WorldWideScience

Sample records for midsouth ehealth alliance

  1. Midsouth Pulpwood Prices, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick E. Miller

    1993-01-01

    The average delivered price for a cord of Midsouth roundwood in 1991 was $56.39, an increase of 6.5 percent since 1990. Softwood roundwood averaged $58.24 and hardwoods, $50.48 per standard cord, up 2.8 and 7.9 percent, respectively. Chipped residue prices were $26.52 for softwood and $21.0l for hardwood per green ton. The expenditure for wood fiber in the Midsouth...

  2. Interoperable eHealth Platform for Personalized Smart Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mihaylov, Mihail Rumenov; Mihovska, Albena Dimitrova; Kyriazakos, Sofoklis

    2015-01-01

    personalized context-aware applications to serve the user's needs. This paper proposes the use of advised sensing, context-aware and cloud-based lifestyle reasoning to design an innovative eHealth platform that supports highly personalized smart services to primary users. The architecture of the platform has...... been designed in accordance with the interoperability requirements and standards as proposed by ITU-T and Continua Alliance. In particular, we define the interface dependencies and functional requirements needed, to allow eCare and eHealth vendors to manufacture interoperable sensors, ambient and home...

  3. eHealth indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    HYPPÖNEN, Hannele; AMMENWERTH, Elske; Nøhr, Christian

    2012-01-01

    eHealth indicators are needed to measure defined aspects of national eHealth implementations. However, until now, eHealth indicators are ambiguous or unclear. Therefore, an expert workshop "Towards an International Minimum Dataset for Monitoring National Health Information System Implementations......" was organized. The objective was to develop ideas for a minimum eHealth indicator set. The proposed ideas for indicators were classified based on EUnetHTA and De-Lone & McClean, and classification was compared with health IT evaluation criteria classification by Ammenwerth & Keizer. Analysis of the workshop...... results emphasized the need for a common methodological framework for defining and classifying eHealth indicators. It also showed the importance of setting the indicators into context. The results will benefit policy makers, developers and researchers in pursuit of provision and use of evidence...

  4. How a Fully Automated eHealth Program Simulates Three Therapeutic Processes: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holter, Marianne T S; Johansen, Ayna; Brendryen, Håvar

    2016-06-28

    eHealth programs may be better understood by breaking down the components of one particular program and discussing its potential for interactivity and tailoring in regard to concepts from face-to-face counseling. In the search for the efficacious elements within eHealth programs, it is important to understand how a program using lapse management may simultaneously support working alliance, internalization of motivation, and behavior maintenance. These processes have been applied to fully automated eHealth programs individually. However, given their significance in face-to-face counseling, it may be important to simulate the processes simultaneously in interactive, tailored programs. We propose a theoretical model for how fully automated behavior change eHealth programs may be more effective by simulating a therapist's support of a working alliance, internalization of motivation, and managing lapses. We show how the model is derived from theory and its application to Endre, a fully automated smoking cessation program that engages the user in several "counseling sessions" about quitting. A descriptive case study based on tools from the intervention mapping protocol shows how each therapeutic process is simulated. The program supports the user's working alliance through alliance factors, the nonembodied relational agent Endre and computerized motivational interviewing. Computerized motivational interviewing also supports internalized motivation to quit, whereas a lapse management component responds to lapses. The description operationalizes working alliance, internalization of motivation, and managing lapses, in terms of eHealth support of smoking cessation. A program may simulate working alliance, internalization of motivation, and lapse management through interactivity and individual tailoring, potentially making fully automated eHealth behavior change programs more effective.

  5. eHealth in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kierkegaard, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Denmark is widely regarded as a leading country in terms of eHealth integration and healthcare delivery services. The push for eHealth adoption over that past 20 years in the Danish health sector has led to the deployment of multiple eHealth technologies. However, in reality the Danish healthcare...... suffers from eHealth system fragmentation which has led to eHealth's inability to reach full potential in delivering quality healthcare service. This paper will presents a case study of the current state of eHealth in the Danish healthcare system and discuss the current challenges the country is facing...

  6. Appalachia meets the mid-south in Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Richard S.; Jackson, Michel T.-T.

    2003-04-01

    The father of bluegrass and long-time member of the Opry in Nashville, Bill Monroe, had a number of musical influences, including blues, gospel, and the American versions of Anglo-Scots-Irish folk music endemic to Appalachia. (Although Bill Monroe was from western Kentucky, the Appalachian influence is apparent.) In 1946 he recorded a song for Columbia Records that he had written. This song was recorded again in 1954 at Sun Studios as a ``B side'' by the future king of rock and roll, Elvis Presley. Raised in East Tupelo, MS and Memphis, Elvis' music derived from the mid-south's blues and gospel music, but with a peculiar honkytonk-informed, Memphis style. We will compare these artists through this common song and their spoken interviews in terms of voice quality and English dialect. Some copy-synthesis of these artists will be attempted in our search for the high, lonesome and rock and roll sounds.

  7. Wat is eHealth?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dol, Aranka

    2012-01-01

    Presentatie tijdens methodieklunch PsyQ team eetstoornissen op 21 november 2012.
    Presentatie over wat is ehealth? Op welke zorgprocessen kan ehealth worden ingezet? Wie zijn de beoogde gebruikers? Mogelijke inzet van ehealth interventies op de reeds bestaande behandelingen van obesitas.

  8. eHealth Recruitment Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Debbe; Canada, Ashanti; Bhatt, Riddhi; Davis, Jennifer; Plesko, Lisa; Baranowski, Tom; Cullen, Karen; Zakeri, Issa

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about effective eHealth recruitment methods. This paper presents recruitment challenges associated with enrolling African-American girls aged 8-10 years in an eHealth obesity prevention program, their effect on the recruitment plan, and potential implications for eHealth research. Although the initial recruitment strategy was…

  9. Nordic eHealth Indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyppönen, Hannele; Faxvaag, Arild; Gilstad, Heidi

    This report describes first results of the Network: eHealth policy analysis and first common Nordic eHealth indicators. The results show similarities and also some differences in the eHealth policies, priorities and implementation. Interesting similarities and differences in availability and use...... of eHealth services in the Nordic countries were found with the first comparable eHealth indicators. The results create a basis for Evidence-based policy making as well as benchmarking and learning best practices from each other....

  10. E-health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elkjaer, Margarita

    2012-01-01

    decrease the use of endoscopy in some cases. The findings corresponded well with action plan for a European e-Health Area and could be a helpful tool to provide more efficient health care for UC patients. Widespread implementation of the "Constant-Care" is possible, but it may require a reshaping...

  11. Constructive eHealth evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høstgaard, Anna Marie Balling

    2016-01-01

    Despite the existence of an extensive body of knowledge about best practices and factors that contribute to the successful development and adoption of eHealth, many eHealth development-projects still face a number of problems - many of them of an organizational nature. This chapter presents a new...... method: “The Constructive eHealth evaluation method” aimed at supporting real end-user participation - a well-known success factor in eHealth development. It provides an analytical framework for achieving real end-user participation during the different phases in the eHealth lifecycle. The method...... was developed and used for the first time during the evaluation of an EHR planning process in a Danish region. It has proven effective for providing management at more levels on-going information and feedback from end-users, allowing management to change direction during eHealth development in order to achieve...

  12. Field evaluation of potential pheromone lures for Lygus lineolaris (Hemiptera: Miridae) in the Mid-South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant bugs (Hemiptera: Miridae) are phytophagous pests of cultivated plants around the world. In the mid-South region of the United States, Lygus lineolaris is a primary pest of cotton, and causes economic damage. Previously published research about the volatiles produced by members of the genus Lyg...

  13. eHealth Policy

    CERN Document Server

    Capello, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    The rising of a new technological era has brought within it opportunities and threats the health systems worldwide have to deal with. In such a changed scenario the role of decision-makers is crucial to identify the real and perceived needs of the population and those areas on intervention in which eHealth can help to improve the quality and efficacy of care. Therefore, in-depth analysis of the state of the art both in industrialized and in developing countries is paramount. Many in fact are constraints that mine the designing and implementation of electronic systems for health. Only if policymakers understand the real implication of eHealth and the complexities of the human being, working model could be introduced. Otherwise the systems proposed will follow the same schemes that have produced failures so far. It implies also that the mutated role of the patient had to be known, together with his expectations and needs. Nevertheless, in a globalize world, a policy for eHealth have to consider also those facto...

  14. Constructive eHealth evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høstgaard, Anna Marie Balling; Bertelsen, Pernille Scholdan; Nøhr, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Information and communication sources in the healthcare sector are replaced with new eHealth technologies. This has led to problems arising from the lack of awareness of the importance of end-user involvement in eHealth development and of the difficulties caused by using...... traditional summative evaluation methods. The Constructive eHealth evaluation method (CeHEM) provides a solution to these problems by offering an evaluation framework for supporting and facilitating end-user involvement during all phases of eHealth development. The aim of this paper is to support this process...... by sharing experiences of the eHealth evaluation method used in the introduction of electronic health records (EHR) in the North Denmark Region of Denmark. It is the first time the fully developed method and the experiences on using the CeHEM in all five phases of a full lifecycle framework is presented...

  15. Nordic eHealth Indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyppönen, Hannele; Faxvaag, Arild; Gilstad, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    eHealth indicator and benchmarking activities are rapidly increasing nationally and internationally. The work is rarely based on a transparent methodology for indicator definition. This article describes first results of testing an indicator methodology for defining eHealth indicators, which...... was reported at the Medical Informatics Europe conference in 2012. The core elements of the methodology are illustrated, demonstrating validation of each of them in the context of Nordic eHealth Indicator work. Validation proved the importance of conducting each of the steps of the methodology, with several...

  16. Alliance in Youth Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linda Rothman; H. Pijnenburg; Rinie van Rijsingen

    2015-01-01

    This article introduces the concept of alliance in youth care. The concept of (therapeutic) alliance originates in adult psychotherapy and related research. Alliance refers to the working relationship between youth care workers and their clients. Within this concept, personal (emotional) and task

  17. eHealth recruitment challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Debbe; Canada, Ashanti; Bhatt, Riddhi; Davis, Jennifer; Plesko, Lisa; Baranowski, Tom; Cullen, Karen; Zakeri, Issa

    2006-11-01

    Little is known about effective eHealth recruitment methods. This paper presents recruitment challenges associated with enrolling African-American girls aged 8-10 years in an eHealth obesity prevention program, their effect on the recruitment plan, and potential implications for eHealth research. Although the initial recruitment strategy was literature-informed, it failed to enroll the desired number of girls within a reasonable time period. Therefore, the recruitment strategy was reformulated to incorporate principles of social marketing and traditional marketing techniques. The resulting plan included both targeted, highly specific strategies (e.g., selected churches), and more broad-based approaches (e.g., media exposure, mass mailings, radio advertisements). The revised plan enabled recruitment goals to be attained. Media appeared to be particularly effective at reaching the intended audience. Future research should identify the most effective recruitment strategies for reaching potential eHealth audiences.

  18. The Debate over eHealth

    CERN Document Server

    Gaddi, Antonio Vittorino

    2014-01-01

    The future of eHealth and telemedicine has recently become a much debated and controversial subject. It is widely believed that eHealth will play an increasingly important role in shaping healthcare systems in the twenty-first century. The rising burden of chronic diseases and the potential of eHealth for cutting costs and improving quality and safety of health services make eHealth a great opportunity for providing more efficient health care.

  19. Healthy e-health? Think 'environmental e-health'!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Richard E; Saunders, Chad; Palacios, Moné; Nguyen, Duyen Thi Kim; Ali, Sajid

    2010-01-01

    The Environmental e-Health Research and Training Program has completed its scoping study to understand the breadth of a new field of research: Environmental e-Health. Nearly every aspect of modern life is associated, directly or indirectly, with application of technology, from a cup of coffee, through transportation to and from work, to appliances in the home and industrial activities. In recent decades the rapidly increasing application of information and communications technologies (ICT) has added to the cacophony of technological 'noise' around us. Research has shown that technology use, including ICTs, has impact upon the environment. Studying environmental impact in such a complex global setting is daunting. e-Health is now being used as a convenient microcosm of ICT application within which to study these impacts, and is particularly poignant given that e-Health's environmental harms conflict with its noble goals of 'doing no harm'. The study has identified impacts, both benefits and harms in all three life-cycle phases for e-Health: up-stream (materials extraction, manufacturing, packaging, distribution), mid-stream (use period), and down-stream (end-of-life processes--disposal, recycling). In addition the literature shows that a holistic 'Life Cycle Assessment' approach is essential to understand the complexity of the setting, and determine the true balance between total harms and total benefits, and for whom.

  20. THE ALLIANCE FORMATION PROCESS

    OpenAIRE

    Whipple, Judith M.; Frankel, Robert

    1998-01-01

    While interest in developing strategic alliances within the food system continues to increase, there remains considerable risk when firms adopt such a cooperative strategy. The risk is due in part to the lack of concrete guidelines that illustrate the steps or stages of alliance development and the important strategic and operational decisions required at each stage. The existence of such guidelines would facilitate alliance formation and enable managers and researchers to better understand a...

  1. Alliance capability as a mediator between experience and alliance performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heimeriks, Koen; Duysters, Geert

    This study centers around the way in which firms can enhance alliance performance through the development of alliance capabilities. Whereas most research has focused on inter-firm antecedents of alliance performance, research on intra-firm antecedents pointing to prior experience and internal...... alliance managers and Vice-Presidents of 151 firms. The survey covers over 2600 alliances for the period 1997-2001. This study not only finds that alliance capabilities partially mediate between alliance experience and alliance performance, but also yields novel insights into the micro-level building...

  2. Value of Neonicotinoid Insecticide Seed Treatments in Mid-South Corn (Zea mays) Production Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, J H; Gore, J; Catchot, A L; Stewart, S D; Lorenz, G M; Musser, F R; Cook, D R; Kerns, D L; Leonard, B R; Dodds, D M

    2018-02-09

    Neonicotinoid seed treatments are one of several effective control options used in corn, Zea mays L., production in the Mid-South for early season insect pests. An analysis was performed on 91 insecticide seed treatment trials from Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Tennessee to determine the value of neonicotinoids in corn production systems. The analysis compared neonicotinoid insecticide treated seed plus a fungicide to seed only with the same fungicide. When analyzed by state, corn yields were significantly higher when neonicotinoid seed treatments were used compared to fungicide only treated seed in Louisiana and Mississippi. Corn seed treated with neonicotinoid seed treatments yielded 111, 1,093, 416, and 140 kg/ha, higher than fungicide only treatments for Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Tennessee, respectively. Across all states, neonicotinoid seed treatments resulted in a 700 kg/ha advantage compared to fungicide only treated corn seed. Net returns for corn treated with neonicotinoid seed treatment were $1,446/ha compared with $1,390/ha for fungicide only treated corn seed across the Mid-South. Economic returns for neonicotinoid seed treated corn were significantly greater than fungicide-only-treated corn seed in 8 out of 14 yr. When analyzed by state, economic returns for neonicotinoid seed treatments were significantly greater than fungicide-only-treated seed in Louisiana. In some areas, dependent on year, neonicotinoid seed treatments provide significant yield and economic benefits in Mid-South corn. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Developing Alliance Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heimeriks, Koen H.; Duysters, Geert; Vanhaverbeke, Wim

    This paper assesses the differential performance effects of learning mechanisms on the development of alliance capabilities. Prior research has suggested that different capability levels could be identified in which specific intra-firm learning mechanisms are used to enhance a firm's alliance...

  4. Proceedings of the 2013 MidSouth Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Society (MCBIOS) Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, Jonathan D; Dozmorov, Mikhail G; Burian, Dennis; Kaundal, Rakesh; Perkins, Andy; Perkins, Ed; Kupfer, Doris M; Springer, Gordon K

    2013-01-01

    The tenth annual conference of the MidSouth Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Society (MCBIOS 2013), "The 10th Anniversary in a Decade of Change: Discovery in a Sea of Data", took place at the Stoney Creek Inn & Conference Center in Columbia, Missouri on April 5-6, 2013. This year's Conference Chairs were Gordon Springer and Chi-Ren Shyu from the University of Missouri and Edward Perkins from the US Army Corps of Engineers Engineering Research and Development Center, who is also the current MCBIOS President (2012-3). There were 151 registrants and a total of 111 abstracts (51 oral presentations and 60 poster session abstracts).

  5. Investing in e-health

    CERN Document Server

    Gustafson, David H; Hawkins, Robert P

    2007-01-01

    As the Internet's presence in health care grows more pervasive, an increasing number of health care providers have begun to implement eHealth innovations in their practice. This book explores the development of a model to predict and explain the degree of success it is possible to achieve in implementing e-health systems. This model allows an institution to benchmark its progress towards IHCS implementation and advises administrators where to invest resources to increase the chance of successful implementation. A set of case studies highlights key features of the model, with each case study fu

  6. Developing contemporary and historical live tree biomass estimates for old pine-hardwood stands of the Midsouth, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Don C. Bragg

    2012-01-01

    Calculating stand biomass potential is an increasingly important aspect of silviculture, particularly when attempting to restore forest ecosystems or determining additionality in sequestered carbon. However, the lumbering of the original forests of the Midsouth region of the United States of America, coupled with the accelerating conversion of unmanaged natural-origin...

  7. Alliances in "The Hunger Games"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Judith

    2012-01-01

    This lesson plan is based on "The Hunger Games" by Suzanne Collins. Characters in "The Hunger Games" form alliances both inside and outside the arena. Katniss and Gale form alliances within District 12. Katniss, Peeta, and the other tributes form alliances for a variety of reasons during the Games. An alliance means that "someone's got your back"…

  8. Trust in Strategic Alliances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bo

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the dynamic and multi-dimensional nature of trust in strategic alliances. Adopting a co-evolutionary approach, I developed a framework to show how trust, conceptualised in different forms, plays distinct roles at various evolutionary stages of the alliance relationship....... Emphasising the multi-dimensional and dynamic role of trust, the framework illustrates how initial levels of a particular type of trust may co-evolve with the alliance and influence subsequent phases of the relationship – either on its own or in combination with other types or dimensions of trust....... The theoretical distinction between trust as antecedent, moderator and outcome during the evolution of the alliance relationship leads to research questions that may guide future empirical research....

  9. Alliances: Are they effective?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wardt, J. de

    1997-01-01

    Concern is growing in the oil field that alliances are not doing as well as they should be. Have they been adopted as a panacea without sufficient understanding of what they are and how to implement them? That question is answered in this analysis, which is organized as follows: a changing industry--two key trend drivers; entering a new era of organizing and managing systems; types of contracts--alliances vs. fixed and incentive contracts, limitations of discounting; oilfield alliances--new solutions are needed to improve the system; change/commitments--how changes are being implemented by the innovators, how many really support it; and alliances take effort and time--why it isn't easy to do it right

  10. Family Caregiver Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on your schedule. Look for our launch soon! FAMILY CARE NAVIGATOR ─ Click on Your State AL AK ... AiA18 Smart Patients Caregivers Community In partnership with Family Caregiver Alliance Learn more Caregiver Research Studies show ...

  11. Learning in Strategic Technology Alliances

    OpenAIRE

    SCHOENMAKERS, Wilfred; DUYSTERS, Geert

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we examine the influence of strategic technology alliances on organisational learning. From an empirical perspective we examined the pre- and post- alliance knowledge bases of allying firms. We found that the pre- alliance knowledge base overlap of the allying firms has an inverted U-shaped relationship with the degree of learning taking place in the alliance. Alliances established for the purpose of learning also show a significantly greater increase in knowledge base overlap f...

  12. Building National eHealth Platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vassilakopoulou, Polyxeni; Grisot, Miria; Jensen, Tina Blegind

    2017-01-01

    , the coordination of work among multiple contributors, and, the handling of technical heterogeneity within the pre-existing and continuous evolving eHealth landscape. Inclusiveness is related both to the character of public platforms as “common goods”, and, to growth ambitions for public eHealth. The aim...

  13. eHealth development: a holistic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lentferink, Aniek

    2016-01-01

    This presentation was held during the course 'eHealth development a holistic approach' at the University of Twente. The presentation included information about the project Quantified Self at Work and specifically the approach of co-creation during eHealth design with important stakeholders.

  14. Strategic alliance development : a study on alliances between competing firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wahyuni, S.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to reveal the development of lSAs (International Strategic Alliances) and the important factors for every phase of an alliance relationship. Since there are a great number of variables that can be assessed throughout the whole process of an alliance life, we decided

  15. Sustaining alliances for integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werhane, P H

    2000-01-01

    Research in business ethics has shown that value-grounded organizations outperform their counterparts in business terms and that industries can successfully regulate themselves. The market in health care, systems theory, and stakeholder analysis are used to generate a set of five potential core values to sustain an Ethics Alliance of Oral Health Organizations.

  16. Learning in strategic technology alliances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenmakers, W.W.M.E.; Duysters, G.M.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we examine the influence of strategic technology alliances on organisational learning. From an empirical perspective we examine the pre- and post-alliance knowledge bases of allying firms. We find that the pre-alliance knowledge base overlap of the allying firms has an inverted

  17. BARRIERS OF STRATEGIC ALLIANCES ORGANIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav M. Sannikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available General barriers of organization of different types of strategic alliances have beenconsidered in the article. There are several recommendations for overcoming themin cases of international alliances, and in case of work in one state. The article also identified goals and tasks of single coordination center of alliance to overcome organization barriers.

  18. Acceptance of Swedish e-health services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Mary-Louise; Loria, Karla

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate older people’s acceptance of e-health services, in order to identify determinants of, and barriers to, their intention to use e-health. Method: Based on one of the best-established models of technology acceptance, Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), in-depth exploratory interviews with twelve individuals over 45 years of age and of varying backgrounds are conducted. Results: This investigation could find support for the importance of usefulness and perceived ease of use of the e-health service offered as the main determinants of people’s intention to use the service. Additional factors critical to the acceptance of e-health are identified, such as the importance of the compatibility of the services with citizens’ needs and trust in the service provider. Most interviewees expressed positive attitudes towards using e-health and find these services useful, convenient, and easy to use. Conclusion: E-health services are perceived as a good complement to traditional health care service delivery, even among older people. These people, however, need to become aware of the e-health alternatives that are offered to them and the benefits they provide. PMID:21289860

  19. Legal aspects of E-HEALTH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callens, Stefaan; Cierkens, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Cross-border activities in health care in the European single market are increasing. Many of these cross-border developments are related to e-Health. E-Health describes the application of information and communication technologies across the whole range of functions that affect the health care sector. E-health attracts a growing interest on the European level that highlights the sharp need of appropriate regulatory framework able to ensure its promotion in the European Union. Some Directives constitute a step in this direction. Both the Data Protection Directive, the E-Commerce Directive, the Medical Device Directive and the Directive on Distance Contracting are some of the most important European legal achievements related to e-Health. Although the directives are not adopted especially for e-health applications, they are indirectly very important for e-Health. Firstly, the Data Protection Directive applies to personal data which form part of a filing system and contains several important principles that have to be complied with by e-Health actors processing personal data concerning health. Secondly, the E-commerce Directive applies to services provided at a distance by electronic means. Many e-Health applications fall within this scope. Thirdly, the Medical Devices Directive is of importance for the e-Health sector, especially with regard to e.g. the medical software that is used in many e-health applications. Finally, the Directive on Distance Contracting applies to contracts for goods or services which make use of one or more means of distance communication; E-Health business may involve the conclusion of contracts. Despite these Directives more developments are needed at the European level in order to make sure that e-Health will play an even more important role in health care systems than is the case today. The new e-Health applications like electronic health records, e-health platforms, health grids and the further use of genetic data and tissue involve new

  20. Understanding Alliance Formation Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    military, transportation, and communications technologies, which caused every place in the world to be politically significant. Second, “divisions of power...test a similar claim about the association between distance and dyadic alliance formation. In their first model, in which they use the complete data...1885 to 1990] are positively related to dyadic trade levels, and that their non- defense-pact counterparts are not significantly related to trade in

  1. Velvet Creative Alliance

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Tallinnas Niine t. 11 asuva disainibüroo Velvet Creative Alliance sisekujundus, mille eest sisearhitekt Taavi Aunre (Boom) pälvis Eesti Sisearhitektide Liidu 2006. a. büroointerjööri preemia. Osa mööblist on valmistatud T. Aunre jooniste järgi. Graafilise disaini osa kavandas disainibüroo ise. T. Aunrest, tema tähtsamad tööd. Plaan, 9 värv. vaadet, foto T. Aunrest

  2. eHealth in Denmark: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierkegaard, Patrick

    2013-12-01

    Denmark is widely regarded as a leading country in terms of eHealth integration and healthcare delivery services. The push for eHealth adoption over that past 20 years in the Danish health sector has led to the deployment of multiple eHealth technologies. However, in reality the Danish healthcare suffers from eHealth system fragmentation which has led to eHealth's inability to reach full potential in delivering quality healthcare service. This paper will presents a case study of the current state of eHealth in the Danish healthcare system and discuss the current challenges the country is facing today.

  3. Involving patients with E-health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karen Dam

    2015-01-01

    With e-health technologies, patients are invited as co-producers of data and information. The invitation sparks new expectations, yet often results in disappointments. With persistent ambitions to involve patients by means of e-health, it seems crucial to gain a better understanding of the nature......, sources and workings of the expectations that come with being invited. I analyse the use of an e-health system for ICD-patients, focusing on how patients sought to serve as information providers. Continuing STS-research on invisible work in technology use, I show how using the system involved complex work...... that understanding the dialogic dynamics and ‘overflows’ of information filtration work can help unpack the challenges of facilitating (patient) participation with e-health and other filtration devices....

  4. Governance structures impact on eHealth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kierkegaard, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background National eHealth implementation efforts need to move beyond the scope of making technology the primary focus and instead consider the broader spectrum of influences that can either hinder or facilitate eHealth adoption such as governance structures and policies. In this study, Denmark...... serves as an ideal candidate for further examination due to the country׳s rich history of intertwining events that have played an important role in the dynamic relationship between governance and eHealth success and failures. Methods A case study approach was used to gather a combination of primary...... and secondary data sources. All data collection was carried out through desk-research. Data collection relied on performing an extensive search of literature for relevant studies using combinations of keywords that reflected eHealth and governance-related topics. Inclusion and exclusion criteria׳s were applied...

  5. Acceptance of Swedish e-health services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary-Louise Jung

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Mary-Louise Jung1, Karla Loria11Division of Industrial Marketing, e-Commerce and Logistics, Lulea University of Technology, SwedenObjective: To investigate older people’s acceptance of e-health services, in order to identify determinants of, and barriers to, their intention to use e-health.Method: Based on one of the best-established models of technology acceptance, Technology Acceptance Model (TAM, in-depth exploratory interviews with twelve individuals over 45 years of age and of varying backgrounds are conducted.Results: This investigation could find support for the importance of usefulness and perceived ease of use of the e-health service offered as the main determinants of people’s intention to use the service. Additional factors critical to the acceptance of e-health are identified, such as the importance of the compatibility of the services with citizens’ needs and trust in the service provider. Most interviewees expressed positive attitudes towards using e-health and find these services useful, convenient, and easy to use.Conclusion: E-health services are perceived as a good complement to traditional health care service delivery, even among older people. These people, however, need to become aware of the e-health alternatives that are offered to them and the benefits they provide.Keywords: health services, elderly, technology, Internet, TAM, patient acceptance, health-seeking behavior

  6. Education as eHealth Infrastructure: Considerations in Advancing a National Agenda for eHealth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilberts, Sonya; Gray, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the role of education as infrastructure in large-scale ehealth strategies--in theory, in international practice and in one national case study. Education is often invisible in the documentation of ehealth infrastructure. Nevertheless a review of international practice shows that there is significant educational investment made…

  7. Contextual factors and challenges to e-health literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolanle A. Olaniran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We live in a digital world or digital era. Hence, People will argue that not only do information communication technologies (ICTs make e-health possible but rather that it is an innovation advance whose time has come. Notwithstanding, e-health while hoping to create well needed improvement in health care, it is rife with certain challenges which are not limited to e-health literacy. However, this paper looks specifically at e-health literacy. The paper, in particular overviews e-health while addressing the impacts of key contextual factors that impacts e-health and e-health literacy regarding the propensity to adopt and use e-health in LEDCs.

  8. Interpartner Legitimacy in the Alliance Development Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Das, T.K.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a framework to understand interpartner legitimacy in strategic alliances. Interpartner legitimacy is the mutual acknowledgment by the alliance partners that their actions are proper in the developmental processes of the alliance. We argue that interpartner legitimacy is needed...... legitimacy in different alliance types. Finally, we derive propositions for further research, and discuss strategies that alliance managers can adopt to develop interpartner legitimacy....

  9. Building Alliance Capability: Management Techniques for Superior Alliance Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A.J. Draulans (Johan); A-P. de Man (Ard-Pieter); H.W. Volberda (Henk)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractDespite the fact that they represent a growing element of business strategy, alliances between organisations quite often result in failure. This is partly due to the fact that firms have not built up adequate capabilities to manage alliances. Special management techniques have to be

  10. Building alliance capability : management techniques for superior alliance performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draulans, J.; Man, de A.P.; Volberda, H.W.

    2003-01-01

    Despite the fact that they represent a growing element of business strategy, alliances between organisations quite often result in failure. This is partly due to the fact that firms have not built up adequate capabilities to manage alliances. Special management techniques have to be implemented in

  11. Ehealth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Natalia Konstantinovich; Andersen, Nynne Nyboe; Callaerts-Vegh, Zsuzsanna

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of a low fermentable, oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols diet (LFD) and the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). METHODS: Randomised, unblinded controlled trial on the effect of 6-wk treatment with ...

  12. Ehealth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Natalia; Andersen, Nynne Nyboe; Végh, Zsuzsanna

    2014-01-01

    with LFD, LGG or a normal Danish/Western diet (ND) in patients with IBS fulfilling Rome III diagnostic criteria, recruited between November 2009 and April 2013. Patients were required to complete on a weekly basis the IBS severity score system (IBS-SSS) and IBS quality of life (IBS-QOL) questionnaires...... in a specially developed IBS web self-monitoring application. We investigated whether LFD or LGG could reduce IBS-SSS and improve QOL in IBS patients. RESULTS: One hundred twenty-three patients (median age 37 years, range: 18-74 years), 90 (73%) females were randomised: 42 to LFD, 41 to LGG and 40 to ND....... A significant reduction in mean ± SD of IBS-SSS from baseline to week 6 between LFD vs LGG vs ND was revealed: 133 ± 122 vs 68 ± 107, 133 ± 122 vs 34 ± 95, P SSS for baseline covariates showed statistically significant reduction of IBS-SSS in LFD group compared to ND (IBS-SSS...

  13. Understanding organizational change for alliancing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.M. Keers, Bianca; van Fenema, Paul C.; Zijm, Henk

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine an organization’s operational alignment in the process of alliance formation. Design/methodology/approach: A literature study was conducted on the strategic importance of assessing and aligning organizations’ operations for alliancing. Furthermore, an

  14. Crafting successful strategic technology alliances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duysters, G.M.; Kok, G.; Vaandrager, M.

    1999-01-01

    Despite the trend towards an increasing use of strategic technology alliances, mortality rates of cooperative agreements have always been extremely high. In this paper we argue that rapid economic and technological developments have overthrown traditional thinking about alliances and that firms

  15. Strategic alliances and market risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havenaar, Matthias; Hiscocks, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Strategic alliances in product development and marketing are crucial to the biotechnology industry. Many alliances, however, are terminated before the drug reaches the market. In this article we make the case that strategic alliances can fail because of how they are negotiated. Alliance contracts are often inflexible and do not allow for changes in market conditions. We propose a model for contract valuation that can assist biotech and/or pharma deal makers in negotiating alliances that have a higher chance of survival in uncertain market conditions. The model makes use of variable royalties and milestone payments. Because licensing is key to the biotech and/or pharma business model this article will be of interest not only to professionals in licensing, but to all professionals active in the industry. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Recruitment methods for survey research: Findings from the Mid-South Clinical Data Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heerman, William J; Jackson, Natalie; Roumie, Christianne L; Harris, Paul A; Rosenbloom, S Trent; Pulley, Jill; Wilkins, Consuelo H; Williams, Neely A; Crenshaw, David; Leak, Cardella; Scherdin, Jon; Muñoz, Daniel; Bachmann, Justin; Rothman, Russell L; Kripalani, Sunil

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this study was to report survey response rates and demographic characteristics of eight recruitment approaches to determine acceptability and effectiveness of large-scale patient recruitment among various populations. We conducted a cross sectional analysis of survey data from two large cohorts. Patients were recruited from the Mid-South Clinical Data Research Network using clinic-based recruitment, research registries, and mail, phone, and email approaches. Response rates are reported as patients who consented for the survey divided by the number of eligible patients approached. We contacted more than 90,000 patients and 13,197 patients completed surveys. Median age was 56.3years (IQR 40.9, 67.4). Racial/ethnic distribution was 84.1% White, non-Hispanic; 9.9% Black, non-Hispanic; 1.8% Hispanic; and 4.0% other, non-Hispanic. Face-to-face recruitment had the highest response rate of 94.3%, followed by participants who "opted-in" to a registry (76%). The lowest response rate was for unsolicited emails from the clinic (6.1%). Face-to-face recruitment enrolled a higher percentage of participants who self-identified as Black, non-Hispanic compared to other approaches (18.6% face-to-face vs. 8.4% for email). Technology-enabled recruitment approaches such as registries and emails are effective for recruiting but may yield less racial/ethnic diversity compared to traditional, more time-intensive approaches. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Applying e-health to case management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J M

    2000-01-01

    The healthcare industry is only beginning to understand e-health. E-health can be defined as the use of technology to directly improve healthcare delivery-affording patients the opportunity to participate in their own healthcare management, provider, and institution. The market is changing rapidly, and innovations, partnerships, and mergers are taking place daily. For healthcare institutions, setting a long-term, yet adaptable e-health strategy is of vital importance for the continued success of the organization. For clinicians, an understanding of and familiarity with technologies can significantly improve workflow, organization, and patient interaction. For the patient, technology can be leveraged as a means to take initiative and responsibility for his/her own health. This article defines e-health and explains the implications and benefits of e-health to nurses and their patients. The article also identifies unique opportunities e-health/e-commerce can provide case managers in promoting patient connectivity, care management, and economy in cost of care.

  18. The Research Data Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, K. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Research Data Alliance (RDA) is an international organization created in 2012 to provide researchers with a forum for identifying and removing barriers to data sharing. Since then, RDA has gained over 3000 individual members, over three dozen organizational members, 47 Interest Groups, and 17 Working Groups, all focused on research data sharing. Interoperability is one instantiation of data sharing, but is not the only barrier to overcome. Technology limitations, discipline-specific cultures that do not support sharing, lack of best-practices, or lack of good definitions, are only three of a long list of situations preventing researchers from sharing their data. This presentation will cover how RDA has grown, some details on how the first eight solutions contribute to interoperability and sharing, and a sneak peek at what's in the pipeline.

  19. Principles and framework for eHealth strategy development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Richard E; Mars, Maurice

    2013-07-30

    Significant investment in eHealth solutions is being made in nearly every country of the world. How do we know that these investments and the foregone opportunity costs are the correct ones? Absent, poor, or vague eHealth strategy is a significant barrier to effective investment in, and implementation of, sustainable eHealth solutions and establishment of an eHealth favorable policy environment. Strategy is the driving force, the first essential ingredient, that can place countries in charge of their own eHealth destiny and inform them of the policy necessary to achieve it. In the last 2 years, there has been renewed interest in eHealth strategy from the World Health Organization (WHO), International Telecommunications Union (ITU), Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), the African Union, and the Commonwealth; yet overall, the literature lacks clear guidance to inform countries why and how to develop their own complementary but locally specific eHealth strategy. To address this gap, this paper further develops an eHealth Strategy Development Framework, basing it upon a conceptual framework and relevant theories of strategy and complex system analysis available from the literature. We present here the rationale, theories, and final eHealth strategy development framework by which a systematic and methodical approach can be applied by institutions, subnational regions, and countries to create holistic, needs- and evidence-based, and defensible eHealth strategy and to ensure wise investment in eHealth.

  20. National eHealth strategy toolkit

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide the application of information and communication technologies to support national health-care services is rapidly expanding and increasingly important. This is especially so at a time when all health systems face stringent economic challenges and greater demands to provide more and better care especially to those most in need. The National eHealth Strategy Toolkit is an expert practical guide that provides governments their ministries and stakeholders with a solid foundation and method for the development and implementation of a national eHealth vision action plan and monitoring fram

  1. eHealth literacy, Internet and eHealth service usage: a survey among cancer patients and their relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halwas, Nikolaus; Griebel, Lena; Huebner, Jutta

    2017-11-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate Internet and eHealth usage, with respect to eHealth literacy, by cancer patients and their relatives. Using a standardized questionnaire we asked patients who attended lectures on complementary medicine in 2016. We received 142 questionnaires. The frequency of general Internet usage was directly associated with younger age and better Internet connection. Younger participants were not only more confident in allocating health-related Internet information into reliable or unreliable facts, but also more confident and capable of gaining medical knowledge through eHealth services. A regular use of eHealth services facilitated the decision-making process. Reading ability was associated with a better understanding regarding eHealth offers. In a modern health care system, emphasis should be on skills contributing to eHealth literacy among patients to improve their ability to profit from eHealth offers and improve health care.

  2. What is eHealth (6)? Development of a Conceptual Model for eHealth: Qualitative Study with Key Informants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Tim; McGregor, Deborah; Brunner, Melissa; Keep, Melanie; Janssen, Anna; Barnet, Stewart

    2017-10-24

    Despite rapid growth in eHealth research, there remains a lack of consistency in defining and using terms related to eHealth. More widely cited definitions provide broad understanding of eHealth but lack sufficient conceptual clarity to operationalize eHealth and enable its implementation in health care practice, research, education, and policy. Definitions that are more detailed are often context or discipline specific, limiting ease of translation of these definitions across the breadth of eHealth perspectives and situations. A conceptual model of eHealth that adequately captures its complexity and potential overlaps is required. This model must also be sufficiently detailed to enable eHealth operationalization and hypothesis testing. This study aimed to develop a conceptual practice-based model of eHealth to support health professionals in applying eHealth to their particular professional or discipline contexts. We conducted semistructured interviews with key informants (N=25) from organizations involved in health care delivery, research, education, practice, governance, and policy to explore their perspectives on and experiences with eHealth. We used purposeful sampling for maximum diversity. Interviews were coded and thematically analyzed for emergent domains. Thematic analyses revealed 3 prominent but overlapping domains of eHealth: (1) health in our hands (using eHealth technologies to monitor, track, and inform health), (2) interacting for health (using digital technologies to enable health communication among practitioners and between health professionals and clients or patients), and (3) data enabling health (collecting, managing, and using health data). These domains formed a model of eHealth that addresses the need for clear definitions and a taxonomy of eHealth while acknowledging the fluidity of this area and the strengths of initiatives that span multiple eHealth domains. This model extends current understanding of eHealth by providing clearly

  3. Identifying Health Consumers' eHealth Literacy to Decrease Disparities in Accessing eHealth Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyejin; Cormier, Eileen; Gordon, Glenna; Baeg, Jung Hoon

    2016-02-01

    The increasing amount of health information available on the Internet highlights the importance of eHealth literacy skills for health consumers. Low eHealth literacy results in disparities in health consumers' ability to access and use eHealth information. The purpose of this study was to assess the perceived eHealth literacy of a general health consumer population so that healthcare professionals can effectively address skills gaps in health consumers' ability to access and use high-quality online health information. Participants were recruited from three public library branches in a Northeast Florida community. The eHealth Literacy Scale was used. The majority of participants (n = 108) reported they knew how and where to find health information and how to use it to make health decisions; knowledge of what health resources were available and confidence in the ability to distinguish high- from low-quality information were considerably less. The findings suggest the need for eHealth education and support to health consumers from healthcare professionals, in particular, how to access and evaluate the quality of health information.

  4. The evolution of alliance capabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heimeriks, K.H.; Duysters, G.M.; Vanhaverbeke, W.P.M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper assesses the effectiveness and differential performance effects of learning mechanisms on the evolution of alliance capabilities. Relying on the concept of capability lifecycles, prior research has suggested that different capability levels could be identified in which different

  5. Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance Crisis Hotline Information Coping with a Crisis Suicide Prevention Information Psychiatric Hospitalization ... sign-up Education info, training, events Mood Disorders Depression Bipolar Disorder Anxiety Screening Center Co-occurring Illnesses/ ...

  6. TinyOS Alliance Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnet, Philippe; Culler, David; Estrin, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    This memo describes the goals and organization structure of the TinyOS Alliance. It covers membership, the working group forums for contribution, intellectual property, source licensing, and the TinyOS Steering Committee (TSC)....

  7. Requirements for and barriers towards interoperable ehealth technology in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Nijeweme-d'Hollosy, Wendeline; van Velsen, Lex Stefan; Huygens, Martine; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    Despite eHealth technology's rapid growth, eHealth applications are rarely embedded within primary care, mostly because systems lack interoperability. This article identifies requirements for, and barriers towards, interoperable eHealth technology from healthcare professionals' perspective -- the

  8. The winning alliance

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    The ICTR-PHE 2012 conference, which closed its doors today after five busy days, sealed the alliance between the physics and medical communities. We have come a long way since 1977, when physicist David Townsend took the first PET images of a small mouse. Today, physicists are developing new detector techniques that medical doctors can transfer to the clinic in fields that are no longer confined to cancer treatment. Several powerful and innovative solutions for better healthcare are on their way.   An overwhelming number of proposals for improving virtually all aspects of cancer treatment was presented at the ICTR-PHE 2012: from new detectors and read-out solutions for implementation in the next generation of imaging instrumentation to accelerator-based facilities for the production of new isotopes for use both as radio-tracers and as drugs. And this is not all, because the issues that were discussed at the joint conference also included new uses of enhanced PET-CT imaging for cardiovascular...

  9. Western Nuclear Science Alliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reese, Steve; Miller, George; Frantz, Stephen; Beller, Denis; Morse, Ed; Krahenbuhl, Melinda; Flocchini, Bob; Elliston, Jim

    2010-01-01

    The Western Nuclear Science Alliance (WNSA) was formed at Oregon State University (OSU) under the DOE Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) program in 2002. The primary objective of the INIE program is to strengthen nuclear science and engineering programs at the member institutions and to address the long term goal of the University Reactor Infrastructure and Education Assistance Program. WNSA has been very effective in meeting these goals. The infrastructure at several of the WNSA university nuclear reactors has been upgraded significantly, as have classroom and laboratory facilities for Nuclear Engineering, Health Physics, and Radiochemistry students and faculty. Major nuclear-related education programs have been inaugurated, including considerable assistance by WNSA universities to other university nuclear programs. Research has also been enhanced under WNSA, as has outreach to pre-college and college students and faculty. The INIE program under WNSA has been an exceptional boost to the nuclear programs at the eight funded WNSA universities. In subsequent years under INIE these programs have expanded even further in terms of new research facilities, research reactor renovations, expanded educational opportunities, and extended cooperation and collaboration between universities, national laboratories, and nuclear utilities.

  10. A calculating alliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanis, M; Sippel, S

    1999-01-01

    This article discusses the effects of the alliance between the Church and the Argentine state on women's reproductive rights. Several commentators have criticized how President Carlos Menem used the campaign against abortion for his own political interest. He issued a presidential decree on antiabortion campaign--the Day of the Unborn Child. This decree was announced on December 8, 1998, and the day of observance is March 25 of every coming year. Although the Argentine government does not have a law that explicitly regulates family planning method for the last two decades, many Argentines find the action of the president selfish. The initiation of this presidential decree was the culmination of Menem's manipulation of church and state to secure clerical support for his political regime. Even if statistics is providing him with data concerning the effects of unclear reproductive health laws, he and the church still has chosen not to focus on reproductive rights exclusively, but have concerned themselves primarily with other social and economic issues. While Menem uses the Vatican's pro-life rhetoric and his presidential power to protect fetal life, Argentines will have to contend with the existing Menem policies, which compromise the health of women and children.

  11. Stakeholder driven indicators for eHealth performance management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedlūga, Tomas; Mikulskienė, Birutė

    2017-08-01

    The goal of the present article is to compile a corpus of indicators of eHealth development evaluation that would essentially reflect stakeholder approaches and complement technical indicators of assessment of an eHealth system. Consequently, the assessment of the development of an eHealth system would reflect stakeholder approaches and become an innovative solution in attempting to improve productivity of IT projects in the field of health care. The compiled minimum set of indicators will be designed to monitor implementation of the national eHealth information system. To ensure reliability of the quality research, the respondents were grouped in accordance to the geographical distribution and diversity of the levels and types of the represented jobs and institutions. The applied analysis implies several managerial insights on the hierarchy of eHealth indicators. These insights may be helpful in recommending priority activities in implementation of an eHealth data system on the national or international level. The research is practically useful as it is the first to deal with the topic in Lithuania and its theoretical and practical aspect are particularly relevant in implementation of an eHealth data system in Lithuania. The eHealth assessment indicators presented in the article may be practically useful in two aspects: (1) as key implementation guidelines facilitating the general course of eHealth system development and (2) as a means to evaluate eHealth outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Knowledge acquisition and complementary specialization in alliances : The impact of technological overlap and alliance experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kavusan, Korcan; Noorderhaven, Niels G.; Duysters, Geert M.

    2016-01-01

    While alliances are widely acknowledged to facilitate knowledge transfers across firms, alliances also allow partnering firms to combine technological capabilities toward joint innovation outcomes through complementary specialization. We examine how technological overlap and alliance experience -

  13. Monitoring and Benchmarking eHealth in the Nordic Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nøhr, Christian; Koch, Sabine; Vimarlund, Vivian; Gilstad, Heidi; Faxvaag, Arild; Hardardottir, Gudrun Audur; Andreassen, Hege K; Kangas, Maarit; Reponen, Jarmo; Bertelsen, Pernille; Villumsen, Sidsel; Hyppönen, Hannele

    2018-01-01

    The Nordic eHealth Research Network, a subgroup of the Nordic Council of Ministers eHealth group, is working on developing indicators to monitor progress in availability, use and outcome of eHealth applications in the Nordic countries. This paper reports on the consecutive analysis of National eHealth policies in the Nordic countries from 2012 to 2016. Furthermore, it discusses the consequences for the development of indicators that can measure changes in the eHealth environment arising from the policies. The main change in policies is reflected in a shift towards more stakeholder involvement and intensified focus on clinical infrastructure. This change suggests developing indicators that can monitor understandability and usability of eHealth systems, and the use and utility of shared information infrastructure from the perspective of the end-users - citizens/patients and clinicians in particular.

  14. eHealth literacy and preferences for eHealth resources in parents of children with complex CHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasparian, Nadine A; Lieu, Nathan; Winlaw, David S; Cole, Andrew; Kirk, Edwin; Sholler, Gary F

    2017-05-01

    Introduction This study aimed to (a) examine eHealth literacy, beliefs, and behaviours in parents of children with complex CHD, and (b) identify parents' preferences for the content, format, features, and functions of eHealth resources for CHD. Materials and methods Families (n=198) of children born between 2008 and 2011 and diagnosed with CHD requiring surgery were mailed a survey assessing a range of variables including eHealth literacy, beliefs, and behaviours as well as preferences for the format, functions, features, and content of eHealth resources for CHD. A total of 132 parents (83 mothers, 49 fathers) completed the survey (response rate: 50%). Mothers (96%) were more likely to access eHealth resources than fathers (83%, χ2=6.74, p=0.009). Despite high eHealth resource use, eHealth literacy was relatively low, with results demonstrating considerable and widespread gaps in awareness of, access to, and communication about eHealth resources. Over 50% of parents reported that decisions regarding their child's healthcare were influenced, to some extent, by web-based resources. Barriers to doctor-patient communication about eHealth included limited consultation time and concern about doctors' disapproval. Participants demonstrated a strong desire for "eHealth prescriptions" from their child's healthcare team, and perceived a wide range of eHealth topics as highly important, including treatment-related complications as well as physical, cognitive, and emotional development in children with CHD. Discussion Results suggest a need for stronger, more proactive partnerships between clinicians, researchers, educators, technologists, and patients and families to bring about meaningful innovations in the development and implementation of eHealth interventions in paediatric cardiology.

  15. Your alliances are too stable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, David; Bamford, James

    2005-06-01

    A 2004 McKinsey survey of more than 30 companies reveals that at least 70% of them have major alliances that are underperforming and in need of restructuring. Moreover, JVs that broaden or otherwise adjust their scope have a 79% success rate, versus 33% for ventures that remain essentially unchanged. Yet most firms don't routinely evaluate the need to overhaul their alliances or intervene to correct performance problems. That means corporations are missing huge opportunities: By revamping just one large alliance, a company can generate 100 million dololars to 300 million dollars in extra income a year. Here's how to unlock more value from alliances: (1) Launch the process. Don't wait until your venture is in the middle of a crisis; regularly scan your major alliances to determine which need restructuring. Once you've targeted one, designate a restructuring team and find a senior sponsor to push the process along. Then delineate the scope of the team's work. (2) Diagnose performance. Evaluate the venture on the following performance dimensions: ownership and financials, strategy, operations, governance, and organization and talent. Identify the root causes of the venture's problems, not just the symptoms, and estimate how much each problem is costing the company. (3) Generate restructuring options. Based on the diagnosis, decide whether to fix, grow, or exit the alliance. Assuming the answer is fix or grow, determine whether fundamental or incremental changes are needed, using the five performance dimensions above as a framework. Then assemble three or four packages of restructuring options, test them with shareholders, and gain parents' approval. (4) Execute the changes. Embark on a widespread and consistent communication effort, building support among executives in the JV and the parent companies. So the process stays on track, assign accountability to certain groups or individuals.

  16. Health Consumers eHealth Literacy to Decrease Disparities in Accessing eHealth Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyejin; Cormier, Eileen; Glenna, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the perceived eHealth literacy of a general health consumer population so that health care professionals can effectively address skills gaps in health consumers' ability to access and use high quality online health information. Participants were recruited from three public library branches in a Northeast Florida community. The eHealth literacy scale (eHEALS) was used. The majority of participants (n = 108) reported they knew how and where to find health information and how to use it to make health decisions; knowledge of what health resources were available and confidence in the ability to distinguish high from low quality information was considerably less. The findings suggest the need for eHealth education and support to health consumers from health care professionals, in particular, how to access and evaluate the quality of health information.

  17. CLOUD-POWERED e-HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu Cristian STEFAN

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available During the last years, the global economic crisis has affected all domains, including the health sector. Many governments have considered that the solution to this problem is to reduce public expenses on healthcare, to decrease the budgets for health services, to rationalize the medical plans for the population, to increase the share of health expenditure paid by patients and to select the products on the pharmaceutical market.In order to improve the medical service whilst maintaining reduced infrastructure costs, the new digital technologies offer the solution of cloud-based services for the e-health systems.In this paper we present the cloud-hosted healthcare applications concept, the advantages of using e-Health on distributed platforms and some considerations about the security levels. Also, we further present an experiment based on the free OpenEMR solution, which has also a cloud version, ZH-Services OpenEMR.

  18. Strategic alliances : Alliance contracting and trust in an evolutionary perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerard Berendsen; Ineke Pieters; Ben Alders

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we will identify the contract dimensions of alliance contracts directed at joint development of new products or services. We will determine to what extent these contract dimensions are adaptable to future needs and insights. We will also provide insight into the contingency of these

  19. Learning and specialization in strategic alliances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kavusan, K.; Noorderhaven, Niels; Duijsters, Geert

    2017-01-01

    We explore the conditions enabling partners in strategic alliances to acquire valuable technological knowledge from each other, and to specialize in complementary areas. Our findings show that knowledge acquisition across alliance partners is maximized when the technological knowledge bases of

  20. The evidence base for successful alliancing

    OpenAIRE

    Hutchinson, Linda; Spalburg, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: There is increasing recognition that collaborative and integrated working is needed to meet the challenges faced in UK health and care and other public funded services. Alliances and alliance contracts have generated interest as a possible tool that commissioners can use to drive collaboration. There are examples in healthcare from New Zealand and recent alliance developments in services in England.In adopting alliance methodologies for the context of public sector commissioning...

  1. The Relationship between Supervisee Stress, Coping Resources, the Working Alliance, and the Supervisory Working Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnilka, Philip B.; Chang, Catherine Y.; Dew, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined the relationship of perceived stress, specific types of coping resources, the working alliance, and the supervisory working alliance among 232 counselor supervisees. The working alliance and the supervisory working alliance were negatively related to perceived stress and positively related to multiple coping resources. Two…

  2. Development of the eHealth Literacy Assessment Toolkit, eHLA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Dorthe Furstrand; Kayser, Lars

    2015-01-01

    In a world with rising focus on the use of eHealth, the match between the competences of the individual and the demands of eHealth systems becomes increasingly important, thus making assessment of eHealth literacy as a measure of user competences a vital element. We propose the eHealth Literacy...

  3. Working Alliances in College Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    I explain how professors can establish working alliances with students to cultivate a climate conducive to learning. This process involves (a) attending to the emotional bonds that exist in the college classroom, (b) developing shared educational goals and tasks to promote a common sense of purpose, and (c) addressing classroom conflict to repair…

  4. Novozymes-Monsanto bioag alliance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henning Otte

    2017-01-01

    er begge drevet af globale udfordringer med hensyn til den fremtidige fødevaresituation og -forsyning. På imagefronten er der dog tale om meget forskellige virksomheder, hvilket dog ikke ser ud til at have været afgørende. Begge partnere har individuelle styrker og svagheder i alliance...

  5. Strategic technology alliance termination : an empirical investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadowski, B.M.; Duysters, G.M.

    2008-01-01

    There is growing consensus that overall alliance termination rates are high. However, despite this track record of termination and despite unsurpassed growth rates of strategic technology alliances, little is known about the reasons for their termination. Typically strategic alliances have been

  6. Alliances and Bisection Width for Planar Graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Martin; Revsbæk, Morten

    2013-01-01

    An alliance in a graph is a set of vertices (allies) such that each vertex in the alliance has at least as many allies (counting the vertex itself) as non-allies in its neighborhood of the graph. We show that any planar graph with minimum degree at least 4 can be split into two alliances in polyn...

  7. EHealth Technologies in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Belinda D; Gray, Kathleen; Knowles, Simon R; De Cruz, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Electronic-health technologies (eHealth) such as Web-based interventions, virtual clinics, smart-phone applications, and telemedicine are being used to manage patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We aimed to: (1) Evaluate the impact of eHealth technologies on conventional clinical indices and patient-reported outcome measures (PROs) in IBD; (2) assess the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and feasibility of using eHealth technologies to facilitate the self-management of individuals with IBD, and; (3) provide recommendations for their design and optimal use for patient care. Relevant publications were identified via a literature search, and 17 publications were selected based on predefined quality parameters. Six randomized controlled trials and nine observational studies utilizing eHealth technologies in IBD were identified. Compared with standard outpatient-led care, eHealth technologies have led to improvements in: Relapse duration [(n = 1) 18 days vs 77 days, p eHealth studies include heterogeneity of outcome measures, lack of clinician/patient input, lack of validation against conventional clinical indices and PROs, and limited cost-benefit analyses. EHealth technologies have the potential for promoting self-management and reducing the impact of the growing burden of IBD on health care resource utilization. A theoretical framework should be applied to the development, implementation, and evaluation of eHealth interventions. Copyright © 2016 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. An integrative ICT platform for eHealth

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Alberts, Ronell

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Both eHealth and mHealth have much potential for efficient and effective health service delivery. However, fragmentation of applications and the lack of interoperability have been identified as major challenges for the effective deployment of eHealth...

  9. Under observation : The interplay between eHealth and surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purtova, Nadezhda; Adams, Samantha; Leenes, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    The essays in this book clarify the technical, legal, ethical, and social aspects of the interaction between eHealth technologies and surveillance practices. The book starts out by presenting a theoretical framework on eHealth and surveillance, followed by an introduction to the various ideas on

  10. eHealth voor Zorgprocesinnovatie : e-book

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. A.L. Cordia

    2015-01-01

    Het E-book 'eHealth voor Zorgprocesinnovatie' van ir. Anneloes Cordia, expert bij Kenniscentrum Zorginnovatie, heeft als doel eHealth en ICT-systemen in de zorg in verband te brengen met de belangrijke kwaliteitsdoelstellingen zoals doelmatigheid en transparantie. Daarnaast biedt het E-book

  11. Modeling patients' acceptance of provider-delivered e-health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, E Vance; Lankton, Nancy K

    2004-01-01

    Health care providers are beginning to deliver a range of Internet-based services to patients; however, it is not clear which of these e-health services patients need or desire. The authors propose that patients' acceptance of provider-delivered e-health can be modeled in advance of application development by measuring the effects of several key antecedents to e-health use and applying models of acceptance developed in the information technology (IT) field. This study tested three theoretical models of IT acceptance among patients who had recently registered for access to provider-delivered e-health. An online questionnaire administered items measuring perceptual constructs from the IT acceptance models (intrinsic motivation, perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness/extrinsic motivation, and behavioral intention to use e-health) and five hypothesized antecedents (satisfaction with medical care, health care knowledge, Internet dependence, information-seeking preference, and health care need). Responses were collected and stored in a central database. All tested IT acceptance models performed well in predicting patients' behavioral intention to use e-health. Antecedent factors of satisfaction with provider, information-seeking preference, and Internet dependence uniquely predicted constructs in the models. Information technology acceptance models provide a means to understand which aspects of e-health are valued by patients and how this may affect future use. In addition, antecedents to the models can be used to predict e-health acceptance in advance of system development.

  12. eHealth literacy research-Quo vadis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebel, Lena; Enwald, Heidi; Gilstad, Heidi; Pohl, Anna-Lena; Moreland, Julia; Sedlmayr, Martin

    2017-10-18

    The concept of electronic health (eHealth) literacy evolved from the social and information sciences and describes competencies necessary to use electronic health services. As it is a rather new topic, and as there is no current overview of the state of the art in research, it is not possible to identify research gaps. Therefore, the objective of this viewpoint article is to increase knowledge on the current state of the art of research in eHealth literacy and to identify gaps in scientific research which should be focused on by the research community in the future. The article provides a current viewpoint of the concept of eHealth literacy and related research. Gaps can be found in terms of a missing "gold standard" regarding both the definition and the measurement of eHealth literacy. Furthermore, there is a need for identifying the implications on eHealth developers, which evolve from the measurement of eHealth literacy in eHealth users. Finally, a stronger inclusion of health professionals, both in the evolving concept and in the measurement of eHealth literacy, is needed in the future.

  13. General Practitioners' Perspective on eHealth and Lifestyle Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Carl Joakim; Søgaard, Gabrielle Isidora; Clemensen, Jane

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Wearables, fitness apps, and patient home monitoring devices are used increasingly by patients and other individuals with lifestyle challenges. All Danish general practitioners (GPs) use digital health records and electronic health (eHealth) consultations on a daily basis, but how...... they perceive the increasing demand for lifestyle advice and whether they see eHealth as part of their lifestyle support should be explored further. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore GPs' perspectives on eHealth devices and apps and the use of eHealth in supporting healthy lifestyle behavior...... or in partnership with 1 to 4 colleagues and all use electronic patient health records for prescription, referral, and asynchronous electronic consultations. We performed qualitative, semistructured, individual in-depth interviews with the GPs in their own office about how they used eHealth and mHealth devices...

  14. Strategic Alliance Development - A Process Model A Case Study Integrating Elements of Strategic Alliances

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Yunos, Mohd Bulkiah

    2007-01-01

    There has been enormous increase in the formation of strategic alliance and the research efforts devoted to understanding alliance development process over the last few decades. However, the critical elements that influence the each stage of alliance development are yet unexplored. This dissertation aims to fill this gap and to supplement it by introducing an integrated process model of strategic alliance development and its critical elements. The process model for strategic alliance developm...

  15. E-health readiness assessment for e-health framework for Africa: a case study of hospitals in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Coleman, A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed e-healthcare readiness of rural and urban hospitals in North West Province of South Africa. Outcome of assessment led to creation of e-health architectural framework for e-health solutions. Assessment was conducted in usage...

  16. A scoping review of Australian allied health research in ehealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacono, Teresa; Stagg, Kellie; Pearce, Natalie; Hulme Chambers, Alana

    2016-10-04

    Uptake of e-health, the use of information communication technologies (ICT) for health service delivery, in allied health appears to be lagging behind other health care areas, despite offering the potential to address problems with service access by rural and remote Australians. The aim of the study was to conduct a scoping review of studies into the application of or attitudes towards ehealth amongst allied health professionals conducted in Australia. Studies meeting inclusion criteria published from January 2004 to June 2015 were reviewed. Professions included were audiology, dietetics, exercise physiology, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, podiatry, social work, and speech pathology. Terms for these professions and forms of ehealth were combined in databases of CINAHL (EBSCO), Cochrane Library, PsycINFO (1806 - Ovid), MEDLINE (Ovid) and AMED (Ovid). Forty-four studies meeting inclusion criteria were summarised. They were either trials of aspects of ehealth service delivery, or clinician and/or client use of and attitudes towards ehealth. Trials of ehealth were largely from two research groups located at the Universities of Sydney and Queensland; most involved speech pathology and physiotherapy. Assessments through ehealth and intervention outcomes through ehealth were comparable with face-to-face delivery. Clinicians used ICT mostly for managing their work and for professional development, but were reticent about its use in service delivery, which contrasted with the more positive attitudes and experiences of clients. The potential of ehealth to address allied health needs of Australians living in rural and remote Australia appears unrealised. Clinicians may need to embrace ehealth as a means to radicalise practice, rather than replicate existing practices through a different mode of delivery.

  17. Physician leadership in e-health? A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keijser, Wouter; Smits, Jacco; Penterman, Lisanne; Wilderom, Celeste

    2016-07-04

    Purpose This paper aims to systematically review the literature on roles of physicians in virtual teams (VTs) delivering healthcare for effective "physician e-leadership" (PeL) and implementation of e-health. Design/methodology/approach The analyzed studies were retrieved with explicit keywords and criteria, including snowball sampling. They were synthesized with existing theoretical models on VT research, healthcare team competencies and medical leadership. Findings Six domains for further PeL inquiry are delineated: resources, task processes, socio-emotional processes, leadership in VTs, virtual physician-patient relationship and change management. We show that, to date, PeL studies on socio-technical dynamics and their consequences on e-health are found underrepresented in the health literature; i.e. no single empirical, theoretic or conceptual study with a focus on PeL in virtual healthcare work was identified. Research limitations/implications E-health practices could benefit from organization-behavioral type of research for discerning effective physicians' roles and inter-professional relations and their (so far) seemingly modest but potent impact on e-health developments. Practical implications Although best practices in e-health care have already been identified, this paper shows that physicians' roles in e-health initiatives have not yet received any in-depth study. This raises questions such as are physicians not yet sufficiently involved in e-health? If so, what (dis)advantages may this have for current e-health investments and how can they best become involved in (leading) e-health applications' design and implementation in the field? Originality/value If effective medical leadership is being deployed, e-health effectiveness may be enhanced; this new proposition needs urgent empirical scrutiny.

  18. Education-Based Gaps in eHealth: A Weighted Logistic Regression Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Amo, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background Persons with a college degree are more likely to engage in eHealth behaviors than persons without a college degree, compounding the health disadvantages of undereducated groups in the United States. However, the extent to which quality of recent eHealth experience reduces the education-based eHealth gap is unexplored. Objective The goal of this study was to examine how eHealth information search experience moderates the relationship between college education and eHealth behaviors. ...

  19. DETERMINING INTERNATIONAL STRATEGIC ALLIANCE PER-FORMANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Bo Bernhard

    2002-01-01

    This paper considers the relationship between subjective measures of international al-liance performance and a set of variables, which may act as predictors of success before the alliance is formed (pre-alliance formation factors), and a set of variables which emerge during the operation of the alliance (post-alliance formation factors). The empiri-cal study, based on a web-survey, investigates a sample of Danish partner firms engaged in 48 equity joint ventures and 70 non-equity joint ventur...

  20. Enlight: A Comprehensive Quality and Therapeutic Potential Evaluation Tool for Mobile and Web-Based eHealth Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumel, Amit; Faber, Keren; Mathur, Nandita; Kane, John M; Muench, Fred

    2017-03-21

    Studies of criteria-based assessment tools have demonstrated the feasibility of objectively evaluating eHealth interventions independent of empirical testing. However, current tools have not included some quality constructs associated with intervention outcome, such as persuasive design, behavior change, or therapeutic alliance. In addition, the generalizability of such tools has not been explicitly examined. The aim is to introduce the development and further analysis of the Enlight suite of measures, developed to incorporate the aforementioned concepts and address generalizability aspects. As a first step, a comprehensive systematic review was performed to identify relevant quality rating criteria in line with the PRISMA statement. These criteria were then categorized to create Enlight. The second step involved testing Enlight on 42 mobile apps and 42 Web-based programs (delivery mediums) targeting modifiable behaviors related to medical illness or mental health (clinical aims). A total of 476 criteria from 99 identified sources were used to build Enlight. The rating measures were divided into two sections: quality assessments and checklists. Quality assessments included usability, visual design, user engagement, content, therapeutic persuasiveness, therapeutic alliance, and general subjective evaluation. The checklists included credibility, privacy explanation, basic security, and evidence-based program ranking. The quality constructs exhibited excellent interrater reliability (intraclass correlations=.77-.98, median .91) and internal consistency (Cronbach alphas=.83-.90, median .88), with similar results when separated into delivery mediums or clinical aims. Conditional probability analysis revealed that 100% of the programs that received a score of fair or above (≥3.0) in therapeutic persuasiveness or therapeutic alliance received the same range of scores in user engagement and content-a pattern that did not appear in the opposite direction. Preliminary

  1. Strategic alliances in engineering, technology and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jazrawi, W.

    1991-01-01

    The role of strategic alliances in the development of heavy oil resources, both mineable and in-situ, is discussed. A strategic alliance is defined as a custom designed, long term collaborative working arrangement between two parties to pool, exchange, and integrate their resources to maximize mutual gain. A combination of one or more of the following success factors is seen as contributing to the unlocking of static heavy oil resources: sufficiently high and sustained crude oil prices; strategic intent to pursue heavy oil development regardless of short-term setbacks or economic downturns; technology breakthroughs that can reduce bitumen supply and upgrading costs; and strategic alliances. An idealized model for strategic alliances designed to help develop heavy oil resources is illustrated. The advantages and pitfalls involved in strategic alliances are listed along with the characteristics of viable contract agreements for such alliances. Some examples of strategic alliances in engineering and technology development are presented from Alberta experience. 2 figs., 1 tab

  2. Heartland Alliance for Regional Transmission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Nancy [Climate and Energy Project, Inc., Hutchinson, KS (United States)

    2017-03-15

    The Heartland Alliance for Regional Transmission (HART) will foster a candid, productive conversation among stakeholders that identifies challenges to and benefits from a massive build out of wind generation and transmission across the Southwest Power Pool. Based on the outcomes of those deliberations, HART will develop and deliver an ambitious, coordinated, peer-to-peer outreach effort that spans the SPP to improve market acceptance for wind.

  3. How do physicians discuss e-health with patients? the relationship of physicians' e-health beliefs to physician mediation styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Yuki; Stewart, Erin

    2013-01-01

    A survey of 104 physicians examined the role of physicians' evaluation of the quality of e-health and beliefs about the influence of patients' use of e-health in how physicians discuss e-health materials with patients. Physicians' lower (poor) evaluation of the quality of e-health content predicted more negative mediation (counter-reinforcement of e-health content). Perceived benefits of patients' e-health use predicted more positive (endorsement of e-health content). Physician's perceived concerns (negative influence) regarding patients' e-health use were not a significant predictor for their mediation styles. Results, challenging the utility of restrictive mediation, suggested reconceptualizing it as redirective mediation in a medical interaction. The study suggested that patient-generated e-health-related inquiries invite physician mediation in medical consultations. Findings and implications are discussed in light of the literature of physician-patient interaction, incorporating the theory of parental mediation of media into a medical context.

  4. Screening of delayed-onset hearing loss in preschool children in the mid-south of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guanming; Fu, Siqing; Luo, Shaojun; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Guoqiang

    2013-08-01

    Newborn hearing screening has been successfully implemented worldwide to improve the detection of hearing loss. However, delayed-onset hearing loss subsequent to newborn hearing screening remains a concern. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of delayed-onset hearing loss in preschool children who previously passed newborn hearing screening in Hubei Province in mid-south China. Preschool children were screened by transient evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) for delayed-onset hearing loss. Children referred after the TEOAE screening were assessed audiologically. Between March 2010 and September 2011, 28 546 preschool children (4.86 ± 1.67 years old), who had passed newborn hearing screening were targeted for screening from four cities in Hubei Province, China. During the study period, 540 children (1.89%) were referred for audiologic assessment and 22 (0.77/1000) of them had permanent delayed-onset hearing loss, including 8 (0.28/1000) with bilateral moderate hearing loss, 10 (0.35/1000) with mild bilateral hearing loss, 2 (0.07/1000) with unilateral moderate hearing loss, and 2 (0.07/1000) with unilateral mild hearing loss. Despite the success of newborn hearing screening, the provision of hearing screening in preschool remains essential for identifying delayed-onset hearing loss.

  5. Cattle traceability in the Mid-South region of Mato Grosso State: economic, technical and conception aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo de Andrade Ferrazza

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available It was aimed to investigate economic aspects of the establishment of traceability in the Mid-South region of MT, Brazil, methods of animal identification, complains, drawbacks and degree of importance given by ranchers. During May to July 2009 were conducted interviews with 13 owners of Rural Establishments Approved in SISBOV (ERAS and the survey of economic values practiced by three certifying companies and one slaughterhouse from the region. All the farms interviewed utilized earring and bottom. The main difficulties for the establishment of tracking were the frequent changes (46.30%, the understanding of the laws (30.57%, and the choice of the certifier (23.13%. The greatest drawbacks of Cattle and Buffalo Identification and Certification System (SISBOV were the excessive delay of official audits (53.85%, the instability of differential value (23.10%, loss of identification elements (15.39% and the delay when requested earring reprinting (7.69%. The importance ascribed was ensuring the credibility and adding value to the Brazilian product (84.61%. The individual value for the tracking process was R$ 4,34. The difference of tracked animal slaughtered for the European Union was R$ 10,73@-1. The establishment of the tracking system presented economic viability and the variation of the values paid by the tracked meat despite animals aiming exportation.

  6. Government capacities and stakeholders: what facilitates ehealth legislation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Newly established high-technology areas such as eHealth require regulations regarding the interoperability of health information infrastructures and data protection. It is argued that government capacities as well as the extent to which public and private organizations participate in policy-making determine the level of eHealth legislation. Both explanatory factors are influenced by international organizations that provide knowledge transfer and encourage private actor participation. Methods Data analysis is based on the Global Observatory for eHealth - ATLAS eHealth country profiles which summarizes eHealth policies in 114 countries. Data analysis was carried out using two-component hurdle models with a truncated Poisson model for positive counts and a hurdle component model with a binomial distribution for zero or greater counts. Results The analysis reveals that the participation of private organizations such as donors has negative effects on the level of eHealth legislation. The impact of public-private partnerships (PPPs) depends on the degree of government capacities already available and on democratic regimes. Democracies are more responsive to these new regulatory demands than autocracies. Democracies find it easier to transfer knowledge out of PPPs than autocracies. Government capacities increase the knowledge transfer effect of PPPs, thus leading to more eHealth legislation. Conclusions All international regimes – the WHO, the EU, and the OECD – promote PPPs in order to ensure the construction of a national eHealth infrastructure. This paper shows that the development of government capacities in the eHealth domain has to be given a higher priority than the establishment of PPPs, since the existence of some (initial) capacities is the sine qua non of further capacity building. PMID:24410989

  7. eHealth literacy among undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubaishat, Ahmad; Habiballah, Laila

    2016-07-01

    The Internet has become a major source of health related information. Nursing students, as future healthcare providers, should be skilled in locating, using and evaluating online health information. The main purpose of this study was to assess eHealth literacy among nursing students in Jordan, as well as to explore factors associated with eHealth literacy. A descriptive cross sectional survey was conducted in two universities in Jordan, one public and one private. A total of 541 students completed the eHealth literacy scale (eHEALS). Some additional personal and demographical variables were collected to explore their relation to eHealth literacy. Students have a moderate self-perceived level of eHealth literacy (M=3.62, SD=0.58). They are aware of the available online health resources and know how to search, locate, and use these resources. Yet, they lack skills to evaluate them and cannot differentiate between high and low quality resources. Factors that are related to eHealth literacy include type of university, type of student admission, academic level, students' internet skills, and their perception of the usefulness and importance of the internet. On the other hand, age, gender, grade point average (GPA), and frequency of internet use were found not to significantly affect eHealth literacy. This study represents a baseline reference for eHealth literacy in Jordan. Students have some of the necessary skills, while others still need to be improved. Nursing educators and administrators should incorporate eHealth literacy skills into the curriculum. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Exploring antecedents of consumer satisfaction and repeated search behavior on e-health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun Jung; Park, Jungkun; Widdows, Richard

    2009-03-01

    E-health information has become an important resource for people seeking health information. Even though many studies have been conducted to examine the quality of e-health information, only a few studies have explored the effects of the information seekers' motivations on the perceived quality of e-health information. There is even less information about repeated searches for e-health information after the users' initial experience of e-health information use. Using an online survey of information seekers, 252 e-health information users' responses were collected. The research examines the relationship among motivation, perceived quality, satisfaction, and intention to repeat-search e-health information. The results identify motivations to search e-health information and confirm the relationship among motivation, perceived quality dimensions, and satisfaction and intention to repeat searches for e-health information.

  9. eHealth Applications Promising Strategies for Behavior Change

    CERN Document Server

    Noar, Seth M

    2012-01-01

    eHealth Applications: Promising Strategies for Behavior Change provides an overview of technological applications in contemporary health communication research, exploring the history and current uses of eHealth applications in disease prevention and management. This volume focuses on the use of these technology-based interventions for public health promotion and explores the rapid growth of an innovative interdisciplinary field. The chapters in this work discuss key eHealth applications by presenting research examining a variety of technology-based applications. Authors Seth M. Noar and Nancy

  10. Third Intensive Balkan Telemedicine and e-Health Seminar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    and Cultural Affairs HD High Definition ISDN Integrates Services Digital Network IStTeH International Society for Telemedicine and eHealth IT...Lievens1,2, Marlina Jordanova, MD, PhD3,4 1International Society for Telemedicine & eHealth , Switzerland;2Med-e-Tel, Grimbergen, Belgium; 3Med-e-Tel...Approach F. Lievens 1,2,3, M. Jordanova 4,5 1 Board Member and Secretary, International Society for Telemedicine & eHealth (ISfTeH), Switzerland 2

  11. Strategic leadership will be essential for dietitian eHealth readiness: A qualitative study exploring dietitian perspectives of eHealth readiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maunder, Kirsty; Walton, Karen; Williams, Peter; Ferguson, Maree; Beck, Eleanor

    2018-05-16

    To explore dietitians' perspectives on the eHealth readiness of Australian dietitians, and to identify strategies to improve eHealth readiness of the profession. Dietitians who met the criteria for nutrition informatics experts participated in semi-structured interviews between June 2016 and March 2017. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis using coding was undertaken until consensus was reached by the researchers regarding key themes, topics and exemplar quotes. Interviews with 10 nutrition informatics experts revealed 25 discussion topics grouped into four main themes: benefits of eHealth for dietitians; risks of dietitians not being involved in eHealth; dietitians are not ready for eHealth; and strategies to improve eHealth readiness. The strategies identified for improving eHealth readiness included: collaboration and representation, education, offering of incentives and mentoring, as well as development of a national strategy, organisational leaders, nutrition informatics champions and a supportive environment. These findings suggest that dietitians may not be ready for eHealth. Strategic leadership and the actioning of other identified strategies will be imperative to preparing dietitians for eHealth to ensure the profession can practice effectively in the digital age, optimise nutrition care and support research for eHealth. If dietitians do not engage in eHealth, others may take their place, or dietitians may be forced to use eHealth in ways that are not the most effective for practice or maximising patient outcomes. © 2018 Dietitians Association of Australia.

  12. e-Health Cloud: Opportunities and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jameela Al-Jaroodi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available As the costs of healthcare services rise and healthcare professionals are becoming scarce and hard to find, it is imminent that healthcare organizations consider adopting health information technology (HIT systems. HIT allows health organizations to streamline many of their processes and provide services in a more efficient and cost-effective manner. The latest technological trends such as Cloud Computing (CC provide a strong infrastructure and offer a true enabler for HIT services over the Internet. This can be achieved on a pay-as-you-use model of the “e-Health Cloud” to help the healthcare industry cope with current and future demands yet keeping their costs to a minimum. Despite its great potential, HIT as a CC model has not been addressed extensively in the literature. There are no apparent frameworks which clearly encompass all viable schemes and interrelationships between HIT and CC. Therefore, analyzing and comparing the effectiveness of such schemes is important. In this paper we introduce the concept of “e-Health Cloud” highlighting many of its constituents and proposing building an e-health environment and elucidating many of the challenges confronting the success of the e-Health Cloud. We will also discuss different possible solutions to address challenges such as security and privacy.

  13. E-health interventions for suicide prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Helen; Batterham, Philip J; O'Dea, Bridianne

    2014-08-12

    Many people at risk of suicide do not seek help before an attempt, and do not remain connected to health services following an attempt. E-health interventions are now being considered as a means to identify at-risk individuals, offer self-help through web interventions or to deliver proactive interventions in response to individuals' posts on social media. In this article, we examine research studies which focus on these three aspects of suicide and the internet: the use of online screening for suicide, the effectiveness of e-health interventions aimed to manage suicidal thoughts, and newer studies which aim to proactively intervene when individuals at risk of suicide are identified by their social media postings. We conclude that online screening may have a role, although there is a need for additional robust controlled research to establish whether suicide screening can effectively reduce suicide-related outcomes, and in what settings online screening might be most effective. The effectiveness of Internet interventions may be increased if these interventions are designed to specifically target suicidal thoughts, rather than associated conditions such as depression. The evidence for the use of intervention practices using social media is possible, although validity, feasibility and implementation remains highly uncertain.

  14. Beef alliances: motivations, extent, and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Ted C; Kovanda, Joseph

    2003-07-01

    With their growth, it is important to consider how alliances will impact the beef industry in the future. Alliances have the potential to make sweeping changes to cattle production, live and feeder cattle marketing, food safety protocols, use of government grades and standards, ownership structure, supply chain management, wholesale and retail product marketing, risk management, and many other industry activities. In an effort to address these issues, this article addresses the following questions: What is an alliance? What has motivated their proliferation? What have we learned from alliances? What aspects of alliances affect their likelihood of success or failure? What is the future of alliances? Are they a fad or a long-term evolving industry structural change?

  15. Collaborative Customer Management in Financial Services Alliances

    OpenAIRE

    Geib, Malte; Kolbe, Lutz; Brenner, Walter

    2004-01-01

    The integration of the financial services industry and many financial services companies' focus on core competencies have led to the emergence of financial services alliances. These alliances face a variety of challenges regarding an integrated approach to customer relationship management (CRM) by the partner companies.In this paper we describe the challenges derived from an analysis of five financial services companies that formed different financial services alliances. The main inhibitors o...

  16. Towards a dynamic concept of alliance capability

    OpenAIRE

    SLUYTS, Kim; MARTENS, Rudy; MATTHYSSENS, Paul

    2008-01-01

    This paper has a threefold purpose. First, we offer a literature review on alliance capability based on strategic and competence based management literature. Second, we extend existing literature on alliance capability by breaking this concept down into five sub capabilities, which are each linked to a stage of the alliance life cycle. Finally, we suggest how firms can support these capabilities through structural, technological and people-related tools and techniques. We argue that current l...

  17. How Should We Define eHealth, and Does the Definition Matter?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Showell, Chris; Nøhr, Christian

    2012-01-01

    There is no useful definition for eHealth; we would like to find one. This study will provide a contribution to clarify the discussion on eHealth as a concept to enhance the understanding of the range of meanings which have been ascribed to the term ehealth.......There is no useful definition for eHealth; we would like to find one. This study will provide a contribution to clarify the discussion on eHealth as a concept to enhance the understanding of the range of meanings which have been ascribed to the term ehealth....

  18. Terra Nova breaks new ground for alliances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghiselin, D.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of alliances to help develop the Terra Nova oil and gas field in the offshore Atlantic areas of Canada. Largely attributed to BP, the strategic alliance concept got its start in the North Sea and on the North Slope of Alaska. BP saw it as the best way to take advantage of economy-of-scale, mitigate risk, and achieve outsourcing goals while retaining their core competencies. This paper reviews the methods of developing the alliances, the developing of a development plan for the Terra Nova field, and how the alliance plans to maximize the profittability of the operation for all involved

  19. A model of strategic marketing alliances for hospices: vertical, internal, osmotic alliances and the complete model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starnes, B J; Self, D R

    1999-01-01

    This article develops two previous research efforts. William J. Winston (1994, 1995) has proposed a set of strategies by which health care organizations can benefit from forging strategic alliances. Raadt and Self (1997) have proposed a classification model of alliances including horizontal, vertical, internal, and osmotic. In the second of two articles, this paper presents a model of vertical, internal, and osmotic alliances. Advantages and disadvantages of each are discussed. Finally, the complete alliance system model is presented.

  20. Multinational surveys for monitoring eHealth policy implementations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilstad, Heidi; Faxvaag, Arild; Hyppönen, Hannele

    2014-01-01

    Development of multinational variables for monitoring eHealth policy implementations is a complex task and requires multidisciplinary, knowledgebased international collaboration. Experts in an interdisciplinary workshop identified useful data and pitfalls for comparative variable development...

  1. Standardization and Innovation for Smart e-Health Monitoring Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mihovska, Albena D.; Kyriazakos, Sofoklis; Mihaylov, Mihail Rumenov

    2015-01-01

    The challenges faced by standardization in relation to the potential of wireless communication technologies to deliver lower cost, higher efficiency, enhanced quality of experience and diversified smart e-Health services, are multi-fold and determined by the complexity of the myriad of emerging...... user and usage scenarios. In addition, there is the challenge of protection of privacy and the maintenance of trust. This paper aims to show the evidence of the correlation between standardization and innovation in the area of ehealth technology. It describes a capability framework proposed...... for the delivery of e-Health services in support of independent living. The proposed framework incorporates innovative research and standardized solutions. The paper addresses the correlation between standardization and innovation, in particular for the area of e-Health. It analyzes the potential of research...

  2. E-HEALTH CLOUD FOR NIGERIAN TEACHING HOSPITALS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    massive data storage and availability of resources on demand. With well over ... this issue by proposing a Cloud computing infrastructure for e-Health solutions in Nigeria. This will ... security and privacy as each application has its own virtual.

  3. Alliance Concentration in Multinational Companies : Examining Alliance Portfolios, Firm Structure, and Firm Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Brenda; Faems, Dries; Noseleit, Florian

    Research summary: This article explores the distribution of alliances across firms' internal structure. Focusing on multinational companies, we examine the impact of alliance portfolio concentrationi.e., the extent to which alliances are concentrated within a limited number of geographic unitson

  4. Alliance Concentration in Multinational Companies : Examining Alliance Portfolios, Firm Structure, and Firm Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Brenda; Faems, Dries; Noseleit, Florian

    2017-01-01

    Research summary: This article explores the distribution of alliances across firms' internal structure. Focusing on multinational companies, we examine the impact of alliance portfolio concentrationi.e., the extent to which alliances are concentrated within a limited number of geographic unitson

  5. Technology alliances in emerging economies : Persistence and interrelation in European firms’alliance formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacob, J.; Belderbos, R.; Gilsing, V.A.

    2013-01-01

    We analyse the patterns and determinants of technology alliance formation with partner firms from emerging economies with a focus on European firms' alliance strategies. We examine to what extent European firms' alliance formation with partners based in emerging economies is persistent – that is, to

  6. Conceptual framework for development of comprehensive e-health evaluation tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoja, Shariq; Durrani, Hammad; Scott, Richard E; Sajwani, Afroz; Piryani, Usha

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to develop an e-health evaluation tool based on a conceptual framework including relevant theories for evaluating use of technology in health programs. This article presents the development of an evaluation framework for e-health programs. The study was divided into three stages: Stage 1 involved a detailed literature search of different theories and concepts on evaluation of e-health, Stage 2 plotted e-health theories to identify relevant themes, and Stage 3 developed a matrix of evaluation themes and stages of e-health programs. The framework identifies and defines different stages of e-health programs and then applies evaluation theories to each of these stages for development of the evaluation tool. This framework builds on existing theories of health and technology evaluation and presents a conceptual framework for developing an e-health evaluation tool to examine and measure different factors that play a definite role in the success of e-health programs. The framework on the horizontal axis divides e-health into different stages of program implementation, while the vertical axis identifies different themes and areas of consideration for e-health evaluation. The framework helps understand various aspects of e-health programs and their impact that require evaluation at different stages of the life cycle. The study led to the development of a new and comprehensive e-health evaluation tool, named the Khoja-Durrani-Scott Framework for e-Health Evaluation.

  7. eHealth for Patient Engagement: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barello, Serena; Triberti, Stefano; Graffigna, Guendalina; Libreri, Chiara; Serino, Silvia; Hibbard, Judith; Riva, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    eHealth interventions are recognized to have a tremendous potential to promote patient engagement. To date, the majority of studies examine the efficacy of eHealth in enhancing clinical outcomes without focusing on patient engagement in its specificity. This paper aimed at reviewing findings from the literature about the use of eHealth in engaging patients in their own care process. We undertook a comprehensive literature search within the peer-reviewed international literature. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria. eHealth interventions reviewed were mainly devoted to foster only partial dimensions of patient engagement (i.e., alternatively cognitive, emotional or behavioral domains related to healthcare management), thus failing to consider the complexity of such an experience. This also led to a great heterogeneity of technologies, assessed variables and achieved outcomes. This systematic review underlines the need for a more holistic view of patient needs to actually engage them in eHealth interventions and obtaining positive outcomes. In this sense, patient engagement constitute a new frontiers for healthcare models where eHealth could maximize its potentialities.

  8. E-health progresses in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisil, Ioana; Jitaru, Elena

    2006-01-01

    The paper is presenting the recent evolution of e-health aspects in Romania. Data presented are based on governmental reports. Surveys organized by the "Lucian Blaga" University of Sibiu and studies carried on by the national Institute for Research and Development in Informatics (I.C.I.) have shown that Romania has important health problems, from cardio vascular diseases (CVD) to cancer and infectious diseases, a high score on mortality and morbidity and a low one on natality. Poor management of the health sector did not help to solve all these problems. In the last 14 years there were several attempts to reform healthcare but none succeeded until now. The health insurance system is operational but needs still to be improved. Acknowledging the deep crisis of the health system the Prime Minister nominated a new minister of health and important changes in the health management approach are to be envisaged. One of this is the introduction of the e-procurement system for all health related goods. In spite of the crisis of the health system, e-health applications are flourishing. We can distinguish applications at national and local level and also punctual applications. The main applications refer to hospital information systems (HIS), electronic health records (EHR), e-procurement, image processing, diagnosis and treatment aids, telediagnosis, teleconsultation, education, research and domain oriented web support services. Most academic clinical hospital is now members of a web community "mednet". Unfortunately a lot of medical web sites have disappeared for lack of funds. As the health sector is in general funded from the public budget and the health crisis is deepened in the last years, the driving force in implementing e-health concepts and technologies is not the Ministry of Health but the Information Technology (IT) community, with a strong support from the Ministry of Information Technology and Communications and also from the Ministry of Education and Research

  9. Northeast Waste Management Alliance (NEWMA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goland, A.N.; Kaplan, E.

    1993-11-01

    Funding was provided to Brookhaven National Laboratory in the fourth quarter of FY93 to establish a regional alliance as defined by Dr. Clyde Frank during his visit to BNL on March 7, 1993. In collaboration with the Long Island Research Institute (LIRI), BNL developed a business plan for the Northeast Waste Management Alliance (NEWMA). Concurrently, informal discussions were initiated with representatives of the waste management industry, and meetings were held with local and state regulatory and governmental personnel to obtain their enthusiasm and involvement. A subcontract to LIRI was written to enable it to formalize interactions with companies offering new waste management technologies selected for their dual value to the DOE and local governments in the Northeast. LIRI was founded to develop and coordinate economic growth via introduction of new technologies. As a not-for-profit institution it is in an ideal position to manage the development of NEWMA through ready access to venture capital and strong interactions with the business community, universities, and BNL. Another subcontract was written with a professor at SUNY/Stony Brook to perform an evaluation of new pyrolitic processes, some of which may be appropriate for development by NEWMA. Independent endorsement of the business plan recently by another organization, GETF, with broad knowledge of DOE/EM-50 objectives, provides a further incentive for moving rapidly to implement the NEWMA strategy. This report describes progress made during the last quarter of FY93

  10. Carbon dioxide emissions and energy balance closure before, during, and after biomass burning in mid-South rice fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, B.; Adviento-Borbe, A.; Reba, M. L.; Runkle, B.; Suvocarev, K.

    2017-12-01

    Biomass burning or field burning is a crop management practice that removes rice straw, reduces tillage, controls pests and releases nutrients for the next cropping season. Current field burning emissions are not included in agricultural field annual emissions largely because of the lack of studies, especially on the field scale. Field burning measurements are important for greenhouse gas emission inventories and quantifying the annual carbon footprint of rice. Paired eddy covariance systems were used to measure energy balance, CO2 fluxes, and H2O fluxes in mid-South US rice fields (total area of 25 ha) before, during and after biomass burning for 20 days after harvest. During the biomass burning, air temperatures increased 29°C, while ambient CO2 concentration increased from 402 to 16,567 ppm and H2O concentrations increased from 18.73 to 25.62 ppt. For the burning period, 67-86 kg CO2 ha-1 period-1 was emitted calculated by integrating fluxes over the biomass burning event. However, the estimated emission using aboveground biomass and combustion factors was calculated as 11,733 kg CO2 ha-1 period-1. Part of the difference could be attributed to sensor sensitivity decreasing 80% during burning for two minutes due to smoke. Net ecosystem exchange (NEE) increased by a factor of two, 1.14 before burning to 2.44 μmol m-2 s-1 possibly due to greater reduction of plant material and photosynthesis following burning. This study highlights the contribution of rice straw burning to total CO2 emissions from rice production.

  11. Fear of e-Health records implementation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laur, Audrey

    2015-03-01

    As our world is dominated by Information Communication and Technologies (ICT), governments of many leading countries have decided to implement ICT in their health systems. The first step is the digitalisation of medical records (e-Health Records or EHRs). In order to reduce concerns that health systems encountered, EHRs are supposed to prevent duplicated prescriptions and hospitalisations, ineffective transferability of medical records, lack of communication in clinical assessments, etc. They are also expected to improve the relationship between health providers and patients. At first sight, EHR seems to offer considerable potential for assisting health policies, enabling the development of new tools to facilitate coordination and cooperation among health professionals and promoting a new approach to sharing medical information. However, as discussed in this article, recent debates have shown that EHR presents pros and cons (technical, financial, social) that governments need to clarify urgently. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  12. Peer Mentoring through eAlliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaha, Cindy; Cunningham, Beth; Cox, Anne; Ramos, Idalia; Whitten, Barbara

    2018-06-01

    Being a woman in astronomy or physics can be a very isolating experience. Peer mentoring has been shown to help combat this isolation. eAlliance, an NSF ADVANCE PLAN-D program hosted by AAPT, is seeking to establish mutual mentoring networks of women faculty within the physics and astronomy community. The eAlliance program will reduce the isolation of participating faculty members and provide support to help members achieve their personal goals and enhance their career development. Participants register at the eAlliance website (ealliance.aapt.org) and complete a personal profile which is used to match them to other registered women faculty with similar mentoring goals. So far, 95 women have registered in the eAlliance database and 22 of the participants are astronomers. Currently the project has five sponsored eAlliances (with 4-5 members each) and several more in the process of forming. As of March 2018, 4 of the 22 sponsored eAlliance members are astronomers. The mentoring cohorts are holding regular electronic meetings and using project funds to support annual face-to-face meetings at national meetings of their own choosing. The first eAlliance Summit Meeting will be held in July 2018 and will bring all the cohorts together to share their peer mentoring experiences and gather advice for future cohorts just starting out. All women faculty in astronomy and physics are invited to join the eAlliance program.

  13. Essays on capability development through alliances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kavusan, K.

    2015-01-01

    As a result of the surging rate of technological innovation in the last decades, firms in high-technology industries increasingly rely on alliances to tap into external knowledge sources and to develop new products and services. While alliances are of vital importance to many firms to develop new

  14. Project alliancing in the offshore industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halman, Johannes I.M.; Braks, B.F.M.

    In this paper the shift towards new types of project organisation within the Offshore Industry is explained and discussed. Special focus is given to the organisational concept of Project Alliancing. The principles, structure and culture of a Project Alliance as applied within the Offshore Industry

  15. THE E-HEALTH SYSTEMS IN POLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdzisław PÓLKOWSKI

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Information Technologies are disruptive technologies that have caused major changes in health system in Poland. Current digital economy is driven by modern information and new IT tools, which offer hospitals, doctors and patient access to any type of information, regardless of its form of existence, storage type or geographical location. These tools encourage the development of new activities, health services. The purpose of this article is to analyze the the current state of development of e-services in Poland in the context of nowadays health system. In the first part of the paper, the authors present various programmes, which enable the access to the medical services and patients’ data online. The next part of the paper is devoted to examining the technical aspects of the said programmes and presenting their advantages as well as the areas which might be improved.The last part of the work will be focused on the websites of the selected health institutions. According to the authors, WWW services provide much information on how the process of computer systems are being implemented, what data the services include and the capacity of the equipment as well as the software, human resources and the knowledge in this sphere. Moreover this section highlights the latest trends in e-health with particular emphasis on aspects such as the use of private and public cloud computer and t heir integration with web sites of health institutions. This study brings its contribution to the understanding of the change of health system in Poland behavior by using a new perspective e-health systems and IT tools above by doctors, officers and patients.

  16. Technical aspects of portal technology application for e-health systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosińska, Joanna; Słowikowski, Paweł

    2004-01-01

    E-health is an emerging field on the intersection of medical information technologies, public health and business, referring to health services and information delivered or enhanced through the Internet and related technologies. Portal technology, allowing services to be accessible over the Internet is a perfect tool for providing e-health services. The use of portal technologies has had deep influence on the architecture of the whole e-health system, both regarding new subsystems and older ones which we want to integrate with the portal. Portals provide new possibilities for creating novel types of e-health applications as well. In this paper we provide a brief overview of e-health systems and portal technologies, and present many technical aspects of portal technology application for e-health systems such as the architecture of portal-based e-health systems, graphical user interfaces, access to various e-health systems' resources, personalization, security and privacy.

  17. Towards Alliance Performance Management in Service Logistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Keers

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the management of stakeholder values for alliance success. A multiple-case study method is used to analyze – within six organizations attempting to form alliances – how the management of inter-organizational dimensions of stakeholder value adds to the success of an alliance business strategy. Our study focuses on the establishment of vertical service alliances within the Dutch maritime sector, including private-private as well as public-private initiatives. The findings point toward the usefulness of developing an inter-organizational success map. Because of its comprehensive multi-stakeholder orientation, a success map can be used by alliance managers to understand management’s considerations, including the trade-offs among an alliance’s various performance drivers. This new conceptual thinking can enhance research and best practices on inter-organizational design.

  18. Project alliancing in the offshore industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halman, J.I.M.; Braks, B.F.M.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper the shift towards new types of project organisation within the offshore industry is explained and discussed. Special focus is given to the organisational concept of project alliancing. The principles, structure and culture of a project alliance as applied within the offshore industry are described. In the paper the organisational concept of project alliancing is discussed on its potential to reduce project costs and enhance profits, both for the operator (oil and gas company) as well as for participating contractors. A risk and reward mechanism developed to share project risks and rewards between allied parties is explained for an alliance case. Based upon an in-depth study carried out within a contractor company in the offshore industry the organisational and financial implications of project alliancing are presented. (author)

  19. Forging Industry-Academic Alliances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Woodside

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available With ever increasing amounts of data, organizations are identifying the importance of Business Intelligence (BI and Analytics for decision making. However in order to realize the full potential of these technologies, organizations require well-trained and educated management and analytic subject matter experts to transform the data and results into actionable information for decisions. In order to meet this demand for analytical talent, a Center for Business Intelligence and Analytics (CBIA housed within the university seeks to develop knowledge and skills vital in the fast changing field of business, through developing the next generation of managers and analysts with skills in decision-making through use of analytical techniques. This presentation provides the strategic framework for the definition and development of a CBIA and framework for joint academic and industry collaboration to develop the next generation of industry experts. The core components including industry demand, alliance objectives including objectives, curriculum and talent requirements, and opportunities.

  20. Attitudes Toward e-Health: The Otolaryngologists' Point of View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holderried, Martin; Hoeper, Ansgar; Holderried, Friederike; Blumenstock, Gunnar; Ernst, Christian; Tropitzsch, Anke

    2018-06-01

    Online communication and the number of e-health applications have noticeably increased. However, little is known about the otolaryngologists' use behavior and their attitudes toward the potential of e-health. The aims of the study were to evaluate the documentation, information, and communication technologies used by otolaryngologists and to get a better understanding of their attitudes toward the potential of e-health for cross-sectoral patient care. A survey was developed and tested by otolaryngologists, healthcare-information technology experts, and health services researchers. A total of 334 otolaryngologists in private practice were asked to participate in this cross-sectional study. In total, 234 of them took part in the study, and 157 returned completed questionnaires. Statistical analysis was performed by using crosstabs, including chi-square tests, and multivariate logistic regressions. Results and Materials: Digital technologies are widely used by otolaryngologists (e.g., 89.6% use an electronic health record). However, the majority of intersectoral communication is still based on analogue techniques (e.g., fax use in 63.7%). From the otolaryngologists' perspectives, the potential of e-health for intersectoral care is mostly in appointment scheduling, further referrals to hospitals, and automated appointment reminders. The physicians' attitudes toward e-health are associated with their Internet use behavior in daily life (odds ratio = 4.30, confidence interval 1.11-16.64, p = 0.035) but not with their demographics. The otolaryngologists are well prepared and have an overall positive attitude toward e-health for deeper use in cross-sectoral care. Therefore, e-health in otolaryngology needs more attention and resources for further studies, especially with a focus on quality and safety of care.

  1. How to improve eHealth interventions in Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E.W.C.; Kulyk, Olga Anatoliyivna; Wentzel, M.J.; Sieverink, Floor; Beerlage-de Jong, Nienke; Kelders, Saskia Marion

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: eHealth is gaining more and more ground in health psychology and behavioural medicine to support wellbeing, a healthier lifestyle or adherence to medications. Despite the large number of eHealth projects to date, the actual use of eHealth interventions is lower than expected. Many

  2. How should we define eHealth, and does the definition matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showell, Chris; Nøhr, Christian

    2012-01-01

    There is no useful definition for eHealth; we would like to find one. This study will provide a contribution to clarify the discussion on eHealth as a concept to enhance the understanding of the range of meanings which have been ascribed to the term ehealth.

  3. E-health applications and services for patient empowerment: Directions for best practices in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alpay, L.L.; Henkemans, O.B.; Otten, W.; Rövekamp, T.A.J.M.; Dumay, A.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: E-health may enable the empowerment process for patients, particularly the chronically ill. However, e-health is not always designed with the requirements of patient empowerment in mind. Drawing on evidence-based e-health studies, we propose directions for best practices to develop

  4. E-health Applications and Services for Patient Empowerment : Directions for Best Practices in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alpay, L.L.; Blanson Henkemans, O.; Otten, W.; Rövekamp, T.A.J.M.; Dumay, A.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: E-health may enable the empowerment process for patients, particularly the chronically ill. However, e-health is not always designed with the requirements of patient empowerment in mind. Drawing on evidence-based e-health studies, we propose directions for best practices to develop

  5. Ready for eHealth. Older Swedes’ Perceptions of eHealth Services: Using the PIADS Scale as a Predictor for Readiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarianne Wiklund Axelsson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Relevant determinants of adoption of eHealth are needed in order to understand future usage. Aim: To investigate the anticipated psychosocial impact of present and future eHealth services and discuss how psychosocial factors can impact the readiness for eHealth services among older Swedes and reflect upon instruments for measuring eHealth acceptance. Method: The Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Device Scale (PIADS measured the psychosocial impact of eHealth services as illustrated in pictures of a set of events of eHealth services that may reasonably occur in the present and the future. The PIADS scale and the scenarios were administered via a randomly selected sample from the Swedish population aged 55–105. Results and Discussion: Older Swedes have, from a psychosocial perspective, positive expectations regarding eHealth services. The PIADS scale could be a useful supplement to acceptance measurements in the context of eHealth. Using animated illustrations to depict eHealth services, together with the PIADS scale, can generate findings that are generalizable across technologies. The dimensions adaptability, competence and self-esteem could be relevant determinants of adoption of eHealth.

  6. Review and Support of the Relationship between Alliance Competence and Alliance Orientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo R. Llanos-Herrera

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to contribute to the understanding of the formation of strategic alliances among companies. Specifically, it seeks to understand the relationship between alliance competence (Lambe, Speakman & Hunt, 2002 and alliance orientation (Kandemir, Yaprak & Cavusgil, 2006, following some of the most important guidelines of the leading exponents of theories based on resources and dynamic capabilities. Once the concepts were developed we proceeded to establish a hypothesis that seeks to better understand the relationships between the constructs and how they interact to achieve alliances that are beneficial for the parties involved. In particular, the findings corroborate the proposed relationships, supporting a direct link between market orientation constructs and senior management commitment to the alliances, as well as the commitment of senior management and competencies for alliances. As a fundamental contribution to this work, a mediating role of the alliance orientation construct was also detected between the relationship of senior management commitment and alliance competence. Future research is proposed into the elements of the practical guidelines for alliances and the relationship of this construct with the others related to alliances and particularly to their performance.

  7. Fostering change within organizational participants of multisectoral health care alliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearld, Larry R; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Mittler, Jessica N

    2012-01-01

    A touted advantage of multisectoral health care alliances is their ability to coordinate diverse constituencies and pursue community health goals in ways that allow them to make greater progress than each constituency could independently. However, participating organizations may have goals that do not entirely overlap or necessarily align with the alliance's goals, which can weaken or undermine an alliance's efforts. Fostering changes within participating organizations in ways that are consistent with the alliance's goals (i.e., alliance-oriented change) may be one mechanism by which alliances can coordinate diverse activities and improve care in their local communities. We examined whether alliance-oriented change within participating organizations is associated with alliance decision-making and conflict management style, level of participation, perceptions of alliance participation benefits and costs, and awareness of alliance activities within participating organizations. The study used two rounds of survey data collected from organizational participants of 14 alliances participating in the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Aligning Forces for Quality program. Alliance participants generally reported low levels of alliance-oriented change within their organizations as a result of the alliance and its activities. However, participants reporting higher levels of internal change in response to alliance activities had more positive perceptions of alliance decision-making style, higher levels of participation in alliance activities, more positive perceptions of alliance participation benefits relative to costs, and greater awareness of alliance activities across multiple levels of their respective organizations. Despite relatively low levels of alliance-oriented change within participating organizations, alliances may still have the means to align the goal orientations of a diverse membership and foster change that may extend the reach of the alliance in the community.

  8. eHealth research from the user's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Bradford W; Shneiderman, Ben

    2007-05-01

    The application of information technology (IT) to issues of healthcare delivery has had a long and tortuous history in the United States. Within the field of eHealth, vanguard applications of advanced computing techniques, such as applications in artificial intelligence or expert systems, have languished in spite of a track record of scholarly publication and decisional accuracy. The problem is one of purpose, of asking the right questions for the science to solve. Historically, many computer science pioneers have been tempted to ask "what can the computer do?" New advances in eHealth are prompting developers to ask "what can people do?" How can eHealth take part in national goals for healthcare reform to empower relationships between healthcare professionals and patients, healthcare teams and families, and hospitals and communities to improve health equitably throughout the population? To do this, eHealth researchers must combine best evidence from the user sciences (human factors engineering, human-computer interaction, psychology, and usability) with best evidence in medicine to create transformational improvements in the quality of care that medicine offers. These improvements should follow recommendations from the Institute of Medicine to create a healthcare system that is (1) safe, (2) effective (evidence based), (3) patient centered, and (4) timely. Relying on the eHealth researcher's intuitive grasp of systems issues, improvements should be made with considerations of users and beneficiaries at the individual (patient-physician), group (family-staff), community, and broad environmental levels.

  9. A systematic review of gamification in e-Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardi, Lamyae; Idri, Ali; Fernández-Alemán, José Luis

    2017-07-01

    Gamification is a relatively new trend that focuses on applying game mechanics to non-game contexts in order to engage audiences and to inject a little fun into mundane activities besides generating motivational and cognitive benefits. While many fields such as Business, Marketing and e-Learning have taken advantage of the potential of gamification, the digital healthcare domain has also started to exploit this emerging trend. This paper aims to summarize the current knowledge regarding gamified e-Health applications. A systematic literature review was therefore conducted to explore the various gamification strategies employed in e-Health and to address the benefits and the pitfalls of this emerging discipline. A total of 46 studies from multiple sources were then considered and thoroughly investigated. The results show that the majority of the papers selected reported gamification and serious gaming in health and wellness contexts related specifically to chronic disease rehabilitation, physical activity and mental health. Although gamification in e-Health has attracted a great deal of attention during the last few years, there is still a dearth of valid empirical evidence in this field. Moreover, most of the e-Health applications and serious games investigated have been proven to yield solely short-term engagement through extrinsic rewards. For gamification to reach its full potential, it is therefore necessary to build e-Health solutions on well-founded theories that exploit the core experience and psychological effects of game mechanics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Collaborative innovation effort and size in alliances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asikainen, Anna-Leena; Radziwon, Agnieszka

    of organisational and marketing innovations. Additionally, small firms were more likely (than large) to engage into alliances as a part of their strategy. On more general level our data also confirm that factors such as: number of highly educated employees, foreign ownership of a firm and presence of firm......This study presents quantitative investigation of the factors that influence the process of forming strategic alliances with a special focus on the role of innovation strategies and firm’s size in alliance building process. The empirical sample is based on a large scale data from the Community...

  11. Review and Support of the Relationship between Alliance Competence and Alliance Orientation

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalo R. Llanos-Herrera; Nelson A. Andrade-Valbuena

    2017-01-01

    This paper seeks to contribute to the understanding of the formation of strategic alliances among companies. Specifically, it seeks to understand the relationship between alliance competence (Lambe, Speakman & Hunt, 2002) and alliance orientation (Kandemir, Yaprak & Cavusgil, 2006), following some of the most important guidelines of the leading exponents of theories based on resources and dynamic capabilities. Once the concepts were developed we proceeded to establish a hypothesis that se...

  12. Ready for eHealth? Health Professionals' Acceptance and Adoption of eHealth Interventions in Inpatient Routine Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennemann, Severin; Beutel, Manfred E; Zwerenz, Rüdiger

    2017-03-01

    eHealth interventions can be effective in treating health problems. However, adoption in inpatient routine care seems limited. The present study therefore aimed to investigate barriers and facilitators to acceptance of eHealth interventions and of online aftercare in particular in health professionals of inpatient treatment. A total of 152 out of 287 health professionals of various professional groups in four inpatient rehabilitation facilities filled out a self-administered web-based questionnaire (response rate: 53%); 128 individuals were eligible for further data analysis. Acceptance and possible predictors were investigated with a complex research model based on the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology. Acceptance of eHealth interventions was rather low (M = 2.47, SD = 0.98); however, acceptance of online aftercare was moderate (M = 3.08, SD = 0.96, t(127) = 8.22, p eHealth literacy was elevated. Social influence, performance expectancy, and treatment-related internet and mobile use significantly predicted overall acceptance. No differences were found between professional and age groups. Although acceptance of eHealth interventions was limited in health professionals of inpatient treatment, moderate acceptance of online aftercare for work-related stress implies a basis for future implementation. Tailored eHealth education addressing misconceptions about inferiority and incongruity with conventional treatment considering the systemic aspect of acceptance formation are needed.

  13. Managing multiple facets of risk in new product alliances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, R.P.; Johnson, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    The trend of forming alliances to develop new products continues; however, many of these new product alliances fail. As such we explore how key risk types intrinsic in new product alliances, performance, relational, and knowledge appropriation risks, influence alliance success. Further, we theorize

  14. Shaping the alliance management agenda: a capability approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duysters, G.; Saebi, T.; de Man, A.P.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past years, the topic of alliance capability has captured the attention of numerous alliance scholars. This emerging research stream claims that a main cause for alliance success lies in the partner's individual capability to manage their alliances. This editorial paper reviews the main

  15. Managing strategic alliances in the power generation industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Rajesh

    2003-01-01

    Highlights the challenges for power development developers in initiating alliances in the power generation industry. Importance of strategic alliances in the industry; Nature of the alliances in the independent power industry; Strategies for creating and sustaining value in global power development......; Management of tensions inherent in internal and external alliances....

  16. Using eHealth to Increase Autonomy Supportive Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Helle; Blom, Karina Fischer; Lee, Anne

    2018-01-01

    eHealth solutions are increasingly implemented in antenatal care to enhance women's involvement. The main aim of this study was to evaluate women's assessment of autonomy supportive care during the antenatal care visits among low-risk pregnant women. An intervention study was conducted including...... a control group attending standard antenatal care and an intervention group having access to an eHealth knowledge base, in addition to standard care. A total of 87 women were included in the control group and a total of 121 women in the intervention group. Data were collected using an online questionnaire 2...... weeks after participants had given birth. Data were analyzed using χ tests and Wilcoxon rank sums. Use of an eHealth knowledge base was associated with statistically significant higher scores for women's overall assessment of antenatal care visits, the organization of antenatal care visits, confidence...

  17. Consumer e-health solutions: the cure for Baumol's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Adalsteinn D

    2014-01-01

    Baumol's disease is the fact that costs in persistently labour-intensive sectors such as healthcare do not drop, despite increased use of technology. The idea of consumer e-health solutions is seductive, because it provides one option for treating Baumol's disease. However, barriers to the implementation of these solutions exist, and the successful treatment of Baumol's disease with consumer e-health solutions rests on more than their removal. In this introduction, the editor-in-chief adds to the conversation four shifts that are critical to reaping the benefits of consumer e-health solutions: moving the focus from privacy to protection; from mere access to the use of information in decision-making; from the patient-provider dyad to one that includes a full formal and informal care team; and from structural solutions in healthcare to ones designed around the goals we have for our health system.

  18. Determinants of Consumer eHealth Information Seeking Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandefer, Ryan H; Westra, Bonnie L; Khairat, Saif S; Pieczkiewicz, David S; Speedie, Stuart M

    2015-01-01

    Patients are increasingly using the Internet and other technologies to engage in their own healthcare, but little research has focused on the determinants of consumer eHealth behaviors related to Internet use. This study uses data from 115,089 respondents to four years of the National Health Interview Series to identify the associations between one consumer eHealth behavior (information seeking) and demographics, health measures, and Personal Health Information Management (PHIM) (messaging, scheduling, refills, and chat). Individuals who use PHIM are 7.5 times more likely to search the internet for health related information. Just as health has social determinants, the results of this study indicate there are potential social determinants of consumer eHealth behaviors including personal demographics, health status, and healthcare access.

  19. NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer funds the Cancer Nanotechnology Training Centers collectively with the NCI Cancer Training Center. Find out about the funded Centers, to date, that train our next generation of scientists in the field of Canc

  20. Creation of a European alliance in radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Real, A.; Mora, J. C.; Robles, B.; Cancio, D.

    2011-01-01

    Eight European organizations, including the CIEMAT, have created an Alliance Radioecology, pledging to integrate part of their R and D on a new Strategic Research Agenda, in order to integrate and sustain long-term research in this discipline.

  1. Successful alliances driven by processes, not discounts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brett, J.F.; Craig, V.B.; Pile, K.E.; Wadsworth, D.B.; Brett, K.V.; Aslakson, J.

    1996-01-01

    When alliances are executed properly and partners have a full understanding of true integration, drilling ventures can improve their potential to reduce costs and accelerate production by 12--30%. Many companies enter alliances without a full grasp of the economic potential such a relationship might offer. Many alliances rely too heavily on relationship issues and commercial terms instead of focusing on integrating their technical processes successfully. Process-driven alliance (PDA) is the term adopted by a new Gas Research Institute report prepared by OGCI Management Inc. to represent a fundamentally different way to plan, execute, and evaluate drilling projects. This paper discusses the findings of the GRI study, describing the stability of PDAs, value chain, successful PDAs, changed commercial terms, and characteristics of failure

  2. eHealth in Saudi Arabia: Current Trends, Challenges and Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsulame, Khaled; Khalifa, Mohamed; Househ, Mowafa

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the current status of eHealth in Saudi Arabia from the perspective of health informatics professionals. We used a case study approach and analyzed participant data using thematic analysis. The study took place between July and August 2013. Data collection included interviews with nine senior health information professionals in Saudi Arabia. The findings describe participant views on current eHealth trends in Saudi Arabia and show differences among Saudi healthcare organizations in terms of eHealth adoption. Participants also describe the challenges relating to organizational and cultural issues, end user attitudes towards eHealth projects, and the lack of specialized human resources to implement eHealth systems. Two main recommendations made by the participants were to form a new national body for eHealth and to develop a unified plan for the implementation of Saudi eHealth initiatives.

  3. Relationship Between Parental and Adolescent eHealth Literacy and Online Health Information Seeking in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Fong-Ching; Chiu, Chiung-Hui; Chen, Ping-Hung; Miao, Nae-Fang; Lee, Ching-Mei; Chiang, Jeng-Tung; Pan, Ying-Chun

    2015-10-01

    This study examined the relationship between parental and adolescent eHealth literacy and its impact on online health information seeking. Data were obtained from 1,869 junior high school students and 1,365 parents in Taiwan in 2013. Multivariate analysis results showed that higher levels of parental Internet skill and eHealth literacy were associated with an increase in parental online health information seeking. Parental eHealth literacy, parental active use Internet mediation, adolescent Internet literacy, and health information literacy were all related to adolescent eHealth literacy. Similarly, adolescent Internet/health information literacy, eHealth literacy, and parental active use Internet mediation, and parental online health information seeking were associated with an increase in adolescent online health information seeking. The incorporation of eHealth literacy courses into parenting programs and school education curricula is crucial to promote the eHealth literacy of parents and adolescents.

  4. The Transition from Alliance Networks to Multilateral Alliances in the Global Airline Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio G. Lazzarini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines conditions in which alliance networks (informal webs of bilateral entanglements between firms may or may not evolve into multilateral alliances (broad, formal multiple-firm arrangements. I offer a theory to explain the formation of multilateral alliances based on both the resource profile and the structure of existing interfirm networks, and provide an initial test of that theory in the context of the global airline industry. Using data from 75 global airlines and their alliances, I propose a methodology to retrieve samples of alliance networks and then use regression analysis to assess how the resource profile and the structure of these networks influence their formalization into multilateral alliances. I find that multilateral alliances are more likely to emerge when alliance networks exhibit high resource diversity and network structure characterized by moderate density and high centralization. Apparently, while highly sparse networks reduce actors’ awareness of their potential joint collaboration, highly dense or embedded networks substitute for the need for formal controls accompanying multilateral agreements. The effect of centralization suggests that the formation of multilateral alliances tends to be triggered by leading actors directly connected to other network members.

  5. Partner Capabilities and Alliance Time Frame: An Analysis of International Strategic Alliances from the CEE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hossein Jalali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Partner selecton is one of the most discussed issues in strategic alliances literature. However, the majority of research has typically focused on generic partner characteristcs and presented conceptual models for alliance partner selecton, addressing clan image but only limited pieces of the partner selecton puzzle. Rooted in the resource-based view, this paper suggests that partner selecton is contngent upon the intended tme frame of strategic alliances and presents a new and intensive conceptual framework that examines the appropriate partner capability for strategic alliances, in the case of short/medium-term alliances and long-term ones. Based on empirical evidences from 736 alliances in the CEE region, the fndings stress the differences between varied partner capabilites in short/medium-term and long-term alliances. Accordingly, the signifcance of technological capability increases with the number of year’s alliances endured. Moreover, the importance of market capability decreases signifcantly when alliances last for a longer tme frame.

  6. Strategic Alliances in The Robotics Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Bjørn

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the master-thesis was to examine how Blue Ocean Robotics can structure its strategic alliances to gain a competitive advantage in the market development of robotics in international markets.......The purpose of the master-thesis was to examine how Blue Ocean Robotics can structure its strategic alliances to gain a competitive advantage in the market development of robotics in international markets....

  7. When and how to create strategic alliances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinsvold, C.

    1994-01-01

    As oil prices remain flat and discoveries become more costly, the relationships between suppliers and operators are changing. Arms-length, unit pricing buying practices remain the norm for many buyers, but others have identified advantages of forming alliances that make greater use of the suppliers' capabilities. Recently, operators and the service industry have started to evolve a new culture that provides value-added solutions in an incentive environment. coupled with long-term risk-sharing or partnering arrangements, the potential advantages to both the operator and supplier are clear. An alliance is a long-term commitment between the operator and one or more supplier organizations, formed to achieve well-defined project objectives in a way that is beneficial to all alliance partners. Alliances take many forms and are adapted to meet the needs of the project. Successful alliances are characterized by trust, common goals and open communication. They build on the efficiencies, capabilities and strengths each partner brings to the relationship. The nine steps to creating a successful alliance are described

  8. Key state legislative provisions on purchasing alliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, E K; Curtis, R E; Haugh, K

    1994-01-01

    In order to function effectively in post-reform healthcare markets, behavioral healthcare professionals must understand and interact with health purchasing alliances. Healthcare reform initiatives based upon the principles of managed competition envision an important role for cooperative health purchasing organizations, or "health alliances," that collect premiums and contract with health plans for the provision of comprehensive health services delivered within the framework of a standardized benefit package. Health purchasing alliances have already been implemented in eight states, and this trend is expected to grow. The following article illustrates the structure and authority of the health alliances that are already in operation, and is presented here to give Behavioral Healthcare Tomorrow journal readers an up-to-date overview of reforming healthcare markets. This matrix arrays recent state laws which we identify as clearly including components of managed competition or purchasing alliances. Other states undoubtedly have elements of reform that include some aspects of these concepts. For example, under legislation, a Vermont health care authority was established and, among other things, charged with developing two comprehensive reform proposals, one of which will involve multipayors and the other a single-payor system. Options will likely embody many of the activities of alliances. Vermont is not included in this matrix because these provisions are still in the developmental stage.

  9. Strategic Alliances: the Potential for Russian Nanoindustry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inshakova Elena Ivanovna

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Strategic alliances as a form of interfirm cooperation (including international cooperation increase the potential of solving large-scale problems of national nanoindustry development, providing synergy of participants resources united by the principle of complementarity and substitution in the process of joint implementation of complex R&D programs, mobilization and input of significant financial, material, technical and intellectual resources of the participants in nanotechnology projects. Strategic alliances in nanoindustry with national and international companies participation are defined as institutional and organizational form of interfirm cooperation. At this, the upper limit of its functioning is represented by hierarchical relations in transactions within the integrated structures, and the low limit by heterarchical relations in transactions among the detached firms. The paper identifies the main factors of successful functioning of strategic alliances in nanoindustry. At the same time, the participants pursuit of their own economic interests (including non-matching interests will inevitably become a source of origin and accumulation of contradictions in the alliance, which can cause its disintegration or acquisition of a weaker, passive participant by a stronger one. This determines the need for a thorough study of decisions on entering into a strategic alliance, on tactical and operational participation in its management in accordance with the contribution of partners to its creation, defining their authority and share in the results of operations. The article also studies the experience of strategic alliances formation in American and European nanoindustry, and exemplifies the potential of such interfirm cooperation in the realia of Russian economy.

  10. Knowledge translation in eHealth: building a virtual community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Jesdeep; Lau, Francis; Hagens, Simon; Leaver, Chad; Price, Morgan

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge can be powerful in eliciting positive change when it is put into action. This is the belief that drives knowledge translation. The University of Victoria (UVic) eHealth Observatory is focused on deriving knowledge from health information system (HIS) evaluation, which needs to be shared with HIS practitioners. Through an application of the Knowledge-to-Action Framework and the concept of a virtual community, we have established the virtual eHealth Benefits Evaluation Knowledge Translation (KT) Community. This paper describes the foundational elements of the KT Community and our overall KT strategy.

  11. The International Planetary Data Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, T.; Arviset, C.; Crichton, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    The International Planetary Data Alliance (IPDA) is an association of partners with the aim of improving the quality of planetary science data and services to the end users of space based instrumentation. The specific mission of the IPDA is to facilitate global access to, and exchange of, high quality scientific data products managed across international boundaries. Ensuring proper capture, accessibility and availability of the data is the task of the individual member space agencies. The IPDA was formed in 2006 with the purpose of adopting standards and developing collaborations across agencies to ensure data is captured in common formats. Member agencies include: Armenian Astronomical Society, China National Space Agency (CNSA), European Space Agency (ESA), German Aerospace Center (DLR), Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO), Italian Space Agency (ASI), Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), National Air and Space Administration (NASA), National Centre for Space Studies (CNES), Space Research Institute (IKI), UAE Space Agency, and UK Space Agency. The IPDA Steering Committee oversees the execution of projects and coordinates international collaboration. The IPDA conducts a number of focused projects to enable interoperability, construction of compatible archives, and the operation of the IPDA as a whole. These projects have helped to establish the IPDA and to move the collaboration forward. A key project that is currently underway is the implementation of the PDS4 data standard. Given the international focus, it has been critical that the PDS and the IPDA collaborate on its development. Also, other projects have been conducted successfully, including developing the IPDA architecture and corresponding requirements, developing shared registries for data and tools across international boundaries, and common templates for supporting agreements for archiving and sharing data for international missions. Several projects demonstrating interoperability across

  12. Contractual Alliance Governance: Impact of Different Contract Functions on Alliance Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faems, D.L.M.; Alberink, Rutger; Groen, Arend J.; Klein Woolthuis, Rosalinde

    2010-01-01

    Recent research on alliance governance has emphasized that contracts can have both a control and coordination function. In this paper, we test the impact of these different contract functions on alliance performance. Conducting structural equation analyses on a sample of 270 Dutch technology

  13. Strategic Alliance Poker: Demonstrating the Importance of Complementary Resources and Trust in Strategic Alliance Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutzel, Christopher R.; Worthington, William J.; Collins, Jamie D.

    2012-01-01

    Strategic Alliance Poker (SAP) provides instructors with an opportunity to integrate the resource based view with their discussion of strategic alliances in undergraduate Strategic Management courses. Specifically, SAP provides Strategic Management instructors with an experiential exercise that can be used to illustrate the value creation…

  14. Entrepreneurial Alliances: A Study of Entrepreneurship and Strategic Alliances in the Charter School Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Cheryl A.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the practices, processes, and success rates of 15 entrepreneurial alliances in the Texas charter school industry. The research involved interdisciplinary industries (business and education) and focused on how a specific type of alliance structure utilized social innovation to exploit opportunity and impact change in the…

  15. Enacting the alliance : towards a role-based theory of alliance implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noorderhaven, N.G.; Peeters, T.J.G.; Elst, van den J.; Das, T.K.

    2011-01-01

    Alliance research has tended to neglect the roles of individual managers and employees. However, firms are no unitary actors but complex social systems comprising individuals whose mindsets and interests influence an alliance. Building on organizational role theory we distinguish between three types

  16. Implementation of Fog Computing for Reliable E-Health Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Craciunescu, Razvan; Mihovska, Albena Dimitrova; Mihaylov, Mihail Rumenov

    2015-01-01

    tasks, such as storage and data signal processing to the edge of the network, thus decreasing the latency associated with performing those tasks within the cloud. The research scenario is an e-Health laboratory implementation where the real-time processing is performed by the home PC, while...

  17. Intensifying Innovation Adoption in Educational eHealth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissanen, M. K.

    2014-01-01

    In demanding innovation areas such as eHealth, the primary emphasis is easily placed on the product and process quality aspects in the design phase. Customer quality may receive adequate attention when the target audience is well-defined. But if the multidimensional evaluative focus does not get enough space until the implementation phase, this…

  18. The Promise and Challenge of eHealth Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Nancy L.; Gold, Robert S.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how health education researchers can use the Internet to both intervene in health behavior and evaluate the effects of interventions (eHealth), describing the potential of computer technology for behavior interventions via message tailoring, intervention tailoring, simulations, games, and online communities, and noting implementation…

  19. Developing e-Health Information by Empowerment Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Bodil; Engberg, Axel; Barlach, Anders

    2006-01-01

    This innovative study relates patient empowerment to strategies for education and e-health information to support self-care to patients with knee surgery in a Danish university hospital outpatient clinic. Interdisciplinary teamwork and Information and Communication Technology are integral parts...

  20. Implementing successful e-health implementations within developing countries

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ouma, S

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available ), hospital staff members (n=31) and patients (n=24). Therefore a total of (n=60), participated in the study. The findings revealed that just like in the majority of the developing nations, there are very few computers and e-health solutions that are currently...

  1. Business models for sustained ehealth implementation: lessons from two continents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dyk, L; Wentzel, M.J.; van Limburg, A.H.M.; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E.W.C.; Schutte, C.S.L.; Schutte, C.S.L.

    2012-01-01

    There is general consensus that Computers and Information Technology have the potential to enhance health systems applications, and many good examples of such applications exist all over the world. Unfortunately, with respect to eHealth and telemedicine, there is much disillusionment and scepticism.

  2. eHealth, care and quality of life

    CERN Document Server

    Capello, Fabio; Manca, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The debate over eHealth is alive as never before. Supporters suggest that it will result in dramatic innovations in healthcare, including a giant leap towards patient-centered care, new opportunities to improve effectiveness, and enhanced wellness and quality of life. In addition, the growing market value of investments in health IT suggests that eHealth can offer at least a partial cure for the current economic stagnation. Detractors counter these arguments by claiming that eHealth has already failed: the UK Department of Health has shut down the NHS National Program for IT, Google has discontinued its Health flagship, and doubts have arisen over privacy safeguards for both patients and medical professionals. This book briefly explains why caregivers, professionals, technicians, patients, politicians, and others should all consider themselves stakeholders in eHealth. It offers myth-busting responses to some ill-considered arguments from both sides of the trench, in the process allowing a fresh look at eHeal...

  3. Sustainable implementation of e-health enabled interdisciplinary collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijser, Wouter Alexander; Smits, Jacco Gerardus Wilhelmus Leonardus; Penterman, Lisanne; Wilderom, Celeste P.M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Integrated care can prosper from e-health solutions that hold a vast potential for increasing effective information sharing and communication: collaboration. This is in particular the case in the care for elder persons: a growing population often in need of a variety of care, health

  4. Global eHealth, Social Business and Citizen Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Ashraf, Mahfuz; Ray, Pradeep

    2017-01-01

    The UNSW WHO Collaborating Centre (WHOCC) in eHealth was established in 2013. Its designated activities are: mHealth and evidence-based evaluation, including use case analyses. The UNSW Yunus Social Business Health Hub (YSBHH), established in 2015 to build on the Yunus Centre/Grameen Bank eHealth initiatives, added social business and community participation dimensions to the UNSW global eHealth program. The Grameen Bank is a social business built around microcredit, which are small loans to poor people to enable them to "produce something, sell something, earn something to develop self-reliance and a life of dignity". The vision revolves around global partnerships for development, Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The scope includes mHealth implementation and evaluation in the context of the Internet of Things (IoT), with a growing focus on social business and citizen engagement approaches. This paper summarises a critical case study of the UNSW WHOCC (eHealth) designated activities in collaboration with Bangladesh institutions (International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDRB) and Yunus Centre). Issues and challenges are highlighted.

  5. Physician leadership in e-health? A systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijser, Wouter Alexander; Smits, Jacco Gerardus Wilhelmus Leonardus; Penterman, Lisanne; Wilderom, Celeste P.M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This paper aims to systematically review the literature on roles of physicians in virtual teams (VTs) delivering healthcare for effective “physician e-leadership” (PeL) and implementation of e-health. Design/methodology/approach The analyzed studies were retrieved with explicit keywords and

  6. E-health internationalization requirements for audit purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouhbi, Sofia; Fernández-Alemán, José Luis; Carrillo-de-Gea, Juan Manuel; Toval, Ambrosio; Idri, Ali

    2017-06-01

    In the 21st century, e-health is proving to be one of the strongest drivers for the global transformation of the health care industry. Health information is currently truly ubiquitous and widespread, but in order to guarantee that everyone can appropriately access and understand this information, regardless of their origin, it is essential to bridge the international gap. The diversity of health information seekers languages and cultures signifies that e-health applications must be adapted to satisfy their needs. In order to achieve this objective, current and future e-health programs should take into account the internationalization aspects. This paper presents an internationalization requirements specification in the form of a reusable requirements catalog, obtained from the principal related standards, and describes the key methodological elements needed to perform an e-health software audit by using the internationalization knowledge previously gathered. S Health, a relevant, well-known Android application that has more than 150 million users in over 130 countries, was selected as a target for the e-health internationalization audit method and requirements specification presented above. This application example helped us to put into practice the proposal and show that the procedure is realistic and effective. The approach presented in this study is subject to continuous improvement through the incorporation of new knowledge originating from additional information sources, such as other standards or stakeholders. The application example is useful for early evaluation and serves to assess the applicability of the internationalization catalog and audit methodology, and to improve them. It would be advisable to develop of an automated tool with which to carry out the audit method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. ENTREPRENEURIAL ECO-SYSTEMS & REGIONAL ALLIANCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe ENGLISH

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of universities and their role in enterprise development, support and education is very mature. However when Isenberg coined the term ‘entrepreneurial ecosystem’ and suggested that higher education was one of the key foundation blocks of a regional eco-system it threw open the concept of the university having a wider role in the overall business, economic and civic life of a region. What is this wider role, and how do the universities themselves view their place in this evolving entrepreneurial eco-system? How do they fit into Regional Alliances set up to build regional economic development? This paper introduces two pilot Alliances that have been recently formed using both the education institutes and the wider eco-system to drive Innovation and Graduate Employability (The SHIP and REAL Alliances.

  8. Multinational Corporation and International Strategic Alliance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆兮

    2015-01-01

    The world is now deeply into the second great wave of globalization, in which product, capital, and markets are becoming more and more integrated across countries. Multinational corporations are gaining their rapid growth around the globe and playing a significant role in the world economy. Meanwhile, the accelerated rate of globalization has also imposed pressures on MNCs, left them desperately seeking overseas alliances in order to remain competitive. International strategic alliances, which bring together large and commonly competitive firms for specific purposes, have gradual y shown its importance in the world market. And the form of international joint venture is now widely adopted. Then after the formation of alliances, selecting the right partner, formulating right strategies, establishing harmonious and effective partnership are generally the key to success.

  9. Do Strategic Alliances, Acquisitions, and R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martynov Aleksey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies possible complementarities and substitution effects between such strategic choices as alliances, acquisitions and internal R&D investments. The findings indicate that a firm’s absorptive capacity affects the presence of complementarities and substitution effects among those strategic choices. Firms with high absorptive capacity exhibit substitution effects between alliances and acquisitions and between alliances and internal R&D investments. Firms with high absorptive capacity also exhibit complementarities between acquisitions and additional R&D investments. These results were obtained from panel data of large and medium U.S. companies spanning the years 1998-2009. The results are robust to the use of different measures of performance: profitability, market-to-book value, and sales growth. This paper contributes to our understanding of the role of absorptive capacity for the optimal choice of inter-organizational strategy vs. greater internal R&D investments.

  10. How is eHealth literacy measured and what do the measurements tell us?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Astrid Karnøe; Kayser, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of digital services and technologies in health care calls for effective tools to evaluate the users’ eHealth literacy in order to better understand the users’ interaction with health technologies. We here present a systematic review of existing tools to measure eHealth literacy...... and for what these tools have been used to investigate. We identified eight tools, of which three of them are bases upon a conceptual model of eHealth literacy and the remaining five are dual tools, i.a. comprised of individual measures for health literacy and digital literacy. Of these eight tools, only one...... tool (The eHealth literacy Scale - eHEALS) was used in other studies than the one it was originally published in. eHEALS has primarily been used to establish eHealth literacy levels in different populations. Five of the studies have been conducted by examining eHealth literacy’s impact on health...

  11. Are Health Literacy and eHealth Literacy the Same or Different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monkman, Helen; Kushniruk, Andre W; Barnett, Jeff; Borycki, Elizabeth M; Greiner, Leigh E; Sheets, Debra

    2017-01-01

    Many researchers assume that there is a relationship between health literacy and eHealth literacy, yet it is not clear whether the literature supports this assumption. The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a relationship between health and eHealth literacy. To this end, participants' (n = 36) scores on the Newest Vital Sign (NVS, a health literacy measure) were correlated with the eHealth Literacy Scale (eHEALS, an eHealth literacy measure). This analysis revealed no relationship (r = -.041, p = .81) between the two variables. This finding suggests that eHealth Literacy and health literacy are dissimilar. Several possible explanations of the pattern of results are proposed. Currently, it does not seem prudent to use the eHEALS as the sole measure of eHealth literacy, but rather researchers should continue to complement it with a validated health literacy screening tool.

  12. Social Support for Diabetes Self-Management via eHealth Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorderstrasse, Allison; Lewinski, Allison; Melkus, Gail D'Eramo; Johnson, Constance

    2016-07-01

    eHealth interventions have been increasingly used to provide social support for self-management of type 2 diabetes. In this review, we discuss social support interventions, types of support provided, sources or providers of support, outcomes of the support interventions (clinical, behavioral, psychosocial), and logistical and clinical considerations for support interventions using eHealth technologies. Many types of eHealth interventions demonstrated improvements in self-management behaviors, psychosocial outcomes, and clinical measures, particularly HbA1c. Important factors to consider in clinical application of eHealth support interventions include participant preferences, usability of eHealth technology, and availability of personnel to orient or assist participants. Overall, eHealth is a promising adjunct to clinical care as it addresses the need for ongoing support in chronic disease management.

  13. Financial analysis for the infusion alliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perucca, Roxanne

    2010-01-01

    Providing high-quality, cost-efficient care is a major strategic initiative of every health care organization. Today's health care environment is transparent; very competitive; and focused upon providing exceptional service, safety, and quality. Establishing an infusion alliance facilitates the achievement of organizational strategic initiatives, that is, increases patient throughput, decreases length of stay, prevents the occurrence of infusion-related complications, enhances customer satisfaction, and provides greater cost-efficiency. This article will discuss how to develop a financial analysis that promotes value and enhances the financial outcomes of an infusion alliance.

  14. New Actors and Alliances in Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richey, Lisa Ann; Ponte, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    ‘New actors and alliances in development’ brings together an interdisciplinary group of scholars exploring how development financing and interventions are being shaped by a wider and more complex platform of actors than usually considered in the existing literature. The contributors also trace...... a changing set of key relations and alliances in development – those between business and consumers; ngos and celebrities; philanthropic organisations and the state; diaspora groups and transnational advocacy networks; ruling elites and productive capitalists; and ‘new donors’ and developing country...

  15. Strategic alliances fit pattern of industry innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crump, J.G.

    1997-01-01

    The strategic alliance, vitally important as an isolated practice in the oil and gas business, also fits a broad pattern of innovation by which the industry is redefining itself for prosperity in a new energy age. The industry is experiencing a renaissance in almost every aspect, from technological breakthroughs to innovative business practices to new products and markets. An inevitable outgrowth of such rapid and fundamental change is an evolution in business relationships. The strategic alliance is at the forefront of this trend. Development of new relationships capitalizes on, and partly results from, enormous advances in technology and finance. The paper discusses new relationships, the outsourcing rage, integrating work flows, and technological advances

  16. Coupling methodology within the software platform alliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montarnal, Ph; Deville, E; Adam, E; Bengaouer, A [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Modelisation des Systemes et Structures 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Dimier, A; Gaombalet, J; Loth, L [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs (ANDRA), 92 - Chatenay Malabry (France); Chavant, C [Electricite de France (EDF), 92 - Clamart (France)

    2005-07-01

    CEA, ANDRA and EDF are jointly developing the software platform ALLIANCES which aim is to produce a tool for the simulation of nuclear waste storage and disposal repository. This type of simulations deals with highly coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical and chemical (T-H-M-C) processes. A key objective of Alliances is to give the capability for coupling algorithms development between existing codes. The aim of this paper is to present coupling methodology use in the context of this software platform. (author)

  17. Coupling methodology within the software platform alliances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montarnal, Ph.; Deville, E.; Adam, E.; Bengaouer, A.; Dimier, A.; Gaombalet, J.; Loth, L.; Chavant, C.

    2005-01-01

    CEA, ANDRA and EDF are jointly developing the software platform ALLIANCES which aim is to produce a tool for the simulation of nuclear waste storage and disposal repository. This type of simulations deals with highly coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical and chemical (T-H-M-C) processes. A key objective of Alliances is to give the capability for coupling algorithms development between existing codes. The aim of this paper is to present coupling methodology use in the context of this software platform. (author)

  18. Design and Implementation of e-Health System Based on Semantic Sensor Network Using IETF YANG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenquan Jin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, healthcare services can be delivered effectively to patients anytime and anywhere using e-Health systems. e-Health systems are developed through Information and Communication Technologies (ICT that involve sensors, mobiles, and web-based applications for the delivery of healthcare services and information. Remote healthcare is an important purpose of the e-Health system. Usually, the eHealth system includes heterogeneous sensors from diverse manufacturers producing data in different formats. Device interoperability and data normalization is a challenging task that needs research attention. Several solutions are proposed in the literature based on manual interpretation through explicit programming. However, programmatically implementing the interpretation of the data sender and data receiver in the e-Health system for the data transmission is counterproductive as modification will be required for each new device added into the system. In this paper, an e-Health system with the Semantic Sensor Network (SSN is proposed to address the device interoperability issue. In the proposed system, we have used IETF YANG for modeling the semantic e-Health data to represent the information of e-Health sensors. This modeling scheme helps in provisioning semantic interoperability between devices and expressing the sensing data in a user-friendly manner. For this purpose, we have developed an ontology for e-Health data that supports different styles of data formats. The ontology is defined in YANG for provisioning semantic interpretation of sensing data in the system by constructing meta-models of e-Health sensors. The proposed approach assists in the auto-configuration of eHealth sensors and querying the sensor network with semantic interoperability support for the e-Health system.

  19. eHealth and Global Health: Investments Opportunities and Challenges for Industry in Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iluyemi, Adesina; Briggs, Jim

    eHealth investments from developed countries to developing countries are expected to follow the emerging trend of eHealth for meeting global health problems. However, eHealth industry from developed countries will need to learn to make this impending venture a ‘win-win’ situation with profitable return on investments. This short paper highlights some of these challenges that must be overcome in order to achieve these objectives.

  20. eHealth literacy issues, constructs, models, and methods for health information technology design and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Monkman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of eHealth literacy is beginning to be recognized as a being of key importance in the design and adoption of effective and efficient health information systems and applications targeted to lay people and patients. Indeed, many systems such as patient portals and personal health records have not been adopted due to a mismatch between the level of eHealth literacy demanded by a system and the level of eHealth literacy possessed by end users. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of important concepts related to eHealth literacy, as well as how the notion of eHealth literacy can be applied to improve the design and adoption of consumer health information systems. This paper begins with describing the importance of eHealth literacy with respect to design of health applications for the general public paired with examples of consumer health information systems whose limited success and adoption has been attributed to the lack of consideration for eHealth literacy. This is followed by definitions of what eHealth literacy is and how it emerged from the related concept of health literacy. A model for conceptualizing the importance of aligning consumers’ eHealth literacy skills and the demands systems place on their skills is then described. Next, current tools for assessing consumers’ eHealth literacy levels are outlined, followed by an approach to systematically incorporating eHealth literacy in the deriving requirements for new systems is presented. Finally, a discussion of evolving approaches for incorporating eHealth literacy into usability engineering methods is presented.

  1. The Alliance to Scale Digital Innovation and Entrepreneurship (Seed ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Alliance to Scale Digital Innovation and Entrepreneurship (Seed Alliance). This project will support digital innovations that solve development challenges. ... It combines three regional, competitive small grants and awards programs from ...

  2. Obstacles to Successful Implementation of eHealth Applications into Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voogt, Marianne P; Opmeer, Brent C; Kastelein, Arnoud W; Jaspers, Monique W M; Peute, Linda W

    2018-01-01

    eHealth can improve healthcare worldwide, and scientific research should provide evidence on the efficacy, safety and added value of such interventions. For successful implementation of eHealth interventions into clinical practice, barriers need to be anticipated. We identified seven barriers by interviewing health professionals in the Dutch healthcare system. These barriers covered three topics: financing, human factors and organizational factors. This paper discusses their potential impact on eHealth uptake. Bridging the gap between studies to assess effective eHealth interventions and their value-based implementation in healthcare is much needed.

  3. Association of eHealth literacy with cancer information seeking and prior experience with cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyejin; Moon, Mikyung; Baeg, Jung Hoon

    2014-09-01

    Cancer is a critical disease with a high mortality rate in the US. Although useful information exists on the Internet, many people experience difficulty finding information about cancer prevention because they have limited eHealth literacy. This study aimed to identify relationships between the level of eHealth literacy and cancer information seeking experience or prior experience with cancer screening tests. A total of 108 adults participated in this study through questionnaires. Data covering demographics, eHealth literacy, cancer information seeking experience, educational needs for cancer information searching, and previous cancer screening tests were obtained. Study findings show that the level of eHealth literacy influences cancer information seeking. Individuals with low eHealth literacy are likely to be less confident about finding cancer information. In addition, people who have a low level of eHealth literacy need more education about seeking information than do those with a higher level of eHealth literacy. However, there is no significant relationship between eHealth literacy and cancer screening tests. More people today are using the Internet for access to information to maintain good health. It is therefore critical to educate those with low eHealth literacy so they can better self-manage their health.

  4. USING THE SYNERGY OF ALLIANCES AND PARTNERSHIP FOR SUSTAINABLE GROWTH

    OpenAIRE

    Elena DOVAL; Oriana DOVAL

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to demonstrate by searching the literature that the synergy of different types of alliances and partnership brings much more opportunities for the sustainable growth of the companies. After a briefing about definitions, types and purpose of alliances and partnership the paper reminds the process of alliances and partnership formation and emphasises the main advantages and limits of alliances and partnership Finally, a new type of company is defined, i.e. ‘the s...

  5. ALLIANCES: simulation platform for radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deville, E.; Montarnal, Ph.; Loth, L.; Chavant, C.

    2009-01-01

    CEA, ANDRA and EDF are jointly developing the software platform ALLIANCES whose aim is to produce a tool for the simulation of nuclear waste storage and disposal. This type of simulations deals with highly coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical and radioactive (T-H-M-C-R) processes. ALLIANCES' aim is to accumulate within the same simulation environment the already acquired knowledge and to gradually integrate new knowledge. The current version of ALLIANCES contains the following modules: - Hydraulics and reactive transport in unsaturated and saturated media; - Multi-phase flow; - Mechanical thermal-hydraulics; - Thermo-Aeraulics; - Chemistry/Transport coupling in saturated media; - Alteration of waste package coupled with the environment; - Sensitivity analysis tools. The next releases will include more physical phenomena like: reactive transport in unsaturated flow and multicomponent multiphase flow; incorporation of responses surfaces in sensitivity analysis tools; integration of parallel numerical codes for flow and transport. Since the distribution of the first release of ALLIANCES (December 2003), the platform was used by ANDRA for his safety simulation program and by CEA for reactive transport simulations (migration of uranium in a soil, diffusion of different reactive species on laboratory samples, glass/iron/clay interaction). (authors)

  6. Alliances - Another Way to Access the Market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarov, Yuri A.

    1999-01-01

    The late 1990s were a difficult period for the world economy: decreased economic growth rate, dropping prices for energy and other raw materials, dropping import prices of natural gas. Companies involved in the energy business are currently at the stage of survival. High-priced projects with increased risks are postponed until better times. Consequently, Gazprom had to cut investments by two thirds. For Gazprom, the problems have been aggravated by the transition from authoritatively planned economy to market economy. Alliances are one of the most effective current methods of operation in the natural gas market. Alliances between Gazprom and leading Western oil and gas companies are beneficial both to the participants and the consumers because such alliances will provide for creation of a service package of the 21th century. The importance for Gazprom of cooperation with its alliance partners is that it makes it possible to implement cost-cutting measures that benefit both producers and consumers. It also makes it possible to ensure reliable distribution of the gas

  7. Managing R&D Alliance Portfolios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engel Nielsen, Lars; Mahnke, Volker

    2003-01-01

    be observed in several companies engaged in the cross section of telecommunication and mobile technology where increased complexity magnifies managerial challenges. Drawing on modern portfolio theory, this paper offers a model for managing portfolios of R&D alliances. In particular, an analysis...

  8. Strategic alliances in oil and gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crump, J.G.

    1998-01-01

    A competitor today is an ally tomorrow. A strategic partner in one market is an adversary in another. In this radically new way of doing business, the oil and gas industry seems quite at home. The trend to mergers is not unique to the oil industry, what is unique is the knack of petroleum companies to form strategic alliances [it

  9. Mergers and alliances the wider view

    CERN Document Server

    Woodsworth, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Volume 36 of Advances in Librarianship seeks to provide a broad review of the factors that lead to mergers and other alliances, the methods used to ensure effective and successful collaborations, and descriptions of the factors which contributed to less successful efforts at consolidation.

  10. Developing Strategic Alliances in Management Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, E. Ann; Wright, Gill

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The notion of effective strategic alliances provides the basis on which this paper proposes a framework to manage the application and outcomes of management learning. The management of key partner collaboration emerges in this paper as a major success factor in determining effective management learning. A proactive structured approach to…

  11. Facilitating Economic Development through Strategic Alliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noftsinger, John B., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how colleges and universities are becoming increasingly involved in economic development, with the formation of strategic alliances that have led to programs that benefit business and higher education. Discusses example programs from the Valley of Virginia Partnership for Education, and the outreach program of James Madison University.…

  12. Black-Brown Relations: Are Alliances Possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klor de Alva, J. Jorge; West, Cornel

    1997-01-01

    Dialogue between Cornel West and Jorge Klor de Alva explores the question of black-brown alliances, those between African Americans and Hispanic Americans. If minority groups can put aside the difference of skin color and join to combat economic and social racism, they can have far-reaching and meaningful impacts on society. (SLD)

  13. The therapeutic alliance: a psychoanalytic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freebury, D R

    1989-11-01

    Psychoanalysis has long distinguished between the transference neurosis and that part of the communication between therapist and patient which depends upon a relatively intact part of the patient's ego. It has been proposed that it is this capacity of the patient that sustains the difficult work of dealing with communications which are the consequence of transference, and which often threaten the viability of the treatment. This quality has been referred to variously as the unobjectionable positive transference, rational transference, mature transference, therapeutic alliance and working alliance. The ever broadening scope of Psychoanalysis, along with our greater knowledge of early childhood development, has enhanced our understanding of the many influences affecting the treatment alliances. Newer views of the transference, which stress the significance of the therapists' contributions to the therapeutic dyad, make it clear that the therapeutic alliance can no longer be explained as some simple, reality based, conflict free, motivating force. It involves, rather, a complex interaction of several factors, to each of which one must add the therapists' reciprocal reactions. Psychotherapy outcome research will need to take all of these factors into consideration.

  14. Robustness of airline alliance route networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lordan, Oriol; Sallan, Jose M.; Simo, Pep; Gonzalez-Prieto, David

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the robustness of the three major airline alliances' (i.e., Star Alliance, oneworld and SkyTeam) route networks. Firstly, the normalization of a multi-scale measure of vulnerability is proposed in order to perform the analysis in networks with different sizes, i.e., number of nodes. An alternative node selection criterion is also proposed in order to study robustness and vulnerability of such complex networks, based on network efficiency. And lastly, a new procedure - the inverted adaptive strategy - is presented to sort the nodes in order to anticipate network breakdown. Finally, the robustness of the three alliance networks are analyzed with (1) a normalized multi-scale measure of vulnerability, (2) an adaptive strategy based on four different criteria and (3) an inverted adaptive strategy based on the efficiency criterion. The results show that Star Alliance has the most resilient route network, followed by SkyTeam and then oneworld. It was also shown that the inverted adaptive strategy based on the efficiency criterion - inverted efficiency - shows a great success in quickly breaking networks similar to that found with betweenness criterion but with even better results.

  15. Rice postharvest learning alliance in Cambodia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flor, Rica Joy; Leeuwis, Cees; Maat, Harro; Gummert, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Research projects employ the learning alliance (LA) approach but there is scepticism that its rhetoric is not evident in practice. The authors examined a case of an implemented LA, comparing its outcomes with assumptions from the project and its conceptual design to evaluate the implementation of

  16. 78 FR 35747 - Airworthiness Directives; Engine Alliance Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Engine Alliance Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... Alliance GP7270 and GP7277 turbofan engines. This AD was prompted by damage to the high-pressure compressor... Alliance GP7270 and GP7277 turbofan engines with a high-pressure compressor (HPC) stage 6 disk, part number...

  17. 78 FR 5710 - Airworthiness Directives; Engine Alliance Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Engine Alliance Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... all Engine Alliance GP7270 and GP7277 turbofan engines. This AD requires initial and repetitive...) Applicability This AD applies to all Engine Alliance GP7270 and GP7277 turbofan engines with a high-pressure...

  18. Firm Performance and Alliance Capability: The mediating role of culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Man, A.P.; Luvison, D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – Extant literature has looked at the effect of alliance capability and organizational culture on alliance portfolio performance, but the relationship between the two has not been explored. The purpose of this paper is to explore the hypothesis that an alliance supportive culture is not only

  19. An Overview of Strategic Alliances between Universities and Corporations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmuti, Dean; Abebe, Michael; Nicolosi, Marco

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Strategic alliances generally represent inter-firm cooperative agreements aimed at achieving competitive advantage for the partners. In recent years, there has been a dramatic increase in strategic alliances by multinational firms. This paper aims to explore the essence of these alliances and why they have become such a growing area of…

  20. Interoperable and standard e-Health solution over Bluetooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, I; Del Valle, P; Munoz, P; Trigo, J D; Escayola, J; Martínez-Espronceda, M; Muñoz, A; Serrano, L; Garcia, J

    2010-01-01

    The new paradigm of e-Health demands open sensors and middleware components that permit transparent integration and end-to-end interoperability of new personal health devices. The use of standards seems to be the internationally adopted way to solve these problems. This paper presents the implementation of an end-to-end standards-based e-Health solution. This includes ISO/IEEE11073 standard for the interoperability of the medical devices in the patient environment and EN13606 standard for the interoperable exchange of the Electronic Healthcare Record. The design strictly fulfills all the technical features of the most recent versions of both standards. The implemented prototype has been tested in a laboratory environment to demonstrate its feasibility for its further transfer to the healthcare system.

  1. Alliance group formation: enabling and constraining effects of embeddedness and social capital in strategic technology alliance networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duysters, G.M.; Lemmens, C.E.A.V.

    2003-01-01

    The role of embeddedness and social capital in the process of alliance group formation in strategic technology alliance networks is examined. In particular, the social mechanisms that enable and enforce alliance group formation is studies. It is argued that the enabling effect of embeddedness during

  2. Therapeutic alliance in a randomized clinical trial for bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurso, Erin C; Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E; Ciao, Anna; Cao, Li; Crosby, Ross D; Smith, Tracey L; Klein, Marjorie H; Mitchell, James E; Crow, Scott J; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Peterson, Carol B

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the temporal relation between therapeutic alliance and outcome in two treatments for bulimia nervosa (BN). Eighty adults with BN symptoms were randomized to 21 sessions of integrative cognitive-affective therapy (ICAT) or enhanced cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT-E). Bulimic symptoms (i.e., frequency of binge eating and purging) were assessed at each session and posttreatment. Therapeutic alliance (Working Alliance Inventory) was assessed at Sessions 2, 8, 14, and posttreatment. Repeated-measures analyses using linear mixed models with random intercepts were conducted to determine differences in alliance growth by treatment and patient characteristics. Mixed-effects models examined the relation between alliance and symptom improvement. Overall, patients in both treatments reported strong therapeutic alliances. Regardless of treatment, greater therapeutic alliance between (but not within) subjects predicted greater reductions in bulimic behavior; reductions in bulimic behavior also predicted improved alliance. Patients with higher depression, anxiety, or emotion dysregulation had a stronger therapeutic alliance in CBT-E than ICAT, while those with more intimacy problems had greater improvement in therapeutic alliance in ICAT compared to CBT-E. Therapeutic alliance has a unique impact on outcome, independent of the impact of symptom improvement on alliance. Within- and between-subjects effects revealed that changes in alliance over time did not predict symptom improvement, but rather that individuals who had a stronger alliance overall had better bulimic symptom outcomes. These findings indicate that therapeutic alliance is an important predictor of outcome in the treatment of BN. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. A qualitative case study of ehealth and digital literacy experiences of pharmacy staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLure, Katie; Stewart, Derek

    2018-06-01

    eHealth's many forms are benchmarked by the World Health Organization. Scotland is considered an advanced adopter of ehealth. The third global survey on ehealth includes pharmacy-related ehealth indicators. Advances in ehealth place an obligation on pharmacy staff to demonstrate proficiency, or digital literacy, in using ehealth technologies. The aim of this study was to provide an indepth exploration of the ehealth and digital literacy experiences of pharmacy staff in the North East of Scotland. A qualitative local case study approach was adopted for observational and interview activities in community and hospital pharmacies. Interview and observational data were collated and analysed using a framework approach. This study gained management approval from the local health board following ethical review by the sponsor university. Nineteen pharmacies and staff (n = 94) participated including two hospitals. Most participants were female (n = 82), aged 29 years and younger (n = 34) with less than 5 years pharmacy experience (n = 49). Participants identified their own digital literacy as basic. Most of the pharmacies had minimum levels of technology implemented (n = 15). Four themes (technology, training, usability, processes) were inducted from the data, coded and modelled with illustrative quotes. Scotland is aspirational in seeking to support the developing role of pharmacy practice with ehealth, however, evidence to date shows most pharmacy staff work with minimum levels of technology. The self-reported lack of digital literacy and often mentioned lack of confidence in using IT suggest pharmacy staff need support and training. Informal work based digital literacy development of the pharmacy team is self-limiting. Usability of ehealth technology could be a key element of its' acceptability. There is potential to better engage with ehealth process efficiencies in both hospital and community pharmacy. As Scotland increasingly invests in ehealth pharmacy

  4. Applied Ethics and eHealth: Principles, Identity, and RFID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, Diane; Duquenoy, Penny

    The social and ethical implications of contemporary technologies are becoming an issue of steadily growing importance. This paper offers an overview in terms of identity and the field of ethics, and explores how these apply to eHealth in both theory and practice. The paper selects a specific circumstance in which these ethical issues can be explored. It focuses particularly on radio-frequency identifiers (RFID). It ends by discussing ethical issues more generally, and the practice of ethical consideration.

  5. eHealth Research from the User’s Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Hesse, Bradford W.; Shneiderman, Ben

    2007-01-01

    The application of Information Technology (IT) to issues of healthcare delivery has had a long and tortuous history in the U.S. Within the field of eHealth, vanguard applications of advanced computing techniques, such as applications in artificial intelligence or expert systems, have languished in spite of a track record of scholarly publication and decisional accuracy. The problem is one of purpose, of asking the right questions for the science to solve. Historically, many computer science p...

  6. E-health readiness assessment framework in iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezai-Rad, M; Vaezi, R; Nattagh, F

    2012-01-01

    Concept of e-readiness is used in many areas such as e-business, e-commerce, e-government, and e-banking. In terms of healthcare, e-readiness is a rather new concept, and is propounded under the title of E-healthcare. E-health readiness refers to the readiness of communities and healthcare institutions for the expected changes brought by programs related to Information and Communications Technology (lCT). The present research is conducted aiming at designing E-health Readiness Assessment Framework (EHRAF) in Iran. The e-health readiness assessment framework was designed based on reviewing literature on e-readiness assessment models and opinions of ICT and health experts. In the next step, Delphi method was used to develop and test the designed framework. Three questionnaires developed to test and modify the model while determining weights of the indices; afterward they were either sent to experts through email or delivered to them in face. The designed framework approved with 4 dimensions, 11 constituents and 58 indices. Technical readiness had the highest importance coefficient (0.256099), and the other dimensions were of the next levels of coefficient importance: core readiness (0.25520), social communication readiness (0.244658), and engagement readiness (0.244039). The framework presents the movement route and investment priorities in e-health in Iran. The proposed framework is a good instrument for measuring the e-readiness in health centers in Iran, and for identifying strengths and weaknesses of these centers to access ICT and its implementation for more effectiveness and for analyzing digital divide between them, as well.

  7. E-Health Readiness Assessment Framework in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezai-Rad, M; Vaezi, R; Nattagh, F

    2012-01-01

    Background: Concept of e-readiness is used in many areas such as e-business, e-commerce, e-government, and e-banking. In terms of healthcare, e-readiness is a rather new concept, and is propounded under the title of E-healthcare. E-health readiness refers to the readiness of communities and healthcare institutions for the expected changes brought by programs related to Information and Communications Technology (lCT). The present research is conducted aiming at designing E-health Readiness Assessment Framework (EHRAF) in Iran. Methods: The e-health readiness assessment framework was designed based on reviewing literature on e-readiness assessment models and opinions of ICT and health experts. In the next step, Delphi method was used to develop and test the designed framework. Three questionnaires developed to test and modify the model while determining weights of the indices; afterward they were either sent to experts through email or delivered to them in face. Results: The designed framework approved with 4 dimensions, 11 constituents and 58 indices. Technical readiness had the highest importance coefficient (0.256099), and the other dimensions were of the next levels of coefficient importance: core readiness (0.25520), social communication readiness (0.244658), and engagement readiness (0.244039). Conclusion: The framework presents the movement route and investment priorities in e-health in Iran. The proposed framework is a good instrument for measuring the e-readiness in health centers in Iran, and for identifying strengths and weaknesses of these centers to access ICT and its implementation for more effectiveness and for analyzing digital divide between them, as well. PMID:23304661

  8. Issues on E-health Adoption in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Kolawole J. Adebayo; Edward O. Ofoegbu

    2014-01-01

    E-health is the application of information technology for health care management. It includes all applications of information communication technologies to promote healthcare services support, delivery and education for improving efficiency in health care delivery to the citizens. Many factors contribute to the poor state of the medical sector of Nigeria, and in fact many developing countries, two of the most important being record keeping and accessibility. Nigeria still operates a paper bas...

  9. eHealth in cardiovascular medicine: A clinical update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saner, Hugo; van der Velde, Enno

    2016-10-01

    Demographic changes, progress in medicine technology and regional problems in providing healthcare to low density populations are posing great challenges to our healthcare systems. Rapid progress in computer sciences and information technologies have a great impact on the way healthcare will be delivered in the near future. This article describes opportunities and challenges of eHealth and telemedicine in the framework of our health systems and, in particular, in the context of today's cardiology services. The most promising applications of eHealth and telemedicine include: (a) prevention and lifestyle interventions; (b) chronic disease management including hypertension, diabetes and heart failure; (c) arrhythmia detection including early detection of atrial fibrillation and telemonitoring of devices such as pacemaker, internal cardioverter defibrillators and implantable rhythm monitoring devices; (d) telerehabilitation. Major obstacles to the integration of eHealth and telemedicine into daily clinical practice include limited large-scale evidence, in particular, for cost-effectiveness, as well as lack of interoperability, inadequate or fragmented legal frameworks and lack of reimbursement. An important challenge for those involved in these new technologies will be to keep the main focus on patient's individual needs and to carefully evaluate the evidence behind the practice. © The European Society of Cardiology 2016.

  10. Initiatives in the Romanian eHealth Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Andrei SITAR TAUT

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Even if the foundation in the field of eHealth was set almost half century ago, the current achievements’ status does not place Romania on a good position in a European ranking. The efforts made during the last years are promising, but they still cannot surpass the enormous gaps in many eHealth indicators. This is not a surprising fact because the eHealth level must be sustained by a healthy and stable sanitary system and infrastructure, which, in our country, is almost in collapse, especially now in the context of global economic and financial crisis. We consider being guilty for these circumstances the lack of a clear and solid mid-term strategy developed at the level of the Ministry of Health (MoH, harmonized in a global legal and regulatory framework as well, and also the non-correlated researcher groups interests. The good attitude of practitioners regarding the challenges of new technologies and the political will can still give a chance to the Romanian healthcare system and to its modern faces.

  11. eHealth Intervention for Problematic Internet Use (PIU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Lawrence T; Lam, Mary K

    2016-12-01

    Excessive use of the Internet is considered a problematic behaviour by clinicians and researchers. Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) has been advocated for a long time as a treatment approach and has been extended to include family therapy in the recent years. As eTherapy (eHealth) has become an important component in the treatment of many mental health problems, it is prudent to explore the current status of the eHealth approach as an intervention option for this problem. This systematic review aims to examine the current development of online intervention programmes for this particular condition. The PRISMA guidelines for systematic reviews and meta-analysis were employed to conduct the search for literature following a systematic and structured approach. Of the 182 articles screened, three satisfied the selection criteria. Information was extracted and analysed systematically for each study and tabulated. All these studies were pilot studies with small sample sizes. Two of these articles aimed to explore the therapeutic efficacy of newly developed online intervention programmes for Internet addiction (IA) and online gaming addiction. The third article described the design and development of an App for smartphone addiction. The results obtained from this review have provided insight into the on-going development of eHealth interventions as well as the health informatics approaches in offering a possible and practical solution to tackle this growing problem.

  12. A FRAMEWORK FOR SUBCONTRACTOR INTEGRATION IN ALLIANCE CONTRACTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilasini, Nimesha

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Project alliancing involves the active collaboration of construction project owners and non-owner participants (designer, contractors, and suppliers to deliver projects in an atmosphere of shared responsibilities and liabilities. Alliancing connotes integration but in real practice, it fails to create a true alliance environment since only part of the value chain (owner, designer, main contractor is considered for integration. Consequently subcontractors are very often left out of the key alliance. Therefore this study identifies improvement areas to current alliance practice and suggests changes that will permit critical sub-contracting processes to be integrated into a project’s main alliance. To achieve this objective the research follows a comparative study approach. Information obtained from relevant literature is used to identify current subcontractor management practices and best practices for subcontractor integration in alliances. A case study of an alliance project is used to identify improvement areas in subcontractor management practices in an alliance environment. From these findings, the study proposes a revised alliance framework that integrates subcontractors from the early stages in alliance contracts, thus enabling the realisation of benefits accruable to projects through early contractor involvement.

  13. Innovation routes and evidence guidelines for eHealth small and medium-sized enterprises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lianne Bodenstaff; Ruud Janssen; Robbert Menko; Irene Krediet; Hilco Prins; Timber Haaker; Sikke Visser; Marike Hettinga

    2013-01-01

    eHealth applications hold many promises, for instance to improve the quality of health care, to increase its accessibility, or to reduce its cost. Yet, many eHealth innovations never reach the stage where they get embedded into routine health care. This is due in part to a lack of evidence that

  14. Cyber-Management of People with Chronic Disease: A Potential Solution to eHealth Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, E-Liisa; Armstrong, Kylie; Usher, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    The evolving eHealth agenda presents a range of potential opportunities for the management and prevention of chronic disease. This paper identifies issues and barriers to the uptake of eHealth and describes a strategy ("Healthy Outcomes for Australians"[C]-HOFA) for creating a central knowledge filter and cyber space method for tracking…

  15. The Role of Libraries in eHealth Service Delivery in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Sarada

    2009-01-01

    eHealth is an emerging service sector which has great potential to improve health care delivery to rural and remote communities, facilitate health surveillance, and promote health education and research. Despite the critical need for eHealth services in Australia based on the challenges of distance and human resources, its utility has yet to be…

  16. Scope of Policy Issues in eHealth: Results From a Structured Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrani, Hammad; Nayani, Parvez; Fahim, Ammad

    2012-01-01

    Background eHealth is widely used as a tool for improving health care delivery and information. However, distinct policies and strategies are required for its proper implementation and integration at national and international levels. Objective To determine the scope of policy issues faced by individuals, institutions, or governments in implementing eHealth programs. Methods We conducted a structured review of both peer-reviewed and gray literature from 1998–2008. A Medline search for peer-reviewed articles found 40 papers focusing on different aspects of eHealth policy. In addition, a Google search found 20 national- and international-level policy papers and documents. We reviewed these articles to extract policy issues and solutions described at different levels of care. Results The literature search found 99 policy issues related to eHealth. We grouped these issues under the following themes: (1) networked care, (2) interjurisdictional practice, (3) diffusion of eHealth/digital divide, (4) eHealth integration with existing systems, (5) response to new initiatives, (6) goal-setting for eHealth policy, (7) evaluation and research, (8) investment, and (9) ethics in eHealth. Conclusions We provide a list of policy issues that should be understood and addressed by policy makers at global, jurisdictional, and institutional levels, to facilitate smooth and reliable planning of eHealth programs. PMID:22343270

  17. Commentary: Pediatric eHealth Interventions: Common Challenges During Development, Implementation, and Dissemination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Ric G.; Connelly, Mark A.; Palermo, Tonya M.; Ritterband, Lee M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To provide an overview of common challenges that pediatric eHealth researchers may encounter when planning, developing, testing, and disseminating eHealth interventions along with proposed solutions for addressing these challenges. Methods The article draws on the existing eHealth literature and the authors’ collective experience in pediatric eHealth research. Results and conclusions The challenges associated with eHealth interventions and their proposed solutions are multifaceted and cut across a number of areas from eHealth program development through dissemination. Collaboration with a range of individuals (e.g., multidisciplinary colleagues, commercial entities, primary stakeholders) is the key to eHealth intervention success. To ensure adequate resources for design, development, and planning for sustainability, a number of public and private sources of funding are available. A study design that addresses ethical concerns and security issues is critical to ensure scientific integrity and intervention dissemination. Table I summarizes key issues to consider during eHealth intervention development, testing, and dissemination. PMID:24816766

  18. Health Professionals' Expanding eHealth Competences for Supporting Patients' Self-Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujala, Sari; Rajalahti, Elina; Heponiemi, Tarja; Hilama, Pirjo

    2018-01-01

    An increasing number of new eHealth services that support patients' self-management has changed health professionals' work and has created a need for a new eHealth competence. In this study, we evaluated the health professionals' eHealth competences and training needs in a public health organization in Finland. The target organization's goal was to increase the number of eHealth services provided to patients, and health professionals and their competences were seen as critical for the adoption of services. Data was collected through an online survey of 701 health professionals working in the target organization. Professionals perceived their basic computer skills as good and they were mostly willing to use eHealth services in patient work. However, health professionals need guidance, especially in their patient work in the new eHealth-enabled environment. They were less confident about their competence to motivate and advise patients to use eHealth services and how to communicate with patients using eHealth solutions. The results also imply that eHealth competence is not merely about an individual's skills but that organizations need to develop new working processes, work practices and distribution of work. We suggest that the training and support needs identified be considered in curricula and lifelong learning.

  19. An ontology for regulating eHealth interoperability in developing African countries

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moodley, D

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available eHealth governance and regulation are necessary in low resource African countries to ensure effective and equitable use of health information technology and to realize national eHealth goals such as interoperability, adoption of standards and data...

  20. Commentary: pediatric eHealth interventions: common challenges during development, implementation, and dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yelena P; Steele, Ric G; Connelly, Mark A; Palermo, Tonya M; Ritterband, Lee M

    2014-07-01

    To provide an overview of common challenges that pediatric eHealth researchers may encounter when planning, developing, testing, and disseminating eHealth interventions along with proposed solutions for addressing these challenges. The article draws on the existing eHealth literature and the authors' collective experience in pediatric eHealth research. The challenges associated with eHealth interventions and their proposed solutions are multifaceted and cut across a number of areas from eHealth program development through dissemination. Collaboration with a range of individuals (e.g., multidisciplinary colleagues, commercial entities, primary stakeholders) is the key to eHealth intervention success. To ensure adequate resources for design, development, and planning for sustainability, a number of public and private sources of funding are available. A study design that addresses ethical concerns and security issues is critical to ensure scientific integrity and intervention dissemination. Table I summarizes key issues to consider during eHealth intervention development, testing, and dissemination. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. An empowerment-based approach to developing innovative e-health tools for self-management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alpay, L.; Boog, P. van der; Dumaij, A.

    2011-01-01

    E-health is seen as an important technological tool in achieving self-management; however, there is little evidence of how effective e-health is for self-management. Example tools remain experimental and there is limited knowledge yet about the design, use, and effects of this class of tools. By way

  2. Women's expectations and experiences regarding e-health treatment: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeks, Carmen; Teunissen, Doreth; van der Stelt-Steenbergen, Anke; Lagro-Janssen, Antoine

    2017-08-01

    There is a gap in knowledge of women's perceptions of e-health treatment. This review aims to investigate women's expectations and experiences regarding e-health. A search was conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsycInfo in March 2016. We included articles published between 2000 and March 2016, reporting on e-health interventions. The initial search yielded 2987 articles. Eventually, 16 articles reporting on 16 studies were included. Barriers to e-health treatment were lower for women than barriers to face-to-face treatment, such as feelings of shame and time constraints. Women were able to develop an online therapeutic relationship. As reduced feelings of obligation and lack of motivation were women's greatest challenges in completing e-health treatment, they expressed a wish for more support during e-health treatment, preferably blended care. e-Health lowers the threshold for women to seek healthcare. Combining e-health interventions with face-to-face sessions may enhance women's motivation to complete treatment.

  3. A holistic framework to improve the uptake and impact of eHealth technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E.W.C.; Nijland, N.; van Limburg, A.H.M.; Ossebaard, Hans Cornelis; Kelders, Saskia Marion; Eysenbach, Gunther; Seydel, E.R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Many eHealth technologies are not successful in realizing sustainable innovations in health care practices. One of the reasons for this is that the current development of eHealth technology often disregards the interdependencies between technology, human characteristics, and the

  4. Guidelines for eHealth and social media in sexual health promotion for young ethnic minorities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulyk, Olga Anatoliyivna; den Daas, C.; Boom, C.; David, S.; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E.W.C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Recently a rapid growth of modern technologies addressing sexuality and health has taken place. Young ethnic minorities could especially benefit from these eHealth initiatives, but they have to meet their specific needs. Sexual health is a sensitive subject in many cultures and eHealth

  5. Personas: The Linking Pin in Holistic Design for eHealth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Velsen, Lex Stefan; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E.W.C.; Nijland, N.; Beaujean, Desirée; van Steenbergen, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Personas, lively descriptions of distinctive user groups for a technology, have the potential to be a useful tool for designing useful and usable eHealth services. In this paper we discuss the role of personas in a holistic design approach for eHealth: the CeHRes roadmap. We show, using the case of

  6. Risks related to the use of eHealth technologies - an exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossebaard, Hans Cornelis; de Bruijn, Adrie; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E.W.C.; Geertsma, R.E.

    2013-01-01

    More awareness is needed about the risks of e-Health technology. While information regarding its potential is abundant, the risks associated with the use of information (including mobile) and communication technology in health care have scarcely been addressed. In order to implement e-Health

  7. Education-Based Gaps in eHealth: A Weighted Logistic Regression Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amo, Laura

    2016-10-12

    Persons with a college degree are more likely to engage in eHealth behaviors than persons without a college degree, compounding the health disadvantages of undereducated groups in the United States. However, the extent to which quality of recent eHealth experience reduces the education-based eHealth gap is unexplored. The goal of this study was to examine how eHealth information search experience moderates the relationship between college education and eHealth behaviors. Based on a nationally representative sample of adults who reported using the Internet to conduct the most recent health information search (n=1458), I evaluated eHealth search experience in relation to the likelihood of engaging in different eHealth behaviors. I examined whether Internet health information search experience reduces the eHealth behavior gaps among college-educated and noncollege-educated adults. Weighted logistic regression models were used to estimate the probability of different eHealth behaviors. College education was significantly positively related to the likelihood of 4 eHealth behaviors. In general, eHealth search experience was negatively associated with health care behaviors, health information-seeking behaviors, and user-generated or content sharing behaviors after accounting for other covariates. Whereas Internet health information search experience has narrowed the education gap in terms of likelihood of using email or Internet to communicate with a doctor or health care provider and likelihood of using a website to manage diet, weight, or health, it has widened the education gap in the instances of searching for health information for oneself, searching for health information for someone else, and downloading health information on a mobile device. The relationship between college education and eHealth behaviors is moderated by Internet health information search experience in different ways depending on the type of eHealth behavior. After controlling for college

  8. A Holistic Framework to Improve the Uptake and Impact of eHealth Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Limburg, Maarten; Ossebaard, Hans C; Kelders, Saskia M; Eysenbach, Gunther; Seydel, Erwin R

    2011-01-01

    Background Many eHealth technologies are not successful in realizing sustainable innovations in health care practices. One of the reasons for this is that the current development of eHealth technology often disregards the interdependencies between technology, human characteristics, and the socioeconomic environment, resulting in technology that has a low impact in health care practices. To overcome the hurdles with eHealth design and implementation, a new, holistic approach to the development of eHealth technologies is needed, one that takes into account the complexity of health care and the rituals and habits of patients and other stakeholders. Objective The aim of this viewpoint paper is to improve the uptake and impact of eHealth technologies by advocating a holistic approach toward their development and eventual integration in the health sector. Methods To identify the potential and limitations of current eHealth frameworks (1999–2009), we carried out a literature search in the following electronic databases: PubMed, ScienceDirect, Web of Knowledge, PiCarta, and Google Scholar. Of the 60 papers that were identified, 44 were selected for full review. We excluded those papers that did not describe hands-on guidelines or quality criteria for the design, implementation, and evaluation of eHealth technologies (28 papers). From the results retrieved, we identified 16 eHealth frameworks that matched the inclusion criteria. The outcomes were used to posit strategies and principles for a holistic approach toward the development of eHealth technologies; these principles underpin our holistic eHealth framework. Results A total of 16 frameworks qualified for a final analysis, based on their theoretical backgrounds and visions on eHealth, and the strategies and conditions for the research and development of eHealth technologies. Despite their potential, the relationship between the visions on eHealth, proposed strategies, and research methods is obscure, perhaps due to a

  9. Alliance - a paradigm shift in energy transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornelson, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    Key components of the Alliance Pipeline Project were outlined. This joint Canada - U.S. venture consists of a $Can 3.7 billion, producer-driven, high-pressure, rich-gas pipeline from producing fields in western Canada to an interconnection with the North American pipeline grid near Chicago. The initial volume for the system is 1.3 Bcfd, with provision for expansion to 2 Bcfd at minimal cost. The project also includes a $Can 200 million, non-regulated, natural gas liquids extraction plant and delivery system originating near Chicago. Alberta ethane supply and demand for 1995 and supply projections for 2010, (for delivery through the Alliance pipeline?), were also highlighted. 11 figs

  10. 'Mechanical restraint-confounders, risk, alliance score'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deichmann Nielsen, Lea; Bech, Per; Hounsgaard, Lise

    2017-01-01

    . AIM: To clinically validate a new, structured short-term risk assessment instrument called the Mechanical Restraint-Confounders, Risk, Alliance Score (MR-CRAS), with the intended purpose of supporting the clinicians' observation and assessment of the patient's readiness to be released from mechanical...... restraint. METHODS: The content and layout of MR-CRAS and its user manual were evaluated using face validation by forensic mental health clinicians, content validation by an expert panel, and pilot testing within two, closed forensic mental health inpatient units. RESULTS: The three sub-scales (Confounders......, Risk, and a parameter of Alliance) showed excellent content validity. The clinical validations also showed that MR-CRAS was perceived and experienced as a comprehensible, relevant, comprehensive, and useable risk assessment instrument. CONCLUSIONS: MR-CRAS contains 18 clinically valid items...

  11. The importance of using evidence-based e-health smoking cessation programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hein De Vries

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available eHealth programs have become very popular to help people to quit smoking. Yet, the efficacy of eHealth programs is dependent on the health communication theories used and applied in these programs. Computer tailored technology has shown to be an effective tool to help people to quit smoking. Programs with even one session can increase the success rates significantly. During this presentation I will discuss several computer tailored eHealth programs for smoking cessation that have been developed and tested at Maastricht University. I will discuss the theoretical grounding of these programs, their effects and the cost-effectiveness. Additionally I will also outline some potential innovations for eHealth programs, and will also share the results of a test comparing eHealth and mHealth.

  12. Conceptualizing ‘role’ in patient-engaging e-health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langstrup, Henriette; Rahbek, Anja Elkjær

    2015-01-01

    Patient-engaging eHealth is promoted as a means to improve care and change the social order of healthcare – most notably the roles of patients and healthcare professionals. Nevertheless, while researchers across various fields expect and praise such changes, these social aspects are rarely...... addressed rigorously in the literature on the effects of eHealth. In this paper we review the scientific literature on patient-engaging eHealth with the purpose of articulating the different ways in which role is conceptualized in the different strands of literature and what explicit and implicit...... to be at stake when using eHealth to further the involvement of patients in their own care. We argue that a more rigorous and reflective approach to the use of concepts with rich intellectual histories such as the concept of role will qualify both empirical research in eHealth as well as discussions...

  13. Self-managed eHealth Disease Monitoring in Children and Adolescents with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Katrine; Jakobsen, Christian; Houen, Gunnar

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate the impact of eHealth on disease activity, the need for hospital contacts, and medical adherence in children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Furthermore, to assess eHealth's influence on school attendance and quality of life (QoL). METHODS: Patients...... with IBD, 10 to 17 years attending a public university hospital, were prospectively randomized to a 2-year open label case-controlled eHealth intervention. The eHealth-group used the web-application young.constant-care.com (YCC) on a monthly basis and in case of flare-ups, and were seen at one annual......: Fifty-three patients in nonbiological treatment were included (27 eHealth/26 control). We found no differences between the groups regarding escalation in treatment and disease activity (symptoms, fecal calprotectin, and blood). The number of total outpatient visits (mean: eHealth 3.26, SEM 0.51; control...

  14. Cluster as a Form of Strategic Alliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena Godlewska

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the theory of clusters that are treated as natural elements of European model of economic development. There are highlighted Polish Forum of Lisbon Strategy point of view that indicated clusters as one of fundamental ideas recommended for Polish economy. In based on literature and observation of articles authors the concept, examples of Polish clusters and their role in strategic alliance are presented.

  15. Strategic Alliances: the Potential for Russian Nanoindustry

    OpenAIRE

    Inshakova Elena Ivanovna

    2015-01-01

    Strategic alliances as a form of interfirm cooperation (including international cooperation) increase the potential of solving large-scale problems of national nanoindustry development, providing synergy of participants resources united by the principle of complementarity and substitution in the process of joint implementation of complex R&D programs, mobilization and input of significant financial, material, technical and intellectual resources of the participants in nanotechnology projects....

  16. Trusting Relationships in the NATO Alliance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keating, Vincent Charles

    – particularly given the historical (and even current) animosities between some of the member states. How is it that so many states can work together given the structural bias towards distrust in the international system? Given the goal of the papers on this panel to investigate how NATO might in fact facilitate......, in order to reveal the points of intersection that might help us to understand how and why trusting relationships can be formed within the NATO alliance....

  17. The clinical partnership as strategic alliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotny, Jeanne M; Donahue, Moreen; Bhalla, Bharat B

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a renewed partnership between a collegiate school of nursing and a community hospital. Universities and hospitals are searching for creative solutions to increase the number of registered nurses available to meet the demand for nursing care. An affiliation agreement had been in existence for many years, but health care system imperatives made it necessary to redesign the partnership between nursing education and nursing service. The model used to develop this new partnership is based on the work done in the field of management and is in the form of a strategic alliance. The success of a strategic alliance depends on two key factors: the relationship between partners and partnership performance. Identified outcomes show that this partnership is helping to meet the increasing demand for nursing care by building student capacity, satisfying mutual needs of faculty and clinical staff, and removing economic barriers. This article describes the development of the strategic alliance, its current status, and strategies for the future.

  18. The Alliance Negotiation Scale: A psychometric investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Jennifer M; Safran, Jeremy D; Muran, J Christopher

    2016-08-01

    This study investigates the utility and psychometric properties of a new measure of psychotherapy process, the Alliance Negotiation Scale (ANS; Doran, Safran, Waizmann, Bolger, & Muran, 2012). The ANS was designed to operationalize the theoretical construct of negotiation (Safran & Muran, 2000), and to extend our current understanding of the working alliance concept (Bordin, 1979). The ANS was also intended to improve upon existing measures such as the Working Alliance Inventory (WAI; Horvath & Greenberg, 1986, 1989) and its short form (WAI-S; Tracey & Kokotovic, 1989) by expanding the emphasis on negative therapy process. The present study investigates the psychometric validity of the ANS test scores and interpretation-including confirming its original factor structure and evaluating its internal consistency and construct validity. Construct validity was examined through the ANS' convergence and divergence with several existing scales that measure theoretically related constructs. The results bolster and extend previous findings about the psychometric integrity of the ANS, and begin to illuminate the relationship between negotiation and other important variables in psychotherapy research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Predicting Ecosystem Alliances Using Landscape Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Satsangi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous articles in the TIM Review have covered various aspects of the concept of business ecosystems, from the types of ecosystems to keystone strategy, to different member roles and value co-creation. While there is no dearth of suggested best practices that organizations should follow as ecosystem members, it can be difficult to apply these insights into actionable steps for them to take. This is especially true when the ecosystem members already have a prior history of cooperation or competition with each other, as opposed to where a new ecosystem is created. Landscape theory, a political science approach to predicting coalition formation and strategic alliances, can be a useful complement to ecosystems studies by providing a tool to evaluate the best possible alliance options for an organization, given information about itself and the other companies in the system. As shown in the case study of mobile device manufacturers choosing platform providers in the mobile ecosystem, this tool is highly flexible and customizable, with more data providing a more accurate view of the alliances in the ecosystem. At the same time, with even basic parameters, companies can glean significant information about which coalitions will best serve their interest and overall standing within the ecosystem. This article shows the synergies between landscape theory and an ecosystems approach and offers a practical, actionable way in which to analyze individual member benefits.

  20. Adoption of e-health technology by physicians: a scoping review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Grood C

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Chloe de Grood,1 Aida Raissi,2 Yoojin Kwon,3 Maria Jose Santana1 1Department of Community Health Sciences, W21C Research and Innovation Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, 2University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, 3Toronto Public Library, Toronto, ON, Canada Objective: The goal of this scoping review was to summarize the current literature identifying barriers and opportunities that facilitate adoption of e-health technology by physicians.Design: Scoping review.Setting: MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases as provided by Ovid were searched from their inception to July 2015. Studies captured by the search strategy were screened by two reviewers and included if the focus was on barriers and facilitators of e-health technology adoption by physicians.Results: Full-text screening yielded 74 studies to be included in the scoping review. Within those studies, eleven themes were identified, including cost and liability issues, unwillingness to use e-health technology, and training and support.Conclusion: Cost and liability issues, unwillingness to use e-health technology, and training and support were the most frequently mentioned barriers and facilitators to the adoption of e-health technology. Government-level payment incentives and privacy laws to protect health information may be the key to overcome cost and liability issues. The adoption of e-health technology may be facilitated by tailoring to the individual physician’s knowledge of the e-health technology and the use of follow-up sessions for physicians and on-site experts to support their use of the e-health technology. To ensure the effective uptake of e-health technologies, physician perspectives need to be considered in creating an environment that enables the adoption of e-health strategies. Keywords: medical informatics, electronic medical records, diffusion of innovation, attitude of health personnel, information seeking behavior

  1. An eHealth Capabilities Framework for Graduates and Health Professionals: Mixed-Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Deborah; Keep, Melanie; Janssen, Anna; Spallek, Heiko; Quinn, Deleana; Jones, Aaron; Tseris, Emma; Yeung, Wilson; Togher, Leanne; Solman, Annette; Shaw, Tim

    2018-01-01

    Background The demand for an eHealth-ready and adaptable workforce is placing increasing pressure on universities to deliver eHealth education. At present, eHealth education is largely focused on components of eHealth rather than considering a curriculum-wide approach. Objective This study aimed to develop a framework that could be used to guide health curriculum design based on current evidence, and stakeholder perceptions of eHealth capabilities expected of tertiary health graduates. Methods A 3-phase, mixed-methods approach incorporated the results of a literature review, focus groups, and a Delphi process to develop a framework of eHealth capability statements. Results Participants (N=39) with expertise or experience in eHealth education, practice, or policy provided feedback on the proposed framework, and following the fourth iteration of this process, consensus was achieved. The final framework consisted of 4 higher-level capability statements that describe the learning outcomes expected of university graduates across the domains of (1) digital health technologies, systems, and policies; (2) clinical practice; (3) data analysis and knowledge creation; and (4) technology implementation and codesign. Across the capability statements are 40 performance cues that provide examples of how these capabilities might be demonstrated. Conclusions The results of this study inform a cross-faculty eHealth curriculum that aligns with workforce expectations. There is a need for educational curriculum to reinforce existing eHealth capabilities, adapt existing capabilities to make them transferable to novel eHealth contexts, and introduce new learning opportunities for interactions with technologies within education and practice encounters. As such, the capability framework developed may assist in the application of eHealth by emerging and existing health care professionals. Future research needs to explore the potential for integration of findings into workforce development

  2. Predictors of High eHealth Literacy in Primary Lung Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Robin A; Puts, Martine T E; Papadakos, Janet; Le, Lisa W; Milne, Victoria C; Hope, Andrew J; Catton, Pamela; Giuliani, Meredith E

    2015-12-01

    Lung cancer survivors are likely to have low health literacy which is an independent risk factor for poorer health outcomes. The eHealth literacy in lung cancer survivors has not been reported. The purposes of this study were to determine self-perceived eHealth literacy levels in lung cancer survivors and to explore predictors of higher eHealth literacy. A cross-sectional study was conducted at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre in Toronto, Canada. Survivors completed a survey that collected demographic, self-perceived eHealth literacy (using the eHealth Literacy Scale), and quality of life information. Tumor and treatment details were extracted from medical records. Demographic data was summarized using descriptive statistics and compared against those with high and low eHealth literacy using Fisher's exact test. Eighty-three survivors were enrolled over 7 months. Median age was 71 years (range 44-89); 41 survivors (49%) were male. Forty-six (55%) survivors had some college education or higher. Most had access to eResources (78%) via computer, Internet, or smartphone. Fifty-seven (69%) scored 5 or greater (7=excellent) on the overall health scale. Twenty-eight (33.7%) perceived themselves to have high eHealth literacy. There was no statistically significant correlation between eHealth literacy groups and age (p=1.00), gender (p=0.82), living situation (p=1.00), overall health (p=1.00), overall quality of life (QoL) (p=1.00), or histology (p=0.74). High eHealth literacy correlated with the level of education received (p=0.003) and access to eResources (p=0.004). The self-perceived eHealth literacy of lung cancer survivors is generally low.

  3. The Healthy ALLiances (HALL) framework: prerequisites for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelen, Maria A; Vaandrager, Lenneke; Wagemakers, Annemarie

    2012-04-01

    Chronic conditions are on the rise worldwide, and there is increasingly a call for the primary care and public health sectors to join forces in alliances. GPs have an important role to play in such alliances. However, successful cooperation is not as obvious as it may seem, and the sectors are not used to working together. The objective is to identify conditions and prerequisites for successful alliances. Identification of conditions and prerequisites is mainly based on stepwise analysis and iterative developments in research on collaboration processes in the area of health promotion and public health. The process as a whole resulted in the framework presented in this paper. This so-called HALL framework identifies three clusters of factors that either hinder or facilitate the success of alliances: (i) institutional factors, (ii) personal factors of participants in the alliance and (iii) factors relating to the organization of the alliance. The institutional and personal factors 'stick' to the stakeholders and are brought into the alliance. The third group refers to the lessons learned from dealing with the first two characteristics to make the alliance successful. Partners in alliances bring in personal attributes and institutional characteristics that can form obstacles to successful alliances, but, when they are addressed in a flexible and positive way, obstacles can be turned in contributory factors, leading to many potential benefits, such as collaborative learning and innovation.

  4. General Practitioners' Perspective on eHealth and Lifestyle Change: Qualitative Interview Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Carl Joakim; Søgaard, Gabrielle Isidora; Clemensen, Jane; Sndergaard, Jens; Nielsen, Jesper Bo

    2018-04-17

    Wearables, fitness apps, and patient home monitoring devices are used increasingly by patients and other individuals with lifestyle challenges. All Danish general practitioners (GPs) use digital health records and electronic health (eHealth) consultations on a daily basis, but how they perceive the increasing demand for lifestyle advice and whether they see eHealth as part of their lifestyle support should be explored further. This study aimed to explore GPs' perspectives on eHealth devices and apps and the use of eHealth in supporting healthy lifestyle behavior for their patients and themselves. A total of 10 (5 female and 5 male) GPs were recruited by purposive sampling, aged 38 to 69 years (mean 51 years), of which 4 had an urban uptake of patients and 6 a rural uptake. All of them worked in the region of Southern Denmark where GPs typically work alone or in partnership with 1 to 4 colleagues and all use electronic patient health records for prescription, referral, and asynchronous electronic consultations. We performed qualitative, semistructured, individual in-depth interviews with the GPs in their own office about how they used eHealth and mHealth devices to help patients challenged with lifestyle issues and themselves. We also interviewed how they treated lifestyle-challenged patients in general and how they imagined eHealth could be used in the future. All GPs had smartphones or tablets, and everyone communicated on a daily basis with patients about disease and medicine via their electronic health record and the internet. We identified 3 themes concerning the use of eHealth: (1) how eHealth is used for patients; (2) general practitioners' own experience with improving lifestyle and eHealth support; and (3) relevant coaching techniques for transformation into eHealth. GPs used eHealth frequently for themselves but only infrequently for their patients. GPs are familiar with behavioral change techniques and are ready to use them in eHealth if they are used to

  5. Designing eHealth that Matters via a Multidisciplinary Requirements Development Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Velsen, Lex; Wentzel, Jobke; Van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia Ewc

    2013-06-24

    Requirements development is a crucial part of eHealth design. It entails all the activities devoted to requirements identification, the communication of requirements to other developers, and their evaluation. Currently, a requirements development approach geared towards the specifics of the eHealth domain is lacking. This is likely to result in a mismatch between the developed technology and end user characteristics, physical surroundings, and the organizational context of use. It also makes it hard to judge the quality of eHealth design, since it makes it difficult to gear evaluations of eHealth to the main goals it is supposed to serve. In order to facilitate the creation of eHealth that matters, we present a practical, multidisciplinary requirements development approach which is embedded in a holistic design approach for eHealth (the Center for eHealth Research roadmap) that incorporates both human-centered design and business modeling. Our requirements development approach consists of five phases. In the first, preparatory, phase the project team is composed and the overall goal(s) of the eHealth intervention are decided upon. Second, primary end users and other stakeholders are identified by means of audience segmentation techniques and our stakeholder identification method. Third, the designated context of use is mapped and end users are profiled by means of requirements elicitation methods (eg, interviews, focus groups, or observations). Fourth, stakeholder values and eHealth intervention requirements are distilled from data transcripts, which leads to phase five, in which requirements are communicated to other developers using a requirements notation template we developed specifically for the context of eHealth technologies. The end result of our requirements development approach for eHealth interventions is a design document which includes functional and non-functional requirements, a list of stakeholder values, and end user profiles in the form of

  6. Analysis of ehealth search perspectives among female college students in the health professions using Q methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellefson, Michael; Hanik, Bruce; Chaney, J Don; Tennant, Bethany

    2012-04-27

    The current "Millennial Generation" of college students majoring in the health professions has unprecedented access to the Internet. Although some research has been initiated among medical professionals to investigate the cognitive basis for health information searches on the Internet, little is known about Internet search practices among health and medical professional students. To systematically identify health professional college student perspectives of personal eHealth search practices. Q methodology was used to examine subjective perspectives regarding personal eHealth search practices among allied health students majoring in a health education degree program. Thirteen (n = 13) undergraduate students were interviewed about their attitudes and experiences conducting eHealth searches. From the interviews, 36 statements were used in a structured ranking task to identify clusters and determine which specific perceptions of eHealth search practices discriminated students into different groups. Scores on an objective measure of eHealth literacy were used to help categorize participant perspectives. Q-technique factor analysis of the rankings identified 3 clusters of respondents with differing views on eHealth searches that generally coincided with participants' objective eHealth literacy scores. The proficient resourceful students (pattern/structure coefficient range 0.56-0.80) described themselves as using multiple resources to obtain eHealth information, as opposed to simply relying on Internet search engines. The intermediate reluctant students (pattern/structure coefficient range 0.75-0.90) reported engaging only Internet search engines to locate eHealth information, citing undeveloped evaluation skills when considering sources of information located on the Internet. Both groups of advanced students reported not knowing how to use Boolean operators to conduct Internet health searches. The basic hubristic students (pattern/structure coefficient range 0

  7. Strategic alliances for improved performance in underground mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessinger, S.L.; Langley, S.B.

    1999-01-01

    As the competitive climate of the modern coal industry continues, it seems clear that only by the intervention of small, highly focused workgroups will new efficiency and economy result in the continuous improvement required to survive and prosper. Strategic Alliances, drawing from known and proven principles, can contribute to efficiency and economy. However, individual attitudes and corporate-cultures often must change to foster the growth of functional Strategic Alliances. Motivating personal change in individuals within prospective Strategic Alliance partners is perhaps the most difficult element about establishing a new Strategic Alliance or maintaining an existing Alliance. Ultimately, Strategic Alliances are not fundamentally about corporations, or executives as leaders, but about individuals throughout the endeavors of both partner-organizations and a shared-vision to achieve a common goal

  8. AN INVESTIGATION INTO FACTORS INFLUENCING INTERNATIONAL STRATEGIC ALLIANCE PROCESS

    OpenAIRE

    Sari Wahyuni; Theo J.B.M. Postma

    2003-01-01

    Empirical research indicates that strategic alliances, like other organizational forms, emerge as an adaptive mechanism to market uncertainty, and their developments over time reflect the co-evolution of distinctive firm capabilities and of industry and market activities. Interestingly, most strategic alliances go through similar revolutionary cycles in terms of their motives and capabilities toward the cooperative relationship. Studies in this areas how that alliance failure is an outcome of...

  9. Coal mine enterprise integration based on strategic alliance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Q.; Sun, J.; Xu, S. [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China). Dept. of Computer Science and Technology

    2003-07-01

    The relationship between coal mine and related enterprise was analysed. Aiming at the competitive world market as well as the dynamic requirement, a coal mine enterprise integration strategy and a enterprise strategic alliance were proposed for the product providing service business pattern. The modelling method of the enterprise strategic alliance was proposed, including the relationship view model, information view model and business process view model. The idea of enterprise strategic alliance is useful for enterprise integration. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Product development alliances: factors influencing formation and success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Johanne Rønnow; Harmsen, Hanne; Friis, Alan

    2008-01-01

    , results indicate that success factors are rather universal across industries and types of alliances. Research limitations/implications - Further research should explore the findings further, both within the food industry context, as well as more broadly in terms of geography and industry. Practical...... implications - Managers obtain a tool for planning and refining their innovation strategy and actions regarding product development alliances. Originality/value - This research contributes to the presently limited literature on product development alliances, specifically in the food industry context....

  11. Persistence of and interrelation between horizontal and vertical technology alliances

    OpenAIRE

    Belderbos, R.A.; Gilsing, V.; Lokshin, B.

    2009-01-01

    We examine how and to what extent the propensity to be engaged in alliances with different partner types (suppliers, customers and competitors) depends on prior alliance engagement with partner firms of the same type (persistence) and prior engagement in alliances with the other partner types (interrelation). We derive hypotheses from a combined competence and governance view of collaboration, and test these on an extensive panel dataset of innovation-active Dutch firms during 1996-2004. We f...

  12. IMPORTANCE OF STRATEGIC ALLIANCES IN COMPANY’S ACTIVITY

    OpenAIRE

    Elena BARANOV

    2013-01-01

    Strategic alliance is an agreement between two or more organizations to cooperate in a specific business activity, so that each benefits from the strengths of the other, and gains competitive advantage. The formation of strategic alliances has been seen as a response to globalization and increasing uncertainty and complexity in the business environment. Strategic alliances involve the sharing of knowledge and expertise between partners as well as the reduction of risk and costs in areas such ...

  13. Personality Diagnosis for Personalized eHealth Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortellese, Fabio; Nalin, Marco; Morandi, Angelica; Sanna, Alberto; Grasso, Floriana

    In this paper we present two different approaches to personality diagnosis, for the provision of innovative personalized services, as used in a case study where diabetic patients were supported in the improvement of physical activity in their daily life. The first approach presented relies on a static clustering of the population, with a specific motivation strategy designed for each cluster. The second approach relies on a dynamic population clustering, making use of recommendation systems and algorithms, like Collaborative Filtering. We discuss pro and cons of each approach and a possible combination of the two, as the most promising solution for this and other personalization services in eHealth.

  14. The Technological Growth in eHealth Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Srivastava

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The infusion of information communication technology (ICT into health services is emerging as an active area of research. It has several advantages but perhaps the most important one is providing medical benefits to one and all irrespective of geographic boundaries in a cost effective manner, providing global expertise and holistic services, in a time bound manner. This paper provides a systematic review of technological growth in eHealth services. The present study reviews and analyzes the role of four important technologies, namely, satellite, internet, mobile, and cloud for providing health services.

  15. Analytic Strategies of Streaming Data for eHealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sunmoo

    2016-01-01

    New analytic strategies for streaming big data from wearable devices and social media are emerging in ehealth. We face challenges to find meaningful patterns from big data because researchers face difficulties to process big volume of streaming data using traditional processing applications.1 This introductory 180 minutes tutorial offers hand-on instruction on analytics2 (e.g., topic modeling, social network analysis) of streaming data. This tutorial aims to provide practical strategies of information on reducing dimensionality using examples of big data. This tutorial will highlight strategies of incorporating domain experts and a comprehensive approach to streaming social media data.

  16. The Technological Growth in eHealth Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shilpa; Pant, Millie; Abraham, Ajith; Agrawal, Namrata

    2015-01-01

    The infusion of information communication technology (ICT) into health services is emerging as an active area of research. It has several advantages but perhaps the most important one is providing medical benefits to one and all irrespective of geographic boundaries in a cost effective manner, providing global expertise and holistic services, in a time bound manner. This paper provides a systematic review of technological growth in eHealth services. The present study reviews and analyzes the role of four important technologies, namely, satellite, internet, mobile, and cloud for providing health services.

  17. E-health, health systems and social innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brem, Alexander; Sliwa, Sophie Isabel; Agarwal, Nivedita

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores telecare as one of the practical applications in the field of e-health. Using 11 expert interviews the study evaluates development of cross-national analogies between the different institutional contexts of health systems in Germany, Austria, and Denmark. Telecare is treated a...... to be driving socially innovative solutions. Implications for research and practice, as well as future research directions, are elaborated....... as a set of ideas regarding future processes in health and home care services, involving technological solutions, starting to change stakeholders' behaviour, work practices, and social roles. A system-centric framework is proposed to evaluate the interdependencies between telecare, the changing...

  18. Semantically Enriched Data Access Policies in eHealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdowicz, Michał; Ganzha, Maria; Paprzycki, Marcin

    2016-11-01

    Internet of Things (IoT) requires novel solutions to facilitate autonomous, though controlled, resource access. Access policies have to facilitate interactions between heterogeneous entities (devices and humans). Here, we focus our attention on access control in eHealth. We propose an approach based on enriching policies, based on well-known and widely-used eXtensible Access Control Markup Language, with semantics. In the paper we describe an implementation of a Policy Information Point integrated with the HL7 Security and Privacy Ontology.

  19. The Technological Growth in eHealth Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shilpa; Pant, Millie; Abraham, Ajith; Agrawal, Namrata

    2015-01-01

    The infusion of information communication technology (ICT) into health services is emerging as an active area of research. It has several advantages but perhaps the most important one is providing medical benefits to one and all irrespective of geographic boundaries in a cost effective manner, providing global expertise and holistic services, in a time bound manner. This paper provides a systematic review of technological growth in eHealth services. The present study reviews and analyzes the role of four important technologies, namely, satellite, internet, mobile, and cloud for providing health services. PMID:26146515

  20. The Role of eHealth in Optimizing Preventive Care in the Primary Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Mariko; Noble, Natasha; Mansfield, Elise; Waller, Amy; Henskens, Frans; Sanson-Fisher, Rob

    2015-05-22

    Modifiable health risk behaviors such as smoking, overweight and obesity, risky alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and poor nutrition contribute to a substantial proportion of the world's morbidity and mortality burden. General practitioners (GPs) play a key role in identifying and managing modifiable health risk behaviors. However, these are often underdetected and undermanaged in the primary care setting. We describe the potential of eHealth to help patients and GPs to overcome some of the barriers to managing health risk behaviors. In particular, we discuss (1) the role of eHealth in facilitating routine collection of patient-reported data on lifestyle risk factors, and (2) the role of eHealth in improving clinical management of identified risk factors through provision of tailored feedback, point-of-care reminders, tailored educational materials, and referral to online self-management programs. Strategies to harness the capacity of the eHealth medium, including the use of dynamic features and tailoring to help end users engage with, understand, and apply information need to be considered and maximized. Finally, the potential challenges in implementing eHealth solutions in the primary care setting are discussed. In conclusion, there is significant potential for innovative eHealth solutions to make a contribution to improving preventive care in the primary care setting. However, attention to issues such as data security and designing eHealth interfaces that maximize engagement from end users will be important to moving this field forward.

  1. Relationships Between eHealth Literacy and Health Behaviors in Korean Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun-Hee; Son, Youn-Jung

    2017-02-01

    The Internet is a useful and accessible source for health-related information for modern healthcare consumers. Individuals with adequate eHealth literacy have an incentive to use the Internet to access health-related information, and they consider themselves capable of using Web-based knowledge for health. This cross-sectional study aimed to describe the relationship between eHealth literacy and health behaviors. A total of 230 adults aged 18 to 39 years and residing in South Korea participated in the study. The mean (SD) score for eHealth literacy was 25.52 (4.35) of a total possible score of 40. The main source of health information was the Internet. Using hierarchical linear regression, the results showed that eHealth literacy was the strongest predictor of health behaviors after adjusting for general characteristics. These findings indicate that eHealth literacy can be an important factor in promoting individual health behaviors. Further research on eHealth literacy and actual health behaviors including intention and self-reported health behaviors are required to explain the impact of eHealth literacy on overall health status.

  2. Large Scale eHealth Deployment in Europe: Insights from Concurrent Use of Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberg, Marco; Chronaki, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale eHealth deployment projects face a major challenge when called to select the right set of standards and tools to achieve sustainable interoperability in an ecosystem including both legacy systems and new systems reflecting technological trends and progress. There is not a single standard that would cover all needs of an eHealth project, and there is a multitude of overlapping and perhaps competing standards that can be employed to define document formats, terminology, communication protocols mirroring alternative technical approaches and schools of thought. eHealth projects need to respond to the important question of how alternative or inconsistently implemented standards and specifications can be used to ensure practical interoperability and long-term sustainability in large scale eHealth deployment. In the eStandards project, 19 European case studies reporting from R&D and large-scale eHealth deployment and policy projects were analyzed. Although this study is not exhaustive, reflecting on the concepts, standards, and tools for concurrent use and the successes, failures, and lessons learned, this paper offers practical insights on how eHealth deployment projects can make the most of the available eHealth standards and tools and how standards and profile developing organizations can serve the users embracing sustainability and technical innovation.

  3. E-health in the new millennium: a research and practice agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metaxiotis, Kostas; Ptochos, Dimitrios; Psarras, John

    2004-01-01

    Advances in telecommunications, automated processes, web technologies and wireless computing are already forcing dramatic changes in a variety of sectors, ranging from business and industry to education and health. Yet, the electronic business space, in a broader sense, is still in a relatively early state of evolution, and it is only recently that policy makers have started looking at the potential of applying the tools and techniques of e-commerce to the tasks of other sectors. The use of the internet as a source of health information and connectivity between healthcare providers and consumers has increased interest in e-health. E-health offers the rich potential of supplementing traditional delivery of services and channels of communication in ways that extend the healthcare organisation's ability to meet the needs of its patients. To date, some e-health applications have improved the quality of healthcare, and later they will lead to substantial cost savings. However, e-health is not simply a technology but a complex technological and relational process. In this sense, practitioners and researchers who want to successfully exploit e-health need to pay attention to various pending issues that have to be addressed. The aim of this paper is to propose a novel taxonomy for e-health research in the new millennium by instantaneously presenting the current status with some major themes of e-health research.

  4. Possibility of Strategic Alliance from Competition:A Game Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张树义; 陈彦茹

    2004-01-01

    The possibility for two competitive firms to form a strategic alliance was quantitatively analyzed with the game theory. The strategic alliance could be formed in an infinitely repeated game with complete information or a finitely repeated game with incomplete information. In the former situation, the discount ratio is important. If the discount ratio is large enough, alliance would be a possible solution. In the latter situation, the bigger the possibility of the rationality is, the more possible is for both firms to make strategic alliance.

  5. Therapeutic working alliance: From a psychoanalitical to a pantheoretical conception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Praper

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Although the concept of therapeutic working alliance was rooted in psychoanalysis, today it is more prominent in psychoanalytic psychotherapies than psychoanalysis. It is rather surprising that we cannot find the concept in the Laplanche and Pontalis Dictionary. During the last two decades a growing body of empirical research material on therapeutic working alliance was published, confirming the idea of the alliance as a separate dimension of therapeutic relationship with few recognisable components. The dimension of the therapeutic working alliance was examined in several approaches and proved as one of the most important therapeutic factors, regardless of the approach, and it has finally been accepted as a pantheoretical concept.

  6. The Alliance Capability of Technology-Based Born Globals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxtorp, Liliya Altshuler; Elg, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    A detailed investigation of the aspects comprising the alliance capability of technology-based born globals. Alliance capability is regarded as a set of organizational skills necessary from the decision to search for a partner for a technology collaboration, which may also involve a marketing...... and risks of collaborating with MNEs.Methodology: A longitudinal process study of a Danish technology born global with three embedded cases of its R&D and marketing alliances with Asian MNEs.Findings: The organisational skills comprising the alliance capability are defined to be internal and external...

  7. IMPORTANCE OF STRATEGIC ALLIANCES IN COMPANY’S ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena BARANOV

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Strategic alliance is an agreement between two or more organizations to cooperate in a specific business activity, so that each benefits from the strengths of the other, and gains competitive advantage. The formation of strategic alliances has been seen as a response to globalization and increasing uncertainty and complexity in the business environment. Strategic alliances involve the sharing of knowledge and expertise between partners as well as the reduction of risk and costs in areas such as relationships with suppliers and the development of new products and technologies. A strategic alliance is sometimes equated with a joint venture, but an alliance may involve competitors, and generally has a shorter life span. Strategic partnership is a closely related concept. This article analyzes definition of strategic alliance, its benefits, types, process of formation, and provides a few cases studies of strategic alliances. This paper tries to synthesize the scope and role of marketing functions in the determination of effectiveness of strategic alliances. Several propositions from a marketing viewpoint concerning the analysis of alliance process are formulated. On the basis of the propositions, a framework is developed for future research.

  8. Development and formative evaluation of the e-Health Implementation Toolkit (e-HIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mair Frances

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT or e-Health is seen as essential for a modern, cost-effective health service. However, there are well documented problems with implementation of e-Health initiatives, despite the existence of a great deal of research into how best to implement e-Health (an example of the gap between research and practice. This paper reports on the development and formative evaluation of an e-Health Implementation Toolkit (e-HIT which aims to summarise and synthesise new and existing research on implementation of e-Health initiatives, and present it to senior managers in a user-friendly format. Results The content of the e-HIT was derived by combining data from a systematic review of reviews of barriers and facilitators to implementation of e-Health initiatives with qualitative data derived from interviews of "implementers", that is people who had been charged with implementing an e-Health initiative. These data were summarised, synthesised and combined with the constructs from the Normalisation Process Model. The software for the toolkit was developed by a commercial company (RocketScience. Formative evaluation was undertaken by obtaining user feedback. There are three components to the toolkit - a section on background and instructions for use aimed at novice users; the toolkit itself; and the report generated by completing the toolkit. It is available to download from http://www.ucl.ac.uk/pcph/research/ehealth/documents/e-HIT.xls Conclusions The e-HIT shows potential as a tool for enhancing future e-Health implementations. Further work is needed to make it fully web-enabled, and to determine its predictive potential for future implementations.

  9. Why Business Modeling is Crucial in the Development of eHealth Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia EWC; Nijland, Nicol; Ossebaard, Hans C; Hendrix, Ron MG; Seydel, Erwin R

    2011-01-01

    The impact and uptake of information and communication technologies that support health care are rather low. Current frameworks for eHealth development suffer from a lack of fitting infrastructures, inability to find funding, complications with scalability, and uncertainties regarding effectiveness and sustainability. These issues can be addressed by defining a better implementation strategy early in the development of eHealth technologies. A business model, and thus business modeling, help to determine such an implementation strategy by involving all important stakeholders in a value-driven dialogue on what the technology should accomplish. This idea also seems promising to eHealth, as it can contribute to the whole development of eHealth technology. We therefore suggest that business modeling can be used as an effective approach to supporting holistic development of eHealth technologies. The contribution of business modeling is elaborated in this paper through a literature review that covers the latest business model research, concepts from the latest eHealth and persuasive technology research, evaluation and insights from our prior eHealth research, as well as the review conducted in the first paper of this series. Business modeling focuses on generating a collaborative effort of value cocreation in which all stakeholders reflect on the value needs of the others. The resulting business model acts as the basis for implementation. The development of eHealth technology should focus more on the context by emphasizing what this technology should contribute in practice to the needs of all involved stakeholders. Incorporating the idea of business modeling helps to cocreate and formulate a set of critical success factors that will influence the sustainability and effectiveness of eHealth technology. PMID:22204896

  10. Are There Just Barriers? Institutional Perspective On the Development of E-Health in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kautsch Marcin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Development of e-health in Poland has suffered from multiple setbacks and delays. This paper presents views on and experiences with implementation of e-health solutions of three groups of respondents: buyers, suppliers and external experts with the aim of establishing to what extent and in what way e-health development was taking place in Polish public health care and if there were any national policy targets or European targets influencing this development. It is based on desktop studies and interviews conducted in Poland in the spring and summer of 2015. The interviews largely confirmed findings from the desktop study: legal obstacles were the decisive factor hindering the development of e-health, especially telemedicine, with extensive insufficiency of basic IT infrastructure closely following. Stakeholders were deterred from engaging with telemedicine, and from procuring e-health using non-standard procedures, from fear of legal liability. Some doctor’s resistance to e-health was also noted. There are reasons for optimism. Amendment to the Act on the System of Information in Health Care removed most legal obstacles to e-health. The Polish national payer (NFZ has started introducing reimbursement for remote services, though it is still too early see results of these changes. Some doctors′ reluctance to telemedicine may change due to demographic changes in this professional group, younger generations may regard ICT-based solutions as a norm. In the same time, poor development of basic IT infrastructure in Polish hospitals is likely to persist, unless a national programme of e-health development is implemented (with funds secured and contracting e-health services by NFZ is introduced on a larger scale.

  11. Why business modeling is crucial in the development of eHealth technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Limburg, Maarten; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E W C; Nijland, Nicol; Ossebaard, Hans C; Hendrix, Ron M G; Seydel, Erwin R

    2011-12-28

    The impact and uptake of information and communication technologies that support health care are rather low. Current frameworks for eHealth development suffer from a lack of fitting infrastructures, inability to find funding, complications with scalability, and uncertainties regarding effectiveness and sustainability. These issues can be addressed by defining a better implementation strategy early in the development of eHealth technologies. A business model, and thus business modeling, help to determine such an implementation strategy by involving all important stakeholders in a value-driven dialogue on what the technology should accomplish. This idea also seems promising to eHealth, as it can contribute to the whole development of eHealth technology. We therefore suggest that business modeling can be used as an effective approach to supporting holistic development of eHealth technologies. The contribution of business modeling is elaborated in this paper through a literature review that covers the latest business model research, concepts from the latest eHealth and persuasive technology research, evaluation and insights from our prior eHealth research, as well as the review conducted in the first paper of this series. Business modeling focuses on generating a collaborative effort of value cocreation in which all stakeholders reflect on the value needs of the others. The resulting business model acts as the basis for implementation. The development of eHealth technology should focus more on the context by emphasizing what this technology should contribute in practice to the needs of all involved stakeholders. Incorporating the idea of business modeling helps to cocreate and formulate a set of critical success factors that will influence the sustainability and effectiveness of eHealth technology.

  12. Knowledge, use and attitude toward eHealth among patients with chronic lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstede, J; de Bie, J; van Wijngaarden, B; Heijmans, M

    2014-12-01

    Despite high expectations and numerous initiatives in the area of eHealth, implementation and use of eHealth applications on a national level is no common practice yet. There is no full understanding of patients' attitude on eHealth yet. Aim of this study is to gain insight into the level of knowledge and experiences with eHealth of people with chronic lung diseases. A telephone survey among 400 people with a medical diagnosis of asthma or COPD was conducted. All patients participated in the larger research program National Panel of people with Chronic diseases or Disabilities (NPCD) conducted by NIVEL. Eight percent of the asthma and COPD patients knew of the term eHealth. Knowledge of specific eHealth applications (e.g. electronic medical record, electronic consultations, monitoring from a distance) was higher and ranged from 21 to 88%. Most available applications were used by less than 20% of the patients, although figures differ by age and educational level. People who have used applications were in general rather positive about their use. Non-users did not see clear advantages of using eHealth applications. A majority thought that eHealth decreases human contact in health care and will not contribute to a higher quality of care. On the contrary, almost half of the patients considered eHealth as a possibility to take more responsibility in their own care. Asthma and COPD patients were unanimous that the use of eHealth should always be a free choice. Although most asthma and COPD patient know of one or more eHealth applications, actual use remains low. Patients who do have experience with the use of eHealth are on the whole positive. However, patients without experience have no clear ideas about the advantages. They should be convinced first, and stressing the possibilities for more personal control might be an important argument to persuade them. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The eHealth Enhanced Chronic Care Model: a theory derivation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Perry M; Greenwood, Deborah A; Paterniti, Debora A; Ward, Deborah; Miller, Lisa M Soederberg

    2015-04-01

    Chronic illnesses are significant to individuals and costly to society. When systematically implemented, the well-established and tested Chronic Care Model (CCM) is shown to improve health outcomes for people with chronic conditions. Since the development of the original CCM, tremendous information management, communication, and technology advancements have been established. An opportunity exists to improve the time-honored CCM with clinically efficacious eHealth tools. The first goal of this paper was to review research on eHealth tools that support self-management of chronic disease using the CCM. The second goal was to present a revised model, the eHealth Enhanced Chronic Care Model (eCCM), to show how eHealth tools can be used to increase efficiency of how patients manage their own chronic illnesses. Using Theory Derivation processes, we identified a "parent theory", the Chronic Care Model, and conducted a thorough review of the literature using CINAHL, Medline, OVID, EMBASE PsychINFO, Science Direct, as well as government reports, industry reports, legislation using search terms "CCM or Chronic Care Model" AND "eHealth" or the specific identified components of eHealth. Additionally, "Chronic Illness Self-management support" AND "Technology" AND several identified eHealth tools were also used as search terms. We then used a review of the literature and specific components of the CCM to create the eCCM. We identified 260 papers at the intersection of technology, chronic disease self-management support, the CCM, and eHealth and organized a high-quality subset (n=95) using the components of CCM, self-management support, delivery system design, clinical decision support, and clinical information systems. In general, results showed that eHealth tools make important contributions to chronic care and the CCM but that the model requires modification in several key areas. Specifically, (1) eHealth education is critical for self-care, (2) eHealth support needs to be

  14. An e-health trend plan for the Jordanian health care system: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawabdeh, Ali Ahamd Awad

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the potential of e-health by focusing explicitly on the delivery of health care products and services. The examination of e-health activity is guided by one broad research question, "What is the potential for constructing e-health strategy as an innovative health technology?". A great amount of attention has been given to e-health activity in the present day. However important this form of e-health is, this type of service simply does not face the same constraints that must be addressed by those actually delivering health care services. The researchers employed a qualitative data collection technique to formulate more examples and cases to derive lessons for Jordan. Phone interviews in a random sample were conducted with corporate officers in Jordan in order to reveal the internal organizational structure and business trends, interface issues, marketing strategies, as well as comparing and contrasting the online health world to the traditional health care realm. Internet-related projects is a top priority for health care information technology executives in the present day, with a cautious approach toward "e-health", as many products have yet to mature, and that the "click and mortar" model may perhaps be the optimal strategy for e-health in Jordan. This paper reviews the e-health trends to demonstrate the tremendous potential for health-related commercial activity on the internet. However, the researcher examining the barriers facing e-health to the Jordanian health system also pointed out almost insurmountable challenges. Despite the apparent promise of e-health, its instability is measured by its failure so far to systematically penetrate the organization of health care. Beyond the pragmatic negotiation of e-health in the immediate context of clinical practice, there are wider issues about how the development/implementation of e-health is funded, about its organization and management at the policy level; and about its

  15. A Service Design Thinking Approach for Stakeholder-Centred eHealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunji

    2016-01-01

    Studies have described the opportunities and challenges of applying service design techniques to health services, but empirical evidence on how such techniques can be implemented in the context of eHealth services is still lacking. This paper presents how a service design thinking approach can be applied for specification of an existing and new eHealth service by supporting evaluation of the current service and facilitating suggestions for the future service. We propose Service Journey Modelling Language and Service Journey Cards to engage stakeholders in the design of eHealth services.

  16. The Impacts of Control Mechanism in Strategic Alliance on Alliance Performance: From the Perspective of Boundary Dilemma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Hao; XIE En; WANG Dong

    2016-01-01

    In order to solve the problem of boundary dilemma in the strategic alliance,this paper firstly examines the impact of the control mechanism in the strategic alliance on the coordinative efficiency and opportunistic risks of the alliance,and then it tests the different impacts of coordinative efficiency and opportunistic risks on the performances of the alliance members.The empirical results indicate that the formal contract control can efficiently resolve the problem of opportunistic risks in the boundary dilemma,so as to improve the performance of the alliance members;whereas the informal social control including relation control and information technology control can efficiently solve the problem of coordinative efficiency in the boundary dilemma,so as to improve the performance of the alliance members.These findings can enrich and extend existing literature in strategic alliance management and provide significant empirical evidences and theoretical supports for the strategic alliance members to resolve boundary dilemma and further enhance alliance cooperative performance.

  17. Patient-Centered e-Health Record over the Cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumaditis, Konstantinos; Themistocleous, Marinos; Vassilacopoulos, George; Prentza, Andrianna; Kyriazis, Dimosthenis; Malamateniou, Flora; Maglaveras, Nicos; Chouvarda, Ioanna; Mourouzis, Alexandros

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the Patient-Centered e-Health (PCEH) conceptual aspects alongside a multidisciplinary project that combines state-of-the-art technologies like cloud computing. The project, by combining several aspects of PCEH, such as: (a) electronic Personal Healthcare Record (e-PHR), (b) homecare telemedicine technologies, (c) e-prescribing, e-referral, e-learning, with advanced technologies like cloud computing and Service Oriented Architecture (SOA), will lead to an innovative integrated e-health platform of many benefits to the society, the economy, the industry, and the research community. To achieve this, a consortium of experts, both from industry (two companies, one hospital and one healthcare organization) and academia (three universities), was set to investigate, analyse, design, build and test the new platform. This paper provides insights to the PCEH concept and to the current stage of the project. In doing so, we aim at increasing the awareness of this important endeavor and sharing the lessons learned so far throughout our work.

  18. Alliance building and narcissistic personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronningstam, Elsa

    2012-08-01

    Building a therapeutic alliance with a patient with pathological narcissism or narcissistic personality disorder is a challenging process. A combined alliance building and diagnostic strategy is outlined that promotes patients' motivation and active engagement in identifying their own problems. The main focus is on identifying grandiosity, self-regulatory patterns, and behavioral fluctuations in their social and interpersonal contexts while engaging the patient in meaningful clarifications and collaborative inquiry. A definition of grandiosity as a diagnostic characterological trait is suggested, one that captures self-criticism, inferiority, and fragility in addition to superiority, assertiveness, perfectionism, high ideals, and self-enhancing and self-serving interpersonal behavior. These reformulations serve to expand the spectrum of grandiosity-promoting strivings and activities, capture their fluctuations, and help clinicians attend to narcissistic individuals' internal experiences and motivation as well as to their external presentation and interpersonal self-enhancing, self-serving, controlling, and aggressive behavior. A case example illustrates this process. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The allianced enterprise : global strategies for corporate collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duysters, G.M.; Man, de A.P.; Vasudevan, A.

    2001-01-01

    Firms all over the world are entering into strategic alliances. Successful alliance management, however, requires corporations to adapt their management models to the demands of this new mode of organization. New tools, techniques and ideas need to be introduced in order to fully benefit from the

  20. Exploration of a Contextual Management Framework for Strategic Learning Alliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dealtry, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims to take a further step forward in examining those important business factors that will shape the future of best practice in the quality management of internal and external strategic alliances. Design/methodology/approach: The article presents a speculative scenario on the future of strategic alliances in education,…

  1. Persistence of, and interrelation between, horizontal and vertical technology alliances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belderbos, R.; Gilsing, V.A.; Lokshin, B.

    2012-01-01

    The authors explore to what extent there is persistence in, and interrelation between, alliance strategies with different partner types (customers, suppliers, competitors). In a panel data set of innovation-active firms in the Netherlands from 1996 to 2004, the authors find persistence in alliance

  2. Beyond contracts : Governing structures in non-equity alliances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reuer, Jeffrey; Devarakonda, S.V.

    Non-equity alliances are often portrayed in the literature as purely contractual collaborative agreements. This paper questions the notion that contractual safeguards and incentives alone provide the formal governance mechanisms that undergird non-equity alliances. We argue and show that partners

  3. Representations of Parent-Child Alliances in Children's Family Drawings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Kim; Wallace, Tamar; Rudy, Duane

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between children's representations of parent-child alliances (PCA) and their peer relationship quality, using a new scale that was developed to rate representations of PCA in children's family drawings. The parent-child alliance pattern is characterized by a relationship between parent and…

  4. Strategic Alliances in Education: The Knowledge Engineering Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westera, Wim; van den Herik, Jaap; van de Vrie, Evert

    2004-01-01

    The field of higher education shows a jumble of alliances between fellow institutes. The alliances are strategic in kind and serve an economy-of-scales concept. A large scale is a prerequisite for allocating the budgets for new educational methods and technologies in order to keep the educational services up-to-date. All too often, however,…

  5. Validity of the Working Alliance Inventory within Child Protection Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killian, Michael; Forrester, Donald; Westlake, David; Antonopoulou, Paraskevi

    2017-01-01

    The Working Alliance Inventory remains a widely studied measure of quality of therapeutic relationships between the practitioner and client. No prior study has examined the psychometrics and validity of the Working Alliance Inventory-Short (WAI-S) in a sample of families, social workers, and trained observers within child protection services.…

  6. The Integrative Psychotherapy Alliance: Family, Couple and Individual Therapy Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsof, William M.; Catherall, Donald R.

    1986-01-01

    Presents an integrative definition of the therapeutic alliance that conceptualizes individual, couple and family therapy as occurring within the same systemic framework. The implications of this concept for therapy reserach are examined. Three new systematically oriented scales to measure the alliance are presented along with some preliminary data…

  7. The dynamics of alliances. A game theoretical approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, A. de

    2007-01-01

    In this dissertation, Annelies de Ridder presents a game theoretical approach to strategic alliances. More specifically, the dynamics of and within alliances have been studied. To do so, four new models have been developed in the game theoretical tradition. Both coalition theory and strategic game

  8. The interplay of structural and relational governance in innovation alliances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garbade, P.J.P.; Omta, S.W.F.; Fortuin, F.T.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The present paper aims to extend the discussion in the governance literature about whether structural and relational governance mechanisms complement or substitute each other in innovation alliances. Where structural governance mechanisms refer to the division of tasks within the alliance and to

  9. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Consumer-Focused Health Information Technology Systems Through eHealth Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kayser, Lars; Kushniruk, Andre; Osborne, Richard H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: eHealth systems and applications are increasingly focused on supporting consumers to directly engage with and use health care services. Involving end users in the design of these systems is critical to ensure a generation of usable and effective eHealth products and systems. Often...... the end users engaged for these participatory design processes are not actual representatives of the general population, and developers may have limited understanding about how well they might represent the full range of intended users of the eHealth products. As a consequence, resulting information...... model with the domains of a new concept of eHealth literacy. METHODS: This approach expands an existing method for supporting health IT system development, which advocates use of a three-dimensional user-task-context matrix to comprehensively identify the users of health IT systems, and what their needs...

  10. eHealth Technologies as an Intervention to Improve Adherence to Topical Antipsoriatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Mathias Tiedemann; Andersen, Flemming; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Topical antipsoriatics are recommended first-line treatment of psoriasis, but rates of adherence are low. Patient support by use of electronic health (eHealth) services is suggested to improve medical adherence. OBJECTIVE: To review randomised controlled trials (RCTs) testing eHealth...... interventions designed to improve adherence to topical antipsoriatics and to review applications for smartphones (apps) incorporating the word psoriasis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Literature review: Medline, Embase, Cochrane, PsycINFO, and Web of Science were searched using search terms for eHealth, psoriasis....... CONCLUSION: There is a critical need for high-quality RCTs testing if the ubiquitous eHealth technologies, e.g. some of the numerous apps, can improve psoriasis patients' rates of adherence to topical antipsoriatics....

  11. Perceived value of eHealth among people living with multimorbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Runz-Jørgensen, Sidsel; Schiøtz, Michaela L.; Christensen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of multimorbidity is increasing, creating challenges for patients, healthcare professionals,and healthcare systems. Given that chronic disease management increasingly involves eHealth, it is useful to assess its perceived value among people with multimorbidity. Objective......: To explore challenges related to multimorbidity and patients’ perspectives on eHealth. Design: Ten semi-structured interviews with adults, living with multimorbidity in Copenhagen, Denmark. Interviews focused on patient-experienced challenges, from challenges related to self-management to challenges...... experienced in the healthcare sector, as well as perceptions of eHealth. During interviews, participants were presented with pictures of different eHealth technologies. Data analysis followed the systematic text condensation approach. Results: Participants experienced challenges in their daily lives,e.g. when...

  12. Drivers for successful long-term lifestyle change, the role of e-health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Carl Joakim; Clemensen, Jane; Nielsen, Jesper Bo

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Assisting patients in lifestyle change using collaborative e-health tools can be an efficient treatment for non-communicable diseases like diabetes, cardiovascular disease and chronic obstructive lung disease that are caused or aggravated by unhealthy living in the form of unhealthy diet......, physical inactivity or tobacco smoking. In a prospective pilot study, we tested an online collaborative e-health tool in general practice. The aim of this study was to identify drivers of importance for long-term personal lifestyle changes from a patient perspective when using a collaborative e-health tool......, including the support of peers and healthcare professionals. Setting General practice clinics in the Region of Southern Denmark. Participants 10 overweight patients who had previously successfully used a hybrid online collaborative e-health tool with both face-to-face and online consultations to lose weight...

  13. Systems engineering perspective on eHealth implementations: case study of users

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fanta, GB

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The expected outputs and outcomes for healthcare services delivery were not realized by the implemented eHealth systems in South Africa. This paper investigates the impact of system engineering management (SEM) practices on the efficiency...

  14. How can eHealth enhance adherence to cancer therapy and supportive care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bateman Emma H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available eHealth is currently a hot topic, but is certainly not a new one. The use of communications technology to relay health-related information or provide medical services has been around since the advent of this technology. It has been primarily over the last decade that eHealth has seen a global expansion, due to the far-reaching capabilities of the Internet and the widespread use of wireless technology. This paper will outline what eHealth is, what adherence is, and how eHealth can help with adherence, in cancer and supportive care particularly. It will discuss the current state of the art, and project into the future.

  15. Method for selecting e-health standards to support interoperability of healthcare information systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adebesin, F

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available There is growing concern over the fragmentation and inability of healthcare information systems (e-health systems) to exchange pertinent healthcare information that can empower healthcare professionals to make informed decisions regarding the care...

  16. A perfect match : an empirical investigation into partner selection as an alliance capability

    OpenAIRE

    Duisters, Danielle

    2013-01-01

    Strategic alliances have become a cornerstone of business development. Not only the number of alliances but also the percentage of revenues coming from alliances has increased. Individual companies form alliances to enter new markets, to gain knowledge, or to share risk and resources to bring value to their consumers. So alliances are more and more integrated into company strategy. In this study, alliances are defined as voluntary, evolving, open-ended, and flexible organizational forms betwe...

  17. Managing Adaptation in Multi-Partner Collaboration: Role of Alliance Board

    OpenAIRE

    Barbic, Frano; Hidalgo Nuchera, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Adaptation to changing circumstances is crucial for success of alliances. Using a longitudinal case study of the R&D non-equity multi-partner alliance between four partners, we examine how the alliance board can complement incomplete contracts for coordinated adaptation. We trace the interactions between the partners in order to explore the functioning of the alliance board in multi-partner alliances for coordinated adaptation. We found that alliance board can complement incomplete contract, ...

  18. Library Services Alliance of New Mexico. 1994 Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Library Services Alliance is a unique multi-type library consortium committed to resource sharing. As a voluntary association of university and governmental laboratory libraries supporting scientific research, the Alliance has become a leader in New Mexico in using cooperative ventures to cost-effectively expand resources supporting their scientific and technical communities. During 1994, the alliance continued to expand on their strategic planning foundation to enhance access to research information for the scientific and technical communities. Significant progress was made in facilitating easy access to the on-line catalogs of member libraries via connections through the Internet. Access to Alliance resources is now available via the World Wide Web and Gopher, as well as links to other databases and electronic information. This report highlights the accomplishments of the Alliance during calendar year 1994.

  19. Group Innovation Ability of Agricultural Technological Innovation Strategic Alliance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chishun; MA; Jintian; YU

    2013-01-01

    Agricultural technological innovation strategic alliance, as an important form of strategic alliance, has steadily strengthened the collaborative management among organizations and raised competitive power with the backing of improved group innovation ability. This article studies innovation ability from individual innovation ability to the group innovation ability. Firstly, basic connotation of group innovation ability is to be concluded through the comparison of individual and group innovation ability. Secondly, evaluation index system is to be established based on the influencing factors of the group innovation ability of agricultural technological innovation strategic alliance and evaluation is based on three dimensions, namely organization technological innovation ability, alliance collaborative innovation ability as well as innovation environment. Furthermore, basic methods for promoting the group innovation ability of alliance are to be proposed.

  20. With Some Help From My Network: Supplementing eHealth Literacy With Social Ties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Tsahi Zack; Brainin, Esther; Neter, Efrat

    2017-03-30

    eHealth literacy is defined as the ability to seek, find, understand, and appraise health information from electronic sources and apply knowledge gained to addressing or solving a health problem. Previous research has shown high reliance on both online and face-to-face interpersonal sources when sharing and receiving health information. In this paper, we examine these interpersonal sources and their interplay with respondents' eHealth literacy and perceived health outcomes. Specifically, we look at how the relationship between eHealth literacy and health outcomes is moderated by (1) finding help while performing online activities, (2) finding others with similar health concerns online, and (3) the importance of finding others with similar health concerns for people from ethnic minorities, specifically Palestinian citizens of Israel versus Israeli Jews. We used a nationally representative random-digit dial telephone household survey of an Israeli adult population (age ≥21 years, N=819). The collected data were analyzed using two regression models. The first examined how the correlation between eHealth literacy and perceived outcomes was moderated by the availability of help. The second examined how the correlation between eHealth literacy and perceived outcomes was moderated by finding others with similar health concerns and by ethnicity. Respondents with low eHealth literacy who were able to recruit help when performing online activities demonstrated higher perceived health outcomes compared to similar respondents who did not find help. Respondents with low eHealth literacy, who were able to find others with similar health concerns (online), demonstrated higher perceived health outcomes when compared to similar respondents who did not find others with similar health concerns. Finally, finding similar others online was more helpful in enhancing health outcomes for ethnic minorities; Palestinian citizens of Israel gained more health benefits by finding similar

  1. Reporting an Experience on Design and Implementation of e-Health Systems on Azure Cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Shilin; Ranjan, Rajiv; Strazdins, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Electronic Health (e-Health) technology has brought the world with significant transformation from traditional paper-based medical practice to Information and Communication Technologies (ICT)-based systems for automatic management (storage, processing, and archiving) of information. Traditionally e-Health systems have been designed to operate within stovepipes on dedicated networks, physical computers, and locally managed software platforms that make it susceptible to many serious limitations...

  2. Heuristic Evaluation of Ehealth Interventions: Establishing Standards That Relate to the Therapeutic Process Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumel, Amit; Muench, Fred

    2016-01-13

    In recent years, the number of available eHealth interventions aimed at treating behavioral and mental health challenges has been growing. From the perspective of health care providers, there is a need for eHealth interventions to be evaluated prior to clinical trials and for the limited resources allocated to empirical research to be invested in the most promising products. Following a literature review, a gap was found in the availability of eHealth interventions evaluation principles related to the patient experience of the therapeutic process. This paper introduces principles and concepts for the evaluation of eHealth interventions developed as a first step in a process to outline general evaluation guidelines that relate to the clinical context from health care providers' perspective. Our approach was to conduct a review of literature that relates to the examination of eHealth interventions. We identified the literature that was most relevant to our study and used it to define guidelines that relate to the clinical context. We then compiled a list of heuristics we found to be useful for the evaluation of eHealth intervention products' suitability for empirical examination. Four heuristics were identified with respect to the therapeutic process: (1) the product's ease of use (ie, usability), (2) the eHealth intervention's compatibility with the clinical setting, (3) the presence of tools that make it easier for the user to engage in therapeutic activities, and (4) the provision of a feasible therapeutic pathway to growth. We then used this set of heuristics to conduct a detailed examination of MyFitnessPal. This line of work could help to set the bar higher for product developers and to inform health care providers about preferred eHealth intervention designs.

  3. Utilization and efficacy of internet-based eHealth technology in gastroenterology: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Simon R; Mikocka-Walus, Antonina

    2014-04-01

    While there have been several reviews exploring the outcomes of various eHealth studies, none have been gastroenterology-specific. This paper aims to evaluate the research conducted within gastroenterology which utilizes internet-based eHealth technology to promote physical and psychological well-being. A systematic literature review of internet-based eHealth interventions involving gastroenterological cohorts was conducted. Searched databases included: EbSCOhost Medline, CINAHL, and PsycINFO. Inclusion criteria were studies reporting on eHealth interventions (both to manage mental health problems and somatic symptoms) in gastroenterology, with no time restrictions. Exclusion criteria were non-experimental studies, or studies using only email as primary eHealth method, and studies in language other than English. A total of 17 papers were identified; seven studies evaluated the efficacy of a psychologically oriented intervention (additional two provided follow-up analyses exploring the original published data) and eight studies evaluated disease management programs for patients with either irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or celiac disease. Overall, psychological eHealth interventions were associated with significant reductions in bowel symptoms and improvement in quality of life (QoL) that tended to continue up to 12 months follow up. The eHealth disease management was shown to generally improve QoL, adherence, knowledge about the disease, and reduce healthcare costs in IBD, although the studies were associated with various methodological problems, and thus, this observation should be confirmed in well-designed interventional studies. Based on the evidence to date, eHealth internet-based technology is a promising tool that can be utilized to both promote and enhance gastrointestinal disease management and mental health.

  4. Critical analysis of e-health readiness assessment frameworks: suitability for application in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauco, Kabelo Leonard; Scott, Richard E; Mars, Maurice

    2018-02-01

    Introduction e-Health is an innovative way to make health services more effective and efficient and application is increasing worldwide. e-Health represents a substantial ICT investment and its failure usually results in substantial losses in time, money (including opportunity costs) and effort. Therefore it is important to assess e-health readiness prior to implementation. Several frameworks have been published on e-health readiness assessment, under various circumstances and geographical regions of the world. However, their utility for the developing world is unknown. Methods A literature review and analysis of published e-health readiness assessment frameworks or models was performed to determine if any are appropriate for broad assessment of e-health readiness in the developing world. A total of 13 papers described e-health readiness in different settings. Results and Discussion Eight types of e-health readiness were identified and no paper directly addressed all of these. The frameworks were based upon varying assumptions and perspectives. There was no underlying unifying theory underpinning the frameworks. Few assessed government and societal readiness, and none cultural readiness; all are important in the developing world. While the shortcomings of existing frameworks have been highlighted, most contain aspects that are relevant and can be drawn on when developing a framework and assessment tools for the developing world. What emerged is the need to develop different assessment tools for the various stakeholder sectors. This is an area that needs further research before attempting to develop a more generic framework for the developing world.

  5. Risks related to the use of eHealth technologies - an exploratory study

    OpenAIRE

    Ossebaard, Hans Cornelis; de Bruijn, Adrie; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E.W.C.; Geertsma, R.E.

    2013-01-01

    More awareness is needed about the risks of e-Health technology. While information regarding its potential is abundant, the risks associated with the use of information (including mobile) and communication technology in health care have scarcely been addressed. In order to implement e-Health technology successfully and safely, the evaluation of their benefits should be integrated into and complemented with systematic risk assessment. This is the main recommendation resulting from an explorato...

  6. Further Validation of the Learning Alliance Inventory: The Roles of Working Alliance, Rapport, and Immediacy in Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Daniel T.

    2015-01-01

    This study further examined the reliability and validity of the Learning Alliance Inventory (LAI), a self-report measure designed to assess the working alliance between a student and a teacher. The LAI was found to have good internal consistency and test--retest reliability, and it demonstrated the predicted convergence with measures of immediacy…

  7. Lightweighted and energy-aware MIKEY-Ticket for e-health applications in the context of internet of things

    OpenAIRE

    Abdmeziem , Mohammed Riyadh; Tandjaoui , Djamel; Romdhani , Imed

    2017-01-01

    E-health applications have emerged as a promising approach to provide unobtrusive and customizable support to elderly and frail people based on their situation and circumstances. However, due to limited resources available in such systems and data privacy concerns, security issues constitute a major obstacle to their safe deployment. To secure e-health communications, key management protocols play a vital role in the security process. Nevertheless, current e-health systems are unable to run e...

  8. Climate change and eHealth: a promising strategy for health sector mitigation and adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åsa Holmner

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is one of today's most pressing global issues. Policies to guide mitigation and adaptation are needed to avoid the devastating impacts of climate change. The health sector is a significant contributor to greenhouse gas emissions in developed countries, and its climate impact in low-income countries is growing steadily. This paper reviews and discusses the literature regarding health sector mitigation potential, known and hypothetical co-benefits, and the potential of health information technology, such as eHealth, in climate change mitigation and adaptation. The promising role of eHealth as an adaptation strategy to reduce societal vulnerability to climate change, and the link's between mitigation and adaptation, are also discussed. The topic of environmental eHealth has gained little attention to date, despite its potential to contribute to more sustainable and green health care. A growing number of local and global initiatives on ‘green information and communication technology (ICT’ are now mentioning eHealth as a promising technology with the potential to reduce emission rates from ICT use. However, the embracing of eHealth is slow because of limitations in technological infrastructure, capacity and political will. Further research on potential emissions reductions and co-benefits with green ICT, in terms of health outcomes and economic effectiveness, would be valuable to guide development and implementation of eHealth in health sector mitigation and adaptation policies.

  9. eHealth in Wound Care,- overview and key issues to consider before implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Zena; Angel, Donna; Bjerregaard, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This document aims to provide wound care clinicians with a rapid and structured overview of the key issues related to use of eHealth applications (telemedicine and telehealth) within wound care. This includes: • An overview of terminology and available literature • Guidance on the methodo......Purpose This document aims to provide wound care clinicians with a rapid and structured overview of the key issues related to use of eHealth applications (telemedicine and telehealth) within wound care. This includes: • An overview of terminology and available literature • Guidance...... on the methodology for evaluation of eHealth solutions • An introduction to and discussion of the potential benefits of eHealth technologies in wound care, and the possible barriers to their implementation • Recommendations for ensuring a good implementation process and supporting involvement of wound care...... professionals in safeguarding that eHealth solutions meet the needs of the patients. Methodology The document sections lean on the structure and focus areas of the Model for ASsessment of Telemedicine (MAST) which defines crucial items to evaluate an eHealth application. The content of the document is developed...

  10. Climate change and eHealth: a promising strategy for health sector mitigation and adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmner, Åsa; Rocklöv, Joacim; Ng, Nawi; Nilsson, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Climate change is one of today's most pressing global issues. Policies to guide mitigation and adaptation are needed to avoid the devastating impacts of climate change. The health sector is a significant contributor to greenhouse gas emissions in developed countries, and its climate impact in low-income countries is growing steadily. This paper reviews and discusses the literature regarding health sector mitigation potential, known and hypothetical co-benefits, and the potential of health information technology, such as eHealth, in climate change mitigation and adaptation. The promising role of eHealth as an adaptation strategy to reduce societal vulnerability to climate change, and the link's between mitigation and adaptation, are also discussed. The topic of environmental eHealth has gained little attention to date, despite its potential to contribute to more sustainable and green health care. A growing number of local and global initiatives on ‘green information and communication technology (ICT)’ are now mentioning eHealth as a promising technology with the potential to reduce emission rates from ICT use. However, the embracing of eHealth is slow because of limitations in technological infrastructure, capacity and political will. Further research on potential emissions reductions and co-benefits with green ICT, in terms of health outcomes and economic effectiveness, would be valuable to guide development and implementation of eHealth in health sector mitigation and adaptation policies. PMID:22679398

  11. Health literacy in the eHealth era: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Henna; Xie, Bo

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to identify studies on online health service use by people with limited health literacy, as the findings could provide insights into how health literacy has been, and should be, addressed in the eHealth era. To identify the relevant literature published since 2010, we performed four rounds of selection-database selection, keyword search, screening of the titles and abstracts, and screening of full texts. This process produced a final of 74 publications. The themes addressed in the 74 publications fell into five categories: evaluation of health-related content, development and evaluation of eHealth services, development and evaluation of health literacy measurement tools, interventions to improve health literacy, and online health information seeking behavior. Barriers to access to and use of online health information can result from the readability of content and poor usability of eHealth services. We need new health literacy screening tools to identify skills for adequate use of eHealth services. Mobile apps hold great potential for eHealth and mHealth services tailored to people with low health literacy. Efforts should be made to make eHealth services easily accessible to low-literacy individuals and to enhance individual health literacy through educational programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. eHealth Literacy: Essential Skills for Consumer Health in a Networked World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Cameron D; Skinner, Harvey A

    2006-06-16

    Electronic health tools provide little value if the intended users lack the skills to effectively engage them. With nearly half the adult population in the United States and Canada having literacy levels below what is needed to fully engage in an information-rich society, the implications for using information technology to promote health and aid in health care, or for eHealth, are considerable. Engaging with eHealth requires a skill set, or literacy, of its own. The concept of eHealth literacy is introduced and defined as the ability to seek, find, understand, and appraise health information from electronic sources and apply the knowledge gained to addressing or solving a health problem. In this paper, a model of eHealth literacy is introduced, comprised of multiple literacy types, including an outline of a set of fundamental skills consumers require to derive direct benefits from eHealth. A profile of each literacy type with examples of the problems patient-clients might present is provided along with a resource list to aid health practitioners in supporting literacy improvement with their patient-clients across each domain. Facets of the model are illustrated through a set of clinical cases to demonstrate how health practitioners can address eHealth literacy issues in clinical or public health practice. Potential future applications of the model are discussed.

  13. Socio-technical and organizational challenges to wider e-Health implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitacca, M; Mazzù, M; Scalvini, S

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in information communication technology allow contact with patients at home through e-Health services (telemedicine, in particular). We provide insights on the state of the art of e-Health and telemedicine for possible wider future clinical use. Telemedicine opportunities are summarized as i) home telenursing, ii) electronic transfer to specialists and hospitals, iii) teleconsulting between general practitioners and specialists and iv) call centres activities and online health. At present, a priority action of the EU is the Initiative on TM for chronic disease management as home health monitoring and the future Vision for Europe 2020 is based on development of Integrated Telemedicine Services. There are pros and cons in e-Health and telemedicine. Benefits can be classified as benefits for i) citizens, patients and caregivers and ii) health care provider organizations. Institutions and individuals that play key roles in the future of e-Health are doctors, patients and hospitals, while the whole system should be improved at three crucial levels: 1) organizational, 2) regulatory and 3) technological. Quality, access and efficiency are the general key issues for the success of e-Health and telemedicine implementation. The real technology is the human resource available into the organizations. For e-Health and telemedicine to grow, it will be necessary to investigate their long-term efficacy, cost effectiveness, possible improvement in quality of life and impact on public health burden.

  14. Strategic hospital alliances: impact on financial performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, J P; McCue, M J; Luke, R D; Bramble, J D; Rossiter, L F; Ozcan, Y A; Pai, C W

    1997-01-01

    Acute care hospitals have increasingly been forming local strategic hospital alliances (SHAs), which consume considerable resources in forming and may affect the competitiveness of provider markets. This research shows that SHAs and market factors, which have been perceived to be threats to hospitals, are related to hospitals' financial performance. Among the findings are that SHA members have higher net revenues but that they are not more effective at cost control. Nor do the higher net revenues result in higher cash flow. However, increasing SHA penetration in a market is related to lower net revenues per case. In addition, the penetration of private health maintenance organizations in markets is associated with lower revenues and expenses.

  15. The coming alliance revolution in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, R P

    1993-01-01

    Like it or not, the health care profession is being "shifted" into a revolutionary new world. The question is not will it change but rather how will it change? Who will determine its fate? What form will these changes take? What are the best alternatives for physicians, institutions, health care workers, insurers, employers, and, most importantly, patients? Some of the changes will come from government mandate, others from market forces. To understand what the future might bring, we should look at both the driving forces behind the changes and how other industries have responded to similar forces. An important consideration for health care professionals will be how, if at all, the concepts of collaboration and cooperation that are inherent in networking and alliances will guide their planning.

  16. Alliance Coordination, Dysfunctions, and the Protection of Idiosyncratic Knowledge in Strategic Learning Alliances

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    In high technology industries firms use strategic learning alliances to create value that can’t be created alone. While they open their interorganizational membrane to gain new skills and competences, generate new products and services, accelerate development speed, and enter into new markets their idiosyncratic knowledge base may be impaired when knowledge related dysfunctions like the unintended knowledge transfer, asymmetric learning speed or premature closing occur. Within a value approac...

  17. Reactive transport models and simulation with ALLIANCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leterrier, N.; Deville, E.; Bary, B.; Trotignon, L.; Hedde, T.; Cochepin, B.; Stora, E.

    2009-01-01

    Many chemical processes influence the evolution of nuclear waste storage. As a result, simulations based only upon transport and hydraulic processes fail to describe adequately some industrial scenarios. We need to take into account complex chemical models (mass action laws, kinetics...) which are highly non-linear. In order to simulate the coupling of these chemical reactions with transport, we use a classical Sequential Iterative Approach (SIA), with a fixed point algorithm, within the mainframe of the ALLIANCES platform. This approach allows us to use the various transport and chemical modules available in ALLIANCES, via an operator-splitting method based upon the structure of the chemical system. We present five different applications of reactive transport simulations in the context of nuclear waste storage: 1. A 2D simulation of the lixiviation by rain water of an underground polluted zone high in uranium oxide; 2. The degradation of the steel envelope of a package in contact with clay. Corrosion of the steel creates corrosion products and the altered package becomes a porous medium. We follow the degradation front through kinetic reactions and the coupling with transport; 3. The degradation of a cement-based material by the injection of an aqueous solution of zinc and sulphate ions. In addition to the reactive transport coupling, we take into account in this case the hydraulic retroaction of the porosity variation on the Darcy velocity; 4. The decalcification of a concrete beam in an underground storage structure. In this case, in addition to the reactive transport simulation, we take into account the interaction between chemical degradation and the mechanical forces (cracks...), and the retroactive influence on the structure changes on transport; 5. The degradation of the steel envelope of a package in contact with a clay material under a temperature gradient. In this case the reactive transport simulation is entirely directed by the temperature changes and

  18. eHealth Literacy and Partner Involvement in Treatment Decision Making for Men With Newly Diagnosed Localized Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lixin; Tatum, Kimberly; Greene, Giselle; Chen, Ronald C

    2017-03-01

    To examine how the eHealth literacy of partners of patients with newly diagnosed prostate cancer affects their involvement in decision making, and to identify the factors that influence their eHealth literacy.
. Cross-sectional exploratory study.
. North Carolina.
. 142 partners of men with newly diagnosed localized prostate cancer. 
. A telephone survey and descriptive and multiple linear regression analyses were used.
. The partners' eHealth literacy, involvement in treatment decision making, and demographics, and the health statuses of the patients and their partners. 
. Higher levels of eHealth literacy among partners were significantly associated with their involvement in getting a second opinion, their awareness of treatment options, and the size of the social network they relied on for additional information and support for treatment decision making for prostate cancer. The factor influencing eHealth literacy was the partners' access to the Internet for personal use, which explained some of the variance in eHealth literacy.
. This study described how partners' eHealth literacy influenced their involvement in treatment decision making for prostate cancer and highlighted the influencing factors (i.e., partners' access to the Internet for personal use).
. When helping men with prostate cancer and their partners with treatment decision making, nurses need to assess eHealth literacy levels to determine whether nonelectronically based education materials are needed and to provide clear instructions on how to use eHealth resources.

  19. The Influence of eHealth Literacy on Perceived Trust in Online Health Communication Channels and Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paige, Samantha R; Krieger, Janice L; Stellefson, Michael L

    2017-01-01

    Disparities in online health information accessibility are partially due to varying levels of eHealth literacy and perceived trust. This study examined the relationship between eHealth literacy and perceived trust in online health communication channels and sources among diverse sociodemographic groups. A stratified sample of Black/African Americans (n = 402) and Caucasians (n = 409) completed a Web-based survey that measured eHealth literacy and perceived trustworthiness of online health communication channels and information sources. eHealth literacy positively predicted perceived trust in online health communication channels and sources, but disparities existed by sociodemographic factors. Segmenting audiences according to eHealth literacy level provides a detailed understanding of how perceived trust in discrete online health communication channels and information sources varies among diverse audiences. Black/African Americans with low eHealth literacy had high perceived trust in YouTube and Twitter, whereas Black/African Americans with high eHealth literacy had high perceived trust in online government and religious organizations. Older adults with low eHealth literacy had high perceived trust in Facebook but low perceived trust in online support groups. Researchers and practitioners should consider the sociodemographics and eHealth literacy level of an intended audience when tailoring information through trustworthy online health communication channels and information sources.

  20. Disentangling the change-alliance relationship: Observational assessment of the therapeutic alliance during change and stuck episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellado, Augusto; Suárez, Nicolás; Altimir, Carolina; Martínez, Claudio; Pérez, Janet; Krause, Mariane; Horvath, Adam

    2017-09-01

    The therapeutic alliance is considered the most robust process variable associated with positive therapeutic outcome in a variety of psychotherapeutic models [Alexander, L. B., & Luborsky, L. (1986). The Penn Helping Alliance Scales. In L. S. Greenberg & W. M. Pinsoff (Eds.), The psychotherapeutic process: A research handbook (pp. 325-356). New York: Guilford Press; Horvath, A. O., Gaston, L., & Luborsky, L. (1993). The alliance as predictor of benefits of counseling and therapy. In N. Miller, L. Luborsky, J. Barber, & J. P. Docherty (Eds.), Psychodynamic treatment research: A handbook for clinical practice (pp. 247-274). New York, NY: Basic Books; Horvath, A. O., Del Re, A. C., Flückiger, C., & Symonds, D. (2011). Alliance in individual psychotherapy. Psychotherapy, 48, 9-16; Orlinky, D., Grawe, K., & Parks, B. (1994). Process and outcome in psychotherapy: Noch einmal. In A. Bergin & J. S. Garfield (Eds.), Handbook of psychotherapy and behaviour change (4th ed., pp. 270-378). New York, NY: Wiley and Sons]. The relationship between alliance and outcome has traditionally been studied based on measures that assess these therapy factors at a global level. However, the specific variations of the alliance process and their association with therapy segments that are relevant for change have not yet been fully examined. The present study examines the variations in the therapeutic alliance in 73 significant in-session events: 35 change and 38 stuck episodes identified through the observation of 14 short-term therapies of different theoretical orientations. Variations in the alliance were assessed using the VTAS-SF [Shelef, K., & Diamond, G. (2008). Short form of the revised Vanderbilt Therapeutic Alliance Scale: Development, reliability, and validity. Psychotherapy Research, 18, 433-443]. Nested analyses (HLM) indicate a statistically significant better quality of the alliance during change episodes.

  1. Doctor-patient communication in the e-health era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Jonathan P

    2012-08-28

    The digital revolution will have a profound impact on how physicians and health care delivery organizations interact with patients and the community at-large. Over the coming decades, face-to-face patient/doctor contacts will become less common and exchanges between consumers and providers will increasingly be mediated by electronic devices.In highly developed health care systems like those in Israel, the United States, and Europe, most aspects of the health care and consumer health experience are becoming supported by a wide array of technology such as electronic and personal health records (EHRs and PHRs), biometric & telemedicine devices, and consumer-focused wireless and wired Internet applications.In an article in this issue, Peleg and Nazarenko report on a survey they fielded within Israel's largest integrated delivery system regarding patient views on the use of electronic communication with their doctors via direct-access mobile phones and e-mail. A previous complementary paper describes the parallel perspectives of the physician staff at the same organization. These two surveys offer useful insights to clinicians, managers, researchers, and policymakers on how best to integrate e-mail and direct-to-doctor mobile phones into their practice settings. These papers, along with several other recent Israeli studies on e-health, also provide an opportunity to step back and take stock of the dramatic impact that information & communication technology (ICT) and health information technology (HIT) will have on clinician/patient communication moving forward.The main goals of this commentary are to describe the scope of this issue and to offer a framework for understanding the potential impact that e-health tools will have on provider/patient communication. It will be essential that clinicians, managers, policymakers, and researchers gain an increased understanding of this trend so that health care systems around the globe can adapt, adopt, and embrace these rapidly

  2. Doctor-patient communication in the e-health era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiner Jonathan P

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The digital revolution will have a profound impact on how physicians and health care delivery organizations interact with patients and the community at-large. Over the coming decades, face-to-face patient/doctor contacts will become less common and exchanges between consumers and providers will increasingly be mediated by electronic devices. In highly developed health care systems like those in Israel, the United States, and Europe, most aspects of the health care and consumer health experience are becoming supported by a wide array of technology such as electronic and personal health records (EHRs and PHRs, biometric & telemedicine devices, and consumer-focused wireless and wired Internet applications. In an article in this issue, Peleg and Nazarenko report on a survey they fielded within Israel's largest integrated delivery system regarding patient views on the use of electronic communication with their doctors via direct-access mobile phones and e-mail. A previous complementary paper describes the parallel perspectives of the physician staff at the same organization. These two surveys offer useful insights to clinicians, managers, researchers, and policymakers on how best to integrate e-mail and direct-to-doctor mobile phones into their practice settings. These papers, along with several other recent Israeli studies on e-health, also provide an opportunity to step back and take stock of the dramatic impact that information & communication technology (ICT and health information technology (HIT will have on clinician/patient communication moving forward. The main goals of this commentary are to describe the scope of this issue and to offer a framework for understanding the potential impact that e-health tools will have on provider/patient communication. It will be essential that clinicians, managers, policymakers, and researchers gain an increased understanding of this trend so that health care systems around the globe can adapt, adopt

  3. Pumping services alliance: A new strategy for the 90's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milligan, M.R.; Smith, T.; Crombie, D.

    1993-01-01

    Shell Canada has forged a pumping services alliance with Nowsco Well Service Ltd. for an initial two year period. The alliance will cover pumping related services such as well cementation, well stimulation, coiled tubing work and, in the future could include other services such as pressure testing, corrosion inhibition treatments, flowline pigging, and pumping pipeline inspection tools. The alliance represents a major challenge in operating philosophy away from a competitive bidding strategy to a new strategy of forging business alliances that afford both parties benefits in a more cooperative mode. The alliance incorporates the service company more into the business of Shell Canada and comprises engineering and operations capability. The perceived benefits such an alliance would bring to the business are identified and the key issues that guided selection are documented. Detailed submissions from four major service companies were received and reviwed in a prequalification stage; final selection was made by a multi-disciplinary team. A joint mission statement was prepared that represented Nowsco's and Shell's vision of the alliance and helped guide the negotiations leading to a contract being struck complete with key result areas and performance measurement criteria. 5 refs

  4. Associations of eHealth Literacy With Health Behavior Among Adult Internet Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsutake, Seigo; Shibata, Ai; Ishii, Kaori; Oka, Koichiro

    2016-07-18

    In the rapidly developing use of the Internet in society, eHealth literacy-having the skills to utilize health information on the Internet-has become an important prerequisite for promoting healthy behavior. However, little is known about whether eHealth literacy is associated with health behavior in a representative sample of adult Internet users. The aim of this study was to examine the association between eHealth literacy and general health behavior (cigarette smoking, physical exercise, alcohol consumption, sleeping hours, eating breakfast, eating between meals, and balanced nutrition) among adult Internet users in Japan. The participants were recruited among registrants of a Japanese Internet research service company and asked to answer a cross-sectional Internet-based survey in 2012. The potential respondents (N=10,178) were randomly and blindly invited via email from the registrants in accordance with the set sample size and other attributes. eHealth literacy was assessed using the Japanese version of the eHealth Literacy Scale. The self-reported health behaviors investigated included never smoking cigarettes, physical exercise, alcohol consumption, sleeping hours, eating breakfast, not eating between meals, and balanced nutrition. We obtained details of sociodemographic attributes (sex, age, marital status, educational attainment, and household income level) and frequency of conducting Internet searches. To determine the association of each health behavior with eHealth literacy, we performed a logistic regression analysis; we adjusted for sociodemographic attributes and frequency of Internet searching as well as for other health behaviors that were statistically significant with respect to eHealth literacy in univariate analyses. We analyzed the data of 2115 adults (response rate: 24.04%, 2142/10,178; male: 49.74%, 1052/2115; age: mean 39.7, SD 10.9 years) who responded to the survey. Logistic regression analysis showed that individuals with high eHealth

  5. Readiness of healthcare providers for eHealth: the case from primary healthcare centers in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Shadi; Khodor, Rawya; Alameddine, Mohamad; Baroud, Maysa

    2016-11-10

    eHealth can positively impact the efficiency and quality of healthcare services. Its potential benefits extend to the patient, healthcare provider, and organization. Primary healthcare (PHC) settings may particularly benefit from eHealth. In these settings, healthcare provider readiness is key to successful eHealth implementation. Accordingly, it is necessary to explore the potential readiness of providers to use eHealth tools. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the readiness of healthcare providers working in PHC centers in Lebanon to use eHealth tools. A self-administered questionnaire was used to assess participants' socio-demographics, computer use, literacy, and access, and participants' readiness for eHealth implementation (appropriateness, management support, change efficacy, personal beneficence). The study included primary healthcare providers (physicians, nurses, other providers) working in 22 PHC centers distributed across Lebanon. Descriptive and bivariate analyses (ANOVA, independent t-test, Kruskal Wallis, Tamhane's T2) were used to compare participant characteristics to the level of readiness for the implementation of eHealth. Of the 541 questionnaires, 213 were completed (response rate: 39.4 %). The majority of participants were physicians (46.9 %), and nurses (26.8 %). Most physicians (54.0 %), nurses (61.4 %), and other providers (50.9 %) felt comfortable using computers, and had access to computers at their PHC center (physicians: 77.0 %, nurses: 87.7 %, others: 92.5 %). Frequency of computer use varied. The study found a significant difference for personal beneficence, management support, and change efficacy among different healthcare providers, and relative to participants' level of comfort using computers. There was a significant difference by level of comfort using computers and appropriateness. A significant difference was also found between those with access to computers in relation to personal beneficence and

  6. An eHealth Capabilities Framework for Graduates and Health Professionals: Mixed-Methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Melissa; McGregor, Deborah; Keep, Melanie; Janssen, Anna; Spallek, Heiko; Quinn, Deleana; Jones, Aaron; Tseris, Emma; Yeung, Wilson; Togher, Leanne; Solman, Annette; Shaw, Tim

    2018-05-15

    The demand for an eHealth-ready and adaptable workforce is placing increasing pressure on universities to deliver eHealth education. At present, eHealth education is largely focused on components of eHealth rather than considering a curriculum-wide approach. This study aimed to develop a framework that could be used to guide health curriculum design based on current evidence, and stakeholder perceptions of eHealth capabilities expected of tertiary health graduates. A 3-phase, mixed-methods approach incorporated the results of a literature review, focus groups, and a Delphi process to develop a framework of eHealth capability statements. Participants (N=39) with expertise or experience in eHealth education, practice, or policy provided feedback on the proposed framework, and following the fourth iteration of this process, consensus was achieved. The final framework consisted of 4 higher-level capability statements that describe the learning outcomes expected of university graduates across the domains of (1) digital health technologies, systems, and policies; (2) clinical practice; (3) data analysis and knowledge creation; and (4) technology implementation and codesign. Across the capability statements are 40 performance cues that provide examples of how these capabilities might be demonstrated. The results of this study inform a cross-faculty eHealth curriculum that aligns with workforce expectations. There is a need for educational curriculum to reinforce existing eHealth capabilities, adapt existing capabilities to make them transferable to novel eHealth contexts, and introduce new learning opportunities for interactions with technologies within education and practice encounters. As such, the capability framework developed may assist in the application of eHealth by emerging and existing health care professionals. Future research needs to explore the potential for integration of findings into workforce development programs. ©Melissa Brunner, Deborah Mc

  7. Research on Efficiency of Knowledge Transfer in Technical Innovation Alliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang-sheng, Jiang

    The knowledge transfer efficiency (KTE) is closely relative to the success or failure of technology innovation in strategic alliances. This paper takes the KTE as the essential variable to establish the benefit function model of technology innovations to explore the KTE's influences on partners' innovative decisions under two different modes: independent innovations and alliance innovations. It is found that the higher the KTE, the greater the reducing extent of production costs is. The results could provide some theoretical supports for selections of the optimal competitive-ooperative relationship and managerial flexibility in technical innovation alliances.

  8. A Realist Study of the North Korea-China Alliance

    OpenAIRE

    Hedengran, Rasmus Duus; Kondrup, Alexander Schmidt

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this project was to investigate the nature of the China-North Korea alliance in light of recent developments on the Korean Peninsula. The project found this issue relevant to examine, as this relationship is often identified as being a key factor in shaping the current conflict. The research was centered around the foundations of the alliance and how it has changed to this day. This framework was made possible through the use of Stephen Walt’s balance of threat and alliance formati...

  9. Science and Engineering Alliance: A new resource for the nation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and four major Historically Black Colleges and Universities with strong research and development capabilities in science, engineering and computer technology have formed the Science and Engineering Alliance. Located in California, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas, each brings to the Alliance a tradition of research and development and educational excellence. This unique consortium is now available to perform research development and training to meet the needs of the public and private sectors. The Alliance was formed to help assure an adequate supply of top-quality minority scientists in the next century, while simultaneously meeting the research and development needs of the public and private sectors.

  10. Dropout From an eHealth Intervention for Adults With Type 2 Diabetes: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, Silje Stangeland; Karlsen, Bjørg; Oord, Ellen Renate; Graue, Marit; Oftedal, Bjørg

    2017-05-30

    Adequate self-management is the cornerstone of type 2 diabetes treatment, as people make the majority of daily treatment measures and health decisions. The increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and the complexity of diabetes self-management demonstrate the need for innovative and effective ways to deliver self-management support. eHealth interventions are promoted worldwide and hold a great potential in future health care for people with chronic diseases such as T2DM. However, many eHealth interventions face high dropout rates. This led to our interest in the experiences of participants who dropped out of an eHealth intervention for adults with T2DM, based on the Guided Self-Determination (GSD) counseling method. In this study, we aimed to explore experiences with an eHealth intervention based on GSD in general practice from the perspective of those who dropped out and to understand their reasons for dropping out. To the best of our knowledge, no previous qualitative study has focused on participants who withdrew from an eHealth self-management support intervention for adults with T2DM. A qualitative design based on telephone interviews was used to collect data. The sample comprised 12 adults with type 2 diabetes who dropped out of an eHealth intervention. Data were collected in 2016 and subjected to qualitative content analysis. We identified one overall theme: "Losing motivation for intervention participation." This theme was illustrated by four categories related to the participants' experiences of the eHealth intervention: (1) frustrating technology, (2) perceiving the content as irrelevant and incomprehensible, (3) choosing other activities and perspectives, and (4) lacking face-to-face encounters. Our findings indicate that the eHealth intervention based on GSD without face-to-face encounters with nurses reduced participants' motivation for engagement in the intervention. To maintain motivation, our study points to the importance of

  11. eHealth for inflammatory bowel disease self-management - the patient perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Con, Danny; Jackson, Belinda; Gray, Kathleen; De Cruz, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Electronic health (eHealth) solutions may help address the growing pressure on IBD outpatient services as they encompass a component of self-management. However, information regarding patients' attitudes towards the use of eHealth solutions in IBD is lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate eHealth technology use and explore the perspectives of IBD patients on what constitutes the ideal eHealth solution to facilitate self-management. A mixed methods qualitative and quantitative analysis of the outcomes of a discussion forum and an online survey conducted at a tertiary hospital in Melbourne, Australia between November 2015 and January 2016 was undertaken. Eighteen IBD patients and parents participated in the discussion forum. IBD patients expressed interest in eHealth tools that are convenient and improve access to care, communication, disease monitoring and adherence. Eighty six patients with IBD responded to the online survey. A majority of patients owned a mobile phone (98.8%), had access to the internet (97.7%), and felt confident entering data onto a phone or computer (73.3%). Most patients (98.8%) were willing to use at least one form of information and communication technology to help manage their IBD. Smartphone apps and internet websites were the two most preferred technologies to facilitate IBD self-management. This study demonstrates the willifngness of patients to engage with eHealth as a potential solution to facilitate IBD self-management. Future development and testing of eHealth solutions should be informed by all major stakeholders including patients to maximise their uptake and efficacy to facilitate IBD self-management.

  12. Evaluation of the Introduction of an e-Health Skills Component for Dietetics Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollo, Megan E; Collins, Clare E; MacDonald-Wicks, Lesley

    2017-11-01

    Appropriate and effective use of technology within practice is a key competency outlined in Australian dietetics training standards. An e-health skills component (lecture and workshop) was introduced to undergraduate students enrolled in an Australian nutrition and dietetics program. The lecture orientated students to key e-health terms and concepts relating to telehealth and m-health technologies, while the workshop provided an opportunity to apply knowledge. The workshop consisted of four stations with activities relating to (1) orientation to telehealth equipment; (2) comparison of dietetic consultation components completed in person versus remotely via video call; (3) quality assessment of mobile apps; and (4) exploration of advantages and disadvantages, and the ethical, security, and privacy issues relating to use of e-health technologies in dietetic practice. Student experience of the training was evaluated via questionnaire. Forty-five students (62.2% aged ≤19-24 years, 86.7% female) completed the survey. Following the workshop, the level of understanding relating to each key e-health concept improved significantly (p education to support the use of e-health technologies within dietetic practice were rated a high level of importance by most students (78-80%). The majority of students (93.3% to 97.8%) reported a positive experience at each of the four workshop stations, with "informative" the most common word selected to rate each station (37.8% to 44.4% of students across the four stations). The introduction of an e-health skills component resulted in an improved understanding of concepts for using these technologies. These findings provide preliminary support for integration of further e-health training within the dietetics program.

  13. CONSORT-EHEALTH: Improving and Standardizing Evaluation Reports of Web-based and Mobile Health Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Web-based and mobile health interventions (also called “Internet interventions” or "eHealth/mHealth interventions") are tools or treatments, typically behaviorally based, that are operationalized and transformed for delivery via the Internet or mobile platforms. These include electronic tools for patients, informal caregivers, healthy consumers, and health care providers. The Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement was developed to improve the suboptimal reporting of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). While the CONSORT statement can be applied to provide broad guidance on how eHealth and mHealth trials should be reported, RCTs of web-based interventions pose very specific issues and challenges, in particular related to reporting sufficient details of the intervention to allow replication and theory-building. Objective To develop a checklist, dubbed CONSORT-EHEALTH (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials of Electronic and Mobile HEalth Applications and onLine TeleHealth), as an extension of the CONSORT statement that provides guidance for authors of eHealth and mHealth interventions. Methods A literature review was conducted, followed by a survey among eHealth experts and a workshop. Results A checklist instrument was constructed as an extension of the CONSORT statement. The instrument has been adopted by the Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR) and authors of eHealth RCTs are required to submit an electronic checklist explaining how they addressed each subitem. Conclusions CONSORT-EHEALTH has the potential to improve reporting and provides a basis for evaluating the validity and applicability of eHealth trials. Subitems describing how the intervention should be reported can also be used for non-RCT evaluation reports. As part of the development process, an evaluation component is essential; therefore, feedback from authors will be solicited, and a before-after study will evaluate whether reporting has been improved

  14. The e-Health Implementation Toolkit: Qualitative evaluation across four European countries

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    MacFarlane, Anne

    2011-11-19

    Abstract Background Implementation researchers have attempted to overcome the research-practice gap in e-health by developing tools that summarize and synthesize research evidence of factors that impede or facilitate implementation of innovation in healthcare settings. The e-Health Implementation Toolkit (e-HIT) is an example of such a tool that was designed within the context of the United Kingdom National Health Service to promote implementation of e-health services. Its utility in international settings is unknown. Methods We conducted a qualitative evaluation of the e-HIT in use across four countries--Finland, Norway, Scotland, and Sweden. Data were generated using a combination of interview approaches (n = 22) to document e-HIT users\\' experiences of the tool to guide decision making about the selection of e-health pilot services and to monitor their progress over time. Results e-HIT users evaluated the tool positively in terms of its scope to organize and enhance their critical thinking about their implementation work and, importantly, to facilitate discussion between those involved in that work. It was easy to use in either its paper- or web-based format, and its visual elements were positively received. There were some minor criticisms of the e-HIT with some suggestions for content changes and comments about its design as a generic tool (rather than specific to sites and e-health services). However, overall, e-HIT users considered it to be a highly workable tool that they found useful, which they would use again, and which they would recommend to other e-health implementers. Conclusion The use of the e-HIT is feasible and acceptable in a range of international contexts by a range of professionals for a range of different e-health systems.

  15. [Training, the key to improving eHealth literacy of upper secondary school students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Rabanal, Carme; Vall, Aurora; Boter, Clara

    To explore whether training on strategies to identify and assess health-related information online has a positive impact on students' perception of their own eHealth literacy. The validated eHealth Literacy Scale (eHEALS) was administered to a sample of upper secondary school students, aged 15-18. One week later, they attended a training session on how to search and identify reliable health-related information and resources online. The eHEALS was administered again at the end of this session. Information about gender and school year was collected in both sessions. Perceived eHealth literacy was assessed by comparing the scores obtained before and after the session. Bivariate and multiple linear regressions were completed. Of the 298 students enrolled in upper secondary school (Bachillerato), 285 were included in the study. Approximately 52.28% (149) were female, and 47.72% (136) were male. The mean eHEALS score before the session was 24.19 (range: 8-40), and was 28.54 after it. The training was associated with higher perceived eHealth literacy scores (p <0,0001). Health literacy was positively associated with the usefulness and importance students give the Internet. Attendance at a training session on strategies to identify and assess health-related resources online is associated with higher levels of perceived eHealth literacy. Implementing specific training sessions on eHealth literacy in upper secondary school is a promising approach for enhancing students' eHealth literacy. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. The e-health implementation toolkit: qualitative evaluation across four European countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacFarlane Anne

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Implementation researchers have attempted to overcome the research-practice gap in e-health by developing tools that summarize and synthesize research evidence of factors that impede or facilitate implementation of innovation in healthcare settings. The e-Health Implementation Toolkit (e-HIT is an example of such a tool that was designed within the context of the United Kingdom National Health Service to promote implementation of e-health services. Its utility in international settings is unknown. Methods We conducted a qualitative evaluation of the e-HIT in use across four countries--Finland, Norway, Scotland, and Sweden. Data were generated using a combination of interview approaches (n = 22 to document e-HIT users' experiences of the tool to guide decision making about the selection of e-health pilot services and to monitor their progress over time. Results e-HIT users evaluated the tool positively in terms of its scope to organize and enhance their critical thinking about their implementation work and, importantly, to facilitate discussion between those involved in that work. It was easy to use in either its paper- or web-based format, and its visual elements were positively received. There were some minor criticisms of the e-HIT with some suggestions for content changes and comments about its design as a generic tool (rather than specific to sites and e-health services. However, overall, e-HIT users considered it to be a highly workable tool that they found useful, which they would use again, and which they would recommend to other e-health implementers. Conclusion The use of the e-HIT is feasible and acceptable in a range of international contexts by a range of professionals for a range of different e-health systems.

  17. The e-Health Implementation Toolkit: qualitative evaluation across four European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFarlane, Anne; Clerkin, Pauline; Murray, Elizabeth; Heaney, David J; Wakeling, Mary; Pesola, Ulla-Maija; Waterworth, Eva Lindh; Larsen, Frank; Makiniemi, Minna; Winblad, Ilkka

    2011-11-19

    Implementation researchers have attempted to overcome the research-practice gap in e-health by developing tools that summarize and synthesize research evidence of factors that impede or facilitate implementation of innovation in healthcare settings. The e-Health Implementation Toolkit (e-HIT) is an example of such a tool that was designed within the context of the United Kingdom National Health Service to promote implementation of e-health services. Its utility in international settings is unknown. We conducted a qualitative evaluation of the e-HIT in use across four countries--Finland, Norway, Scotland, and Sweden. Data were generated using a combination of interview approaches (n = 22) to document e-HIT users' experiences of the tool to guide decision making about the selection of e-health pilot services and to monitor their progress over time. e-HIT users evaluated the tool positively in terms of its scope to organize and enhance their critical thinking about their implementation work and, importantly, to facilitate discussion between those involved in that work. It was easy to use in either its paper- or web-based format, and its visual elements were positively received. There were some minor criticisms of the e-HIT with some suggestions for content changes and comments about its design as a generic tool (rather than specific to sites and e-health services). However, overall, e-HIT users considered it to be a highly workable tool that they found useful, which they would use again, and which they would recommend to other e-health implementers. The use of the e-HIT is feasible and acceptable in a range of international contexts by a range of professionals for a range of different e-health systems.

  18. Experience of nurses with using eHealth in Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan: a qualitative study in primary and secondary healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulzar, Saleema; Khoja, Shariq; Sajwani, Afroz

    2013-03-02

    To improve the quality of health care in remote parts of Pakistan, a research project was initiated in the mountainous region of Gilgit-Baltistan using information and communication technology to improve patient care and support continuing education of health providers (eHealth). This paper describes the experience of nurses in using eHealth in their routine practices. All health centres of Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan using eHealth as part of this study, were taken as a single case. These include four primary healthcare centres, three secondary care centres and one medical centre. In-depth interviews were conducted using semi-structured interview guide to study nurses' perspective about using eHealth, and its perceived impact on their professional lives. According to the respondents, eHealth enhanced access to care for remote communities, and improved quality of health services by providing opportunities for continuing learning. Nurses also appreciated eHealth for reducing their professional isolation, and providing exposure to new knowledge through teleconsultations and eLearning.The responses categorized under six major headings include: gaps in health services prior to eHealth; role of eHealth in addressing these gaps; benefits of eHealth; challenges in eHealth implementation; community's perception about eHealth; and future recommendations. Low-cost and simple eHealth solutions have shown to benefit nurses, and the communities in the remote mountainous regions of Pakistan.

  19. Experience of nurses with using eHealth in Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan: a qualitative study in primary and secondary healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background To improve the quality of health care in remote parts of Pakistan, a research project was initiated in the mountainous region of Gilgit-Baltistan using information and communication technology to improve patient care and support continuing education of health providers (eHealth). This paper describes the experience of nurses in using eHealth in their routine practices. Methods All health centres of Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan using eHealth as part of this study, were taken as a single case. These include four primary healthcare centres, three secondary care centres and one medical centre. In-depth interviews were conducted using semi-structured interview guide to study nurses’ perspective about using eHealth, and its perceived impact on their professional lives. Results According to the respondents, eHealth enhanced access to care for remote communities, and improved quality of health services by providing opportunities for continuing learning. Nurses also appreciated eHealth for reducing their professional isolation, and providing exposure to new knowledge through teleconsultations and eLearning. The responses categorized under six major headings include: gaps in health services prior to eHealth; role of eHealth in addressing these gaps; benefits of eHealth; challenges in eHealth implementation; community’s perception about eHealth; and future recommendations. Conclusions Low-cost and simple eHealth solutions have shown to benefit nurses, and the communities in the remote mountainous regions of Pakistan. PMID:23452373

  20. Ties that tear apart : the social embeddedness of strategic alliance termination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooks, G.; Snijders, C.C.P.; Duysters, G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Strategic alliances between firms are inherently unstable, and many alliances fail before the planned termination date. Most studies of the instability of strategic alliances focus on internal factors, such as tensions between alliance partners. In the present study social networks, in particular

  1. Ties that tear apart. The social embeddedness of strategic alliance termination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rook, G.; Snijders, C.; Duijsters, G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Strategic alliances between firms are inherently unstable, and many alliances fail before the planned termination date. Most studies of the instability of strategic alliances focus on internal factors, such as tensions between alliance partners. In the present study social networks, in particular

  2. The Effects of Trust in Virtual Strategic-Alliance Performance Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston-Ortiz, Dina

    2010-01-01

    Outsourcing increases supported by technology have led to the formation of virtual strategic partnerships. Historically, 70% to 75% of alliance partnerships fail because members are often competitors outside the alliance network. To address alliance failure, a Delphi Study was conducted to identify the role of trust and alliance performance…

  3. A perfect match : an empirical investigation into partner selection as an alliance capability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duisters, Danielle

    2013-01-01

    Strategic alliances have become a cornerstone of business development. Not only the number of alliances but also the percentage of revenues coming from alliances has increased. Individual companies form alliances to enter new markets, to gain knowledge, or to share risk and resources to bring value

  4. 78 FR 63559 - Order of Suspension of Trading; In The Matter of Crown Alliance Capital Limited

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... Alliance Capital Limited (``Crown Alliance''), quoted under the ticker symbol CACL, because of questions regarding the accuracy of assertions in Crown Alliance's public filings concerning the company's assets and... of Crown Alliance Capital Limited October 22, 2013. It appears to the Securities and Exchange...

  5. Competition between alliance blocks : the case of the RISC microprocessor technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanhaverbeke, W.P.M.; Noorderhaven, N.G.

    2001-01-01

    Competition between alliance blocks is a new form of rivalry: groups of firms link together for a common purpose by means of strategic alliances, and competition between alliance blocks is superimposed on competition between individual firms. This paper focuses on alliance blocks in the RISC

  6. FROM ME TO US: THE CONSTRUCTION OF FAMILY ALLIANCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdiolo, Sarah; Roskam, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    This longitudinal prospective and multi-informant study based on a three-wave research program (pregnancy, 12 months' postpartum, and 16 months' postpartum) aimed to determine the process of construction of family alliance, as assessed by the Lausanne Trilogue Play (Fivaz-Depeursinge & Corboz-Warnery, 1999). A model using parents' individual characteristics (i.e., personality traits and attachment orientations) as distal variables, coparenting as a mediator, child's temperament as a moderator, and family alliance as outcome was tested using structural equation modeling on 62 nonreferred families. Results showed that both parents' conscientiousness was positively and mothers' avoidant attachment and fathers' anxious attachment were negatively and indirectly (via coparenting) associated with the family alliance. The discussion underlines mothers' and fathers' different roles and the importance of coparenting as a core mechanism in the development of family alliance. © 2015 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  7. UbuntuNet Alliance : Consolidating Research and Education ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    UbuntuNet Alliance : Consolidating Research and Education Networking - Phase II ... North of Sahara, South of Sahara, United States ... social science, population and public health, and health systems research relevant to the emerging crisis.

  8. The U.S.-Japan Alliance: Sustaining the Transformation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wright, bruce A; Hague, Mark O

    2007-01-01

    .... Most significantly, it outlines the strategic foundations for the alliance and provides operational-level guidance to further the partnership in support of the National Security Strategy and the four...

  9. Published Research - NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer has published much exciting and impactful research over the years. Find here a list of all of these listed in PubMed and others across the field of Cancer Nanotechnology.

  10. Networks of military alliances, wars, and international trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Matthew O; Nei, Stephen

    2015-12-15

    We investigate the role of networks of alliances in preventing (multilateral) interstate wars. We first show that, in the absence of international trade, no network of alliances is peaceful and stable. We then show that international trade induces peaceful and stable networks: Trade increases the density of alliances so that countries are less vulnerable to attack and also reduces countries' incentives to attack an ally. We present historical data on wars and trade showing that the dramatic drop in interstate wars since 1950 is paralleled by a densification and stabilization of trading relationships and alliances. Based on the model we also examine some specific relationships, finding that countries with high levels of trade with their allies are less likely to be involved in wars with any other countries (including allies and nonallies), and that an increase in trade between two countries correlates with a lower chance that they will go to war with each other.

  11. The Physician-Patient Working Alliance in Hemodialysis Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuertes, Jairo N; Rubinstein, Sofia; Reyes, Mariela; Iampornpipopchai, Pichet; Mujeeb, Shanza; Smith, Carroll R; Toporovsky, Arielle

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, the role of psychological and social factors, including the physician-patient working alliance, have emerged as integral components of medical care for patients with a myriad of health conditions. The current study examines a model comprised of psychological-interpersonal factors and the extent to which it explains patient satisfaction with and adherence to hemodialysis treatment. One hundred and seven adults with end-stage renal disease who were receiving regular outpatient hemodialysis participated in the study. Path analyses show that the physician-patient working alliance indirectly predicts patient adherence through patient satisfaction and patients' outcome expectations. The working alliance directly predicts patients' quality of life. It is concluded that consistent with previous research, the physician-patient working alliance is a significant factor in predicting key patient behaviors in medical care.

  12. Cooperation in International Strategic Alliances and Impact on Host Economies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Jeppe

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have suggested that linkages between multinational enterprises entering developing countries and local firms can promote knowledge upgrading in local firms. Alliances are a particularly intense type of linkage, and this study investigates how the construct of cooperation, which...

  13. Revolution in Business Affairs: Strategic Business Alliances in Army Transformation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bliss, Gary

    2002-01-01

    .... What commercial business practices could assist the Army in its Transformation? Can Strategic Business Alliances between the government and contractors help forge a winning team to aid in the Transformation effort?

  14. Commodity Alliance Model – An Option for Advancing Private and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Commodity Alliance Model – An Option for Advancing Private and Commercial ... that ensure adequate value addition and ultimate remunerative price for farmers' ... and integrating them in terms of fair price determination, information flow and ...

  15. Formalized classification of European fen vegetation at the alliance level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterka, Tomáš; Hájek, Michal; Jiroušek, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Aims Phytosociological classification of fen vegetation (Scheuchzerio palustris-Caricetea fuscae class) differs among European countries. Here we propose a unified vegetation classification of European fens at the alliance level, provide unequivocal assignment rules for individual vegetation plot...

  16. eHealth effectiveness : does scientific literature provide evidence of the effectiveness of eHealth and what does that mean?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schurer, Margreet; Velthuijsen, Hugo

    Although the scientific literature consists of over 10,000 papers on eHealth, remarkably few applications are consistently being used in the healthcare domain. Numerous reasons for this lack of progression have been noted, one of these being the objection of medical professionals to the introduction

  17. Wind Alliance for the Sustainable Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho, Damarys Gonzalez [Puerto Rico Energy Affairs Administration, San Juan (Puerto Rico). Executive Office of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico

    2012-09-30

    The Puerto Rico Energy Affairs Administration (PREAA) is actively engaged in the implementation of existing public policy for the conservation of energy and promotion of renewable energy to reduce consumer’s costs and reduce environmental impact. Puerto Rico is an island in where no own reserves of gas, oil or coal exists. This severe dependence in on foreign oil is reflected in the higher cost of electricity in Puerto Rico, which is significantly higher than most of the United States. Therefore, public energy policy of Puerto Rico places emphasis on diversification of energy sources and the use of renewable energy technologies. The Wind energy Alliance for the Sustainable Development project focused on the formation of a wind energy working group to educate and promote wind energy technologies; at the same time the evaluating the viability of wind energy in Puerto Rico. The educational outreach was performed through a series of wind energy workshops where interested parties such as, installers, sellers, engineers, general public even opposing groups participate from the activities.

  18. Alliance for Sequestration Training, Outreach, Research & Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Hilary [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Geophysics Jackson School of Geosciences

    2013-12-31

    The Sequestration Training, Outreach, Research and Education (STORE) Alliance at The University of Texas at Austin completed its activity under Department of Energy Funding (DE-FE0002254) on September 1, 2013. The program began as a partnership between the Institute for Geophysics, the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering Department at UT. The initial vision of the program was to promote better understanding of CO2 utilization and storage science and engineering technology through programs and opportunities centered on training, outreach, research and technology transfer, and education. With over 8,000 hrs of formal training and education (and almost 4,500 of those hours awarded as continuing education credits) to almost 1,100 people, STORE programs and activities have provided benefits to the Carbon Storage Program of the Department of Energy by helping to build a skilled workforce for the future CCS and larger energy industry, and fostering scientific public literacy needed to continue the U.S. leadership position in climate change mitigation and energy technologies and application. Now in sustaining mode, the program is housed at the Center for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering, and benefits from partnerships with the Gulf Coast Carbon Center, TOPCORP and other programs at the university receiving industry funding.

  19. Required Steps of Managing International Equity Placement Strategic Alliance

    OpenAIRE

    Wandebori, Harimukti; de Bruijn, Erik Joost; Steenhuis, Harm-Jan

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the research is to unravel the steps of managing international equity placement strategic alliance (IEPSA). The steps of managing an IEPSA are obtained by conducting theoretical review. The theoretical reviews consist of theory of strategic alliance; definition, classification, and finding definition of an IEPSA, political and analytical considerations and the necessary steps. These steps of managing IEPSA can be classified into analyzing of macro consideration, micro considera...

  20. Combining service marketing and strategic alliances in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, I R

    1993-11-01

    With or without federal health care reform to impact the delivery of health care services in the U.S., hospitals must commit to service marketing and strategic alliances as a fundamental business strategy. Service marketing not only differentiates the provider, but with the proper programs in place, it may actually facilitate the formation of strategic alliances. The combination of these strategies will be particularly effective in preparing for any health care policy change.

  1. International Alliance of Green Hotels to Reach Sustainable Competitive Advantages

    OpenAIRE

    Hufei Ge; Silu Chen; Yujie Chen

    2018-01-01

    Under increasing environmental pressure, hotel firms need to improve their ability to access international alliances while maintaining good performance for sustainable development. This paper uses survey data from 784 hotels running at different levels of service in China to test the hypothesis in an integrated analytical model, and the findings show that the impact of international alliances varies with different levels of green hotels. Despite operating in the same sector, hotels running at...

  2. A transaction cost approach to strategic alliances in telecommunications

    OpenAIRE

    Camino Blasco, David; Trecu, Juan Ramón

    1996-01-01

    An emerging form of international business organization is the strategic alliance, a species of joint-venture in which an innovator of technology contracts with another firm for the joint exploitation of technology and other assets across a number of national territories. This work will examine international alliances, applying insights from both the transaction cost and foreign investment theories to the telecommunications service industry and asking whether these cooperation agreements are ...

  3. Advantages and pitfalls of South Africa-Angola strategic alliances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Vogel

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Owing to a shortage of South African research focusing on international strategic alliances, this study aimed to determine whether the advantages and pitfalls of international strategic alliances referred to in international business publications are also applicable to South African international strategic alliances. Design/Methodology/Approach: This was a formal, empirical study that targeted the 163 South African enterprises which were members of the South African-Angolan Chamber of Commerce in 2005 and 2006. Findings: The results identified joint ventures as the most prominent mode of entry when expanding into developing countries and, with few exceptions, the findings support the advantages and pitfalls of international strategic alliances identified in other international publications. Value of the research: A great deal of international management research over the years has been focused on the importance of strategic alliances as a mode of entry, as well as on the pitfalls experienced by alliance partners, particularly in developed countries. However, the lack of such research in Africa in general and South Africa in particular means that South African enterprises must base their entry mode selection on non-South African research findings, and although this sample size was small, the lack of other Africa-specific research makes this research significant. Implications: With South Africa being the largest source of FDI into the rest of Africa, the findings of this paper show that South African enterprises can attain the advantages associated with international strategic alliances when using this mode of entry into Africa. In terms of pitfalls, the findings highlight the need for multinational enterprises to pay specific attention to the role of governments when forming strategic alliances.

  4. Searching for a Role of Nursing Personnel in Developing Landscape of Ehealth: Factors Determining Attitudes toward Key Patient Empowering Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplaga, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Nurses may play an important role in the delivery of medical services based on the use of ehealth tools. Nevertheless, their taking an active role in an ehealth environment depends on their possessing the appropriate skills and mindset. The main objective of this paper was to assess nurses' opinions and to analyze the predictors of their acceptance of ehealth features relevant to patient empowerment with a strong focus on chronic care. A survey was conducted among nurses from hospital centers of south-eastern Poland based on a questionnaire designed to assess their attitudes toward the ehealth domain. The predictors of the nurses' acceptance of ehealth usage within specific contexts were assessed with uni- and multivariate logistic regression. An analysis was performed on data from 648 questionnaires retained after a quality check. The duration of Internet use was consistently related to higher acceptance of ehealth applications and more certainty regarding the reliability of health-related information available on the Internet. Nurses from urban medical centers were more skeptical about the use of specific ehealth solutions. Previous experience in using information technologies is the main factor influencing the acceptance of specific ehealth solutions relevant for care provided to patients suffering from chronic conditions.

  5. Perceptions of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and their physiotherapists regarding the use of an eHealth intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vorrink, S.N.W.; Huisman, C.; Kort, H.S.M.; Troosters, T.; Lammers, J.J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: If eHealth interventions are not used (properly), their potential benefits cannot be fulfilled. User perceptions of eHealth are an important determinant of its successful implementation. This study examined how patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and their

  6. A Strategic Study about Quality Characteristics in e-Health Systems Based on a Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Mayo, F J; Escalona, M J; Mejías, M; Aragón, G; García-García, J A; Torres, J; Enríquez, J G

    2015-01-01

    e-Health Systems quality management is an expensive and hard process that entails performing several tasks such as analysis, evaluation, and quality control. Furthermore, the development of an e-Health System involves great responsibility since people's health and quality of life depend on the system and services offered. The focus of the following study is to identify the gap in Quality Characteristics for e-Health Systems, by detecting not only which are the most studied, but also which are the most used Quality Characteristics these Systems include. A strategic study is driven in this paper by a Systematic Literature Review so as to identify Quality Characteristics in e-Health. Such study makes information and communication technology organizations reflect and act strategically to manage quality in e-Health Systems efficiently and effectively. As a result, this paper proposes the bases of a Quality Model and focuses on a set of Quality Characteristics to enable e-Health Systems quality management. Thus, we can conclude that this paper contributes to implementing knowledge with regard to the mission and view of e-Health (Systems) quality management and helps understand how current researches evaluate quality in e-Health Systems.

  7. A Strategic Study about Quality Characteristics in e-Health Systems Based on a Systematic Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. Domínguez-Mayo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available e-Health Systems quality management is an expensive and hard process that entails performing several tasks such as analysis, evaluation, and quality control. Furthermore, the development of an e-Health System involves great responsibility since people’s health and quality of life depend on the system and services offered. The focus of the following study is to identify the gap in Quality Characteristics for e-Health Systems, by detecting not only which are the most studied, but also which are the most used Quality Characteristics these Systems include. A strategic study is driven in this paper by a Systematic Literature Review so as to identify Quality Characteristics in e-Health. Such study makes information and communication technology organizations reflect and act strategically to manage quality in e-Health Systems efficiently and effectively. As a result, this paper proposes the bases of a Quality Model and focuses on a set of Quality Characteristics to enable e-Health Systems quality management. Thus, we can conclude that this paper contributes to implementing knowledge with regard to the mission and view of e-Health (Systems quality management and helps understand how current researches evaluate quality in e-Health Systems.

  8. Business Modeling to Implement an eHealth Portal for Infection Control: A Reflection on Co-Creation With Stakeholders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Limburg, A.H.M.; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E.W.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is acknowledged that the success and uptake of eHealth improve with the involvement of users and stakeholders to make technology reflect their needs. Involving stakeholders in implementation research is thus a crucial element in developing eHealth technology. Business modeling is an

  9. A generic quality assurance model (GQAM) for successful e-health implementation in rural hospitals in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ruxwana, N

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Although e-health can potentially facilitate the management of scarce resources and improve the quality of healthcare services, implementation of e-health programs continues to fail or not fulfi l expectations. A key contributor to the failure of e...

  10. Implementation factors and their effect on e-Health service adoption in rural communities : a systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hage, M.L.; Roo, J.P.; van Offenbeek, M.A.G.; Boonstra, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: An ageing population is seen as a threat to the quality of life and health in rural communities, and it is often assumed that e-Health services can address this issue. As successful e-Health implementation in organizations has proven difficult, this systematic literature review considers

  11. The Conceptual Framework of the National eHealth Development Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasa Rotomskienė (Juciūtė

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary. In April 2004 the European Commission adopted the eHealth Action Plan and urged the member states of the European Union to develop national eHealth implementation strategies and corresponding action plans to support their delivery. Extensive eHealth infrastructures and systems were soon viewed as central to the future provision of safe, efficient, high quality and citizen-centred healthcare. However, the ambitious plans and high expectations were soon followed by even larger failures. Based on the findings from the two international case studies undertaken by the article’s author, the article has presented the conceptual e-health development framework, which introduces a much more complex understanding of eHealth development processes than the prevailing technocratic view towards technology-led organisational change. Considerable attention is paid to the organisational changes that have to take place along and the role that stakeholders play while implementing technology-led organisational change in healthcare contexts.Purpose—the purpose of this article is to deliver a conceptual framework for the analysis of eHealth development, which would correspond to the contemporary needs of practical eHealth development.Design/methodology/approach—the research findings presented in the article were delivered using qualitative research methodology and associated research methods such as document analysis, in-depth interviews and participant observation.Findings—the article has delivered a conceptual framework of eHealth development at the national level.Research limitations/implications—the research findings are based on two international case studies undertaken by the author in the UK. While using the results in other countries, local realities and contexts have to be taken into account.Practical implications—the article has presented empirically grounded new insights in relation to eHealth development at the national level. These

  12. History and structure of Japan-US nuclear alliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    'Japan-US nuclear alliance' for civil use of nuclear energy was used here as technical term for the state Japanese commercial power plants were all water-cooled reactors under the US nuclear engineering umbrella and US admitted Japanese development of all 'SNT: sensitive nuclear technology' in the area of nuclear fuel cycle. 'Japan-US alliance' was used for various areas closely related with national security while 'Japan-US nuclear weapon alliance' was for military use of nuclear energy such as nuclear weapon (transport methods included) and counter weapon system. Military and civil use of nuclear energy relied fundamentally on common technical bases and especially nuclear fuel cycle related technologies were directly connected to both uses and called 'SNT'. Japanese nuclear policy sticking to SNT might come from the axiom: nuclear engineering for national security, that meant Japan refrained from nuclear arms but maintained technical and industrial potential of nuclear arms. This could be called 'nuclear arms standby strategy' and derived from compromise of both countries to play role of stabilizer of 'Japan-US alliance'. History of Japanese nuclear power development could be well understood as formation process of 'Japan-US nuclear alliance'. If Fukushima Daiichi accident forced nuclear power to phase out, nuclear fuel cycle would be obliged to terminate. This meant failure of the axiom and dissolution of 'Japan-US nuclear alliance'. (T. Tanaka)

  13. AN INVESTIGATION INTO FACTORS INFLUENCING INTERNATIONAL STRATEGIC ALLIANCE PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sari Wahyuni

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Empirical research indicates that strategic alliances, like other organizational forms, emerge as an adaptive mechanism to market uncertainty, and their developments over time reflect the co-evolution of distinctive firm capabilities and of industry and market activities. Interestingly, most strategic alliances go through similar revolutionary cycles in terms of their motives and capabilities toward the cooperative relationship. Studies in this areas how that alliance failure is an outcome of the co-evolutionary adjustment to changes in the market, the competitive dynamics between partners, and assessment of efficiency of the alliance as an alternative governance structure. It is thus critical to adopt a dynamics perspective and historical observations of cooperative process. This paper attempts to distil, derive and integrate theories across different perspectives into a unified framework that offers a better understanding of alliance process development. Our analysis shows that we can divide strategic alliance development into three phases of development: formation, operation and evaluation. We further endeavor to seek the important factors that should be taken into account in each stage of their life.

  14. The History and Accomplishments of the LIVESTRONG Young Adult Alliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews-Bradshaw, Beth; Johnson, Rebecca; Kaplan, Stuart; Craddock, Kelli; Hayes-Lattin, Brandon

    2011-03-01

    This article outlines the history, background, and accomplishments of the LIVESTRONG Young Adult Alliance. The LIVESTRONG Young Adult Alliance, a program of the Lance Armstrong Foundation, was developed as a vehicle for a strategic plan designed to implement the Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology Progress Review Group (AYAO PRG) recommendations. The AYAO PRG was co-sponsored by Lance Armstrong Foundation and the National Cancer Institute (NCI); both LIVESTRONG and NCI provide strategic oversight and guidance to the Alliance. Highlights and accomplishments: The Alliance accomplishments include the publication of disease-specific retrospective analyses, funding of an AYA cohort study and biorepository proposal, publication of two position statements on guidelines for care of AYAs with cancer and training for AYA oncology health professionals, promotion of an international charter of rights for AYA cancer patients, creation and distribution of a survey to college health professionals, creation and implementation of a Cancer Centers Working Group and Institutional Review Board Toolkit, and continued growth and collaboration through an annual meeting. The growth and success of the Alliance has coincided with the growth of AYA oncology as a field. The collaborative environment of the Alliance draws together a diverse group of individuals united in the effort to increase survival rates and improve the quality of life for adolescents and young adults diagnosed with cancer.

  15. Caracterization of the process of forming strategic alliances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Mattana

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The union between companies has represented an increase in their competitive capabilities. The strategic alliances have been shown as alternatives for the adequacy of the conduct and organizational framework of the companies toward the market and the world economic juncture. Nevertheless, researches demonstrate that a good number of enterprises of this nature fail. In this sense, this study aimed at characterizing the formation and sustentation of a strategic alliance which has already been formed for 26 years and, thus, verifying the main foundations which are responsible for the maintenance of the union health. The unity of analysis was the alliance between companies as FEMSA and CVI Indústria de Refrigerantes Ltda. Through the method of case study, using the qualitative technique with the aim of describing the case in study, four managers and one collaborator, all of them linked to the alliance, were interviewed. The research allowed establishing that the main foundations of sustaining the alliance in study are in the individual abilities of the partnerships, in the synergy among individual strategies and in the feeling of mutual confidence which exists. Moreover, it was found out that, in the moments of crisis, the major factor responsible for the maintenance of the business is the determination of the upper management on keeping a climate of enthusiasm between the participants of the strategic alliance.

  16. Challenges Fostering Unwillingness to Form Strategic Alliances among Medium-Sized Manufacturing Firms in Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Kafigi Jeje

    2014-01-01

    For many years, strategic alliances have attracted the attention of researchers. The most researched area is the challenges facing the development and maintenance of strategic alliances. Most studies on alliance challenges have concentrated on strategic alliances among large firms in developed economies. Little research has been done on the link between these challenges and firms¡¯ unwillingness to form strategic alliances. We therefore want to find whether the unwillingness to form strategic...

  17. China-Russia Alliance - a common choice of the two countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Hang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Compared with Sino-Soviet Alliance and NATO countries alliance, China -Russia Alliance should have its own characteristics. China-Russia Alliance can further enhance strategic mutual trust betweeneach other, enhance cooperation quality and space, to promote the mutualprogress and prosperity, achieve national revival of China and Russia as soon as possible, which is the ultimate goal of theChina-Russia Alliance.

  18. eHealth in the future of medications management: personalisation, monitoring and adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Car, Josip; Tan, Woan Shin; Huang, Zhilian; Sloot, Peter; Franklin, Bryony Dean

    2017-04-05

    Globally, healthcare systems face major challenges with medicines management and medication adherence. Medication adherence determines medication effectiveness and can be the single most effective intervention for improving health outcomes. In anticipation of growth in eHealth interventions worldwide, we explore the role of eHealth in the patients' medicines management journey in primary care, focusing on personalisation and intelligent monitoring for greater adherence. eHealth offers opportunities to transform every step of the patient's medicines management journey. From booking appointments, consultation with a healthcare professional, decision-making, medication dispensing, carer support, information acquisition and monitoring, to learning about medicines and their management in daily life. It has the potential to support personalisation and monitoring and thus lead to better adherence. For some of these dimensions, such as supporting decision-making and providing reminders and prompts, evidence is stronger, but for many others more rigorous research is urgently needed. Given the potential benefits and barriers to eHealth in medicines management, a fine balance needs to be established between evidence-based integration of technologies and constructive experimentation that could lead to a game-changing breakthrough. A concerted, transdisciplinary approach adapted to different contexts, including low- and middle-income contries is required to realise the benefits of eHealth at scale.

  19. What happens when seniors participate in new eHealth schemes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frennert, Susanne; Östlund, Britt

    2016-10-01

    This article adds empirical depth to our understanding of seniors' involvement in the making of eHealth systems. Multi-sited interviews and observations were conducted at seniors' homes before an eHealth system was installed, during the home trials and post-removal of the system. Our findings indicate that although the senior participants chose to participate in the home trials, the choice itself was configured by the stigmatization of seniors as technophobes, fear of "falling behind" and the association of technology with youth, the future and being up-to-date. Being a participant in home trials of an eHealth system became an identity of its own, representing a forward thinking and contemporary person who embraced changes and new technology. Implications for Rehabilitation This article highlights the importance of understanding the participants' drive to participate in field trials and the impact this motivation has on how, during field trials, they perceive using an eHealth system and its perceived usefulness. When studying eHealth systems "in the making at senior" participants' homes, the seniors become part of the research team. The senior participants' learning and knowledge transfer evolves from the dialogue with the research team. For equal participation and power there is a need for ethical, mutual and equal power-relations in the research team (between researchers from different paradigms such as engineers and sociologists) as well as between the researchers' and the participants'.

  20. Interdisciplinary eHealth Practice in Cancer Care: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Anna; Brunner, Melissa; Keep, Melanie; Hines, Monique; Nagarajan, Srivalli Vilapakkam; Kielly-Carroll, Candice; Dennis, Sarah; McKeough, Zoe; Shaw, Tim

    2017-10-25

    This review aimed to identify research that described how eHealth facilitates interdisciplinary cancer care and to understand the ways in which eHealth innovations are being used in this setting. An integrative review of eHealth interventions used for interdisciplinary care for people with cancer was conducted by systematically searching research databases in March 2015, and repeated in September 2016. Searches resulted in 8531 citations, of which 140 were retrieved and scanned in full, with twenty-six studies included in the review. Analysis of data extracted from the included articles revealed five broad themes: (i) data collection and accessibility; (ii) virtual multidisciplinary teams; (iii) communication between individuals involved in the delivery of health services; (iv) communication pathways between patients and cancer care teams; and (v) health professional-led change. Use of eHealth interventions in cancer care was widespread, particularly to support interdisciplinary care. However, research has focused on development and implementation of interventions, rather than on long-term impact. Further research is warranted to explore design, evaluation, and long-term sustainability of eHealth systems and interventions in interdisciplinary cancer care. Technology evolves quickly and researchers need to provide health professionals with timely guidance on how best to respond to new technologies in the health sector.

  1. eHealth Education of Professionals in the Baltic Sea Area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygholm, Ann; Günther, Julia; Bertelsen, Pernille

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a study on the extent, level and content of e-Health in existing formal educational systems in Lithuania, Germany, Finland, Norway and Denmark with the objectives of identifying future educational needs within this area. The study was carried out as a desk-top study...... and took place within the context of the ICT for Health project. The results of the study on the one hand revealed a wide range of programs and courses that included e-Health, but on the other hand also showed that in the educations of health care professionals (physicians, nurses etc.) the integration...... of e-Health elements are often marginal or non-existing. Thus the study indicates that there is a need for a higher integration of e-Health in the education of health care professionals. We discuss what kind of knowledge of e-Health is needed and how it could or should be integrated in these educations...

  2. eHealth adoption factors in medical hospitals: A focus on the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Sander; van Geenhuizen, Marina; de Reuver, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Despite strong policy interest in eHealth, actual adoption in many European hospitals is low. This study develops and tests in a preliminary way an organisational eHealth adoption model rooted in several adoption frameworks to improve understanding of this phenomenon. The model is explored through a survey among hospitals in the Netherlands using a Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) approach. Specific attention is paid to measurement of organisational readiness and to adoption as a process including different stages. Our results suggest a sharp decrease in the adoption process by hospitals after the stage of interest/commitment. Adoption tends to be significantly affected by size of the hospital, organisational readiness including technical aspects, and top management support. eHealth adoption tends to be not a linear process nor a linear function of contextual antecedents. Organisational readiness is an important antecedent for eHealth adoption. The paper concludes with organisational strategies and policies to foster eHealth adoption in hospitals and suggestions for future study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A Model for Usability Evaluation for the Development and Implementation of Consumer eHealth Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, David; Carter, Philip; Koziol-McLain, Jane; Feather, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Consumer eHealth products are often used by people in their own homes or other settings without dedicated clinical supervision, and often with minimal training and limited support--much as eCommerce and eGovernment applications are currently deployed. Internet based self-care systems have been advocated for over a decade as a way to reduce costs and allow more convenient care, and--because of the expectation that they will be used to reduced health cost--, by increasing self-care and avoiding hospitalization. However, the history of consumer eHealth interventions is mixed, with many unsuccessful implementations. Many consumer eHealth products will form part of a broader complex intervention, with many possible benefits and effects on both individuals and society. This poster describes a model of consumer eHealth assessment based on multiple methods of usability evaluation at different stages in the design and fielding of eHealth systems. We argue that different methods of usability evaluation are able to give valuable insights into the likely effects of an intervention in a way that is congruent with software development processes.

  4. A Review of Interoperability Standards in E-health and Imperatives for their Adoption in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funmi Adebesin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The ability of healthcare information systems to share and exchange information (interoperate is essential to facilitate the quality and effectiveness of healthcare services. Although standardization is considered key to addressing the fragmentation currently challenging the healthcare environment, e-health standardization can be difficult for many reasons, one of which is making sense of the e-health interoperability standards landscape. Specifically aimed at the African health informatics community, this paper aims to provide an overview of e-health interoperability and the significance of standardization in its achievement. We conducted a literature study of e-health standards, their development, and the degree of participation by African countries in the process. We also provide a review of a selection of prominent e-health interoperability standards that have been widely adopted especially by developed countries, look at some of the factors that affect their adoption in Africa, and provide an overview of ongoing global initiatives to address the identified barriers. Although the paper is specifically aimed at the African community, its findings would be equally applicable to many other developing countries.

  5. A Measure of the Parent-Team Alliance in Youth Residential Psychiatry: The Revised Short Working Alliance Inventory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, A.; Delsing, M.J.M.H.; Van Widenfelt, B.M.; Vermeiren, R.R.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The therapeutic alliance between multidisciplinary teams and parents within youth (semi) residential psychiatry is essential for the treatment process and forms a promising process variable for Routine Outcome Monitoring (ROM). No short evaluative instrument, however, is currently

  6. Special topic interoperability and EHR: Combining openEHR, SNOMED, IHE, and continua as approaches to interoperability on national ehealth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bestek, M.; Stanimirovi, D.

    2017-01-01

    into the eHealth environment, and identification of the main success factors in the field, which are necessary for achieving required interoperability, and consequently, for the successful implementation of eHealth projects in general. Methods: The paper represents an in-depth analysis regarding...... the potential application of openEHR, SNOMED, IHE and Continua approaches in the development and implementation process of eHealth in Slovenia. The research method used is both exploratory and deductive in nature. The methodological framework is grounded on information retrieval with a special focus on research...... could alleviate the pertinent interoperability issues in the Slovenian eHealth context. 2. Analyzing the possibilities (requirements) for their inclusion in the construction process for individual eHealth solutions. 3. Identification and charting the main success factors in the interoperability field...

  7. Item response theory analysis of Working Alliance Inventory, revised response format, and new Brief Alliance Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallinckrodt, Brent; Tekie, Yacob T

    2016-11-01

    The Working Alliance Inventory (WAI) has made great contributions to psychotherapy research. However, studies suggest the 7-point response format and 3-factor structure of the client version may have psychometric problems. This study used Rasch item response theory (IRT) to (a) improve WAI response format, (b) compare two brief 12-item versions (WAI-sr; WAI-s), and (c) develop a new 16-item Brief Alliance Inventory (BAI). Archival data from 1786 counseling center and community clients were analyzed. IRT findings suggested problems with crossed category thresholds. A rescoring scheme that combines neighboring responses to create 5- and 4-point scales sharply reduced these problems. Although subscale variance was reduced by 11-26%, rescoring yielded improved reliability and generally higher correlations with therapy process (session depth and smoothness) and outcome measures (residual gain symptom improvement). The 16-item BAI was designed to maximize "bandwidth" of item difficulty and preserve a broader range of WAI sensitivity than WAI-s or WAI-sr. Comparisons suggest the BAI performed better in several respects than the WAI-s or WAI-sr and equivalent to the full WAI on several performance indicators.

  8. A Measure of the Parent-Team Alliance in Youth Residential Psychiatry: The Revised Short Working Alliance Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamers, Audri; Delsing, Marc J M H; van Widenfelt, Brigit M; Vermeiren, Robert R J M

    The therapeutic alliance between multidisciplinary teams and parents within youth (semi) residential psychiatry is essential for the treatment process and forms a promising process variable for Routine Outcome Monitoring (ROM). No short evaluative instrument, however, is currently available to assess parent-team alliance. In this study, the Working Alliance Inventory-Short Version (WAV-12), a widely used alliance questionnaire, was adjusted to assess parent-team alliance from both a parent and team perspective within a youth residential setting. Psychometric properties, including factor structure and validity of the subscales, were explored. A sample of youth with mainly complex developmental disorders admitted to 11 inpatient and day patient units of a child and adolescent psychiatric institute participated in this study. The case manager involved with the youth and the primary caregiver of 87 youth completed the revised WAV-12 (WAV-12R). The team version of the WAV-12R showed a good fit to the original conceptualized model, and distinguished Bond, Task and Goal scales. For the parents' version an adjusted model with Insight, Bond and combined Task/Goal scales had the best fit. The reliability and validity of the scales were shown to be good. This paper presents preliminary evidence that the parent and treatment team versions of the WAV-12R are psychometrically sound for assessing parent-team alliance within youth (semi) residential psychiatry in the Netherlands. The team and parents' versions of the WAV-12R are recommended instruments to complement outcome measures in ROM.

  9. Development of Saudi e-health literacy scale for chronic diseases in Saudi Arabia: using integrated health literacy dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Nasriah; AlFakhry, Ohoud; Matbuli, Abeer; Alzahrani, Asma; Arab, Noha Samir Sadiq; Madani, Alaa; Alshehri, Noura; Albarrak, Ahmed I

    2018-05-01

    Health literacy has become a global issue, and it is important that patients and individuals are able to use information technology to access health information and educational services. The research objective is to develop a Saudi e-health literacy scale (SeHL) for measuring e-health literacy among Saudis suffering from non-communicable diseases (NCD). Overall, 14 relevant papers in related interdisciplinary fields were reviewed to select the most useful literacy dimensions. From these articles, we extracted the most common dimensions used to measure e-health literacy across the disciplines. Multiple workshops with multidisciplinary team members reviewed and evaluated items for SeHL. Four key aspects of e-health literacy-use of technology/media, information-seeking, usefulness and confidence-were identified and integrated as e-health literacy dimensions. These will be used to measure e-health literacy among Saudi patients with NCDs. A translation from Arabic to English was performed in order to ensure that translation process was accurate. A SeHL scale was developed to measure e-health literacy among Saudi patients. By understanding e-health literacy levels, we will be able to create a patient-education system to be used by patients in Saudi Arabia. As information technology is increasingly used by people of all ages all over the world, e-health literacy has been identified as a key factor in determining health outcomes. To date, no comprehensive scale exists to assess e-health literacy levels among speakers of Arabic, particularly among people with NCD such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and hypertension.

  10. Assessing the Coverage of E-Health Services in Sub-Saharan Africa. A Systematic Review and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeloye, Davies; Adigun, Taiwo; Misra, Sanjay; Omoregbe, Nicholas

    2017-05-18

    E-Health has attracted growing interests globally. The relative lack of facilities, skills, funds and information on existing e-Health initiatives has affected progress on e-Health in Africa. To review publicly available literature on e-Health in sub-Saharan Africa (sSA) towards providing information on existing and ongoing e-Health initiatives in the region. Searches of relevant literature were conducted on Medline, EMBASE and Global Health, with search dates set from 1990 to 2016. We included studies on e-Health initiatives (prototypes, designs, or completed projects) targeting population groups in sSA. Our search returned 2322 hits, with 26 studies retained. Included studies were conducted in 14 countries across the four sub-regions in sSA (Central, East, South and West) and spreading over a 12-year period, 2002-2014. Six types of e-Health interventions were reported, with 17 studies (65 %) based on telemedicine, followed by mHealth with 5 studies (19 %). Other e-Health types include expert system, electronic medical records, e-mails, and online health module. Specific medical specialties covered include dermatology (19 %), pathology (12 %) and radiology (8 %). Successes were 'widely reported' (representing 50 % overall acceptance or positive feedbacks in a study) in 10 studies (38 %). The prominent challenges reported were technical problems, poor internet and connectivity, participants' selection biases, contextual issues, and lack of funds. E-Health is evolving in sSA, but with poorly published evidence. While we call for more quality research in the region, it is also important that population-wide policies and on-going e-Health initiatives are contextually feasible, acceptable, and sustainable.

  11. The International Planetary Data Alliance (IPDA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Thomas; Gopala Krishna, Barla; Crichton, Daniel J.

    2016-07-01

    The International Planetary Data Alliance (IPDA) is a close association of partners with the aim of improving the quality of planetary science data and services to the end users of space based instrumentation. The specific mission of the IPDA is to facilitate global access to, and exchange of, high quality scientific data products managed across international boundaries. Ensuring proper capture, accessibility and availability of the data is the task of the individual member space agencies. The IPDA is focused on developing an international standard that allows discovery, query, access, and usage of such data across international planetary data archive systems. While trends in other areas of space science are concentrating on the sharing of science data from diverse standards and collection methods, the IPDA concentrates on promoting governing data standards that drive common methods for collecting and describing planetary science data across the international community. This approach better supports the long term goal of easing data sharing across system and agency boundaries. An initial starting point for developing such a standard will be internationalization of NASA's Planetary Data System's (PDS) PDS4 standard. The IPDA was formed in 2006 with the purpose of adopting standards and developing collaborations across agencies to ensure data is captured in common formats. It has grown to a dozen member agencies represented by a number of different groups through the IPDA Steering Committee. Member agencies include: Armenian Astronomical Society, China National Space Agency (CNSA), European Space Agency (ESA), German Aerospace Center (DLR), Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO), Italian Space Agency (ASI), Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), National Air and Space Administration (NASA), National Centre for Space Studies (CNES), Space Research Institute (IKI), UAE Space Agency, and UK Space Agency. The IPDA Steering Committee oversees the execution of

  12. What Do Chinese and Foreign Universities Value about Their Strategic Alliances? Exploring a Dimension of Higher Education Alliances in a Cross Cultural Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Mike

    2003-01-01

    There are now over 5,000 alliances between Chinese and foreign universities but there is little research on how managers from the two sides value the various aspects of their educational alliances. This research finds that both sides valued a range of alliance levels, types, activities, sizes and structures but there were significant differences.…

  13. A Proposed Intelligent Policy-Based Interface for a Mobile eHealth Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavasoli, Amir; Archer, Norm

    Users of mobile eHealth systems are often novices, and the learning process for them may be very time consuming. In order for systems to be attractive to potential adopters, it is important that the interface should be very convenient and easy to learn. However, the community of potential users of a mobile eHealth system may be quite varied in their requirements, so the system must be able to adapt easily to suit user preferences. One way to accomplish this is to have the interface driven by intelligent policies. These policies can be refined gradually, using inputs from potential users, through intelligent agents. This paper develops a framework for policy refinement for eHealth mobile interfaces, based on dynamic learning from user interactions.

  14. Home e-health system integration in the Smart Home through a common media server.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pau, I; Seoane, F; Lindecrantz, K; Valero, M A; Carracedo, J

    2009-01-01

    Home e-health systems and services are revealed as one of the most important challenges to promote Quality of Life related to Health in the Information Society. Leading companies have worked on e-health systems although the majority of them are addressed to hospital or primary care settings. The solution detailed in this paper offers a personal health system to be integrated with Smart Home services platform to support home based e-care. Thus, the home e-health system and architecture detailed in this research work is ready to supply a seamless personal care solution both from the biomedical data analysis, service provision, security guarantee and information management s point of view. The solution is ready to be integrated within the Accessible Digital Home, a living lab managed by Universidad Politécnica de Madrid for R&D activities.

  15. Security Attacks and Solutions in Electronic Health (E-health) Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeadally, Sherali; Isaac, Jesús Téllez; Baig, Zubair

    2016-12-01

    For centuries, healthcare has been a basic service provided by many governments to their citizens. Over the past few decades, we have witnessed a significant transformation in the quality of healthcare services provided by healthcare organizations and professionals. Recent advances have led to the emergence of Electronic Health (E-health), largely made possible by the massive deployment and adoption of information and communication technologies (ICTs). However, cybercriminals and attackers are exploiting vulnerabilities associated primarily with ICTs, causing data breaches of patients' confidential digital health information records. Here, we review recent security attacks reported for E-healthcare and discuss the solutions proposed to mitigate them. We also identify security challenges that must be addressed by E-health system designers and implementers in the future, to respond to threats that could arise as E-health systems become integrated with technologies such as cloud computing, the Internet of Things, and smart cities.

  16. Effects of eHealth physical activity encouragement in adolescents with complex congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Susanne Hwiid; Andersen, Lars L; Søndergaard, Lars

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess benefit and harms of adding an eHealth intervention to health education and individual counseling in adolescents with congenital heart disease. DESIGN: Randomized clinical trial. SETTING: Denmark. PATIENTS: A total of 158 adolescents aged 13-16years with no physical activity...... restrictions after repaired complex congenital heart disease. INTERVENTIONS: PReVaiL consisted of individually tailored eHealth encouragement physical activity for 52weeks. All patients received 45min of group-based health education and 15min of individual counseling involving patients' parents. OUTCOMES......·kg(-1)·min(-1) (95% CI -2.66 to 1.36). Between-group differences at 1year in physical activity, generic health-related quality of life, and disease-specific quality of life were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: Adding a tailored eHealth intervention to health education and individual...

  17. Development of a virtual lab for practical eLearning in eHealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Juliane; Forjan, Mathias; Sauermann, Stefan; Mense, Alexander; Urbauer, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    In recent years an ongoing development in educational offers for professionals working in the field of eHealth has been observed. This education is increasingly offered in the form of eLearning courses. Furthermore, it can be seen that simulations are a valuable part to support the knowledge transfer. Based on the knowledge profiles defined for eHealth courses a virtual lab should be developed. For this purpose, a subset of skills and a use case is determined. After searching and evaluating appropriate simulating and testing tools six tools were chosen to implement the use case practically. Within an UML use case diagram the interaction between the tools and the user is represented. Initially tests have shown good results of the tools' feasibility. After an extensive testing phase the tools should be integrated in the eHealth eLearning courses.

  18. Development of Knowledge Profiles for International eHealth eLearning Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Juliane; Sauermann, Stefan; Mense, Alexander; Forjan, Mathias; Urbauer, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Professionals working in the multidisciplinary field of eHealth vary in their educational background. However, knowledge in the areas of medicine, engineering and management is required to fulfil the tasks associated with eHealth sufficiently. Based on the results of an analysis of national and international educational offers a survey gathering user requirements for the development of knowledge profiles in eHealth was conducted (n=75) by professionals and students. During a workshop the first results were presented and discussed together with the network partners and the attendees. The resulting knowledge profiles contain knowledge areas of all three thematic content categories including fundamentals of medical terminology, standards and interoperability and usability as well as basics of all three content categories. The knowledge profiles are currently applied in a master's degree programme at the UAS Technikum Wien and will be developed further.

  19. Integrity mechanism for eHealth tele-monitoring system in smart home environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantas, Georgios; Lymberopoulos, Dimitrios; Komninos, Nikos

    2009-01-01

    During the past few years, a lot of effort has been invested in research and development of eHealth tele-monitoring systems that will provide many benefits for healthcare delivery from the healthcare provider to the patient's home. However, there is a plethora of security requirements in eHealth tele-monitoring systems. Data integrity of the transferred medical data is one of the most important security requirements that should be satisfied in these systems, since medical information is extremely sensitive information, and even sometimes life threatening information. In this paper, we present a data integrity mechanism for eHealth tele-monitoring system that operates in a smart home environment. Agent technology is applied to achieve data integrity with the use of cryptographic smart cards. Furthermore, the overall security infrastructure and its various components are described.

  20. Required Steps of Managing International Equity Placement Strategic Alliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harimukti Wandebori

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research is to unravel the steps of managing international equity placement strategic alliance (IEPSA. The steps of managing an IEPSA are obtained by conducting theoretical review. The theoretical reviews consist of theory of strategic alliance; definition, classification, and finding definition of an IEPSA, political and analytical considerations and the necessary steps. These steps of managing IEPSA can be classified into analyzing of macro consideration, micro consideration, domestic company’s stakeholder support, cultural understanding, strategic planning, internal support, human resource management, organizational arrangement, management control system, evolved cultural understanding, and evaluating results. In this research, the domestic partners who formed the IEPSAs are limited to State-Owned Enterprises (SOEs. The IEPSA was one of the means of privatization. The research will be beneficial for both foreign and domestic partners who form an IEPSA in the previous SOEs. By knowing the steps of managing the IEPSA both partners will be able to secure a successful implementation of IEPSA. By identifying the steps of managing the IEPSA, the stakeholder will not see IEPSA as threat rather as an opportunity to improve performance, to create synergy, and generate benefits for both partners and stakeholder. By knowing the necessary steps of managing the IEPSA, the stakeholder including society and politician will envisage the IEPSA as a means of effectively improving the SOEs’ performances.The research was espected to provide contributions for the research on strategic alliances. Apparently, there exist no literatures discussing about IEPSA in the domain of strategic alliances. Keywords: strategic alliance, equity placement, international equity placement strategic alliance, privatization, steps of international equity placement strategic alliance, state-owned enterprises

  1. Harnessing the Web: How E-Health and E-Health Literacy Impact Young Adults' Perceptions of Online Health Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briones, Rowena

    2015-12-31

    The rise of technology has changed how people take control of their health, enabling individuals to choose to live healthier lives and make better treatment decisions. With this said, the Internet has emerged as the channel used by individuals for actively seeking or passively receiving health information. To explore how young adults assess the quality of health information, and how they construct meaning of online health information in general. Through 50 in-depth interviews, this study aims to examine how and why young adults turn to the Web for health information, and what strategies they employ to ensure that they are getting credible information. A total of 50 in-depth interviews were conducted with young adults to explore how they make meaning of online health information. Depending on the geographic area of the participant, the interview took place face-to-face at a location convenient for them, over Skype, or over the telephone and lasted on average 40 minutes. The interviews were transcribed verbatim, fully retaining the speech style of the moderator and the participants. Data were analyzed using techniques from the grounded theory approach, using a constant comparative method to allow for themes to emerge from the transcripts. The participants shared several benefits to this mode of health information seeking, claiming that it made for more productive visits with doctors and made health information more readily accessible through a variety of different formats. Additionally, the participants demonstrated their e-health literacy levels by discussing how they assessed online health information, engaging in a series of strategies that encompassed different aspects of e-health literacy. Social media channels were brought up by the participants as relatively new tools that can be used to assist in the seeking, understanding, and sharing of health information. However, participants also cautioned about the use of social media in regards to its informal nature

  2. The High-Tech Face of e-Health

    CERN Document Server

    Shiers, Jamie D

    2014-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the current and potential use of e-Infrastructures in the domain of eHealth. It starts by identifying a small number of specific Use Cases and then addresses how these can be optimized—or possibly revolutionized—by the use of state-of-the-art distributing computing infrastructures (DCIs). Specific topics that are addressed include “long-term” data preservation (for the duration of a patient’s life as well as (far) beyond for collective-oriented studies), federation of heterogeneous data sources, provision of redundant and highly accessible data storage and federated identity management. The work draws heavily on the author’s experience in distributed computing infrastructures to address the challenges of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, together with participation in generic e-Infrastructure projects, such as the EGEE project services and EGI. It also benefits from experience in hadron-therapy oriented projects with which CERN has synergies both as an accelerator laborato...

  3. The cloud paradigm applied to e-Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaplana, Jordi; Solsona, Francesc; Abella; Filgueira, Rosa; Rius, Josep

    2013-03-14

    Cloud computing is a new paradigm that is changing how enterprises, institutions and people understand, perceive and use current software systems. With this paradigm, the organizations have no need to maintain their own servers, nor host their own software. Instead, everything is moved to the cloud and provided on demand, saving energy, physical space and technical staff. Cloud-based system architectures provide many advantages in terms of scalability, maintainability and massive data processing. We present the design of an e-health cloud system, modelled by an M/M/m queue with QoS capabilities, i.e. maximum waiting time of requests. Detailed results for the model formed by a Jackson network of two M/M/m queues from the queueing theory perspective are presented. These results show a significant performance improvement when the number of servers increases. Platform scalability becomes a critical issue since we aim to provide the system with high Quality of Service (QoS). In this paper we define an architecture capable of adapting itself to different diseases and growing numbers of patients. This platform could be applied to the medical field to greatly enhance the results of those therapies that have an important psychological component, such as addictions and chronic diseases.

  4. The cloud paradigm applied to e-Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Cloud computing is a new paradigm that is changing how enterprises, institutions and people understand, perceive and use current software systems. With this paradigm, the organizations have no need to maintain their own servers, nor host their own software. Instead, everything is moved to the cloud and provided on demand, saving energy, physical space and technical staff. Cloud-based system architectures provide many advantages in terms of scalability, maintainability and massive data processing. Methods We present the design of an e-health cloud system, modelled by an M/M/m queue with QoS capabilities, i.e. maximum waiting time of requests. Results Detailed results for the model formed by a Jackson network of two M/M/m queues from the queueing theory perspective are presented. These results show a significant performance improvement when the number of servers increases. Conclusions Platform scalability becomes a critical issue since we aim to provide the system with high Quality of Service (QoS). In this paper we define an architecture capable of adapting itself to different diseases and growing numbers of patients. This platform could be applied to the medical field to greatly enhance the results of those therapies that have an important psychological component, such as addictions and chronic diseases. PMID:23496912

  5. [The efficacy of e-health management on weight control in adolescents: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Mei-Chen; Lin, Chia-Ling; Tsao, Lee-Ing

    2014-02-01

    Advances during the past decade have made it feasible to apply e-health methods to chronic disease management. Researchers have recently begun applying these methods to weight control. The application of e-health management methods to weight control in adolescents has yet to be investigated empirically. This study conducted a systematic review of reports discussing the weight-control effects of e-health management in adolescents. Researchers searched 6 electronic databases for relevant articles published between 1995 and April 2013. Data were collected using inclusion and exclusion criteria. A modified Jadad Scale was used to evaluate the quality of the identified articles. Seven studies met the inclusion criterion of targeting adolescent subject populations. A total of 3728 adolescents and 1394 parents participated in these studies. The majority of participants were overweight girls and median participant ages ranged from 12.52 (SD = 3.15) to 15.31 (SD = 0.69). All studies reported that e-health management reduced body mass index and body fat percentage. Four studies indicate that e-health management may improve physical activity knowledge and skills. However, diet control outcomes among the seven studies varied. Empirical results demonstrate that e-health management significantly affects weight control. However, the effectiveness of log-in versus primary outcome indicators was inconclusive. Future studies should consider the use of incentives, reminder systems, and other strategies to enhance website usage. The development of an Internet-based, computer-tailored weight-management intervention for overweight adolescents and the development of an appropriate care model are recommended.

  6. E-health use in african american internet users: can new tools address old disparities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisolm, Deena J; Sarkar, Madhurima

    2015-03-01

    Web-based health information may be of particular value among the African American population due to its potential to reduce communication inequalities and empower minority groups. This study explores predictors of e-health behaviors and activities for African American Internet users. We used the 2010 Pew Internet and American Life Health Tracking Survey to examine sociodemographic and health status predictors of e-health use behaviors among African Americans. E-health use behaviors included searching for e-health information, conducting interactive health-related activities, and tracking health information online. In the African American subsample, 55% (n=395) were at least "occasional" Internet users. Our model suggests that searching for health information online was positively associated with being helped/knowing someone helped by online information (odds ratio [OR]=5.169) and negatively associated with lower income (OR=0.312). Interactive health activities were associated with having a college education (OR=3.264), being 65 years of age or older (OR=0.188), having a family member living with chronic conditions (OR=2.191), having a recent medical crisis (OR=2.863), and being helped/knowing someone helped by online information (OR=8.335). E-tracking behaviors were significantly stronger among African Americans who had health insurance (OR=3.907), were helped/knowing someone helped by online information (OR=4.931), and were social media users (OR=4.799). Findings suggest significant differences in e-health information-seeking behaviors among African American Internet users-these differences are mostly related to personal and family health concerns and experiences. Targeted online e-health resources and interventions can educate and empower a significant subset of the population.

  7. eHealth literacy demands and cognitive processes underlying barriers in consumer health information seeking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connie V. Chan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Consumer eHealth tools play an increasingly important role in engaging patients as participants in managing their health and seeking health information. However, there is a documented gap between the skill and knowledge demands of eHealth systems and user competencies to benefit from these tools. Objective: This research aims to reveal the knowledge- and skill-related barriers to effective use of eHealth tools. Methods: We used a micro-analytic framework for characterizing the different cognitive dimensions of eHealth literacy to classify task demands and barriers that 20 participants experienced while performing online information-seeking and decision-making tasks. Results: Participants ranged widely in their task performance across all 6 tasks as measured by task scores and types of barriers encountered. The highest performing participant experienced only 14 barriers whereas the lowest scoring one experienced 153. A more detailed analysis of two tasks revealed that the highest number of incorrect answers and experienced barriers were caused by tasks requiring: (a Media literacy and Science literacy at high cognitive complexity levels and (b a combination of Numeracy and Information literacy at different cognitive complexity levels. Conclusions: Applying this type of analysis enabled us to characterize task demands by literacy type and by cognitive complexity. Mapping barriers to literacy types provided insight into the interaction between users and eHealth tasks. Although the gap between eHealth tools, users’ skills, and knowledge can be difficult to bridge, an understanding of the cognitive complexity and literacy demands can serve to reduce the gap between designer and consumer.

  8. The use of eHealth to promote physical activity in cancer survivors: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberlin, Ciarán; O'Dwyer, Tom; Mockler, David; Moran, Jonathan; O'Donnell, Dearbhaile M; Broderick, Julie

    2018-06-16

    Achieving adequate levels of physical activity (PA) and avoiding sedentary behaviour are particularly important in cancer survivors. eHealth, which includes, but is not limited to, the delivery of health information through Internet and mobile technologies, is an emerging concept in healthcare which may present opportunities to improve PA in cancer survivors. The aim of this systematic review was to explore the effects of eHealth in the promotion of PA among cancer survivors. Suitable articles were searched using PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsychInfo, Web of Science and SCOPUS databases using a combination of keywords and medical subject headings. Articles were included if they described an eHealth intervention designed to improve PA in cancer survivors. Two reviewers screened studies for inclusion. In total, 1065 articles were considered. Ten studies met eligibility criteria. A variety of platforms designed to increase PA were described in these studies: web application (app) (n = 5), web and mobile application (n = 2), mobile app (n = 1), website only (n = 1), e-mail based (n = 1). All studies measured PA using self-report outcome measures with the exception of one study which measured steps using a Fitbit. Meta-analysis was not performed because of variations in study design and interventions. All studies reported improvements in PA, with 8/10 studies reporting statistically significant changes. The use of eHealth to promote PA in cancer survivors is a relatively new concept, which is supported by the recent emergent evidence described in this review. eHealth shows promise as a means of promoting and increasing daily PA, but further high-quality, longer term studies are needed to establish the feasibility and effectiveness of eHealth platforms aimed at that goal.

  9. Implementation science approaches for integrating eHealth research into practice and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, Russell E; Phillips, Siobhan M; Sanchez, Michael A

    2014-07-01

    To summarize key issues in the eHealth field from an implementation science perspective and to highlight illustrative processes, examples and key directions to help more rapidly integrate research, policy and practice. We present background on implementation science models and emerging principles; discuss implications for eHealth research; provide examples of practical designs, measures and exemplar studies that address key implementation science issues; and make recommendations for ways to more rapidly develop and test eHealth interventions as well as future research, policy and practice. The pace of eHealth research has generally not kept up with technological advances, and many of our designs, methods and funding mechanisms are incapable of providing the types of rapid and relevant information needed. Although there has been substantial eHealth research conducted with positive short-term results, several key implementation and dissemination issues such as representativeness, cost, unintended consequences, impact on health inequities, and sustainability have not been addressed or reported. Examples of studies in several of these areas are summarized to demonstrate this is possible. eHealth research that is intended to translate into policy and practice should be more contextual, report more on setting factors, employ more responsive and pragmatic designs and report results more transparently on issues important to potential adopting patients, clinicians and organizational decision makers. We outline an alternative development and assessment model, summarize implementation science findings that can help focus attention, and call for different types of more rapid and relevant research and funding mechanisms. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  10. Analysis of eHealth Search Perspectives Among Female College Students in the Health Professions Using Q Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanik, Bruce; Chaney, J. Don; Tennant, Bethany

    2012-01-01

    Background The current “Millennial Generation” of college students majoring in the health professions has unprecedented access to the Internet. Although some research has been initiated among medical professionals to investigate the cognitive basis for health information searches on the Internet, little is known about Internet search practices among health and medical professional students. Objective To systematically identify health professional college student perspectives of personal eHealth search practices. Methods Q methodology was used to examine subjective perspectives regarding personal eHealth search practices among allied health students majoring in a health education degree program. Thirteen (n = 13) undergraduate students were interviewed about their attitudes and experiences conducting eHealth searches. From the interviews, 36 statements were used in a structured ranking task to identify clusters and determine which specific perceptions of eHealth search practices discriminated students into different groups. Scores on an objective measure of eHealth literacy were used to help categorize participant perspectives. Results Q-technique factor analysis of the rankings identified 3 clusters of respondents with differing views on eHealth searches that generally coincided with participants’ objective eHealth literacy scores. The proficient resourceful students (pattern/structure coefficient range 0.56-0.80) described themselves as using multiple resources to obtain eHealth information, as opposed to simply relying on Internet search engines. The intermediate reluctant students (pattern/structure coefficient range 0.75-0.90) reported engaging only Internet search engines to locate eHealth information, citing undeveloped evaluation skills when considering sources of information located on the Internet. Both groups of advanced students reported not knowing how to use Boolean operators to conduct Internet health searches. The basic hubristic students

  11. How Partner Characteristics Can Affect Performance of Alliances with Different Time Frames?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hossein JALALI

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Firms increasingly adopt cooperative strategies and form strategic alliances with foreign partners to be prosperous in entering to international market. Most of scholars have typically focused on generic, conceptual models for alliances partner selection, addressing only limited dimensions of the partner characteristics. This paper presents a new empirical framework that considering the effect of partner characteristics on export performance of alliances, in the case of short/mediumterm alliances and long-term ones. The study explores the effective partner characteristics for each type of alliances based on a sample of 540 alliances which rooted in East European region and also, have at least one Iranian partner. The findings stress the differences between varied partner characteristics in short/medium-term and long-term alliances. More specifically, results introduce a framework that addresses certain and specific partner characteristics to improve the export performance of alliances, due to the time frame of strategic alliances.

  12. Strategic Classification and Examination of the Development of Current Airline Alliance Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi H.; Evans, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Previous research argues that despite the fact that strategic alliances have become an important feature of the world airline industry, little rigorous analysis has been done on the effects of these alliances. This is partially because there is a lack of precise definitions to specify different types of airline alliances in the literature. This research identifies several categories of airline alliances through a strategic classification of the current alliance activities involving the major airlines for the period 1989 to 1999. The classification enables this research to examine how strategic alliance activities are evolving, particularly to compare how airlines in North America, the European Union and the Asia Pacific region have committed to different alliances. Findings show that there is a significant difference between the number and scope of alliances adopted in the three aviation markets. These findings facilitate research to further analyse the impact of market liberalization on various formations of strategic airline alliances.

  13. Align, share responsibility and collaborate: potential considerations to aid in e-health policy development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragaban, Nouran; Day, Karen; Orr, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Policies that support strategic development and implementation are related to health ICT implementation successes. This research aimed to explore the question, 'Why have we not seen more successful ICT implementation in healthcare, and what does policy have to do with success?' Healthcare systems are faced with rising costs, increased prevalence of chronic diseases and diminishing resources. E-health initiatives have gained acceptance in addressing these crucial health sector issues. National governments and healthcare organisations are finding it necessary to have health Information and Communications Technology (ICT) systems in place. However, poorly developed health information policies, lack of a clear business plan and ineffective leadership contribute to failure of ICT implementation in healthcare. This study uses a Grounded Theory approach, in which a series of data gathering activities will be completed. The first author attended the Health Information Management & Systems Society (HIMSS) Policy Summit in the USA in 2011. Five Summit participants were approached individually and informally discussed the 'meaningful use' policy and how it influences ICT implementation in healthcare. Field notes were made and analysed for themes relating to the research question. There were three overlapping concepts that all of the participants indicated as primary considerations for policymakers. The alignment aspect stresses the need to align e-health initiatives with overall health policy, ensuring that e-health is incorporated with other healthcare investments. The shared responsibility theme involves the need for e-health initiatives to be recognised as a priority along all levels of government, i.e. local, state, federal, and national. This stresses the importance of health ICT development and implementation in a joint government direction. The last theme is collaboration with stakeholders, including clear division of tasks and clarity about technical and non

  14. eWALL Innovation for Smart e-Health Monitoring Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mihovska, Albena Dimitrova; Kyriazakos, Sofoklis

    2017-01-01

    E-health environments should be designed to provide personalized services and applications to their primary users (i.e. the patients) by breaking the barrier of technology acceptance and addressing their daily needs, under strict regulation and security constraints. A typical scenario would employ...... wireless and wired sensors and local or cloud-based processing units to collect, process, store and communicate data related to the patients’ needs and condition. E-health devices can be located on the patients’ bodies or immediate environments to monitor and interact with the patients, while they perform...

  15. Constructive eHealth evaluation: lessons from evaluation of EHR development in 4 Danish hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høstgaard, Anna Marie Balling; Bertelsen, Pernille; Nøhr, Christian

    2017-04-20

    Information and communication sources in the healthcare sector are replaced with new eHealth technologies. This has led to problems arising from the lack of awareness of the importance of end-user involvement in eHealth development and of the difficulties caused by using traditional summative evaluation methods. The Constructive eHealth evaluation method (CeHEM) provides a solution to these problems by offering an evaluation framework for supporting and facilitating end-user involvement during all phases of eHealth development. The aim of this paper is to support this process by sharing experiences of the eHealth evaluation method used in the introduction of electronic health records (EHR) in the North Denmark Region of Denmark. It is the first time the fully developed method and the experiences on using the CeHEM in all five phases of a full lifecycle framework is presented. A case study evaluation of the EHR development process in the North Denmark Region was conducted from 2004 to 2010. The population consisted of clinicians, IT professionals, administrators, and vendors. The study involved 4 hospitals in the region. Data were collected using questionnaires, observations, interviews, and insight gathered from relevant documents. The evaluation showed a need for a) Early involvement of clinicians, b) The best possible representation of clinicians, and c) Workload reduction for those involved. The consequences of not providing this were a lack of ownership of decisions and negative attitudes towards the clinical benefits related to these decisions. Further, the result disclosed that by following the above recommendations, and by providing feedback to the 4 actor groups, the physicians' involvement was improved. As a result they took ownership of decisions and gained a positive attitude to the clinical benefits. The CeHEM has proven successful in formative evaluation of EHR development and can point at important issues that need to be taken care of by management

  16. The influence of context and process when implementing e-health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heaney David

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investing in computer-based information systems is notoriously risky, since many systems fail to become routinely used as part of everyday working practices, yet there is clear evidence about the management practices which improve the acceptance and integration of such systems. Our aim in this study was to identify to what extent these generic management practices are evident in e-health projects, and to use that knowledge to develop a theoretical model of e-health implementation. This will support the implementation of appropriate e-health systems. Methods This study consisted of qualitative semi-structured interviews with managers and health professionals in Scotland, UK. We contacted the Scottish Ethics Committee, who advised that formal application to that body was not necessary for this study. The interview guide aimed to identify the issues which respondents believed had affected the successful implementation of e-health projects. We drew on our research into information systems in other sectors to identify likely themes and questions, which we piloted and revised. Eighteen respondents with experience of e-health projects agreed to be interviewed. These were recorded, transcribed, coded, and then analysed with 'Nvivo' data analysis software. Results Respondents identified factors in the context of e-health projects which had affected implementation, including clarity of the strategy; supportive structures and cultures; effects on working processes; and how staff perceived the change. The results also identified useful implementation practices such as balancing planning with adaptability; managing participation; and using power effectively. Conclusion The interviews confirmed that the contextual factors that affect implementation of information systems in general also affect implementation of e-health projects. As expected, these take place in an evolving context of strategies, structures, cultures, working processes and

  17. Can eHealth tools enable health organizations to reach their target audience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbib, Ahmad; Hodgson, Corinne; Calderwood, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Data from the health risk assessment operated by the Heart and Stroke Foundation found users were more likely to be female; married; have completed post secondary education; and report hypertension, stroke, or being overweight or obese. In developing and operating eHealth tools for health promotion, organizations should compare users to their target population(s). eHealth tools may not be optimal for reaching some higher-risk sub-groups, and a range of social marketing approaches may be required.

  18. eHealth services and Directive on Electronic Commerce 2000/31/EC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gyseghem, Jean-Marc

    2008-01-01

    We often restrict the analysis of eHealth services to a concept of privacy. In this article, we'll demonstrate that other legislation can apply to those services as Directive 2000/31/EC on Ecommerce. By creating telematic networks or infrastructure, eHealth services are offering information services. But what are the consequences with such concept? What are the duties and rights for the actors of the network(s)? We'll try to answer to some questions, even if it won't be exhaustive.

  19. The Factor Structure of The Working Alliance Inventory in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrusyna, Tomasz P.; Tang, Tony Z.; DeRubeis, Robert J.; Luborsky, Lester

    2001-01-01

    Studies of the therapeutic alliance in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) have varied in their results, necessitating a deeper understanding of this construct. Through an exploratory factor analysis of the alliance in CBT, as measured by the Working Alliance Inventory (shortened, observer-rated version), the authors found a two-factor structure of alliance that challenges the commonly accepted one general factor of alliance. The results suggest that the relationship between therapist and client (Relationship) may be largely independent of the client's agreement with and confidence in the therapist and CBT (Agreement/ Confidence), necessitating independent measures of these two factors, not one measure of a general alliance factor. PMID:11402080

  20. Study on the partner selecting method of strategic alliance in high and new technology enterprises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宏起; 唐宇; 迟运领

    2004-01-01

    A successful and effective strategic alliance involves many factors, of which selecting a proper partner is the most important factor to achieve the success of the alliance. In view of the characteristics of strategic alliance in high and new technology enterprises and according to the analysis on the standards of partner selecting and the factors of the success of alliance, this paper does some deeper research on the partner selecting and the alliance evaluation process from the perspective of different strategic levels by using a fuzzy comprehensive evaluating method, thus providing a method to select the alliance partner for high and new technology enterprises in China.

  1. The divided communities of shared concerns: mapping the intellectual structure of e-Health research in social science journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, L Crystal; Wang, Zhen-Zhen; Peng, Tai-Quan; Zhu, Jonathan J H

    2015-01-01

    Social scientific approach has become an important approach in e-Health studies over the past decade. However, there has been little systematical examination of what aspects of e-Health social scientists have studied and how relevant and informative knowledge has been produced and diffused by this line of inquiry. This study performed a systematic review of the body of e-Health literature in mainstream social science journals over the past decade by testing the applicability of a 5A categorization (i.e., access, availability, appropriateness, acceptability, and applicability), proposed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, as a framework for understanding social scientific research in e-Health. This study used a quantitative, bottom-up approach to review the e-Health literature in social sciences published from 2000 to 2009. A total of 3005 e-Health studies identified from two social sciences databases (i.e., Social Sciences Citation Index and Arts & Humanities Citation Index) were analyzed with text topic modeling and structural analysis of co-word network, co-citation network, and scientific food web. There have been dramatic increases in the scale of e-Health studies in social sciences over the past decade in terms of the numbers of publications, journal outlets and participating disciplines. The results empirically confirm the presence of the 5A clusters in e-Health research, with the cluster of applicability as the dominant research area and the cluster of availability as the major knowledge producer for other clusters. The network analysis also reveals that the five distinctive clusters share much more in common in research concerns than what e-Health scholars appear to recognize. It is time to explicate and, more importantly, tap into the shared concerns cutting across the seemingly divided scholarly communities. In particular, more synergy exercises are needed to promote adherence of the field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All

  2. Presentation of political Alliances in the Romanian audiovisual media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flaviu Calin RUS

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This material wishes to highlight the way in which the main political alliances have been formed in Romania in the last 20 years, as well as the way they have been reflected in the media. Moreover, we have tried to analyze the involvement of journalists and political analysts in explaining these political events. The study will focus on four political alliances, namely: CDR (the Romanian Democratic Convention, D.A. (Y.E.S. - Justice and Truth between PNL – the National Liberal Party and PD - the Democratic Party, ACD (the Centre-Right Alliance between PNL and PC – the Conservative Party and USL (the Social-Liberal Union between PSD – the Social Democrat Party, PNL and PC.

  3. A Socio-technical Approach for Transient SME Alliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezgui, Yacine

    The paper discusses technical requirements to promote the adoption of alliance modes of operation by SMEs in the construction sector. These requirements have provided a basis for specifying a set of functionality to support the collaboration and cooperation needs of SMEs. While service-oriented architectures and semantic web services provide the middleware technology to implement the identified functionality, a number of key technical limitations have been identified, including lack of support for the dynamic and non-functional characteristics of SME alliances distributed business processes, lack of execution monitoring functionality to manage running business processes, and lack of support for semantic reasoning to enable SME business process service composition. The paper examines these issues and provides key directions for supporting SME alliances effectively.

  4. International Alliance of Green Hotels to Reach Sustainable Competitive Advantages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hufei Ge

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Under increasing environmental pressure, hotel firms need to improve their ability to access international alliances while maintaining good performance for sustainable development. This paper uses survey data from 784 hotels running at different levels of service in China to test the hypothesis in an integrated analytical model, and the findings show that the impact of international alliances varies with different levels of green hotels. Despite operating in the same sector, hotels running at different levels of service vary their respective tactics to gain sustainable competitive advantage and achieve significantly different results. This study intends to inform hotel managers in obtaining specific performance goals by developing absorptive capacity, and by choosing the most suitable alliance for their level of operation.

  5. Best intentions: Lessons learned on international partnering and alliance contracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrell, S.; McDermott, J.R.; Ramsay, A.; Watzke, J.

    1996-01-01

    Although the energy industry is still in the early stages of partnering and alliancing, there is enough accumulated experience to be worth sharing information on what has worked and what has not. This paper explores the lessons learned in six agreements in the UK, the US, and the Middle East. It concludes that not all projects are potential candidates for partnering or alliances. Those likely to be successful will contain common characteristics of complexity, uncertainty, technology and duration. Management structure is moving towards integrated teams, although projects currently fall along a broad spectrum before becoming truly integrated. The risk/reward structure is becoming more complex over time, although it is unclear that tinkering with percentage sharing schemes will actually change the behavior of project participants and result in additional cost savings. The use of team building techniques and facilitators may well enhance the alliance implementation, but the choice of both company and individual members is fundamental to success. The overriding success factor, however, is the setting of fair and achievable targets. All of the managers surveyed stated that their projects benefited from the use of a partnering or alliance structure. Three of the projects were far enough along to cite significant cost savings. Although some in the industry are still doubtful that alliances can make a true difference to a project's outcome, those who have participated are convinced they have achieved results which would have been unattainable in a traditional structure. They would add, however, that partnering and alliancing is not easy, and not for all projects. The industry must share practical information if significant learning is to occur

  6. The effect of individual factors on health behaviors among college students: the mediating effects of eHealth literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, WanChen; Chiang, ChiaHsun; Yang, ShuChing

    2014-12-12

    College students' health behavior is a topic that deserves attention. Individual factors and eHealth literacy may affect an individual's health behaviors. The integrative model of eHealth use (IMeHU) provides a parsimonious account of the connections among the digital divide, health care disparities, and the unequal distribution and use of communication technologies. However, few studies have explored the associations among individual factors, eHealth literacy, and health behaviors, and IMeHU has not been empirically investigated. This study examines the associations among individual factors, eHealth literacy, and health behaviors using IMeHU. The Health Behavior Scale is a 12-item instrument developed to measure college students' eating, exercise, and sleep behaviors. The eHealth Literacy Scale is a 12-item instrument designed to measure college students' functional, interactive, and critical eHealth literacy. A nationally representative sample of 525 valid college students in Taiwan was surveyed. A questionnaire was administered to collect background information about participants' health status, degree of health concern, major, and the frequency with which they engaged in health-related discussions. This study used Amos 6.0 to conduct a confirmatory factor analysis to identify the best measurement models for the eHealth Literacy Scale and the Health Behavior Scale. We then conducted a multiple regression analysis to examine the associations among individual factors, eHealth literacy, and health behaviors. Additionally, causal steps approach was used to explore indirect (mediating) effects and Sobel tests were used to test the significance of the mediating effects. The study found that perceptions of better health status (t520=2.14-6.12, PeHealth literacy and adoption of healthy eating, exercise, and sleep behaviors. Moreover, eHealth literacy played an intermediary role in the association between individual factors and health behaviors (Sobel test=2.09-2.72, Pe

  7. International Education Alliance for education in Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, G.P.

    1993-01-01

    Sharing information among countries about technologies being used or planned for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste management, storage, and disposal is important toward building national confidence and trust within nations for proceeding with implementation of long-term solutions to waste management. To facilitate the effective sharing, specific mechanisms or vehicles are required. To this end, in 1992, the International Education Alliance for Education in Radioactive Waste Management was established. This paper discusses the purpose, objectives, plans, activities, and benefits of this newly-formed first-of-a-kind international education alliance in this field

  8. Understanding the working alliance with clients diagnosed with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyer, Laura; O'Halloran, Mary Sean; Christoe-Frazier, Liesel

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic working alliance is a vital ingredient of psychotherapy, specifically for clients diagnosed with anorexia nervosa, as progress is often slow and treatment difficult. This qualitative phenomenological study investigated the experiences of eight clients with anorexia nervosa and seven therapists who work with this population, regarding which therapist factors aided in and challenged the working alliance formation in individual psychotherapy. Data was gathered through semi-structured interviews. Some helpful therapist factors included collaboration, appropriate self-disclosure, providing a warm and safe environment, and willingness to be contacted outside of a session. Unhelpful factors included lack of attunement and objectivity and failure to individualize treatment.

  9. Analysis on stability of strategic alliance: A game theory perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Fei-qiong; FAN Liang-cong

    2006-01-01

    Strategic alliance has suffered much instabilities since its first implementation. Scholars have carried out many embedded, precise and comprehensive researches from both theory and empiricism. Here we try to find certain stable solutions by employing game theory, in an attempt to construct theoretical bases for strategic alliance, which people called "one of the most important organizational innovation in the end of the 20th century" (Shi, 2001), to exploit its advantages in the process of globalization. Finally, this article puts forward some advices for its success.

  10. Partner Selection for Strategic Alliance in Networked Manufacturing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENYou-ping; YINYong; ZHOUZu-de

    2004-01-01

    Networked Manufacturing is the trend evolution for manufacture enterprise to gain core competence in the networked economy environment. In this paper, the definition of the strategic alliance is introduced and its life cycle is described. As the selection of suitable partners is of vital importance to the success for strategic alliance in Networked Manufacturing environment, also in this paper, the definition, criteria and process for partner selection are introduced. Then the fuzzy-AHP (Analytic Hierarchy Process) method, as a fuzzy extension of analytic hierarchical approach for partner selection, is given. In the end, a case study is provided.

  11. Information Technology and Telecommunications: Impacts on Strategic Alliance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张延峰; 刘益; 李垣

    2002-01-01

    Strategic alliance (SA) is an important way with which the enterprise can grow up. However, the development of information technology and telecommunications (IT&Ts) has vital impacts on the theory and practice of SA management. This paper analyzes these impacts from four respects: the management thinking, forming, inter-organizational interaction, information exchange and knowledge transferring of SA. We point out the new characteristics of SA management in the information age and then put forward corresponding countermeasures on the basic of analyzing current alliance management theory and issue. Finally we discuss some issues that would be researched further in the future.

  12. The Authorized Economic Operator in the Pacific Alliance

    OpenAIRE

    Vega Cancino, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    This paper portrays an up-to-date status of the Authorized Economic Operator (AEO) Programs in the Pacific Alliance (PA), shining a light on the different obstacles these programs have encountered and what their probable outcomes will be in the coming years. The main goal with this investigation is to answer two questions: (1) What is the current situation of the AEO programs within the Pacific Alliance? (2) What impact will the PA’s AEO programs have in the medium term? Can these programs be...

  13. The HISH-alliance and the Arab spring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dandan, Salem Ben Souhail

    , in terms of relative strength, as being essential in understanding the alliance. It then goes on to look at what the Arab-spring has so far meant for the different actors and how this has impacted the alliance. It is argued that the ability of the non-state armed entities, Hezbollah and Hamas...... within the global community, due to the current systemic situation and the Arab-spring. In short, the paper aims to establish a correlation between the international and regional changes, the newly found autonomy of the non-state entities and the decreasing capabilities of the states, in order...

  14. Lessons Learned From a Living Lab on the Broad Adoption of eHealth in Primary Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huygens, Martine Wilhelmina Johanna; Schoenmakers, Tim M; Oude Nijeweme-D'Hollosy, Wendy; van Velsen, Lex; Vermeulen, Joan; Schoone-Harmsen, Marian; Jansen, Yvonne JFM; van Schayck, Onno CP; Friele, Roland; de Witte, Luc

    2018-01-01

    Background Electronic health (eHealth) solutions are considered to relieve current and future pressure on the sustainability of primary health care systems. However, evidence of the effectiveness of eHealth in daily practice is missing. Furthermore, eHealth solutions are often not implemented structurally after a pilot phase, even if successful during this phase. Although many studies on barriers and facilitators were published in recent years, eHealth implementation still progresses only slowly. To further unravel the slow implementation process in primary health care and accelerate the implementation of eHealth, a 3-year Living Lab project was set up. In the Living Lab, called eLabEL, patients, health care professionals, small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), and research institutes collaborated to select and integrate fully mature eHealth technologies for implementation in primary health care. Seven primary health care centers, 10 SMEs, and 4 research institutes participated. Objective This viewpoint paper aims to show the process of adoption of eHealth in primary care from the perspective of different stakeholders in a qualitative way. We provide a real-world view on how such a process occurs, including successes and failures related to the different perspectives. Methods Reflective and process-based notes from all meetings of the project partners, interview data, and data of focus groups were analyzed systematically using four theoretical models to study the adoption of eHealth in primary care. Results The results showed that large-scale implementation of eHealth depends on the efforts of and interaction and collaboration among 4 groups of stakeholders: patients, health care professionals, SMEs, and those responsible for health care policy (health care insurers and policy makers). These stakeholders are all acting within their own contexts and with their own values and expectations. We experienced that patients reported expected benefits regarding the use

  15. Lessons Learned From a Living Lab on the Broad Adoption of eHealth in Primary Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinkels, Ilse Catharina Sophia; Huygens, Martine Wilhelmina Johanna; Schoenmakers, Tim M; Oude Nijeweme-D'Hollosy, Wendy; van Velsen, Lex; Vermeulen, Joan; Schoone-Harmsen, Marian; Jansen, Yvonne Jfm; van Schayck, Onno Cp; Friele, Roland; de Witte, Luc

    2018-03-29

    Electronic health (eHealth) solutions are considered to relieve current and future pressure on the sustainability of primary health care systems. However, evidence of the effectiveness of eHealth in daily practice is missing. Furthermore, eHealth solutions are often not implemented structurally after a pilot phase, even if successful during this phase. Although many studies on barriers and facilitators were published in recent years, eHealth implementation still progresses only slowly. To further unravel the slow implementation process in primary health care and accelerate the implementation of eHealth, a 3-year Living Lab project was set up. In the Living Lab, called eLabEL, patients, health care professionals, small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), and research institutes collaborated to select and integrate fully mature eHealth technologies for implementation in primary health care. Seven primary health care centers, 10 SMEs, and 4 research institutes participated. This viewpoint paper aims to show the process of adoption of eHealth in primary care from the perspective of different stakeholders in a qualitative way. We provide a real-world view on how such a process occurs, including successes and failures related to the different perspectives. Reflective and process-based notes from all meetings of the project partners, interview data, and data of focus groups were analyzed systematically using four theoretical models to study the adoption of eHealth in primary care. The results showed that large-scale implementation of eHealth depends on the efforts of and interaction and collaboration among 4 groups of stakeholders: patients, health care professionals, SMEs, and those responsible for health care policy (health care insurers and policy makers). These stakeholders are all acting within their own contexts and with their own values and expectations. We experienced that patients reported expected benefits regarding the use of eHealth for self

  16. An Exploration of How Health Professionals Create eHealth and mHealth Education Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamim, Suha Rahif

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how health education professionals create ehealth and mhealth education interventions. Three research questions led this qualitative study. The first research question focused on the use of learning theories, instructional models, and instructional design models. The second research question focused on the…

  17. Developing a Questionnaire to Measure Perceived Attributes of eHealth Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Nancy L.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To design a valid and reliable questionnaire to assess perceived attributes of technology-based health education innovations. Methods: College students in 12 personal health courses reviewed a prototype eHealth intervention using a 30-item instrument based upon diffusion theory's perceived attributes of an innovation. Results:…

  18. The potential of eHealth in otorhinolaryngology-head and neck surgery: patients' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holderried, Martin; Ernst, C; Holderried, F; Rieger, M; Blumenstock, G; Tropitzsch, A

    2017-07-01

    The use of modern information and communication technologies (ICT) in daily life has significantly increased during the last several years. These essential online technologies have also found their way into the healthcare system. The use of modern ICT for health reasons can be summarized by the term 'eHealth'. Despite the potential importance of eHealth in the field of otorhinolaryngology (ORL), there is little understanding of patients' attitudes towards the deeper integration of these technologies into intersectoral care. The aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of patients' attitudes towards the use of modern ICT for intersectoral communication and information transfer in the field of ORL. Therefore, a structured interview was developed by an interdisciplinary team of otorhinolaryngologists, public health researchers, and information technology (IT) specialists. Overall, 211 ORL patients were interviewed at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Tuebingen University Hospital, Germany, and 203 of these patients completed the interview. This study revealed ORL patients' perspectives on the potential of eHealth, especially for appointment scheduling, appointment reminders, and intersectoral communication of personal medical information. Furthermore, this study provides evidence that data security and the impacts of eHealth on the physician-patient relationship and on treatment quality warrant special attention in future research.

  19. Preparedness for eHealth: Health Sciences Students' Knowledge, Skills, and Confidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Mary K.; Hines, Monique; Lowe, Robyn; Nagarajan, Srivalli; Keep, Melanie; Penman, Merrolee; Power, Emma

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of the role eHealth will play in the effective and efficient delivery of healthcare. This research challenges the assumption that students enter university as digital natives, able to confidently and competently adapt their use of information and communication technology (ICT) to new contexts. This study explored…

  20. eHealth Technologies as an intervention to improve adherence to topical antipsoriatics: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Mathias Tiedemann; Andersen, Flemming; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    2018-03-01

    Topical antipsoriatics are recommended first-line treatment of psoriasis, but rates of adherence are low. Patient support by use of electronic health (eHealth) services is suggested to improve medical adherence. To review randomised controlled trials (RCTs) testing eHealth interventions designed to improve adherence to topical antipsoriatics and to review applications for smartphones (apps) incorporating the word psoriasis. Literature review: Medline, Embase, Cochrane, PsycINFO and Web of Science were searched using search terms for eHealth, psoriasis and topical antipsoriatics. General analysis of apps: The operating systems (OS) for smartphones, iOS, Google Play, Microsoft Store, Symbian OS and Blackberry OS were searched for apps containing the word psoriasis. Literature review: Only one RCT was included, reporting on psoriasis patients' Internet reporting their status of psoriasis over a 12-month period. The rate of adherence was measured by Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS ® ). An improvement in medical adherence and reduction of severity of psoriasis were reported. General analysis of apps: A total 184 apps contained the word psoriasis. There is a critical need for high-quality RCTs testing if the ubiquitous eHealth technologies, for example, some of the numerous apps, can improve psoriasis patients' rates of adherence to topical antipsoriatics.

  1. Authentication Architecture for Region-Wide e-Health System with Smartcards and a PKI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zúquete, André; Gomes, Helder; Cunha, João Paulo Silva

    This paper describes the design and implementation of an e-Health authentication architecture using smartcards and a PKI. This architecture was developed to authenticate e-Health Professionals accessing the RTS (Rede Telemática da Saúde), a regional platform for sharing clinical data among a set of affiliated health institutions. The architecture had to accommodate specific RTS requirements, namely the security of Professionals' credentials, the mobility of Professionals, and the scalability to accommodate new health institutions. The adopted solution uses short-lived certificates and cross-certification agreements between RTS and e-Health institutions for authenticating Professionals accessing the RTS. These certificates carry as well the Professional's role at their home institution for role-based authorization. Trust agreements between e-Health institutions and RTS are necessary in order to make the certificates recognized by the RTS. As a proof of concept, a prototype was implemented with Windows technology. The presented authentication architecture is intended to be applied to other medical telematic systems.

  2. Erasmus MC at CLEF eHealth 2016: Concept recognition and coding in French texts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Van Mulligen (Erik M.); Z. Afzal (Zubair); S.A. Akhondi (Saber); D. Vo (Dang); J.A. Kors (Jan)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWe participated in task 2 of the CLEF eHealth 2016 chal-lenge. Two subtasks were addressed: entity recognition and normalization in a corpus of French drug labels and Medline titles, and ICD-10 coding of French death certificates. For both subtasks we used a dictionary-based approach.

  3. Constructing third age eHealth consumers by using personas from a cultural age perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ekström, M.; Loos, E.F.

    2015-01-01

    Society ages and our already extensive use of a host of different portable devices continues to expand. No leap of the imagination is needed to grasp that an exponential growth of the eHealth market is at hand. While the ageing of the baby boomers will have an impact on the global economy as a

  4. Why Business Modeling is crucial in the Development of e-Health Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Limburg, A.H.M.; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E.W.C.; Nijland, N.; Ossebaard, Hans Cornelis; Hendrix, Ron M.G.; Seydel, E.R.

    2011-01-01

    The impact and uptake of information and communication technologies that support health care are rather low. Current frameworks for eHealth development suffer from a lack of fitting infrastructures, inability to find funding, complications with scalability, and uncertainties regarding effectiveness

  5. Supportive Accountability: A model for providing human support for internet and ehealth interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohr, D.C.; Cuijpers, P.; Lehman, K.A.

    2011-01-01

    The effectiveness of and adherence to eHealth interventions is enhanced by human support. However, human support has largely not been manualized and has usually not been guided by clear models. The objective of this paper is to develop a clear theoretical model, based on relevant empirical

  6. eHealth Service Support in Future IPv6 Vehicular Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Vèque

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent vehicular networking activities include novel automotive applications, such as public vehicle to vehicle/infrastructure (V2X, large scale deployments, machine-to-machine (M2M integration scenarios, and more. The platform described in this paper focuses on the integration of eHealth in a V2I setting. This is to allow the use of Internet from a vehicular setting to disseminate health-related information. From an eHealth viewpoint, the use of remote healthcare solutions to record and transmit a patient’s vital signs is a special telemedicine application that helps hospital resident health professionals to optimally prepare the patient’s admittance. From the automotive perspective, this is a typical vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I communication scenario. This proposal provides an IPv6 vehicular platform, which integrates eHealth devices and allows sending captured health-related data to a personal health record (PHR application server in the IPv6 Internet. The collected data is viewed remotely by a doctor and supports his diagnostic decision. In particular, our work introduces the integration of vehicular and eHealth testbeds, describes related work and presents a lightweight auto-configuration method based on a DHCPv6 extension to provide IPv6 connectivity with a few numbers of messages.

  7. Improving access to healthcare with eHealth in sub-Saharan Africa ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    23 août 2013 ... Health systems across Africa are hindered by inadequate resources and growing disease burdens. Access to timely and affordable health services is needed to manage diseases and improve health and well-being. The growing field of electronic health (eHealth) is helping fill gaps in decision-making and ...

  8. Developing eHealth policies for greater equity in Kenya | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2018-01-29

    Jan 29, 2018 ... Developing eHealth policies will increase access to care for rural populations ... regions of the country, home to the people most in need of services, ... Were health services available in a timely and affordable manner to those ...

  9. Health Technology Trust: Undeserved or Justified? A review of technological risks in eHealth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossebaard, Hans Cornelis; Geertsma, R.E.; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E.W.C.; van Gemert-Pijnen, L.; Ossebaard, HC; Smedberg, A; Wynchank, S.; Giacomelli, P.

    2012-01-01

    Challenges for global health care are considerable. Increasing healthcare expenditures, ageing, the rise of chronic diseases and the public health threat of infectious diseases give reason to worldwide concern. Many believe eHealth technologies to contribute to the solution of these issues and to

  10. Barriers and requirements for achieving interoperable eHealth technology in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Nijeweme-d'Hollosy, Wendeline; van Velsen, Lex Stefan; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite its great promises, eHealth is not yet structurally embedded within the IT infrastructure of primary care. This is mainly due to the fact that healthcare technologies have been developed without coordination and a centralized approach [1], which in turn has led to a lack of shared standards

  11. Generic Quality Assurance Model (GQAM) for successful e-health acquisition in rural hospitals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ruxwana, N

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The e-health evolution has the potential to aid management of scarce resources and improve quality if services within healthcare. However, their implementation continues to fail. Amongst other reasons, the lack of project quality management is found...

  12. Determinants of the intention to use e-Health by community dwelling older people.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, A.J.E. de; Peeters, J.M.; Brabers, A.E.M.; Schellevis, F.G.; Rademakers, J.J.D.J.M.; Francke, A.L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the future, an increasing number of elderly people will be asked to accept care delivered through the Internet. For example, health-care professionals can provide treatment or support via telecare. But do elderly people intend to use such so-called e-Health applications? The objective

  13. eHealth Research, Theory and Development: A Multi-Disciplinary Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gemert-Pijnen, J.E.W.C.; Sanderman, Robbert; Kelders, Saskia M.; Kip, Hanneke

    2018-01-01

    This is the first book to provide a comprehensive overview of the social and technological context in which e-health applications have arisen, the psychological principles on which they are based, and the key development and measurement issues to their successful intervention.

  14. Factors Determining the Success and Failure of eHealth Interventions: Systematic Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Wouter; Johansen, Monika Alise

    2018-01-01

    Background eHealth has an enormous potential to improve healthcare cost, effectiveness, and quality of care. However, there seems to be a gap between the foreseen benefits of research and clinical reality. Objective Our objective was to systematically review the factors influencing the outcome of eHealth interventions in terms of success and failure. Methods We searched the PubMed database for original peer-reviewed studies on implemented eHealth tools that reported on the factors for the success or failure, or both, of the intervention. We conducted the systematic review by following the patient, intervention, comparison, and outcome framework, with 2 of the authors independently reviewing the abstract and full text of the articles. We collected data using standardized forms that reflected the categorization model used in the qualitative analysis of the outcomes reported in the included articles. Results Among the 903 identified articles, a total of 221 studies complied with the inclusion criteria. The studies were heterogeneous by country, type of eHealth intervention, method of implementation, and reporting perspectives. The article frequency analysis did not show a significant discrepancy between the number of reports on failure (392/844, 46.5%) and on success (452/844, 53.6%). The qualitative analysis identified 27 categories that represented the factors for success or failure of eHealth interventions. A quantitative analysis of the results revealed the category quality of healthcare (n=55) as the most mentioned as contributing to the success of eHealth interventions, and the category costs (n=42) as the most mentioned as contributing to failure. For the category with the highest unique article frequency, workflow (n=51), we conducted a full-text review. The analysis of the 23 articles that met the inclusion criteria identified 6 barriers related to workflow: workload (n=12), role definition (n=7), undermining of face-to-face communication (n=6), workflow

  15. eHealth and mHealth initiatives in Bangladesh: A scoping study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The health system of Bangladesh is haunted by challenges of accessibility and affordability. Despite impressive gains in many health indicators, recent evidence has raised concerns regarding the utilization, quality and equity of healthcare. In the context of new and unfamiliar public health challenges including high population density and rapid urbanization, eHealth and mHealth are being promoted as a route to cost-effective, equitable and quality healthcare in Bangladesh. The aim of this paper is to highlight such initiatives and understand their true potential. Methods This scoping study applies a combination of research tools to explore 26 eHealth and mHealth initiatives in Bangladesh. A screening matrix was developed by modifying the framework of Arksey & O’Malley, further complemented by case study and SWOT analysis to identify common traits among the selected interventions. The WHO health system building blocks approach was then used for thematic analysis of these traits. Results Findings suggest that most eHealth and mHealth initiatives have proliferated within the private sector, using mobile phones. The most common initiatives include tele-consultation, prescription and referral. While a minority of projects have a monitoring and evaluation framework, less than a quarter have undertaken evaluation. Most of the initiatives use a health management information system (HMIS) to monitor implementation. However, these do not provide for effective sharing of information and interconnectedness among the various actors. There are extremely few individuals with eHealth training in Bangladesh and there is a strong demand for capacity building and experience sharing, especially for implementation and policy making. There is also a lack of research evidence on how to design interventions to meet the needs of the population and on potential benefits. Conclusion This study concludes that Bangladesh needs considerable preparation and planning to sustain eHealth

  16. eHealth literacy: extending the digital divide to the realm of health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neter, Efrat; Brainin, Esther

    2012-01-27

    eHealth literacy is defined as the ability of people to use emerging information and communications technologies to improve or enable health and health care. The goal of this study was to explore whether literacy disparities are diminished or enhanced in the search for health information on the Internet. The study focused on (1) traditional digital divide variables, such as sociodemographic characteristics, digital access, and digital literacy, (2) information search processes, and (3) the outcomes of Internet use for health information purposes. We used a countrywide representative random-digital-dial telephone household survey of the Israeli adult population (18 years and older, N = 4286). We measured eHealth literacy; Internet access; digital literacy; sociodemographic factors; perceived health; presence of chronic diseases; as well as health information sources, content, search strategies, and evaluation criteria used by consumers. Respondents who were highly eHealth literate tended to be younger and more educated than their less eHealth-literate counterparts. They were also more active consumers of all types of information on the Internet, used more search strategies, and scrutinized information more carefully than did the less eHealth-literate respondents. Finally, respondents who were highly eHealth literate gained more positive outcomes from the information search in terms of cognitive, instrumental (self-management of health care needs, health behaviors, and better use of health insurance), and interpersonal (interacting with their physician) gains. The present study documented differences between respondents high and low in eHealth literacy in terms of background attributes, information consumption, and outcomes of the information search. The association of eHealth literacy with background attributes indicates that the Internet reinforces existing social differences. The more comprehensive and sophisticated use of the Internet and the subsequent increased

  17. Factors Determining the Success and Failure of eHealth Interventions: Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granja, Conceição; Janssen, Wouter; Johansen, Monika Alise

    2018-05-01

    eHealth has an enormous potential to improve healthcare cost, effectiveness, and quality of care. However, there seems to be a gap between the foreseen benefits of research and clinical reality. Our objective was to systematically review the factors influencing the outcome of eHealth interventions in terms of success and failure. We searched the PubMed database for original peer-reviewed studies on implemented eHealth tools that reported on the factors for the success or failure, or both, of the intervention. We conducted the systematic review by following the patient, intervention, comparison, and outcome framework, with 2 of the authors independently reviewing the abstract and full text of the articles. We collected data using standardized forms that reflected the categorization model used in the qualitative analysis of the outcomes reported in the included articles. Among the 903 identified articles, a total of 221 studies complied with the inclusion criteria. The studies were heterogeneous by country, type of eHealth intervention, method of implementation, and reporting perspectives. The article frequency analysis did not show a significant discrepancy between the number of reports on failure (392/844, 46.5%) and on success (452/844, 53.6%). The qualitative analysis identified 27 categories that represented the factors for success or failure of eHealth interventions. A quantitative analysis of the results revealed the category quality of healthcare (n=55) as the most mentioned as contributing to the success of eHealth interventions, and the category costs (n=42) as the most mentioned as contributing to failure. For the category with the highest unique article frequency, workflow (n=51), we conducted a full-text review. The analysis of the 23 articles that met the inclusion criteria identified 6 barriers related to workflow: workload (n=12), role definition (n=7), undermining of face-to-face communication (n=6), workflow disruption (n=6), alignment with clinical

  18. Guidelines and Recommendations for Developing Interactive eHealth Apps for Complex Messaging in Health Promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Kayla Joanne; Chang, Shanton; Maclean, Skye Tamara; Callegari, Emma Teresa; Garland, Suzanne Marie; Reavley, Nicola Jane; Varigos, George Andrew; Wark, John Dennis

    2016-02-09

    The now ubiquitous catchphrase, "There's an app for that," rings true owing to the growing number of mobile phone apps. In excess of 97,000 eHealth apps are available in major app stores. Yet the effectiveness of these apps varies greatly. While a minority of apps are developed grounded in theory and in conjunction with health care experts, the vast majority are not. This is concerning given the Hippocratic notion of "do no harm." There is currently no unified formal theory for developing interactive eHealth apps, and development is especially difficult when complex messaging is required, such as in health promotion and prevention. This paper aims to provide insight into the creation of interactive eHealth apps for complex messaging, by leveraging the Safe-D case study, which involved complex messaging required to guide safe but sufficient UV exposure for vitamin D synthesis in users. We aim to create recommendations for developing interactive eHealth apps for complex messages based on the lessons learned during Safe-D app development. For this case study we developed an Apple and Android app, both named Safe-D, to safely improve vitamin D status in young women through encouraging safe ultraviolet radiation exposure. The app was developed through participatory action research involving medical and human computer interaction researchers, subject matter expert clinicians, external developers, and target users. The recommendations for development were created from analysis of the development process. By working with clinicians and implementing disparate design examples from the literature, we developed the Safe-D app. From this development process, recommendations for developing interactive eHealth apps for complex messaging were created: (1) involve a multidisciplinary team in the development process, (2) manage complex messages to engage users, and (3) design for interactivity (tailor recommendations, remove barriers to use, design for simplicity). This research has

  19. eHealth and mHealth initiatives in Bangladesh: a scoping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Tanvir; Lucas, Henry; Khan, Azfar Sadun; Islam, Rubana; Bhuiya, Abbas; Iqbal, Mohammad

    2014-06-16

    The health system of Bangladesh is haunted by challenges of accessibility and affordability. Despite impressive gains in many health indicators, recent evidence has raised concerns regarding the utilization, quality and equity of healthcare. In the context of new and unfamiliar public health challenges including high population density and rapid urbanization, eHealth and mHealth are being promoted as a route to cost-effective, equitable and quality healthcare in Bangladesh. The aim of this paper is to highlight such initiatives and understand their true potential. This scoping study applies a combination of research tools to explore 26 eHealth and mHealth initiatives in Bangladesh. A screening matrix was developed by modifying the framework of Arksey & O'Malley, further complemented by case study and SWOT analysis to identify common traits among the selected interventions. The WHO health system building blocks approach was then used for thematic analysis of these traits. Findings suggest that most eHealth and mHealth initiatives have proliferated within the private sector, using mobile phones. The most common initiatives include tele-consultation, prescription and referral. While a minority of projects have a monitoring and evaluation framework, less than a quarter have undertaken evaluation. Most of the initiatives use a health management information system (HMIS) to monitor implementation. However, these do not provide for effective sharing of information and interconnectedness among the various actors. There are extremely few individuals with eHealth training in Bangladesh and there is a strong demand for capacity building and experience sharing, especially for implementation and policy making. There is also a lack of research evidence on how to design interventions to meet the needs of the population and on potential benefits. This study concludes that Bangladesh needs considerable preparation and planning to sustain eHealth and mHealth initiatives successfully

  20. The Comparative Effects of Transaction Cost Economics and Resource Based View: A Technological Alliance Motivational Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwan Jin Kim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the impact of two main alliance motivation theories, transaction cost economics (TCE and resource based view (RBV, on alliance processes among Korean manufacturing high-tech ventures. Results show that TCE and RBV are complimentarily explaining the formation of inter-firm alliances. TCE variables are more related with alliance partner characteristics while RBV is more linked with partner capabilities. Both show positive effects on performance. No significant effect is found on determining an alliance governance structure. While selecting appropriate technological alliance partners show positive effects on performance, no significant effect is found between alliance governance structure and performance. Factors of both theories impacting each alliance stage and analytical explanations of such impacts are discussed.

  1. Lessons Learned: A Strategic Alliance to Improve Elementary Physical Education in an Urban School District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Hannah R; Haguewood, Robin; Tantoco, Nicole; Madsen, Kristine A

    2015-01-01

    Physical education (PE) can help to achieve important public health goals, but is often under-prioritized and lacking in schools. To detail the actions, impact, and successes of a strategic alliance formed by three collaborating organizations to improve PE in a large California school district. Semistructured interviews with alliance members, principals, and teachers in 20 elementary schools, 3 years after the alliance formation. Interviewees reported district-level increases in priority and funding for PE and attributed improvements to the alliance's collection and dissemination of local data on the status of PE. Common goals, trust, and open communication within the alliance were seen as critical to the alliance's success. However, changes in district- or school-level accountability measures for PE were not reported. This strategic alliance succeeded in promoting district-level priority and funding for PE. Ongoing alliance work will focus on increasing accountability measures for PE, which may take longer to implement.

  2. Maternal Depression Mediates the Link Between Therapeutic Alliance and Improvements in Adolescent Externalizing Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granic, I.; Otten, R.; Blokland, K.; Solomon, T.; Engels, R.C.M.E.; Ferguson, B.

    2012-01-01

    The current study: (1) examined the relation between therapeutic alliance and changes in adolescent externalizing behavior in Multisystemic Therapy; (2) tested whether maternal depression mediates this relation; and (3) determined whether mothers' and clinicians' perceptions of the alliance

  3. Towards Usable E-Health. A Systematic Review of Usability Questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Vanessa E C; Dunn Lopez, Karen

    2017-05-10

    The use of e-health can lead to several positive outcomes. However, the potential for e-health to improve healthcare is partially dependent on its ease of use. In order to determine the usability for any technology, rigorously developed and appropriate measures must be chosen. To identify psychometrically tested questionnaires that measure usability of e-health tools, and to appraise their generalizability, attributes coverage, and quality. We conducted a systematic review of studies that measured usability of e-health tools using four databases (Scopus, PubMed, CINAHL, and HAPI). Non-primary research, studies that did not report measures, studies with children or people with cognitive limitations, and studies about assistive devices or medical equipment were systematically excluded. Two authors independently extracted information including: questionnaire name, number of questions, scoring method, item generation, and psychometrics using a data extraction tool with pre-established categories and a quality appraisal scoring table. Using a broad search strategy, 5,558 potentially relevant papers were identified. After removing duplicates and applying exclusion criteria, 35 articles remained that used 15 unique questionnaires. From the 15 questionnaires, only 5 were general enough to be used across studies. Usability attributes covered by the questionnaires were: learnability (15), efficiency (12), and satisfaction (11). Memorability (1) was the least covered attribute. Quality appraisal showed that face/content (14) and construct (7) validity were the most frequent types of validity assessed. All questionnaires reported reliability measurement. Some questionnaires scored low in the quality appraisal for the following reasons: limited validity testing (7), small sample size (3), no reporting of user centeredness (9) or feasibility estimates of time, effort, and expense (7). Existing questionnaires provide a foundation for research on e-health usability. However

  4. Motives behind Strategic Alliance Formation among Medium-Sized Manufacturing Firms in Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Kafigi Jeje

    2014-01-01

    Research on strategic alliance motives has attracted a great attention as firms strive to become market leaders. One critical area is to assess the contribution of these motives to strategic alliance formation. Most studies on alliance motives concentrate on international strategic alliances that involve large or multinational corporations from developed economies. Little research has been done on Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs), particularly Medium-Sized Enterprises (MEs) from the manufa...

  5. Game Theory Study on Distributors' Alliance to Gain Competitive Advantage in Marketing Channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Shi-ying; CHEN Jie; WANG Fang-hua

    2005-01-01

    Using the Cournot Game Model, this paper has analyzed the motivation of the distributors' alliance to gain competitive advantage in marketing channel. At first, this paper separately analyzed the advantage of alliance in the situation of oneshort game and infinitely repeated game, then, based on the analysis of distributors' betrayal of the alliance under infinitely repeated game, the conditions to maintain the distributors alliance are put forward and discussed.

  6. Relational Governance,Alliance Type and Alliance Performance in Chinese Strategic Alliances%战略联盟中关系控制与联盟类型对联盟绩效的影响研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乐琦; 李建媛; 蒋峦

    2016-01-01

    基于中国境内141个企业战略联盟样本,首先验证了在中国情境下战略联盟中关系控制对联盟绩效的积极作用,在此基础上检验了联盟类型对关系控制与联盟绩效关系的调节作用。结果表明:与产权联盟相比,非产权联盟中关系控制对联盟绩效的积极作用更大;与横向联盟和非相关联盟相比,纵向联盟中关系控制对联盟绩效的积极作用更大;与本地联盟相比,跨区联盟中关系控制对联盟绩效的积极作用更大;与短期联盟相比,长期联盟中关系控制对联盟绩效的积极作用更大。%Based on a sample of 141 alliances,this paper testifies the positive effect of relational governance on alliance per-formance. Moreover,it is focus on the moderating role of alliance type on the relationship between relational governance and alliance performance. The empirical results show that,compared with equity-based alliance,relational governance has more positive effect on alliance performance in non equity-based alliance;compared to horizontal alliance and irrelevant alliance, relational governance has more positive effect on alliance performance in vertical alliance;compared with local alliance,re-lational governance has more positive effect on alliance performance in cross-region alliance;compared with short-time alli-ance,relational governance has more positive effect on alliance performance in long-time alliance.

  7. Crisis in the transition of Telecom Alliance Unisource

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Marrewijk, A.H.

    2004-01-01

    The telecom sector has changed dramatically during the last decade. In order to meet new regulations, fierce competition and a growing demand for cheap and high quality telecom services by multinationals, European public telecom operators have created pan-European strategic alliances. This paper

  8. National Alliance of Business Sales Techniques and Results (STAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golightly, Steven J.

    This paper presents an overview of the Sales Techniques and Results (STAR) training program developed by the National Alliance of Business in conjunction with IBM. The STAR training program can be used to help vocational directors, teachers, and counselors to be better salespersons for cooperative education or job placement programs. The paper…

  9. Management of strategic coopetition among partners within international airline alliances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Himpel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: International network-carriers span the globe by linking airports on all five continents. At the core of those networks are hub-airports that serve as the centers for (inter-national in- and outbound traffic flows. From a business model point of view, the major international carriers are so-called network-carriers, for their core concept is based on transfer-oriented hub-and-spoke-systems. In order to maximize revenue streams of network-carriers, changes in strategic slot allocation and strategic net planning are becoming increasingly relevant. The aim of this work was to analyze the impact of various elements of the management of strategic coopetition among partners within international airline alliances on the revenues obtained by individual partners. Methods: the problems related to the optimization of strategic slot allocation and strategic net planning from the point of view of the individual profit shared and added net contribution margins were discussed. Results and conclusions: Two extreme scenarios may be projected. The first one is that partners within a given alliance system may start to increase merger and acquisition activities. Thereby scale effects may be utilized. The other one is, when rivalry becomes too dominant over time, some partners may (have to exit alliance systems. Thereby "atomic" subsystems may be on the rebound. Strategic coopetition management is aimed to keep leading international network carriers "on track" in the field of alliance management of that nature.

  10. Institutional Distance and Partner Selection in International Technological Alliances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krammer, Marius

    2013-01-01

    This study posits that institutional distance has a negative influence on partner selection in international technological alliances. Empirical results based on a dataset of firms in the global tire industry confirm that firms prefer technological partners from closer cognitive, normative and

  11. Clinical Perspective The parent-child-therapist alliance: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Child and Adolescent Mental Health ... The parent-child-therapist alliance: A case study using a strategic approach. Thirusha Naidu, Sheethal Behari. Abstract. In this paper we present a single case study of a clinical approach that ...

  12. Alliance Formation Motives in SMEs An Explorative Conjoint Analysis Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gils, Anita; Zwart, Peter S.

    Cooperative agreements are important tools to improve the competitive position of small and medium-sized firms.This explorative conjoint analysis study simultaneously examines the importance of firm, environmental and partner motives on the formation of two types of SME-alliances. In addition, we

  13. Required Steps of Managing International Equity Placement Strategic Alliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harimukti Wandebori

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research is to unravel the steps of managing international equity placement strategic alliance (IEPSA. The steps of managing an IEPSA are obtained by conducting theoretical review. The theoretical reviews consist of theory of strategic alliance; definition, classification, and finding definition of an IEPSA, political and analytical considerations and the necessary steps. These steps of managing IEPSA can be classified into analyzing of macro consideration, micro consideration, domestic company’s stakeholder support, cultural understanding, strategic planning, internal support, human resource management, organizational arrangement, management control system, evolved cultural understanding, and evaluating results. In this research, the domestic partners who formed the IEPSAs are limited to State-Owned Enterprises (SOEs. The IEPSA was one of the means of privatization. The research will be beneficial for both foreign and domestic partners who form an IEPSA in the previous SOEs. By knowing the steps of managing the IEPSA both partners will be able to secure a successful implementation of IEPSA. By identifying the steps of managing the IEPSA, the stakeholder will not see IEPSA as threat rather as an opportunity to improve performance, to create synergy, and generate benefits for both partners and stakeholder. By knowing the necessary steps of managing the IEPSA, the stakeholder including society and politician will envisage the IEPSA as a means of effectively improving the SOEs’ performances.The research was espected to provide contributions for the research on strategic alliances. Apparently, there exist no literatures discussing about IEPSA in the domain of strategic alliances.

  14. Strategic Alliances: the prospect for business growth | Obo | Global ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To this end, the business firms are classified as runners up firm and weak business firm. An alternative concept, the strategic alliances, is hereby proposed as the only way forward to help resolve these differences and to provide a better framework for managing business firms that would enhance growth and profitability.

  15. Corporate Developments and Strategic Alliances in E-Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Thomas; Hermens, Antoine

    2001-01-01

    Describes the emergence of corporate universities and strategic alliances among universities, electronic learning companies, and technology companies that are providing online delivery of interactive education and training. Outlines characteristics of comprehensive electronic learning and cautions against the use of new technologies to deliver…

  16. Advisory Working Alliance, Perceived English Proficiency, and Acculturative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Meifen; Tsai, Pei-Chun; Chao, Ruth Chu-Lien; Du, Yi; Lin, Shu-Ping

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the moderators of (a) general or cross-cultural advisory working alliances and (b) perceived English proficiency on the association between acculturative stress and psychological distress. A total of 143 East Asian international students completed an online survey. Results from a hierarchical regression…

  17. Alliances in the Dutch BeweegKuur lifestyle intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog-van den Esker, den F.G.; Wagemakers, A.; Vaandrager, L.; Dijk, van M.; Koelen, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: BeweegKuur (Exercise Therapy) is a Dutch lifestyle programme in which participants are referred by a general practitioner (GP) to a lifestyle advisor. To support participants, regional and local alliances are established. The present study explored the successes and challenges associated

  18. 76 FR 65696 - Battelle Energy Alliance, et al.;

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Battelle Energy Alliance, et al.; Notice of Consolidated Decision on Applications for Duty-Free Entry of Electron Microscope This is a decision consolidated pursuant to Section 6(c) of the Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Materials...

  19. Abstracts of 3. congress of global anti-nuclear alliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The 3 congress of global anti-nuclear alliance was held on 18-20 May, 2000 in Astana. There were 55 reports on different aspects of nuclear disarmament; nuclear safeguards; safe operation of nuclear power plants; rehabilitation of population and lands, damaged from many-years tests in Semipalatinsk site; radiobiological monitoring of ecosystems and others presented at the congress

  20. IDRC Pre-ICN Forum on Competition and Development Alliance ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    dzavalamora

    2011-05-17

    May 17, 2011 ... Alliance Building for A Culture of Compliance. Session 1: The general case for ... Big business: cost benefit equation may be negative. • Small business and farmers ... constitutions (e.g. US, Australia ) and treaties. (e.g. TFEU).