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Sample records for mile island crisis

  1. The Three Mile Island crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houts, P.S.; Cleary, P.D.; Hu, T.W.

    1988-01-01

    Since the March 1979 accident at the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant, many studies have assessed its impacts. Compiled and summarized in this book are the results of five related surveys, all aimed at the scientific assessment of the psycho-socio-economic behavior of the residents around the TMI facility. These studies are based on a randomly selected, large sample of the population (with telephones) around TMI

  2. Utilization of medical care following the Three Mile Island crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, P S; Hu, T W; Henderson, R A; Cleary, P D; Tokuhata, G

    1984-02-01

    Four studies are reported on how utilization of primary health care was affected by the Three Mile Island (TMI) crisis and subsequent distress experienced by persons living in the vicinity of the plant. The studies concerned: 1) Blue Cross-Blue Shield records of claims by primary care physicians in the vicinity of TMI; 2) utilization rates in a family practice located near the facility; 3) interviews with persons living within five miles of TMI following the crisis; and 4) responses to a questionnaire by primary care physicians practicing within 25 miles of TMI. All four studies indicated only slight increases in utilization rates during the year following the crisis. One study found that persons who were upset during the crisis tended to be high practice utilizers both before and after the crisis. These results suggest that, while patterns of physician utilization prior to the TMI crisis predicted emotional response during the crisis, the impact of the TMI crisis on subsequent physician utilization was small.

  3. Utilization of medical care following the Three Mile Island crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houts, P.S.; Hu, T.W.; Henderson, R.A.; Cleary, P.D.; Tokuhata, G.

    1984-01-01

    Four studies are reported on how utilization of primary health care was affected by the Three Mile Island (TMI) crisis and subsequent distress experienced by persons living in the vicinity of the plant. The studies concerned: 1) Blue Cross-Blue Shield records of claims by primary care physicians in the vicinity of TMI; 2) utilization rates in a family practice located near the facility; 3) interviews with persons living within five miles of TMI following the crisis; and 4) responses to a questionnaire by primary care physicians practicing within 25 miles of TMI. All four studies indicated only slight increases in utilization rates during the year following the crisis. One study found that persons who were upset during the crisis tended to be high practice utilizers both before and after the crisis. These results suggest that, while patterns of physician utilization prior to the TMI crisis predicted emotional response during the crisis, the impact of the TMI crisis on subsequent physician utilization was small

  4. Crisis contained, The Department of Energy at Three Mile Island: a history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantelon, P L; Williams, R C

    1980-12-01

    An account is given of the response of US DOE to the Three Mile Island-2 accident on March 28, 1979. The accident is treated as though it was a military battle. A synoptic chronologgy of the accident events and of DOE and other responses is included. (DLC)

  5. Crisis contained, The Department of Energy at Three Mile Island: a history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantelon, P.L.; Williams, R.C.

    1980-12-01

    An account is given of the response of US DOE to the Three Mile Island-2 accident on March 28, 1979. The accident is treated as though it was a military battle. A synoptic chronologgy of the accident events and of DOE and other responses is included

  6. Three Mile Island accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, B.; Olivier, E.; Roux, J.P.; Pelle, P.

    2010-01-01

    Deluded by equivocal instrumentation signals, operators at TMI-2 (Three Mile Island - unit 2) misunderstood what was going on in the reactor and for 2 hours were taking inadequate decisions that turned a reactor incident into a major nuclear event that led to the melting of about one third of the core. The TMI accident had worldwide impacts in the domain of nuclear safety. The main consequences in France were: 1) the introduction of the major accident approach and the reinforcement of crisis management; 2) the improvement of the reactor design, particularly that of the pressurizer valves; 3) the implementation of safety probabilistic studies; 4) a better taking into account of the feedback experience in reactor operations; and 5) a better taking into account of the humane factor in reactor safety. (A.C.)

  7. Three Mile Island revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLeod, G.K.

    1986-01-01

    The accident at Three Mile Island proved that the Pennsylvania Department of Health lacked the tools to deal with the serious health consequences that occurred during and after this emergency. Despite the relative safety of nuclear power generation, we must be better prepared for the health and medical consequences of serous radiation emergencies. The author reviews the Three Mile Island accident through the eyes of newspaper reporters

  8. Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, M.S.; Shultz, S.M.

    1988-01-01

    This bibliography is divided into the following categories: Accident Overviews, Sequence and Causes; International Commentary and Reaction; Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Planning; Health Effects; Radioactive Releases and the Environment; Accident Investigations/Commissions; Nuclear Industry: Safety, Occupational, and Financial Issues; Media and Communications; Cleanup; Sociopolitical Response and Commentary; Restart; Legal Ramifications; Federal Documents: President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island; Federal Documents: Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Federal Documents: United States Department of Energy; Federal Documents: Miscellaneous Reports; Pennsylvania State Documents; Federal and State Hearings; and Popular Literature

  9. Three Mile Island update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, B.J.

    1984-01-01

    Almost six years after the accident at Three Mile Island-2, cleanup operations are proceeding and the financial condition of the owners has improved. The author reviews some of the cleanup activities and notes the milestones ahead before reaching the September, 1988 target date for completion. A decision to decommission or refurbish will follow the completion of fuel removal activities in 1987. The cleanup has produced considerable data and useful information. In particular, the experience of large-scale decontamination and radioactive waste processing, along with information on fission product transport, is relevant for maintenance and safe operation of other plants. Both macro- and microscopic examination of the core could help in developing safer reactors in the future. 3 figures, 1 table

  10. Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This document addresses the Three Mile Island accident which resulted in a core partial fusion. It recalls that other reactors of this plant are still being operated. The operation of this PWR is briefly described, and the main events and phases of the accident are briefly presented (failure of the secondary circuit supply pump, failure of a pressurizer component and wrong information about it, mistaken reaction in the control room, core partial fusion due to insufficient cooling means). It shows that the accident occurred because of a combination of technical failures and human mistakes. This situation has put operator education and organisation into question again. The main actors and their mistakes, weaknesses and responsibilities are indicated: Metropolitan Edison (the operator), the NRC (the US nuclear safety authority). Some key figures are recalled, as well as the context of construction of the plant. Impacts and consequences are reviewed: implementation of new standards, population concern. The document outlines that radioactive exposures due to the accident were minor

  11. The Three Mile Island Disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Emeral

    1980-01-01

    For the past decade, education has been experiencing meltdown, explosions, radiation leaks, heat pollution, and management crises, just like the Three Mile Island disaster. This article offers suggestions on how to deal with these problems. (Author/LD)

  12. Three Mile Island Accident Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Three Mile Island Accident Data consists of mostly upper air and wind observations immediately following the nuclear meltdown occurring on March 28, 1979, near...

  13. The lessons of Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKee, K.C.

    1990-01-01

    This article looks at the lessons learned from the Three Mile Island incident in 1979 from the perspective of the manager of public affairs for General Public Utilities. A review of what was done, the types of information presented, the interfaces to the press, public and local and state government and why it did not work is presented. The article addresses communications and crisis management

  14. Three-Mile Island Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinauskas, A.P.

    1983-01-01

    Activities associated with the Three-Mile Island (TMI) Program were of two types. One involved providing technical review and guidance for specific recovery efforts at TMI, whereas the second was concerned more directly with providing technical assistance to recovery operations through detailed analyses and experimental activities. The work was divided into four elements: Task I - coordination of and participation in the operation of the Technical Advisory Group (TAG) for the cleanup of aqueous streams at TMI; Task II - participation in the Technical Assistance and Advisory Group (TAAG) on TMI operations; Task III - chemical development and other technical support to TMI recovery operations; and Task IV - development of inorganic sorbents for the decontamination of aqueous streams. At the program review that was conducted approximately mid-fiscal year, it was decided to curtail the Task IV activities in favor of studies of more-urgent problems. Technical progress for each of the tasks of this program is presented

  15. Heads from "Post" and "Times" on Three-Mile Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenichel, Michael; Dan, Peter

    1980-01-01

    Reports that during the week of the 1979 crisis at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant, the "New York Post" gave less factual information than "The New York Times" in both its main headlines and subheadlines; also notes that the information the "Post" did give was more sensationalized. (GT)

  16. In the Shadow of Three Mile Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair-Clough, Ida; Wheeler, Brenda

    1979-01-01

    Describes how teachers turned the reality of the nuclear reactor incident at Three Mile Island into a learning experience for children by recreating the sequence of events through creative dramatics. (CM)

  17. A Chemistry Lesson at Three Mile Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammano, Nicholas J.

    1980-01-01

    Details the procedures used in utilizing the hydrogen bubble incident at Three Mile Island to relate these basic chemical principles to nuclear chemistry: gas laws, Le Chatelier's principle and equilibrium, and stoichiometry. (CS)

  18. Managing Nuclear Reactor Accidents: Issues Raised by Three Mile Island

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, G.W.

    1980-01-01

    This paper provides a descriptive account of significant events in the accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant in March, 1979. It is based upon documents collected as background materials for the IIASA workshop: Procedural and Organizational Measures for Accident Management: Nuclear Reactors. In addition to the references listed, information was supplied by John Lathrop, who conducted interviews with government and industry officials involved in the crisis. There have been ...

  19. Siren system designed for Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, V.M.

    1984-01-01

    Since the Three Mile Island (TMI) incident in 1979, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) guidelines require utilities operating nuclear reactors to warn all civilian populations within a 10-mile radius by audible alarms in the event of a nuclear plant emergency. The case history presented involves the planning and implementation of a suitable siren-alarm system by General Public Utilities and its consultant firm. 1 figure

  20. Normal Accident at Three Mile Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrow, Charles

    1981-01-01

    Discusses some aspects of the accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant. Explains a number of factors involved including the type of accident, warnings, design and equipment failure, operator error, and negative synergy. Presents alternatives to systems with catastrophic potential. (MK)

  1. Nuclear accidents. Three mile Island (United States)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duco, J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the accident of Three Miles Island power plant which occurred the 28 march 1979 in the United States. The accident scenario, the consequences and the reactor core and vessel, after the accident, are analyzed. (A.L.B.)

  2. The Three-Mile Island incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, L.M.

    1979-10-01

    A description is given of the engineering design principles of the PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) of the Three Mile Island-2 power plant. The successive stages of the incident are recounted, with diagrammatic illustrations, and graphs showing the reactor coolant system parameters at various times after the incident. The consequential events and core damage are discussed. (U.K.)

  3. Good Engineering + Poor Communication = Three Mile Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathes, J. C.

    The accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant resulted from a communication failure. Following an incident at an Ohio plant a year and a half earlier, B. M. Dunn, manager of Emergency Core Cooling Systems Analysis at Babcock and Wilcox (engineers), wrote a memorandum making specific recommendations on written instructions for nuclear…

  4. Three Mile Island accident. Local reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-04-01

    Local reactions to the Three Mile Island are presented as well as newspaper articles covering this accident. In addition, this document presents a plan to set forth procedures and guidelines to be utilized by authorized emergency personnel in Middletown, Royalton, Londonderry Township, and Lower Swatara Township located in Pennsylvania, United States. The plan will provide for the orderly and efficient handling of area residents during time of serious incidents emanating from Three Mile Island facility. Emergency personnel in each community should be familiar with portions of the plan that pertain to the other near-by communities. The cooperation of all parties concerned will insure that a maximum effort is being made to help protect the public against injuries and v/ill in some cases keep any damages to communities to a minimum

  5. Facts on Three Mile Island. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermansky, B. et al.

    1980-01-01

    The accident in the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant is discussed with respect to media reporting and availability of correct information at the time of the accident. It is shown that while the accident itself was by far not so serious as it was purported to be the panic surrounding it was caused by misinforming the public about its true nature and extent. (M.S.)

  6. Evacuation behavior and Three Mile Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutter, S; Barnes, K

    1982-06-01

    The responses of the residents to the nuclear power plant arcident at Three Mile Island, Pennsylvania illustrate the factors influencing pre-impact coping responses of populations exposed to technological hazards. Confusion itnd ambiguous information influenced both the decision to evaluate and to remain in place. Proximity to the facility, stage in life cycle and the actions of friends and neighbors influenced the decision to evacuate.

  7. Instructor development program at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irizarry, C.A.; Jones, J.W.; Knief, R.

    1981-01-01

    The Three Mile Island (TMI) Training Department has prepared and conducted Instructor Development Programs which have upgraded the capabilities of its instructors and provided more uniformity among its diverse efforts. The week-long course was prepared in-house by a staff that combined college teaching experience in both education and technical subjects with strong background in industrial training. Through the first two offerings of the course, twenty-five individuals have participated and eight have served on the course staff

  8. Three Mile Island: prologue or epilogue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, D.

    1980-01-01

    This book contains a minute-by-minute account of the opening hours of the Three Mile Island accident. The testimony of technicians in the plant, people in the state emergency system, and federal observers given before the President's Commission, Congress, and the Pennsylvania Select Committee is documented here. Basic information about the theory and structure of a reactor is explained so clearly that the reader grasps the full meaning of the mechanical failure at Three Mile Island. As the development of the accident is chronicled, details of the governmental response are given. Particular attention is focused on communication difficulties between the state and federal government and on jurisdictional disputes among agencies involved in emergency response and public health. The licensing and inspection processes for nuclear reactors is described, and in particular, the history of Three Mile Island's Unit II, to elucidate the weaknesses in the Nuclear Regulatory Commissions's safety procedures. The qualifications and training requirements for nuclear powerplant operators are also examined. Beyond structural and regulatory problems, the author argues that reactors can never be made fail-safe; the assumption that we can envision all possible combinations of multiple system failures is unreasonable. We must then decide whether the benefits of nuclear energy warrant the risks

  9. Three mile island. The silent disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J S; Fisher, J H

    1981-04-24

    From Wednesday, March 28, 1979, to Wednesday, April 4, 1979, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, was in a state of near-panic in response to the Three Mile Island nuclear accident. The Dauphin County Office of Emergency Preparedness quickly attempted to develop a plan to evacuate not only the population of an area 20 miles in radius from the plant but the short-term and long-term care medical facilities as well. For medical evacuation, a system of classification of patients was defined and matched to needed transportation. Furthermore, a critical coordinating link was established with the Hospital Association of Pennsylvania to identify and categorize relocation beds in receiving hospitals far from the incident site in the event of evacuation. Just as this incident was unusual, so too were the planning activities unique since they were never before conceived or accomplished.

  10. Three Mile Island. The silent disaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.S. Jr.; Fisher, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    From Wednesday, March 28, 1979, to Wednesday, April 4, 1979, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, was in a state of near-panic in response to the Three Mile Island nuclear accident. The Dauphin County Office of Emergency Preparedness quickly attempted to develop a plan to evacuate not only the population of an area 20 miles in radius from the plant but the short-term and long-term care medical facilities as well. For medical evacuation, a system of classification of patients was defined and matched to needed transportation. Furthermore, a critical coordinating link was established with the Hospital Association of Pennsylvania to identify and categorize relocation beds in receiving hospitals far from the incident site in the event of evacuation. Just as this incident was unusual, so too were the planning activities unique since they were never before conceived or accomplished

  11. Facts on Three Mile Island. IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermansky

    1980-01-01

    A number of commissions and committees were established in the USA following the Three Mile Island-2 accident, charged with investigating the causes of the accident and suggesting precautions which would limit future possible occurrences of such accidents. The recommendations by the most significant bodies are briefly outlined, including the: (1) instructions by NRC for the operators of PWR type nuclear power plants; (2) recommendations by the Kemeny commission appointed by president Carter; (3) recommendations by the Advisory Committee for Reactor Safety (ACRS); (4) measures taken by the Tennessee Valley Authority. (Ha)

  12. Three Mile Island accident technical support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, R.L.; Crimmins, T.M.; Lowe, W.W.

    1981-01-01

    A large number of technical support personnel were required to respond to the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident of March 28, 1979. Under the leadership of General Public Utilities personnel, onsite (round-the-clock shift) technical support began the evening of March 29 and within a week the TMI Recovery Organization incorporated all of the essential technical capability to implement the Base Plan for Cooldown, manage the radioactive waste problem, and begin the steps toward long-range plant recovery. These steps toward recovery are described in some detail. 1 refs

  13. The Three Mile Island Population Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhaber, M K; Tokuhata, G K; Digon, E; Caldwell, G G; Stein, G F; Lutz, G; Gur, D

    1983-01-01

    Shortly after the March 28, 1979, accident at the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear plant outside Harrisburg, Pa., the Pennsylvania Department of Health, in conjunction with the Centers for Disease Control and the U.S. Bureau of the Census, conducted a census of the 35,930 persons residing within 5 miles of the plant. With the help of 150 enumerators, demographic and health-related information was collected on each person to provide baseline data for future short- and long-term epidemiologic studies of the effects of the accident. Individual radiation doses were estimated on the basis of residential location and the amount of time each person spent in the 5-mile area during the 10 days after the accident. Health and behavioral resurveys of the population will be conducted approximately every 5 years. Population-mobility, morbidity, and mortality will be studied yearly by matching the TMI Population Registry with postal records, cancer registry records, and death certificate data. Because the radiation dose from TMI was extremely small, any increase in morbidity or mortality attributable to the accident would be so small as not to be measurable by present methods; however, adverse health effects as a result of psychological stress may occur. Also, a temporary increase in reporting of disease could occur because of increased surveillance and attention to health.

  14. Fission product transport at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, D.E.; Cox, T.E.; Broughton, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Three Mile Island Unit 2 radionuclide analyses are reviewed and summarized in order to determine how fission products moved to various parts of the reactor system at the time of the accident. Despite high fuel temperatures and major core damage, the core retained a very large fraction of most radionuclides. Reactor coolant, either remaining in the primary system or released to various sumps and tanks, retained significant quantities of cesium and iodine. Noble gases were effectively retained within the containment building with the exception of small releases to the environment. Long-term deposition and retention on vessel, piping, and bulding surfaces were insignificant for all isotopes examined. The measured partitioning of radionuclides within these systems is tabulated and recommendations for additional analyses are presented

  15. the accident at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torrey, L.

    1979-01-01

    The recently published final report of the President's Commision on the accident at Three Mile Island (TMI) is considered. In the report the power utilities and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are severely criticised for being 'unable to provide an acceptable level of safety in nuclear power' which is reflected in the operators lack of training and understanding in depth. The 44 recommendations of the Commission include the abolition of the NRC, periodic renewal of operating licences, the siting of all future nuclear power plants away from large population centres, emergency response procedures to be improved and the revamping of warning display panels in control rooms. The commission also evaluated the severity of the accident and endeavoured to determine how close TMI came to a total catastrophic meltdown. The role of the media in the accident was also considered. (UK)

  16. Three Mile Island accident. Local reactions; L'accident de Three Mile Island. Reactions locales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1979-04-15

    Local reactions to the Three Mile Island are presented as well as newspaper articles covering this accident. In addition, this document presents a plan to set forth procedures and guidelines to be utilized by authorized emergency personnel in Middletown, Royalton, Londonderry Township, and Lower Swatara Township located in Pennsylvania, United States. The plan will provide for the orderly and efficient handling of area residents during time of serious incidents emanating from Three Mile Island facility. Emergency personnel in each community should be familiar with portions of the plan that pertain to the other near-by communities. The cooperation of all parties concerned will insure that a maximum effort is being made to help protect the public against injuries and v/ill in some cases keep any damages to communities to a minimum.

  17. Three Mile Island zeolite vitirification demonstration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemens, D.H.; Knowlton, D.E.; Shupe, M.W.

    1981-06-01

    The cleanup of the high-activity-level water at Three Mile Island (TMI) provides an opportunity to further develop waste management technology. Approximately 790,000 gallons of high-activity-level water at TMI's Unit-2 Nuclear Power Station will be decontaminated at the site using the submerged demineralizer system (SDS). In the SDS process, the cesium and strontium in the water are sorbed onto zeolite that is contained within metal liners. The Department of Energy has asked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to take a portion of the zeolite from the SDS process and demonstrate, on a production scale, that this zeolite can be vitrified using the in-can melting process. This paper is a brief overview of the TMI zeolite vitrification program. The first section discusses the formulation of a glass suitable for immobilizing SDS zeolite. The following section describes a feed system that was developed to feed zeolite to the in-can melter. It also describes the in-can melting process and the government owned facilities in which the demonstrations will take place. Finally, the schedule for completing the program activities is outlined

  18. Definitional Hegemony as a Public Relations Strategy: The Rhetoric of the Nuclear Power Industry after Three Mile Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionisopoulos, George N.; Crable, Richard E.

    1988-01-01

    Examines (1) definitional hegemony as one of several rhetorical options available to issue managers; (2) the post-accident rhetorical context of the Three Mile Island nuclear crisis; and (3) the specific strategies utilized to deal with this crisis. Assesses the nuclear industry's public relations efforts. (MS)

  19. General description of the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueras, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    A general description of systems and components of the Three Mile Island-2 nuclear power plant is presented, for the primary system (NSSS), the secondary system (BOP), the energy generation system and for other auxiliaries in the plant. (author)

  20. The health effects of the accident at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1988-01-01

    The major healt effect of the accident at Three Mile Island was that of a pronounced demoralizing effect on the general population living in the Three Mile Island area, including teenagers and mothers of preschool children, and the nuclear plant workers. However, this effect has proved transient in all groups studied except the nuclear workers, who continued to show relatively high levels of demoralization some months after the accident. Moreover, the groups in the general population and the workers, in their differen ways, had continuing problems of trust that stemmed directly from the Three Mile Island accident. For both the nuclear workers and general population, the mental health and behavioral effects are understandable in terms of the objective realities of the threats they faced during the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island

  1. Nuclear safety after Three Mile Island and Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballard, G.M.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on nuclear safety after Three Mile island and Chernobyl. Topics covered include: Design for safety; Man-machine interaction; Source terms and consequence; and accident response

  2. Chronic Stress and Three Mile Island: Toxic Exposure and Uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Laura M.; And Others

    Although many researchers expected the psychological effects of the accident at the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear plant to be short-lived, area residents continued to show elevated levels of stress. To examine stress levels of TMI residents 28 months after the accident, 141 subjects were chosen from nearby areas, and from a town 80 miles away.…

  3. Health effects of the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1980-05-01

    Between March 28 and April 15, 1979 the collective dose resulting from the radioactivity released to the population living within a 50-mile radius of the Three Mile Island nuclear plant was about 2000 person-rems, less than 1% of the annual natural background level. The average dose to a person living within 5 miles of the nuclear plant was less than 10% of annual background radiation. The maximum estimated radiation dose received by any one individual in the general population (excluding the nuclear plant workers) during the accident was 70 mrem. The doses received by the general population as a result of the accident were so small that there will be no detectable additional cases of cancer, developmental abnormalities, or genetic ill-health. Three Three Mile Island nuclear workers received radiation doses of about 3 to 4 rem, exceeding maximum permissible quarterly dose of 3 rem. The major health effect of the accident at Three Mile Island was that of a pronounced demoralizing effect on the general population in the Three Mile Island area, including teenagers and mothers of preschool children and the nuclear plant workers. However, this effect proved transient in all groups studied except the nuclear workers

  4. The psychological impact of the Three Mile Island incident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, P D; Houts, P S

    1984-01-01

    This study examines the psychological impact of the Three Mile Island incident. The results are based on data from a panel study of 403 persons living within five miles of Three Mile Island (TMI), and a telephone survey of 1,506 people living within 55 miles of that area. Active coping strategies were associated with continued high levels of distress. Having more friends was related to reduced distress, but introspection, taking protective actions, being active in organizations, and seeking out others were all related to higher levels of distress. High self-esteem was related to a decrease in symptoms and psychotropic drug use, and avoidance behaviors were related to higher than expected numbers of symptoms. Efforts to profile those who used different coping strategies were relatively unsuccessful. The results emphasize the need to consider the nature of the stressor when developing models of coping and response to stressful situations.

  5. Psychological impact of the Three Mile Island incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleary, P.D.; Houts, P.S.

    1984-01-01

    This study examines the psychological impact of the Three Mile Island incident. The results are based on data from a panel study of 403 persons living within five miles of Three Mile Island (TMI), and a telephone survey of 1,506 people living within 55 miles of that area. Active coping strategies were associated with continued high levels of distress. Having more friends was related to reduced distress, but introspection, taking protective actions, being active in organizations, and seeking out others were all related to higher levels of distress. High self-esteem was related to a decrease in symptoms and psychotropic drug use, and avoidance behaviors were related to higher than expected numbers of symptoms. Efforts to profile those who used different coping strategies were relatively unsuccessful. The results emphasize the need to consider the nature of the stressor when developing models of coping and response to stressful situations

  6. Impact of Three Mile Island on the nuclear community and the future of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, S.

    1980-01-01

    The Three Mile Island incident has already impacted on the future of nuclear power specifically and on the energy crisis generally. The resultant NRC's de facto moratorium on the licensing of commercial nuclear power plants will increase the use of oil, raise the cost of electric power, and may create power shortages. On the positive side, TMI may have been beneficial in that it has precipitated a searching reassessment and improvement of nuclear power safety and practices-TMI not withstanding, the rate of nuclear power expansion must increase; otherwise the energy crisis will deepen in the years to come

  7. Three Mile Island Unit-2 events of 28 March 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syed Hussin Shabuddin, Syed Nahar [PUSPATI, Selangor (Malaysia)

    1984-12-01

    Three Mile Island was the most severe accident at a commercial nuclear power plant in the United States. This paper attempts to give in detail and chronological order the technical events that happened on the day of the accident. Operator response to plant conditions and its consequences are explained.

  8. The East European Press and Three-Mile Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Owen V.

    This report of the investigation into East European newspaper treatment of the accident at Pennsylvania's Three Mile Island nuclear power plant in the spring of 1979 focuses on the Czech and Slovak media, particularly on the Slovak Communist Party's daily newspaper, "Pravda." The response of the media of other East European countries to…

  9. The accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butragueno, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    The sequence of events in the Three Mile Island, Unit 2, accident on the March 28, 1979 is analyzed. In this plant a loss of feed-water transient became a small LOCA that caused a serious core damage. A general emergency situation was declared after uncontrolled radioactive releases were detectec. (author)

  10. Local Coverage of Three Mile Island during 1981-82.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Sharon M.

    Local newspaper coverage of the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant accident was examined in a study to determine what changes, if any, were made by local media and what lessons they had learned from it. Data were collected through interviews with 21 media representatives. TMI coverage in the six newspapers was examined using each…

  11. Some reactions to the accident at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunster, H.J.

    1980-01-01

    The accident at Three Mile Island is reviewed and those features which ought to encourage changes in UK practices identified. Emergency measurements, both on site and in the environment, siting considerations and possible trends in regulatory policy are dealt with. (author)

  12. Saving American democracy: the lessons of Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    The author's experience of serving with a presidential commission investigating the Three Mile Island nuclear accident leads to an observation that the only way to save American democracy is to change the fundamental decision-making process, at the Federal level, so that it can come to grips with the enormous and complex issues that face this nation

  13. Three Mile Island ambient-air-temperature sensor measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fryer, M.O.

    1983-01-01

    Data from the ambient-air-temperature sensors in Three Mile Island-Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor containment building are analyzed. The data were for the period of the hydrogen burn that was part of the TMI-2 accident. From the temperature data, limits are placed on the duration of the hydrogen burn

  14. Risk cognition and the public: case of Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutter, S.L.

    1984-01-01

    Residents of within 50 miles of the nuclear power plant at Three Mile Island (TMI), Pennsylvania, were surveyed in 1979, 1980, and 1982 to assess their general attitudes toward nuclear power, to assess their individual coping responses to the March 1979 accident, and to monitor changes in attitudes over the three-year period. Most respondents feel that future accidents like TMI will occur one or twice more in their lifetimes, that operating nuclear power stations should have improved safeguards and should continue operating, and that major insitutions - government and utility companies - are experiencing a continued erosion of public trust

  15. Evacuation decision-making at three mile island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeigler, Donald. J.; Johnson, James. H.

    1987-01-01

    The accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant in 1979 provoked an unanticipated and unprecedented spontaneous evacuation of people living in the area. Following the accident, revised and upgraded emergency preparedness and response regulations were issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency. (FEMA). This includes the assumption that public education and awareness will minimise the tendency of people to evacuate spontaneously from the vicinity of an accident. This assumption is challenged. Results of an empirical test of a casual model of emergency evacuation decision-making are given. This test was devised to aid understanding of the public behaviour at the time of the Three Mile Island incident. The emergency plans for the Sizewell-B reactor are subject to brief critical consideration. It is concluded that evacuation plans need to reflect people's natural inclinations to move away from a nuclear hazard. (UK)

  16. Numerical simulation of the accident of Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrin, M.H.; Kastelanski, P.

    1981-01-01

    The chief object of the present study was to assess the ability of our numerical code for the dynamic behavior of power plants, SICLE, to handle the simulation of small accidents in PWRs. In the first part of the paper the authors introduce the main principles, equations and numerical methods of the code. In the second part those of the elements of Three Mile Island Power Plant which were simulated, the different phases of the accident and the results obtained with the code are described. These results are compared to the values recorded in the plant and generally a good agreement is found (for instance the primary pressure). As a conclusion SICLE is the minimum code for representing accidents such as Three Mile Island; its main advantage lies in its ability to take into account all the elements of the plant which are important in the study

  17. The accident of the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llory, M.

    1999-01-01

    This book questions which statement can be made twenty years after the accident of the Three Mile Island reactor (USA) on the performances of complex reactor safety systems and on their evolutions and improvements. It questions also todays limits of reactors security and how such a reactor accident can be possible today. It presents also an analysis of the organizations which propose new perspectives in nuclear safety. (J.S.)

  18. Defuelling at Three Mile Island 2 continues on schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frew, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    In September GPU Nuclear announced that it had extracted half of the debris from the reactor vessel at Three Mile Island 2 and loaded it into casks for transport from the site. The work has been speeded by the development of special tools and working methods and has been accompanied by a continuous programme of decontamination. The health risks to workers are now considered to be no greater than those at operating plants. (author)

  19. A perspective on the Three Mile Island incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hensley, G.

    1979-01-01

    An account is given of the accident on March 28, 1979, in the No. 2 unit of the Three Mile Island nuclear power station. The sequence is described, beginning with the loss of secondary coolant to the PWR's steam generators. Equipment failure and the consequences of human actions are analyzed, and lessons to be learned are discussed. Some conclusions are reached with particular reference to the accident and to nuclear power. (U.K.)

  20. Simulation of the Three Mile Island transient in Semiscale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, T.K.; Loomis, G.G.; Shumway, R.W.

    1979-07-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary review and analysis of the data obtained from eight simulations of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Nuclear Power Generating Station transient (March 28, 1979) that have been conducted in the Semiscale Mod-3 System. The Semiscale simulations of the Three Mile Island (TMI) transient were basically conducted from the same sequence of events as those recorded in the plant. System initial conditions representative of those in the TMI system were established and the transient was initiated by terminating steam generator feedwater and steam valve flow. The steam generator secondaries were drained to control primary to secondary heat transfer. The pressurizer power operated relief valve, pressurizer code safety valve, and core power trip were operated on system pressure. High pressure safety injection was activated for about one minute during the Semiscale simulations. In addition, both primary loop coolant pumps were shut off in the Semiscale simulation at the same time that the Three Mile Island loop 2A pump was shut off

  1. Nuclear power after three mile island. Last of four articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faltermayer, E.

    1979-01-01

    This final and fourth article on nuclear power reviews the March 28, 1979 accident at Three Mile Island-2 Reactor. The most lasting effect will probably be the jarring of the public's confidence and acceptance of nuclear technology. Even before Three Mile Island, electric utilities were starting to desert uranium and switch to coal-fired power plants. Cost overruns, Federal indecision on fuel reprocessing and waste disposal, long licensing procedures, and many other regulatory mandates are cited as deterrents to nuclear power. Coal is the only real alternative for utilities in the U.S., at least for some time to come, even though it is hazardous to mine and dirty to burn. Its use will probably cause far more fatalities than all the nuclear mishaps that may occur. Most unbiased studies indicate economic advantages of nuclear plants over coal-fired plants, even when decommissioning costs are added; it is felt, though, that the somewhat debatable advantages might easily disappear with the new safety and regulatory costs that will be imposed. It remains to be seen how many insurance claims will result from Three Mile Island and whether Congress may raise, or even remove, the controversial $560-million liability limit for nuclear power plants

  2. Social survey of Three Mile Island area residents. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunn, S.D.; Johnson, J.H. Jr; Zeigler, D.J.

    1979-08-01

    Recognizing that there is concern among government officials, utility company officials, engineers, physical, social, and behavioral scientists, and the general public about the consequences of the Three Mile Island accident, the overall objective of this report is to examine how the accident affected TMI area residents. This final report is a detailed analysis and description of the summary results published previously. A questionnaire was mailed to a sample of residents in the Three Mile Island area within one month of the accident. The survey instrument and sampling design are discussed in a subsequent chapter. Because of the nature of the accident and individual memories about dates, places, and events, it was necessary to conduct a survey as soon as possible after the accident. Area residents were asked a variety of questions including: (1) when and how they learned about the accident; (2) where they evacuated and why; (3) what confidence they placed in reports by the government and utility companies; (4) how their attitudes toward nuclear power have changed as a result of the accident; and (5) what impact the accident is likely to have on themselves and the Three Mile Island area. These questions and others are examined in this report. The results are analyzed in light of a number of social, economic, and political characteristics. Both statistical tests and a graphical presentation of the results are included

  3. Three Mile Island serious but not fatal to nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The Three Mile Island nuclear incident will cause some delays in the construction of nuclear plants. But when the emotion dies down, people will realize there is still an obvious need for nuclear power in the long term, even as President Carter indicated in his press conference after his television energy message. This was the conclusion arrived at by several top officials of electric utilities in a spot check on the President's energy message and on their views on Three Mile Island. The officials also commented on decontrol of oil prices and wheeling power to oil-fired regions. Karl H. Rudolph of Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company says that Three Mile Island was a serious event, but the industry tries to place the event in perspective, particularly in view of its continuing dramatization in the news media. The truth of the matter is that, despite human error and mechanical failures, the redundant safety systems in the plant worked...because of what happened, nuclear constuction, both now and in the future, will include even better safety systems. As more is learned about nuclear power, says Aaron E. Autry of Central Power and Light, Corpus Christi, the relative safety of nuclear will be greater than any other option, including coal. Many other comments are made concerning coal, and executives from Detroit Edison and Co. and Consumers Power Co. agree that the President will have to improve rail transportation and relax tax air quality regulations if he wants electricity to be produced by coal in the future

  4. 78 FR 77726 - Exelon Generation Company, LLC Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    ... Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 1 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Exemption... License No. DPR-50, which authorizes operation of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 1 (TMI-1... Facility Operating License No. DPR-50, which authorizes operation of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station...

  5. 33 CFR 165.554 - Security Zone; Three Mile Island Generating Station, Susquehanna River, Dauphin County...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zone; Three Mile Island... Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.554 Security Zone; Three Mile Island Generating Station... waters of the Susquehanna River in the vicinity of the Three Mile Island Generating Station bounded by a...

  6. 75 FR 36700 - Exelon Generation Company, LLC; Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 1; Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ...; Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 1; Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact... Company, LLC (the licensee), for operation of Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 1 (TMI-1), located... Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2, NUREG-0552, dated December 1972, and Generic...

  7. Some public health lessons from Three Mile Island: a case study in chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macleod, G K

    1981-01-01

    The March 28, 1979, nuclear reactor accident at Three Mile Island near Harrisburg, illustrated the inadequacy of Pennsylvania's public health sector in implementing emergency measures. Throughout the crisis, decisions impacting public health were made by engineers and physicists rather than by physicians. Recommendations to improve the preparedness of the state's public health department to handle future nuclear accidents include: developing a radiological emergency response plan for the health aspects of an accident/ establishing a radiation health unit/ collecting baseline data on the incidence of hypothyroidism around nuclear power plants/ and preparing potassium iodide for deployment and distribution.

  8. Cancer near the Three Mile Island nuclear plant: radiation emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, M C; Beyea, J; Nieves, J W; Susser, M

    1990-09-01

    As a public charge, cancers among the 159,684 residents living within a 10-mile (16-km) radius of the Three Mile Island nuclear plant were studied relative to releases of radiation during the March 28, 1979, accident as well as to routine plant emissions. The principal cancers considered were leukemia and childhood malignancies. Estimates of the emissions delivered to small geographic study tracts were derived from mathematical dispersion models which accounted for modifying factors such as wind and terrain; the model of accident emissions was validated by readings from off-site dosimeters. Incident cancers among area residents for the period 1975-1985 (n = 5,493) were identified by a review of the records at all local and regional hospitals; preaccident and postaccident trends in cancer rates were examined. For accident emissions, the authors failed to find definite effects of exposure on the cancer types and population subgroups thought to be most susceptible to radiation. No associations were seen for leukemia in adults or for childhood cancers as a group. For leukemia in children, the odds ratio was raised, but cases were few (n = 4), and the estimate was highly variable. Moreover, rates of childhood leukemia in the Three Mile Island area are low compared with national and regional rates. For exposure to routine emissions, the odds ratios were raised for childhood cancers as a whole and for childhood leukemia, but confidence intervals were wide and included 1.0. For leukemia in adults, there was a negative trend. Trends for two types of cancer ran counter to expectation. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma showed raised risks relative to both accident and routine emissions; lung cancer (adjusted only indirectly for smoking) showed raised risks relative to accident emissions, routine emissions, and background gamma radiation. Overall, the pattern of results does not provide convincing evidence that radiation releases from the Three Mile Island nuclear facility influenced

  9. Analysis of Three Mile Island-Unit 2 accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-03-01

    The Nuclear Safety Analysis Center (NSAC) of the Electric Power Research Institute has analyzed the Three Mile Island-2 accident. Early results of this analysis were a brief narrative summary, issued in mid-May 1979 and an initial version of this report issued later in 1979 as noted in the Foreword. The present report is a revised version of the 1979 report, containing summaries, a highly detailed sequence of events, a comparison of that sequence of events with those from other sources, 25 appendices, references and a list of abbreviations and acronyms. A matrix of equipment and system actions is included as a folded insert

  10. Three Mile Island - the challenge, the saga, the outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffman, F.E.; Feinroth, H.

    1982-01-01

    Progress which has been made in tackling some of the problems raised by the accident at Three Mile Island 2 is discussed. Improvements in the design, operation, management and regulation of nuclear plants are described. An assessment is given of the challenge facing the nuclear industry to explain the accident to the public and to demonstrate that a catastrophe was never close since significant barriers still existed to prevent major releases of radioactivity. The job of cleaning up the contaminated plant is described and the lessons to be learnt from this task are outlined. (U.K.)

  11. TMI-2 [Three Mile Island Unit 2] licensing history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrne, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    Three Mile Island (TMI), which is located in central Pennsylvania near Harrisburg, is the site of the TMI-2 accident, the most significant nuclear accident in US commercial nuclear power. Since the accident on March 28, 1979, TMI-2 has been undergoing cleanup activities designed to place the plant in a safe, stable, and secure postaccident configuration. At the completion of the cleanup program, TMI-2 will be placed in such a configuration, termed postdefueling monitored storage (PDMS), by the licensee, GPU Nuclear Corporation. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief overview of the TMI-2 licensing history and to describe its impact on the regulatory process

  12. Three Mile Island Nuclear Station steam generator chemical cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    The Three Mile Island-1 steam generators were chemically cleaned in 1991 by the B and W Nuclear Service Co. (BWNS). This secondary side cleaning was accomplished through application of the EPRI/SGOG (Electric Power Research Institute - Steam Generator Owners Group) chemical cleaning iron removal process, followed by sludge lancing. BWNS also performed on-line corrosion monitoring. Corrosion of key steam generator materials was low, and well within established limits. Liquid waste, subsequently processed by BWNS was less than expected. 7 tabs

  13. Evaluation of carbons exposed to the Three Mile Island accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deitz, V.R.; Romans, J.B.; Bellamy, R.R.

    1981-01-01

    One of the lines of defense that served to mitigate the radiological effects of the accident at Three Mile Island was the activated carbon installed in ventilation air flows. Filters in the Auxiliary and Fuel Handling Buildings of Unit 2 adsorbed tens to hundreds of curies of iodine-131, preventing the release to the environment. The carbon exposed to the accident has been replaced and the spent carbon has been analyzed in the laboratory. Independent analyses were performed for the two filter trains in both the Auxiliary and Fuel Handling Buildings, replaced at various times after the accident. The results of these analyses are compared to new (unexposed) carbons

  14. An analysis of the Three Mile Island accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, G.L.; Siddal, E.

    1980-09-01

    Starting with a systematic analysis of the chain of events that took place during the Three Mile Island accident, the authors assess the significance of the four distinct phases of the accident. Inferences that can be drawn with respect to the safety of CANDU reactors are discussed. A rational reaction to the accident is suggested, and several factors are shown not to have played an important part, contrary to public impressions. The authors point out that over-reaction to the accident could detract from public safety. The Canadian response to the accident is discussed. (auth)

  15. Immobilization of Three-Mile Island core debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, J.M.; Miller, R.L.; Flinn, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    The immobilization of Three-Mile Island core debris in iron-enriched basalt (IEB), a fused-cast nuclear waste form, was considered. The amount of zirconium clad UO 2 fuel assemblies that can be dissolved in IEB using the Zr to UO 2 ratio present in the core was bracketed between 25 and 30% at 1500 0 C. The factors controlling the rate of dissolution of fuel pellets and Inconel, a structural component of the core, were investigated. Since the UO 2 dissolved in IEB could be a valuable resource in the future, the recovery of uranium from IEB using conventional ore-dressing and leaching techniques was assessed

  16. Nuclear accident at Three Mile Island: its effect on a local community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behler, G.T. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    This dissertation consists of a longitudinal case study of the extent to which the structure of community power in Riverside, (a pseudonym) Pennsylvania (the largest community located within five miles of the Three Mile Island nuclear facility) changed as a result of the March, 1979 accident. The investigation centers around testing a basic working hypothesis. Simply stated, this working hypothesis argues that Riverside's power structure has become more pluralistic in response to the Three Mile Island nuclear accident. An additional corollary to this working hypothesis is also tested. This corollary asserts that many of Riverside's community power actors have become much more cosmopolitan in their political-action tactics and problem-solving orientations as a results of the TMI crisis. The aforementioned working hypothesis and associated corollary are tested via the combined utilization of three different techniques for measuring the distribution of social power. The findings of the study clearly demonstrate the existence of increased pluralism, politicization, and cosmopolitanism within Riverside since March of 1979. Furthermore, these research results, and the entire dissertation itself, contribute to a number of subfields within the discipline of sociology. In particular,contributions are noted for the subfields of community power, social movements, and disaster research

  17. Three Mile Island Commission and the language of legitimacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingrutd, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    This work is an exploration in discourse. It assumes that discourse is constitutive of and constituted by social organization. The research site for this investigation is provided by transcripts from the President's Commission to investigate the accident at Three Mile Island. The transcripts cover five days of meetings where 12 Commissioners discussed the content, nuance, tone and scope of the report they would submit to the President. The analytical goal of the research is to understand four features of the dialogue: (1) formal structure of conversation: how utterances are organized into an orderly, rational, meaningful conversation; (2) meaning or content of the talk; (3) the way conversational form and content act together to create a form of rationality or orientation to task and (4) social context surrounding the talk. The approach to the transcripts relies upon a variety of discourse analysis techniques in order to examine four essential disputes - places of deep level disagreement among the Commissioners. For each dispute, the forces that constrained and/or compelled the dialogue toward resolution are noted. The work concludes by asserting that the linguistic practices used by the Commissioners indicate a techno-bureaucratic approach to understanding the accident at Three Mile Island and formulating recommendations for public policy toward nuclear power

  18. Evacuation decision-making at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeigler, D.J.; Johnson, J.H. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    During the emergency at the Three Mile Island generating station in the United States, evacuation became a common adaptive response among the local population. The planning for nuclear emergencies in the US has proceeded as if there were no significant differences between nuclear and other types of disasters requiring evacuation. In the United Kingdom, emergency planning for a new generation of pressurized water reactors, about which there is legitimate safety concern, has been influenced not at all by the experience with the Three Mile Island PWR in 1979. The TMI accident has been the US's most serious experience with a nuclear plant accident and therefore is an appropriate analogy for predicting the evacuation response to future nuclear emergencies. In this light, the authors accept the need to develop models that will enable them to predict the magnitude of the evacuation shadow phenomenon around other nuclear power sites and estimate its impact on our plans to remove the threatened population from the hazard zone in the minimum amount of time. Rather than depend on education and information control to stifle evacuation response, the authors believe that evacuation plans need to build on people's natural behavioural inclinations to protect themselves in response to the nuclear hazard

  19. Cancer near the Three Mile Island nuclear plant: Radiation emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatch, M.C.; Beyea, J.; Nieves, J.W.; Susser, M.

    1990-01-01

    As a public charge, cancers among the 159,684 residents living within a 10-mile (16-km) radius of the Three Mile Island nuclear plant were studied relative to releases of radiation during the March 28, 1979, accident as well as to routine plant emissions. The principal cancers considered were leukemia and childhood malignancies. Estimates of the emissions delivered to small geographic study tracts were derived from mathematical dispersion models which accounted for modifying factors such as wind and terrain; the model of accident emissions was validated by readings from off-site dosimeters. Incident cancers among area residents for the period 1975-1985 (n = 5,493) were identified by a review of the records at all local and regional hospitals; preaccident and postaccident trends in cancer rates were examined. For accident emissions, the authors failed to find definite effects of exposure on the cancer types and population subgroups thought to be most susceptible to radiation. No associations were seen for leukemia in adults or for childhood cancers as a group. For leukemia in children, the odds ratio was raised, but cases were few (n = 4), and the estimate was highly variable. Moreover, rates of childhood leukemia in the Three Mile Island area are low compared with national and regional rates. For exposure to routine emissions, the odds ratios were raised for childhood cancers as a whole and for childhood leukemia, but confidence intervals were wide and included 1.0. For leukemia in adults, there was a negative trend. Trends for two types of cancer ran counter to expectation. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma showed raised risks relative to both accident and routine emissions; lung cancer (adjusted only indirectly for smoking) showed raised risks relative to accident emissions, routine emissions, and background gamma radiation

  20. Nuclear reactor safety research since Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mynatt, F.R.

    1982-01-01

    The Three Mile Island nuclear power plant accident has resulted in redirection of reactor safety research priorities. The small release to the environment of radioactive iodine-13 to 17 curies in a total radioactivity release of 2.4 million to 13 million curies-has led to a new emphasis on the physical chemistry of fission product behavior in accidents; the fact that the nuclear core was severely damaged but did not melt down has opened a new accident regime-that of the degraded core; the role of the operators in the progression and severity of the accident has shifted emphasis from equipment reliability to human reliability. As research progresses in these areas, the technical base for regulation and risk analysis will change substantially

  1. Nuclear reactor safety research since three mile island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mynatt, F R

    1982-04-09

    The Three Mile Island nuclear power plant accident has resulted in redirection of reactor safety research priorities. The small release to the environment of radioactive iodine-13 to 17 curies in a total radioactivity release of 2.4 million to 13 million curies-has led to a new emphasis on the physical chemistry of fission product behavior in accidents; the fact that the nuclear core was severely damaged but did not melt down has opened a new accident regime-that of the degraded core; the role of the operators in the progression and severity of the accident has shifted emphasis from equipment reliability to human reliability. As research progresses in these areas, the technical base for regulation and risk analysis will change substantially.

  2. Adrenal cortical response to stress at Three Mile Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, M A; Baum, A

    1984-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between biochemical, psychologic, and behavioral components of chronic stress associated with living near the damaged nuclear power plant at Three Mile Island (TMI). Relative to control subjects, TMI subjects had higher levels of urinary cortisol, which correlated significantly with urinary catecholamines, self-report of physical and mental symptoms, and decrements in task performance. Further, it was found that males had higher urinary cortisol levels than females at TMI, while at the control sites, levels of cortisol were comparable between males and females. Finally, no significant relationship between coping style and urinary cortisol was detected. Levels of stress response among TMI are residents, though significantly greater than control subjects, were within normal ranges and thus should be considered subclinical in intensity. Their persistence over 17 months, however, suggests some cause for concern.

  3. Three Mile Island and Chernobyl: what happened. What did not

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, N.C.

    1994-01-01

    Three Mile Island (TMI) melted 20 tons of fuel and Chernobyl melted 190 tons of fuel. Contrary to some prior predictions, the fuel at TMI collected in the bottom head but did not melt through the vessel. At Chernobyl, about 130 tons of fuel remained in the reactor cavity after the explosion. It took nine days for this fuel to melt through 6 m of serpentine gravel after which it quickly spread on the floor below the reactor and solidified. It caused no damage to piping or building structures. Again, this was much less damage than expected. Information from these two events should be used to see if more realistic models of core melt can be developed

  4. Psychological adaptation among residents following restart of Three Mile Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince-Embury, S; Rooney, J F

    1995-01-01

    Psychological adaptation is examined in a sample of residents who remained in the vicinity of Three Mile Island following the restart of the nuclear generating facility which had been shut down since the 1979 accident. Findings indicate a lowering of psychological symptoms between 1985 and 1989 in spite of increased lack of control, less faith in experts and increased fear of developing cancer. The suggestion is made that reduced stress might have been related to a process of adaptation whereby a cognition of emergency preparedness was integrated by some of these residents as a modulating cognitive element. Findings also indicate that "loss of faith in experts" is a persistently salient cognition consistent with the "shattered assumptions" theory of victimization.

  5. Chronic stress, catecholamines, and sleep disturbance at Three Mile Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, L M; Fleming, R; Baum, A

    1987-01-01

    The present study was concerned with the relationship between chronic stress and sleep disturbance. Previous research has provided evidence of chronic stress responding among people living near the Three Mile Island nuclear generating facility. Compared to control subjects, the TMI group has exhibited greater symptom reporting, poorer performance on behavioral measures of concentration, and elevated levels of urinary norepinephrine and epinephrine. Other research has suggested a relationship between arousal and insomnia. The extent to which stress and sleep disturbances were experienced by residents at TMI was examined and compared to levels of stress and sleep disturbance among a group of control subjects. The relationship between stress and sleep disturbances was also examined. Results indicated that TMI area residents exhibited more stress than the controls and reported greater disturbance of sleep. Modest relationships among stress and sleep measures suggested that the symptoms of stress measured in this study were not primary determinants of sleep problems.

  6. Use of the submerged demineralizer system at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Hitz, C.G.

    1983-01-01

    The Submerged Demineralizer System (SDS) has been used at Three Mile Island-Unit 2 (TMI-2) to process more than 1.5 million gallons of water contaminated as a result of the March, 1979 accident. The SDS has processed approximately 315,000 gallons of water accumulated in tanks in the Auxiliary Building, approximately 650,000 gallons of water that existed in the Reactor Containment Building basement, approximately 90,000 gallons of primary reactor coolant (processed in a bleed and feed mode) and approximately 169,000 gallons of water used in the large scale decontamination of the Reactor Building. During its operation, the SDS has immobilized approximately 340,000 curies of the principal fission products 137 Cs, 134 Cs and 90 Sr on inorganic media (zeolite). Processing summaries and performance evaluations are presented. 12 references, 1 figure, 6 tables

  7. Chronic stress, catecholamines, and sleep disturbance at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, L.M.; Fleming, R.; Baum, A.

    1987-01-01

    The present study was concerned with the relationship between chronic stress and sleep disturbance. Previous research has provided evidence of chronic stress responding among people living near the Three Mile Island nuclear generating facility. Compared to control subjects, the TMI group has exhibited greater symptom reporting, poorer performance on behavioral measures of concentration, and elevated levels of urinary norepinephrine and epinephrine. Other research has suggested a relationship between arousal and insomnia. The extent to which stress and sleep disturbances were experienced by residents at TMI was examined and compared to levels of stress and sleep disturbance among a group of control subjects. The relationship between stress and sleep disturbances was also examined. Results indicated that TMI area residents exhibited more stress than the controls and reported greater disturbance of sleep. Modest relationships among stress and sleep measures suggested that the symptoms of stress measured in this study were not primary determinants of sleep problems

  8. Operator/instrumentation interactions during the Three Mile Island incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, G.E.

    1979-10-01

    A discussion is presented of the operator/instrumentation interactions which had an effect on the course of the incident at the Three Mile Island-2 Nuclear Power Plant. A brief review of the sequence of occurrences at TMI-2 over the first 16 hours of the incident is given with particular emphasis on operator/instrumentation interactions. A breakdown of the six major items that seemed to have contributed to the characteristics of the incident is then given and also an outline of some of the currently proposed operator/instrumentation improvements. The six major items involve water level indication in the reactor, electromatic relief valve operation, auxiliary feed-water flow indication, containment isolation, extended range instrumentation, and computer readout

  9. Tourist visitation impacts of the accident at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himmelberger, J.J.; Ogneva-Himmelberger, Y.A.; Baughman, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    This paper analyzes tourist visitation impacts of the March 27, 1979 accident at Three Mile Island. A review of the literature, supplemented with recollections from Pennsylvanian public officials, are used to specify a conventional tourism impact model which holds that depressed 1979 summer tourism season was more influenced by gasoline shortages and possibly other confounding variables (such as rainy local weather conditions and a polio outbreak) than by the nuclear accident. Regression analysis using monthly visitation data for Hershey Chocolate World, Gettysburg National Park, The Pennsylvania Dutch Convention and Visitor Bureau, and several state parks as dependent variables provide support for this model. Potential tourism implications of an accident at Yucca Mountain are briefly discussed in light of our findings

  10. Safety culture and the accident at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erp, Jan B. van

    2002-01-01

    Prior to the accident at Three Mile Island, little attention was being paid to the human role in the safe operation of civilian nuclear power plants. The investigation of the TMI accident showed that its root causes were primarily human-related. The Kemeny Report on the TMI accident does not use the term 'safety culture'; however, it fully identifies all relevant aspects of safety culture. It was only after the accident at Chernobyl that the term 'safety culture' came into widespread use. However, it should be noted that, during the years after TMI and before Chernobyl, already major changes had been instituted concerning human factors and human reliability in the civilian nuclear energy programs of many countries. Greater credit should be given to the remarkable insights developed by the Kemeny Commission as contained in the Kemeny Report. (author)

  11. Analysis of the Three Mile Island (TMI-2) hydrogen burn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrie, J.; Postma, A.

    1983-01-01

    As a basis for the analysis of the hydrogen burn which occurred in the Three Mile Island Containment on March 28, 1979, a study of recorded temperatures and pressures was made. Long-term temperature information was obtained from the multipoint temperature recorder which shows 12 containment atmosphere temperatures plotted every 6 min. The containment atmosphere pressure recorder provided excellent long and short-term pressure information. Short-term information was obtained from the multiplex record of 24 channels of data, recorded every 3 sec, and the alarm printer record which shows status change events and prints out temperatures, pressures, and the time of the events. The timing of these four data recording systems was correlated and pertinent data were tabulated, analyzed and plotted to show average containment temperature and pressure versus time. The data used have not been qualified and accuracy is not fully assured. Photographs and videotapes of the containment entries provided qualitative burn information

  12. Accident at Three Mile Island: the human dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sills, D.L.; Wolf, C.P.; Shelanski, V.B.

    1982-01-01

    A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 19 chapters, divided according to the following Parts: (1) Public Perceptions of Nuclear Energy; (2) Local Responses to Nuclear Plants; (3) Institutional Responsibilities for Nuclear Energy; (4) The Interaction of Social and Technical Systems; and (5) Implications for Public Policy. All of the abstracts will appear in Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA); three will appear in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA). At the request of the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island (the Kemeny Commission), the Social Science Research Council commissioned social scientists to write a series of papers on the human dimensions of the event. This volume includes those papers, in revised and expanded form, and a comprehensive bibliography of published and unpublished social science research on the accident and its aftermath

  13. Drop tests of the Three Mile Island knockout canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Box, W.D.; Aaron, W.S.; Shappert, L.B.; Childress, P.C.; Quinn, G.J.; Smith, J.V.

    1987-01-01

    A type of Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) defueling canister, called a ''knockout'' canister, was subjected to a series of drop tests at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Drop Test Facility. These tests confirmed the structural integrity of internal fixed neutron poisons in support of a request for NRC licensing of this type of canister for the shipment of TMI-2 reactor fuel debris to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the Core Examination R and D Program. This report presents the data generated and the results obtained from a series of four drop tests that included two drops with the test assembly in the vertical position and two drops with the assembly in the horizontal position

  14. The Three Mile Island accident. Diagnosis and prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, L.M.; Malinauskas, A.P.; Eidam, G.R.; Burton, H.M.

    1986-01-01

    The Three Mile Island accident occurred on March 29, 1979. The decision to hold a symposium on the TMI accident aftermath was reached when it was realized that enough information had been gathered during the past 6 years to provide a fairly complete picture of the damage and of the activities required for eventual recovery. The symposium was organized into three sessions: the first dealt with a description of the accident, the second focused on the chemical aspects involved, and the third addressed the strategy and progress made toward recovery. The symposium was intended to focus on these three subjects and leave the environmental considerations to future meetings and reports. Although it might appear shortsighted to exclude the environmental impact, the exclusion was considered necessary in order to maintain the focus we sought

  15. Adrenal cortical response to stress at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaeffer, M.A.; Baum, A.

    1984-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between biochemical, psychologic, and behavioral components of chronic stress associated with living near the damaged nuclear power plant at Three Mile Island (TMI). Relative to control subjects, TMI subjects had higher levels of urinary cortisol, which correlated significantly with urinary catecholamines, self-report of physical and mental symptoms, and decrements in task performance. Further, it was found that males had higher urinary cortisol levels than females at TMI, while at the control sites, levels of cortisol were comparable between males and females. Finally, no significant relationship between coping style and urinary cortisol was detected. Levels of stress response among TMI are residents, though significantly greater than control subjects, were within normal ranges and thus should be considered subclinical in intensity. Their persistence over 17 months, however, suggests some cause for concern

  16. Post Three Mile Island shielding review - a case history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isakari, H.H.; Shaw, H.C.

    1983-01-01

    The radiation shielding review of the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant was performed in accordance with the requirement of the Three Mile Island Action Plan. The review covered plant shielding and environmental qualification of equipment for spaces and systems which may be used in post-accident operations. Radiation doses during postulated loss-of-coolant accident and high-energy-line-break accident were calculated for equipment located both inside and outside the containment. Vital areas, those requiring post-accident access and occupancy, were identified and their associated dose rates and integrated doses were calculated. It was found that all four of the vital areas (Control Room, Technical Support Center, Switchgear Room, and Emergency Sampling Compartment) are shielded from external sources of radiation sufficiently to permit personnel access and occupancy that would not be unduly limited by the radiation environment caused by the postulated accidents. (author)

  17. NSAC: in-depth look at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lihach, N.; Zebroski, E.

    1979-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Analysis Center (NSAC) is hoping to learn what caused the reactor accident at Three Mile Island, what happened during the accident, and how to take advantage of what is learned to prevent future incidents. When the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) was asked to make an independent assessment, the NSAC was organized with a separate identity and funded by special contributions from the electric utilities. The Center has nearly completed the first phase of organization and data gathering on the sequence of events. This will be followed by a safety analysis to determine causes and to look for ways to improve nuclear power plant technology. The Center will also serve as a clearing house for studies on the effects of radiation, improvements in instrumentation, and emergency response systems

  18. 78 FR 49553 - Three Mile Island, Unit 2; Post Shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 50-320; NRC-2013-0183] Three Mile Island, Unit 2; Post Shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of receipt... Shutdown Decommissioning Activity Report (PSDAR) for Three Mile Island, Unit 2 (TMI-2). The PSDAR provides...

  19. Three Mile Island Startup program and its contributions to plant performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brill, R.A.; Barton, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    The General Public Utilities Service Corporation Startup Organization provided a specialized group for startup testing, coordination, and management of the Three Mile Island Unit No. 1 nuclear power plant. This organization conducted an extensive test program which contributed to Three Mile Island's high first year plant availability

  20. Drop tests of the Three Mile Island knockout canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Box, W.D.; Aaron, W.S.; Shappert, L.B.; Childress, P.C.; Quinn, G.J.; Smith, J.V.

    1986-09-01

    A type of Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) defueling canister, called a ''knockout'' canister, was subjected to a series of drop tests at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Drop Test Facility. These tests were designed to confirm the structural integrity of internal fixed neutron poisons in support of a request for NRC licensing of this type of canister for the shipment of TMI-2 reactor fuel debris to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the Core Examination R and D Program. Work conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory included (1) precise physical measurements of the internal poison rod configuration before assembly, (2) canister assembly and welding, (3) nondestructive examination (an initial hydrostatic pressure test and an x-ray profile of the internals before and after each drop test), (4) addition of a simulated fuel load, (5) instrumentation of the canister for each drop test, (6) fabrication of a cask simulation vessel with a developed and tested foam impact limiter, (7) use of refrigeration facilities to cool the canister to well below freezing prior to three of the drops, (8) recording the drop test with still, high-speed, and normal-speed photography, (9) recording the accelerometer measurements during impact, (10) disassembly and post-test examination with precise physical measurements, and (11) preparation of the final report

  1. Analysis of Three Mile Island - Unit 2 accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-07-01

    The Nuclear Safety Analysis Center (NSAC) of the Electric Power Research Institute is analyzing the Three Mile Island-2 accident. An early result of this analysis was a brief narrative summary, issued in mid May 1979. The present report contains a revised version of that narrative summary, a highly detailed sequence of events, a standard reference list, a list of abbreviations and acronyms, and several appendices. The appendices serve either to describe plant features which are pertinent to the understanding of the sequence of events, or indicate how certain inferences and conclusions in the report were reached. Supplementing the appendices contained herein, additional appendices are in preparation; these will be issued when available (e.g., the appendices Hydrogen Phenomena and Operator Actions during Initial Transient will follow later). Also in preparation is a matrix of equipment and systems actions during the accident. This report together with future supplements and a separate Core Damage Assessment report, will embody the principal results of that phase of NSAC work which is devoted to learning and understanding what happened during the accident. Subsequent phases will concentrate on causes, lessons learned and generic remedial or preventive measures which may be appropriate

  2. Analysis of Three Mile Island-Unit 2 accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-07-01

    The Nuclear Safety Analysis Center (NSAC) of the Electic Power Research Institute is analyzing the Three Mile Island-2 accident. An early result of this analysis was a brief narrative summary, issued in mid-May 1979. The present report contains a revised version of that narrative summary, a highly detailed sequence of events, a standard reference list, a list of abbreviations and acronyms, and several appendices. The appendices serve either to describe plant features which are pertinent to the understanding of the sequence of events, or indicate how certain inferences and conclusions in the report were reached. Supplementing the appendices contained herein, additional appendices are in preparation; these will be issued when available (e.g., the appendices Hydrogen Phenomena and Operator Actions duing Initial Transient will follow later). Also in preparation is a matrix of equipment and systems actions during the accident. This report together with future supplements and a separate Core Damage Assessment report, will embody the principal results of that phase of NSAC's work which is devoted to learning and understanding what happened during the accident. Subsequent phases will concentrate on causes, lessons learned and generic remedial or preventive measures which may be appropriate

  3. Thyroid cancer characteristics in the population surrounding Three Mile Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Neerav; Camacho, Fabian; Mangano, Joseph; Goldenberg, David

    2012-06-01

    To determine differences in disease characteristics between the thyroid cancer populations in the area around the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant and the rest of the state of Pennsylvania. Retrospective cross-sectional study. Data from the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry from 1985 to 2008 were reviewed and information regarding age at diagnosis, sex, race, residential status, county of residence, thyroid pathology, thyroid surgery, and staging was recorded. Dauphin, Lancaster, and York counties were defined as the TMI area. Records of 26,357 thyroid cancer patients were reviewed, with 2,611 patients within the TMI area. A higher proportion of papillary thyroid cancer (P < .001) and lower proportion of follicular thyroid cancer (P < .001) were noted in the TMI area population. Thyroid cancer cases from the TMI area were found to be more likely to be diagnosed before the age of 65 years (P < .001), be Pennsylvania born (P < .001), be well differentiated (P < .001), be <10 mm in size (P < .001), and be localized without spread (P < .001). Although the TMI area shows a higher incidence of thyroid cancer as compared to the rest of the state, this was not statistically significant. The TMI population showed a higher proportion of papillary thyroid cancer and less aggressive pathology and earlier diagnosis compared to the rest of Pennsylvania. No statistically significant difference in thyroid cancer incidence was noted. Overall, the study does not show a clear link with more advanced thyroid cancer and proximity to the TMI nuclear reactors. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. Mental health effects of the Three Mile Island nuclear reactor restart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dew, M A; Bromet, E J; Schulberg, H C; Dunn, L O; Parkinson, D K

    1987-08-01

    Controversy over potential mental health effects of the Three Mile Island Unit-1 restart led the authors to examine prospectively the pattern of psychiatric symptoms in a sample of Three Mile Island area mothers of young children. Symptom levels after restart were elevated over previous levels; a sizable subcohort of the sample reported relatively serious degrees of postrestart distress. History of diagnosable major depression and generalized anxiety following the Three Mile Island accident, plus symptoms and beliefs about personal risk prior to the restart, best predicted postrestart symptoms.

  5. Three Mile Island telephone survey: preliminary report on procedures and findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, C.B.

    1979-10-01

    This report describes the methodology used in, and the results of, a telephone survey conducted in the vicinity of the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant. The survey is part of a study of the socioeconomic impacts of nuclear power plant construction and operation at Three Mile Island, and eleven other nuclear power plant sites. The survey covers the areas of evacuation behavior, information processing, short-term accident effects, continuing effects of the accident, and respondent's evaluation of TMI and nuclear power in general. Approximately 1500 households in the vicinity of the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant participated in the survey, which was conducted in July and August 1979

  6. Mental health effects of the Three Mile Island nuclear reactor restart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dew, M.A.; Bromet, E.J.; Schulberg, H.C.; Dunn, L.O.; Parkinson, D.K.

    1987-01-01

    Controversy over potential mental health effects of the Three Mile Island Unit-1 restart led the authors to examine prospectively the pattern of psychiatric symptoms in a sample of Three Mile Island area mothers of young children. Symptom levels after restart were elevated over previous levels; a sizable subcohort of the sample reported relatively serious degrees of postrestart distress. History of diagnosable major depression and generalized anxiety following the Three Mile Island accident, plus symptoms and beliefs about personal risk prior to the restart, best predicted postrestart symptoms

  7. Atmospheric Release Advisory capability (ARAC) response to the Three Mile Island accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickerson, M.H.; Gudiksen, P.H.

    1979-10-01

    This paper discusses the three general classes of support provided by the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) and describes the role played by ARAC in support of DOE during the Three Mile Island accident in March and April of 1979

  8. Lessons of the accident at Three Mile Island nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veksler, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    Measures taken in the USA for improving safety of NPPs after the accident at ''Three Mile Island'' nuclear power plant are considered. Activities, related to elimination of accident consequences are analyzed. Perspectives of resuming the NPP operation are discussed

  9. Radiation mapping helps in the Three Mile Island 2 clean up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nightingale, Brian

    1986-01-01

    Modelling to depict the location and nature of the radiation measurements needed before surveys are undertaken can save personnel exposure and improve the quality of the radiation data itself, as experience at Three Mile Island 2 has shown. (author)

  10. Understanding Victims of Technological Disaster: Beliefs and Worries of Three Mile Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince-Embury, Sandra; Rooney, James

    The primary purpose of the present study was to examine how prevalent were concerns about restarting Three Mile Island nuclear reactor Unit I among people within a five-mile radius of the plant four years after the accident involving reactor Unit II. Also explored were concerns related to expectations about the restart of Unit I, perception of…

  11. Emergency preparedness and response in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania - the Three Mile Island incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, O.K.

    1981-01-01

    This paper addresses the emergency response mechanism and legal basis in effect in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania at the time of the Three Mile Island incident. It reviews the sequence of events as they directly affected the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency and examines the method used by the Agency to discharge its responsibilities. Finally, the paper lists some of the lessons learned from the Three Mile Island experience. (author)

  12. Three Mile Island nuclear reactor accident of March 1979. Environmental radiation data: Volume III. A report to the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretthauer, E.W.; Grossman, R.F.; Thome, D.J.; Smith, A.E.

    1981-03-01

    This report contains a listing of environmental radiation monitoring data collected in the vicinity of Three Mile Island (TMI) following the March 28, 1979 accident. These data were collected by the EPA, NRC, DOE, HHS, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, or the Bethlehem Steel Corporation. This volume consists of Table 9 Computer printout of environmental data collected NRC

  13. A brief review of the accident at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corey, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    A question-and-answer format is used to discuss the Three Mile Reactor accident and the lessons learned. The aspects touched upon include the hydrogen bubble, the radiation levels the public was exposed to, and the consequences of the accident to the nuclear power program

  14. Three Mile Island nuclear reactor accident of March 1979. Environmental radiation data: Volume I. A report to the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretthauer, E.W.; Grossman, R.F.; Thome, D.J.; Smith, A.E.

    1981-03-01

    This report contains a listing of environmental radiation monitoring data collected in the vicinity of Three Mile Island (TMI) following the March 28, 1979 accident. These data were collected by the EPA, NRC, DOE, HHS, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, or the Bethlehem Steel Corporation. The original report was printed in September 1979 and the update was released in December 1979. Volume 1 consists of the following 5 tables: Table 1-Measurements made by principal participants; Table 2-Cross-check program instituted by US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for iodine-131 in milk. Table 3-Comparison of EPA and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) air data collected at the Three Mile Island (TMI) Observation Center; Table 4-Summary of EPA Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas (EMSL-LV) and EPA Eastern Environmental Radiation Facility-Montgomery (EERF-Montgomery) sampling and analytical procedures; Table 5-Computer printout of environmental data collected by EPA

  15. Three Mile Island nuclear reactor accident of March 1979. Environmental radiation data: Volume V. A report to the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretthauer, E.W.; Grossman, R.F.; Thome, D.J.; Smith, A.E.

    1981-03-01

    This report contains a listing of environmental radiation monitoring data collected in the vicinity of Three Mile Island (TMI) following the March 28, 1979 accident. These data were collected by the EPA, NRC, DOE, HHS, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, or the Bethlehem Steel Corporation. This volume consists of the following 2 volumes: Table 16 Summary of Metropolitan Edison Company (Met-Ed) sampling and analytical procedures; and Table 17 Computer printout of data collected by Met-Ed

  16. 137Cs levels in deer following the Three Mile Island accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, R W

    1993-06-01

    White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virgianus) tongues were assayed to assess whether or not significant widespread 137Cs contamination occurred in the vicinity of Three Mile Island Nuclear Station as a result of the 1979 accident. White-tailed deer tongues harvested from 10 Pennsylvania counties more than 88 km away from Three Mile Island had significantly higher 137Cs levels than deer tongues harvested from counties surrounding the nuclear plant. The mean deer tongue 137Cs levels found in Pennsylvania white-tailed deer were lower than 137Cs levels found in deer from other parts of the U.S. sampled shortly after culmination of major atmospheric nuclear testing. These findings support the conclusions of previous studies suggesting that only minimal quantities of 137Cs escaped from the damaged Three Mile Island plant after the accident.

  17. Post-accident cleanup of radioactivity at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooksbank, R.E.; Armento, W.J.

    1980-02-01

    The technical staff of the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island (TMI) requested that Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) prepare documentation concerned with the cleanup of radioactivity on the Three Mile Island site following the March 28, 1979 accident. The objective of this report is to provide information in a summarized form, which will be of direct usefulness to the commissioners. The information contained herein includes discussion of on-site assistance and accomplishments following the accident, flowsheet development for the TMI recovery team (by the Technical Advisory Group), and the numerous reports already generated on the TMI cleanup and recovery

  18. US Department of Energy Three Mile Island research and development program. 1985 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.R.

    1986-04-01

    In 1985, the US Department of Energy's Three Mile Island Research and Development Program at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2), the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and other supporting laboratories, concentrated on three major areas: fuel and waste handling and disposition, accident evaluation, and reactor evaluation. While the general technology being developed is of direct benefit to the recovery operations at TMI-2, this technology will be of generic benefit to the entire nuclear power industry. Others engaged in research and development, design, construction, operation, maintenance, and regulation of nuclear plants will have access to this technology to enhance plant safety and reliability

  19. Note on the stock market's reaction to the accident at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spudeck, R.E.; Moyer, C.R.

    1989-01-01

    This note provides new information regarding the market reaction toward electric utility stocks that resulted both from the accident at Three Mile Island, and the events predating and postdating the accident. The results suggest that some of the market reaction heretofore ascribed to the accident resulted instead from regulatory activity occurring before the accident. We also provide results suggesting that regulatory activity by the Pennsylvania Public Utilities Commission in the wake of the accident served to offset a majority of the increased systematic risk resulting from the accident. Our results imply that previously reported lingering effects of the accident at Three Mile Island may be regulatory effects from events predating the accident

  20. The Three Mile Island - 2 incident and damage to pheasants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.

    1981-01-01

    In popular Austrian TV show deformed pheasants were shown hatched from eggs which were purchased by an Austrian pheasants breeder from a pheasantry about 60 miles from Harrisburg. The case was presented in such a way that the public could have correlated the deformed pheasants to the TMI-2 incident. As detailed investigations showed that the radiation dose after the TMI-2 incident was rather low even very close to the nuclear power plant such an effect seems highly unlikely. Analyses of the hatch percentages of other pheasants breeder using eggs from the very same flock showed no abnormal behaviour whatsoever. Therefore, the negative hatch result of the Austrian breeder must originate in other environmental effects either during transport or breeding. (author)

  1. Lessons of Three Mile Island for the health care community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wald, N.

    1986-01-01

    The author discusses the key points that we should have learned from the TMI accident. There has to be one responsible decision maker; otherwise conflicting decision increase the stress and anxiety levels. There has to be a realistic appraisal and clear communication of the situation with all of the people involved. Both overoptimistic and overpessimistic views are deleterious in promoting realistic responses from the population at risk. There has to be an action plan on paper that is credible, one which people can believe will work. Adequate time, thought, and resources have to be dedicated to the plan. It is not simply a matter of putting words on paper. Education for radiation emergencies is critically important. All professional (including governors, their staffs, and health care personnel) and the general public must know something about radiation before they are caught in the middle of a crisis

  2. Radiological impacts of transporting Three Mile Island core debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, N.D.

    1986-01-01

    This document presents an assessment of the radiological impacts of one cask shipment. It focuses on potential effects of the shipment on the public along the route. The document begins with a description of the shipping cask, followed by a description of the survivability tests required to confirm the cask design. Some actual accidents that similar casks have survived wholly intact are described. Next considered is the limit of radiation exposure dose rate that is imposed by regulatory agencies under normal conditions. No shipping of radioactive material is allowed unless the container is at or below the normal limit. A comparison is made between the normal radiation exposure limit and the radiation dose received annually by individuals from natural sources. Then, estimates of the radiation dose received by persons along the rail route in urban, suburban, and rural areas during normal transport are presented. Those times when the train stops for whatever reason (called rest stops) are considered also. Next, potential accident events are considered. Recent accident statistics are presented, and chances for an accident at different train velocities are estimated for any mile of track. The alternative of truck transport is considered briefly

  3. A summary of the Three Mile Island accident: from zero hour to lessons for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, L.F.S. de; Oliveira Barroso, A.C. de

    The accident that occured at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant, unit 2 (TMI-2) in March 1979 is analysed. The main events that occured during the accident are described in detail. The main project features of TMI-2 and Angra-1 nuclear power plant, Brazil are compared and analysed. (L.F.S.) [pt

  4. Emotional, Behavioral, and Physiological Effects of Chronic Stress at Three Mile Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Andrew; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Evaluated the psychophysiological impact of Three Mile Island on nearby residents (N=38) compared to people living near an undamaged nuclear plant (N=32), a coal-fired plant (N=24) and a control group. Results indicated that residents of the TMI area exhibited more symptoms of stress a year after the accident. (WAS)

  5. Blueprint for Breakdown: Three Mile Island and the Media before the Accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Sharon M.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses media coverage of the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant before and during the disaster. Concludes that there was a communication breakdown prior to the accident. Outlines the causes and offers suggestions for avoiding similar breakdowns in the future. (JMF)

  6. A Content Analysis of News Media Coverage of the Accident at Three Mile Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Mitchell; Edison, Nadyne G.

    A study was conducted for the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island to analyze coverage of the accident by ten news organizations: two wire services, three commercial television networks, and five daily newspapers. Copies of all stories and transcripts of news programs during the first week of the accident were examined from…

  7. Planning for large-scale accidents: learning from the Three Mile Island accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, D.W.

    1981-01-01

    Decision-making issues raised at the Three Mile Island nuclear accident in Pennsylvania are explored. The organizations involved, their interconnections, and decisions are described. The underlying issues bearing on allocation of effort to pre-accident planning and actual accident responses are also noted. Finally, a framework from this effort is used for guiding the planning of operations for future accidents. (author)

  8. Three Mile Island: a report to the commissioners and to the public. Volume II, Part 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This is the third and final part of the second volume of a study of the Three Mile Island accident. Part 3 of Volume II contains descriptions and assessments of responses to the accident by the utility and by the NRC and other government agencies

  9. Selection, training, qualification and licensing of Three Mile Island reactor operating personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eytchison, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    The various programs which were intended to staff Three Mile Island with competent, trained operators and supervisors are reviewed. The analysis includes a review of the regulations concerning operator training and licensing, and describes how the requirements were implemented by the NRC, Metropolitan Edison Company, and Babcock and Wilcox Company. Finally the programs conducted by these three organisations are evaluated. (U.K.)

  10. Use of photographic film to estimate exposure near the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuping, R.E.

    1981-02-01

    This report documents the methodology and results of a Bureau of Radiological Health study of the use of photographic film samples for estimating exposure levels near the Three Mile Island nuclear power station. The study was conducted to provide an independent assessment of the radiation levels near TMI following the accident on March 28, 1979

  11. Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) response to the Three Mile Island accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickerson, M.H.; Gudiksen, P.H.

    1980-01-01

    A discussion is presented of the three general classes of support provided by the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) and describes the role played by ARAC in support of DOE during the Three Mile Island accident in March and April of 1979. 6 refs

  12. The Three Mile Island accident, a world premiere for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouvier, Yves

    2015-01-01

    When it happened on 28 March 1979, the accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power station in Pennsylvania took experts and operators by surprise. Although human losses were minor, this world shaking media event significantly changed public attitudes towards nuclear energy and put a definitive stop to the development of nuclear power in the USA. (author)

  13. US Department of Energy Three Mile Island research and development program: Annual report, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1987-04-01

    Defueling of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor continued through 1986. This report summarizes this work and other TMI-2 related cleanup, research, and development activities. Other major topics include: core stratification sampling and other data acquisition tasks, the fuel shipping program, waste immobilization and management, decontamination and dose reduction, and future uses and applications of TMI-2 data.

  14. Impact of the Three Mile Island accident on reactor safety and licensing in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvie, J.D.

    1980-06-01

    This paper discusses the implications of the accident at Three Mile Island on reactor safety and licensing in Canada. Reactor safety principles which can be learned from, or are reaffirmed by, the accident are reviewed. It is concluded that reactor safety demands a firm commitment to safety by all those involved in the nuclear industry. (auth)

  15. The lessons of Three Mile Island - public acceptance of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, T.R.

    1979-01-01

    An evaluation is given of the effects which the accident at Three Mile Island has had on public acceptance of nuclear power in the United States. Furthermore the impact of the changes in public acceptance on the financing of nuclear power projects is assessed. (author)

  16. US Department of Energy Three Mile Island research and development program: Annual report, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-04-01

    Defueling of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor continued through 1986. This report summarizes this work and other TMI-2 related cleanup, research, and development activities. Other major topics include: core stratification sampling and other data acquisition tasks, the fuel shipping program, waste immobilization and management, decontamination and dose reduction, and future uses and applications of TMI-2 data

  17. Three Mile Island technical information and examination program instrumentation and electrical summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meininger, R.D.

    1985-07-01

    This report summarizes the investigations on instrumentation and electrical systems that were subjected to a loss-of-coolant accident environment during and following the accident at Three Mile Island Unit-2 (TMI-2) on March 28, 1979. The report is a summary of information previously published in GEND-INF reports, plus current knowledge of the investigators

  18. Emergency planning and preparedness: pre- and post-Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, H.E.

    1980-01-01

    The problems of radiological emergency response planning revealed by the Three-Mile Island nuclear power plant accident, are discussed. The most pressing problems are the need for an adequate planning basis, the improvement of accident assessment, the improvement and development of training programs, the need for adequate fundina and the development of emergency planning auidance. (H.K.)

  19. Lessons learned? Selected public acceptance case studies since Three Mile Island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blee, D. [NAC International, Atlanta Corporate Headquarters, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2001-02-01

    This paper will present an overview of the present situation, some recent polling survey information, and then look at lessons learned in terms of selected case studies and some global issues over the 22 years since the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident. That is quite an ambitious topic but there are some important lessons we can learn from the post-TMI era. (author)

  20. Three Mile Island nuclear reactor accident of March 1979. Environmental radiation data: Update. A report to the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretthauer, E.W.; Grossman, R.F.; Thome, D.J.; Smith, A.E.

    1981-03-01

    This report contains a listing of environmental radiation monitoring data collected in the vicinity of Three Mile Island (TMI) following the March 28, 1979 accident. These data were collected by the EPA, NRC, DOE, HHS, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, or the Bethlehem Steel Corporation. The original report was printed in September 1979 and the update was released in December 1979. Also included in this update is a listing of whole-body counting data obtained by the NRC to assess the quantity of internally deposited radionuclides in TMI workers and volunteer residents within a three-mile-radius of TMI. No reactor-related radionuclides were identified in any of the whole-body counting data

  1. Answers to frequently asked questions about cleanup activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2. Public information report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    The document presents answers to frequently asked questions about plans for cleanup and decontamination activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2. Answers to the questions asked are based on information in the NRC 'Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement related to decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from March 28, 1979, accident, Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2' NUREG-0683

  2. Three Mile Island nuclear reactor accident of March 1979. Environmental radiation data: Volume II. A report to the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretthauer, E.W.; Grossman, R.F.; Thome, D.J.; Smith, A.E.

    1981-03-01

    This report contains a listing of environmental radiation monitoring data collected in the vicinity of Three Mile Island (TMI) following the March 28, 1979 accident. These data were collected by the EPA, NRC, DOE, HHS, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, or the Bethlehem Steel Corporation. The original report was printed in September 1979 and the update was released in December 1979. Table 6-Summary of Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW) sampling and analytical procedures; Table 7-Computer printout of environmental data collected by HEW; Table 8-Summary of US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sampling and analytical procedures

  3. Residential proximity and cognition of risk at Three Mile Island: implications for evacuation planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutter, S.L.

    1984-01-01

    This paper specifically examines the relationship between risk cognition and distance from the source of the threat or hazard using an experienced population, the residents in the vicinity of the Three Mile Island plant. Survey data from 1980 and 1982 are used to assess the effect of distance from the plant on the cognition of risk. Risk, as used in this paper, is defined as both an estimate of the likelihood of accidents, frequency of accidents and an evaluation of the future use of nuclear power to generate electricity. It is suggested that residents living closer to the plant will be more aware of the risks that those living farther away. It is also suggested that there will be some differences between the cognition of societal risks from the production of power from nuclear sources and the more salient risks associated with the production of power from the Three Mile Island plant

  4. Examinations of fuel debris samples from Three Mile Island Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagase, Fumihisa

    2012-01-01

    In the accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plants, fuels were molten due to loss of coolant and heat-up of the reactor core. Information on properties of molten fuels (debris) is important to analyze progress of the accident, estimate the status inside the damaged reactors and work on a plan for debris removal. Extensive examinations for properties of debris have been conducted after the accident at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 in 1979. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency conducted a part of the examinations in the frame of the OECD/NEA Three Mile Island Vessel Investigation Program. This issue report outline and main results of the TMI-2 debris examination programs. (author)

  5. Three Mile Island: a report to the commissioners and to the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogovin, M.

    1979-01-01

    Within weeks of the March 28, 1979 accident at Three Mile Island, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) decided to institute a Special Inquiry to review and report on the accident. THe principal objectives of the inquiry were determined what happened and why, to assess the actions of utility and NRC personnel before and during the accident, and to identify deficiencies in the system and areas where further investigation might be warranted. The work of the Special Inquiry was not intended to duplicate the efforts of the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island. It was designed to enable the NRC to fulfill its regulatory responsibilities by achieving the fullest possible understanding of the accident, both from a technical point of view and from the standpoint of how the NRC's own regulatory processes functioned

  6. Reactions of local residents to the accident at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, C.B.

    1982-01-01

    Both survey data and interviews with people living near Three Mile Island indicated a substantial variation in the response of individuals to the accident. At the extremes, some were virtually oblivious to the potential gravity of the situation and others were traumatized by it. This variation was one of the most unexpected results of the research that has been conducted in the local area. The accident at Three Mile Island began at about 4:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 28 March 1979. The two-week period immediately following the accident was characterized by a gradual increase in concern on the part of officials and the general public through Monday, 2 April, followed by a gradual decrease in concern. Although the effects of the accident will continue to be felt in the area for some time, it is appropriate to set apart the first two weeks for study because of the sense of urgency that existed during that time

  7. Instrumentation and electrical program at the Three Mile Island Unit 2, Technical Integration Office

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecker, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    The Three Mile Island Unit 2 accident of March 28, 1979 presents unique research opportunities that can provide valuable information on nuclear power plant safety philosophy and safety systems performance. The Technical Integration Office at Three Mile Island was established by the Department of Energy to manage a broad-based research and development program. One significant part of this effort is the Instrumentation and Electrical Program, which operates: (1) to identify instruments and electrical components that failed during or since the accident; (2) to test and analyze them in order to identify the causes of failure; and (3) to assess the survivability of those that did not fail. The basis for selection of equipment is discussed, and the testing methodology is described. Also, some results of Instrumentation and Electrical Program work to date are presented

  8. Summary Report of Commercial reactor Criticality Data for Three Mile Island Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larry B. Wimmer

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the ''Summary Report of Commercial Reactor Criticality Data for Three Mile Island Unit I'' is to present the CRC data for the TMI-1 reactor. Results from the CRC evaluations will support the development and validation of the neutronics models used for criticality analyses involving commercial spent nuclear fuel. These models and their validation are discussed in the ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2000)

  9. US Department of Energy Three Mile Island Research and Development Program: 1987 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-04-01

    Defueling of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor continued through 1987. This report summarizes this work and other TMI-2 related cleanup, research, and development activities. Other major topics include: Waste immobilization; Core transportation, receipt, and storage; Abnormal waste; Accident Evaluation and Technical Integration Programs; and Future uses and applications of TMI-2 data. While the technology being developed is of direct benefit to the recovery operations at TMI-2, it will also benefit the entire nuclear power industry

  10. Longitudinal study of appraisal at Three Mile Island: implications for life event research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsteen, R; Schorr, J K; Goldsteen, K S

    1989-01-01

    This study tests a path model which indicates the occurrence of appraisal following the accident at Three Mile Island (TMI). The model posits a causal relationship between trust in TMI-related authorities, perceived danger, perceived harm to health, and psychological distress. The implications of the findings for life event research are discussed in terms of the etiological significance of meaning, event consequences, and control.

  11. Three Mile Island nuclear reactor accident of March 1979. Environmental radiation data: Update 2, Volume III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilton, B.A.; Grossman, R.F.

    1981-03-01

    The original report contains a listing of environmental radiation monitoring data collected in the vicinity of Three Mile Island (TMI) following the March 28, 1979 accident. These data were collected by the EPA, NRC, DOE, HHS, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, or the Bethlehem Steel Corporation. The original report was printed in September 1979 and the update was released in December 1979. This final update consists of additional data for 1979 by the same participating organizations, which has not been previously reported

  12. Mediating influences of social support on stress at Three Mile Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, R; Baum, A; Gisriel, M M; Gatchel, R J

    1982-09-01

    Symptom reporting, task performance, and urinary catecholamine excretion were studied in a group of people living near the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant and in control populations. More than a year after the accident, living near the damaged reactor was associated with elevations in all indices of stress compared with control levels. Social support mediated these stress indices such that higher levels were associated with fewer psychological and behavioral symptoms of stress. Biochemical measures showed a different pattern of results.

  13. Three Mile Island - The hour-by-hour account of what really happened

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, M.

    1980-01-01

    An hour-by-hour account is given of the progression of events leading up to and during the accident at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor. The emergency procedures followed, the evacuation of local residents and the decisions taken as the possibility of a meltdown became apparent are recorded in detail together with aspects of the media coverage and the problems of communication. (U.K.)

  14. Summary of the consequences for safety which result from the Three-Mile-Island accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smidt, D.

    1982-01-01

    The paper focusses on the Three-Mile-Island (TMI) accident in terms of reactor safety, and describes the first stage of the event's course (the first 2 hours and 18 minutes), the second stage (up to 16 hours after accident onset) and the stage till ultimate transition to stationary cooling. Conclusions are drawn for plant design and control room concepts. In conclusion, problems of staff training for critical situations are discussed. (HAG) [de

  15. Experience with intermediate strong base anion resins at three mile island nuclear station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federick, K.H.; Reed, J.G.; Glass, R.M.

    1978-01-01

    A-104 resin appears to have been an excellent replacement for upflow regenerated Stratabeds at Three Mile Island. It has resulted in a 50% increase in operating throughputs, lower maintenance and greater ease of operation for the makeup trains. It should be stressed that differences in raw water characteristics or equipment design might render this experience not applicable to any given specific installation. A thorough evaluation of all aspects of such a conversion is recommended before any changes are attempted. 1 ref

  16. Mediating influences of social support on stress at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, R.; Baum, A.; Gisriel, M.M.; Gatchel, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    Symptom reporting, task performance, and urinary catecholamine excretion were studied in a group of people living near the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant and in control populations. More than a year after the accident, living near the damaged reactor was associated with elevations in all indices of stress compared with control levels. Social support mediated these stress indices such that higher levels were associated with fewer psychological and behavioral symptoms of stress. Biochemical measures showed a different pattern of results

  17. Nondestructive techniques for assaying fuel debris in piping at Three Mile Island Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinjamuri, K.; McIsaac, C.V.; Beller, L.S.; Isaacson, L.; Mandler, J.W.; Hobbins, R.R. Jr.

    1981-11-01

    Four major categories of nondestructive techniques - ultrasonic, passive gamma ray, infrared detection, and remote video examination - have been determined to be feasible for assaying fuel debris in the primary coolant system of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) Reactor. Passive gamma ray detection is the most suitable technique for the TMI-2 piping; however, further development of this technique is needed for specific application to TMI-2

  18. Answers to questions about updated estimates of occupational radiation doses at Three Mile Island, Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-12-01

    The purpose of this question and answer report is to provide a clear, easy-to-understand explanation of revised radiation dose estimates which workers are likely to receive over the course of the cleanup at Three Mile Island, Unit 2, and of the possible health consequences to workers of these new estimates. We will focus primarily on occupational dose, although pertinent questions about public health and safety will also be answered

  19. Island in Crisis: Response to Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenere, Frank J.

    2018-01-01

    On September 6, 2017, Hurricane Irma, a Category 5 storm packing winds of 185 miles per hour skirted the northern coast of Puerto Rico, leaving 1 million residents without electrical power. Schools were closed for 5 days, but a major calamity was narrowly avoided. Overall, residents were grateful for their good fortune, but the same could not be…

  20. Three Mile Island nuclear reactor accident of March 1979. Environmental radiation data: Volume IV. A report to the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretthauer, E.W.; Grossman, R.F.; Thome, D.J.; Smith, A.E.

    1981-03-01

    This report contains a listing of environmental radiation monitoring data collected in the vicinity of Three Mile Island (TMI) following the March 28, 1979 accident. These data were collected by the EPA, NRC, DOE, HHS, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, or the Bethlehem Steel Corporation. The original report was printed in September 1979 and the update was released in December 1979. This volume consists of the following: Table 10 Summary of US Department of Energy (DOE) sampling and analytical procedures; Table 11 Computer printout of environmental data collected by DOE; Table 12 Summary of Commonwealth of Pennsylvania sampling and analytical procedures; Table 13 Computer printout of environmental data collected by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; Table 14 Summary of State of New Jersey sampling and analytical procedures; Table 15 Computer printout of data collected by the State of New Jersey

  1. Building Post-Crisis Capacity in the Solomon Islands

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Bailey

    2009-01-01

    This capacity development brief summarizes the results of a multi-donor team review of four examples of post-crisis capacity development interventions in the Solomon Islands in 2005-08 whose performance was frequently cited as successful by local stakeholders. Although not based on post-project evaluations, the review found a number of patterns and potential lessons: (1) responding to imme...

  2. Cancer rates after the Three Mile Island nuclear accident and proximity of residence to the plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, M C; Wallenstein, S; Beyea, J; Nieves, J W; Susser, M

    1991-06-01

    In the light of a possible link between stress and cancer promotion or progression, and of previously reported distress in residents near the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant, we attempted to evaluate the impact of the March 1979 accident on community cancer rates. Proximity of residence to the plant, which related to distress in previous studies, was taken as a possible indicator of accident stress; the postaccident pattern in cancer rates was examined in 69 "study tracts" within a 10-mile radius of TMI, in relation to residential proximity. A modest association was found between postaccident cancer rates and proximity (OR = 1.4; 95% CI = 1.3, 1.6). After adjusting for a gradient in cancer risk prior to the accident, the odds ratio contrasting those closest to the plant with those living farther out was 1.2 (95% CI = 1.0, 1.4). A postaccident increase in cancer rates near the Three Mile Island plant was notable in 1982, persisted for another year, and then declined. Radiation emissions, as modeled mathematically, did not account for the observed increase. Interpretation in terms of accident stress is limited by the lack of an individual measure of stress and by uncertainty about whether stress has a biological effect on cancer in humans. An alternative mechanism for the cancer increase near the plant is through changes in care-seeking and diagnostic practice arising from postaccident concern.

  3. Longitudinal analysis of categorical epidemiological data: a study of Three Mile Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fienberg, S E; Bromet, E J; Follmann, D; Lambert, D; May, S M

    1985-11-01

    The accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant in 1979 led to an unprecedented set of events with potentially life threatening implications. This paper focusses on the analysis of a longitudinal study of the psychological well-being of the mothers of young children living within 10 miles of the plant. The initial analyses of the data utilize loglinear/logit model techniques from the contingency table literature, and involve the fitting of a sequence of logit models. The inadequancies of these analyses are noted, and a new class of mixture models for logistic response structures is introduced to overcome the noted shortcomings. The paper includes a brief outline of the methodology relevant for the fitting of these models using the method of maximum likelihood, and then the model is applied to the TMI data. The paper concludes with a discussion of some of the substantive implications of the mixture model analysis.

  4. Quick look report, entry 4: Three Mile Island Unit 2, November 13, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eidam, G.E.

    1981-06-01

    This report summarizes tasks performed during entry 4 at Three Mile Island Unit 2. During the entry into containment, which was made on November 13, 1980, additional beta and gamma surveys were conducted to supplement data acquired on previous entries. A decontamination test was completed on Elevation 305. Power receptables tested on Elevation 305 were deenergized, but receptacles on Elevation 347 were energized. Still photography was acquired of Elevations 305 and 347. During the entry, 86 still photographs were taken. Videotaping (color and black and white) was done on Elevations 305 and 347, but lighting on both elevations was insufficient for high-quality video

  5. Research and development activities on Three Mile Island Unit Two. Annual report for 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    The year 1985 was significant in the cleanup of Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2). Major milestones in the project included lifting the plenum assembly from the reactor vessel and the start of operations to remove the damaged fuel from the reactor. This report summarizes these milestones and other TMI-2 related cleanup, research, and development activities. Other major topics include the following: waste immobilization and management; fuel shipping cask delivery and testing; sample acquisition and evaluation; and decontamination and dose reduction. 26 figs.

  6. The Three Mile Island accident and its impact on the American public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDermott, J.J.

    1982-01-01

    The story of the Three Mile Island reactor accident is presented. The details of the measures to control reactor operation is described after a reasoning on the possible causes of the loss-of-coolant failure. Major emphasize have been put on the impact on the Pennsylvanian public caused mainly by false information and alarming rumors. The attitude of journalists and the exaggerating reports by the media caused greater financial damage than the actual consequences of the reactor failure. In reality, the excess contamination of the environment could hardly be detected. (R.P.)

  7. Who pays the costs of industrial accidents like Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doub, W.O.; Shoemaker, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The accident at Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear unit 2 generating plant in Pennsylvania provides a case study on how losses resulting from large industrial accidents are allocated in society. TMI demonstrated that industry regulation, no matter how pervasive, can fail to prevent social harm, and that there are often costs beyond personal injuries and property damage. Although the Price-Anderson Act compensated the public, other insurance was inadequate to cover the losses of shareholders and ratepayers. When the $300 million property insurance proved inadequate, the industry raised property damage insurance to $1 billion and replacement power insurance to $250 million

  8. Three Mile Island nuclear generating station accident of March 28, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitken, J.H.; Johnson, A.C.; Kelly, R.J.; Wong, K.Y.

    1979-04-01

    The government of Ontario dispatched a Scientific Assessment Team to the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant to assess the consequences of an accident which occurred at unit 2 on 1979 March 28. The team's objectives were to acquire up-to-the-minute information concerning the accident, study the potential for environmental impacts on Ontario, observe the outcome of off-site emergency procedures, and offer assisance from Ontario should it appear of value. The findings, observations, and impressions of the team are summarized. (OST)

  9. Some public health lessons from Three Mile Island: a case study in chaos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLeod, G.K.

    1981-01-01

    The problems arising from Three Mile Island were not limited to deficiencies in reactor design, safety controls or manpower training. The author, Pennsylvania's newly appointed Secretary of Health, states that the public health sector was totally unprepared to cope with this accident. H e contends that decisions were made by engineers and physicists when medical doctors were called for; that the incidence of hypothyroidism has increased tenfold downwind from two Pennsylvania reactor sites and he appeals for cooperation between physicians specialized in radiation medicine, nuclear physicists and engineers to establish public health safeguards in the event of future accidents. (Auth.)

  10. Impact of the Three Mile Island accident on research and development programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zammite, R.

    1989-10-01

    The influence of the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident, on the evolution of the nuclear safety engineering concepts, are analyzed. An overview of the nuclear safety studies performed before and after the accident is presented. Before the TMI accident, the research programs were mainly centered on dimensional problems involving factors, such as explosions and earthquakes. The TMI accident demonstrated that the fusion of the reactor's core could actually hoppen. It was also realized that the safety of nuclear power plants depended on accurate research programs, also extended to factors beyond dimensional analysis [fr

  11. Three Mile Island, Unit 2, radiation protection program: report of the special panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinhold, C.B.; Murphy, T.D.; Neely, D.R.; Kathren, R.L.; Rich, B.L.; Stone, G.F.; Casey, W.R.

    1979-12-01

    A special panel was appointed by the Director of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, NRC, to review the radiation protection program at Three Mile Island Unit 2. The Panel confirmed several management and technical deficiencies in the program. Recent major GPU/Met Ed commitments and actions demonstrated a major change in management attitude. The Panel concluded that exposures to personnel can be maintained to as low as is reasonably achievable while limited preparatory recovery work continues and when further needed improvements are implemented as needed, the radiation safety program will be able to support major recovery activities

  12. Data integrity review of Three Mile Island Unit 2. Hydrogen burn data. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacoby, J.K.; Nelson, R.A.; Nalezny, C.L.; Averill, R.H.

    1983-09-01

    About 10 hours after the March 28, 1979 loss-of-coolant accident began at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2), a hydrogen burn occurred inside the Reactor Building. This report reviews and presents data from 16 channels of resistance temperature detectors (RTDs), 2 steam generator pressure transmitters, 16 Reactor Building pressure switches, 2 channels of Reactor Building pressure measurements, and measurements of Reactor Building hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen concentrations with regard to their usefulness for determining the extent of the burn and the resulting pressure and temperature excursions inside the building

  13. NRC plan for cleanup operations at Three Mile Island Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, R.; Snyder, B.J.

    1980-07-01

    The NRC plan defines the functional role of the NRC in cleanup operations at Three Mile Island Unit 2 to assure that agency regulatory responsibilities and objectives will be fulfilled. The plan outlines NRC functions in TMI-2 cleanup operations in the following areas: (1) the functional relationship of NRC to other government agencies, the public, and the licensee to coordinate activities, (2) the functional roles of these organizations in cleanup operations, (3) the NRC review and decision-making procedure for the licensee's proposed cleanup operation, (4) the NRC/licensee estimated schedule of major actions, and (5) NRC's functional role in overseeing implementation of approved licensee activities

  14. Quick look report, Entry 3: Three Mile Island Unit 2, October 16, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-07-01

    This report summarizes tasks performed during the third entry at Three Mile Island Unit 2. During the entry into containment, which was made on October 16, 1980, additional beta, gamma, and neutron surveys were performed to supplement data obtained on previous entries. In addition, several maintenance tasks were completed including testing the operation of both equipment hatch doors, replacing a loose parts monitor system pre-amplifier, and removing a source range monitor. The five-man entry team accomplished these tasks in about 1-1/2 hours

  15. Some public health lessons from Three Mile Island: a case study in chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLeod, G K [Pittsburgh Univ., PA (USA). Graduate School of Public Health

    1981-01-01

    The problems arising from Three Mile Island were not limited to deficiencies in reactor design, safety controls or manpower training. The author, Pennsylvania's newly appointed Secretary of Health, states that the public health sector was totally unprepared to cope with this accident. H e contends that decisions were made by engineers and physicists when medical doctors were called for; that the incidence of hypothyroidism has increased tenfold downwind from two Pennsylvania reactor sites and he appeals for cooperation between physicians specialized in radiation medicine, nuclear physicists and engineers to establish public health safeguards in the event of future accidents.

  16. System calculations related to the accident at Three-Mile Island using TRAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ireland, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    The Three Mile Island nuclear plant (Unit 2) was modeled using the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC-P1A) and a base case calculation, which simulated the initial part of the accident that occurred on March 28, 1979, was performed. In addition to the base case calculation, several parametric calculations were performed in which a single hypothetical change was made in the system conditions, such as assuming the high pressure injection (HPI) system operated as designed rather than as in the accident. Some of the important system parameter comparisons for the base case as well as some of the parametric case results are presented

  17. Three Mile Island - a review of the accident and its implications for CANDU safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pannell, R.J.; Campbell, F.R.

    1980-03-01

    After the accident at the Three Mile Island-2 reactor all Canadian owners of CANDU nuclear power plants were asked by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) to conduct a design review to assess the reliability of feedwater supply to boilers, the availability of backup cooling systems, and the adequacy of routine and emergency operating procedures. The authors studied the available information on the accident and the replies received from licensees. Their report is in three sections: a description of the accident, the authors' opinions of the underlying causes, and recommendations to the AECB regarding what might be done to confirm or improve the safety of CANDU plants

  18. Three Mile Island, Unit 2, radiation protection program: report of the special panel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinhold, C. B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Murphy, T. D. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States); Neely, D. R. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States); Kathren, R. L. [Batelle Pacific Northwest Lab. (United States); Rich, B. L. [Exxon Nuclear Idaho Co., Inc. ID (United States); Stone, G. F. [Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga, TN (United States); Casey, W. R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1979-12-01

    A special panel was appointed by the Director of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, NRC, to review the radiation protection program at Three Mile Island Unit 2. The Panel confirmed several management and technical deficiencies in the program. Recent major GPU/Met Ed commitments and actions demonstrated a major change in management attitude. The Panel concluded that exposures to personnel can be maintained to as low as is reasonably achievable while limited preparatory recovery work continues and when further needed improvements are implemented as needed, the radiation safety program will be able to support major recovery activities.

  19. Cigarette smoking and the risk of adult leukemia: results from the Three Mile Island cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaohui; Talbott, Evelyn O; Zborowski, Jeanne V; Rager, Judith R

    2007-01-01

    Smoking is an unconfirmed risk factor for the development of leukemia. The authors examined the potential link using data from the Three Mile Island cohort for the period 1979-1995. Eligible for analysis were 24,539 individuals aged 14 years or older who were followed up over 16 years from the Three Mile Island cohort. The authors identified all incident leukemia cases through the Pennsylvania Department of Health Cancer Registry. They used the Cox proportional hazards model to evaluate the relationships and observed 42 incident leukemia cases, including 15 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases, in the cohort. After controlling for other confounding factors, the authors found current smoking to be associated with an increased risk of adult AML (relative risk = 3.47; 95% confidence interval = 1.002-11.99). The authors also observed a marginally significant linear trend of risk of AML associated with the number of years smoked (p = .06). The results from this study suggested that cigarette smoking was associated with an increased risk of adult AML. Further investigation is required to confirm these findings.

  20. NRC as referee (reactor licensing following the Three Mile Island accident)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenhut, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    In this article, the NRC's licensing director reports on the progress made by US utilities in complying with the key regulations stemming from the Three Mile Island accident. Over 130 items must be improved at more than 65 reactors. The actions taken by France in response to its own analysis of the accident are discussed. New NRC requirements with regard to operational safety, design, and emergency-response capability are outlined. Nearly all the training, or software, items in Nureg-0737 (''Clarification of TMI Action Plan Requirements'') and more than half of the mechanical, or hardware, items have been completed at plants with operating reactors. The Committee to Review Generic Requirements was created to develop means for controlling the number and nature of NRC requirements placed on licensees. Probabilistic risk-assessment techniques were not widely used by the NRC until after the Three Mile Island accident. The NRC has directed licensees and applicants for operating licenses to conduct control-room design reviews to identify and correct human-engineering discrepancies. Includes 2 tables

  1. Three Mile Island: a report to the commissioners and to the public. Volume II, Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This is part one of three parts of the second volume of the Special Inquiry Group's report to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the accident at Three Mile Island. The first volume contained a narrative description of the accident and a discussion of the major conclusions and recommendations. This second volume is divided into three parts. Part 1 of Volume II focuses on the pre-accident licensing and regulatory background. This part includes an examination of the overall licensing and regulatory system for nuclear powerplants viewed from different perspectives: the system as it is set forth in statutes and regulations, as described in Congressional testimony, and an overview of the system as it really works. In addition, Part 1 includes the licensing, operating, and inspection history of Three Mile Island Unit 2, discussions of relevant regulatory matters, a discussion of specific precursor events related to the accident, a case study of the pressurizer design issue, and an analysis of incentives to declare commercial operation

  2. Socio-economic impacts of nuclear generating stations: Three Mile Island case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, C.

    1982-07-01

    This report documents a case study of the socio-economic impacts of the construction and operation of the Three Mile Island nuclear power stations. It is part of a major post-licensing study of the socio-economic impacts at twelve nuclear power stations. The case study covers the period beginning with the announcement of plans to construct the reactor and ending in the period 1980 to 1981. The case study deals with changes in the economy, population, settlement patterns and housing, local government and public services, social structure, and public response in the study area during the construction/operation of the reactor. A regional modeling approach is used to trace the impact of the construction/operation on the local economy, labor market, and housing market. Emphasis in the study is on the attribution of socio-economic impacts to the reactor or other causal factors. As part of the study of local public response to the construction/operation of the reactor, the effects of the Three Mile Island accident are examined

  3. Degradation of resins in EPICOR-II prefilters from Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Johnson, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    The Low-Level Waste Data Base Development--EPICOR-II Resin/Liner Investigation Program funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission is investigating the chemical and physical conditions of the synthetic ion exchange resins contained in several EPICOR-Il prefilters. Those prefilters were used during cleanup of contaminated water from the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station after the March 1979 accident. This paper summarizes results and analyses of the third sampling of resins from prefilters PF-8 and -20. Results are compared with baseline data from tests performed on unirradiated resins supplied by Epicor, Inc. to determine if degradation has occurred due to the high internal radiation dose. Results also are compared with results from tests performed on resins obtained from the first and second samplings of those two prefilters. 17 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  4. Degradation of resins in EPICOR-II prefilters from Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Sanders, R.D. Sr.

    1986-01-01

    The Low-Level Waste Data Base Development--EPICOR-II Resin/Liner Investigation Program funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission is investigating the chemical and physical conditions of the synthetic ion exchange resins contained in several EPICOR-II prefilters. Those prefilters were used during cleanup of contaminated water from the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station after the March 1979 accident. This paper summarizes results and analyses of the second sampling of resins from prefilters PF-8 and -20. Results are compared with baseline data from tests performed on unirradiated resins supplied by Epicor, Inc. to determine if degradation has occurred due to the high internal radiation dose. Results also are compared with results from tests performed on resins obtained from the first sampling of those two prefilters

  5. Health-related economic costs of the Three-Mile Island accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, T W; Slaysman, K S

    1984-01-01

    On March 1979, a nuclear power station at Three-Mile Island (TMI) near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, had a major breakdown. During the two-week period of the accident, about 150,000 residents were evacuated for reasons associated with safety and health. Many residents during and after the accident, regardless of whether they left or stayed, made mental and physical adjustments due to this accident. This paper is to estimate the economic costs incurred by individuals or communities as a result of a change in physical or mental health status and/or a change in health care services due to the TMI accident. The findings indicate that stress symptoms caused by the accident did affect the health-related behaviors of area residents. Of the costs examined, the economic costs of work days lost and physician visits are the largest cost items. There were some increases in consumption of alcohol, cigarettes, and tranquilizers immediately following the accident.

  6. Three Mile Island epidemiologic radiation dose assessment revisited: 25 years after the accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, R William

    2005-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, public health concerns following the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident prompted several epidemiologic investigations in the vicinity of TMI. One of these studies is ongoing. This commentary suggests that the major source of radiation exposure to the population has been ignored as a potential confounding factor or effect modifying factor in previous and ongoing TMI epidemiologic studies that explore whether or not TMI accidental plant radiation releases caused an increase in lung cancer in the community around TMI. The commentary also documents the observation that the counties around TMI have the highest regional radon potential in the United States and concludes that radon progeny exposure should be included as part of the overall radiation dose assessment in future studies of radiation-induced lung cancer resulting from the TMI accident.

  7. Estimation of the economic impacts of Three Mile Island nuclear power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagara, Aya; Fujimoto, Noboru; Fukuda, Kenji

    1998-01-01

    The Three Mile Island nuclear power plant accident had an immediate negative impact on the economy of the seven-country area which surrounds the plant site. In order to estimate the social effect of the nuclear power plant accident economically, immediate and short term economical impacts on some industrial classification have been evaluated. The economical effect to Metropolitan Edison Co., the circumstantial payment of the insurance and the lawsuit for the compensation for damages, etc. have been estimated at dollar 90 million for the manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industry, dollar 5 million for the tourist industry and dollar 50,000 for agriculture. The total loss for the state and country governments is about dollar 90,000. Metropolitan Edison Co. expended also dollar 111 million for the substitute energy and dollar 760 million for the decontamination cost. Since the lawsuit for the compensation for damages is still continuing, the total impacts cost is calculated more than a billion dollar. (author)

  8. Impact of Federal R and D funding on Three Mile Island cleanup costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The Chairman and the Ranking Minority Member of the House Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs requested that GAO respond to several questions concerning the administration's proposed $123 million in Federal funding for data acquisition and research and development activities during the cleanup of the Three Mile Island nuclear reactor Unit 2. GAO found that: adequate legislative authority exists to support DOE's proposed data acquisition and research and development activities during the cleanup process; adherence to the estimated timetable for cleanup completion will allow DOE to meet its program objectives within the proposed budget, but slippages would probably make additional funding necessary; and the DOE program will reduce the utility company's financial needs by an estimated $66 to $69 million, about one-third of the Federal share proposed by the Governor of Pennsylvania on July 9, 1981

  9. Radiation effects on resins and zeolites at Three Mile Island Unit II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, J.K.; Grant, P.J.; Hofstetter, K.J.; Quinn, G.J.; Runion, T.C.

    1984-01-01

    The March 1979 accident at Three Mile Island created certain waste forms that are not routinely encountered in normal light water reactor plants and were the subject of a research and development program. Fifty EPICOR II organic resin containers were loaded to as much as 2200 Ci (of predominantly cesium plus strontium) in the course of processing contaminated water. Resin samples were taken from two of the EPICOR II vessels and examined. Nineteen zeolite containers loaded with radioactive cesium plus strontium to as much as 55,000 Ci have been analyzed. The makeup and purification system demineralizer resins, highly contaminated by the letdown of reactor coolant, have been radiation surveyed, and gas, liquid, and resin samples have been obtained. On-site sampling and analysis of these wastes indicated that combustible gases (hydrogen and oxygen) were being generated as a result of radiolysis. The results of this work are discussed, compared, and presented

  10. Detailed flow analysis for the Three Mile Island unit 2 reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lillington, J.N.; Lyons, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    Some particular characteristics of the steam flow in the accident at the Three Mile Island unit 2 pressurized water reactor are investigated using the AEA Technology Flow3D code. Natural circulation flows with heat removal from the core and deposition in the upper plenum are predicted during the primary heating phase. The structure of the upper plenum cylinder and core blockage, owing to material relocation, are shown to force the flow into a complex three-dimensional pattern. The flows and temperature distributions from the calculations are shown to be consistent with the observed damage pattern above the core. Despite high core temperatures, damage was limited by the operation of one of the pumps at the end of the initial heating phase. Flow3D calculations are also carried out to demonstrate that the three-dimensional buoyancy driven flows are completely destroyed by the high steam generation rates arising from the pump operation. (author)

  11. An analysis of Three Mile Island: the accident that shouldn't have happened

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubinstein, E.; Mason, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    The sequence of events in the nuclear reactor accident at Three Mile Island on March 28, 1979, is reported. Three problems thought to trigger the reactor accident were a persistent leak of reactor coolant, a closing of two valves in the auxillary feedwater system, and an apparent resin blockage in the transfer line that forced water back into the condensate lines of the air pumps. Hindsight indicates that a large amount of the damage to the reactor core could have been prevented if operators had closed the electromatic relief valve to end the loss of coolant and not throttled down the high pressure injection pumps in the emergency core cooling system. Steps taken to reestablish control of the reactor core are described

  12. Evaluation of the Three Mile Island accident in the context of WASH-1400

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, R.D. III.

    1980-01-01

    The accident at unit 2 of the Three Mile Island nuclear station (TMI-2) on March 28, 1979, occurred after approximately 400 reactor years (RY) of commercial nuclear reactor operation in the US. The purpose of work summarized here was to evaluate the probability statements in the WASH-1400 reactor safety study (RSS) in view of the TMI-2 event and to estimate the likely public impact of TMI-2. The RSS probability estimate for such a release was found to be consistent with the fact that the TMI-2 accident occurred. The expected health effects are consistent with those for a low-level category of radioactivity release as described in the RSS and they are immeasurably small. However, the public perception of the health effects of the release is likely to be much more severe than the estimated health effects

  13. Preparations to load, transport, receive, and store the damaged TMI-2 [Three Mile Island] reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reno, H.W.; Schmitt, R.C.; Quinn, G.J.; Ayers, A.L. Jr.; Lilburn, B.J. Jr.; Uhl, D.L.

    1986-03-01

    The March 1979 incident at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station (TMI) which damaged the core of the Unit 2 reactor resulted in numerous scientific and technical challenges. Some of those challenges involve removing, packaging, and transporting the core debris to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for storage, examination, and preparation for final disposal. This paper highlights preparations for transporting the core debris from TMI to INEL and receiving and storing that material at INEL. Issues discussed include interfacing of equipment and facilities at TMI, loading operations, transportation activities using a newly designed cask, receiving and storing operations at INEL, and criticality control during storage. Key to the transportation effort was designing, testing, fabricating, and licensing two rail casks which individually provide double containment of the damaged fuel. 27 figs

  14. The cleanup of Three Mile Island Unit 2: A technical history, 1979--1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holton, W.C.; Negin, C.A.; Owrutsky, S.L.

    1990-09-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute has sponsored a technical history project to ensure that the logic and consequences of decisions made during the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) cleanup are available for recovery from an accident involving damaged fuel and fission product release. The objectives of the history project are to identify the major questions and challenges facing management; describe the influencing factors and the options available; and present the final decisions and their consequences. This history of decision-making is intended to assist a project manager who must respond to a fuel damage accident, even if the scale is much smaller than TMI-2. The history has focused on decisions related to seven major aspects of the cleanup: cleanup management, postaccident stabilization, personnel protection, data acquisition, radioactive waste management, decontamination, and defueling. A detailed chronology and extensive bibliography accompany the text

  15. Commercial disposal of High Integrity Containers (HICs) containing EPICOR-II prefilters from Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Lynch, R.J.; Tyacke, M.J.

    1985-09-01

    This report describes the processes of loading, transporting, and commercially disposing of 45 High Integrity Containers (HICs), each containing an EPICOR-II prefilter. Also described are the improvements that were applied in the disposition of the 45 commercial EPICOR-II prefilters at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), versus those used for the demonstration unit. The significance of this effort was that the commercial disposal campaign involved the first-of-a-kind production use of a reinforced concrete HIC at the US Ecology, Inc. facility in the State of Washington. This allowed for safe disposal of high-specific-activity ion exchange material in EPICOR-II prefilters generated during the cleanup of the Unit-2 Auxiliary and Fuel Handling Building of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station. 26 figs

  16. Structural stability of the market model after the Three Mile Island accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.R.

    1984-01-01

    This article examines the stability of alpha and beta in the market model resulting from the Three Mile Island accident. The data consist of weekly returns on 70 utility stocks. Both a dummy variable test and the Fisher F statistics are utilized to test for stability. In addition to the individual stocks, the 70 utilities are partioned into two portfolios for the test: nuclear and non-nuclear. The main conclusions are: for the non-nuclear portfolio, no change is observed; for the nuclear portfolio, alpha fell and beta rose (the impact, however, is transitory and insignificant); and the behavior of the residuals suggests that the result is consistent with an efficient market. 17 references, 3 tables

  17. Implementation of remote equipment at TMI-2 [Three Mile Island Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giefer, D.; Jeffries, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    Each of the remote vehicles in use, or planned for use, at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) during the period from 1984 to the present had certain distinct common features. These were proven to be desirable for remote application in the TMI-2 environment. Proper implementation requires consideration of the following: control systems, rigging systems, power supplies, operator/support interface, maintenance concerns, viewing systems, contamination control, and communications. Design and component fabrication of these features allowed deployment of each of the remote devices. This paper discusses these systems and their impact for the use of remote mobile equipment at TMI-2. In most cases, the means of implementation dictated the design features of the devices

  18. Answers to frequently asked questions about cleanup activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    This question-and-answer report provides answers in nontechnical language to frequently asked questions about the status of cleanup activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2. The answers update information first prepared in 1981, shortly after the cleanup got under way. Since then, a variety of important developments in the cleanup has occurred. The information in the report should be read in conjunction with NUREG 1060, a discussion of increased occupational exposure estimates for the cleanup. The questions and answers in this report cover purpose and community involvement, decontamination of water and reactor, fuel removal, radwaste transport, environmental impact, social and economic effects, worker exposures and safety, radiation monitoring, potential for accidents, and schedule and funding

  19. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor accident with THALES code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Kazuichiro; Soda, Kunihisa

    1991-10-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has established a Task Group in the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) to perform an analysis of Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident as a standard problem to benchmark severe accident computer codes and to assess the capability of the codes. The TMI-2 Analysis Exercise was performed at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) using the THALES (Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of Loss-of-Coolant, Emergency Core Cooling and Severe Core Damage) - PM1/TMI code. The purpose of the analysis is to verify the capability of THALES-PM1/TMI code to describe accident progression in the actual plant. The present paper describes the final result of the TMI-2 Analysis Exercise performed at JAERI. (author)

  20. Investigation into information flow during the accident at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This report was prepared in response to a request from NRC Chairman Ahearne that directed the Office of Inspection and Enforcement to resume its investigation of information flow during the accident at Three Mile Island (TMI) that occurred on March 28, 1979. This investigation was resumed on March 21, 1980. The transfer of information among individuals, agencies, and personnel from Metropolitan Edison was analyzed to ascertain what knowledge was held by various individuals of the specific events, parameters, and systems during the accident at TMI. Maximum use was made of existing records, and additional interviews were conducted to clarify areas that had not been pursued during earlier investigations. Although the passage of time between the accident and post-accident interviews hampered precise recollections of events and circumstances, the investigation revealed that information was not intentionally withheld during the accident and that the system for effective transfer of information was inadequate during the accident

  1. Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Projects. Summary Report. Three Mile Island Unit 2 Polar Crane Recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerge, D. H.; Miller, R. L.

    1984-08-01

    This document summarizes information concerning restoration of the Three Mile Island-Unit 2 Polar Crane to a fully operational condition following the loss of coolant accident experienced on March 28, 1979. The data collected from activity reports, reactor containment entry records, and other sources were placed in a computerized information retrieval/manipulation system which permits extraction/manipulation of specific data which could be utilized in planning for recovery activities should a similar accident occur in a nuclear generating plant. The information is presented in both computer output form and a manually assembled summarization. This report contains only the manpower requirements and radiation exposures actually incurred during recovery operations within the reactor containment and does not include support activities or costs. (author)

  2. TMI-2 [Three Mile Island Unit 2] reactor building dose reduction task force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    In late October 1982, the director of Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) created the dose reduction task force with the objective of identifying the principal radiological sources in the reactor building and recommending actions to minimize the dose to workers on labor-intensive projects. Members of the task force were drawn form various groups at TMI. Findings and recommendations were presented to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in a briefing on November 18, 1982. The task force developed a three-step approach toward dose reduction. Step 1 identified the radiological sources. Step 2 modeled the source and estimated its contribution to the general area dose rates. Step 3 recommended actions to achieve dose reductions consistent with general exposure rate goals

  3. Radionuclide analyses taken during primary coolant decontamination at Three Mile Island indicate general circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Baston, V.F.; Hitz, C.G.; Malinauskas, A.P.

    1983-01-01

    Radionuclide concentration data taken during decontamination of the primary reactor coolant system at Three Mile Island by a feed-and-bleed process have provided information on future defueling operations. Analysis of the radiocesium concentrations in samples taken at the letdown point indicates general circulation within the primary system, including the reactor vessel and both steam generators. A standard dilution model with parameters consistent with engineering estimates (volume, flow rate, etc.) accurately predicts the radiocesium decontamination rates. Unlike cesium, the behavior of other principal soluble radionuclides ( 90 Sr and 3 H) cannot be readily described by dilution theory. A significant appearance rate is observed for 90 Sr suggesting a chemical solubility mechanism. The use of processed water containing high 3 H for makeup causes uncertainty in the interpretation of the 3 H analysis

  4. Post-accident TMI-2 (Three Mile Island-Unit 2) decontamination and defueling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Baston, V.F.

    1986-01-01

    Following the accident at Three Mile Island-Unit 2 (TMI-2), a substantial quantity of fission products was distributed throughout various plant systems and areas. The control of further migration of these radionuclides was accomplished by various physical and chemical means. The decontamination and defueling activities have proceeded within specific regulatory, administrative, and hardware restrictions. A summary of the post-accident status of the plant systems, the decontamination methods used, and the end-point criteria will be discussed. The hardware installed or utilized to perform the cleanup operations will be described. The methods and progress of defueling will also be presented. The development of detailed water chemistry requirements and their effects on systems and decontamination efforts are discussed. The planning, scheduling, and performance of specific recovery tasks are presented along with a general overview of water and chemical management at TMI-2

  5. Investigation of hydrogen-burn damage in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvares, N.J.; Beason, D.G.; Eidem, G.R.

    1982-06-01

    About 10 hours after the March 28, 1979 Loss-of-Coolant Accident began at Three Mile Island Unit 2, a hydrogen deflagration of undetermined extent occurred inside the reactor building. Examinations of photographic evidence, available from the first fifteen entries into the reactor building, yielded preliminary data on the possible extent and range of hydrogen burn damage. These data, although sparse, contributed to development of a possible damage path and to an estimate of the extent of damage to susceptible reactor building items. Further information gathered from analysis of additional photographs and samples can provide the means for estimating hydrogen source and production rate data crucial to developing a complete understanding of the TMI-2 hydrogen deflagration. 34 figures

  6. Three Mile Island epidemiologic radiation dose assessment revisited: 25 years after the accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, R. W.

    2005-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, public health concerns following the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident prompted several epidemiologic investigations in the vicinity of TMI. One of these studies is ongoing. This commentary suggests that the major source of radiation exposure to the population has been ignored as a potential confounding factor or effect modifying factor in previous and ongoing TMI epidemiologic studies that explore whether or not TMI accidental plant radiation releases caused an increase in lung cancer in the community around TMI. The commentary also documents the observation that the counties around TMI have the highest regional radon potential in the United States and concludes that radon progeny exposure should be included as part of the overall radiation dose assessment in future studies of radiation-induced lung cancer resulting from the TMI accident. (authors)

  7. Criteria development of remotely controlled mobile devices for TMI-2 [Three Mile Island Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillnow, R.; Bengel, P.; Giefer, D.

    1988-01-01

    Since 1982, GPU Nuclear Corporation has used a series of remote mobile devices for data collection and cleanup of highly contaminated areas in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) nuclear facilities. This paper describes these devices and the general criteria established for their design. Until 1984, the remote equipment used at TMI was obtained from industry sources. This included devices called SISI, FRED, and later LOUIE-1. Following 1984, the direction was to obtain custom-made devices to assure a design that would be more appropriate for the TMI-2 environment. Along with this approach came more detailed criteria and a need for a thorough understanding of the task to be accomplished by the devices. The following families of equipment resulted: (1) remote reconnaissance vehicles (RRVs), (2) the LOUIE family, and (3) remote working vehicle (RWV) family

  8. NRC plan for cleanup operations at Three Mile Island Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, R.; Snyder, B.

    1982-02-01

    This NRC Plan, which defines NRC's functional role in cleanup operations at Three Mile Island Unit 2 and outlines NRC's regulatory responsibilities in fulfilling this role, is the first revision to the initial plan issued in July 1980 (NUREG-0698). Since 1980, a number of policy developments have occurred which will have an impact on the course of cleanup operations. This revision reflects these developments in the area of NRC's review and approval process with regard to cleanup operations as well as NRC's interface with the Department of Energy's involvement in the cleanup and waste disposal. This revision is also intended to update the cleanup schedule by presenting the cleanup progress that has taken place and NRC's role in ongoing and future cleanup activities

  9. Processing and removal of the Three Mile Island makeup and purification system resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, J.K.; McIntosh, T.W.; Northey, L.M.; GaTanto, J.J.; Osterhoudt, T.R.; Thompson, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    The accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 in March 1979 left the makeup and purification demineralizers inaccessible to workers. These demineralizers contained the highest concentrations of radioactive isotopes outside the Reactor Building. Additionally, unknown quantities of fuel were in the demineralizers. Other concerns centered on the unknown condition of the demineralizer resins, the possible loss of system integrity, and the presence of hydrogen due to the radiolytic breakdown of water contained in the demineralizers. GPU Nuclear, with the US Department of Energy and its contractors EG and G Idaho, Inc., Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Westinghouse Hanford Company, remotely measured the fuel and fission product inventory of the demineralizers and demonstrated a practical chemical processing method using samples acquired from the demineralizers. Equipment was developed and installed to elute the radioactive cesium from the demineralizers. And elution, which began in September 1984 now nears completion

  10. The impact of the accident at Three Mile Island on plant control and instumentation philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catlow, F.

    1983-01-01

    Independent commissions which were appointed to evaluate the causes of the accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant in the USA exposed major weakness in the man/machine interface which they felt might be common to other similar plants. Strengthening this link is regarded as twofold: i) Educating the man to enhance his understanding of plant processes; ii) Improving the machine interface. The paper reviews suggested improvements in instumentation which would aid the control of a nuclear plant. These comprise mainly: a) The application of human factors engineering principles to control room design in order to make the 'machine' more manageable; b) improved data feedback so that the operator can make an accurate assessment of plant status at any instant. The author considers that there is a likelihood that the general philosophy of the man/machine interface being applied to the nuclear industry could be applied to some extent to conventional power plants and even other industries

  11. We Are All Harrisburg': Three Mile Island and the Ultimate Indivisibility of the Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Pero, Mario

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the impact on U.S. nuclear policies of the incident at the Three Mile Island reactor in Pennsylvania in March 1979 by focusing on three interrelated issues: the inescapable connection between the civilian and the military dimensions of the nuclear power; the effective mobilization from below against nuclear energy in 1970's America and the ability of anti-nuclear groups to appeal across the political and cultural spectrum; and how the political and cultural transformations of the 1970's challenged the certainties of the previous decades and hindered the development of nuclear energy. Draft of a paper published in 'RSA Journal (Rivista di Studi Americani)' 2015, no. 26, p. 143-173

  12. International experience in the implementation of the lessons learned from the Three Mile Island incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-08-01

    This document consists of two parts and an Appendix. Part I provides a summary of worldwide experiences and subsequent recommendations regarding the implementation of the Three Mile Island-Unit 2 incident lessons learned. Part II gives in a summary fashion, specific responses and actions of the mentioned countries and international organizations as categorized into ten (10) subject areas. The Appendix, on the other hand, contains examples of the experiences of Brazil, Germany (F.R.), Hungary, and the Philippines, on the implementation of TMI lessons learned. This document should be useful to countries with nuclear power development programmes in that it provides a means for comparison of their actions with others. For countries which are embarking on their first nuclear power project, the document should provide a useful reference for specific TMI-related issues that need to be considered in their nuclear programmes

  13. Radiological consequences of the reactor accident at Three Mile Island, Pennsylvania, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, P.M.

    1979-01-01

    The findings of the Ad Hoc Population Dose Assessment Group are reviewed and summarized (Population Dose and Health Impact of the Accident at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station. A preliminary assessment for the period March 28 through April 7, 1979; May 10, 1979. Washington DC, US Government Printing Office, 1979). The principal radionuclides released were xenon-133 and xenon-135, with some iodine-131. External exposure to gamma radiation was estimated from TLDs positioned at various on-site and off-site locations. Lung exposure from inhaled xenon-133 was calculated and air and milk monitoring results gave potential dose equivalents to a child's thyroid. These numerical estimates will be further refined, but only minor corrections to the present values are anticipated. The findings of this preliminary assessment have indicated that the radiological consequences to the public of the reactor accident are minimal. (UK)

  14. Life stage differences in resident coping with restart of the Three Mile Island nuclear generating facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince-Embury, S.; Rooney, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    A study of residents who remained in the vicinity of Three Mile Island (TMI) immediately following the restart of the nuclear generating plant revealed that older residents employed a more emotion-focused coping style in the face of this event than did younger residents. Coping style was, however, unrelated to the level of psychological symptoms for these older residents, whereas demographic variables were related. Among younger residents, on the other hand, coping style was related to the level of psychological symptoms, whereas demographic variables were not. Among younger residents, emotion-focused coping was associated with more symptoms and problem-focused coping was associated with fewer symptoms, contradicting previous findings among TMI area residents

  15. Electric-utility returns and risk in the light of Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, L.D.; D'Souza, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The impact of the Three Mile Island nuclear-generating-unit failure on the performance of nuclear-dependent electric utilities is examined in this article. A comparative examination of the time series of abnormal returns and risk measures on nuclear-dependent utilities and nondependent utilities prior to the TMI incident, at the time of the incident, and subsequent to it was performed by the authors. The results are consistent with a hypothesis that investors associate a decline in future profitability or increased risk with nuclear-associated utilities. However, the more-objective measures indicate a clear reduction in risk for nuclear-associated utilities since the TMI incident, both in relation to the market as a whole and in relation to electric utilities which are not nuclear-associated. 4 references, 1 figure, 3 tables

  16. Radioactive plume from the Three Mile Island accident: xenon-133 in air at a distance of 375 kilometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlen, M; Kunz, C O; Matuszek, J M; Mahoney, W E; Thompson, R C

    1980-02-08

    The transit of an air mass containing radioactive gas released from the Three Mile Island reactor was recorded in Albany, New York, by measuring xenon-133. These measurements provide an evaluation of Three Mile Island effluents to distances greater than 100 kilometers. Two independent techniques identified xenon-133 in ambient air at concentrations as high as 3900 picocuries per cubic meter. The local gamma-ray whole-body dose from the passing radioactivity amounted to 0.004 millirem, or 0.004 percent of the annual dose from natural sources.

  17. Spontaneous abortions after the Three Mile Island nuclear accident: a life table analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhaber, M K; Staub, S L; Tokuhata, G K

    1983-07-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether the incidence of spontaneous abortion was greater than expected near the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant during the months following the March 28, 1979 accident. All persons living within five miles of TMI were registered shortly after the accident, and information on pregnancy at the time of the accident was collected. After one year, all pregnancy cases were followed up and outcomes ascertained. Using the life table method, it was found that, given pregnancies after four completed weeks of gestation counting from the first day of the last menstrual period, the estimated incidence of spontaneous abortion (miscarriage before completion of 16 weeks of gestation) was 15.1 per cent for women pregnant at the time of the TMI accident. Combining spontaneous abortions and stillbirths (delivery of a dead fetus after 16 weeks of gestation), the estimated incidence was 16.1 per cent for pregnancies after four completed weeks of gestation. Both incidences are comparable to baseline studies of fetal loss.

  18. Spontaneous abortions after the Three Mile Island nuclear accident: a life table analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldhaber, M.K.; Staub, S.L.; Tokuhata, G.K.

    1983-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether the incidence of spontaneous abortion was greater than expected near the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant during the months following the March 28, 1979 accident. All persons living within five miles of TMI were registered shortly after the accident, and information on pregnancy at the time of the accident was collected. After one year, all pregnancy cases were followed up and outcomes ascertained. Using the life table method, it was found that, given pregnancies after four completed weeks of gestation counting from the first day of the last menstrual period, the estimated incidence of spontaneous abortion (miscarriage before completion of 16 weeks of gestation) was 15.1 per cent for women pregnant at the time of the TMI accident. Combining spontaneous abortions and stillbirths (delivery of a dead fetus after 16 weeks of gestation), the estimated incidence was 16.1 per cent for pregnancies after four completed weeks of gestation. Both incidences are comparable to baseline studies of fetal loss

  19. Differential paths to activism: a study of social movement organizations in Three Mile Island communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cable, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    This project compares political activists from four community protest organizations in Three Mile Island (TMI) communities that were formed as a response of the March 1979 accident at the TMI nuclear power plant. These organizations constituted four separate groups of activists concerned with the same set of grievances. The purpose of the study was to compare the activists across groups to assess differential paths to activism. The data were gathered over a three-year period from March 1979 to March 1982 and included monthly newsletters published by the organizations, newspaper accounts of relevant events; and a systematic survey of 149 of the most active participants. The thesis of differential paths to activism was supported by the data; two relatively distinct paths were found to dominate the TMI communities. In the path that dominated in communities within five miles of the plant, activists tended to be older, more conservative, and less ideologically inclined to protest prior to the accident. In the path to activism that dominated in communities further from the plant site, activists tended to be younger, more liberal, and more experienced in protests

  20. Answers to questions about removing krypton from the Three Mile Island, Unit 2 reactor building. Public information report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-05-01

    This document presents answers to frequently asked questions about the probable effects of controlled releases of the krypton presently contained within the reactor building of Three Mile Island, Unit 2. Also answered are questions about alternative means for removing the krypton

  1. Title list publicly available documents: Three Mile Island Unit 2, Docket 50-320. Cumulated to May 21, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This title list of publicly available documents pertaining to Three Mile Island Unit 2, Docket 50-320, includes those preincident and postincident documents filed in the NRC Public Document Room as of May 21, 1979. It is divided into preincident and postincident listings, with both listings subdivided into the categories used for filing and searching in the NRC Public Document Room

  2. Title list, publicly available documents: Three Mile Island Unit 1, Docket 50-289 - cumulated to November 16, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This title list of publicly available documents pertaining to Three Mile Island Unit 1, Docket 50-289, includes all documents pertaining to this Docket that had been filed in the NRC Public Document Room as of November 16, 1979. The categories used for filing and searching in the NRC Public Document Room are used to catalog the entries

  3. 78 FR 22347 - GPU Nuclear Inc., Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station, Unit 2, Exemption From Certain...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 50-320; NRC-2013-0065] GPU Nuclear Inc., Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station, Unit 2, Exemption From Certain Security Requirements AGENCY: Nuclear... and State Materials and Environmental Management Programs, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission...

  4. Programmatic changes due to TMI-2 [Three Mile Island Unit 2]: Accident planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wingert, V.L.

    1988-01-01

    The focus of the paper is lessons learned for emergency planning and preparedness form the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. The lessons learned are examined from two perspectives: (a) lessons learned that have resulted in programmatic changes, and (b) lessons learned that have not been adequately addressed. There is no doubt that the TMI-2 accident is the pivotal event that caused a major rethinking of the pre-TMI emergency preparedness posture and led to a fundamentally different approach to emergency preparedness for commercial nuclear power plant accidents. While this new approach has evolved into a comprehensive, systematic, and even prototypical national program, it has also generated new problems: escalating costs for state and local governments and leveraging of the federal licensing process by state and local governments who do not want specific nuclear power plants to operate. A discussion of the primary lessons learned on emergency preparedness is presented under the following topics: beyond defense-in-depth, predetermined action, mandatory emergency planning and preparedness, and federal coordination

  5. Safety of Ikata Nuclear Power Station from the accident of Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonaka, Hiroshi

    1979-01-01

    The leak of radioactive substances occurred on March 28, 1979, in the No. 2 plant of Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station, and this accident must be put to use to prevent similar accidents and to secure safety hereafter in the nuclear power stations being operated in Japan. In the TMI accident, too many problems concerning the operation management seemed to exist in a series of events. In this paper, a few matters related to the TMI accident among the aspects of the operation management in Ikata Nuclear Power Station are reported. As the problems of operation management, it is considered that the operation of the TMI plant was continued as the exit valve of auxiliary feed line was closed, that it took long time to close the root valve for a pressurizer relief valve manually, and that the ECCS was stopped manually. In TMI, the abnormal phenomenon of losing main feed water has occurred 6 times since the attainment of criticality in March, 1978, and the opening and sticking of pressurizer relief valves occurred at least twice in about 150 times of their actuation in the nuclear reactors designed by Babcock and Wilcox Co. In Ikata Nuclear Power Station, these problems are detected early and the suitable measures are taken immediately, therefore it never happens to continue the operation as the problems are left as they are. It is not conceivable that similar troubles occur many times. (Kako, I.)

  6. Three Mile Island accident: a case study of life event appraisal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsteen, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    This research investigates community reactions to the accident at the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear powered electric generating plant in March, 1979. The investigation is placed in the context of life event research and chooses an appraisal orientation. Three innovations are argued: 1) perceived consequences of the event best predict reactions to it, 2) the attitudes of significant others toward the event influence reactions to the accident under certain circumstances, and 3) sense of well-being is a good outcome measure for a general population. The hypotheses posit that the attitudes of others will affect sense of well-being only when individual attitudes concerning the consequences of the accident are moderate; when individual attitudes are extreme, the attitudes of others will have no demonstrable effect on outcomes. The findings did not support all the prediction of the hypotheses. However, they indicate that perceived consequences are the best predictors of sense of well-being and that an individual's attitudinal position, his strength of attitude, and the nature of the stimulus are highly related to whether or not an individual will be influenced by the views of others

  7. Lessons learned from Three Mile Island (TMI), USNRC long-term trends, industry response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szalay, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    Studies resulting from Three Mile Island (TMI) showed that corrections were needed in information processing, operator training and procedures, and certain aspects of the safety review process. These have been undertaken by industry and NRC and the results are positive. New safety instructions have been set up. The Nuclear Safety Analysis Center (NSAC) is providing a focus for analysis of issues which have generic elements affecting a number of plants of similar or related design. The Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) is setting industry standards for training and certification of operators and supervisory personnel, and for training of the managerial chain which oversees safety practices. Changes in procedures and in some design features called for in the recommendations of the NRC Lessons Learned Task Force (NUREG-0578) have been simplemented by utilities. Other requirements included in the NRC Action Plan (NUREG-0660) and its companion document clarification of TMI Action Plan Requirements (NUREG-0737), are also being addressed. Improved operator training and emergency procedures provide a continuing opportunity to make safety gains. Problems remain to be faced in the regulatory and political arenas. The long-term licensing trend will be affected by the manner in which degraded core issues and the development of a safety goal proceed. The Industry Degraded Core Rulemaking (IDCOR) program has been undertaken to develop the nuclear industry's position in anticipation of an impending rulemaking. Both industry and NRC are working on the development of a safety goal and standard risk assessment methodology. (AF)

  8. Incidence of thyroid cancer surrounding Three Mile Island nuclear facility: the 30-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Roger J; De Simone, Nicole F; Slotkin, Jaime F; Henson, Baker L

    2013-08-01

    Original data reported a potential increased incidence of thyroid cancer surrounding the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear facility. A causal link to the accident, however, was indeterminate. Our objective was to determine if data 30 years later will change original conclusions, explore thyroid cancer incidence rates near nuclear power plants, and better understand effects of chronic low level radiation. Retrospective cross-sectional study. Retrospective data for specific Pennsylvania counties were provided by the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry Dataset for thyroid cancer using the Epidemiological Query and Mapping System search engine. Our study examines thyroid cancer incidence from 1985 through 2009 analyzed by year, county, and age. Thirty years after the TMI accident, an increased incidence of thyroid cancer is seen in counties south of TMI and in high-risk age groups. The average incidence rates from 1990 through 2009 were greater than expected in York, Lancaster, Adams, and Chester Counties. Thyroid cancer incidence since the TMI accident was greater than expected in the counties analyzed when compared to local and national population growth. This supports a link to chronic low level radiation exposure and thyroid cancer development. Despite these findings, a direct correlation to the accident remains uncertain as incidence rates may coincide with other factors, and original data were limited. © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  9. Potassium iodide as a thyroid blocker--Three Mile Island to today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, J A

    1989-05-01

    The Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear emergency in the U.S. in March 1979 marked the first occasion when use of potassium iodide (KI) was considered for thyroid blocking of the population in the vicinity of a potentially serious release of fission products from a nuclear power reactor. In face of a demand that could not be satisfied by commercial supplies of low-dose KI drug products from the U.S. pharmaceutical industry, the Food and Drug Administration directed the manufacture and stockpiling of sufficient quantities of saturated solution of potassium iodide (SSKI) to provide protection for one million people in the event of a large-scale release of radioiodines. Although the drug was not used, the experience of producing, stockpiling, and making ready for use a large quantity of the drug resulted in significant public policy, regulatory, and logistical issues. A number of these issues have been resolved through scientific debate and consensus, development of official guidance regarding the proper role of KI in nuclear emergencies, and the approval of New Drug Applications for KI products specifically intended for thyroid blocking in nuclear emergencies. Other issues regarding broad-scale implementation of the guidelines remain today. This paper traces the history of the development and implementation of the use of KI from pre-TMI to the present.

  10. Characterization of an aerosol sample from the auxiliary building of the Three Mile Island reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanapilly, G M; Stanley, J A; Newton, G J; Wong, B A; DeNee, P B

    1983-11-01

    Analyses for radioisotopic composition and dissolution characteristics were performed on an aerosol filter sample collected for a week by an air sampler located in the auxiliary building of the Three Mile Island nuclear reactor. The major radioisotopes found on the filter were 89Sr, 90Sr, 134Cs and 137Cs. Greater than 90% of both 89-90Sr and 134-137Cs dissolved within 48 hr in an in vitro test system. Scanning electron microscopic analyses showed the presence of respirable size particles as well as larger particles ranging up to 10 micron in diameter. The major matrix components were Fe, Ca, S, Mg, Al and Si. Although the radionuclides were present in a heterogeneous matrix, they were in a soluble form. This information enables a better evaluation of bioassay data and predictions of dose distribution resulting from an inhalation exposure to this aerosol. Further, the combination of techniques used in this study may be applicable to the characterization of other aerosols of unknown composition.

  11. Critique of source term and environmental measurement at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, A.P.

    1979-01-01

    The most serious malfunction to date at an operating power reactor in the US occurred at Unit 2 of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station (TMI) at 0400 est on March 28, 1979. Subsequently, between 3X and 10 x 10 6 Ci of radiogases (principally 133 Xe) were released to the atmosphere from the plant vent in decreasing concentrations over the next few weeks, accompanied by abut 10 Ci of 131 I. During this period, the plant's typical effluent monitors and field radiation monitoring program were unable to supply prompt and reliable radiological information. In order to provide a sufficient radioanalytical capability for the large number of in-plant and environmental samples (air, water, soil, vegetation and milk) which were obtained, the existing on-site facilities were augmented by mobile laboratories. The laboratory facilities of the Bureau of Radiological Health (BRH-PA) of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Conservation were supplemented by a nearby temporary facility for gamma analysis set up by the Department of Energy (DOE). Many environmental samples, principally of milk, were also transported to more remotely established radioanalytical laboratories of state and federal agencies

  12. Metallurgical examination of, and resin transfer from, Three Mile Island prefilter liners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, Jr, J W; Spaletta, H W

    1984-08-01

    Metallurgical examinations were performed on two EPICOR-II prefilter liners at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to determine conditions of the liners and identify the minimum expected lifetime of those and other liners stored at INEL. The research work was accomplished by EG and G Idaho, Inc. for the EPICOR-II Research and Disposition Program, which is funded by the US Department of Energy. The EPICOR-II prefilter liners were used to filter radionuclides from contaminated water during cleanup of Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2). The liners were constructed of carbon steel with a phenolic protective coating and contained organic and inorganic ion-exchange filtration media. Program plans call for interim storage of EPICOR-II prefilters at INEL for up to ten years, before final disposal in high integrity containers at the Hanford, Washington commercial disposal site. This report describes the (a) resin transfer process used to empty liners for examination, (b) removal of metallographic sections from those liners, (c) specimen preparation, and (d) findings from metallographic examination of those specimens. A minimum lifetime for the liners is determined and recommendations are given for storage of wastes from future TMI-2 activities.

  13. A guide to technical information regarding TMI-2 [Three Mile Island Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aucliar, K.D.; Epler, J.

    1988-01-01

    A considerable amount of information has been obtained and documented concerning the March 1979 accident and its consequences at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) nuclear generating station. The information has been essential in (a) understanding the nature, progression, and extent of the damage from the accident; (b) assessing the effects of this damage on the plant's facilities, systems, equipment, and surrounding environment; and (c) planning, preparation, performance, and evaluation of the accident recovery activities. The composite of all of this literature is the technical information available at TMI-2. The issues raised by the accident are far-reaching and complex, and the technical information has usefulness beyond its application at TMI-2. Issues raised as a result of the accident pose questions that are technical, legal, financial, and political in nature. However, because the quantity of information is vast, this paper focuses on the technical data generated as a result of the TMI-2 accident recovery activities. Most of the written information generated during the TMI-2 recovery program was provided to meet the needs of the various key participants in the recovery. The informational needs of these groups varied widely; consequently, their motivation for record retention, content, and structure revolved around serving those needs. This paper provides some guidance to those researchers interested in investigating technical data as it relates to TMI-2

  14. Timing of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 core degradation as determined by forensic engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrie, J.O.

    1988-01-01

    Unlike computer simulation of an event, forensic engineering is the evaluation of recorded data and damaged as well as surviving components after an event to determine progressive causes of the event. Such an evaluation of the 1979 Three Mile Island Unit 2 accident indicates that gas began accumulating in steam, generator A at 6:10, or 130 min into the accident and, therefore, fuel cladding ruptures and/or zirconium-water reactions began at that time. Zirconium oxidation/hydrogen generation rates were highest (∼70 kg of hydrogen per minute) during the core quench and collapse at 175 min. By 180 min, over 85% of the hydrogen generated by the zirconium-water reaction had been produced, and ∼400 kg of hydrogen had accumulated in the reactor coolant system. At that time, hydrogen concentrations at the steam/water interfaces in both steam generators approached 90%. By 203 min, the damaged reactor core had been reflooded and has not been uncovered since that time. Therefore, the core was completely under water at 225 min, when molten core material flowed into the lower head of the reactor vessel. 10 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  15. The legacy of Three Mile Island: Implications for today's U.S. Department of Energy challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coe, R.P.; Conaway, W.T.; Williams, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    Over the course of the 16 year period following the accident at Three Mile Island-Unit-2, much has been learned and volumes have been written regarding the cause and massive cleanup activities of the incident. Because of these Lessons Learned, important changes have been made and the US commercial nuclear industry is safer and more reliable as a result. It is important to recognize that two major sources of information emerged from this event. First and foremost were the important safety issues that required immediate answers and the addition of the modifications to plants that these answers generated. Second and of considerable significance to the US Department of energy (US DOE) in today's post-cold war environment are the frequently hard-won lessons involved with the recovery, clean-up, and defueling of TMI-2 and its unprecedented transition into long-term, monitored storage. While the commercial industry, regulatory authorities, and the public saw an immediate need for instituting the important safety lessons from TMI-2, these new systems, improved training and operating practices have paid off in increased reliability and extended operations. However, there was no such immediate application for the second source of information, that being the application of the deactivation and long-term storage technology learned at TMI-2 to a current condition. The tasks and methods used in the TMI-2 recovery have strong parallels in the present-day DOE cleanup program

  16. Historical summary of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 core debris transportation campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, R.C.; Tyacke, M.J. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Quinn, G.J. [Wastren, Inc., Germantown, MD (United States)

    1993-03-01

    Transport of the damaged core materials from the Unit 2 reactor of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station (TMI-2) to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for examination and storage presented many technical and institutional challenges, including assessing the ability to transport the damaged core; removing and packaging core debris in ways suitable for transport; developing a transport package that could both meet Federal regulations and interface with the facilities at TMI-2 and the INEL; and developing a transport plan, support logistics, and public communications channels suited to the task. This report is a historical summary of how the US Department of Energy addressed those challenges and transported, received, and stored the TMI-2 core debris at the INEL. Subjects discussed include preparations for transport, loading at TMI-2, institutional issues, transport operations, receipt and storage at the INEL, governmental inquiries/investigations, and lessons learned. Because of public attention focused on the TMI-2 Core Debris Transport Program, the exchange of information between the program and public was extensive. This exchange is a focus for parts of this report to explain why various operations were conducted as they were and why certain technical approaches were employed. And, because of that exchange, the program may have contributed to a better public understanding of such actions and may contribute to planning and execution of similar future actions.

  17. The Sizewell B inquiry and East Anglia: the legacy of Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemp, R.V.

    1985-01-01

    This paper argues that the great length and cost of the Public Inquiry into the proposed Sizewell-B PWR reactor is due to its investigatory style. This style became necessary because of the complexity of the issues, the difference in resources between the proponents and objectors and because of delays in licensing of the PWR by the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate. The fears about the safety of the PWR type reactors followed the accident at Three Mile Island in 1979, and the Major of Harrisburg was called by the local residents opposed to the siting to give evidence at the Inquiry. The ways in which the Sizewell-B Inquiry has attempted to come to terms with the fears and concerns of local objectors to the project are looked at. The paper considers how these can be properly weighed when the government is committed to nuclear power. The Inquiry is only advisory - the final decision will be taken by the Ministers after Parliamentary debate. The procedures and facilities adopted by the Inquiry are listed and, in particular, the two evening public meetings held in nearby towns to hear the views of local residents outside the formal main hearing are noted. The two main safety aspects of concern were the incidence of leukemia in East Suffolk, and the planning in case of an emergency at Sizewell-B. The experience of the Mayor of Harrisburg was relevant to this point. (U.K.)

  18. Metallurgical examination of, and resin transfer from, Three Mile Island prefilter liners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Spaletta, H.W.

    1984-08-01

    Metallurgical examinations were performed on two EPICOR-II prefilter liners at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to determine conditions of the liners and identify the minimum expected lifetime of those and other liners stored at INEL. The research work was accomplished by EG and G Idaho, Inc. for the EPICOR-II Research and Disposition Program, which is funded by the US Department of Energy. The EPICOR-II prefilter liners were used to filter radionuclides from contaminated water during cleanup of Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2). The liners were constructed of carbon steel with a phenolic protective coating and contained organic and inorganic ion-exchange filtration media. Program plans call for interim storage of EPICOR-II prefilters at INEL for up to ten years, before final disposal in high integrity containers at the Hanford, Washington commercial disposal site. This report describes the (a) resin transfer process used to empty liners for examination, (b) removal of metallographic sections from those liners, (c) specimen preparation, and (d) findings from metallographic examination of those specimens. A minimum lifetime for the liners is determined and recommendations are given for storage of wastes from future TMI-2 activities

  19. Personnel contamination protection techniques applied during the TMI-2 [Three Mile Island Unit 2] cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrand, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The severe damage to the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) core and the subsequent discharge of reactor coolant to the reactor and auxiliary buildings resulted in extremely hostile radiological environments in the TMI-2 plant. High fission product surface contamination and radiation levels necessitated the implementation of innovative techniques and methods in performing cleanup operations while assuring effective as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) practices. The approach utilized by GPU Nuclear throughout the cleanup in applying protective clothing requirements was to consider the overall health risk to the worker including factors such as cardiopulmonary stress, visual and hearing acuity, and heat stress. In applying protective clothing requirements, trade-off considerations had to be made between preventing skin contaminations and possibly overprotecting the worker, thus impacting his ability to perform his intended task at maximum efficiency and in accordance with ALARA principles. The paper discusses the following topics: protective clothing-general use, beta protection, skin contamination, training, personnel access facility, and heat stress

  20. Potassium iodide as a thyroid blocker--Three Mile Island to today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halperin, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    The Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear emergency in the U.S. in March 1979 marked the first occasion when use of potassium iodide (KI) was considered for thyroid blocking of the population in the vicinity of a potentially serious release of fission products from a nuclear power reactor. In face of a demand that could not be satisfied by commercial supplies of low-dose KI drug products from the U.S. pharmaceutical industry, the Food and Drug Administration directed the manufacture and stockpiling of sufficient quantities of saturated solution of potassium iodide (SSKI) to provide protection for one million people in the event of a large-scale release of radioiodines. Although the drug was not used, the experience of producing, stockpiling, and making ready for use a large quantity of the drug resulted in significant public policy, regulatory, and logistical issues. A number of these issues have been resolved through scientific debate and consensus, development of official guidance regarding the proper role of KI in nuclear emergencies, and the approval of New Drug Applications for KI products specifically intended for thyroid blocking in nuclear emergencies. Other issues regarding broad-scale implementation of the guidelines remain today. This paper traces the history of the development and implementation of the use of KI from pre-TMI to the present

  1. Heat stress control in the TMI-2 [Three Mile Island Unit 2] defueling and decontamination activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schork, J.S.; Parfitt, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    During the initial stages of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) defueling and decontamination activities for the reactor building, it was realized that the high levels of loose radioactive contamination would require the use of extensive protective clothing by entry personnel. While there was no doubt that layered protective clothing protects workers from becoming contaminated, it was recognized that these same layers of clothing would impose a very significant heat stress burden. To prevent the potentially serious consequences of a severe reaction to heat stress by workers in the hostile environment of the TMI-2 reactor building and yet maintain the reasonable work productivity necessary to perform the recovery adequately, an effective program of controlling worker exposure to heat stress had to be developed. Body-cooling devices produce a flow of cool air, which is introduced close to the skin to remove body heat through convection and increased sweat evaporation. The cooling effect produced by the Vortex tube successfully protected the workers from heat stress, however, there were several logistical and operational problems that hindered extensive use of these devices. The last type of cooling garment examined was the frozen water garment (FWG) developed by Elizier Kamon at the Pennsylvania State University as part of an Electric Power Research Institute research grant. Personal protection, i.e., body cooling, engineering controls, and administrative controls, have been implemented successfully

  2. Evaluation of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor building decontamination process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougherty, D.; Adams, J.W.

    1983-08-01

    Decontamination activities from the cleanup of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building are generating a variety of waste streams. Solid wastes being disposed of in commercial shallow land burial include trash and rubbish, ion-exchange resins (Epicor-II) and strippable coatings. The radwaste streams arising from cleanup activities currently under way are characterized and classified under the waste classification scheme of 10 CFR Part 61. It appears that much of the Epicor-II ion-exchange resin being disposed of in commerical land burial will be Class B and require stabilization if current radionuclide loading practices continue to be followed. Some of the trash and rubbish from the cleanup of the reactor building so far would be Class B. Strippable coatings being used at TMI-2 were tested for leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents, thermal stability, radiation stability, stability under immersion and biodegradability. Actual coating samples from reactor building decontamination testing were evaluated for radionuclide leaching and biodegradation

  3. Technology transfer and radioactive waste management at TMI-2 [Three Mile Island Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The accident that occurred on March 28, 1979, at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) nuclear generating station caused extensive damage to the reactor core and created high radiation contamination levels throughout the facility. The electric power industry, regulators, and government agencies were faced with one of the most technically challenging recovery situations ever encountered in this country. But it was also realized that this adversity presented opportunities for the advancement of state-of-the-art technologies as well as the potential to produce information that could enhance nuclear power plant safety and reliability. Perhaps one of the more significant aspects of the TMI-2 recovery has been the advancement of radioactive waste management technology. The high levels and unusual nature of the TMI-2 radioactive waste necessitated the development of innovative techniques for processing, packaging, shipping, and disposal. The investment in research was rewarded with large volume reductions and associated cost savings. It is anticipated that the TMI-2 radioactive waste management technology will make major contributions to the design of new systems to meet this growing need. The following areas appear particularly suited for this purpose: volume reduction, high-integrity containers, and selective isotope removal

  4. Human factors in surgery: from Three Mile Island to the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Addessi, Alessandro; Bongiovanni, Luca; Volpe, Andrea; Pinto, Francesco; Bassi, PierFrancesco

    2009-01-01

    Human factors is a definition that includes the science of understanding the properties of human capability, the application of this understanding to the design and development of systems and services, the art of ensuring their successful applications to a program. The field of human factors traces its origins to the Second World War, but Three Mile Island has been the best example of how groups of people react and make decisions under stress: this nuclear accident was exacerbated by wrong decisions made because the operators were overwhelmed with irrelevant, misleading or incorrect information. Errors and their nature are the same in all human activities. The predisposition for error is so intrinsic to human nature that scientifically it is best considered as inherently biologic. The causes of error in medical care may not be easily generalized. Surgery differs in important ways: most errors occur in the operating room and are technical in nature. Commonly, surgical error has been thought of as the consequence of lack of skill or ability, and is the result of thoughtless actions. Moreover the 'operating theatre' has a unique set of team dynamics: professionals from multiple disciplines are required to work in a closely coordinated fashion. This complex environment provides multiple opportunities for unclear communication, clashing motivations, errors arising not from technical incompetence but from poor interpersonal skills. Surgeons have to work closely with human factors specialists in future studies. By improving processes already in place in many operating rooms, safety will be enhanced and quality increased.

  5. Evaluation of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor building decontamination process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dougherty, D.; Adams, J. W.

    1983-08-01

    Decontamination activities from the cleanup of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building are generating a variety of waste streams. Solid wastes being disposed of in commercial shallow land burial include trash and rubbish, ion-exchange resins (Epicor-II) and strippable coatings. The radwaste streams arising from cleanup activities currently under way are characterized and classified under the waste classification scheme of 10 CFR Part 61. It appears that much of the Epicor-II ion-exchange resin being disposed of in commerical land burial will be Class B and require stabilization if current radionuclide loading practices continue to be followed. Some of the trash and rubbish from the cleanup of the reactor building so far would be Class B. Strippable coatings being used at TMI-2 were tested for leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents, thermal stability, radiation stability, stability under immersion and biodegradability. Actual coating samples from reactor building decontamination testing were evaluated for radionuclide leaching and biodegradation.

  6. Historical summary of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 core debris transportation campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, R.C.; Tyacke, M.J.; Quinn, G.J.

    1993-03-01

    Transport of the damaged core materials from the Unit 2 reactor of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station (TMI-2) to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for examination and storage presented many technical and institutional challenges, including assessing the ability to transport the damaged core; removing and packaging core debris in ways suitable for transport; developing a transport package that could both meet Federal regulations and interface with the facilities at TMI-2 and the INEL; and developing a transport plan, support logistics, and public communications channels suited to the task. This report is a historical summary of how the US Department of Energy addressed those challenges and transported, received, and stored the TMI-2 core debris at the INEL. Subjects discussed include preparations for transport, loading at TMI-2, institutional issues, transport operations, receipt and storage at the INEL, governmental inquiries/investigations, and lessons learned. Because of public attention focused on the TMI-2 Core Debris Transport Program, the exchange of information between the program and public was extensive. This exchange is a focus for parts of this report to explain why various operations were conducted as they were and why certain technical approaches were employed. And, because of that exchange, the program may have contributed to a better public understanding of such actions and may contribute to planning and execution of similar future actions

  7. Review of light water reactor safety through the Three Mile Island accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phung, D.L.

    1984-05-01

    This review of light water reactor safety through the Three Mile Island accident has the purpose of establishing the baseline over which safety achievement post-TMI is assessed, and the need for new reactor designs and business direction is judged. Five major areas of reactor safety pre-TMI are examined: (1) safety philosophy and institutions, (2) reactor design criteria, (3) operational problems, (4) the Rasmussen reactor safety study, and (5) the TMI accident and repercussions. Although nuclear power has made spectacular achievements over the period pre-TMI and although TMI is technically a minor accident, this review concludes that there were basic flaws in the technology and in the manner safety philosophy was conceived and carried out. These flaws included (1) a reactor design that has high core power density, low heat capacity, and low system tolerance to upsets, (2) reactor deployment that had been expedited without extensive operational experience, (3) rules and regulations that had to play catch-up with commercial reactor development, (4) an industry that was fragmented, short-sighted, and tended to rely on the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for safety guidance, (5) information that was not effectively shared, and (6) attention that was inadequate to the human aspects of reactor operation and to public reaction to the specter of a reactor accident, major or minor

  8. Experimenting with sodar in support of emergency preparedness at Three Mile Island-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heck, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    In November 1988 at Three Mile Island Unit 1 (TMI-1), GPU Nuclear successfully completed the annual drill-for-grade that, from a modeling point of view, broke new ground for this plant. The meteorological and modeling aspects of the drill scenario were unprecedented for two reasons. First, the plume was buoyant and rose far above the height of the meteorological tower located at TMI. Second, the wind direction data from the meteorological tower were not representative of the wind direction at plume height. In the drill scenario, the buoyant plume resulted from a steam generator tube rupture where the steam ejects directly into the atmosphere via safety relief valves. Plume modeling indicated that the plume would rise to 400 ft, given the scenario meteorology. Wind data from the on-site meteorological tower, however, was only available up to 150 ft. Comparisons of sodar and tower winds were made for various weather conditions. Sodar results were studied in detail during light, moderate, and high winds; various wind directions; occurrences of rain and snow; and by time of day to determine effects of diurnal meteorological conditions on sodar performance

  9. Lessons learned from the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Advisory Panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lach, D.; Bolton, P.; Durbin, N.; Harty, R.

    1994-08-01

    In response to public concern about the cleanup of the Three Mile Island, Unit 2 (TMI-2) facility after an accident on March 28, 1979 involving a loss of reactor coolant and subsequent damage to the reactor fuel, twelve citizens were asked to serve on an independent Advisory Panel to consult with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the decontamination and cleanup of the facility. The panel met 78 times over a period of thirteen years, holding public meetings in the vicinity of TMI-2 and meeting regularly with NRC Commissioners in Washington, DC. This report describes the results of a project designed to identify and describe the lessons learned from the Advisory Panel and place those lessons in the context of what we generally know about citizen advisory groups. A summary of the empirical literature on citizen advisory panels is followed by a brief history of the TMI-2 Advisory Panel. The body of the report contains the analysis of the lessons learned, preliminary conclusions about the effectiveness of the Panel, and implications for the NRC in the use of advisory panels. Data for the report include meeting transcripts and interviews with past and present Panel participants

  10. Characterization of solids in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor defueling water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, D.O.

    1987-12-01

    Because of the impact of poor water clarity on defueling operations at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Nuclear Power Station, a study was undertaken to characterize suspended particulates in the reactor defueling water. The examination included cascade filtration through Nuclepore filters of progressively smaller pore sizes, using three water samples obtained at different times and after varying degrees of clarification. The solids collected on the filters were examined with a scanning electron microscope and analyzed with energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence. A wide variety of solids was observed, and 26 elements were detected. These included all the materials expected from the reactor system (uranium, zirconium, silver, cadmium, indium, iron, chromium, and nickel), chemicals and zeolites used to decontaminate the water (aluminum, silicon, sodium), common impurities (potassium, chlorine, sulfur, magnesium, calcium, and others), as well as some unexpected metals (molybdenum, manganese, bromine, and lead). There was also evidence for the presence of organic material. A diverse assortment of particles with widely varying surface properties was found to be present

  11. Dispositional and situational variables related to evacuation at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, I.S.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore some of the factors influential in local residents' evacuating or remaining in the Three Mile Island area during the nuclear power plant accident of March, 1979. Investigated variables included individuals' behavioral dispositions to attend or to avoid threatening stimuli as well as situational concerns related to demographic characteristics and subjective experience. Investigation of situational variables also probed respondents' concerns about accident-related fears. Two main relationships were investigated. The first hypothesized that positive relationships existed both between dispositional attention to threat and evacuation and between dispositional avoidance of threat and remaining. The second investigation task of the research explored evacuation-related situational variables in regard to individuals' awareness of potential danger at TMI. No support was found for the hypothesized relationships between evacuation and dispositions relative to threat. Situational variables significantly related to evacuation included: specific directives to evacuate the area; disruption of telephone service during the week of the accident; and household proximity to TMI

  12. Cancer incidence among residents of the Three Mile Island accident area: 1982-1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yueh-Ying; Youk, Ada O; Sasser, Howell; Talbott, Evelyn O

    2011-11-01

    The Pennsylvania Department of Health established a registry of the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant accident in 1979. Over 93% of the population present on the day of the accident within a 5-mile radius was enrolled and interviewed. We used the registry to investigate the potential cancer risk from low-dose radiation exposure among the TMI population. Cancer incidence data among the TMI cohort were available from 1982 to 1995. Because more than 97% of the population were white and few cancer cases were reported for those younger than 18 years of age, we included whites of age 18 years and older (10,446 men and 11,048 women) for further analyses. Cox regression models were used to estimate the relative risk (RR) per 0.1 mSv and 95% confident interval (CI) of cancer by radiation-related exposures. The cancers of interest were all malignant neoplasms, cancer of bronchus, trachea, and lung, cancer of lymphatic and hematopoietic tissues, leukemia, and female breast. Among men and women, there was no evidence of an increased risk for all malignant neoplasms among the TMI cohort exposed to higher maximum and likely γ radiation (RR=1.00, 95% CI=0.97, 1.01 and RR=0.99, 95% CI=0.94, 1.03, respectively) after adjusting for age, gender, education, smoking, and background radiation. Elevation in risk was noted for cancer of the bronchus, trachea, and lung in relation to higher background radiation exposure (RR=1.45, 95% CI=1.02-2.05 at 8.0-8.8 μR/h compared to 5.2-7.2 μR/h). An increased risk of leukemia was found among men exposed to higher maximum and likely γ radiation related to TMI exposure during the ten days following the accident (RR=1.15, 95% CI=1.04, 1.29 and RR=1.36, 95% CI=1.08, 1.71, respectively). This relationship was not found in women. Increased cancer risks from low-level radiation exposure within the TMI cohort were small and mostly statistically non-significant. However, additional follow-up on this population is warranted, especially to

  13. Effects of the accident at Three Mile Island on the mental health and behavior responses of the general population and the nuclear workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1982-02-01

    A main conclusion drawn from the investigation by the President's Commission was that the most serious health effect of the Three Mile Island nuclear accident was severe mental stress, which was short-lived. The highest levels of psychological distress were found among those living within 5 miles of Three Mile Island, in families with preschool children, and among the Three Mile Island nuclear workers. This report provides some understanding of how these conclusions were drawn, the methods used to obtain information of the experiences of mental stress and the behavioral effects and responses of the general population and the nuclear workers to the accident at Three Mile Island. In order to limit the scope of the discussion, information is taken from the Behavioral Effects Task Group Report [TMI79c] to the President's Commission, and thus from the labors of the many behavioral scientists

  14. Altered molecular profile in thyroid cancers from patients affected by the Three Mile Island nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, David; Russo, Mariano; Houser, Kenneth; Crist, Henry; Derr, Jonathan B; Walter, Vonn; Warrick, Joshua I; Sheldon, Kathryn E; Broach, James; Bann, Darrin V

    2017-07-01

    In 1979, Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant experienced a partial meltdown with release of radioactive material. The effects of the accident on thyroid cancer (TC) in the surrounding population remain unclear. Radiation-induced TCs have a lower incidence of single nucleotide oncogenic driver mutations and higher incidence of gene fusions. We used next generation sequencing (NGS) to identify molecular signatures of radiation-induced TC in a cohort of TC patients residing near TMI during the time of the accident. Case series. We identified 44 patients who developed papillary thyroid carcinoma between 1974 and 2014. Patients who developed TC between 1984 and 1996 were at risk for radiation-induced TC, patients who developed TC before 1984 or after 1996 were the control group. We used targeted NGS of paired tumor and normal tissue from each patient to identify single nucleotide oncogenic driver mutations. Oncogenic gene fusions were identified using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. We identified 15 patients in the at-risk group and 29 patients in the control group. BRAF V600E mutations were identified in 53% patients in the at-risk group and 83% patients in the control group. The proportion of patients with BRAF mutations in the at-risk group was significantly lower than predicted by the The Cancer Genome Atlas cohort. Gene fusion or somatic copy number alteration drivers were identified in 33% tumors in the at-risk group and 14% of tumors in the control group. Findings were consistent with observations from other radiation-exposed populations. These data raise the possibility that radiation released from TMI may have altered the molecular profile of TC in the population surrounding TMI. 4 Laryngoscope, 127:S1-S9, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  15. Peer review of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Vessel Investigation Project metallurgical examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohl, R.W.; Gaydos, R.G.; Vander Voort, G.F.; Diercks, D.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-07-01

    Fifteen samples recovered from the lower head of the Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 nuclear reactor pressure vessel were subjected to detailed metallurgical examinations by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), with supporting work carried out by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and several of the European participants. These examinations determined that a portion of the lower head, a so-called elliptical ``hot spot`` measuring {approx}0.8 {times} 1 m, reached temperatures as high as 1100{degrees}C during the accident and cooled from these temperatures at {approx}10--100{degrees}C/min. The remainder of the lower head was found to have remained below the ferrite-toaustenite transformation temperature of 727{degrees}C during the accident. Because of the significance of these results and their importance to the overall analysis of the TMI accident, a panel of three outside peer reviewers, Dr. Robert W. Bohl, Mr. Richard G. Gaydos, and Mr. George F. Vander Voort, was formed to conduct an independent review of the metallurgical analyses. After a thorough review of the previous analyses and examination of photo-micrographs and actual lower head specimens, the panel determined that the conclusions resulting from the INEL study were fundamentally correct. In particular, the panel reaffirmed that four lower head samples attained temperatures as high as 1100{degrees}C, and perhaps as high as 1150--1200{degrees}C in one case, during the accident. They concluded that these samples subsequently cooled at a rate of {approx}50--125{degrees}C/min in the temperature range of 600--400{degrees}C, in good agreement with the original analysis. The reviewers also agreed that the remainder of the lower head samples had not exceeded the ferrite-to-austenite transformation temperature during the accident and suggested several refinements and alternative procedures that could have been employed in the original analysis.

  16. Radwaste reduction experience at Oyster Creek and Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, M.

    1993-01-01

    True radwaste minimization at an operating nuclear power plant means straddling the line between ''what is'' and ''what-can-be'' and then regularly moving that line so that dreams become reality. This effort involves keeping track of and maintaining successful programs of the past while searching out and incorporating the best of the upcoming processes, equipment, and contractors. Some of the tactics used for waste minimization have appreciable results and some have small direct results. But even those with small results add to a final total of volume saved. In addition, the approaches with smaller results demonstrate an unmistakable attitude on the part of management that any unnecessary radwaste production is not acceptable. This attitude is understood and assimilated by engineering, operations, and maintenance in such a way that it becomes a matter of pride to reduce radwaste production to quantities below those officially projected. The GPUN plants at Oyster Creek and Three Mile Island Unit-1 limit the quantity of materials allowed onsite under the premise that an item that stays out of contaminated areas cannot become radwaste. For material exiting contaminated zones, the plants have used a combination of preventative avoidance of radwaste generation and careful processing. This includes sorting and screening of materials leaving contaminated areas to reduce the number of items to eventually be treated, preplanning of work efforts to minimize radwaste that must be generated, wood planning, onsite decontamination units, onsite contractor supplied equipment, and offsite radwaste processors in order to minimize the final amount of radwaste to be buried. Sometimes when employing one of these methods, it is necessary to consider not only the waste generated by the process directly but also secondary wastes caused by interactions with other areas of plant operation, such as equipment maintenance

  17. Aerial radiological survey of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station and surrounding area, Middletown, Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colton, D.P.

    1983-08-01

    An aerial radiological survey was performed over the area surrounding the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station during October 26 to 30, 1982. The survey covered an 82-square-kilometer area centered on the nuclear plant and encompassed the communities of Middletown, York Haven, Goldsboro and Royalton, Pennsylvania. The highest radiation exposure rates, up to a maximum of 200 microroentgens per hour (μR/h), were inferred from data measured directly over the TMI facilities. This detected radiation was due to the presence of cobalt-58, cobalt-60 and cesium-137, which was consistent with normal plant operations. Similar activity is routinely observed in aerial surveys over nuclear power plants which have been or are presently in an operational mode. For the remainder of the survey area, the inferred radiation exposure rates varied from 6 to 14 μR/h. The reported exposure rate values include an estimated cosmic ray contribution of 3.7 μR/h. Ground-based measurements, conducted during the time of the aerial survey, were compared to the aerial results. Pressurized ionization chamber readings and a group of soil samples were acquired at several locations within the survey area, along the river banks upstream and downstream of the survey area, and at the ground-based locations used for a previous aerial survey which was conducted in 1976. The exposure rate values obtained from these measurements were in agreement with the corresponding aerial data. With the exception of the activity observed within the TMI facilities, no evidence of any contamination which might have occurred as a result of past reactor operations or the 1979 TMI Unit 2 accident was detected from the aerial survey data. This was further supported by the results of the soil sample analyses and the comparison with the 1976 aerial survey data. 7 references, 12 figures, 4 tables

  18. Peer review of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Vessel Investigation Project metallurgical examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohl, R.W.; Gaydos, R.G.; Vander Voort, G.F.; Diercks, D.R.

    1994-07-01

    Fifteen samples recovered from the lower head of the Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 nuclear reactor pressure vessel were subjected to detailed metallurgical examinations by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), with supporting work carried out by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and several of the European participants. These examinations determined that a portion of the lower head, a so-called elliptical ''hot spot'' measuring ∼0.8 x 1 m, reached temperatures as high as 1100 degrees C during the accident and cooled from these temperatures at ∼10--100 degrees C/min. The remainder of the lower head was found to have remained below the ferrite-toaustenite transformation temperature of 727 degrees C during the accident. Because of the significance of these results and their importance to the overall analysis of the TMI accident, a panel of three outside peer reviewers, Dr. Robert W. Bohl, Mr. Richard G. Gaydos, and Mr. George F. Vander Voort, was formed to conduct an independent review of the metallurgical analyses. After a thorough review of the previous analyses and examination of photo-micrographs and actual lower head specimens, the panel determined that the conclusions resulting from the INEL study were fundamentally correct. In particular, the panel reaffirmed that four lower head samples attained temperatures as high as 1100 degrees C, and perhaps as high as 1150--1200 degrees C in one case, during the accident. They concluded that these samples subsequently cooled at a rate of ∼50--125 degrees C/min in the temperature range of 600--400 degrees C, in good agreement with the original analysis. The reviewers also agreed that the remainder of the lower head samples had not exceeded the ferrite-to-austenite transformation temperature during the accident and suggested several refinements and alternative procedures that could have been employed in the original analysis

  19. Radiation hazards in children - lessons from Chernobyl, Three Mile Island and Fukushima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fushiki, Shinji

    2013-03-01

    On March 11, 2011, Japan was hit by the Great East Japan Earthquake followed by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Disaster. Firstly, this review focuses on what happened after the accidents at the Three Mile Island nuclear power station in 1979 and the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in 1986, in terms of the effects of these incidents on health. The most critical issue when considering the effects of radiation on the health of children was the increase of thyroid cancer, as clearly demonstrated among people who were children or adolescence at the time of the Chernobyl accident. Therefore, in the early days after a nuclear accident, the primary concern should be efforts to prevent the exposure of children to radioactive iodine through inhalation and ingestion, because radioactive iodine preferentially accumulates in the thyroid. In the longer term, another concern is exposure to radionuclides with long half-lives, including cesium137 and cesium134, with physical half-lives of 30 and 2 years, respectively. Secondly, fetal radiation risks and radiobiological studies on low-level radiation are briefly reviewed, with reference to the effects upon the developing brain. A fetal dose of 100 mSv may increase the risk of an effect on brain development, especially neuronal migration, based upon the results of experiments with rodents. Finally, this review proposes that research on the health effects of low level radiation should be prioritized so that accurate information on the effects of radiation can be disseminated and prevent the prevalence of unnecessary fear lacking scientific justification. Copyright © 2012 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Radiation effects on resins and zeolites at Three Mile Island Unit II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, J.K.; Grant, P.J.; Quinn, G.J.; Hofstetter, K.J.

    1984-01-01

    Radiation effects on resin and zeolite used in the waste cleanup at Three Mile Island Unit II have been examined both experimentally and in-situ. Hydrogen and organic gases are generated due to absorbed radiation as a function of resin material, curie loading and residual water content. Significant oxygen scavaging was demonstrated in the organic resin liners. Hydrogen and oxygen gases in near stoichiometric quantities are generated from irradiation of residual water in inorganic zeolites. Gas generation was determined to be directly proportional to curie content but correlates poorly with residual water content in zeolite vessels. Results of the gas generation analyses of EPICOR II liners show that vessels with less than 166 curies had almost no hydrogen generated during two years of storage and therefore did not require safety measures for shipment or storage. Experimental measurements done at research laboratories predicted similar results associated with hydrogen gas generation and oxygen depletion. X-ray diffraction examinations and ion exchange capacity measurements indicated no evidence of irradiation effects on the structure or cesium exchange capacity for zeolites exposed to 10 10 rads. Darkening and damage of organic resin due to radiation has been identified. Breaking and agglomeration of the purification demineralizer resin is believed to be the result of temperature effects. No damage was identified from radiation effects on zeolite. Organic and inorganic sorbents used in the processing of contaminated waters at TMI-2 have been shown to be effective in maintaining long-term stability under high radiation conditions. The effects of radiolytic degradation have been shown by direct measurements and simulation tests and are of use in their general application throughout the industry

  1. NRC views and analysis of the recommendations of the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-11-01

    Analysis and recommendations relating to the Three Mile Island-2 Reactor accident are presented concerning the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the utility and its suppliers, the training of operating personnel, technical assessment, worker and public health and safety, emergency planning and response, and the public's right to information. Also included are examples of NRC considerations that are outside the recommendations of the President's Commission, and views of commissioners Bradford and Gilinsky

  2. Publicly available documents Three Mile Island Unit 2, Docket 50-320. Title list, July 1-October 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    This supplemental title list of publicly available documents pertaining to Three Mile Island Unit 2, Docket 50-320, includes those preincident and postincident documents filed in the NRC Public Document Room between July 1, 1979 and October 31, 1979. It is divided into preincident and postincident listings, with both listings sub-divided into the categories used for filing and searching in the NRC Public Document Room.

  3. Publicly available documents Three Mile Island Unit 2, Docket 50-320. Title list, July 1-October 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This supplemental title list of publicly available documents pertaining to Three Mile Island Unit 2, Docket 50-320, includes those preincident and postincident documents filed in the NRC Public Document Room between July 1, 1979 and October 31, 1979. It is divided into preincident and postincident listings, with both listings sub-divided into the categories used for filing and searching in the NRC Public Document Room

  4. Annual Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program Report for the Three Mile Island, Unit 2, Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, Gregory Graham

    2002-01-01

    This report presents the results of the 2001 Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program conducted in accordance with 10 CFR 72.44 for the Three Mile Island, Unit 2, Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation. A description of the facility and the monitoring program is provided. The results of monitoring the two predominant radiation exposure pathways, potential airborne radioactivity releases and direct radiation exposure, indicate the facility operation has not contributed to any increase in the estimated maximum potential dose commitment to the general public.

  5. Utilization of the atmospheric release advisory capability (ARAC) services during and after the Three Mile Island accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, J.B.; Dickerson, M.H.; Greenly, G.D.; Gudiksen, P.H.; Sullivan, T.J.

    1980-01-01

    At 0820 PST on 28 March 1979, the Department of Energy's Emergency Operations Center advised the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) that the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, had experienced an accident some four hours earlier, resulting in the atmospheric release of xenon-133 and krypton-88. This report describes ARAC's response to the Three Mile Island accident, including the role ARAC played throughout the 20 days that real-time assessments were made available to the Department of Energy on-scene commander. It also describes the follow-up population-dose calculations performed for the President's Commission on Three Mile Island. At the request of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, a questionnaire addressing the usefulness of ARAC products during the accident was sent to ARAC-product users. A summary of the findings from this questionnaire, along with recommendations for improving ARAC service, is also presented. The accident at Mississauga, Ontario, Canada, is discussed in the context of a well-planned emergency response by local and Federal officials

  6. Effects of the accident at Three Mile Island on residential property values and sales. Final report, April 1980-January 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamble, H.B.; Downing, R.H.

    1981-04-01

    The study examined the effects of the accident at Three Mile Island on residential property values and number of sales within a 25-mile radius of the plant. Regression analyses, using data on 583 actual market sales of single family homes from 1977 through 1979, examined the effects before and after the accident on the basis of distance and direction from the plant and on three different property value classes. All valid single family property sales between 1975 and 1979 within the 25-mile area were examined in a time series analysis. Interviews were conducted with realtors, financial institution officials and building contractors in the area. The accident had no measurable effects, positive or negative, on the value of single family residential properties within a 25-mile radius of the plant, or in any direction from the plant, or on low, medium, or high value properties. The plant had no measurable effects on residential property values for the 2 years prior to the accident. Immediately following the accident there was a sharp decline in the number of residential sales within 10 miles of the plant, but the real estate market returned to near normal conditions within 4-8 weeks. The interviews basically confirmed the above findings

  7. Incidence of thyroid cancer in residents surrounding the Three Mile Island nuclear facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Roger J

    2008-04-01

    On March 28, 1979, the worst nuclear exposure incident in U.S. history occurred near Harrisburg, PA. Small quantities of xenon and iodine radioisotopes were released into the environment from the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant. The Pennsylvania Department of Health (PDoH) implemented a TMI Population Registry, including 32,135 individuals within a 5-mile radius of TMI, to track possible health effects to the local population. Although no increase in cancer mortality has been noted in this cohort, cancer incidence has not been tracked. Given the long latency period for the development of thyroid cancer after exposure to low-level radiation exposure, it is plausible that an increase in thyroid cancer incidence might just now be occurring. Retrospective analysis of the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry Dataset for Thyroid Cancer using the Epidemiological Query and Mapping System (EpiQMS) search engine. EpiQMS is an interactive health statistics Website that can produce numbers, rates, graphs, charts, maps, and county profiles using various demographic variables (age, sex, race, etc.) from birth, death, cancer, and population datasets for the state and counties or regions of Pennsylvania. Eighteen years of data (1985-2002) on thyroid cancer incidence were obtained from the PDoH. The three at-risk counties of Dauphin, York, and Lancaster were analyzed with regard to observed numbers of thyroid cancer cases versus expected incidence. Although the nuclear accident at TMI occurred in 1979, 1985 was chosen as the starting point for data analysis because that is when the PDoH began maintaining cancer incidence records. In the first year available for evaluation (1985), there were 11 new thyroid cancer cases in each of the at-risk counties (Dauphin, York, Lancaster). By 2002, the incidence had increased to 29 in Dauphin County, 81 in Lancaster County, and 69 in York County. The increase in thyroid cancer in Dauphin County is not above what would be expected for both

  8. Involvement of the ORNL Chemical Technology Division in contaminated air and water handling at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooksbank, R.E.; King, L.J.

    1979-08-01

    The President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island requested that Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) generate documents concerning two areas in which ORNL personnel provided on-site assistance following the accident on March 28, 1979. These are: instrumentation diagnostics, and the treatment of radioactive wastes and liquid effluents stemming from the accident. This report describes the involvement of the ORNL Chemical Technology Division (CTD) in contaminated air and water handling at Three Mile Island

  9. Crisis Communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunkle, M.K.

    1989-01-01

    The author discusses how one of the strongest examples of how destructive poor crisis communications can be the Three Mile Island accident of March 1979. This was an event that was minimal in its physical effects on the public and environment beyond the walls of that nuclear power plant. However, the emotional trauma on the local public, the economic impact on area businesses and property owners, and the long term impact on the entire nuclear utility industry were great. Approximately 80,000 people as far as 15 miles from the plant evacuated over a weekend. There have been no new orders for nuclear plants and many cancellations since the event 10 years ago. This paper presents an analysis of the accident at Three Mile Island

  10. Development of a high integrity container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive wastes from Three Mile Island unit II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzworth, R.E.; Chapman, R.L.; Burton, H.M.; Bixby, W.W.

    1981-01-01

    The EPICOR II ion exchange system used to decontaminate approximately 1900 m 3 of contaminated water in the Auxiliary and Fuel Handling Building (AFHB) generated 50 highly loaded and 22 lesser loaded organic resin liners. The 22 lesser loaded resins were shipped to a commercial disposal site, but the highly loaded liners have been stored on the island since their generation. One highly loaded liner, or prefilter, was shipped to Battelle Columbus Laboratories (BCL) in May, 1981 as part of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Three Mile Island Information and Examination Program. The prefilter is being characterized to determine the behavior of the waste form with respect to time and the internal environment and to provide an information base for use in management and regulatory decisions relative to the storage, processing, and disposal of these wastes. Due to the unique characteristics of these wastes, the US DOE is sponsoring programs, such as the BCL Sorbent Experiments Program, to evaluate their characteristics and to provide a High Integrity Container (HIC) Development Program which would improve waste suitability for disposal at a land burial facility. This paper addresses regulatory considerations, establishment of design criteria, proposed design concepts, system demonstration, and status of the HIC Development Program for storage, transportation, and disposal of high specific activity, low level radioactive wastes from Three Mile Island Unit II as typified by EPICOR II ion exchange media and liners

  11. Hospital organizational response to the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island: implications for future-oriented disaster planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell, C.

    1982-01-01

    The 1979 nuclear accident at Three Mile Island (TMI) near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, caused severe organizational problems for neighboring health care institutions. Dauphin County, just north of TMI, contained four hospitals ranging in distance from 9.5 to 13.5 miles from the stricken plant. Crash plans put into effect within 48 hours of the initial incident successfully reduced hospital census to below 50 per cent of capacity, but retained bedridden and critically ill patients within the risk-zone. No plans existed for area-wide evacuation of hospitalized patients. Future-oriented disaster planning should include resource files of host institution bed capacity and transportation capabilities for the crash evacuation of hospitalized patients during non-traditional disasters

  12. Flowsheet development studies for the decontamination of high-activity-level water at Three Mile Island Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, E.D.; Bigelow, J.E.; Campbell, D.O.; King, L.J.; Knauer, J.B.

    1980-01-01

    Several chemical processing flowsheets were considered for the decontamination of high-activity-level water at the Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2. A zeolite ion exchange process was evaluated and recommended for absorption of the bulk of the highly radioactive cesium and strontium. Standard organic ion-exchange resins were selected to remove the remaining traces of radioactive nuclides (except tritium which cannot be removed by any practical process). Process conditions were evaluated using both synthetic, tracer-level solutions and samples of actual, high-activity level water from TMI Unit 2

  13. Evaluation of environmental data relating to selected nuclear power plant sites: the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murarka, I.P.

    1976-08-01

    Environmental monitoring data for the years 1973 and 1974 pertaining to the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station Unit 1, which began operation in early 1974, were analyzed by the most practical qualitative and quantitative methods. Terrestrial biotic resources were considered for this plant. The effects of the operation of Unit 1 on the local terrestrial organisms were found to be undetectable. Although the plant has not operated long enough to reveal long-term deleterious effects, the present indications do not lead to a concerned prediction that any are developing. The data acquired, method of analysis, and results obtained are presented in detail along with recommendations for improving monitoring techniques

  14. Evaluation of the response to xenon-133 radiations by thermoluminescent dosimeters used during the accident at Three Mile Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, R J; Zanzonico, P B; Masterson, M E; St Germain, J M; Laughlin, J S

    1982-03-01

    An evaluation is presented of the accuracy and sensitivity of three types of TLD's used during the accident at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station. This evaluation indicated that, due to the method of calibration, all the dosimeters over-responded to 133Xe radiations. The response ranged from slightly above unity to almost two. Exposures of the TLD's were of two types, namely, the characteristic X-rays either were or were not filtered from the beam. The angular sensitivity of the dosimeters is also reported.

  15. Simulation of Zircaloy cladding deformation under accident conditions derived from analysis of data from Three Mile Island-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E.D.; Mann, C.A.; Reynolds, A.E.

    1981-01-01

    A limited series of tests has been carried out based on a published analysis of Three Mile Island data. Zircaloy PWR cladding specimens were pressurised to 6.9 MPa at 500 deg C and heated at 0.2-1.0 deg C/sec in slowly flowing steam until they failed. The temperature at which rupture occurred ranged from 700 to 760 deg C. Three specimens were directly heated, and one was indirectly heated using an internal heater. The lengths of cladding strained greater than 33% ranged from 5.7 to 9.7 times the original diameter

  16. Aerial radiological survey of the Three Mile Island Station Nuclear Power Plant (Goldsboro, Pennsylvania). Date of survey: August 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsche, A.E.

    1977-03-01

    An airborne radiological survey of an 2143 km 2 area surrounding the Three Mile Island Station was made during August 2 to August 4, 1976. Detected radioisotopes and their associated gamma ray exposure rates were consistent with that expected from the normal background emitters. Areal average exposure rates equivalent to one meter above the ground are presented in the form of an isopleth map. Geological data are presented in an isopleth map of rock and soil types; a brief description of the vegetation and terrain surrounding the site is also included

  17. Characterization of the Three Mile Island Unit-2 reactor building atmosphere prior to the reactor building purge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartwell, J.K.; Mandler, J.W.; Duce, S.W.; Motes, B.G.

    1981-05-01

    The Three Mile Island Unit-2 reactor building atmosphere was sampled prior to the reactor building purge. Samples of the containment atmosphere were obtained using specialized sampling equipment installed through penetration R-626 at the 358-foot (109-meter) level of the TMI-2 reactor building. The samples were subsequently analyzed for radionuclide concentration and for gaseous molecular components (O 2 , N 2 , etc.) by two independent laboratories at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The sampling procedures, analysis methods, and results are summarized

  18. Percolation cooling of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 lower head by way of thermal cracking and gap formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, K.L.

    2002-01-01

    Two partial models have been developed to elucidate the Three Mile Island Unit 2 lower head coolability by water percolation from above into the thermally cracking debris bed and into a gap between the debris and the wall The bulk permeability of the cracked top crust is estimated based on simple...... fracture mechanics and application of Poiseuille's law to the fractures. The gap is considered as an abstraction representing an initially rugged interface, which probably expanded by thermal deformation and cracking in connection with the water ingress. The coupled flow and heat conduction problem...

  19. The status of recommendations of the President's Commission on the accident at Three Mile Island: A ten-year review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    This report summarizes the status of actions taken by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in response to recommendations made by the Presidential Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island in the 10 years since the accident occurred in March 1979. It also updates NRC's initial response to the Presidential Commission's recommendations contained in ''NRC Views and Analysis of the Recommendations of the President's Commission of the Accident at Three Mile Island'' (NUREG-0632), issued in November 1979. The status of ongoing initiatives for actions not yet complete is also reported for reference purposes. On the basis of its analysis of NRC and the industry, the Presidential Commission found many then-current practices inadequate and in need of improvement. As a result of its recommendations and of guidance from other studies, substantial changes have been made in the 10 years since the accident. This report reflects how, based on Presidential Commission recommendations and continued work, revised practices and standards are now being implemented by NRC and throughout the industry

  20. Socioeconomic impacts of nuclear generating stations: Three Mile Island case study. Technical report 1 Oct 78-4 Jan 82

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, C.

    1982-07-01

    The report documents a case study of the socioeconomic impacts of the construction and operation of the Three Mile Island nuclear power station. It is part of a major post-licensing study of the socioeconomic impacts at twelve nuclear power stations. The case study covers the period beginning with the announcement of plans to construct the reactor and ending in the period, 1980-81. The case study deals with changes in the economy, population, settlement patterns and housing, local government and public services, social structure, and public response in the study area during the construction/operation of the reactor. A regional modeling approach is used to trace the impact of construction/operation on the local economy, labor market, and housing market. Emphasis in the study is on the attribution of socioeconomic impacts to the reactor or other causal factors. As part of the study of local public response to the construction/operation of the reactor, the effects of the Three Mile Island accident are examined

  1. A comparison of measured radionuclide release rates from Three Mile Island Unit-2 core debris for different oxygen chemical potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baston, V.F.; Hofstetter, K.J.; Ryan, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    Chemical and radiochemical analyses of reactor coolant samples taken during defueling of the Three Mile Island Unit-2 (TMI-2) reactor provide relevant data to assist in understanding the solution chemistry of the radionuclides retained within the TMI-2 reactor coolant system. Hydrogen peroxide was added to various plant systems to provide disinfection for microbial contamination and has provided the opportunity to observe radionuclide release under different oxygen chemical potentials. A comparison of the radionuclide release rates with and without hydrogen peroxide has been made for these separate but related cases, i.e., the fuel transfer canal and connecting spent-fuel pool A with the TMI-2 reactor plenum in the fuel transfer canal, core debris grab sample laboratory experiments, and the reactor vessel fluid and associated core debris. Correlation and comparison of these data indicate a physical parameter dependence (surface-to-volume ratio) affecting all radionuclide release; however, selected radionuclides also demonstrate a chemical dependence release under the different oxygen chemical potentials. Chemical and radiochemical analyses of reactor coolant samples taken during defueling of the Three Mile Island Unit-2 (TMI-2) reactor provide relevant data to assist in understanding the solution chemistry of the radionuclides retained within the TMI-2 reactor coolant system

  2. Report of Special Review Group, Office of Inspection and Enforcement, on lessons learned from Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    The IE Special Review Group (SRG) was constituted by V. Stello, Jr., Director, Office of Inspection and Enforcement (IE), in a memorandum to IE Management dated July 12, 1979, to review the lessons learned from the Three Mile Island (TMI) Accident. This memorandum is enclosed as Appendix A to this report. The members of SRG were selected on the basis of their qualifications and experience in IE. SRG members were selected mainly from Regional Offices. Several of the members had been assigned to Three Mile Island following the accident. Several members had been assigned to the Incident Response Center in NRC Headquarters following the accident. Several other members had no direct involvement in responding to the accident. SRG was divided into two groups, one to review the preventive aspects and one to review the responsive aspects. This action was taken so that the qualifications of individual SRG members could be utilized most efficiently across the spectrum of matters considered. Although for the most part the two groups worked separately, each member of SRG has reviewed the entire report and concurs in its contents

  3. Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects: Summary status report: Three Mile Island Unit 2 radioactive waste and laundry shipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerge, D.H.; Haffner, D.R.

    1988-06-01

    This document summarizes information concerning radioactive waste and laundry shipments from the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station Unit 2 to radioactive waste disposal sites and to protective clothing decontamination facilities (laundries) since the loss of coolant accident experienced on March 28, 1979. Data were collected from radioactive shipment records, summarized, and placed in a computerized data information retrieval/manipulation system which permits extraction of specific information. This report covers the period of April 9, 1979 through April 19, 1987. Included in this report are: waste disposal site locations, dose rates, curie content, waste description, container type and number, volumes and weights. This information is presented in two major categories: protective clothing (laundry) and radioactive waste. Each of the waste shipment reports is in chronological order

  4. Potential Role of Land Use and Land Cover Information in Powerplant Siting: Example of Three Mile Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Selecting a site for a nuclear powerplant can be helped by digitizing land use and land cover data, population data, and other pertinent data sets, and then placing them in a geographic information system. Such a system begins with a set of standardized maps for location reference and then provides for retrieval and analysis of spatial data keyed to the maps. This makes possible thematic mapping by computer, or interactive visual display for decisionmaking. It also permits correlating land use area measurements with census and other data (such as fallout dosages), and the updating of all data sets. The system is thus a tool for dealing with resource management problems and for analyzing the interaction between people and their environment. An explanation of a computer-plotted map of land use and cover for Three Mile Island and vicinity is given.

  5. Nuclear power: renaissance or relapse? Global climate change and long-term Three Mile Island activists' narratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culley, Marci R; Angelique, Holly

    2010-06-01

    Community narratives are increasingly important as people move towards an ecologically sustainable society. Global climate change is a multi-faceted problem with multiple stakeholders. The voices of affected communities must be heard as we make decisions of global significance. We document the narratives of long-term anti-nuclear activists near the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant who speak out in the dawn of a nuclear renaissance/relapse. While nuclear power is marketed as a "green" solution to global warming, their narratives reveal three areas for consideration; (1) significant problems with nuclear technology, (2) lessons "not" learned from the TMI disaster, and (3) hopes for a sustainable future. Nuclear waste, untrustworthy officials and economic issues were among the problems cited. Deceptive shaping of public opinion, nuclear illiteracy, and an aging anti-nuclear movement were reasons cited for the lessons not learned. However, many remain optimistic and envision increased participation to create an ecologically-balanced world.

  6. Neutron dosimetry in the Three-Mile Island Unit 2 reactor cavity with solid-state track recorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Ruddy, F.H.; Preston, C.C.; McElroy, W.N.; Rao, S.V.; Greenborg, J.; Fricke, V.R.

    1986-01-01

    Solid-state track recorder (SSTR) neutron dosimetry has been conducted in the Three-Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor cavity, for nondestructive assessment of the fuel distribution. Two axial stringers were deployed in the annular gap with 17 SSTR dosimeters located on each stringer. SSTR experimental results reveal that neutron streaming, upward from the bottom of the reactor cavity region, dominates the observed neutron intensity. These absolute thermal neutron flux observations are consistent with the presence of a significant amount of fuel debris lying at the bottom of the reactor vessel. A conservative lower bound estimated from these SSTR data implies that at least 2 tonnes of fuel, which is roughly 4 fuel assemblies, is lying at the bottom of the vessel. This existence of significant neutron streaming also explains the high count rate observed with the source range monitors that are located in the TMI-2 reactor cavity. (author)

  7. Predictors of temporal patterns of psychiatric distress during 10 years following the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dew, M A; Bromet, E J

    1993-04-01

    The present study examines psychiatric symptom levels during a 10-year period in a community sample of mothers of young children. All were identified in the early aftermath of the 1979 Three Mile Island nuclear accident, and followed through the accident's 1989 anniversary. Cluster analysis was used to identify long-term distress profiles during the study period; women's temporal profiles were found to be either (a) stable and at low, clinically nonsignificant levels of distress across all measurement points or (b) at consistently elevated, clinically significant levels that varied with the timing of postaccident events such as the restart of the undamaged reactor and the 10th anniversary. Subsequent multivariate analyses indicated that preaccident characteristics, as well as parameters reflecting respondents' initial involvement with, and reactions to the accident, were important for distinguishing between women within the two temporal profile groups. Implications of the results for both policy formulation and continued research on significant environmental stressors is discussed.

  8. Quality assurance in the removal and transport of the TMI-2 [Three Mile Island Unit 2] core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, G.R.; Marsden, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    The March 1979 accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) damaged the core of the reactor. One of the major cleanup activities involves removal of the damaged core from the reactor and transporting it from the TMI-2 site near Middletown, Pennsylvania, to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) near Idaho Falls, Idaho. Removal and transport of the damaged core necessitated the development of much specialized equipment. This paper focuses on the role quality assurance (QA) played in the design, fabrication, acceptance, and use of three important pieces of core debris removal and transportation equipment: (1) the core boring machine, (2) the fuel debris canisters, (3) the NuPac 125-B rail cask and handling equipment

  9. Disposal demonstration of a high integrity container (HIC) containing an EPICOR-II prefilter from Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Tyacke, M.J.; Schmitt, R.C.; Reno, H.W.

    1985-02-01

    A high integrity container (HIC) was developed, tested, and certified for use in disposing of unusual low-level radioactive waste from Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2). The work was coordinated by EG and G Idaho, Inc. and funded by the US Department of Energy. A disposal demonstration using an HIC containing an EPICOR-II prefilter from TMI-2 was completed at the commercial disposal facility in the State of Washington. A Certification of Compliance was issued by the Department of Social and Health Services of the State of Washington to use the HIC in disposing of up to 50 EPICOR-II prefilters. That Certification of Compliance was issued after rigorous review of the HIC design and test program by the State and by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report describes the processes of loading, transporting, and disposing of the demonstration HIC and briefly describes the design, testing, and approval effort leading up to the demonstration

  10. Transporting TMI-2 [Three Mile Island Unit 2] core debris to INEL: Public safety and public response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, R.C.; Reno, H.W.; Young, W.R.; Hamric, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the approach taken by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to ensure that public safety is maintained during transport of core debris from the Unit-2 reactor at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station near Harrisburg, PA, to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, ID. It provides up-to-date information about public response to the transport action and discusses DOE's position on several institutional issues. The authors advise that planners of future transport operations be prepared for a multitude of comments from all levels of federal, state, and local governments, special interest groups, and private citizens. They also advise planners to keep meticulous records concerning all informational transactions

  11. TMI-2 [Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station] fuel canister and core sample handling equipment used in INEL hot cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Shurtliff, W.T.; Lynch, R.J.; Croft, K.M.; Whitmill, L.J.; Allen, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the specialized remote handling equipment developed and used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to handle samples obtained from the core of the damaged Unit 2 reactor at Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station (TM-2). Samples of the core were removed, placed in TMI-2 fuel canisters, and transported to the INEL. Those samples will be examined as part of the analysis of the TMI-2 accident. The equipment described herein was designed for removing sample materials from the fuel canisters, assisting with initial examination, and processing samples in preparation for detailed examinations. The more complex equipment used microprocessor remote controls with electric motor drives providing the required force and motion capabilities. The remaining components were unpowered and manipulator assisted

  12. The public whole body counting program following the Three Mile Island accident. Technical report, April-September 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotchy, R.L.; Bores, R.J.

    1980-12-01

    In early April, 1979 the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory instituted a program to determine whether any radioactivity released as a result of the March 28, 1979 accident at the Three Mile Island Unit-2 was accumulating in members of the general public living near Unit-2. The program used a device called a whole body counter which has the capability of measuring very small quantities of radioactivity in people. There were 753 men, women and children successfully counted; nine of these people were counted a second time, leading to a total of 762 whole body counts. There was no radioactivity identified in any member of the public which could have originated from the radioactive materials released following the accident. Several people with higher than average levels of naturally occurring radioactivity were identified. The counting systems used are briefly described. Technical problems encountered, results and conclusions are discussed

  13. Accident at Three Mile Island: the contribution of the social sciences to the evaluation of emergency preparedness and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynes, R.R.

    1982-01-01

    At 4:00 A.M. on 28 March 1979, a serious accident occurred in the nuclear-power plant at Three Mile Island near Middletown, Pennsylvania. It was caused by mechanical malfunctions in the plant, and for the next four days the extent and severity of the accident were not clear. Because it raised serious concerns about the safety of nuclear power, on 11 April President Carter established a commission to study and investigate the accident. Several aspects of the formation and evolution of the commission are particularly relevant to the social sciences. One was the way the original problem was defined for the commission by the presidential executive order. A second was the commission's own definition of the problem that evolved as the investigation progressed. As that definition became more inclusive, the body of social science literature relating to emergencies became increasingly relevant

  14. Advertising/public relations campaign to combat the negative economic impact caused by the nuclear mishap at Three Mile Island, Pennsylvania. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, through the Department of Commerce, conducted a media advertising campaign to offset the negative implications and effects of the Three Mile Island incident. The emphasis of the campaign has been directed toward a friendly, all-clear image for Pennsylvania. The travel industry of the entire Commonwealth of Pennsylvania is the chief beneficiary of the proposed project

  15. Advertising/public relations campaign to combat the negative economic impact caused by the nuclear mishap at Three Mile Island, Pennsylvania. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, through the Department of Commerce, conducted a media advertising campaign to offset the negative implications and effects of the Three Mile Island incident. The emphasis of the campaign has been directed toward a friendly, all-clear image for Pennsylvania. The travel industry of the entire Commonwealth of Pennsylvania is the chief beneficiary of the proposed project.

  16. The significance of the human factor in the safety of nuclear reactors: the French experience and the lessons of Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houze, C.; Oury, J.M.

    1982-05-01

    The importance of the human factor to French nuclear safety policy and the application of human fallibility as a parameter of safety analysis are described. The impact of reactor operating experience on future theoretical and practical application considerations is discussed. Particular reference is given to the lessons of Three Mile Island

  17. Using Pennsylvania's Three Mile Island Accident as a Case Study to Analyze Newspaper Coverage: A Diary of Events and Suggestions for Teaching Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susskind, Jacob L.

    1983-01-01

    Methods for studying the coverage of the same current news story in several newspapers are outlined. Secondary school students critically examine news reporting, detect false or propagandistic reports, and learn to weigh and judge evidence. An example using the Three Mile Island nuclear accident is provided. (KC)

  18. A nuclear power unit with a Babcock type steam generating system-analysis of the break-down in the Three Mile Island power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, A.

    1980-01-01

    Installations of the primary and the secondary circuits and basic automatic control and protection systems for a nuclear power unit with Babcock type vertical, once-through steam generator are described. On this background the course of the break-down in the Three Mile Island power plant at Harrisburg is presented and analysed. (author)

  19. Tourism Impacts of Three Mile Island and Other Adverse Events: Implications for Lincoln County and Other Rural Counties Bisected by Radioactive Wastes Intended for Yucca Mountain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelberger, Jeffery J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Summarizes key research implications of Three Mile Island and other major hazard events as related to tourism. Examines how the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository system will impact tourism in southern Nevada and other visitor-oriented rural counties bisected by planned waste transportation corridors. (AIM)

  20. Effects of the accident at Three Mile Island on the mental health and behavioral responses of the general population and nuclear workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1983-02-01

    On March 28, 1979, an accident occurred at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant Unit No. 2 near Middletown, PA. A Presidential Commission was established to investigate the incident and was given the responsibility to evaluate the actual and potential impact of the events on the health and safety of the workers and the public. A main conclusion of the investigation was that the most serious health effect was severe, short-lived mental stress. This paper describes the study and the findings for four different study groups: (1) the general population of heads of households located within 20 miles of the plant; (2) mothers of preschool children from the same area; (3) teenagers in the 7th, 9th, and 11th grades from the area; and (4) nuclear workers employed at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant

  1. A reevaluation of cancer incidence near the Three Mile Island nuclear plant: the collision of evidence and assumptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, S; Richardson, D; Armstrong, D; Crawford-Brown, D

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies concluded that there was no evidence that the 1979 nuclear accident at Three Mile Island (TMI) affected cancer incidence in the surrounding area; however, there were logical and methodological problems in earlier reports that led us to reconsider data previously collected. A 10-mile area around TMI was divided into 69 study tracts, which were assigned radiation dose estimates based on radiation reading and models of atmospheric dispersion. Incident cancers from 1975 to 1985 were ascertained from hospital records and assigned to study tracts. Associations between accident doses and incidence rates of leukemia, lung cancer, and all cancer were assessed using relative dose estimates calculated by the earlier investigators. Adjustments were made for age, sex, socioeconomic characteristics, and preaccident variation in incidence. Considering a 2-year latency, the estimated percent increase per dose unit +/- standard error was 0.020 +/- 0.012 for all cancer, 0.082 +/- 0.032 for lung cancer, and 0.116 +/- 0.067 for leukemia. Adjustment for socioeconomic variables increased the estimates to 0.034 +/- 0.013, 0.103 +/- 0.035, and 0.139 +/- 0.073 for all cancer, lung cancer, and leukemia, respectively. Associations were generally larger considering a 5-year latency, but were based on smaller numbers of cases. Results support the hypothesis that radiation doses are related to increased cancer incidence around TMI. The analysis avoids medical detection bias, but suffers from inaccurate dose classification; therefore, results may underestimate the magnitude of the association between radiation and cancer incidence. These associations would not be expected, based on previous estimates of near-background levels of radiation exposure following the accident.

  2. A reevaluation of cancer incidence near the Three Mile Island nuclear plant: The collision of evidence and assumptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wing, S.; Richardson, D.; Armstrong, D.; Crawford-Brown, D.

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies concluded that there was no evidence that the 1979 nuclear accident at Three Mile Island (TMI) affected cancer incidence in the surrounding area; however, there were logical and methodological problems in earlier reports that led us to reconsider data previously collected. A 10-mile area around TMI was divided into 69 study tracts, which were assigned radiation dose estimates based on radiation readings and models of atmospheric dispersion. Incident cancers from 1975 to 1985 were ascertained from hospital records and assigned to study tracts. Associations between accident doses and incidence rates of leukemia, lung cancer, and all cancer were assessed using relative dose estimates calculated by the earlier investigators. Adjustments were made for age, sex, socioeconomic characteristics, and preaccident variation in incidence. Considering a 2-year latency, the estimated percent increase per dose unit ± standard error was 0.020 ± 0.012 for all cancer, 0.082 ± 0.032 for lung cancer, and 0.116 ± 0.067 for leukemia. Adjustment for socioeconomic variables increased the estimates to 0.034 ± 0.013, 0.103 ± 0.035, and 0.139 ± 0.073 for all cancer, lung cancer, and leukemia, respectively. Associations were generally larger considering a 5-year latency, but were based on smaller numbers of cases. Results support the hypothesis that radiation doses are related to increased cancer incidence around TMI. The analysis avoids medical detection bias, but suffers from inaccurate dose classification; therefore, results may underestimate the magnitude of the association between radiation and cancer incidence. These associations would not be expected, based on previous estimates of near-background levels of radiation exposure following the accident. 35 refs., 3 tabs

  3. Unauthorized forced entry into the protected area at Three Mile Island Unit 1 on February 7, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    On February 7, 1993, at 6:53 a.m. Eastern Standard Time (EST) an intruder drove into tile site owner-controlled area, through a gate into the protected area of Three Mile Island Nuclear Generating Station, Unit I (TMI-1) and crashed through a roll-up door on the Turbine Building. TMI Security reported this event to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) Headquarters operations officer and declared a Security Emergency upon determining that the protected area of the plant had been compromised. At 7:23 a.m., the TMI-1 shift supervisor officially notified the NRC Headquarters operations officer that he had declared a Site Area Emergency effective at 7:05 a.m. Upon considering the possible significance to physical security and the regulatory questions that could result from the event, the NRC Executive Director for Operations established an incident investigation team to determine what happened and make appropriate findings and conclusions. In this report the team described the event and the response to the event, evaluated the regulatory requirements, and presented the team's findings and conclusions

  4. Thermal and stress analyses of the reactor pressure vessel lower head of the Three Mile Island Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, K.; Onizawa, K.; Kurihara, R.; Kawasaki, S.; Soda, K.

    1992-01-01

    Thermal and stress analyses were performed using the finite element analysis code ABAQUS to clarify the factors which caused tears in the stainless steel liner of the reactor pressure vessel lower head of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor pressure vessel during the accident on 28 March 1979. The present analyses covered the events which occurred after approximately 20 tons of molten core material were relocated to the lower head of the reactor pressure vessel. They showed that the tensile stress was highest in the case where the relocated core material consisting of homogeneous UO 2 debris was assumed to attack the lower head and the debris was then quenched. The peak tensile stress was in the vicinity of the welded zone of the penetration nozzle. This result agrees with the findings from the examination of the TMI-2 reactor pressure vessel that major tears in the stainless steel liner were observed around two penetration nozzles of the lower head. (author)

  5. Assessment of extent and degree of thermal damage to polymeric materials in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvares, N.J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes assumptions and procedures used to perform thermal damage analysis caused by post loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) hydrogen deflagration at Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor. Examination of available photographic evidence yields data on the extent and range of thermal and burn damage. Thermal damage to susceptible material in accessible regions of the reactor building was distributed in non-uniform patterns. No clear explanation for non-uniformity was found in examined evidence, e.g., burned materials were adjacent to materials that appear similar but were not burned. Because these items were in proximity to vertical openings that extend the height of the reactor building, the authors assume the unburned materials preferentially absorbed water vapor during periods of high, local steam concentration. A control pendant from the polar crane located in the top of the reactor building sustained asymmetric burn damage of decreasing degree from top to bottom. Evidence suggests the polar-crane pendant side that experienced heaviest damage was exposed to intense radiant energy from a transient fire plume in the reactor containment volume. Simple hydrogen-fire-exposure tests and heat transfer calculations approximate the degree of damage found on inspected materials from the containment building and support for an estimated 8% pre-fire hydrogen

  6. Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects. Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor defueling and disassembly. Summary status report. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerge, D.H.; Miller, R.L.; Scotti, K.S.

    1986-05-01

    This document summarizes information relating to the preparations for defueling the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor and disassembly activities being performed concurrently with decontamination of the facility. Data have been collected from activity reports, reactor containment entry records, and other sources and entered in a computerized data sysem which permits extraction/manipulation of specific data which can be used in planning for recovery from a loss of coolant event similar to that experienced at TMI-2 on March 28, 1979. This report contains summaries of man-hours, manpower, and radiation exposures incurred during the period of April 23, 1979 to April 16, 1985, in the completion of activities related to preparation for reactor defueling. Support activities conducted outside of radiation areas are not included within the scope of this report. Computerized reports included in this document are: A chronological summary listing work performed for the period; and summary reports for each major task undertaken in connection with the specific scope of this report. Presented in chronological order for the referenced time period. Manually-assembled table summaries are included for: Labor and exposures by department; and labor and exposures by major activity

  7. Solid-state track recorder neutron dosimetry in the Three-Mile Island Unit-2 reactor cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Ruddy, F.H.; Preston, C.C.; McElroy, W.N.

    1985-04-01

    Solid-state track recorder (SSTR) neutron dosimetry has been conducted in the Three-Mile Island Unit (TMI-2) reactor cavity (i.e., the annular gap between the pressure vessel and the biological shield) for nondestructive assessment of the fuel distribution. Two axial stringers were deployed in the annular gap with 17 SSTR dosimeters located on each stringer. SSTR experimental results reveal that neutron streaming, upward from the bottom of the reactor cavity region, dominates the observed neutron intensity. These absolute thermal neutron flux observations are consistent with the presence of a significant amount of fuel debris lying at the bottom of the reactor vessel. A conservative lower bound estimated from these SSTR data implies that there are at least 2 tonnes of fuel, which is roughly 4 fuel assemblies, at the bottom of the vessel. The existence of significant neutron streaming also explains the high count rate observed with the source range monitors (SRMs) that are located in the TMI-2 reactor cavity

  8. Percolation Cooling of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Lower Head by Way of Thermal Cracking and Gap Formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomsen, K.L.

    2002-01-01

    Two partial models have been developed to elucidate the Three Mile Island Unit 2 lower head coolability by water percolation from above into the thermally cracking debris bed and into a gap between the debris and the wall. The bulk permeability of the cracked top crust is estimated based on simple fracture mechanics and application of Poiseuille's law to the fractures. The gap is considered as an abstraction representing an initially rugged interface, which probably expanded by thermal deformation and cracking in connection with the water ingress. The coupled flow and heat conduction problem for the top crust is solved in slab geometry based on the two-phase Darcy equations together with quasi-steady mass and energy conservation equations. The resulting water penetration depth is in good agreement with the depth of the so-called loose debris bed. The lower-head and bottom-crust problem is treated analogously by a two-dimensional axisymmetric model. The notion of a gap is maintained as a useful concept in the flow analysis. Simulations show that a central hot spot with a peak wall temperature of 1075 to 1100 deg. C can be obtained, but the quenching rates are not satisfactory. It is concluded that a three-dimensional model with an additional mechanism to explain the sudden water ingress to the hot spot center would be more appropriate

  9. Neutron dosimetry in the Three-Mile Island Unit 2 reactor cavity with solid-state track recorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Ruddy, F.H.; Preston, C.C.; McElroy, W.N.; Rao, S.V.; Greenborg, J.; Fricke, V.R.

    1985-01-01

    Solid-state track recorder (SSTR) neutron dosimetry has been conducted in the Three-Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor cavity (i.e., the annular gap between the pressure vessel and the biological shield) for nondestructive assessment of the fuel distribution. Two axial stringers were deployed in the annular gap with 17 SSTR dosimeters located on each stringer. SSTR experimental results reveal that neutron streaming, upward from the bottom of the reactor cavity region, dominates the observed neutron intensity. These absolute thermal neutron flux observations are consistent with the presence of a significant amount of fuel debris lying at the bottom of the reactor vessel. A conservative lower bound estimated from these SSTR data implies that at least 2 tonnes of fuel, which is roughly 4 fuel assemblies, is lying at the bottom of the vessel. The existence of significant neutron streaming also explains the high count rate observed with the source range monitors (SRMs) that are located in the TMI-2 reactor cavity

  10. Process improvement studies for the Submerged Demineralizer System (SDS) at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station, Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, D.O.; Collins, E.D.; King, L.J.; Knauer, J.B.

    1982-05-01

    Tests were made to investigate flowsheet modifications which might improve the expected performance of the reference Submerged Demineralizer System (SDS) flowsheet for decontaminating the high-activity-level water at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station, Unit 2. The tests included one series designed to show the effects of aging time, temperature, and pH on reduction of the concentrations of residual 137 Cs and 90 Sr, and a second series designed to evaluate the physical sorption of 125 Sb on silica gel or other inorganic sorbents. Results of the tests indicated that the most promising method for reducing 137 Cs and 90 Sr concentrations below 10 -4 μCi/mL is to age the effluent water from the zeolite columns for at least 2 h at 75 0 C prior to its passage through another zeolite column. Sorption of the 125 Sb on silica gel or other inorganic sorbents did not show sufficient promise to be considered for practical use. A previously identified method for removal of 125 Sb requires deionization of the water by removal of the sodium on a cation exchange resin prior to sorption of 125 Sb on anion exchange resin; however, this method would generate a relatively large amount of low-activity-level solid waste

  11. Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects. Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor building decontamination. Summary status report. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerge, D.H.; Miller, R.L.; Scotti, K.S.

    1986-05-01

    This document summarizes information relating to decontamination of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor building. The report covers activities for the period of June 1, 1979 through March 29, 1985. The data collected from activity reports, reactor containment entry records, and other sources were entered into a computerized data system which permits extraction/manipulation of specific information which can be used in planning for recovery from an accident similar to that experienced at TMI-2 on March 28, 1979. This report contains summaries of man-hours, manpower, and radiation exposures incurred during decontamination of the reactor building. Support activities conducted outside of radiation areas are excluded from the scope of this report. Computerized reports included in this document are: a chronological summary listing work performed relating to reactor building decontamination for the period specified; and summary reports for each major task during the period. Each task summary is listed in chronological order for zone entry and subtotaled for the number of personnel entries, exposures, and man-hours. Manually-assembled table summaries are included for: labor and exposures by department and labor and exposures by major activity

  12. An analysis of the human reliability on Three Mile Island II accident considering THERP and ATHEANA methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, Renato Alves da; Alvim, Antonio Carlos Marques

    2005-01-01

    The research on the Analysis of the Human Reliability becomes more important every day, as well as the study of the human factors and the contributions of the same ones to the incidents and accidents, mainly in complex plants or of high technology. The analysis here developed it uses the methodologies THERP (Technique for Human Error Prediction) and ATHEANA (A Technique for Human Error Analysis), as well as, the tables and the cases presented in THERP Handbook and to develop a qualitative and quantitative study of an occurred nuclear accident. The chosen accident was it of Three Mile Island (TMI). The accident analysis has revealed a series of incorrect actions that resulted in the permanent loss of the reactor and shutdown of Unit 2. This study also aims at enhancing the understanding of the THERP and ATHEANA methods and at practical applications. In addition, it is possible to understand the influence of plant operational status on human failures and the influence of human failures on equipment of a system, in this case, a nuclear power plant. (author)

  13. Assessment of extent and degree of thermal damage to polymeric materials in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvares, N.J.

    1985-06-01

    This paper describes assumptions and procedures used to perform thermal damage analysis caused by post loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) hydrogen deflagration at Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor. Examination of available photographic evidence yields data on the extent and range of thermal and burn damage. Thermal damage to susceptible material in accessible regions of the reactor building was distributed in non-uniform patterns. No clear explanation for non-uniformity was found in examined evidence, e.g., burned materials were adjacent to materials that appear similar but were not burned. Because these items were in proximity to vertical openings that extend the height of the reactor building, we assume the unburned materials preferentially absorbed water vapor during periods of high, local steam concentration. A control pendant from the polar crane located in the top of the reactor building sustained asymmetric burn damage of decreasing degree from top to bottom. Evidence suggests the polar-crane pendant side that experienced heaviest damage was exposed to intense radiant energy from a transient fire plume in the reactor containment volume. Simple hydrogen-fire-exposure tests and heat transfer calculations approximate the degree of damage found on inspected materials from the containment building and support for an estimated 8% pre-fire hydrogen

  14. Three mile island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassler, P.M.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains information about Pennsylvania government and county publications as well as U.S. government publications. Journal articles and U.S. government-sponsored publications: reports and publications are included

  15. Human reliability data, human error and accident models--illustration through the Three Mile Island accident analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bot, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Our first objective is to provide a panorama of Human Reliability data used in EDF's Safety Probabilistic Studies, and then, since these concepts are at the heart of Human Reliability and its methods, to go over the notion of human error and the understanding of accidents. We are not sure today that it is actually possible to provide in this field a foolproof and productive theoretical framework. Consequently, the aim of this article is to suggest potential paths of action and to provide information on EDF's progress along those paths which enables us to produce the most potentially useful Human Reliability analyses while taking into account current knowledge in Human Sciences. The second part of this article illustrates our point of view as EDF researchers through the analysis of the most famous civil nuclear accident, the Three Mile Island unit accident in 1979. Analysis of this accident allowed us to validate our positions regarding the need to move, in the case of an accident, from the concept of human error to that of systemic failure in the operation of systems such as a nuclear power plant. These concepts rely heavily on the notion of distributed cognition and we will explain how we applied it. These concepts were implemented in the MERMOS Human Reliability Probabilistic Assessment methods used in the latest EDF Probabilistic Human Reliability Assessment. Besides the fact that it is not very productive to focus exclusively on individual psychological error, the design of the MERMOS method and its implementation have confirmed two things: the significance of qualitative data collection for Human Reliability, and the central role held by Human Reliability experts in building knowledge about emergency operation, which in effect consists of Human Reliability data collection. The latest conclusion derived from the implementation of MERMOS is that, considering the difficulty in building 'generic' Human Reliability data in the field we are involved in, the best

  16. TMI-2 decay power: LASL fission-product and actinide decay power calculations for the President's commission on the accident at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, T.R.; Wilson, W.B.

    1980-03-01

    Fission-product and actinide decay heating, gas content, curies, and detailed contributions of the most important nuclide contributors were supplied in a series of letters following requests from the Presidential Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island. In addition, similar data assuming different irradiation (power) histories were requested for purposes of comparison. This report consolidates the tabular and graphical data supplied and explains its basis

  17. TMI-2 decay power: LASL fission-product and actinide decay power calculations for the President's Commission at Three Mile Island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    England, T.R.; Wilson, W.B.

    1979-10-01

    Fission-product and actinide decay heating, gas content, curies, and detailed contributions of the most important nuclide contributors were supplied in a series of letters following requests from the Presidential Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island. In addition, similar data assuming different irradiation (power) histories were requested for purposes of comparison. This report consolidates the tabular and graphical data supplied and explains its basis.

  18. TMI-2 decay power: LASL fission-product and actinide decay power calculations for the President's Commission at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, T.R.; Wilson, W.B.

    1979-10-01

    Fission-product and actinide decay heating, gas content, curies, and detailed contributions of the most important nuclide contributors were supplied in a series of letters following requests from the Presidential Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island. In addition, similar data assuming different irradiation (power) histories were requested for purposes of comparison. This report consolidates the tabular and graphical data supplied and explains its basis

  19. Characterization of fuel distributions in the Three-Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor system by neutron and gamma-ray dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Ruddy, F.H.; Preston, C.C.; McNeece, J.P.; Kaiser, B.J.; McElroy, W.N.

    1984-04-01

    The resolution of technical issues generated by the accident at Three-Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) will inevitably be of long range benefit. Determination of the fuel debris dispersal in the TMI-2 reactor system represents a major technical issue. In reactor recovery operations, such as for the safe handling and final disposal of TMI-2 waste, quantitative fuel assessments are being conducted throughout the reactor core and primary coolant system

  20. A human reliability analysis of the Three Mile power plant accident considering the THERP and ATHEANA methodologies; Uma analise da confiabilidade humana do acidente na Usina de Three Mile Island II considerando as metodologias Therp e Atheana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, Renato Alves da

    2004-03-15

    The main purpose of this work is the study of human reliability using the THERP (Technique for Human Error Prediction) and ATHEANA methods (A Technique for Human Error Analysis), and some tables and also, from case studies presented on the THERP Handbook to develop a qualitative and quantitative study of nuclear power plant accident. This accident occurred in the TMI (Three Mile Island Unit 2) power plant, PWR type plant, on March 28th, 1979. The accident analysis has revealed a series of incorrect actions, which resulted in the Unit 2 shut down and permanent loss of the reactor. This study also aims at enhancing the understanding of the THERP method and ATHEANA, and of its practical applications. In addition, it is possible to understand the influence of plant operational status on human failures and of these on equipment of a system, in this case, a nuclear power plant. (author)

  1. The long-term impact of a man-made disaster: An examination of a small town in the aftermath of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Reactor Accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsteen, R; Schorr, J K

    1982-03-01

    This paper explores the long-term effects of a nuclear accident on residents' perceptions of their physical and mental health, their trust of public officials, and their attitudes toward the future risks of nuclear power generation In their community. We find that in the period after the accident at Three Mile Island that there are constant or Increasing levels of distress reported by community residents. We conclude that the effects of a technological disaster may often be more enduring than those natural disaster and that greater research efforts should be made to Investigate the long-term consequences of man-made catastrophies of all types.

  2. Tourism impacts of Three Mile Island and other adverse events: implications for Lincoln County and other rural counties bisected by radioactive wastes intended for Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himmelberger, J.J.; Baughman, M.; Ogneva-Himmelberger, Y.A.

    1995-01-01

    Whether the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository system will adversely impact tourism in southern Nevada is an open question of particular importance to visitor-oriented rural counties bisected by planned waste transportation corridors (highway or rail). As part of one such county's repository impact assessment program, tourism implications of Three Mile Island (TMI) and other major hazard events have been revisited to inform ongoing county-wide socioeconomic assessments and contingency planning efforts. This paper summarizes key research implications of such research as applied to Lincoln County, Nevada. Implications for other rural counties are discussed in light of the research findings

  3. Tourism impacts of Three Mile Island and other adverse events: Implications for Lincoln County and other rural counties bisected by radioactive wastes intended for Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himmelberger, J.J.; Ogneva-Himmelberger, Y.A. [Clark Univ., Worcester, MA (United States); Baughman, M. [Interech Services Corporation, Carson City, NV (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Whether the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository system will adversely impact tourism in southern Nevada is an open question of particular importance to visitor-oriented rural counties bisected by planned waste transportation corridors (highway or rail). As part of one such county`s repository impact assessment program, tourism implications of Three Mile Island (TMI) and other major hazard events have been revisited to inform ongoing county-wide socioeconomic assessments and contingency planning efforts. This paper summarizes key research implications of such research as applied to Lincoln County, Nevada. Implications for other rural counties are discussed in light of the research findings. 29 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Airborne cloud tracking measurements during the Three Mile Island nuclear station accident, Middletown, Pennsylvania. Date of survey: March-June 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beers, R.H.; Burson, Z.G.; Maguire, T.C.; Shipman, G.R.

    1984-12-01

    The Department of Energy's Aerial Measuring Systems (AMS) flew aerial monitoring missions in response to the Three Mile Island nuclear accident. The first flight was made at 1600 hours EST on 28 March 1979, the first day of the accident. Over 150 flights were made during the period of greatest concern. Measurements included isotope identification, plume direction, and maximum radiation levels inside the plume. The highest exposure rate measured (15 milliroentgen per hour, mR/h) was at 300 feet altitude, 1/4 mile from the plant, at 1030 hours on 30 March 1979. The highest measurement at 1 mile was 4.5 mR/h; this occurred at 1600 hours the same day. The Nuclear Emergency Search Team's (NEST's) communication system and logistic support contributed significantly to the overall DOE coordination of off-site radiation measurements. The AMS also provided real time measurements of radioactive krypton gas during purging operations in June 1980. 13 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  5. Justifications of policy-error correction: a case study of error correction in the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.P.

    1982-01-01

    The sensational Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant Accident of 1979 raised many policy problems. Since the TMI accident, many authorities in the nation, including the President's Commission on TMI, Congress, GAO, as well as NRC, have researched lessons and recommended various corrective measures for the improvement of nuclear regulatory policy. As an effort to translate the recommendations into effective actions, the NRC developed the TMI Action Plan. How sound are these corrective actions. The NRC approach to the TMI Action Plan is justifiable to the extent that decisions were reached by procedures to reduce the effects of judgmental bias. Major findings from the NRC's effort to justify the corrective actions include: (A) The deficiencies and errors in the operations at the Three Mile Island Plant were not defined through a process of comprehensive analysis. (B) Instead, problems were identified pragmatically and segmentally, through empirical investigations. These problems tended to take one of two forms - determinate problems subject to regulatory correction on the basis of available causal knowledge, and indeterminate problems solved by interim rules plus continuing study. The information to justify the solution was adjusted to the problem characteristics. (C) Finally, uncertainty in the determinate problems was resolved by seeking more causal information, while efforts to resolve indeterminate problems relied upon collective judgment and a consensus rule governing decisions about interim resolutions

  6. Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects. Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor coolant system and systems decontamination. Summary status report. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerge, D.H.; Miller, R.L.; Scotti, K.S.

    1986-05-01

    This document summarizes information relating to the decontamination and restoration of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor coolant system and other plant systems. Data have been collected from activity reports, reactor containment entry records, and other sources and entered in a computerized data system which permits extraction/manipulation of specific data which can be used in planning for recovery from a loss of coolant event similar to that experienced by the Three Mile Island Unit 2 on March 28, 1979. This report contains a summary of radiation exposures, manpower, and time spent in radiation areas during the referenced period. Support activities conducted outside of radiation areas are not included. Computer reports included are: A chronological listing of all activities related to decomtamination and restoration of the reactor coolant system and other plant systems for the period of April 5, 1979, through December 19, 1984; a summary of labor and exposures by department for the same time period; and summary reports for each major task undertaken in connection with this specific work scope during the referenced time period

  7. Final supplement to the final environmental statement related to operation of Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2: (Docket No. 50-320)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-12-01

    The proposed action is the continuation of construction permit CPPR-66 and the issuance of operating license to Metropolitan Edison Company, Jersey Central Power and Light Company, and the Pennsylvania Electric Company (the Applicants) for the operation of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2, Docket No. 50-320, near Harrisburg in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania. The Three Mile Island Nuclear Station Unit Number 2 has a designed thermal rating of 2772 megawatts with a maximum electrical output of 959 megawatts. Two natural draft cooling towers are utilized for dissipating the waste heat from the closed cycle cooling system. Extension of TMINS-Bechtelsville 500 kV transmission line an additional 7.36 miles from Bechtelsville to Hosensack required acquisition of additional 175 foot wide right-of-way along an existing 150 foot wide 230 kV corridor. Construction of this line segment resulted in clearing of 21 acres of woodland, spanning over 134.5 acres of agricultural land and diverting of 0.4 acres from agriculture to use under tower bases. About 550 curies of radionuclides in liquid effluents (0.24 Ci/yr excluding tritium and 550 Ci/yr of tritium) will be released to the environment annually. Gaseous releases will be approximately 6700 Ci/yr of noble gases, 0.01 Ci/yr of iodine-131, 560 Ci/yr of tritium, 25 Ci/yr of argon-41, and 0.06 Ci/yr of particulates. No significant environmental impacts are anticipated from normal operational releases of radioactive materials. The calculated dose to the estimated year 1990 US population is less than 540 manrem/yr. This value is less than the natural fluctuation in the approximately 28,000,000 manrem/yr dose this population would receive from background radiation

  8. Psychological aspects in a volcanic crisis: El Hierro Island eruption (October, 2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, P.; Llinares, A.; Garcia, A.; Marrero, J. M.; Ortiz, R.

    2012-04-01

    The recent eruption on the El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain) has shown that Psychology plays an important role in the emergence management of a natural phenomenon. However, Psychology continues to have no social coverage it deserves in the mitigation of the effects before, during and after the occurrence of a natural phenomenon. Keep in mind that an unresolved psychological problem involves an individual and collective mismatch may become unrecoverable. The population of El Hierro has been under a state of alert since July 2011, when seismic activity begins, until the occurrence of submarine eruption in October 2011 that is held for more than three months. During this period the inhabitants of the small island have gone through different emotional states ranging from confusion to disappointment. A volcanic eruption occurs not unexpectedly, allowing to have a time of preparation / action before the disaster. From the psychological point of view people from El Hierro Island have responded to different stages of the same natural process. Although the island of El Hierro is of volcanic origin, the population has no historical memory since the last eruption occurred in 1793. Therefore, the educational system does not adequately address the formation in volcanic risk. As a result people feel embarrassment when the seismovolcanic crisis begins, although no earthquakes felt. As an intermediate stage, when the earthquakes are felt by the population, scientists and operational Emergency Plan care to inform and prepare actions in case of a possible eruption. The population feel safe despite the concerns expressed by not knowing where, how and when the eruption will occur. Once started the submarine eruption, taking into account that all the actions (evacuation, relocation, etc.) have worked well and that both their basic needs and security are covered there are new states of mind. These new emotional states ranging from disenchantment with the phenomenology of the

  9. Characterization of fuel distribution in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor system by neutron and gamma-ray dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Ruddy, F.H.; Preston, C.C.; McNeece, J.P.; Kaiser, B.J.; McElroy, W.N.

    1984-01-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray dosimetry are being used for nondestructive assessment of the fuel distribution throughout the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor core region and primary cooling system. The fuel content of TMI-2 makeup and purification Demineralizer A has been quantified with Si(Li) continuous gamma-ray spectrometry and solid-state track recorder (SSTR) neutron dosimetry. For fuel distribution characterization in the core region, results from SSTR neutron dosimetry exposures in the TMI-2 reactor cavity are presented. These SSTR results are consistent with the presence of a significant amount of fuel debris, equivalent to several fuel assemblies or more, lying at the bottom of the reactor vessel. (Auth.)

  10. Investigation: revelations about Three Mile Island disaster raise doubts over nuclear plant safety: a special facing south investigation by Sue Sturgis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgis, Sue

    2009-01-01

    A series of mishaps in a reactor at the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear plant led to the 1979 meltdown of almost half the uranium fuel and uncontrolled releases of radiation into the air and surrounding Susquehanna River. It was the single worst disaster ever to befall the U.S. nuclear power industry. Health physics technician Randall Thompson's story about what he witnessed while monitoring radiation there after the incident is being publicly disclosed for the first time. It is supported by a growing body of evidence and it contradicts the U.S. government's contention that the TMI accident posed no threat to the public. Thompson and his wife, a nuclear health physicist who also worked at TMI in the disaster's wake, warn that the government's failure to acknowledge the full scope of the disaster is leading officials to underestimate the risks posed by a new generation of nuclear power plants.

  11. Flow-induced vibration analysis of Three Mile Island Unit-2 once-through steam generator tubes. Volume 1. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.R.; Brown, J.C.; Harris, C.E.; McGuinn, E.J.; Simonis, J.C.; Thoren, D.E.

    1981-06-01

    Tube responses to flow-induced vibration were measured in the top two spans and the tenth span in the B once-through steam generator at Three Mile Island, Unit 2. This program evaluated the effects of flow-induced biration of OTSG tubes during steady-state and transient operation. Twenty-three tubes were instrumented with accelerometers and strain gages in tubes located along the open lane, in the bundle, and at the tenth span. Tube displacements, frequencies, dynamic strains, and mode shapes were determined during steady-state and transient operation. Pressure sensors were installed in the OTSG to measure pressure fluctuations and plant parameters, which were recorded for correlation with tube response. Data analysis results indicate that the steady-state tube response increases with increasing reactor power, with the maximum response (12 mils peak to peak at midspan) at the outer perimeter of the generator in the 16th span

  12. Evaluation of zeolite mixtures for decontaminating high-activity-level water at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, E.D.; Campbell, D.O.; King, L.J.; Knauer, J.B.; Wallace, R.M.

    1984-05-01

    Mixtures of Linde Ionsiv IE-96 and Ionsiv A-51 were evaluated for use in the Submerged Demineralizer System (SDS) that was installed at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Nuclear Power Station to decontaminate approx. 2780 m 3 of high-activity-level water. The original SDS flowsheet was conservatively designed for removal of cesium and strontium and would have required the use of approx. 60 SDS columns. Mixed zeolite tests were made on a 10 -5 scale and indicated that the appropriate ratio of IE-96/A-51 was 3/2. A mathematical model was used to predict the performance of the mixed zeolite columns in the SDS configuration and with the intended method of operation. Actual loading results were similar to those predicted for strontium and better than those predicted for cesium. The number of SDS columns needed to process the HALW was reduced to approx. 10. 6 references, 4 figures, 2 tables

  13. Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects. Three Mile Island Unit 2. Radioactive waste and laundry shipments. Volume 9. Summary status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerge, D.H.; Miller, R.L.; Scotti, K.S.

    1986-05-01

    This document summarizes information concerning radioactive waste and laundry shipments from the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station Unit 2 to radioactive waste disposal sites and to protective clothing decontamination facilities (laundries) since the loss of coolant accident experienced on March 28, 1979. Data were collected from radioactive shipment records, summarized, and placed in a computerized data information retrieval/manipulation system which permits extraction of specific information. This report covers the period of April 9, 1979 to May 5, 1985. Included in this report are: waste disposal site locations, dose rates, curie content, waste description, container type and number, volumes and weights. This information is presented in two major categories: protective clothing (laundry) and radioactive waste. Each of the waste shipment reports is in chronological order

  14. Non-radiological consequences to the aquatic biota and fisheries of the Susquehanna River from the 1979 accident at Three Mile Island Nuclear Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickey, C.R. Jr.; Samworth, R.B.

    1979-11-01

    The non-radiological consequences to the aquatic biota and fishes of the Susquehanna River from the March 28, 1979 accident at Three Mile Island Nuclear Station were assessed through the post-accident period of July 1979. Thermal and chemical discharges during the period did not exceed required effluent limitations. Several million gallons of treated industrial waste effluents were released into the river which were not of unusual volumes compared with normal operation and were a very small proportion of the seasonally high river flows. The extent and relative location of the effluent plume were defined and the fisheries known to have been under its immediate influence were identified, including rough, forage, and predator/sport fishery species

  15. Population dose and health impact of the accident at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station. Preliminary estimates for the period March 28, 1979--April 7, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battist, L.; Congel, F.; Buchanan, J.; Peterson, H.

    1979-05-01

    This report contains a preliminary assessment of the radiation dose and potential health impact of the accident on March 28, 1979 at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station. This assessment was prepared by a task group composed of technical staff members from The Environmental Protection Agency, The Department of Health, Education and Welfare, and The Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The estimated dose that might have been received by an individual is less than 100 mrem. The collective dose received by the 2,164,000 people estimated to live within 50 miles of the reactor site is calculated to be 3,300 person-rem (with a range of 1600 to 5300 person-rem). This corresponds to an average dose of approximately 1.5 mrem. The potential number of fatal cancers that is projected to occur as a result of the accident is less than 1. This potential impact would be undetectable compared to the 325,000 cancer deaths that would normally be expected to occur in a population of 2,164,000. The estimated total health impact, including fatal and non-fatal cancers and genetic effects to all future generations is approximately 2 health effects

  16. Financial implications of the accident at Three Mile Island. Oversight hearings before the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, First Session on financial implications of the accident at Three Mile Island, hearings held in Washington, DC, May 4-5, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    Five panel presentations and a total of 21 witnesses testified at a two-day hearing May 4-5, 1981, in Washington, DC, on the financial consequences of the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident and the economic issues of the cleanup. The committee's goal was to listen to recommendations for government response and to determine the government's proper role and whether legislation is necessary to fulfill that role. Another issue under consideration was the restart of the undamaged unit one. The hearing record includes testimony of witnesses representing the nuclear power industry, environmental groups, and the financial and insurance industries and three appendices with additional materials

  17. Population dose estimation from a hypothetical release of 2.4 x 106 curies of noble gases and 1 x 104 curies of 131I at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, C.D.; Lane, B.H.; Cotter, S.J.; Miller, C.W.; Glandon, S.R.

    1981-09-01

    Beginning on March 28, 1979, a sequence of events occurred at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station Unit 2 (TMINS-2) nuclear power reactor which resulted in the accidental release of approximately 2.4 x 10 6 Ci of noble gases and 13 to 15 Ci 131 I. A comprehensive study of this incident has been reported by the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island. As part of this study, the Technical Assessment Task Group for the Commission addressed a series of alternative event scenarios, including the potential for a higher release of 131 I. As a continuation of this task, this report presents the estimated collective dose to the population within 50 miles of TMINS-2 from a hypothetical release of 2.4 x 10 6 Ci of noble gases and 1 x 10 4 Ci 131 I by the methodology of atmospheric dispersion modeling and population dose estimation through the inhalation, ingestion and immersion exposure pathways

  18. Investigation into the March 28, 1979 Three Mile Island accident by Office of Inspection and Enforcement (Investigative Report No. 50-320/79-10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-07-01

    On March 28, 1979, the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Nuclear Power Plant experienced the most severe accident in U.S. commercial nuclear power plant operating history. This report sets forth the facts concerning the events of the accident determined as a result of an investigation by the NRC Office of Inspection and Enforcement. The IE investigation is limited to two aspects of the accident: (1) Those related operational actions by the licensee during the period from before the initiating event until approximately 8:00 p.m., March 28, when primary coolant flow was re-established by starting a reactor coolant pump, and (2) Those steps taken by the licensee to control the release of radioactive material to the off-site environs, and to implement his emergency plan during the period from the initiation of the event to midnight, March 30. These investigation periods were selected because they include the licensee actions which most significantly affected the accident sequence and its results

  19. Critical evaluation of radiological measurements and of the need for evacuation of the nearby public during the Three Mile Island incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, A.P.

    1981-01-01

    The most serious malfunction to date at an operating power reactor in the USA occurred at Unit 2 of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station on 28 March 1979. The incident disclosed the inability of typical effluent monitors and field radiation monitoring programmes to furnish prompt and accurate information about abnormal releases. The upper range of the monitors was exceeded, so that the only available information about external exposures and radioiodines was from field measurements and air sampling. The routine TLD placement was sparse, necessitating interpolation and extrapolation in the estimation of population dose. There was no 'lead' agency among the several involved. This made for poor co-ordination and duplication of effort, as well as to delays and lapses in communication. In terms of the amounts and kinds of radioactivity released and population dose, the incident was a relatively minor event. However, there was a widespread public concern, based on the perceived potential for much larger releases. Subsequent evaluation indicates that, except for radiogases, most of the activity which escaped from the fuel was retained in the primary coolant water or in leakage into the containment building. Only under 'worst case' assumptions would the ground-level release of the airborne activity in the containment have warranted the evacuation of even nearby persons. The possibility of containment failure would have been minimized by the provision of standby facilities for its controlled ventilation. (author)

  20. Inhibiting mild steel corrosion from sulfate-reducing bacteria using antimicrobial-producing biofilms in Three-Mile-Island process water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, R; Ornek, D; Syrett, B C; Green, R M; Hsu, C-H; Mansfeld, F B; Wood, T K

    2004-04-01

    Biofilms were used to produce gramicidin S (a cyclic decapeptide) to inhibit corrosion-causing, sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). In laboratory studies these biofilms protected mild steel 1010 continuously from corrosion in the aggressive, cooling service water of the AmerGen Three-Mile-Island (TMI) nuclear plant, which was augmented with reference SRB. The growth of both reference SRB (Gram-positive Desulfosporosinus orientis and Gram-negative Desulfovibrio vulgaris) was shown to be inhibited by supernatants of the gramicidin-S-producing bacteria as well as by purified gramicidin S. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and mass loss measurements showed that the protective biofilms decreased the corrosion rate of mild steel by 2- to 10-fold when challenged with the natural SRB of the TMI process water supplemented with D. orientis or D. vulgaris. The relative corrosion inhibition efficiency was 50-90% in continuous reactors, compared to a biofilm control which did not produce the antimicrobial gramicidin S. Scanning electron microscope and reactor images also revealed that SRB attack was thwarted by protective biofilms that secrete gramicidin S. A consortium of beneficial bacteria (GGPST consortium, producing gramicidin S and other antimicrobials) also protected the mild steel.

  1. Observations on health outcome studies of exposure of the worker and the general population during the nuclear reactor accident at three mile island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1988-01-01

    The nuclear reactor accident at Three Mile Island in March 1979 resulted in the release of radioactivity to the environment. Radiation exposure of the workers and the general population living in the vicinity of the damaged nuclear reactor was estimated based on dose measurements, meteorological conditions, demographic characteristics, reconstruction of the source term, and a number of other factors. The projected estimates of potential delayed health effects in the worker and general population, notable cancer, developmental abnormalities of the newborn, and genetic ill-health, were carefully estimated based on then-current knowledge of radiation risks and statistical techniques of analysis. Almost a decade later, we now have epidemiological and statistical data on certain of these health outcomes in the exposed populations at risk. Discussion includes the reliability of the initial radiation risk estimates, the major illnesses of concern, the mental stress and behavioral effects at the time of and following the accident, and the current findings of the ongoing studies of the health outcomes of the vulnerable populations at risk

  2. Effect of pregnancy during TMI crisis on mothers' mental health and their child's development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houts, P.S.; Tokuhata, G.K.; Bratz, J.; Bartholomew, M.J.; Sheffer, K.W.

    1991-01-01

    Five years after the Three Mile Island nuclear accident, the mental health of women who had been pregnant and living within 10 miles of Three Mile Island at the time of the accident was similar to that of women from the same area who became pregnant after the accident. Ratings of the development of the two groups of children when they were 5 years old were also similar. However, women who were pregnant during the crisis and had been extremely disturbed about their pregnancies rated their children's health as poorer than did the women who were pregnant later

  3. Three Mile Island in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trauger, D.B.

    1979-01-01

    The events of March 28 are described briefly. Some of the causes, for example, failures due to men, to machines, and to man-machine interfaces are discussed. Some plans and actions now being taken to improve things for the future are outlined

  4. The Three Mile Island accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zebroski, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    It is important that the causes of this accident (and other, similar accidents but with less dramatic consequences) are completely understood and that the role of every contributing factor is exactly determined in order to discuss modifications and to judge their relative importance and schedule in an objective way. If the role of the various factors contributing to an accident is not fully understood, there will always be a 'mythology' of prejudiced and highly simplified assumptions. The experience of failure analysis shows that the causes first assumed are hardly ever the right ones, and that in some major and complex cases even the second or third generation of assumed causes is wrong. (orig.) [de

  5. Three Mile Island Unit 1 Main Steam Line Break Three-Dimensional Neutronics/Thermal-Hydraulics Analysis: Application of Different Coupled Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Auria, Francesco; Moreno, Jose Luis Gago; Galassi, Giorgio Maria; Grgic, Davor; Spadoni, Antonino

    2003-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the double ended main steam line break (MSLB) accident assumed to occur in the Babcock and Wilcox Three Mile Island Unit 1 (TMI-1) has been carried out at the Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione of the University of Pisa, Italy, in cooperation with the University of Zagreb, Croatia. The overall activity has been completed within the framework of the participation in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development-Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations-Nuclear Science Committee pressurized water reactor MSLB benchmark.Thermal-hydraulic system codes (various versions of Relap5), three-dimensional (3-D) neutronics codes (Parcs, Quabbox, and Nestle), and one subchannel code (Cobra) have been adopted for the analysis. Results from the following codes (or code versions) are assumed as reference:1. Relap5/mod3.2.2, beta version, coupled with the 3-D neutron kinetics Parcs code parallel virtual machine (PVM) coupling2. Relap5/mod3.2.2, gamma version, coupled with the 3-D neutron kinetics Quabbox code (direct coupling)3. Relap5/3D code coupled with the 3-D neutron kinetics Nestle code.The influence of PVM and of direct coupling is also discussed.Boundary and initial conditions of the system, including those relevant to the fuel status, have been supplied by Pennsylvania State University in cooperation with GPU Nuclear Corporation (the utility, owner of TMI) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The comparison among the results obtained by adopting the same thermal-hydraulic nodalization and the coupled code version is discussed in this paper.The capability of the control rods to recover the accident has been demonstrated in all the cases as well as the capability of all the codes to predict the time evolution of the assigned transient. However, one stuck control rod caused some 'recriticality' or 'return to power' whose magnitude is largely affected by boundary and initial conditions

  6. Final programmatic environmental impact statement related to decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from March 28, 1979 accident, Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2, Docket No. 50-320

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    The appendices included in this report include the following: Comments on the Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (A-1); Commission's Statement of Policy and Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (B-1); 'Final Environmental Assessment for Decontamination of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building Atmosphere, Final NRC Staff Report,' US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, NUREG-0662, May 1980 (C-1); 'Environmental Assessment for Use of EPICOR-Il at Three Mile Island Unit 2,' US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, NUREG-0591, October 3, 1979 (D-1); Fish and Fisheries of York Haven Pond and Conowingo Pond of the Susquehanna River and Upper Chesapeake Bay (E1); Reuse of Accident Water (F-1); Engineering Considerations for Treatment of TMI-2 Accident-Generated Liquid Waste G-1); Engineering Considerations Related to Immobilization of Radioactive Wastes (H-1); Justification for Radiation Fields Used in Section 6 I-1); Economic Cost Basis (K-1); Average Individual Quarterly Dose Limits Used in Determinations of Work Force Estimates (L-1); 'Long-Term Environmental Radiation Surveillance Plan for Three Mile Island,' US Environmental Protection Agency, 1981 (M-1); Occupational Radiation Exposure during Onsite Waste Handling (N-1); Decontamination Status of Auxiliary and Fuel Handling Buildings (0-1); Chemical Systems for Decontamination of Primary System Components (P-1); Onsite Storage Facility (Q-1); Proposed Additions to Technical Specifications for TMI-2 Cleanup Program (R-1); Calculations of Discharge of Processed Accident Water to the Atmosphere (S-1); The Behavior of Sorbable Radionuclides in the Susquehanna River and Chesapeake Bay (T-1); Decommissioning of TMI-2 (U-1); Assessment of Groundwater Liquid Pathway from Leakage of Containment Water at Three Mile Island, Unit 2 (V-1); Calculation Models and Parameters Used in Estimating Doses, and Interpretation of Model Results (W-1); Contributors to the PEIS X-1); Scheduled

  7. Accident at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Powerplant. Part 1. Oversight hearings before a task force of the Subcommittee on Energy and the Environment of the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, House of Representatives, Ninety-Sixth Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs conducted an informal review of the accident beginning on March 28, 1979 at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant. Officials of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, plant operating personnel employed by General Public Utilities, and representatives of the reactor manufacturer, Babcock and Wilcox Company, related their activities during the accident and their analyses of the sequence of events

  8. Implementing and measuring safety goals and safety culture. 1. Lessons to Learn from Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, and Tokaimura and the New Era of the European Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reisch, Frigyes

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to analyze the reasons, the progression, and the improvements made in the aftermath of the world's three most disastrous and publicized nuclear accidents, as well as the lessons still to be learned. At present, the entire European electrical grid is integrated, and reactor manufacturers have become fewer and bigger. Until now, largely only the operators were accused of committing human errors. This contradicts the claim that later technological improvements offset the possibility of a repetition of the accident. To improve the safety culture, new complementary views are presented that previously had been overlooked. Technological improvements and safety culture deficiencies at the managerial level are still missing. Although the accidents at Three Mile Island (TMI), Chernobyl, and Tokaimura occurred on different continents at entirely different plants, these accidents share many common features in terms of precursors, progression, and succession. In the actual work, these common features are analyzed, and as a result, some recommendations are made. The results of the analyses show the following deficiencies in safety culture: 1. The precursors were not properly evaluated, and consequently, the correct conclusions were not deduced and applied. 2. The operators need much improved information about the status of the process that they control to be able to make the right decisions. 3. Operators must improve their awareness of observing deviations at an early stage to avoid accidents, and they also must improve their preparedness to meet the challenges of unexpected occurrences. 4. Management must learn to see the activities at the plant through the operators' eyes. 5. The price of the 'profit' of meeting time schedules by pressuring people is all to high for these practices to continue. The significance of the results is that they give direction to an improved safety culture, as follows: 1. Industry and management authority must assume

  9. Summary and discussion of findings from: population dose and health impact of the accident at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station (a preliminary assessment for the period March 28-April 7, 1979)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    This report was prepared by technical staff members of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the Department of Health, Education and Welfare (HEW), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), who constitute an Ad Hoc Population Dose Assessment Group. It is an assessment of the health impact on the approximately 2 million offsite residents within 50 miles of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station from the dose received by the entire population (collective dose). The Ad Hoc Group has examined in detail the available data for the period up to and including April 7, 1979. The report also addresses several areas of concern about the types of radionuclides released, about the contribution to population exposure due to beta radiation (which does not penetrate the clothing and skin) emitted from the released radionuclides, about the degree of coverage afforded by available radiation measurements, and about the range of health effects that may result from the estimated collective dose

  10. The 2011 volcanic crisis at El Hierro (Canary Islands): monitoring ground deformation through tiltmeter and gravimetric observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoso, J.; Montesinos, F. G.; Benavent, M.; Vélez, E. J.

    2012-04-01

    El Hierro is an ocean island located at the western end of the Canary Islands, and along with Tenerife and La Palma islands have been the most geologically active in the recent past. The island has a triple armed rift and, presently, is at the stage of growth, representing the summit of a volcanic shield elevating from the seafloor at depth of 4000 m up to 1501 m above the sea level (Münn et al., 2006; Carracedo et al., 1999). Since July 19th, 2011 seismic activity has produced more than 11950 events up to date. The seismic crisis resulted in a volcanic eruption that began on October 10th, being still currently active. The new volcano is located 2 km off the coast and about 300 m depth, in the submarine flank of the southern rift of the island, which is extended some 40 km length. Since September 2004 until November 2010 two continuous tilt stations were installed at the north, Balneario site (BA), and at the center of the island, Aula de la Naturaleza (AU) site. Both stations were used to assess the pattern of local ground movements in the island. When seismic swarm started on past July 2011, we have reinstalled both tilt stations (BA and AU) and 2 new ones located at the south of the island, namely Montaña Quemada (MQ) and Restinga (RE) sites. We have used short base platform tiltmeters that measure ground tilts with resolutions varying from 0.1 up to 0.01 microradians (µrad). On October 8th, a 4.4 magnitude earthquake took place and is supposed that fractured the ocean crust at some 8-10 km off the south coast of the island and about 1000 m depth. Typical spike signals were observed at the tilt stations. Two days after, the eruption onset was recorded also at tilt stations through a remarkable increase of the high frequency signal, being of large amplitude the components (radial) orientated towards the new volcano edifice. When compared with previous tiltmeter records in the island, tilt pattern were clearly modified several times at the stations when strong

  11. Industry's response to the accident at Three Mile Island. Oversight hearings before the Subcommittee on Energy and the Environment of the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, House of Representatives, Ninety-Sixth Congress, first session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    This hearing is part of a review of the country's nuclear polices. It reviews testimony concerning the nuclear industry's response to Three Mile Island. Witnesses discuss the lessons industry has learned from the accident and what steps it will take to police itself. Views are offered on a regulatory policy to promote remote sitings of reactors. As the Presidential Kemeny Commission completes its work and reports its conclusions, this subcommittee then will be ready to begin to consider legislative changes in our existing nuclear policy

  12. Programmatic environmental impact statement related to decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from March 28, 1979 accident, Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2 (Docket No. 50-320): Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act and the Commission's implementing regulations and its April 27, 1981 Statement of Policy, the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement related to decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from March 28, 1979, accident Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2 NUREG-0683 (PEIS) is being supplemented. This draft supplement updates the environmental evaluation of accident-generated water disposal alternatives published in the PEIS, utilizing more complete and current information. Also, the draft supplement includes a specific environmental evaluation of the licensee's recently submitted proposal for water disposition

  13. Impact of the accident at the Three Mile Island on the behavior and well-being of nuclear workers. Part II. Job tension, psychophysiological symptoms, and indices of distress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasl, S.V.; Chisholm, R.F.; Eskenazi, B.

    1981-01-01

    Three Mile Island (TMI) workers experienced much greater job tension and lower occupational self-esteem (supervisors only) in comparison with workers interviewed at the Peach Bottom Plant. At the time of the accident, TMI workers reported experiencing more periods of anger, extreme worrry and extreme upset, and more psychophysiological symptoms. Six months after the accident, some persistence of these feelings and symptoms was evident. Demoralization was greater primarily among TMI non-supervisory workers. The impact of the accident was not greater among TMI workers living closer to the plant. Presence of a preschool child at home enhanced the impact of the accident, but primarily among TMI supervisors. 39 references, 17 tables

  14. Behavior and Attitudes under Crisis Conditions: Selected Issues and Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-02-01

    Behavior, and the Intervening Variables." The American Sociologist, 4, 29-34 (1969). Farace , Richard V., Kenneth L. Villard. and L. Edna Rogers, "Family...crisis couldn’t happen here. Farace , Villard and Rogers (1972:12-13) illustrate the point: Another situation which helps support the idea that "those...Effect! the Accident at Three Mile Island; ’Findings to Date,"’ U.S. Nuc Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC. (1980). Farace , Richard V., Edna L

  15. Workforce Development for Communities in Crisis and Transition: A Case Study of the Windward Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, L. Alfons

    The Windward Islands (Dominica, Grenada, St. Lucia, and St. Vincent and the Grenadines) have taken several approaches to educate the work force and prepare for the technology-driven society of the future. These approaches include government initiatives, such as the governments' commitment to primary education and more recently to secondary…

  16. Three Mile Island cleanup and rehabilitation. Oversight Hearing before the Subcommittee on Energy and the Environment of the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, House of Representatives, Ninety-Sixth Congress, second session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this hearing is to present testimony concerning the cleanup and rehabilitation of unit 2 at Three Mile Island nuclear powerplant. A particular concern is with the manner in which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is confronting this difficult situation. An attempt is being made to understand, among other things, the path the Commission is taking in making its decisions. Along the way the Commission will have to make tradeoffs between economics and public health and the Commission's views as to how such tradeoffs should and can be made will be heard. The Commission's views and those of other witnesses as to the responsibility of the NRC to take account of the public anxiety in the region in terms of its decision-making will be discussed. The anxiety question arises with respect to the venting of the radioactive krypton gas from the Three Mile Island containment. While most experts seem to agree that the releasing of this krypton into the atmosphere will not create a radiological hazard, there is a disagreement as to whether venting would exacerabate the anxiety that is prevalent in the area surrounding the plant. How NRC is approaching the venting question, which may be typical of many that would be made as the cleanup process proceeds, is important. There seems to be also some disagreement as to the dangers that might arise if the krypton is eliminated by a process which would capture it but which would take longer than it would be releasing it directly into the atmosphere

  17. Van Three Mile Island tot Piper Alpha : veiligheidsmanagement en veiligheidssystemen, een overzicht van Engels- en Nederlandstaligge literatuur, Deel 2, de periode 1979-1988

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swuste, P.; Groeneweg, J.; Gulijk, C. van; Zwaard, W.; Lemkowitz, S.

    2015-01-01

    Vraagstelling: Wat is de invloed geweest van algemene managementstromingen en onderzoek naar de oorzaken van ongevallen en rampen op het management van veiligheid, in de periode tussen Three Nile Island en Piper Alpha? Binnen welke context heeft deze ontwikkeling plaats gevonden en wat is de invloed

  18. Evaluation of zeolite mixtures for decontamination of high-activity-level water in the Submerged Demineralizer System (SDS) flowsheet at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station, Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, L.J.; Campbell, D.O.; Collins, E.D.; Knauer, J.B.; Wallace, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    Mixtures of Linde Ionsiv IE-96 and Ionsiv A-51 zeolites were evaluated for use in the Submerged Demineralizer System (SDS) that was installed at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station, Unit 2 (TMI-2) for decontaminating approx. 3000 m 3 (approx. 700,000 gal) of high-activity-level water in the containment building sump. Small-scale, tracer-level column tests were made using various mixtures of the zeolites to evaluate the capability for simultaneous removal of cesium and strontium. A column loading test was made in a hot cell using a mixture of equal parts of the zeolites to evaluate the performance of the mixture in removing cesium and strontium from a sample of TMI-2 sump water. A computerized mathematical model of the mixed-bed SDS system was used to evaluate the test data in order to select a zeolite mixture and predict system performance

  19. Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement: related to decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from March 28, 1979 accident Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2 (Docket No. 50-320). Final supplement dealing with occupational radiation dose. Supplement No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act, the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Related to Decontamination and Disposal of Radioactive Wastes Resulting from March 28, 1979 Accident Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2 has been supplemented. The supplement was required because current information indicates that cleanup may entail substantially more occupational radiation dose to the cleanup work force than originally anticipated. Cleanup was originally estimated to result in from 2000 to 8000 person-rem of occupational radiation dose. Although nearly 2000 person-rem have resulted from cleanup operations performed up to now, current estimates now indicate that between 13,000 and 46,000 person-rem are expected to be required. Alternative cleanup methods considered in the supplement either did not result in appreciable dose savings or were not known to be technically feasible

  20. Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement related to decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from March 28, 1979 accident at Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2 (Docket No. 50-320): Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act, the Commission's implementing regulations, and the Commission's April 27, 1981 Statement of Policy, the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement related to decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from March 28, 1979, accident Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2 NUREG-0683 (PEIS) is being supplemented. This supplement updates the environmental evaluation of accident-generated water disposal alternatives published in the PEIS, utilizing more complete and current information. Also, the supplement includes a specific environmental evaluation of the licensee's proposal for water disposition. Although no clearly preferable water disposal alternative was identified, the supplement concluded that a number of alternatives could be implemented without significant environmental impact. The NRC staff has concluded that the licensee's proposed disposal of the accident-generated water by evaporation will not significantly affect the quality of the human environment. Further, any impacts from the disposal program are outweighed by its benefits

  1. The impact of the accident at the Three Mile Island on the behavior and well-being of nuclear workers; Part I: perceptions and evaluations, behavioral responses, and work-related attitudes and feelings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasl, S V; Chisholm, R F; Eskenazi, B

    1981-05-01

    In order to assess the impact of the accident at the Three Mile Island (TMI), telephone interviews were conducted six months later with 324 nuclear workers assigned to TMI and 298 workers assigned to a comparison plant at Peach Bottom (PB). Examination of PB-TMI differences, stratified by supervisory status, revealed the following: Part I: TMI workers reported greater exposure to radiation at the time of the accident and felt that their health had been thereby endangered. TMI workers experienced more uncertainty and conflict at the time of the accident. Coping responses such as seeing a doctor, taking drugs, and increasing alcohol consumption were quite infrequent. Leaving the area was more common; however, over 40 per cent of TMI workers wished to leave but did not do so because of work obligations. TMI workers reported much lower job satisfaction and much greater uncertainty about their job future.

  2. Final programmatic environmental impact statement related to decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from March 28, 1979 accident, Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2, Docket No. 50-320

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1981-03-01

    A Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) related to the decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from the March 28, 1979, accident at Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2 (Docket No. 50-320) has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in response to a directive issued by the Commission on November 21, 1979. This statement is an overall study of the activities necessary for decontamination of the facility, defueling, and disposition of the radioactive wastes. The available alternatives considered ranged from implementation of full cleanup to no action other than continuing to maintain the reactor in a safe shutdown condition. Also included are comments of governmental agencies, other organizations, and the general public on the Draft PEIS on this project, and staff responses to these comments. (author)

  3. The impact of the accident at the Three Mile Island on the behavior and well-being of nuclear workers. Part I. Perceptions and evaluations, behavioral responses, and work-related attitudes and feelings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasl, S.V.; Chisholm, R.F.; Eskenazi, B.

    1981-01-01

    In order to assess the impact of the accident at the Three Mile Island (TMI), telephone interviews were conducted six months later with 324 nuclear workers assigned to TMI and 298 workers assigned to a comparison plant at Peach Bottom (PB). Examination of PB-TMI differences, stratified by supervisory status, revealed that: (1) TMI workers reported greater exposure to radiation at the time of the accident and felt that their health had been thereby endangered; (2) TMI workers experienced more uncertainty and conflict at the time of the accident; (3) coping responses such as seeing a doctor, taking drugs, and increasing alcohol consumption were quite infrequent; (4) leaving the area was more common; however, over 40% of TMI workers wished to leave but did not do so because of work obligations; and (5) TMI workers reported much lower job satisfaction and much greater uncertainty about thier job future. 139 references, 8 tables

  4. Programmatic environmental impact statement related to decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from March 28, 1979 accident, Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2 (Docket No. 50-320). Draft supplement dealing with occupational radiation dose. Supplement No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-12-01

    In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act, the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Related to Decontamination and Disposal of Radioactive Waste for the 1979 Accident at Three Mile Island Nuclear Station Unit 2 has been supplemented. The supplement was required because current information indicates that cleanup will entail substantially more occupational radiation dose to the cleanup work force than originally anticipated. Cleanup was originally estimated to result in from 2000 to 8000 person-rem of occupational radiation dose. Although only 1700 person-rem have resulted from cleanup operations performed up to now, current estimates now indicate that between 13,000 and 46,000 person-rem are expected to be required. Alternate cleanup methods considered in the supplement either did not result in appreciable dose savings or were not known to be technically feasible

  5. Inland Waterway Mile Markers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Contains 11,201 sequential mile positions of navigable inland waterways and the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway. Records include eight fields; id, latitude, longitude,...

  6. Analysis of steam-generator tube-rupture events combined with auxiliary-feedwater control-system failure for Three Mile Island-Unit 1 and Zion-Unit 1 pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassersharif, B.

    1986-01-01

    A steam-generator tube-rupture (SGTR) event combined with loss of all offsite alternating-current power and failure of the auxiliary-feedwater (AFW) control system has been investigated for the Three Mile Island-Unit 1 (TMI-1) and Zion-Unit 1 (Zion-1) pressurized water reactors. The Transient Reactor Analysis Code was used to simulate the accident sequence for each plant. The objectives of the study were to predict the plant transient response with respect to tube-rupture flow termination, extent of steam generator overfill, and thermal-hydraulic conditions in the steam lines. Two transient cases were calculated: (1) a TMI-1 SGTR and runaway-AFW transient, and (2) a Zion-1 SGTR and runaway-AFW transient. Operator actions terminated the tube-rupture flow by 1342 s (22.4 min) and 1440 s (24.0 min) for TMI-1 and Zion-1, respectively, but AFW injection was continued. The damaged steam generator (DSG) overfilled by 1273 s (21.2 min) for the TMI-1 calculation and by 1604 s (26.7 min) for the Zion-1 calculation. The DSG steam lines were completely filled by 1500 s (25 min) and 2000 s (33.3 min) for TMI-1 and Zion-1, respectively. The maximum subcooling in the steam lines was approx.63 K (approx.113 0 F) for TMI-1 and approx.44 K (approx.80 0 F) for Zion-1

  7. Decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from the March 28, 1979 accident, Three-Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2, Pennsylvania-Docket No. 50-320 (final supplement 2 to the final environmental impact statement of March 1981)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    Implementation of actions necessary for decontamination of the facility, defueling of the reactor, and disposition of the radioactive wastes that resulted from the accident on March 28, 1979 at Unit 2 of the Three-Mile Island Nuclear Station in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania are discussed. This second final supplement to the final environmental impact statement, filed in March 1981 on facility decontamination, reevaluates the environmental impacts of accident-generated water disposal alternatives, using more complete and current information. This supplement also includes a specific evaluation of the recently submitted proposal for water disposition. The project would alleviate a radiological hazard that threatens the well-being of the surrounding population and downstream communities. Risks to the general public have been estimated to be very small fractions of the estimated normal incidence of cancer fatalities and genetic disorders. The most significant potential impact is the risk of physical injury associated with transportation accidents. Social impacts during the operation could result in reduced property values, competition between the work force and tourists for temporary housing, and congestion of local traffic arteries. Some psychological stress would experienced by area residents. Economic effects could include increased electricity rates, reduced tourism, and possible resistance to consumption of area goods that consumers might mistakenly think are contaminated

  8. Crisis and Policy Reformcraft: Advocacy Coalitions and Crisis-induced Change in Swedish Nuclear Energy Policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nohrstedt, Daniel

    2007-04-01

    This dissertation consists of three interrelated essays examining the role of crisis events in Swedish nuclear energy policymaking. The study takes stock of the idea of 'crisis exceptionalism' raised in the literature, which postulates that crisis events provide openings for major policy change. In an effort to explain crisis-induced outcomes in Swedish nuclear energy policy, each essay explores and develops theoretical assumptions derived from the Advocacy Coalition Framework (ACF). The introduction discusses the ACF and other theoretical perspectives accentuating the role of crisis in policymaking and identifies three explanations for crisis-induced policy outcomes: minority coalition mobilization, learning, and strategic action. Essay 1 analyzes the nature and development of the Swedish nuclear energy subsystem. The results contradict the ACF assumption that corporatist systems nurture narrow subsystems and small advocacy coalitions, but corroborate the assumption that advocacy coalitions remain stable over time. While this analysis identifies temporary openings in policymaking venues and in the advocacy coalition structure, it is argued that these developments did not affect crisis policymaking. Essay 2 seeks to explain the decision to initiate a referendum on nuclear power following the 1979 Three Mile Island accident. Internal government documents and other historical records indicate that strategic considerations superseded learning as the primary explanation in this case. Essay 3 conducts an in-depth examination of Swedish policymaking in the aftermath of the 1986 Chernobyl accident in an effort to explain the government's decision not to accelerate the nuclear power phaseout. Recently disclosed government documents show that minority coalition mobilization was insufficient to explain this decision. In this case, rational learning and strategic action provided a better explanation. The main theoretical contribution derived from the three essays is to posit

  9. Crisis and Policy Reformcraft: Advocacy Coalitions and Crisis-induced Change in Swedish Nuclear Energy Policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nohrstedt, Daniel

    2007-04-15

    This dissertation consists of three interrelated essays examining the role of crisis events in Swedish nuclear energy policymaking. The study takes stock of the idea of 'crisis exceptionalism' raised in the literature, which postulates that crisis events provide openings for major policy change. In an effort to explain crisis-induced outcomes in Swedish nuclear energy policy, each essay explores and develops theoretical assumptions derived from the Advocacy Coalition Framework (ACF). The introduction discusses the ACF and other theoretical perspectives accentuating the role of crisis in policymaking and identifies three explanations for crisis-induced policy outcomes: minority coalition mobilization, learning, and strategic action. Essay 1 analyzes the nature and development of the Swedish nuclear energy subsystem. The results contradict the ACF assumption that corporatist systems nurture narrow subsystems and small advocacy coalitions, but corroborate the assumption that advocacy coalitions remain stable over time. While this analysis identifies temporary openings in policymaking venues and in the advocacy coalition structure, it is argued that these developments did not affect crisis policymaking. Essay 2 seeks to explain the decision to initiate a referendum on nuclear power following the 1979 Three Mile Island accident. Internal government documents and other historical records indicate that strategic considerations superseded learning as the primary explanation in this case. Essay 3 conducts an in-depth examination of Swedish policymaking in the aftermath of the 1986 Chernobyl accident in an effort to explain the government's decision not to accelerate the nuclear power phaseout. Recently disclosed government documents show that minority coalition mobilization was insufficient to explain this decision. In this case, rational learning and strategic action provided a better explanation. The main theoretical contribution derived from the three

  10. Crisis Management training at nuclear facilities: Simulations in bomb threats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, L.

    1993-01-01

    Substantial enhancements to the study of the theoretical and applied foundations of crisis management have been achieved in recent years. Whereas risk managers study 'the probability that a harmful consequence of a particular event will occur during a given time,' crisis management explores unexpected, potentially negative events with short or long-term implications involving injury to life or property. In this regard, crisis management focuses on the mitigation of organizational after-shock; risk management is preventative in scope. While the risk management function of nuclear facilities has been addressed widely in the literature, comparatively little has been written that addresses the myriad, interdisciplinary challenges associated with managing organizational disarray. The issue of crisis management has assumed paramount importance in recent years due to unexpected geopolitical events (e.g., Persian Gulf War), rampant violence facing organizations (e.g., mass shootings in Killeen, Texas and several U.S. Post Offices) and an acceleration of serious crisis impacting large organizations (e.g., Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, Exxon Valdez, NASA Challenger disaster). Without question, the public is increasingly demanding that organizational managers possess a fundamental understanding of crisis management and its principal underpinnings: effective public communication regarding the event and a return to normalcy, employee and public safety and evacuation measures, and other mitigation measures will protect life and property

  11. Reactor accidents. Chernobyl and Three Miles Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marx, G.

    1990-01-01

    A description of the facilities at Chernobyl and TMI, as well as of the course of the accidents is given. Supplementary information relates to the quantities and types of radionuclides released and to the size of the group of persons concerned. (DG) [de

  12. The people of Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tredici, R. del.

    1982-01-01

    Compilation of 51 interviews with people of the most various social classes of the surrounding of TMI immediately and some time after the accident. Interviews of the year 1981, e.g. with Dr. Tokuhata, functionary in the Ministry of Health of Pa, on a pretended increase of infant mortality after the accident, are not contained in the original American edition. (HP) [de

  13. Three Mile Island: a preliminary checklist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drazan, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    This checklist aims to be as complete as possible for articles found in the periodical literature and for separately published monographs. It excludes newspaper accounts and state and federal documents. The bibliography contains 17 monographs arranged by author, followed by 149 authored journal articles and 119 unauthored articles arranged alphabetically by title

  14. Final environmental impact statement for the construction and operation of an independent spent fuel storage installation to store the Three Mile Island Unit 2 spent fuel at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Docket Number 72-20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-03-01

    This Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) contains an assessment of the potential environmental impacts of the construction and operation of an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) for the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) fuel debris at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental laboratory (INEEL). US Department of Energy-Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is proposing to design, construct, and operate at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The TMI-2 fuel debris would be removed from wet storage, transported to the ISFSI, and placed in storage modules on a concrete basemat. As part of its overall spent nuclear fuel (SNF) management program, the US DOE has prepared a final programmatic environmental impact statement (EIS) that provides an overview of the spent fuel management proposed for INEEL, including the construction and operation of the TMI-2 ISFSI. In addition, DOE-ID has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) to describe the environmental impacts associated with the stabilization of the storage pool and the construction/operation of the ISFSI at the ICPP. As provided in NRC's NEPA procedures, a FEIS of another Federal agency may be adopted in whole or in part in accordance with the procedures outlined in 40 CFR 1506.3 of the regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ). Under 40 CFR 1506.3(b), if the actions covered by the original EIS and the proposed action are substantially the same, the agency adopting another agency's statement is not required to recirculate it except as a final statement. The NRC has determined that its proposed action is substantially the same as actions considered in DOE's environmental documents referenced above and, therefore, has elected to adopt the DOE documents as the NRC FEIS

  15. Crustal Deformation During the 2011 Volanic Crisis of El Hierro, Canary Islands, Revealed by Continuous GPS Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagiya, T.; Barrancos Martinez, J.; Calvo, D.; Padron, E.; Hernandez, G. H.; Hernández, P. A.; Perez Rodriguez, N.; Suárez, J. M. P.

    2012-04-01

    Seismo-volcnic activity of El Hierro started in the middle of July of 2011 and resulted in the active submarine eruption after October 12 south off La Restinga, the southern tip of the island. We have been operating one continuous GPS site on the island since 2004. Responding to the activity, we quickly installed 5 more GPS sites. Including another site operated by the Canary Islands Cartograhical Service (GRAFCAN) for a cartographic purpose, we have been monitoring 7 GPS sites equipped with dual-frequency receivers. We present the result of our crustal deformation monitoring and the magmatic activity inferred from the deformation data. In accordance with the deformation pattern, we divide the volcanic activity in 2011 into 4 stages. The first stage is from the middle of July to middle of September, during which steady magmatic inflation is estimated at the center of the island. The inflated volume of the first stage is estimated to be about 1.3 X 107 m3 at the depth of about 5km. The second stage, which continued until the first submarine eruption on October 12, is characterized by the accelerated deformation due to the upward as well as southward migration of magma. Additional inflation of about 2.1 X 107 m3 occurred in the depth range of 1-2km. The third stage continued for about 3 weeks after the first submarine eruption. During this stage, submarine eruption continues while no significant surface deformation is observed. It is considered magma supply from a deeper magma chamber continued during this 3 weeks period. Therefore, the total inflation volume during the first two stages gives the minimum estimate for the total magma volume. Since the beginning of November 2011, many GPS sites started subsiding. However, this deflation pattern is quite different from those in the shallow inflation stages. Horizontal deformation during this 4th stage is not significant, implying that deflation is occurring below the moho.

  16. Financial fallout from Three Mile Island. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Energy Conservation and Power of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, First Session, H.R. 2512, May 1 and September 22, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    This hearing, the first in a series, on how to finance cleanup costs and damage compensation after a nuclear accident began with testimony from those involved in the Three Mile Island accident. The testimony covers the limitations of the Price-Anderson Act and examines H.R. 2512, which provides supplemental insurance to cover the costs of remedial action. Among the recommendations was the possibility of having operators and manufacturers share in the costs. The hearing record includes the text of H.R. 2512, a report from the Securities Exchange Commission, the testimony of 14 witnesses, and additional material submitted for the record

  17. On the Edge of Crisis: Contending Perspectives on Development, Tourism, and Community Participation on Rote Island, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra Wright

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The eastern Indonesian province of Nusa Tenggara Timur (NTT is struggling to overcome the burden of widespread poverty, illness, and illiteracy. Within the context of globalisation and Indonesia���s ongoing transitions in governance, people on Rote Island, NTT, are experiencing rapid socio-cultural change. The increasing arrival of tourists and foreign business interests add further complexity to these processes of transition. The direction forward for Rote is a topic of considerable debate amongst community members, development workers, businesses, and other stakeholders. This qualitative pilot study explores key community stakeholders’ perspectives on development, tourism, and community sustainability in Delha, Rote. It has revealed conflicting perspectives about future development and tourism on Rote, with particular concern regarding social, cultural, and environmental impacts, and loss of autonomy and community control. Important ‘dynamics of exclusion’ between stakeholders are identified. More equitable participation in planning and decision-making is needed to ensure that the benefits of tourism and development are not concentrated with a privileged few. ----- Die indonesische Provinz Nusa Tenggara Timur (NTT ist mit weitverbreiteter Armut, Krankheiten und Analphabetismus konfrontiert. Im Kontext der Globalisierung und Indonesiens politischer Transformation vollzieht sich ein rascher soziokultureller Wandel auf der Insel Rote, NTT. Eine steigende Zahl an TouristInnen sowie ausländische Unternehmensinteressen verschärfen die komplexe Übergangssituation. Der weitere Entwicklungsweg für Rote ist Gegenstand zahlreicher Debatten zwi- schen Community-Mitgliedern, EntwicklungshelferInnen, Unternehmen und anderen AkteurInnen. Die vorliegende qualitative Vorstudie untersucht zentrale Perspektiven unterschiedlicher Akteu- rInnen in Bezug auf die zukünftige Entwicklung Rotes und legt besonderes Augenmerk auf soziale, kulturelle und

  18. Crisis and Crisis Scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Øjvind

    2016-01-01

    This special issue of Nordicum-Mediterraneum contains select proceedings from the third meeting of the Nordic Summer University research circle called “Crisis and Crisis Scenarios: Normativity, Possibilities and Dilemmas”, held April 9th — 12th, 2015 at the Lysebu Conference Centre in Oslo, Norway....... The circle’s research program runs from 2014 to 2016 and is aimed at examining the concept of crisis as it is used today in academia and public discussion. In this collection of papers from the symposium we present some of the different ways in which the topic of the study group was addressed....

  19. Investigating last mile distribution challenges of wine suppliers in Lagos, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    M.Com. (Business Management) The last mile distribution is the final link of successful supply chain operations. The high demand for products, lead time uncertainties and replenishment time complicate the distribution task. In order to achieve a competitive business edge, suppliers need to work at developing and improving their last mile distribution link. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of the last mile wine distribution in Lagos Island, Nigeria, and to determin...

  20. VT Mile Points - 1/10-Mile Intervals

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The mile points data layer is comprised of discrete locations based on specific measured intervals along a route. These intervals are represented along a...

  1. 75 FR 55272 - Safety Zone; Mississippi River, Mile 212.0 to 214.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-10

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Mississippi River, Mile 212.0 to 214.5 AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone for waters of the Upper Mississippi River, Mile 212.0 to 214.5, extending West of Portage Island to the right descending bank of the...

  2. Medical and psychological aspects of crisis management during a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drottz-Sjoeberg, B.M.

    1993-06-01

    Crisis handling in most kinds of disasters is affected by e.g. the information situation, prior experience and preparedness, availability of resources, efficiency of leadership and coordination, and type of disaster. A nuclear accident creates a situation which differs from many 'normal' disasters and natural catastrophes, for example with respects to the invisible nature of radiation and radioactive contamination and thus the dependence on access to specific technical equipment and expertise, and to information about the radiation situation. The scope of the accident, and the existing levels of radiation, define subsequent actions; information policies and existing channels of communication lay the foundation for public reactions. The present paper explores some examples of public reactions, and crisis handling of some previous radiation accidents on the basis of two dimensions, i.e. degree of information availability and degree of impact or 'environmental damage'. The examples include the radiation accidents in the Chelyabinsk region in the southern Urals, at Three Mile Island, USA, at Chernobyl in the Ukraine, and in Goiania, Brazil. It is concluded that public reactions differ as a function of existing expectations, and the crisis handling is more affected by the existing organizational and social structures than by needs and reactions of potential victims. Another conclusion is that pre-disaster preparedness regarding public information, and organization of countermeasures, are crucial to the outcome of a successful crisis handling and for enhancing public trust in crisis management. 39 refs, 2 figs

  3. Medical and psychological aspects of crisis management during a nuclear accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drottz-Sjoeberg, B M

    1993-06-01

    Crisis handling in most kinds of disasters is affected by e.g. the information situation, prior experience and preparedness, availability of resources, efficiency of leadership and coordination, and type of disaster. A nuclear accident creates a situation which differs from many `normal` disasters and natural catastrophes, for example with respects to the invisible nature of radiation and radioactive contamination and thus the dependence on access to specific technical equipment and expertise, and to information about the radiation situation. The scope of the accident, and the existing levels of radiation, define subsequent actions; information policies and existing channels of communication lay the foundation for public reactions. The present paper explores some examples of public reactions, and crisis handling of some previous radiation accidents on the basis of two dimensions, i.e. degree of information availability and degree of impact or `environmental damage`. The examples include the radiation accidents in the Chelyabinsk region in the southern Urals, at Three Mile Island, USA, at Chernobyl in the Ukraine, and in Goiania, Brazil. It is concluded that public reactions differ as a function of existing expectations, and the crisis handling is more affected by the existing organizational and social structures than by needs and reactions of potential victims. Another conclusion is that pre-disaster preparedness regarding public information, and organization of countermeasures, are crucial to the outcome of a successful crisis handling and for enhancing public trust in crisis management. 39 refs, 2 figs.

  4. Programmatic environmental impact statement related to decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from March 28, 1979 accident, Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2 (Docket No. 50-320): Draft supplement dealing with post-defueling monitored storage and subsequent cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-04-01

    In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act, the Commission's implementing regulations, and its April 27, 1981,Statement of Policy, the Programmatic environmental impact statement related to decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from March 28, 1979 accident Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2, NUREG-0683 (PEIS) is being supplemented. This draft supplement updates the enviromental evaluation of cleanup alternatives published in the PEIS, utilizing more complete and current information. Also, the draft supplement includes a specific environmental evaluation of the licensee's recently submitted proposal for post-defueling monitored storage. The NRC staff has concluded that the licensee's proposal to place the facility in a monitored storage configuration will not significantly affect the quality of the human environment. Further, any impacts from the long-term storage of the facility are outweighed by its benefits. 63 refs., 23 figs., 65 tabs

  5. Impact abroad of the accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant: March-September 1979. Prepared for the Subcommittee on Energy, Nuclear Proliferation and Federal Services of the Committee on Governmental Affairs, United States Senate by the Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    On March 28, 1979, an accident occurred in a nuclear power plant at Three Mile Island, near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. It caused widespread fears of catastrophe and raised doubts as to the adequacy of what some nuclear utilities and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission have done to assure safe operation of nuclear power plants. Now, some ten months after the accident, its effects on Federal regulation and upon the public's attitude toward nuclear power are still evolving. The final effects remain hidden in the future. They can be expected to have an impact on the development of nuclear power in the United States and also abroad. The accident at Three Mile island has been investigated and analyzed exhaustively by the NRC, by the nuclear industry, by a Presidential commission (the Kemeny Commission), and by two committees of Congress. Some of these studies are still in progress. Many foreign governments sent teams to analyze and report on the accident and reactions to it. Because the future of nuclear power abroad seems likely to bear imprint of the accident, and because of the inescapable interconnection between nuclear power in the United States and in other countries, Senator John Glenn's Subcommittee on Energy, Nu-Proliferation and Federal Services of the Senate Committee on Government Affairs, asked the Congressional Research Service (CRS) to arrange for reviews of the impacts abroad. The CRS contracted for this review with two well-situated analysts. One is Geoffrey Greenhalgh, an Englishman who has had a long association with the nuclear power industry in Europe and is a support of it. The other is Walter C. Patterson, who is one of the leading articulate critics of nuclear power and has long been associated with Friends of the Earth, in London

  6. Diabetes MILES--The Netherlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nefs, Giesje; Bot, Mariska; Browne, Jessica L

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As the number of people with diabetes is increasing rapidly worldwide, a more thorough understanding of the psychosocial aspects of living with this condition has become an important health care priority. While our knowledge has grown substantially over the past two decades with respect...... to the physical, emotional and social difficulties that people with diabetes may encounter, many important issues remain to be elucidated. Under the umbrella of the Diabetes MILES (Management and Impact for Long-term Empowerment and Success) Study International Collaborative, Diabetes MILES--The Netherlands aims...... to examine how Dutch adults with diabetes manage their condition and how it affects their lives. Topics of special interest in Diabetes MILES--The Netherlands include subtypes of depression, Type D personality, mindfulness, sleep and sexual functioning. METHODS/DESIGN: Diabetes MILES--The Netherlands...

  7. Hypertensive Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Hypertensive Crisis: When You Should Call 9-1-1 for ... Nov 13,2017 A hypertensive ( high blood pressure ) crisis is when blood pressure rises quickly and severely ...

  8. Hemolytic crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003270.htm Hemolytic crisis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hemolytic crisis occurs when large numbers of red blood cells ...

  9. Crisis Thought

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, Edwin Kent

    2016-01-01

    Crisis thought is an idea that gives a name to and accounts for some of the problematics of the sign crisis in political, social, cultural, and economic discourse. Specifically, crisis thought is a discursive formation, a concept used loosely here to refer to an assemblage of signs such as anxiety or fear that evoke or invoke similar, but inaccurate connotations as crisis in political and everyday usage. The general question this study grapples with is why political, social, cultural, and eco...

  10. Managing crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Bakacsi, Gyula

    2010-01-01

    The traditional approach to crisis management suggest autocratic leadership, that has risks anyway (leader is the bottle-neck of problem solving, single-loop learning, crisis management is a matter of efficiency). However, managing nowadays crisis is rather effectiveness issue, and requires double-loop learning (second-order change) and leadership role in the sense of Kotter’s theory. Paper discusses the top-management’s leadership responsibilities, and their special tasks in the problem solv...

  11. 2010 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Topographic Lidar: Channel Islands, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Terrapoint collected LiDAR for 197 square miles covering five islands off the coast of Los Angeles, California. These islands are part of the Channel Islands...

  12. Crisis Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Anca Jarmila Guţă

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents the manner in which the crisis of different types can disturb the normal activity of an organization and also the modalities by which the communication in this situation can solve or attenuate the negative effects of a crisis.

  13. Reactor safety after TMI (Three-Mile Island)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smidt, D.

    1980-01-01

    The present status of safety design in Germany and the governing principles behind it, are presented. The problem of human failure and what could be done about it, are discussed. This is followed by the description of some research projects for further increasing the accident prevention capability of German plants. (E.G.) [pt

  14. Three Mile Island, Bhopal and Chernobyl: causes and consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovich, J.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1970's worldwide criticisms of nuclear power have been so strong that in many countries nuclear power has been outlawed. At Kyoto, scientists and politicians working together have designed a Protocol where the role of nuclear power in reducing CO2 emissions was completely ignored. One of the reasons for this, probably the most important one, is the general perception that nuclear power is unacceptably dangerous and that world can live without it. Both perceptions are, of course, incorrect. Some twenty years ago, as a physicist, not being part of 'nuclear establishment', I became interested in these two issues. Since then, as explained in a number of my publications, I have come to a firm conclusion that (a) nuclear power on the world scale is an essential energy source, whether we like it or not, and (b) that nuclear power is a very safe technology, probably the safest of all technologies the modem industrialized world has. To illustrate this last statement, in this paper I compare causes and consequences of two largest nuclear accidents, TMI and Chernobyl, with Bhopal accident, probably the largest accident that chemical technology has ever produced. (author)

  15. Education's "Three Mile Island": PL 94-142.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, McCay

    1981-01-01

    PL 94-142 is viewed as educationally and psychologically destructive to disabled students. It is also described as financially devastating to local school districts since it mandates that: (1) Cost cannot be considered a factor in developing educational programs for handicapped children; and (2) The most money be spent on children least likely to…

  16. The lessons of the incident at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.

    1979-01-01

    Although the radiation level in the incident did not exceed the danger level of 100 millirem it should be asked why the important safety valve was closed, why the security building was not isolated and why the safety cooling system had been withdrawn. (J.S.)

  17. Accident at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajusz, J.; Vamos, G.

    1979-01-01

    A short description of the TMI power plant is given. The course of events leading to the reactor accident and that of the first two weeks is described. The effect on the environment is estimated. The reasons and consequences of the accident are analysed. The probability of such an accident at the Paks Nuclear Power Plant is estimated. (R.J.)

  18. Three Mile Island: Impact on electric rate structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, E.F.

    1983-01-01

    The historical significance of the March 28, 1979 accident at TMI-2 has not, can not and will not likely be fully appreciated by our generation. The nuclear industry, the financial community, regulator of electric utilities and the investor-owned electric utilities are beginning to understand this newly added complex dimension that has entered our daily work process. The degree of understanding that each possesses is a function of his involvement in the restoration process in evaluating whether the nuclear option is to survive. The body of material presented herein represents an effort to capsulize the significant associated with providing electricity at reasonable prices to all service classifications that followed in the wake of the March 29, 1979 TMI accident. Highlights of some of the oft-conflicting activities and cost implications are defined. An attempt is also made to quantify the rate changes, subsequent to the accident, as to TMI related and non-TMI related cost. Some of the cost allocation difficulties encountered are also enumerated. There are no classic textbooks, treatise, or manuals on the market that abridge the traditional approaches to ratemaking. Finally, a perspective comparison is made to demonstrate that GPU's rates are still reasonable considering other factors - namely overall inflation and regional electricity prices

  19. Analysis of Three Mile Island Unit 2 accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    NSAC is conducting a detailed review of this accident and of the lessons to be learned. So far it has concentrated primarily on events during the sixteen hours following initiation of the accident. A sequence of events has been developed and is being verified and annotated by comparing oral and written statements with instrumentation records, data logs, operator logs, and inferences which can be made from these records. This report is being developed with the expectation that, while not completed or fully verified, it may be useful at this time. Supplements may be issued later as the analyses which are still under way are completed

  20. Developments pertaining to the Three Mile Island accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.B.

    1979-01-01

    Some of the developments since August 1979 pertaining to the accident are of general interest and are summarized. No attempt is made to present a comprehensive review of the accident nor to evaluate the material that has become available. The article merely calls attention to the available information

  1. Three Mile Island Cleanup: experiences, waste disposal, and environmental impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, L.J.; Opelka, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    These papers were presented in a two-session symposium during the American Institute of Chemical Engineers 1981 Summer National meeting in Detroit, Michigan, August 16-19, 1981. The cleanup activities described included the venting of the gases, mostly krypton-85, from the reactor containment building and several entries of personnel into the containment building to determine the physical conditions and the levels of radiation and radioactive contamination. Results of the latest process development tests of the flowsheet for the submerged Demineralizer Water Treatment System for decontaminating the water in the containment building were presented. The status of existing knowledge of radiation effects on ion exchange materials used in radioactive waste management were reviewed. A program to demonstrate incorporation of the loaded zeolite into a glass as a final waste form was also described. The generation, classification, treatment, and disposal of solid waste forms resulting from the cleanup were discussed with special consideration of the ion exchange media used for cleanup of liquids with relatively high radionuclide concentrations. The radiological, socioeconomic, and psychological impacts of the cleanup were evaluated. This work formed the basis for the recent issuance by the NRC of a programmatic environmental impact statement relative to decontamination and disposal of the radioactive wastes resulting from the accidents

  2. The Great Unescape: Three Mile Island, Fukushima, and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    During the Second World War, the Luftwaffe ran a maximum security prisoner of war (POW) camp called "Stalag Luft III," which imprisoned captured Allied air force servicemen. The story of the 1944 escape from Stalag Luft III is one of the most famous stories of the Second World War as described in the firsthand written account and…

  3. Post accident training program design at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawyer, L.L.

    1981-01-01

    The TMI preaccident training staff typically consisted of 9 professional and 3 administrative support persons. Procedures were prepared and facilities designated for operator training. The thrust of the post accident effort was directed to expanding the training function to include all other personnel while modifying the operator training to address lessons learned. Significant experiences were encountered in part task simulation, job and task analysis, decision analysis and with various external committees. These experiences led to specific opinions on industry needs in the areas of staffing, regulation, importance of training and contractor assistance

  4. Technology transfer at Three Mile Island Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, H.M.; Bixby, W.W.

    1982-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) formulated a program at TMI-2 in concert with the Coordination Agreement. The DOE TME-2 Information and Examination Program (TI and EP) aims to fulfill three general objectives. First, the TI and EP aims to obtain information from the TMI-2 accidient for resolving specific safety and licensing concerns; modifying applicable standards, specifications, and regulations; and defining changes in design, maintenance, operation, and personnel training. Second, the TI and EP uses TMI-2 information to advance technology in decontamination work; radioactive waste immobilization and disposal; system requalification; damaged fuel handling; and plant, reactor, and safety engineering. Finally, the TI and EP distributes the information gained from the Program to others that are engaged in research and development, design, construction, operation, maintenance, and regulation of nuclear power plants

  5. Nuclear Crisis Communications: The Plan Worked. A Critique of NRC Communications in the Fukushima Daiichi Reactor Crisis - 12073

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner, Eliot; Harrington, Holly; Schmidt, Rebecca [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    'Call the AV-Photo folks and get someone in here to shoot b-roll. We'll never be able to accommodate the network cameras and the only way I can get this to the media is to produce it ourselves'. Eliot Brenner, Director NRC Office of Public Affairs, March 12, 2011. For the past four years we have been speaking to audiences at Waste Management about communications issues. Last year, though we were kept from attending because of the federal budget crisis, our surrogates described to you the lessons the nuclear industry should draw from the BP Gulf oil spill crisis. Those remarks were delivered 11 days before the Fukushima Daiichi tragedy became the nuclear landmark of a generation - an industry changing event with worldwide ramifications, both in science and regulation and in communications. Eliot Brenner cut his teeth on crisis communication in the aviation industry where tragedy unfolds rapidly. He has been a speech-writer to three cabinet secretaries, spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration and now spokesman for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission since 2004. Holly Harrington manages the NRC crisis response program and has 26 years federal public affairs experience, including eight years at the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Her crisis experience includes the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, numerous hurricanes and floods, Sept 11, and, now Fukushima Daiichi. Rebecca Schmidt is a veteran government relations professional whose decades in Washington include service with the House Armed Services Committee, the House Budget Committee and the Secretary of Defense. Collectively, the Offices of Public Affairs and Congressional Affairs conducted the largest outreach for the agency since Three Mile Island. We worked with the basic rule, described to Waste Management last year just 11 days before Fukushima - communicate early, often and clearly. The response - while not without its problems and lessons - went as smoothly as a chaotic event like

  6. LIDAR Products, State of Rhode Island: LIDAR for the North East – ARRA and LiDAR for the North East Part II; LiDAR was collected in the Winter and Spring 2011 at a 1 meter or better nominal post spacing (1m GSD) for approximately 1,074 square miles of Rhode Island, whi, Published in 2012, 1:9600 (1in=800ft) scale, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — LIDAR Products dataset current as of 2012. State of Rhode Island: LIDAR for the North East – ARRA and LiDAR for the North East Part II; LiDAR was collected in the...

  7. Crisis Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents summaries of four articles relevant to school crisis response. The first article, "Peritraumatic Dissociation Predicts Posttraumatic Stress in Youth Following Accidents" summarized by Jim Matthews, suggests that peritraumatic dissociation is a powerful predictor of PTSD symptoms among youth who have been in a car…

  8. Crisis meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      To all CERN staff: your rights are at risk ! We invite you to come to a crisis meeting on Wednesday 2nd April at 10:30 a.m., Auditorium, Main Building, Meyrin site. Your presence is crucial, we are ALL concerned !

  9. Crisis meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    To all CERN staff: your rights are at risk! We invite you to come to a crisis meeting on Thursday 7th May 2015 at 9 a.m., Auditorium, Main Building, Meyrin site. Your presence is crucial, we are ALL concerned!

  10. Information Crisis

    CERN Document Server

    Losavio, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Information Crisis discusses the scope and types of information available online and teaches readers how to critically assess it and analyze potentially dangerous information, especially when teachers, editors, or other information gatekeepers are not available to assess the information for them. Chapters and topics include:. The Internet as an information tool. Critical analysis. Legal issues, traps, and tricks. Protecting personal safety and identity. Types of online information.

  11. The role of crisis in family crisis intervention: do crisis experience and crisis change matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al, C.M.W.; Stams, G.J.J.M.; van der Laan, P.H.; Asscher, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation studies of crisis intervention have focused on prevention of out-of-home placement of children or family functioning, but largely neglected the aspect of crisis. The present study examined crisis in 183 families receiving Family Crisis Intervention (FCI), addressing crisis characteristics

  12. 78 FR 16411 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-15

    ... operating schedule that governs the Rock Island Railroad and Highway Drawbridge across the Upper Mississippi River, mile 482.9, at Rock Island, Illinois. The deviation is necessary to allow the Quad City Heart...-366-9826. [[Page 16412

  13. Chinese Crisis Management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gudgel, Andy

    2004-01-01

    .... China's crisis management strategy is geared towards obtaining the maximum political advantage for China, as opposed to resolving the crisis. China tries to define the crisis on its terms in order to shape the resolution favorably.

  14. Crisis Communication Online

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utz, Sonja; Schultz, Friederike; Glocka, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Social media play in today's societies a fundamental role for the negotiation and dynamics of crises. However, classical crisis communication theories neglect the role of the medium and focus mainly on the interplay between crisis type and crisis communication strategy. Building on the recently...... developed “networked crisis communication model” we contrast effects of medium (Facebook vs. Twitter vs. online newspaper) and crisis type (intentional vs. victim) in an online experiment. Using the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster as crisis scenario, we show that medium effects are stronger than...... the effects of crisis type. Crisis communication via social media resulted in a higher reputation and less secondary crisis reactions such as boycotting the company than crisis communication in the newspaper. However, secondary crisis communication, e.g. talking about the crisis communication, was higher...

  15. KANT CRISIS

    OpenAIRE

    William H Carter

    2011-01-01

    • ISSUE 2-1, 2011 • 68 KANT CRISIS This study approaches the last days of Immanuel Kant through the lens of his contemporary biographers and other correspondents. Among the latter, Kant’s brother and, subsequently, his brother’s family provide a symptomatic reflection upon Kant’s management of his genealogy and his legacy. Yet behind this body of work is another corpus, one which embodies maternal and paternal legacies that are not readily subsumed by Oedipus or Kant’s philosophy. This work (...

  16. Overpopulation crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C; Russell Wms

    1984-01-01

    This article reviews field research on the violent response on the part of animals to conditions of crowding. Monkey species in zoos have consistently been noted to be more quarrelsome and violent than their counterparts in the wild. Up to a certain critical population density various animal species form cooperative social units; however, a surplus population upsets this balance. In addition, under conditions of intense crowding, mammal's care and protection of the young is transformed into indifference, neglect, competition, domination, and ultimately murder. The reversal of social behavior under crowded conditions can be understood as a means of response to a population crisis, in which population is in danger of outrunning resources. In the absence of confinement, tensions among monkeys lead to war between bands. A community weakened by crowding also is more likely to succumb to certain stress diseases and to have less resilience against parasites. Under various special conditions, tolerance may evolve to permit temporary compression without violence; on the other hand, when a violent response is suppressed, the response tends to be explosive when it does occur. If population reduction is delayed too long, the result may be violence, famine, and permanent damage to the environment from overgrazing. In human society there has generally been a lag in the full development of the violent response to crowding. Given the power of modern military technology, it is imperative that human populations avert a population crisis response by substituting voluntary fertility control for involuntary mortality control.

  17. Heat Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Heat Island Effect Site provides information on heat islands, their impacts, mitigation strategies, related research, a directory of heat island reduction initiatives in U.S. communities, and EPA's Heat Island Reduction Program.

  18. Island biogeography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whittaker, Robert James; Fernández-Palacios, José María; Matthews, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    Islands provide classic model biological systems. We review how growing appreciation of geoenvironmental dynamics of marine islands has led to advances in island biogeographic theory accommodating both evolutionary and ecological phenomena. Recognition of distinct island geodynamics permits gener...

  19. Narcotráfico, violencia y crisis social en el Caribe insular colombiano: El caso de la isla de San Andrés en el contexto del Gran Caribe Drug Traffiking, Violence and the Social Crisis in Colombian Caribbean Islands: The Case of San Andrés Island in the Context of the Great Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Mantilla

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo tiene por objetivo presentar un diagnóstico preliminar de la magnitud del tráfico de drogas, sus dinámicas, modalidades, y las condiciones sociales y económicas que favorecen el desarrollo de este negocio ilegal en la isla de San Andrés (Colombia. El análisis se desarrolla, no obstante, en el marco de la condición histórica y natural de "zona de tránsito" de drogas, armas y otros recursos ilegales, que se le atribuye a la región del Gran Caribe, entendida como un continuo geográfico, histórico y cultural en el que se observan patrones comunes en materia de amenazas a la seguridad, la geopolítica de las relaciones con Estados Unidos y los efectos sociales y económicos derivados del flagelo del narcotráfico. En este sentido, el caso de la isla de San Andrés (Colombia se examina más como parte de la dinámica insular gran caribeña que como parte de las tendencias propias del negocio en la Colombia continental, lo que permite, sin embargo, establecer las conexiones entre ambos espacios regionales -el insular y el continental- y, a la vez, evaluar el impacto regional del fenómeno a partir de las conexiones ilegales que desde el archipiélago se establecen con algunos países vecinos del Gran Caribe. Finalmente, se sostiene la hipótesis de que el fenómeno del narcotráfico se instala en la isla como resultado de factores geohistóricos, culturales y socioeconómicos que en conjunto han determinado la participación activa de distintos sectores de la sociedad en este negocio ilegal.The objective of thispaper is to present a preliminary diagnosis of the magnitude, dynamics, and modalities of drug trafficking, together with the social and economic conditions that support the development of this illegal activity in the island of San Andres (Colombia. Analysis is conducted within a framework that identifies this trafficking zone as a natural and historic corridor for trade in weapons, drugs, and other illicit

  20. Crisis management and crisis prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallensteen, P.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports that many proposals have come forth to ease the tension between East and West. Some focus on arms developments, others take up diplomatic issues. In addition, some have raised the question of crisis management and crisis prevention. Can crises be prevented even before they have taken place? The Palme Commission on Disarmament and Security suggested, in its 1982 report, ways of restraining superpower involvement in Third World conflicts. Such conflicts, it was argued, could escalate and ultimately result in nuclear confrontation between the United States and the Soviet Union. Certainly, the commission also paid attention to conflicts over issues in Europe and to problems in Eastern or in Western Europe. However, the commission raised a question that lately has received increasing attention: the dangers of superpower confrontation over Third World issues. In his statement to the United Nations on 24 October 1985, President Regan pointed to the need for settling regional conflicts as they play a large role in building suspicions and tensions. Regan's initiative explicitly concerned Afghanistan, Cambodia, Ethiopia, Angola and Nicaragua. It included negotiations with the Soviet Union over Afghanistan, and, at a later stage, also over other issues. The goal, he the, was not to force a settlement on the parties. The initiative concerned issues that have for the American public, justified armaments and reduced Soviet credibility

  1. 78 FR 79312 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-30

    ... deviation from the operating schedule that governs the Rock Island Railroad and Highway Drawbridge across the Upper Mississippi River, mile 482.9, at Rock Island, Illinois. The deviation is necessary to allow.... Army Rock Island Arsenal requested a temporary deviation for the Rock Island Railroad and Highway...

  2. 76 FR 9224 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-17

    ... issued a temporary deviation from the regulation governing the operation of the Rock Island Railroad and Highway Drawbridge across the Upper Mississippi River, mile 482.9, at Rock Island, Illinois. The deviation.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The U.S. Army Rock Island Arsenal requested a temporary deviation for the Rock Island...

  3. Miles-Ezzell's WACC Approach Yields Arbitrage

    OpenAIRE

    Löffler, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    A simple counterexample shows the the widely used WACC approach to value leverage firms developed by Miles and Ezzell can create an arbitrage opportunity. The only consequence to be drawn is that their WACC approach cannot be applied under the circumstances assumed by Miles and Ezzell. We show how the WACC has to be modified in order to obtain proper results. We develop a theory in continuous as well as discrete time. In discrete time it turns out that with a further assumption on the cash fl...

  4. 78 FR 31454 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Hudson River, Troy and Green Island, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    ...-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Hudson River, Troy and Green Island, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... that governs the highway bridge (Troy Green Island) across the Hudson River, mile 152.7, between Troy... the regulations for the 112th Street Bridge, mile 155.4, between Troy and Cohoes which has been...

  5. 78 FR 56607 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Hudson River, Troy and Green Island, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    ...-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Hudson River, Troy and Green Island, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... operation of the highway bridge across the Hudson River, mile 152.7, between Troy and Green Island, New York... Street Bridge, mile 155.4, between Troy and Cohoes which has been converted to a fixed bridge. It is...

  6. Mile-A-Minute (Pest Alert)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denise Binion; William Jackson

    2009-01-01

    Mile-a-minute weed (Persicaria perfoliata (L.) H. Gross, formerly Polygonum perfoliatum, L.) is an annual vine in the Polygonaceae or Buckwheat family. It is native to eastern Asia including India, Bhutan, Nepal, China, Burma, Japan, Korea, Indonesia, Bangladesh, Siberia, the Philippines, New Guinea, the Malay peninsula and the...

  7. Émile Durkheims politiske teori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harste, Gorm

    2009-01-01

    Émile Durkheim skabte en af de mest koherænte teorier om moderne samfunds udvikling og ikke mindst om udviklinger i stat og demokrati. Demokrati defineres som deliberativt demokrati, dvs. at demokrati ikke skal forstås blot som flertalsstyre, men som kommunikationen i forhandlingerne om samfundets...

  8. Kant Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William H Carter

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available • ISSUE 2-1, 2011 • 68 KANT CRISIS This study approaches the last days of Immanuel Kant through the lens of his contemporary biographers and other correspondents. Among the latter, Kant’s brother and, subsequently, his brother’s family provide a symptomatic reflection upon Kant’s management of his genealogy and his legacy. Yet behind this body of work is another corpus, one which embodies maternal and paternal legacies that are not readily subsumed by Oedipus or Kant’s philosophy. This work (of art is Kant’s own body or corpus, which he painstakingly maintained and which provided a case study for his refelctions on preventive medicine in The Conflict of the Faculties. William H. Carter studied at the University of Virginia, the University of Heidelberg, and earned his Ph.D. at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He taught German for three years at Tulane University and recently returned to the Department of World Languages and Cultures at Iowa State University, where he began his teaching career. His current book project is titled “Devilish Details: Goethe’s Public Service and Political Economy.” Julian Fickler attends the Academy of Fine Arts Karlsruhe, class of Helmut Dorner. He is the recipient of a prestigious fellowship award bestowed by the Künstlerförderung des Cusanuswerks Bonn. He has exhibited solo locally and in group at venues in Berlin and Hamburg.

  9. FirstMile US Fall 2005 Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Moore, Virginia Tech 5. Broadband Delivery means Living Longer and Living Better a. The First Mile in Healthcare, Michael Ackerman, National Library of...deal with it and interact with it." The Internet will be delivered by a wide variety of means and go to places where people may not have access to...Fall 2005 Conference Proceedings First Regional Commnunity Network - OneCleveland Steven Brand, OneCleveland 4U -ýýeý L ECommunity Computing -Thin

  10. 75 FR 13131 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Sale of Plum Island, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-18

    ... the anticipated sale of Plum Island, New York and an ancillary support facility at Orient Point, New...) for the Sale of Plum Island, NY AGENCY: Office of Real Property Utilization & Disposal; General...: Plum Island is an 840-acre island located approximately 1.5 miles off the northeast tip of Orient Point...

  11. The Puerto Rico Healthcare Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Jesse

    2015-12-01

    The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico is an organized nonincorporated territory of the United States with a population of more than 3.5 million U.S. citizens. The island has been the focus of much recent attention due to the recent default on its debt (estimated at more than $70 billion), high poverty rates, and increasing unemployment. Less attention, however, has been given to the island's healthcare system, which many believe is on the verge of collapsing. Healthcare makes up 20% of the Puerto Rican economy, and this crisis affects reimbursement rates for physicians while promoting the disintegration of the island's healthcare infrastructure. A major contributor relates to a disparity in federal funding provided to support the island's healthcare system when compared with that provided to the states in the mainland and Hawaii. Puerto Rico receives less federal funding for healthcare than the other 50 states and the District of Columbia even though it pays its share of social security and Medicare taxes. To make matters worse, the U.S. Center for Medicaid and Medicare Services is planning soon to implement another 11% cut in Medical Advantage reimbursements. This disparity in support for healthcare is considered responsible for ∼$25 billion of Puerto Rico's total debt. The impact of these events on the health of Puerto Ricans in the island cannot be entirely predicted, but the loss of healthcare providers and diminished access to care are a certainty, and quality care will suffer, leading to serious implications for those with chronic medical disorders including respiratory disease.

  12. Crisis Management: Research Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.; Dorman, Sally; Anderson, Luke; McNair, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This article presents summaries of three studies relevant to school crisis response. The first report, "A Framework for International Crisis Intervention" (Sally Dorman), is a review of how existing crisis intervention models (including the NASP PREPaRE model) have been adapted for international use. The second article, "Responding…

  13. Fair Miles? The concept of 'food miles' through a sustainable development lens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacGregor, James; Vorley, Bill

    2006-10-15

    The concept of 'food miles' presents an argument to buy goods which have travelled the shortest distance from farm to table, and to discriminate against long-haul transportation, especially air-freighted goods. The long-distance transport of food is associated with additional emissions due to increased transportation coupled with greater packaging, as well as a disconnection between the public and local farming. Furthermore, 'food miles' encapsulates (and is at the vanguard of) the climate change debate in the UK. In light of growing international concern over the speed and scale of climate change, the concept of 'food miles' has captured public attention and apparently is changing some consumers' behaviour, although only around one-third of shoppers know of the concept.

  14. Canary Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This easterly looking view shows the seven major volcanic islands of the Canary Island chain (28.0N, 16.5W) and offers a unique view of the islands that have become a frequent vacation spot for Europeans. The northwest coastline of Africa, (Morocco and Western Sahara), is visible in the background. Frequently, these islands create an impact on local weather (cloud formations) and ocean currents (island wakes) as seen in this photo.

  15. Improvements in BTS estimation of ton-miles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    Ton-miles (one ton of freight shipped one mile) is the primary physical measure of freight transportation output. This paper describes improved measurements of ton-miles for air, truck, rail, water, and pipeline modes. Each modal measure contains a d...

  16. 78 FR 21537 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... Operation Regulations; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of... operating schedule that governs the Rock Island Railroad and Highway Drawbridge across the Upper Mississippi River, mile 482.9, at Rock Island, Illinois. The deviation is necessary to allow the Front Street 5K Run...

  17. 78 FR 69995 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of... operating schedule that governs the Rock Island Railroad and Highway Drawbridge across the Upper Mississippi River, mile 482.9, at Rock Island, Illinois. The deviation is necessary to allow the bridge owner time...

  18. 75 FR 81125 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ... Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of... the Upper Mississippi River, mile 481.4, at Rock Island, Illinois. The deviation is necessary to allow... Rock Island, Illinois to open on signal if at least 24 hours advance notice is given for 44 days from...

  19. 77 FR 20716 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... issued a temporary deviation from the regulation governing the operation of the Rock Island Railroad and Highway Drawbridge across the Upper Mississippi River, mile 482.9, at Rock Island, Illinois. The deviation...) 366-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The U.S. Army Rock Island Arsenal requested a temporary deviation...

  20. 77 FR 3607 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    ... issued a temporary deviation from the regulation governing the operation of the Rock Island Railroad and Highway Drawbridge across the Upper Mississippi River, mile 482.9, at Rock Island, Illinois. The deviation...) 366-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The U.S. Army Rock Island Arsenal requested a temporary deviation...

  1. 75 FR 17561 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-07

    ... issued a temporary deviation from the regulation governing the operations of the Rock Island Railroad and Highway Drawbridge across the Upper Mississippi River, Mile 482.9, Rock Island, Illinois. The deviation is... Manager, Docket Operations, telephone (202) 366-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The U.S. Army Rock Island...

  2. 78 FR 18933 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ... operating schedule that governs the Rock Island Railroad and Highway Drawbridge across the Upper Mississippi River, mile 482.9, at Rock Island, Illinois. The deviation is necessary to allow the Quad City Marathon..., Docket Operations, telephone (202) 366-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The U.S. Army Rock Island Arsenal...

  3. 76 FR 9223 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-17

    ... issued a temporary deviation from the regulation governing the operation of the Rock Island Railroad and Highway Drawbridge across the Upper Mississippi River, mile 482.9, at Rock Island, Illinois. The deviation...) 366-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The U.S. Army Rock Island Arsenal requested a temporary deviation...

  4. 75 FR 22228 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-28

    ... issued a temporary deviation from the regulation governing the operation of the Rock Island Railroad and Highway Drawbridge across the Upper Mississippi River, Mile 482.9, Rock Island, Illinois. The deviation is... Manager, Docket Operations, telephone (202) 366-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The U.S. Army Rock Island...

  5. 77 FR 5398 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... issued a temporary deviation from the regulation governing the operation of the Rock Island Railroad and Highway Drawbridge across the Upper Mississippi River, mile 482.9, at Rock Island, Illinois. The deviation...) 366-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The U.S. Army Rock Island Arsenal requested a temporary deviation...

  6. 75 FR 68974 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ..., has issued a temporary deviation from the regulation governing the operation of the Rock Island Railroad and Highway Drawbridge across the Upper Mississippi River, mile 482.9, at Rock Island, Illinois... Operations, telephone 202-366-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The U.S. Army Rock Island Arsenal requested a...

  7. 78 FR 15292 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Upper Mississippi River, Rock Island, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-11

    ... schedule that governs the Rock Island Railroad and Highway Drawbridge, across the Upper Mississippi River, mile 482.9, at Rock Island, Illinois. The deviation is necessary to allow the River Bandits 5K Run/Walk...) 366-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The U.S. Army Rock Island Arsenal requested a temporary deviation...

  8. Economic crisis: prelude to an energetic crisis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevallier, B.

    2009-01-01

    Recession due to the financial crisis of 2008 has stopped the world economic development and the hydrocarbons sector too. Collapse of prices, cancellation of investments, reach of a 'peak demand', the four speeches which are given here, describe these impacts and their consequences; but in scrutinizing the incentives of the crisis, they show the new role of petroleum: pretext value against the weakness of dollar and the inflation risks, speculative value for the investment funds. (O.M.)

  9. Learning Crisis Unit through Post-Crisis: Characteristics and Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebbi, Hela; Pündrich, Aline Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to identify the characteristics that a crisis unit should have to achieve effective learning after crisis. Literature has identified many relations between learning organizations and crisis; yet, there is a dearth of research on specific studies about crisis units and their post-crisis learning features. Thus, this paper…

  10. L’Italia: una crisi nella crisi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Roncaglia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article synthesises the large and extending literature on the financial and economic crisis from a Post-Keynesian point of view. The authors take on the position that the international and internal real imbalances are serious and worrying, but yet they are not the cause of the crisis or of its tremendous dimension. The flawed and insufficient regulation of finance is the prime cause of the crisis, as well as it is one of the main hindrances to expansionary macroeconomic policies that may less painfully drive developed countries out of the crisis. It then examines the most recent developments in the euro-area, claiming that we are not facing a sovereign debt crisis but rather a speculative attack on the euro. Finally, the article considers specifically the situation of Italy, currently at the hearth of such an attack, and suggests that the country was already facing critical developments before the 2007/2008 crisis. Thus, the policy measures so far suggested to exit the current stressful situation, in so far as they ignore this fact, seriously run the risk of proving insufficient or altogether noxious.

  11. Nitel Veri Analizinde Miles-Huberman Modeli

    OpenAIRE

    Baltacı, Ali

    2018-01-01

    Buaraştırmada, nitel araştırmalarda kullanılan veri analizi yöntemlerindenMiles-Huberman modelinin kuramsal temelleri ve uygulamaya yönelik stratejileriele alınmıştır. Bu çalışma özünde nitelveri analizinde araştırmacıların sıklıkla yöntembilim eksikliklerinden doğanuygulama sorunlarına karşı kavramsal bir zemin oluşturmayı hedeflemiştir.Çalışma ile nitel araştırma verilerinin analizinde eksikliği hissedilen kavramsalzemin oluşturulacak ve uygulamaya dönük stratejiler üzerinde durulacaktır. B...

  12. Crowds and Crisis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Christian

    The November Revolution in 1918 made manifest and further unleashed a political crisis in Germany, the consequences of which have been thoroughly examined. What has attracted less attention is how the Revolution also triggered a semantic crisis within sociology, namely with regard to conceptions...... selected aspects of classical crowd semantics – in particular notions of imitation and suggestibility – and for placing them centrally in the understanding of the social, in times of crisis and not....

  13. Integrated crisis management exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, R.B.; DeHart, R.E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes some of the steps that Mobil has taken to enhance their crisis management capability and to improve their readiness. The approach stretches from the individual plant level to Mobil's Corporate offices in Fairfax, Virginia. Some of the lessons learned from several integrated crisis management exercises are outlined and some areas where additional industry co-operation in crisis management could pay dividends are suggested

  14. US health care crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirić, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    The United States health care is presently challenged by a significant economic crisis. The purpose of this report is to introduce the readers of Medicinski Pregled to the root causes of this crisis and to explain the steps undertaken to reform health care in order to solve the crisis. It is hoped that the information contained in this report will be of value, if only in small measure, to the shaping of health care in Serbia.

  15. Crisis, criticism, change: Regulatory reform in the wake of nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sexton, Kimberly A.; )

    2015-01-01

    Accidents are a forcing function for change in the nuclear industry. While these events can shed light on needed technical safety reforms, they can also shine a light on needed regulatory system reforms. The TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP) accident in Japan is the most recent example of this phenomenon, but it is not the only one. In the wake of the three major accidents that have occurred in the nuclear power industry - Three Mile Island (TMI) in the United States; Chernobyl in Ukraine, in the former Soviet Union; and the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident in Japan - a commission or committee of experts issued a report (or reports) with harsh criticism of the countries' regulatory system. And each of these accidents prompted changes in the respective regulatory systems. In looking at these responses, however, one must ask if this crisis, criticism, change approach is working and whether regulatory bodies around the world should instead undertake their own systematic reviews, un-prompted by crisis, to better ensure safety. This article will attempt to analyse the issue of regulatory reform in the wake of nuclear accidents by first providing a background in nuclear regulatory systems, looking to international and national legal frameworks. Next, the article will detail a cross-section of current regulatory systems around the world. Following that, the article will analyse the before and after of the regulatory systems in the United States, the Soviet Union and Japan in relation to the TMI, Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents. Finally, taking all this together, the article will address some of the international and national efforts to define exactly what makes a good regulator and provide conclusions on regulatory reform in the wake of nuclear accidents. (author)

  16. The Madagascar Crisis, SADC Mediation and the Changing Indian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The 2009 crisis is indicative of the vulnerability of this island state to deep-seated structural factors relating to its history, geostrategic position on the Indian Ocean and elite cultures. The Southern African Development Community (SADC) would lead the condemnation of this forced change of government as unconstitutional ...

  17. Entiat 4Mile WELLs Completion Report, 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinowksi, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The Entiat 4-mile Wells (Entiat 4-mile) project is located in the Entiat subbasin and will benefit Upper Columbia steelhead, spring Chinook and bull trout. The goal of this project is to prevent juvenile fish from being diverted into an out-of-stream irrigation system and to eliminate impacts due to the annual maintenance of an instream pushup dam. The objectives include eliminating a surface irrigation diversion and replacing it with two wells, which will provide Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) with a Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) BiOp metric credit of one. Wells were chosen over a new fish screen based on biological benefits and costs. Long-term biological benefits are provided by completely eliminating the surface diversion and the potential for fish entrainment in a fish screen. Construction costs for a new fish screen were estimated at $150,000, which does not include other costs associated with implementing and maintaining a fish screening project. Construction costs for a well were estimated at $20,000 each. The diversion consisted of a pushup dam that diverted water into an off-channel pond. Water was then pumped into a pressurized system for irrigation. There are 3 different irrigators who used water from this surface diversion, and each has multiple water right claims totaling approximately 5 cfs. Current use was estimated at 300 gallons per minute (approximately 0.641 cfs). Some irrigated acreage was taken out of orchard production less than 5 years ago. Therefore, approximately 6.8 acre-feet will be put into the State of Washington Trust Water Right program. No water will be set aside for conservation savings. The construction of the two irrigation wells for three landowners was completed in September 2006. The Lower Well (Tippen/Wick) will produce up to 175 gpm while the Upper Well (Griffith) will produce up to 275 gpm during the irrigation season. The eight inch diameter wells were

  18. Laser Safety Evaluation of the MILES and Mini MILES Laser Emitting Components; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AUGUSTONI, ARNOLD L.

    2002-01-01

    Laser safety evaluation and output emission measurements were performed (during October and November 2001) on SNL MILES and Mini MILES laser emitting components. The purpose, to verify that these components, not only meet the Class 1 (eye safe) laser hazard criteria of the CDRH Compliance Guide for Laser Products and 21 CFR 1040 Laser Product Performance Standard; but also meet the more stringent ANSI Std. z136.1-2000 Safe Use of Lasers conditions for Class 1 lasers that govern SNL laser operations. The results of these measurements confirmed that all of the Small Arms Laser Transmitters, as currently set (''as is''), meet the Class 1 criteria. Several of the Mini MILES Small Arms Transmitters did not. These were modified and re-tested and now meet the Class 1 laser hazard criteria. All but one System Controllers (hand held and rifle stock) met class 1 criteria for single trigger pulls and all presented Class 3a laser hazard levels if the trigger is held (continuous emission) for more than 5 seconds on a single point target. All units were Class 3a for ''aided'' viewing. These units were modified and re-tested and now meet the Class 1 hazard criteria for both ''aided'' as well as ''unaided'' viewing. All the Claymore Mine laser emitters tested are laser hazard Class 1 for both ''aided'' as well as ''unaided'' viewing

  19. Memories of MilesMiles Blackwell and his contribution to South African librarianship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S.C. Hooper

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of BH Blackwell (BHB, and specifically of Miles Blackwell, to the development of libraries and librarians in South Africa is explored based on available literature sources and personal reminiscences. This article tells how Miles was true to his personal values and how he demonstrated his integrity in the exercise of his office. Miles integrated in his mind the history of the “firm” of BHB and the times that it lived though with his sense of his responsibility to his customers. He was prepared to stand up against enormous political pressure from his peers in Europe and North America, and perhaps his fellow board members in BHB, to make sure that the channels of published information flow remained open to his customers in South Africa. The value of books and information was what he believed in. His service to his customers in South Africa reflected the self-sacrificing service ethic that he understood to be the essence of the family firm of which he had the great privilege of leading. He contributed to the development of the new, post-apartheid South Africa by ensuring that the people who needed the enlightened word to become part of the global society, benefited by what he had done.

  20. Dalla crisi finanziaria alla crisi reale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARLO D’ADDA

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The financial crisis of 2008 is put in relation with two bubbles, financial and housing. Easy credit is at the origin of both bubbles. Risky bonds were issued to mobilize mortgages originated in the housing market, and bad bonds entered a fantastic number of institutional and private portfolios all over the world without any perception of the their risk. Unfortunately, bank credit to speculators was abundant and fed the final growth of the bubbles. When fears started to spread, the fall was immediate and expectations impaired very rapidly. The main aggregate demand components were severely curtailed and production fell as well. This is the crisis of the real economy. Fortunately, as opposed to what happened in 1929, the interventions of central banks and governments have been of an unprecedented size. The bail out of insolvent banks in particular has been providential. The exit from the current crisis, however, will surely be slow.

  1. Crisis Management Research Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    In this column, Crisis Management in the Schools Interest Group members summarize recent crisis management publications. The first article summarized was a meta-analysis of the risk factors associated with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) among adults. The second study looked at the presence of life stressors among students who were expelled…

  2. Energy and crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, L.P.

    1984-01-01

    Several aspects of the Brazilian energy policy are dealt with, regarding petroleum, electric energy and the nuclear question. Regional and international aspects relating to the energy crisis are discussed, and some alternatives for this crisis are suggested. (I. de C.R.) [pt

  3. Crisis control - the background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    The problems of destructive accidents and the need for a crisis management system to deal with every kind of emergency is discussed. Crisis control with regard to the ''Problem'' and the ''Outlook'' were covered, as well as the ''Development of an Incident''. (U.K.)

  4. Crimean Crisis and Military Balance in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongshu Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available As the Crimean Crisis goes on, many analysis have been focusing on the dynamics among parties of Ukraine, the EU, the US and Russia. Very few noticed another important strategic impact the Crisis may cause: the Chinese military rebalancing in East Asia. China has been increasingly confident in assuming both political and military power in the East Asian region. The confidence resulted in the South China Sea disputes with ASEAN countries, “Anti-Secession Law” against Taiwan, and the Diaoyu/Senkaku Islands Dispute with Japan. Behind such confidence of China, the EU has consistently been exporting defence products to China since the end of the Cold War; Ukraine, although sometimes reluctantly, has also been backing China along the process of building up a stronger navy as well as other defense industry construction; Russia has traditionally been supplying China with a wide range of military hardware. It can be noticed that the Crimean Crisis involved three out of four countries and region that have been behind China’s rise. How will the Crimean Crisis influence China’s rebalance in East Asia then? The answers stay opaque. This paper will attempt to answer the questions.

  5. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Puerto Rico (Fact Sheet); NREL(National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-03-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico - a U.S. territory located about 60 miles east of the Dominican Republic and directly west of the U.S. Virgin Islands.

  6. 33 CFR 117.169 - Mare Island Strait and the Napa River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Strait and the Napa River. (a) The draw of the Mare Island Drawbridge, mile 2.8, at Vallejo shall open on... may contact the City of Vallejo via the same telephone number to schedule drawspan operation. (b) The...

  7. 2012 USACE Post Sandy Topographic LiDAR: Rhode Island and Massachusetts Coast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This topographic elevation point data derived from multiple return light detection and ranging (LiDAR) represents 354.272 square miles of coastline for Rhode Island...

  8. Crisis Communication and Management: Surviving a Public Relations Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eramo, Eric M.

    2009-01-01

    Crisis management, or crisis communication, is never a good thing for a business to experience. It is, however, a public relations' professional moment to shine and put their honed skills to good use. A good crisis management plan is not only action during the crisis but preparation and reflection. Hiring a PR firm that deals with crisis…

  9. From oil crisis to climate crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langseth, Bjarne

    2000-01-01

    The oil crisis in the 1970s led to the shift from oil to hydro- and nuclear power. An almost similar shift might soon come as a ''climate crisis''. A climate crisis may imply a renaissance for hydropower and nuclear power and natural gas will be used on a large scale. In Europe, natural gas is currently considered environmentally friendly. Although there is at present growing opposition to nuclear power in Sweden and Germany, this attitude may change as the result of increased focus on the costs of the alternatives. A forced phase-out of nuclear power in Europe simultaneously with a climate crisis with reduced energy production from fossil fuels is likely to entail significantly increased prices of electricity. In Norway, 98% of the country's electric power production is based on hydro power, which means that much more heating can be based on electricity than in countries in which electricity is produced by combustion of fossil fuels. Much research is in progress to find technologies that will make it possible to shift from fossil fuel energy to energy from renewable sources like solar, water, wind, biomass and geothermal energy

  10. Husserl's Crisis as a crisis of psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feest, Uljana

    2012-06-01

    This paper places Husserl's mature work, The Crisis of the European Sciences, in the context of his engagement with--and critique of--experimental psychology at the time. I begin by showing (a) that Husserl accorded psychology a crucial role in his philosophy, i.e., that of providing a scientific analysis of subjectivity, and (b) that he viewed contemporary psychology--due to its naturalism--as having failed to pursue this goal in the appropriate manner. I then provide an analysis of Husserl's views about naturalism and scientific philosophy. Some central themes of the Crisis are traced back to Husserl's earlier work and to his relationship with his teacher, Franz Brentano, with whom he disagreed about the status of "inner perception" as the proper scientific method for a phenomenological analysis. The paper then shows that Husserl was well aware of at least one publication about the crisis of psychology (Bühler's 1927 book), and it teases out some aspects of the complicated relationship between Husserl and members of the Würzburg School of thought psychology: The latter had drawn on Husserl's writings, but Husserl felt that they had misunderstood his central thesis. I conclude by placing Husserl's work in the wider context of scientific, cultural, and political crisis-discourses at the time. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Narratives of crisis: identity crisis or crisis of meaning?!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseli Araújo Barros Costa

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is about a review of a broader research on the understanding of the professional development of Mathematics teachers, especially the results of the analysis of one of the selected categories, the projectors and the crisis narratives. This analysis was theoretically supported by Larrosa (2002. To carry out the research, we adopted the qualitative research, with a narrative focus, based on semi-structured interviews about the life history of a teacher who teaches mathematics in Basic Education. Based on a concept of professional development taken from a continuous perspective, idealized in a broader context of teaching work, permeating crises and conflicts, the analysis shows that the teacher's crisis reports are related to factors such as: low salaries, conflicts in her current institution Lack of social prestige and insecurity. His reports reveal that initial training did nothing to address the "new" changes in education. It shows that their lack of enthusiasm is associated with the emptying of the useful meaning of their formation, which results from the overvaluation of their exchange value. However, a crisis narrative can construct the present as a critical moment in the double sense of the word as a decisive moment and, at the same time, as a moment in which the subject critically recovers his own history, appropriates himself critically To find out where it is and to decide its own movement (LARRROSA, 2002. The individual, by critically restoring his history, can rethink the past, think the present, and (reconstruct his own future. The teacher, in her crisis narratives, shows that, by critically recovering her story, by putting out all her "revolt", she opens a "door" that will possibly show a new path to be taken. This seeks new challenges for their professional development

  12. Crisis? What Crisis? The Normality of the Current Food Crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, T.

    2010-01-01

    The 2005–8 food crisis was a shock to political elites, but in some respects the situation was normal. Food policies are failing to respond adequately to the squeeze on land, people, health and environment. Strong evidence of systems failure and stress, termed here New Fundamentals, ought to reframe twenty-first century food politics and effort. Yet so far, international discourse is too often narrow and technical. The paper suggests that 2005–8 reinforced how the dominant twentieth century p...

  13. Dalla crisi finanziaria alla crisi reale. ( Financial and real crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo D'Adda

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available  The financial crisis of 2008 is put in relation with two bubbles, financial and housing. Easy credit is at the origin of both bubbles. Risky bonds were issued to mobilize mortgages originated in the housing market, and bad bonds entered a fantastic number of institutional and private portfolios all over the world without any perception of the their risk. Unfortunately, bank credit to speculators was abundant and fed the final growth of the bubbles. When fears started to spread, the fall was immediate and expectations impaired very rapidly. The main aggregate demand components were severely curtailed and production fell as well. This is the crisis of the real economy. Fortunately, as opposed to what happened in 1929, the interventions of central banks and governments have been of an unprecedented size. The bail out of insolvent banks in particular has been providential. The exit from the current crisis, however, will surely be slow.  JEL: E44, G01, G10

  14. Trust vs. Crisis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    The three social phenomena -- norms, trust, and crisis -- are in this paper combined into one model that illustrates their function and relationship. Crisis is seen as a reaction to serious violations of expectations that leave people disoriented, insecure about situational norms, and unable...... to judge whom to trust. One logical solution to a crisis is to rebuild a shared understanding of the norms involved in any given context. Banking is used as a case. Central concepts are borrowed from Niklas Luhmann Trust (1968), Alf Ross Directives and Norms (1967), and Arthur G. Neal National Trauma...

  15. Trust vs. Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Mogensen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The three social phenomena -- norms, trust, and crisis -- are in this paper combined into one model that illustrates their function and relationship. Crisis is seen as a reaction to serious violations of expectations that leave people disoriented, insecure about situational norms, and unable to judge whom to trust. One logical solution to a crisis is to rebuild a shared understanding of the norms involved in any given context. Banking is used as a case. Central concepts are borrowed from Niklas Luhmann Trust (1968, Alf Ross Directives and Norms (1967, and Arthur G. Neal National Trauma & Collective Memory (1998.

  16. Crisis response to schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K

    2000-01-01

    While community based crisis response teams offer needed resources to schools impacted by crisis, they are often not asked to help. Reports from crisis team leaders at the school shooting incidents at James W. Parker Middle School, Edinboro, Pennsylvania and Columbine High School, Littleton, Colorado are contrasted regarding utilization of community resources. Factors limiting the usefulness of community based teams include unfamiliarity with school organization, culture, and procedures. Key differences in school vs. community team precepts, decision-making, and strategic paradigms render team coordination difficult. Successful cross training presents opportunities for school-community partnership and utilization of community teams for school duty.

  17. Sickle Cell Crisis (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Sickle Cell Crisis (Pain Crisis) KidsHealth / For Teens / Sickle Cell ... drepanocíticas (Crisis de dolor) What Is a Sickle Cell Crisis? Sickle cell disease changes the shape of ...

  18. Crisis communication. Lessons from 9/11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argenti, Paul

    2002-12-01

    The sheer enormity of last year's terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon gave new meaning to the term "crisis management." Suddenly, companies near Ground Zero, as well as those more than a thousand miles away, needed a plan. Because the disasters disrupted established channels not only between businesses and customers but between businesses and employees, internal crisis-communications strategies that could be quickly implemented became a key responsibility of top management. Without these strategies, employees' trauma and confusion might have immobilized their firms and set their customers adrift. In this article, executives from a range of industries talk about how their companies, including Morgan Stanley, Oppenheimer Funds, American Airlines, Verizon, the New York Times, Dell, and Starbucks, went about restoring operations and morale. From his interviews with these individuals, author and management professor Paul Argenti was able to distill a number of lessons, each of which, he says, may "serve as guideposts for any company facing a crisis that undermines its employees' composure, confidence, or concentration." His advice to senior executives includes: Maintain high levels of visibility, so that employees are certain of top management's command of the situation and concern; establish contingency communication channels and work sites; strive to keep employees focused on the business itself, because a sense of usefulness enhances morale and good morale enhances usefulness; and ensure that employees have absorbed the firm's values, which will guide them as they cope with the unpredictable. The most forward-thinking leaders realize that managing a crisis-communications program requires the same dedication and resources they give to other dimensions of their business. More important, they realize that their employees always come first.

  19. What does it mean to be average? : the miles per gallon versus gallons per mile paradox revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haans, A.

    2008-01-01

    In the efficiency paradox, which was introduced by Hand (1994; J R Stat Soc A, 157, 317-356), two groups of engineers are in disagreement about the average fuel efficiency of a set of cars. One group measured efficiency on a miles per gallon scale, the other on a gallons per mile scale. In the

  20. 78 FR 77592 - Safety Zone; Lower Mississippi River Mile 94.1-Mile 95.1; New Orleans, LA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    ... 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Lower Mississippi River Mile 94.1-Mile 95.1; New Orleans, LA AGENCY: Coast Guard... zone is prohibited unless specifically authorized by the Captain of the Port New Orleans or a... temporary rule, call Lieutenant Commander (LCDR) Brandon Sullivan, Sector New Orleans, at (504) 365-2281 or...

  1. 78 FR 36660 - Safety Zone; Mississippi River Mile 95.5-Mile 96.5; New Orleans, LA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Mississippi River Mile 95.5-Mile 96.5; New Orleans, LA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... of the Port New Orleans or a designated representative. DATES: This rule is effective from 9:45 p.m... email Lieutenant Commander (LCDR) Brandon Sullivan, Sector New Orleans, U.S. Coast Guard; telephone (504...

  2. Miles better? how 'fair miles' stack up in the sustainable supermarket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garside, Ben; MacGregor, James; Vorley, Bill

    2007-12-15

    In 2007, 'food miles' shot to the top of consumer concerns in the UK. Buying goods that took the shortest route from farm to table was widely seen as a way of shrinking carbon footprints. This left airfreighted produce singled out as the epitome of unsustainable consumption, and some UK retailers began to label flown items such as green beans from Kenya. Yet looking at the bigger picture, fresh produce airfreighted from Africa accounts for less than 0.1 per cent of UK emissions, and per capita emissions from sub-Saharan Africa are minuscule compared to those in industrialised countries. Against this background are the million-plus African livelihoods supported by growing the produce. Within the grocery supply chain the time is ripe for 'fair miles' — a working idea that puts development in the South on the environmental agenda, and allows UK retailers a more balanced response on behalf of their millions of customers.

  3. Companies’ management during economic crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Kumpikaitė, Vilmantė; Grybauskas, Andrius; Juodelis, Mantas; Strumyla, Dovydas

    2011-01-01

    Lots of companies faced recent economic crisis. It was generated by global markets deregulation and it triggered relevant situation to emerge other types of crisis. Many scientists all over the world analyses how crisis affected global economy and changed companies’ management actions. Scientists exclude these types of crisis: economic, informational, physical, human resource, reputational, psychopathic acts production and financial. This paper examines economic crisis generated negative effe...

  4. Veterans Crisis Line

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The caring responders at the Veterans Crisis Line are specially trained and experienced in helping Veterans of all ages and circumstances. Some of the responders are...

  5. Emotional crisis communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, T.G.L.A.; Verhoeven, J.W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Organizational crises are usually highly emotional experiences for both organizations and stakeholders. Hence, crisis situations often result in emotionally charged communication between the two parties. Despite the attention of organizations and scholars to the emotions of stakeholders during

  6. Policing the Global Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William I. Robinson

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available As part of my research for a book manuscript on the crisis of global capitalism I recently finished writing (Robinson forthcoming, I decided to re-read the classic 1978 study conducted by the noted socialist and cultural theorist Stuart Hall and several of his colleagues, Policing the Crisis. The authors show in that book how the restructuring of capitalism as a response to the crisis of the 1970s - which was the last major crisis of world capitalism until the current one hit in 2008 -led in the United Kingdom and elsewhere to an "exceptional state," by which they meant a situation in which there was an ongoing breakdown of consensual mechanisms of social control and a growing authoritarianism.

  7. Marshall Islands

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2015-01-01

    This note aims to build understanding of the existing disaster risk financing and insurance (DRFI) tools in use in The Marshall Islands and to identify gaps where potential engagement could further develop financial resilience. The likelihood that a hazardous event will have a significant impact on the Marshall Islands has risen with the increasing levels of population and assets in the urban ...

  8. 2030 the ecological crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferone, G.

    2008-01-01

    The ecological crisis will happen on 2030. A combination of climatic change, energy problems, increase in population, will mix up. The author debates about true questions on the economy: how to get quickly towards renewable energies use, how much will it cost, must we generalize the carbon tax, what about economic giant as India and China, what about the technology development to solve the crisis? (A.L.B.)

  9. International Trade Crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Popa Diana

    2011-01-01

    This article captures a brief history of the negotiations of the Doha Development Agenda (DDA), analyzes its deadlock and offers some suggestions for a successful Doha deal. First, this study shows that the nearly decade-long negotiation stalemate is caused by the opposite perceptions between industrialized countries and developing ones on agriculture, as well as by the influences of economic crisis on the world trade. Subsequently, some proposals are presented to solve the current crisis fro...

  10. The World Financial Crisis

    OpenAIRE

    F. Gerard Adams

    2009-01-01

    The world financial crisis of 2008 is a consequence of new financial technologies, new accounting methods and new international linkages. These developments have come at a time when governments have returned to an old-fashioned freemarket philosophy. This paper links the systemic financial/economic crisis of 2008 to the new economy developments, globalisation and policy philosophy perspectives of recent decades. It raises the question of how to re-establish confidence once traditional thinkin...

  11. Crisis decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holsti, O.R.

    1989-01-01

    This article presents evidence that the potential loss of control of events by officials who must operate under conditions that generate substantial stress is one of the central problems of crisis decision making. Examples of U.S. crises management and alliance management are reviewed, and possible tools for improving crisis management decisions are discussed. This article particularly focuses on crises which may lead to nuclear war

  12. L’Italia: una crisi nella crisi.(Italy: A Crisis within the Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo D'ippoliti

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The article synthesises the large and extending literature on the financial and economic crisis from a Post-Keynesian point of view. The authors take on the position that the international and internal real imbalances are serious and worrying, but yet they are not the cause of the crisis or of its tremendous dimension. The flawed and insufficient regulation of finance is the prime cause of the crisis, as well as it is one of the main hindrances to expansionary macroeconomic policies that may less painfully drive developed countries out of the crisis. It then examines the most recent developments in the euro-area, claiming that we are not facing a sovereign debt crisis but rather a speculative attack on the euro. Finally, the article considers specifically the situation of Italy, currently at the hearth of such an attack, and suggests that the country was already facing critical developments before the 2007/2008 crisis. Thus, the policy measures so far suggested to exit the current stressful situation, in so far as they ignore this fact, seriously run the risk of proving insufficient or altogether noxious.JEL: B50; E12; G01  

  13. Financial crisis and crisis management in Sweden: Lessons for today

    OpenAIRE

    Jonung, Lars

    2009-01-01

    This paper gives an account of the Swedish financial crisis covering the period 1985-2000, dealing with financial deregulation and the boom in the late 1980s, the bust and the financial crisis in the early 1990s, the recovery from the crisis and the bank resolution policy adopted during the crisis. The paper focuses on three issues: the causes and consequences of the financial crisis, the policy response concerning bank resolution, and the applicability of the Swedish model of bank crisis man...

  14. RESTRUCTURING COMPANIES UNDER CRISIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hezi Aviram SHAYB

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nobody is planning to fail, but many companies are failing because of lack of planning. Real business experience showed during the years that crisis can be prevented, avoided or limited. If detected in time, the risks associated with the crisis can be mitigated and the effects can be diminished, with the condition that the actions required are done fast, in a sharp and accurate manner. When it comes, a crisis brings an intense level of pressure and under these conditions there is no time or room for mistakes. Delays, losing focus and lack of planning will bring a company one step away from failure. The right way to deal with crisis, if required measures are not done in time, is to minimize the losses and reposition in the best way possible. Analysing the success stories of some of the biggest and strongest companies in the world, led to an important conclusion: the majority of these companies were in the situation to face huge crises which threatened their ability to survive in certain moments, on their way to success. With the right planning and by setting a proper organisational structure, the negative aspects of the crisis can be turned into benefits and opportunities for the company. The most critical challenge for management is to assess the level of exposure to risk of the company and identify the key points to focus on in order to overcome the crisis and create value. In order to set up a strong plan in dealing with crisis, a business organisation needs reliable, efficient and effective tools and this is what this article is all about.

  15. 33 CFR 207.249 - Ouachita and Black Rivers, Ark. and La., Mile 0.0 to Mile 338.0 (Camden, Ark.) above the mouth of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... not provided as part of the Red River Locks and Dams. When water levels rise to within 2 feet of the.... and La., Mile 0.0 to Mile 338.0 (Camden, Ark.) above the mouth of the Black River; the Red River, La., Mile 6.7 (Junction of Red, Atchafalaya and Old Rivers) to Mile 276.0 (Shreveport, La.); use...

  16. SRTM Anaglyph: Fiji Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The Sovereign Democratic Republic of the Fiji Islands, commonly known as Fiji, is an independent nation consisting of some 332 islands surrounding the Koro Sea in the South Pacific Ocean. This topographic image shows Viti Levu, the largest island in the group. With an area of 10,429 square kilometers (about 4000 square miles), it comprises more than half the area of the Fiji Islands. Suva, the capital city, lies on the southeast shore. The Nakauvadra, the rugged mountain range running from north to south, has several peaks rising above 900 meters (about 3000 feet). Mount Tomanivi, in the upper center, is the highest peak at 1324 meters (4341 feet). The distinct circular feature on the north shore is the Tavua Caldera, the remnant of a large shield volcano that was active about 4 million years ago. Gold has been mined on the margin of the caldera since the 1930s. The Nadrau plateau is the low relief highland in the center of the mountain range. The coastal plains in the west, northwest and southeast account for only 15 percent of Viti Levu's area but are the main centers of agriculture and settlement.This shaded relief anaglyph image was generated using preliminary topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. A computer-generated artificial light source illuminates the elevation data from the top (north) to produce a pattern of light and shadows. Slopes facing the light appear bright, while those facing away are shaded. The stereoscopic effect was created by first draping the shaded relief image back over the topographic data and then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.This image was acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument

  17. Crisis exercises at AREVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanson, D.

    2016-01-01

    AREVA being an operator of nuclear facilities has to organize crisis exercises regularly. About 100 crisis exercises are performed each year in AREVA installations. These exercises allow the training of the staff, the assessing of material and humane means and the checking of the quality of the interfaces between all the participants (other AREVA teams or Nuclear Safety Authority or...). The management of nuclear crisis is based on anticipation and relies on 3 pillars: a referential gathering all the useful documents (emergency plans, procedures,...), the training and practice of AREVA staff in specific domains to cope with emergency situations, and various crisis exercises to keep fit all the teams. The basis emergency exercise lasts 2 hours and is organized into modules. First module: detecting abnormal conditions, alerting, rescuing and limiting the consequences; second module: launching the emergency plan; third module: understanding the situation and limiting the consequences; fourth module: communicating with other actors that intervene in a nuclear crisis (nuclear safety authority, state or local officials, the media...); and fifth module: anticipating the end of the emergency phase to prepare post-accidental management. (A.C.)

  18. Unpacking the Global Crisis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juego, Bonn; Schmidt, Johannes Dragsbæk

    The paper hopes to contribute to a reading of the political economy of the current global crisis with a focus on four interrelated themes. First, we discuss the constitutive role and functional character of crises in the evolution of neo-liberalism in particular and in capitalist reproduction...... opposing crisis responses—from multilaterals to regional organisations to global civil society—and realise that responses from either pro-neoliberal or anti-neoliberal forces are fundamentally the same through the years, simply re-articulating analyses and programmes that they have respectively...... pursued and advocated long before the global crisis. And fourth, in the context of East and Southeast Asia, we examine the tendencies of the global crisis vis-à-vis the strengthening and even acceleration of emergent authoritarian liberalism in the region despite and because of the global crisis....

  19. Mapping and assessing the environmental impacts of border tactical infrastructure in the Sky Island Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroline Patrick-Birdwell; Sergio Avila-Villegas; Jenny Neeley; Louise Misztal

    2013-01-01

    In this project we mapped the different types of border barriers, identified impacts of border infrastructure on public and private lands and conducted spatial analyses within the approximately 200 miles of international border in the Sky Island region. The Sky Island region, bisected by the U.S.-Mexico border, is critically important for its biodiversity and...

  20. Re-Envisioning Crisis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snaith, Holly; Rosamond, Ben

    2015-01-01

    of EU integration – namely the 1970s oil shocks and the more recent global financial crisis – in order to determine the extent to which these events have been contemporarily defined as providing opportunities to act, or simply challenges to the existing order. The paper provides an analysis of the way...... in which EU actors have mobilised the idea of ‘crisis’ in order to (a) exert control over endogenous and exogenous destabilising forces, (b) (re)define the EU as an object of both political engagement and academic study, and finally (c) make the case for further expansion and integration (particularly....... The comparative nature of the findings helps to contextualise current discourses around the global financial crisis, in order to evaluate the EU’s previous efforts at global repositioning, and the significance of crisis discourse to these efforts....