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Sample records for miklas scholz rory

  1. Book Review Psychotherapy and Phenomenology By Ian Rory ...

    Book Review Psychotherapy and Phenomenology By Ian Rory Owen (2006) ... Psychotherapy and Phenomenology: On Freud, Husserl and Heidegger. New York: iUniverse. Soft Cover (352 ... AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE ...

  2. Albrecht Scholz (1940-2013): German dermatologist and historian of dermatology.

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Parish, Lawrence Charles; Plewig, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    Albrecht Scholz (Figure 1) was born in Görlitz (now Zgorzelec, a city located at the Polish-German border, covering both sides of the River Nysa) on September 6, 1940, the youngest of three children. His father was a laryngologist, specializing in voice and hearing impairment. Scholz attended school in his hometown and in 1958 passed his Matura examination, after which he studied medicine at both Humboldt University in Berlin and the “Carl Gustav Carus” Medical Academy in Dresden. Following successful completion of the state examination in 1964 and an internship at the Reichenbach Hospital the following year, he was granted the right to practice medicine. His 1964 doctoral dissertation was titled, “Evaluation of Astrand's Steps in Elderly Patients.”

  3. Sylka Scholz: Männlichkeitssoziologie. Münster: Verlag Westfälisches Dampfboot 2012.

    Anna Buschmeyer

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Sylka Scholz bringt verschiedene Stränge ihrer bisherigen Forschung über Männer und Männlichkeit zusammen und bietet so einen guten Überblick. Für das viel diskutierte Forschungsfeld formuliert sie einen neuen theoretischen Rahmen und prüft dessen empirische Tragfähigkeit in den Feldern Arbeitsmarkt, Militär und Politik. Sie kann aufzeigen, dass Männlichkeit zwar brüchig wird, sich aber kein Zusammenbruch männlicher Herrschaft und keine Alternative zur bisherigen hegemonialen Männlichkeit abzeichnet. Das Buch eignet sich gut für eine Einführung in das Forschungsgebiet, an unterschiedlichen Stellen wird weiterer Forschungsbedarf aufgezeigt. Theoretisch ist das Zusammendenken der Ansätze von Connell und Bourdieu für die Weiterentwicklung des Faches hilfreich – stellenweise hätte jedoch ruhig auch in diesem Buch schon etwas weiter theoretisiert werden dürfen.Sylka Scholz brings together various strands of her previous research on men and masculinity and is thus able to offer a good overview. She formulates a new theoretical frame for this much discussed field of research and examines its empirical validity in the fields of job market, military, and politics. She manages to show that, while the concept of masculinity is certainly becoming fragile, neither a collapse of male domination nor an alternative to the present hegemonic masculinity are looming. This book is a good introduction to the field of research, which also highlights several areas that need further research. The combination of the approaches of Connell and Bourdieu is, in theory, helpful for the development of the field – in parts however, it would have been good to theorize more already in this book.

  4. Review of the Book “Digital Labor: The Internet as Playground and Factory”, Edited by Trebor Scholz

    Sebastian Sevignani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is a review of the collected volume Digital Labor: The Internet as Playground and Factory, edited by Trebor Scholz (2013 and published by Routledge, New York. The author introduces the articles, discusses them briefly, and gives an overall evaluation of the book.

  5. Reclassification of Geobacillus pallidus (Scholz et al. 1988) Banat et al. 2004 as Aeribacillus pallidus gen. nov., comb. nov.

    Miñana-Galbis, David; Pinzón, Dora L; Lorén, J Gaspar; Manresa, Angels; Oliart-Ros, Rosa M

    2010-07-01

    Although Anoxybacillus and Geobacillus, two genera of thermophilic bacteria close to the genus Bacillus, have only been described recently, the number of species in these genera has increased rapidly. Four thermophilic, lipolytic strains (DR01, DR02, DR03 and DR04) isolated from a hot spring in Veracruz (Mexico), which could not be identified phenotypically, were subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Three strains were identified as belonging to the genus Anoxybacillus, but strain DR03 was identified as Geobacillus pallidus. This result led us to perform a phylogenetic analysis of the genera Anoxybacillus and Geobacillus based on 16S rRNA gene sequences from all the type strains of these genera. Phylogenetic trees showed three major clusters, Anoxybacillus-Geobacillus tepidamans, Geobacillus sensu stricto and Geobacillus pallidus, while the 16S rRNA gene sequences of G. pallidus (DR03 and the type strain) showed low similarity to sequences of Anoxybacillus (92.5-95.1 %) and Geobacillus (92.8-94.5 %) species, as well as to Bacillus subtilis (92.2-92.4 %). In addition, G. pallidus could be differentiated from Anoxybacillus and Geobacillus on the basis of DNA G+C content and fatty acid and polar lipid profiles. From these results, it is proposed that Geobacillus pallidus should be classified in a novel genus, for which we propose the name Aeribacillus, as Aeribacillus pallidus gen. nov., comb. nov. The type strain of Aeribacillus pallidus is H12(T) (=ATCC 51176(T) =DSM 3670(T) =LMG 19006(T)).

  6. New species of Ameloblastella Kritsky, Mendoza-Franco & Scholz, 2000 and Cosmetocleithrum Kritsky, Thatcher & Boeger, 1986 (Monogenea: Dactylogyridae) infecting the gills of catfishes (Siluriformes) from the Peruvian Amazonia

    Mendoza-Franco, E. F.; Mendoza-Palmero, C. A.; Scholz, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 9 (2016), s. 847-862 ISSN 0165-5752 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP505/12/G112 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : neotropical Monogenea * Ancyrocephalinae * Pimelodidae * redescription * proposal * Brazil Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.181, year: 2016

  7. Neophilometroides n. gen. (Nematoda: Philometridae) for Philometroides caudatus Moravec, Scholz and Vivas-Rodríguez, 1995, with erection of Neophilometroidinae n. subfam

    Moravec, František; Salgado-Maldonado, G.; Aguilar-Aguilar, R.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 4 (2002), s. 774-777 ISSN 0022-3395 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA6022901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6022909 Keywords : nematodes * parasites of fish * Neophilometroides Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.336, year: 2002

  8. 77 FR 74837 - President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST)

    2012-12-18

    ... week of the meeting. Questions about the meeting should be directed to Dr. Amber Hartman Scholz, PCAST... accommodation to access this public meeting should contact Dr. Amber Hartman Scholz at least ten business days...

  9. Hoe veranderen we de wereld? Of: Zandkastelen bouwen in de regen

    Douglas, Scott|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/370529529

    2013-01-01

    Bundel met essays van Alain Badiou, Margaret Atwood, John Gray, Rory Stewart, Parag Khanna, Evgeny Morozov, Rory Sutherland, Agnes Heller, Roger Scruton, Daniel Pick en de winnaar van de Nexus Connect-essaywedstrijd, Scott Douglas. Het mandaat om de wereld te veranderen moet worden teruggegeven aan

  10. The Holistic Leadership Model and the Nurse Unit Manager ...

    partnership with the New York University Rory Meyers College of Nursing. Abstract. Effective ... approach to leadership that has the potential to create a work environment defined ... rules, and seek and follow direction, whereas a leader.

  11. Download this PDF file

    ABEOLUGBENGAS

    (CKD) patients with regard to their dialysis, medication, dietary and fluid restriction. Methods: Key words were ... 1School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Rwanda, Rwanda. 2Rory Meyens ... acid base, fluid, and electrolyte balance (5).

  12. History, Criticism and Place

    Hinds, Mat; Carter, Adrian; Malpas, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Rory Spence and Richard Leplastrier shared a conversation and friendship that lasted 20years until Spence's death in 2004. The discussions focused largely upon issues of place, distilled through the practice of Leplastrier....

  13. Strike slip faulting inferred from offsetting of drainages: Lower ...

    Two levels of fluvial terraces have developed along the ... (a) Two levels of alluvial terraces abutting against the .... source mechanics; (eds) Das J, Boatwright J, Scholz C H, ... tectonics and alluvial rivers; Cambridge University Press. NY, 276 ...

  14. Short Communication

    pond was drained and left empty for two weeks to dry and then lime was added .... using inoculating wire loop and cultured on Blood and MacConkey agar and ... and temperate zones causing Ichthyophthiriasis or 'white spot disease' (Scholz,.

  15. B-Cell Activation and Tolerance Mediated by B-Cell Receptor, Toll-Like Receptor, and Survival Signal Crosstalk in SLE Pathogenesis

    2017-09-01

    Dec, 2016 "Integrating innate , adaptive, & survival signals to control B cell selection, homeostasis and tolerance" Pasteur Institute of Shanghai...secondary lymphoid tissues. Aging Dis. 2: 361–373. 8. Goenka, R., J. L. Scholz, M. S. Naradikian, and M. P. Cancro. 2014. Memory B cells form in aged...Scholz, and M. P. Cancro. 2011. A B- cell subset uniquely responsive to innate stimuli accumulates in aged mice. Blood 118: 1294–1304. 10. Rubtsov, A

  16. 76 FR 31263 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of California; Interstate Transport of...

    2011-05-31

    ...://www.regulations.gov : Follow the on-line instructions for submitting comments. 2. E-mail: mays.rory....regulations.gov or e-mail. http://www.regulations.gov is an anonymous access system, and EPA will not know...-mail directly to EPA, your e-mail address will be automatically captured and included as part of the...

  17. Employment Handbook for Fighting Counterinsurgencies: A Toolkit for How to Build Rapport, Create Jobs, and Work towards a Viable State

    2009-11-01

    term projects • Nothing Medium term projects(establish co-ops) • Cut hair • Sewing o Embroidery o Clothes • Food production o Preserves...Projects for women Sewing • Embroidery • Clothes Cut hair Food preserves Cultural items (Rory Stewart) • Jewelry • Clothes • Rugs

  18. 192 inventory and economic evaluation of seedling species in ...

    2010-09-02

    Sep 2, 2010 ... and Rate of Return on Investment (RORI) were adapted for economic analysis. The result revealed ..... that goes to the employees and material input suppliers. Thus ... and ecological wellbeing of the people in the area. In fact ...

  19. Russia’s Security Relations with Finland, Norway, and Sweden

    2017-09-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release. Distribution is unlimited. RUSSIA’S SECURITY... RELATIONS WITH FINLAND, NORWAY, AND SWEDEN by Rory J. Hayden September 2017 Thesis Advisor: Mikhail Tsypkin Co-Advisor: David S. Yost...THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK i REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of

  20. Determining adaptive and adverse oxidative stress responses in human bronical epithelial cells exposed to zinc

    Determining adaptive and adverse oxidative stress responses in human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to zincJenna M. Currier1,2, Wan-Yun Cheng1, Rory Conolly1, Brian N. Chorley1Zinc is a ubiquitous contaminant of ambient air that presents an oxidant challenge to the human lung...

  1. Aiming Airsea Battle: An Operational Concept To Counter China’s Maritime Area Denial Capabilities

    2011-06-18

    unnamed great power: “To protect Germany’s sea trade and colonies in the existing circumstances there is only one means – Germany must have a battle...with friends and allies, but by ourselves if we must.24 As multiple analysts have noted, the unnamed adversary alluded to here is unmistakably...21 Rory Medcalf, “Chinese Ghost Story,” The Diplomat, February 14, 2008. 22 Ibid. 23 Donn A. Starry, “US and Federal

  2. ILO to promote global asbestos ban.

    O'Neill, Rory

    2006-01-01

    The International Labour Office (ILO) is to pursue a global ban on asbestos, the world's biggest ever industrial killer. The landmark decision came with the adoption of a resolution on 14 June 2006 at the ILO conference in Geneva and followed a high level union campaign. Rory O'Neill asked Jukka Takala, director of ILO's Safe Work program, what ILO will now do to help make the world asbestos-free.

  3. Open Praxis, volumen 0 issue 1

    Open Praxis, Editor

    2006-01-01

    Table of Contents - Providing Effective Feedback Online Zane Berge & Mauri Collins (1-10) - Mobile Technologies and the Future of Global Education Rory McGreal (11-16) - Cross-Border Higher Education through E-Learning: Issues and Opportunities Kumiko Aoki (17-25) - Open and Distance Education in the Global Environment: Opportunities for Collaboration Ellie Chambers (26-33) - Global Trade in Educational Services: Implications for Open and Distance Learning (ODL) S. Savithri & K. Murug...

  4. Investigating Traffic Avoidance Maneuver Preferences of Unmanned Aircraft Operators

    2016-06-13

    aircraft in the NAS under instrument flight rules ( IFR ), in radio communications with ATC, and with a traffic display highlighting traffic within 80...Lincoln Laboratory developed uncorrelated encounter model [13] for evaluation of a preliminary pilot model. The UAS was assumed to be on an IFR ...Vol. 59, No. 1, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, Santa Monica, CA, 2015, pp. 45-49. [10] Rorie, R. C., Fern, L., and Shively R. J., “The impact

  5. Microsoft founder opens the Windows of the micro-world

    2009-01-01

    On Monday 8 June Bill Gates came to CERN for a short visit along with his son Rory. The Bulletin managed to grab a few words with him and discovered how much he appreciates (and supports) fundamental science. After meeting CERN Director-General Rolf Heuer, Gates and his son were given an introduction to CERN by Sergio Bertolucci, Director for Research, and then had a tour of the LHC tunnel, the Control Centre and SM18 with Mike Lamont before heading down to the CMS cavern guided by Jim Virdee, CMS Spokesperson, and Wolfram Zeuner.Millions of kids around the world dream of becoming the next Bill Gates, but Gates’ own son may well dream of becoming a physicist. "One of the reasons we wanted to come here is because Rory, my 10-year-old son, has shown a real interest in physics", explains Gates. "Rory has received some extra home-schooling in science. A lot of what we’ve been discussing has been building up to actually being able to s...

  6. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report October 2014

    Ogden, Dan [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report October 2014 Highlights • Rory Kennedy, Dan Ogden and Brenden Heidrich traveled to Germantown October 6-7, for a review of the Infrastructure Management mission with Shane Johnson, Mike Worley, Bradley Williams and Alison Hahn from NE-4 and Mary McCune from NE-3. Heidrich briefed the group on the project progress from July to October 2014 as well as the planned path forward for FY15. • Jim Cole gave two invited university seminars at Ohio State University and University of Florida, providing an overview of NSUF including available capabilities and the process for accessing facilities through the peer reviewed proposal process. • Jim Cole and Rory Kennedy co-chaired the NuMat meeting with Todd Allen. The meeting, sponsored by Elsevier publishing, was held in Clearwater, Florida, and is considered one of the premier nuclear fuels and materials conferences. Over 340 delegates attended with 160 oral and over 200 posters presented over 4 days. • Thirty-one pre-applications were submitted for NSUF access through the NE-4 Combined Innovative Nuclear Research Funding Opportunity Announcement. • Fourteen proposals were received for the NSUF Rapid Turnaround Experiment Summer 2014 call. Proposal evaluations are underway. • John Jackson and Rory Kennedy attended the Nuclear Fuels Industry Research meeting. Jackson presented an overview of ongoing NSUF industry research.

  7. 77 FR 67808 - President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST)

    2012-11-14

    ...-secondary science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. PCAST will also receive an... only for substantive commentary on PCAST's work, not for business marketing purposes. Oral Comments: To.... Amber Hartman Scholz at least ten business days prior to the meeting so that appropriate arrangements...

  8. influence of fructose on the mechanisms for ethanol

    Mgina

    capacity of the kidneys to excrete uric acid. (Vamvakas et al. 1998), and possibly causing hyperuricemia. Fructose has been reported to accelerate blood alcohol clearance rate by re-oxidising. NADH to NAD+ needed for further alcohol oxidation (Scholz & Nohl 1976, Mascord et al 1991) and so, minimizes the increase in.

  9. Orbital apex syndrome caused by aspergilloma in an ...

    A Cheko,1 MDS; S Jung,1 MD; S Teuber-Hanselmann,2 MD; A W Oseni,3 MD, MSc; A Tsogkas,1 MD; M Scholz,1 MD; A K Petridis,1 MD. 1 Department of Neurosurgery, Sana Hospitals Duisburg, Duisburg, Germany. 2 Institute of Neuropathology, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany. 3 Neurosurgical Division ...

  10. Statistical parameters of Bhuj earthquake sequence of January 26th ...

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    2001-01-26

    Jan 26, 2001 ... 6.9) took a heavy toll of human lives, exceeding. 17000 (Anon 2001b). The damage .... Resources & Water Supply Dept., Vadodara, India. (unpublished) ... cisco; California: W.H. Freeman & Co, Inc.) Scholz C H 1968 Micro ...

  11. Wrox Cross Platform Android and iOS Mobile Development Three-Pack

    McClure, Wallace B; Croft, John J; Dick, Jonathan; Hardy, Chris; Olson, Scott; Hunter, John; Horgen, Ben; Goers, Kenny; Blyth, Rory; Dunn, Craig; Bowling, Martin

    2012-01-01

    A bundle of 3 best-selling and respected mobile development e-books from Wrox form a complete library on the key tools and techniques for developing apps across the hottest platforms including Android and iOS.  This collection includes the full content of these three books, at a special price:Professional Android Programming with Mono for Android and .NET/C#, ISBN: 9781118026434, by Wallace B. McClure, Nathan Blevins, John J. Croft, IV, Jonathan Dick, and Chris HardyProfessional iPhone Programming with MonoTouch and .NET/C#, ISBN: 9780470637821, by Wallace B. McClure, Rory Blyth, Craig Dunn, C

  12. Weiße und Braune Zwerge zeigen sich unwirtlich

    Heller, René

    2013-02-01

    Mehr als 850 Exoplaneten haben Astronomen seit dem Jahr 1992 nachgewiesen. Die meisten von ihnen umkreisen normale Hauptreihensterne, aber es wurden auch Trabanten im Umlauf um Braune oder Weiße Zwerge aufgespürt. Nun haben Rory Barnes von der University of Washington in Seattle und René Heller am Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam die Bewohnbarkeit möglicher Planeten um solche Objekte untersucht und dabei festgestellt, dass sie für Leben, wie wir es kennen, ungeeignet sind.

  13. Medical Robotic and Telesurgical Simulation and Education Research

    2012-09-01

    an expert - Gladwell “There is no excuse for the surgeon to learn on the patient.” – William Mayo, 1927 32 Outliers l"n r: · oRY or l l E s MALCOLM ...10,000 hours to become an expert - Gladwell “There is no excuse for the surgeon to learn on the patient.” – William Mayo, 1927 100 Outliers l"n r...oRY or l l E s MALCOLM GLADW Medical Education – Explosion of Information • Medical procedures are becoming more numerous and more complex – medical

  14. Thomas Piketty: Capital in the Twenty-First Century (Le Capital au XXIe siècle. (Ensk þýðing: Arthur Goldhammer.

    Gylfi Magnússon

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Í umsögn gagnrýnanda kemur meðal annars eftirfarandi fram: Ritinu er ekki ætlað að vera lokaorðin um viðfangsefnið heldur miklu frekar grunnur að frekari umræðu og rannsóknum. Það hefur tekist. Capital in the Twenty-First Century er verk sem hefur þegar vakið mikla umræðu og verður vafalaust rætt áfram árum saman. Það er raunar nánast skyldulesning fyrir þá sem ætla sér að fjalla um þjóðhagfræði og hlutverk hins opinbera, hversu sammála eða ósammála sem þeir eru höfundinum.

  15. Academic Training: Physics technologies in medicine

    Françoise benz

    2005-01-01

    24, 25, 26, 27 January 2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Physics technologies in medicine M. GILARDI / Univ. of Milano, I. - U. AMALDI / Univ. of Milano Bicocca and TERA Foundation - M. SCHOLZ / GSI, Darmstadt, D. - O. JÄKEL / Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg, D Monday 24 January The frontiers of medical imaging M. GILARDI / Univ. of Milano, I. Tuesday 25 January From the discovery of X-rays to CT/PET diagnostics and conformal radiation therapy U. AMALDI / Univ. of Milano Bicocca and TERA Foundation Wednesday 26 January The increased biological effectiveness of heavy charged particle radiation: from cell culture experiments to biophysics modelling M. SCHOLZ / GSI, Darmstadt, D. Thursday 27 January Medical Physics aspects of radiotherapy with ions O. JÄKEL / Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg, D The lectures are open to all those interested, without application. The abstract of the lectures...

  16. Estonia ballett üle seitsme aasta taas Pärnus / Silja Joon

    Joon, Silja, 1966-

    2010-01-01

    Rahvusooperi Estonia balleti kunstiline juht Toomas Edur Estonia balletitrupist ja 20. veebruaril toimuvast kolmest lühiballetist koosnevast balletiõhtust Pärnu kontserdimajas. Esitatakse Bohuslav Martinu "Enne öö saabumist" (koreograaf Nils Christe), Arnold Schönbergi "Pelléas ja Mélisande" (koreograaf Tiit Härm), Robert Schumanni "Teine sümfoonia" (koreograaf Uwe Scholz)

  17. Status Report on Speech Research. A Report on the Status and Progress of Studies on the Nature of Speech, Instrumentation for Its Investigation, and Practical Applications.

    1985-10-01

    Kay Arlyne Russo Sara Basson Noriko Kobayashi Richard C. Schmidt "..’ Eric Bateson Rena A. Krakow John Scholz ... . Suzanne Boyce Deborah Kuglitsch...greater accuracy than isolated vowels ( Gottfried & Strange, 1980; Rakerd et al., 1984; Strange, Edman, & Jenkins, 1976; Strange, Verbrugge, Shankweiler...Perceptual structure of monophthongs and diphthongs in "" English. Language and Speech, 26, 21-59. Gottfried , T. L., & Strange, W. (1980

  18. Order-specific fertility estimates based on perinatal statistics and statistics on out-of-hospital births

    Kreyenfeld, Michaela; Peters, Frederik; Scholz, Rembrandt; Wlosnewski, Ines

    2014-01-01

    Until 2008, German vital statistics has not provided information on biological birth order. We have tried to close part of this gap by providing order-specific fertility rates generated from Perinatal Statistics and statistics on out-of-hospital births for the period 2001-2008. This investigation has been published in Comparative Population Studies (CPoS) (see Kreyenfeld, Scholz, Peters and Wlosnewski 2010). The CPoS-paper describes how data from the Perinatal Statistics and statistics on out...

  19. Energy and Resource Recovery from Wastewater Treatment: State of the Art and Potential Application for the Army and the DoD

    2015-06-01

    animals, as opposed to using it directly for human consumption. Biosolids derived from sludge Sludges are generated as a by-product of conventional...deodorants, and in odor-resistant clothing. Zeolitic sieves can be used to recover specific metals, and electrical methods, such as electrokinetics...Richard J. Scholze, Scott A. Waisner, and Chris S. Griggs June 2015 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. The US Army

  20. Controls on Earthquake Rupture and Triggering Mechanisms in Subduction Zones

    2010-06-01

    Honduras, the Tech Catholic Community, the MIT Warehouse Music Program, and the MIT Women’s Chorale. I’m extraordinarily grateful for my friends up in... Campos , 1995; Lay and Bilek, 2007]. Understanding this variation in earthquake occurrence in circum-Pacific subduction zones has been the subject of...Pacheco et al., 1993; Scholz and Campos , 1995; Abercrombie et al., 2001]. However, wide variability in seismogenic behavior exists not only between

  1. Exoplanets Detection, Formation, Properties, Habitability

    Mason, John W

    2008-01-01

    This edited, multi-author volume will be an invaluable introduction and reference to all key aspects in the field of exoplanet research. The reviews cover: Detection methods and properties of known exoplanets, Detection of extrasolar planets by gravitational microlensing. The formation and evolution of terrestrial planets in protoplanetary and debris disks. The brown dwarf-exoplanet connection. Formation, migration mechanisms and properties of hot Jupiters. Dynamics of multiple exoplanet systems. Doppler exoplanet surveys. Searching for exoplanets in the stellar graveyard. Formation and habitability of extra solar planets in multiple star systems. Exoplanet habitats and the possibilities for life. Moons of exoplanets: habitats for life. Contributing authors: •Rory Barnes •David P. Bennett •Jian Ge •Nader Haghighipour •Patrick Irwin •Hugh Jones •Victoria Meadows •Stanimir Metchev •I. Neill Reid •George Rieke •Caleb Scharf •Steinn Sigurdsson

  2. On the Witt vector Frobenius

    Davis, Christopher James; Kedlaya, Kiran

    2014-01-01

    We study the kernel and cokernel of the Frobenius map on the p-typical Witt vectors of a commutative ring, not necessarily of characteristic p. We give many equivalent conditions to surjectivity of the Frobenius map on both finite and infinite length Witt vectors. In particular, surjectivity...... on finite Witt vectors turns out to be stable under certain integral extensions; this provides a clean formulation of a strong generalization of Faltings’s almost purity theorem from p-adic Hodge theory, incorporating recent improvements by Kedlaya–Liu and by Scholze....

  3. Publications of the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center: October 1999-December 2015

    2017-01-01

    Nitroaromatic Contaminants and Cyclodextrin Amendments in Expansive Clays , by D. Kessler, C.P. Marsh, J.J. McCormick, D.M. Cropek, A.R. Deguzman, R...Assessment of the Effectiveness of Clay Soil Covers as Engineered Barriers in Waste Disposal Facilities with Emphasis on Modeling Cracking Behavior...Water and Wastewater Sanitary Systems, by R.J. Scholze and H.H. Zaghloul ADA398730 ERDC/CERL TR-01-69 Nov 2001 Pilot-Scale Reactor for

  4. Textkritische Edition der Übersetzung des Psalters in die Litauische Sprache von Johannes Bretke, Pastor zu Labiau und Königsberg i. Pr., nach der Handschrift aus dem Jahre 1580 [...

    Gelumbeckaitė, Jolanta

    2003-01-01

    The review discusses the historical critical edition of the Psalm Book translated into Lithuanian by Jonas Bretkūnas in 1580 prepared by Friedrich Scholz, Professor Emeritus at Münster University. This is the first textologically diplomatically in corpore published volume of the Bible manuscript by Bretkūnas (1579–1590) and the first critical edition of the 16th c. Lithuanian manuscript text. The critical edition of the Psalm Book is part of a large Bretkūnas’ Bible publishing project, consis...

  5. Notes i contribucions al coneixement de la flora de Menorca (X). Notes florístiques

    Fraga-Arguimbau, Pere

    2014-01-01

    Es donen a conèixer noves dades corològiques i observacions taxonòmiques per a la flora de Menorca referents a 50 tàxons. D'aquests 13 són novetat per a la flora de les Balears: Agrostis stolonifera subsp. gaditana (Boiss. & Reut.) Valdés & H. Scholz, Asteriscus pygmaeus (DC.) Coss. & Durieu, Callitriche obtnsangula Le Gall, Dactylis glomerata subsp. hackelii (Asch. & Graebn.) Cif. & Giacom., Daucus muricatus (L.) L., Ehrharta calycina J.E. Sm., Eleocharis palustris subsp. waltersii Bures & D...

  6. Green tax reform, marginal revenue of wage income taxes, and the wage curve. A brief note

    Ziesemer, T.

    2002-01-01

    It has been shown elsewhere (Schneider, 1997) that the success of a green tax reform depends crucially on a small slope of the wage curve of an efficiency wage model in which production occurs using a second factor E, energy or emissions. Also elsewhere (Scholz, 1998) it was revealed that there is a second necessary condition that the marginal revenue of the wage income tax is negative. In this note we show that (1) these two conditions are not independent, but rather depend both on the slope of the wage curve; and (2) if Schneider's condition of a sufficiently flat wage curve is fulfilled, marginal revenue of wage income taxes must be negative. By implication, both the green tax reform and the sign of the marginal revenue of wage income taxes depend on the slope of the wage curve which allows to distinguish three cases of a tax reform: (a) a double dividend for a very small slope of the wage curve (Schneider's case); (b) failure of unemployment reduction (Scholz' case) for a very steep wage curve; (c) failure of emission reduction for an intermediate case of a wage curve slope

  7. The future of bioenergy; Die Zukunft der Bioenergie

    NONE

    2015-07-01

    This volume contains the following five contributions: 1. The impact of the governmental biogas production on agricultural rents in Germany. An econometric study (Hendrik Garvert); 2. Biogas as price drivers on the land and rental market? An Empirical Analysis (Uwe Latacz-Lohmann); 3. Analysis of comparative advantage of bioenergy in electricity and heat production. Greenhouse gas abatement and mitigation costs in Brandenburg (Lukas Scholz); 4. Flexibility potential of biogas and biomethane CHP in the investment portfolio (Matthias Edel); 5. Legal possibilities and limitations of a reform of the system for the promotion of bioenergy (Jose Martinez). [German] Dieser Band enthaelt folgende fuenf Themenbeitraege: 1. Die Auswirkungen der staatlichen Biogasfoerderung auf landwirtschaftliche Pachtpreise in Deutschland. Eine oekonometrische Untersuchung (Hendrik Garvert); 2. Biogas als Preistreiber am Bodenmarkt und Pachtmarkt? Eine empirische Analyse (Uwe Latacz-Lohmann); 3. Analyse komparativer Kostenvorteile von Bioenergielinien in der Strom- und Waermeproduktion Treibhausgasvermeidung und Vermeidungskosten in Brandenburg (Lukas Scholz); 4. Flexibilisierungspotenzial von Biogas- und Biomethan-BHKWs im Anlagenbestand (Matthias Edel); 5. Rechtliche Moeglichkeiten und Grenzen einer Reform des Systems zur Foerderung der Bioenergie (Jose Martinez).

  8. Fisheries Enhancement on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation; Hangman Creek, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    Peters, Ronald; Kinkead, Bruce; Stanger, Mark

    2003-07-01

    Historically, Hangman Creek produced Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Upper Columbia Basin Tribes. One weir, located at the mouth of Hangman Creek was reported to catch 1,000 salmon a day for a period of 30 days a year (Scholz et al. 1985). The current town of Tekoa, Washington, near the state border with Idaho, was the location of one of the principle anadromous fisheries for the Coeur d'Alene Tribe (Scholz et al. 1985). The construction, in 1909, of Little Falls Dam, which was not equipped with a fish passage system, blocked anadromous fish access to the Hangman Watershed. The fisheries were further removed with the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. As a result, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe was forced to rely more heavily on native fish stocks such as Redband trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri), Westslope Cutthroat trout (O. clarki lewisii), Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and other terrestrial wildlife. Historically, Redband and Cutthroat trout comprised a great deal of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's diet (Power 1997).

  9. Temperature and precipitation records from stalagmites grown under disequilibrium conditions: A model approach.

    Mühlinghaus, C.; Scholz, D.; Mangini, A.

    2009-04-01

    To reconstruct past variations in Earth's climate, a variety of climate archives are studied. During the last decades stalagmites came into focus due to their long, continuous growth and absolute dating techniques. In this study a numerical model was developed, which calculates variations in temperature and precipitation during the growth period of stalagmites grown under isotopic disequilibrium conditions using the isotope profiles both along the growth axis and individual growth layers as well as the growth depth relation. The model is based on the inversion and combination of existing models (Dreybrodt 1999, Kaufmann et al. 2004, Mühlinghaus et al. 2007, Scholz et al. 2008, Mühlinghaus et al. 2008b) and incorporates important parameters describing the cave and the overlying soil. Beside the dependence on temperature and water supply it depends on the isotopic composition of the drip water, the pCO2 pressure of the soil and the cave atmosphere as well as on the mixing coefficient, which describes mixing between the impinging drop and the existing solution layer. To determine the characteristics of temperature and precipitation, in a first step all other parameters are assumed to remain constant over the whole growth period to simplify calculations. This allows to run the model with only two input variables: the isotopic composition ^13C of the drip water and a temperature information at any point of time during the growth period of the stalagmite (e.g. the recent cave temperature). All other parameters are determined by the model. The CSM (Combined Stalagmite Model, Mühlinghaus et al. 2008a) was applied to three stalagmites from the Marcelo Arévalo cave in Southern Patagonia, Chile (Schimpf 2005, Kilian et al. 2006, Schimpf et al. in prep). These stalagmites grew in a small cave next to each other during the last 4500 years. However, their isotopic profiles along the growth axis show different kinetic influences. Despite these conditions, the temperature

  10. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report November 2014

    Soelberg, Renae [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report November 2014 Highlights Rory Kennedy and Sarah Robertson attended the American Nuclear Society Winter Meeting and Nuclear Technology Expo in Anaheim, California, Nov. 10-13. ATR NSUF exhibited at the technology expo where hundreds of meeting participants had an opportunity to learn more about ATR NSUF. Dr. Kennedy briefed the Nuclear Engineering Department Heads Organization (NEDHO) on the workings of the ATR NSUF. • Rory Kennedy, James Cole and Dan Ogden participated in a reactor instrumentation discussion with Jean-Francois Villard and Christopher Destouches of CEA and several members of the INL staff. • ATR NSUF received approval from the NE-20 office to start planning the annual Users Meeting. The meeting will be held at INL, June 22-25. • Mike Worley, director of the Office of Innovative Nuclear Research (NE-42), visited INL Nov. 4-5. Milestones Completed • Recommendations for the Summer Rapid Turnaround Experiment awards were submitted to DOE-HQ Nov. 12 (Level 2 milestone due Nov. 30). Major Accomplishments/Activities • The University of California, Santa Barbara 2 experiment was unloaded from the GE-2000 at HFEF. The experiment specimen packs will be removed and shipped to ORNL for PIE. • The Terrani experiment, one of three FY 2014 new awards, was completed utilizing the Advanced Photon Source MRCAT beamline. The experiment investigated the chemical state of Ag and Pd in SiC shell of irradiated TRISO particles via X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. Upcoming Meetings/Events • The ATR NSUF program review meeting will be held Dec. 9-10 at L’Enfant Plaza. In addition to NSUF staff and users, NE-4, NE-5 and NE-7 representatives will attend the meeting. Awarded Research Projects Boise State University Rapid Turnaround Experiments (14-485 and 14-486) Nanoindentation and TEM work on the T91, HT9, HCM12A and 9Cr ODS specimens has been completed at

  11. Network structure and institutional complexity in an ecology of water management games

    Mark Lubell

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Social-ecological systems are governed by a complex of ecology of games featuring multiple actors, policy institutions, and issues, and not just single institutions operating in isolation. We update Long's (1958 ecology of games to analyze the coordinating roles of actors and institutions in the context of the ecology of water management games in San Francisco Bay, California. The ecology of games is operationalized as a bipartite network with actors participating in institutions, and exponential random graph models are used to test hypotheses about the structural features of the network. We found that policy coordination is facilitated mostly by federal and state agencies and collaborative institutions that span geographic boundaries. Network configurations associated with closure show the most significant departures from the predicted model values, consistent with the Berardo and Scholz (2010 "risk hypothesis" that closure is important for solving cooperation problems.

  12. Neuroscience in Nazi Europe part I: eugenics, human experimentation, and mass murder.

    Zeidman, Lawrence A

    2011-09-01

    The Nazi regime in Germany from 1933 to 1945 waged a veritable war throughout Europe to eliminate neurologic disease from the gene pool. Fueled by eugenic policies on racial hygiene, the Nazis first undertook a sterilization campaign against "mental defectives," which included neurologic patients with epilepsy and other disorders, as well as psychiatric patients. From 1939-41 the Nazis instead resorted to "euthanasia" of many of the same patients. Some neuroscientists were collaborators in this program, using patients for research, or using extracted brains following their murder. Other reviews have focused on Hallervorden, Spatz, Schaltenbrand, Scherer, and Gross, but in this review the focus is on neuroscientists not well described in the neurology literature, including Scholz, Ostertag, Schneider, Nachtsheim, and von Weizsäcker. Only by understanding the actions of neuroscientists during this dark period can we learn from the slippery slope down which they traveled, and prevent history from repeating itself.

  13. Analysis of native cellular DNA after heavy ion irradiation: DNA double-strand breaks in CHO-K1 cells

    Heilmann, J.; Taucher-Scholz, G.; Kraft, G.

    1994-11-01

    A fast assay for the detection of DNA double-strand breaks was developed involving constant field gel electrophoresis (Taucher-Scholz et al., 1994) and densitometric scanning of agarose gels stained with ethidium bromide. With this technique, DSB induction was investigated after irradiation of CHO cells with carbon ions with LET values between 14 keV/μm and 400 keV/μm. In parallel, a computer code was developed to simulate both the principle of the electrophoretic detection of DNA double-strand breaks and the action of radiations of different ionization density. The results of the experiments and the calculations are presented here and compared with each other. (orig./HSI)

  14. Academic Training: Physics technologies in medicine

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    24, 25, 26, 27 January 2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Physics technologies in medicine M. GILARDI / Univ. of Milano, I. - U. AMALDI / Univ. of Milano Bicocca and TERA Foundation - M. SCHOLZ / GSI, Darmstadt, D. - O. JÄKEL / Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg, D Monday 24 January The frontiers of medical imaging M. GILARDI / Univ. of Milano, I. The lecture will deal with the evolution of diagnostic imaging techniques, focussing on tomographic methods (x rays Computerized Tomography, CT, Magnetic Resonance Imaging. MRI, Positron Emission Tomography, PET). The physical parameters characterizing the performance of current generation scanners and their potential future improvement will be discussed. The clinical diagnostic value of multi modal imaging and the relevance of image fusion to image guided radiotherapy will be also presented. Tuesday 25 January From the discovery of X-rays to CT/PET diagnostics and co...

  15. Measuring impact revisited - an update on infrastructure, methods and techniques

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    Impact is generally defined as any change or outcome resulting from an activity. In case of scientific research publications are the quantifiable outcome of the research process. The presentation will therefore focus on electronic publication impact as a limited but rather well defined sub-field of research impact. Publication impact can be measured by author or reader generated indicators. Author generated indicators would be citations. Reader generated indicators would be usage. Usage data can be collected through webserver or linkresolver logs. It has to be normalized in order to be shared and analyzed meaningfully. There are some initiatives to provide a suitable infrastructure including publisher data (COUNTER/SUSHI) and data collected through open access repositories. Citation as well as usage data can be analyzed quantitatively or structurally. These analyses can be combined or complemented to create new metrics to add to the ISI impact factor (IF). View Frank Scholze's biography

  16. Open Praxis, volumen 0 issue 1

    Editor Open Praxis

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Table of Contents - Providing Effective Feedback Online Zane Berge & Mauri Collins (1-10 - Mobile Technologies and the Future of Global Education Rory McGreal (11-16 - Cross-Border Higher Education through E-Learning: Issues and Opportunities Kumiko Aoki (17-25 - Open and Distance Education in the Global Environment: Opportunities for Collaboration Ellie Chambers (26-33 - Global Trade in Educational Services: Implications for Open and Distance Learning (ODL S. Savithri & K. Murugan (34-44 - Interactive Computer Simulation to Support Teaching of Biology in Distance Learning Basuki Hardjojo, Diki, S. Nurmawati & Susi Sulistiana (45-54 - An Analysis of Learning Styles of Distance Learners at the Institute of Education Development, Universiti Teknologi Mara, Malaysia Syed Jamal Abdul Nasir bin Syed Mohamad, & Ahmad Saat Daud Mohamad (55-61 - Application of Cognitive Dissonance Theory to Reduce Dropouts in Distance Education System G. Radhakrishna & Anurag Saxena (62-66 - Effects of Globalisation on Education and Culture S. Chinnammai (67-72 - Learning Beyond Boundary: The Quest Of a Global Researcher Gomata Varanasi (73-78 - Computer Technology for Literacy and Empowerment of Masses in Developing Countries Piyush Swami & Sasi Benzigar (79-84

  17. Statutes of Limitation for Sexual Offenses Against Children Fyrning kynferðisbrota gegn börnum

    Svala Ísfeld Ólafsdóttir

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract in English is unavailable.Hér á eftir er rakinn aðdragandi þeirra breytinga sem gerðar voru á fyrningarreglum almennra hegningarlaga vegna kynferðisbrota gegn börnum síðasta vor með lögum nr. 61/2007. Ein þeirra fól í sér að alvarleg kynferðisbrot gegn börnum fyrnast nú ekki. Frá refsipólitísku og afbrotafræðilegu sjónarmiði er þessi breyting athyglisverð. Í henni felst frávik frá þeirri stefnumörkun löggjafans til langs tíma að fækka ófyrnanlegum brotum og að eingöngu þau brot sem geta varðað ævilöngu fangelsi skuli vera ófyrnanleg. Ekkert þeirra kynferðisbrota sem breytingin tekur til getur varðað svo þungri refsingu. Breytingin átti sér langan aðdraganda, þótt svo mætti virðast af ferli málsins á Alþingi vorið 2007 að hana hafi borið brátt að. Fjöldi frumvarpa sem að þessu snúa hefur verið lagður fram á Alþingi síðari ár og umræður á þeim vettvangi um eðli kynferðisbrota gegn börnum, rannsóknir fagfólks og reynslusögur fórnarlamba kynferðisbrota og lýsingar þeirra á afleiðingum brotanna á lífshlaup sitt, skýra þetta frávik frá meginstefnu löggjafans að verulegu leyti. Ákvörðunin var tekin eftir mikil skoðanaskipti og umræður. Aðdragandinn sýnir að breytingin byggist á sérstöku eðli þessara brota og felur í sér áherslu á alvarlegar og langvarandi afleiðingar þeirra fyrir fórnarlömbin, sem taldar eru vega þyngra en almenn rök að baki fyrningarreglum um réttarstöðu brotamanns, erfiðleika við rannsókn brotanna og sönnun. Á hinn bóginn má vera að vegna þessara vandkvæða feli breytingin fyrst og fremst í sér táknræna viðurkenningu löggjafans á alvarleika brotanna, fremur en að hún eigi eftir að hafa mikla raunhæfa þýðingu.

  18. Reporting of Sepsis Cases for Performance Measurement Versus for Reimbursement in New York State.

    Prescott, Hallie C; Cope, Tara M; Gesten, Foster C; Ledneva, Tatiana A; Friedrich, Marcus E; Iwashyna, Theodore J; Osborn, Tiffany M; Seymour, Christopher W; Levy, Mitchell M

    2018-05-01

    Under "Rory's Regulations," New York State Article 28 acute care hospitals were mandated to implement sepsis protocols and report patient-level data. This study sought to determine how well cases reported under state mandate align with discharge records in a statewide administrative database. Observational cohort study. First 27 months of mandated sepsis reporting (April 1, 2014, to June 30, 2016). Hospitalizations with sepsis at New York State Article 28 acute care hospitals. Sepsis regulations with mandated reporting. We compared cases reported to the New York State Department of Health Sepsis Clinical Database with discharge records in the Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System database. We classified discharges as 1) "coded sepsis discharges"-a diagnosis code for severe sepsis or septic shock and 2) "possible sepsis discharges," using Dombrovskiy and Angus criteria. Of 111,816 sepsis cases reported to the New York State Department of Health Sepsis Clinical Database, 105,722 (94.5%) were matched to discharge records in Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System. The percentage of coded sepsis discharges reported increased from 67.5% in the first quarter to 81.3% in the final quarter of the study period (mean, 77.7%). Accounting for unmatched cases, as many as 82.7% of coded sepsis discharges were potentially reported, whereas at least 17.3% were unreported. Compared with unreported discharges, reported discharges had higher rates of acute organ dysfunction (e.g., cardiovascular dysfunction 63.0% vs 51.8%; p New York State Department of Health Sepsis Clinical Database. Incomplete reporting appears to be driven more by underrecognition than attempts to game the system, with minimal bias to risk-adjusted hospital performance measurement.

  19. The New York Sepsis Severity Score: Development of a Risk-Adjusted Severity Model for Sepsis.

    Phillips, Gary S; Osborn, Tiffany M; Terry, Kathleen M; Gesten, Foster; Levy, Mitchell M; Lemeshow, Stanley

    2018-05-01

    In accordance with Rory's Regulations, hospitals across New York State developed and implemented protocols for sepsis recognition and treatment to reduce variations in evidence informed care and preventable mortality. The New York Department of Health sought to develop a risk assessment model for accurate and standardized hospital mortality comparisons of adult septic patients across institutions using case-mix adjustment. Retrospective evaluation of prospectively collected data. Data from 43,204 severe sepsis and septic shock patients from 179 hospitals across New York State were evaluated. Prospective data were submitted to a database from January 1, 2015, to December 31, 2015. None. Maximum likelihood logistic regression was used to estimate model coefficients used in the New York State risk model. The mortality probability was estimated using a logistic regression model. Variables to be included in the model were determined as part of the model-building process. Interactions between variables were included if they made clinical sense and if their p values were less than 0.05. Model development used a random sample of 90% of available patients and was validated using the remaining 10%. Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness of fit p values were considerably greater than 0.05, suggesting good calibration. Areas under the receiver operator curve in the developmental and validation subsets were 0.770 (95% CI, 0.765-0.775) and 0.773 (95% CI, 0.758-0.787), respectively, indicating good discrimination. Development and validation datasets had similar distributions of estimated mortality probabilities. Mortality increased with rising age, comorbidities, and lactate. The New York Sepsis Severity Score accurately estimated the probability of hospital mortality in severe sepsis and septic shock patients. It performed well with respect to calibration and discrimination. This sepsis-specific model provides an accurate, comprehensive method for standardized mortality comparison of adult

  20. Dobutamine stress echocardiography: a review and update

    Gilstrap LG

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Lauren Gray Gilstrap,1 R Sacha Bhatia,2 Rory B Weiner,3 David M Dudzinski3 1Division of Cardiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; 2Institute for Health Systems Solutions, Women's College Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada; 3Cardiology Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Stress echocardiography is a noninvasive cardiovascular diagnostic test that provides functional and hemodynamic information in the assessment of a number of cardiac diseases. Performing stress echocardiography with a pharmacologic agent such as dobutamine allows for simulation of increased heart rate and increased myocardial physiologic demands in patients who may be unable to exercise due to musculoskeletal or pulmonary comorbidities. Dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE, like exercise echocardiography, has found its primary application in ischemic heart disease, with roles in identification of obstructive epicardial coronary artery disease, detection of viable myocardium, and assessment of the efficacy of anti-ischemic medical therapy in patients with known coronary artery disease. DSE features prominently in the evaluation and management of valvular heart disease by helping to assess the effects of mitral and aortic stenoses, as well as a specific use in differentiating true severe valvular aortic stenosis from pseudostenosis that may occur in the setting of left ventricular systolic dysfunction. DSE is generally well tolerated, and its side effects and contraindications generally relate to consequences of excess inotropic and/or chronotropic stimulation of the heart. The aim of this paper is to review the indications, contraindications, advantages, disadvantages, and risks of DSE. Keywords: stress echocardiography, dobutamine, coronary artery disease, myocardial ischemia

  1. Real-time Science and Educational Collaboration Online from the Indian Ocean

    Wilson, R. H.; Sager, W. W.

    2007-12-01

    During Summer of 2007, scientists and students (via the web) jointly participated in research during the Ninety East Ridge Expedition (cruise KNOX06RR) . Staff organizers from Joint Oceanographic Institutions" JOI Learning and the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program planned and implemented an interactive website to allow students to directly participate with scientists during the site survey aboard the R/V Roger Revelle. Dr. Will Sager and middle school teacher Rory Wilson collaborated daily during the scientific expedition with science team, ship crew and students. From the outset, students were involved and helped to guide the program; this included coming up with the website name and initial design work. Communication with students included the website, individual and group emails and video conferences with student groups. Seven secondary schools from the USA, Europe, India and Thailand participated actively in the project from June to August. Students viewed daily updates on the website, sent in answers for weekly science challenge questions, and interacted with scientists and crew. Student participants learned about navigation, geophysics and petrology, as well as ship operations and technology. Students and educators tracked the expedition's progress in a multi-media environment. Website statistics were recorded; participation began well and increased during the expedition as more people became engaged with the website. All of the crew and scientists wrote self-profiles to help students learn about the range of ocean careers; several of the scientists and graduate students on board wrote or co- authored website articles for students. During this presentation, we will explore and review the major features of the outreach program using the Sea90e website to demonstrate how this real-time interaction engages students in science learning. We will discuss the benefits of collaboration for science and education in our "classroom at sea."

  2. Early discharge care with ongoing follow-up support may reduce hospital readmissions in COPD

    Maria Lawlor

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Maria Lawlor1, Sinead Kealy1, Michelle Agnew1, Bettina Korn1, Jennifer Quinn1, Ciara Cassidy1, Bernard Silke2, Finbarr O’Connell1, Rory O’Donnell11Department of Respiratory Medicine, CResT Directorate, St. James’ Hospital, Dublin 8, Ireland; 2Department of General Internal Medicine, Gems Directorate, St. James’ Hospital, Dublin 8, IrelandBackground: Early discharge care and self-management education, although effective in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, do not typically reduce hospital re-admission rates for exacerbations of the disease. We hypothesized that a respiratory outreach programme that comprises early discharge care followed by continued rapid-access out-patient support would reduce the need for hospital readmission in these patients.Methods: Two hundred and forty-six patients, acutely admitted with exacerbations of COPD, were recruited to the respiratory outreach programme that included early discharge care, followup education, telephone support and rapid future access to respiratory out-patient clinics. Sixty of these patients received self-management education also. Emergency department presentations and admission rates were compared at six and 12 months after, compared to prior to, participation in the programme for the same patient cohort.Results: The frequency of both emergency department presentations and hospital admissions was significantly reduced after participation in the programme.Conclusions: Provision of a respiratory outreach service that includes early discharge care, followed by education, telephone support and ongoing rapid access to out-patient clinics is associated with reduced readmission rates in COPD patients.Keywords: COPD management outreach, follow-up, out-patient clinics

  3. Reduced Order Modeling in General Relativity

    Tiglio, Manuel

    2014-03-01

    Reduced Order Modeling is an emerging yet fast developing filed in gravitational wave physics. The main goals are to enable fast modeling and parameter estimation of any detected signal, along with rapid matched filtering detecting. I will focus on the first two. Some accomplishments include being able to replace, with essentially no lost of physical accuracy, the original models with surrogate ones (which are not effective ones, that is, they do not simplify the physics but go on a very different track, exploiting the particulars of the waveform family under consideration and state of the art dimensional reduction techniques) which are very fast to evaluate. For example, for EOB models they are at least around 3 orders of magnitude faster than solving the original equations, with physically equivalent results. For numerical simulations the speedup is at least 11 orders of magnitude. For parameter estimation our current numbers are about bringing ~100 days for a single SPA inspiral binary neutron star Bayesian parameter estimation analysis to under a day. More recently, it has been shown that the full precessing problem for, say, 200 cycles, can be represented, through some new ideas, by a remarkably compact set of carefully chosen reduced basis waveforms (~10-100, depending on the accuracy requirements). I will highlight what I personally believe are the challenges to face next in this subarea of GW physics and where efforts should be directed. This talk will summarize work in collaboration with: Harbir Antil (GMU), Jonathan Blackman (Caltech), Priscila Canizares (IoA, Cambridge, UK), Sarah Caudill (UWM), Jonathan Gair (IoA. Cambridge. UK), Scott Field (UMD), Chad R. Galley (Caltech), Frank Herrmann (Germany), Han Hestahven (EPFL, Switzerland), Jason Kaye (Brown, Stanford & Courant). Evan Ochsner (UWM), Ricardo Nochetto (UMD), Vivien Raymond (LIGO, Caltech), Rory Smith (LIGO, Caltech) Bela Ssilagyi (Caltech) and MT (UMD & Caltech).

  4. Medizinhistorische Literatur [Medical history literature

    Bauer, Bruno

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available [english] The focus of the current issue 1-2/2012 of GMS Medizin – Bibliothek – Information is on medical history literature. In six articles special collections and recent projects of medical history libraries in Berlin, Hamburg, Heidelberg, Leipzig, Vienna and Zurich are presented. The authors in this issue are Melanie Scholz & Vera Seehausen (From Augusta to Klingsor, from Luise to Benjamin – past, present and future of the library of the Institute of the History of Medicine in Berlin, Alexandra Veith (Library of the Institute for History of Medicine and Ethics of Medicine, Heidelberg, Melanie Kintzel, Meike Knittel & Tanja Krutky (Historic collections of the Medical Library of the University of the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf and their deacidification, Dagmar Geithner (Library of the Karl Sudhoff Institute for the History of Medicine and Science, Leipzig – a Historical Review, Harald Albrecht, Bruno Bauer & Walter Mentzel (The Josephinian Library and the medical-historic stock of the University Library of the Medical University of Vienna and Monika Huber & Ursula Reis (Library of the Institute and Museum of the History of Medicine Zurich.[german] Schwerpunktthema der aktuellen Ausgabe 1-2/2012von GMS Medizin – Bibliothek – Information ist medizinhistorische Literatur. In sechs Beiträgen werden Bestände und aktuelle Projekte medizinhistorischer Bibliotheken in Berlin, Hamburg, Heidelberg, Leipzig, Wien und Zürich vorgestellt. Verfasst wurden die Beiträge der Schwerpunktausgabe von Melanie Scholz & Vera Seehausen (Von August zu Klingsor, von Luise zu Benjamin – Vergangenheit, Gegenwart und Zukunft der Bibliothek des Instituts für Geschichte der Medizin in Berlin, Melanie Kintzel, Meike Knittel & Tanja Krutky (Medizinhistorische Buchbestände am Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf und ihre Entsäuerung, Ara Veith (Bibliothek des Instituts für Geschichte und Ethik der Medizin in Heidelberg, Dagmar Geithner

  5. Recent Developments of the Local Effect Model (LEM) - Implications of clustered damage on cell transformation

    Elsässer, Thilo

    predict the risk of the complex mixed radiation field occurring in deep space. 1. F. A. Cucinotta and M. Durante, Lancet Oncol. 7, 431-435 (2006). 2. M. Scholz and G. Kraft, Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 52, 29-33 (1994). 3. Th. Els¨sser and M. Scholz, Radiat. Res. 167, 319-329 (2007). a 4. R. C. Miller, S. A. Marino, D. J. Brenner, S. G. Martin, M. Richards, G. Randers-Pehrson, and E. J. Hall, Radiat. Res. 142, 54-60 (1995).

  6. Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout : Habitat/Passage Improvement Project Annual Report 2000.

    Sear, Sheri

    2001-02-01

    Lake Franklin D. Roosevelt was created with the completion of the Grand Coulee Dam in 1942. The lake stretches 151 miles up-stream to the International border between the United States and Canada at the 49th parallel. Increased recreational use, subsistence and sport fishing has resulted in intense interest and possible exploitation of the resources within the lake. Previous studies of the lake and its fishery have been limited. Early studies indicate that natural reproduction within the lake and tributaries are not sufficient to support a rainbow trout (Onchoryhnchus mykiss) fishery (Scholz et. al., 1988). These studies indicate that the rainbow trout population may be limited by lack of suitable habitat for spawning and rearing (Scholz et. al., 1988). The initial phase of this project (Phase I, baseline data collection- 1990-91) was directed at the assessment of limiting factors such as quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other limiting factors. Population estimates were conducted using the Seber/LeCren removal/depletion method. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, several streams were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation-1992-96). At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring) began. This phase will assess changes and gauge the success achieved through the improvements. The objective of the project is to correct passage barriers and improve habitat conditions of selected tributaries to Lake Roosevelt for adfluvial rainbow trout that utilize tributary streams for spawning and rearing. Streams with restorable habitats were selected for improvements. Completion of improvement efforts should increase the adfluvial rainbow trout contribution to the resident fishery in Lake Roosevelt. Three co-operating agencies, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CCT), the Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI

  7. Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout : Habitat/Passage Improvement Project Annual Report 1999.

    Jones, Charles D.

    2000-02-01

    Lake Franklin D. Roosevelt was created with the completion of the Grand Coulee Dam in 1942. The lake stretches 151 miles up-stream to the International border between the United States and Canada at the 49th parallel. Increased recreational use, subsistence and sport fishing has resulted in intense interest and possible exploitation of the resources within the lake. Previous studies of the lake and its fishery have been limited. Early studies indicate that natural reproduction within the lake and tributaries are not sufficient to support a rainbow trout (Onchoryhnchus mykiss) fishery (Scholz et. al., 1988). These studies indicate that the rainbow trout population may be limited by lack of suitable habitat for spawning and rearing (Scholz et. al., 1988). The initial phase of this project (Phase I, baseline data collection- 1990-91) was directed at the assessment of limiting factors such as quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other limiting factors. Population estimates were conducted using the Seber/LeCren removal/depletion method. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, several streams were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation-1992-96). At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring) began. This phase will assess changes and gauge the success achieved through the improvements. The objective of the project is to correct passage barriers and improve habitat conditions of selected tributaries to Lake Roosevelt for adfluvial rainbow trout that utilize tributary streams for spawning and rearing. Streams with restorable habitats were selected for improvements. Completion of improvement efforts should increase the adfluvial rainbow trout contribution to the resident fishery in Lake Roosevelt. Three co-operating agencies, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CCT), the Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI

  8. 3D Numerical Rift Modeling with Application to the East African Rift System

    Glerum, A.; Brune, S.; Naliboff, J.

    2017-12-01

    As key components of plate tectonics, continental rifting and the formation of passive margins have been extensively studied with both analogue models and numerical techniques. Only recently however, technical advances have enabled numerical investigations into rift evolution in three dimensions, as is actually required for including those processes that cause rift-parallel variability, such as structural inheritance and oblique extension (Brune 2016). We use the massively parallel finite element code ASPECT (Kronbichler et al. 2012; Heister et al. 2017) to investigate rift evolution. ASPECT's adaptive mesh refinement enables us to focus resolution on the regions of interest (i.e. the rift center), while leaving other areas such as the asthenospheric mantle at coarse resolution, leading to kilometer-scale local mesh resolution in 3D. Furthermore, we implemented plastic and viscous strain weakening of the nonlinear viscoplastic rheology required to develop asymmetric rift geometries (e.g. Huismans and Beaumont 2003). Additionally created plugins to ASPECT allow us to specify initial temperature and composition conditions based on geophysical data (e.g. LITHO1.0, Pasyanos et al. 2014) or to prescribe more general along-strike variation in the initial strain seeding the rift. Employing the above functionality, we construct regional models of the East African Rift System (EARS), the world's largest currently active rift. As the EARS is characterized by both orthogonal and oblique rift sections, multi-phase extension histories as well as magmatic and a-magmatic branches (e.g. Chorowicz 2005; Ebinger and Scholz 2011), it constitutes an extensive natural laboratory for our research into the 3D nature of continental rifting. References:Brune, S. (2016), in Plate boundaries and natural hazards, AGU Geophysical Monograph 219, J. C. Duarte and W. P. Schellart (Eds.). Chorowicz, J. (2005). J. Afr. Earth Sci., 43, 379-410. Ebinger, C. and Scholz, C. A. (2011), in Tectonics of

  9. A non-accelerating foreshock sequence followed by a short period of quiescence for a large inland earthquake

    Doi, I.; Kawakata, H.

    2012-12-01

    Laboratory experiments [e.g. Scholz, 1968; Lockner et al., 1992] and field observations [e.g. Dodge et al., 1996; Helmstetter and Sornette, 2003; Bouchon et al., 2011] have elucidated part of foreshock behavior and mechanism, but we cannot identify foreshocks while they are occurring. Recently, in Japan, a dense seismic network, Hi-net (High Sensitivity Seismograph Network), provides continuous waveform records for regional seismic events. The data from this network enable us to analyze small foreshocks which occur on long period time scales prior to a major event. We have an opportunity to grasp the more detailed pattern of foreshock generation. Using continuous waveforms recorded at a seismic station located in close proximity to the epicenter of the 2008 Iwate-Miyagi inland earthquake, we conducted a detailed investigation of its foreshocks. In addition to the two officially recognized foreshocks, calculation of cross-correlation coefficients between the continuous waveform record and one of the previously recognized foreshocks revealed that 20 micro foreshocks occurred within the same general area. Our analysis also shows that all of these foreshocks occurred within the same general area relative to the main event. Over the two week period leading up to the Iwate-Miyagi earthquake, such foreshocks only occurred during the last 45 minutes, specifically over a 35 minute period followed by a 10 minute period of quiescence just before the mainshock. We found no evidence of acceleration of this foreshock sequence. Rock fracturing experiments using a constant loading rate or creep tests have consistently shown that the occurrence rate of small fracturing events (acoustic emissions; AEs) increases before the main rupture [Scholz, 1968]. This accelerative pattern of preceding events was recognized in case of the 1999 Izmit earthquake [Bouchon et al., 2011]. Large earthquakes however need not be accompanied by acceleration of foreshocks if a given fault's host rock

  10. Global earthquake catalogs and long-range correlation of seismic activity (Invited)

    Ogata, Y.

    2009-12-01

    In view of the long-term seismic activity in the world, homogeneity of a global catalog is indispensable. Lately, Engdahl and Villaseñor (2002) compiled a global earthquake catalog of magnitude (M)7.0 or larger during the last century (1900-1999). This catalog is based on the various existing catalogs such as Abe catalog (Abe, 1981, 1984; Abe and Noguchi, 1983a, b) for the world seismicity (1894-1980), its modified catalogs by Perez and Scholz (1984) and by Pacheco and Sykes (1992), and also the Harvard University catalog since 1975. However, the original surface wave magnitudes of Abe catalog were systematically changed by Perez and Scholz (1984) and Pacheco and Sykes (1992). They suspected inhomogeneity of the Abe catalog and claimed that the two seeming changes in the occurrence rate around 1922 and 1948 resulted from magnitude shifts for some instrumental-related reasons. They used a statistical test assuming that such a series of large earthquakes in the world should behave as the stationary Poisson process (uniform occurrences). It is obvious that their claim strongly depends on their a priori assumption of an independent or short-range dependence of earthquake occurrence. We question this assumption from the viewpoint of long-range dependence of seismicity. We make some statistical analyses of the spectrum, dispersion-time diagrams and R/S for estimating and testing of the long-range correlations. We also attempt to show the possibility that the apparent rate change in the global seismicity can be simulated by a certain long-range correlated process. Further, if we divide the globe into the two regions of high and low latitudes, for example, we have different shapes of the cumulative curves to each other, and the above mentioned apparent change-points disappear from the both regions. This suggests that the Abe catalog shows the genuine seismic activity rather than the artifact of the suspected magnitude shifts that should appear in any wide enough regions

  11. REPEATING FAST RADIO BURSTS FROM HIGHLY MAGNETIZED PULSARS TRAVELING THROUGH ASTEROID BELTS

    Dai, Z. G.; Wang, J. S.; Huang, Y. F.; Wu, X. F.

    2016-01-01

    Very recently, Spitler et al. and Scholz et al. reported their detections of 16 additional bright bursts in the direction of the fast radio burst (FRB) 121102. This repeating FRB is inconsistent with all of the catastrophic event models put forward previously for hypothetically non-repeating FRBs. Here, we propose a different model, in which highly magnetized pulsars travel through the asteroid belts of other stars. We show that a repeating FRB could originate from such a pulsar encountering a large number of asteroids in the belt. During each pulsar-asteroid impact, an electric field induced outside of the asteroid has such a large component parallel to the stellar magnetic field that electrons are torn off the asteroidal surface and accelerated to ultra-relativistic energies instantaneously. The subsequent movement of these electrons along magnetic field lines will cause coherent curvature radiation, which can account for all of the properties of an FRB. In addition, this model can self-consistently explain the typical duration, luminosity, and repetitive rate of the 17 bursts of FRB 121102. The predicted occurrence rate of repeating FRB sources may imply that our model would be testable in the next few years.

  12. Where the Solar system meets the solar neighbourhood: patterns in the distribution of radiants of observed hyperbolic minor bodies

    de la Fuente Marcos, Carlos; de la Fuente Marcos, Raúl; Aarseth, Sverre J.

    2018-05-01

    Observed hyperbolic minor bodies might have an interstellar origin, but they can be natives of the Solar system as well. Fly-bys with the known planets or the Sun may result in the hyperbolic ejection of an originally bound minor body; in addition, members of the Oort cloud could be forced to follow inbound hyperbolic paths as a result of secular perturbations induced by the Galactic disc or, less frequently, due to impulsive interactions with passing stars. These four processes must leave distinctive signatures in the distribution of radiants of observed hyperbolic objects, both in terms of coordinates and velocity. Here, we perform a systematic numerical exploration of the past orbital evolution of known hyperbolic minor bodies using a full N-body approach and statistical analyses to study their radiants. Our results confirm the theoretical expectations that strong anisotropies are present in the data. We also identify a statistically significant overdensity of high-speed radiants towards the constellation of Gemini that could be due to the closest and most recent known fly-by of a star to the Solar system, that of the so-called Scholz's star. In addition to and besides 1I/2017 U1 (`Oumuamua), we single out eight candidate interstellar comets based on their radiants' velocities.

  13. A generalized theoretical framework for the description of spin decoupling in solid-state MAS NMR: Offset effect on decoupling performance

    Tan, Kong Ooi; Meier, Beat H., E-mail: beme@ethz.ch, E-mail: maer@ethz.ch; Ernst, Matthias, E-mail: beme@ethz.ch, E-mail: maer@ethz.ch [Physical Chemistry, ETH Zürich, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Agarwal, Vipin [Physical Chemistry, ETH Zürich, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); TIFR Centre for Interdisciplinary Sciences, 21 Brundavan Colony, Narsinghi, Hyderabad 500 075 (India)

    2016-09-07

    We present a generalized theoretical framework that allows the approximate but rapid analysis of residual couplings of arbitrary decoupling sequences in solid-state NMR under magic-angle spinning conditions. It is a generalization of the tri-modal Floquet analysis of TPPM decoupling [Scholz et al., J. Chem. Phys. 130, 114510 (2009)] where three characteristic frequencies are used to describe the pulse sequence. Such an approach can be used to describe arbitrary periodic decoupling sequences that differ only in the magnitude of the Fourier coefficients of the interaction-frame transformation. It allows a ∼100 times faster calculation of second-order residual couplings as a function of pulse sequence parameters than full spin-dynamics simulations. By comparing the theoretical calculations with full numerical simulations, we show the potential of the new approach to examine the performance of decoupling sequences. We exemplify the usefulness of this framework by analyzing the performance of commonly used high-power decoupling sequences and low-power decoupling sequences such as amplitude-modulated XiX (AM-XiX) and its super-cycled variant SC-AM-XiX. In addition, the effect of chemical-shift offset is examined for both high- and low-power decoupling sequences. The results show that the cross-terms between the dipolar couplings are the main contributions to the line broadening when offset is present. We also show that the SC-AM-XIX shows a better offset compensation.

  14. submitter Variable RBE in proton therapy: comparison of different model predictions and their influence on clinical-like scenarios

    Giovannini, Giulia; Cabal, Gonzalo; Bauer, Julia; Tessonnier, Thomas; Frey, Kathrin; Debus, Jürgen; Mairani, Andrea; Parodi, Katia

    2016-01-01

    Background: In proton radiation therapy a constant relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1 is usually assumed. However, biological experiments have evidenced RBE dependencies on dose level, proton linear energy transfer (LET) and tissue type. This work compares the predictions of three of the main radio-biological models proposed in the literature by Carabe-Fernandez, Wedenberg, Scholz and coworkers. Methods: Using the chosen models, a spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) as well as two exemplary clinical cases (single field and two fields) for cranial proton irradiation, all delivered with state-of-the-art pencil-beam scanning, have been analyzed in terms of absorbed dose, dose-averaged LET $(LET_D)$, RBE-weighted dose $(D_{RBE})$ and biological range shift distributions. Results: In the systematic comparison of RBE predictions by the three models we could show different levels of agreement depending on $(α/β) x$ and LET values. The SOBP study emphasizes the variation of LET D and RBE not only as a functi...

  15. Frequently asked questions in hypoxia research

    Wenger RH

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Roland H Wenger,1,2 Vartan Kurtcuoglu,1,2 Carsten C Scholz,1,2 Hugo H Marti,3 David Hoogewijs1,2,4 1Institute of Physiology and Zurich Center for Human Physiology (ZIHP, University of Zurich, 2National Center of Competence in Research “Kidney.CH”, Zurich, Switzerland; 3Institute of Physiology and Pathophysiology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, 4Institute of Physiology, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany Abstract: “What is the O2 concentration in a normoxic cell culture incubator?” This and other frequently asked questions in hypoxia research will be answered in this review. Our intention is to give a simple introduction to the physics of gases that would be helpful for newcomers to the field of hypoxia research. We will provide background knowledge about questions often asked, but without straightforward answers. What is O2 concentration, and what is O2 partial pressure? What is normoxia, and what is hypoxia? How much O2 is experienced by a cell residing in a culture dish in vitro vs in a tissue in vivo? By the way, the O2 concentration in a normoxic incubator is 18.6%, rather than 20.9% or 20%, as commonly stated in research publications. And this is strictly only valid for incubators at sea level. Keywords: gas laws, hypoxia-inducible factor, Krogh tissue cylinder, oxygen diffusion, partial pressure, tissue oxygen levels

  16. Monogeneans of freshwater fishes from cenotes (sinkholes) of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico.

    Mendoza-Franco, E F; Scholz, T; Vivas-Rodríguez, C; Vargas-Vázquez, J

    1999-01-01

    During a survey of the parasites of freshwater fishes from cenotes (sinkholes) of the Yucatan Peninsula the following species of monogeneans were found on cichlid, pimelodid, characid and poeciliid fishes: Sciadicleithrum mexicanum Kritsky, Vidal-Martinez et Rodriguez-Canul, 1994 from Cichlasoma urophthalmus (Günther) (type host), Cichlasoma friedrichsthali (Heckel), Cichlasoma octofasciatum (Regan), and Cichlasoma synspilum Hubbs, all new host records; Sciadicleithrum meekii Mendoza-Franco, Scholz et Vidal-Martínez, 1997 from Cichlasoma meeki (Brind); Urocleidoides chavarriai (Price, 1938) and Urocleidoides travassosi (Price, 1938) from Rhamdia guatemalensis (Günther); Urocleidoides costaricensis (Price et Bussing, 1967), Urocleidoides heteroancistrium (Price et Bussing, 1968), Urocleidoides anops Kritsky et Thatcher, 1974, Anacanthocotyle anacanthocotyle Kritsky et Fritts, 1970, and Gyrodactylus neotropicalis Kritsky et Fritts, 1970 from Astyanax fasciatus; and Gyrodactylus sp. from Gambusia yucatana Regan. Urocleidoides chavarriai, U. travassosi, U. costaricensis, U. heteroancistrium, U. anops, Anacanthocotyle anacanthocotyle and Gyrodactylus neotropicalis are reported from North America (Mexico) for the first time. These findings support the idea about the dispersion of freshwater fishes and their monogenean parasites from South America through Central America to southeastern Mexico, following the emergence of the Panamanian isthmus between 2 and 5 million years ago.

  17. A generalized theoretical framework for the description of spin decoupling in solid-state MAS NMR: Offset effect on decoupling performance.

    Tan, Kong Ooi; Agarwal, Vipin; Meier, Beat H; Ernst, Matthias

    2016-09-07

    We present a generalized theoretical framework that allows the approximate but rapid analysis of residual couplings of arbitrary decoupling sequences in solid-state NMR under magic-angle spinning conditions. It is a generalization of the tri-modal Floquet analysis of TPPM decoupling [Scholz et al., J. Chem. Phys. 130, 114510 (2009)] where three characteristic frequencies are used to describe the pulse sequence. Such an approach can be used to describe arbitrary periodic decoupling sequences that differ only in the magnitude of the Fourier coefficients of the interaction-frame transformation. It allows a ∼100 times faster calculation of second-order residual couplings as a function of pulse sequence parameters than full spin-dynamics simulations. By comparing the theoretical calculations with full numerical simulations, we show the potential of the new approach to examine the performance of decoupling sequences. We exemplify the usefulness of this framework by analyzing the performance of commonly used high-power decoupling sequences and low-power decoupling sequences such as amplitude-modulated XiX (AM-XiX) and its super-cycled variant SC-AM-XiX. In addition, the effect of chemical-shift offset is examined for both high- and low-power decoupling sequences. The results show that the cross-terms between the dipolar couplings are the main contributions to the line broadening when offset is present. We also show that the SC-AM-XIX shows a better offset compensation.

  18. Duloxetine for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome

    Beth A Scholz

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Beth A Scholz, Cara L Hammonds, Chad S BoomershineDepartment of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS is a widespread pain condition associated with a wide range of additional symptoms including fatigue, insomnia, depression, anxiety and stiffness. Duloxetine is one of three medications currently FDA approved for use in FMS management. Duloxetine is a mixed serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI that functions by increasing central nervous system levels of serotonin and norepinephrine. This review is a primer on use of duloxetine in FMS management and includes information on pharmacology and pharmacokinetics, a review of the three duloxetine FMS treatment trials currently in publication, a discussion of the safety and tolerability of duloxetine, and patient-focused perspectives on duloxetine use in FMS management. Duloxetine has proven efficacy in managing pain and mood symptoms in adult FMS patients with and without major depressive disorder. However, due to side effects, duloxetine must be used with caution in patients with fatigue, insomnia, gastrointestinal complaints, headache, cardiovascular disease, bleeding-risk, and in those 24 years of age and younger due to risk of suicidality. Duloxetine use should be avoided in patients with liver disease or alcoholics. As with all medications, duloxetine is best used as part of an individualized regimen that includes nonpharmacologic modalities of exercise, education and behavioral therapies.Keywords: fibromyalgia, duloxetine, SNRI, safety

  19. Elastic modulus of tree frog adhesive toe pads.

    Barnes, W Jon P; Goodwyn, Pablo J Perez; Nokhbatolfoghahai, Mohsen; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2011-10-01

    Previous work using an atomic force microscope in nanoindenter mode indicated that the outer, 10- to 15-μm thick, keratinised layer of tree frog toe pads has a modulus of elasticity equivalent to silicone rubber (5-15 MPa) (Scholz et al. 2009), but gave no information on the physical properties of deeper structures. In this study, micro-indentation is used to measure the stiffness of whole toe pads of the tree frog, Litoria caerulea. We show here that tree frog toe pads are amongst the softest of biological structures (effective elastic modulus 4-25 kPa), and that they exhibit a gradient of stiffness, being stiffest on the outside. This stiffness gradient results from the presence of a dense network of capillaries lying beneath the pad epidermis, which probably has a shock absorbing function. Additionally, we compare the physical properties (elastic modulus, work of adhesion, pull-off force) of the toe pads of immature and adult frogs.

  20. REPEATING FAST RADIO BURSTS FROM HIGHLY MAGNETIZED PULSARS TRAVELING THROUGH ASTEROID BELTS

    Dai, Z. G.; Wang, J. S.; Huang, Y. F. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wu, X. F., E-mail: dzg@nju.edu.cn [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2016-09-20

    Very recently, Spitler et al. and Scholz et al. reported their detections of 16 additional bright bursts in the direction of the fast radio burst (FRB) 121102. This repeating FRB is inconsistent with all of the catastrophic event models put forward previously for hypothetically non-repeating FRBs. Here, we propose a different model, in which highly magnetized pulsars travel through the asteroid belts of other stars. We show that a repeating FRB could originate from such a pulsar encountering a large number of asteroids in the belt. During each pulsar-asteroid impact, an electric field induced outside of the asteroid has such a large component parallel to the stellar magnetic field that electrons are torn off the asteroidal surface and accelerated to ultra-relativistic energies instantaneously. The subsequent movement of these electrons along magnetic field lines will cause coherent curvature radiation, which can account for all of the properties of an FRB. In addition, this model can self-consistently explain the typical duration, luminosity, and repetitive rate of the 17 bursts of FRB 121102. The predicted occurrence rate of repeating FRB sources may imply that our model would be testable in the next few years.

  1. Application of an adapted PRECIS-2 instrument to assess efficacy- and effectiveness-study designs in a systematic review of intervention studies of the hepatitis C virus-care continuum among people who use drugs

    Jordan AE

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Ashly E Jordan,1,2 David C Perlman,2,3 Daniel J Smith,1 Holly Hagan1,2 1New York University, Rory Meyers College of Nursing, New York, NY, USA; 2Center for Drug Use and HIV Research, 3Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai Beth Israel, New York, NY, USA Introduction: Systematic reviews and meta-analyses examining intervention studies may need to categorize studies by the degree to which they reflect efficacy or effectiveness study-design elements when reporting systematic reviews and meta-analysis results.Materials and methods: We identified reports presenting data from intervention studies eligible for evaluation with an adapted PRECIS-II instrument as part of a larger systematic review of the hepatitis C virus (HCV-care continuum among people who used drugs. We applied the instrument to score reports examining any of the HCV-care-continuum steps of testing, linkage to care, and treatment on an efficacy–effectiveness spectrum. Composite scores are presented in tabular format and in stacked dot plots.Results: The adapted PRECIS-II instrument was applied to 37 unique reports that presented data on 51 HCV-care-continuum outcomes of testing (n=16, linkage to care (n=12, and treatment (n=23. Totals of 28, six, and three reports had been produced on one, two, or all three outcomes, respectively. Ten and eight studies described themselves as having efficacy or effectiveness designs, respectively; 33 did not specify. PRECIS-II composite scores for reports produced on testing, linkage to care, and treatment ranged widely: 1.22–5. Composite scores for reports examining HCV treatment indicated study designs that tended toward effectiveness (3.35, but those examining testing (3.85 or linkage (3.8 had more effectiveness-study designs (P=0.003, P=0.013, respectively.Conclusion: Reviewed reports varied widely in their use of efficacy/effectiveness-study designs, suggesting that systematic reviews and meta-analyses need to consider heterogeneity in efficacy

  2. Excess risk of major vascular diseases associated with airflow obstruction: a 9-year prospective study of 0.5 million Chinese adults

    Kurmi OP

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Om P Kurmi,1 Liming Li,2 Kourtney J Davis,3 Jenny Wang,1 Derrick A Bennett,1 Ka Hung Chan,1 Ling Yang,1 Yiping Chen,1 Yu Guo,4 Zheng Bian,4 Junshi Chen,5 Liuping Wei,6 Donghui Jin,7 Rory Collins,1 Richard Peto,1 Zhengming Chen1 On behalf of the China Kadoorie Biobank collaborative group 1Clinical Trial Service and Epidemiological Studies Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; 2Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, China; 3Real World Evidence and Epidemiology, GlaxoSmithKline, Collegeville, PA, USA; 4Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing China; 5China National Center for Food Safety Risk Assessment, Beijing, China; 6NCDs Prevention and Control Department, Liuzhou CDC, Liuzhou, China; 7NCDs Prevention and Control Department, Hunan CDC, Changsha, China Background: China has high COPD rates, even among never-regular smokers. Little is known about nonrespiratory disease risks, especially vascular morbidity and mortality after developing airflow obstruction (AFO in Chinese adults. Objective: We aimed to investigate the prospective association of prevalent AFO with major vascular morbidity and mortality. Materials and methods: In 2004–2008, a nationwide prospective cohort study recruited 512,891 men and women aged 30–79 years from 10 diverse localities across China, tracking cause-specific mortality and coded episodes of hospitalization for 9 years. Cox regression yielded adjusted HRs for vascular diseases comparing individuals with spirometry-defined prevalent AFO at baseline to those without. Results: Of 489,382 participants with no vascular disease at baseline, 6.8% had AFO, with prevalence rising steeply with age. Individuals with prevalent AFO had significantly increased vascular mortality (n=1,429, adjusted HR 1.29, 95% CI 1.21–1.36. There were also increased risks of hemorrhagic stroke (n=823, HR 1.18, 95% CI 1.09–1

  3. The associations between serum adiponectin, leptin, C-reactive protein, insulin, and serum long-chain omega-3 fatty acids in Labrador Retrievers

    Streeter RM

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Renee M Streeter,1 Angela M Struble,1 Sabine Mann,2 Daryl V Nydam,2 John E Bauer,3 Marta G Castelhano,1 Rory J Todhunter,1 Bethany P Cummings,4 Joseph J Wakshlag11Department of Clinical Sciences, 2Department of Population Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA; 3Department of Clinical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA; 4Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USAAbstract: Obesity has been associated with an increased inflammatory response and insulin resistance due to adipose tissue–derived adipokines and increases in C-reactive protein (CRP. Dogs appear to be similar to other species with the exception of adiponectin, which might not be affected by obesity status. Serum long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid concentrations have been positively and negatively associated with serum adipokines. The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between leptin, CRP, adiponectin, and insulin to body condition score (BCS and to the long-chain omega-3 fatty acids in serum lipoproteins, including alpha-linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, docosapentanenoic acid (DPA, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA as a reflection of dietary omega-3 status in the Labrador Retriever. Seventy-seven Labrador Retrievers were evaluated for BCS, percent fasting serum lipoprotein fatty acid concentrations, as well as serum leptin, adiponectin, insulin, and CRP. A multivariable general linear regression model was constructed to examine the association between the dependent variables leptin, CRP, adiponectin, and insulin and the predictor variables of BCS, age, and sex, as well as concentrations of alpha-linolenic acid, EPA, DHA, and DPA. Adiponectin concentration was positively associated with age (P<0.0008, EPA (P=0.027 and negatively associated with DHA (P=0.008. Leptin concentration was positively associated with an increased DHA (P=0.009, BCS (P

  4. The relationship of SSRI and SNRI usage with interstitial lung disease and bronchiectasis in an elderly population: a case–control study

    Rosenberg T

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Ted Rosenberg,1 Rory Lattimer,2 Patrick Montgomery,3 Christian Wiens,4 Liran Levy5 1Department of Family Medicine, University of British Columbia and Island Medical Program, Victoria, BC, 2Home Team Medical Services, Victoria, BC, 3Division of Geriatric Medicine, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC, 4Geriatric Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC, 5Lung Transplant Program, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada Background: The association between interstitial lung disease (ILD and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SSRI/SNRI has been previously described in published case reports. However, its prevalence may be more common than expected. We examined the association between SSRI/SNRI usage and presence of ILD and or bronchiectasis (ILD/B in an elderly population.Methods: We conducted a retrospective case series and case–control study involving all 296 eligible elderly patients in one primary care geriatric practice in Victoria, BC, Canada. Cases required the presence of ILD/B on computed tomography (CT or chest X-ray (CXR. Cases were excluded if they had other causes for ILD/B on CXR or CT such as exposure to known pneumotoxic drugs, metastatic cancer, rheumatoid lung disease, sarcoidosis, previous pulmonary tuberculosis, or pneumoconiosis. Data were abstracted from the patients’ medical record. The exposure variable was standardized cumulative person-month (p-m dose of SSRI/SNRI. The study was approved by the Clinical Research Ethics Board of University of British Columbia with a waiver of informed consent.Results: A total of 12 cases and 273 controls were identified. Their mean ages were 89.0 and 88.7 years, respectively (p=0.862. A total of 10/12 cases and 99/273 controls were exposed to SSRI/SNRI. The odds ratio was 8.79, 95% confidence interval 2.40–32.23 (p=0.001. The median p-m exposure to SSRI/SNRI was 110.0 months for cases and 29.5 for

  5. Poverty, disability and welfare Fátækt,fötlun og velferð

    James G. Rice

    2011-12-01

    ð fyrirliggjandi gögn sýni að fatlað fólk sé líklegra en ófatlað til að vera fátækt hafa fáar rannsóknir beinst að samspili fötlunar og fátæktar. Markmið rannsóknanna sem hér er greint frá var að afla þekkingar á félagslegum og fjárhagslegum aðstæðum fatlaðs fólks og öryrkja með áherslu á að öðlast skilning á daglegri reynslu og sjónarhorni fólksins sjálfs. Beitt var eigindlegum aðferðum, einstaklingsviðtölum og rýnihópaviðtölum. Þátttakendur voru alls um 80, fjölbreyttur hópur með tilliti til aldurs, skerðingar, fjölskylduaðstæðna, búsetu, menntunar og fleiri þátta. Niðurstöður sýna að þátttakendur bjuggu við þröngan kost, margir áttu erfitt með að uppfylla brýnustu þarfir sínar og fjölskyldunnar og börðust við að falla ekki í fátækt. Fólk sýndi mikla útsjónarsemi við að lifa af á örorkubótum. Þrátt fyrir það var erfitt eða ómögulegt fyrir flesta að leggja fyrir til að eiga varasjóð en það er lykilatriði til að takast á við óvænt áföll og útgjöld. Þegar í harðbakka sló leituðu þátttakendur aðstoðar í félagslegu tengslaneti sínu, oftast til fjölskyldu, og ljóst er að gagnkvæm stuðningstengsl gátu skipt miklu um afkomu fólks. Þær erfiðu fjárhagslegu og félagslegu aðstæður sem flestir bjuggu við sköpuðu álag, kvíða og streitu sem höfðu neikvæð áhrif á líðan og heilsufar. Mikilvægt er að aðgerðir stjórnvalda til að sporna við fátækt byggist á þekkingu á aðstæðum fólks og þeim flóknu ferlum sem eru að verki þar sem fátækt og fötlun mætast.

  6. Reconstruction of past climate variability in SE Spain between 14 and 8 ka

    Budsky, Alexander; Scholz, Denis; Mertz-Kraus, Regina; Christoph, Spötl; Gibert, Luis; Jochum, Klaus Peter; Andreae, Meinrat O.

    2016-04-01

    . Budsky, A., Scholz, D., Gibert, L., Mertz-Kraus, R., 2015. 230Th/U-dating of the Cueva Victoria flowstone sequence: Preliminary results and paleoclimate implications, in: Gibert, L., Ferràndez-Canadell, C. (Eds.), Geology and Paleontology of Cueva Victoria. Mastia 11-13, Cartagena, pp. 101-109. Gibert, L., Scott, G.R., Scholz, D., Budsky, A., Ferràndez, C., Ribot, F., Martin, R.A., Lería, M., 2016. Chronology for the Cueva Victoria fossil site (SE Spain): Evidence for Early Pleistocene Afro-Iberian dispersals. Journal of Human Evolution 90, 183-197.

  7. Self-imposed evaluation of the Helmholtz Research School MICMoR as a tool for quality assurance and advancement of a structured graduate programme

    Elija Bleher, Bärbel; Schmid, Hans Peter; Scholz, Beate

    2015-04-01

    The Helmholtz Research School MICMoR (Mechanisms and Interactions of Climate Change in Mountain Regions) offers a structured graduate programme for doctoral students in the field of climate change research. It is hosted by the Institute of Meteorology and Climate Research (KIT/IMK-IFU) in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, in collaboration with 7 Bavarian partner universities and research institutions. Hence, MICMoR brings together a considerably large network with currently 20 doctoral students and 55 scientists. MICMoR offers scientific and professional skills training, provides a state-of-the-art supervision concept, and fosters international exchange and interdisciplinary collaboration. In order to develop and advance its programme, MICMoR has committed itself to a self-imposed mid-term review in its third year, to monitor to which extent its original objectives have been reached, and to explore and identify where MICMoR has room for improvement. The evaluation especially focused on recruitment, supervision, training, networking and cooperation. Carried out by an external expert (Beate Scholz from scholz ctc), the evaluation was based on a mixed methods approach, i.e. combining a quantitative survey involving all doctoral candidates as well as their supervisors and focus groups with different MICMoR stakeholders. The evaluation has brought forward some highly interesting results, pinpointing challenges and opportunities of setting up a structured doctoral programme. Overall, the evaluation proved to be a useful tool for evidence-based programme and policy planning, and demonstrated a high level of satisfaction of supervisors and fellows. Supervision, with facets ranging from disciplinary feedback to career advice, is demanding and requires strong commitment and adequate human resources development by all parties involved. Thus, MICMoR plans to offer mentor coaching and calls on supervisors and mentors to form a community of learners with their doctoral students. To

  8. Age and speleogenesis of epigenic gypsum caves in the northern Apennines (Italy)

    Columbu, Andrea; Chiarini, Veronica; De Waele, Jo; Drysdale, Russell; Forti, Paolo; Hellstrom, John; Woodhead, Jon

    2016-04-01

    Triassic and Messinian gypsum beds host the majority of the caves in the eastern flank of the northern Apennines. To date, more than six hundreds voids have been mapped, including the longest known epigenic gypsum cave system in the world (Spipola-Acquafredda, ~11 km of tunnels) (De Waele et al., 2013). Superimposed caves are typically sub-horizontal (Klimchouk, 2000) and connected through vertical shafts, reflecting the palaeo base-level variations. When preserved, river terraces at the surface lie at the same palaeo altitude of the base level and horizontal cave passages. Notwithstanding the well-known geology of the area known (Vai and Martini, 2001), the age of these caves has been greatly underestimated in the past. Considering the rapid dissolution of the gypsum and uplifting of the area, the start of speleogenesis activity was considered to have occurred during the last glacial age. The age of karst voids can be only indirectly estimated by the dating of the infilling sediments. U-Th dating on carbonate speleothems provides high-precision and accurate ages (Hellstrom, 2003; Scholz and Hoffmann, 2008). We thus applied this methodology to 20 speleothems coming from 14 different caves belonging to the Monte Tondo, Spipola Acquafredda, Castelnuovo, Stella-Rio Basino and Brisighella systems. The results show that: i) caves were forming since at least ~300 ka; ii) the peak of speleogenesis was reached during relatively cold climate stages, when rivers formed terraces at the surface and aggradation caused paragenesis in the stable cave levels (Columbu et al., 2015). Besides the significant contribution to the understanding of the Apennines evaporite karst evolution, this study (and its further advancement) may also refine knowledge of the local vs regional uplifting rates and base-level variations since the late Pleistocene (Wegmann and Pazzaglia, 2009). References Columbu, A., De Waele, J., Forti, P., Montagna, P., Picotti, V., Pons-Branchu, E., Hellstrom, J

  9. A comparison of seismicity in world's subduction zones: Implication by the difference of b-values

    Nishikawa, T.; Ide, S.

    2013-12-01

    from plate tectonic velocities (Scholz and Campos, 2012). Lithosphere age also has a weak negative correlation with the degree of seismic coupling. Based on differences in b-values for the types of faulting, Schorlemmer et al. (2005) suggested that b-value depends inversely on differential stress. This idea, taken together with correlations in the present study, suggests a model where the buoyancy of subducting slabs which depends on the lithosphere age determines stress state and the b-value in each sunbduction zone. The stress state also controls the seismic coupling. This model is basically consistent with the idea of Ruff and Kanamori (1980). Subduction zones with younger and lighter lithosphere are in a compressive stress state and associate with high coupling and small b-values (Chile), while those with older and heavier lithosphere are in a tensional stress state and correlate with low coupling and large b-values (Mariana). Subduction zones such as Nicaragua and El Salvador where b-values are much higher than the expectation from the above correlations may be explained by considering the fact that local tectonics affects the seismic coupling (LaFemina et al., 2009; Scholz and Campos, 2012).

  10. Past climate variability between 97 and 7 ka reconstructed from a multi proxy speleothem record from Western Cuba

    Winterhalder, Sophie; Scholz, Denis; Mangini, Augusto; Spötl, Christoph; Jochum, Klaus Peter; Pajón, Jesús M.

    2016-04-01

    . Due to the competing influence of the NA, the Gulf of Mexico and the Pacific Ocean, the proposed severe changes in the tropical hydrological cycle during that time (such as variations of the ITCZ, insolation and the thermohaline circulation (THC)) have potentially lead to significant changes in sources and trajectories of precipitation in Western Cuba. Our record, thus, provides an important contribution towards understanding and differentiating these parameters on Caribbean climate during glacial climate changes. References: Fensterer, C., Scholz, D., Hoffmann, D., Spötl, C., Pajón, J.M., Mangini, A., 2012. Cuban stalagmite suggests relationship between Caribbean precipitation and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation during the past 1.3 ka. The Holocene, 0959683612449759. Fensterer, C., Scholz, D., Hoffmann, D.L., Spötl, C., Schröder-Ritzrau, A., Horn, C., Pajón, J.M., Mangini, A., 2013. Millennial-scale climate variability during the last 12.5 ka recorded in a Caribbean speleothem. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 361, 143-151. Winter, A., Miller, T., Kushnir, Y., Sinha, A., Timmermann, A., Jury, M.R., Gallup, C., Cheng, H., Edwards, R.L., 2011. Evidence for 800years of North Atlantic multi-decadal variability from a Puerto Rican speleothem. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 308, 23-28.

  11. The Lake Petén Itzá Scientifi c Drilling Project

    Daniel Ariztegui

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Polar ice cores provide us with high-resolution records of past climate change at high latitudes on both glacial-to-interglacial and millennial timescales. Paleoclimatologists and climate modelers have focused increasingly on the tropics, however, as a potentially important driver of global climate change because of the region’s role in controlling the Earth’s energy budget and in regulating the water vapor content of the atmosphere. Tropical climate change is often expressed most strongly as variations in precipitation, and closed-basin lakes are sensitive recorders of the balance between precipitation and evaporation. Recent advances in fl oating platformsand drilling technology now offer the paleolimnological community the opportunity to obtain long sediment records from lowland tropical lakes, as illustrated by the recent successful drilling of Lakes Bosumtwi and Malawi in Africa (Koeberl et al., 2005; Scholz et al., 2006. Tropical lakes suitable for paleoclimatic research were sought in Central America to complement the African lake drilling. Most lakes in the Neotropics are shallow, however, and these basins fell dry during the Late Glacial period because the climate in the region was more arid than today. The search for an appropriate lake to study succeeded in 1999 when a bathymetric survey of Lake Petén Itzá, northern Guatemala, revealed a maximum depth of 165 m, making itthe deepest lake in the lowlands of Central America (Fig. 1 .Although the lake was greatly reduced in volume during the Late Glacial period, the deep basin remained submerged and thus contains a continuous history of lacustrine sediment deposition. A subsequent seismic survey of Lake Petén Itzá in 2002 showed a thick sediment package overlying basement, with several subbasins containing up to 100 m of sediment (Anselmetti et al., 2006.

  12. Policy Debate | Ecuador’s Yasuní-ITT Initiative : What Can We Learn from its Failure?

    Pamela L. Martin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Editor’s note: This paper is a contribution to the ‘Policy Debate’ section of International Development Policy. In this section, academics, policy-makers and practioners engage in a dialogue on global development challenges. Papers are copy-edited but not peer-reviewed. Instead, the initial thematic contribution is followed by critical comments and reactions from scholars and/or policy-makers.In her article ‘Pay to Preserve: The Global Politics of Ecuador’s Yasuní-ITT Proposal’, published in DevPol’s special issue on  Energy and Development in 2011, Pamela L. Martin, Associate Professor of Politics at the Coastal Carolina University in Conway, South Carolina, provided a favourable outlook on Ecuador’s innovative environmental governance mechanism. Accordingly, its unique potential lay in its objective of contributing towards sustainable development and social justice and in case of success, the author even predicted a possible replication in other developing countries. Despite its benefits, the initiative was abandoned in 2013. In this paper, Martin revisits the initiative and analyses the reasons for its failure, namely President Correa’s public pursuit of a Plan B, entering into negotiations with oil firms interested to explore the ITT reserves. Moreover, the initiative was in stark competition with the national REDD+ programme, the mainstream policy approach to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation against payments, which is being negotiated under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC.Pamela L. Martin’s article is followed by a response by Dr. Imme Scholz, Deputy Director of the German Development Institute/Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE. She examines why Germany, as the largest European donor, withdrew its support for the Yasuní-ITT Initiative.Readers who are intetested are invited to contribute to this policy debate on our blog .Download the whole

  13. Microstructure and Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical effects as an explanation for rate dependency during seismic slip

    Stefanou, I.; Rattez, H.; Sulem, J.

    2017-12-01

    Rapid shear tests of granulated fault gouges show pronounced rate-dependency. For this reason rate-dependent constitutive laws are frequently used for describing fault friction.Here we propose a micromechanical, physics-based continuum approach by considering the characteristic size of the microstructure and the thermal- and pore-pressure-diffusion mechanisms that take place in the fault gouge during rapid shearing. It is shown that even for rate-independent materials, the apparent, macroscopic behavior of the system is rate-dependent. This is due to the competition of the characteristic lengths and time scales introduced indirectly by the microstructure and the thermal and hydraulic diffusivities.Both weakening and shear band thickness are rate dependent, despite the fact that the constitutive description of the material was considered rate-independent. Moreover the size of the microstructure, which here is identified with the grain size of the fault gouge (D50), plays an important role in the slope of the softening branch of the shear stress-strain response curve and consequently in the transition from aseismic to seismic slip.References Dieterich, J. H. (1979). Modeling of rock friction: 1. Experimental results and constitutive equations. Journal of Geophysical Research, 84(B5), 2161. http://doi.org/10.1029/JB084iB05p02161 Scholz, C. H. (2002). The mechanics of earthquakes and faulting (Second). Cambridge. Sulem, J., & Stefanou, I. (2016). Thermal and chemical effects in shear and compaction bands. Geomechanics for Energy and the Environment, 6, 4-21. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.gete.2015.12.004

  14. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; 1988-1989 Annual Report.

    Peone, Tim L.; Scholz, Allan T.; Griffith, James R.

    1990-10-01

    In the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1987 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1987), the Council directed the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to construct two kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) hatcheries as partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead incurred by construction of Grand Coulee Dam [Section 903 (g)(l)(C)]. The hatcheries will produce kokanee salmon for outplanting into Lake Roosevelt as well as rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Lake Roosevelt net-pen program. In section 903 (g)(l)(E), the Council also directed BPA to fund a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the kokanee hatcheries. The monitoring program included the following components: (1) a year-round, reservoir-wide, creel survey to determine angler use, catch rates and composition, and growth and condition of fish; (2) assessment of kokanee, rainbow, and walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) feeding habits and densities of their preferred prey, and; (3) a mark and recapture study designed to assess the effectiveness of different locations where hatchery-raised kokanee and net pen reared rainbow trout are released. The above measures were adopted by the Council based on a management plan, developed by the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center, Spokane Indian Tribe, Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington Department of Wildlife, and National Park Service, that examined the feasibility of restoring and enhancing Lake Roosevelt fisheries (Scholz et al. 1986). In July 1988, BPA entered into a contract with the Spokane Indian Tribe to initiate the monitoring program. The projected duration of the monitoring program is through 1995. This report contains the results of the monitoring program from August 1988 to December 1989.

  15. Power Scaling of Petroleum Field Sizes and Movie Box Office Earnings.

    Haley, J. A.; Barton, C. C.

    2017-12-01

    The size-cumulative frequency distribution of petroleum fields has long been shown to be power scaling, Mandelbrot, 1963, and Barton and Scholz, 1995. The scaling exponents for petroleum field volumes range from 0.8 to 1.08 worldwide and are used to assess the size and number of undiscovered fields. The size-cumulative frequency distribution of movie box office earnings also exhibits a power scaling distribution for domestic, overseas, and worldwide gross box office earnings for the top 668 earning movies released between 1939 and 2016 (http://www.boxofficemojo.com/alltime/). Box office earnings were reported in the dollars-of-the-day and were converted to 2015 U.S. dollars using the U.S. consumer price index (CPI) for domestic and overseas earnings. Because overseas earnings are not reported by country and there is no single inflation index appropriate for all overseas countries. Adjusting the box office earnings using the CPI index has two effects on the power functions fit. The first is that the scaling exponent has a narrow range (2.3 - 2.5) between the three data sets; and second, the scatter of the data points fit by the power function is reduced. The scaling exponents for the adjusted value are; 2.3 for domestic box office earnings, 2.5 for overseas box office earnings, and 2.5 worldwide box office earnings. The smaller the scaling exponent the greater the proportion of all earnings is contributed by a smaller proportion of all the movies: where E = P (a-2)/(a-1) where E is the percentage of earnings, P is the percentage of all movies in the data set. The scaling exponents for box office earnings (2.3 - 2.5) means that approximately 20% of the top earning movies contribute 70-55% of all the earnings for domestic, worldwide earnings respectively.

  16. REDESCRIPTION OF SCIADOCEPHALUS MEGALODISCUS DIESING, 1850, ONE THE EARLIEST DIVERGING NEOTROPICAL FISH TAPEWORMS (CESTODA: PROTEOCEPHALIDAE).

    Scholz, Tomáš; de Chambrier, Alain

    2018-06-04

    The tapeworm Sciadocephalus megalodiscus Diesing, 1850 (Cestoda: Proteocephalidae) is redescribed based on newly collected specimens parasitizing tucunare peacock bass, Cichla monoculus Agassiz, 1831 (Perciformes: Cichlidae), in the Peruvian Amazon. Even though this cestode was redescribed 2 decades ago by Rego et al. (1999), that redescription did not report some of the unique features of this species. The most unusual characteristics of the species are: (i) peculiar formation of the uterus, with fast formation of numerous, tightly packed diverticula protruding ventrally and dorsally, with simultaneous disintegration of the ovary and vitelline follicles in the first pregravid proglottids; (ii) inverted umbrella-shaped scolex with a well-developed apical sucker; (iii) a large-sized, follicular (grape cluster-like) ovary, which occupies most of the central (median) third of proglottids, with the ovarian isthmus situated almost equatorially; (iv) regular alternation of genital pores; (v) a well-developed internal seminal vesicle; and (vi) a small-sized strobila (shorter than 6 mm) consisting of few proglottids (15-20). Preliminary molecular data reveal S. megalodiscus to be most closely related to Cichlidocestus gillesi, the type species of the recently erected Cichlidocestus de Chambrier, Pinacho-Pinacho, Hernández-Orts and Scholz, 2017. Species of both genera parasitize Neotropical cichlids and are unique among all proteocephalids in the shape and position of the ovary. They also share other morphological characteristics unusual among other proteocephalids and thus these two genera can be considered good candidates to be placed in a new, higher-level taxon such as separate subfamily or even family when a new, more natural classification of the Proteocephalidae is proposed.

  17. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2000 Annual Report.

    Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Kettle Falls, WA)

    2001-03-01

    The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. These strategic changes have been the result of recommendations through the Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) and were done to enhance imprinting, improve survival and operate the two kokanee facilities more effectively. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear 200,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Monitoring and evaluation is preformed by the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program. From 1988 to 1998, the principle sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The most recent information from the monitoring program also suggests that the hatchery and net pen rearing programs have been beneficial to enhancing the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake.

  18. Molecular evidence of cryptic diversity in Paracaryophyllaeus (Cestoda: Caryophyllidea), parasites of loaches (Cobitidae) in Eurasia, including description of P. vladkae n. sp.

    Scholz, Tomáš; Oros, Mikuláš; Bazsalovicsová, Eva; Brabec, Jan; Waeschenbach, Andrea; Xi, Bing-Wen; Aydoğdu, Ali; Besprozvannykh, Vladimir; Shimazu, Takeshi; Králová-Hromadová, Ivica; Littlewood, D Timothy J

    2014-12-01

    Molecular phylogenetic analysis of an extensive collection of monozoic tapeworms of the genus Paracaryophyllaeus Kulakovskaya, 1961 (Cestoda: Caryophyllidea), parasites of loaches (Cypriniformes: Cobitidae) in Eurasia, has revealed cryptic species diversity within this long-time monotypic genus, especially in the Paracaryophyllaeus gotoi (Motomura, 1927) species complex [syn. Paracaryophyllaeus dubininorum (Kulakovskaya, 1961); type species]. Three independent, well-supported clades were discovered on the basis of molecular data: (i) specimens from Misgurnus anguillicaudatus and Cobitis lutheri from China, Russian Far East and Japan - called herein P. cf. gotoi 1, which may be conspecific with P. gotoi (Motomura, 1927), although in the absence of sequence data for P. gotoi from its type locality (basin of the River Kumkan in Korea), no certain inferences about their identity can currently be made; (ii) specimens from M. anguillicaudatus from China and Japan - P. cf. gotoi 2, which are morphologically indistinguishable from those of P. cf. gotoi 1; and (iii) morphologically distinct tapeworms from the endemic loach Cobitis bilseli from southwestern Turkey (Beyşehir Lake), which are described herein as a new species. Paracaryophyllaeus vladkae Scholz, Oros and Aydoğdu n. sp. differs from the remaining species of the genus in the following characteristics: the testes begin anterior to the first vitelline follicles (versus posterior), the body is short and robust (versus more elongate and slender), and the scolex is wide, rounded or apically tapered (versus claviform to truncate). Species composition of the genus, host specificity of species and geographical distribution are briefly discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Sherman Creek Hatchery, annual report 2000

    2001-01-01

    The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. These strategic changes have been the result of recommendations through the Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) and were done to enhance imprinting, improve survival and operate the two kokanee facilities more effectively. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear 200,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Monitoring and evaluation is preformed by the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program. From 1988 to 1998, the principle sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The most recent information from the monitoring program also suggests that the hatchery and net pen rearing programs have been beneficial to enhancing the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake

  20. The SOFeX Group

    Coale, K. H.

    2002-12-01

    The SOFeX Group is comprised of the following institutions and individuals, all of whose participation resulted in a successful experiment. Moss Landing Marine Laboratories: K. Coale, C. Hunter, M. Gordon, S. Tanner, W. Wang, N. Ladizinsky, D. Cooper, G. Smith, J. Brewster; Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute: K. Johnson, F. Chavez, S. Fitzwater, P. Strutton, G. Elrod, Z. Chase, E. Drake, J. Plant; Oregon State University: B. Hales, J. Barth, L.Bandstra, P. Covert, D. Hubbard, J. Jennings, S. Pierce, E. Scholz; Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory: T. Takahashi; Duke University: R. Barber, V. Lance, D. Stube, A. Hilting, M. Hiscock, A. Apprill, C. Van Hilst, ; Virginia Institute of Marine Science: W. Smith, H. Ducklow, L. Delizo, J. Oliver, E. Bailey, J. Peloquin, R. Daniels, J. Bauer; University Of Hawaii: M. Landry, R. Bidigare, S. Brown, N. Cassar, B. Twining, K. Selph, C. Sheridan; NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory: R. Wanninkhof, K. Sullivan, C. Neill; University of Miami: F. Millero, X. Zhu, W. Hiscock, V. Koehler, A. Cabrera; University of Calif. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory: J. Bishop, T. Wood, C. Guay, P. Lam; Rutgers University: P. Falkowski, Z. Kolber, R. Nicolayson, S. Tozzi, M. Gorbunov, M. Koblizek; University of Massachusets: M. Altabet, M. McIlvan, D. Timothy; New Mexico Tech.: Oliver Wingenter; San Francisco State Univ. - Romberg Tiburon Center: W. Cochlan, J. Herndon; University of Calif. Santa Cruz: R. Kudela, A. Roberts; Univ. of Calif. Santa Barbara: M. Brezinski, J. Jones, M. Demarest; Massachusets Inst. of Technology: S. Chisolm, Z. Johnson; Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute: K. Buesseler, J. Andrews, G. Crossin, S. Pike, J. Tegeder, C. Herbold, K. Mahoney, M.Coggeshell ; University of East Anglia: L. Houghton, L. Goldson, A. Watson, J. Ledwell; Institute of Marine Research, Kiel: Peter Croot; University of Otago: R. Frew, E. Abraham, P. Boyd.

  1. In vitro dynamic solubility test: influence of various parameters.

    Thélohan, S; de Meringo, A

    1994-10-01

    This article discusses the dissolution of mineral fibers in simulated physiological fluids (SPF), and the parameters that affect the solubility measurement in a dynamic test where an SPF runs through a cell containing fibers (Scholze and Conradt test). Solutions simulate either the extracellular fluid (pH 7.6) or the intracellular fluid (pH 4.5). The fibers have various chemical compositions and are either continuously drawn or processed as wool. The fiber solubility is determined by the amount of SiO2 (and occasionally other ions) released in the solution. Results are stated as percentage of the initial silica content released or as dissolution rate v in nm/day. The reproducibility of the test is higher with the less soluble fibers (10% solubility), than with highly soluble fibers (20% solubility). The influence of test parameters, including SPF, test duration, and surface area/volume (SA/V), has been studied. The pH and the inorganic buffer salts have a major influence: industrial glasswool composition is soluble at pH 7.6 but not at pH 4.5. The opposite is true for rock- (basalt) wool composition. For slightly soluble fibers, the dissolution rate v remains constant with time, whereas for highly soluble fibers, the dissolution rate decreases rapidly. The dissolution rates believed to occur are v1, initial dissolution rate, and v2, dissolution rate of the residual fibers. The SA of fibers varies with the mass of the fibers tested, or with the fiber diameter at equal mass. Volume, V, is the chosen flow rate. An increase in the SA/V ratio leads to a decrease in the dissolution rate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. COPD and its association with smoking in the Mainland China: a cross-sectional analysis of 0.5 million men and women from ten diverse areas

    Kurmi OP

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Om P Kurmi,1 Liming Li,2,3 Jenny Wang,1 Iona Y Millwood,1 Junshi Chen,4 Rory Collins,1 Yu Guo,2 Zheng Bian,2 Jiangtao Li,5 Biyun Chen,6 Kaixu Xie,7 Weifan Jia,8 Yali Gao,9 Richard Peto,1 Zhengming Chen1 On behalf of the China Kadoorie Biobank Collaborative Group 1Nuffield Department of Population Health, Clinical Trial Service Unit and Epidemiological Studies Unit (CTSU, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; 2Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University, 3Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Dong Cheng District, 4China National Center for Food Safety Risk Assessment, Beijing, 5NCDs Prevention and Control Department, Huixian CDC, Huixian, Henan, 6NCDs Prevention and Control Department, Hunan CDC, Changsha, 7NCDs Prevention and Control Department, Tongxiang CDC, Zhejiang, 8NCDs Prevention and Control Department, Liuyang CDC, Baiyikengdao, Liuyang, Changsha, Hunan, 9NCDs Prevention and Control Department, Sichuan CDC, Sichuan, Mainland China Purpose: In adult Chinese men, smoking prevalence is high, but little is known about its association with chronic respiratory disease, which is still poorly diagnosed and managed. Methods: A nationwide study recruited 0.5 million men and women aged 30–79 years during 2004–2008 from ten geographically diverse areas across the Mainland China. Information was collected from each participant regarding smoking and self-reported physician diagnosis of chronic bronchitis/emphysema (CB/E, along with measurement of lung function indices. Logistic regression was used to yield sex-specific odds ratios (ORs relating smoking to airflow obstruction (AFO, defined as forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC <0.7 and CB/E, adjusting for age, areas, education, and income. Results: Overall 74% of men were ever regular smokers; among them, 7.2% had AFO compared with 5.4% in never-smokers, yielding an OR of 1.42 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.34–1

  3. Piloted Well Clear Performance Evaluation of Detect and Avoid Systems with Suggestive Guidance

    Mueller, Eric; Santiago, Confesor; Watza, Spencer

    2016-01-01

    Regulations to establish operational and performance requirements for unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) are being developed by a consortium of government, industry and academic institutions (RTCA, 2013). Those requirements will apply to the new detect-and-avoid (DAA) systems and other equipment necessary to integrate UAS with the United States (U.S) National Airspace System (NAS) and will be determined according to their contribution to the overall safety case. That safety case requires demonstration that DAA-equipped UAS collectively operating in the NAS meet an airspace safety threshold (AST). Several key gaps must be closed in order to link equipment requirements to an airspace safety case. Foremost among these is calculation of the systems risk ratio, the degree to which a particular system mitigates violation of an aircraft separation standard (FAA, 2013). The risk ratio of a DAA system, in combination with risk ratios of other collision mitigation mechanisms, will determine the overall safety of the airspace measured in terms of the number of collisions per flight hour. It is not known what the effectiveness is of a pilot-in-the-loop DAA system or even what parameters of the DAA system most improve the pilots ability to maintain separation. The relationship between the DAA system design and the overall effectiveness of the DAA system that includes the pilot, expressed as a risk ratio, must be determined before DAA operational and performance requirements can be finalized. Much research has been devoted to integrating UAS into non-segregated airspace (Dalamagkidis, 2009, Ostwald, 2007, Gillian, 2012, Hesselink, 2011, Santiago, 2015, Rorie 2015 and 2016). Several traffic displays intended for use as part of a DAA system have gone through human-in-the-loop simulation and flight-testing. Most of these evaluations were part of development programs to produce a deployable system, so it is unclear how to generalize particular aspects of those designs to general

  4. Transformation research for a sustainable energy system. Contributions; Transformationsforschung fuer ein nachhaltiges Energiesystem. Beitraege

    Stadermann, Gerd; Szczepanski, Petra; Wunschick, Franziska; Martin, Niklas (comps.)

    2012-03-15

    Within the 2011 annual meeting of the Renewable Energy Research Association (Berlin, Federal Republic of Germany) from 12th to 13th October 2011, the following lectures were held: (1) Environmentally safe and socially compatible transformation of energy systems (G. Schuette); (2) Open questions on the transformation of energy systems (E. Weber); (3) System analysis on the transformation of energy systems up to 2050 (J. Schmid); (4) Economic aspects: Chances, markets and workplaces (F. Staiss); (5) Perspectives for an interplay of energy efficiency and renewable energy resources as well as their implementation in the energy system (A. Bett); (6) New accents of research promotion for a more rapid development of renewable energy sources (K. Deller); (7) The 6th Energy Research Program of the Federal Government (R. Tryfonidou); (8) Recommendations of the FVEE for the research policy of the Research Government (G. Sadermann); (9) How can research and politics promote the system transformation (M. Hustedt); (10) The energy system of tomorrow - Strategies and research for the transformation of high amounts of renewable energy resources (W. Duerrschmidt); (11) Long-term strategies for the development of renewable energies in Germany (J. Nitsch); (12) Development of storage capacities for an efficient power generation by renewable energy resources in Germany and Europe by 2050 (Y. Scholz); (13) Prognoses of temporal and spatial variability of renewable energy resources (B. Lange); (14) Smart Grids - Transformation of our electrical energy supply (G. Ebert); (15) Model regions for intelligently networked energy systems; (16) Cities and concepts of neighbourhood - model cities (D. Schmidt); (17) Transformation of the German power system to a decentral regenerative economy (U. Leprich); (18) Alteration of the general conditions for new incentive models, heat acts, restoration of buildings (M. Schmidt); (19) Acceptance and participation research on energy sustainability (P

  5. Singlet oxygen feedback delayed fluorescence of protoporphyrin IX in organic solutions.

    Vinklárek, Ivo S; Scholz, Marek; Dědic, Roman; Hála, Jan

    2017-04-12

    Delayed fluorescence (DF) of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) has been recently proposed as a tool for monitoring of mitochondrial oxygen tension in vivo as well as for observation of the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy (PDT) [E. G. Mik, Anesth. Analg., 2013, 117, 834-346; F. Piffaretti et al., J. Biomed. Opt., 2012, 17, 115007]. However, the efficiency of the mechanism of thermal activation (E-type DF), which was considered in the papers, is limited due to a large energy gap between the first excited singlet and the first triplet state of PpIX at room or body temperatures. Moreover, the energy gap is roughly equal to other porphyrinoid photosensitizers that generate DF mostly through the Singlet Oxygen Feedback-Induced mechanism (SOFDF) under certain conditions [M. Scholz and R. Dědic, Singlet Oxygen: Applications in Biosciences and Nanosciences, 2016, vol. 2, pp. 63-81]. The mechanisms of delayed fluorescence of PpIX dissolved either in dimethylformamide (DMF) or in the mixture of DMF with ethylene glycol (EG) were investigated at atmospheric partial pressure of oxygen by means of a simultaneous time-resolved detection of 1 O 2 phosphorescence and PpIX DF which makes a direct comparison of the kinetics and lifetimes of both the luminescence channels possible. Samples of PpIX (100 μM) exhibit concave DF kinetics, which is a typical footprint of the SOFDF mechanism. The dramatic decrease in the DF intensity after adding a selective 1 O 2 quencher sodium azide (NaN 3 , 10 mM) proves that >90% of DF is indeed generated through SOFDF. Moreover, the analysis of the DF kinetics in the presence of NaN 3 implies that the second significant mechanism of DF generation is the triplet-triplet annihilation (P-type DF). The bimolecular mechanism of DF was further confirmed by the decrease of the DF intensity in the more viscous mixture DMF/EG and by the increase of the ratio of DF to the prompt fluorescence (PF) intensity with the increasing excitation intensity. These results

  6. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2003 Annual Report.

    Lovrak, Jon (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Program, Hatcheries Division, Ford, WA); Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Program, Hatcheries Division, Kettle Falls, WA)

    2004-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operation and evaluation. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribes form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery. The LRHCT also serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. Since 1994 the kokanee fingerling program has changed to yearling releases. By utilizing both the hatcheries and additional net pens, up to 1,000,000 kokanee yearlings can be reared and released. The construction and operation of twenty net pens in 2001 enabled the increased production. Another significant change has been to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native tributary stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin waters. The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program (LRFEP) is responsible for monitoring and evaluation on the Lake Roosevelt Projects. From 1988 to 1998, the principal sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and

  7. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; 1990 Annual Report.

    Griffith, Janelle R.; Scholz, Allan T. (Eastern Washington University, Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Research Center, Cheney, WA)

    1991-09-01

    feasibility of restoring and enhancing Lake Roosevelt fisheries (Scholz et al. 1986). In July 1988, BPA entered into a contract with the Spokane Indian Tribe to initiate the monitoring program and continue research through 1995. This report contains the results of the monitoring program from January to December 1990.

  8. Cost efficiency and ressource efficiency in the waste management. Proceedings; Kosten- und Ressourceneffizienz in der Abfallwirtschaft. Tagungsband

    Fricke, K. [Arbeitskreis fuer die Nutzbarmachung von Siedlungsabfaellen (ANS) e.V., Braunschweig (Germany)]|[Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Abfall- und Ressourcenwirtschaft; Bergs, C.G. [Bundesministerium fuer Umwelt, Naturschutz und Reaktorsicherheit, Berlin (Germany); Kosak, G. [Arbeitskreis fuer die Nutzbarmachung von Siedlungsabfaellen (ANS) e.V., Braunschweig (Germany)]|[IBK-Kosak GmbH, Neustadt/Weinstrasse (Germany); Wallamnn, R. (eds.) [Arbeitskreis fuer die Nutzbarmachung von Siedlungsabfaellen (ANS) e.V., Braunschweig (Germany)]|[IGW Ingenieurgemeinschaft Witzenhausen Fricke und Turk GmbH (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Uphoff); (s) An economical optimisation of existing composting plants by means of energetical use of sectional flows (T. Turk, M. Idelmann, J. Hake); (t) Conditioning of biomass from biological wastes: A cost efficient and resource efficient solution? (J. Dach, S. Bode, A. Warnstedt, G. Mueller); (u) Implementation of fermentation in the utilization of biological waste and treatment of residual wastes (K. Fricke, T. Bahr); (v) Enhancement of the energy efficiency of composting plants such as Kompostwerk Goettingen GmbH (K. Loewe, O. Ruehl, M. Nelles, S. Prechtl, R. Scholz); (w) Measures for treatment of processing water and drainage water during fermentation of waste materials - what can the waste management learn from the residential water management? (N. Dichtl, L. Guenther, S. Wolter); (x) Management of material transport of biological wastes with the aim: Optimization of utilization of organic wastes (F. Knappe).

  9. White matter structure changes as adults learn a second language.

    Schlegel, Alexander A; Rudelson, Justin J; Tse, Peter U

    2012-08-01

    Traditional models hold that the plastic reorganization of brain structures occurs mainly during childhood and adolescence, leaving adults with limited means to learn new knowledge and skills. Research within the last decade has begun to overturn this belief, documenting changes in the brain's gray and white matter as healthy adults learn simple motor and cognitive skills [Lövdén, M., Bodammer, N. C., Kühn, S., Kaufmann, J., Schütze, H., Tempelmann, C., et al. Experience-dependent plasticity of white-matter microstructure extends into old age. Neuropsychologia, 48, 3878-3883, 2010; Taubert, M., Draganski, B., Anwander, A., Müller, K., Horstmann, A., Villringer, A., et al. Dynamic properties of human brain structure: Learning-related changes in cortical areas and associated fiber connections. The Journal of Neuroscience, 30, 11670-11677, 2010; Scholz, J., Klein, M. C., Behrens, T. E. J., & Johansen-Berg, H. Training induces changes in white-matter architecture. Nature Neuroscience, 12, 1370-1371, 2009; Draganski, B., Gaser, C., Busch, V., Schuirer, G., Bogdahn, U., & May, A. Changes in grey matter induced by training. Nature, 427, 311-312, 2004]. Although the significance of these changes is not fully understood, they reveal a brain that remains plastic well beyond early developmental periods. Here we investigate the role of adult structural plasticity in the complex, long-term learning process of foreign language acquisition. We collected monthly diffusion tensor imaging scans of 11 English speakers who took a 9-month intensive course in written and spoken Modern Standard Chinese as well as from 16 control participants who did not study a language. We show that white matter reorganizes progressively across multiple sites as adults study a new language. Language learners exhibited progressive changes in white matter tracts associated with traditional left hemisphere language areas and their right hemisphere analogs. Surprisingly, the most significant changes

  10. Flowstones from SE Spain document a close relationship between North Atlantic temperature and precipitation in the Western Mediterranean between 7 and 112 ka

    Budsky, Alexander; Scholz, Denis; Mertz-Kraus, Regina; Spötl, Christoph; Gibert, Luis; Jochum, Klaus Peter

    2017-04-01

    Here we present three flowstone records from Cueva Victoria, SE Spain, covering the period between Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5 and MIS 3, the Late Glacial and the Holocene. The flowstones were precisely dated by the MC-ICPMS 230Th/U-method. In addition, stable oxygen and carbon isotope ratios as well as trace element concentrations were determined at high resolution (centennial to decadal scale). Present-day climate of SE Spain is classified as semi-arid with dry summer months (Iberian margin. δ18O values are around -3.5 ‰ and decrease to -5 to -6 ‰ during D/O events, while δ13C values are around -9 ‰ and decrease to -10 to -11 ‰ ) during D/O events. We interpret these changes as more humid conditions during D/O events, with elevated sea-surface temperatures in the North Atlantic and the Mediterranean Sea leading to increased moisture transport and precipitation on the SE Iberian Peninsula. As a consequence, vegetation density increased, which is reflected by the decrease in δ13C values and Mg and Sr concentrations and an increase in P content. In the Holocene, the flowstone grew continuously from the Bølling/Allerød to the mid-Holocene (7 ka). Stable isotopes record a trend of increasing temperatures with decreasing values towards the mid-Holocene (δ18O ≈ - 6.4 ‰ , δ13C ≈ -11 ‰ ). However, δ13C values record a significant excursion with elevated values (up to -3.8 ‰ ) during a period from 9.5 to 7.7 ka related to cold Bond-events in the North Atlantic, which is interpreted as a dry period in SE Spain. Budsky, A., Scholz, D., Gibert, L., Mertz-Kraus, R., 2015. 230Th/U-dating of the Cueva Victoria flowstone sequence: Preliminary results and paleoclimate implications, in: Gibert, L., Ferràndez-Canadell, C. (Eds.), Geology and Paleontology of Cueva Victoria. Mastia 11-13, Cartagena, pp. 101-109.

  11. Life extension of German nuclear power plants only with the consent of the Federal Council? The importance and extent of the need for consent to an amendment to the German Atomic Energy Act

    Schneider, Horst

    2010-01-01

    In its coalition agreement of October 26, 2009, the new German federal government plans ''to extend the service life of German nuclear power plants while, at the same time, complying with the strict German and international safety standards.'' This has triggered a debate not only about (nuclear) energy, as in the past election campaign in the summer of 2009, but also about the constitutional law issue whether an amendment to the Atomic Energy Act resulting in longer operating life of nuclear power plants required the consent of the Federal Council (the ''Bundesrat,'' the second chamber of parliament). After the election to the state parliament in North Rhine-Westphalia on May 9, 2010, majority in the Federal Council changed. As a consequence, no consent to an amendment to the Atomic Energy Act must be expected. In view of the large number of recent statements about constitutional law in opinions for various federal and ministerial accounts as well as firms and associations, the outline by R. Scholz in the May issue of atw 2010 will be followed in this issue by the key points of examination of the need for consent, under aspects of constitutional law, and an attempt will be made to explain the evaluations underlying the generation of a legal concept about these items. The decision by the German Federal Constitutional Court of May 4, 2010, published on June 11, 2010, plays a major role in this respect because it established clarity in some important aspects of a legal subject matter in the field of state admini-stration on behalf of the federation, albeit in the field of air traffic law, not nuclear law. However, the structures of the norms in the German Basic Law (Art. 87c and Art. 87d, para.2) to be applied are almost identical. The energy policy and energy economy aspects of a plant life extension are considered along with the option of an appeal to the Federal Constitutional Court against any plant life extension. Finally, the key findings are summarized briefly

  12. Health status, renal function, and quality of life after multiorgan failure and acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy

    Faulhaber-Walter R

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Robert Faulhaber-Walter,1,2 Sebastian Scholz,1,3 Herrmann Haller,1 Jan T Kielstein,1,* Carsten Hafer1,4,* 1Department of Renal and Hypertensive Disease, Medical School Hannover, Hannover, Germany; 2Facharztzentrum Aarberg, Waldshut-Tiengen, Germany; 3Sanitaetsversorgungszentrum Wunstorf, Wunstorf, Germany; 4HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt, Erfurt, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI in need of renal replacement therapy (RRT may have a protracted and often incomplete rehabilitation. Their long-term outcome has rarely been investigated. Study design: Survivors of the HANnover Dialysis OUTcome (HANDOUT study were evaluated after 5 years for survival, health status, renal function, and quality of life (QoL. The HANDOUT study had examinded mortality and renal recovery of patients with AKI receiving either standard extendend or intensified dialysis after multi organ failure. Results: One hundred fifty-six former HANDOUT participants were analyzed. In-hospital mortality was 56.4%. Five-year survival after AKI/RRT was 40.1% (86.5% if discharged from hospital. Main causes of death were cardiovascular complications and sepsis. A total of 19 survivors presented to the outpatient department of our clinic and had good renal recovery (mean estimated glomerular filtration rate 72.5±30 mL/min/1.73 m2; mean proteinuria 89±84 mg/d. One person required maintenance dialysis. Seventy-nine percent of the patients had a pathological kidney sonomorphology. The Charlson comorbidity score was 2.2±1.4 and adjusted for age 3.3±2.1 years. Numbers of comorbid conditions averaged 2.38±1.72 per patient (heart failure [52%] > chronic kidney disease/myocardial infarction [each 29%]. Median 36-item short form health survey (SF-36™ index was 0.657 (0.69 physical health/0.66 mental health. Quality-adjusted life-years after 5 years were 3.365. Conclusion: Mortality after severe AKI is higher than

  13. Web-Based Alcohol Intervention: Study of Systematic Attrition of Heavy Drinkers.

    Radtke, Theda; Ostergaard, Mathias; Cooke, Richard; Scholz, Urte

    2017-06-28

    alcohol consumption appears to be a key factor of the dropout rate in a Web-based alcohol intervention study. Thus, it is important to develop strategies to keep participants who are at high risk in Web-based interventions. ©Theda Radtke, Mathias Ostergaard, Richard Cooke, Urte Scholz. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 28.06.2017.

  14. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2001 Annual Report.

    Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Kettle Falls, WA)

    2002-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribe form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery and serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native/indigenous stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin Waters. Monitoring and evaluation is preformed by the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program. From 1988 to 1998, the principle sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The most recent information from

  15. A systematic investigation into b values prior to coming large earthquakes

    Nanjo, K.; Yoshida, A.

    2017-12-01

    The Gutenberg-Richter law for frequency-magnitude distribution of earthquakes is now well established in seismology. The b value, the slope of the distribution, is supposed to reflect heterogeneity of seismogenic region (e.g. Mogi 1962) and development of interplate coupling in subduction zone (e.g. Nanjo et al., 2012; Tormann et al. 2015). In the laboratory as well as in the Earth's crust, the b value is known to be inversely dependent on differential stresses (Scholz 1968, 2015). In this context, the b value could serve as a stress meter to help locate asperities, the highly-stressed patches, in fault planes where large rupture energy is released (e.g. Schorlemmer & Wiemer 2005). However, it still remains uncertain whether the b values of events prior to coming large earthquakes are always low significantly. To clarify this issue, we conducted a systematic investigation into b values prior to large earthquakes in the Japanese Mainland. Since no physical definition of mainshock, foreshock, and aftershock is known, we simply investigated b values of the events with magnitudes larger than the lower-cutoff magnitude, Mc, prior to earthquakes equal to or larger than a threshold magnitude, Mth, where Mth>Mc. Schorlemmer et al. (2005) showed that the b value for different fault types differs significantly, which is supposed to reflect the feature that the fracture stress depends on fault types. Therefore, we classified fault motions into normal, strike-slip, and thrust types based on the mechanism solution of earthquakes, and computed b values of events associated with each fault motion separately. We found that the target events (M≥Mth) and the events that occurred prior to the target events both show a common systematic change in b: normal faulting events have the highest b values, thrust events the lowest and strike-slip events intermediate values. Moreover, we found that the b values for the prior events (M≥Mc) are significantly lower than the b values for the

  16. Variable RBE in proton therapy: comparison of different model predictions and their influence on clinical-like scenarios

    Giovannini, Giulia; Böhlen, Till; Cabal, Gonzalo; Bauer, Julia; Tessonnier, Thomas; Frey, Kathrin; Debus, Jürgen; Mairani, Andrea; Parodi, Katia

    2016-01-01

    In proton radiation therapy a constant relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1 is usually assumed. However, biological experiments have evidenced RBE dependencies on dose level, proton linear energy transfer (LET) and tissue type. This work compares the predictions of three of the main radio-biological models proposed in the literature by Carabe-Fernandez, Wedenberg, Scholz and coworkers. Using the chosen models, a spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) as well as two exemplary clinical cases (single field and two fields) for cranial proton irradiation, all delivered with state-of-the-art pencil-beam scanning, have been analyzed in terms of absorbed dose, dose-averaged LET (LET D ), RBE-weighted dose (D RBE ) and biological range shift distributions. In the systematic comparison of RBE predictions by the three models we could show different levels of agreement depending on (α/β) x and LET values. The SOBP study emphasizes the variation of LET D and RBE not only as a function of depth but also of lateral distance from the central beam axis. Application to clinical-like scenario shows consistent discrepancies from the values obtained for a constant RBE of 1.1, when using a variable RBE scheme for proton irradiation in tissues with low (α/β) x , regardless of the model. Biological range shifts of 0.6– 2.4 mm (for high (α/β) x ) and 3.0 – 5.4 mm (for low (α/β) x ) were found from the fall-off analysis of individual profiles of RBE-weighted fraction dose along the beam penetration depth. Although more experimental evidence is needed to validate the accuracy of the investigated models and their input parameters, their consistent trend suggests that their main RBE dependencies (dose, LET and (α/β) x ) should be included in treatment planning systems. In particular, our results suggest that simpler models based on the linear-quadratic formalism and LET D might already be sufficient to reproduce important RBE dependencies for re-evaluation of plans optimized with

  17. Impact of the organic coating on nanoparticles stability and reactivity

    Gelabert, A.; Sivry, Y.; Ould Boualy, L.; Roselyne, F.; Juillot, F.; Menguy, N.; Benedetti, M. F.

    2010-12-01

    hydrophobic-coated NPs at higher concentrations, the isotherm sorption shape shifts from a Langmuir type to a linear increase, thus indicating an important change in the sorption mechanism. To explain these differences in sorption as a function of the coating properties, the NPs aggregation state has been investigated for all three suspensions, and this parameter appears to be one of the major controls for the coated NPs sorbing properties. These physico-chemical aspects of manufactured NPs behaviour in natural systems constitute an essential step with great implications for ecotoxicological studies. Gottshalk F., Sonderer T., Scholz R.W., and Nowack B., Environmental Science and Technology, 2009, 43, 9216-9222

  18. Fast radio bursts and their possible neutron star origins

    Hessels, J. W. T.

    2017-12-01

    The discovery of the ‘Lorimer Burst’, a little over a decade ago, ignited renewed interest in searching for short-duration radio transients (Lorimer et al 2007 Science 318 777). This event is now considered to be the first established Fast Radio Burst (FRB), which is a class of millisecond-duration radio transients (Thornton et al 2013 Science 341 53). The large dispersive delays observed in FRBs distinguish them from the individual bright pulses from Galactic pulsars, and suggests that they originate deep in extragalactic space. Amazingly, FRBs are not rare: the implied event rate ranges up to many thousands of events per sky, per day (Champion et al 2016 MNRAS 460 L30). The fact that only two dozen FRBs have been discovered to date is a consequence of the limited sensitivity and field of view of current radio telescopes (Petroff et al 2016 PASA 33 e045). The precise localization of FRB 121102, the first and currently only FRB observed to repeat (Spitler et al 2014 ApJ 790 101; Spitler et al 2016 Nature 531 202; Scholz et al 2016 ApJ 833 177), has led to the unambiguous identification of its host galaxy and thus proven its extragalactic origin and large energy scale (Chatterjee et al 2017 Nature 541 58; Tendulkar et al 2017 ApJL 834 L7; Marcote et al 2017 ApJL 834 L8). It remains unclear, however, whether all FRBs are capable of repeating [many appear far less active (Petroff et al 2015 MNRAS 454 457)] or whether FRB 121102 implies that there are multiple sub-classes. Regardless, the repetitive nature of FRB 121102 and its localization to within a star-forming region in the host galaxy (Bassa et al 2017 ApJL 843 L8) imply that the bursts might originate from an exceptionally powerful neutron star - one necessarily quite unlike any we have observed in the Milky Way. In these proceedings, I give a very brief introduction to the FRB phenomenon and focus primarily on the insights that FRB 121102 has provided thus far.

  19. University-level Non-proliferation and Safeguards Education and Human Capital Development Activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Bachner K. M.; Pepper, S.; Gomera, J.; Einwechter, M.; Toler, L. T.

    2016-07-24

    BNL has offered Nuclear Nonproliferation, Safeguards and Security in the 21st Century,? referred to as NNSS, every year since 2009 for graduate students in technical and policy fields related to nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation. The course focuses on relevant policy issues, in addition to technical components, and is part of a larger NGSI short course initiative that includes separate courses that are delivered at three other national laboratories and NNSA headquarters. [SCHOLZ and ROSENTHAL] The course includes lectures from esteemed nonproliferation experts, tours of various BNL facilities and laboratories, and in-field and table-top exercises on both technical and policy subjects. Topics include the history of the Treaty on the Non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and other relevant treaties, the history of and advances in international nuclear safeguards, current relevant political situations in countries such as Iran, Iraq, and the Democratic Peoples? Republic of Korea (DPRK), nuclear science and technology, instrumentation and techniques used for verification activities, and associated research and development. The students conduct a mock Design Information Verification (DIV) at BNL?s decommissioned Medical Research Reactor. The capstone of the course includes a series of student presentations in which students act as policy advisors and provide recommendations in response to scenarios involving a current nonproliferation related event that are prepared by the course organizers. ?The course is open to domestic and foreign students, and caters to students in, entering, or recently having completed graduate school. Interested students must complete an application and provide a resume and a statement describing their interest in the course. Eighteen to 22 students attend annually; 165 students have completed the course to date. A stipend helps to defray students? travel and subsistence expenses. In 2015, the course was shortened from three weeks to

  20. MULTIDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH ON SHOREA JAVANICA

    E.F. TORQUEBIAU*

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available The plantations of Shorea javanica K.&V. (Dipterocarpaceae in the district of Krui (Lampung province, Sumatra; see Fig. 1 for situation map and main climatic data are remarkable examples of successful land development after deforestation and shifting cultivation which was mentioned in the Indonesian forestry literature as far back as 1937 (Rappard 1937. This tree is a white Meranti which is locally found in the natural forest and tapped for its beautiful, crystalline resin, or "damar". The local name of the tree is "Damar Mata Kucing", which means "cat's eye resin". One of the traditional cultivation systems in the area is shifting cultivation ("ladang": rain-fed rice is grown during one or two years and then coffee, other crops, and damar trees are planted to convert the ladang into a permanent agricultural field. The damar trees close their canopies above the other crops after some years and can be tapped for resin after about 15 years and during a rotation of approximately 50 years. They constitute dense stands of 40—50 m high trees called "kebun damar" (damar gardens which look like a natural rain forest. Seeds for planting stock were formerly obtained from the surrounding natural forest but nowadays they come from the pre-existing plantations which cover an area of approximately 1000 ha (Scholz 1983. Fruiting seasons are occasional and irregular, often several years spaces, so that the farmers manage large nurseries of seedlings which can be maintained for several years and transplanted to the plantations when needed. Transplantation of bare-rooted seedlings is easy. Other useful trees (e.g. clove trees, are simultaneously planted in the ladang at the time of planting the damar trees, so that, although the latter largely dominate, the resulting stand is a multi-layered, mixed one, comprising of different useful plants (fruits, vegetables, medicinal plants, etc.. The whole cultivation system, from the shifting cultivation stage to the

  1. Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program : Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d’Alene Reservation : 2007 Annual Report.

    Firehammer, Jon A.; Vitale, Angelo J.; Hallock, Stephanie A. [Coeur d' Alene Tribe Department of Natural Resources Fisheries Program

    2009-09-08

    Historically, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe depended on runs of anadromous salmon and steelhead along the Spokane River and Hangman Creek, as well as resident and adfluvial forms of trout and char in Coeur d'Alene Lake, for survival. Dams constructed in the early 1900s on the Spokane River in the City of Spokane and at Little Falls (further downstream) were the first dams that initially cut-off the anadromous fish runs from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These fisheries were further removed following the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams on the Columbia River. Together, these actions forced the Tribe to rely solely on the resident fish resources of Coeur d'Alene Lake for their subsistence needs. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe is estimated to have historically harvested around 42,000 westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) per year (Scholz et al. 1985). In 1967, Mallet (1969) reported that 3,329 cutthroat trout were harvested from the St. Joe River, and a catch of 887 was reported from Coeur d'Alene Lake. This catch is far less than the 42,000 fish per year the tribe harvested historically. Today, only limited opportunities exist to harvest cutthroat trout in the Coeur d'Alene Basin. It appears that a suite of factors have contributed to the decline of cutthroat trout stocks within Coeur d'Alene Lake and its tributaries (Mallet 1969; Scholz et al. 1985; Lillengreen et al. 1993). These factors included the construction of Post Falls Dam in 1906, major changes in land cover types, impacts from agricultural activities, and introduction of exotic fish species. The decline in native cutthroat trout populations in the Coeur d'Alene basin has been a primary focus of study by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's Fisheries and Water Resources programs since 1990. The overarching goals for recovery have been to restore the cutthroat trout populations to levels that allow for subsistence harvest, maintain genetic

  2. Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation; Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water, and Wildlife Program, REVISED 2002 Annual Report.

    Vitale, Angelo; Lamb, Dave; Scott, Jason

    2004-04-01

    Historically, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe depended on runs of anadromous salmon and steelhead along the Spokane River and Hangman Creek, as well as resident and adfluvial forms of trout and char in Coeur d'Alene Lake, for survival. Dams constructed in the early 1900s on the Spokane River in the City of Spokane and at Little Falls (further downstream) were the first dams that initially cut-off the anadromous fish runs from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These fisheries were further removed by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams on the Columbia River. Together, these actions forced the Tribe to rely solely on the resident fish resources of Coeur d'Alene Lake (Staff Communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe is estimated to have historically harvested around 42,000 westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki) per year (Scholz et al. 1985). In 1967, Mallet (1969) reported that 3,329 cutthroat were harvested from the St. Joe River, and a catch of 887 was reported from Coeur d'Alene Lake. This catch is far less than the 42,000 fish per year the tribe harvested historically. Today, only limited opportunities exist to harvest cutthroat trout in the Coeur d'Alene Basin. The declines in native salmonid fish populations, particularly cutthroat and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), in the Coeur d'Alene basin have been the focus of study by the Coeur d' Alene Tribe's Fisheries and Water Resources programs since 1990. It appears that there are a number of factors contributing to the decline of resident salmonid stocks within Coeur d'Alene Lake and its tributaries (Ellis 1932; Oien 1957; Mallet 1969; Scholz et. al. 1985, Lillengreen et. al. 1993). These factors include: construction of Post Falls Dam in 1906; major changes in land cover types, agricultural activities and introduction of exotic fish species. Over 100 years of mining activities in the Coeur d'Alene River drainage have had devastating

  3. Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 2002 Annual Report.

    Vitale, Angelo, Lamb, Dave; Scott, Jason

    2003-12-01

    Historically, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe depended on runs of anadromous salmon and steelhead along the Spokane River and Hangman Creek, as well as resident and adfluvial forms of trout and char in Coeur d'Alene Lake, for survival. Dams constructed in the early 1900s on the Spokane River in the City of Spokane and at Little Falls (further downstream) were the first dams that initially cut-off the anadromous fish runs from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These fisheries were further removed by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams on the Columbia River. Together, these actions forced the Tribe to rely solely on the resident fish resources of Coeur d'Alene Lake (Staff Communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe is estimated to have historically harvested around 42,000 westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki) per year (Scholz et al. 1985). In 1967, Mallet (1969) reported that 3,329 cutthroat were harvested from the St. Joe River, and a catch of 887 was reported from Coeur d'Alene Lake. This catch is far less than the 42,000 fish per year the tribe harvested historically. Today, only limited opportunities exist to harvest cutthroat trout in the Coeur d'Alene Basin. The declines in native salmonid fish populations, particularly cutthroat and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), in the Coeur d'Alene basin have been the focus of study by the Coeur d' Alene Tribe's Fisheries and Water Resources programs since 1990. It appears that there are a number of factors contributing to the decline of resident salmonid stocks within Coeur d'Alene Lake and its tributaries (Ellis 1932; Oien 1957; Mallet 1969; Scholz et. al. 1985, Lillengreen et. al. 1993). These factors include: construction of Post Falls Dam in 1906; major changes in land cover types, agricultural activities and introduction of exotic fish species. Over 100 years of mining activities in the Coeur d'Alene River drainage have had devastating

  4. Bulk-friction modeling of afterslip and the modified Omori law

    Wennerberg, Leif; Sharp, Robert V.

    1997-01-01

    Afterslip data from the Superstition Hills fault in southern California, a creep event on the same fault, the modified Omori law, and cumulative moments from aftershocks of the 1957 Aleutian Islands earthquake all indicate that the original formulation by Dieterich (1981) [Constitutive properties of faults with simulated gouge. AGU, Geophys. Monogr. 24, 103–120] for friction evolution is more appropriate for systems far from instability than the commonly used approximation developed by Ruina (1983) [Slip instability and state variable friction laws. J. Geophys. Res. 88, 10359–10370] to study instability. The mathematical framework we use to test the friction models is a one-dimensional, massless spring-slider under the simplifying assumption, proposed by Scholz (1990) [The Mechanics of Earthquakes and Faulting. Cambridge University Press] and used by Marone et al. (1991) [On the mechanics of earthquake afterslip. J. Geophys. Res., 96: 8441–8452], that the state variable takes on its velocity-dependent steady-state value throughout motion in response to a step in stress. This assumption removes explicit state-variable dependence from the model, obviating the need to consider state-variable evolution equations. Anti-derivatives of the modified Omori law fit our data very well and are very good approximate solutions to our model equations. A plausible friction model with Omori-law solutions used by Wesson (1988) [Dynamics of fault creep. J. Geophys. Res. 93, 8929–8951] to model fault creep and generalized by Rice (1983) [Constitutive relations for fault slip and earthquake instabilities. Pure Appl. Geophys. 121, 443–475] to a rate-and-state variable friction model yields exactly Omori's law with exponents greater than 1, but yields unstable solutions for Omori exponents less than 1. We estimate from the Dieterich formulation the dimensionless parameter a∗ which is equal to the product of the nominal coefficient of friction and the more commonly reported

  5. The Wood-Growth-and-Burial Process (WGBP) Permanent Wood Sequestration to Solve the Global Carbon Dioxide Problem

    Scholz, F.; Hasse, U.

    2008-12-01

    , or/and via very slightly increased energy prices. It is a great advantage of the WGBP that it will not be competitive with the agriculture, as the areas most suitable for the process are not attractive for the growth of food or energy plants. The WGBP does not need fertilizers and irrigation, and it does not need genetically engineered plants. It is completely ecological and environmentally friendly. The WGBP can be performed at almost any place of the world, and it is not necessary to perform the process at the sites of carbon dioxide emission. The WGBP will contribute to a fair international trade. The WGBP will be equally available to all countries and societies of the world. There is no discrimination of poorer or less advanced societies. The WGBP will produce wood deposits for future generation, which once may become sources for biomass processing technologies, be it for the production of chemicals of energy. The burial sites will be saving banks of precious material. Ref.: F. Scholz, U. Hasse: ChemSusChem 1 (2008) 381-384 greifswald.de/~analytik/

  6. Bulk-friction modeling of afterslip and the modified Omori law

    Wennerberg, Leif; Sharp, Robert V.

    1997-08-01

    Afterslip data from the Superstition Hills fault in southern California, a creep event on the same fault, the modified Omori law, and cumulative moments from aftershocks of the 1957 Aleutian Islands earthquake all indicate that the original formulation by Dieterich (1981) [Constitutive properties of faults with simulated gouge. AGU, Geophys. Monogr. 24, 103-120] for friction evolution is more appropriate for systems far from instability than the commonly used approximation developed by Ruina (1983) [Slip instability and state variable friction laws. J. Geophys. Res. 88, 10359-10370] to study instability. The mathematical framework we use to test the friction models is a one-dimensional, massless spring-slider under the simplifying assumption, proposed by Scholz (1990) [The Mechanics of Earthquakes and Faulting. Cambridge University Press] and used by Marone et al. (1991) [On the mechanics of earthquake afterslip. J. Geophys. Res., 96: 8441-8452], that the state variable takes on its velocity-dependent steady-state value throughout motion in response to a step in stress. This assumption removes explicit state-variable dependence from the model, obviating the need to consider state-variable evolution equations. Anti-derivatives of the modified Omori law fit our data very well and are very good approximate solutions to our model equations. A plausible friction model with Omori-law solutions used by Wesson (1988) [Dynamics of fault creep. J. Geophys. Res. 93, 8929-8951] to model fault creep and generalized by Rice (1983) [Constitutive relations for fault slip and earthquake instabilities. Pure Appl. Geophys. 121, 443-475] to a rate-and-state variable friction model yields exactly Omori's law with exponents greater than 1, but yields unstable solutions for Omori exponents less than 1. We estimate from the Dieterich formulation the dimensionless parameter a∗ which is equal to the product of the nominal coefficient of friction and the more commonly reported friction

  7. Geological data acquisition for site characterisation at Olkiluoto: a framework for the phase of underground investigations

    Milnes, A.G.; Aaltonen, I.; Kemppainen, K.; Mattila, J.; Wikstroem, L.; Front, K.; Kaerki, A.; Gehoer, S.; Paulamaeki, S.; Paananen, M.; Ahokas, T.

    2007-05-01

    , have already provided a broad basis of experience for detailed site characterisation. In addition to the lithological data acquisition, other areas of geological data acquisition are also treated here in more detail, particularly with respect to classification schemes, parameterization, and qualitative characterisation for increasing geological site understanding. Important areas which are discussed in detail include: systematic characterisation of foliation and related small-scale heterogeneities, according to type, orientation and degree of development, including the assessment of their rock mechanics significance; identification and description of hydrothermal and other rock alteration phenomena; identification and parameterisation of deformation zone intersections, and their classification in terms of the scientifically established Sibson-Scholz fault zone model (brittle, semi-brittle, low-grade ductile and high-grade ductile deformation zone types); detailed consideration of brittle deformation zone architecture, with particular focus on the characterisation of the core and damage zones, and kinematic parameters; classification and parameterisation of individual fractures, as a background for systematic geological studies as well as systematic data acquisition for rock quality estimation (Q-system) and Discrete Fracture Network modelling (orig.)

  8. EDITORIAL: The Fifth International Workshop and Summer School on Plasma Physics

    2006-04-01

    , Russia, the US, China, South Korea and India (as of March 2006). It will take several years to accomplish this important task. There is no doubt that the success depends not only on funding but also on enthusiastic people willing to contribute with their skills and knowledge. Young scientists and engineers must be enrolled to the programme and trained in various disciplines of fusion science and technology. There are various education schemes and work programmes. Organization of summer schools on fusion-related plasma physics is an important part of the training process. Several schools are organized annually or every second year in Europe. Fusion-related science is so vast that it is impossible to cover all topics during an event lasting for one or two weeks. Therefore, each school has its distinctive features and focuses on a selected group of issues to be addressed in depth. This also applies to the Workshop and Summer School on Plasma Physics in Kudowa Zdrój (Poland) that, has been organised annually since 2001. It was initiated by Dr Marek Scholz with the help of his colleagues from the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion (IPPLM) in Warsaw. The idea was to create a forum for students mainly from Eastern Europe to learn and discuss subjects in general plasma physics and dense magnetized media, predominantly in plasma focus devices. Over the years the school has matured and created a clear profile. A unique feature has always been to accommodate in the programme not only tutorials delivered by invited senior scientists but also presentations prepared by the students. In June 2005 the 5th Workshop and Summer School on Plasma Physics was held under the heading 'Towards Fusion Energy: Plasma Physics, Diagnostics, Applications'. There were 59 participants, including 44 students, coming from plasma physics and material research laboratories in 17 countries: Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Georgia, Iran, Italy, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Russia

  9. EDITORIAL: Non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors Non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors

    Han, Jung; Kneissl, Michael

    2012-02-01

    topics including growth and heteroepitaxy, bulk GaN substrates, theory and modelling, optical properties, laser diodes and LEDs as well as transport properties and electronics. Farrell et al review materials and growth issues for high-performance non- and semipolar light-emitting devices, and Scholz provides an overview of heteroepitaxial growth of semipolar GaN. Okada et al review growth mechanisms of non- and semipolar GaN layers on patterned sapphire substrates, and Vennéguès discusses defect reduction methods for heteroepitaxially grown non- and semipolar III-nitride films. Leung et al explain how kinetic Wulff plots can be used to design and control non-polar and semipolar GaN heteroepitaxy, and a contribution by Sawaki et al explores the impurity incorporation in (1-101) GaN grown on Si substrates. In the area of bulk crystal growth Kucharski et al review non- and semipolar GaN substrates by ammonothermal growth, and Chichibu et al discuss the challenges for epitaxial growth of InGaN on free-standing m-plane GaN substrates. Calculation of semipolar orientations for wurtzitic semiconductor heterostructures and their application to nitrides and oxides are reviewed by Bigenwald et al, and Ito et al present an ab initio approach to reconstruction, adsorption, and incorporation on GaN surfaces. Finally, the theoretical description of non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductor quantum-well structures is presented by Ahn et al. In a discussion of the optical properties, Kisin et al discuss the effect of the quantum well population on the optical characteristics of polar, semipolar and non-polar III-nitride light emitters, and Jönen et al investigate the indium incorporation and optical properties of non- and semipolar GaInN QW structures. Wernicke et al explore the emission wavelength of polar, non-polar, and semipolar InGaN quantum wells and the incorporation of indium. In a contribution by Melo et al, the gain in polar and non-polar/semipolar gallium

  10. Energy from waste. Vol. 2; Energie aus Abfall. Bd. 2

    Thome-Kozmiensky, K.J.; Beckmann, M.

    2007-07-01

    In the book under consideration, the thermal treatment in waste incinerators, in industrial power stations and in coal-fired power stations is in the foreground. Possibilities of gasification are described. The chapter 'Developments of thermal waste treatment' consists of the following chapter: (a) Maximal size of waste incineration plants (Johannes J.E. Martin); (b) Trends and highlights of the thermal waste treatment in Europe (Martin Brunner); (c) Utilization of waste heat from Vienna waste incinerators for the operation of a district cooling grid - Effects on the primary energy efficiency of district heating and district cooling in Vienna (Franz Schindelar, Alexander Wallisch); (d) Evolutionary plant development based on experiences (Hans-Peter Buechner); (e) Effects of increased chlorine freights at the cocombustion of secondary fuels at the site of the brown coal fired power station Jaenschwalde (Frank Mielke, Andreas Sparmann, Sven Kappa); (f) Refuse-fueled power stations and waste incinerators - different plant technology? (Hendrik Seeger); (g) Generation of fuel gas from high calorific wastes (Udo Hellwig, Michael Beyer); (h) Strength testing of steam vessels with increased testing pressure (Wolfgang Rossmaier). The chapter 'Energy efficiency of waste incinerators' consists the following contributions: (a) Evaluation of energy efficiency in plants of thermal waste treatment; (b) Scientific-technical and juridical rationality - a contradiction? Comments to the judgement o the VGH Baden-Wuerttemberg according to waste incineration (Bodo A. Baars and Adolf Nottrodt); (c) Determination of the energy efficiency in plants of thermal waste incineration - To the difficulties of equivalent values and calculation of the calorific value (Michael Beckmann, Reinhard Scholz). The chapter 'Optimization of the plant technology' contains the following contributions: (a) Stay a while - Considerations according to the first tank of thermal waste

  11. EDITORIAL: Nanodevices come to life Nanodevices come to life

    Demming, Anna

    2011-03-01

    -nanowire field-effect-transistor biosensor [8] and have applied the device to real-time electrical detection of electronic signals during and after binding with a target protein. High resolution imaging and sensing techniques have seen enormous developments that have moved the field from point measurements and still image collection to the direct measurement of biomolecular dynamics and nanoscale motion pictures. The field continues to buzz with new ideas, promising many further exciting advances. As Thomas Edison, inventor and a pioneer in motion pictures, once said: 'to have a great idea, have a lot of them' [9]. References [1] Lang H P, Hegner M, Meyer E and Gerber Ch 2002 Nanotechnology 13 R29-36 [2] Binnig G, Quate C F and Gerber Ch 1986 Appl. Phys. Lett. 56 930 [3] Yokokawa M, Wada C, Ando T, Sakai N, Yagi A, Yoshimura S H, Takeyasu K 2006 EMBO 25 4567-76 [4] Picco L M, Bozec L, Ulcinas A, Engledew D J, Antognozzi M, Horton M A and Miles M J 2007 Nanotechnology 18 044030 [5] Montemagno C and Bachand G 1999 Nanotechnology 10 225-31 [6] Scholz T, J Vicary A, Jeppesen G M, Ulcinas A, Hörber J K H and Antognozzi M 2011 Nanotechnology 22 095707 [7] Minary-Jolandan M and Yu M-F 2009 Nanotechnology 20 085706 [8] Kim K S, Lee H-S, Yang J-A, Jo M-H, Hahn S K 2009 Nanotechnology 20 235501 [9] Olsen T A B 2011 www.knowledgehouse.info/bio_edison.html

  12. Chronicle of a Death Foretold

    2007-05-01

    more dust production and mass ejection: in these phases indeed the amount of dust is significantly higher than in the others. After this intense matter production and ejection the star continues its pulsation and when it reaches the maximum luminosity, it displays a much more expanded dust shell. This clearly supports a strong connection between the Mira pulsation and the dust production and expulsion. Furthermore, the astronomers found that grains of aluminum oxide - also called corundum - constitute most of S Ori's dust shell: the grain size is estimated to be of the order of 10 millionths of a centimetre, that is one thousand times smaller than the diameter of a human hair. "We know one chapter of the secret life of a Mira star, but much more can be learned in the near future, when we add near-infrared interferometry with the AMBER instrument on the VLTI to our (already broad) observational approach," said Wittkowski. More Information The research presented here is reported in a paper in press in the journal Astronomy and Astrophysics ("The Mira variable S Ori: Relationships between the photosphere, molecular layer, dust shell, and SiO maser shell at 4 epochs", by M. Wittkowski et al.). It is available in PDF format from the publisher's web site. The team consists of Markus Wittkowski (ESO), David A. Boboltz (U.S. Naval Observatory, USA), Keiichi Ohnaka and Thomas Driebe (MPIfR Bonn, Germany), and Michael Scholz (University of Heidelberg, Germany and University of Sydney, Australia).

  13. Triticale (XTriticosecale W.) Heavy Metal Upptake as a Possibility of Food Chain Pollution in a Long-Term Field Experiment in Hungary

    László Phd, M., ,, Dr.

    2009-04-01

    mixes and crackers due to a savory, nutty flavor. Etanol plants will pay a premium for triticale over barley since it has more starch and no hull, making alcohol production more efficient. Germany, France, China, Poland and Hungary account for nearly 90 percent of world triticale production (Donald et al. 2001). Heavy metals are dangerous because they tend to bioaccumulate in food chain. Bioaccumulation means an increase in the concentration of a chemical in a biological organism over time, compared to the chemical`s concentration in they environment. Compounds accumulate in living things any time they are taken up and stored faster han they are broken down (metabolize) or extreted. Crops have ability to heavy metal accumulation from fertilizers such as Cd, Pb, Cu, Zn etc. to a different degree (Lee et al. 2001, Scholz and Ellerbrock 2004). The main purposes of this study was to determine the triticale toxic element upptake by the soil, triticale leaf+straw and grain element concentrations on acid sandy soil in a long-term field fertilization experiment at Nyirlugos, Hungary in 1998. Material and Methods: Field experiments were carried out on an acidic sandy brown forest soil at Nyírlugos in East-Hungary from 1962 to 2005. Soil geochemical parameters were as follow: humus 0.6%, pH (H2O) 5.8, pH (KCl) 4.6, total N 32.8 mg/kg, AL (ammonium lactate soluble)- P2O5 43 mg/kg, AL-K2O 52 mg/kg. The experiments involved 32 NPKCaMg treatments in 4 replications giving a total of 128 plots. N levels were 0, 50, 100, 150 kg/ha/yr, P2O5 and K2O 0, 60, 120, 180 kg/ha/yr, CaCO3 0, 250, 500, 1000 kg/ha/yr and MgCO3 doses were 0, 140, 280 kg/ha/yr. Plot brutto size was 50 m2. Composite soil samples consisting of 25 subsamples collected at before flowering time from the ploughed layer of each plot. The so-called "mobile" fraction was extracted by ammonium-acetate+EDTA (AAc+EDTA, Lakanen and Ervio 1971) and the heavy metal determination by ICP-AES technic. Plant leaf+straw and seed

  14. Human-induced environmental degradation during Anthropocene in Turkey

    Efe, Recep; Curebal, Isa; Soykan, Abdullah; Sönmez, Suleyman

    2015-04-01

    .; Andreae, M.O.; Kadereit, J.W.; Esper, J.; Scholz, D.; Pöschl, U.; Jacob, D.E.; Schöne, B.R.; Schreg, R.; Vött, A.; Jordan, D.; Lelievld, J.: Weller, C.G.; Alt, K.W.; Gaudzinski-Windheuser, S.; Bruhn, K.C.; Tost, H.; Sirocko, F.; Crutzen, P.J. (2013), The Paleoanthropocene - The beginnings of anthropogenic environmental change, Anthropocene, 3: 83-88. Hoang, H.T.T.; Vanacker, V.; Van Rompaey, A.; Vu, K.C.; Nguyen, A.T. (2014), Changing human-landscape interactions after development of tourism in the nothern Vietnamese Highlands, Anthropocene, 5: 42-51 Matteo, G.; Lingua, E.; Marzano, R.; Urbinati, C.; Bhuju, D.; Carrer, M. (2014), Human interactions with forest landscape in the Khumbu valley, Nepal, Anthropocene, 6: 39-47 Sanderson, E.W.; Jaiteh, M.; Levy, M.A.; Redford, K.H.; Wannebo, A.V.; Woolmer, G. (2002), The Human Footprint and the Last of the Wild. Bioscience 52: (10).891-904 Steffen, W.; Persson, A.; Deutsch, L.; Zalasiewicz, J.; Williams, M.; Richardson, K.; Crumley, C.; Crutzen, P.; Folke, C.; Gordon, L.; Molina, M.; Ramanathan, V., Rockström, J.; Scheffer, M.; Schellnhuber, H.J.; Svedin, U. (2011), The Anthropocene: From Global Change to Planetary Stewardship, AMBIO, 40: 739-761 Web-1 http://www.anthropocene.info/en/home Zalasiewicz, J.; Williams, M.; Smith, A.; L. Barry, T.; L. Coe, A.; R. Bown, P.; Brenchley, P.; Cantrill, D.; Gale, A.; Gibbard, P.; Gregory, F.J.; Hounslow, M.W.; Kerr, A.C.; Pearson, P.; Knox, R.; Powell, J.; Waters, C.; Marshall, J.; Oates, M.; Rawson, P.; Stone, P. (2008), Are we now living in the Anthropocene? GSA Today 18 (2): 4-8.

  15. An estimation of Central Iberian Peninsula atmospheric δ13C and water δD in the Upper Cretaceous using pyrolysis compound specific isotopic analysis (Py-CSIA) of a fossil conifer.

    González-Pérez, José A.; Jiménez-Morillo, Nicasio T.; De la Rosa, José M.; Almendros, Gonzalo; González-Vila, Francisco J.

    2015-04-01

    /alkene series in the range C24-C29 (δD = -124.44±5.2‰). This was taken as a proxy to infer the original H isotopic signal of water in the area in the Upper Cretaceous. Poole et al. (2004) proposed that δDpalaeowarter= δDC24-C29 n-alkanes + 100 giving a value for plaeowater δD = -24.44±5.2‰. This indicates that 75 Mya our plant probably uptake deuterium enriched rain water that again points to warm growing environmental conditions. (1) Gómez, B.; Martín-Closas C.; Brale G.; Solé de Porta N.; Thévenard F.; Guignard G. Paleontology 2002 45, 997-1036. (2) Nguyen Tu, T.T.; Kvaček, J.; Uličnỷ, D.; Bocherens, H.; Mariotti, A.; Broutin, J. Palaeogeogr. Palaeoclimatol. Palaeoecol. 2002 183, 43-70. (3) Almendros, G.; Álvarez-Ramis, C.; Polo, A. Revista de la Real Academia de Ciencias Exactas, Físicas y Naturales 1982 76, 285-302. (4) Dabin, B. Chah. ORSTOM Ser. Pedol. 1976 4, 287-297. (5) Schnitzer, M.; Khan, S.U. Humic Substances in the Environment. Marcel Dekker Inc. 1972, New York, N.Y. (6) Dorado, E.; Polo. A. An. Edafol. Agrobiol. 1976 55, 723-732. (7) Bocherens, H.; Friis, E.M.; Mariotti, A.; Pedersen, K.R. Lethaia 1993 26, 347-358. (8) Nguyen Tu, T.T.; Bocherens, H.; Mariotti, A.; Baudin, F.; Pons, D.; Broutin, J.; Derenne, S.; Largeau C. Palaeogeogr. Palaeoclimatol. Palaeoecol. 1999 145, 79-93. (9) Aucour, A-.M.; Gomez, B.; Sheppard, S.M.F., Thévenard, F. Palaeogeogr. Palaeoclimatol. Palaeoecol. 2008 257, 462-473. (10) Michener, N.; Lajtha K. (Eds). Stable Isotopes in Ecology and Environmental Science (2nd Ed) 2007 Blackwell Publishing. (11) Poole, I., van Bergen, P.F.; Kool, K.; Schouten , S.; Cantrill, D. J. Org. Geochem. 2004 35, 1261-1274. (12) Gerber, S.; Joos, F.; Brügger, P.; Stocker, T.F.; Mann, M.E.; Sitch, S.; Scholze, M. Clim. Dyn. 2003 20, 281-299, 2003 (13) Pedentchouk, N.; Freeman, K.H.; Harris, N.B. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 2006 70, 2063-2072. (14) Radke, J.; Bechtel, A.; Gaupp, R.; Püttmann, W.; Schwark, L.; Sachse D.; Gleixner, G. Geochim

  16. VLBA Teams With Optical Interferometer to Study Star's Layers

    2007-05-01

    speed of about 10 km/s. The multi-wavelength analysis indicates that near the minimum there is more dust production and mass ejection: in these phases indeed the amount of dust is significantly higher than in the others. After this intense matter production and ejection the star continues its pulsation and when it reaches the maximum luminosity, it displays a much more expanded dust shell. This clearly supports a strong connection between the Mira pulsation and the dust production and expulsion. Furthermore, the astronomers found that grains of aluminum oxide - also called corundum - constitute most of S Ori's dust shell: the grain size is estimated to be of the order of 10 millionths of a centimetre, that is one thousand times smaller than the diameter of a human hair. "We know one chapter of the secret life of a Mira star, but much more can be learned in the near future, when we add near-infrared interferometry with the AMBER instrument on the VLTI to our (already broad) observational approach," said Wittkowski. More Information The research presented here is reported in a paper in press in the journal Astronomy and Astrophysics ("The Mira variable S Ori: Relationships between the photosphere, molecular layer, dust shell, and SiO maser shell at 4 epochs", by M. Wittkowski et al.). It is available in PDF format from the publisher's web site. The team consists of Markus Wittkowski (ESO), David A. Boboltz (U.S. Naval Observatory, USA), Keiichi Ohnaka and Thomas Driebe (MPIfR Bonn, Germany), and Michael Scholz (University of Heidelberg, Germany and University of Sydney, Australia). Notes A maser is the microwave equivalent to a laser, which emits visible light. A maser emits powerful microwave radiation instead and its study requires radio telescopes. An astrophysical maser is a naturally occurring source of stimulated emission that may arise in molecular clouds, comets, planetary atmospheres, stellar atmospheres, or from various conditions in interstellar space. ESO

  17. Selected Abstracts of the 1st Congress of joint European Neonatal Societies (jENS 2015; Budapest (Hungary; September 16-20, 2015; Session “Other”

    Various Authors

    2015-09-01

    . Al Omran, S. AL AbdiABS 44. DECREASE OF ADMISSION HYPOTHERMIA AMONG NEWBORNS IN NICU • A. Bystricka, J. Abu Asbeh, M. Qadir, K. Annadurai, J.M. KhanABS 45. LUNG ULTRASOUND TRAINING REDUCES RADIATION EXPOSURE IN NICU-ADMITTED PRETERM NEONATES • G. Escourrou, N. Yousef, A. Debray, C. Boussard, D. De LucaABS 46. POST-DISCHARGE NEONATAL FOLLOW-UP OF HYPERBILIRUBINEMIA BASED ON TRANSCUTANEOUS BILIRUBINOMETRY. RELIABILITY AND EFFICACY IN TERM AND NEAR-TERM INFANTS • A. Juster-Reicher, O. Flidel-Rimon, I. Vexler, I. Rozin, E.S. ShinwellABS 47. DECISION-MAKING FOR EXTREMELY PRETERM INFANTS: A SURVEY ABOUT THE ATTITUDES AND VALUES WITHIN A MULTI-CULTURAL SOCIETY • M. Hendriks, H.U. Bucher, S. Klein, R. Baumann-Hölzle, J.-C. FauchèreABS 48. EFFICACY OF SYSTEMIC FLUCONAZOLE PROPHYLAXIS IN REDUCTION OF SYSTEMIC CANDIDIASIS IN EXTREMELY LOW BIRTHWEIGHT (ELBW INFANTS • V.S. Rajadurai, B. Sriram, P.C. Khoo, J.M. Manuel, P. AgarwalABS 49. DEVELOPING COLLABORATION BETWEEN STAFF AND PARENTS IN THE NICU AT HONVED KORHAZ, BUDAPEST, HUNGARY • Z. Boukydis, C. Nador, B. Schill, A. LengyelABS 50. MACRO- AND MICROANALYSIS OF EARLY MOTHER-PRETERM INFANT INTERACTIONS: IMPLICATIONS FOR PREVENTIVE INTERVENTION • E. Kiepura, G. KmitaABS 51. ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION IN MOTHERS AND FATHERS OF A VERY PRETERM BORN CHILD AFTER HOSPITAL DISCHARGE • M. Jeukens-Visser, M. Husson, K. Koldewijn, A. Wassenaer-van Leemhuis, M. Flierman, D. Meijssen, P. van SchieABS 52. TRANSCRIPTIONAL REGULATION OF SEX-SPECIFIC GONADAL DIFFERENTIATION INVOLVES COOPERATION BETWEEN WT1 AND GATA4 ON FOXL2 AND SOX9 EXPRESSION • C. Dame, L.J. Rudigier, H. Scholz, K.M. KirschnerABS 53. BACTERIOLOGICAL SAFETY IN TRANSPORT, A CONTINUOUS CHALLENGE • G. Jourdain, P. Quentin, V. Derouin, A. Boet, J.L. Chabernaud, D. De LucaABS 54. GUIDELINES FOR NEONATAL SURGERY IN ITALY: WORK IN PROGRESS • I. Bernardini, M. Chiavarini, S. Tesoro, L. Marchesini, D. Bologni, W. Orlandi, M. PioppoABS 55. ADOPTION OF ASEPTIC NON

  18. Fnom Editor

    Ugur Demiray

    2006-01-01

    third article is about “Environmental Education and Networking in Mafeteng Primary Schools: A Participatory Approach” which is written by Constance BITSO, from Institute of Education National University of Lesotho, Southern Africa. His paper explores that a participatory process of Environmental Education (EE networking in Mafeteng primary schools, than discusses cycles of the participatory process undertaken for the EE networking in Mafeteng schools, including identification of problems, problem solving, reflective workshop and study tour. And finally the paper outlines issues that emerged in participatory EE networking, which include school governance, teachers’ existing knowledge, and communication, decision-making and power relations. The fourth article is a join study from Canada. It is dealt with skill enhancement for the health subject which is titled “Skill Enhancement for Health: An Evaluation of an Online Pilot Teaching Module on Epidemiology”, written by Rory McGREAL, Sue DAVIS, Terry MURPHY, Chris SMITH. Their article based on a pilot study about an epidemiology course conducted online and delivered across Canada was based on four main criteria: design, content, process and outcomes. The evaluation of this pilot of across Canada was based on four main criteria: design, content, process and outcomes. Data was collected through seven sources: participant online survey results, post-pilot workshop feedback, four focus groups, telephone interviews with participants, interviews with course developers, examination of online materials, and analysis of log files generated by the web server. The pilot course showed that the course took much more time than estimated; the online environment was challenging/frustrating for some; there were technical glitches; discussion boards were not regularly used; interaction with instructors was minimal; feedback from instructors was slow in coming; the short development time led to errors/mismatches between content and

  19. Discovery of Nearest Known Brown Dwarf

    2003-01-01

    : PR Photo 03d/03 shows the southern constellation Indus (The Indian) and its surroundings, as drawn in the famous Uranographia published 1801 of German astronomer Johann Elert Bode. This reproduction was made from original printing plates held by the library of the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam (Germany). The binary stellar system Epsilon Indi is associated with one of the arrows in the Indian's hand. However, because of its proximity, only 12 light-years away, it is moving so fast across the sky that it is now located someway below the arrows. In only a few thousand years, it will have moved out of the Indus constellation and into the neighbouring constellation Tucana (The Toucan). The constellation Indus lies deep in the southern sky, nestled between three birds, Grus (The Crane), Tucana (The Toucan) and Pavo (The Peacock), cf. PR Photo 03d/03. First catalogued in 1595-1597 by the Dutch navigators Pieter Dirkszoon Keyser and Frederick de Houtman, this constellation was added to the southern sky by Johann Bayer in his book 'Uranometria' (1603) to honour the Native Americans that European explorers had encountered on their travels. In particular, it has been suggested that it is specifically the native peoples of Tierra del Fuego and Patagonia that are represented in Indus, just over two thousand kilometres south of La Silla where the first spectroscopic observations of Epsilon Indi B were made some 400 years later. In the later drawing by Bode shown here, Epsilon Indi, the fifth brightest star in Indus, is associated with one of the arrows in the Indian's hand. More information The information in this press release is based on a paper ("Epsilon Indi B: a new benchmark T dwarf" by Ralf-Dieter Scholz and co-authors), soon to be published in the European journal Astronomy & Astrophysics (Letters). It is available on the web in preprint form at http://babbage.sissa.it/abs/astro-ph/0212487.