WorldWideScience

Sample records for mig weld effects

  1. The effects of welding parameters on ultra-violet light emissions, ozone and CrVI formation in MIG welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, J H; Mortazavi, S B; French, M J; Hewitt, P J; Redding, C R

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the relationships between ultra-violet emission, ozone generation and CrVI production in MIG welding which were measured as a function of shield gas flow rate, welding voltage, electrode stick-out and shield gas composition using an automatic welding rig that permitted MIG welding under reproducible conditions. The experimental results are interpreted in terms of the physico-chemical processes occurring in the micro- and macro-environments of the arc as part of research into process modification to reduce occupational exposure to ozone and CrVI production rates in MIG welding. We believe the techniques described here, and in particular the use of what we have termed u.v.-ozone measurements, will prove useful in further study of ozone generation and CrVI formation and may be applied in the investigation of engineering control of occupational exposure in MIG and other welding process such as Manual Metal Arc (MMA) and Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG).

  2. Influence of shielding gas pressure on welding characteristics in CO2 laser-MIG hybrid welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanbin; Lei, Zhenglong; Li, Liqun; Wu, Lin

    2006-01-01

    The droplet transfer behavior and weld characteristics have been investigated under different pressures of shielding gas in CO2 laser and metal inert/active gas (laser-MIG) hybrid welding process. The experimental results indicate that the inherent droplet transfer frequency and stable welding range of conventional MIG arc are changed due to the interaction between CO2 laser beam and MIG arc in laser-MIG hybrid welding process, and the shielding gas pressure has a crucial effect on welding characteristics. When the pressure of shielding gas is low in comparison with MIG welding, the frequency of droplet transfer decreases, and the droplet transfer becomes unstable in laser-MIG hybrid welding. So the penetration depth decreases, which shows the characteristic of unstable hybrid welding. However, when the pressure of shielding gas increases to a critical value, the hybrid welding characteristic is changed from unstable hybrid welding to stable hybrid welding, and the frequency of droplet transfer and the penetration depth increase significantly.

  3. Latest MIG, TIG arc-YAG laser hybrid welding systems for various welding products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishide, Takashi; Tsubota, Shuho; Watanabe, Masao

    2003-03-01

    Laser welding is capable of high-efficiency low-strain welding, and so its applications are started to various products. We have also put the high-power YAG laser of up to 10 kW to practical welding use for various products. On the other hand the weakest point of this laser welding is considered to be strict in the welding gap aiming allowance. In order to solve this problem, we have developed hybrid welding of TIG, MIG arc and YAG laser, taking the most advantages of both the laser and arc welding. Since the electrode is coaxial to the optical axis of the YAG laser in this process, it can be applied to welding of various objects. In the coaxial MIG, TIG-YAG welding, in order to make irradiation positions of the YAG laser beams having been guided in a wire or an electrode focused to the same position, the beam transmitted in fibers is separated to form a space between the separated beams, in which the laser is guided. With this method the beam-irradiating area can be brought near or to the arc-generating point. This enables welding of all directions even for the member of a three-dimensional shape. This time we carried out welding for various materials and have made their welding of up to 1 mm or more in welding groove gap possible. We have realized high-speed 1-pass butt welding of 4m/min in welding speed with the laser power of 3 kW for an aluminum alloy plate of approximately 4 mm thick. For a mild steel plate also we have realized butt welding of 1m/min with 5 kW for 6 mm thick. Further, in welding of stainless steel we have shown its welding possibility, by stabilizing the arc with the YAG laser in the welding atmosphere of pure argon, and shown that this welding is effective in high-efficiency welding of various materials. Here we will report the fundamental welding performances and applications to various objects for the coaxial MIG, TIG-YAG welding we have developed.

  4. Mechanical properties and corrosion behaviour of MIG welded 5083 aluminium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durmus, Huelya [Celal Bayar Univ., Turgutlu-Manisa (Turkey)

    2011-07-01

    For this study 5083 Aluminium alloy plates, as used in automobiles and watercraft, were experimentally MIG welded. The plates were joined with different wires and at various currents. The effects of welding with different parameters on the mechanical and corrosion properties were investigated. The corrosion behaviour of the MIG welded 5083 Aluminium base material was also investigated. The effects of the chemical composition of the filler material on the mechanical properties were examined by metallographic inspection and tensile testing. By EDS and XRD analyses of specimens it turned out that different structures in the weld metal (Cu3Si) affect its mechanical properties. The mechanical properties of the specimens welded with 5356 filler metal were found as quite well improved as compared to those specimens welded with 4043 and 5183 filler material. The results of the metallographic analysis, and mechanical and corrosion tests exhibited that the 5356 filler material was most suitable for the 5083 Al alloy base material. (orig.)

  5. Mechanical and electrochemical characteristics with welding materials in robotic MIG welding of dissimilar Al alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Jong; Han, Min Su; Woo, Yong Bin [Mokpo Maritime Univ., Mokpo (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    In this study, mechanical and electrochemical characteristics with welding material in MIG welded with ROBOT for dissimilar Al alloys were investigated using various experiment methods. The MIG welding by ROBOT with ER5183 and ER5556 for the 5456-H116 and 6061-T6 Al alloy were carried out. The hardness of welding zone was lower than that of base metal. In electrochemical experiment, ER5183 welding material presented excellent characteristics. The yield strength and maximum tensile strength in welding with welding material of ER5183 presented lower value than those of ER5556. The elongation and time-to-fracture showed the opposite results.

  6. Investigation of mixing and diffusion processes in hybrid spot laser-MIG keyhole welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, J; Tsai, H L

    2009-01-01

    In hybrid laser-MIG keyhole welding, anti-crack elements can be added into the weld pool through a filler metal in anticipation of compensating mass loss, preventing porosity formation and improving compositional and mechanical properties of the welds. Understanding the mixing and diffusion of the filler metal in the molten pool is vital to achieve these desired objectives. In this study, mathematical models and associated numerical techniques have been developed to investigate the mixing and diffusion processes in hybrid laser-MIG keyhole welding. The transient interactions between droplets and weld pool and dynamics of the melt flow are studied. The effects of key process parameters, such as droplet size (wire diameter), droplet generation frequency (wire feed speed) and droplet impinging speed, on mixing/diffusion are systematically investigated. It was found that compositional homogeneity of the weld pool is determined by the competition between the mixing rate and the solidification rate. A small-size filler droplet together with high generation frequency can increase the latitudinal diffusion of the filler metal into the weld pool, while the large-size droplet along with the low generation frequency helps to get more uniform longitudinal diffusion. Increasing the impinging velocity of the filler droplet can improve the latitudinal diffusion of the filler metal. However, a high impinging velocity can cause a lower diffusion zone in the upper part of the welds. This study provides a good foundation for optimizing the hybrid laser-MIG keyhole welding process to achieve quality welds with desired properties.

  7. Study on factors affecting the droplet temperature in plasma MIG welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamat, Sarizam Bin; Tashiro, Shinichi; Tanaka, Manabu; Yusoff, Mahani

    2018-04-01

    In the present study, the mechanism to control droplet temperature in the plasma MIG welding was discussed based on the measurements of the droplet temperature for a wide range of MIG currents with different plasma electrode diameters. The measurements of the droplet temperatures were conducted using a two color temperature measurement method. The droplet temperatures in the plasma MIG welding were then compared with those in the conventional MIG welding. As a result, the droplet temperature in the plasma MIG welding was found to be reduced in comparison with the conventional MIG welding under the same MIG current. Especially when the small plasma electrode diameter was used, the decrease in the droplet temperature reached maximally 500 K. Also, for a particular WFS, the droplet temperatures in the plasma MIG welding were lower than those in the conventional MIG welding. It is suggested that the use of plasma contributes to reducing the local heat input into the base metal by the droplet. The presence of the plasma surrounding the wire is considered to increase the electron density in its vicinity, resulting in the arc attachment expanding upwards along the wire surface to disperse the MIG current. This dispersion of MIG current causes a decrease in current density on the droplet surface, lowering the droplet temperature. Furthermore, dispersed MIG current also weakens the electromagnetic pinch force acting on the neck of the wire above the droplet. This leads to a larger droplet diameter with increased surface area through lower frequency of droplet detachment to decrease the MIG current density on the droplet surface, as compared to the conventional MIG welding at the same MIG current. Thus, the lower droplet temperature is caused by the reduction of heat flux into the droplet. Consequently, the mechanism to control droplet temperature in the plasma MIG welding was clarified.

  8. Analysis of Smut Formation Phenomena on MIG and Plasma-MIG Hybrid Weld of Cryogenic Al-Mg Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hee-keun [Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering, Geoje (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Tae-jin; Kang, Chung-yun [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Black deposits (smut) are created on MIG welds in cryogenic Al alloys. The smut should be removed because it ruins the appearance of the end product and affects surface treatments such as painting. It was recently reported that plasma–MIG hybrid (PMH) welding controls the formation of smut during welding. In order to determine the reason for this, smut formation using both MIG and PMH welding was investigated through metallurgy and arc phenomena analysis. Smut on MIG welds is a Mg–Al–O amorphous layer that includes nano-sized MgO particles less than 100 nm in diameter and MgO particles 1–2 µm in diameter. Smut on MIG welds is created by large amounts of metal vapor from the arc explosion generated between the welding wire and the weld pool after a short circuit transfer. However, smut on PMH welds is not created owing to the small amount of metal vapor produced from a stable globular transfer rather than a short circuit transfer and arc explosion.

  9. Analysis of Smut Formation Phenomena on MIG and Plasma-MIG Hybrid Weld of Cryogenic Al-Mg Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hee-keun; Yoon, Tae-jin; Kang, Chung-yun

    2016-01-01

    Black deposits (smut) are created on MIG welds in cryogenic Al alloys. The smut should be removed because it ruins the appearance of the end product and affects surface treatments such as painting. It was recently reported that plasma–MIG hybrid (PMH) welding controls the formation of smut during welding. In order to determine the reason for this, smut formation using both MIG and PMH welding was investigated through metallurgy and arc phenomena analysis. Smut on MIG welds is a Mg–Al–O amorphous layer that includes nano-sized MgO particles less than 100 nm in diameter and MgO particles 1–2 µm in diameter. Smut on MIG welds is created by large amounts of metal vapor from the arc explosion generated between the welding wire and the weld pool after a short circuit transfer. However, smut on PMH welds is not created owing to the small amount of metal vapor produced from a stable globular transfer rather than a short circuit transfer and arc explosion.

  10. Microprobe investigation of brittle segregates in aluminum MIG and TIG welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larssen, P. A.; Miller, E. L.

    1968-01-01

    Quantitative microprobe analysis of segregated particles in aluminum MIG /Metal Inert Gas/ and TIG /Tungsten Inert Gas/ welds indicated that there were about ten different kinds of particles, corresponding to ten different intermetallic compounds. Differences between MIG and TIG welds related to the individual cooling rates of these welds.

  11. Closing the weld gap with laser/mig hybrid welding process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olsen, Flemming Ove; Wiwe, Bjarne David

    2003-01-01

    In this article, laboratory tests are demonstrated that systematically accesses the critical gap distance when welding CMn 2.13 mm steel with a 2.6 kW CO2 laser, combined with a MIG energy source. In the work, the welding speed is varied at gap distances from 0 to 0.8 mm such that the limits...... for obtaining sound welds are identified. The welds are quality assessed according to ISO 13.919-1 and EN25817, transversal hardness measurements are made and the heat input to the workpiece is calculated. The results show that the critical gap is 0.1 mm for a laser weld alone. With hybrid welding, this can...... be increased to 0.6 mm, even at a welding speed of 3.5 m/min. The maximum welding speed with the hybrid process is comparable to laser welding alone, 4.5 m/min. The measured hardness is comparable to MIG welding, and this corresponds to a 33 percent reduction compared to laser welding alone. The heat input...

  12. Thermo-Mechanical Modeling of Laser-Mig Hybrid Welding (lmhw)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kounde, Ludovic; Engel, Thierry; Bergheau, Jean-Michel; Boisselier, Didier

    2011-01-01

    Hybrid welding is a combination of two different technologies such as laser (Nd: YAG, CO2…) and electric arc welding (MIG, MAG / TIG …) developed to assemble thick metal sheets (over 3 mm) in order to reduce the required laser power. As a matter of fact, hybrid welding is a lso used in the welding of thin materials to benefit from process, deep penetration and gap limit. But the thermo-mechanical behaviour of thin parts assembled by LMHW technology for railway cars production is far from being controlled the modeling and simulation contribute to the assessment of the causes and effects of the thermo mechanical behaviour in the assembled parts. In order to reproduce the morphology of melted and heat-affected zones, two analytic functions were combined to model the heat source of LMHW. On one hand, we applied a so-called "diaboloïd" (DB) which is a modified hyperboloid, based on experimental parameters and the analysis of the macrographs of the welds. On the other hand, we used a so-called "double ellipsoïd" (DE) which takes the MIG only contribution including the bead into account. The comparison between experimental result and numerical result shows a good agreement.

  13. Study on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of 304 Stainless Steel Joints by Tig-Mig Hybrid Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogundimu, Emmanuel O.; Akinlabi, Esther T.; Erinosho, Mutiu F.

    Stainless steel is a family of Fe-based alloys having excellent resistance to corrosion and as such has been used imperatively for kitchen utensils, transportation, building constructions and much more. This paper presents the work conducted on the material characterizations of a tungsten inert gas (TIG)-metal inert gas (MIG) hybrid welded joint of type 304 austenitic stainless steel. The welding processes were conducted in three phases. The phases of welding employed are MIG welding using a current of 170A, TIG welding using a current of 190A, and a hybrid TIG-MIG welding with currents of 190/170A, respectively. The MIG, TIG, and hybrid TIG-MIG weldments were characterized with incomplete penetration, full penetration and excess penetration of weld. Intergranular austenite was created toward transition and heat affected zones. The thickness of the delta ferrite (δ-Fe) formed in the microstructures of the TIG weld is more than the thickness emerged in the microstructures of MIG and hybrid TIG-MIG welds. A TIG-MIG hybrid weld of specimen welded at the currents of 190/170A has the highest ultimate tensile strength value and percentage elongation of 397.72MPa and 35.7%. The TIG-MIG hybrid welding can be recommended for high-tech industrial applications such as nuclear, aircraft, food processing, and automobile industry.

  14. The Use of Compressed Air for Micro-Jet Cooling After MIG Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadryś D.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The material selected for this investigation was low alloy steel weld metal deposit (WMD after MIG welding with micro-jet cooling. The present investigation was aimed as the following tasks: obtained WMD with various amount of acicular ferrite and further analyze impact toughness of WMD in terms of acicular ferrite amount in it. Weld metal deposit (WMD was first time carried out for MIG welding with micro-jet cooling of compressed air and gas mixture of argon and air. Until that moment only argon, helium and nitrogen were tested as micro-jet gases for MIG/MAG processes. An important role in the interpretation of the results can give methods of artificial intelligence.

  15. Mechanical properties of CO2/MIG welded structural rolled steel and stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Jong Young; Yoon, Myong Jin; Kim, Sang Youn; Kim, Tae Gyu; Shin, Hyeon Seung

    2015-01-01

    To accomplish long-term use of specific parts of steel, welding technology is widely applied. In this study, to compare the efficiency in improving mechanical properties, rolled steel (SS400) was welded with stainless steel (STS304) by both CO 2 welding method and MIG (metal inert gas) welding method, respectively. Multi-tests were conducted on the welded specimen, such as X-ray irradiation, Vickers' Hardness, tensile test, fatigue test and fatigue crack growth test. Based on the fatigue crack growth test performed by two different methods, the relationship of da/dN was analyzed. Although the hardness by the two methods was similar, tensile test and fatigue properties of MIG welded specimen are superior to CO 2 welded one.

  16. Theoretical and experimental contributions regarding the impact on work environment of welding processes in MIG / MAG protective gas medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh. Amza

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the main factors that cause environmental pollution in the case of the welding procedure in a protective gas environment. In the research the MIG and MAG welding processes were taken into account. The materials used in the experiments were 8TiCr170 stainless steel as the base material and as filler materials 4 types of welding wires were used, characterized by different chemical compositions. To assess the impact on the work environment of such welding processes the pollution coefficient Cp was defined based on the material balance equation as the ratio of the mass of all materials used in the welding process Mt and the effective mass of the welded performed Mu.

  17. Kinetics of manganese in MAG/MIG welding with a 18/8/6 wire

    OpenAIRE

    Tušek, Janez

    2001-01-01

    The paper deals with a study of MAG/MIG welding of low-alloy ferritic steel and highalloy austenitic steel with a 18/8/6 wire. Manganese burn-off from the wire in welding a single-V butt weld was studied. It was found that manganese burns off in the arc during melting of a droplet at the wire end, and from the weld pool during weld formation. The range of manganese burn-off depends mainly on the type of shielding gas used and the arc length, i.e., from the arc voltage. The manganese burn-off ...

  18. The porosity formation mechanism in the laser-MIG hybrid welded joint of Invar alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xiaohong; Gao, Qiyu; Gu, Cheng; Sun, Weihua; Chen, Jicheng; Wei, Yanhong

    2017-10-01

    The porosity formation mechanism in the laser-metal inter gas (MIG) multi-layer hybrid welded (HW) joint of 19.05 mm thick Invar alloy is investigated. The microstructure characteristics and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) are analyzed. The phase identification was conducted by the X-ray diffractometer (XRD). Experimental results show that the generation of porosity is caused by the relatively low laser power in the root pass and low current in the cover pass. It is also indicated that the microstructures of the welded joints are mainly observed to be columnar crystal and equiaxial crystal, which are closely related to the porosity formation. The EDS results show that oxygen content is significantly high in the inner wall of the porosity. The XRD results indicate that the BM and the WB of laser-MIG HW all are composed of Fe0.64Ni0.36 and γ-(Fe,Ni). When the weld pool is cooled quickly, [NiO] [FeO] and [MnO] are formed that react on C to generate CO/CO2 gases. The porosity of laser-MIG HW for Invar alloy is oxygen pore. The root source of metallurgy porosity formation is that the dissolved gases are hard to escape sufficiently and thus exist in the weld pool. Furthermore, 99.99% pure Argon is recommended as protective gas in the laser-MIG HW of Invar alloy.

  19. Comparison of Plasma, Metal Inactive Gas (MIG) and Tungsten Inactive Gas (TIG) Processes for Laser Hybrid Welding (302)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2003-01-01

    enables a more stable ignition and running process than both TIG and MIG hybrid welding. Because of the delivery of extra material from a hot wire, the MIG hybrid process is well suited for bridging gaps of up to 0.6 mm in butt-welding of 2 mm steel. But because of the constant delivery of new material......, the MIG process is more difficult to control than laser/plasma and laser/TIG processes. All three types of secondary heat sources enable an increased ductility of the weld as compared to pure laser welding when welding 1.8 mm GA 260 with a TIG torch and 2.13 mm CMn steel with a plasma arc or MIG...

  20. Development of aluminium viscous damper by high speed MIG welding process; Kosoku MIG yosetsuho ni yoru aluminium sei viscous damper no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hino, H; Hotta, M [Nippon Light Metal Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Maeda, Y; Shimizu, H [Fukoku Co. Ltd., Saitama (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    We have developed a welded aluminum viscous damper to improve the joining strength between the case and the cover of the conventional damper mechanically fastened by adhesion. The distortion of the welded damper was decreased to an acceptable level using the high speed MIG welding process. Sound quality and good appearance were obtained by optimizing the initial speed of the filler wire and by controlling the welding conditions at the starting part and in the lap part. The leakage load and the fatigue limit of the welded damper were 5 and 10 times those of the conventional damper, respectively. 3 refs., 15 figs.

  1. Analysis of Thermo-Elastic Fracture Problem during Aluminium Alloy MIG Welding Using the Extended Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuanfang He

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermo-elastic fracture problem and equations are established for aluminium alloy Metal Inert Gas (MIG welding, which include a moving heat source and a thermoelasticity equation with the initial and boundary conditions for a plate structure with a crack. The extended finite element method (XFEM is implemented to solve the thermo-elastic fracture problem of a plate structure with a crack under the effect of a moving heat source. The combination of the experimental measurement and simulation of the welding temperature field is done to verify the model and solution method. The numerical cases of the thermomechanical parameters and stress intensity factors (SIFs of the plate structure in the welding heating and cooling processes are investigated. The research results provide reference data and an approach for the analysis of the thermomechanical characteristics of the welding process.

  2. Evaluation of welding by MIG in martensitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, M.A.; Mariano, N.A.; Marinho, D.H.C. Marinho

    2010-01-01

    This work evaluated structure's characterization and mechanical properties after the welding process of the stainless steel CA6NM. The employed welding process was the metal active gas with tubular wire. The control of the thermal cycle in the welding process has fundamental importance regarding the properties of the welded joint, particularly in the thermally affected zone. The mechanical properties were appraised through impact resistance tests and the hardness and microstructure through metallographic characterization and Ray-X diffraction. The parameters and the process of welding used promoted the hardness and toughness appropriate to the applications of the steel. Welding energy's control becomes an essential factor that can affect the temperature of carbide precipitation and the nucleation of the retained austenite in the in the region of the in the thermally affected zone. (author)

  3. Kinetics of manganese in MAG/MIG welding with a 18/8/6 wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tusek, J.

    2001-01-01

    The paper deals with a study of MAG/MIG welding of low-alloy ferritic steel and high-alloy austenitic steel with a 18/8/6 wire. Manganese burn-off from the wire in welding a single-V butt weld was studied. It was found that manganese burns off in the arc during melting of a droplet at the wire end, and from the weld pool during weld formation. The range of manganese burn-of-depends mainly on the type of shielding gas used and the arc length,i. e., from the arc voltage. The manganese burn-off increases with an increase of the content of active gases, i.e., CO 2 and O 2 in the neutral gas i. e., argon. It also increases with an increase in arc voltage. The longer the welding arc, the longer exposition of the filler materials to the welding arc and the wider the penetration, Which allows manganese vapours to evaporate from the weld pool. The most important finding is that manganese burn-off from the 18/8/6 wire during welding of austenitic stainless steel with low-alloy ferritic steel is considerably strong, i.e., from 20% to 30%; nevertheless the wire concerned is perfectly suitable for welding of different types of steel. (Author) 23 refs

  4. Sample Entropy-Based Approach to Evaluate the Stability of Double-Wire Pulsed MIG Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Yao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the sample entropy, this paper deals with a quantitative method to evaluate the current stability in double-wire pulsed MIG welding. Firstly, the sample entropy of current signals with different stability but the same parameters is calculated. The results show that the more stable the current, the smaller the value and the standard deviation of sample entropy. Secondly, four parameters, which are pulse width, peak current, base current, and frequency, are selected for four-level three-factor orthogonal experiment. The calculation and analysis of desired signals indicate that sample entropy values are affected by welding current parameters. Then, a quantitative method based on sample entropy is proposed. The experiment results show that the method can preferably quantify the welding current stability.

  5. Influence of Metal Transfer Stability and Shielding Gas Composition on CO and CO2 Emissions during Short-circuiting MIG/MAG Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valter Alves de Meneses

    Full Text Available Abstract: Several studies have demonstrated the influence of parameters and shielding gas on metal transfer stability or on the generation of fumes in MIG/MAG welding, but little or nothing has been discussed regarding the emission of toxic and asphyxiating gases, particularly as it pertains to parameterization of the process. The purpose of this study was to analyze and evaluate the effect of manufacturing aspects of welding processes (short-circuit metal transfer stability and shielding gas composition on the gas emission levels during MIG/MAG welding (occupational health and environmental aspects. Using mixtures of Argon with CO2 and O2 and maintaining the same average current and the same weld bead volume, short-circuit welding was performed with carbon steel welding wire in open (welder’s breathing zone and confined environments. The welding voltage was adjusted to gradually vary the transfer stability. It was found that the richer the composition of the shielding gas is in CO2, the more CO and CO2 are generated by the arc. However, unlike fume emission, voltage and transfer stability had no effect on the generation of these gases. It was also found that despite the large quantity of CO and CO2 emitted by the arc, especially when using pure CO2 shielding gas, there was no high level residual concentration of CO and CO2 in or near the worker’s breathing zone, even in confined work cells.

  6. TIG and MIG welding of 6061 and 7020 aluminium alloys. Microstructural studies and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez de Salazar, J.M.; Urena, A.; Villauriz, E.; Manzanedo, S.; Barrena, I.

    1998-01-01

    The aluminium alloys of the 6XXX and 7XXX series, are actually considered of medium and high strength, and are been profusely used in different industries such as aeronautical, automotive, etc.However, its wide application as structural material needs of the proper development of their joining process. The present work describes the results obtained from the microstructural evaluation, both with optical and scanning electronic micros copies (OM) and SEM), and of the mechanical one (hardness changes) of the weld produced in the alloys using different arc welding techniques: FTAW (TIG) and GMAW (MIG). For the last one, a filler metal with a composition of Al-5Mg, AWS denomination A5.10-92 (AA5356), has been used. (Author) 5 refs

  7. Welding of Low Alloy Steel DIN 15Mo3 by MIG/MAG Spot

    OpenAIRE

    Nabeel K. Abid Al- Sahib

    2006-01-01

    ????? ????? ????? ????? ??????? ?????? ?? ????? ?????? ?????? ?????? ??????? ?????? ?????? (MIG/MAG spot) ???????? ??? ??????? ????? ?? ???? ???????? ????? ??? ???????? ?? ?????? ??????????? ??????? ???????? ????? ???? ??????? ??????? ????? ??? (DIN15Mo3) ?????? ?????? ?????? ?????? ?????? ?? ???? ???? ?????? ???????" ??? ?????? ??? ????. ????? ??????? ??????? ?????? ??? CO2 ????" ?? ??? ??????? ?? ???? ??????? ??????? ????? ?? ?????? ????? ?? ??? ???? ?? ????? (13%) ???? (4mm) ???? (2sec). ?...

  8. Kinetics of manganese in MAG/MIG welding with a 18/8/6 wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tušek, Janez

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a study of MAG/MIG welding of low-alloy ferritic steel and highalloy austenitic steel with a 18/8/6 wire. Manganese burn-off from the wire in welding a single-V butt weld was studied. It was found that manganese burns off in the arc during melting of a droplet at the wire end, and from the weld pool during weld formation. The range of manganese burn-off depends mainly on the type of shielding gas used and the arc length, i.e., from the arc voltage. The manganese burn-off increases with an increase of the content of active gases, i.e., CO2 and O2, in the neutral gas, i.e., argon. It also increases with an increase in arc voltage. The longer the welding arc, the longer exposition of the filler material to the welding arc and the wider the penetration, which allows manganese vapours to evaporate from the weld pool. The most important finding is that manganese burn-off from the 18/8/6 wire during welding of austenitic stainless steel with low-alloy ferritic steel is considerably strong, i.e., from 20% to 30%; nevertheless the wire concerned is perfectly suitable for welding of different types of steel.

    El artículo describe el estudio de un acero ferrítico poco aleado con un acero austenítico altamente aleado con el alambre 18/8/6 mediante el procedimiento MAG/MIG. Se ha investigado el consumo del manganeso del alambre durante la soldadura a tope con la preparación en V. Con los análisis se ha comprobado que el manganeso se consume en el arco desde la formación de la gota en la punta del alambre hasta la solidificación del metal aportado fundido. La cantidad perdida del manganeso depende, sobre todo, del tipo del gas de protección y de la longitud del arco, esto es, de la tensión convencional en el arco. Con el aumento de los gases activos (CO2 y O2 respecto al gas neutro argon, el consumo del manganeso va aumentando. También se observó que el consumo del manganeso va

  9. Evaluation of welding by MIG in martensitic stainless steel; Avaliacao da soldagem pelo processo MIG em aco inoxidavel martensitico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, M.A. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil); Mariano, N.A.; Marinho, D.H.C. Marinho, E-mail: neideaparecidamariano@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Alfenas (UNIFAL), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    This work evaluated structure's characterization and mechanical properties after the welding process of the stainless steel CA6NM. The employed welding process was the metal active gas with tubular wire. The control of the thermal cycle in the welding process has fundamental importance regarding the properties of the welded joint, particularly in the thermally affected zone. The mechanical properties were appraised through impact resistance tests and the hardness and microstructure through metallographic characterization and Ray-X diffraction. The parameters and the process of welding used promoted the hardness and toughness appropriate to the applications of the steel. Welding energy's control becomes an essential factor that can affect the temperature of carbide precipitation and the nucleation of the retained austenite in the in the region of the in the thermally affected zone. (author)

  10. Case Study Regarding the Design of a Direct Current Electromagnet for the MIG Welding of Metallic Materials Part I: Description of the Welding Methods and Preliminary Calculus of the Electromagnet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudorel Ene

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper refers to the design of a direct current electromagnet, located on the head of a swan neck welding gun of a MIG welding equipment and used for magnetising the rotation space of two additional electric arches, in order to preheat the electrode wire and of the protective gas, partially turned into plasma jet. One describes the MIG welding method in which the electromagnet is used as well as its preliminary calculus.

  11. Circumferential welding applied for inox steel super duplex UNS S32750 using the process MIG using CMT® control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Invernizzi, Bruno Pizol

    2017-01-01

    This study carried out circumferential welding experiments in UNS S32750 Super Duplex Stainless Steel tubes using diameters of 19,05 mm and 48,20 mm. Welds were performed using various welding parameters on a MIG machine with Cold Metal Transfer® CMT control. The weld joints were evaluated by visual and dimensional inspection in addition to the Vickers microhardness and traction tests, as well as the microstructural analysis in conjunction with phase precipitation analysis, which was performed according to practice A of ASTM A923, and corrosion test in accordance with practice A of ASTM G48 in conjunction with ASTM A923. The results indicated that welds performed in pipes with a diameter of 19.05 mm showed a weld joint with unacceptable dimensions according to the standard, this condition being attributed the use of a high wire diameter for the welding conditions used. Welding performed for pipes with a diameter of 48.20 mm showed a lack of penetration under the conditions employed when welded by the conventional CMT® process. In the case of the use of CMT® combined with pulsed arc, under conditions that generated greater heat input during welding, this resulted in total penetration of the joint and adequate surface finish. The results indicated that welding using the CMT® process combined with pulsed arc, under the conditions (parameters) employed generated good surface finish, combined mechanical properties, meeting standards requirements, as well as a balanced microstructure and high resistance to corrosion. (author)

  12. A comparative study of laser beam welding and laser-MIG hybrid welding of Ti-Al-Zr-Fe titanium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ruifeng; Li Zhuguo; Zhu Yanyan; Rong Lei

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Ti-Al-Zr-Fe titanium alloy sheets were welded by LBW and LAMIG methods. → LAMIG welded joints have better combination of strength and ductility. → LAMIG welding is proved to be feasible for the production of titanium sheet joints. - Abstract: Ti-Al-Zr-Fe titanium alloy sheets with thickness of 4 mm were welded using laser beam welding (LBW) and laser-MIG hybrid welding (LAMIG) methods. To investigate the influence of the methods difference on the joint properties, optical microscope observation, microhardness measurement and mechanical tests were conducted. Experimental results show that the sheets can be welded at a high speed of 1.8 m/min and power of 8 kW, with no defects such as, surface oxidation, porosity, cracks and lack of penetration in the welding seam. In addition, all tensile test specimens fractured at the parent metal. Compared with the LBW, the LAMIG welding method can produce joints with higher ductility, due to the improvement of seam formation and lower microhardness by employing a low strength TA-10 welding wire. It can be concluded that LAMIG is much more feasible for welding the Ti-Al-Zr-Fe titanium alloy sheets.

  13. Assessment of the biological effects of welding fumes emitted from metal inert gas welding processes of aluminium and zinc-plated materials in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, L; Bauer, M; Bertram, J; Gube, M; Lenz, K; Reisgen, U; Schettgen, T; Kraus, T; Brand, P

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate biological effects and potential health risks due to two different metal-inert-gas (MIG) welding fumes (MIG welding of aluminium and MIG soldering of zinc coated steel) in healthy humans. In a threefold cross-over design study 12 male subjects were exposed to three different exposure scenarios. Exposures were performed under controlled conditions in the Aachener Workplace Simulation Laboratory (AWSL). On three different days the subjects were either exposed to filtered ambient air, to welding fumes from MIG welding of aluminium, or to fumes from MIG soldering of zinc coated materials. Exposure was performed for 6 h and the average fume concentration was 2.5 mg m(-3). Before, directly after, 1 day after, and 7 days after exposure spirometric and impulse oscillometric measurements were performed, exhaled breath condensate (EBC) was collected and blood samples were taken and analyzed for inflammatory markers. During MIG welding of aluminium high ozone concentrations (up to 250 μg m(-3)) were observed, whereas ozone was negligible for MIG soldering. For MIG soldering, concentrations of high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) and factor VIII were significantly increased but remained mostly within the normal range. The concentration of neutrophils increased in tendency. For MIG welding of aluminium, the lung function showed significant decreases in Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF) and Mean Expiratory Flow at 75% vital capacity (MEF 75) 7 days after exposure. The concentration of ristocetin cofactor was increased. The observed increase of hsCRP during MIG-soldering can be understood as an indicator for asymptomatic systemic inflammation probably due to zinc (zinc concentration 1.5 mg m(-3)). The change in lung function observed after MIG welding of aluminium may be attributed to ozone inhalation, although the late response (7 days after exposure) is surprising. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of controlled shot peening on fusion welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lah, Nur Azida Che; Ali, Aidy; Ismail, Napsiah; Chai, Lim Poon; Mohamed, Abdul Aziz

    2010-01-01

    This work examines the effect of controlled shot peening (CSP) treatment on the fatigue strength of an ASTM A516 grade 70 carbon steel welded joint. Metallurgical modifications, hardness, elemental compositions, and internal discontinuities, such as porosity, inclusions, lack of penetration, and undercut found in treated and untreated fusion welded joints, were characterized. The fatigue results of as-welded and peened skimmed joints were compared. It was observed that the effect of the CSP and skimming processes improved the fatigue life of the fusion weld by 50% on MMA-welded, 63% on MIG-welded, and 60% on TIG-welded samples.

  15. The effect of welding process and shielding atmosphere on the AlMg4.5Mn weld metal properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokic Cvetkovic, Radica; Popovic, Olivera [Belgrade Univ. (Serbia). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering; Burzic, Meri; Jovicic, Radomir [Belgrade Univ. (Serbia). Innovation Center; Kastelec Macura, Sandra [Technikum Taurunum, Zemun (Serbia); Buyukyildirim, Galip [IWE, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2013-01-15

    In this paper, the AlMg4.5Mn alloy has been welded using tungsten inert gas (TIG) and metal inert gas (MIG) processes with different gas shielding atmospheres. Tensile strength, hardness, impact and fracture toughness, fatigue crack growth parameters ({Delta}K{sub th}, da/dN), as well as microstructure were determined. By comparing results for different gas mixtures, the main conclusion for TIG welding was that increased helium content has an important effect on toughness and fatigue crack growth parameters, whereas its effect on other mechanical properties is not significant. On the other hand, in the case of MIG welding, adding helium does not affect mechanical properties, except the fatigue crack growth rate. It was also established that adding nitrogen (TIG welding) and oxygen (MIG welding) reduces toughness and increases crack growth rate, so their use in shielding mixtures is not recommended. (orig.)

  16. The numerical simulation of heat transfer during a hybrid laser-MIG welding using equivalent heat source approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendaoud, Issam; Matteï, Simone; Cicala, Eugen; Tomashchuk, Iryna; Andrzejewski, Henri; Sallamand, Pierre; Mathieu, Alexandre; Bouchaud, Fréderic

    2014-03-01

    The present study is dedicated to the numerical simulation of an industrial case of hybrid laser-MIG welding of high thickness duplex steel UR2507Cu with Y-shaped chamfer geometry. It consists in simulation of heat transfer phenomena using heat equivalent source approach and implementing in finite element software COMSOL Multiphysics. A numerical exploratory designs method is used to identify the heat sources parameters in order to obtain a minimal required difference between the numerical results and the experiment which are the shape of the welded zone and the temperature evolution in different locations. The obtained results were found in good correspondence with experiment, both for melted zone shape and thermal history.

  17. Circumferential welding applied for inox steel super duplex UNS S32750 using the process MIG using CMT® control; Soldagem circunferencial do aço inoxidável super duplex UNS S32750 pelo processo MIG com controle CMT®

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Invernizzi, Bruno Pizol

    2017-07-01

    This study carried out circumferential welding experiments in UNS S32750 Super Duplex Stainless Steel tubes using diameters of 19,05 mm and 48,20 mm. Welds were performed using various welding parameters on a MIG machine with Cold Metal Transfer® CMT control. The weld joints were evaluated by visual and dimensional inspection in addition to the Vickers microhardness and traction tests, as well as the microstructural analysis in conjunction with phase precipitation analysis, which was performed according to practice A of ASTM A923, and corrosion test in accordance with practice A of ASTM G48 in conjunction with ASTM A923. The results indicated that welds performed in pipes with a diameter of 19.05 mm showed a weld joint with unacceptable dimensions according to the standard, this condition being attributed the use of a high wire diameter for the welding conditions used. Welding performed for pipes with a diameter of 48.20 mm showed a lack of penetration under the conditions employed when welded by the conventional CMT® process. In the case of the use of CMT® combined with pulsed arc, under conditions that generated greater heat input during welding, this resulted in total penetration of the joint and adequate surface finish. The results indicated that welding using the CMT® process combined with pulsed arc, under the conditions (parameters) employed generated good surface finish, combined mechanical properties, meeting standards requirements, as well as a balanced microstructure and high resistance to corrosion. (author)

  18. A comparative study of the SSC resistance of a novel welding process IEA with SAW and MIG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natividad, C.; Salazar, M.; Espinosa-Medina, M.A.; Perez, R.

    2007-01-01

    The Stress Sulphide Cracking resistance of X65 weldments produced by Indirect Electric Arc, Submerged Arc Welding (SAW) and Metal Inert Gas (MIG) processes were evaluated in a NACE solution saturated with H 2 S at 25 deg. C, 37 deg. C and 50 deg. C using Slow Strain Rate Tests (SSRT) and electrochemical measurements. Weldments produced by the Indirect Electric Arc presented the best Stress Sulphide Cracking resistance at 25 deg. C. This behavior is attributed to the microstructural modification of the weld bead from ferrite in a needlelike form to a fine grain microstructure, which was not observed at 37 deg. C and 50 deg. C. In addition, the hydrogen permeation flux increased with the temperature, this result is associated with the ferrite phase. The electrochemical results show a decrease of the trapping sites for the atomic hydrogen on this weldment. This behavior has not been observed for the other welding processes due to their microstructure (a typical columnar growth of coarse grain)

  19. Case Study Regarding the Design of a Direct Current Electromagnet for the MIG Welding of Metallic Materials Part II: Constructive-Electromagnetic Dimension and Verification of the Electromagnet Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudorel Ene

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper refers to the design of a direct current electromagnet, located on the head of a swan neck welding gun of a MIG welding equipment and used for magnetising the rotation space of two additional electric arches, in order to preheat the electrode wire and of the protective gas, partially turned into plasma jet. We present the constructive - electromagnetic dimensioning and the verification of the electromagnet operation.

  20. Controlled short-circuiting MIG-MAG welding process and procedures applied to the root pass in pipeline construction; Processo de soldagem MIG/MAG em curto-circuito controlado e procedimentos aplicados ao passe de raiz na construcao de linhas dutoviarias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Regis H.G. e; Gohr Junior, Raul; Weck, Leonardo W.A. [Santa Catarina Univ., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Lab. de Soldagem e Mecatronica (LABSOLDA)

    2005-07-01

    The work deals with the study and development of the Controlled Short-Circuiting MIG/MAG Welding Process (CCC) and procedures for the root pass on pipes, in pipelines construction. The developed process (CCC) consists in an semi-automatic slag free operation, yielding higher productivity than the Coated Electrode and TIG processes, with satisfactory properties on the root weld. The significant influence of the welding over the time schedule and construction cost makes the development of this technology attractive, in order to become available at low cost, enhancing the companies' competitiveness in the globalized oil sector. The developed system, a MIG/MAG variant, features the advantages of short-circuiting metal transfer and avoids its inconveniences (mainly with high CO{sub 2} content gases), enabling its use on pipes root welding. This is possible through current waveform control, providing process and weld pool stability. Procedures for the root pass were determined for each of the welding positions reached in thick walled pipes welding, with the CCC. Also, the low welder training time was notable. (author)

  1. Effects on the efficiency of activated carbon on exposure to welding fumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, D. [Southern Company Services, Inc., Birmingham, AL (United States)

    1995-02-01

    It is the intention of this paper to document that certain types of welding fumes have little or no effect on the effectiveness of the carbon filter air filtration efficiency when directly exposed to a controlled amount of welding fumes for a short-term period. The welding processes studied were restricted to shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), flux cored arc welding (FCAW), gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes. Contrary to the SMAW and FCAW processes, the GTAW (or TIG) and the GMAW (or MIG) welding processes do not require the use of flux as part of the overall process. Credit was taken for these processes occurring in inert gas environments and producing minimal amount of smoke. It was concluded that a study involving the SMAW process would also envelop the effects of the TIG and MIG welding processes. The quantity of welding fumes generated during the arc welding process is a function of the particular process, the size and type of electrode, welding machine amperage, and operator proficiency. For this study, the amount of welding for specific testing was equated to the amount of welding normally conducted during plant unit outages. Different welding electrodes were also evaluated, and the subsequent testing was limited to an E7018 electrode which was judged to be representative of all carbon and stainless steel electrodes commonly used at the site. The effect of welding fumes on activated charcoal was tested using a filtration unit complete with prefilters, upstream and downstream high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, and a carbon adsorber section. The complete system was field tested in accordance with ANSI N510 standards prior to exposing the filters and the adsorber bed to welding fumes. The carbon samples were tested at an established laboratory using ASTM D3803-1989 standards.

  2. The possibility of using laser and micro-jet technology in the welding of structural elements of vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Wojciech MAJEWSKI

    2015-01-01

    A paper presents the possibility of laser welding using micro-jet cooling. The effect of micro-jet cooling on microstructure and mechanical properties of the weld metal deposit was carried out. New welding process was analyzed for use in the automotive industry. Studies have confirmed the positive effect of cooling micro-jet cooling both for the MIG welding and laser welding.

  3. Effect of controlled atmosphere on the mig-mag arc weldment properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kacar, Ramazan; Koekemli, Koray

    2005-01-01

    Due to their higher welding speed, automation and weld pool protection against to the atmosphere gases, gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process is widely used in industry. Due to the less stable arc associated with the use of consumable electrodes, GMAW process is not clean as good as gas tungsten arc welding process. Furthermore, the greater arc length in GMAW process also reduces the protective effect of the shielding gas. Due to electrochemical and thermochemical reactions between weld pool and arc atmosphere, it is quite important, especially weld metal toughness and joining of reactive materials to entirely create inert atmosphere for GMAW process. Therefore, a controlled atmosphere cabinet was developed for GMAW process. Low carbon steel combinations were welded with classical GMAW process in argon atmosphere as well as controlled atmosphere cabinet by using similar welding parameters. The mechanical and metallurgical properties of both weldments were evaluated. Result shows that toughness of the weld metal that was obtained in the controlled atmosphere cabinet much higher than that of classical GMAW process. The metallographic examination also clarified that there was not any gas porosity and inclusion in the weld metal compared with classical process

  4. Effects Of Welding On The Fatigue Behaviour Of Commercial Aluminum AA-1100 Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthayakumar, M.; Balasubramanian, V.; Rani, Ahmad Majdi Abdul; Hadzima, Branislav

    2018-04-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is an budding solid state welding process, which is frequently used for joining aluminum alloys where materials can be joined without melt and recast. Therefore, when welding alloys through FSW the phase transformations occurs will be in the solid state form. The present work is aimed in evaluating the fatigue life of friction stir welded commercial grade aluminum alloy joints. The commercial grade AA1100 aluminum alloy of 12mm thickness plate is welded and the specimens are tested using a rotary beam fatigue testing machine at different stress levels. The stress versus number of cycles (S-N) curves was plotted using the data points. The Fatigue life of tungsten inert gas (TIG) and metal inert gas (MIG) welded joints was compared. The fatigue life of the weld joints was interrelated with the tensile properties, microstructure and micro hardness properties. The effects of the notches and welding processes are evaluated and reported.

  5. A Nonlinear Mixed Effects Approach for Modeling the Cell-To-Cell Variability of Mig1 Dynamics in Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Almquist

    Full Text Available The last decade has seen a rapid development of experimental techniques that allow data collection from individual cells. These techniques have enabled the discovery and characterization of variability within a population of genetically identical cells. Nonlinear mixed effects (NLME modeling is an established framework for studying variability between individuals in a population, frequently used in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, but its potential for studies of cell-to-cell variability in molecular cell biology is yet to be exploited. Here we take advantage of this novel application of NLME modeling to study cell-to-cell variability in the dynamic behavior of the yeast transcription repressor Mig1. In particular, we investigate a recently discovered phenomenon where Mig1 during a short and transient period exits the nucleus when cells experience a shift from high to intermediate levels of extracellular glucose. A phenomenological model based on ordinary differential equations describing the transient dynamics of nuclear Mig1 is introduced, and according to the NLME methodology the parameters of this model are in turn modeled by a multivariate probability distribution. Using time-lapse microscopy data from nearly 200 cells, we estimate this parameter distribution according to the approach of maximizing the population likelihood. Based on the estimated distribution, parameter values for individual cells are furthermore characterized and the resulting Mig1 dynamics are compared to the single cell times-series data. The proposed NLME framework is also compared to the intuitive but limited standard two-stage (STS approach. We demonstrate that the latter may overestimate variabilities by up to almost five fold. Finally, Monte Carlo simulations of the inferred population model are used to predict the distribution of key characteristics of the Mig1 transient response. We find that with decreasing levels of post-shift glucose, the transient

  6. An Investigation of the Microstructure of an Intermetallic Layer in Welding Aluminum Alloys to Steel by MIG Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quoc Manh; Huang, Shyh-Chour

    2015-12-02

    Butt joints of A5052 aluminum alloy and SS400 steel, with a new type of chamfered edge, are welded by means of metal inert gas welding and ER4043 Al-Si filler metal. The microhardness and microstructure of the joint are investigated. An intermetallic layer is found on the surface of the welding seam and SS400 steel sheet. The hardness of the intermetallic layer is examined using the Vickers hardness test. The average hardness values at the Intermetallic (IMC) layer zone and without the IMC layer zone were higher than that of the welding wire ER4043. The tensile strength test showed a fracture at the intermetallic layer when the tensile strength is 225.9 MPa. The tensile value test indicated the average of welds was equivalent to the 85% tensile strength of the A5052 aluminum alloy. The thickness of the intermetallic layers is non-uniform at different positions with the ranges from 1.95 to 5 μm. The quality of the butt joint is better if the intermetallic layer is minimized. The Si crystals which appeared at the welding seam, indicating that this element participated actively during the welding process, also contributed to the IMC layer's formation.

  7. Experimental study on the effect of welding speed and tool pin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a novel solid state welding process for joining metallic alloys and ... compared with conventional welding methods such as TIG or MIG. ... Conventional fusion welding of aluminium alloys often produces a weld which .... Ti. 0.1%. Cr. 0.25%. Al. Balance. 3.1 Configuration of welding tool geometry.

  8. Nuclear Technology. Course 28: Welding Inspection. Module 28-3, Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG), Metal Inert Gas (MIG) and Submerged Arc Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espy, John

    This third in a series of ten modules for a course titled Welding Inspection presents the apparatus, process techniques, procedures, applications, associated defects, and inspection for the tungsten inert gas, metal inert gas, and submerged arc welding processes. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1)…

  9. Effect of welding process on the microstructure and properties of dissimilar weld joints between low alloy steel and duplex stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Lu, Min-xu; Zhang, Lei; Chang, Wei; Xu, Li-ning; Hu, Li-hua

    2012-06-01

    To obtain high-quality dissimilar weld joints, the processes of metal inert gas (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding for duplex stainless steel (DSS) and low alloy steel were compared in this paper. The microstructure and corrosion morphology of dissimilar weld joints were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM); the chemical compositions in different zones were detected by energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS); the mechanical properties were measured by microhardness test, tensile test, and impact test; the corrosion behavior was evaluated by polarization curves. Obvious concentration gradients of Ni and Cr exist between the fusion boundary and the type II boundary, where the hardness is much higher. The impact toughness of weld metal by MIG welding is higher than that by TIG welding. The corrosion current density of TIG weld metal is higher than that of MIG weld metal in a 3.5wt% NaCl solution. Galvanic corrosion happens between low alloy steel and weld metal, revealing the weakness of low alloy steel in industrial service. The quality of joints produced by MIG welding is better than that by TIG welding in mechanical performance and corrosion resistance. MIG welding with the filler metal ER2009 is the suitable welding process for dissimilar metals jointing between UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel and low alloy steel in practical application.

  10. The possibility of using laser and micro-jet technology in the welding of structural elements of vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech MAJEWSKI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A paper presents the possibility of laser welding using micro-jet cooling. The effect of micro-jet cooling on microstructure and mechanical properties of the weld metal deposit was carried out. New welding process was analyzed for use in the automotive industry. Studies have confirmed the positive effect of cooling micro-jet cooling both for the MIG welding and laser welding.

  11. Efeito do formato de onda e gás de proteção sobre a taxa de fusão e geometria do cordão na soldagem MIG/MAG-PV Effect of waveform and shielding gas on melting rate and bead geometry for MIG/MAG-PV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Saldanha do Nascimento

    2012-03-01

    /MAG-PV with great potential for overlaying and root pass applications, it is fundamental to assess the effect of process parameters on the bead formation and wire-burn rate, specially the latter, since higher melting rate is achieved by this process during negative polarity. Therefore, this work aims to assess the effect of two different waveforms previously investigated, in which current pauses before and after the main pulse during positive polarity (this condition leads to better stability. The shielding gas effect was also investigated for the bead geometry (width, penetration and reinforcement, melting rate, deposition rate and deposition efficiency. Bead-on-plate weldments were carried out over SAE 1020 carbon steel with MIG/MAG-PV welding at 30 and 50% of time in negative polarity. The employed shielding gases were Ar+2%O2, Ar+5%O2, Ar+8%CO2 and Ar+15%CO2. The arc length was kept approximately the same during the runs by varying the wire-feed speed. Also, the relationship between wire-feed speed and travel speed was kept constant in order to keep the same amount of deposited material. It is possible to conclude that the better understanding on the relationship among bead geometry, parameters and consumables leads to assure a desired bead profile, in accordance with a given application. Moreover, the melting rate analysis allows selecting more coherent parameters and consumables to assure lower material losses and high productivity.

  12. The Effect Of Different Micro-Jet Streams Number On Plastic Properties Of Welds

    OpenAIRE

    Hadryś D.; Węgrzyn T.; Piwnik J.

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of that paper was analysing of plastic properties of welds made with micro-jet cooling. New technology of micro-jet welding could be regarded as a new way to improve plastic properties of welds. It allows to obtain welds with better properties in comparison to ordinary welding method. Moreover, it is possible to steering of weld structure and properties of the weld. During research Erichsen cupping tests and bending tests were carried out for welds made by MIG method with micro-...

  13. Automatic welding and cladding in heavy fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altamer, A. de

    1980-01-01

    A description is given of the automatic welding processes used by an Italian fabricator of pressure vessels for petrochemical and nuclear plant. The automatic submerged arc welding, submerged arc strip cladding, pulsed TIG, hot wire TIG and MIG welding processes have proved satisfactory in terms of process reliability, metal deposition rate, and cost effectiveness for low alloy and carbon steels. An example shows sequences required during automatic butt welding, including heat treatments. Factors which govern satisfactory automatic welding include automatic anti-drift rotator device, electrode guidance and bead programming system, the capability of single and dual head operation, flux recovery and slag removal systems, operator environment and controls, maintaining continuity of welding and automatic reverse side grinding. Automatic welding is used for: joining vessel sections; joining tubes to tubeplate; cladding of vessel rings and tubes, dished ends and extruded nozzles; nozzle to shell and butt welds, including narrow gap welding. (author)

  14. The Effect Of Different Micro-Jet Streams Number On Plastic Properties Of Welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadryś D.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of that paper was analysing of plastic properties of welds made with micro-jet cooling. New technology of micro-jet welding could be regarded as a new way to improve plastic properties of welds. It allows to obtain welds with better properties in comparison to ordinary welding method. Moreover, it is possible to steering of weld structure and properties of the weld. During research Erichsen cupping tests and bending tests were carried out for welds made by MIG method with micro-jet cooling. Argon was cooling medium. Different numbers of micro-jet streams were used to weld cooling. Different plastic properties were obtained for different numbers of micro-jet streams. In this research welds made by new method of welding (welding with micro-jet cooling were compared with welds made by ordinary welding method.

  15. Mechanical Properties of Plug Welds after Micro-Jet Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadryś D.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available New technology of micro-jet welding could be regarded as a new way to improve mechanical properties of plug welds. The main purpose of that paper was analyzing of mechanical properties of plug welds made by MIG welding method with micro-jet cooling. The main way for it was comparison of plug welds made by MIG welding method with micro-jet cooling and plug welds made by ordinary MIG welding method. It is interesting for steel because higher amount of acicular ferrite (AF in weld metal deposit (WMD is obtained in MIG welding method with micro-jet cooling in relation to ordinary MIG welding method. This article presents the influence of the cooling medium and the number of micro-jet streams on mechanical properties of the welded joint. Mechanical properties were described by force which is necessary to destroy weld joint.

  16. [New welding processes and health effects of welding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Vecchia, G Marina; Maestrelli, Piero

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes some of the recent developments in the control technology to enhance capability of Pulse Gas Metal Arc Welding. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) processing has been also considered. FSW is a new solid-state joining technique. Heat generated by friction at the rotating tool softens the material being welded. FSW can be considered a green and energy-efficient technique without deleterious fumes, gas, radiation, and noise. Application of new welding processes is limited and studies on health effects in exposed workers are lacking. Acute and chronic health effects of conventional welding have been described. Metal fume fever and cross-shift decline of lung function are the main acute respiratory effects. Skin and eyes may be affected by heat, electricity and UV radiations. Chronic effects on respiratory system include chronic bronchitis, a benign pneumoconiosis (siderosis), asthma, and a possible increase in the incidence of lung cancer. Pulmonary infections are increased in terms of severity, duration, and frequency among welders.

  17. Mechanical Properties of Plug Welds after Micro-Jet Cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Hadryś D.

    2016-01-01

    New technology of micro-jet welding could be regarded as a new way to improve mechanical properties of plug welds. The main purpose of that paper was analyzing of mechanical properties of plug welds made by MIG welding method with micro-jet cooling. The main way for it was comparison of plug welds made by MIG welding method with micro-jet cooling and plug welds made by ordinary MIG welding method. It is interesting for steel because higher amount of acicular ferrite (AF) in weld metal deposit...

  18. Effect of the weld joint configuration on stressed components, residual stresses and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cevik, Bekir; Oezer, Alpay; Oezcatalbas, Yusuf [Gazi Univ., Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-03-01

    The effect of the weld joint configuration on components has been studied, which are under service loads, under repair or construction and the residual stresses as well as the mechanical properties of the joint have been determined. For this purpose, a horizontal positioned tensile testing device and a semi-automatic MIG welding machine have been used and then the weld joints of the plates were subjected to different elastic stresses. When the temperature of the joined elements decreased to room temperature, applied elastic stresses were released. By this means, the effects of the existing tensile stresses in the joined parts and the tensile stresses created by the welding processes were investigated. The tensile stresses occurring in the joined elements were determined by using the photo-elasticity analysis method and the hole-drilling method. Also, tensile-shear tests were applied in order to determine the effect of permanent tensile loads on the mechanical properties of the joint. Experimental results showed that the application of corner welded lap joints for components under tensile loading significantly decrease the shear strength and yielding capacities of the joint. (orig.)

  19. Effects of heat input on mechanical properties of metal inert gas welded 1.6 mm thick galvanized steel sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafiqul, M I; Ishak, M; Rahman, M M

    2012-01-01

    It is usually a lot easier and less expensive to galvanize steel before it is welded into useful products. Galvanizing afterwards is almost impossible. In this research work, Galvanized Steel was welded by using the ER 308L stainless steel filler material. This work was done to find out an alternative way of welding and investigate the effects of heat input on the mechanical properties of butt welded joints of Galvanized Steel. A 13.7 kW maximum capacity MIG welding machine was used to join 1.6 mm thick sheet of galvanized steel with V groove and no gap between mm. Heat inputs was gradually increased from 21.06 to 25.07 joules/mm in this study. The result shows almost macro defects free welding and with increasing heat input the ultimate tensile strength and welding efficiency decrease. The Vickers hardness also decreases at HAZ with increasing heat input and for each individual specimen; hardness was lowest in heat affected zone (HAZ), intermediate in base metal and maximum in welded zone. The fracture for all specimens was in the heat affected zone while testing in the universal testing machine.

  20. Effects of heat input on mechanical properties of metal inert gas welded 1.6 mm thick galvanized steel sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiqul, M. I.; Ishak, M.; Rahman, M. M.

    2012-09-01

    It is usually a lot easier and less expensive to galvanize steel before it is welded into useful products. Galvanizing afterwards is almost impossible. In this research work, Galvanized Steel was welded by using the ER 308L stainless steel filler material. This work was done to find out an alternative way of welding and investigate the effects of heat input on the mechanical properties of butt welded joints of Galvanized Steel. A 13.7 kW maximum capacity MIG welding machine was used to join 1.6 mm thick sheet of galvanized steel with V groove and no gap between mm. Heat inputs was gradually increased from 21.06 to 25.07 joules/mm in this study. The result shows almost macro defects free welding and with increasing heat input the ultimate tensile strength and welding efficiency decrease. The Vickers hardness also decreases at HAZ with increasing heat input and for each individual specimen; hardness was lowest in heat affected zone (HAZ), intermediate in base metal and maximum in welded zone. The fracture for all specimens was in the heat affected zone while testing in the universal testing machine.

  1. Effects of Fusion Tack Welds on Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Pendleton, M. L.; Brooke, S. A.; Russell, C. K.

    2012-01-01

    In order to know whether fusion tack welds would affect the strength of self-reacting friction stir seam welds in 2195-T87 aluminum alloy, the fracture stresses of 144 tensile test coupons cut from 24 welded panels containing segments of friction stir welds were measured. Each of the panels was welded under unique processing conditions. A measure of the effect of the tack welds for each panel was devised. An analysis of the measures of the tack weld effect supported the hypothesis that fusion tack welds do not affect the strength of self-reacting friction stir welds to a 5% level of confidence.

  2. Investigation on the Effect of Pulsed Energy on Strength of Fillet Lap Laser Welded AZ31B Magnesium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleh, M. N. M.; Ishak, M.; Aiman, M. H.; Idris, S. R. A.; Romlay, F. R. M.

    2017-09-01

    AZ31B magnesium alloy have been hugely applied in the aerospace, automotive, and electronic industries. However, welding thin sheet AZ31B was challenging due to its properties which is easily to evaporated especially using conventional fusion welding method such as metal inert gas (MIG). Laser could be applied to weld this metal since it produces lower heat input. The application of fiber laser welding has been widely since this type of laser could produce better welding product especially in the automotive sectors. Low power fiber laser was used to weld this non-ferrous metal where pulse wave (PW) mode was used. Double fillet lap joint was applied to weld as thin as 0.6 mm thick of AZ31B and the effect of pulsed energy on the strength was studied. Bond width, throat length, and penetration depth also was studied related to the pulsed energy which effecting the joint. Higher pulsed energy contributes to the higher fracture load with angle of irradiation lower than 3 °

  3. Effect of Welding Parameters on Dilution and Weld Bead Geometry in Cladding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The effect of pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) variables on the dilution and weld bead geometry in cladding X65 pipeline steel with 316L stainless steel was studied. Using a full factorial method, a series of experiments were carried out to know the effect of wire feed rate, welding speed, distance between gas nozzle and plate, and the vertical angle of welding on dilution and weld bead geometry. The findings indicate that the dilution of weld metal and its dimension i.e. width, height and depth increase with the feed rate, but the contact angle of the bead decreases first and then increases. Meantime, welding speed has an opposite effect except for dilution. There is an interaction effect between welding parameters at the contact angle. The results also show forehand welding or decreasing electrode extension decrease the angle of contact. Finally,a mathematical model is contrived to highlight the relationship between welding variables with dilution and weld bead geometry.

  4. Research on the Effects of Technical Parameters on the Molding of the Weld by A-TIG Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Kai; Pan, Wu

    2012-01-01

    The effects of welding parameters on the molding of weld by A-TIG welding of a 4mm thickness mild steel plate is studied in the present paper. The results obtained show that: as welding current increases A-TIG welding penetration gets deeper than TIG welding; size and shape of HAZ has remarkable change; A-TIG welding has the narrower weld pool width than TIG welding.

  5. Seleção dos parâmetros através dos custos de soldagem para aplicação de revestimento com ligas de níquel depositadas pelo processo MIG/MAG Using the welding costs to select welding parameters for Weld Overlay with nickel alloy through the GMAW process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Rodolfo Paulino Pessoa

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho foram calculados e comparados os custos de soldagem associados a cada um dos ensaios realizados, como forma de determinar parâmetros operacionais adequados e economicamente viáveis para soldagem com o processo MIG/MAG com transferência metálica por curto-circuito, visando uma correta deposição de revestimentos com ligas de níquel sobre um substrato de aço C-Mn. O número de ensaios a serem realizados, foi determinado pelo uso do método Taguchi que dividiu os ensaios em duas matrizes L9, resultando num total de 18 ensaios. Na comparação dos gastos despendidos em cada um dos ensaios foi utilizado o custo direto total da soldagem de um revestimento com 55 mm de largura e 190 mm de comprimento, utilizando uma sobreposição de 50%. Com base nos resultados dos ensaios foram pré-selecionados quatro ensaios (R7, R11, R12 e RC4, dentre os quais o ensaio R11 apresentou o menor custo. Mas vale ressaltar que nos quatro ensaios pré-selecionados o material de adição utilizado foi a liga 625, pois esta liga apresentar um custo do arame-eletrodo muito inferior as demais ligas (C-276 e 686. Assim a escolha do material de adição para aplicação do revestimento ficou restrita somente a liga 625.In this work were calculated and compared the welding costs for each of the tests performed to determine operational parameters and economically feasible for welding with GMAW process in a short circuiting transfer mode, aiming at a correct weld overlay with nickel alloy on a substrate of C-Mn steel. The number of tests to be performed was determined by using the Taguchi method that divided the tests into two L9 orthogonal arrays resulting in a total of 18 experiments. To compare the costs incurred in each of the tests we used the total direct cost of welding a layer with dimensions of 55 x 190 mm, using an overlap of 50%. Based on the results of the tests were pre-selected four tests (R7, R11, R12 and RC4, among which the test R11 has the

  6. The effects of welded joint characteristics on its properties in HDPE thermal fusion welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Hongbin; Peng, Jun

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, PE100 pipes with the diameter of 200 mm and the thickness of 11.9 mm were used as material. The welded joints were obtained in different welding pressures with the optimal welding temperature of 220∘C. Reheating process on the welded joints with the temperature of 130∘C was carried out. The joints exhibited X-type, and the cause of X-type joints was discussed. The temperature field in the forming process of welded joints was measured, and tensile and bending tests on welded joints were carried out. The fracture surface of welded joints was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and crystallinity calculation was taken by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The mechanism of X-type weld profile effects on welded joints properties was analyzed. It was concluded that the mechanical properties of welded joints decrease with the reduced X distance between lines.

  7. Mig-6 plays a critical role in the regulation of cholesterol homeostasis and bile acid synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bon Jeong Ku

    Full Text Available The disruption of cholesterol homeostasis leads to an increase in cholesterol levels which results in the development of cardiovascular disease. Mitogen Inducible Gene 6 (Mig-6 is an immediate early response gene that can be induced by various mitogens, stresses, and hormones. To identify the metabolic role of Mig-6 in the liver, we conditionally ablated Mig-6 in the liver using the Albumin-Cre mouse model (Alb(cre/+Mig-6(f/f; Mig-6(d/d. Mig-6(d/d mice exhibit hepatomegaly and fatty liver. Serum levels of total, LDL, and HDL cholesterol and hepatic lipid were significantly increased in the Mig-6(d/d mice. The daily excretion of fecal bile acids was significantly decreased in the Mig-6(d/d mice. DNA microarray analysis of mRNA isolated from the livers of these mice showed alterations in genes that regulate lipid metabolism, bile acid, and cholesterol synthesis, while the expression of genes that regulate biliary excretion of bile acid and triglyceride synthesis showed no difference in the Mig-6(d/d mice compared to Mig-6(f/f controls. These results indicate that Mig-6 plays an important role in cholesterol homeostasis and bile acid synthesis. Mice with liver specific conditional ablation of Mig-6 develop hepatomegaly and increased intrahepatic lipid and provide a novel model system to investigate the genetic and molecular events involved in the regulation of cholesterol homeostasis and bile acid synthesis. Defining the molecular mechanisms by which Mig-6 regulates cholesterol homeostasis will provide new insights into the development of more effective ways for the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disease.

  8. Effects of post weld heat treatment and weld overlay on the residual stress and mechanical properties in dissimilar metal weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Wagner R.C.; Ribeiro, Vladimir S.; Vilela, Alisson H.F.; Almeida, Camila R.O.; Rabello, Emerson G., E-mail: wrcc@cdtn.br, E-mail: camilarezende.cr@gmail.com, E-mail: egr@cdtn.br, E-mail: vladimirsoler@hotmail.com, E-mail: ahfv02@outlook.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The object of this work is a dissimilar metal weld (DMW) pipe joint between carbon steel (A-106 Gr B) and stainless steel (A-312 TP316L) pipes and filler metals of Nickel alloy (82/182), which find wide application in the field of chemical, oil, petroleum industries, fossil fuel and nuclear power plant. A lot of the failures that have occurred in dissimilar metal welded are affected greatly by residual stresses. Residual stress is often a cause of premature failure of critical components under normal operation of welded components. Several methods have been tested and developed for removing the tensile residual stresses. The aim of the methods is to reduce the tensile stress state or to create compressive stresses at a predefined area, such as the inner surface of a welded pipe joint. Post weld heat treatment (PWHT) and weld overlay (WOL) are two of the residual stress mitigation methods which reduce the tensile residual stress, create compressive stresses and arrest crack initiation and crack growth. The technique used to substantially minimized or eliminated this failure development in the root weld is the post weld heat treatments (stress relief heat treatment) or the weld overlay. In this work was studied the effectiveness in reducing internal residual stress in dissimilar metal welded pipe joints subjected to post weld heat treatment and weld overlay, measurement by hole-drilling strain-gage method of stress relaxation. Also held was mechanical characterization of the welded pipe joint itself. (author)

  9. Effects of post weld heat treatment and weld overlay on the residual stress and mechanical properties in dissimilar metal weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Wagner R.C.; Ribeiro, Vladimir S.; Vilela, Alisson H.F.; Almeida, Camila R.O.; Rabello, Emerson G.

    2017-01-01

    The object of this work is a dissimilar metal weld (DMW) pipe joint between carbon steel (A-106 Gr B) and stainless steel (A-312 TP316L) pipes and filler metals of Nickel alloy (82/182), which find wide application in the field of chemical, oil, petroleum industries, fossil fuel and nuclear power plant. A lot of the failures that have occurred in dissimilar metal welded are affected greatly by residual stresses. Residual stress is often a cause of premature failure of critical components under normal operation of welded components. Several methods have been tested and developed for removing the tensile residual stresses. The aim of the methods is to reduce the tensile stress state or to create compressive stresses at a predefined area, such as the inner surface of a welded pipe joint. Post weld heat treatment (PWHT) and weld overlay (WOL) are two of the residual stress mitigation methods which reduce the tensile residual stress, create compressive stresses and arrest crack initiation and crack growth. The technique used to substantially minimized or eliminated this failure development in the root weld is the post weld heat treatments (stress relief heat treatment) or the weld overlay. In this work was studied the effectiveness in reducing internal residual stress in dissimilar metal welded pipe joints subjected to post weld heat treatment and weld overlay, measurement by hole-drilling strain-gage method of stress relaxation. Also held was mechanical characterization of the welded pipe joint itself. (author)

  10. Plastic properties of weld after micro-jet cooling

    OpenAIRE

    J. Piwnik; D. Hadryś; G. Skorulski

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: of that paper was analysing main plastic properties of welds made by MIG method with micro-jet cooling. The main reason of it was investigate possibilities of getting better plastic properties of welds made by MIG method with micro-jet cooling than welds made by ordinary welding method. It is possible because higher amount of acicular ferrite (AF) in WMD (weld metal deposit) is obtained in MIG method with micro-jet cooling in relation to ordinary welding method.Design/methodology/app...

  11. Effect of Scratches on Pinch Welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korinko, P

    2005-01-01

    Fill stems for tritium reservoirs have stringent scratch requirements such that any indications that appear to have depth are cause for rework or rejection. A scoping study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of scratches approximately 0.0015 to 0.002 inch deep on the fitness for service and bond quality. The stems were characterized using borescope before and after welding. The four stems were welded with near optimal weld parameters, proof tested, and examined metallographically. The stems were radiographed, proof tested, and examined metallographically. The scratches did not adversely affect (1) the weld integrity based on radiography, (2) the ability to withstand the proof pressure, and (3) the weld quality based on metallographic cross-sections. Based on these limited results at a nominal weld current, the weld process is very robust. It may be able to recover from manufacturing defects and inspection anomalies worse than those expected for typical fill stem manufacturing processes; additional testing specific to each application over a range of weld heats is needed to verify applicability of these results

  12. Effect of weld spacing on microstructure and mechanical properties of CLAM electron beam welding joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Yutao; Huang, Bo, E-mail: aufa0007@163.com; Zhang, Junyu; Zhang, Baoren; Liu, Shaojun; Huang, Qunying

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The welded joints of CLAM steel with different weld spacings have been fabricated with electron beam welding, and a simplified model of CLAM sheet was proposed. • The microstructure and mechanical properties such as microhardness, impact and tensile were investigated at different welding spacing for both conditions of as-welded and post weld heat treatment (PWHT). • The effect of the welding thermal cycle was significantly when the weld spacings were smaller than 4 mm. • When the weld spacing was small enough, the original microstructures would be fragmented with the high heat input. - Abstract: China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel has been chosen as the primary structural material in the designs of dual function lithium-lead (DFLL) blanket for fusion reactors, China helium cooled ceramic breeder (HCCB) test blanket module (TBM) for ITER and China fusion engineering test reactor (CFETR) blanket. The cooling components of the blankets are designed with high density cooling channels (HDCCs) to remove the high nuclear thermal effectively. Hence, the welding spacing among the channels are small. In this paper, the welded joints of CLAM steel with different weld spacings have been fabricated with electron beam welding (EBW). The weld spacing was designed to be 2 mm, 3 mm, 4 mm, 6 mm and 8 mm. The microstructure and mechanical properties such as microhardness, impact and tensile were investigated at different welding spacing for both conditions of as-welded and post weld heat treatment (PWHT). The PWHT is tempering at 740 °C for 120 min. The results showed that the grain size in the heat affected zone (HAZ) increased with the increasing weld spacing, and the joint with small weld spacing had a better performance after PWHT. This work would give useful guidance to improve the preparation of the cooling components of blanket.

  13. Uma metodologia para parametrização do processo MIG/MAG CA A methodology for parameterization of the AC MIG/MAG process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Américo Scotti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available O processo MIG/MAG CA tem um potencial muito grande de aplicação, por permitir unir as características da soldagem MIG/MAG convencional (corrente contínua, com o eletrodo no positivo com as de se usar corrente negativa na soldagem MIG/MAG. Entretanto, o formato de onda de corrente (alternada, pulsada no positivo e constante no negativo demanda uma seleção criteriosa de seus inúmeros parâmetros de regulagem, o que vem limitando o estudo e aplicação desta versão de processo MIG/MAG. O objetivo deste trabalho foi propor e avaliar uma metodologia capaz de estimar os parâmetros de regulagem do processo MIG/MAG CA, de tal forma a se obter soldas com estabilidade de comprimento de arco e cordões com geometria adequada. É feita uma descrição passo a passo da definição dos parâmetros de entrada e da forma de se obter experimentalmente alguns valores de parâmetros necessários para estimação de outros valores de regulagem. As equações de estimação são apresentadas e discutidas. É feita uma demonstração da aplicação da metodologia, com a validação dos resultados pela comparação entre valores estimados e reais.The AC MIG/MAG process presents remarkable application potential, since it allows join the characteristics of the conventional MIG/MAG process (direct current, electrode positive with the ones obtained when negative current is applied in MIG/MAG welding. However, the current wave shape (alternate, pulsed in positive and constant in negative polarities demands a criterions selection of its innumerous setting parameters, fact that limits the development and application of this process version. The objective of this work was to propose and assess a methodology able to estimate the setting parameters of the CA MIG/MAG welding process, in such a way to result in welds with arc length stability and adequate bead geometry. A step-a-step description of the input parameter definitions and of the way to experimentally obtain

  14. Seleção de parâmetros através do método Taguchi para soldagem de revestimento com ligas de níquel pelo processo MIG/MAG Using the Taguchi method to select welding parameters for weld overlay with nickel alloy through the GMAW process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Rodolfo Paulino Pessoa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho utilizou-se o método Taguchi (planejamento Robusto de experimentos, para cumprir com um reduzido número de ensaios, dois objetivos: obter a influência dos fatores de controle sobre as variáveis respostas e determinar as condições ideais para aplicação das ligas de níquel nas soldagens de revestimentos através do processo MIG/MAG com transferência metálica por curto-circuito. Foram escolhidos seis fatores de controle com três níveis cada: Tensão de referência, Velocidade de soldagem, Tipo de tecimento, Técnica da tocha, Gás de proteção e o Material de adição. Por sua vez as variáveis respostas escolhidas foram: Diluição (D e Razão entre o reforço e a largura (R/L. As soldagens foram realizadas na posição plana por simples deposição sobre chapas de aço ASTM 516 Gr60 com dimensões de 200 x 50 x 12,7 mm. O uso do tecimento proporcionou cordões com baixos valores da razão R/L e obteve valores bastante baixos de diluição chegando à ordem de 5%. A combinação dos níveis dos fatores de controle apontados como ótimos pelo método Taguchi resultaram em valores para as variáveis repostas consideradas adequadas para a soldagem de revestimento.In this work aim the Taguchi method (Robust design of experiments was chosen to achieve with a limited number of tests two objectives: the first was to the influence of the control factors (welding parameters on quality characteristics (weld bead geometry and the second was to determine optimal conditions for weld overlay with nickel alloy through the GMAW process in a short circuiting transfer mode. Six control factors were employed with three levels each: Reference voltage, Welding speed, Arc oscillation, welding gun orientation (Perpendicular, forehand and backhand, Shielding gas and filler metal. Already the employed quality characteristics were: Percent dilution (D and the ration between reinforcement and bead width (R/L. The weldings were accomplished using

  15. EFFECTS OF ELECTRODE DEFORMATION OF RESISTANCE SPOT WELDING ON 304 AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL WELD GEOMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nachimani Charde

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The resistance spot welding process is accomplished by forcing huge amounts of current flow from the upper electrode tip through the base metals to the lower electrode tip, or vice versa or in both directions. A weld joint is established between the metal sheets through fusion, resulting in a strong bond between the sheets without occupying additional space. The growth of the weld nugget (bond between sheets is therefore determined from the welding current density; sufficient time for current delivery; reasonable electrode pressing force; and the area provided for current delivery (electrode tip. The welding current and weld time control the root penetration, while the electrode pressing force and electrode tips successfully accomplish the connection during the welding process. Although the welding current and weld time cause the heat generation at the areas concerned (electrode tip area, the electrode tips’ diameter and electrode pressing forces also directly influence the welding process. In this research truncated-electrode deformation and mushrooming effects are observed, which result in the welded areas being inconsistent due to the expulsion. The copper to chromium ratio is varied from the tip to the end of the electrode whilst the welding process is repeated. The welding heat affects the electrode and the electrode itself influences the shape of the weld geometry.

  16. Effects of alloying element on weld characterization of laser-arc hybrid welding of pure copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Kangda; Gong, Mengcheng; Xie, Yong; Gao, Ming; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2018-06-01

    Effects of alloying elements of Si and Sn on weld characterizations of laser-arc hybrid welded pure copper (Cu) with thickness of 2 mm was studied in detail by using different wires. The weld microstructure was analyzed, and the mechanical properties (micro-hardness and tensile property), conductivity and corrosion resistance were tested. The results showed that the alloying elements benefit the growth of column grains within weld fusion zone (FZ), increase the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the FZ and weld corrosion resistance, and decrease weld conductivity. The mechanisms were discussed according to the results.

  17. STUDY AND ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECT OF WELDING PROCESS ON DISTORTION WITH 304L STAINLESS STEEL WELD JOINTS

    OpenAIRE

    Dhananjay Kumar*, Dharamvir mangal

    2017-01-01

    The effect of welding process on the distortion with 304L stainless steel 12thk weld joints made by TIG (tungsten inert gas) and SMAW (Shielded metal arc welding) welding process involving different type joint configuration have been studied. The joint configurations employed were double V-groove edge preparation for double side SMAW welding and square – butt preparation for double side TIG welding. All weld joints passed by radiographic. Distortion measurements were carried out using height ...

  18. Welding. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of nine terminal objectives for an intermediate welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (3 hours daily) course designed to prepare the student for employment in the field of welding. Electric welding and specialized (TIG & MIG)…

  19. Investigate The Effect Of Welding Parameters On Mechanical Properties During The Welding Of Al-6061 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Prasad

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Friction welding is a solid state welding technique which is being used in recent times to weld similar as well as dissimilar metals for getting defect free weld. Many combinations like low carbon to stainless steel austenitic to ferrite stainless steel aluminium to copper and titanium to aluminium or steel have been tried out by various solid state welding processes with quite good results. In the present work the 3 level full factorial design has been employed to investigate the effect of welding parameters on tensile strength toughness and heat generation during the welding of Al-6061 alloy. Mathematical relationships between friction welding parameters and mechanical properties like heat generation tensile strength and toughness have also been developed. An attempt has also been made to examine the fracture surfaces of test specimens using SEM. It has been found that welding speed is the most significant parameter thats affect the heat generation tensile strength and toughness. it has been found that tensile strength and toughness during welding increases with increased in welding speed while tensile strength and toughness initially increased as the welding time increases after that it decreased with increase in welding time. The difference in weight of alloying elements can be clearly seen by analyzing spectrum of elements.

  20. Nitrogen And Oxygen Amount In Weld After Welding With Micro-Jet Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Węgrzyn T.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Micro-jet cooling after welding was tested only for MIG welding process with argon, helium and nitrogen as a shielded gases. A paper presents a piece of information about nitrogen and oxygen in weld after micro-jet cooling. There are put down information about gases that could be chosen both for MIG/MAG welding and for micro-jet process. There were given main information about influence of various micro-jet gases on metallographic structure of steel welds. Mechanical properties of weld was presented in terms of nitrogen and oxygen amount in WMD (weld metal deposit.

  1. Recent developments in pipeline welding practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Fourteen chapters are included: overview of pipeline welding systems and quality assurance, CRC automatic welding system, H.C. Price Co. automatic welding system, semi-automatic MIG-welding process, partial penetration welding of steel pipes for gas distribution, construction procedures and quality control in offshore pipeline construction, welding in repair and maintenance of gas transmission pipelines, British Gas studies of welding on pressurized gas transmission pipelines, hot tapping pipelines, underwater welding for offshore pipelines and associated equipment, radial friction welding, material composition vs weld properties, review of NDT of pipeline welds, and safety assurance in pipeline construction. A bibliography of approximately 150 references is included, arranged according to subject and year.

  2. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2011-01-01

    Offers an introduction to the range of available welding technologies. This title includes chapters on individual techniques that cover principles, equipment, consumables and key quality issues. It includes material on such topics as the basics of electricity in welding, arc physics, and distortion, and the weldability of particular metals.$bThe first edition of Welding processes handbook established itself as a standard introduction and guide to the main welding technologies and their applications. This new edition has been substantially revised and extended to reflect the latest developments. After an initial introduction, the book first reviews gas welding before discussing the fundamentals of arc welding, including arc physics and power sources. It then discusses the range of arc welding techniques including TIG, plasma, MIG/MAG, MMA and submerged arc welding. Further chapters cover a range of other important welding technologies such as resistance and laser welding, as well as the use of welding techniqu...

  3. Effects of welding parameters on friction stir spot welding of high density polyethylene sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilici, Mustafa Kemal; Yukler, Ahmet Irfan

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: (a) Schematic illustration of the cross section of a friction stir spot weld and (b) Geometry of the weld bonded area, x: nugget thickness and y: the thickness of the upper sheet. Highlights: → Welding parameters affect the FSSW nugget formation and the strength of the joint. → Melting of polyethylene occurred in the vicinity of the tool pin. → The joint that fractures with a pull nugget failure mode has a higher strength. -- Abstract: Friction stir spot welding parameters affect the weld strength of thermoplastics, such as high density polyethylene (HDPE) sheets. The effects of the welding parameters on static strength of friction stir spot welds of high density polyethylene sheets were investigated. For maximizing the weld strength, the selection of welding parameters is very important. In lap-shear tests two fracture modes were observed; cross nugget failure and pull nugget failure. The tool rotational speed, tool plunge depth and dwell time were determined to be important in the joint formation and its strength. The joint which had a better strength fails with a pull nugget failure morphology. Weld cross section image analysis of the joints were done with a video spectral comparator. The plunge rate of the tool was determined to have a negligible effect on friction stir spot welding.

  4. [Study on the arc spectral information for welding quality diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Yong; Gu, Xiao-Yan; Li, Huan; Yang, Li-Jun

    2009-03-01

    Through collecting the spectral signals of TIG and MIG welding arc with spectrometer, the arc light radiations were analyzed based on the basic theory of plasma physics. The radiation of welding arc distributes over a broad range of frequency, from infrared to ultraviolet. The arc spectrum is composed of line spectra and continuous spectra. Due to the variation of metal density in the welding arc, there is great difference between the welding arc spectra of TIG and MIG in both their intensity and distribution. The MIG welding arc provides more line spectra of metal and the intensity of radiation is greater than TIG. The arc spectrum of TIG welding is stable during the welding process, disturbance factors that cause the spectral variations can be reflected by the spectral line related to the corresponding element entering the welding arc. The arc spectrum of MIG welding will fluctuate severely due to droplet transfer, which produces "noise" in the line spectrum aggregation zone. So for MIG welding, the spectral zone lacking spectral line is suitable for welding quality diagnosis. According to the characteristic of TIG and MIG, special spectral zones were selected for welding quality diagnosis. For TIG welding, the selected zone is in ultraviolet zone (230-300 nm). For MIG welding, the selected zone is in visible zone (570-590 nm). With the basic theory provided for welding quality diagnosis, the integral intensity of spectral signal in the selected zone of welding process with disturbing factor was studied to prove the theory. The results show that the welding quality and disturbance factors can be diagnosed with good signal to noise ratio in the selected spectral zone compared with signal in other spectral zone. The spectral signal can be used for real-time diagnosis of the welding quality.

  5. Nitrogen And Oxygen Amount In Weld After Welding With Micro-Jet Cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Węgrzyn T.; Piwnik J.

    2015-01-01

    Micro-jet cooling after welding was tested only for MIG welding process with argon, helium and nitrogen as a shielded gases. A paper presents a piece of information about nitrogen and oxygen in weld after micro-jet cooling. There are put down information about gases that could be chosen both for MIG/MAG welding and for micro-jet process. There were given main information about influence of various micro-jet gases on metallographic structure of steel welds. Mechanical properties of weld was pr...

  6. Effect of preemptive weld overlay sequence on residual stress distribution for dissimilar metal weld of Kori nuclear power plant pressurizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Hong Yeol; Song, Tae Kwang; Chun, Yun Bae; Oh, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Weld overlay is one of the residual stress mitigation method which arrest crack. An overlay weld sued in this manner is termed a Preemptive Weld OverLay(PWOL). PWOL was good for distribution of residual stress of Dissimilar Metal Weld(DMW) by previous research. Because range of overlay welding is wide relatively, residual stress distribution on PWR is affected by welding sequence. In order to examine the effect of welding sequence, PWOL was applied to a specific DMW of KORI nuclear power plant by finite element analysis method. As a result, the welding direction that from nozzle to pipe is better good for residual stress distribution on PWR.

  7. Effect of preemptive weld overlay sequence on residual stress distribution for dissimilar metal weld of Kori nuclear power plant pressurizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Hong Yeol; Song, Tae Kwang; Chun, Yun Bae; Oh, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae; Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong

    2008-01-01

    Weld overlay is one of the residual stress mitigation method which arrest crack. An overlay weld sued in this manner is termed a Preemptive Weld OverLay(PWOL). PWOL was good for distribution of residual stress of Dissimilar Metal Weld(DMW) by previous research. Because range of overlay welding is wide relatively, residual stress distribution on PWR is affected by welding sequence. In order to examine the effect of welding sequence, PWOL was applied to a specific DMW of KORI nuclear power plant by finite element analysis method. As a result, the welding direction that from nozzle to pipe is better good for residual stress distribution on PWR

  8. Effect of rotation speed and welding speed on Friction Stir Welding of AA1100 Aluminium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, P.; Bojanampati, S.; Karthikeyan, R.; Ganithi, R.

    2018-04-01

    Aluminum AA1100 is the most widely used grade of Aluminium due to its excellent corrosion resistance, high ductility and reflective finish, the selected material was welded with Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process on a CNC machine, using a combination of different tool rotation speed (1500 rpm, 2500 rpm, 3500 rpm) and welding speed (10 mm/min, 30 mm/min, 50 mm/min) as welding parameters. The effect of FSW using this welding parameter was studied by measuring the ultimate tensile strength of the welded joints. A high-speed steel tool was prepared for welding the Aluminium AA1100 alloy having an 8mm shoulder diameter and pin dimension of 4mm diameter and 2.8 mm length. The welded joints were tested using the universal testing machine. It was found that Ultimate Tensile Strength of FSW specimen was highest with a value of 98.08 MPa when the weld was performed at rotation speed of 1500 RPM and welding speed of 50 mm/min.

  9. Effects of Flux Precoating and Process Parameter on Welding Performance of Inconel 718 Alloy TIG Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsuan-Liang; Wu, Tong-Min; Cheng, Ching-Min

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of activating flux on the depth-to-width ratio (DWR) and hot cracking susceptibility of Inconel 718 alloy tungsten inert gas (TIG) welds. The Taguchi method is employed to investigate the welding parameters that affect the DWR of weld bead and to achieve optimal conditions in the TIG welds that are coated with activating flux in TIG (A-TIG) process. There are eight single-component fluxes used in the initial experiment to evaluate the penetration capability of A-TIG welds. The experimental results show that the Inconel 718 alloy welds precoated with 50% SiO2 and 50% MoO3 flux were provided with better welding performance such as DWR and hot cracking susceptibility. The experimental procedure of TIG welding process using mixed-component flux and optimal conditions not only produces a significant increase in DWR of weld bead, but also decreases the hot cracking susceptibility of Inconel 718 alloy welds.

  10. Effects of heat input on the pitting resistance of Inconel 625 welds by overlay welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun Seok; Park, Young IL; Lee, Hae Woo

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the relationship between the dilution ratio of the weld zone and pitting resistance depending on the heat input to welding of the Inconel alloy. Each specimen was produced by electroslag welding using Inconel 625 as the filler metal. In the weld zone of each specimen, dendrite grains were observed near the fusion line and equiaxed grains were observed on the surface. It was also observed that a melted zone with a high Fe content was formed around the fusion line, which became wider as the welding heat input increased. In order to evaluate the pitting resistance, potentiodynamic polarization tests and CPT tests were conducted. The results of these tests confirmed that there is no difference between the pitting resistances of each specimen, as the structures of the surfaces were identical despite the effect of the differences in the welding heat input for each specimen and the minor dilution effect on the surface.

  11. Fatigue life estimation of welded components considering welding residual stress relaxation and its mean stress effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Seung Ho; Han, Jeong Woo; Shin, Byung Chun; Kim, Jae Hoon

    2003-01-01

    The fatigue life of welded joints is sensitive to welding residual stress and complexity of their geometric shapes. To predict the fatigue life more reasonably, the effects of welding residual stress and its relaxation on their fatigue strengths should be considered quantitatively, which are often regarded to be equivalent to the effects of mean stresses by external loads. The hot-spot stress concept should be also adopted which can reduce the dependence of fatigue strengths for various welding details. Considering the factors mentioned above, a fatigue life prediction model using the modified Goodman's diagram was proposed. In this model, an equivalent stress was introduced which is composed of the mean stress based on the hot-spot stress concept and the relaxed welding residual stress. From the verification of the proposed model to real welding details, it is proved that this model can be applied to predict reasonably their fatigue lives

  12. Effect of weld line shape on material flow during friction stir welding of aluminum and steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasui, Toshiaki; Ando, Naoyuki; Morinaka, Shinpei; Mizushima, Hiroki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    The effect of weld line shape on material flow during the friction stir welding of aluminum and steel was investigated. The material flow velocity was evaluated with simulated experiments using plasticine as the simulant material. The validity of the simulated experiments was verified by the marker material experiments on aluminum. The circumferential velocity of material around the probe increased with the depth from the weld surface. The effect is significant in cases where the advancing side is located on the outside of curve and those with higher curvature. Thus, there is an influence of weld line shape on material flow

  13. Effect of welding speed on microstructural and mechanical properties of friction stir welded Inconel 600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, K.H.; Fujii, H.; Nakata, K.

    2009-01-01

    In order to evaluate the properties of a friction stir welded Ni base alloy, Inconel 600 (single phase type) was selected. Sound friction stir welds without weld defect were obtained at 150 and 200 mm/min in welding speed, however, a groove like defect occurred at 250 mm/min. The electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) method was used to analyze the grain boundary character distribution. As a result, dynamic recrystallization was observed at all conditions, and the grain refinement was achieved in the stir zone, and it was gradually accelerated from 19 μm in average grain size of the base material to 3.4 μm in the stir zone with increasing the welding speed. It also has an effect on the mechanical properties so that friction stir welded zone showed 20% higher microhardness and 10% higher tensile strength than those of base material.

  14. Effect of constraint condition and internal medium on residual stress under overlay welding for dissimilar metal welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Tae Kwang; Kim, Yun Jae; Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong; Kim, Jong Sung; Kim, Jin Weon

    2007-01-01

    In nuclear power plants, residual stress of dissimilar metal weld propagates cracks in the weld metal which is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. Overlay welding is a process widely used to mitigate residual stress replacing inside tensile stress by compression stress. However, according to the result of this study the effect of overlay welding on residual stress depends on both internal medium and constraint condition. The purpose of this study is to maximize the positive effect of overlay welding by finite element analyses

  15. Effect of tool shape and welding parameters on mechanical properties and microstructure of dissimilar friction stir welded aluminium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Chetan Aneja; Amit Handa

    2016-01-01

    In the present experimental study, dissimilar aluminum alloy AA5083 and AA6082 were friction stir welded by varying tool shape, welding speed and rotary speed of the tool in order to investigate the effect of varying tool shape and welding parameters on the mechanical properties as well as microstructure. The friction stir welding (FSW) process parameters have great influence on heat input per unit length of weld. The outcomes of experimental study prove that mechanical properties increases w...

  16. MIG-6 negatively regulates STAT3 phosphorylation in uterine epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Yang, Woo Sub; Lee, Jae Hee; Kim, Byung Gak; Broaddus, Russell R.; Lim, Jeong M.; Kim, Tae Hoon; Jeong, Jae-Wook

    2017-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common malignancy of the female genital tract. Progesterone (P4) has been used for several decades in endometrial cancer treatment, especially in women who wish to retain fertility. However, it is unpredictable which patients will respond to P4 treatment and which may have a P4 resistant cancer. Therefore, identifying the mechanism of P4 resistance is essential to improve the therapies for endometrial cancer. Mitogen-inducible gene 6 (Mig-6) is a critical mediator of progesterone receptor (PGR) action in the uterus. In order to study the function of Mig-6 in P4 resistance, we generated a mouse model in which we specifically ablated Mig-6 in uterine epithelial cells using Sprr2f-cre mice (Sprr2fcre+Mig-6f/f). Female mutant mice develop endometrial hyperplasia due to aberrant phosphorylation of STAT3 and proliferation of the endometrial epithelial cells. The results from our immunoprecipitation and cell culture experiments showed that MIG-6 inhibited phosphorylation of STAT3 via protein interactions. Our previous study showed P4 resistance in mice with Mig-6 ablation in Pgr positive cells (Pgrcre/+Mig-6f/f). However, Sprr2fcre+Mig-6f/f mice were P4 responsive. P4 treatment significantly decreased STAT3 phosphorylation and epithelial proliferation in the uterus of mutant mice. We showed that Mig-6 has an important function of tumor suppressor via inhibition of STAT3 phosphorylation in uterine epithelial cells and the anti-tumor effects of P4 are mediated by the endometrial stroma. This data helps to develop a new signaling pathway in the regulation of steroid hormones in the uterus, and to overcome P4 resistance in human reproductive diseases, such as endometrial cancer. PMID:28925396

  17. Segregation effects in welded stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhter, J.I.; Shoaid, K.A.; Ahmed, M.; Malik, A.Q.

    1987-01-01

    Welding of steels causes changes in the microstructure and chemical composition which could adversely affect the mechanical and corrosion properties. The report describes the experimental results of an investigation of segregation effects in welded austenitic stainless steels of AISI type 304, 304L, 316 and 316L using the techniques of scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis. Considerable enhancement of chromium and carbon has been observed in certain well-defined zones on the parent metal and on composition, particularly in the parent metal, in attributed to the formation of (M 23 C 6 ) precipitates. The formation of geometrically well-defined segregation zones is explained on the basis of the time-temperature-precipitation curve of (M 23 C 6 ). (author)

  18. The Effect of Welding Energy on the Microstructural and Mechanical Properties of Ultrasonic-Welded Copper Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingwei; Cao, Biao; Lu, Qinghua

    2017-01-01

    The effects of welding energy on the mechanical and microstructural characteristics of ultrasonic-welded pure copper plates were investigated. Complex dynamic recrystallization and grain growth occurred inside the weld zone during ultrasonic welding. At a low welding energy, a thin band of straight weld interfaces was observed and had an ultra-fine grain structure. With an increase in welding energy, the weld interface progressively changed from flat to sinusoidal, and eventually turned into a convoluted wavy pattern, bearing similarities to shear instabilities, as observed in fluid dynamics. The lap shear load of the joints initially increased and then remained stable as the welding energy increased. The tensile characteristics of the joints significantly depended on the development of plastic deformation at the interface. The influence of the microstructure on the hardness was also discussed. PMID:28772553

  19. Design Optimization and Fatigue Analysis of Laser Stake Welded Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    is ultimately envisioned that laser welding will be as common in the shipyard as other processes such -- as MIG, TIG and SMAW. Laser stake- welding of...input from conventional welding techniques can be detrimental to the polymer matrix composite material. In comparison, the laser welding process allows...more discrete frequencies. In the laser welding process , the photons are targeted on the work piece surface which needs to be welded . Highly

  20. Effect of A-TIG Welding Process on the Weld Attributes of Type 304LN and 316LN Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, M.

    2017-03-01

    The specific activated flux has been developed for enhancing the penetration performance of TIG welding process for autogenous welding of type 304LN and 316LN stainless steels through systematic study. Initially single-component fluxes were used to study their effect on depth of penetration and tensile properties. Then multi-component activated flux was developed which was found to produce a significant increase in penetration of 10-12 mm in single-pass TIG welding of type 304LN and 316LN stainless steels. The significant improvement in penetration achieved using the activated flux developed in the present work has been attributed to the constriction of the arc and as well as reversal of Marangoni flow in the molten weld pool. The use of activated flux has been found to overcome the variable weld penetration observed in 316LN stainless steel with TIG welds compared to that of the welds produced by conventional TIG welding on the contrary the transverse strength properties of the 304LN and 316LN stainless steel welds produced by A-TIG welding exceeded the minimum specified strength values of the base metals. Improvement in toughness values were observed in 316LN stainless steel produced by A-TIG welding due to refinement in the weld microstructure in the region close to the weld center. Thus, activated flux developed in the present work has greater potential for use during the TIG welding of structural components made of type 304LN and 316LN stainless steels.

  1. Effect of pulsed current and post weld aging treatment on tensile properties of argon arc welded high strength aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, V.; Ravisankar, V.; Reddy, G. Madhusudhan

    2007-01-01

    This paper reveals the effect of pulsed current and post weld aging treatment on tensile properties of argon arc welded AA7075 aluminium alloy. This alloy has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring high strength-to-weight ratio, such as transportable bridge girders, military vehicles, road tankers and railway transport systems. The preferred welding processes of high strength aluminium alloy are frequently gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process due to their comparatively easier applicability and better economy. Weld fusion zones typically exhibit coarse columnar grains because of the prevailing thermal conditions during weld metal solidification. This often results inferior weld mechanical properties and poor resistance to hot cracking. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to refine the fusion zone grains by applying pulsed current welding technique. Four different welding techniques have been used to fabricate the joints and they are: (i) continuous current GTAW (CCGTAW), (ii) pulsed current GTAW (PCGTAW), (iii) continuous current GMAW (CCGMAW) and (iv) pulsed current GMAW (PCGMAW) processes. As welded joint strength is much lower than the base metal strength and hence, a simple aging treatment has been given to improve the tensile strength of the joints. Current pulsing leads to relatively finer and more equi-axed grain structure in GTA and GMA welds. In contrast, conventional continuous current welding resulted in predominantly columnar grain structures. Post weld aging treatment is accompanied by an increase in tensile strength and tensile ductility

  2. Effects of Mars Atmosphere on Arc Welds: Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtright, Z. S.

    2018-01-01

    Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) is a vital fusion welding process widely used throughout the aerospace industry. Its use may be critical for the repair or manufacture of systems, rockets, or facilities on the Martian surface. Aluminum alloy AA2219-T87 and titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V butt welds have been investigated for weldability and weld properties in a simulated Martian gas environment. The resulting simulated Martian welds were compared to welds made in a terrestrial atmosphere, all of which used argon shielding gas. It was found that GTAW is a process that may be used in a Martian gas environment, not accounting for pressure and gravitational effects, as long as adequate argon shielding gas is used to protect the weld metal. Simulated Martian welds exhibited higher hardness in all cases and higher tensile strength in the case of AA2219-T87. This has been attributed to the absorption of carbon into the fusion zone, causing carbide precipitates to form. These precipitates may act to pin dislocations upon tensile testing of AA2219-T87. Dissolved carbon may have also led to carburization, which may have caused the increase in hardness within the fusion zone of the welds. Based on the results of this experiment and other similar experiments, GTAW appears to be a promising process for welding in a Martian gas environment. Additional funding and experimentation is necessary to determine the effects of the low pressure and low gravity environment found on Mars on GTAW.

  3. Spot weld arrangement effects on the fatigue behavior of multi-spot welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanifard, Soran; Zehsaz, Mohammad; Esmaeili, Firooz

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, the effects of spot weld arrangements in multi-spot welded joints on the fatigue behavior of the joints are studied. Three different four-spot welded joints are considered: one-row four-spot parallel to the loading direction, one-row four-spot perpendicular to the loading direction and two-row four-spot weld specimens. The experimental fatigue test results reveal that the differences between the fatigue lives of three spot welded types in the low cycle regime are more considerable than those in the high cycle regime. However, all kinds of spot weld specimens have similar fatigue strength when approaching a million cycles. A non-linear finite element analysis is performed to obtain the relative stress gradients, effective distances and notch strength reduction factors based on the volumetric approach. The work here shows that the volumetric approach does a very good job in predicting the fatigue life of the multi-spot welded joints

  4. Interaction of both plasmas in CO2 laser-MAG hybrid welding of carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutsuna, Muneharu; Chen, Liang

    2003-03-01

    Researches and developments of laser and arc hybrid welding has been curried out since in 1978. Especially, CO2 laser and TIG hybrid welding has been studied for increasing the penetration depth and welding speed. Recently laser and MIG/MAG/Plasma hybrid welding processes have been developed and applied to industries. It was recognized as a new welding process that promote the flexibility of the process for increasing the penetration depth, welding speed and allowable joint gap and improving the quality of the welds. In the present work, CO2 Laser-MAG hybrid welding of carbon steel (SM490) was investigated to make clear the phenomenon and characteristics of hybrid welding process comparing with laser welding and MAG process. The effects of many process parameters such as welding current, arc voltage, welding speed, defocusing distance, laser-to-arc distance on penetration depth, bead shape, spatter, arc stability and plasma formation were investigated in the present work. Especially, the interaction of laser plasma and MAG arc plasma was considered by changing the laser to arc distance (=DLA).

  5. Um critério para determinar a regulagem da tensão em soldagem MIG/MAG por curto-circuito A criterion to determine voltage setting in short-circuit GMAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Maradei Carneiro de Rezende

    2011-06-01

    mixture 85% Argon - carbon dioxide 15%. To meet the proposed relationship, it was covered up the regulation of welding voltages from very low to very high for what was expected for this condition of welding. The results confirm the effectiveness of the "Index of regularity" as a means of assessing adjustments welding MIG / MAG to minimize spatter and optimize the coating on the weld bead.

  6. Effect of welding processes on the impression creep resistance of type 316 LN stainless steel weld joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasudevan, M.; Vasantharaja, P.; Sisira, P.; Divya, K.; Ganesh Sundara Raman, S.

    2016-01-01

    Type 316 LN stainless steel is the major structural material used in the construction of fast breeder reactors. Activated Tungsten Inert Gas (A-TIG) welding , a variant of the TIG welding process has been found to enhance the depth of penetration significantly during autogenous welding and also found to enhance the creep rupture life in stainless steels. The present study aims at comparing the effect of TIG and A-TIG welding processes on the impression creep resistance of type 316 LN stainless steel base metal, fusion zone and heat affected zone (HAZ) of weld joints. Optical and TEM have been used to correlate the microstructures with the observed creep rates of various zones of the weld joints. Finer microstructure and higher ferrite content was observed in the TIG weld joint fusion zone. Coarser grain structure was observed in the HAZ of the weld joints. Impression creep rate of A-TIG weld joint fusion zone was almost equal to that of the base metal and lower than that of the TIG weld joint fusion zone. A-TIG weld joint HAZ was found to have lower creep rate compared to that of conventional TIG weld joint HAZ due to higher grain size. HAZ of the both the weld joints exhibited lower creep rate than the base metal. (author)

  7. Applying of dilatometric effect for resistance welding automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondarenko O. F.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The important issue of resistance spot welding control to obtain high quality welded joints, especially in living tissue welding, is considered. The actual state of the issue is described and analyzed. In order to improve the quality of welded joints, the applying of dilatometric effect to control the resistance spot welding process, namely of shifting the welding electrodes, is suggested. To register the shifting, the use of modern inertial microelectromechanical sensors (MEMS is proposed. The experimental measuring system, which processes the MEMS-sensor signal and makes it suitable for use as a feedback signal, is developed. The structure and operational algorithm of the system are described. The abilities of measuring with MEMS-sensors the values of electrode shifting caused by dilatometric effect under resistance welding are assessed. These method and equipment are recommended for welding the metals, as well as for welding the living tissues. The results of preliminary studies prove the advisability and relevance of the suggested solutions.

  8. Effect of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on Creep Rupture Properties of Grade 91 Steel Heavy Section Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Leijun

    2012-11-02

    This project will conduct a systematic metallurgical study on the effect of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on the creep rupture properties of P91 heavy section welds. The objective is to develop a technical guide for selecting PWHT parameters, and to predict expected creep-rupture life based on the selection of heat treatment parameters. The project consists of four interdependent tasks: Experimentally and numerically characterize the temperature fields of typical post-weld heat treatment procedures for various weld and joint configurations to be used in Gen IV systems. Characterize the microstructure of various regions, including the weld fusion zone, coarse-grain heat-affected zone, and fine-grain heat affected zone, in the welds that underwent the various welding and PWHT thermal histories. Conduct creep and creep-rupture testing of coupons extracted from actual and physically simulated welds. Establish the relationship among PWHT parameters, thermal histories, microstructure, creep, and creep-rupture properties.

  9. Effect on spot welding variables on nugget size and bond strength of 304 austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charde, Nachimani

    2012-01-01

    Resistance spot welding (RSW) has revolutionized mechanical assembly in the automotive industry since its introduction in the early 1970s. Currently, one mechanical assembly in five is welded using spot welding technology, with welding of stainless steel sheet becoming increasingly common. Consequently, this research paper examines the spot welding of 2 mm thick 304 austenitic stainless steel sheet. The size of a spot weld nugget is primarily determined by the welding parameters: welding current, welding time, electrode force and electrode tip diameter However, other factors such as electrode deformation, corrosion, dissimilar materials and material properties also affect the nugget size and shape. This paper analyzes only the effects of current, weld time and force variations with unchanged electrode tip diameter. A pneumatically driven 75kVA spot welder was used to accomplish the welding process and the welded samples were subjected to tensile, hardness and metallurgical testing to characterize the size and shape of the weld nugget and the bond strength.

  10. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  11. Assessment of biological chromium among stainless steel and mild steel welders in relation to welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmé, J L; Shirali, P; Mereau, M; Sobaszek, A; Boulenguez, C; Diebold, F; Haguenoer, J M

    1997-01-01

    Air and biological monitoring were used for assessing external and internal chromium exposure among 116 stainless steel welders (SS welders) using manual metal arc (MMA), metal inert gas (MIG) and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding processes (MMA: n = 57; MIG: n = 37; TIG: n = 22) and 30 mild steel welders (MS welders) using MMA and MIG welding processes (MMA: n = 14; MIG: n = 16). The levels of atmospheric total chromium were evaluated after personal air monitoring. The mean values for the different groups of SS welders were 201 micrograms/m3 (MMA) and 185 micrograms/m3 (MIG), 52 micrograms/m3 (TIG) and for MS welders 8.1 micrograms/m3 (MMA) and 7.3 micrograms/m3 (MIG). The curve of cumulative frequency distribution from biological monitoring among SS welders showed chromium geometric mean concentrations in whole blood of 3.6 micrograms/l (95th percentile = 19.9), in plasma of 3.3 micrograms/l (95th percentile = 21.0) and in urine samples of 6.2 micrograms/l (95th percentile = 58.0). Among MS welders, mean values in whole blood and plasma were rather more scattered (1.8 micrograms/l, 95th percentile = 9.3 and 1.3 micrograms/l, 95th percentile = 8.4, respectively) and in urine the value was 2.4 micrograms/l (95th percentile = 13.3). The analysis of variance of chromium concentrations in plasma previously showed a metal effect (F = 29.7, P process effect (F = 22.2, P process interaction (F = 1.3, P = 0.25). Concerning urinary chromium concentration, the analysis of variance also showed a metal effect (F = 30, P process effect (F = 72, P process interaction (F = 13.2, P = 0.0004). Throughout the study we noted any significant differences between smokers and non-smokers among welders. Taking in account the relationships between chromium concentrations in whole, plasma or urine and the different welding process. MMA-SS is definitely different from other processes because the biological values are clearly higher. These higher levels are due to the very significant

  12. Underwater welding and repair technologies applied in PWR environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scandella, Fabrice; Carpreau, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe several welding processes and technologies which have been used for underwater applications and which can be applied when repairing components of a PWR type reactor. They address, describe and discuss wet arc welding processes, the peculiarities of underwater welding, and the use of various processes such as 111, 114 and 135 processes, underwater welding with the hybrid plasma MIG-MAG process, underwater welding with the laser wire process, underwater welding with the FSW, FSP or UWFSW processes, underwater welding with variants of the friction welding process (friction surfacing, taper stitch welding, hydro-pillar processing

  13. Thermal-deformation effect of welding on A 1 reactor pressure vessel weld joints properties and state of stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becka, J.; Kupka, I.

    1976-01-01

    The methods are compared of electroslag welding and of arc welding with a view to their possible application in welding the Bohunice A-1 reactor pressure vessel. Considered are the thermal deformation effects of welding on the physical properties and the stress present in welded joints. For testing, plates were used having the dimensions of 1100x2300x200 mm and rings with 4820 mm outer diameter, 1800 mm height and 170 mm thickness made of steel CSN 413O30 modified with Ni, Al+Ti. The deformation effect of welding on the residual surface and triaxial stress, the specific stored energy, the initiation temperature of brittle crack and the critical size of the initiation defect corresponding to the thermal deformation effect of welding were determined. It was found that for electroslag welding, there is a low probability of crack formation in the joints, a low level of residual stress and a low level of specific stored energy in a relatively wide joint zone. For arc welding there is a considerable probability of defect formation in the vicinity of the sharp boundary of the joint, a high level of the triaxial state of stress in the tensile region, and a high level of specific stored energy concentrated in the narrow zone of weld joints. The recommended thermal process is given for welding pressure vessels made of the CSN 413030 steel modified with Ni, Al+Ti, and 150 to 200 mm in thickness. (J.P.)

  14. Effect of the weld groove shape and pass number on residual stresses in butt-welded pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattari-Far, I.; Farahani, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    This study used finite element techniques to analyze the thermo-mechanical behaviour and residual stresses in butt-welded pipes. The residual stresses were also measured in some welds by using the Hole-Drilling method. The results of the finite element analysis were compared with experimentally measured data to evaluate the accuracy of the finite element modelling. Based on this study, a finite element modelling procedure with reasonable accuracy was developed. The developed FE modelling was used to study the effects of weld groove shape and weld pass number on welding residual stresses in butt-welded pipes. The hoop and axial residual stresses in pipe joints of 6 and 10 mm thickness of different groove shapes and pass number were studied. It is shown that these two parameters may have significant effects on magnitude and distribution of residual stresses in welded pipes.

  15. Welding for the CRBRP steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalaris, C.N.; Ring, P.J.; Durand, R.E.; Wright, E.A.

    1979-01-01

    The rationale for selecting weld design, welding procedures and inspection methods was based upon the desire to obtain the highest reliability welds for the CRBRP steam generators. To assure the highest weld reliability, heavy emphasis was placed on the control of material cleanliness and composition substantially exceeding the requirements of the ASME Code for 2-1/4Cr--1Mo. The high tube/tubesheet weld quality was achieved through close material control, an extensive weld development program and the selection of high reliability welding equipment. Shell and nozzle weld fabrication using TIG, MIG, and submerged arc procedures are also being controlled through precise specifications, including preheat and postheat programs, together with radiography and ultrasonic inspection to ascertain the weld quality desired. Details of the tube/tubesheet welding and shell welding are described and results from the weld testing program are discussed

  16. Welding state of art for Eurofer 97 application to Tritium Blanket Module for ITER Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, P. [CEA Saclay, Dept. Modelisation de Systemes et Structures (DEN/DANS/DM2S/DIR), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Janin, F. [CEA Saclay, Dept. Modelisation de Systemes et Structures (DEN/DANS/DPC/SCP/Gerailp), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Eurofer weldability must be established for data base assessment and TBM manufacturing support. Electron Beam, Hybrid (Laser combined with MIG/MAG), Laser and Narrow Gap TIG processes have been carried out on Eurofer samples from 0.5 mm to 40 mm. Electron Beam produces very narrow fusion zone width, in the range of 3 to 4 mm, that yields brittle joints with (5-ferrite. This process is considered only for low penetration depth (cooling plates). The other processes produce similar results, with attenuation or enhanced effects, depending on cooling rates and weld penetration depth. Pre- and post-heating have been applied on hybrid and laser welds. High hardness values, increasing brittleness and softening effects in the Heat Affected Zone are observed for each welding configuration that could signal creep problems. The Fusion Zones are typically composed of martensite laths, with small grain sizes. In the Heat Affected Zones, martensite grains are observed with M23C6 carbide precipitation. Delta ferrite has been observed only in Electron Beam welds, due to very high cooling rate during the solidification phase, related to strong enhanced weld shape. Eurofer filler wire with optimized chemical composition is developed for producing welds with good properties. To restore properties after welding, PWHT seems is necessary and several treatments including one at 750 deg. C for 2 hours have been performed. Also tries is a re-austenisation treatment of 10 h at 1050 deg. C. affecting order to improve results, pre- and post-heating has been applied. The heating produced by the resistive heater was too low, and new welding tests are planned at higher temperatures (400 deg. C). However, the pre- and post-heating at higher temperatures will complicate manufacturing of TBM clamping For penetration depths below 10 mm, laser process is the reference method and TIG second. Distortion level performed by laser process is acceptable for manufacturing

  17. To investigate the effect of heat treatment on fracture toughness of welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hameed, A.; Pasha, R.A.; Shah, M.

    2013-01-01

    Annealing as a post weld heat treatment (PWHT), increases toughness in the welding joints of medium carbon steel in the same way as it increases toughness of the non-welded medium carbon steel. Measurement of increase in toughness through PWHT is focus of the present research work. Welded samples of commercially available steel AISI -1035 have been used for the proposed evaluation. The samples welded by two different techniques namely oxyacetylene gas welding and manual metal arc welding, passed through annealing process along with non-welded samples for comparison of increase in toughness. Toughness measured by impact tests revealed the improvement, which in the order of increasing effects is in gas welded, electric welded and non-welded samples. The aim of the present research was to measure the improvement in fracture toughness through post weld heat treatment (annealing). It has been shown that toughness increases as the structural flaws decrease. (author)

  18. Pin Tool Geometry Effects in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querin, J. A.; Rubisoff, H. A.; Schneider, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW) there is significant evidence that material can take one of two different flow paths when being displaced from its original position in front of the pin tool to its final position in the wake of the weld. The geometry of the pin tool, along with the process parameters, plays an important role in dictating the path that the material takes. Each flow path will impart a different thermomechanical history on the material, consequently altering the material microstructure and subsequent weld properties. The intention of this research is to isolate the effect that different pin tool attributes have on the flow paths imparted on the FSWed material. Based on published weld tool geometries, a variety of weld tools were fabricated and used to join AA2219. Results from the tensile properties and microstructural characterization will be presented.

  19. Effectiveness of amorphous silica encapsulation technology on welding fume particles and its impact on mechanical properties of welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jun; Wu, Chang-Yu; Franke, Gene

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel welding shielding gas containing a silica precursor. • Up to 76% of the welding fume particles encapsulated in an amorphous silica layer. • No statistical difference between different types of welds in mechanical tests. • Can potentially reduce the toxicity of welding fume particles. - Abstract: Stainless steel welding generates nano-sized fume particles containing toxic metals which may cause serious health effects upon inhalation. The objective of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of an amorphous silica encapsulation (ASE) technology by evaluating its silica coating efficiency (SCE), particle morphology, and its impact on the weld’s mechanical properties. Tetramethylsilane (TMS) added to the welding shielding gas decomposed at the high-temperature arc zone to enable the silica coating. Collected welding fume particles were digested by two acid mixtures with different degrees of silica solubility, and the measured mass differences in the digests were used to determine the SCE. The SCEs were around 48–64% at the low and medium primary shielding gas flow rates. The highest SCE of 76% occurred at the high shielding gas flow rate (30 Lpm) with a TMS carrier gas flow of 0.64 Lpm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images confirmed the amorphous silica layer on the welding fume particles at most gas flow rates, as well as abundant stand-alone silica particles formed at the high gas flow rate. Metallography showed that welds from the baseline and from the ASE technology were similar except for a tiny crack found in one particular weld made with the ASE technology. Tensile tests showed no statistical difference between the baseline and the ASE welds. All the above test results confirm that welding equipment retrofitted with the ASE technology has the potential to effectively address the toxicity problem of welding fume particles without affecting the mechanical properties of the welds

  20. Effect of tool shape and welding parameters on mechanical properties and microstructure of dissimilar friction stir welded aluminium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetan Aneja

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present experimental study, dissimilar aluminum alloy AA5083 and AA6082 were friction stir welded by varying tool shape, welding speed and rotary speed of the tool in order to investigate the effect of varying tool shape and welding parameters on the mechanical properties as well as microstructure. The friction stir welding (FSW process parameters have great influence on heat input per unit length of weld. The outcomes of experimental study prove that mechanical properties increases with decreasing welding speed. Furthermore mechanical properties were also found to improve as the rotary speed increases and the same phenomenon was found to happen while using straight cylindrical threaded pin profile tool. The microstructure of the dissimilar joints revealed that at low welding speeds, the improved material mixing was observed. The similar phenomenon was found to happen at higher rotational speeds using straight cylindrical threaded tool.

  1. Identification of the Quality Spot Welding used Non Destructive Test-Ultrasonic Testing: (Effect of Welding Time)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifa, A.; Endramawan, T.; Badruzzaman

    2017-03-01

    Resistance Spot Welding (RSW) is frequently used as one way of welding is used in the manufacturing process, especially in the automotive industry [4][5][6][7]. Several parameters influence the process of welding points. To determine the quality of a welding job needs to be tested, either by damaging or testing without damage, in this study conducted experimental testing the quality of welding or identify quality of the nugget by using Non-Destructive Test (NDT) -Ultrasonic Testing (UT), in which the identification of the quality of the welding is done with parameter thickness of worksheet after welding using NDT-UT with use same material worksheet and have more thickness of worksheet, the thickness of the worksheet single plate 1mm, with the capability of propagation Ultrasonic Testing (UT) standard limited> 3 mm [1], welding process parameters such as the time difference between 1-10s and the welding current of 8 KV, visually Heat Affected Zone ( HAZ ) have different results due to the length of time of welding. UT uses a probe that is used with a frequency of 4 MHz, diameter 10 mm, range 100 and the couplant used is oil. Identification techniques using drop 6dB, with sound velocity 2267 m / s of Fe, with the result that the effect of the Welding time affect the size of the HAZ, identification with the lowest time 1s show results capable identified joined through NDT - UT.

  2. Effect of welding current and speed on occurrence of humping bead in high-speed GMAW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Ji; Wu Chuansong

    2009-01-01

    The developed mathematical model of humping formation mechanism in high-speed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) is used to analyze the effects of welding current and welding speed on the occurrence of humping bead. It considers both the momentum and heat content of backward flowing molten jet inside weld pool. Three-dimensional geometry of weld pool, the spacing between two adjacent humps and hump height along humping weld bead are calculated under different levels of welding current and welding speed. It shows that wire feeding rate, power intensity and the moment of backward flowing molten jet are the major factors on humping bead formation.

  3. Mechanical behaviour of cracked welded structures including mismatch effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornet, P.

    2002-01-01

    The most important parameters for predicting more precisely the fracture behaviour of welded structures have been identified. In particular, the plasticity development at the crack tip in the ligament appeared as a major parameter to evaluate the yield load of such a complex structure. In this way defect assessments procedures have been developed or modified to take into account the mismatch effect that is to say the mechanical properties of the different material constituting the weld joint. This paper is a synthesis of the work done in the past at Electricite de France on this topic in regards with other work done in France or around the World. The most important parameters which control the plasticity development at the crack tip and so mainly influence the fracture behaviour of welded structures are underlined: the mismatch ratio (weld to base metal yield strength ratio), the mismatch ratio (weld to base metal yield strength ratio), the ligament size and the weld width. Moreover, commonly used fracture toughness testing procedures developed in case of homogeneous specimens cannot be used in a straight forward manner and so has to be modified to take into account the mismatch effect. Number or defect assessment procedures taking into account the mismatch effect by considering the yield load of the welded structure are shortly described. Then, the 'Equivalent Material Method' developed at EDF which allows a good prediction of the applied J-Integral at the crack tip is more detailed. This procedure includes not only both weld and base metal yield strength, the structure geometry, the crack size and the weld dimension using the yield load of the real structures but also includes the effect of both weld and base metal strain hardening exponents. Some validations of this method are proposed. Finally, the ability of finite element modelling to predict the behaviour of such welded structures is demonstrated by modelling real experiments: crack located in the middle of

  4. Effect of process control mode on weld quality of friction stir welded plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shazly, Mostafa; Sorour, Sherif; Alian, Ahmed R. [Faculty of Engineering, The British University in Egypt, Cairo (Egypt)

    2016-01-15

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process which requires no filler material where the heat input is generated by frictional energy between the tool and workpiece. The objective of the present work is to conduct a fully coupled thermomechanical finite element analysis based on Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) formulation for both 'Force-Controlled' and 'Displacement-Controlled' FSW process to provide more detailed insight of their effect on the resulting joint quality. The developed finite element models use Johnson- Cook material model and temperature dependent physical properties for the welded plates. Efforts on proper modeling of the underlying process physics are done focusing on the heat generation of the tool/workpiece interface to overcome the shortcomings of previous investigations. Finite elements results show that 'Force-Controlled' FSW process provides better joint quality especially at higher traveling speed of the tool which comes to an agreement with published experimental results.

  5. effects of metal inert gas welding parameters on some mechanical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EFFECTS OF METAL INERT GAS WELDING PARAMETERS ON SOME MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL IN ACIDIC ... Design Expert Software, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Rockwell Hardness Test, Monsanto Tensometer and Izod Impact Test were used to determine the ...

  6. Effect of preemptive weld overlay on residual stress mitigation for dissimilar metal weld of nuclear power plant pressurizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Tae Kwang; Bae, Hong Yeol; Chun, Yun Bae; Oh, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae; Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong

    2008-01-01

    Weld overlay is one of the residual stress mitigation methods which arrest crack initiation and crack growth. Therefore weld overlay can be applied to the region where cracking is likely to be. An overlay weld used in this manner is termed a Preemptive Weld OverLay(PWOL). In Pressurized Water Reactor(PWR) dissimilar metal weld is susceptible region for Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking(PWSCC). In order to examine the effect of PWOL on residual stress mitigation, PWOL was applied to a specific dissimilar metal weld of Kori nuclear power plant by finite element analysis method. As a result, strong compressive residual stress was made in PWSCC susceptible region and PWOL was proved effective preemptive repair method for weldment

  7. Effect of preemptive weld overlay on residual stress mitigation for dissimilar metal weld of nuclear power plant pressurizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Tae Kwang; Bae, Hong Yeol; Chun, Yun Bae; Oh, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    Weld overlay is one of the residual stress mitigation methods which arrest crack initiation and crack growth. Therefore weld overlay can be applied to the region where cracking is likely to be. An overlay weld used in this manner is termed a Preemptive Weld OverLay(PWOL). In Pressurized Water Reactor(PWR) dissimilar metal weld is susceptible region for Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking(PWSCC). In order to examine the effect of PWOL on residual stress mitigation, PWOL was applied to a specific dissimilar metal weld of Kori nuclear power plant by finite element analysis method. As a result, strong compressive residual stress was made in PWSCC susceptible region and PWOL was proved effective preemptive repair method for weldment.

  8. Analysis of Pulsed Laser Welding Parameters Effect on Weld Geometry of 316L Stainless Steel using DOE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Pakmanesh

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the optimization of pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding parameters was done on a lap-joint of a 316L stainless steel foil in order to predict the weld geometry through response surface methodology. For this purpose, the effects of laser power, pulse duration, and frequency were investigated. By presenting a second-order polynomial, the above-mentioned statistical method was managed to be well employed to evaluate the effect of welding parameters on weld width. The results showed that the weld width at the upper, middle and lower surfaces of weld cross section increases by increasing pulse durationand laser power; however, the effects of these parameters on the mentioned levels are different. The effect of pulse duration in the models of weld upper, middle and lower widths was calculated as 76, 73 and 68%, respectively. Moreover, the effect of power on theses widths was determined as 18, 24 and 28%, respectively. Finally, by superimposing these models, optimum conditions were obtained to attain a full penetration weld and the weld with no defects.

  9. Effect of Welding Processes on the Microstructure, Mechanical Properties and Residual Stresses of Plain 9Cr-1Mo Steel Weld Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraju, S.; Vasantharaja, P.; Brahadees, G.; Vasudevan, M.; Mahadevan, S.

    2017-12-01

    9Cr-1Mo steel designated as P9 is widely used in the construction of power plants and high-temperature applications. It is chosen for fabricating hexcan fuel subassembly wrapper components of fast breeder reactors. Arc welding processes are generally used for fabricating 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints. A-TIG welding process is increasingly being adopted by the industries. In the present study, shielded metal arc (SMA), tungsten inert gas (TIG) and A-TIG welding processes are used for fabricating the 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints of 10 mm thickness. Effect of the above welding processes on the microstructure evolution, mechanical properties and residual stresses of the weld joints has been studied in detail. All the three weld joints exhibited comparable strength and ductility values. 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joint fabricated by SMAW process exhibited lower impact toughness values caused by coarser grain size and inclusions. 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joint fabricated by TIG welding exhibited higher toughness due to finer grain size, while the weld joint fabricated by A-TIG welding process exhibited adequate toughness values. SMA steel weld joint exhibited compressive residual stresses in the weld metal and HAZ, while TIG and A-TIG weld joint exhibited tensile residual stresses in the weld metal and HAZ.

  10. Effect of Welding Process on Microstructure, Mechanical and Pitting Corrosion Behaviour of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    An attempt has been made to weld 2205 Duplex stainless steel of 6mm thick plate using conventional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and activated gas tungsten arc welding (A- GTAW) process using silica powder as activated flux. Present work is aimed at studying the effect of welding process on depth of penetration, width of weld zone of 2205 duplex stainless steel. It also aims to observe the microstructural changes and its effect on mechanical properties and pitting corrosion resistance of 2205 duplex stainless steel welds. Metallography is done to observe the microstructural changes of the welds using image analyzer attached to the optical microscopy. Hardness studies, tensile and ductility bend tests were evaluated for mechanical properties. Potentio-dynamic polarization studies were carried out using a basic GillAC electro-chemical system in 3.5% NaCl solution to observe the pitting corrosion behaviour. Results of the present investigation established that increased depth of penetration and reduction of weld width in a single pass by activated GTAW with the application of SiO2 flux was observed when compared with conventional GTAW process. It may be attributed to the arc constriction effect. Microstructure of the weld zones for both the welds is observed to be having combination of austenite and delta ferrite. Grain boundary austenite (GBA) with Widmanstatten-type austenite (WA) of plate-like feature was nucleated from the grain boundaries in the weld zone of A-GTAW process. Mechanical properties are relatively low in activated GTAW process and are attributed to changes in microstructural morphology of austenite. Improved pitting corrosion resistance was observed for the welds made with A-GTAW process.

  11. The effect of welding parameters on the corrosion behaviour of friction stir welded AA2024-T351

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jariyaboon, M; Davenport, A.J.; Ambat, Rajan

    2007-01-01

    The effect of welding parameters (rotation speed and travel speed) on the corrosion behaviour of friction stir welds in the high strength aluminium alloy AA2024-T351 was investigated. It was found that rotation speed plays a major role in controlling the location of corrosion attack. Localised...... intergranular attack was observed in the nugget region for low rotation speed welds, whereas for higher rotation speed welds, attack occurred predominantly in the heat-affected zone. The increase in anodic reactivity in the weld zone was due to the sensitisation of the grain boundaries leading to intergranular...... attack. Enhancement of cathodic reactivity was also found in the nugget as a result of the precipitation of S-phase. The results were compared with samples of AA2024-T351 that had been heat treated to simulate the thermal cycle associated with welding, and with samples that had been exposed to high...

  12. Effects of Welding Parameters on Strength and Corrosion Behavior of Dissimilar Galvanized Q&P and TRIP Spot Welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Russo Spena

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effects of the main welding parameters on mechanical strength and corrosion behavior of galvanized quenching and partitioning and transformation induced plasticity spot welds, which are proposed to assemble advanced structural car elements for the automotive industry. Steel sheets have been welded with different current, clamping force, and welding time settings. The quality of the spot welds has been assessed through lap-shear and salt spray corrosion tests, also evaluating the effects of metal expulsion on strength and corrosion resistance of the joints. An energy dispersive spectrometry elemental mapping has been used to assess the damage of the galvanized zinc coating and the nature of the corrosive products. Welding current and time have the strongest influence on the shear strength of the spot welds, whereas clamping force is of minor importance. However, clamping force has the primary effect on avoiding expulsion of molten metal from the nugget during the joining process. Furthermore, clamping force has a beneficial influence on the corrosion resistance because it mainly hinders the permeation of the corrosive environment towards the spot welds. Although the welded samples can exhibit high shear strength also when a metal expulsion occurs, this phenomenon should be avoided because it enhances the damage and vaporization of the protective zinc coating.

  13. Effect of welding structure and δ-ferrite on fatigue properties for TIG welded austenitic stainless steels at cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuri, Tetsumi; Ogata, Toshio; Saito, Masahiro; Hirayama, Yoshiaki

    2000-04-01

    High-cycle and low-cycle fatigue properties of base and weld metals for SUS304L and SUS316L and the effects of welding structure and δ-ferrite on fatigue properties were investigated at cryogenic temperatures in order to evaluate the long-life reliability of the structural materials to be used in liquid hydrogen supertankers and storage tanks and to develop a welding process for these applications. The S-N curves of the base and weld metals shifted towards higher levels, i.e., the longer life side, with decreasing test temperatures. High-cycle fatigue tests demonstrated the ratios of fatigue strength at 10 6 cycles to tensile strength of the weld metals to be 0.35-0.7, falling below those of base metals with decreasing test temperatures. Fatigue crack initiation sites in SUS304L weld metals were mostly at blowholes with diameters of 200-700 μm, and those of SUS316L weld metals were at weld pass interface boundaries. Low-cycle fatigue tests revealed the fatigue lives of the weld metals to be somewhat lower than those of the base metals. Although δ-ferrite reduces the toughness of austenitic stainless steels at cryogenic temperatures, the effects of δ-ferrite on high-cycle and low-cycle fatigue properties are not clear or significant.

  14. Effects of microstructure and residual stress on fatigue crack growth of stainless steel narrow gap welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Changheui; Cho, Pyung-Yeon; Kim, Minu; Oh, Seung-Jin; Yang, Jun-Seog

    2010-01-01

    The effects of weld microstructure and residual stress distribution on the fatigue crack growth rate of stainless steel narrow gap welds were investigated. Stainless steel pipes were joined by the automated narrow gap welding process typical to nuclear piping systems. The weld fusion zone showed cellular-dendritic structures with ferrite islands in an austenitic matrix. Residual stress analysis showed large tensile stress in the inner-weld region and compressive stress in the middle of the weld. Tensile properties and the fatigue crack growth rate were measured along and across the weld thickness direction. Tensile tests showed higher strength in the weld fusion zone and the heat affected zone compared to the base metal. Within the weld fusion zone, strength was greater in the inner weld than outer weld region. Fatigue crack growth rates were several times greater in the inner weld than the outer weld region. The spatial variation of the mechanical properties is discussed in view of weld microstructure, especially dendrite orientation, and in view of the residual stress variation within the weld fusion zone. It is thought that the higher crack growth rate in the inner-weld region could be related to the large tensile residual stress despite the tortuous fatigue crack growth path.

  15. Effect of post-weld aging treatment on mechanical properties of Tungsten Inert Gas welded low thickness 7075 aluminium alloy joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temmar, M.; Hadji, M.; Sahraoui, T.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The effects of post-weld aging treatment on the properties of joints is studied. → The post-weld aging treatment increases the tensile strength of TIG welded joints. → The strengthening is due to a balance of dissolution, reversion and precipitation. → Simple post-weld aging at 140 o C enhances the properties of the welded joints. -- Abstract: This paper reports the influence of post-weld aging treatment on the microstructure, tensile strength, hardness and Charpy impact energy of weld joints low thickness 7075 T6 aluminium alloy welded by Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG). Hot cracking occurs in aluminium welds when high levels of thermal stress and solidification shrinkage are present while the weld is undergoing various degrees of solidification. Weld fusion zones typically exhibit microstructure modifications because of the thermal conditions during weld metal solidification. This often results in low weld mechanical properties and low resistance to hot cracking. It has been observed that the mechanical properties are very sensitive to microstructure of weld metal. Simple post-weld aging treatment at 140 o C applied to the joints is found to be beneficial to enhance the mechanical properties of the welded joints. Correlations between microstructures and mechanical properties were discussed.

  16. Mars Atmosphere Effects on Arc Welds: Phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtright, Z. S.

    2016-01-01

    while on the surface of Mars. The Orion capsule is made primarily of AA2219-T87, and the water filtration system is primarily Ti-6Al-4V, so the effect of the Mars environment on welding those materials must be known to reduce potential mission risk. GTAW is a portable process that can weld a versatile group of metals, so it has many potential applications for welding on Mars. Thus, missions to colonize Mars will depend on the capability to weld a strong, leak-tight joint. Metals are also likely to be used in support structures made of a lightweight and durable material. For this reason, it is important to understand the implications of welding in a Mars environment. A comparison of the Martian and terrestrial atmospheres are provided in table 1. Based on the elemental compositions, simulation of the Martian atmosphere can be made using primarily CO2 gas.

  17. The Effect of Welding Current and Composition of Stainless steel on the Panetration in GTAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Yılmaz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, welding was performed on the plates of two different types of AISI 316 and AISI 316Ti austenitic stainless steels by GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding without using welding consumable in flat position. Automatic GTAW welding machine was used to control and obtain the exact values. The effects of welding currents used in welding process and the compositions of the stainless steels materials on the penetration were investigated. Weld bead size and shape such as bead width and dept were important considerations for penetration. Welding process was performed using various welding current values. The study showed that both welding parameters and composition of the stainless steels has influence on the penetration and It is increased with increasing of welding current. Besides, P/W rate of the weldments were influenced by the current and hardness values of the weld metal decrease with increasing welding current. The microstructure of the weld metal was also changed by variation of welding current.

  18. Assessment of the Biological Effects of Welding Fumes Emitted From Metal Active Gas and Manual Metal Arc Welding in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewald, Eva; Gube, Monika; Baumann, Ralf; Bertram, Jens; Kossack, Veronika; Lenz, Klaus; Reisgen, Uwe; Kraus, Thomas; Brand, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Emissions from a particular welding process, metal inert gas brazing of zinc-coated steel, induce an increase in C-reactive protein. In this study, it was investigated whether inflammatory effects could also be observed for other welding procedures. Twelve male subjects were separately exposed to (1) manual metal arc welding fumes, (2) filtered air, and (3) metal active gas welding fumes for 6 hours. Inflammatory markers were measured in serum before, and directly, 1 and 7 days after exposure. Although C-reactive protein concentrations remained unchanged, neutrophil concentrations increased directly after exposure to manual metal arc welding fumes, and endothelin-1 concentrations increased directly and 24 hours after exposure. After exposure to metal active gas and filtered air, endothelin-1 concentrations decreased. The increase in the concentrations of neutrophils and endothelin-1 may characterize a subclinical inflammatory reaction, whereas the decrease of endothelin-1 may indicate stress reduction.

  19. The effect of microstructure and geometry on the fatigue behaviour of bundle assembly welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surette, B.A.; Gabbani, M.

    1997-01-01

    Cracking of end plates, in the Darlington NGS, was attributed to high-cycle fatigue resulting from flow-induced vibrations. Because the cracks were predominantly associated with the bundle assembly welds and with certain element positions, a program was initiated to study whether the microstructure and geometry of the weld zone affected the fatigue behaviour of the assembly welds. Assembly weld samples were subjected to different heat treatments, resulting in different microstructures of the weld zone. Results of fatigue testing suggest that heat treatment of the welds (i.e., microstructure) had little effect on the fatigue life. Assembly welds were also produced with different weld notch geometries, and compared with samples having notches produced by machining (instead of welding). The results of these tests showed that geometry of the weld had a significant effect on fatigue life. However, the geometry of the weld notch required to significantly improve fatigue life is not achievable using the current assembly welding process. A small improvement in fatigue life of welded samples appears possible by increasing the weld diameter. (author)

  20. A study of the bio-accessibility of welding fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlinger, Balázs; Ellingsen, Dag G; Náray, Miklós; Záray, Gyula; Thomassen, Yngvar

    2008-12-01

    The respiratory bio-accessibility of a substance is the fraction that is soluble in the respiratory environment and is available for absorption. In the case of respiratory exposure the amount of absorbed substance plays a main role in the biological effects. Extensive bio-accessibility studies have always been an essential requirement for a better understanding of the biological effects of different workplace aerosols, such as welding fumes. Fumes generated using three different welding techniques, manual metal arc (MMA) welding, metal inert gas (MIG) welding, and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding were investigated in the present study. Each technique was used for stainless steel welding. Welding fumes were collected on PVC membrane filters in batches of 114 using a multiport air sampler. Three different fluids were applied for the solubility study: deionised water and two kinds of lung fluid simulants: lung epithelial lining fluid simulant (Gamble's solution) and artificial lung lining fluid simulant (Hatch's solution). In order to obtain sufficient data to study the tendencies in solubility change with time, seven different leaching periods were used (0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24 h), each of them with three replicates. The effect of dissolution temperature was also studied. The total amounts of selected metals in the three different welding fumes were determined after microwave-assisted digestion with the mixture of aqua regia and hydrofluoric acid. The most obvious observation yielded by the results is that the solubility of individual metals varies greatly depending on the welding technique, the composition of the leaching fluid and leaching time. This study shows that the most reasonable choice as a media for the bio-assessment of solubility might be Hatch's solution by a dissolution time of 24 h.

  1. Research on 16Mo3 (16M Steel Pipes Overlaid with Haynes Nicro625 Alloy Using MIG (131 Method / Badania Rur Ze Stali 16Mo3 (16M Napawanych Metodą MIG (131 Stopem Haynes Nicro625

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golański G.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the research on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a pipe made of 16Mo3 steel, overlaid with superalloy based on Haynes NiCro625 nickel. The overlay weld was overlaid using the MIG (131 method. The performed macro - and microscopic tests have shown the correct structure of the overlay weld without any welding unconformities. The examined overlay weld was characterized by a dendritic structure of the primary crystals accumulating towards the heat removal. It has been proved that the content of iron in the surface zone does not exceed 7%, and the steel-superalloy joint shows the highest properties in comparison with the materials joined.

  2. Annealing effects in low upper-shelf welds (series 9)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskander, S.K.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the Ninth Irradiation Series is to evaluate the correlation between fracture toughness and CVN impact energy during irradiation, annealing, and reirradiation (IAR). Results of annealing CVN specimens from the low-USE welds from the Midland beltline and nozzle course welds, as well as HSST plate 02 and HSSI weld 73W are given. Also presented is the effect of annealing on the initiation fracture toughness of annealed material from Midland beltline weld and HSST plate 02. The results from capsule 10-5 specimens of weld 73W confirm those previously obtained on the so-called undersize specimens that were irradiated in the Fifth Irradiation Series, namely that the recovery due to annealing at 343 degrees C (650 degrees F) for 1 week is insignificant. The fabrication of major components for the IAR facility for two positions on the east side of the FNR at the University of Michigan has begun. Fabrication of two reusable capsules (one for temperature verification and the other for dosimetry verification), as well as two capsules for IAR, studies is also under way. The design of a reusable capsule capable of reirradiating previously irradiated and annealed CVN and 1T C(T) specimens is also progressing. The data acquisition and control (DAC) instrumentation for the first two IAR facilities is essentially complete and awaiting completion of the IAR facilities and temperature test capsule for checkout and control algorithm development

  3. Effect of post-weld heat treatment and electrolytic plasma processing on tungsten inert gas welded AISI 4140 alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewan, Mohammad W.; Liang, Jiandong; Wahab, M.A.; Okeil, Ayman M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The effects of PWHT and EPP were explored on TIG welded AISI4140 alloy steel. • All welded samples were checked with PAUT and ensured defect-free before testing. • Residual stresses, hardness, and tensile properties were measured experimentally. • PWHT resulted higher ductility but lower tensile strength for grain refinement. • EPP-treated samples showed higher tensile strength but lower ductility. - Abstract: Post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) is commonly adopted on welded joints and structures to relieve post-weld residual stresses; and restore the mechanical properties and structural integrity. An electrolytic plasma process (EPP) has been developed to improve corrosion behavior and wear resistance of structural materials; and can be employed in other applications and surface modifications aspects. In this study the effects of PWHT and EPP on the residual stresses, micro-hardness, microstructures, and uniaxial tensile properties are explored on tungsten inert gas (TIG) welded AISI-4140 alloys steel with SAE-4130 chromium–molybdenum alloy welding filler rod. For rational comparison all of the welded samples are checked with nondestructive Phased Array Ultrasonic Testing (PAUT) and to ensure defect-free samples before testing. Residual stresses are assessed with ultrasonic testing at different distances from weld center line. PWHT resulted in relief of tensile residual stress due to grain refinement. As a consequence higher ductility but lower strength existed in PWHT samples. In comparison, EPP-treated samples revealed lower residual stresses, but no significant variation on the grain refinement. Consequently, EPP-treated specimens exhibited higher tensile strength but lower ductility and toughness for the martensitic formation due to the rapid heating and quenching effects. EPP was also applied on PWHT samples, but which did not reveal any substantial effect on the tensile properties after PWHT at 650 °C. Finally the microstructures and

  4. The effect of welding methods on the microstructure and properties of welded tantalum sheets and a mathematical analysis of heat transfer in welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharir, Y.

    1977-12-01

    The effect of electromagnetic vibration of the arc and the influence of varying the pulses of the current on the nature of solidification in the molten zone of welded tantalum were investigated. Their influence on microstructure and some service properties were also studied. At optimum conditions equi-axed grains and refined microstructure were obtained in the fusion zone of the weld. Similar results were achieved by selecting proper conditions for the current pulses. The effect of varying welding speed and the combined effect of welding speed and optimal vibration conditions were also examined. The experiments were performed in an inert-gas-chamber designed for this purpose. Most of the tests to evaluate service performance were devoted to the investigation of some mechanical properties (yield stress, ultimate tensile strength, hardness and ductility) of the fusion-zone itself. Slight improvement in strength and significant increase in ductility were achieved by an advanced welding technique as compared with the results of a more conventional welding method. The optimum conditions for the advanced welding technique applied in this work were determined. A new mathematical model for calculating heat distribution in tantalum sheets was developed. A non-stationary calculation, independent of specific initial conditions or the shape of the molten pool, is the basis of this model. Consequently, it can be used for advanced welding techniques where the molten pool is dynamic in shape or nature. The model takes into account heat losses by an exponential function and the variation of some physical properties as a function of temperature. The differential equations are solved numerically by an explicit-finite-difference-method by a computer program written for this purpose. Calculated and experimental results are in good agreement. (author)

  5. The effect of post-welding conditions in friction stir welds: From weld simulation to Ductile Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Nielsen, Kim Lau; Tutum, Cem Celal

    2012-01-01

    software ANSYS, a thermo-mechanical model is employed to predict the thermally induced stresses and strains during welding, while an in-house finite element code is used to study the plastic flow localization and failure in a subsequent structural analysis. The coupling between the two models is made......The post-welding stress state, strain history and material conditions of friction stir welded joints are often strongly idealized when used in subsequent modeling analyses, typically by neglecting one or more of the features above. But, it is obvious that the conditions after welding do influence......, showed the largest influence of the post-welding conditions, even though significant relaxation of the residual stress state was predicted....

  6. Ocular effects of chronic exposure to welding light on calabar welders

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was generally observed that welders in Calabar, Nigeria did not always wear their protective goggles during welding. Since chronic exposure to welding light can impair vision this study was done to assess the effect of exposure to welding light on ocular function of welders in Calabar, Nigeria. There were 195 subjects ...

  7. Low activation steels welding with PWHT and coating for ITER Test Blanket Modules and DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, P.; Tavassoli, F.; Rieth, M.; Diegele, E.; Poitevin, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Eurofer weldability is established for data base assessment and TBM manufacturing support. Electron Beam, Hybrid (Laser combined with MIG/MAG), Laser and Narrow Gap TIG processes have been carried out on Eurofer Low activation steel. Electron Beam produces very narrow fusion zone width, in the range of 3 to 4 mm, and too strong enhanced weld shape with brittle joints with δ-ferrite and pores. This process is considered only for low penetration depth (cooling plates). The other processes produce 2 families of similar results: one for Hybrid (MIG + Laser) and Laser processes, and a second one for TIG and Narrow Gap TIG processes. The first one procures less distortion and coarsened fusion zone, due to higher cooling rate. For all the welding processes, high hardness values, increasing brittleness and softening effects in the Heat Affected Zone are observed for each welding configuration that could signal creep problems. The Fusion Zones are typically composed of martensite laths, with small grain sizes. In the Heat Affected Zones, martensite grains are observed with carbide precipitation. Eurofer filler wire with optimized chemical composition is developed for producing welds with good properties and high joint coefficient value. To restore mechanical properties after welding, PWHT have been developed: single step for the first family and 2 steps for the second one. Distortions of different mock-ups with and without PWHT have been managed to assess manufacturing rules and clamping devices. Welding data base has thus been established. W coating on the TBM structure has shown no strong effect on the TBM structure. (author)

  8. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of an Ultrasonic Spot Welded Aluminum Alloy: The Effect of Welding Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Peng

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the microstructures, tensile lap shear strength, and fatigue resistance of 6022-T43 aluminum alloy joints welded via a solid-state welding technique–ultrasonic spot welding (USW–at different energy levels. An ultra-fine necklace-like equiaxed grain structure is observed along the weld line due to the occurrence of dynamic crystallization, with smaller grain sizes at lower levels of welding energy. The tensile lap shear strength, failure energy, and critical stress intensity of the welded joints first increase, reach their maximum values, and then decrease with increasing welding energy. The tensile lap shear failure mode changes from interfacial fracture at lower energy levels, to nugget pull-out at intermediate optimal energy levels, and to transverse through-thickness (TTT crack growth at higher energy levels. The fatigue life is longer for the joints welded at an energy of 1400 J than 2000 J at higher cyclic loading levels. The fatigue failure mode changes from nugget pull-out to TTT crack growth with decreasing cyclic loading for the joints welded at 1400 J, while TTT crack growth mode remains at all cyclic loading levels for the joints welded at 2000 J. Fatigue crack basically initiates from the nugget edge, and propagates with “river-flow” patterns and characteristic fatigue striations.

  9. Effect of Post Weld Heat Treatment on Corrosion Behavior of AA2014 Aluminum – Copper Alloy Electron Beam Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkata Ramana, V. S. N.; Mohammed, Raffi; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    The present work pertains to the study of corrosion behavior of aluminum alloy electron beam welds. The aluminium alloy used in the present study is copper containing AA2014 alloy. Electron Beam Welding (EBW) was used to weld the alloys in annealed (O) condition. Microstructural changes across the welds were recorded and the effect of post weld heat treatment (PWHT) in T4 (Solutionized and naturally aged) condition on pitting corrosion resistance was studied. A software based PAR basic electrochemical system was used for potentio-dynamic polarization tests. From the study it is observed that weld in O condition is prone to more liquation than that of PWHT condition. This may be attributed to re-melting and solidification of excess eutectic present in the O condition of the base metal. It was also observed that slightly higher hardness values are recorded in O condition than that of PWHT condition. The pitting corrosion resistance of the PMZ/HAZ in PWHT condition is better than that of O condition. This is attributed to copper segregation at the grain boundaries of PMZ in O condition.

  10. Effect of post weld heat treatment on the microstructure and tensile properties of activated flux TIG welds of Inconel X750

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramkumar, K. Devendranath, E-mail: ramdevendranath@gmail.com; Ramanand, R.; Ameer, Ajmal; Simon, K. Aghil; Arivazhagan, N.

    2016-03-21

    This study addresses the effect of post weld heat treatment on the fusion zone microstructure and the mechanical properties of activated flux tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) weldments of Inconel X750. In this study, a compound flux of 50% SiO{sub 2}+50% MoO{sub 3} was used for A-TIG welding of the samples. Comparative studies on the microstructure and mechanical properties have been made on the weldments both in the as-welded and post weld heat treated conditions. Direct ageing post weld heat treatment (PWHT) was carried out at 705 °C for 22 h on the A-TIG weldment to assess the structure–property relationships. It was inferred that direct ageing post weld heat treatment resulted in better tensile strength (1142 MPa) compared to the as-welded coupons (736 MPa). The joint efficiencies of the as-welded and post weld heat treated conditions were found to be 60.7% and 94.07% respectively. The impact toughness of the as-welded coupons were found to be greater than the post weld heat treated samples; however the impact toughness of the welds are greater than the parent metal employed in both the cases. This study also attested the detailed structure–property relationships of A-TIG weldments using the combined techniques of optical and scanning electron microscopy, Electron Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDAX) techniques.

  11. Effect of post weld heat treatment on the microstructure and tensile properties of activated flux TIG welds of Inconel X750

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramkumar, K. Devendranath; Ramanand, R.; Ameer, Ajmal; Simon, K. Aghil; Arivazhagan, N.

    2016-01-01

    This study addresses the effect of post weld heat treatment on the fusion zone microstructure and the mechanical properties of activated flux tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) weldments of Inconel X750. In this study, a compound flux of 50% SiO_2+50% MoO_3 was used for A-TIG welding of the samples. Comparative studies on the microstructure and mechanical properties have been made on the weldments both in the as-welded and post weld heat treated conditions. Direct ageing post weld heat treatment (PWHT) was carried out at 705 °C for 22 h on the A-TIG weldment to assess the structure–property relationships. It was inferred that direct ageing post weld heat treatment resulted in better tensile strength (1142 MPa) compared to the as-welded coupons (736 MPa). The joint efficiencies of the as-welded and post weld heat treated conditions were found to be 60.7% and 94.07% respectively. The impact toughness of the as-welded coupons were found to be greater than the post weld heat treated samples; however the impact toughness of the welds are greater than the parent metal employed in both the cases. This study also attested the detailed structure–property relationships of A-TIG weldments using the combined techniques of optical and scanning electron microscopy, Electron Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDAX) techniques.

  12. Minimally-invasive glaucoma surgeries (MIGS) for open angle glaucoma: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavia, Carlo; Dallorto, Laura; Maule, Milena; Ceccarelli, Manuela; Fea, Antonio Maria

    2017-01-01

    MIGS have been developed as a surgical alternative for glaucomatous patients. To analyze the change in intraocular pressure (IOP) and glaucoma medications using different MIGS devices (Trabectome, iStent, Excimer Laser Trabeculotomy (ELT), iStent Supra, CyPass, XEN, Hydrus, Fugo Blade, Ab interno canaloplasty, Goniscopy-assisted transluminal trabeculotomy) as a solo procedure or in association with phacoemulsification. Randomized control trials (RCT) and non-RCT (non randomized comparative studies, NRS, and before-after studies) were included. Studies with at least one year of follow-up in patients affected by primary open angle glaucoma, pseudoexfoliative glaucoma or pigmentary glaucoma were considered. Risk of Bias assessment was performed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias and the ROBINS-I tools. The main outcome was the effect of MIGS devices compared to medical therapy, cataract surgery, other glaucoma surgeries and other MIGS on both IOP and use of glaucoma medications 12 months after surgery. Outcomes measures were the mean difference in the change of IOP and glaucoma medication compared to baseline at one and two years and all ocular adverse events. The current meta-analysis is registered on PROSPERO (reference n° CRD42016037280). Over a total of 3,069 studies, nine RCT and 21 case series with a total of 2.928 eyes were included. Main concerns about risk of bias in RCTs were lack of blinding, allocation concealment and attrition bias while in non-RCTs they were represented by patients' selection, masking of participants and co-intervention management. Limited evidence was found based on both RCTs and non RCTs that compared MIGS surgery with medical therapy or other MIGS. In before-after series, MIGS surgery seemed effective in lowering both IOP and glaucoma drug use. MIGS showed a good safety profile: IOP spikes were the most frequent complications and no cases of infection or BCVA loss due to glaucoma were reported. Although MIGS seem efficient in the

  13. The effect of flux on properties of weld in submerged arc welding with filler metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fattahpour, Iran.

    1984-01-01

    In the submerged-arc welding, the electrode wire is shielded by a blanket of granular fusible material called a flux. This granular material, flux, must ensure the deposition of weld metal of given chemical composition and specified mechanical properties. The flux must also ensure stable burning of the welding arc and contribute to the formation of a dense weld of required shape and size, and free from pores, cracks and slag inclusions. As the deposited molten metal solidifies, the flux must form a slag crust, easily separable from the surface of the weld. This material must be of a certain chemical composition and possess definite physical properties, such as melting point, viscosity, bulk weight. The chemical composition of the flux is chosen, depending on the composition of the welded metal and electrode wire used. (Author)

  14. EFFECT OF PRE-HEAT TREATMENT ON MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF Ti-6Al-4V WELDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gnofam Jacques TCHEIN

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The work presented here is related to the optimization of the Friction Stir Welding (FSW process. The objective is to study the influence of some parameters used in the production of welded joints by FSW. The most important parameters are the welding speed and the rotational speed of the tool. The effect of pre-heat treatment on the plates to be welded is also studied by the design of experimental methods. These pre-heat treatments result not only in a change of mechanical properties of plates to be welded, but also of their microstructure. The experiments were performed following a 16 lines fractional Taguchi table.

  15. Effect of tool geometry on friction stir spot welding of polypropylene sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Bilici

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of tool geometry and properties on friction stir spot welding properties of polypropylene sheets were studied. Four different tool pin geometries, with varying pin angles, pin lengths, shoulder diameters and shoulder angles were used for friction stir spot welding. All the welding operations were done at the room temperature. Lap-shear tensile tests were carried out to find the weld static strength. Weld cross section appearance observations were also done. From the experiments the effect of tool geometry on friction stir spot weld formation and weld strength were determined. The optimum tool geometry for 4 mm thick polypropylene sheets were determined. The tapered cylindrical pin gave the biggest and the straight cylindrical pin gave the lowest lap-shear fracture load.

  16. The effects of laser welding parameters on the microstructure of ferritic and duplex stainless steels welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekkarinen, J.; Kujanpää, V.

    This study is focused to determine empirically, which microstructural changes occur in ferritic and duplex stainless steels when heat input is controlled by welding parameters. Test welds were done autogenously bead-on-plate without shielding gas using 5 kW fiber laser. For comparison, some gas tungsten arc welds were made. Used test material were 1.4016 (AISI 430) and 1.4003 (low-carbon ferritic) type steels in ferritic steels group and 1.4162 (low-alloyed duplex, LDX2101) and 1.4462 (AISI 2205) type steels in duplex steels group. Microstructural changes in welds were identified and examined using optical metallographic methods.

  17. Effects of residual stress on fatigue strength of small diameter welded pipe joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Tetsuo; Hattori, Takahiro; Nomoto, Toshiharu; Iida, Kunihiro; Sato, Masanobu

    1996-01-01

    A power plant consists of many welded components, therefore, it is essential in establishing the reliability of the power plant to maintain the reliability of all welded components. The fatigue failure caused by mechanical vibrations of small diameter welded joints, which is represented by socket welded joints, is one of the major causes of trouble for the welded parts of the power plant. Here, bending fatigue tests were conducted to investigate the fatigue strength of small diameter socket welded pipe joints. In the most cases of large diameter socket joints, a fatigue crack started from the root of the fillet weld though the stress amplitude at the root was smaller than that at the toe of fillet weld. Additionally, the fatigue strength was affected by the weld bead sequence. The residual stress was considered to be one of the important parameters governing fatigue strength, therefore, its effects were investigated. In several types of pipe joints, the local stress and residual stress distributions were calculated by finite element analysis. The residual stresses were compressive at the toe and tensile at the root of the socket welded joints. Based on these results, the effects of residual stresses on the fatigue strength are discussed for small diameter welded pipe joints in the present work

  18. Effect of tool rotational speed and penetration depth on dissimilar aluminum alloys friction stir spot welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín M. Piccini

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, the automotive industry is looking for the use of aluminum parts in replace of steel parts in order to reduce the vehicles weight. These parts have to be joined, for instance, by welding processes. The more common welding process in the automotive industry is the Resistance Spot Welding (RSW technique. However, RSW of aluminum alloys has many disadvantages. Regarding this situation, a variant of the Friction Stir Welding process called Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW has been developed, showing a strong impact in welding of aluminum alloys and dissimilar materials in thin sheets. Process parameters affect the characteristics of the welded joints. However, the information available on this topic is scarce, particularly for dissimilar joints and thin sheets. The aim of this work was to study the effect of the rotational speed and the tool penetration depth on the characteristics of dissimilar FSS welded joints. Defects free joints have been achieved with higher mechanical properties than the ones reported. The maximum fracture load was 5800 N. It was observed that the effective joint length of the welded spots increased with the tool penetration depth, meanwhile the fracture load increased and then decreased. Finally, welding at 1200 RPM produced welded joints with lower mechanical properties than the ones achieved at 680 and 903 RPM.

  19. Microstructure and toughness of ferritic weld metal of hyperbaric welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, L.

    1988-01-01

    In the present work ferritic weld metals of hyperbaric MIG/MAG welds with pressures up to 100 bar were examined. As a result of the pressure, interactions with the shielding gas, the filler metal as well as with the welding parameters had to be expected and were consequently included in the analysis. Investigation was focused on the influence of these parameters on the chemical composition of the weld metals, the microstructure and toughness behaviour, including fracture mechanics test. Using quantitative microstructural analysis as well as fractography a correlation between microstructure and toughness has been shown. (orig.) [de

  20. Effects of multi-pass arc welding on mechanical properties of carbon steel C25 plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adedayo, S.M.; Babatunde, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of multi-pass welding on mechanical properties of C25 carbon steel plate were examined. Mild steel plate workpieces of 90 x 55 mm 2 area and 10 mm thickness with a 30 degrees vee weld-grooves were subjected to single and multi-pass welding. Toughness, hardness and tensile tests of single and multi-pass welds were conducted. Toughness values of the welds under double pass welds were higher than both single pass and unwelded alloy, at respective maximum values of 2464, 2342 and 2170 kN/m. Hardness values were reduced under double pass relative to single pass welding with both being lower than the value for unwelded alloy; the values were 40.5, 43.2 and 48.5 Rs respectively at 12 mm from the weld line. The tensile strength of 347 N/mm 2 under multi-pass weld was higher than single pass weld with value of 314 N/mm 2 . Therefore, the temperature distribution and apparent pre-heating during multi-pass welding increased the toughness and tensile strength of the weldments, but reduced the hardness. (au)

  1. Gas Mixtures for Welding with Micro-Jet Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Węgrzyn T.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Welding with micro-jet cooling after was tested only for MIG and MAG processes. For micro-jet gases was tested only argon, helium and nitrogen. A paper presents a piece of information about gas mixtures for micro-jet cooling after in welding. There are put down information about gas mixtures that could be chosen both for MAG welding and for micro-jet process. There were given main information about influence of various micro-jet gas mixtures on metallographic structure of steel welds. Mechanical properties of weld was presented in terms of various gas mixtures selection for micro-jet cooling.

  2. Effects of the use of MIG3 bioceramics fabrics use - long infrared emitter - in pain, intolerance to cold and periodic limb movements in post-polio syndrome Efeitos do uso de tecidos com biocerâmica MIG3 - emissora de infravermelho longo - na dor, intolerância ao frio e movimentos periódicos dos membros na síndrome pós-poliomielite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Mesquita e Silva

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The main post-polio syndrome (PPS symptoms are new-onset weakness, new-onset atrophy, fatigue, cold intolerance, and pain associated with sleep disturbances. The polysomnographic study is the gold pattern to analyze sleep disorders. OBJECTIVE: To assess pain, intolerance to cold and periodic limb movements (PLM index before and after the use of MIG3 bioceramic fabrics over 4 weeks. METHOD: 12 patients with PPS from UNIFESP/EPM. All patients were submitted to polysomnography and infra-red examinations with answered scales of pain and intolerance to cold before and after the use of MIG3 bioceramics fabrics. RESULTS: There were significant decreases in pain and PLM index. CONCLUSION: MIG3 bioceramic fabrics can help in the treatment of pain and PLM in PPS patients.Dentre as manifestações clínicas da SPP destacam-se nova fraqueza, fadiga, dor, intolerância ao frio, nova atrofia e transtornos do sono. A polissonografia de noite inteira permanece sendo padrão ouro para análise do sono e diagnóstico de transtornos do sono. OBJETIVO: Avaliar o comportamento da dor, intolerância ao frio (IF e índice de movimentos periódicos de membros (PLMs após uso de colchonete e roupas com biocerâmica MIG3 por 4 semanas. MÉTODO: 12 pacientes com SPP, da UNIFESP/EPM. Todos realizaram exames de polissonografia e infravermelho e responderam a questionários de dor e IF antes e após o uso dos materiais. RESULTADOS: Houve diminuição significativa da dor e dos PLMs. CONCLUSÃO: Os tecidos com biocerâmica MIG3 podem ser um coadjuvante ao tratamento da dor e dos PLMs nos pacientes com SPP.

  3. Innovative welding technology’s impact on the productivity of small and medium enterprises in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Makore

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This research paper focuses on the evaluation of innovative welding technology’s impact on the productivity of Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs. The paper examines business operational sector and size, technology currently in use, customer/supplier relationships, and technical knowledge levels, skills in use on the shop floor level, training, safety standards implementation and quality control aspects in the SMEs. The companies are evaluated on their use of Oxygen and Acetylene gas welding, Manual Metal Arc Welding (MMA, Metal Inert Gas Welding (MIG and Tungsten Inert Gas Welding (TIG for maintenance and productive purposes. Both exploratory and descriptive research designs are applied in this study. A structured survey instrument was administered to seventy five (75 SMEs selected based the researcher’s judgement of companies’ industrial classification. The findings are that technological innovativeness has both positive and negative effects on the commercial success of companies,however management in SMEs do not leverage on the use of innovative welding technology. The findings on the nonsignificance of the influence of technological innovativeness of welding processes can be as a result internal managerial controllable factors and outward uncontrollable environmental factors.

  4. Welding of heat-resistant 20% Cr-5% Al steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tusek, J.; Arbi, D.; Kosmac, A.; Nartnik, U.

    2002-01-01

    The paper treats welding of heat-resistant ferritic stainless steels alloyed with approximately 20% Cr and 5% Al. The major part of the paper is dedicated to welding of 20% Cr-5% Al steel with 3 mm in thickness. Welding was carried out with five different welding processes, i. e., manual metal-arc, MIG, TIG, plasma arc, and laser beam welding processes, using a filler material and using no filler material, respectively. The welded joints obtained were subjected to mechanical tests and the analysis of microstructure in the weld metal and the transition zone. The investigations conducted showed that heat-resistant ferritic stainless 20% Cr-5% Al steel can be welded with fusion welding processes using a Ni-based filler material. (orig.)

  5. effect of post-weld heat treatment on the microstructure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    while the hardness, toughness and tensile properties of the samples were determined by using Indentec universal hardness testing ... submerge arc welding, gas metal arc welding, plasma ..... [4] Vijendra Singh, Physical Metallurgy, Standard.

  6. Effect of process parameters on microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir welded joints: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanare, S. P.; Kalyankar, V. D.

    2018-04-01

    Friction stir welding is emerging as a promising technique for joining of lighter metal alloys due to its several advantages over conventional fusion welding processes such as low thermal distortion, good mechanical properties, fine weld joint microstructure, etc. This review article mainly focuses on analysis of microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir welded joints. Various microstructure characterization techniques used by previous researchers such as optical microscopes, x-ray diffraction, electron probe microscope, transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscopes with electron back scattered diffraction, electron dispersive microscopy, etc. are thoroughly overviewed and their results are discussed. The effects of friction stir welding process parameters such as tool rotational speed, welding speed, tool plunge depth, axial force, tool shoulder diameter to tool pin diameter ratio, tool geometry etc. on microstructure and mechanical properties of welded joints are studied and critical observations are noted down. The microstructure examination carried out by previous researchers on various zones of welded joints such as weld zone, heat affected zone and base metal are studied and critical remarks have been presented. Mechanical performances of friction stir welded joints based on tensile test, micro-hardness test, etc. are discussed. This article includes exhaustive literature review of standard research articles which may become ready information for subsequent researchers to establish their line of action.

  7. Inspección de soldadura MIG/MAG de piezas metálicas utilizando técnicas de visión artificial y procesamiento de imágenes

    OpenAIRE

    Loja Bravo, Christian Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Este trabajo presenta la inspección de soldadura MIG/MAG de piezas metálicas, a través de un módulo prototipo de visión artificial que detecta fallas de tipo: porosidad, salpicaduras y discontinuidad de soldadura. Mediante un corpus de imágenes de piezas soldadas, se realizan pruebas de clasificación e interpretación de resultados. The present project describes the MIG/MAG welding inspection of metal pieces, through a prototype module of computer vision that detects faults of type: porosit...

  8. Study on the welding process of the CTB outbox prototype of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chen; Lu, Kun; Song, Yuntao; Zhu, Rui; Bao, Hongwei; Li, Shoukang; Zhang, Chunjie; Tuo, Fuxing

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Welding progress simulation of ITER CTB outbox by SYSWELD. • 2 m length box mockup welding for R&D. • Special welding tooling and groove design for welding deformation control and improvement of welding quality. • Double torch automatic MIG welding method application. - Abstract: The current study investigated the main welding process of the box. We first performed a simple simulation of the welding process for the four long weld lines on CTB (Coil Terminal Box) outbox by using the finite element analysis mode of SYSWELD. Then a 2 m length mock up box was welded for R&D to optimize the welding parameters and deformation distribution. Base on the R&D experiences, we designed a special tooling of the prototype box which can be used to control the deformation during the welding process. A 8 m length CTB outbox prototype was successfully welded by using double torch automatic MIG (Metal Inert-Gas) welding. The dimension inspection results confirmed that the welding deformation of the box can be controlled within 3 mm on each side. Based on the ultrasonic inspection, all the welding seams met quality level B by standard EN 5817.

  9. Hybrid friction stir welding for dissimilar materials through electro-plastic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xun; Lan, Shuhuai; Ni, Jun

    2018-05-29

    A hybrid Friction Stir Welding approach and device for dissimilar materials joining employing Electro-Plastic Effect. The approach and device include an introduction of high density, short period current pulses into traditional friction stir welding process, which therefore can generate a localized softened zone in the workpiece during plastic stirring without significant additional temperature increase. This material softened zone is created by high density current pulses based on Electro-Plastic Effect and will move along with the friction stir welding tool. Smaller downward force, larger processing window and better joint quality for dissimilar materials are expected to be achieved through this hybrid welding technique.

  10. The Effect of Weld Penetration on Blast Performance of Welded Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Manufacture and Preparation BisPlate HHA is a quenched and tempered steel armour plate of high hardness, marketed for applications where light weight and...The welded coupons consisted of armour steel plate, Bisalloy BisPlate High Hardness Armour steel, welded to Bisalloy BisPlate80 steel with an...If an armoured vehicle is subjected to explosive blast loading, such as, detonation of a mine or an Improvised Explosive Device (IED), the blast

  11. The effect of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of welded zircaloy-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, D G

    1962-07-15

    Zircaloy-2 tensile specimens, subsize impact bars and representative spigot welds were subjected to three NRX cycles in the X-5 loop. Average loop temperature was 260{sup o}C over the three cycles. One group of tensile specimens was heat-treated in vacuum at 900{sup o}C for 40 minutes, another group contained welded areas in the centre of the gauge length and a third group was hydrided after welding. Notches of the impact specimens were located in the fusion zone of the weld, Spigot welds were made on autoclaved and unautoclaved simulated production assemblies. The transition temperature of Zircaloy-2 increased appreciably upon welding. This was accompanied by a decrease in absorbed energy values for all temperatures between 0{sup o} and 300{sup o}C. Neutron irradiation had no effect on the impact properties of welded. Zircaloy-2. Welding decreased the uniform and total elongation at room temperature and at 260{sup o}C, and increased the 260{sup o}C PL, YS and UTS. Hydriding to a nominal 100 ppm hydrogen had no effect on the unirradiated tensile properties at either test temperature. The heat treatment decreased the strength properties but did not affect the ductility. Neutron irradiation increased the YS of the welded and hydrided material by 20% and the heat treated YS by 40%. Irradiation also increased the 260{sup o}C strength properties of the as-welded material. It was found that the unautoclaved spigot welds had a generally higher tensile strength than the autoclaved and welded specimens. For specimens welded in either condition, the outer welds of the 19-element bundle had a lower average breaking load than the inner welds. Neutron irradiation had no effect on the tensile strength of these welds. It was also demonstrated that a cup-and-cone type of fracture could be produced in a bend test. These fractures were similar to those observed in irradiated fuel bundles which had been damaged during transfer operations. A large amount of scatter rendered some

  12. Effect of process parameters on the residual stresses in AA5083-H321 friction stir welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombard, H. [NMMU, Gardham Avenue, PO Box 77000, 6031 Port Elizabeth (South Africa); University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Hattingh, D.G. [NMMU, Gardham Avenue, PO Box 77000, 6031 Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Steuwer, A. [NMMU, Gardham Avenue, PO Box 77000, 6031 Port Elizabeth (South Africa); FaME38 at the ILL-ESRF, 6 rue J Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)], E-mail: steuwer@ill.fr; James, M.N. [NMMU, Gardham Avenue, PO Box 77000, 6031 Port Elizabeth (South Africa); University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-15

    This paper investigates the effect of varying welding parameters on the residual stress profiles in friction stir welds of aluminium alloy AA5083-H321, which were created on a fully instrumented friction welding machine. The residual stresses were determined non-destructively using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The width and maximum of the residual stress profile show clear correlation with the heat input, and in particular feed rate, which was found to be the dominant parameter.

  13. Effect of Thermal Aging and Test Temperatures on Fracture Toughness of SS 316(N) Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt, B. Shashank; Babu, M. Nani; Shanthi, G.; Moitra, A.; Sasikala, G.

    2018-03-01

    The effect of thermal aging and test temperatures on fracture toughness (J 0.2) of SS 316(N) weld material has been studied based on J-R curve evaluations. The aging of the welds was carried out at temperatures 370, 475 and 550 °C and for durations varying from 1000 to 20,000 h. The fracture toughness (J-R curve) tests were carried out at 380 and 550 °C for specimens after all aging conditions, including as-weld condition. The initiation fracture toughness (J 0.2) of the SS 316(N) weld material has shown degradation after 20,000-h aging durations and is reflected in all the test temperatures and aging temperatures. The fracture toughness after different aging conditions and test temperatures, including as-weld condition, was higher than the minimum specified value for this class of welds.

  14. The effect of tensioning and sectioning on residual stresses in aluminium AA7749 friction stir welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altenkirch, J.; Steuwer, A.; Peel, M.; Richards, D.G.; Withers, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Using synchrotron X-ray diffraction the residual stress distribution has been measured in a series of AA7449-W51 aluminium friction stir welds that had been tensioned to different loads during welding. By modifying the stress accumulation path, the application of a tensioning stress has reduced the tensile magnitude of the final residual weld stresses. In the present case the residual stresses were minimised when the applied load is ∼35% of the room temperature yield stress of the parent material. Subsequent sectioning of the weld into shorter test lengths, as might be necessary for weld testing, resulted in a progressive and significant relaxation of the residual stress field. The effect of tensioning on the weld component distortion also has been investigated

  15. A review on the effect of welding on the corrosion of magnesium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, N. S.; Alias, J.

    2017-10-01

    Welding is an important joining technique for lightweight alloys with their increasing applications in aerospace, aircraft, automotive, electronics and other industries. The applications of lightweight alloys particularly magnesium alloys increased rapidly due to their beneficial properties such as low density, high strength-to-mass ratio, good dimensional stability, electromagnetic shielding and good recyclability. The effect of welding on the corrosion of magnesium alloys are reviewed in this paper, which closely related to the developed microstructure by the welding process. The paper focuses particularly on friction stir and laser welding. The basic principles of friction stir and laser welding are discussed, to present the likelihood of defects which significantly affect the corrosion of magnesium alloy. The finding in corrosion demonstrated the morphology of corrosion occurrence on each welded region, and observation on the potential and current values are also included.

  16. EBSD characterization of the effect of welding parameters on HAZ of AISI409

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjbarnodeha E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main problems during the welding of ferritic stainless steels is severe grain growth in the heat affected zone (HAZ. In the present study, microstructural characteristics of tungsten inert gas (TIG welded AISI409 ferritic stainless steel were investigated. The effect of the welding parameters on grain size٫ local misorientation and low angle grain boundaries was studied. It was found that the base metal was partly in recrystallization state. Complete recrystallization followed by severe grain growth occurs after joining process due to welding heating cycle. A decrease in the number of low angle grain boundaries in HAZ was observed. Nevertheless, the welding plastic strain increases the density of local misorientation and low angle grain boundaries. This investigation shows that the final state of strain is the result of the competition between welding plastic strains and stress relieving from recrystallization but the decisive factor in determining the grain size in HAZ is heat input.

  17. The effect of welding parameters on surface quality of AA6351 aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yacob, S; Ariffin, N; Ali, R; Arshad, A; Wahab, M I A; Ismail, S A; Roji, NS M; Din, W B W; Zakaria, M H; Abdullah, A; Yusof, M I; Kamarulzaman, K Z; Mahyuddin, A; Hamzah, M N; Roslan, R; MAli, M A; Ahsan, Q

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, the effects of gas metal arc welding-cold metal transfer (GMAW-CMT) parameters on surface roughness are experimentally assessed. The purpose of this study is to develop a better understanding of the effects of welding speed, material thickness and contact tip to work distance on the surface roughness. Experiments are conducted using single pass gas metal arc welding-cold metal transfer (GMAW-CMT) welding technique to join the material. The material used in this experiment was AA6351 aluminum alloy with the thickness of 5mm and 6mm. A Mahr Marsuft XR 20 machine was used to measure the average roughness (Ra) of AA6351 joints. The main and interaction effect analysis was carried out to identify process parameters that affect the surface roughness. The results show that all the input process parameters affect the surface roughness of AA6351 joints. Additionally, the average roughness (Ra) results also show a decreasing trend with increased of welding speed. It is proven that gas metal arc welding-cold metal transfer (GMAW-CMT)welding process has been successful in term of providing weld joint of good surface quality for AA6351 based on the low value surface roughness condition obtained in this setup. The outcome of this experimental shall be valuable for future fabrication process in order to obtained high good quality weld. (paper)

  18. Effect of heat treatment on carbon steel pipe welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Harun.

    1987-01-01

    The heat treatment to improve the altered properties of carbon steel pipe welds is described. Pipe critical components in oil, gasification and nuclear reactor plants require adequate room temperature toughness and high strength at both room and moderately elevated temperatures. Microstructure and microhardness across the welds were changed markedly by the welding process and heat treatment. The presentation of hardness fluctuation in the welds can produce premature failure. A number of heat treatments are suggested to improve the properties of the welds. (author) 8 figs., 5 refs

  19. Revestimento de Níquel Depositado pela Soldagem MIG e MIG com Arame Frio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Mendes da Mota

    Full Text Available Resumo: Este artigo apresenta um estudo das características operacionais, geométricas e microestruturais de soldas MIG e MIGAF (MIG com arame frio aplicadas no revestimento de chapa de um aço AISI 1020, com uma superliga de níquel ER NiCrMo-4, tipo Hastelloy 276C. A soldagem foi automatizada, na posição plana, e realizada por uma fonte eletrônica em CC+ com aquisição instantânea dos oscilogramas de corrente e tensão de soldagem. As variáveis de entrada foram às velocidades do arame eletrodo e do arame frio, e a velocidade de soldagem. Foram avaliadas a operacionalidade dos processos e o efeito da energia de soldagem sobre as características geométricas (reforço e largura, diluição, microestrutura e microdureza do revestimento. Os resultados indicaram um bom desempenho operacional, a ausência de defeitos nos passes isolados e nos revestimentos para as soldagens com MIGAF. Além disso, constataram-se menores níveis de diluição.

  20. Effect of preemptive weld overlay on residual stress of repaired weldment in surge nozzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Chang Young; Song, Tae Kwang; Bae, Hong Yeol; Chun, Yun Bae; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    In the welding process, weldments usually include repair weld during the manufacturing process. Repair welds is supposed to cause strong tensile residual stress. Moreover weldments, usually made by Alloy 82/182, is susceptible to PWSCC. Therefore, mitigation of welding residual stress in weldments is important for reliable operating. PWOL is one of the methods for mitigation and verified for over twenty years. In this paper, residual stress distribution of repaired weldments and the effect of PWOL on mitigation is examined for surge nozzle.

  1. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazumder, B.; Yu, X.; Edmondson, P.D.; Parish, C.M.; Miller, M.K.; Meyer, H.M.; Feng, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygen-enriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the size of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.

  2. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazumder, B., E-mail: mazumderb@ornl.gov [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Yu, X.; Edmondson, P.D.; Parish, C.M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Miller, M.K. [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Meyer, H.M.; Feng, Z. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygen-enriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the size of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.

  3. A Study on Tooling and Its Effect on Heat Generation and Mechanical Properties of Welded Joints in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikader, Sujoy; Biswas, Pankaj; Puri, Asit Baran

    2018-04-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has been the most attracting solid state welding process as it serves numerous advantages like good mechanical, metallurgical properties etc. Non weldable aluminium alloys like 5XXX, 7XXX series can be simply joined by this process. In this present study a mathematical model has been developed and experiments were successfully performed to evaluate mechanical properties of FSW on similar aluminium alloys i.e. AA1100 for different process parameters and mainly two kind of tool geometry (straight cylindrical and conical or cylindrical tapered shaped pin with flat shoulder). Tensile strength and micro hardness for different process parameters are reported of the welded plate sample. It was noticed that in FSW of similar alloy with tool made of SS-310 tool steel, friction is the major contributor for the heat generation. It was seen that tool geometry, tool rotational speed, plunging force by the tool and traverse speed have significant effect on tensile strength and hardness of friction stir welded joints.

  4. Effect of multiple repairs in girth welds of pipelines on the mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega, O.E.; Hallen, J.M.; Villagomez, A.; Contreras, A.

    2008-01-01

    This work presents the results of multiple weld repairs in the same area in seamless API X-52 microalloyed steel pipe. Four conditions of shielded metal arc welding repairs and one as-welded specimen of the girth weld were characterized to determine changes in the microstructure, grain size in the heat affected zone, and to evaluate their effect on the mechanical properties of the weld joints. The mechanical properties by means of tension tests, Charpy-V impact resistance and Vickers hardness of the welds were analyzed. The results indicate that significant changes are not generated in the microstructural constituents of the heat affected zone. Grain growth in the heat affected zone at the specimen mid-thickness with the number of repairs was observed. Tensile strength of the weld joints meets the requirement of the API 1104 standard even after the fourth weld repair. Significant reduction in Charpy-V impact resistance with the number of weld repairs was found when the notch location was in the intersection of the fusion line with the specimen mid-thickness. A significant increase in the Vickers hardness of the heat affected zone occurred after the first repair and a gradual decrease in the Vickers hardness occurred as the number of repairs increases

  5. Non-Uniform Cathode Emission Studies of a MIG Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchewka, C. D.; Shapiro, M. A.; Sirigiri, J. R.; Temkin, R. J.

    2004-11-01

    We present the initial results of the modeling of the effect of emission non-uniformity in 96 kV, 40 A Magnetron Injection Gun (MIG) of a 1.5 MW 110 GHz gyrotron using a 3D gun simulation code. The azimuthal emission nonuniformity can lead to increased mode competition and an overall decreased efficiency of the device [1]. The electron beam is modeled from the cathode to a downstream position where the velocity spread saturates using the AMAZE 3D suite of codes. After bench marking the results of the 3D code with 2D codes such as TRAK2D and EGUN, the emitter was modified to simulate asymmetric emission from the cathode to gain an understanding into the effects of inhomogeneous beam current density on the velocity spread and pitch factor of the electron beam. [1] G. S. Nusinovich, A.N. Vlasov, M. Botton, T. M. Antonsen, Jr., S. Cauffman, K. Felch, ``Effect of the azimuthal inhomogeneity of electron emission on gyrotron operation,'' Phys. Plasmas, vol. 8, no. 7, pp. 3473-3479, 2001

  6. The effect of welding speed and molten metal peak temperature on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of welding speed and molten metal peak temperature on thermal history of an arch - welded steel plate by numerical methods. SM Adedayo. Abstract. No Abstract. Journal of Applied Science, Engineering and Technology Vol. 1(1) 2001: 1-16. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL ...

  7. Effects of Laser Peening, and Shot Peening, on Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatamleh, Omar; Hackel, Lloyd; Rankin, Jon; Truong, Chanh; Walter, Matt

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing the effects of laser peening and shot peening on friction stir welding is shown. The topics include: 1) Background; 2) Friction Stir Welding (FSW); 3) Microstructure; 4) Laser & Shot Peening; 5) Residual Stresses; 6) Tensile Behavior; 7) Fatigue Life & Surface Roughness; 8) Crack Growth; and 9) Benefits.

  8. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  9. Magnetic property effect on transport processes in resistance spot welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, P S [Department of Mechanical and Electro-Mechanical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan 80424 (China); Wu, T H, E-mail: pswei@mail.nsysu.edu.tw, E-mail: wux0064@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yung Ta Institute of Technology and Commerce, Pintong, Taiwan 909 (China)

    2011-08-17

    This study investigates the effects of the Curie temperature and magnetic permeability on transport variables, solute distribution and nugget shapes during resistance spot welding. The Curie temperature is the temperature below which a metal or alloy is ferromagnetic with a high magnetic permeability, and above which it is paramagnetic with a small magnetic permeability. The model proposed here accounts for electromagnetic force, heat generation and contact resistance at the faying surface and electrode-workpiece interfaces and bulk resistance in workpieces. Contact resistance includes constriction and film resistances, which are functions of hardness, temperature, electrode force and surface condition. The computed results show that transport variables and nugget shapes can be consistently interpreted from the delay of response time and jump of electric current density as a result of finite magnetic diffusion, rather than through the examination of the variations of dynamic electrical resistance with time. The molten nugget on the faying surface is initiated earlier with increasing magnetic permeability and Curie temperature. A high Curie temperature enhances convection and solute mixing, and readily melts through the workpiece surface near the electrode edge. Any means to reduce the Curie temperature or magnetic permeability, such as adjusting the solute content, can be a good way to control weld quality. This study can also be applied to interpret the contact problems encountered in various electronics and packaging technologies, and so on.

  10. Gas Mixtures for Welding with Micro-Jet Cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Węgrzyn T.

    2015-01-01

    Welding with micro-jet cooling after was tested only for MIG and MAG processes. For micro-jet gases was tested only argon, helium and nitrogen. A paper presents a piece of information about gas mixtures for micro-jet cooling after in welding. There are put down information about gas mixtures that could be chosen both for MAG welding and for micro-jet process. There were given main information about influence of various micro-jet gas mixtures on metallographic structure of steel welds. Mechani...

  11. Effect of friction stir welding parameters on microstructure and mechanical properties of DSS–Cu joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokri, V., E-mail: v.shokri@modares.ac.ir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tarbiat Modarres University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi, A. [School of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi, M.H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tarbiat Modarres University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-05-02

    Dissimilar joining of copper to duplex stainless steel (DSS) is challenging at high temperatures of fusion welding owing to the large difference in physical properties of the base metals. To reduce negative effects of welding at high temperatures, solid state welding at lower temperatures has been proposed. To study different effects of welding parameters (rotation speed, travel speed and tool offset) on weld zone microstructure and mechanical properties butt joints of a copper alloy and duplex stainless steel (DSS) were produced by friction stir welding (FSW). It has been found that heat input generated by the interaction of different welding conditions has a significant effect on the formation of a brittle intermetallic at the interface and eventually the final mechanical properties. At low heat inputs, mixing of the two sides is insufficient and metallurgical bonding is weak; while at high heat inputs, the thickness of the formed intermetallic is too thick which causes stress concentration at the interface and premature failure. An optimum welding condition was found (rotation speed of 1200 rpm, travel speed of 30 mm/min and tool offset of 0.5 mm) which almost reached the mechanical properties of the Cu-alloy monolayer.

  12. Effect of Forced Convection Heat Transfer on Weld Pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Cooling Curves for GTAW Welds Superimposed on CCT Diagram ............. 26 11 - Photomacrographs Showing Weld Macrostructure (TS Plane...decomposition kinetics. Superposition of the weld metal cooling rates measured in this study on the CCT diagram shows that the time for nucleation and growth...m - TABLE 2 - TRANSFORMATION AND COOLING TIMES FROM CCT DIAGRAM *II I I. I I I Cooling Rate I Transformation I Time to Cool tL-I- I Heat Input I

  13. Effect of process parameters on optimum welding condition of DP590 steel by friction stir welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Gon; Kim, Ji Sun; Kim, In Ju

    2014-01-01

    In the automotive industry, vehicle weight reduction techniques have been actively studied to improve the rate of fuel consumption and to cope with the regulation restricting exhaust gas. For this reason, advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) is preferred in the automobile industry as its tensile strength is 590 MPa and over. In this study, to obtain the optimum welding condition, the friction stir welding (FSW) process applied to AHSS was considered. The FSW experiment was performed on a stir plate using a Si 3 N 4 tool and a 1.4-mm thick DP590 steel sheet manufactured by cold rolling. In addition, to investigate the temperature distribution of the advancing and retreating sides in the welding state, the tool rotation speed of 800 rpm, and the welding speed of 180 mm/min, a K-type thermocouple was inserted in the backing plate, and the peak temperature was evaluated at each point. Especially, the correlation between the heat input per unit length and the formation of the FSW zone was minutely analyzed.

  14. Heat input effect of friction stir welding on aluminum alloy AA 6061-T6 welded joint

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedmak, A.; Kumar, R.; Chattopadhyaya, S.; Hloch, Sergej; Tadić, S.; Djurdjević, A. A.; Čeković, I. R.; Dončeva, E.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 2 (2016), s. 637-641 ISSN 0354-9836 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : friction stir welding * defect * heat input * maximum temperature Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 1.093, year: 2016 http://www.doiserbia.nb.rs/img/doi/0354-9836/2016/0354-98361500147D.pdf

  15. Effect of process parameters on optimum welding condition of DP590 steel by friction stir welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Gon; Kim, Ji Sun; Kim, In Ju [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    In the automotive industry, vehicle weight reduction techniques have been actively studied to improve the rate of fuel consumption and to cope with the regulation restricting exhaust gas. For this reason, advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) is preferred in the automobile industry as its tensile strength is 590 MPa and over. In this study, to obtain the optimum welding condition, the friction stir welding (FSW) process applied to AHSS was considered. The FSW experiment was performed on a stir plate using a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} tool and a 1.4-mm thick DP590 steel sheet manufactured by cold rolling. In addition, to investigate the temperature distribution of the advancing and retreating sides in the welding state, the tool rotation speed of 800 rpm, and the welding speed of 180 mm/min, a K-type thermocouple was inserted in the backing plate, and the peak temperature was evaluated at each point. Especially, the correlation between the heat input per unit length and the formation of the FSW zone was minutely analyzed.

  16. Effect of Prior Deformation on Welding Microstructure of Steel 304L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WU Luo-fei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This subject was raised by an automotive company.Based on the welding design on the curved surface,the effect of prior deformation on the weld structure was studied.Metal active-gas welding was used on the T-joint and pre-deformed plates of austenitic stainless steel 304L to find the proper welding parameters and observe the effect of prior deformation on the microstructure.The proper parameters acquired are:the speed of the torch is 4mm/s,the speed of delivery of welding wire is 2.5m/min and the voltage is 17V.In the T-joint and pre-deformed joint,the weld toes are in the zone with strain of 0% and 30%.In the pre-deformed welding specimen,it was observed that the fusion zone and partially melted zone are narrowed,carbide precipitation and ferrites are found less.In all,the microstructure in the pre-deformed weld joints on 304L is more uniform.

  17. Effect of Dynamic Reheating Induced by Weaving on the Microstructure of GTAW Weld Metal of 25% Cr Super Duplex Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Joon Sung

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the additional growth and/or transformation of the austenite phase that occurs in weld metals of super duplex stainless steel upon reheating is known. However, the effects have not been fully investigated, especially with respect to reheating induced by weaving during single-pass welding. In this work, bead-on-pipe gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW was conducted on super duplex stainless steel to understand the effect of weaving on the microstructure of weld metal. Microstructural analysis, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD, and focused ion beam transmission electron microscopy (FIB-TEM were carried out to investigate the relationship between weaving and microstructural change. The weaving of GTAW produced a dynamic reheated area just before the weld bead during welding. It was revealed that extensive reheated weld existed even after one welding pass, and that the content of the austenite phase in the reheated area was higher than that in the non-reheated area, indicating the existence of a large quantity of intragranular austenite phase. In addition, the Cr2N content in the reheated area was lower than that in the non-reheated area. This reduction of Cr2N was closely related to the reheating resulting from weaving. TEM analysis revealed that Cr2N in the non-reheated area was dispersed following heating and transformed to secondary austenite.

  18. Effects of Ar and He on Microstructures and Properties of Laser Welded 800MPa TRIP Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Wen-Quan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fiber laser welding of cold rolled TRIP steel (transformation Induced Plasticity steel sheet with tensile strength of 820MPa and thickness of 1.4mm was carried out using shielding gases Ar and He, respectively. For the same laser power and welding speed, the effects of different shielding gases on penetration and bead section morphologies were investigated. The microstructures and properties of the TRIP steel joints were also studied. The investigation showed that higher penetration and lower porosity could be obtained under shielding gas He using the same laser power and welding speed. The microstructures of the TRIP joint mainly included martensite and retained austenite. But the joint microhardness and tensile strength were higher under the shielding gas He. The tensile strength of the welded joint perpendicular to the weld line was equal to that of the base metal. But the tensile strength of the joint parallel with the weld line was higher than that of the base metal. The plasticity and formability of the welded joint were impaired due to the formation of martensite in the weld metal.

  19. Effects of off-specification procedures on the mechanical properties of half-bead weld repairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobson, D.O.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1983-07-01

    We examined the effects of off-specification procedures on the mechanical properties of half-bead weld repairs. The name half-bead is derived from the specification that half the thickness of the initial weld layer be ground off before the second layer is deposited. In this study the heat-affected zones of a weldment made with both all and none of the first layer removed were tested for toughness, hardness, and microstructural differences, and the results were compared with the properties of a protypical half-bead repair made under ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Sect. XI, guidelines. The results of this limited study showed no apparent justification for the requirement to grind off half the first layer in this type of weld repair. The graded electrode sizes used to make the welds probably had more to do with the weld properties than did the range of first-layer thicknesses used in this study

  20. Effect of cryogenic cooling on corrosion of friction stir welded AA7010-T7651

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jariyaboon, Manthana; Davenport, A. J.; Ambat, Rajan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to study how cryogenic CO2 cooling during the welding process affects corrosion behaviour of friction stir welding (FSW) AA7010-T7651. Design/methodology/approach - Friction stir welded AA7010-17651 was produced with a rotation speed of 288 rpm and a travel...... speed of 58 mm/min. The liquid CO2 was sprayed onto the weld centre line immediately after the toolpiece. The microstructures of welds in different regions were observed using Field Emission Gun Scanning Electron Microscope (FEG-SEM). The effect on the corrosion susceptibility was investigated using...... a gel visualisation test and potentiodynamic polarisation measurements using a micro-electrochemical technique. Findings - The main corrosion region for both FSWs AA7010-T7651 produced with and without cryogenic CO2 cooling is in the HAZ region, which exhibited intergranular attack. Cryogenic cooling...

  1. Effect of linear energy on the properties of an AL alloy in DPMIG welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Tianfa; Jin, Li; Xue, Jiaxiang

    2018-01-01

    The effect of different linear energy parameters on the DPMIG welding performance of AA1060 aluminium alloy is studied in this paper. The stability of the welding process is verified with a Labview electrical signal acquisition system, and the microstructure and tensile properties of the welded joint are studied via optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and electrical tensile tests. The test results show that the welding process for the DPMIG methods stable and that the weld beads appear as scales. Tensile strength results indicate that, with increasing linear energy, the tensile strength first increases and then decreases. The tensile strength of the joint is maximized when the linear energy is 120.5 J / mm-1.

  2. Modelling of Energy Expenditure at Welding Workstations: Effect of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The welding workstation usually generates intense heat during operations, which may affect the welder's health if not properly controlled, and can also affect the performance of the welder at work. Consequently, effort to control the conditions of the welding workstation is essential, and is therefore pursued in this paper.

  3. Effect of Welding Speed on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties due to The Deposition of Reinforcements on Friction Stir Welded Dissimilar Aluminium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baridula Ravinder Reddy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The strength of the welded joint obtained by solid state stir welding process was found to be improved as compared to fusion welding process. The deposition of reinforcements during friction stir welding process can further enhance the strength of the welded joint by locking the movement of grain boundaries. In the present study, the aluminium alloys AA2024 and AA7075 were welded effectively by depositing the multi-walled carbon nanotubes in to the stir zone. The mechanical properties and microstructures were studied by varying the traverse speed at constant rotational speed. The results show that rotating tool pin stirring action and heat input play an important role in controlling the grain size. The carbon nanotubes were found to be distributed uniformly at a welding speed (traverse speed of 80mm/min. This enhanced the mechanical properties of the welded joint. The microstructure and Electron dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX studies indicate that the deposition of carbon nanotubes in the stir zone was influenced by the traverse speed.

  4. Effect of Post Weld Heat Treatment on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Submerged Friction Stir Welded 7A04 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAO Ya-xin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available 7A04 aluminum alloy plate was jointed by submerged friction stir welding(SFSW, and welded joints were treated (Post Weld Heat Treatment, PWHT, and the effect of post weld heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties in SFSW was investigated. The results show that PWHT joints exhibit dispersively distributed fine precipitates phase morphology, are significantly superior than the feature of the small amount of precipitates with dispersed distribution in SFSW joints. Compared with SFSW joints, the mechanical properties of joints are improved significantly by PWHT. The average hardness of the weld joints nugget zone is increased by 39.7HV, and the tensile strength is increased by 67MPa, reaches 96.1% of the base material, strain hardening capacity of the joints is also enhanced, the tensile fracture exhibits mixed fracture feature of microporous polymerization and cleavage.

  5. Effect of Surface Tension Anisotropy and Welding Parameters on Initial Instability Dynamics During Solidification: A Phase-Field Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fengyi; Wei, Yanhong

    2018-05-01

    The effects of surface tension anisotropy and welding parameters on initial instability dynamics during gas tungsten arc welding of an Al-alloy are investigated by a quantitative phase-field model. The results show that the surface tension anisotropy and welding parameters affect the initial instability dynamics in different ways during welding. The surface tension anisotropy does not influence the solute diffusion process but does affect the stability of the solid/liquid interface during solidification. The welding parameters affect the initial instability dynamics by varying the growth rate and thermal gradient. The incubation time decreases, and the initial wavelength remains stable as the welding speed increases. When welding power increases, the incubation time increases and the initial wavelength slightly increases. Experiments were performed for the same set of welding parameters used in modeling, and the results of the experiments and simulations were in good agreement.

  6. Update on Minimally Invasive Glaucoma Surgery (MIGS and New Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia M. Brandão

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional glaucoma surgery has been challenged by the advent of innovative techniques and new implants in the past few years. There is an increasing demand for safer glaucoma surgery offering patients a timely surgical solution in reducing intraocular pressure (IOP and improving their quality of life. The new procedures and devices aim to lower IOP with a higher safety profile than fistulating surgery (trabeculectomy/drainage tubes and are collectively termed “minimally invasive glaucoma surgery (MIGS.” The main advantage of MIGS is that they are nonpenetrating and/or bleb-independent procedures, thus avoiding the major complications of fistulating surgery related to blebs and hypotony. In this review, the clinical results of the latest techniques and devices are presented by their approach, ab interno (trabeculotomy, excimer laser trabeculotomy, trabecular microbypass, suprachoroidal shunt, and intracanalicular scaffold and ab externo (canaloplasty, Stegmann Canal Expander, suprachoroidal Gold microshunt. The drawback of MIGS is that some of these procedures produce a limited IOP reduction compared to trabeculectomy. Currently, MIGS is performed in glaucoma patients with early to moderate disease and preferably in combination with cataract surgery.

  7. STUDY OF ARC IMPULSE FREQUENCY EFFECT ON THE STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF WELDED CONNECTION ELEMENTS IN ALUMINIUM PIPELINE SYSTEMS, MADE WITH MASTERTIG 3500

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Pavel V. Bakhmatov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary . The article focuses on the arc impulse frequency effect on the structure and properties of welded connections in aluminum pipeline systems hand-operated with argon-arc welding nonconsumable rod on MasterTig3500. It was revealed that the frequency of the welding current impulses plays an important role in the forming of the welded connection. The authors determined the optimal value of the welding current frequency significantly accelerating the welding process to ensure consistent quality of the weld. The authors detailed some features of cleaning assembly parts with a wire brush prior to welding process.

  8. Heat input effect of friction stir welding on aluminium alloy AA 6061-T6 welded joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedmak Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the heat input and maximum temperature developed during friction stir welding with different parameters. Aluminium alloy (AA 6061-T6 has been used for experimental and numerical analysis. Experimental analysis is based on temperature measurements by using infrared camera, whereas numerical analysis was based on empirical expressions and finite element method. Different types of defects have been observed in respect to different levels of heat input.

  9. Effects of microplasma arc AISI 316L welds on the corrosion behaviour of pipelines in LiBr cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sánchez-Tovar, R.; Montañés, M.T.; García-Antón, J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •SECM tests reveal differences in electrochemical activity of base and welded alloys. •The highest electrochemical activity is obtained for the welded alloy. •Microplasma arc welding process hinders passivation in lithium bromide. •Microplasma arc welding increases corrosion rate and susceptibility to pitting. •The galvanic pair between base and welded alloys in LiBr is weak. -- Abstract: The effect of microplasma arc welding (MPAW) on the electrochemical and corrosion behaviour of AISI 316L stainless steel tubes has been studied. Scanning electrochemical measurements were performed in sodium chloride to evaluate the difference in the electrochemical activity of base (non-welded) and welded samples. Oxygen reduction rates increase in AISI 316L due to the heat treatment effect induced by welding, indicating a higher electrochemical activity in the welded samples. Additionally, the use of MPA weldments in lithium bromide (LiBr) absorption machines was also analysed at typical operating temperatures and Reynolds numbers. The welding process increases corrosion rates, hinders passivation and increases the susceptibility to pitting attack in LiBr. However, zero-resistance ammeter and localization index measurements show that the galvanic pair generated between the base and welded alloys is weak, both electrodes being in their passive state. Temperature greatly affects the corrosion process

  10. Effect of Heat Input on Geometry of Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Bead on Low Carbon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Manas Kumar; Hazra, Ritesh; Mondal, Ajit; Das, Santanu

    2018-05-01

    Among different weld cladding processes, gas metal arc welding (GMAW) cladding becomes a cost effective, user friendly, versatile method for protecting the surface of relatively lower grade structural steels from corrosion and/or erosion wear by depositing high grade stainless steels onto them. The quality of cladding largely depends upon the bead geometry of the weldment deposited. Weld bead geometry parameters, like bead width, reinforcement height, depth of penetration, and ratios like reinforcement form factor (RFF) and penetration shape factor (PSF) determine the quality of the weld bead geometry. Various process parameters of gas metal arc welding like heat input, current, voltage, arc travel speed, mode of metal transfer, etc. influence formation of bead geometry. In the current experimental investigation, austenite stainless steel (316) weld beads are formed on low alloy structural steel (E350) by GMAW using 100% CO2 as the shielding gas. Different combinations of current, voltage and arc travel speed are chosen so that heat input increases from 0.35 to 0.75 kJ/mm. Nine number of weld beads are deposited and replicated twice. The observations show that weld bead width increases linearly with increase in heat input, whereas reinforcement height and depth of penetration do not increase with increase in heat input. Regression analysis is done to establish the relationship between heat input and different geometrical parameters of weld bead. The regression models developed agrees well with the experimental data. Within the domain of the present experiment, it is observed that at higher heat input, the weld bead gets wider having little change in penetration and reinforcement; therefore, higher heat input may be recommended for austenitic stainless steel cladding on low alloy steel.

  11. Effect of the purging gas on properties of Ti stabilized AISI 321 stainless steel TIG welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taban, Emel; Kaluc, Erdinc; Aykan, T. Serkan [Kocaeli Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2014-07-01

    Gas purging is necessary to provide a high quality of stainless steel pipe welding in order to prevent oxidation of the weld zone inside the pipe. AISI 321 stabilized austenitic stainless steel pipes commonly preferred in refinery applications have been welded by the TIG welding process both with and without the use of purging gas. As purging gases, Ar, N{sub 2}, Ar + N{sub 2} and N{sub 2} + 10% H{sub 2} were used, respectively. The aim of this investigation is to detect the effect of purging gas on the weld joint properties such as microstructure, corrosion, strength and impact toughness. Macro sections and microstructures of the welds were investigated. Chemical composition analysis to obtain the nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen content of the weld root was done by Leco analysis. Ferrite content of the beads including root and cap passes were measured by a ferritscope. Vickers hardness (HV10) values were obtained. Intergranular and pitting corrosion tests were applied to determine the corrosion resistance of all welds. Type of the purging gas affected pitting corrosion properties as well as the ferrite content and nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen contents at the roots of the welds. Any hot cracking problems are not predicted as the weld still solidifies with ferrite in the primary phase as confirmed by microstructural and ferrite content analysis. Mechanical testing showed no significant change according to the purge gas. AISI 321 steel and 347 consumable compositions would permit use of nitrogen rich gases for root shielding without a risk of hot cracking.

  12. Effect of welding parameters on pitting behavior of GTAW of DSS and super DSS weldments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhu Paulraj

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the effect of welding parameters on corrosion behavior of welded duplex stainless steel (DSS and super duplex stainless steel (SDSS. The effect of welding parameters, such as heat input, inter-pass temperature, cooling rate, shielding/back purging gas, on corrosion behavior was studied. DSS and SDSS pipes were welded with Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW process. After welding, the test samples were non-destructively tested to ensure no defects and test samples were prepared for microstructural examinations and ferrite content measurements. The root region had complex microstructure because of the repetitive heating of the zone during different weld layers. It was observed that at low heat input desirable microstructure was formed. The test samples were subjected to corrosion tests, i.e. ASTM G48 test for the determination of pitting corrosion rate, potentiodynamic polarization tests, and potentiostatic tests to verify susceptibility of the alloys to corrosion attack. DSS weldments had CPT in between 23 °C to 27 °C and SDSS weldments had CPT between 37 °C to 41 °C in potentiostatic measurements. The corrosion test results were correlated to the microstructures of the weldments. The pitting resistance of individual phases was studied and the effect of secondary austenite on corrosion attack was also observed.

  13. Effects of Heat Input on Microstructure, Corrosion and Mechanical Characteristics of Welded Austenitic and Duplex Stainless Steels: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghusoon Ridha Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of input heat of different welding processes on the microstructure, corrosion, and mechanical characteristics of welded duplex stainless steel (DSS are reviewed. Austenitic stainless steel (ASS is welded using low-heat inputs. However, owing to differences in the physical metallurgy between ASS and DSS, low-heat inputs should be avoided for DSS. This review highlights the differences in solidification mode and transformation characteristics between ASS and DSS with regard to the heat input in welding processes. Specifically, many studies about the effects of heat energy input in welding process on the pitting corrosion, intergranular stress, stresscorrosion cracking, and mechanical properties of weldments of DSS are reviewed.

  14. Micromechanical and internal discontinuity aspects in fusion welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nur Azida Che Lah; Aidy Ali

    2009-01-01

    Full text: This paper deals with characterization of macrostructure, microstructure, hardness, elemental compositions and internal discontinuities of ASTM A516 grade 70 fusion welded joints. The welded joints of ASTM A516 grade 70 carbon steel, which are widely used in pressure vessel fabrication were prepared using welding procedures of Manual Metal Arc (MMA), Metal Inert Gas (MIG) and Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG). Local microstructural condition and elemental composition of the welds were characterised using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in association with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). Radiography testing was applied to study the common internal weld defects. This comprehensive information provides a practical guide in order to determine the most adequate welding procedure and assisting in understanding the behaviour of the weld zones. (author)

  15. Effects of Exposure to Welding Fume on Lung Function: Results from the German WELDOX Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, M; Hoffmeyer, F; Gawrych, K; Lotz, A; Heinze, E; Berresheim, H; Merget, R; Harth, V; Van Gelder, R; Hahn, J-U; Hartwig, A; Weiß, T; Pesch, B; Brüning, T

    2015-01-01

    The association between exposure to welding fume and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been insufficiently clarified. In this study we assessed the influence of exposure to welding fume on lung function parameters. We investigated forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV1/FVC, and expiratory flow rates in 219 welders. We measured current exposure to respirable particles and estimated a worker's lifetime exposure considering welding techniques, working conditions and protective measures at current and former workplaces. Multiple regression models were applied to estimate the influence of exposure to welding fume, age, and smoking on lung function. We additionally investigated the duration of working as a welder and the predominant welding technique. The findings were that age- and smoking-adjusted lung function parameters showed no decline with increasing duration, current exposure level, and lifetime exposure to welding fume. However, 15% of the welders had FEV1/FVC below the lower limit of normal, but we could not substantiate the presence of an association with the measures of exposure. Adverse effects of cigarette smoking were confirmed. In conclusion, the study did not support the notion of a possible detrimental effect of exposure to welding fume on lung function in welders.

  16. TIG Dressing Effects on Weld Pores and Pore Cracking of Titanium Weldments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Jun Yi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Weld pores redistribution, the effectiveness of using tungsten inert gas (TIG dressing to remove weld pores, and changes in the mechanical properties due to the TIG dressing of Ti-3Al-2.5V weldments were studied. Moreover, weld cracks due to pores were investigated. The results show that weld pores less than 300 μm in size are redistributed or removed via remelting due to TIG dressing. Regardless of the temperature condition, TIG dressing welding showed ductility, and there was a loss of 7% tensile strength of the weldments. Additionally, it was considered that porosity redistribution by TIG dressing was due to fluid flow during the remelting of the weld pool. Weld cracks in titanium weldment create branch cracks around pores that propagate via the intragranular fracture, and oxygen is dispersed around the pores. It is suggested that the pore locations around the LBZ (local brittle zone and stress concentration due to the pores have significant effects on crack initiation and propagation.

  17. Effects of heat treatments on laser welded Mg-rare earth alloy NZ30K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Jun; Huang Jian; Li Min; Li Zhuguo; Dong Jie; Wu Yixiong

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Firstly find the tadpole-shape precipitates in the welding joint. → The precipitation strengthening can account for 79% of the total strength. → The results can provide some insights on the application of Mg-RE alloy. - Abstract: In this study, the effects of heat treatments on the quality of laser welded Mg-rare earth alloy NZ30K were systematically studied. The microstructure and mechanical properties of joints, welded by a 15 kW high power CO 2 laser, under different heat treatments had been tested and analyzed. The results indicated that the heat treatment plays an important role in the mechanical strength of laser welded joint of NZ30K. The microstructure of samples after the solution treatment as well as aging treatment is different from that of the as-received welded joint. For solution treatment, although the microstructure is much different from that of as-received welded joint, the solution strengthening effect is not obvious. There are lots of precipitates in the fusion zone after the aging treatment, which will significantly enhance the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and the yield tensile strength (YTS) of the welding joint. 79% of YTS is caused by precipitation strengthening. Therefore, the results implied that the UTS and YTS can be greatly improved by proper heat treatment.

  18. Introduction of Nickel Coated Silicon Carbide Particles in Aluminum Metal Matrix Hardfaced by MIG/TIG Processes on Precoated Flux Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kamburov

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate an aluminium metal matrix surface layer hardfaced by shielded gas metal arc welding processes applying either metal inert gas (MIG or tungsten inert gas (TIG, with standard wire filler onto the precoated flux layer - a baked resistant film containing electroless nickel coated micro/nano SiC particles. During baking, the components of the flux (MgCl2, NaCl, KCl and Na3AlF6 form a low melting eutectic, which: protects the hardfaced surface from oxidation, provides electrical conductance and keeps the particles on the surface during welding, as well as facilitates particles wettability and their interfacial bonding with the molten metal into the weld puddle.

  19. The Effectiveness of Surface Coatings on Preventing Interfacial Reaction During Ultrasonic Welding of Aluminum to Magnesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteli, Alexandria; Robson, Joseph D.; Chen, Ying-Chun; Prangnell, Philip B.

    2013-12-01

    High power ultrasonic spot welding (USW) is a solid-state joining process that is advantageous for welding difficult dissimilar material couples, like magnesium to aluminum. USW is also a useful technique for testing methods of controlling interfacial reaction in welding as the interface is not greatly displaced by the process. However, the high strain rate deformation in USW has been found to accelerate intermetallic compound (IMC) formation and a thick Al12Mg17 and Al3Mg2 reaction layer forms after relatively short welding times. In this work, we have investigated the potential of two approaches for reducing the IMC reaction rate in dissimilar Al-Mg ultrasonic welds, both involving coatings on the Mg sheet surface to (i) separate the join line from the weld interface, using a 100- μm-thick Al cold spray coating, and (ii) provide a diffusion barrier layer, using a thin manganese physical vapor deposition (PVD) coating. Both methods were found to reduce the level of reaction and increase the failure energy of the welds, but their effectiveness was limited due to issues with coating attachment and survivability during the welding cycle. The effect of the coatings on the joint's interface microstructure, and the fracture behavior have been investigated in detail. Kinetic modeling has been used to show that the benefit of the cold spray coating can be attributed to the reaction rate reverting to that expected under static conditions. This reduces the IMC growth rate by over 50 pct because at the weld line, the high strain rate dynamic deformation in USW normally enhances diffusion through the IMC layer. In comparison, the thin PVD barrier coating was found to rapidly break up early in USW and become dispersed throughout the deformation layer reducing its effectiveness.

  20. Acute respiratory effects and biomarkers of inflammation due to welding-derived nanoparticle aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierschke, Katrin; Isaxon, Christina; Andersson, Ulla B K; Assarsson, Eva; Axmon, Anna; Stockfelt, Leo; Gudmundsson, Anders; Jönsson, Bo A G; Kåredal, Monica; Löndahl, Jakob; Pagels, Joakim; Wierzbicka, Aneta; Bohgard, Mats; Nielsen, Jörn

    2017-07-01

    Welders are exposed to airborne particles from the welding environment and often develop symptoms work-related from the airways. A large fraction of the particles from welding are in the nano-size range. In this study we investigate if the welders' airways are affected by exposure to particles derived from gas metal arc welding in mild steel in levels corresponding to a normal welding day. In an exposure chamber, 11 welders with and 10 welders without work-related symptoms from the lower airways and 11 non-welders without symptoms, were exposed to welding fumes (1 mg/m 3 ) and to filtered air, respectively, in a double-blind manner. Symptoms from eyes and upper and lower airways and lung function were registered. Blood and nasal lavage (NL) were sampled before, immediately after and the morning after exposure for analysis of markers of oxidative stress. Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) for analysis of leukotriene B4 (LT-B4) was sampled before, during and immediately after exposure. No adverse effects of welding exposure were found regarding symptoms and lung function. However, EBC LT-B4 decreased significantly in all participants after welding exposure compared to filtered air. NL IL-6 increased immediately after exposure in the two non-symptomatic groups and blood neutrophils tended to increase in the symptomatic welder group. The morning after, neutrophils and serum IL-8 had decreased in all three groups after welding exposure. Remarkably, the symptomatic welder group had a tenfold higher level of EBC LT-B4 compared to the two groups without symptoms. Despite no clinical adverse effects at welding, changes in inflammatory markers may indicate subclinical effects even at exposure below the present Swedish threshold limit (8 h TWA respirable dust).

  1. Effects of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Toughness of Flash Butt Welded High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shajan, Nikhil; Arora, Kanwer Singh; Asati, Brajesh; Sharma, Vikram; Shome, Mahadev

    2018-04-01

    Effect of post-weld heat treatment on the weld microstructure, texture, and its correlation to the toughness of flash butt welded joints were investigated. Upon flash butt welding, the α and γ-fiber in the parent material converted to Goss (110)[001], rotated Goss (110)[1 \\bar{1} 0], and rotated cube (001)[1 \\bar{1} 0], (001)[ \\overline{11} 0] textures along the fracture plane. Formation of these detrimental texture components was a result of shear deformation and recrystallization of austenite at temperatures above T nr resulting in a drop of toughness at the weld zone. Inter-critical and sub-critical annealing cycles proved to be less effective in reducing the Goss (110)[001], rotated Goss (110)[1 \\bar{1} 0], and rotated cube (001)[1 \\bar{1} 0], (001)[ \\overline{11} 0] texture components, and therefore, toughness values remained unaffected. Post-weld heat treatment in the austenite phase field at 1000 °C for 5 seconds resulted in the formation of new grains with different orientations leading to a reduction in the texture intensities of both Goss and rotated Goss components and therefore improved weld zone toughness. Prolonged annealing time was found to be ineffective in improving the toughness due to grain growth.

  2. Low Alloy Steel Structures After Welding with Micro-Jet Cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Węgrzyn T.; Piwnik J.; Hadryś D.; Wszołek Ł.

    2017-01-01

    The paper focuses on low alloy steel after innovate welding method with micro-jet cooling. Weld metal deposit (WMD) was carried out for welding and for MIG and MAG welding with micro-jet cooling. This method is very promising mainly due to the high amount of AF (acicular ferrite) and low amount of MAC (self-tempered martensite, retained austenite, carbide) phases in WMD. That structure corresponds with very good mechanical properties, ie. high impact toughness of welds at low temperature. Mic...

  3. The Effect of Weld Reinforcement and Post-Welding Cooling Cycles on Fatigue Strength of Butt-Welded Joints under Cyclic Tensile Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araque, Oscar; Arzola, Nelson; Hernández, Edgar

    2018-04-12

    This research deals with the fatigue behavior of butt-welded joints, by considering the geometry and post-welding cooling cycles, as a result of cooling in quiet air and immersed in water. ASTM A-36 HR structural steel was used as the base metal for the shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process with welding electrode E6013. The welding reinforcement was 1 mm and 3 mm, respectively; axial fatigue tests were carried out to determine the life and behavior in cracks propagation of the tested welded joints, mechanical characterization tests of properties in welded joints such as microhardness, Charpy impact test and metallographic analysis were carried out. The latter were used as input for the analysis by finite elements which influence the initiation and propagation of cracks and the evaluation of stress intensity factors (SIF). The latter led to obtaining the crack propagation rate and the geometric factor. The tested specimens were analyzed, by taking photographs of the cracks at its beginning in order to make a count of the marks at the origin of the crack. From the results obtained and the marks count, the fatigue crack growth rate and the influence of the cooling media on the life of the welded joint are validated, according to the experimental results. It can be concluded that the welded joints with a higher weld reinforcement have a shorter fatigue life. This is due to the stress concentration that occurs in the vicinity of the weld toe.

  4. Effect of weld morphology on mechanical response and failure of friction stir welds in a naturally aged aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imam, Murshid; Biswas, Kajal; Racherla, Vikranth

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Friction stir welds of AA 6063-T4 are obtained using three tool pin profiles. ► Signature of weld defects in mechanical response of welds is investigated. ► Correlation between peak temperatures in HAZs and their hardness is studied. ► Reasons for strengthening of WNZ and softening of HAZs are found using TEM and XRD. ► A FEM model for the weld zone is developed and validated. -- Abstract: Friction stir butt welds in 6063-T4 aluminium alloy were obtained using square and two tapered tool pin profiles. Tensile tests at 0°, 45°, and 90° to the weld line, hardness contours in the weld cross-section, temperatures in the heat affected zones, cross-sectional macrographs, transmission electron micrographs, and X-ray diffraction studies were used to characterize the welds. In transverse weld specimen, tunnel defects appearing at higher weld speeds for tapered pin profiles, were found to result in mechanical instabilities, i.e. sharp drops in load–displacement curves, much before macroscopic necking occured. Further, in comparison to the base metal, a marked reduction in ductility was observed even in transverse specimen with defect free welds. Hardness contours in the weld cross-section suggest that loss in ductility is due to significant softening in heat affected zone on the retreating side. Transmission electron microscopy images demonstrate that while recovery and overaging are responsible for softening in the heat affected zone, grain size refinement from dynamic recrystallization is responsible for strengthening of the weld nugget zone. X-ray diffraction studies in the three weld zones: weld nugget zone, heat affected zone, and the base metal corroborate these findings. A weld zone model, for use in forming simulations on friction stir welded plates of naturally aged aluminium alloys, was proposed based on mechanical characterization tests. The model was validated using finite element analysis.

  5. Effect of Water Cooling on the Performances of Friction Stir Welding Heat-Affected Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H. J.; Liu, H. J.; Yu, L.

    2012-07-01

    The heat-affected zone (HAZ) is generally the intrinsic weakest location of the normal friction stir welded precipitate hardened aluminum alloys. In order to improve the mechanical properties of the HAZ by controlling the temperature level, underwater friction stir welding (FSW) of an Al-Cu aluminum alloy was conducted in the present study. The results indicate that the hardness of the HAZ can be improved through underwater FSW. Microstructural analysis reveals that the hardness improvement is attributed to the lowering of precipitate coarsening level and the narrowing of precipitate free zone, which are essentially induced by the variations of welding thermal cycles under the cooling effect of water.

  6. Hydrogen effects in duplex stainless steel welded joints - electrochemical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalska, J.; Łabanowski, J.; Ćwiek, J.

    2012-05-01

    In this work results on the influence of hydrogen on passivity and corrosion resistance of 2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) welded joints are described. The results were discussed by taking into account three different areas on the welded joint: weld metal (WM), heat-affected zone (HAZ) and parent metal. The corrosion resistance was qualified with the polarization curves registered in a synthetic sea water. The conclusion is that, hydrogen may seriously deteriorate the passive film stability and corrosion resistance to pitting of 2205 DSS welded joints. The presence of hydrogen in passive films increases corrosion current density and decreases the potential of the film breakdown. It was also found that degree of susceptibility to hydrogen degradation was dependent on the hydrogen charging conditions. WM region has been revealed as the most sensitive to hydrogen action.

  7. Effect of Activated Flux on the Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, and Residual Stresses of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Weld Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maduraimuthu, V.; Vasudevan, M.; Muthupandi, V.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2012-02-01

    A novel variant of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding called activated-TIG (A-TIG) welding, which uses a thin layer of activated flux coating applied on the joint area prior to welding, is known to enhance the depth of penetration during autogenous TIG welding and overcomes the limitation associated with TIG welding of modified 9Cr-1Mo steels. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a specific activated flux for enhancing the depth of penetration during autogeneous TIG welding of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. In the current work, activated flux composition is optimized to achieve 6 mm depth of penetration in single-pass TIG welding at minimum heat input possible. Then square butt weld joints are made for 6-mm-thick and 10-mm-thick plates using the optimized flux. The effect of flux on the microstructure, mechanical properties, and residual stresses of the A-TIG weld joint is studied by comparing it with that of the weld joints made by conventional multipass TIG welding process using matching filler wire. Welded microstructure in the A-TIG weld joint is coarser because of the higher peak temperature in A-TIG welding process compared with that of multipass TIG weld joint made by a conventional TIG welding process. Transverse strength properties of the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel weld produced by A-TIG welding exceeded the minimum specified strength values of the base materials. The average toughness values of A-TIG weld joints are lower compared with that of the base metal and multipass weld joints due to the presence of δ-ferrite and inclusions in the weld metal caused by the flux. Compressive residual stresses are observed in the fusion zone of A-TIG weld joint, whereas tensile residual stresses are observed in the multipass TIG weld joint.

  8. Effect of Trailing Intensive Cooling on Residual Stress and Welding Distortion of Friction Stir Welded 2060 Al-Li Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shude; Yang, Zhanpeng; Wen, Quan; Yue, Yumei; Zhang, Liguo

    2018-04-01

    Trailing intensive cooling with liquid nitrogen has successfully applied to friction stir welding of 2 mm thick 2060 Al-Li alloy. Welding temperature, plastic strain, residual stress and distortion of 2060 Al-Li alloy butt-joint are compared and discussed between conventional cooling and trailing intensive cooling using experimental and numerical simulation methods. The results reveal that trailing intensive cooling is beneficial to shrink high temperature area, reduce peak temperature and decrease plastic strain during friction stir welding process. In addition, the reduction degree of plastic strain outside weld is smaller than that inside weld. Welding distortion presents an anti-saddle shape. Compared with conventional cooling, the reductions of welding distortion and longitudinal residual stresses of welding joint under intense cooling reach 47.7 % and 23.8 %, respectively.

  9. Effect of yield stress matching on ductile fracture behavior of girth welds for X line pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motohashi, Hiroyuki; Hagiwara, Naoto [Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd. (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    This paper describes the effects of yield stress matching on the ductile fracture behavior of girth welded joints for X linepipes. Three welded joints were made on an X line pipe using several consumables to obtain about a 20% overmatched, even matched and about a 20% under matched weld metal. For these three welded joints, curved wide plate tensile tests were then conducted with a surface notch in the weld metal. To determine the ductile crack initiation from the surface notch, these tests employed a direct-current electric potential (d-c E P) method. Crack opening displacement, gauge length strain and local strain adjacent to the surface notch were also measured. The ductile crack initiation was successfully detected using the d-c E P method. The yield stress matching significantly affected the ductile crack initiation and fracture behavior, that is, the overmatched welded joint had a higher resistance to ductile fracture than that of the under matched welded joint. The allowable strength matching level was determined from the relationship between the strength matching and the gauge length strain at the ductile crack initiation detected using the d-c E P method. (author)

  10. Microstructural Effects on Hydrogen Delayed Fracture of 600 MPa and 800 MPa grade Deposited Weld Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hee Jae; Lee, Tae Woo; Cho, Kyung Mox; Kang, Namhyun; Yoon, Byung Hyun; Park, Seo Jeong; Chang, Woong Seong

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen-delayed fracture (HDF) was analyzed from the deposited weld metals of 600-MPa and 800-MPa flux-cored arc (FCA) welding wires, and then from the diffusible hydrogen behavior of the weld zone. Two types of deposited weld metal, that is, rutile weld metal and alkali weld metal, were used for each strength level. Constant loading test (CLT) and thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) analysis were conducted on the hydrogen pre-charged specimens electrochemically for 72 h. The effects of microstructures such as acicular ferrite, grain-boundary ferrite, and low-temperature-transformation phase on the time-to failure and amount of diffusible hydrogen were analyzed. The fracture time for hydrogen-purged specimens in the constant loading tests decreased as the grain size of acicular ferrite decreased. The major trapping site for diffusible hydrogen was the grain boundary, as determined by calculating the activation energies for hydrogen detrapping. As the strength was increased and alkali weld metal was used, the resistance to HDF decreased.

  11. Mig-6 regulates endometrial genes involved in cell cycle and progesterone signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Jae Hee [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, Grand Rapids, MI (United States); Dunwoodie, Sally L. [Developmental and Stem Cell Biology Division, Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute, Darlinghurst, New South Wales 2010 (Australia); St. Vincent' s Clinical School and the School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Kensington, New South Wales 2033 (Australia); Ku, Bon Jeong, E-mail: bonjeong@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Internal Medicine, Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jae-Wook, E-mail: JaeWook.Jeong@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, Grand Rapids, MI (United States); Department of Women' s Health, Spectrum Health System, Grand Rapids, MI (United States)

    2015-07-10

    Mitogen inducible gene 6 (Mig-6) is an important mediator of progesterone (P4) signaling to inhibit estrogen (E2) signaling in the uterus. Ablation of Mig-6 in the murine uterus leads to the development of endometrial hyperplasia and E2-induced endometrial cancer. To identify the molecular pathways regulated by Mig-6, we performed microarray analysis on the uterus of ovariectomized Mig-6{sup f/f} and PGR{sup cre/+}Mig-6{sup f/f} (Mig-6{sup d/d}) mice treated with vehicle or P4 for 6 h. The results revealed that 772 transcripts were significantly regulated in the Mig-6{sup d/d} uterus treated with vehicle as compared with Mig-6{sup f/f} mice. The pathway analysis showed that Mig-6 suppressed the expression of gene-related cell cycle regulation in the absence of ovarian steroid hormone. The epithelium of Mig-6{sup d/d} mice showed a significant increase in the number of proliferative cells compared to Mig-6{sup f/f} mice. This microarray analysis also revealed that 324 genes are regulated by P4 as well as Mig-6. Cited2, the developmentally important transcription factor, was identified as being regulated by the P4-Mig-6 axis. To determine the role of Cited2 in the uterus, we used the mice with Cited2 that were conditionally ablated in progesterone receptor-positive cells (PGR{sup cre/+}Cited2{sup f/f}; Cited2{sup d/d}). Ablation of Cited2 in the uterus resulted in a significant reduction in the ability of the uterus to undergo a hormonally induced decidual reaction. Identification and analysis of these responsive genes will help define the role of P4 as well as Mig-6 in regulating uterine biology. - Highlights: • We identify Mig-6- and P4-regulated uterine genes by microarray analysis. • Mig-6 suppresses cell cycle progression and epithelial cell proliferation in uterus. • We identify the Mig-6 dependent induced genes by P4. • Cited2 plays an important role for decidualization as a P4 and Mig-6 target gene.

  12. Evaluation of occupational exposure to toxic metals released in the process of aluminum welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matczak, Wanda; Gromiec, Jan

    2002-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate occupational exposure to welding fumes and its elements on aluminum welders in Polish industry. The study included 52 MIG/Al fume samples and 18 TIG/Al samples in 3 plants. Air samples were collected in the breathing zone of welders (total and respirable dust). Dust concentration was determined gravimetrically, and the elements in the collected dust were determined by AAS. Mean time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations of the welding dusts/fumes and their components in the breathing zone obtained for different welding processes were, in mg/m3: MIG/Al fumes mean 6.0 (0.8-17.8), Al 2.1 (0.1-7.7), Mg 0.2 (TIG/Al fumes 0.7 (0.3-1.4), Al 0.17 (0.07-0.50). A correlation has been found between the concentration of the main components and the fume/dust concentrations in MIG/Al and TIG/Al fumes. Mean percentages of the individual components in MIG/Al fumes/dusts were Al: 30 (9-56) percent; Mg: 3 (1-5.6) percent; Mn: 0.2 (0.1-0.3) percent; Cu: 0.2 (welding methods, the nature of welding-related operations, and work environment conditions.

  13. Effect of Chemical Composition on Susceptibility to Weld Solidification Cracking in Austenitic Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoi, Kota; Shinozaki, Kenji

    2017-12-01

    The influence of the chemical composition, especially the niobium content, chromium equivalent Creq, and nickel equivalent Nieq, on the weld solidification cracking susceptibility in the austenite single-phase region in the Schaeffler diagram was investigated. Specimens were fabricated using the hot-wire laser welding process with widely different compositions of Creq, Nieq, and niobium in the region. The distributions of the susceptibility, such as the crack length and brittle temperature range (BTR), in the Schaeffler diagram revealed a region with high susceptibility to solidification cracking. Addition of niobium enhanced the susceptibility and changed the distribution of the susceptibility in the diagram. The BTR distribution was in good agreement with the distribution of the temperature range of solidification (Δ T) calculated by solidification simulation based on Scheil model. Δ T increased with increasing content of alloying elements such as niobium. The distribution of Δ T was dependent on the type of alloying element owing to the change of the partitioning behavior. Thus, the solidification cracking susceptibility in the austenite single-phase region depends on whether the alloy contains elements. The distribution of the susceptibility in the region is controlled by the change in Δ T and the segregation behavior of niobium with the chemical composition.

  14. Residual stress measurement of large scaled welded pipe using neutron diffraction method. Effect of SCC crack propagation and repair weld on residual stress distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroshi; Katsuyama, Jinya; Tobita, Tohru; Morii, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    The RESA-1 neutron engineering diffractometer in the JRR-3 (Japan Research Reactor No.3) at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency, which is used for stress measurements, was upgraded to realize residual stress measurements of large scaled mechanical components. A series of residual stress measurements was made to obtain through-thickness residual stress distributions in a Type 304 stainless steel butt-welded pipe of 500A-sch.80 using the upgraded RESA-1 diffractometer. We evaluated effects of crack propagation such as stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and a part-circumference repair weld on the residual stress distributions induced by girth welding. Measured residual stress distributions near original girth weld revealed good agreement with typical results shown in some previous works using finite element method, deep hole drilling as well as neutron diffraction. After introducing a mock crack with 10 mm depth in the heat affected zone on the inside wall of the pipe by electro discharge machining, the axial residual stresses were found to be released in the part of the mock crack. However, changes in the through-wall bending stress component and the self-equilibrated stress component were negligible and hence the axial residual stress distribution in the ligament was remained in the original residual stresses near girth weld without the mock crack. Furthermore, changes in hoop and radial residual stress were also small. The residual stress distributions after a part repair welding on the outer circumference of the girth weld were significantly different from residual stress distributions near the original girth weld. The through-thickness average axial residual stress was increased due to increase of the tensile membrane stress and mitigation of the bending stress after repair welding. Throughout above studies, we evidenced that the neutron diffraction technique is useful and powerful tool for measuring residual stress distributions in large as well as thick mechanical

  15. The effect of initial stress induced during the steel manufacturing process on the welding residual stress in multi-pass butt welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-ung Park

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A residual stress generated in the steel structure is broadly categorized into initial residual stress during manufacturing steel material, welding residual stress caused by welding, and heat treatment residual stress by heat treatment. Initial residual stresses induced during the manufacturing process is combined with welding residual stress or heat treatment residual stress, and remained as a final residual stress. Because such final residual stress affects the safety and strength of the structure, it is of utmost importance to measure or predict the magnitude of residual stress, and to apply this point on the design of the structure. In this study, the initial residual stress of steel structures having thicknesses of 25 mm and 70 mm during manufacturing was measured in order to investigate initial residual stress (hereinafter, referred to as initial stress. In addition, thermal elastic plastic FEM analysis was performed with this initial condition, and the effect of initial stress on the welding residual stress was investigated. Further, the reliability of the FE analysis result, considering the initial stress and welding residual stress for the steel structures having two thicknesses, was validated by comparing it with the measured results. In the vicinity of the weld joint, the initial stress is released and finally controlled by the weld residual stress. On the other hand, the farther away from the weld joint, the greater the influence of the initial stress. The range in which the initial stress affects the weld residual stress was not changed by the initial stress. However, in the region where the initial stress occurs in the compressive stress, the magnitude of the weld residual compressive stress varies with the compression or tension of the initial stress. The effect of initial stress on the maximum compression residual stress was far larger when initial stress was considered in case of a thickness of 25 mm with a value of 180

  16. Micro-invasive glaucoma surgery (MIGS: a review of surgical procedures using stents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pillunat LE

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Lutz E Pillunat,1 Carl Erb,2 Anselm GM Jünemann,3 Friedemann Kimmich4 1Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden, 2Augenklinik am Wittenbergplatz, Berlin, Germany; 3Department of Ophthalmology University of Rostock, Rostock, Germany; 4eyecons, Karlsruhe, Germany Abstract: Over the last decade several novel surgical treatment options and devices for glaucoma have been developed. All these developments aim to cause as little trauma as possible to the eye, to safely, effectively, and sustainably reduce intraocular pressure (IOP, to produce reproducible results, and to be easy to adopt. The term “micro-invasive glaucoma surgery (MIGS” was used for summarizing all these procedures. Currently MIGS is gaining more and more interest and popularity. The possible reduction of the number of glaucoma medications, the ab interno approach without damaging the conjunctival tissue, and the probably safer procedures compared to incisional surgical methods may explain the increased interest in MIGS. The use of glaucoma drainage implants for lowering IOP in difficult-to-treat patients has been established for a long time, however, a variety of new glaucoma micro-stents are being manufactured by using various materials and are available to increase aqueous outflow via different pathways. This review summarizes published results of randomized clinical studies and extensive case report series on these devices, including Schlemm’s canal stents (iStent®, iStent® inject, Hydrus, suprachoroidal stents (CyPass®, iStent® Supra, and subconjunctival stents (XEN. The article summarizes the findings of published material on efficacy and safety for each of these approaches. Keywords: glaucoma, micro-invasive glaucoma surgery, MIGS, iStent, iStent inject, CyPass, Hydrus, XEN

  17. Effect of Process Variables on the Inertia Friction Welding of Superalloys LSHR and Mar-M247

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffey, D. W.; Senkov, O. N.; Shivpuri, R.; Semiatin, S. L.

    2016-08-01

    The effect of inertia friction welding process parameters on microstructure evolution, weld plane quality, and the tensile behavior of welds between dissimilar nickel-base superalloys was established. For this purpose, the fine-grain, powder metallurgy alloy LSHR was joined to coarse-grain cast Mar-M247 using a fixed level of initial kinetic energy, but different combinations of the flywheel moment of inertia and initial rotation speed. It was found that welds made with the largest moment of inertia resulted in a sound bond with the best microstructure and room-temperature tensile strength equal to or greater than that of the parent materials. A relationship between the moment of inertia and weld process efficiency was established. The post-weld tensile behavior was interpreted in the context of observed microstructure gradients and weld-line defects.

  18. Effect of Weld Bead Shape on the Fatigue Behavior of GMAW Lap Fillet Joint in GA 590 MPa Steel Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Insung Hwang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of weld bead shape on the fatigue strength of lap fillet joints using the gas metal arc welding (GMAW process was investigated. The base material used in the experiment was 590 MPa grade galvanealed steel sheet with 2.3 mm and 2.6 mm thickness. In order to make the four types of weld beads with different shapes by factors such as length, angle, and area, the welding process, wire feeding speed, and joint shape were changed. The stress-number of cycles to failure (S–N curve and fatigue strength were obtained from the fatigue test for four types of weld bead, and the cause of the fatigue strength difference was clarified through the analysis of the geometrical factors, such as length, angle, and area of the weld bead. In addition, the relationship between weld bead shape and fatigue strength was discussed.

  19. Effect of friction stir welding speed on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeid, T.; Abdollah-zadeh, A.; Assadi, H.; Malek Ghaini, F.

    2008-01-01

    The present study focuses on the effect of the welding speed on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the stir zone (SZ) in friction stir welding (FSW) of SAF 2205 duplex stainless steel. A single tool, made of a WC-base material, was used to weld 2 mm-thick plates at a constant rotational speed of 600 rpm. X-ray radiography revealed that sound welds were successfully obtained for the welding speeds in the range of 50-200 mm/min, whereas a groove-like defect was formed at the higher speed of 250 mm/min. Moreover, increasing the welding speed decreased the size of the α and γ grains in the SZ, and hence, improved the mean hardness value and the tensile strength of the SZ. These results are interpreted with respect to interplay between the welding speed and the peak temperature in FSW

  20. Effect of post weld heat treatment on tensile properties and microstructure characteristics of friction stir welded armour grade AA7075-T651 aluminium alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Sivaraj, P.; Kanagarajan, D.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the effects of post weld heat treatments, namely artificial ageing and solution treatment followed by artificial ageing, on microstructure and mechanical properties of 12 mm thick friction stir welded joints of precipitation hardenable high strength armour grade AA7075-T651 aluminium alloy. The tensile properties, such as yield strength, tensile strength, elongation and notch tensile strength, are evaluated and correlated with the microhardness and microstructural features....

  1. Multiple Crack Growth Prediction in AA2024-T3 Friction Stir Welded Joints, Including Manufacturing Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlone, Pierpaolo; Citarella, Roberto; Sonne, Mads Rostgaard

    2016-01-01

    A great deal of attention is currently paid by several industries toward the friction stir welding process to realize lightweight structures. Within this aim, the realistic prediction of fatigue behavior of welded assemblies is a key factor. In this work an integrated finite element method - dual...... boundary element method (FEM-DBEM) procedure, coupling the welding process simulation to the subsequent crack growth assessment, is proposed and applied to simulate multiple crack propagation, with allowance for manufacturing effects. The friction stir butt welding process of the precipitation hardened AA...... on a notched specimen. The whole procedure was finally tested comparing simulation outcomes with experimental data. The good agreement obtained highlights the predictive capability of the method. The influence of the residual stress distribution on crack growth and the mutual interaction between propagating...

  2. Modelling of ultrasonic impact treatment (UIT of welded joints and its effect on fatigue strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.L. Yuan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic impact treatment (UIT is a remarkable post-weld technique applying mechanical impacts in combination with ultrasound into the welded joints. In the present work, a 3D simulation method including welding simulation, numerical modelling of UIT-process and an evaluation of fatigue crack growth has been developed. In the FE model, the actual treatment conditions and local mechanical characteristics due to acoustic softening are set as input parameters. The plastic deformation and compressive stress layer are found to be more pronounced when acoustic softening takes place. The predicted internal residual stress distributions of welded joint before and after UIT are compared with experimental results, showing a fairly good agreement with each other. Finally, simulated results of fatigue crack growth in various residual stress fields are well compared with test results, so that the proposed model may provide an effective tool to simulate UIT-process in engineering structures.

  3. Effects of heat input on pitting corrosion in super duplex stainless steel weld metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yong taek; Shin, Hak soo; Lee, Hae woo

    2012-12-01

    Due to the difference in reheating effects depending on the heat input of subsequent weld passes, the microstructure of the weld metal varies between acicular type austenite and a mixture of polygonal type and grain boundary mixed austenite. These microstructural changes may affect the corrosion properties of duplex stainless steel welds. This result indicates that the pitting resistance of the weld can be strongly influenced by the morphology of the secondary austenite phase. In particular, the ferrite phase adjacent to the acicular type austenite phase shows a lower Pitting Resistance Equivalent (PRE) value of 25.3, due to its lower chromium and molybdenum contents, whereas the secondary austenite phase maintains a higher PRE value of more than 38. Therefore, it can be inferred that the pitting corrosion is mainly due to the formation of ferrite phase with a much lower PRE value.

  4. Mitigation of harmful effects of welds in zirconium alloy components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, C.E.; Doubt, G.L.; Fong, R.W.L.; Root, J.H.; Bowden, J.W.; Sagat, S.; Webster, R.T.

    1995-01-01

    Welding produces local residual tensile stresses and changes in texture in components made from zirconium alloys. In the heat-affected zone in tubes or plates, the basal plane normals are rotated into the plane of the component and perpendicular to the direction of the weld. Thin-walled Zircaloy-2 tubes containing an axial weld do not reach their full strength because they always fail prematurely in the weld when pressurized to failure in a fixed-end burst test. Reinforcing the weld by increasing its thickness by 25% moves the failure to the parent metal and improves the biaxial strength of the tube by 20 to 25% and increases the total elongation by 200 to 450%. In components made from Zr-2.5Nb, the texture in the heat-affected zone promotes delayed hydride cracking (DHC) driven by tensile residual stress. Although the texture is not much affected by heat-treatments below 630 o C and large grain interaction stresses remain as a result of mixed textures, macro-residual tensile stresses can be relieved by heat treatment to the point where the probability of cracking is very low. (author)

  5. Mitigation of harmful effects of welds in zirconium alloy components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, C.E.; Doubt, G.L.; Fong, R.W.L.; Root, J.H.; Bowden, J.W.; Sagat, S.; Webster, R.T.

    1993-10-01

    Welding produces local residual tensile stresses and changes in texture in components made from zirconium alloys. In the heat-affected zone in tubes or plates, the basal plane normals are rotated into the plane of the component and perpendicular to the direction of the weld. Thin-walled zircaloy-2 tubes containing an axial weld do not reach their full strength, because they always fail prematurely in the weld when pressurised to failure in a fixed-end burst test. Reinforcing the weld by increasing its thickness by 25% moves the failure to the parent metal, improves the biaxial strength of the tube by 20 to 25%, and increases the total elongation by 200 to 450%. In components made from Zr-2.5Nb, the texture in the heat-affected zone promotes delayed hydride cracking (DHC) driven by tensile residual stress. Although the texture is not much affected by heat-treatments below 630 degrees celsius and large grain interaction stresses remain as a result of mixed textures, macro-residual tensile stresses can be relieved by heat-treatment to the point where the probability of cracking is very low

  6. Mitigation of harmful effects of welds in zirconium alloy components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, C.E.; Doubt, G.L.; Fong, R.W.L.; Root, J.H.; Bowden, J.W.; Sagat, S.

    1994-01-01

    Welding produces local residual tensile stresses and changes in texture in components made from zirconium alloys. In the heat-affected zone in tubes or plates, the basal plane normals are rotated into the plane of the component and perpendicular to the direction of the weld. Thin-walled Zircaloy-2 tubes containing an axial weld do not reach their full strength because they always fail prematurely in the weld when pressurized to failure in a fixed-end burst test. Reinforcing the weld by increasing its thickness by 25% moves the failure to the parent metal and improves the biaxial strength of the tube by 20 to 25% and increases the total elongation by 200 to 450%. In components made from Zr-2.5Nb, the texture in the heat-affected zone promotes delayed hydride cracking (DHC) driven by tensile residual stress. Although the texture is not much affected by heat-treatments below 630 C and large grain interaction stresses remain as a result of mixed textures, macro-residual tensile stresses can be relieved by heat treatment to the point where the probability of cracking is very low

  7. Welding robot package; Arc yosetsu robot package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, S. [Yaskawa Electric Corp., Kitakyushu (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    For the conventional high-speed welding robot, the welding current was controlled mainly for reducing the spatters during short circuits and for stabilizing the beads by the periodic short circuits. However, an increase of deposition amount in response to the speed is required for the high-speed welding. Large-current low-spatter welding current region control was added. Units were integrated into a package by which the arc length is kept in short without dispersion of arc length for welding without defects such as undercut and unequal beads. In automobile industry, use of aluminum parts is extended for the light weight. The welding is very difficult, and automation is not so progressing in spite of the poor environment. Buckling of welding wire is easy to occur, and supply of wire is obstructed by the deposition of chipped powders on the torch cable, which stay within the contact chip resulting in the deposition. Dislocation of locus is easy to occur at the corner of rectangular pipe during the welding. By improving these troubles, an aluminum MIG welding robot package has been developed. 13 figs.

  8. Effect of joint design on ballistic performance of quenched and tempered steel welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishnan, M.; Balasubramanian, V.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Traditional usage of austenitic stainless steel filler for armour steel welding shows poor ballistic performance. • Earlier efforts show dubious success on ballistic resistance of armour steel joints. • Comparative evaluation of equal/unequal joint design on ballistic performance. • Effect of joint design covers the main aspects of successful bullet stoppage. - Abstract: A study was carried out to evaluate the effect of joint design on ballistic performance of armour grade quenched and tempered steel welded joints. Equal double Vee and unequal double Vee joint configuration were considered in this study. Targets were fabricated using 4 mm thick tungsten carbide hardfaced middle layer; above and below which austenitic stainless steel layers were deposited on both sides of the hardfaced interlayer in both joint configurations. Shielded metal arc welding process was used to deposit for all layers. The fabricated targets were evaluated for its ballistic performance and the results were compared in terms of depth of penetration on weld metal. From the ballistic test results, it was observed that both the targets successfully stopped the bullet penetration at weld center line. Of the two targets, the target made with unequal double Vee joint configuration offered maximum resistance to the bullet penetration at weld metal location without any bulge at the rear side. The higher volume of austenitic stainless steel front layer and the presence of hardfaced interlayer after some depth of soft austenitic stainless steel front layer is the primary reason for the superior ballistic performance of this joint

  9. Residual stresses due to weld repairs, cladding and electron beam welds and effect of residual stresses on fracture behavior. Annual report, September 1, 1977--November 30, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybicki, E.F.

    1978-11-01

    The study is divided into three tasks. Task I is concerned with predicting and understanding the effects of residual stresses due to weld repairs of pressure vessels. Task II examines residual stresses due to an electron beam weld. Task III addresses the problem of residual stresses produced by weld cladding at a nozzle vessel intersection. The objective of Task I is to develop a computational model for predicting residual stress states due to a weld repair of pressure vessel and thereby gain an understanding of the mechanisms involved in the creation of the residual stresses. Experimental data from the Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL) is used to validate the computational model. In Task II, the residual stress model is applied to the case of an electron beam weld of a compact tension freacture specimen. The results in the form of residual stresses near the weld are then used to explain unexpected fracture behavior which is observed in the testing of the specimen. For Task III, the residual stress model is applied to the cladding process used in nozzle regions of nuclear pressure vessels. The residual stresses obtained from this analysis are evaluated to determine their effect on the phenomena of under-clad cracking

  10. Effect of the Addition of Nickel Powder and Post Weld Heat Treatment on the Metallurgical and Mechanical Properties of the Welded UNS S32304 Duplex Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Tahaei

    Full Text Available Abstract In this research, the effect of the addition of nickel powder and the application of a post weld heat treatment (PWHT on the welding properties of the UNS S32304 lean duplex stainless steel were investigated in order to improve the microstructure and mechanical properties. Nickel powder was directly poured inside the joint gap and mixed with the filler metal during the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW process; moreover, the solution heat treatment was performed at 1100 °C for 10 min. The joints were characterized by optical microscopy (OM and the evolution of the phase percentages in the different zones was studied by means of the image analysis technique. Tensile and hardness tests were carried out on the joints in order to evaluate the improvement of the mechanical properties. The results showed that both the addition of nickel powder during the welding process and the post weld heat treatment made it possible to improve the mechanical properties of the weld joints. PWHT had the best effect in restoring the equal percentage of ferrite and austenite compared to the addition of nickel powder.

  11. Thermo-Mechanical Calculations of Hybrid Rotary Friction Welding at Equal Diameter Copper Bars and Effects of Essential Parameters on Dependent Special Variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, M. H.; Davari, H.; Hadian, A. M.; Ahmadabadi, M. Nili

    2007-01-01

    Hybrid Rotary Friction Welding is a modified type of common rotary friction welding processes. In this welding method parameters such as pressure, angular velocity and time of welding control temperature, stress, strain and their variations. These dependent factors play an important rule in defining optimum process parameters combinations in order to improve the design and manufacturing of welding machines and quality of welded parts. Thermo-mechanical simulation of friction welding has been carried out and it has been shown that, simulation is an important tool for prediction of generated heat and strain at the weld interface and can be used for prediction of microstructure and evaluation of quality of welds. For simulation of Hybrid Rotary Friction Welding, a commercial finite element program has been used and the effects of pressure and rotary velocity of rotary part on temperature and strain variations have been investigated

  12. Thermo-Mechanical Calculations of Hybrid Rotary Friction Welding at Equal Diameter Copper Bars and Effects of Essential Parameters on Dependent Special Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsa, M. H.; Davari, H.; Hadian, A. M.; Ahmadabadi, M. Nili

    2007-05-01

    Hybrid Rotary Friction Welding is a modified type of common rotary friction welding processes. In this welding method parameters such as pressure, angular velocity and time of welding control temperature, stress, strain and their variations. These dependent factors play an important rule in defining optimum process parameters combinations in order to improve the design and manufacturing of welding machines and quality of welded parts. Thermo-mechanical simulation of friction welding has been carried out and it has been shown that, simulation is an important tool for prediction of generated heat and strain at the weld interface and can be used for prediction of microstructure and evaluation of quality of welds. For simulation of Hybrid Rotary Friction Welding, a commercial finite element program has been used and the effects of pressure and rotary velocity of rotary part on temperature and strain variations have been investigated.

  13. Effect of the crack-starter weld condition on the nil-ductility transition temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Masanobu; Funada, Tatsuo; Tomimatsu, Minoru

    1985-01-01

    In ASME Code Sec. III, the value of the reference nil-ductility temperature RT sub(EDT) has an important significance to determine the result of the fracture mechanics evaluation. While in the standard both the drop-weight test and Charpy impact test are required to determine the RT sub(NDT), in practice it is normally determined only by the nil-ductility transition temperature (T sub(EDT)) obtained by the drop-weight test. The cases of data scatter in T sub(NDT) were investigated to establish appropriate conditions of crack-starter bead welding. Drop-weight tests were carried out for nuclear vessel steels by changing welding conditions to examine the effects of welding amperage and shapes of welding table on T sub(NDT). The results show that the preparation of crack-starter bead by small welding amperage should not be allowed, because it makes the measured T sub(NDT) non-conservative, and that it is important to use a welding table which increases the cooling rate of specimen. Furthermore, the authors proposed methods for estimating T sub(NDT) of nuclear vessel steels by using Charpy transition temperatures. (author)

  14. Effect of Pin Geometry on the Mechanical Strength of Friction-Stir-Welded Polypropylene Composite Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordestani, F.; Ashenai Ghasemi, F.; Arab, N. B. M.

    2017-09-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid-state welding process, which has successfully been applied in aerospace and automotive industries for joining materials. The friction stir tool is the key element in the FSW process. In this study, the effect of four different tool pin geometries on the mechanical properties of two types of polypropylene composite plates, with 30% glass and carbon fiber, respectively, were investigated. For this purpose, four pins of different geometry, namely, a threaded-tapered pin, square pin, four-flute threaded pin, and threaded-tapered pin with a chamfer were made and used to carry out the butt welding of 5-mm-thick plates. The standard tensile and Izod impact tests were performed to evaluate the tensile strength and impact toughness of welded specimens. The results indicated that the threaded-tapered pin with a chamfer produced welds with a better surface appearance and higher tensile and impact strengths. The tests also showed that, with the threaded-tapered pin with a chamfer, the impact strength of the glass- and carbon-fiber composite welds were about 40 and 50%, respectively, of that of the base materials.

  15. Effect of laser welding parameters on the austenite and martensite phase fractions of NiTi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, J.P., E-mail: jp.oliveira@campus.fct.unl.pt [CENIMAT/i3N, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa (Portugal); Braz Fernandes, F.M. [CENIMAT/i3N, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa (Portugal); Miranda, R.M. [UNIDEMI, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa (Portugal); Schell, N. [Institute of Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Max-Planck-Str. 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Ocaña, J.L. [Centro Láser UPM, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Edificio “La Arboleda”, Ctra. Valencia, km 7,300, Campus Sur UPM, 28031 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-09-15

    Although laser welding is probably the most used joining technique for NiTi shape memory alloys there is still a lack of understanding about the effects of laser welding parameters on the microstructural induced changes: in both the heat affected and fusion zones martensite may be present, while the base material is fully austenitic. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction was used for fine probing laser welded NiTi joints. Through Rietveld refinement the martensite and austenite phase fractions were determined and it was observed that the martensite content increases towards the weld centreline. This is related to a change of the local transformation temperatures on these regions, which occurs due to compositional variation in those regions. The martensite phase fraction in the thermally affected regions may have significant implications on functional properties on these joints. - Highlights: •Synchrotron X-ray diffraction was used for fine probing of the microstructure in laser welded NiTi joints. •Rietveld refinement allowed to determine the content of martensite along the heat affected and fusion zones. •The martensite content increases from the base material towards the weld centreline.

  16. Effect of weld metal chemistry and heat input on the structure and properties of duplex stainless steel welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muthupandi, V.; Bala Srinivasan, P.; Seshadri, S.K.; Sundaresan, S

    2003-10-15

    The excellent combination of strength and corrosion resistance in duplex stainless steels (DSS) is due to their strict composition control and microstructural balance. The ferrite-austenite ratio is often upset in DSS weld metals owing to the rapid cooling rates associated with welding. To achieve the desired ferrite-austenite balance and hence properties, either the weld metal composition and/or the heat input is controlled. In the current work, a low heat input process viz., EBW and another commonly employed process, gas tungsten-arc welding have been employed for welding of DSS with and without nickel enhancement. Results show that (i) chemical composition has got a greater influence on the ferrite-austenite ratio than the cooling rate, (ii) and even EBW which is considered an immature process in welding of DSS, can be employed provided means of filler addition could be devised.

  17. Cardiovascular effects in rats after intratracheal instillation of metal welding particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wen; Antonini, James M; Lin, Yen-Chang; Roberts, Jenny R; Kashon, Michael L; Castranova, Vincent; Kan, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Studies have indicated that pulmonary exposure to welding fumes can induce a series of adverse effects in the respiratory system, including infection, bronchitis, siderosis and decreased pulmonary function. Recent clinical and epidemiological studies have found that pulmonary exposure to welding fumes is also associated with a higher incidence of cardiovascular events. However, there is insufficient evidence to confirm a direct effect of welding fumes on the cardiovascular system. The present study investigated the effects of pulmonary exposure to welding fumes on the heart and the vascular system in rats. Two chemically distinct welding fumes generated from manual metal arc-hard surfacing (MMA-HS) and gas metal arc-mild steel (GMA-MS) welding were tested. Three groups of rats were instilled intratracheally with MMA-HS (2 mg/rat), GMA-MS (2 mg/rat) or saline as control once a week for seven weeks. On days 1 and 7 after the last treatment, basal cardiovascular function and the cardiovascular response to increasing doses of adrenoreceptor agonists were assessed. MMA-HS treatment reduced the basal levels of left ventricle end-systolic pressure and dP/dt(max) at 1 day post-treatment, and decreased dP/dt(min) in response to isoproterenol (ISO) at 7 days post-treatment. Unlike MMA-HS, GMA-MS only affected left ventricular end-diastolic pressure in response to ISO at 7 days post-treatment. Treatment with MMA-HS or GMA-MS did not alter heart rate and blood pressure. Our findings suggest that exposure to different welding fumes can induce different adverse effects on the cardiovascular system, and that cardiac contractility may be a sensitive indicator of cardiovascular dysfunction.

  18. Effect of electromagnetic interaction during fusion welding of AISI 2205 duplex stainless steel on the corrosion resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Rentería, M.A., E-mail: marcogarciarenteria@uadec.edu.mx [Faculty of Metallurgy, Autonomous University of Coahuila, Carretera 57 Km. 5, CP 25720, Monclova, Coahuila (Mexico); López-Morelos, V.H., E-mail: vhlopez@umich.mx [Instituto de Investigación en Metalurgia y Materiales, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, A.P. 888, CP 58000, Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); González-Sánchez, J., E-mail: jagonzal@uacam.mx [Centre for Corrosion Research, Autonomous University of Campeche, Av. Agustín Melgar s/n, Col. Buenavista, CP 24039, Campeche, Cam (Mexico); García-Hernández, R., E-mail: rgarcia@umich.mx [Instituto de Investigación en Metalurgia y Materiales, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, A.P. 888, CP 58000, Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Dzib-Pérez, L., E-mail: franciscocl7@yahoo.com.mx [Centre for Corrosion Research, Autonomous University of Campeche, Av. Agustín Melgar s/n, Col. Buenavista, CP 24039, Campeche, Cam (Mexico); Curiel-López, F.F., E-mail: franciscocl7@yahoo.com.mx [Faculty of Metallurgy, Autonomous University of Coahuila, Carretera 57 Km. 5, CP 25720, Monclova, Coahuila (Mexico)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Application of EMILI during welding 2205 Duplex stainless steel hindered the coarsening of δ grains in HTHAZ and promoted regeneration of γ. • Welds made with simultaneous EMILI presented TPI values at the HTHAZ similar to those for BM. • Welds made under 3, 12 and 15 mT presented a mass loss by anodic polarisation similar to that observed for the as-received BM. • This behaviour is due to changes in the dynamics of microstructural evolution during welding with EMILI. - Abstract: The effect of electromagnetic interaction of low intensity (EMILI) applied during fusion welding of AISI 2205 duplex stainless steel on the resistance to localised corrosion in natural seawater was investigated. The heat affected zone (HAZ) of samples welded under EMILI showed a higher temperature for pitting initiation and lower dissolution under anodic polarisation in chloride containing solutions than samples welded without EMILI. The EMILI assisted welding process developed in the present work enhanced the resistance to localised corrosion due to a modification on the microstructural evolution in the HAZ and the fusion zone during the thermal cycle involved in fusion welding. The application of EMILI reduced the size of the HAZ, limited coarsening of the ferrite grains and promoted regeneration of austenite in this zone, inducing a homogeneous passive condition of the surface. EMILI can be applied during fusion welding of structural or functional components of diverse size manufactured with duplex stainless steel designed to withstand aggressive environments such as natural seawater or marine atmospheres.

  19. The effect of pretreatment, welding technique and filter alloys in TIG welding of AlLiCu alloys. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, U.; Neye, G.

    1989-01-01

    Previous publications on TIG welding on recently developed AlLiCu alloys point to unsatisfactory results if one proceeds in the usual way. In this report, the conditions are shown for producing welds with few pores with the aid of TIG welding using usual production methods. After reporting on investigations with argon as the cover gas in the first part of the report, this part is concerned with experiments in which helium was used as the cover gas. (orig.) [de

  20. The effect of weld chemistry on the likely primary water stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of alloy 82 dissimilar metal welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persaud, S.Y., E-mail: suraj.persaud@mail.utoronto.ca [University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Ramamurthy, S. [Surface Science Western, London, ON (Canada); Newman, R.C. [University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Alloy 82 dissimilar weld joints between carbon steel and Alloy 600 were exposed to a simulated primary water environment consisting of hydrogenated steam at 480 {sup o}C and 1 bar. Dilution from the carbon steel to the weld was significant, particularly in the root where Fe was enriched to 35 at. % and Cr was depleted to 10 at. %. The heterogeneous composition of the weld from root to crown resulted in differences in internal and external oxidation tendency. An Fe-rich external surface oxide formed on the weld root which may help to prevent embrittlement and SCC by internal intergranular oxidation. (author)

  1. Effect of flux powder SiO2 for the welding of 304-austenitic stainless ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    optimal weld pool geometry in the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of ..... Flux assisted gas tungsten arc and laser welding of titanium with cryolite containing fluxes: arc spectroscopy and corrosion resistance studies, Welding Journal, Vol.

  2. Effect of acoustic softening on the thermal-mechanical process of ultrasonic welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kunkun; Zhang, Yansong; Wang, Hongze

    2017-03-01

    Application of ultrasonic energy can reduce the static stress necessary for plastic deformation of metallic materials to reduce forming load and energy, namely acoustic softening effect (ASE). Ultrasonic welding (USW) is a rapid joining process utilizing ultrasonic energy to form a solid state joint between two or more pieces of metals. Quantitative characterization of ASE and its influence on specimen deformation and heat generation is essential to clarify the thermal-mechanical process of ultrasonic welding. In the present work, experiments were set up to found out mechanical behavior of copper and aluminum under combined effect of compression force and ultrasonic energy. Constitutive model was proposed and numerical implemented in finite element model of ultrasonic welding. Thermal-mechanical analysis was put forward to explore the effect of ultrasonic energy on the welding process quantitatively. Conclusions can be drawn that ASE increases structural deformation significantly, which is beneficial for joint formation. Meanwhile, heat generation from both frictional work and plastic deformation is slightly influenced by ASE. Based on the proposed model, relationship between ultrasonic energy and thermal-mechanical behavior of structure during ultrasonic welding was constructed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of geometric construction on residual stress distribution in designing a nuclear rotor joined by multipass narrow gap welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Long; Zhang, Linjie; Zhang, Jianxun; Zhuang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The internal stress of the pipe is measured using local material removal method. • Bottom protrusion at weld seam can release the stress and mitigate stress evolution. The through-wall axial stress is bending type under the effect of the rotor discs. • The impact of geometric construction on the stress evolution begins after pass 15. - Abstract: The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of geometric construction on the distribution of residual stresses before and after heat treatment in designing a nuclear welded rotor. The local material removal method was used to measure internal residual stress of the experimental pipe after post weld heat treatment. Three finite element models were employed as follows: a model of experimental pipe, a model with a bottom protrusion existed at the weld region, and a model of two rotor discs butt-welded with a bottom protrusion at the weld region. Investigated results showed that the bottom protrusion existed at the weld region can decrease the residual stress and mitigate the stress evolution significantly on the inner surface. Under the binding effect of the rotor discs, the axial stress of inner surface region is compressive stress; the through-wall axial stress at the weld center line can be deemed to a bending type; both the hoop stress and axial stress at the weld center line on the inner surface are compressive. The impact of geometric construction on the stress evolution at the root bead begins after pass 15 deposited

  4. Tests of arc-welding-related EMI effects on startup instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, T.; Kalechstein, W.; Cosgrove, D.

    1996-01-01

    The tests described in this paper were conducted to characterize the effects that electromagnetic interference (EMI), from arc welding, has on startup instrumentation (SUI). This paper reviews the results of a literature search on EMI resulting from arc welding and gives the objective and scope of the tests conducted and describes the test equipment and setting, and test procedure and results. Are-welding-related EMI levels in an SUI system were measured to determine the dominant source of interference, the coupling path and the susceptible part of the SUI system. The effectiveness of easily implemented improvements in reducing the level of EMI in the SUI system were also tested. Recommendations are provided on how to eliminate or reduce the EMI effects on sensitive nuclear instruments. (author)

  5. The effect of electrode vertex angle on automatic tungsten-inert-gas welds for stainless steel 304L plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maarek, V.; Sharir, Y.; Stern, A.

    1980-03-01

    The effect of electrode vertex angle on penetration depth and weld bead width, in automatic tungsten-inert-gas (TIG) dcsp bead-on-plate welding with different currents, has been studied for stainless steel 304L plates 1.5 mm and 8 mm thick. It has been found that for thin plates, wider and deeper welds are obtained when using sharper electrodes while, for thick plates, narrower and deeper welds are produced when blunt electrodes (vertex angle 180 deg) are used. An explanation of the results, based on a literature survey, is included

  6. Effect of Local Post Weld Heat Treatment on Tensile Properties in Friction Stir Welded 2219-O Al Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Guannan; Sun, Lei; Lin, Caiyuan; Lin, Yanli

    2017-11-01

    To improve the formability of the aluminum alloy welds and overcome the size limitation of the bulk post weld heat treatment (BPWHT) on large size friction stir welded joints, a local post weld heat treatment method (LPWHT) was proposed. In this method, the resistance heating as the moving heat source is adopted to only heat the weld seam. The temperature field of LPWHT and its influence on the mechanical properties and formability of FSW 2219-O Al alloy joints was investigated. The evaluation of the tensile properties of FSW samples was also examined by mapping the global and local strain distribution using the digital image correlation methodology. The results indicated that the formability was improved greatly after LPWHT, while the hardness distribution of the FSW joint was homogenized. The maximum elongation can reach 1.4 times that of as-welded joints with increase the strength and the strain of the nugget zone increased from 3 to 8% when annealing at 300 °C. The heterogeneity on the tensile deformation of the as-welded joints was improved by the nugget zone showing large local strain value and the reason was given according to the dimple fracture characteristics at different annealing temperatures. The tensile strength and elongation of LPWHT can reach 93.3 and 96.1% of the BPWHT, respectively. Thus, the LPWHT can be advantageous compared to the BPWHT for large size welds.

  7. Effects of process variables on characteristics of Nd:YAG laser welds of Inconel 600

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Hee [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea)

    1998-04-01

    This report described a basic study of the pulse shaping effects on weld dimension and weld discontinuities in the continuous seam welds of STS 310S using Nd:YAG laser. Further, laser weldability tests for STS 310S and Inconel 600 was carried out. Pulse shapes used in this experiment were general type, which has been applied generally in laser material processing, ramped-up type (3 steps) and ramped-down type (3 steps). The pulse energy was constant regardless of types of pulse shape. The penetration of laser welds became deeper as the pulse width was longer and the peak power was increased. The pulse of ramped-up type was most effective for deep penetration compared with others. With regard to the laser weldability and reduction of weld discontinuities such as porosity and hot cracking, the general type pulse was the worst and the ramped-down type pulse was the best among 3 types of pulse shape studied in this investigation. (author). 36 refs., 25 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Mitigation of sensitisation effects in unstabilised 12%Cr ferritic stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warmelo, Martin van; Nolan, David; Norrish, John

    2007-01-01

    Sensitisation in the heat-affected zones of ferritic stainless steel welds is typically prevented by stabilisation of the parent material with titanium or niobium, and suitable design of the overall composition to produce a suitably high ferrite factor. However, such alloy modification has proven to be economically unviable for thick gauge (>10 mm) plate products and therefore unstabilised 12%Cr (3CR12) material is still currently being used for heavy gauge structural applications in many parts of the world. The aim of the current work was to review the mechanisms responsible for sensitisation in these unstabilised ferritic stainless steels, and to characterise the sensitisation effects arising from multipass welding procedures. The objective was to determine the influence of welding parameters, and thereby to recommend mitigating strategies. Two particular sensitisation modes were found to occur in the current work, although only one was predominant and considered problematic from a practical perspective. It was found that with proper positioning of weld capping runs and control of weld overlap, it is possible to ensure that sensitising isotherms remain buried beneath the parent surface, and so reduce harmful corrosion effects

  9. Effect of composition on corrosion resistance of high-alloy austenitic stainless steel weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, P.I.; Gooch, T.G.

    1993-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of stainless steel weld metal in the ranges of 17 to 28% chromium (Cr), 6 to 60% nickel (Ni), 0 to 9% molybdenum (Mo), and 0.0 to 0.37% nitrogen (N) was examined. Critical pitting temperatures were determined in ferric chloride (FeCl 3 ). Passive film breakdown potentials were assessed from potentiodynamic scans in 3% sodium chloride (NaCl) at 50 C. Potentiodynamic and potentiostatic tests were carried out in 30% sulfuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ) ar 25 C, which was representative of chloride-free acid media of low redox potential. Metallographic examination and microanalysis were conducted on the test welds. Because of segregation of alloying elements, weld metal pitting resistance always was lower than that of matching composition base steel. The difference increased with higher Cr, Mo, and N contents. Segregation also reduced resistance to general corrosion in H 2 SO 4 , but the effect relative to the base steel was less marked than with chloride pitting. Segregation of Cr, Mo, and N in fully austenitic deposits decreased as the Ni' eq- Cr' eq ratio increased. Over the compositional range studied, weld metal pitting resistance was dependent mainly on Mo content and segregation. N had less effect than in wrought alloys. Both Mo and N enhanced weld metal corrosion resistance in H 2 SO 4

  10. Effect of heat input on the microstructure and mechanical properties of gas tungsten arc welded AISI 304 stainless steel joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Subodh; Shahi, A.S.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Welding procedure is established for welding 6 mm thick AISI 304 using GTAW process. → Mechanical properties of the weld joints are influenced strongly by the heat input. → Highest tensile strength of 657.32 MPa is achieved by joints using low heat input. → Welding parameters affect heat input and hence microstructure of weld joints. → Extent of grain coarsening in the HAZ increases with increase in the heat input. -- Abstract: Influence of heat input on the microstructure and mechanical properties of gas tungsten arc welded 304 stainless steel (SS) joints was studied. Three heat input combinations designated as low heat (2.563 kJ/mm), medium heat (2.784 kJ/mm) and high heat (3.017 kJ/mm) were selected from the operating window of the gas tungsten arc welding process (GTAW) and weld joints made using these combinations were subjected to microstructural evaluations and tensile testing so as to analyze the effect of thermal arc energy on the microstructure and mechanical properties of these joints. The results of this investigation indicate that the joints made using low heat input exhibited higher ultimate tensile strength (UTS) than those welded with medium and high heat input. Significant grain coarsening was observed in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of all the joints and it was found that the extent of grain coarsening in the heat affected zone increased with increase in the heat input. For the joints investigated in this study it was also found that average dendrite length and inter-dendritic spacing in the weld zone increases with increase in the heat input which is the main reason for the observable changes in the tensile properties of the weld joints welded with different arc energy inputs.

  11. Effect of shoulder to pin ratio on magnesium alloy Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, N. H.; Ishak, M.; Shah, L. H.

    2017-09-01

    This study focuses on the effect of shoulder to pin diameter ratio on friction stir welding of magnesium alloy AZ31. Two pieces of AZ31 alloy with thickness of 2 mm were friction stir welded by using conventional milling machine. The shoulder to pin diameter ratio used in this experiment are 2.25, 2.5, 2.75, 3, 3.33, 3.66, 4.5, 5 and 5.5. The rotational speed and welding speed used in this study are 1000 rpm and 100 mm/min, respectively. Microstructure observation of welded area was studied by using optical microscope. Equiaxed grains were observed at the TMAZ and stir zone indicating fully plastic deformation. The grain size of stir zone increased with decreasing shoulder to pin ratio from ratio 3.33 to 5.5 due to higher heat input. It is observed that, surface galling and faying surface defect is produced when excessive heat input is applied. To evaluate the mechanical properties of this specimen, tensile test was used in this study. Shoulder to pin ratio 5.5 shows lowest tensile strength while shoulder to pin diameter ratio 3.33 shows highest tensile strength with weld efficiency 91 % from based metal.

  12. Effect of Cryogenic Treatment on Sensitization of 304 Stainless Steel in TIG Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rupinder; Slathia, Ravinder Singh

    2016-04-01

    Stainless steel (SS) is sensitized by a thermal treatment in the range of 400-850 °C and inter-granular attack would occur upon subsequent exposure to certain media. In many practical situations, such as welding, sensitization is best studied by continuous cooling through the sensitizing temperature range wherein the variables are the peak temperature reached and the cooling rate in contrast to temperature and time of the isothermal hold which has been the customary practice. There are also various methods of controlling the inter-granular corrosion viz. lowering the carbon content, adding stabilizers and applying solution heat treatment but all these methods are either costly or difficult to apply. This study is focussed on the effect of cryogenically treated tungsten electrode of TIG welding on the sensitization behaviour of 304SS by taking into consideration the weld properties (like: hardness, tensile strength, percentage elongation and micro-structure). The parameters of significance are current, pulse frequency and gas flow rate. Further the study suggested that the results of non cryo treated electrode were better than the treated one on sensitization of welded joints during TIG welding within the range of selected parameters.

  13. The Effect of Vibration during Friction Stir Welding on Corrosion Behavior, Mechanical Properties, and Machining Characteristics of Stir Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajad Fouladi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Different methods have been applied to refine various characteristics of the zone (or nugget obtained by friction stir welding (FSW. In the current research, joining components are vibrated normal to the weld line during FSW to refine the zone microstructure. This process is described as friction stir vibration welding (FSVW. The effect of FSVW on mechanical properties, corrosion behavior, and machining characteristics of the zone are investigated. Al5052 alloy specimens are welded using FSW and FSVW processes and their different characteristics are compared and discussed. The results show that the strength and ductility of the welded parts increase when the vibration is applied. The outcomes also show that corrosion resistance of the nugget for FSV-welded specimens is lower than FS welded samples, and machining force of the former specimens is higher than the latter ones. These are related to smaller grain size in the zone of FSV-welded specimens compared to FS welded parts. Smaller grain size leads to a greater volume fraction of grain boundaries and, correspondingly, higher strength and hardness, as well as lower corrosion resistance.

  14. Effect of Austenitic and Austeno-Ferritic Electrodes on 2205 Duplex and 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel Dissimilar Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Jagesvar; Taiwade, Ravindra V.

    2016-11-01

    This study addresses the effect of different types of austenitic and austeno-ferritic electrodes (E309L, E309LMo and E2209) on the relationship between weldability, microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of shielded metal arc welded duplex/austenitic (2205/316L) stainless steel dissimilar joints using the combined techniques of optical, scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive spectrometer and electrochemical. The results indicated that the change in electrode composition led to microstructural variations in the welds with the development of different complex phases such as vermicular ferrite, lathy ferrite, widmanstatten and intragranular austenite. Mechanical properties of welded joints were diverged based on compositions and solidification modes; it was observed that ferritic mode solidified weld dominated property wise. However, the pitting corrosion resistance of all welds showed different behavior in chloride solution; moreover, weld with E2209 was superior, whereas E309L exhibited lower resistance. Higher degree of sensitization was observed in E2209 weld, while lesser in E309L weld. Optimum ferrite content was achieved in all welds.

  15. Effect of fiber laser parameters on laser welded AZ31B Magnesium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mat Salleh Naqiuddin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the usage of Magnesium (Mg alloys has been hugely applied in the industrial application such as in automotive, marine, and electronic due to its advantages of recyclability and lightweight. This alloys required low heat input to be weld since it is easily evaporated due to the Magnesium Oxide (MgO at the surface and it also possesses lower melting point compared to steel. Laser welding is more convenient to weld Mg alloys due to its high power and lower heat input. AZ31B was selected since it has strong mechanical properties among others Mg alloys due to the major alloying elements; Aluminium (Al and Zinc (Zn. Low power fiber laser machine with wavelength of 900 nm was used in this experiment. The intention of this work was to investigate the effect of low power fiber laser parameters and effect of shielding gas on weld penetration and microstructure. Another aim in this work was to produce the joint for this thin sheets metal. Penetration depth and microstructure evaluation were emphasized in the analysis section. Bead-on-Plate (BOP and laser lap welding was conducted on AZ31B with thicknesses of 1.0 mm and 0.6 mm for feasibility study using pulsed wave (PW mode. Defocusing features was used in order to find better focal position, which has less occurrence of evaporation (underfill. The effect of different angle of irradiation was also investigated. Two types of shielding gases, Argon (Ar and Nitrogen (N2 were used in order to study the effect of shielding gas. Lastly, the effect of pulsed energy on penetration types and depth of BOP welded samples was investigated. Focus point was found at focal length of 156 mm with 393.75 μm. For BOP experiment, higher pulsed energy used contributes to melt through defect. Meanwhile, Ns shielding gas proved to be better shielding gas in laser welding the AZ31B. Higher angle of irradiation could reduce the underfill defect. Fillet Lap joint of similar metal was successfully done where 2.0 J of

  16. 3D analyses of the effect of weld orientation in Charpy specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Needleman, A.

    2004-01-01

    . The onset of cleavage is taken to occur when the average of the maximum principal stress over a specified volume attains a critical value. The weld analyzed here is overmatched, so that the yield strength for the weld is larger than that of the base material. Analyses are carried out for specimens where...... the notch is cut parallel to the surface of the test piece, as well as more complex geometries where the notched surface of the specimen is rotated relative to the surface of the test piece. It is found that even for a homogeneous material the brittle-ductile transition can be much affected by three...... dimensional effects; for example, curvature of the deformed free surface gives rise to a stress increase that promotes cleavage. Furthermore, for the rotated specimens the weld geometry relative to the notched specimen surface is so complex that only a full 3D analysis is able to account for the interaction...

  17. Effects of mechanical force on grain structures of friction stir welded oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Wentuo; Kimura, Akihiko; Tsuda, Naoto; Serizawa, Hisashi; Chen, Dongsheng; Je, Hwanil; Fujii, Hidetoshi; Ha, Yoosung; Morisada, Yoshiaki; Noto, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    The weldability of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels is a critical obstructive in the development and use of these steels. Friction stir welding has been considered to be a promising way to solve this problem. The main purpose of this work was to reveal the effects of mechanical force on grain structures of friction stir welded ODS ferritic steel. The grain appearances and the misorientation angles of grain boundaries in different welded zones were investigated by the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Results showed that the mechanical force imposed by the stir tool can activate and promote the recrystallization characterized by the transformation of boundaries from LABs to HABs, and contribute to the grain refinement. The type of recrystallization in the stir zone can be classified as the continuous dynamic recrystallization (CDRX)

  18. Effects of mechanical force on grain structures of friction stir welded oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Wentuo, E-mail: hanwentuo@hotmail.com [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kimura, Akihiko [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Tsuda, Naoto [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Serizawa, Hisashi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Chen, Dongsheng [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Je, Hwanil [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Fujii, Hidetoshi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Ha, Yoosung [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Morisada, Yoshiaki [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Noto, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    The weldability of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels is a critical obstructive in the development and use of these steels. Friction stir welding has been considered to be a promising way to solve this problem. The main purpose of this work was to reveal the effects of mechanical force on grain structures of friction stir welded ODS ferritic steel. The grain appearances and the misorientation angles of grain boundaries in different welded zones were investigated by the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Results showed that the mechanical force imposed by the stir tool can activate and promote the recrystallization characterized by the transformation of boundaries from LABs to HABs, and contribute to the grain refinement. The type of recrystallization in the stir zone can be classified as the continuous dynamic recrystallization (CDRX)

  19. The effect of gas tungsten arc welding and pulsed-gas tungsten arc welding processes’ parameters on the heat affected zone-softening behavior of strain-hardened Al–6.7Mg alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadadzadeh, Amir; Ghaznavi, Majid Mahmoudi; Kokabi, Amir Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The strain-hardened Al–6.7Mg alloy was welded using GTAW and PGTAW processes. • The HAZ softening behavior of the welding joint was characterized. • Employing pulsed current in GTAW process eliminated the HAZ softening. • Duration ratio did not affect the weld strength while the frequency influenced it. - Abstract: The heat affected zone (HAZ) softening behavior of strain-hardened Al–6.7Mg alloy welded by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process was investigated. Increasing the heat input during welding led to formation of a wider HAZ. Moreover, the size of the precipitates was increased at higher heat inputs. Consequently, by increasing the heat input, lower strength was obtained for the welding joints. At the second stage of the study, pulsed-GTAW (PGTAW) process was employed to improve the strength of the joints. It was observed that the overall strength of the welding joints was improved and the fracture during tensile test was moved from the HAZ to the fusion zone. Moreover, the effect of duration ratio and pulse frequency was studied. For the current study, the duration ratio did not have a significant effect on the strength and microstructure of the weld, but increasing the frequency led to higher strength of the weld and finer microstructure

  20. Effect of weld metal properties on fatigue crack growth behaviour of gas tungsten arc welded AISI 409M grade ferritic stainless steel joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanmugam, K.; Lakshminarayanan, A.K.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of filler metals such as austenitic stainless steel, ferritic stainless steel and duplex stainless steel on fatigue crack growth behaviour of the gas tungsten arc welded ferritic stainless steel joints was investigated. Rolled plates of 4 mm thickness were used as the base material for preparing single 'V' butt welded joints. Centre cracked tensile (CCT) specimens were prepared to evaluate fatigue crack growth behaviour. Servo hydraulic controlled fatigue testing machine was used to evaluate the fatigue crack growth behaviour of the welded joints. From this investigation, it was found that the joints fabricated by duplex stainless steel filler metal showed superior fatigue crack growth resistance compared to the joints fabricated by austenitic and ferritic stainless steel filler metals. Higher yield strength, hardness and relatively higher toughness may be the reasons for superior fatigue performance of the joints fabricated by duplex stainless steel filler metal.

  1. Effect of post weld heat treatment on tensile properties and microstructure characteristics of friction stir welded armour grade AA7075-T651 aluminium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sivaraj

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the effects of post weld heat treatments, namely artificial ageing and solution treatment followed by artificial ageing, on microstructure and mechanical properties of 12 mm thick friction stir welded joints of precipitation hardenable high strength armour grade AA7075-T651 aluminium alloy. The tensile properties, such as yield strength, tensile strength, elongation and notch tensile strength, are evaluated and correlated with the microhardness and microstructural features. The scanning electron microscope is used to characterie the fracture surfaces. The solution treatment followed by ageing heat treatment cycle is found to be marginally beneficial in improving the tensile properties of friction stir welds of AA7075-T651 aluminium alloy.

  2. Alloying element effect on the mechanical properties of high-strength stainless steels and welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustovit, A.I.; Yushchenko, K.A.; Fortunatova, N.N.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental steels containing 11-17% Cr, 3-13% Ni, 0-2% Mo, 0-1% Ti, 1-2% Cu, 0-4% Co, 0-1% He, < 0.03% C and their welded joints have been studied. The ''MRA-1'' program was used to obtain mathematical description (in the form of regression equations) of the effect of alloying elements on strength and plasticity of the steels and the welded joints at 20...-196 deg C. The dependences obtained make it possible to predict the properties of the steels and the joints in a satisfactory agreement with their actual behaviour at 20...-196 deg C

  3. PAD WELDING EFFECT ON CRANKSHAFT LENGTH WHILE MAKING BUILD-UP PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Vigerina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reveals a pad welding effect on axial sizes of a crankshaft to be built-up and a dependence of axial deformation of built-up element on an elasticity modulus, a heating temperature and thermal coefficient of linear expansion of an element and a plating, weave bead sizes. This dependence enables to forecast tensile stresses in the plating. The paper contains justification on limitation of axial deformation of the built crank due to decrease of pad welding numbers up to only one during the whole period of its lifetime and carrying out  resource-saving measures.

  4. The effect of welding line heat-affected-zone on the formability of tube hydroforming process

    Science.gov (United States)

    ChiuHuang, Cheng-Kai; Hsu, Cheng-En; Lee, Ping-Kun

    2016-08-01

    Tube hydroforming has been used as a lightweight design approach to reduce CO2 emission for the automotive industry. For the high strength steel tube, the strength and quality of the welding line is very important for a successful tube hydroforming process. This paper aims to investigate the effect of the welding line's strength and the width of the heat-affected zone on the tube thinning during the hydroforming process. The simulation results show that both factors play an important role on the thickness distribution during the tube expansion.

  5. The effect of welding line heat-affected-zone on the formability of tube hydroforming process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ChiuHuang, Cheng-Kai; Hsu, Cheng-En; Lee, Ping-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Tube hydroforming has been used as a lightweight design approach to reduce CO_2 emission for the automotive industry. For the high strength steel tube, the strength and quality of the welding line is very important for a successful tube hydroforming process. This paper aims to investigate the effect of the welding line's strength and the width of the heat-affected zone on the tube thinning during the hydroforming process. The simulation results show that both factors play an important role on the thickness distribution during the tube expansion. (paper)

  6. Effects of weld residual stresses on crack-opening area analysis of pipes for LBB applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, P.; Rahman, S.; Wilkowski, G. [and others

    1997-04-01

    This paper summarizes four different studies undertaken to evaluate the effects of weld residual stresses on the crack-opening behavior of a circumferential through-wall crack in the center of a girth weld. The effect of weld residual stress on the crack-opening-area and leak-rate analyses of a pipe is not well understood. There are no simple analyses to account for these effects, and, therefore, they are frequently neglected. The four studies involved the following efforts: (1) Full-field thermoplastic finite element residual stress analyses of a crack in the center of a girth weld, (2) A comparison of the crack-opening displacements from a full-field thermoplastic residual stress analysis with a crack-face pressure elastic stress analysis to determine the residual stress effects on the crack-opening displacement, (3) The effects of hydrostatic testing on the residual stresses and the resulting crack-opening displacement, and (4) The effect of residual stresses on crack-opening displacement with different normal operating stresses.

  7. Effects of weld residual stresses on crack-opening area analysis of pipes for LBB applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, P.; Rahman, S.; Wilkowski, G.

    1997-01-01

    This paper summarizes four different studies undertaken to evaluate the effects of weld residual stresses on the crack-opening behavior of a circumferential through-wall crack in the center of a girth weld. The effect of weld residual stress on the crack-opening-area and leak-rate analyses of a pipe is not well understood. There are no simple analyses to account for these effects, and, therefore, they are frequently neglected. The four studies involved the following efforts: (1) Full-field thermoplastic finite element residual stress analyses of a crack in the center of a girth weld, (2) A comparison of the crack-opening displacements from a full-field thermoplastic residual stress analysis with a crack-face pressure elastic stress analysis to determine the residual stress effects on the crack-opening displacement, (3) The effects of hydrostatic testing on the residual stresses and the resulting crack-opening displacement, and (4) The effect of residual stresses on crack-opening displacement with different normal operating stresses

  8. Effects of heat treatment and welding process on superelastic behaviour and microstructure of micro electron beam welded NiTi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balz Isabel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Medical devices with small dimensions made of superelastic NiTi become more popular, but joining these parts remains challenging. Since laser welding was found to be an option, electron beam welding seems to be an interesting alternative as it provides additional advantages due to the precise beam positioning and the high vacuum. Superelasticity is influenced by microstructure and surface layer composition that are mainly affected by welding process and by heat treatment and therefore will be investigated in the present paper.

  9. Examination of the effect of Sc on 2000 and 7000 series aluminium alloy castings: for improvements in fusion welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, A.F.; Hyde, K.; Costello, F.; Thompson, S.; Birley, S.; Prangnell, P.B.

    2003-01-01

    It has been reported that small additions of scandium (Sc) can improve the weldability and mechanical properties of some aluminium aerospace alloys that are normally considered to be 'unweldable'. In order to determine the mechanisms by which these improvements occur, and more rapidly arrive at optimum Sc addition levels, small wedge-shaped castings have been used to simulate the cooling rates found in MIG/TIG welds. Using this technique, a range of Sc addition levels have been made to two typical Al-aerospace alloys, 2024 and 7475. It has been found that when the Sc level exceeds a critical concentration, small Al 3 Sc primary particles form in the melt and act as very efficient grain nucleants, resulting in simulated fusion zone grain sizes as fine as 15 μm. This exceptional level of grain refinement produced an unusual grain structure that exhibited no dendritic, or cellular, substructure and a large increase in strength and ductility of the castings. Sc also produced changes in the alloy's freezing paths, which cannot yet be fully explained, but led to the appearance of the W phase in the 2024 alloy and, in both alloys, an overall reduction in the amount of eutectic formed during solidification. When coupled with the high level of grain refinement, this behaviour could be used to explain the increased strength and ductility of the castings. In 2000 and 7000 series aluminium alloys, it is therefore, anticipated that optimised Sc bearing filler wires will significantly improve the mechanical properties of the weld metal, as well as reducing the tendency for solidification cracking

  10. Effect of the Grain Size of the Initial Structure of 1565chM Alloy on the Structure and Properties of the Joints Fabricated by Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikov, V. V.; Drits, A. M.; Gureeva, M. A.; Malov, D. V.

    2017-12-01

    The effect of the initial grain size in the structure of the aluminum 1565chM alloy on the mechanical properties of the welded joints formed by friction stir welding and on the grain size in the weld core is studied. It is shown that the design of tool and, especially, the parameters of a screw groove exert a great effect on the grain size in the weld core.

  11. Physical and chemical characterization of airborne particles from welding operations in automotive plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasch, Jean; D'Arcy, James

    2008-07-01

    Airborne particles were characterized from six welding operations in three automotive plants, including resistance spot welding, metal inert gas (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of aluminum and resistance spot welding, MIG welding and weld-through sealer of galvanized steel. Particle levels were measured throughout the process area to select a sampling location, followed by intensive particle sampling over one working shift. Temporal trends were measured, and particles were collected on filters to characterize their size and chemistry. In all cases, the particles fell into a bimodal size distribution with very large particles >20 mum in diameter, possibly emitted as spatter or metal expulsions, and very small particles about 1 mum in diameter, possibly formed from condensation of vaporized metal. The mass median aerodynamic diameter was about 1 mum, with only about 7% of the particle mass present as ultrafine particles welding particles could be accounted for by chemical analysis, with the remainder possibly present as oxygen. Predominant species were organic carbon, elemental carbon, iron, and aluminum. More than 80% of the particle mass could be accounted for from steel welding, primarily present as iron, organic carbon, zinc, and copper. Particle concentrations and elemental concentrations were compared with allowable concentrations as recommended by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists. In all cases, workplace levels were at least 11 times lower than recommended levels.

  12. Effect of Manganese on the Mechanical Properties of Welded As-Cast Aluminium Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isiaka Oluwole OLADELE

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The effects of manganese on the mechanical properties of welded and un-weld as-cast 6063 aluminium alloy has been studied. Alloys of varying percentage of manganese from 0.019 to 0.24 were sand cast. A wooden pattern of dimensions 200×100×100mm was used, the aluminium (500g was charged into an induction furnace and heated to 750°C for 15 minutes, this was followed by the addition of weighed powdered manganese, stirred and heated at the same temperature for another 5 minutes and thereafter poured into the already prepared sand mould at a temperature of 690°C. The as-cast aluminium samples, were sectioned into two equal parts of 45mm each using power hack saw; a weld groove was created between the sides of the samples using an electric hand grinding machine, the groove served as the path along which the filler metal was deposited on the aluminium, a single v butt joint was produced from each sample and Metal Inert Gas Welding process was carried out to produce the required joint design. The different cast samples were machined to the different test pieces after which they were assessed to determine their mechanical properties (impact, hardness (welded joint and heat affected zone and tensile tests. The microstructures of the welded samples were also studied. From the results, it was observed that Sample F, which has 0.172% Mn, has the best hardness and impact strength while sample C with 0.160% Mn has the highest ultimate tensile strength.

  13. Welding behavior of semi-crystalline polymers 2. The effect of cocrystallisation on autoadhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xue, Y.-Q.; Tervoort, T.A.; Rastogi, S.; Lemstra, P.J.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of cocrystallization on the welding behavior of semicrystalline polymers was studied by means of T-peel testing at room temperature, using ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) as a model polymer. Solution-cast films of UHMWPE have a very special morphology, consisting of

  14. Effect of processing conditions on residual stress distributions by bead-on-plate welding after surface machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihara, Ryohei; Mochizuki, Masahito

    2014-01-01

    Residual stress is important factor for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) that has been observed near the welded zone in nuclear power plants. Especially, surface residual stress is significant for SCC initiation. In the joining processes of pipes, butt welding is conducted after surface machining. Residual stress is generated by both processes, and residual stress distribution due to surface machining is varied by the subsequent butt welding. In previous paper, authors reported that residual stress distribution generated by bead on plate welding after surface machining has a local maximum residual stress near the weld metal. The local maximum residual stress shows approximately 900 MPa that exceeds the stress threshold for SCC initiation. Therefore, for the safety improvement of nuclear power plants, a study on the local maximum residual stress is important. In this study, the effect of surface machining and welding conditions on residual stress distribution generated by welding after surface machining was investigated. Surface machining using lathe machine and bead on plate welding with tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc under various conditions were conducted for plate specimens made of SUS316L. Then, residual stress distributions were measured by X-ray diffraction method (XRD). As a result, residual stress distributions have the local maximum residual stress near the weld metal in all specimens. The values of the local maximum residual stresses are almost the same. The location of the local maximum residual stress is varied by welding condition. It could be consider that the local maximum residual stress is generated by same generation mechanism as welding residual stress in surface machined layer that has high yield stress. (author)

  15. The effect of postprocessing on tensile property and microstructure evolution of friction stir welding aluminum alloy joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Z.L.; Wang, X.S.; Pang, Q.; Huang, F.; Qin, X.P.; Hua, L.

    2015-01-01

    Friction stir welding is an efficient manufacturing method for joining aluminum alloy and can dramatically reduce grain size conferring excellent plastic deformation properties. Consequently, friction stir welding is used to manufacture tailor welded blanks to optimize weight or performance in the final component. In the study, the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of friction stir welding joint during plastic forming and subsequent heat treatment were investigated. The microstructural characteristics of the friction stir welding joints were studied by Electron Backscattered Diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The mechanical properties were evaluated by tensile and microhardness tests. It is found that the tensile and yield strengths of friction stir welding joints are significantly improved after severe plastic deformation due to the grain refinement. Following heat treatment, the strength of the friction stir welding joints significantly decrease due to the obvious abnormal grain growth. Careful attention must be given to the processing route of any friction stir welding joint intended for plastic forming, especially the annealing between forming passes. Severe plastic deforming of the friction stir welding joint leads to a high level of stored energy/dislocation density, which causes the abnormal grain growth during subsequent heat treatment, and consequently reduce the mechanical properties of the friction stir welding joint. - Highlights: • Great changes are observed in the microstructure of FSW joint after postprocessing. • Postprocessing shows great effect on the microstructure stability of FSW joint. • The weld shows more significant decrease in strength than the BM due to the AGG. • Attention must be given to the processing route of FSW joint for plastic forming

  16. Fully mechanized welding of pipelines in the chemical industry and reactor construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Born, K.

    1984-01-01

    Pipes are increasingly being used as a construction element involving a growing demand for modern welding technology. The pulsed-arc welding procedures occupy an important position in mechanized pipe welding especially where flanged joints are to be made on turning pipes with a burner fixed in place. When the construction prohibits the turning of pipes, the orbital welding technique may be used. The paper discusses the question how the economic efficiency of TIG in inert-gas welding, which is the commonly used welding technique, could be enhanced and in how far other pulsed-arc welding methods, e.g. plasma keyhole or MIG/MAG pulsed-arc could be used in future. This could be done using the new possibilities offered by modern power sources and process technology. (orig.) [de

  17. Low Alloy Steel Structures After Welding with Micro-Jet Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Węgrzyn T.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on low alloy steel after innovate welding method with micro-jet cooling. Weld metal deposit (WMD was carried out for welding and for MIG and MAG welding with micro-jet cooling. This method is very promising mainly due to the high amount of AF (acicular ferrite and low amount of MAC (self-tempered martensite, retained austenite, carbide phases in WMD. That structure corresponds with very good mechanical properties, ie. high impact toughness of welds at low temperature. Micro-jet cooling after welding can find serious application in automotive industry very soon. Until that moment only argon, helium and nitrogen were tested as micro-jet gases. In that paper first time various gas mixtures (gas mixtures Ar-CO2 were tested for micro-jet cooling after welding.

  18. Effects of Heat Input and Bead Generation Methods on Finite Element Analysis of Multi-Pass Welding Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Won Dong; Kim, Ji Hoon; Bahn, Chi Bum [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Welding residual stresses are determined by various factors such as heat input, initial temperature of molten bead, heating time, cooling time, cooling conditions, and boundary conditions. In this study, a sensitivity analysis was performed to find the major factors and reasonable assumptions for simulation. Two-dimensional axisymmetric simulation was conducted by using commercial finite element analysis program ABAQUS, for multi-pass Alloy 82 welds in a 304 Stainless Steel and SA-105 Carbon Steel. The major object is to evaluate effects of the heat input methods and weld bead generation methods on the welding residual stress distribution. Totally four kinds of methods were compared. From the previous results, we could make the following conclusions. 1. Although there are non-negligible differences in HAZ depending on heat input method, welding residual stress distributions have roughly similar trends. However, it is needed to perform the more exact analysis to apply heat energy more carefully into the individual bead. 2. Residual stress distribution were similar for the two weld bead generation technique. However, overlapping was happened when element birth technique was applied. Effects of overlapping could not ignore as deformation increases. However, overlapping problem was avoided when quiet element technique was used. 3. Since existence of inactive bead elements, inaccurate weld residual stresses could be occurred in boundaries of previous and next weld elements in case of quiet element technique.

  19. Study of Gravity Effects on Titanium Laser Welding in the Vertical Position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Baohua; Yuan, Zhang; Pu, Haitao; Li, Haigang; Cheng, Hao; Du, Dong; Shan, Jiguo

    2017-09-08

    To obtain satisfactory welds in positional laser beam welding, it is necessary to know how process parameters will influence the quality of welds in different welding positions. In this study, the titanium alloy Ti6Al4V sheets were laser welded in two vertical welding positions (vertical up and vertical down), and the appearance, porosity, strength, and ductility of the laser joints were evaluated. Results show that undercuts of the vertical up welds were greater than that of vertical down welds, while the porosity contents were much higher in vertical down welds than that in vertical up welds. When welding with a higher heat input, the vertical up welding position resulted in poor weld profiles (undercuts and burn-through holes), whereas the vertical down welding position led to excessive porosity contents in welds. Both severe undercut and excessive porosity were detrimental to the tensile properties of the welds. Weld appearance was improved and porosity contents were reduced by using a lower heat input, achieving better weld quality. Therefore, it is suggested that process parameter settings with relatively high laser powers and welding speeds, which can result in lower heat inputs, are used when laser welding the Ti6Al4V titanium alloys vertically.

  20. Effect of nickel content on mechanical properties and fracture toughness of weld metal of WWER-1000 reactor vessel welded joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubchenko, A.S.; Vasilchenko, G.S.; Starchenko, E.G.; Nosov, S.I

    2004-08-01

    Welding of WWER-1000 reactor vessel of steel 15X2HMPHIA is performed using the C{sub B}-12X2H2MAA wire and PHI-16 or PHI-16A flux. Nickel content in the weld metal usually lays within the limits 1.2-1.9%. The experimental data is shown on the weld metal with the nickel contents 1.28-2.45% after irradiation with fluence up to 260.10{sup 22}n/m{sup 2} at energy more than 0.5 MEV. The embrittlement was measured by shift of critical brittleness temperature. Has appeared, that the weld metal with the low nickel content is the least responsive to irradiation embrittlement. The mechanical properties and fracture toughness of the weld metal with the contents of a nickel less than 1.3% are studied. Specimens CT-1T are tested, the 'master-curve', and its confidence bounds with probability of destruction 5 and 95% is built. 'Master-curve' in the specified confidence interval is affirmed by CT-4T specimens test data. Is shown, that the mechanical properties and fracture toughness of the weld metal with the contents of nickel less than 1.3% satisfy the normative requirements.

  1. Effect of nickel content on mechanical properties and fracture toughness of weld metal of WWER-1000 reactor vessel welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubchenko, A.S.; Vasilchenko, G.S.; Starchenko, E.G.; Nosov, S.I.

    2004-01-01

    Welding of WWER-1000 reactor vessel of steel 15X2HMPHIA is performed using the C B -12X2H2MAA wire and PHI-16 or PHI-16A flux. Nickel content in the weld metal usually lays within the limits 1.2-1.9%. The experimental data is shown on the weld metal with the nickel contents 1.28-2.45% after irradiation with fluence up to 260.10 22 n/m 2 at energy more than 0.5 MEV. The embrittlement was measured by shift of critical brittleness temperature. Has appeared, that the weld metal with the low nickel content is the least responsive to irradiation embrittlement. The mechanical properties and fracture toughness of the weld metal with the contents of a nickel less than 1.3% are studied. Specimens CT-1T are tested, the 'master-curve', and its confidence bounds with probability of destruction 5 and 95% is built. 'Master-curve' in the specified confidence interval is affirmed by CT-4T specimens test data. Is shown, that the mechanical properties and fracture toughness of the weld metal with the contents of nickel less than 1.3% satisfy the normative requirements

  2. The Effect of Shielding N{sub 2} gas on The Pitting Corrosion of Seal-welded Super Austenitic Stainless Steel by Autogenous Welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Tae; Kim, Young Sik [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hyun Young [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Company, Gimcheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Many research efforts on the effect of nitrogen on the corrosion resistance of stainless steels have been reported, but little research has been conducted on the effect of nitrogen for the weldment of stainless steels by the seal-weld method. Therefore, this work focused on the determining the corrosion resistance of tube/tube sheet mock-up specimen for sea water condensers, and elucidating the effect of shielding nitrogen gas on its resistance. The pitting corrosion of autogenously welded specimen propagated preferentially along the dendritic structure. Regardless of the percent of shielding nitrogen gas, the analyzed nitrogen contents were very much lower than that of the bulk specimen. This can be arisen because the nitrogen in shielding gas may partly dissolve into the weldment, but simultaneously during the welding process, nitrogen in the alloy may escape into the atmosphere. However, the pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN) of the interdendrite area was higher than that of the dendrite arm, regardless of the shielding gas percent; and the PREN of the interdendrite area was higher than that of the base metal; the PREN of the dendrite arm was lower than that of the base metal because of the formation of (Cr, Mo) rich phases by welding.

  3. Prediction of Weld Residual Stress of Narrow Gap Welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jun Seog; Huh, Nam Su

    2010-01-01

    The conventional welding technique such as shield metal arc welding has been mostly applied to the piping system of the nuclear power plants. It is well known that this welding technique causes the overheating and welding defects due to the large groove angle of weld. On the other hand, the narrow gap welding(NGW) technique has many merits, for instance, the reduction of welding time, the shrinkage of weld and the small deformation of the weld due to the small groove angle and welding bead width comparing with the conventional welds. These characteristics of NGW affect the deformation behavior and the distribution of welding residual stress of NGW, thus it is believed that the residual stress results obtained from conventional welding procedure may not be applied to structural integrity evaluation of NGW. In this paper, the welding residual stress of NGW was predicted using the nonlinear finite element analysis to simulate the thermal and mechanical effects of the NGW. The present results can be used as the important information to perform the flaw evaluation and to improve the weld procedure of NGW

  4. Artificial neural networks application for modeling of friction stir welding effects on mechanical properties of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, E.

    2015-12-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new solid-state joining technique that is widely adopted in manufacturing and industry fields to join different metallic alloys that are hard to weld by conventional fusion welding. Friction stir welding is a very complex process comprising several highly coupled physical phenomena. The complex geometry of some kinds of joints makes it difficult to develop an overall governing equations system for theoretical behavior analyse of the friction stir welded joints. Weld quality is predominantly affected by welding effective parameters, and the experiments are often time consuming and costly. On the other hand, employing artificial intelligence (AI) systems such as artificial neural networks (ANNs) as an efficient approach to solve the science and engineering problems is considerable. In present study modeling of FSW effective parameters by ANNs is investigated. To train the networks, experimental test results on thirty AA-7075-T6 specimens are considered, and the networks are developed based on back propagation (BP) algorithm. ANNs testing are carried out using different experimental data that they are not used during networks training. In this paper, rotational speed of tool, welding speed, axial force, shoulder diameter, pin diameter and tool hardness are regarded as inputs of the ANNs. Yield strength, tensile strength, notch-tensile strength and hardness of welding zone are gathered as outputs of neural networks. According to the obtained results, predicted values for the hardness of welding zone, yield strength, tensile strength and notch-tensile strength have the least mean relative error (MRE), respectively. Comparison of the predicted and the experimental results confirms that the networks are adjusted carefully, and the ANN can be used for modeling of FSW effective parameters.

  5. Artificial neural networks application for modeling of friction stir welding effects on mechanical properties of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maleki, E

    2015-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new solid-state joining technique that is widely adopted in manufacturing and industry fields to join different metallic alloys that are hard to weld by conventional fusion welding. Friction stir welding is a very complex process comprising several highly coupled physical phenomena. The complex geometry of some kinds of joints makes it difficult to develop an overall governing equations system for theoretical behavior analyse of the friction stir welded joints. Weld quality is predominantly affected by welding effective parameters, and the experiments are often time consuming and costly. On the other hand, employing artificial intelligence (AI) systems such as artificial neural networks (ANNs) as an efficient approach to solve the science and engineering problems is considerable. In present study modeling of FSW effective parameters by ANNs is investigated. To train the networks, experimental test results on thirty AA-7075-T6 specimens are considered, and the networks are developed based on back propagation (BP) algorithm. ANNs testing are carried out using different experimental data that they are not used during networks training. In this paper, rotational speed of tool, welding speed, axial force, shoulder diameter, pin diameter and tool hardness are regarded as inputs of the ANNs. Yield strength, tensile strength, notch-tensile strength and hardness of welding zone are gathered as outputs of neural networks. According to the obtained results, predicted values for the hardness of welding zone, yield strength, tensile strength and notch-tensile strength have the least mean relative error (MRE), respectively. Comparison of the predicted and the experimental results confirms that the networks are adjusted carefully, and the ANN can be used for modeling of FSW effective parameters. (paper)

  6. Effect of FSW welding speed on microstructure and microhardness of Al-0.84Mg-0.69Si-0.76Fe alloy at moderate rotational tool velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chand, Suresh; Vineetha, S.; Madhusudhan, D.; Sai Krishna, CH; Kusuma Devi, G.; Bhawani; Hemarao, K.; Ganesh Naidu, G.

    2018-03-01

    The plate of 7.0 mm thickness was double side welded using friction stir welding is investigated. The rotational velocity of friction stir welding tool is used 1400 rpm. The influence of welding speed on the microstructure and microhardness values of Al-0.84Mg-0.69Si-0.76Fe aluminum alloy is presented. Two welding speeds 25 mm/min and 31.5 mm/min are used. The microhardness values of friction stir weld are measured at various locations from the weld interface. The microhardness values in stir zone of weld are found larger than lower welding speed at constant rotational velocity of 1400 rpm of friction stir welding tool. The similar effects on microhardness values are found in the thermo-mechanically affected zone and heat affected zone. The fine microstructure is observed at 31.5 mm/min welding speed compared to the 25 mm/min welding speed at 1400 rpm.

  7. In-field Welding and Coating Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-12

    Gas Technology Institute (GTI) and Edison Welding Institute (EWI) created both laboratory and infield girth weld samples to evaluate the effects of weld geometry and hydrogen off-gassing on the performance of protective coatings. Laboratory made plat...

  8. Improvements in and relating to welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, B.D.

    1979-01-01

    This invention concerns apparatus for use in welding, particularly welding which must be effected in a predetermined, for example, inert atmosphere, e.g. the welding of reactive materials such as zircaloy, titanium, magnesium, aluminium, etc. (U.K.)

  9. Identification of the Thickness of Nugget on Worksheet Spot Welding Using Non Destructive Test (NDT) - Effect of Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifa, A.; Baskoro, A. S.; Sugeng, S.; Badruzzaman, B.; Endramawan, T.

    2018-02-01

    Resistance Spot Welding (RSW) is a process of connecting between two worksheet with thermomechanical loading process, RSW is widely used in automotive industry, the quality of splicing spot welding is influenced by several factors. One of the factors at the time of the welding process is pressure. The quality of welding on the nuggets can be determined by undertaking non-destructive testing by using Non Destructive Test (NDT) - Ultrasonic Test. In the NDT test is done by detecting the thickness of the nugget area, the purpose of research conducted to determine the effect of pressure to welding quality with Nugget thickness gauge measurement with Non Destructive Test method and manual measurement with micrometer, Experimental welding process by entering the welding parameters that have been specified and pressure variables 1 -5 bars on the worksheet thickness of 1 mm. The results of testing with NDT show there is addition of thickness in nugget superiority after compare with measurement result of thickness of nugget with micrometer which slightly experience thickness in nugget area, this indicates that the welding results have a connection between worksheet 1 and worksheet 2.

  10. Effect of friction time on the microstructure and mechanic properties of friction welded AISI 1040/Duplex stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İhsan Kırık

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect on the characteristic microstructure and mechanic properties of friction time on the couple steels AISI 1040/AISI 2205 stainless steel joining with friction welding method was experimentally investigated. Friction welding experiment were carried out in privately prepared PLC controlled continuous friction welding machine by us. Joints were carried out under 1700 rpm rotation speed, with 30MPa process friction pressure, 60MPa forging pressure, 4 second forging pressure and under 3, 5, 7, 9 and 11 second friction time, respectively. After friction welding, the bonding interface microstructures of the specimens were examined by SEM microscopy and EDS analysis. After weld microhardness and tensile strength of specimens were carried out. The result of applied tests and observations pointed out that the properties of microstructure were changed with friction time increased. The excellent tensile strength of joint observed on 1700 rpm rotation speed and 3 second friction time sample.

  11. Effect of Pre/Post T6 Heat Treatment on the Mechanical Properties of Laser Welded SSM Cast A356 Aluminium Alloy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Akhter, R

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available HT) were butt welded, using an Nd: YAG laser. In another experiment, as cast welded samples were heat treated to T6 condition (post HT). The base metal and weld microstructures were presented. The effect of heat treatments on microstructure...

  12. Effective dose in SMAW and FCAW welding processes using rutile consumables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz, M; Rozas, S; Idoeta, R; Alegría, N

    2014-03-01

    The shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and flux cored arc welding (FCAW) processes use covered electrodes and flux cored wire as consumables. Among these consumables, ones containing rutile are the most widely used, and since they have a considerable natural radioactive content, they can be considered as NORM (naturally occurring radioactive material). To calculate the effective dose on workers during their use in a conservative situation, samples of slag and aerosols and particles emitted or deposited during welding were taken and measured by gamma, alpha and beta spectrometry. An analytical method was also developed for estimating the activity concentration of radionuclides in the inhaled air. (222)Rn activity concentration was also assessed. With all these data, internal and external doses were calculated. The results show that external doses are negligible in comparison with internal ones, which do not exceed 1 mSv yr(-1), either in this conservative situation or in any other more favourable one. Radionuclides after Rn in the radioactive natural series are emitted at the same activity concentration to the atmosphere, this being around 17 times higher than that corresponding to radionuclides before Rn. Taking into account these conclusions and the analytical method developed, it can be concluded that one way to assess the activity concentration of natural radionuclides in inhaled air and hence effective doses could be the early gamma-ray spectrometry of aerosols and particles sampled during the welding process.

  13. Welding hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Welding technology is advancing rapidly in the developed countries and has converted into a science. Welding involving the use of electricity include resistance welding. Welding shops are opened in residential area, which was causing safety hazards, particularly the teenagers and children who eagerly see the welding arc with their naked eyes. There are radiation hazards from ultra violet rays which irritate the skin, eye irritation. Welding arc light of such intensity could damage the eyes. (Orig./A.B.)

  14. Effects of surface coating on weld growth of resistance spot-welded hot-stamped boron steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Chang Wook; Lee, Hyun Ju; Kim, Yang Do; Jo, Il Guk; Choi, Il Dong; Park, Yeong Do

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum-silicon-based and zinc-based metallic coatings have been widely used for hot-stamped boron steel in automotive applications. In this study, resistance spot weldability was explored by investigating the effects of the properties of metallic coating layers on heat development and nugget growth during resistance spot welding. In the case of the aluminum-silicon-coated hot-stamped boron steel, the intermetallic coating transformed into a liquid film that covered the faying interface. A wide, weldable current range was obtained with slow heat development because of low contact resistance and large current passage. In the case of the zinc-coated hot-stamped boron steel, a buildup of liquid and vapor formation under large vapor pressure was observed at the faying interface because of the high contact resistance and low vaporization temperature of the intermetallic layers. With rapid heat development, the current passage was narrow because of the limited continuous layer at the faying interface. A more significant change in nugget growth was observed in the zinc coated hot-stamped boron steel than in the aluminum-silicon-coated hot-stamped boron steel.

  15. Feasibility evaluations for the integration of laser butt welding of tubes in industrial pipe coil production lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penasa, Mauro; Colombo, Enrico; Giolfo, Mauro

    1994-09-01

    Due to the good performance shown by laser welded joints, to the quality and repeatability achievable by this welding technique and to its high process productivity, a feature inherent to the laser technology which, together with its high flexibility, allows different operations to be performed by a single source, consistent savings in a production line may be obtained. Therefore laser welding techniques may be of high relevance for industrial applications, provided that a sufficient attention is paid to avoiding a low utilization time to the operating laser source. The paper describes a feasibility study for the integration of a laser source as an automatic unit for circumferential butt welding of tubes in production lines of pipe coils, just before the cold bending station. Using a 6 kW CO2 source, thickness ranging from 3.5 to 11.2 mm in carbon, low alloyed Cr-Mo and austenitic stainless steels, have been successfully welded. Cr-Mo steels require on line preheating treatment, which however can be achieved by laser defocused passes just before welding. The results of the preliminary qualification performed on laser welded joints of the involved topologies of product (materials, diameters and thicknesses) are described together with technological tests required for approval: laser circumferential butt welding of tubes has proven to be effective, with satisfactory and repeatable results and good joint performances. An exhaustive comparison with current welding techniques (TIG, MIG) is then carried out, along with a detailed analysis of the potential advantages and benefits which may be expected by using the laser welding technique, as well as with a first estimation of the investments and running costs. Since laser productivity is saturated only at a rough 35% during the year, an accurate analysis of other possible applications and of a possible lay out of a laser working cell integrated in the factory production lines is performed. Usually little attention is

  16. Effects of Sc and Zr on mechanical property and microstructure of tungsten inert gas and friction stir welded aerospace high strength Al–Zn–Mg alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Ying, E-mail: csudengying@163.com [School of Metallurgy and Environment, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory for Power Metallurgy, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); Peng, Bing [School of Metallurgy and Environment, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); Xu, Guofu, E-mail: csuxgf66@csu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory for Power Metallurgy, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); Pan, Qinglin; Yin, Zhimin; Ye, Rui [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); Wang, Yingjun; Lu, Liying [Northeast Light Alloy Co. Ltd., Hei Longjiang, Harbin 150060 (China)

    2015-07-15

    New aerospace high strength Al–Zn–Mg and Al–Zn–Mg–0.25Sc–0.10Zr (wt%) alloys were welded by tungsten inert gas (TIG) process using a new Al–6.0Mg–0.25Sc–0.10Zr (wt%) filler material, and friction stir welding (FSW) process, respectively. Mechanical property and microstructure of the welded joints were investigated comparatively by tensile tests and microscopy methods. The results show that Sc and Zr can improve the yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of Al–Zn–Mg alloy by 59 MPa (23.3%) and 16 MPa (4.0%) in TIG welded joints, and by 77 MPa (23.8%) and 54 MPa (11.9%) in FSW welded joints, respectively. The ultimate tensile strength and elongation of new Al–Zn–Mg–Sc–Zr alloy FSW welded joint are 506±4 MPa and 6.34±0.2%, respectively, showing superior post welded performance. Mechanical property of welded joint is mainly controlled by its “weakest microstructural zone”. TIG welded Al–Zn–Mg and Al–Zn–Mg–Sc–Zr alloys reinforced with weld bead both failed at fusion boundaries. Secondary Al{sub 3}Sc{sub x}Zr{sub 1−x} particles originally present in parent alloy coarsen during TIG welding process, but they can restrain the grain growth and recrystallization here, thus improving welding performance. For two FSW welded joints, fracture occurred in weld nugget zone. Secondary Al{sub 3}Sc{sub x}Zr{sub 1−x} nano-particles almost can keep unchangeable size (20–40 nm) across the entire FSW welded joint, and thus provide effective Orowan strengthening, grain boundary strengthening and substructure strengthening to strengthen FSW joints. The positive effect from Sc and Zr additions into base metals can be better preserved by FSW process than by TIG welding process.

  17. Effects of Sc and Zr on mechanical property and microstructure of tungsten inert gas and friction stir welded aerospace high strength Al–Zn–Mg alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Ying; Peng, Bing; Xu, Guofu; Pan, Qinglin; Yin, Zhimin; Ye, Rui; Wang, Yingjun; Lu, Liying

    2015-01-01

    New aerospace high strength Al–Zn–Mg and Al–Zn–Mg–0.25Sc–0.10Zr (wt%) alloys were welded by tungsten inert gas (TIG) process using a new Al–6.0Mg–0.25Sc–0.10Zr (wt%) filler material, and friction stir welding (FSW) process, respectively. Mechanical property and microstructure of the welded joints were investigated comparatively by tensile tests and microscopy methods. The results show that Sc and Zr can improve the yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of Al–Zn–Mg alloy by 59 MPa (23.3%) and 16 MPa (4.0%) in TIG welded joints, and by 77 MPa (23.8%) and 54 MPa (11.9%) in FSW welded joints, respectively. The ultimate tensile strength and elongation of new Al–Zn–Mg–Sc–Zr alloy FSW welded joint are 506±4 MPa and 6.34±0.2%, respectively, showing superior post welded performance. Mechanical property of welded joint is mainly controlled by its “weakest microstructural zone”. TIG welded Al–Zn–Mg and Al–Zn–Mg–Sc–Zr alloys reinforced with weld bead both failed at fusion boundaries. Secondary Al 3 Sc x Zr 1−x particles originally present in parent alloy coarsen during TIG welding process, but they can restrain the grain growth and recrystallization here, thus improving welding performance. For two FSW welded joints, fracture occurred in weld nugget zone. Secondary Al 3 Sc x Zr 1−x nano-particles almost can keep unchangeable size (20–40 nm) across the entire FSW welded joint, and thus provide effective Orowan strengthening, grain boundary strengthening and substructure strengthening to strengthen FSW joints. The positive effect from Sc and Zr additions into base metals can be better preserved by FSW process than by TIG welding process

  18. Characterization of Residual Stress Effects on Fatigue Crack Growth of a Friction Stir Welded Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, John A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Seshadri, Banavara R.; James, Mark A.; Brazill, Richard L.; Schultz, Robert W.; Donald, J. Keith; Blair, Amy

    2015-01-01

    An on-line compliance-based method to account for residual stress effects in stress-intensity factor and fatigue crack growth property determinations has been evaluated. Residual stress intensity factor results determined from specimens containing friction stir weld induced residual stresses are presented, and the on-line method results were found to be in excellent agreement with residual stress-intensity factor data obtained using the cut compliance method. Variable stress-intensity factor tests were designed to demonstrate that a simple superposition model, summing the applied stress-intensity factor with the residual stress-intensity factor, can be used to determine the total crack-tip stress-intensity factor. Finite element, VCCT (virtual crack closure technique), and J-integral analysis methods have been used to characterize weld-induced residual stress using thermal expansion/contraction in the form of an equivalent delta T (change in local temperature during welding) to simulate the welding process. This equivalent delta T was established and applied to analyze different specimen configurations to predict residual stress distributions and associated residual stress-intensity factor values. The predictions were found to agree well with experimental results obtained using the crack- and cut-compliance methods.

  19. Effect of friction stir lap welding conditions on joint strength of aluminium alloy 6060

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yazdanian, S; Chen, Z W

    2009-01-01

    Strength of lap joints made by friction stir welding (FSW) depends strongly on how material flows forming the weld nugget zone during FSW and also on how the joint is loaded during testing. Understanding of this processing-property relationship is currently inadequate. In this study, the effects of pin length, welding speed and rotation rate on weld strength using aluminium alloy 6060 were investigated. It has been found that the pin length needed to be slightly greater than the thickness of the sheet for an adequate joint to be established. However, further increase in pin length did not benefit the joint strength. The major factor affecting joint strength has been found to be the rotation speed. An increase in rotation speed resulted in lowering the joint strength. Various modes of fracture have been observed and these modes relate to the degree of hooking and softening. Explanation of how the speed values relate to heat input and material flow and then to the joint strength is given.

  20. The minimum information about a genome sequence (MIGS) specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Dawn; Garrity, George; Gray, Tanya; Morrison, Norman; Selengut, Jeremy; Sterk, Peter; Tatusova, Tatiana; Thomson, Nicholas; Allen, Michael J; Angiuoli, Samuel V; Ashburner, Michael; Axelrod, Nelson; Baldauf, Sandra; Ballard, Stuart; Boore, Jeffrey; Cochrane, Guy; Cole, James; Dawyndt, Peter; De Vos, Paul; dePamphilis, Claude; Edwards, Robert; Faruque, Nadeem; Feldman, Robert; Gilbert, Jack; Gilna, Paul; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Goldstein, Philip; Guralnick, Robert; Haft, Dan; Hancock, David; Hermjakob, Henning; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Hugenholtz, Phil; Joint, Ian; Kagan, Leonid; Kane, Matthew; Kennedy, Jessie; Kowalchuk, George; Kottmann, Renzo; Kolker, Eugene; Kravitz, Saul; Kyrpides, Nikos; Leebens-Mack, Jim; Lewis, Suzanna E; Li, Kelvin; Lister, Allyson L; Lord, Phillip; Maltsev, Natalia; Markowitz, Victor; Martiny, Jennifer; Methe, Barbara; Mizrachi, Ilene; Moxon, Richard; Nelson, Karen; Parkhill, Julian; Proctor, Lita; White, Owen; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Spiers, Andrew; Stevens, Robert; Swift, Paul; Taylor, Chris; Tateno, Yoshio; Tett, Adrian; Turner, Sarah; Ussery, David; Vaughan, Bob; Ward, Naomi; Whetzel, Trish; Gil, Ingio San; Wilson, Gareth; Wipat, Anil

    2008-01-01

    With the quantity of genomic data increasing at an exponential rate, it is imperative that these data be captured electronically, in a standard format. Standardization activities must proceed within the auspices of open-access and international working bodies. To tackle the issues surrounding the development of better descriptions of genomic investigations, we have formed the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC). Here, we introduce the minimum information about a genome sequence (MIGS) specification with the intent of promoting participation in its development and discussing the resources that will be required to develop improved mechanisms of metadata capture and exchange. As part of its wider goals, the GSC also supports improving the ‘transparency’ of the information contained in existing genomic databases. PMID:18464787

  1. The minimum information about a genome sequence (MIGS) specification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Field, D; Garrity, G; Gray, T

    2008-01-01

    With the quantity of genomic data increasing at an exponential rate, it is imperative that these data be captured electronically, in a standard format. Standardization activities must proceed within the auspices of open-access and international working bodies. To tackle the issues surrounding the...... that will be required to develop improved mechanisms of metadata capture and exchange. As part of its wider goals, the GSC also supports improving the 'transparency' of the information contained in existing genomic databases....... the development of better descriptions of genomic investigations, we have formed the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC). Here, we introduce the minimum information about a genome sequence (MIGS) specification with the intent of promoting participation in its development and discussing the resources...

  2. Residual stress by repair welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Masahito; Toyoda, Masao

    2003-01-01

    Residual stress by repair welds is computed using the thermal elastic-plastic analysis with phase-transformation effect. Coupling phenomena of temperature, microstructure, and stress-strain fields are simulated in the finite-element analysis. Weld bond of a plate butt-welded joint is gouged and then deposited by weld metal in repair process. Heat source is synchronously moved with the deposition of the finite-element as the weld deposition. Microstructure is considered by using CCT diagram and the transformation behavior in the repair weld is also simulated. The effects of initial stress, heat input, and weld length on residual stress distribution are studied from the organic results of numerical analysis. Initial residual stress before repair weld has no influence on the residual stress after repair treatment near weld metal, because the initial stress near weld metal releases due to high temperature of repair weld and then stress by repair weld regenerates. Heat input has an effect for residual stress distribution, for not its magnitude but distribution zone. Weld length should be considered reducing the magnitude of residual stress in the edge of weld bead; short bead induces high tensile residual stress. (author)

  3. Metallurgical Effects of Shunting Current on Resistance Spot-Welded Joints of AA2219 Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari Vardanjani, M.; Araee, A.; Senkara, J.; Jakubowski, J.; Godek, J.

    2016-08-01

    Shunting effect is the loss of electrical current via the secondary circuit provided due to the existence of previous nugget in a series of welding spots. This phenomenon influences on metallurgical aspects of resistance spot-welded (RSW) joints in terms of quality and performance. In this paper RSW joints of AA2219 sheets with 1 mm thickness are investigated metallurgically for shunted and single spots. An electro-thermal finite element analysis is performed on the RSW process of shunted spot and temperature distribution and variation are obtained. These predictions are then compared with experimental micrographs. Three values of 5 mm, 20 mm, and infinite (i.e., single spot) are assumed for welding distance. Numerical and experimental results are matching each other in terms of nugget and HAZ geometry as increasing distance raised nugget size and symmetry of HAZ. In addition, important effect of shunting current on nugget thickness, microstructure, and Copper segregation on HAZ grain boundaries were discovered. A quantitative analysis is also performed about the influence of welding distance on important properties including ratio of nugget thickness and diameter ( r t), ratio of HAZ area on shunted and free side of nugget ( r HA), and ratio of equivalent segregated and total amount of Copper, measured in sample ( r Cu) on HAZ. Increasing distance from 5 mm to infinite, indicated a gain of 111.04, -45.55, and -75.15% in r t, r HA, and r Cu, respectively, while obtained ratios for 20 mm welding distance was suitable compared to single spot.

  4. Effect of Post-weld Heat Treatment on the Mechanical Properties of Supermartensitic Stainless Steel Deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappa, Sebastián; Svoboda, Hernán; Surian, Estela

    2017-02-01

    Supermartensitic stainless steels have good weldability and adequate tensile property, toughness and corrosion resistance. They have been developed as an alternative technology, mainly for oil and gas industries. The final properties of a supermartensitic stainless steel deposit depend on its chemical composition and microstructure: martensite, tempered martensite, ferrite, retained austenite and carbides and/or nitrides. In these steels, the post-weld heat treatments (PWHTs) are usually double tempering ones, to ensure both complete tempering of martensite and high austenite content, to increase toughness and decrease hardness. The aim of this work was to study the effect of post-weld heat treatments (solution treatment with single and double tempering) on the mechanical properties of a supermartensitic stainless steel deposit. An all-weld metal test coupon was welded according to standard ANSI/AWS A5.22-95 using a GMAW supermartensitic stainless steel metal cored wire, under gas shielding. PWHTs were carried out varying the temperature of the first tempering treatment with and without a second tempering one, after solution treatment. All-weld metal chemical composition analysis, metallurgical characterization, hardness and tensile property measurements and Charpy-V tests were carried out. There are several factors which can be affected by the PWHTs, among them austenite content is a significant one. Different austenite contents (0-42%) were found. Microhardness, tensile property and toughness were affected with up to 15% of austenite content, by martensite tempering and carbide precipitation. The second tempering treatment seemed not to have had an important effect on the mechanical properties measured in this work.

  5. Effect of technological procedures on the crack resistance of nickel alloy welded joints under heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagdasarov, Yu.S.; Sorokin, L.I.; Yakushin, B.F.; Moryashchev, S.F.

    1983-01-01

    Comparison of the efficiency of some technological procedures directed to the increase of crack resistance of KhN50MBKTYUR (EhP99) alloy welded joints under heat treatment was conducted. Welded joints were manufactured by the methods of electron beam welding, laser welding, automatic argon-arc welding. The latter was conducted by conventional technology as well as with electromagnetic mixing of liquid metal of welding bath, with compulsory cooling of weld matal, with pulse arc. It is shown that the high fracture resistance of welded joints, manufactured by electron beam and laser welding is achieved by combination of high mechanical properties of heat affected zone metal and reduced elastic potential energy margin of residual welding stresses (as compared to argon-arc welding)

  6. Effects of conventional welding and laser welding on the tensile strength, ultimate tensile strength and surface characteristics of two cobalt-chromium alloys: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhan Kumar, Seenivasan; Sethumadhava, Jayesh Raghavendra; Anand Kumar, Vaidyanathan; Manita, Grover

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of laser welding and conventional welding on the tensile strength and ultimate tensile strength of the cobalt-chromium alloy. Samples were prepared with two commercially available cobalt-chromium alloys (Wironium plus and Diadur alloy). The samples were sectioned and the broken fragments were joined using Conventional and Laser welding techniques. The welded joints were subjected to tensile and ultimate tensile strength testing; and scanning electron microscope to evaluate the surface characteristics at the welded site. Both on laser welding as well as on conventional welding technique, Diadur alloy samples showed lesser values when tested for tensile and ultimate tensile strength when compared to Wironium alloy samples. Under the scanning electron microscope, the laser welded joints show uniform welding and continuous molt pool all over the surface with less porosity than the conventionally welded joints. Laser welding is an advantageous method of connecting or repairing cast metal prosthetic frameworks.

  7. Effects of nitrogen in shielding gas on microstructure evolution and localized corrosion behavior of duplex stainless steel welding joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Jing, Hongyang; Xu, Lianyong; Han, Yongdian; Zhao, Lei; Zhou, Chao

    2017-05-01

    The effects of nitrogen addition in shielding gas on microstructure evolution and localized corrosion behavior of duplex stainless steel (DSS) welds were studied. N2-supplemented shielding gas facilitated the primary austenite formation, suppressed the Cr2N precipitation in weld root, and increased the microhardnesses of weld metal. Furthermore, N2-supplemented shielding gas increased pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN) of austenite, but which decreased slightly PREN of ferrite. The modified double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation in 2 M H2SO4 + 1 M HCl was an effective method to study the localized corrosion of the different zones in the DSS welds. The adding 2% N2 to pure Ar shielding gas improved the localized corrosion resistance in the DSS welds, which was due to compensation for nitrogen loss and promoting nitrogen further solution in the austenite phases, suppression of the Cr2N precipitation in the weld root, and increase of primary austenite content with higher PREN than the ferrite and secondary austenite. Secondary austenite are prone to selective corrosion because of lower PREN compared with ferrite and primary austenite. Cr2N precipitation in the pure Ar shielding weld root and heat affected zone caused the pitting corrosion within the ferrite and the intergranular corrosion at the ferrite boundary. In addition, sigma and M23C6 precipitation resulted in the intergranular corrosion at the ferrite boundary.

  8. Coefficient of restitution and plastic strain for impact of elements welded with micro-jet cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian HADRYŚ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of investigations is the qualification how post-accident repair of model car body parts influence on the value of coefficient of restitution. Evaluation of impact energy absorption by model car body parts repaired with MIG welding (with and without micro-jet cooling was carried out. The results of investigations present that the value of coefficient of restitution changes with speed of impact. Coefficient of restitution is bigger for elements welded with micro-jet cooling than for element welded with ordinary method. This could have influence on passive safety of vehicle.

  9. Investigação e desenvolvimento do processo MIG/MAG com arame adicional

    OpenAIRE

    Mogrovejo, Miguel Guayasamin

    2014-01-01

    Dissertação (mestrado) - Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Centro Tecnológico, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Engenharia Mecânica, Florianópolis, 2014 Este trabalho apresenta as relações e aspectos técnicos para desenvolvimento de uma variante do processo MIG/MAG que procura o incremento da produtividade sem comprometer a qualidade. A base da questão é o fato de que no processo MIG/MAG na configuração convencional, apesar de suas nuances de versões como o MIG/MAG CC- ou MIG/MAG CA, a r...

  10. Alleviation of glucose repression of maltose metabolism by MIG1 disruption in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Christopher; Olsson, Lisbeth; Rønnow, B.

    1996-01-01

    The MIG1 gene was disrupted in a haploid laboratory strain (B224) and in an industrial polyploid strain (DGI 342) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The alleviation of glucose repression of the expression of MAL genes and alleviation of glucose control of maltose metabolism were investigated in batch...... cultivations on glucose-maltose mixtures. In the MIG1-disrupted haploid strain, glucose repression was partly alleviated; i.e., maltose metabolism was initiated at higher glucose concentrations than in the corresponding wild-type strain. In contrast, the polyploid Delta mig1 strain exhibited an even more...... stringent glucose control of maltose metabolism than the corresponding wild-type strain, which could be explained by a more rigid catabolite inactivation of maltose permease, affecting the uptake of maltose. Growth on the glucose-sucrose mixture showed that the polyploid Delta mig1 strain was relieved...

  11. Effect of residual stress on fatigue crack propagation at 200 C in a welded joint austenitic stainless steel - ferritic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahouane, A.I.; Gauthier, J.P.; Petrequin, P.

    1988-01-01

    Fatigue resistance of heterogeneous welded joints between austenitic stainless steels and ferritic steels is evaluated for reactor components and more particularly effect of residual stress on fatigue crack propagation in a heterogeneous welded joint. Residual stress is measured by the hole method in which a hole is drilled through the center of a strain gage glued the surface of the materials. In the non uniform stress field a transmissibility function is used for residual stress calculation. High compression residual stress in the ferritic metal near the interface ferritic steel/weld slow down fatigue crack propagation. 5 tabs., 15 figs., 19 refs [fr

  12. Tool material effect on the friction stir butt welding of AA2124-T4 Alloy Matrix MMC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Bozkurt

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present work is to study on the effect of material properties tool on friction stir butt welding of AA2124-T4 alloy matrix MMC. Uncoated tool, coated tool with a CrN, and coated tool with AlTiN were used to weld aluminum MMC plates. Macrostructure and microstructure observations, ultimate tensile strength, wear resistance, and chemical analysis were carried out to determine the appropriate tool for joining these composite plates. Results showed that the good welded joints could be obtained when a tool is coated with AlTiN.

  13. Effects of Ultrasonic Nanocrystal Surface Modification on the Residual Stress, Microstructure, and Corrosion Resistance of 304 Stainless Steel Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chang; Telang, Abhishek; Gill, Amrinder; Wen, Xingshuo; Mannava, Seetha R.; Qian, Dong; Vasudevan, Vijay K.

    2018-03-01

    In this study, ultrasonic nanocrystal surface modification (UNSM) of 304 stainless steel welds was carried out. UNSM effectively eliminates the tensile stress generated during welding and imparts beneficial compressive residual stresses. In addition, UNSM can effectively refine the grains and increase hardness in the near-surface region. Corrosion tests in boiling MgCl2 solution demonstrate that UNSM can significantly improve the corrosion resistance due to the compressive residual stresses and changes in the near-surface microstructure.

  14. Effect of water-cooling treatment times on properties of friction stir welded joints of 7N01-T4 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T. H.; Wang, Y.; Fang, X. F.; Liang, P.; Zhao, Y.; Li, Y. H.; Liu, X. M.

    2018-02-01

    Due to the deformation caused by residual stress in the welding process, welded components need treatment to reduce welding distortion. In this paper, several different times of flame-heating and water-cooling treatment were subjected to the friction stir welding joints of 15mm thick 7N01P-T4 aluminum alloy sheets to study the microstructure variation of friction stir welding joints of 7N01P-T4 aluminum alloy, and to analyze the effect on micro-hardness, tensile and fracture mechanical properties. This investigation will be helpful to optimize treatment methods and provide instruction on industrial production.

  15. Effects of thermal aging on microstructures of low alloy steel–Ni base alloy dissimilar metal weld interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Jong Jin; Lee, Bong Ho; Bahn, Chi Bum; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the advanced instrumental analysis has been performed to investigate the effect of long-term thermal aging on the microstructural evolution in the fusion boundary region between weld metal and low alloy steel in dissimilar metal welds. A representative dissimilar weld mock-up made of Alloy 690-Alloy 152-A533 Gr. B was fabricated and aged at 450 °C for 2750 h. The micro- and nano-scale characterization were conducted mainly near in a weld root region by using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and three dimensional atom probe tomography. It was observed that the weld root was generally divided into several regions including dilution zone in the Ni-base alloy weld metal, fusion boundary, and heat-affected zone in the low alloy steel. A steep gradient was shown in the chemical composition profile across the interface between A533 Gr. B and Alloy 152. The precipitation of carbides was also observed along and near the fusion boundary of as-welded and aged dissimilar metal joints. It was also found that the precipitation of Cr carbides was enhanced by the thermal aging near the fusion boundary

  16. Effects of thermal aging on microstructures of low alloy steel–Ni base alloy dissimilar metal weld interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Jong Jin [Interdisciplinary School of Green Energy, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), 100 Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Bong Ho [National Center for Nanomaterials Technology (NCNT), Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), 77 Cheongam-ro, Nam-gu, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Bahn, Chi Bum [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Kim, Ji Hyun, E-mail: kimjh@unist.ac.kr [Interdisciplinary School of Green Energy, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), 100 Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this study, the advanced instrumental analysis has been performed to investigate the effect of long-term thermal aging on the microstructural evolution in the fusion boundary region between weld metal and low alloy steel in dissimilar metal welds. A representative dissimilar weld mock-up made of Alloy 690-Alloy 152-A533 Gr. B was fabricated and aged at 450 °C for 2750 h. The micro- and nano-scale characterization were conducted mainly near in a weld root region by using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and three dimensional atom probe tomography. It was observed that the weld root was generally divided into several regions including dilution zone in the Ni-base alloy weld metal, fusion boundary, and heat-affected zone in the low alloy steel. A steep gradient was shown in the chemical composition profile across the interface between A533 Gr. B and Alloy 152. The precipitation of carbides was also observed along and near the fusion boundary of as-welded and aged dissimilar metal joints. It was also found that the precipitation of Cr carbides was enhanced by the thermal aging near the fusion boundary.

  17. Microstructural transformations and mechanical properties of cast NiAl bronze: Effects of fusion welding and friction stir processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, M.D.; Swaminathan, S.; Zhilyaev, A.P.; McNelley, T.R.

    2007-01-01

    A plate of as-cast NiAl bronze (NAB) material was sectioned from a large casting. A six-pass fusion weld overlay was placed in a machined groove; a portion of the weld reinforcement was removed by milling and a single friction stir processing (FSP) pass was conducted in a direction transverse to the axis of and over the weld overlay. A procedure was developed for machining of miniature tensile samples and the distributions of strength and ductility were evaluated for the fusion weld metal; for the stir zone (SZ) produced by the friction stir processing; and for a region wherein friction stir processing had taken place over the fusion weld. A region of low ductility in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the fusion weld and in the thermomechanically affected zone (TMAZ) of friction stir processed material was attributed to partial reversion of an equilibrium lamellar eutectoid constituent upon local heating above ∼800 deg. C and formation of non-equilibrium transformation products upon subsequent cooling. The adverse effect on ductility is worse in the heat affected zone of the fusion weld than in the thermomechanically affected zone of friction stir processing due to the lower heat input of the latter process. The implications of this work to engineering applications of friction stir processing are discussed

  18. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  19. Modeling and analyzing the effects of heat treatment on the characteristics of magnesium alloy joint welded by the tungsten-arc inert gas welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Te-Chang; Chou, Chih-Chung; Tsai, Deng-Maw; Chiang, Ko-Ta

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The mathematical model was provided to study the effect of heat treatment on the magnesium alloy welded joint. → The solution strengthening effect of β-phase Mg 17 Al 12 gain promotes the strengthening matrix and ductility of hcp-α-phase Mg. → The average size and proportion of α-phase Mg grain decreases with the increase of the tempering time and temperature. → An increase in the high value of tempering temperature and tempering time leads to increase the maximum tensile strength. → The values of the elongation increases with increasing in both the value of tempering temperature and tempering time. -- Abstract: The objective of this paper is to present the mathematical models for modeling and analysis of the effects of heat treatment on the characteristics of magnesium alloy joint welded by the tungsten-arc inert gas (TIG) welding. The process of heat treatment adopts the tempering process with varying processing parameters, including tempering temperature and tempering time. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the welded joint are considered in the characteristic evaluation and explored by experiment. An experimental plan of the face-centered central composite design (CCD) based on the response surface methodology (RSM) has been employed to carry out the experimental study. The results of analysis of variance (ANOVA) and comparisons of experimental data show that the mathematical models of the value of the maximum tensile strength and elongation are fairly well fitted with the experimental values with a 95% confidence interval. In the tempering process, the microstructure of welded joint in the weld bead displays two main microstructures of hcp-α-phase Mg and bcc-β-phase Mg 17 Al 12 . Results show that the average size and proportion of α-phase Mg grains decreases with the increase of the tempering time and temperature. But, the increase of the tempering time and temperature promote increasing the average size and

  20. Automatization of welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwabuchi, Masashi; Tomita, Jinji; Nishihara, Katsunori.

    1978-01-01

    Automatization of welding is one of the effective measures for securing high degree of quality of nuclear power equipment, as well as for correspondence to the environment at the site of plant. As the latest ones of the automatic welders practically used for welding of nuclear power apparatuses in factories of Toshiba and IHI, those for pipes and lining tanks are described here. The pipe welder performs the battering welding on the inside of pipe end as the so-called IGSCC countermeasure and the succeeding butt welding through the same controller. The lining tank welder is able to perform simultaneous welding of two parallel weld lines on a large thin plate lining tank. Both types of the welders are demonstrating excellent performance at the shops as well as at the plant site. (author)

  1. Effect of beam oscillation on borated stainless steel electron beam welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RajaKumar, Guttikonda [Tagore Engineering College, Chennai (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Ram, G.D. Janaki [Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Chennai (India). Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering; Rao, S.R. Koteswara [SSN College of Engineering, Chennai (India). Mechanical Engineering

    2015-07-01

    Borated stainless steels are used in nuclear power plants to control neutron criticality in reactors as control rods, shielding material, spent fuel storage racks and transportation casks. In this study, bead on plate welds were made using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and electron beam welding (EBW) processes. Electron beam welds made using beam oscillation technique exhibited higher tensile strength values compared to that of GTA welds. Electron beam welds were found to show fine dendritic microstructure while GTA welds exhibited larger dendrites. While both processes produced defect free welds, GTA welds are marked by partially melted zone (PMZ) where the hardness is low. EBW obviate the PMZ failure due to low heat input and in case of high heat input GTA welding process failure occurs in the PMZ.

  2. Effect of beam oscillation on borated stainless steel electron beam welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RajaKumar, Guttikonda; Ram, G.D. Janaki; Rao, S.R. Koteswara

    2015-01-01

    Borated stainless steels are used in nuclear power plants to control neutron criticality in reactors as control rods, shielding material, spent fuel storage racks and transportation casks. In this study, bead on plate welds were made using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and electron beam welding (EBW) processes. Electron beam welds made using beam oscillation technique exhibited higher tensile strength values compared to that of GTA welds. Electron beam welds were found to show fine dendritic microstructure while GTA welds exhibited larger dendrites. While both processes produced defect free welds, GTA welds are marked by partially melted zone (PMZ) where the hardness is low. EBW obviate the PMZ failure due to low heat input and in case of high heat input GTA welding process failure occurs in the PMZ.

  3. Effect of Mg and Cu on mechanical properties of high-strength welded joints of aluminum alloys obtained by laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annin, B. D.; Fomin, V. M.; Karpov, E. V.; Malikov, A. G.; Orishich, A. M.

    2017-09-01

    Results of experimental investigations of welded joints of high-strength aluminum-lithium alloys of the Al-Cu-Li and Al-Mg-Li systems are reported. The welded joints are obtained by means of laser welding and are subjected to various types of processing for obtaining high-strength welded joints. A microstructural analysis is performed. The phase composition and mechanical properties of the welded joints before and after heat treatment are studied. It is found that combined heat treatment of the welded joint (annealing, quenching, and artificial ageing) increases the joint strength, but appreciably decreases the alloy strength outside the region thermally affected by the welding process.

  4. Effect of Inhibitors on Weld Corrosion under Sweet Conditions Using Flow Channel

    OpenAIRE

    Khaled Alawadhi; Abdulkareem Aloraier; Suraj Joshi; Jalal Alsarraf

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to compare the effectiveness and electrochemical behavior of typical oilfield corrosion inhibitors with previous oilfield corrosion inhibitors under the same electrochemical techniques to control preferential weld corrosion of X65 pipeline steel in artificial seawater saturated with carbon dioxide at a pressure of one bar. A secondary aim is to investigate the conditions under which current reversal takes place. A flow channel apparatus was used in the laboratory to s...

  5. Effect of different electrode tip angles with tilted torch in stationary gas tungsten arc welding: A 3D simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abid, M.; Parvez, S.; Nash, D.H.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the effect of different tip angles (30°, 60°, 90° and 120°) on the arc and weld pool behavior is analyzed in 2 mm and 5 mm arc lengths with tilted (70°) torch. Arc temperature, velocity, current density, heat flux and gas shear are investigated in the arc region and pool convection and puddle shapes are studied in the weld pool region. The arc temperature at the tungsten electrode is found the maximum with sharp tip and decreases as the tip angle increases. The arc temperature on the anode (workpiece) surface becomes concentrated with increase in tip angle. The arc velocity and gas shear stress are observed large with sharp tip and decreasing as the tip angle increases. Current density on the anode surface does not change with tip angle and observed almost the same in all the tip angles in both 2 mm and 5 mm arc lengths. Heat flux due to conduction and convection is observed more sensitive to the tip angle and decreases as the tip angle increases. The electromagnetic force is slightly observed increasing and the buoyancy force is observed slightly decreasing with increase in tip angle. Analyzing each driving force in the weld pool individually shows that the gas drag and Marangoni forces are much stronger than the electromagnetic and buoyancy forces. The weld pool shape is observed wide and shallow in sharp and narrow and deep in large tip angle. Increasing the arc length does not change the weld pool width; however, the weld pool depth significantly changes with arc length and is observed deep in short arc length. The arc properties and weld pool shapes are observed wide ahead of the electrode tip in the weld direction due to 70° torch angle. Good agreement is observed between the numerical and experimental weld pool shapes

  6. Effect of Different Welding Processes on Electrochemical and Corrosion Behavior of Pure Nickel in 1 M NaCl Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xijing Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A plasma arc welding (PAW-tungsten inert gas (TIG hybrid welding process is proposed to weld pure nickel. In PAW-TIG welding, the arc of the PAW was first to be ignited, then TIG was ignited, while in PAW welding, only the PAW arc was launched. This paper investigated the effect of different welding processes on electrochemical and corrosion performance of between a pure nickel joint and a base metal in an aerated 1 M NaCl solution, respectively. The average grain size of the joint fabricated by PAW welding (denoted as JP joint is 463.57 μm, the joint fabricated by PAW-TIG welding(denoted as JP-T joint is 547.32 μm, and the base metal (BM is 47.32 μm. In this work, the passivity behaviors of samples were characterized for two welding processes by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS, open circuit potential versus immersion time (OCP-t, and the potentiodynamic polarization plots. EIS spectra, attained with different immersion times, were analyzed and fitted by an equivalent electrical circuit. Photomicrographs of BM, JP, and JP-T were also taken with a scanning electron microscope (SEM to reveal the morphological structure of the pit surfaces. Electrochemical tests show that the sequence of the corrosion resistance is BM > JP > JP-T. The size and quantity of the hemispherical corrosion pits of all samples are different. The corrosion morphology observations found a consistency with the consequence of the electrochemical measurements. The results show that an increase of the grain dimensions due to different heat treatments decreased the pure nickel stability to pitting corrosion.

  7. Effect of Low-Temperature Sensitization on the Corrosion Behavior of AISI Type 304L SS Weld Metal in Simulated Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Girija; Nandakumar, T.; Viswanath, A.

    2018-05-01

    The manuscript presents the investigations carried out on the effect of low-temperature sensitization (LTS) of 304L SS weld metal on its corrosion behavior in simulated groundwater, for its application as a canister material for long-term storage of nuclear vitrified high-level waste in geological repositories. AISI type 304L SS weld pad was fabricated by multipass gas tungsten arc welding process using 308L SS filler wire. The as-welded specimens were subsequently subjected to carbide nucleation and further to LTS at 500 °C for 11 days to simulate a temperature of 300 °C for 100-year life of the canister in geological repositories. Delta ferrite ( δ-ferrite) content of the 304L SS weld metal substantially decreased on carbide nucleation treatment and further only a marginal decrease occurred on LTS treatment. The microstructure of the as-welded consisted of δ-ferrite as a minor phase distributed in austenite matrix. The δ-ferrite appeared fragmented in the carbide-nucleated and LTS-treated weld metal. The degree of sensitization measured by double-loop electrochemical potentokinetic reactivation method indicated an increase in carbide nucleation treatment when compared to the as-welded specimens, and further increase occurred on LTS treatment. Potentiodynamic anodic polarization investigations in simulated groundwater indicated a substantial decrease in the localized corrosion resistance of the carbide-nucleated and LTS 304L SS weld metals, when compared to the as-welded specimens. Post-experimental micrographs indicated pitting as the primary mode of attack in the as-welded, while pitting and intergranular corrosion (IGC) occurred in the carbide-nucleated weld metal. LTS-treated weld metal predominantly underwent IGC attack. The decrease in the localized corrosion resistance of the weld metal after LTS treatment was found to have a direct correlation with the degree of sensitization and the weld microstructure. The results are detailed in the manuscript.

  8. Effect of Low-Temperature Sensitization on the Corrosion Behavior of AISI Type 304L SS Weld Metal in Simulated Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Girija; Nandakumar, T.; Viswanath, A.

    2018-04-01

    The manuscript presents the investigations carried out on the effect of low-temperature sensitization (LTS) of 304L SS weld metal on its corrosion behavior in simulated groundwater, for its application as a canister material for long-term storage of nuclear vitrified high-level waste in geological repositories. AISI type 304L SS weld pad was fabricated by multipass gas tungsten arc welding process using 308L SS filler wire. The as-welded specimens were subsequently subjected to carbide nucleation and further to LTS at 500 °C for 11 days to simulate a temperature of 300 °C for 100-year life of the canister in geological repositories. Delta ferrite (δ-ferrite) content of the 304L SS weld metal substantially decreased on carbide nucleation treatment and further only a marginal decrease occurred on LTS treatment. The microstructure of the as-welded consisted of δ-ferrite as a minor phase distributed in austenite matrix. The δ-ferrite appeared fragmented in the carbide-nucleated and LTS-treated weld metal. The degree of sensitization measured by double-loop electrochemical potentokinetic reactivation method indicated an increase in carbide nucleation treatment when compared to the as-welded specimens, and further increase occurred on LTS treatment. Potentiodynamic anodic polarization investigations in simulated groundwater indicated a substantial decrease in the localized corrosion resistance of the carbide-nucleated and LTS 304L SS weld metals, when compared to the as-welded specimens. Post-experimental micrographs indicated pitting as the primary mode of attack in the as-welded, while pitting and intergranular corrosion (IGC) occurred in the carbide-nucleated weld metal. LTS-treated weld metal predominantly underwent IGC attack. The decrease in the localized corrosion resistance of the weld metal after LTS treatment was found to have a direct correlation with the degree of sensitization and the weld microstructure. The results are detailed in the manuscript.

  9. Arc-weld pool interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glickstein, S.S.

    1978-08-01

    The mechanisms involved in arc-weld pool interactions are extremely complex and no complete theory is presently available to describe much of the phenomena observed during welding. For the past several years, experimental and analytical studies have been undertaken at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory to increase basic understanding of the gas tungsten arc welding process. These studies have included experimental spectral analysis of the arc in order to determine arc temperature and analytical modeling of the arc and weld puddle. The investigations have been directed toward determining the cause and effects of variations in the energy distribution incident upon the weldment. In addition, the effect of weld puddle distortion on weld penetration was investigated, and experimental and analytical studies of weld process variables have been undertaken to determine the effects of the variables upon weld penetration and configuration. A review of the results and analysis of these studies are presented

  10. Effect of groove design on mechanical and metallurgical properties of quenched and tempered low alloy abrasion resistant steel welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Varun; Shahi, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Effect of weld groove design on Q and T steel welded joints is investigated. • Groove design influences heat dissipation characteristics of welded joints. • Double-V groove joint possesses maximum yield strength and UTS. • C-groove joint possesses highest impact energy, both at room temperature and 0 °C. • A wide variation in microhardness exists across different zone of the weldments. - Abstract: Experimental investigations were carried out to study the influence of three different groove designs on mechanical and metallurgical properties of 15 mm thick Q and T (quenched and tempered) steel welded joints. Welding heat input variation corresponding to each joint configuration was kept to a minimal such that the objective of investigating, exclusively, the effect of varied weld volume on the mechanical and metallurgical performance of these joints could be accomplished. Mechanical performance of these joints was evaluated by subjecting them to transverse tensile testing, and Charpy V-notch impact testing of the weld zones at room temperature and 0 °C. The results of this study reveal that among all types of groove formations used for welding, double-V groove joint possessed maximum YS (yield strength) and UTS (ultimate tensile strength), besides maximum strength ratio (YS/UTS) that was followed by U-groove joint and C-groove joint, respectively. However, weld zone tested individually, for the cover as well as the root pass of the C-groove joint possessed highest CVN (Charpy V-notch) values, both at room temperature and 0 °C. Extensive microhardness studies of these weldments showed a wide variation in the microhardness values of the weld zone and the HAZ (heat affected zone). It was concluded that each groove formation/design exerted a significant influence on the heat dissipation characteristics of these joints, which is evident from different morphological features as revealed through optical microscopy. Scanning electron microscopic

  11. Mismatch effect on CT specimen mechanical effect and consequences on the weld toughness characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, S.; Nedelec, M.

    2012-01-01

    The welded joints are particularly sensitive areas in the structures in terms of harmfulness of defects. Given the complexity of the problem (geometry poorly controlled, multi-material aspect, the potential influence of residual stresses), the tests are conducted based on pessimistic assumptions that can wrap all the uncertainties of the problem. In the case of a defect assessment, the considered toughness is deduced from conventional characterization tests with a crack in the welding, considering the current standards, ISO 12135 or ASTM E-1820 which are valid only for an homogeneous specimen. In 2010, a new standard ISO 16563 was published to address the specificity of welded joints. If it covers some of the difficulties, it remains incomplete. In nuclear piping, welds have a mismatch M, i.e. the ratio between the yield strength of the weld metal and the base metal, usually greater than 1: this avoids any problem of strain localization at the junction and ensure that the stresses in the base metal are also easily supported by the welded joint. In this configuration, it turns out that for a given mechanical loading, a crack in the weld located generally has a solicitation, quantified by the parameter J, less (depending on the size of the junction) to those that would see the same crack located in the base metal. Unfortunately, this phenomenon exists also potentially for a characterization test, which would overestimate the true toughness of the welded joint. Plasticity that develops from the crack tip can quickly reach this interface and be affected. To evaluate this phenomenon, we considered two types of representative welded joint (PWR secondary loop ferritic weld and a 316 stainless steel weld) and performed a F.E. analysis of the multi-material CT specimen mechanical answer and on the η coefficient conventionally used to derive the plastic component of J from the area under the curve force-opening displacement. (authors)

  12. The effect of thermal treatments on the corrosion behavior of friction stir welded 7050 and 7075 aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumsden, J.; Pollock, G.; Mahoney, M. [Rockwell Scientific, Camino dos Rios, Thousand Oaks, CA (United States)

    2003-07-01

    The rapid thermal cycle generated during friction stir welding (FSW) produces a gradient of microstructures and precipitate distributions in the weld heat affected zone (HAZ) and the thermo mechanical affected zone (TMAZ). Metallurgical transformations associated with such heating and cooling become complex under these nonequilibrium conditions, producing unstable microstructures, which cause unpredictable changes in properties relative to the parent alloy. Our work has shown that the composition changes caused by the nucleation and coarsening of precipitates during FSW produce a sensitized microstructure in 7050 and 7075 aluminum alloys. This paper describes the deleterious effects on the corrosion behavior of 7050 and 7075 aluminum alloys resulting from FSW and the effects of pre- and post- weld heat treatments on the corrosion properties of the welded material. (orig.)

  13. Mean load effect on fatigue of welded joints using structural stress and fracture mechanics approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Sung; Kim, Cheol; Jin, Tae Eun; Dong, P.

    2006-01-01

    In order to ensure the structural integrity of nuclear welded structures during design life, the fatigue life has to be evaluated by fatigue analysis procedures presented in technical codes such as ASME B and PV Code Section III. However, existing fatigue analysis procedures do not explicitly consider the presence of welded joints. A new fatigue analysis procedure based on a structural stress/fracture mechanics approach has been recently developed in order to reduce conservatism by erasing uncertainty in the analysis procedure. A recent review of fatigue crack growth data under various mean loading conditions using the structural stress/fracture mechanics approach, does not consider the mean loading effect, revealed some significant discrepancies in fatigue crack growth curves according to the mean loading conditions. In this paper, we propose the use of the stress intensity factor range ΔK characterized with loading ratio R effects in terms of the structural stress. We demonstrate the effectiveness in characterizing fatigue crack growth and S-N behavior using the well-known data. It was identified that the S-N data under high mean loading could be consolidated in a master S-N curve for welded joints

  14. Automatic welding machine for piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Koyama, Takaichi; Iizuka, Tomio; Ito, Yoshitoshi; Takami, Katsumi.

    1978-01-01

    A remotely controlled automatic special welding machine for piping was developed. This machine is utilized for long distance pipe lines, chemical plants, thermal power generating plants and nuclear power plants effectively from the viewpoint of good quality control, reduction of labor and good controllability. The function of this welding machine is to inspect the shape and dimensions of edge preparation before welding work by the sense of touch, to detect the temperature of melt pool, inspect the bead form by the sense of touch, and check the welding state by ITV during welding work, and to grind the bead surface and inspect the weld metal by ultrasonic test automatically after welding work. The construction of this welding system, the main specification of the apparatus, the welding procedure in detail, the electrical source of this welding machine, the cooling system, the structure and handling of guide ring, the central control system and the operating characteristics are explained. The working procedure and the effect by using this welding machine, and the application to nuclear power plants and the other industrial field are outlined. The HIDIC 08 is used as the controlling computer. This welding machine is useful for welding SUS piping as well as carbon steel piping. (Nakai, Y.)

  15. Electron-beam welding of 21-6-9 (Cr--Ni--Mn) stainless steel: effect of machine parameters on weldability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, H.

    1975-04-01

    The high-manganese, nitrogen-strengthened 21-6-9 (Cr--Ni--Mn) austenitic stainless steel has a weldability rating similar to that of more common austenitic stainless steels in terms of cracking, porosity, etc. However, weld pool disruption problems may occur with this alloy that can be related to instability within the molten weld pool. Selection of machine parameters is critical to achieving weld pool quiescence as this report confirms from recent tests. Test samples came from heats of air-melted, vacuum-arc remelted, and electroslag remelted material. Low- and high-voltage machine parameters are discussed, and effects of parameter variation on weld pool behavior are given. Data relate weld pool behavior to weld fusion-zone geometry. Various weld parameters are recommended for the 21-6-9 alloy, regardless of its source or chemistry. (auth)

  16. Effect of heating produced by welding on the microstructure and on the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of AA7028 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calatayud, A.; Rodenas, M.; Ferrer, C.; Amigo, V.; Salvador, M.D.

    1997-01-01

    The microstructural and stress corrosion cracking changes due to welding are studied for the AA7028 aluminium alloy. Special attention is paid to the characterization of what is known as the white zone. The influence of the delay step between quenching and aging in a T73 treatment on the microstructure and on the characteristics of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) is also studied. Finally the effect of thermal treatments applied on this zone after the welding is analysed. (Author) 7 refs

  17. Effect of cooling rates on the weld heat affected zone coarse grain microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Celin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of a cooling rate on the S690Q quenched and tempered steel welded joint coarse grain heat affected zone microstructure was investigated using a dilatometer with controlled heating and cooling fixture. Steel samples were heated to a peak temperature of 1350 °C and cooled at the different cooling time Dt8/5. A dilatometric analysis and hardness measurements of the simulated thermal cycle coarse grain samples were done. Transformation start and finish temperature were determined using dilatation vs. temperature data analysis. The microstructure of the sample with a cooling time 5 s consists of martensite, whereas at cooling time 80 s a bainitic microstructure was observed. The investigated steel cooling cycle using simulation approach makes possible to determine the range of an optimum CG HAZ cooling time for the welding.

  18. Thermal treatments effect on the austenite-ferrite equilibrium in a duplex stainless steel weld beads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkessa, Brahim; Badji, Riad; Bettahar, Kheireddine; Maza, Halim

    2006-01-01

    Heat treatments in the temperature range between 800 to 1200 C, with a keeping at high temperature of 60 min, followed by a water quenching at 20 C, have been carried out on austeno-ferritic stainless steel welds (of type SAF 2205-UNS S31803). The heat treatments carried out at temperatures below 1000 C have modified the structure of the duplex stainless steel 2205 in inducing the formation of precipitates, identified by X-ray diffraction as being the intermetallic compound σ and the chromium carbides M 23 C 6 . The treatments applied to temperatures superior to 1000 C shift the δ-γ equilibrium towards the δ phase. Indeed, the increase of the ferrite rate with the treatment temperature is approximately linear. The ferrite rates are higher in the heat-affected zone, which has been submitted to a ferritizing due to the welding thermal effects. (O.M.)

  19. Effects of welding on toughness of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, W. S.; Kim, S. H.; Yoon, J. H.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear energy is being seriously considered to meet the increasing demand for a world-wide energy supply without environmental effects. Generation IV reactors are being developed to produce a reliable energy safely and with an economic benefit. Since these new reactors require an elevated temperature, ferritic/martensitic steels are attracting attention as candidate materials for the reactor vessel of a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) and the cladding of a sodium fast reactor (SFR,) due to their high strength and thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion, and good resistance to corrosion. in recent years, new ferritic/martensitic steels have been developed for ultra supercritical fossil power plants. Advanced technologies for a steel fabrication have improved the elevated temperature properties of ferritic/martensitic steels to make them comparable with austenitic stainless steels. The microstructural stability of the pressure vessel, cladding and core structural materials of the VHTR and SCWR is very important. Welding process affects the microstructure and residual stress, so the toughness of ferritic/martensitic steels decreases in general. In this paper; Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel is welded by SMAW with V-groove, and the effects of welding on tensile and impact properties are evaluated. The upper self energy of the weldment was only 57% of that of the base metal, and the DBTT T 41J and T 68J index temperatures of the weldment were higher than those of the base metal by 17 deg. C, 38 deg. C and 37 deg. C, respectively. (authors)

  20. Effect of weld metal toughness on fracture behavior under ultra-low cycle fatigue loading (earthquake)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kermajani, M. [School of Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghaini, F. Malek, E-mail: Fmalek@modares.ac.ir [School of Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Miresmaeili, R. [School of Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aghakouchak, A.A. [School of Civil Engineering, College of Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shadmand, M. [Department of Research and Development, MAPNA Electric and Control (MECO) Company, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-06-21

    Results from 12 ultra-low cycle fatigue tests performed on the weld metals of both toughness and non-toughness rated grades are presented. Fracture resistance under these loadings seemed to be dependent on materials' toughness, displacement amplitude, and stress state triaxiality, while the toughness effect was more highlighted at high stress levels and concentrations. To study the effect of microstructures on these failures, supporting ancillary tests including all-weld tension coupons, Charpy V-notched impact tests, and optical and scanning electron microscope analyses were performed. The favored microstructures appeared to be those which absorbed energy by plastic deformation and, hence, hindered void formation and/or could avoid crack propagation by deflection. Considering the response of the tested materials to cyclic loadings and the requirements of the materials specified in AISC341 Provisions could question the adequacy of these requirements for weld metals. However, the role of microstructural features like inclusions would be the same in both the Charpy impact tests and ultra-low cycle loadings.

  1. The effect of heat treatment on phosphorus segregation in a submerged-arc weld metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beere, W.B.; Buswell, J.T.

    1999-01-01

    Intergranular fracture (IGF) has been observed in carbon-manganese steels after irradiation or high temperature exposure for prolonged periods. The effect is associated with an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature and has been related to phosphorus diffusion to grain boundaries. Phosphorus also diffuses thermally at the temperatures used for post-weld heat treatments such that in principle, the slightly different heat treatments given to different parts of a large vessel could lead to differing grain boundary phosphorus coverage and hence susceptibility to IGF. The effect of typical heat treatments on phosphorus coverage has been investigated using a finite difference model based on a theory that has been fitted to a wide range of constant temperature data. Regardless of previous history, the grain boundary coverage of phosphorus was predicted to depend on the final anneal and cooling rate. These differed insufficiently in the typical heat treatments to produce significant differences in segregation. It was concluded that the ductile-brittle transition temperature in submerged-arc welds would be unaffected in vessels that had seen typical post-weld heat treatments

  2. Effect of zirconium addition on welding of aluminum grain refined by titanium plus boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaid, A. I. O.

    2014-06-01

    Aluminum oxidizes freely in ordinary atmosphere which makes its welding difficult and weak, particularly it solidifies in columnar structure with large grains. Therefore, it is anticipated that the effect of addition of some grain refiners to its melt before solidification is worth while investigating as it may enhance its weldabilty and improve its mechanical strength. In this paper, the effect of addition of zirconium at a weight of 0.1% (which corresponds to the peretictic limit on the aluminum-zirconium base phase diagram) to commercially pure aluminum, grain refined by Ti+B on its weldability, using gas tungsten arc welding, GTAW, method which was formerly known as TIG. A constant current level of 30 AC Ampere was used because it removes the oxides during the welding process. Metallographic examination of the weldments of the different combinations of Al with Al and Al with its microalloys: in the heat affected zone, HAZ, and away from it was carried out and examined for HAZ width, porosity, cracks and microhardness. It was found that grain refining by Ti+B or Zr resulted in enhancement of the weldment.

  3. Effect of zirconium addition on welding of aluminum grain refined by titanium plus boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaid, A. I. O.

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum oxidizes freely in ordinary atmosphere which makes its welding difficult and weak, particularly it solidifies in columnar structure with large grains. Therefore, it is anticipated that the effect of addition of some grain refiners to its melt before solidification is worth while investigating as it may enhance its weldabilty and improve its mechanical strength. In this paper, the effect of addition of zirconium at a weight of 0.1 percentage (which corresponds to the peretictic limit on the aluminum-zirconium base phase diagram) to commercially pure aluminum, grain refined by Tau i+Beta on its weldability, using gas tungsten arc welding, GTAW, method which was formerly known as TIG. A constant current level of 30 AC Ampere was used because it removes the oxides during the welding process. Metallographic examination of the weldments of the different combinations of Al with Al and Al with its microalloys: in the heat affected zone, HAZ, and away from it was carried out and examined for HAZ width, porosity, cracks and microhardness. It was found that grain refining by Tau i+Beta or Zr resulted in enhancement of the weldment. (author)

  4. Effect of zirconium addition on welding of aluminum grain refined by titanium plus boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaid, A I O

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum oxidizes freely in ordinary atmosphere which makes its welding difficult and weak, particularly it solidifies in columnar structure with large grains. Therefore, it is anticipated that the effect of addition of some grain refiners to its melt before solidification is worth while investigating as it may enhance its weldabilty and improve its mechanical strength. In this paper, the effect of addition of zirconium at a weight of 0.1% (which corresponds to the peretictic limit on the aluminum-zirconium base phase diagram) to commercially pure aluminum, grain refined by Ti+B on its weldability, using gas tungsten arc welding, GTAW, method which was formerly known as TIG. A constant current level of 30 AC Ampere was used because it removes the oxides during the welding process. Metallographic examination of the weldments of the different combinations of Al with Al and Al with its microalloys: in the heat affected zone, HAZ, and away from it was carried out and examined for HAZ width, porosity, cracks and microhardness. It was found that grain refining by Ti+B or Zr resulted in enhancement of the weldment

  5. The effects of alloying elements on microstructures and mechanical properties of tungsten inert gas welded AZ80 magnesium alloys joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Zhang, Jiansheng; Ding, Rongrong

    2017-11-01

    The effects of alloying elements on the macrostructures, microstructures and tensile strength of AZ80 Mg alloy weldments were studied in the present study. The results indicate that with the decrease of Al element content of filler wire, the welding defects of seam are gradually eliminated and the β-Mg17Al12 phases at α-Mg boundaries are refined and become discontinuous, which are beneficial to the improvement of tensile strength. With AZ31 Mg alloy filler wire, the maximum tensile strength of AZ80 weldment is 220 MPa and fracture occurs at the welding seam of joint. It is experimentally proved that robust AZ80 Mg alloy joints can be obtained by tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process with AZ31 Mg alloy filler wire. However, further study is required to improve the microstructures and reduce welding defects of joint in order to further improve the joining strength of AZ80 Mg alloy joint.

  6. Investigation on mechanical properties of welded material under different types of welding filler (shielded metal arc welding)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Abdullah Mohd; Lair, Noor Ajian Mohd; Wei, Foo Jun

    2018-05-01

    The Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) is (or the Stick welding) defined as a welding process, which melts and joins metals with an arc between a welding filler (electrode rod) and the workpieces. The main objective was to study the mechanical properties of welded metal under different types of welding fillers and current for SMAW. This project utilized the Design of Experiment (DOE) by adopting the Full Factorial Design. The independent variables were the types of welding filler and welding current, whereas the other welding parameters were fixed at the optimum value. The levels for types of welding filler were by the models of welding filler (E6013, E7016 and E7018) used and the levels for welding current were 80A and 90A. The responses were the mechanical properties of welded material, which include tensile strength and hardness. The experiment was analyzed using the two way ANOVA. The results prove that there are significant effects of welding filler types and current levels on the tensile strength and hardness of the welded metal. At the same time, the ANOVA results and interaction plot indicate that there are significant interactions between the welding filler types and the welding current on both the hardness and tensile strength of the welded metals, which has never been reported before. This project found that when the amount of heat input with increase, the mechanical properties such as tensile strength and hardness decrease. The optimum tensile strength for welded metal is produced by the welding filler E7016 and the optimum of hardness of welded metal is produced by the welding filler E7018 at welding current of 80A.

  7. Estudio microestructural y de resistencia de uniones soldadas de la aleación AW7020 por procedimiento MIG en función de la preparación de bordes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bloem, Carlos Alberto

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available Medium strength AW7XXX aluminium alloys are widely used as welded structures and in transportation. The applications of these alloys are limited by the behavior of the welded joints. There is not an agreement on the joint geometry that must be used on the 5 mm aluminium welds. The microhardness evolution is one of the most important strength indicator, For this reason, the aim of this work is to study the welded joint geometry influence on microhardness profile and on microstructure of a welded aluminium alloy AW7020 MIG, filled with AW5356.

    Las aleaciones de aluminio de la serie AW7XXX de medias prestaciones se están empleando ampliamente en el sector del transporte, así como en la construcción de estructuras soldadas. La posibilidad de que estas aleaciones se empleen con mayor profusión está condicionada a un mayor conocimiento del comportamiento de la unión soldada. La evolución de la microdureza como un indicador de resistencia es ampliamente utilizado, pero no hay acuerdo sobre el efecto de la preparación de bordes previo a la soldadura y es por ello que el objetivo de este trabajo sea estudiar la influencia de la preparación de bordes sobre el perfil de microdureza y microestructura de la unión soldada de una aleación de aluminio AW7020, soldada mediante el proceso MIG, empleando como metal de aporte AW5356.

  8. Effect of the welding parameters on all-weld-metal deposited from AWS E10018-M, E11018-M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surian, E.

    1996-01-01

    Using each one of the electrodes types AWS A5.5-81-M, from standard batches, three-all-weld metal test pieces were prepared (cold, warm and hot) according to the AWS A5.5-81 standard. In order to have three different values for the heat input, the welding parameters were varied, but always having in mind the mentioned standard requirements. The test pieces were used to determine the mechanical properties and to carry out metallographic studies. the results obtained showed that the alloy deposited by the E10018-M electrode is less sensible to heat input variations than that from both E11018-M and E12018-M electrodes. Therefore, to work with these last mentioned electrodes it is necessary to have a strict control and very exact instructions, even more exacting than those established in the AWS a5.5.-81 standard. 9 refs

  9. Pulsed TIG welding of pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killing, U.

    1989-01-01

    The present study investigates into the effects of impulse welding parameters on weld geometry in the joint welding of thin-walled sheets and pipes (d=2.5 mm), and it uses random samples of thick-walled sheets and pipes (d=10 mm), in fixed positions. (orig./MM) [de

  10. Physical characteristics of welding arc ignition process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Linan; Song, Yonglun; Xiao, Tianjiao; Ran, Guowei

    2012-07-01

    The existing research of welding arc mainly focuses on the stable combustion state and the research on the mechanism of welding arc ignition process is quite lack. The tungsten inert gas(TIG) touch arc ignition process is observed via a high speed camera and the high time resolution spectral diagnosis system. The changing phenomenon of main ionized element provided the electrons in the arc ignition is found. The metallic element is the main contributor to provide the electrons at the beginning of the discharging, and then the excitated shielding gas element replaces the function of the metallic element. The electron density during the period of the arc ignition is calculated by the Stark-broadened lines of Hα. Through the discussion with the repeatability in relaxation phenomenon, the statistical regularity in the arc ignition process is analyzed. The similar rules as above are observed through the comparison with the laser-assisted arc ignition experiments and the metal inert gas(MIG) arc ignition experiments. This research is helpful to further understanding on the generation mechanism of welding arc ignition and also has a certain academic and practical significance on enriching the welding physical theoretical foundation and improving the precise monitoring on automatic arc welding process.

  11. An approach for optimizing arc welding applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapuis, Julien

    2011-01-01

    The dynamic and transport mechanisms involved in the arc plasma and the weld pool of arc welding operations are numerous and strongly coupled. They produce a medium the magnitudes of which exhibit rapid time variations and very marked gradients which make any experimental analysis complex in this disrupted environment. In this work, we study the TIG and MIG processes. An experimental platform was developed to allow synchronized measurement of various physical quantities associated with welding (process parameters, temperatures, clamping forces, metal transfer, etc.). Numerical libraries dedicated to applied studies in arc welding are developed. They enable the treatment of a large flow of data (signals, images) with a systematic and global method. The advantages of this approach for the enrichment of numerical simulation and arc process control are shown in different situations. Finally, this experimental approach is used in the context of the chosen application to obtain rich measurements to describe the dynamic behavior of the weld pool in P-GMAW. Dimensional analysis of these experimental measurements allows to identify the predominant mechanisms involved and to determine experimentally the characteristic times associated. This type of approach includes better description of the behavior of a macro-drop of molten metal or the phenomena occurring in the humping instabilities. (author)

  12. Soldadura TIG y MIG de las aleaciones de aluminio 6061 y 7020. Estudios microestructurales y de propiedades mecánicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez de Salazar, J. M.

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available The aluminium alloys of the 6XXX and 7XXX series, are actually considered of medium and high strength, and are been profusely used in different industries such as aeronautical, automotive, etc. However, its wide application as structural material needs of the proper development of their joining process. The present work describes the results obtained from the microstructural evaluation, both with optical and scanning electronic microscopies (OM and SEM, and of the mechanical one (hardness changes of the weld produced in the alloys using two different are welding techniques: GTAW (TIG and GMAW (MIG. For the last one, a filler metal with a composition of Al-5Mg, AWS denomination A5.10-92 (AA5356, has been used.

    Las aleaciones de las series AA6XXX y AA7XXX están consideradas como de media y alta resistencia, y se utilizan con gran profusión en tecnologías como: aeronáutica, automoción, etc. Pero su aplicación como materiales estructurales pasa, sin duda, por el adecuado desarrollo de sus procesos de unión. En este trabajo, se realiza una evaluación microestructural, tanto mediante técnicas de microscopía óptica (MO como electrónica (MEB-EDS y de las propiedades mecánicas (evolución de la dureza de estas aleaciones, una vez que han sido sometidas a procesos de soldadura con arco, como son GTAW (TIG y GMAW (MIG, empleando un aporte de aleación de aluminio de composición Al-5Mg, cuya denominación es AWS A5.10-92 (AA5356.

  13. Effect of trace solute hydrogen on the fatigue life of electron beam welded Ti-6Al-4V alloy joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Junhui; Hu, Shubing, E-mail: 187352581@qq.com; Ji, Longbo

    2017-01-27

    This paper describes an experimental hydrogenating treatment on a Ti-6Al-4V fatigue specimen containing an electron beam welding joint. The effect of trace solute hydrogen on the microstructures and fatigue behavior of welded Ti-6Al-4V alloy joints was investigated using an optical microscope, X-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and other methodologies. The results demonstrated that no hydride formed in the hydrogenated weld joint at a hydrogen concentration of less than 0.140 wt%. Internal hydrogen, which was present in the alloy in the form of solid solution atoms, caused lattice distortion in the β phase. The fatigue properties of the Ti-6Al-4V weld joint hydrogenated with trace solute hydrogen decreased significantly. The solute hydrogen led to an increase in the brittleness of the hydrogenated weld joint. The dislocation densities in the secondary α and β phase were higher. Fatigue cracks nucleated at the α/β interfaces. The effect of solute hydrogen accelerated the separation of the persistent slip bands, which decreased the threshold required for fatigue crack growth. Solute hydrogen also accelerated the fatigue crack growth rate. These two factors contributed to the degradation of the fatigue life in the electron beam welded Ti-6Al-4V alloy joints.

  14. Soluble transition metals cause the pro-inflammatory effects of welding fumes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeilly, Jane D.; Heal, Mathew R.; Beverland, Iain J.; Howe, Alan; Gibson, Mark D.; Hibbs, Leon R.; MacNee, William; Donaldson, Ken

    2004-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have consistently reported a higher incidence of respiratory illnesses such as bronchitis, metal fume fever (MFF), and chronic pneumonitis among welders exposed to high concentrations of metal-enriched welding fumes. Here, we studied the molecular toxicology of three different metal-rich welding fumes: NIMROD 182, NIMROD c276, and COBSTEL 6. Fume toxicity in vitro was determined by exposing human type II alveolar epithelial cell line (A549) to whole welding fume, a soluble extract of fume or the 'washed' particulate. All whole fumes were significantly toxic to A549 cells at doses >63 μg ml -1 (TD 50; 42, 25, and 12 μg ml -1 , respectively). NIMROD c276 and COBSTEL 6 fumes increased levels of IL-8 mRNA and protein at 6 h and protein at 24 h, as did the soluble fraction alone, whereas metal chelation of the soluble fraction using chelex beads attenuated the effect. The soluble fraction of all three fumes caused a rapid depletion in intracellular glutathione following 2-h exposure with a rebound increase by 24 h. In addition, both nickel based fumes, NIMROD 182 and NIMROD c276, induced significant reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in A549 cells after 2 h as determined by DCFH fluorescence. ICP analysis confirmed that transition metal concentrations were similar in the whole and soluble fractions of each fume (dominated by Cr), but significantly less in both the washed particles and chelated fractions. These results support the hypothesis that the enhanced pro-inflammatory responses of welding fume particulates are mediated by soluble transition metal components via an oxidative stress mechanism

  15. Effect of Heat Exposure on the Fatigue Properties of AA7050 Friction Stir Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, B. C.; Rodriguez, R. I.; Cisko, A.; Jordon, J. B.; Allison, P. G.; Rushing, T.; Garcia, L.

    2018-05-01

    This work examines the effect of heat exposure on the subsequent monotonic and fatigue properties of friction stir-welded AA7050. Mechanical characterization tests were conducted on friction stir-welded specimens as-welded (AW) and specimens heated to 315 °C in air for 20 min. Monotonic testing revealed high joint efficiencies of 98% (UTS) in the AW specimens and 60% in the heat-damaged (HD) specimens. Experimental results of strain-controlled fatigue testing revealed shorter fatigue lives for the HD coupons by nearly a factor of four, except for the highest strain amplitude tested. Postmortem fractography analysis found similar crack initiation or propagation behavior between the AW and HD specimens; however, the failure locations for the AW were predominantly in the heat-affected zone, while the HD specimens also failed in the stir zone. Microhardness measurements revealed a relatively uniform strength profile in the HD group, accounting for the variety of failure locations observed. The differences in both monotonic and cyclic properties observed between the AW and HD specimens support the conclusion that the heat damage (315 °C at 20 min) acts as an over-aging and a quasi-annealing treatment.

  16. Effect of groove on socket welds under the condition of vibration fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiu, Junjie; Jing, Hongyang; Han, Yongdian; Zhao, Lei; Xu, Lianyong

    2013-01-01

    Root failures of socket welds in small bore piping caused by vibration mainly occur at nuclear power plants (NPPs). It was observed that at higher stress level failures tended to originate at the toe while for the case of lower stress failures tended to occur at the root. The groove can increase the penetration depth (PD) of root, which is beneficial to the fatigue life. The effect of groove was also investigated by finite element method (FEM). The simulation results show that groove can decline the stress distribution, stress triaxiality and maximum principal plastic strain in the weld root, and the 5 mm groove suffering σ max (the highest stress of root failure) is almost same as no groove subjecting to σ f (fatigue limit). The test results show that the socket weld with groove can increase the natural frequency and damping of specimen, which make the system more difficult to vibrate. Moreover, the groove can also improve the fatigue property of specimen which do not exist the root failure even under high cycle fatigue (HCF)

  17. Effect of vibration on microstructures and mechanical properties of 304 stainless steel GTA welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chih-Chun; Lai, Chien-Hong; Wu, Weite

    2013-07-01

    This study investigates the microstructures and mechanical properties of 304 stainless steel at various vibration frequencies during simultaneous vibration welding. The experimental results demonstrated that simultaneous vibration welding could accelerate the nucleation and grain refinement of the microstructures. The effect of the grain refinement was more evident at the resonant frequency (375 Hz) and a minimum content of residual δ-ferrite (4.0%). The γ phase grew in the preferential orientation of the (111) direction with and without vibration. The full width at half maximum of the diffraction peak widened after the vibration, which was attributed to the grain refinement. The residual stress could be efficiently removed through simultaneous vibration welding when the amplitude of the vibration was increased. Furthermore, the lowest residual stress (139 MPa) was found when the vibration frequency was 375 Hz. The hardness and Young's modulus exhibited slight increases with low and medium frequencies. The hardness values were increased by 7.6% and Young's modulus was increased by 15% when the vibration frequency was resonant (375 Hz).

  18. Advanced Welding Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  19. Resistance seam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueler, A.W.

    1977-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of the resistance seam welding process are presented. Types of seam welds, types of seam welding machines, seam welding power supplies, resistance seam welding parameters and seam welding characteristics of various metals

  20. Effect of Heat Input During Disk Laser Bead-On-Plate Welding of Thermomechanically Rolled Steel on Penetration Characteristics and Porosity Formation in the Weld Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisiecki A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a detailed analysis of the influence of heat input during laser bead-on-plate welding of 5.0 mm thick plates of S700MC steel by modern Disk laser on the mechanism of steel penetration, shape and depth of penetration, and also on tendency to weld porosity formation. Based on the investigations performed in a wide range of laser welding parameters the relationship between laser power and welding speed, thus heat input, required for full penetration was determined. Additionally the relationship between the laser welding parameters and weld quality was determined.

  1. Welding Penetration Control of Fixed Pipe in TIG Welding Using Fuzzy Inference System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskoro, Ario Sunar; Kabutomori, Masashi; Suga, Yasuo

    This paper presents a study on welding penetration control of fixed pipe in Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding using fuzzy inference system. The welding penetration control is essential to the production quality welds with a specified geometry. For pipe welding using constant arc current and welding speed, the bead width becomes wider as the circumferential welding of small diameter pipes progresses. Having welded pipe in fixed position, obviously, the excessive arc current yields burn through of metals; in contrary, insufficient arc current produces imperfect welding. In order to avoid these errors and to obtain the uniform weld bead over the entire circumference of the pipe, the welding conditions should be controlled as the welding proceeds. This research studies the intelligent welding process of aluminum alloy pipe 6063S-T5 in fixed position using the AC welding machine. The monitoring system used a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to monitor backside image of molten pool. The captured image was processed to recognize the edge of molten pool by image processing algorithm. Simulation of welding control using fuzzy inference system was constructed to simulate the welding control process. The simulation result shows that fuzzy controller was suitable for controlling the welding speed and appropriate to be implemented into the welding system. A series of experiments was conducted to evaluate the performance of the fuzzy controller. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the control system that is confirmed by sound welds.

  2. The Effects of Nitrogen Gas on Microstructural and Mechanical Properties of TIG Welded S32205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Barış Başyiğit

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Duplex stainless steels are gaining greater interest due to their increasing amounts of application fields. Accordingly, there is a need for awareness of problems associated with improper microstructural distributions such as δ-ferrite (delta-ferrite, austenite and other important intermetallic phases that may form in these steel weldments. Since δ-ferrite versus austenite ratio profoundly influences corrosion and mechanical properties, optimum δ-ferrite ratios must be kept approximately within 35–65 vol % and balance austenite to maintain satisfactory corrosion and mechanical properties on welding of these steels. Cooling rates of welds and alloying elements in base metal are the major factors that determine the final microstructure of these steels. In this work, 3 mm thickness of 2205 duplex stainless-steel plates were TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas welded with various amounts of nitrogen gas added to argon shielding gas. Specimens were joined within the same welding parameters and cooling conditions. As nitrogen is a potential austenite stabilizer and an interstitial solid solution hardener, the effects of nitrogen on mechanical properties such as hardness profiles, grain sizes and microstructural modifications are investigated thoroughly by changing the welding shielding gas compositions. Increasing the nitrogen content in argon shielding gas also increases the amount of austenitic phase while δ-ferrite ratios decreases. Nitrogen spherodized the grains of austenitic structure much more than observed in δ-ferrite. The strength values of specimens that welded with the addition of nitrogen gas into the argon shielding gas are increased more in both austenitic and delta-ferritic structure as compared to specimens that welded with plain argon shielding gas. The addition of 1 vol % of nitrogen gas into argon shielding gas provided the optimum phase balance of austenite and δ-ferrite in S32205 duplex stainless-steel TIG-welded specimens.

  3. The mutual effects of hydrogen and microstructure on hardness and impact energy of SMA welds in X65 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latifi, V. Amin; Miresmaeili, Reza, E-mail: miresmaeili@modares.ac.ir; Abdollah-Zadeh, Amir

    2017-01-02

    Micro-alloy steels are broadly used in gas and petroleum transportation industries. However, application of these steels in pipelines is challenged by hydrogen embrittlement due to presence of hydrogen sulfide in the medium. The present work deals with the interaction of hydrogen with plasticity of X65 steel. Two weld joints produced by common E7010-G and E7018 electrodes via shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) method were also investigated. It was revealed in microhardness test that direct charge of hydrogen to the surface did not lead to meaningful variations due to lamination as well as surface and sub-surface porosities. In fact, the effect of hydrogen on material plasticity was influenced by lamination and porosities. On the other hand, indirect charge on the tested surface led to increase in hardness by 12%, 9% and 6% in base metal as well as in weld metals obtained from E7010-G and E7018 electrodes, respectively. Therefore, hydrogen atoms affected plasticity of X65 steel more harshly than that of weld metals; thus, the base metal is more sensitive to hydrogen embrittlement. Due to high strain rate, impact test does not provide sufficient time for hydrogen diffusion through notch during the test. No observation of any variations in impact energies of charged samples may hence be explained by uniform hydrogen concentration throughout the samples. The base steel was seen to be much more sensitive to hydrogen defects rather than weld metals of both electrodes due to possessing pearlite/ferrite interfaces. According to hydrogen concentration studies, E710-G weld metal had more hydrogen diffusivity than X65 steel and E7018 weld metal by four time and 25%, respectively. This was due to acicular ferritic microstructure of E710-G weld metal and its dislocation tangles that provided many reversible traps for hydrogen.

  4. Effect of prior machining deformation on the development of tensile residual stresses in weld-fabricated nuclear components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevey, P.S.; Mason, P.W.; Hornbach, D.J.; Molkenthin, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    Austenitic alloy weldments in nuclear systems may be subject to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) failure if the sum of residual and applied stresses exceeds a critical threshold. Residual stresses developed by prior machining and welding may either accelerate or retard SCC, depending on their magnitude and sign. A combined x-ray diffraction and mechanical procedure was used to determine the axial and hoop residual stress and yield strength distributions into the inside-diameter surface of a simulated Alloy 600 penetration J-welded into a reactor pressure vessel. The degree of cold working and the resulting yield strength increase caused by prior machining and weld shrinkage were calculated from the line-broadening distributions. Tensile residual stresses on the order of +700 MPa were observed in both the axial and the hoop directions at the inside-diameter surface in a narrow region adjacent to the weld heat-affected zone. Stresses exceeding the bulk yield strength were found to develop due to the combined effects of cold working of the surface layers during initial machining and subsequent weld shrinkage. The residual stress and cold work distributions produced by prior machining were found to influence strongly the final residual stress state developed after welding

  5. Effect of electromagnetic interaction during fusion welding of AISI 2205 duplex stainless steel on the corrosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rentería, M. A.; López-Morelos, V. H.; González-Sánchez, J.; García-Hernández, R.; Dzib-Pérez, L.; Curiel-López, F. F.

    2017-02-01

    The effect of electromagnetic interaction of low intensity (EMILI) applied during fusion welding of AISI 2205 duplex stainless steel on the resistance to localised corrosion in natural seawater was investigated. The heat affected zone (HAZ) of samples welded under EMILI showed a higher temperature for pitting initiation and lower dissolution under anodic polarisation in chloride containing solutions than samples welded without EMILI. The EMILI assisted welding process developed in the present work enhanced the resistance to localised corrosion due to a modification on the microstructural evolution in the HAZ and the fusion zone during the thermal cycle involved in fusion welding. The application of EMILI reduced the size of the HAZ, limited coarsening of the ferrite grains and promoted regeneration of austenite in this zone, inducing a homogeneous passive condition of the surface. EMILI can be applied during fusion welding of structural or functional components of diverse size manufactured with duplex stainless steel designed to withstand aggressive environments such as natural seawater or marine atmospheres.

  6. Dissimilar friction stir welds in AA5083-AA6082: The effect of process parameters on residual stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steuwer, A.; Peel, M.J.; Withers, P.J.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of tool traverse and rotation speeds on the residual stresses are quantified for welds between non-age-hardening AA5083 and age-hardening AA6082 and compared to single alloy joints made from each of the two constituents. The residual stresses have been characterised non-destructively by neutron diffraction and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The region around the weld line was characterised by significant tensile residual stress fields which are balanced by compressive stresses in the parent material. The rotation speed of the tool has been found to have a substantially greater influence than the transverse speed on the properties and residual stresses in the welds, particularly on the AA5083 side where the location of the peak stress moves from the stir zone to beyond the edge of the tool shoulder. The changes in residual stress are related to microstructural and hardness changes as determined in a previous study . In particular the larger stresses under the weld tool on the AA5083 side compared to the AA6082 side are related to a transient reduction in yield stress due to dissolution of the hardening precipitates during welding prior to natural aging after welding

  7. Effect of Rotation Rate on Microstructure and Properties of Underwater Friction Stir Welded 7A04-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Wen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Underwater friction stir welding (FSW on 7A04-T6 aluminum alloy plates was carried out, and the effect of rotation rate on microstructure and mechanical properties of joints was investigated. The results show that the minimum hardness of underwater FSW joints is located in the thermo-mechanically affected zone. The hardness of welded joints at the high rotation rate of 950r/min exhibits W-shaped distribution, and the average hardness value in the nugget zone is higher than that of welded joints at the low rotation rate of 475, 600, 750r/min. When the rotation rate increases from 475r/min to 750r/min with a constant welding speed of 235mm/min, the precipitated phases in the nugget zone gradually become coarse, and the ultimate tensile strength coefficient of the joint decreases from 89.71% to 82.33%; when rotation rate increases to 950r/min, the precipitated phases dissolve into aluminum matrix during welding, and age after welding. This produces the fine and homogeneous dispersed phases, which results in an increase of the strength coefficient to 89.04% and a certain enhancement of strain hardening capacity and elongation for the joints. All the tensile fracture surfaces exhibit the mixed characteristics of microporous polymerization and cleavage fracture.

  8. Effect of Friction Stir Welding Parameters on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of AA2024-T4 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. W. El-Morsy

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the effects of rotational and traverse speeds on the 1.5 mm butt joint performance of friction stir welded 2024-T4 aluminum alloy sheets have been investigated. Five rotational speeds ranging from 560 to 1800 rpm and five traverse speeds ranging from 11 to 45 mm/min have been employed. The characterization of microstructure and the mechanical properties (tensile, microhardness, and bending of the welded sheets have been studied. The results reveal that by varying the welding parameters, almost sound joints and high performance welded joints can be successfully produced at the rotational speeds of 900 rpm and 700 rpm and the traverse speed of 35 mm/min. The maximum welding performance of joints is found to be 86.3% with 900 rpm rotational speed and 35 mm/min traverse speed. The microhardness values along the cross-section of the joints show a dramatic drop in the stir zone where the lowest value reached is about 63% of the base metal due to the softening of the welded zone caused by the heat input during joining.

  9. The Effect of Tool Profiles on Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Welded Al5052 T-Joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byeong-Jin; Bang, Hee-Seon; Bang, Han-Sur

    2018-03-01

    Al5052 T butt joints with two skins (5 mm) and one stringer (3 mm) has been successfully welded by friction stir welding (FSW). Notably, this paper has been investigated the effect of tool shape on welded formation mechanism and mechanical properties. The used shapes of tool pin are two types which are cylinder (type 1) and frustum (type 2). Dimension on two types of tool pin shape is respectively pin length of 4.7 mm and pin diameter of frustum type of top (5 mm) and bottom (3 mm). The results of experiment show that inner defects in FSWed T-joints increase significantly in accordance with traverse speed. The maximum tensile strength of welded joint fabricated using type 1 is equivalent to 85% that of the base metal, which is approximately 10% higher than that of type 2. Because welded joint of type 1 has more smoothly plastic flow in comparison with type 2. Consequently, the results show that type 1 is better appropriate for friction stir welded Al5052 T butt joints than type 2.

  10. Effect of Shielding Gas on the Properties of AW 5083 Aluminum Alloy Laser Weld Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyskoč, Maroš; Sahul, Miroslav; Sahul, Martin

    2018-04-01

    The paper deals with the evaluation of the shielding gas influence on the properties of AW 5083 aluminum alloy weld joints produced with disk laser. Butt weld joints were produced under different shielding gas types, namely Ar, He, Ar + 5 vol.% He, Ar + 30 vol.% He and without shielding weld pool. Light and electron microscopy, computed tomography, microhardness measurements and tensile testing were used for evaluation of weld joint properties. He-shielded weld joints were the narrowest ones. On the other hand, Ar-shielded weld joints exhibited largest weld width. The choice of shielding gas had significant influence on the porosity level of welds. The lowest porosity was observed in weld joint produced in Ar with the addition of 5 vol.% He shielding atmosphere (only 0.03%), while the highest level of porosity was detected in weld joint produced in pure He (0.24%). Except unshielded aluminum alloy weld joint, the lowest tensile strength was recorded in He-shielded weld joints. On the contrary, the highest average microhardness was measured in He-shielded weld joints.

  11. IFN-γ, IL-2, IP-10, and MIG as Biomarkers of Exposure to Leishmania spp., and of Cure in Human Visceral Leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana V. Ibarra-Meneses

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available New biomarkers are needed for monitoring the effectiveness of treatment for visceral leishmaniasis (VL. They might also improve the detection of the asymptomatic population in Leishmania-endemic areas. This paper examines the IL-2, IFN-γ, IFN-γ-induced protein 10 (IP-10, and monokine-induced-by-IFN-γ (MIG levels in whole blood—stimulated in vitro with soluble Leishmania antigen (SLA—taken from asymptomatic individuals and patients treated for VL living in a post-outbreak (Leishmania infantum area in Spain, and in an endemic (Leishmania donovani area of Bangladesh. IP-10 was found to be an accurate global marker of asymptomatic subjects with positive cellular/humoral tests, while MIG was found to be a better marker of contact with L. donovani than IL-2 but no for those with L. infantum. Determining IP-10, MIG, and IFN-γ levels proved useful in monitoring the cellular immune response following treatment for active disease caused by L. infantum.

  12. Effect of heat input on dissimilar welds of ultra high strength steel and duplex stainless steel: Microstructural and compositional analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasalloti, H., E-mail: hamed.tasalloti.kashani@student.lut.fi; Kah, P., E-mail: paul.kah@lut.fi; Martikainen, J., E-mail: jukka.martikainen@lut.fi

    2017-01-15

    The effect of heat input on the microstructure and compositional heterogeneity of welds of direct-quenched ultra high strength steel (Optim 960 QC) and duplex stainless steel (UNS S32205) was studied. The dissimilar welds were made using GMAW with a fully austenitic filler wire. In addition to grain coarsening in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the ferritic side, it was found that an increase in heat input correlatively increased the proportional volume of bainitic to martensitic phases. Coarse ferritic grains were observed in the duplex HAZ. Higher heat input, however, had a beneficial effect on the nucleation of austenite in the HAZ. Heat input had a regulatory effect on grain growth within the austenitic weld and more favorable equiaxed austenite was obtained with higher heat input. On the ferritic side of the welds, macrosegregation in the form of a martensitic intermediate zone was observed for all the cooling rates studied. However, on the duplex side, macrosegregation in the fusion boundary was only noticed with higher cooling rates. Microstructural observations and compositional analysis suggest that higher heat input could be beneficial for the structural integrity of the weld despite higher heat input increasing the extent of adverse coarse grains in the HAZ, especially on the ferritic side. - Highlights: •The effect of heat input on dissimilar welds of UHSS and DSS was studied. •Transmutation of the microstructure was discussed in detail. •The influence of heat input on compositional heterogeneity of welds was described. •Higher heat input enhanced bainitic transformation on the ferritic side. •Macrosegregation was affected by the amount of heat input on the DSS side.

  13. Investigation on the Effect of Sub-Zero Treatment on Micro-Hardness and Microstructure of GTAW Welded Al-Si-Mg-Mn Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devanathan, R.; Yuvarajan, D.; Christopher Selvam, D.; Venkatamuni, T.

    2018-02-01

    In this work, the effect of sub-zero treatment on the mechanical properties of an Al-Si-Mg-Mn alloy welded by GTAW (gas tungsten arc welding) leads to significant softening in the welded region. The latter is due to melting and resolidification in the welded region, which have resulted in decomposition of the strengthening precipitates. The experiments were performed on GTAW welded plates of 6 mm thickness by varying the heat inputs, namely, of 370, 317.1, 277.5, 246.4, and 222 J/mm, and sub-zero treatment time periods. The Sub-Zero treatment was performed at-45°C using dry ice; hardness and microstructure investigations were performed in the welded region of the Al‒Si-Mg-Mn alloy that was studied in two different conditions, namely, as-welded and in that formed after post weld sub-zero treatment with artificial aging. It was found that the post weld Sub-Zero treatment followed by artificial aging had led to realization of significantly higher hardness values in the welded region due to the recurrence of the precipitation sequence.

  14. Weld pool and keyhole dynamic analysis based on visual system and neural network during laser keyhole welding

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Masiyang

    2014-01-01

    In keyhole fiber laser welding processes, the weld pool behavior and keyhole dynamics are essential to determining welding quality. To observe and control the welding process, the accurate extraction of the weld pool boundary as well as the width is required. In addition, because of the cause-and-effect relationship between the welding defects and stability of the keyhole, which is primarily determined by keyhole geometry during the welding process, the stability of keyhole needs to be consid...

  15. Thermal damage control of dye-assisted laser tissue welding: effect of dye concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hua; Buckley, Lisa A.; Prahl, Scott A.; Shaffer, Brian S.; Gregory, Kenton W.

    2001-05-01

    Successful laser-assisted tissue welding was implemented to provide proper weld strength with minimized tissue thermal injury. We investigated and compared the weld strengths and morphologic changes in porcine small intestinal submucose (SIS) and porcine ureteral tissues with various concentration of indocyanine green (ICG) and with a solid albumin sheet. The study showed that the tissues were welded at lower ICG concentration (0.05 mM) with minimized tissue thermal damage using an 800-nm wavelength diode laser.

  16. The Effect of Nitrogen and Titanium on the Toughness of High Strength Saw Weld Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-12

    2.3 CCT diagram for typical SAW steel welds [8]. 26 Figure 2.4 Oxygen and nitrogen levels expected from several arc 31 welding processes [10]. Figure...alloyed ferritic weld metal such formation is achieved if the CCT diagram is displaced towards longer times. However, it is worth noting that too large...dilution and cooling rate [5]. In this context, the CCT diagram is often used to denote the transformations that occur in weld metal samples which

  17. Visualization of Spot- welding Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Černý

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This contribution devotes to monitoring of processes running during joining of steel sheets by incadescent so called point welding using non-destructive trial method – acoustic emission (AE. The joining process is detailed described within experimental measuring from the point of view of metallurgic effects runnig during weld creation (records obtained by means of AE method. It takes into consideration quality of joined steels within welding data of steel producer. Steel welding (determined by chemical composition during mechanical verification and firmness of welds consider results of measurement AE and fracture effect of point joints. The measurement also demonstrates conclusion about connection of metallurgic processes with material wave effects (AE measurement and their impact on firmness of joint at steel with guaranteed welding, difficult welding and at their potential combination.

  18. Effect of Interfacial Reaction on the Mechanical Performance of Steel to Aluminum Dissimilar Ultrasonic Spot Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Wang, Li; Chen, Ying-Chun; Robson, Joe D.; Prangnell, Philip B.

    2016-01-01

    The early stages of formation of intermetallic compounds (IMC) have been investigated in dissimilar aluminum to steel welds, manufactured by high power (2.5 kW) ultrasonic spot welding (USW). To better understand the influence of alloy composition, welds were produced between a low-carbon steel (DC04) and two different aluminum alloys (6111 and 7055). The joint strengths were measured in lap shear tests and the formation and growth behavior of IMCs at the weld interface were characterized by electron microscopy, for welding times from 0.2 to 2.4 seconds. With the material combinations studied, the η (Fe2Al5) intermetallic phase was found to form first, very rapidly in the initial stage of welding, with a discontinuous island morphology. Continuous layers of η and then θ (FeAl3) phase were subsequently seen to develop on extending the welding time to greater than 0.7 second. The IMC layer formed in the DC04-AA7055 combination grew thicker than for the DC04-AA6111 welds, despite both weld sets having near identical thermal histories. Zinc was also found to be dissolved in the IMC phases when welding with the AA7055 alloy. After post-weld aging of the aluminum alloy, fracture in the lap shear tests always occurred along the joint interface; however, the DC04-AA6111 welds had higher fracture energy than the DC04-AA7055 combination.

  19. Development of ceramic support the base of cordierite for one-side welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, L.L.P. de; Vieira, C.M.F.; Paranhos, R.P.R.; Tatagiba, L.C.S.

    2009-01-01

    This work has as objective develops ceramic backing for the execution of one side welds in steel. The backing consists the mixture of refractory mineral (Cordierite), adhesive (sodium silicate) and water. Test coupons produced by uniaxial pressing and burned to 1100 deg C they were submitted to physical and mechanical tests for determination the water absorption and flexion strength, respectively. The microstructure of ceramics produced was evaluated by diffraction of X-Ray, scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy. After the production of the ceramic backing, welding tests were accomplished by the process MIG-MAG to evaluate the format of the weld bead. Based on the results obtained, during and after the welding accomplished with the employment of the ceramic backing, has shown that it is technically feasible for one-side welding. (author)

  20. Review of high thickness welding analysis using SYSWELD for a fusion grade reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, Ravi, E-mail: prakash@ipr.res.in; Gangradey, Ranjana, E-mail: ranjana@ipr.res.in

    2013-10-15

    Vacuum vessel and Cryostat for a fusion grade machine are massive structures involving fabrication of chambers with high thickness, about thickness up to 60 mm or more, made of special grade steels. Such machines require accurate planning of welding as the distortions and tolerance levels are stringent. Vacuum vessel of ITER has “D” shaped profile and is toroidal double walled huge steel cage of about 6 m width and 19 m diameter, and the Cryostat of 30 m height and width. The huge vacuum chamber will be fabricated in various parts/sectors due to huge size and then welded with countless weld joints to give the final components. High thickness welding of vacuum vessel is considered to be one of the most important elements in building a reactor of fusion grade due to large ineluctable distortions of welded parts after welding process as it is not easy to correct the large deformations after the welding process and finally the corrections are very expensive. The present paper demonstrates results of welding simulation done using SYSWELD software. Simulation results are of review studies of identified welding process like MIG, MAG, NG-TIG, TIG and EBW for welding large structural D shaped vacuum vessel profile as a case study. Simulation has carried out for SS316LN in clamped as well as unclamped condition for a distortion tolerance of ±2 mm with various weld factors and the local–global approach.

  1. Review of high thickness welding analysis using SYSWELD for a fusion grade reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, Ravi; Gangradey, Ranjana

    2013-01-01

    Vacuum vessel and Cryostat for a fusion grade machine are massive structures involving fabrication of chambers with high thickness, about thickness up to 60 mm or more, made of special grade steels. Such machines require accurate planning of welding as the distortions and tolerance levels are stringent. Vacuum vessel of ITER has “D” shaped profile and is toroidal double walled huge steel cage of about 6 m width and 19 m diameter, and the Cryostat of 30 m height and width. The huge vacuum chamber will be fabricated in various parts/sectors due to huge size and then welded with countless weld joints to give the final components. High thickness welding of vacuum vessel is considered to be one of the most important elements in building a reactor of fusion grade due to large ineluctable distortions of welded parts after welding process as it is not easy to correct the large deformations after the welding process and finally the corrections are very expensive. The present paper demonstrates results of welding simulation done using SYSWELD software. Simulation results are of review studies of identified welding process like MIG, MAG, NG-TIG, TIG and EBW for welding large structural D shaped vacuum vessel profile as a case study. Simulation has carried out for SS316LN in clamped as well as unclamped condition for a distortion tolerance of ±2 mm with various weld factors and the local–global approach

  2. Present and future of laser welding machine; Laser yosetsuki no genjo to tenbo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniu, Y. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-04-01

    This paper describes recent trends of laser welding machine. For CO2 laser welding machine, seam weld of large diameter weld pipes using a 25 kW-class machine, and plate weld of steel plate using a 45 kW-class machine are reported. For YAG laser welding machine, high-output 5.5 kW-class machines are commercialized. Machines with slab structure of plate-like YAG chrystal have been developed which show high-oscillation efficiency and can be applied to cutting. Machines have been developed in which YAG laser output with slab structure is transmitted through GI fiber. High-speed welding of aluminum alloys can be realized by improving the converging performance. Efficiency of YAG laser can be enhanced through the time-divided utilization by switching the beam transmission path using fiber change-over switch. In the automobile industry, CO2 laser is mainly used, and a system combining CO laser with articulate robot is realized. TIG and MIG welding is often used for welding of aluminum for railway vehicles. It is required to reduce the welding strain. In the iron and steel industry, the productivity has been improved by the laser welding. YAG laser is put into practice for nuclear reactors. 5 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Welding Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  4. Microstructure, mechanical and corrosion behavior of high strength AA7075 aluminium alloy friction stir weldsEffect of post weld heat treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vijaya Kumar

    2015-12-01

    It was observed that the hardness and strength of weld were observed to be comparatively high in peak aged (T6 condition but the welds showed poor corrosion resistance. The resistance to pitting corrosion was improved and the mechanical properties were maintained by RRA treatment. The resistance to pitting corrosion was improved in RRA condition with the minimum loss of weld strength.

  5. Estudio numerico y experimental del proceso de soldeo MIG sobre la aleacion 6063--T5 utilizando el metodo de Taguchi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseguer Valdenebro, Jose Luis

    Electric arc welding processes represent one of the most used techniques on manufacturing processes of mechanical components in modern industry. The electric arc welding processes have been adapted to current needs, becoming a flexible and versatile way to manufacture. Numerical results in the welding process are validated experimentally. The main numerical methods most commonly used today are three: finite difference method, finite element method and finite volume method. The most widely used numerical method for the modeling of welded joints is the finite element method because it is well adapted to the geometric and boundary conditions in addition to the fact that there is a variety of commercial programs which use the finite element method as a calculation basis. The content of this thesis shows an experimental study of a welded joint conducted by means of the MIG welding process of aluminum alloy 6063-T5. The numerical process is validated experimentally by applying the method of finite element through the calculation program ANSYS. The experimental results in this paper are the cooling curves, the critical cooling time t4/3, the weld bead geometry, the microhardness obtained in the welded joint, and the metal heat affected zone base, process dilution, critical areas intersected between the cooling curves and the curve TTP. The numerical results obtained in this thesis are: the thermal cycle curves, which represent both the heating to maximum temperature and subsequent cooling. The critical cooling time t4/3 and thermal efficiency of the process are calculated and the bead geometry obtained experimentally is represented. The heat affected zone is obtained by differentiating the zones that are found at different temperatures, the critical areas intersected between the cooling curves and the TTP curve. In order to conclude this doctoral thesis, an optimization has been conducted by means of the Taguchi method for welding parameters in order to obtain an

  6. Effect of zirconium addition on welding of aluminum grain refined by titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaid, A.I.O.

    2011-01-01

    Aluminum and its alloys solidify in large grains columnar structure which tends to reduce their mechanical behaviour and surface quality. Therefore, they are industrially grain refined by titanium or titanium + boron. Furthermore, aluminum oxidizes in ordinary atmosphere which makes its weldability difficult and weak. Therefore, it is anticipated that the effect of addition of zirconium at a weight percentages of 0.1% (which proved to be an effective grain refiner on the weldability of aluminum grain refined by Ti) is worthwhile investigating. This formed the objective of this research work. In this paper, the effect of zirconium addition at a weight percentage of 0.1%, which corresponds to the peritctic limit on the aluminum-zirconium phase diagram, on the weldability of aluminum grain refined by Ti is investigated. Rolled sheets of commercially pure aluminum, Al grain refined Ti of 3 mm thickness were welded together using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding method (GTAW), formerly known as TIG. A constant air gap was maintained at a constant current level, 30 ampere AC, was used because it removes the oxides of the welding process under the same process parameters. Metallographic examination of weldments of the different combinations of aluminum and its microalloys at the heat affected zone, HAZ, and base metal was carried out and examined for width, porosity, cracks and microhardness. It was found that grain refining of commercially pure aluminum by Ti resulted in enhancement of its weldability. Similarly, addition of zirconium to Al grain refined by Ti resulted in further enhancement of the weldment. Photomicrographs of the HAZ regions are presented and discussed. (author)

  7. A study of weld quality in ultrasonic spot welding of similar and dissimilar metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Sarraf, Z; Lucas, M

    2012-01-01

    Several difficulties are faced in joining thinner sheets of similar and dissimilar materials from fusion welding processes such as resistance welding and laser welding. Ultrasonic metal welding overcomes many of these difficulties by using high frequency vibration and applied pressure to create a solid-state weld. Ultrasonic metal welding is an effective technique in joining small components, such as in wire bonding, but is also capable of joining thicker sheet, depending on the control of welding conditions. This study presents the design, characterisation and test of a lateral-drive ultrasonic metal welding device. The ultrasonic welding horn is modelled using finite element analysis and its vibration behaviour is characterised experimentally to ensure ultrasonic energy is delivered to the weld coupon. The welding stack and fixtures are then designed and mounted on a test machine to allow a series of experiments to be conducted for various welding and ultrasonic parameters. Weld strength is subsequently analysed using tensile-shear tests. Control of the vibration amplitude profile through the weld cycle is used to enhance weld strength and quality, providing an opportunity to reduce part marking. Optical microscopic examination and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to investigate the weld quality. The results show how the weld quality is particularly sensitive to the combination of clamping force and vibration amplitude of the welding tip.

  8. Spot Welding Characterizations With Time Variable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Hafid; Pinitoyo, A.; History; Paidjo, Andryansyah; Sagino, Sudarmin; Tamzil, M.

    2001-01-01

    For obtain spot welding used effective data, this research is made, so that time operational of machine increasing. Welding parameters are material classification, electrical current, and weld time. All of the factors are determined welding quality. If the plate more thick, the time must be longer when the current constant. Another factor as determined welding quality are surface condition of electrode, surface condition of weld material, and material classifications. In this research, the weld machine type IP32A2 VI (110 V), Rivoira trademark is characterized

  9. Mechanized hyperbaric welding by robots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aust, E.; Santos, J.F. dos; Bohm, K.H.; Hensel, H.D.

    1988-01-01

    At the GKSS-Forschungszentrum investigations are carried out on mechanized welded test plates produced under working pressure between 10 to 110 bar in breathable TRIMIX-5-atmosphere. The welds are performed by a modified industrial robot, which was adapted in its components to withstand these severe conditions. Variations on the welding parameters were made to maintain a stable arc as well as to provide on indication of the effect of the variables on the mechanical properties of the welded joint. During all tests the robot showed a very good function. Good reliable welds were achieved meeting the requirements according API II04 or BS 4515-1984. (orig.) [de

  10. Effect of using the double layer technique on the microstructure, microhardness and residual stress of welded ASTM A516 GR70 structural steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, George Luiz Gomes de; Miranda, Helio Cordeiro de

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the effect of using the double layer technique on the microstructure, microhardness and residual stresses of welded ASTM A516 Gr70 structural steel. Samples were welded with the same welding parameters and two types of chamfers, while the samples welded using the double layer technique underwent a buttering process on their chamfer face. Residual stress measurement was accomplished through x-ray diffraction, using a mini diffractometer for measurement in field. Metallographic analysis was accomplished in the transverse section of the welded joint, using optic microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The double layer technique showed that can be used in the welding of ASTM A516 Gr70 steel, because, besides promote a refinement and a drawing back of the CG-HAZ, it increased compressive residual stress in the whole surface of the analyzed samples.(author)

  11. Effects of B4C Addition on the Laser Beam Welding Characteristics of Al/SiC MMCs Produced By P/M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar KARAOĞLU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fusion weldability characteristics of metal matrix composites (MMC produced by powder metallurgy (P/M are usually insufficient due to unwanted micro-structural changes that occur during welding. This study aims to investigate the effects of B4C addition as reinforcement on the weld quality of Al/SiC MMCs. After the production of Al/SiC MMCs by P/M with or without the addition of B4C, laser beam welding (LBW characteristics of the materials were investigated by focusing on the integrity of the welds. Optical microscopy (OM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX were utilized for the characterization of the welds. Results show that Al/SiC MMCs produced by P/M can not be easily welded by LBW, but weldability characteristics of the material can be improved by the addition of B4C.

  12. Effect of Process Parameters on Friction Model in Computer Simulation of Linear Friction Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yamileva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The friction model is important part of a numerical model of linear friction welding. Its selection determines the accuracy of the results. Existing models employ the classical law of Amonton-Coulomb where the friction coefficient is either constant or linearly dependent on a single parameter. Determination of the coefficient of friction is a time consuming process that requires a lot of experiments. So the feasibility of determinating the complex dependence should be assessing by analysis of effect of approximating law for friction model on simulation results.

  13. Heat treatment effect on the properties of the EhP767 maraging steel welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taver, E.I.; Piskarev, M.N.; Yushchenko, K.A.; Pustovit, A.I.; Anisimova, M.S.

    1977-01-01

    Heat treatment effect on properties of welded joints of maraging 03Kh13N4K13M3T (EhP767) steel with yield strength over 150 kgs/mm 2 has been investigated. It is shown, that change in impact strength of aged joints at - 196 deg C depends on the amount of residual austenite and grain size. To stabilize 20-40 % residual austenite heat treatment regimes have been developed. Recommended are quenching at 1030-1050 deg C, sub-zero treatment and aging at 520 deg C for 16 hrs

  14. Analysis of the effect of the Electron-Beam welding sequence for a fixed manufacturing route using finite element simulations applied to ITER vacuum vessel manufacture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martín-Menéndez, Cristina, E-mail: cristina@natec-ingenieros.com [Numerical Analysis Technologies, S.L. Marqués de San Esteban No. 52, 33206 Gijón (Spain); Rodríguez, Eduardo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Oviedo, Campus de Gijón, 33203 Gijón (Spain); Ottolini, Marco [Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A., Corso Perrone 25, 16152 Genova (Italy); Caixas, Joan [F4E, c/Josep Pla, n.2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Guirao, Julio [Numerical Analysis Technologies, S.L. Marqués de San Esteban No. 52, 33206 Gijón (Spain)

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • The simulation methodology employed in this paper is able to adapt inside a complex manufacturing route. • The effect of the sequence is lower in a highly constrained assembly than in a lowly constrained one. • The most relevant influence on the distortions is the jigs design, instead of the welding sequence. • The welding distortion analysis should be used as a guidance to design and improve the manufacturing strategy. - Abstract: The ITER Vacuum Vessel Sectors have very tight tolerances and high density of welding. Therefore, prediction and reduction of welding distortion are critical to allow the final assembly with the other Vacuum Vessel Sectors without the production of a full scale prototype. In this paper, the effect of the welding sequence in the distortions inside a fixed manufacturing route and in a highly constrained assembly is studied in the poloidal segment named inboard (PS1). This is one of the four poloidal segments (PS) assembled for the sector. Moreover, some restrictions and limitations in the welding sequence related to the manufacturing process are explained. The results obtained show that the effect of the sequence is lower in a highly constrained assembly than in a low constrained one. A prototype manufactured by AMW consortium (PS1 mock-up) is used in order to validate the finite element method welding simulation employed. The obtained results confirmed that for Electron-Beam welds, both the welding simulation and the mock-up show a low value of distortions.

  15. Effects of solidified microstructures on J-R fracture resistances of the surge line pipe welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, J. H.; Lee, B. S.; Yoo, W.

    2003-01-01

    The cause of the difference in J-R fracture resistances of AISI Type 347 GTAW welds which had almost same amounts of chromium carbides were investigated by the microstructural observations. As a result, the difference in the fracture resistances with the morphologies of the retained δ-ferrites in Type 347 welds were observed. The fracture resistance of the weld which had mostly vermicular type δ-ferrites was inferior to the weld which has lacy and acicular mixed type δ-ferrites. Therefore, it was deduced that the morphology of δ-ferrites affected the J-R fracture resistances of Type 347 welds

  16. Experimental investigation of the thickness effect for large as-welded SAW S355 steel specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ólafsson, Ólafur Magnús; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher; Berggreen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The presented work aims to investigate and establish a pre-cise, thorough and detailed database from series of experi-mental testing of submerged arc welded (SAW) specimens of various thicknesses typically applied in ships and offshore structures and foundations. Welded structures of all sizes...... and shapes exhibit fatigue failure primarily in the welded region, rather than in the base material, due to imperfections and flaws relating to the welding procedure. The welded region has therefore received much attention from universities, re-search institutions along with industry as it is of significant...

  17. Effects of shot peening on the residual stress of welded SS400 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Man; Kim, Tae Hyung; Cheong, Seong Kyun; Lee, Seung Ho

    2002-01-01

    The fatigue life of structures is usually determined by welding zone. The tensile residual stress, which is induced by welding, reduces the fatigue life and fatigue strength of welded structures. If we remove the tensile residual stress or induce the compressive residual stress, the fatigue life of welded structures will be improved. The change of hardness and compressive residual stress of welded zone after shot peening was investigated in this paper. The results show that the hardness was increased by shot peening. The residual stress was reduced by shot peening

  18. A Cross-Sectional Study of the Cardiovascular Effects of Welding Fumes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiqi Li

    Full Text Available Occupational exposure to particulate air pollution has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. However, the risk to welders working today remains unclear. We aimed to elucidate the cardiovascular effects of exposure to welding fumes.In a cross-sectional study, structured interviews and biological sampling were conducted for 101 welders and 127 controls (all non-smoking males from southern Sweden. Personal breathing zone sampling of respirable dust was performed. Blood pressure (BP and endothelial function (using peripheral arterial tonometry were measured. Plasma and serum samples were collected from peripheral blood for measurement of C-reactive protein, low-density lipoprotein, homocysteine, serum amyloid A, and cytokines.Welders were exposed to 10-fold higher levels of particles than controls. Welders had significantly higher BP compared to controls, an average of 5 mm Hg higher systolic and diastolic BP (P ≤ 0.001. IL-8 was 3.4 ng/L higher in welders (P=0.010. Years working as a welder were significantly associated with increased BP (β=0.35, 95%CI 0.13 - 0.58, P=0.0024 for systolic BP; β=0.32, 95%CI 0.16 - 0.48, P<0.001 for diastolic BP, adjusted for BMI but exposure to respirable dust was not associated with BP. No clear associations occurred between welding and endothelial function, or other effect markers.A modest increase in BP was found among welders compared to controls suggesting that low-to-moderate exposure to welding fumes remains a risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

  19. Tool geometry, rotation and travel speeds effects on the properties of dissimilar magnesium/aluminum friction stir welded lap joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadi, J.; Behnamian, Y.; Mostafaei, A.; Gerlich, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Tool geometry, rotation and travel speeds show great effect on the microstructure stability of FSW joint. • Increasing rotation and travel speeds resulted in increasing the tensile strength and ductility of the joints. • Better intermixing between Al/Mg alloys was obtained by tapered threaded pin. • A mechanical interlocking mechanism proposed for higher ductility and superior tensile properties in FSW joints. - Abstract: Lap joint friction stir welding (FSW) between dissimilar AZ31B and Al 6061 alloys sheets was conducted using various welding parameters including tool geometry, rotation and travel speeds. Tapered threaded pin and tapered pin tools were applied to fabricate FSW joints, using different rotation and travel speeds. Metallurgical investigations including X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD), optical microscopy images (OM), scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM–EDS) and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) were used to characterize joints microstructures made with different welding parameters. Intermetallic phases were detected in the weld zone (WZ). Various microstructures were observed in the stir zone which can be attributed to using different travel and rotation speeds. Mechanical evaluation including lap shear fracture load test and microhardness measurements indicated that by simultaneously increasing the tool rotation and travel speeds, the joint tensile strength and ductility reached a maximum value. Microhardness studies and extracted results from stress–strain curves indicated that mechanical properties were affected by FSW process. Furthermore, phase analyses by XRD indicated the presence of intermetallic compounds in the weld zone. Finally, in the Al/Mg dissimilar weld, fractography studies showed that intermetallic compounds formation in the weld zone had an influence on the failure mode

  20. Study of MA Effect on Yield Strength and Ductility of X80 Linepipe Steels Weld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, Nazmul; Lazor, Robert; Gerlich, Adrian P.

    2017-09-01

    Multipass GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding) welding was used to join X80 linepipe materials using two weld metals of slightly different compositions. Welding wires with diameters of 0.984 and 0.909 mm were used while applying the same heat input in each pass. The slight difference in the wire diameters resulted in different HAZ microstructures. The microstructures in the doubly reheated HAZ of both welds were found to contain bainite-ferrite. However, etching also revealed a difference in martensite-austenite (MA) fraction in these reheated zones. The MA exhibited twice the hardness of ferrite when measured by nanoindentation. Tensile testing from the reheated zone of both welds revealed a difference in yield strength, tensile strength and elongation of the transverse weld specimens. In the reheated zone of weld A, (produced with a 0.984 mm wire) a higher fraction of MA was observed, which resulted in higher strength but lower elongation compared to weld B. The ductility of weld A was found severely impaired (to nearly half of weld B) due to formation of closely spaced voids around the MA, along with debonding of MA from the matrix, which occurs just above the yield stress.

  1. Effect of Welding Parameters on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Cast Fe-40Al Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Torun

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Friction welding of cast Fe-40Al alloy was carried out at 1000 rmp for various friction times, friction pressures, and forging pressures. The microstructures of the interface of welded samples were analyzed by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Micrographs demonstrated that excellent welding formed continuously along the interface, except for samples welded for 3 s. Chemical compositions of the interface of the friction welded samples and of the fractured surface of all the specimens were determined using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS. After the welding process, shear tests were applied to the welded samples to determine the shear strength of joints. Test results indicated that the maximum shear strength was 469.5 MPa.

  2. Studies on the Parametric Effects of Plasma Arc Welding of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selva Bharathi, R.; Siva Shanmugam, N.; Murali Kannan, R.; Arungalai Vendan, S.

    2018-03-01

    This research study attempts to create an optimized parametric window by employing Taguchi algorithm for Plasma Arc Welding (PAW) of 2 mm thick 2205 duplex stainless steel. The parameters considered for experimentation and optimization are the welding current, welding speed and pilot arc length respectively. The experimentation involves the parameters variation and subsequently recording the depth of penetration and bead width. Welding current of 60-70 A, welding speed of 250-300 mm/min and pilot arc length of 1-2 mm are the range between which the parameters are varied. Design of experiments is used for the experimental trials. Back propagation neural network, Genetic algorithm and Taguchi techniques are used for predicting the bead width, depth of penetration and validated with experimentally achieved results which were in good agreement. Additionally, micro-structural characterizations are carried out to examine the weld quality. The extrapolation of these optimized parametric values yield enhanced weld strength with cost and time reduction.

  3. Investigation of effect of post weld heat treatment conditions on residual stress for ITER blanket shield blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hun-Chea, E-mail: hcjung@nfri.re.kr [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sa-Woong [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun-Hee [Division of Convergence Technology, Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science (KRISS), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Seung-Wook [Division of Industrial Metrology, Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science (KRISS), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Min-Su; Shim, Hee-Jin [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • PWHT for ITER blanket shield block should be performed for dimensional stability. • Investigation of the effect of PWHT conditions on properties was performed. • Instrumented indentation method for evaluation of properties was used. • Residual stress and hardness decreased with increasing PWHT temperature. • Optimization of PWHT conditions would be needed for satisfaction of requirement. - Abstract: The blanket shield block (SB) shall be required the tight tolerance because SB interfaces with many components, such as flexible support keypads, First Wall (FW) support contact surfaces, FW central bolt, electrical strap contact surfaces and attachment inserts for both FW and Vacuum Vessel (VV). In order to fulfil the tight tolerance requirement, stress relieving shall be performed for dimensional stability after cover welding operation. In this paper, effect of Post Weld Heat Treatment (PWHT) conditions, temperature and holding time, was investigated on the residual stress and hardness. The 316L Stainless Steel (SS) was prepared and welded by manual TIG welding by using filler material with 2.4 mm of diameter. Welded 316L SS plate was machined to prepare the specimen for PWHT. PWHT was implemented at 250, 300, 400 °C for 2 and 3 h (400 °C only) and residual stress after relaxation were determined. The evaluation of residual stress and hardness for each specimen was carried out by instrumented indentation technique. The residual stress and hardness were decreased with increasing the heat treatment temperature and holding time.

  4. Effect of welding processes and joint configuration on the residual stresses and distortion in type 316 LN stainless steel weld joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasantharaja, P.; Vasudevan, M.; Palanichamy, P.

    2012-01-01

    Fabrication by welding introduces significant residual stresses in the welded structure/component due to non-uniform heat distribution during heating and cooling cycle. To control, reduce, or beneficially redistribute the residual stresses in weld joints, the stress distribution needs to be known. In the present study, weld joints of 16 mm thick 316LN stainless steel were made by multi-pass TIG, A-TIG welding and combination of TIG and A-TIG welding processes with various joint configurations. While V-groove edge preparation was required for making multi-pass TIG weld joint, square-edge preparation was sufficient for making A-TIG weld joint. Ultrasonic nondestructive technique based on the critically refracted longitudinal waves (LCR waves) has been used for the quantitative surface/sub-surface residual stress measurements in the weld joints. Distortion measurements were carried out before and after welding using height gauge. A-TIG weld joint was found to exhibit significant reduction in tensile residual stresses and distortion in comparison to that of other joints. (author)

  5. Effect of Multipass TIG and Activated TIG Welding Process on the Thermo-Mechanical Behavior of 316LN Stainless Steel Weld Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, K. C.; Balasubramanian, K. R.; Vasudevan, M.; Vasantharaja, P.; Chandrasekhar, N.

    2016-04-01

    The primary objective of this work was to develop a finite element model to predict the thermo-mechanical behavior of an activated tungsten inert gas (ATIG)-welded joint. The ATIG-welded joint was fabricated using 10 mm thickness of 316LN stainless steel plates in a single pass. To distinguish the merits of ATIG welding process, it was compared with manual multipass tungsten inert gas (MPTIG)-welded joint. The ATIG-welded joint was fabricated with square butt edge configuration using an activating flux developed in-house. The MPTIG-welded joint was fabricated in thirteen passes with V-groove edge configuration. The finite element model was developed to predict the transient temperature, residual stress, and distortion of the welded joints. Also, microhardness, impact toughness, tensile strength, ferrite measurement, and microstructure were characterized. Since most of the recent publications of ATIG-welded joint was focused on the molten weld pool dynamics, this research work gives an insight on the thermo-mechanical behavior of ATIG-welded joint over MPTIG-welded joint.

  6. Numerical Simulation of MIG for 42 GHz, 200 kW Gyrotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Udaybir; Bera, Anirban; Kumar, Narendra; Purohit, L. P.; Sinha, Ashok K.

    2010-06-01

    A triode type magnetron injection gun (MIG) of a 42 GHz, 200 kW gyrotron for an Indian TOKAMAK system is designed by using the commercially available code EGUN. The operating voltages of the modulating anode and the accelerating anode are 29 kV and 65 kV respectively. The operating mode of the gyrotron is TE03 and it is operated in fundamental harmonic. The simulated results of MIG obtained with the EGUN code are validated with another trajectory code TRAK.

  7. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...... to weld by traditional spot welding operations. Such joining processes are, however, not simple to develop due to the large number of parameters involved. Development has traditionally been carried out by large experimental investigations, but the development of a numerical programme system has changed...... this enabling prediction of the welding performance in details. The paper describes the programme in short and gives examples on industrial applications. Finally investigations of causes for failure in a complex industrial joint of two dissimilar metals are carried out combining numerical modelling...

  8. Study of the flux effect nature for VVER-1000 RPV welds with high nickel content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuleshova, E.A., E-mail: evgenia-orm@yandex.ru [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Kurchatov Sq.1, 123182, Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University, “MEPhI” (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Kashirskoe Highway 31, 115409, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gurovich, B.A.; Lavrukhina, Z.V.; Maltsev, D.A.; Fedotova, S.V.; Frolov, A.S.; Zhuchkov, G.M. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Kurchatov Sq.1, 123182, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    This work extends the research of the basic regularities of segregation processes in the grain boundaries (GB) of VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. The paper considers the influence of irradiation with different fast neutron fluxes on the structure, yield strength and ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (T{sub K}) changes as well as on changes of the share of brittle intergranular fracture and development of segregation processes in the VVER-1000 RPV weld metal (WM). The obtained experimental results allow to separate the contribution of the hardening and non-hardening mechanisms to mechanical properties degradation of material irradiated at the operating temperature. It is shown that the difference in T{sub K} shift in WM irradiated to the same fluence with different fast neutron fluxes is mainly due to the difference in the GB accumulation kinetics of impurities and only to a small extent due to the material hardening. Phosphorus bulk diffusion coefficients were evaluated for the temperature exposure, accelerated irradiation and irradiation within surveillance specimens (SS) using a kinetic model of phosphorus GB accumulation in low-alloyed low-carbon steels under the influence of operational factors. The correlation between the GB segregation level of phosphorus and nickel, and the T{sub K} shift - in WM SS was obtained experimentally and indicates the non-hardening mechanism contribution to the total radiation embrittlement of VVER-1000 RPV steels throughout its extended lifetime. - Highlights: • Structural elements in high Ni welds are studied at different irradiation fluxes. • AES study demonstrated different P GB kinetics at different irradiation fluxes. • Hardening and non-hardening mechanism contributions to the flux effect are assessed. • Correlation between ΔT{sub K} and P and Ni GB content is shown for VVER-1000 RPV welds.

  9. Thermal Aging Effects on Heat Affected Zone of Alloy 600 in Dissimilar Metal Weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Jun Hyuk; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Ji Hyun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Dissimilar metal weld (DMW), consists of Alloy 600, Alloy 182, and A508 Gr.3, is now being widely used as the reactor pressure vessel penetration nozzle and the steam generator tubing material for pressurized water reactors (PWR) because of its mechanical property, thermal expansion coefficient, and corrosion resistance. The heat affected zone (HAZ) on Alloy 600 which is formed by welding process is critical to crack. According to G.A. Young et al. crack growth rates (CGR) in the Alloy 600 HAZ were about 30 times faster than those in the Alloy 600 base metal tested under the same conditions [3]. And according to Z.P. Lu et al. CGR in the Alloy 600 HAZ can be more than 20 times higher than that in its base metal. To predict the life time of components, there is a model which can calculate the effective degradation years (EDYs) of the material as a function of operating temperature. This study was conducted to investigate how thermal aging affects the hardness of dissimilar metal weld from the fusion boundary to Alloy 600 base metal and the residual strain at Alloy 600 heat affected zone. Following conclusions can be drawn from this study. The hardness, measured by Vickers hardness tester, peaked near the fusion boundary between Alloy 182 and Alloy 600, and it decreases as the picked point goes to Alloy 600 base metal. Even though the formation of precipitate such as Cr carbide, thermal aging doesn't affect the value and the tendency of hardness because of reduced residual stress. According to kernel average misorientation mapping, residual strain decreases when the material thermally aged. And finally, in 30 years simulated specimen, the high residual strain almost disappears. Therefore, the influence of residual strain on primary water stress corrosion cracking can be diminished when the material undergoes thermal aging.

  10. A Simplified Model for the Effect of Weld-Induced Residual Stresses on the Axial Ultimate Strength of Stiffened Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bai-Qiao; Guedes Soares, C.

    2018-03-01

    The present work investigates the compressive axial ultimate strength of fillet-welded steel-plated ship structures subjected to uniaxial compression, in which the residual stresses in the welded plates are calculated by a thermo-elasto-plastic finite element analysis that is used to fit an idealized model of residual stress distribution. The numerical results of ultimate strength based on the simplified model of residual stress show good agreement with those of various methods including the International Association of Classification Societies (IACS) Common Structural Rules (CSR), leading to the conclusion that the simplified model can be effectively used to represent the distribution of residual stresses in steel-plated structures in a wide range of engineering applications. It is concluded that the widths of the tension zones in the welded plates have a quasi-linear behavior with respect to the plate slenderness. The effect of residual stress on the axial strength of the stiffened plate is analyzed and discussed.

  11. Effects of the Heterogeneity in the Electron Beam Welded Joint on Mechanical Properties of Ti6Al4V Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Gao, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Lin-Jie; Zhang, Jian-Xun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the effect of microstructure heterogeneity on the tensile and low cycle fatigue properties of electron beam welded (EBW) Ti6Al4V sheets. To achieve this goal, the tensile and low cycle fatigue property in the EBW joints and base metal (BM) specimens is compared. During the tensile testing, digital image correlation technology was used to measure the plastic strain field evolution within the specimens. The experimental results showed that the tensile ductility and low cycle fatigue strength of EBW joints are lower than that of BM specimens, mainly because of the effect of microstructure heterogeneity of the welded joint. Moreover, the EBW joints exhibit the cyclic hardening behavior during low fatigue process, while BM specimens exhibit the cyclic softening behavior. Compared with the BM specimens with uniform microstructure, the heterogeneity of microstructure in the EBW joint is found to decrease the mechanical properties of welded joint.

  12. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomlinson, J R; Wagg, A R; Whittle, M J [N.D.T. Applications Centre, CEGB, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1980-11-01

    The metallurgical structure of austenitic welds is described and contrasted with that found in ferritic welds. It is shown that this structure imparts a marked elastic anisotropy in the ultrasonic propagation parameters. Measurements of variations in the apparent attenuation of sound and deviations in the beam direction are described. The measurements are interpreted in terms of the measured velocity anisotropy. Two applications of the fundamental work are described. In the first it is shown how, by using short pulse compression wave probes, and with major modification of the welding procedure, a stainless steel fillet weld in an AGR boiler can be inspected. In the second application, alternative designs of a transition butt weld have been compared for ease of ultrasonic inspection. The effects of two different welding processes on such an inspection are described. Finally, the paper examines the prospects for future development of inspection and defect-sizing techniques for austenitic welds. (author)

  13. Effect of continuous and pulsed currents on microstructural evolution of stainless steel joined by TIG welding; Einfluss des Einsatzes von Dauerstrom und Impulsstrom auf die Mikrostrukturentwicklung bei durch das WIG-Schweissverfahren gefuegtem rostfreiem Stahl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durgutlu, Ahmet; Findik, Tayfun; Guelenc, Behcet [Gazi Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering; Cevik, Bekir [Duezce Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Welding Technology; Kaya, Yakup; Kahraman, Nizamettin [Karabuek Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Manufacturing Engineering

    2015-07-01

    In this study, AISI 316L series austenitic stainless steel sheets were joined by tungsten inert gas welding method in continuous and pulsed currents. Regarding microstructural investigation and hardness values of weld metal, samples were welded to investigate the effect of current type on grain structures of weld metal. Results showed that samples welded by using pulsed current had considerable different properties compared to the samples welded by using continuous current. While the weld metals of joinings obtained by using continuous current displayed a coarse-grained and columnar structure, weld metals obtained by using pulsed current had a finer-grained structure. It was also found that hardness values of samples, which were welded with continuous and pulsed current, were quite different.

  14. Study on the Effect of Laser Welding Parameters on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Ultrafine Grained 304L Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reihane Nafar Dehsorkhi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, an ultrafine grained (UFG 304L stainless steel with the average grain size of 300 nm was produced by a combination of cold rolling and annealing. Weldability of the UFG sample was studied by Nd: YAG laser welding under different welding conditions. Taguchi experimental design was used to optimize the effect of frequency, welding time, laser current and laser pulse duration on the resultant microstructure and mechanical properties. X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Optical Microscope (OM, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM, Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM, microhardness measurements and tension tests were conducted to characterize the sample after thermomechanical processing and laser welding. The results showed that the ultrafine grained steel had the yield strength of 1000 Mpa and the total elongation of 48%, which were almost three times higher than those of the as-received sample. The microstructure of the weld zone was shown to be a mixture of austenite and delta ferrite. The microhardness of the optimized welded sample (315 HV0.5 was found to be close to the UFG base metal (350 HV. It was also observed that the hardness of the heat affected zone (HAZ was  lower than that of the weld zone, which was related to the HAZ grain growth during laser welding. The results of optimization also showed that the welding time was the most important parameter affecting the weld strength. Overall, the study showed that laser welding could be an appropriate and alternative welding technique for the joining of UFG steels.

  15. A Brief Introduction to the Theory of Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and is already an important welding process for the aerospace industry, where welds of optimal quality are demanded. The structure of welds determines weld properties. The structure of friction stir welds is determined by the flow field in the weld metal in the vicinity of the weld tool. A simple kinematic model of the FSW flow field developed at Marshall Space Flight Center, which enables the basic features of FSW microstructure to be understood and related to weld process parameters and tool design, is explained.

  16. Effect of Nickel Contents on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties for Low-Carbon Bainitic Weld Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Gaojun; Cao, Rui; Yang, Jun; Jiang, Yong; Wang, Shuai; Guo, Xili; Yuan, Junjun; Zhang, Xiaobo; Chen, Jianhong

    2017-05-01

    Multi-pass weld metals were deposited on Q345 base steel using metal powder-flux-cored wire with various Ni contents to investigate the effects of the Ni content on the weld microstructure and property. The types of the microstructures were identified by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, and micro-hardness tests. As a focusing point, the lath bainite and lath martensite were distinguished by their compositions, morphologies, and hardness. In particular, a number of black plane facets appearing between lath bainite or lath martensite packets were characterized by laser scanning confocal microscope. The results indicated that with the increase in Ni contents in the range of 0, 2, 4, and 6%, the microstructures in the weld-deposited metal were changed from the domination of the granular bainite to the majority of the lath bainite and/or the lath martensite and the micro-hardness of the weld-deposited metal increased. Meanwhile, the average width of columnar grain displays a decreasing trend and prior austenite grain size decreases while increases with higher Ni content above 4%. Yield strength and ultimate tensile strength decrease, while the reduction in fracture area increases with the decreasing Ni mass fraction and the increasing test temperature, respectively. And poor yield strength in Ni6 specimen can be attributed to elements segregation caused by weld defect. Finally, micro-hardness distribution in correspondence with specimens presents as a style of cloud-map.

  17. Effect of welding parameters on mechanical properties of GTAW of UNS S31803 and UNS S32750 weldments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulraj Prabhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS and Super Duplex Stainless Steel (SDSS pipes were welded by Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW process. The effect of welding parameters such as heat input, cooling rate, shielding/purging gas composition and interpass temperature on tensile strength, hardness and impact toughness were studied. The microstructure analysis revealed presence of intermetallic phases at root region of the weldments. All mechanical properties were improved at lower heat input and high cooling rate due to grain refinement and balanced microstructure [ferrite and austenite]. All weldments exhibited higher strength than base materials. Weld root region was harder than centre and cap region. SDSS is more susceptible to sigma phase formation due to higher alloying elements and weld thermal cycles, which lead to considerable loss of toughness. Higher nitrogen contents in shielding and purging gas resulted strengthening of austenite phase and restriction of dislocations, which ultimately improved mechanical properties. Higher interpass temperature caused reduction in strength and toughness because of grain coarsening and secondary phase precipitation.

  18. The Study Of Histopathological Effects Of Welding Fumes On Spermatogenesis In Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arab M R

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fumes generated during electric welding are one of air pollutants of working place in industrial companies, which can cause some clinical signs and diseases in worker, including mucosal irritation, changing of semen quality and cancer. Chronic exposure of workers with these fumes can cause reduce sperm motility and forward penetration and decrease in normal sperm count. Although a lot of researches were done in this field up to now, there is little information about histopathological effects of these fumes on germinal epithelium. The aim of this study was to identify structural changes of germinal epithelium in Rat as an experimental model after exposure to fumes of electric welding in exposure chamber. Material and Methods: A total number of 60 Sprague Dawley Rats were chosen and divided into experimental (40 and control (20 groups. Each of groups was subdivided into 2, 4, 6 and 8-week subgroups. The number of Rat in each subgroup of experimental and control group was 10 and 5 respectively. Animals were housed in standard situation. After adaptation experimental group were exposed to fumes of electric welding (AMA 2000 electrode, 100 Ampere, 0.1 cm/s speed of electrode welding for 2 hour/day and 5 day/week. The rate of air turn over in exposure chamber was fixed to 12-15/hour. The amount of O3, CO, CO2, NO + NO2 and particulate matter were measured by Galtec detectors and Cellulose acetate filter respectively. According to time table animals were killed and specimens from testis were taken and fixed in formaline buffer solution and processed routinely. Sections with 5-7 micrometer in thickness were stained by H-E, PAS, PNA and Alcian blue pH=2.5. The thickness of germinal epithelium was measured and data were analyzed by Kruskall Wallis test. Results: The results of this study showed a few quantitative and qualitative changes in germinal epithelium. Vasodilatation of vessels in tunica albuginea and interstitial tissue, decreasing of

  19. Effect of welding processes on corrosion resistance of UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, Liu Ho; Hsieh, Wen Chin

    2003-01-01

    An attractive combination of corrosion resistance and mechanical properties in the temperature range -50 to 250 .deg. C is offered by duplex stainless steel. However, undesirable secondary precipitation phase such as σ, γ 2 and Cr 2 N may taken place at the cooling stage from the welding processes. Therefore, this paper describes the influence of different welding procedures such as manual metal arc welding (MMA), tungsten inert gas welding (TIG) and vacuum brazing on corrosion resistance of the welded joint for UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel. Microstructure and chemical compositions of the welded joint were examined. The weight loss of specimens immersed in 6% FeCl 3 solution at 47.5 .deg. C for 24-hours was determined and used to evaluate the pitting resistance of duplex stainless steel and their welds. The region of heat-affected zone of specimen obtained by the MMA is much wider than that resulted from TIG, therefore, the weight loss of welds by MMA was larger than that of weld by TIG. The weight loss of brazed specimens cooled from slow cooling rate was larger than those of specimens cooled from high cooling rate, because the precipitation of σ phase. Beside that, the weight loss of brazed specimen is greater than those of the welded specimens. The galvanic corrosion was observed in brazed duplex stainless steel joints in the chloride solution

  20. Phase analysis of fume during arc weld brazing of steel sheets with protective coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Matusiak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of research of the phase identification and of the quantitative phase analysis of fume generated during Cold Metal Transfer (CMT, ColdArc and Metal Inert Gas / Metal Active Gas (MIG / MAG weld brazing. Investigations were conducted for hot - dip coated steel sheets with zinc (Zn and zinc-iron (Zn - Fe alloy coatings. Arc shielding gases applied during the research-related tests were Ar + O2, Ar + CO2, Ar + H2 and Ar + CO2 + H2 gas mixtures. The analysis of the results covers the influence of the chemical composition of shielding gas on the chemical composition of welding fume.

  1. GAZVIL - Gases and gas mixtures for welding in protective medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avram, I.; Constantin, N.; Cristescu, I.; Stefan, L.; Zamfirache, M.

    1996-01-01

    Gases and gas mixtures are used in machine building industry as protective environment in the welding by the procedures: MIG, MAG, TIG, plasma and micro-plasma. Also they are used in jet plasma production as well as controlled environment in materials heat treatments, passivation or protective procedures of equipment of chemical and petrochemical industries. Gases and gas mixtures are obtained in particular quality conditions while their purity is certified by specific methods making use of performing technology in laboratories to be qualified in the frame of the RELAR system

  2. Effect of post-weld heat treatments on strength and toughness behavior of T-250 maraging steel welded by laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Kun; Shan, Jiguo; Wang, Chunxu; Tian, Zhiling

    2016-01-01

    This paper elucidates here the strength and toughness behavior of T-250 maraging steel welded by laser beam under different approaches of three post-weld heat treatments, i.e. aging (A), solutionizing+aging (SA) and homogenizing+solutionizing+aging (HSA). The microstructures of the weld metals with A and SA processes both comprised of finely dispersive Ni 3 (Ti, Mo) precipitates, small martensite lath and reverted austenite along the grain boundary. However, in the weld metal with HSA process, it exhibited the same Ni 3 (Ti, Mo) precipitate with the large martensite lath and the absence of reverted austenite. The ultimate tensile strength and static toughness of the welded joint with HSA process were 1350.6 MPa and 63.8 MJ m −3 , respectively. The static toughness has been remarkably improved from 71% to 91% of the applied parent metal compared with that of the welded joint with A process. The present study underscores that the Ni 3 (Ti, Mo) precipitate and martensite are significant to ensure the high strength of welded joints. Due to its inconsistent deformation with the matrix of martensite, the reverted austenite has a notable influence on the toughness of welded joints. It shows that the post-weld heat treatments of HSA process can influence the mechanical behavior of welded joints by eliminating the reverted austenite.

  3. Effect of post-weld heat treatments on strength and toughness behavior of T-250 maraging steel welded by laser beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Kun [Laser Processing Research Center, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Shan, Jiguo, E-mail: shanjg@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Laser Processing Research Center, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Professing Technology, Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Chunxu; Tian, Zhiling [Institute for Special Steel, Central Iron & Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2016-04-29

    This paper elucidates here the strength and toughness behavior of T-250 maraging steel welded by laser beam under different approaches of three post-weld heat treatments, i.e. aging (A), solutionizing+aging (SA) and homogenizing+solutionizing+aging (HSA). The microstructures of the weld metals with A and SA processes both comprised of finely dispersive Ni{sub 3}(Ti, Mo) precipitates, small martensite lath and reverted austenite along the grain boundary. However, in the weld metal with HSA process, it exhibited the same Ni{sub 3}(Ti, Mo) precipitate with the large martensite lath and the absence of reverted austenite. The ultimate tensile strength and static toughness of the welded joint with HSA process were 1350.6 MPa and 63.8 MJ m{sup −3}, respectively. The static toughness has been remarkably improved from 71% to 91% of the applied parent metal compared with that of the welded joint with A process. The present study underscores that the Ni{sub 3}(Ti, Mo) precipitate and martensite are significant to ensure the high strength of welded joints. Due to its inconsistent deformation with the matrix of martensite, the reverted austenite has a notable influence on the toughness of welded joints. It shows that the post-weld heat treatments of HSA process can influence the mechanical behavior of welded joints by eliminating the reverted austenite.

  4. Effects of post-weld heat treatment on microstructure and mechanical properties of TLP bonded Inconel718 superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, J.; Wang, Y.F.; Song, X.G.; Li, C.; Feng, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Transient liquid phase bonding of Inconel718 superalloy was carried out using a commercial Ni–Cr–Si–B amorphous interlayer. The interfacial microstructure of Inconel718 joints was analyzed by a scanning electron microscope and a transmission electron microscope. In particular, the effects of post-weld heat treatment on the interfacial microstructure and joining properties of Inconel718 joints were investigated in detail. The results showed that the precipitation of second phases in joints induced by post-weld heat treatment were beneficial to the improvement of joint properties. A tensile strength of 1130 MPa with an elongation percentage of 7% was achieved for a sample bonded at 1050 °C/60 min+1180 °C/60 min followed by the post-weld heat treatment

  5. Effect of pulsed gas tungsten arc welding on corrosion behavior of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balasubramanian, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Maamallan Institute of Technology, Anna University, Sriperumpudur 602 105 (India)], E-mail: manianmb@rediffmail.com; Jayabalan, V. [Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Anna University, Guindy, Chennai 600 025 (India)], E-mail: jbalan@annauniv.edu; Balasubramanian, V. [Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar 608 002 (India)], E-mail: visvabalu@yahoo.com

    2008-07-01

    Due to the excellent combination of properties such as elevated strength-to-weight ratio, high toughness and excellent resistance to corrosion, make titanium alloys attractive for many industrial applications. Advantages of pulsed current welding frequently reported in literature include refinement of fusion zone grain size, etc. Hence, in this investigation an attempt has been made to study the effect of pulsed current Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) welding parameters on corrosion behavior of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy. Pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding was used to fabricate the joints. To optimize the number of experiments to be performed, central composite design was used. The investigation revealed increase in corrosion resistance with increase in peak current and pulse frequency up to an optimum value of the same and decrease in corrosion resistance beyond that optimum point. An increase in corrosion resistance with grain refinement was also detected.

  6. Effect of pulsed gas tungsten arc welding on corrosion behavior of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, M.; Jayabalan, V.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2008-01-01

    Due to the excellent combination of properties such as elevated strength-to-weight ratio, high toughness and excellent resistance to corrosion, make titanium alloys attractive for many industrial applications. Advantages of pulsed current welding frequently reported in literature include refinement of fusion zone grain size, etc. Hence, in this investigation an attempt has been made to study the effect of pulsed current Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) welding parameters on corrosion behavior of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy. Pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding was used to fabricate the joints. To optimize the number of experiments to be performed, central composite design was used. The investigation revealed increase in corrosion resistance with increase in peak current and pulse frequency up to an optimum value of the same and decrease in corrosion resistance beyond that optimum point. An increase in corrosion resistance with grain refinement was also detected

  7. Effect of post weld heat treatments on the resistance to the hydrogen embrittlement of soft martensitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazarabedian, Alfredo; Ovejero Garcia, Jose; Bilmes, P.; Llorente, C.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of external hydrogen on the tensile properties of an all weld sample of a soft martensitic stainless steel was studied. The material was tested in the as weld condition and after tempered conditions modifying the austenite content, and changing the quantity, type and distribution of precipitates. Hydrogen was introduced by cathodic charge or by immersion in an acid brine saturated whit 1 atm hydrogen sulphide, during the mechanical test. The as weld condition showed a good resistance in the hydrogen sulphide, were the tempered samples were embrittled. Under cathodic charge, all samples were susceptible to hydrogen damage. The embritting mechanisms were the same in both environments. When the austenite content, was below 10% the crack path is on the primary austenite grain boundary. At higher austenite content, the crack is transgranular. (author)

  8. On the effect of niobium on the properties of welded joints in the 2.25% Cr-1% Mo type steel with nickel and niobium additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matusek, P.; Gladis, R.; Walder, V.

    The effects were studied of the chemical composition of the base material and of welding parameters on the properties of welded joints of steel 08Cr2.25Mo1NiNb for fast reactor steam generators. Welding was done using Boehler-Fox electrodes and electrodes developed in Czechoslovakia. Testing revealed that the welded joint hardened and embrittled depending on the content of free niobium. The occurrence of eutectic formation of a general composition of Nbsub(m)Xsub(n) and possible of the Fe 2 Nb phase was considered to be one of the possible unfavourable microstructural factor which affects the mechanical properties of the thermally affected zone. The effect of the cooling rate Δtausub(8/5), ie., the effect of welding technologies was also found to be a function of the free niobium content. The results of welded joint creep to the fracture showed that until the 2x10 4 fracture time no negative effect of the welding cycle on the welded joint refractoriness was found. (B.S.)

  9. Effects of strength mis-matching on the fracture behavior of nuclear pressure steel A508-III welded joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Zhengqiang [School of Material Science and Technology, Shanghai Jiaotong University, 1954 Huashan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)]. E-mail: zhuzhq01@sjtu.edu.cn; Jing Hongyang [School of Material Science and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Ge Jingguo [School of Material Science and Technology, Shanghai Jiaotong University, 1954 Huashan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Chen Ligong [School of Material Science and Technology, Shanghai Jiaotong University, 1954 Huashan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2005-01-15

    In this paper, according to the nuclear pressure steel A508-III, the effect of strength mis-matching on the fracture behavior was analyzed by fracture mechanics test and the crack tip stress field of three-point bend specimen was analyzed by using finite element analysis method (FEM). The fracture of heat-affected zone (HAZ) was emphasized especially. The results of FEM show that if the under-matching weld was used, the opening stress and stress triaxiality in the vicinity of crack tip would increase for weld-crack specimen, and would reduce for HAZ-crack specimen. This tendency was confirmed by the test results.

  10. Characterization of intermetallics in aluminum to zinc coated interstitial free steel joining by pulsed MIG brazing for automotive application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basak, Sushovan, E-mail: sushovanbasak@gmail.com [Metallurgical and Material Engineering Department, Jadavpur University, Kolkata–700032 (India); Das, Hrishikesh, E-mail: hrishichem@gmail.com [Metallurgical and Material Engineering Department, Jadavpur University, Kolkata–700032 (India); Pal, Tapan Kumar, E-mail: tkpal.ju@gmail.com [Metallurgical and Material Engineering Department, Jadavpur University, Kolkata–700032 (India); Shome, Mahadev, E-mail: mshome@tatasteel.com [Material Characterization & Joining Group, R & D, Tata Steel, Jamshedpur–831007 (India)

    2016-02-15

    In order to meet the demand for lighter and more fuel efficient vehicles, a significant attempt is currently being focused toward the substitution of aluminum for steel in the car body structure. It generates vital challenge with respect to the methods of joining to be used for fabrication. However, the conventional fusion joining has its own difficulty owing to formation of the brittle intermetallic phases. In this present study AA6061-T6 of 2 mm and HIF-GA steel sheet of 1 mm thick are metal inert gas (MIG) brazed with 0.8 mm Al–5Si filler wire under three different heat inputs. The effect of the heat inputs on bead geometry, microstructure and joint properties of MIG brazed Al-steel joints were exclusively studied and characterized by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), electron probe micro analyzer (EPMA) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) assisted X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and selective area diffraction pattern. Finally microstructures were correlated with the performance of the joint. Diffusion induced intermetallic thickness measured by FESEM image and concentration profile agreed well with the numerically calculated one. HRTEM assisted EDS study was used to identify the large size FeAl{sub 3} and small size Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} type intermetallic compounds at the interface. The growth of these two phases in A2 (heat input: 182 J mm{sup −1}) is attributed to the slower cooling rate with higher diffusion time (~ 61 s) along the interface in comparison to the same for A1 (heat input: 155 J mm{sup −1}) with faster cooling rate and shorter diffusion time (~ 24 s). The joint efficiency as high as 65% of steel base metal is achieved for A2 which is the optimized parameter in the present study. - Highlights: • AA 6061 and HIF-GA could be successfully joined by MIG brazing. • Intermetallics are exclusively studied and characterized by XRD, FESEM and EPMA. • Intermetallic formation by diffusion is

  11. Effects of irradiation on crack-arrest toughness of two high-copper welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskander, S.K.; Corwin, W.R.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the effect of neutron irradiation on the shift and shape of the lower-bound curve to crack-arrest data. Two submerged-arc welds with copper contents of 0.23 and 0.31 wt % were commercially fabricated in 220-mm-thick plate. Crack-arrest specimens fabricated from these welds were irradiated at a nominal temperature of 288 degree C to an average fluence of 1.9 x 10 19 neutrons/cm 2 (>1 MeV). A preliminary evaluation of the results shows that the neutron-irradiation induced crack-arrest toughness temperature shift is about the same as the Charpy V-notch impact temperature shift at the 41-J energy level. The shape of the lower-bound curves, (for the range of test temperatures covered), compared to those of the ASME K Ia -curve did not seem to have been altered by irradiation. 10 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs

  12. Effects of absorbed hydrogen on crack-tip ductility in the welded A516 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattak, M.A.; Haslan, M.H.; Tamin, M.N.

    2007-01-01

    Effects of absorbed hydrogen on structure and properties of welded A516 Grade-70 steel are investigated. Emphasis is placed on ductility measure of the crack-tip plastic zone under Mode I loading. Specimens are cathodically charged in a cell with dilute sulphuric acid and corrosion inhibitor with uniform charging current density of 20 mA/ cm 2 and at different exposure time. Results indicate a change from coarse- to fine-grained microstructures in the weld region and heat affected zone (HAZ) of hydrogen-charged specimen. Well-defined ferrite-pearlite bands in the base metal are transformed into coarse-grain structure. Hardness variation along radial distance indicates higher values towards the center of the bar, possibly due to faster diffusion rate but limited solubility of hydrogen. Load-COD responses indicate that slow, stable crack propagation occurred in both base metal and HAZ. The measured provisional fracture toughness, K Q is higher for HAZ than that for the base metal. The toughness values decreases significantly for the initial three hours of hydrogen charging. The tensile fracture region in the immediate fatigue pre-crack tip forms a triangular (rough) zone due to limited constraint to free surface deformation in the thin specimen. Fracture surface of HAZ is dominated by intergranular fracture with localized cleavage facets. (author)

  13. Effective dose in the manufacturing process of rutile covered welding electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz, M; Rozas, S; Pérez, C; Idoeta, R; Núñez-Lagos, R; Legarda, F

    2013-03-01

    Shielded metal arc welding using covered electrodes is the most common welding process. Sometimes the covering contains naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs). In Spain the most used electrodes are those covered with rutile mixed with other materials. Rutile contains some detectable natural radionuclides, so it can be considered a NORM. This paper mainly focuses on the use of MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code) as a predictive tool to obtain doses in a factory which produces this type of electrode and assess the radiological impact in a specific facility after estimating the internal dose.To do this, in the facility, areas of highest radiation and positions of workers were identified, radioactive content of rutile and rutile covered electrodes was measured, and, considering a worst possible scenario, external dose at working points has been calculated using MCNP. This procedure has been validated comparing the results obtained with those from a pressurised ionisation chamber and TLD dosimeters. The internal dose has been calculated using DCAL (dose and risk calculation). The doses range between 8.8 and 394 μSv yr(-1), always lower than the effective dose limit for the public, 1 mSv yr(-1). The highest dose corresponds to the mixing area.

  14. Glucose and maltose metabolism in MIG1-disrupted and MAL-constitutive strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Christopher; Olsson, Lisbeth; Rønnow, B

    1997-01-01

    in a mixed glucose-maltose medium revealed that the MAL-constitutive strains were more alleviated than the single MIG1-disrupted transformant. While all transformants exhibited higher maximum specific growth rates (0.24-0.25 h(-1)) in glucose-maltose mixtures than the wild type strain (0.20 h(-1)), the MAL-constitutive...

  15. Study of the effect of low-power pulse laser on arc plasma and magnesium alloy target in hybrid welding by spectral diagnosis technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liming; Hao, Xinfeng

    2008-10-01

    In order to study the effect of laser pulses on arc plasma and target metal in the hybrid welding process, the spectra of the plasmas in the welding process of magnesium alloys are analysed in this paper. The acquisition system of plasma spectra is set up and the spectral lines of welding plasma are acquired. Compared with tungsten-inert gas (TIG) welding, the intensities of the spectral lines of magnesium increase sharply while those of Ar decrease for strong evaporation and ionization of magnesium alloys in low-power laser/arc hybrid welding. The electron temperature and density are estimated by the Boltzmann plot method and the Stark broadening effect. The result shows that the electron temperature of arc plasma in the hybrid welding process is much lower than that in TIG welding, especially in the laser beam-affected zone. In contrast, the electron density of the plasma is enhanced. The influences of laser parameters on electron temperature are also studied. The changes in electron temperature and density indicate that the effect of laser pulse on the target metal is the dominant factor influencing the electron temperature and density in low-power laser/arc hybrid welding.

  16. Effect of pulsed current welding on fatigue behaviour of high strength aluminium alloy joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, V.; Ravisankar, V.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2008-01-01

    High strength aluminium alloys (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys) have gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring high strength-to weight ratio, such as transportable bridge girders, military vehicles, road tankers and railway transport systems. The preferred welding processes of high strength aluminium alloy are frequently gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process due to their comparatively easier applicability and better economy. Weld fusion zones typically exhibit coarse columnar grains because of the prevailing thermal conditions during weld metal solidification. This often results inferior weld mechanical properties and poor resistance to hot cracking. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to refine the fusion zone grains by applying pulsed current welding technique. Rolled plates of 6 mm thickness have been used as the base material for preparing single pass welded joints. Single V butt joint configuration has been prepared for joining the plates. The filler metal used for joining the plates is AA 5356 (Al-5Mg (wt%)) grade aluminium alloy. Four different welding techniques have been used to fabricate the joints and they are: (i) continuous current GTAW (CCGTAW), (ii) pulsed current GTAW (PCGTAW), (iii) continuous current GMAW (CCGMAW) and (iv) pulsed current GMAW (PCGMAW) processes. Argon (99.99% pure) has been used as the shielding gas. Fatigue properties of the welded joints have been evaluated by conducting fatigue test using rotary bending fatigue testing machine. Current pulsing leads to relatively finer and more equi-axed grain structure in gas tungsten arc (GTA) and gas metal arc (GMA) welds. In contrast, conventional continuous current welding resulted in predominantly columnar grain structures. Grain refinement is accompanied by an increase in fatigue life and endurance limit

  17. Effect of welding on creep damage evolution in P91B steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baral, J., E-mail: jayshree2k4@gmail.com [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Kharagpur, WB 721302 (India); Swaminathan, J. [CSIR–National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Chakrabarti, D.; Ghosh, R.N. [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Kharagpur, WB 721302 (India)

    2017-07-15

    Study of creep behavior of base metal (without weld) and welded specimens of P91B steel over a range of temperatures (600–650 °C) and stresses (50–180 MPa) showed similar values of minimum creep-rates for both specimens at higher stress regime (>100 MPa) whilst, significantly higher creep rates in the case of welded specimens at lower stress regime. Considering that welded specimen is comprised of two distinct structural regimes, i.e. weld affected zone and base metal, a method has been proposed for estimating the material parameters describing creep behavior of those regimes. Stress–strain distribution across welded specimen predicted from finite element analysis based on material parameters revealed preferential accumulation of stress and creep strain at the interface between weld zone and base metal. This is in-line with the experimental finding that creep rupture preferentially occurs at inter-critical heat affected zone in welded specimens owing to ferrite-martensite structure with coarse Cr{sub 23}C{sub 6} particles. - Highlights: •Comparison of creep properties of welded and virgin specimens of P91B steel. •At lower stresses (<100 MPa) welded samples show higher minimum creep-rate. •Creep rupture at inter-critical heat affected zone (IC-HAZ) in welded specimens. •FEA showing accumulation of creep strain in weld/base metal interface. •Precipitate free soft ferrite matrix accumulates strain and weakens IC-HAZ.

  18. Soldadura (Welding). Spanish Translations for Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    Thirty transparency masters with Spanish subtitles for key words are provided for a welding/general mechanical repair course. The transparency masters are on such topics as oxyacetylene welding; oxyacetylene welding equipment; welding safety; different types of welds; braze welding; cutting torches; cutting with a torch; protective equipment; arc…

  19. WELDING TORCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correy, T.B.

    1961-10-01

    A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

  20. Effects of stop–start features on residual stresses in a multipass austenitic stainless steel weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turski, M.; Francis, J.A.; Hurrell, P.R.; Bate, S.K.; Hiller, S.; Withers, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    In this article we describe experiments that characterise and quantify the localised perturbations in residual stress associated with both ramped and abrupt stop–start features in a multipass weld. Residual stress distributions in AISI Grade 304L/308L stainless steel groove-welded specimens, containing weld interruptions that were introduced in a controlled manner, have been characterised using both neutron diffraction and the incremental deep hole drilling method. The extent to which the localised stresses associated with the interruptions were annealed by overlayed passes was also assessed. The results suggest that, regardless of the type of interruption, there can be significant localised increases in residual stress if the stop–start feature is left exposed. If further weld passes are deposited, then the localised increases in stress are likely to persist if the interruption was abrupt, whereas for a ramped interruption they may be dissipated. - Highlights: ► In this study the residual stress-field surrounding weld interruptions was measured. ► Localised stresses were found to increase at weld interruptions. ► Both ramped and abrupt weld interruptions were investigated. ► After subsequent weld passes, localised stresses persisted for abrupt interruptions. ► After subsequent weld passes, localised stresses dissipated for ramped interruptions.

  1. Welding stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, J.; Barbe, B.; Jolly, N.

    1976-01-01

    The aim is to show how internal stresses are generated and to fix the orders of magnitude. A realistic case, the vertical welding of thick plates free to move one against the other, is described and the deformations and stresses are analyzed. The mathematical model UEDA, which accounts for the elastic modulus, the yield strength and the expansion coefficient of the metal with temperature, is presented. The hypotheses and results given apply only to the instantaneous welding of a welded plate and to a plate welded by a moving electrode [fr

  2. Effect of thermal exposure, forming, and welding on high-temperature, dispersion-strengthened aluminum alloy: Al-8Fe-1V-2Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, J. R.; Gilman, P. S.; Zedalis, M. S.; Skinner, D. J.; Peltier, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of applying conventional hot forming and welding methods to high temperature aluminum alloy, Al-8Fe-1V-2Si (FVS812), for structural applications and the effect of thermal exposure on mechanical properties were determined. FVS812 (AA8009) sheet exhibited good hot forming and resistance welding characteristics. It was brake formed to 90 deg bends (0.5T bend radius) at temperatures greater than or equal to 390 C (730 F), indicating the feasibility of fabricating basic shapes, such as angles and zees. Hot forming of simple contoured-flanged parts was demonstrated. Resistance spot welds with good static and fatigue strength at room and elevated temperatures were readily produced. Extended vacuum degassing during billet fabrication reduced porosity in fusion and resistance welds. However, electron beam welding was not possible because of extreme degassing during welding, and gas-tungsten-arc welds were not acceptable because of severely degraded mechanical properties. The FVS812 alloy exhibited excellent high temperature strength stability after thermal exposures up to 315 C (600 F) for 1000 h. Extended billet degassing appeared to generally improve tensile ductility, fatigue strength, and notch toughness. But the effects of billet degassing and thermal exposure on properties need to be further clarified. The manufacture of zee-stiffened, riveted, and resistance-spot-welded compression panels was demonstrated.

  3. Welding of Thin Steel Plates by Hybrid Welding Process Combined TIG Arc with YAG Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taewon; Suga, Yasuo; Koike, Takashi

    TIG arc welding and laser welding are used widely in the world. However, these welding processes have some advantages and problems respectively. In order to improve problems and make use of advantages of the arc welding and the laser welding processes, hybrid welding process combined the TIG arc with the YAG laser was studied. Especially, the suitable welding conditions for thin steel plate welding were investigated to obtain sound weld with beautiful surface and back beads but without weld defects. As a result, it was confirmed that the shot position of the laser beam is very important to obtain sound welds in hybrid welding. Therefore, a new intelligent system to monitor the welding area using vision sensor is constructed. Furthermore, control system to shot the laser beam to a selected position in molten pool, which is formed by TIG arc, is constructed. As a result of welding experiments using these systems, it is confirmed that the hybrid welding process and the control system are effective on the stable welding of thin stainless steel plates.

  4. Effect of process parameters on mechanical properties of friction stir spot welded magnesium to aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, H.M.; Yuan, W.; Badarinarayan, H.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Lap-shear failure load of ∼2.5 kN was achieved in dissimilar Mg to Al spot welds. • Failure load depends on both welding geometrical features and IMCs formation. • Thin and discontinuous IMCs formed in stir zone are beneficial for weld strength. • Low heat input and good material mixing/interlocking is essential for high strength. - Abstract: Friction stir spot welding was applied to dissimilar cast magnesium (Mg) alloy AM60B and wrought aluminum (Al) alloy 6022-T4 under various welding conditions. The influence of tool rotation rate and shoulder plunge depth on lap-shear failure load was examined. Welds were made at four different tool rotation rates of 1000, 1500, 2000 and 2500 revolution per minute (rpm) and various tool shoulder plunge depths from 0 mm to 0.9 mm. The cross section of each weld exhibited the formation of intermetallic compounds (IMCs) in the stir zone. An increase in tool rotation rate decreased the width of the stir zone and resulted in lower lap-shear failure loads. The stir zone width increased and interlocking of IMCs was observed with an increase in tool shoulder plunge depth at 1000 rpm. High lap-shear failure loads were achieved in welds having a large stir zone width with formation of discontinuous IMCs at the tip of the interfacial hook. An average lap-shear failure load of 2.5 kN was achieved for welds made at 1000 rpm and 0.9 mm shoulder plunge. The present study suggests that the mechanical properties of friction stir spot welded dissimilar alloys are greatly influenced by the stir zone width, interfacial hooks and IMCs which are all weld process dependent

  5. Nickel-base alloy overlay weld with improved ultrasonic flaw detection by magnetic stirring welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashi, Hirano; Kenji, Hirano; Masayuki, Watando; Takahiro, Arakawa; Minoru, Maeda

    2001-01-01

    Ultrasonic flaw detection is more difficult in Nickel-base alloy welds containing dendrites owing to the decrease ultrasonic transmissibility they cause. The present paper discusses application of magnetic stirring welding as a means for reducing dendrite growth with consequent improvement in ultrasonic transmissibility. Single pass and multi-pass welding tests were conducted to determine optimal welding conditions. By PT and macro observation subsequent to welding was carried out, optimal operation conditions were clarified. Overlay welding tests and UT clearly indicated ultrasonic beam transmissibility in overlay welds to be improved and detection capacity to be greater through application of magnetic stirring welding. Optimal operation conditions were determined based on examination of temper bead effects in the heat affected zone of low alloy steel by application of magnetic stirring welding to the butt welded joints between low alloy and stainless steel. Hardness in this zone of low alloy steel after the fourth layer was less than 350 HV. (author)

  6. Modeling of welded bead profile for rapid prototyping by robotic MAG welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Yong; ZHU Sheng; WANG Tao; WANG Wanglong

    2009-01-01

    As a deposition technology, robotic metal active gas(MAG) welding has shown new promise for rapid prototyping (RP) of metallic parts. During the process of metal forming using robotic MAG welding, sectional profile of single-pass welded bead is critical to formed accuracy and quality of metal pans. In this paper, the experiments of single-pass welded bead for rapid prototyping using robotic MAG welding were carried out. The effect of some edge detectors on the cross-sectional edge of welded bead was discussed and curve fitting was applied using leat square fitting. Consequently, the mathematical model of welded bead profile was developed. The experimental results show that good shape could be obtained under suitable welding parameters. Canny operawr is suitable to edge detection of welded bead profile, and the mathematical model of welded bead profile developed is approximately parabola.

  7. Welding, Bonding and Fastening, 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, J. D. (Editor); Stein, B. A. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    A compilation of papers presented in a joint NASA, American Society for Metals, The George Washington University, American Welding Soceity, and Society of Manufacturing Engineers conference on Welding, Bonding, and Fastening at Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, on October 23 to 25, 1984 is given. Papers were presented on technology developed in current research programs relevant to welding, bonding, and fastening of structural materials required in fabricating structures and mechanical systems used in the aerospace, hydrospace, and automotive industries. Topics covered in the conference included equipment, hardware and materials used when welding, brazing, and soldering, mechanical fastening, explosive welding, use of unique selected joining techniques, adhesives bonding, and nondestructive evaluation. A concept of the factory of the future was presented, followed by advanced welding techniques, automated equipment for welding, welding in a cryogenic atmosphere, blind fastening, stress corrosion resistant fasteners, fastening equipment, explosive welding of different configurations and materials, solid-state bonding, electron beam welding, new adhesives, effects of cryogenics on adhesives, and new techniques and equipment for adhesive bonding.

  8. Tensometry technique for X-ray diffraction in applied analysis of welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turibus, S.N.; Caldas, F.C.M.; Miranda, D.M.; Monine, V.I.; Assis, J.T.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the analysis of residual stress introduced in welding process. As the stress in a material can induce damages, it is necessary to have a method to identify this residual stress state. For this it was used the non-destructive X-ray diffraction technique to analyze two plates from A36 steel jointed by metal inert gas (MIG) welding. The stress measurements were made by the sin 2 ψ method in weld region of steel plates including analysis of longitudinal and transverse residual stresses in fusion zone, heat affected zone (HAZ) and base metal. To determine the stress distribution along the depth of the welded material it was used removing of superficial layers made by electropolishing. (author)

  9. Effect of welding process, type of electrode and electrode core diameter on the tensile property of 304L austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinlabi OYETUNJI

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of welding process, type of electrode and electrode core diameter on the tensile property of AISI 304L Austenitic Stainless Steel (ASS was studied. The tensile strength property of ASS welded samples was evaluated. Prepared samples of the ASS were welded under these three various variables. Tensile test was then carried out on the welded samples. It was found that the reduction in ultimate tensile strength (UTS of the butt joint samples increases with increase in core diameter of the electrode. Also, the best electrode for welding 304L ASS is 308L stainless steel-core electrode of 3.2 mm core diameter. It is recommended that the findings of this work can be applied in the chemical, food and oil industries where 304L ASS are predominantly used.

  10. Effects of diode laser welding with dye-enhanced glue on tensile strength of sutures commonly used in urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, A J; Chang, D T; Kayton, M L; Libutti, S K; Connor, J P; Hensle, T W

    1996-01-01

    Tissue welding using laser-activated protein solders may soon become an alternative to sutured tissue approximation. In most cases, approximating sutures are used both to align tissue edges and provide added tensile strength. Collateral thermal injury, however, may cause disruption of tissue alignment and weaken the tensile strength of sutures. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of laser welding on the tensile strength of suture materials used in urologic surgery. Eleven types of sutures were exposed to diode laser energy (power density = 15.9 W/cm2) for 10, 30, and 60 seconds. Each suture was compared with and without the addition of dye-enhanced albumin-based solder. After exposure, each suture material was strained (2"/min) until ultimate breakage on a tensometer and compared to untreated sutures using ANOVA. The strength of undyed sutures were not significantly affected; however, violet and green-dyed sutures were in general weakened by laser exposure in the presence of dye-enhanced glue. Laser activation of the smallest caliber, dyed sutures (7-0) in the presence of glue caused the most significant loss of tensile strength of all sutures tested. These results indicate that the thermal effects of laser welding using our technique decrease the tensile strength of dyed sutures. A thermally resistant suture material (undyed or clear) may prevent disruption of wounds closed by laser welding techniques.

  11. Effects of annealing time on the recovery of Charpy V-notch properties of irradiated high-copper weld metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskander, S.K.; Sokolov, M.A.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1994-01-01

    One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. An important issue to be resolved is the effect on the toughness properties of reirradiating a vessel that has been annealed. This paper describes the annealing response of irradiated high-copper submerged-arc weld HSSI 73W. For this study, the weld has been annealed at 454 C (850 F) for lengths of time varying between 1 and 14 days. The Charpy V-notch 41-J (30-ft-lb) transition temperature (TT 41J ) almost fully recovered for the longest period studied, but recovered to a lesser degree for the shorter periods. No significant recovery of the TT 41J was observed for a 7-day anneal at 343 C (650 F). At 454 C for the durations studied, the values of the upper-shelf impact energy of irradiated and annealed weld metal exceeded the values in the unirradiated condition. Similar behavior was observed after aging the unirradiated weld metal at 460 and 490 C for 1 week

  12. Comparison of the Effects of Tool Geometry for Friction Stir Welding Thin Sheet Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merry, Josh; Takeshita, Jennifer; Tweedy, Bryan; Burford, Dwight

    2006-01-01

    In this presentation, the results of a recent study on the effect of pin tool design for friction stir welding thin sheets (0.040") of aluminum alloys 2024 and 7075 are provided. The objective of this study was to investigate and document the effect of tool shoulder and pin diameter, as well as the presence of pin flutes, on the resultant microstructure and mechanical properties at both room temperature and cryogenic temperature. Specifically, the comparison between three tools will include: FSW process load analysis (tool forces required to fabricate the welds), Static Mechanical Properties (ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation), and Process window documenting the range of parameters that can be used with the three pin tools investigated. All samples were naturally aged for a period greater than 10 days. Prior research has shown 7075 may require post weld heat treatment. Therefore, an additional pair of room temperature and cryogenic temperature samples was post-weld aged to the 7075-T7 condition prior to mechanical testing.

  13. Effects of thermal aging on the microstructure of Type-II boundaries in dissimilar metal weld joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Seung Chang; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Bahn, Chi Bum; Kim, Si Hoon; Kim, Ju Young; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2015-04-01

    In order to investigate the effects of long-term thermal aging on the microstructural evolution of Type-II boundary regions in the weld metal of Alloy 152, a representative dissimilar metal weld was fabricated from Alloy 690, Alloy 152, and A533 Gr.B. This mock-up was thermally aged at 450 °C to accelerate the effects of thermal aging in a nuclear power plant operation condition (320 °C). The microstructure of the Type-II boundary region of the weld root, which is parallel to and within 100 μm of the fusion boundary and known to be more susceptible to material degradation, was then characterized after different aging times using a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope for micro-compositional analysis, electron backscattered diffraction detector for grain and grain boundary orientation analysis, and a nanoindenter for measurement of mechanical properties. Through this, it was found that a steep compositional gradient and high grain average misorientation is created in the narrow zone between the Type-II and fusion boundaries, while the concentration of chromium and number of low-angle grain boundaries increases with aging time. A high average hardness was also observed in the same region of the dissimilar metal welds, with hardness peaking with thermal aging simulating an operational time of 15 years.

  14. Effect of small additions of niobium on the welding behavior of an austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moorhead, A.J.; Sikka, V.K.; Reed, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    To systematically study the effect of niobium on the behavior of Type 304 stainless steel, a low-niobium commercial heat was remelted with varying niobium additions - up to 1000 ppM. A standardized weldability test, the Spot Varestraint, was used to compare the propensity of various heats for hot cracking. The fusion and heat-affected zone cracking behavior of the experimental heats was similar to that of a heat of commercial Type 304, and much superior to that of a commercial heat of Type 347 stainless steel. The superior resistance to fusion zone cracking was attributed to the presence of a small amount of delta ferrite in the microstructure of the weld nugget in the experimental materials. The outstanding heat-affected zone cracking behavior was at least partly attributable to backfilling of grain boundary separations in the experimental heats, as well as in the commercial Type 304

  15. The effect of support springs in ends welded gap hollow YT-joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. F. Vieira

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis on the effect of support springs in an ends circular hollow sections welded into a YT joint. The overall behavior and failure of the joint were characterized under axial compression of the lap brace. Two joint failure modes were identified: chord wall plastification (Mode A and cross-sectional chord buckling (Mode F in the region below the lap brace. The system was modeled with and without support springs using the numerical finite element program Ansys. Model results were compared with experimental data in terms of principal stress in the joint intersection. The finite element model without support springs proved to be more accurate than that with support springs.

  16. Effect of Weld Properties on the Crush Strength of the PWR Spacer Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kee-nam Song

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical properties in a weld zone are different from those in the base material because of different microstructures. A spacer grid in PWR fuel is a structural component with an interconnected and welded array of slotted grid straps. Previous research on the strength analyses of the spacer grid was performed using base material properties owing to a lack of mechanical properties in the weld zone. In this study, based on the mechanical properties in the weld zone of the spacer grid recently obtained by an instrumented indentation technique, the strength analyses considering the mechanical properties in the weld zone were performed, and the analysis results were compared with the previous research.

  17. The effect of axial external magnetic field on tungsten inert gas welding of magnesium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Caixia; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Jing

    2018-04-01

    The influences of axial external magnetic field on the microstructure and mechanical property of the AZ31 magnesium (Mg) alloy joints were studied. The microstructure of Mg alloy joint consisted of the weld seam, heat affected zone and base metal zone. The average grain size of weld seam welded with magnetic field is 39 μm, which is 38% smaller than that of the joint welded with absence of magnetic field. And the microhardness of weld seam increases with the help of magnetic field treatment, owing to the coarse grain refinement. With coil current of 2.0A, the maximum mechanical property of joint increases 6.7% to 255 MPa over the specimen without magnetic field treatment. Furthermore, fracture location is near heat affected area and the fracture surface is characterized with ductile fracture.

  18. Irradiation effects on weld heat-affected zone and plate materials (series 11)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanstad, R.K.; McCabe, D.E.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this task is to examine the effects of neutron irradiation on the fracture toughness (ductile and brittle) of the HAZ of welds and of A 302 grade B (A302B) plate materials typical of those used fabricating older RPVs. The initial plate material of emphasis will be A302B steel, not the A302B modified with nickel additions. This decision was made by the NRC following a survey of the materials of construction for RPBs in operating U.S. nuclear plants. Reference 1 was used for the preliminary survey, and the information from that report was revised by NRC staff based on information contained in the licensee responses to Generic Letter (GL) 92-01, open-quotes Reactor Vessel Structural Integrity, 10CFR50.54(f).close quotes The resulting survey showed a total of eight RPVs with A302B, ten with A302B (modified), and one with A302 grade A plate. Table 5.1 in the previous semiannual report provides a summary of that survey. For the HAZ portion of the program, the intent is to examine HAZ material in the A302B (i.e., with low nickel content) and in A302B (modified) or A533B-1 (i.e., with medium nickel content). During this reporting period, two specific plates were identified as being applicable to this task. One plate is A302B and the other is A302B (modified). The A302B plate (43 x 42 x 7 in.) will be prepared for welding, while the A302B (modified) plate already contains a commercially produced weld (heat 33A277, Linde 0091 flux). These plates were identified from a list of ten materials provided by Mr. E. Biemiller of Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC). The materials have been requested from YAEC for use in this irradiation task, and arrangements are being made with YAEC for procurement of the plates mentioned above

  19. WELDING METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, A.A.; Dunbar, J.V.; Ruffner, J.H.

    1959-09-29

    A semi-automatic method is described for the weld joining of pipes and fittings which utilizes the inert gasshielded consumable electrode electric arc welding technique, comprising laying down the root pass at a first peripheral velocity and thereafter laying down the filler passes over the root pass necessary to complete the weld by revolving the pipes and fittings at a second peripheral velocity different from the first peripheral velocity, maintaining the welding head in a fixed position as to the specific direction of revolution, while the longitudinal axis of the welding head is disposed angularly in the direction of revolution at amounts between twenty minutas and about four degrees from the first position.

  20. Effects of nitrogen and hydrogen in argon shielding gas on bead profile, delta-ferrite and nitrogen contents of the pulsed GTAW welds of AISI 316L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viyanit, Ekkarut [National Metal and Materials Technology Center (MTEC), Pathaumthani (Thailand). Failure Analysis and Surface Technology Lab; Hartung, Fritz; Lothongkum, Gobboon [Chulalongkom University, Bangkok (Thailand). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering,; Phakpeetinan, Panyasak; Chianpairot, Amnuysak

    2016-08-01

    The general effects of 1, 2, 3 and 4 vol.-% nitrogen and 1, 5 and 10 vol.-% hydrogen in argon shielding gas on weld bead profile (depth/width ratio: D/W) and the δ-ferrite content of AISI 316L pulsed GTAW welds were investigated. The limits for imperfections for the quality levels of welds were based on ISO 5817 B. The plates with a thickness of 6 mm were welded at the flat position and the bead on plate. Increasing hydrogen content in argon shielding gas increases the D/W ratio. Excessive hydrogen addition to argon shielding gas will result in incompletely filled groove and excessive penetration of weld. Increasing welding speed decreases the weld-metal volume and the D/W ratios. Nitrogen addition to argon shielding gas has no effect on the D/W ratio. The addition of a mixture of nitrogen and hydrogen to argon shielding gas on the D/W ratio does not show any interaction between them. An effect on the D/W ratio can be exclusively observed as a function of hydrogen content. Increasing hydrogen content in argon shielding gas increases the δ-ferrite content of weld metal. Increasing either nitrogen content in shielding gas or welding speed decreases the δ-ferrite content of weld metal. The nitrogen addition increases the weld metal nitrogen content, however, the hydrogen addition leads to a decrease of weld metal nitrogen content.

  1. Effects of welding fumes on nuclear air cleaning system carbon adsorber banks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberson, P.W. [Duke Power Company, Huntersville, NC (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Standard Technical Specifications for nuclear air cleaning systems include requirements for surveillance tests following fire, painting, or chemical release in areas communicating with the affected system. To conservatively implement this requirement, many plants categorize welding as a chemical release process, and institute controls to ensure that welding fumes do not interact with carbon adsorbers in a filter system. After reviewing research data that indicated welding had a minimal impact on adsorber iodine removal efficiency, further testing was performed with the goal of establishing a welding threshold. It was anticipated that some quantity of weld electrodes could be determined that had a corresponding detrimental impact on iodine removal efficiency for the exposed adsorber. This value could be used to determine a conservative sampling schedule that would allow the station to perform laboratory testing to ensure system degradation did not occur without a full battery of surveillance tests. A series of tests was designed to demonstrate carbon efficiency versus cumulative welding fume exposure. Three series of tests were performed, one for each of three different types of commonly used weld electrodes. Carbon sampling was performed at baseline conditions, and every five pounds of electrode thereafter. Two different laboratory tests were performed for each sample; one in accordance with ASTM 3803/1989 at 95% relative humidity and 30 degrees C, and another using the less rigorous conditions of 70% relative humidity and 80 degrees C. Review of the test data for all three types of electrodes failed to show a significant correlation between carbon efficiency degradation and welding fume exposure. Accordingly, welding is no longer categorized as a `chemical release process` at McGuire Nuclear Station, and limits on welding fume interaction with ventilation systems have been eliminated. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Metals welding by using laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Qaisy, R.A.W.

    1991-01-01

    In the present work, same welding ''conduction limited type'' under atmospheric conditions was performed using pulsed Ng:YAG laser to weld; low carbon steel (LCS), stainless steel (304) (SUS304), stainless steel (303) (SUS303), and brass. Microstructure of welded zone, heat affected zone (HAZ), and the laser energy on penetration depth and effective diameter were studied. Tensile test, micro-hardness, and surface roughness of welded and parent metals were also dealt with. Melting efficiency was worked out and an under vacuum seam welding of low carbon steel has been accomplished. Finally spot welding of aluminium tungsten, and platinium wires were employed using different layer energies. 34 tabs.; 82 figs.; 51 refs.; 1 app

  3. Effects of delta ferrite content on the mechanical properties of E308-16 stainless steel weld metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmonds, D. P.; Vandergriff, D. M.; Gray, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of ferrite content on the properties of type 308 stainless steel shielded metal-arc (SMA) welds were investigated. Welds were made at four levels of ferrite content ranging from 2 to 15 FN (Ferrite Number). Creep and tensile tests were performed. Specimens were aged at 1100/sup 0/C (593/sup 0/C) for times up to 10,000 h (36 Ms) and Charpy V-notch impact tests were performed. Chemical analysis of the original deposits, Magne-gage evaluations, and metallographic evaluation of tested specimens were made. The E308-16 stainless steel electrodes were formulated to produce SMA welds with 2, 5, 9, and 15 FN. The ferrite number was made to vary by varying the nickel and chromium concentrations. Magne-gage determinations revealed that as-welded structures contained an average of 1.8, 4.2, 9.6, and 14.5 FN, respectively. Chemical anslysis of these deposits revealed no unusually high concentrations of tramp elements that would significantly affect mechanical properties. The extra low-ferrite electrodes were made with a different core wire, which produced deposits with slightly higher molybdenum concentrations. This variation in molybdenum should affect properties only minimally. From these chemical analyses and a constitutional diagram, ferrite concentrations were calculated, and the results correlated with the Magne-gage values

  4. Effects of Heat Input on the Mechanical and Metallurgical Characteristics of Tig Welded Incoloy 800Ht Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar S. Arun

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the effect of heat input on the quality characteristics of tungsten inert arc gas welded incoloy 800HT joints using inconel-82 filler wire. Butt welding was done on specimens with four different heat inputs by varying the process parameters like welding current and speed. The result indicated that higher heat input levels has led to the formation of coarser grain structure, reduced mechanical properties and sensitization issues on the weldments. The formation of titanium nitrides provided resistance to fracture and increased the tensile strength of the joints at high temperatures. Further aging was done on the welded sample at a temperature of 750°C for 500 hours and the metallographic result showed formation of carbides along the grain boundaries in a chain of discrete and globular form which increased the hardness of the material. The formation of spinel NiCr2O4 provided oxidation resistance to the material during elevated temperature service.

  5. Effect of hydrogen oxygen and nitrogen, on the tendency of welded joints of titanium alloys to moderate failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorshkov, A.I.; Matyushin, B.A.

    1976-01-01

    The admissible limits have been defined of gaseous impurities content in the metal of welded joints of titanium alloys, with due accout for the phase composition and alloying system. The proposed procedure of testing disk specimens most adequately simulates the behavior of welded joints in full-scale strures. The tests lasting 2.5 to 3 years permit to consider the effect of temporal processes (hydrogen diffusion, relaxation of stresses, phase transformations, etc.) on the durability of a weld. The hydrogen content in the metal of welded joints of OT4 alloy should not exceed 0.008%, that of VT14 alloy should not exceed 0.008%, and that of VT20 alloy should not exceed 0.015% (at an oxygen content of no more than 0.15% and a nitrogen content of no more than 0.03%), the oxygen content being 0.25%, 0.2% and 0.2%, respectxvely (at a hydrogen content of no more than 0.008% and a nitrogen of no more than 0.03%), ;nd the nitrogen content being 0.1%, 0.06% and 0.08%, respectively (at hydrogen content of no more than 0.008% and an oxygen content of no more than 0.15%

  6. The effect of post-weld heat treatment temperature on the microstructure of Inconel 625 deposited metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, Xixue; Di, Xinjie; Wang, Baosen

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Post-weld heat treatment effects on microstructure of deposited metal are studied. • Coarsening of γ′ phase at different post-weld heat treatment temperature is revealed. • Formation of δ phase in deposited metal is a bainite-like transformation process. - Abstract: The effect of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) temperatures on the microstructure of Inconel 625 deposited metal (DM) was examined using an optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The transformation mechanism of the γ ″ → δ phase and the grain growth kinetics of the γ′ phase during PWHT were revealed. The results indicate that the microstructure of as-welded DM is composed of columnar grains of different sizes, of which the average grain size is approximately 160 μm. Certain precipitates, such as the dispersed γ′ phase, blocky MC-type carbide and irregular shape Laves phase, precipitate in the microstructure of the as-welded DM. Compared with as-welded DM, the microstructure of DM after PWHT at 650 °C for 4 h shows minimal variation. With an increase in PWHT temperature, a large number of body-centered tetragonal γ ″ phases precipitate at interdendrite regions in the microstructure of DM after PWHT at 750 °C for 4 h. When the PWHT temperature increases to 850 °C, the metastable γ ″ phase directly transforms into a stable δ phase in shear mode, which exhibits a similar chemical composition but a different crystal structure than the γ ″ phase. At 950 °C, the γ ″ phase and the δ phase disappear, whereas certain M 6 C-type carbides precipitate at the grain boundaries. Alloying elements such as Nb, Mo, Si, Al and Fe in the microstructure of as-welded DM exhibit segregation behavior. Due to an increasing PWHT temperature, the segregation behavior constantly weakens with minimal evolution to the temperature of 750 °C. Above this temperature, partition coefficients tend toward 1, and

  7. The effect of post-weld heat treatment temperature on the microstructure of Inconel 625 deposited metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Xixue [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Advanced Joining Technology, Tianjin University, No.92 Weijin Road, Nankai District, Tianjin 300072 (China); Di, Xinjie, E-mail: dixinjie@tju.edu.cn [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Advanced Joining Technology, Tianjin University, No.92 Weijin Road, Nankai District, Tianjin 300072 (China); Wang, Baosen [Baosteel Research Institute, Baoshan Iron and Steel Co., Ltd., Baoshan District, Shanghai 200431 (China)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Post-weld heat treatment effects on microstructure of deposited metal are studied. • Coarsening of γ′ phase at different post-weld heat treatment temperature is revealed. • Formation of δ phase in deposited metal is a bainite-like transformation process. - Abstract: The effect of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) temperatures on the microstructure of Inconel 625 deposited metal (DM) was examined using an optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The transformation mechanism of the γ{sup ″} → δ phase and the grain growth kinetics of the γ′ phase during PWHT were revealed. The results indicate that the microstructure of as-welded DM is composed of columnar grains of different sizes, of which the average grain size is approximately 160 μm. Certain precipitates, such as the dispersed γ′ phase, blocky MC-type carbide and irregular shape Laves phase, precipitate in the microstructure of the as-welded DM. Compared with as-welded DM, the microstructure of DM after PWHT at 650 °C for 4 h shows minimal variation. With an increase in PWHT temperature, a large number of body-centered tetragonal γ{sup ″} phases precipitate at interdendrite regions in the microstructure of DM after PWHT at 750 °C for 4 h. When the PWHT temperature increases to 850 °C, the metastable γ{sup ″} phase directly transforms into a stable δ phase in shear mode, which exhibits a similar chemical composition but a different crystal structure than the γ{sup ″} phase. At 950 °C, the γ{sup ″} phase and the δ phase disappear, whereas certain M{sub 6}C-type carbides precipitate at the grain boundaries. Alloying elements such as Nb, Mo, Si, Al and Fe in the microstructure of as-welded DM exhibit segregation behavior. Due to an increasing PWHT temperature, the segregation behavior constantly weakens with minimal evolution to the temperature of 750 °C. Above this temperature, partition coefficients

  8. Effect of dual laser beam on dissimilar welding-brazing of aluminum to galvanized steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadpour, Masoud; Yazdian, Nima; Yang, Guang; Wang, Hui-Ping; Carlson, Blair; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2018-01-01

    In this investigation, the joining of two types of galvanized steel and Al6022 aluminum alloy in a coach peel configuration was carried out using a laser welding-brazing process in dual-beam mode. The feasibility of this method to obtain a sound and uniform brazed bead with high surface quality at a high welding speed was investigated by employing AlSi12 as a consumable material. The effects of alloying elements on the thickness of intermetallic compound (IMC) produced at the interface of steel and aluminum, surface roughness, edge straightness and the tensile strength of the resultant joint were studied. The comprehensive study was conducted on the microstructure of joints by means of a scanning electron microscopy and EDS. Results showed that a dual-beam laser shape and high scanning speed could control the thickness of IMC as thin as 3 μm and alter the failure location from the steel-brazed interface toward the Al-brazed interface. The numerical simulation of thermal regime was conducted by the Finite Element Method (FEM), and simulation results were validated through comparative experimental data. FEM thermal modeling evidenced that the peak temperatures at the Al-steel interface were around the critical temperature range of 700-900 °C that is required for the highest growth rate of IMC. However, the time duration that the molten pool was placed inside this temperature range was less than 1 s, and this duration was too short for diffusion-control based IMC growth.

  9. Long-term aging of type 308 stainless steel welds: Effects on properties and microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.J.; Vitek, J.M.; David, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    Multipass gas tungsten arc welds with type 308 stainless steel filler metal in type 304L base plate have been aged at 400, 475, or 550 degrees C for times up to 5,000 h. The changes in mechanical properties as a result of these agings have been followed with tensile, impact, and fracture toughness testing, using subsize tensile, half-size Charpy, and 0.45T compact specimens, respectively. The changes in the microstructure were evaluated with optical and transmission electron microscopy. Relatively little change was observed in the tensile properties for any of the aging treatments, but significant embrittlement was observed in the impact and fracture toughness testing. The transition temperatures increased rapidly for aging at 475 or 550 degrees C, and more slowly for aging at 400 degrees C. The upper-shelf energies and the fracture toughness showed similar responses, with only a small decrease for 400 degrees C aging, but much greater and rapid decreases with aging at 475 or 550 degrees C. Aging at 400 or 475 degrees C resulted in the spinodal decomposition of the ferrite phase in the weld metal into iron-rich alpha and chromium-enriched alpha prime. In addition, at 475 degrees C G-phase precipitates formed homogeneously in the ferrite and also at dislocations. At 550 degrees C carbides formed and grew at the ferrite-austenite interfaces, and some ferrite transformed to sigma phase. These changes must all be considered in determining the effect of aging on the fracture properties

  10. Effect of tool rotational speed on force generation, microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir welded Al–Mg–Cr–Mn (AA 5052-O) alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moshwan, Raza; Yusof, Farazila; Hassan, M.A.; Rahmat, S.M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • 3 mm thick A