WorldWideScience

Sample records for microwave temperature profiler

  1. The Microwave Temperature Profiler (PERF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Boon; Mahoney, Michael; Haggerty, Julie; Denning, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The JPL developed Microwave Temperature Profiler (MTP) has recently participated in GloPac, HIPPO (I to V) and TORERO, and the ongoing ATTREX campaigns. The MTP is now capable of supporting the NASA Global Hawk and a new canister version supports the NCAR G-V. The primary product from the MTP is remote measurements of the atmospheric temperature at, above and below the flight path, providing for the vertical state of the atmosphere. The NCAR-MTP has demonstrated unprecedented instrument performance and calibration with plus or minus 0.2 degrees Kelvin flight level temperature error. Derived products include curtain plots, isentropes, lapse rate, cold point height and tropopause height.

  2. Estimating atmospheric temperature profile by an airborne microwave radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Xu, Jian; Kenntner, Mareike; Schreier, Franz; Doicu, Adrian

    2017-04-01

    As the rising atmospheric issues such as climate change, air pollution, and ozone depletion have extracted extensive attraction worldwide, observing and modeling of atmospheric quantities becomes critical to our understanding of the environment. This work focuses on the performance of an airborne passive microwave radiometer called MTP (Microwave Temperature Profiler). We aim to obtain vertically distributed atmospheric temperature from intensities measured by the instrument in terms of three frequencies and ten viewing angles. A retrieval program TIRAMISU (Temperature InveRsion Algorithm for MIcrowave SoUnding) has been utilized for processing the MTP data. To solve this severely ill-posed inverse problem, an analysis of different ways of constructing the penalty term onto the Tikhonov-type objective function is conducted. This numerical analysis can help us to better understand pros and cons of these regularization methods and to investigate the measurement capabilities of MTP.

  3. Mathematical Simulation of Temperature Profiles within Microwave Heated Wood Made for Wood-Based Nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    Xianjun Li; Yongfeng Luo; Hongbin Chen; Xia He; Jianxiong Lv; Yiqiang Wu

    2013-01-01

    High intensive microwave pretreatment is a new method to modify wood for the fabrication of wood-based nanocomposites. Based on the physical law on heat transfer, a mathematical model to describe the temperature profiles within wood heated by high intensive microwave was established and simulated in this research. The results showed that the temperature profiles within wood were related to microwave heating methods; The temperature inside wood firstly increased and then gradually decreased al...

  4. Microwave Temperature Profiler Mounted in a Standard Airborne Research Canister

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Michael J.; Denning, Richard F.; Fox, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Many atmospheric research aircraft use a standard canister design to mount instruments, as this significantly facilitates their electrical and mechanical integration and thereby reduces cost. Based on more than 30 years of airborne science experience with the Microwave Temperature Profiler (MTP), the MTP has been repackaged with state-of-the-art electronics and other design improvements to fly in one of these standard canisters. All of the controlling electronics are integrated on a single 4 5-in. (.10 13- cm) multi-layer PCB (printed circuit board) with surface-mount hardware. Improved circuit design, including a self-calibrating RTD (resistive temperature detector) multiplexer, was implemented in order to reduce the size and mass of the electronics while providing increased capability. A new microcontroller-based temperature controller board was designed, providing better control with fewer components. Five such boards are used to provide local control of the temperature in various areas of the instrument, improving radiometric performance. The new stepper motor has an embedded controller eliminating the need for a separate controller board. The reference target is heated to avoid possible emissivity (and hence calibration) changes due to moisture contamination in humid environments, as well as avoiding issues with ambient targets during ascent and descent. The radiometer is a double-sideband heterodyne receiver tuned sequentially to individual oxygen emission lines near 60 GHz, with the line selection and intermediate frequency bandwidths chosen to accommodate the altitude range of the aircraft and mission.

  5. Microwave Radiometer Profiler

    Data.gov (United States)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory — The microwave radiometer profiler (MWRP) provides vertical profiles of temperature, humidity, and cloud liquid water content as a function of height or pressure at...

  6. Observations of Atmospheric Temperature Structure from an Airborne Microwave Temperature Profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, J. A.; Schick, K. E.; Young, K.; Lim, B.; Ahijevych, D.

    2014-12-01

    A newly-designed Microwave Temperature Profiler (MTP) was developed at JPL for the NSF-NCAR Gulfstream-V aircraft. The MTP is a scanning microwave radiometer that measures thermal emission in the 50-60 GHz oxygen complex. It scans from near-zenith to near-nadir, measuring brightness temperatures forward, above, and below the aircraft at 17 s intervals. A statistical retrieval method derives temperature profiles from the measurements, using proximate radiosonde profiles as a priori information. MTP data examples from recent experiments, comparisons with simultaneous temperature profiles from the Airborne Vertical Atmospheric Profiling System (AVAPS), and a method for blending MTP and AVAPS temperature profiles will be presented. The Mesoscale Predictability Experiment (MPEX; May-June, 2013) investigated the utility of sub-synoptic observations to extend convective-scale predictability and otherwise enhance skill in regional numerical weather prediction over short forecast periods. This project relied on MTP and AVAPS profiles to characterize atmospheric structure on fine spatial scales. Comparison of MTP profiles with AVAPS profiles confirms uncertainty specifications of MTP. A profile blending process takes advantage of the high resolution of AVAPS profiles below the aircraft while utilizing MTP profiles above the aircraft. Ongoing research with these data sets examines double tropopause structure in association with the sub-tropical jet, mountain lee waves, and fluxes at the tropopause. The attached figure shows a mountain lee wave signature in the MTP-derived isentrope field along the flight track during an east-west segment over the Rocky Mountains. A vertically propagating wave with westward tilt is evident on the leeward side of the mountains at around 38 ksec. The Deep Propagating Gravity Wave Experiment over New Zealand (DEEPWAVE; June-July, 2014) investigated the dynamics of gravity waves from the surface to the lower thermosphere. MTP and AVAPS

  7. Simulations on the influence of lunar surface temperature profiles on CE-1 lunar microwave sounder brightness temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Surface temperature profile is an important parameter in lunar microwave remote sensing. Based on the analysis of physical properties of the lunar samples brought back by the Apollo and Luna missions, we modeled temporal and spatial variation of lunar surface temperature with the heat conduction equation, and produced temperature distribution in top 6.0 m of lunar regolith of the whole Moon surface. Our simulation results show that the profile of lunar surface temperature varies mainly within the top 20 cm, except at the lunar polar regions where the changes can reach to about 1.0 m depth. The temperature is stable beyond that depth. The variations of lunar surface temperature lead to main changes in brightness temperature (TB) at different channels of the lunar microwave sounder (CELMS) on Chang’E-1 (CE-1). The results of this paper show that the temperature profile influenced CELMS TB, which provides strong validation on the CELMS data, and lays a solid basis for future interpretation and utilization of the CELMS data.

  8. Validation of stratospheric temperature profiles from a ground-based microwave radiometer with other techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas, Francisco; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Haefele, Alexander; Keckhut, Philippe; Hauchecorne, Alain

    2016-04-01

    Vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature trends has become recognized as an important indicator of climate change, because different climate forcing mechanisms exhibit distinct vertical warming and cooling patterns. For example, the cooling of the stratosphere is an indicator for climate change as it provides evidence of natural and anthropogenic climate forcing just like surface warming. Despite its importance, our understanding of the observed stratospheric temperature trend and our ability to test simulations of the stratospheric response to emissions of greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances remains limited. One of the main reason is because stratospheric long-term datasets are sparse and obtained trends differ from one another. Different techniques allow to measure stratospheric temperature profiles as radiosonde, lidar or satellite. The main advantage of microwave radiometers against these other instruments is a high temporal resolution with a reasonable good spatial resolution. Moreover, the measurement at a fixed location allows to observe local atmospheric dynamics over a long time period, which is crucial for climate research. This study presents an evaluation of the stratospheric temperature profiles from a newly ground-based microwave temperature radiometer (TEMPERA) which has been built and designed at the University of Bern. The measurements from TEMPERA are compared with the ones from other different techniques such as in-situ (radiosondes), active remote sensing (lidar) and passive remote sensing on board of Aura satellite (MLS) measurements. In addition a statistical analysis of the stratospheric temperature obtained from TEMPERA measurements during four years of data has been performed. This analysis evidenced the capability of TEMPERA radiometer to monitor the temperature in the stratosphere for a long-term. The detection of some singular sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) during the analyzed period shows the necessity of these

  9. Ground-based microwave measuring of middle atmosphere ozone and temperature profiles during sudden stratospheric warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigin, A. M.; Shvetsov, A. A.; Krasilnikov, A. A.; Kulikov, M. Y.; Karashtin, D. A.; Mukhin, D.; Bolshakov, O. S.; Fedoseev, L. I.; Ryskin, V. G.; Belikovich, M. V.; Kukin, L. M.

    2012-12-01

    We carried out the experimental campaign aimed to study the response of middle atmosphere on a sudden stratospheric warming in winter 2011-2012 above Nizhny Novgorod, Russia (56N, 44E). We employed the ground-based microwave complex for remote sensing of middle atmosphere developed in the Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Science. The complex combines two room-temperature radiometers, i.e. microwave ozonometer and the stratospheric thermometer. Ozonometer is a heterodyne spectroradiometer, operating in a range of frequencies that include the rotation transition of ozone molecules with resonance frequency 110.8 GHz. Operating frequency range of the stratospheric thermometer is 52.5-5.4 GHz and includes lower frequency edge of 5 mm molecular oxygen absorption bands and among them two relatively weak lines of O2 emission. Digital fast Fourier transform spectrometers developed by "Acqiris" are employed for signal spectral analysis. The spectrometers have frequency range 0.05-1 GHz and realizes the effective resolution about 61 KHz. For retrieval vertical profiles of ozone and temperature from radiometric data we applied novel method based on Bayesian approach to inverse problem solution, which assumed a construction of probability distribution of the characteristics of retrieved profiles with taking into account measurement noise and available a priori information about possible distributions of ozone and temperature in the middle atmosphere. Here we introduce the results of the campaign in comparison with Aura MLS data. Presented data includes one sudden stratospheric warming event which took place in January 13-14 and was accompanied by temperature increasing up to 310 K at 45 km height. During measurement period, ozone and temperature variations were (almost) anti-correlated, and total ozone abundance achieved a local maxima during the stratosphere cooling phase. In general, results of ground-based measurements are in good agreement with

  10. Microwave radiometer to retrieve temperature profiles from the surface to the stratopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Stähli

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available TEMPERA (TEMPERature RAdiometer is a new ground-based radiometer which measures in a frequency range from 51–57 GHz radiation emitted by the atmosphere. With this instrument it is possible to measure temperature profiles from ground to about 50 km. This is the first ground-based instrument with the capability to retrieve temperature profiles simultaneously for the troposphere and stratosphere. The measurement is done with a filterbank in combination with a digital fast Fourier transform spectrometer. A hot load and a noise diode are used as stable calibration sources. The optics consist of an off-axis parabolic mirror to collect the sky radiation. Due to the Zeeman effect on the emission lines used, the maximum height for the temperature retrieval is about 50 km. The effect is apparent in the measured spectra. The performance of TEMPERA is validated by comparison with nearby radiosonde and satellite data from the Microwave Limb Sounder on the Aura satellite. In this paper we present the design and measurement method of the instrument followed by a description of the retrieval method, together with a validation of TEMPERA data over its first year, 2012.

  11. Microwave radiometer to retrieve temperature profiles from the surface to the stratopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Stähli

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available TEMPERA is a new ground-based radiometer which measures in a frequency range from 51–57 GHz radiation emitted by the atmosphere. The instrument operates thermally stabilized inside a lab. With this instrument it is possible to measure temperature profiles from ground to about 50 km. This is the first ground-based instrument with the capability to retrieve temperature profiles simultaneously for the troposphere and stratosphere. The measurement is done with a filterbank in combination with a digital Fast-Fourier-Transform spectrometer. A hot load and a noise diode are used as stable calibration sources. The optics consist of an off-axis parabolic mirror to collect the sky radiation. Due to the Zeeman effect on the emission lines used, the maximum height for the temperature retrieval is about 50 km. The effect is apparent in the measured spectra. The performance of TEMPERA is validated by comparison with nearby radiosonde and satellite data from the Microwave Limb Sounder on the Aura satellite. In this paper we present the design and measurement method of the instrument followed by a description of the retrieval method, together with a validation of TEMPERA data over its first year, 2012.

  12. Validation and statistical analysis of temperature, humidity profiles and Integrated Water Vapor (IWV) from microwave measurements over Granada (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedoya, Andres; Navas-Guzmán, Francisco; Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas

    2017-04-01

    Profiles of meteorological variables such as temperature, relative humidity and integrated water vapor derived from a ground-based microwave radiometer (MWR, RPG-HATPRO) are continuously monitored since 2012 at Granada station (Southeastern Spain). During this period up to 210 collocated meteorological balloons, equipped with a radiosonde DFM-09 (GRAWMET), were launched. This study is carried out with a twofold goal. On one hand, a validation of the MWR products such as temperature and water vapor mixing ratio profiles and the IWV from MWR is carried out comparing with radiosonde measurements. The behavior of MWR retrievals under clear and cloudy conditions and for special situations such as inversions has been analyzed. On the other hand, the whole period with continuous measurements is used for a statistical evaluation of the meteorological variables derived from MWR in order to thermodynamically characterize the atmosphere over Granada.

  13. Comparison of stratospheric temperature profiles from a ground-based microwave radiometer with lidar, radiosonde and satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas-Guzmán, Francisco; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Haefele, Alexander; Keckhut, Philippe; Hauchecorne, Alain

    2015-04-01

    The importance of the knowledge of the temperature structure in the atmosphere has been widely recognized. Temperature is a key parameter for dynamical, chemical and radiative processes in the atmosphere. The cooling of the stratosphere is an indicator for climate change as it provides evidence of natural and anthropogenic climate forcing just like surface warming ( [1] and references therein). However, our understanding of the observed stratospheric temperature trend and our ability to test simulations of the stratospheric response to emissions of greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances remains limited. Stratospheric long-term datasets are sparse and obtained trends differ from one another [1]. Therefore it is important that in the future such datasets are generated. Different techniques allow to measure stratospheric temperature profiles as radiosonde, lidar or satellite. The main advantage of microwave radiometers against these other instruments is a high temporal resolution with a reasonable good spatial resolution. Moreover, the measurement at a fixed location allows to observe local atmospheric dynamics over a long time period, which is crucial for climate research. TEMPERA (TEMPERature RAdiometer) is a newly developed ground-based microwave radiometer designed, built and operated at the University of Bern. The instrument and the retrieval of temperature profiles has been described in detail in [2]. TEMPERA is measuring a pressure broadened oxygen line at 53.1 GHz in order to determine stratospheric temperature profiles. The retrieved profiles of TEMPERA cover an altitude range of approximately 20 to 45 km with a vertical resolution in the order of 15 km. The lower limit is given by the instrumental baseline and the bandwidth of the measured spectrum. The upper limit is given by the fact that above 50 km the oxygen lines are splitted by the Zeeman effect in the terrestrial magnetic field. In this study we present a comparison of stratospheric

  14. Microwave measurements of temperature profiles, integrated water vapour, and liquid water path at Thule Air Base, Greenland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Giandomenico; Di Iorio, Tatiana; di Sarra, Alcide; Iaccarino, Antonio; Meloni, Daniela; Mevi, Gabriele; Muscari, Giovanni; Cacciani, Marco

    2017-04-01

    A RPG Humidity And Temperature PROfiler (HATPRO-G2 ) radiometer was installed at Thule Air Base (76.5° N, 68.8° W), Greenland, in June 2016 in the framework of the Study of the water VApour in the polar AtmosPhere (SVAAP) project. The Danish Meteorological Institute started measurements of atmospheric properties at Thule Air Base in early '90s. The Thule High Arctic Atmospheric Observatory (THAAO) has grown in size and observing capabilities during the last three decades through the international effort of United States (NCAR and University of Alaska Fairbanks) and Italian (ENEA, INGV, University of Roma and Firenze) institutions (http://www.thuleatmos-it.it). Within this context, the intensive field campaign of the SVAAP project was aimed at the investigation of the surface radiation budget and took place from 5 to 28 July, 2016. After the summer campaign the HATPRO has continued to operate in order to monitor the annual variability of the temperature profile and integrated water vapour as well as the presence and characteristics of liquid clouds in the Artic environment. The combined use of the HATPRO together with other automatic instruments, such as a new microwave spectrometer (the water Vapour Emission Spectrometer for Polar Atmosphere VESPA-22), upward- and downward-looking pyranometers and pyrgeometers, a zenith-looking pyrometer operating in the 9.6-11.5 µm spectral range, an all sky camera, and a meteorological station, allows to investigate the clouds' physical and optical properties, as well as their impact on the surface radiation budget. This study will present and discuss the first few months of HATPRO observations; the effectiveness of the statistical retrieval used to derive the physical parameters from the HATPRO brightness temperatures will also be investigated through the comparison of the temperature and humidity profiles, and integrated water vapour, with data from radiosondes launched during the summer campaign and in winter time.

  15. Mathematical Modeling of Temperature Profiles in Wood During Microwave Heating%微波处理中木材内温度分布的数学模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李贤军; 孙伟圣; 周涛; 吕建雄

    2012-01-01

    A mass of heal will be generated inside the wood by the direct interaction between microwave eleclromagnetic Tiled and water molecule or polar group in wood, which can be used to dry wood quickly or for the modification pretreatmenl of wood. Based on the physical law on heat transfer, a mathematical model to describe the temperature profiles of wood during microwave drying was established and simulated in this research. The results showed that the temperature profiles and its uniformity inside wood are dependent on the microwave heating methods during a microwave drying. The temperature inside wood gradually decreased along the direction of microwave transmission when the unilateral microwave heating was applied during wood drying, and the curve of temperature profiles along the thickness direction of wood is not flat. The temperature gradient with the interior temperature higher than the one in the surface layers was presented inside wood when the bilateral microwave heating were applied for wood microwave drying. Compared with the unilateral microwave heating method, the temperature distribution is more uniform along the thickness direction inside wood for the bilateral microwave heating.%从热传导的物理规律出发,建立微波加热过程中木材内部热传导模型,并通过理论模拟揭示不同微波加热方式对预处理中木材内部温度分布的影响规律.结果表明:微波处理过程中,木材内部的温度分布规律及均匀性与微波加热方式直接相关;当采用单向微波辐射的方式进行加热时,沿着微波入射方向,木材温度逐渐降低,木材内部温差较大,且温度分布均匀性较差;当使用双向微波辐射的方式进行加热时,木材内能形成内高外低的温度梯度,且温度分布均匀性较好.

  16. Time series analysis of ground-based microwave measurements at K- and V-bands to detect temporal changes in water vapor and temperature profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Sibananda; Sahoo, Swaroop; Pandithurai, Govindan

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based microwave measurements performed at water vapor and oxygen absorption line frequencies are widely used for remote sensing of tropospheric water vapor density and temperature profiles, respectively. Recent work has shown that Bayesian optimal estimation can be used for improving accuracy of radiometer retrieved water vapor and temperature profiles. This paper focuses on using Bayesian optimal estimation along with time series of independent frequency measurements at K- and V-bands. The measurements are used along with statistically significant but short background data sets to retrieve and sense temporal variations and gradients in water vapor and temperature profiles. To study this capability, the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM) deployed a microwave radiometer at Mahabubnagar, Telangana, during August 2011 as part of the Integrated Ground Campaign during the Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX-IGOC). In this study, temperature profiles for the first time have been estimated using short but statistically significant background information so as to improve the accuracy of the retrieved profiles as well as to be able to detect gradients. Estimated water vapor and temperature profiles are compared with those taken from the reanalysis data updated by the Earth System Research Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), to determine the range of possible errors. Similarly, root mean square errors are evaluated for a month for water vapor and temperature profiles to estimate the accuracy of the retrievals. It is found that water vapor and temperature profiles can be estimated with an acceptable accuracy by using a background information data set compiled over a period of 1 month.

  17. Retrieval assessment using the microwave simulation tool for the High Altitude and LOng range aircraft HALO: humidity, temperature and hydrometeor profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mech, M.; Crewell, S.; Orlandi, E.; Hirsch, L.

    2011-12-01

    realistic particle habits and shapes. In this presentation the HAMP instruments, the simulation test bed, and the retrieval approaches and results will be introduced. The capability of HAMP for hydrometeor observations and the retrieval of integrated contents are shown based on a data set of simulated brightness temperatures and concurrent hydrometeor contents and profiles. Furthermore, the potential of the selected passive microwave frequencies for the derivation of temperature and humidity profiles, especially upper tropospheric water vapor, is presented. In the simulations the different sensitivities of the various passive microwave frequencies to varying hydrometeor contents and surface properties can be seen clearly. Additionally, the results of retrieval approaches with an integrated profiling technique combining the active and passive information for hydrometeor contents and profiles over ocean and land are presented.

  18. Simultaneous application of microwave energy and hot air to whole drying process of apple slices: drying kinetics, modeling, temperature profile and energy aspect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horuz, Erhan; Bozkurt, Hüseyin; Karataş, Haluk; Maskan, Medeni

    2017-09-01

    Drying kinetics, modeling, temperature profile and energy indices were investigated in apple slices during drying by a specially designed microwave-hot air domestic hybrid oven at the following conditions: 120, 150 and 180 W microwave powers coupled with 50, 60 and 70 °C air temperatures. Both sources of energy were applied simultaneously during the whole drying processes. The drying process continued until the moisture content of apple slices reached to 20% from 86.3% (wet basis, w.b). Drying times ranged from 330 to 800 min and decreased with increasing microwave power and air temperatures. The constant rate period was only observed at low microwave powers and air temperatures. Two falling rate periods were observed. Temperature of apple slices sharply increased within the first 60 min, then reached equilibrium with drying medium and finally increased at the end of the drying process. In order to describe drying behavior of apple slices nine empirical models were applied. The Modified Logistic Model fitted the best our experimental data (R 2 = 0.9955-0.9998; χ 2 = 3.46 × 10-5-7.85 × 10-4 and RMSE = 0.0052-0.0221). The effective moisture and thermal diffusivities were calculated by Fick's second law and ranged from 1.42 × 10-9 to 3.31 × 10-9 m2/s and 7.70 × 10-9 to 12.54 × 10-9 m2/s, respectively. The activation energy (Ea) values were calculated from effective moisture diffusivity (Deff), thermal diffusivity (α) and the rate constant of the best model (k). The Ea values found from these three terms were similar and varied from 13.04 to 33.52 kJ/mol. Energy consumption and specific energy requirement of the hybrid drying of apple slices decreased and energy efficiency of the drying system increased with increasing microwave power and air temperature. Apples can be dried rapidly and effectively by use of the hybrid technique.

  19. A Microwave Radiometric Method to Obtain the Average Path Profile of Atmospheric Temperature and Humidity Structure Parameters and Its Application to Optical Propagation System Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Robert M.; Vyhnalek, Brian E.

    2015-01-01

    The values of the key atmospheric propagation parameters Ct2, Cq2, and Ctq are highly dependent upon the vertical height within the atmosphere thus making it necessary to specify profiles of these values along the atmospheric propagation path. The remote sensing method suggested and described in this work makes use of a rapidly integrating microwave profiling radiometer to capture profiles of temperature and humidity through the atmosphere. The integration times of currently available profiling radiometers are such that they are approaching the temporal intervals over which one can possibly make meaningful assessments of these key atmospheric parameters. Since these parameters are fundamental to all propagation conditions, they can be used to obtain Cn2 profiles for any frequency, including those for an optical propagation path. In this case the important performance parameters of the prevailing isoplanatic angle and Greenwood frequency can be obtained. The integration times are such that Kolmogorov turbulence theory and the Taylor frozen-flow hypothesis must be transcended. Appropriate modifications to these classical approaches are derived from first principles and an expression for the structure functions are obtained. The theory is then applied to an experimental scenario and shows very good results.

  20. Noninvasive Temperature Measurement Based on Microwave Temperature Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Shoucheng Ding

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we have a research of the noninvasive temperature measurement based on microwave temperature sensor. Moreover, in order to solve the surface temperature measurement for designing microwave temperature sensor, the microwave was issued by the transmitting antenna. Microwave encountered by the measured object to return back to the measured object and then convert it into electrical signals, the use of the quantitative relationship between this signal and input noise temperature to...

  1. The Temperature of the Cosmic Microwave Background

    CERN Document Server

    Fixsen, D J

    2009-01-01

    The FIRAS data are independently recalibrated using the WMAP data to obtain a CMB temperature of 2.7260 +/- 0.0013. Measurements of the temperature of the cosmic microwave background are reviewed. The determination from the measurements from the literature is cosmic microwave background temperature of 2.72548 +/- 0.00057 K.

  2. Noninvasive Temperature Measurement Based on Microwave Temperature Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoucheng Ding

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have a research of the noninvasive temperature measurement based on microwave temperature sensor. Moreover, in order to solve the surface temperature measurement for designing microwave temperature sensor, the microwave was issued by the transmitting antenna. Microwave encountered by the measured object to return back to the measured object and then convert it into electrical signals, the use of the quantitative relationship between this signal and input noise temperature to real-time calibration. In order to calculate the antenna brightness temperature and then after signal conditioning circuit, which can show the temperature value, in order to achieve the detection of microwave temperature. Microwave-temperature measurement system hardware based on 89C51 microcontroller consists of the microwave temperature sensor, signal conditioning circuitry and chip control circuit, AD converter circuit and display circuit. The system software is by the main program, the AD conversion routines, subroutines and delay subprogram. The microwave temperature measurement characterize has: without gain fluctuations, without the impact of changes in the noise of the machine, to provide continuous calibration, wide dynamic range.

  3. A temperature profiler

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Peshwe, V.B.; Desa, E.

    An instrument developed for measuring temperature profiles at sea in depth or time scales is described. PC-based programming offers flexibility in setting up the instrument for the mode of operation prior to each cast. A real time clock built...

  4. Continuous Time Series of Water Vapor Profiles from a Combination of Raman Lidar and Microwave Radiometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foth Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a method to retrieve continuous water vapor profiles from a combination of a Raman lidar and a microwave radiometer. The integrated water vapor from the microwave radiometer is used to calibrate the Raman lidar operationally resulting in small biases compared to radiosondes. The height limitations for Raman lidars (cloud base and daylight contamination can be well compensated by the application of a two–step algorithm combining the Raman lidars mass mixing ratio and the microwave radiometers brightness temperatures.

  5. Cosmic Microwave Background Temperature at Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Battistelli, E S; Lamagna, L; Melchiorri, F; Palladino, E; Savini, G; Cooray, A R; Melchiorri, A; Rephaeli, Y; Shimon, M

    2002-01-01

    We have deduced the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature in the Coma cluster (Abell 1656, z=0.0231), and in Abell 2163 (z=0.203) from spectral measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect over four passbands at radio and microwave frequencies. The resulting temperatures at these redshifts are T_{Coma} = 2.750^{+0.043}_{-0.032} K and T_{A2163} = 3.335^{+0.065}_{-0.066} K, respectively. These values are in good agreement with the basic relation T(z)=T_{0}(1+z), where T_{0} = (2.725 +/- 0.002) K as measured by the COBE/FIRAS experiment. Alternative scaling relations that are conjectured in non-standard cosmologies can be constrained by the data; for example, if T(z) = T_{0}(1+z)^{1-a} or T(z)=T_0[1+(1+d)z], then a=-0.07^{+0.12}_{-0.11} and d = 0.07 +/- 0.12. We briefly discuss future prospects for more precise SZ measurements of T(z) at higher redshifts.

  6. Control of plasma profile in microwave discharges via inverse-problem approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyoshi Yasaka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the manufacturing process of semiconductors, plasma processing is an essential technology, and the plasma used in the process is required to be of high density, low temperature, large diameter, and high uniformity. This research focuses on the microwave-excited plasma that meets these needs, and the research target is a spatial profile control. Two novel techniques are introduced to control the uniformity; one is a segmented slot antenna that can change radial distribution of the radiated field during operation, and the other is a hyper simulator that can predict microwave power distribution necessary for a desired radial density profile. The control system including these techniques provides a method of controlling radial profiles of the microwave plasma via inverse-problem approach, and is investigated numerically and experimentally.

  7. Nonuniformity of Temperatures in Microwave Steam Heating of Lobster Tail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischman, Gregory J

    2016-11-01

    The biennial Conference for Food Protection provides a formal process for all interested parties to influence food safety guidance. At a recent conference, an issue was raised culminating in a formal request to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to change its Food Code recommendation for safe cooking of seafood using microwave energy when steaming was also employed. The request was to treat microwave steam cooked seafood as a conventionally cooked raw animal product rather than a microwave cooked product, for which the safe cooking recommendation is more extensive owing to the complex temperature distributions in microwave heating. The request was motivated by a literature study that revealed a more uniform temperature distribution in microwave steam cooked whole lobster. In that study, single-point temperatures were recorded in various sections of the whole lobster, but only one temperature was recorded in the tail, although the large size of the tail could translate to multiple hot and cold points. The present study was conducted to examine lobster tail specifically, measuring temperatures at multiple points during microwave steam cooking. Large temperature differences, greater than 60°C at times, were found throughout the heating period. To compensate for such differences, the Food Code recommends a more extensive level of cooking when microwave energy, rather than conventional heat sources, is used. Therefore, a change in the Food Code regarding microwave steam heating cannot be recommended.

  8. Global Snow Mass Measurements and the Effect of Stratigraphic Detail on Inversion of Microwave Brightness Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Mark; Davenport, Ian; Gurney, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Snow provides large seasonal storage of freshwater, and information about the distribution of snow mass as snow water equivalent (SWE) is important for hydrological planning and detecting climate change impacts. Large regional disagreements remain between estimates from reanalyses, remote sensing and modelling. Assimilating passive microwave information improves SWE estimates in many regions, but the assimilation must account for how microwave scattering depends on snow stratigraphy. Physical snow models can estimate snow stratigraphy, but users must consider the computational expense of model complexity versus acceptable errors. Using data from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Cold Land Processes Experiment and the Helsinki University of Technology microwave emission model of layered snowpacks, it is shown that simulations of the brightness temperature difference between 19 and 37 GHz vertically polarised microwaves are consistent with advanced microwave scanning radiometer-earth observing system and special sensor microwave imager retrievals once known stratigraphic information is used. Simulated brightness temperature differences for an individual snow profile depend on the provided stratigraphic detail. Relative to a profile defined at the 10-cm resolution of density and temperature measurements, the error introduced by simplification to a single layer of average properties increases approximately linearly with snow mass. If this brightness temperature error is converted into SWE using a traditional retrieval method, then it is equivalent to ±13 mm SWE (7 % of total) at a depth of 100 cm. This error is reduced to ±5.6 mm SWE (3 % of total) for a two-layer model.

  9. Temperature profiles of three types CNTs (SWCNT, MWCNT and MWCNT-COOH) loaded environmental matrices generated from a microwave induced heating quantification method

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Relationships of temperature and CNT mass (SWCNT, MWCNT, MWCNT-COOH) were developed for three environmental matrices (sand, soil and sludge) spiked with known...

  10. A Microwave Radiometer for Internal Body Temperature Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheeler, Robert Patterson

    This thesis presents the analysis and design of a microwave radiometer for internal body temperature measurements. There is currently no available method for non-invasive temperature measurement inside the human body. However, knowledge of both relative and absolute temperature variations over time is important to a number of medical applications. The research presented in this thesis details a proof-of-concept near-field microwave radiometer demonstrating relative thermometry of a multi-layer phantom. There are a number of technical challenges addressed in this thesis for radiometric determination of sub-degree temperature variations in the human body. A theoretical approach is developed for determining sensing depth from known complex layered tissues, which is defined as a figure of merit, and is shown to be dependent on frequency, electrical properties of the tissues, and the near-field probe. In order to obtain depth resolution, multiple frequency operation can be used, so multi-frequency probes are designed and demonstrated in this work. The choice of frequencies is determined not only by the tissue material properties, but also by the ever increasing radio interference in the environment. In this work, quiet bands allocated to radio astronomy are investigated. The radiometer and probe need to be compact to be wearable, and several advancements are made towards a fully wearable device: multi-frequency low-profile probes are designed and fabricated on a flexible substrate and the process of on-chip integration is demonstrated by a GaAs MMIC cold noise source for radiometer calibration. The implemented proof-of-concept device consists of two radiometers at 1.4 GHz and 2.7 GHz, designed with commercial inexpensive devices that can enable sufficient sensitivity. The device is tested on a phantom with two water layers whose temperatures are varied in a controlled manner, and focused on the human body temperature range. Measured results are discussed qualitatively

  11. A Method for Combined Passive-Active Microwave Retrievals of Cloud and Precipitation Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, William S.; Kummerow, Christian D.; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Giglio, Louis

    1996-10-01

    Three-dimensional tropical squall-line simulations from the Goddard cumulus ensemble (GCE) model are used as input to radiative computations of upwelling microwave brightness temperatures and radar reflectivities at selected microwave sensor frequencies. These cloud/radiative calculations form the basis of a physical cloud/precipitation profile retrieval method that yields estimates of the expected values of the hydrometeor water contents. Application of the retrieval method to simulated nadir-view observations of the aircraft-borne Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) and NASA ER-2 Doppler radar (EDOP) produce random errors of 23%, 19%, and 53% in instantaneous estimates of integrated precipitating liquid, integrated precipitating ice, and surface rain rate, respectively.On 5 October 1993, during the Convection and Atmospheric Moisture Experiment (CAMEX), the AMPR and EDOP were used to observe convective systems in the vicinity of the Florida peninsula. Although the AMPR data alone could be used to retrieve cloud and precipitation vertical profiles over the ocean, retrievals of high-resolution vertical precipitation structure and profile information over land required the combination of AMPR and EDOP observations.No validation data are available for this study; however, the retrieved precipitation distributions from the convective systems are compatible with limited radar climatologies of such systems, as well as being radiometrically consistent with both the AMPR and EDOP observations. In the future, the retrieval method will be adapted to the passive and active microwave measurements from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite sensors.

  12. Microwave radiometric system for biomedical 'true temperature' and emissivity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüdeke, K M; Köhler, J

    1983-09-01

    A novel type of radiometer is described, which solves the problem of emissivity-(mismatch)-independent noise temperature measurements by simultaneous registration of an object's apparent temperature and its reflectivity with just one microwave receiver and real-time calculation of the object's emissivity and its actual temperature.

  13. Temperature sensing based on a Brillouin fiber microwave generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X. P.; Gan, J. L.; Xu, S. H.; Yang, Z. M.

    2013-04-01

    We propose and demonstrate a novel dual-frequency Brillouin fiber laser used for microwave generation. Based on this configuration, temperature sensing has been realized. The dual-frequency Brillouin lasing is generated independently from two pieces of fiber cascaded within one ring resonator. Microwave generation is acquired as the beat signal of the dual-frequency Brillouin fiber laser, with the beat frequency being linearly proportional to the temperature difference of the two fiber sections. In the experiment, the temperature coefficient of frequency shift is 1.015 ± 0.001 MHz °C-1. The temperature can be precisely measured by acquiring the frequency of the microwave generator, and this new configuration provides a promising application for temperature sensing.

  14. Comparison of Profiling Microwave Radiometer, Aircraft, and Radiosonde Measurements From the Alliance Icing Research Study (AIRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reehorst, Andrew L.

    2001-01-01

    Measurements from a profiling microwave radiometer are compared to measurements from a research aircraft and radiosondes. Data compared is temperature, water vapor, and liquid water profiles. Data was gathered at the Alliance Icing Research Study (AIRS) at Mirabel Airport outside Montreal, Canada during December 1999 and January 2000. All radiometer measurements were found to lose accuracy when the radome was wet. When the radome was not wetted, the radiometer was seen to indicate an inverted distribution of liquid water within a cloud. When the radiometer measurements were made at 15 deg. instead of the standard zenith, the measurements were less accurate.

  15. Microwave Brightness Temperature and Lunar Son Dielectric Property Retrieve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Wu; D.H. Li; A.T. Altyntsev; B.I. Lubyshev

    2005-01-01

    Among many scientific objectives of lunar exploration, investigations on lunar soil become more and more attractive to the scientists duo to the existence of abundant 3He and ilmenite in the lunar soil and their possible utilization. Although the soil composition determination on the lunar surface is available by visible light spectrometer, γ/X-ray spectrometer etc, the evaluations on the total reserves of 3He and ilmenite in the lunar deep and on the thickness of the lunar soil are still impossible so far. In this paper, the authors first give a rough analysis of the microwave brightness temperature images of the lunar disc observed using the NRAO 12 Meter Telescope and Siberian Solar Radio Telescope; then introduce our researches on the microwave dielectric properties of lunar soil simulators; finally, discuss some basic relations between the microwave brightness temperature and lunar soil properties.

  16. Microwave brightness temperature imaging and dielectric properties of lunar soil

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wu Ji; Li Dihui; Zhang Xiaohui; Jiang Jingshan; A T Altyntsev; B I Lubyshev

    2005-12-01

    Among many scientific objectives of lunar exploration, investigations on lunar soil become attractive due to the existence of He3 and ilmenite in the lunar soil and their possible utilization as nuclear fuel for power generation.Although the composition of the lunar surface soil can be determined by optical and /X-ray spectrometers, etc., the evaluation of the total reserves of He3 and ilmenite within the regolith and in the lunar interior are still not available.In this paper,we give a rough analysis of the microwave brightness temperature images of the lunar disc observed using the NRAO 12 meter Telescope and Siberian Solar Radio Telescope.We also present the results of the microwave dielectric properties of terrestrial analogues of lunar soil and,discuss some basic relations between the microwave brightness temperature and lunar soil properties.

  17. Microwave Measurements of Moisture Distributions in the Upper Soil Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, A. M.; Hancock, G. D.; Waite, W. P.; Scott, H. D.; Rand, J. A.

    1984-07-01

    Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to investigate the ability of microwave remote sensing systems to detect the moisture status of a silt loam soil exhibiting abrupt changes in moisture content near the surface. Laboratory soil profiles were prepared with a discontinuous moisture boundary in the subsurface. Reflectivity measurements of these profiles were made with a bistatic reflectometer operating over the frequency ranges of 1-2 and 4-8 GHz (wavelength ranges of 30-15 and 7.5-3.75 cm, respectively). These measurements exhibited a well-developed coherent interference pattern in good agreement with a simple two-layer reflectivity model. Field measurements of bare soil surfaces were conducted for initially saturated profiles and continued for extended periods of drying. During drying, coherent interference patterns similar to those observed in the laboratory were detected. These appear to be due to steep moisture gradients occurring between drying layers near the surface. The field results were modeled by a five-segment linear moisture profile with one or two steep segments and a multilayer reflectivity program. Agreement between model and field response over the frequency range was used to estimate the depth of drying layers within the soil. These depths were monitored over the second and third drying cycles. Formation of the drying layers under field conditions appears to be influenced by drying time, tillage, and evaporative demand. In any case, it appears that the coherent effects caused by nonuniform moisture profiles may substantially affect the reflectivity of even rough soil surfaces.

  18. Fundamental characteristics of microwave explosion pretreatment of wood. I, Properties of temperature development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian-jun Li; Ke-yang Lu; Lan-ying Lin; Yong-dong Zhou; Zhi-yong Cai; Feng Fu

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the effects of microwave radiation intensity, radiation time and initial wood moisture content (MC) on the properties of temperature development in Eucalyptus urophylla wood samples during the microwave explosion pretreatment have been investigated using a new microwave pretreatment equipment. The results show that 1) with the increase of microwave...

  19. Imaging of Active Microwave Devices at Cryogenic Temperatures using Scanning Near-Field Microwave Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanawalla, Ashfaq S.; Dutta, S. K.; Vlahacos, C. P.; Steinhauer, D. E.; Feenstra, B. J.; Anlage, Steven M.; Wellstood, F. C.

    1998-03-01

    The ability to image electric fields in operating microwave devices is interesting both from the fundamental point of view and for diagnostic purposes. To that end we have constructed a scanning near-field microwave microscope which uses an open-ended coaxial probe and operates at cryogenic temperatures.(For related publications see: C. P. Vlahacos, R. C. Black, S. M. Anlage, A. Amar and F. C. Wellstood, Appl. Phys. Lett. 69), 3274 (1996) and S. M. Anlage, C. P. Vlahacos, Sudeep Dutta and F. C. Wellstood, IEEE Trans. Appl. Supercond. 7, 3686 (1997). Using this system we have imaged electric fields generated by both normal metal and superconducting microstrip resonators at temperatures ranging from 77 K to 300 K. We will present images and discuss our results including observations of clear standing wave patterns at the fundamental resonant frequency and an increased quality factor of the resonators at low temperatures.

  20. Physicochemical and sensory profile of rice bran roasted in microwave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Costa Garcia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the physical, chemical, and sensory changes in bran from three rice cultivars according to microwave roasting time. This study analyzed three rice cultivars, BRS Sertaneja (S, BRS Primavera (P, and IRGA 417 (I determining the color parameters (L*, a*, and b * at 6, 9, 12, 15, and 18 minutes of roasting time. After applying the difference from control test, the rice brans with different characteristics aroma and flavor were selected: S and P roasted for 9 and 15 minutes and IRGA 417 roasted for 9, 12, and 15 minutes. These samples were characterized by Free-Choice Profile descriptive sensory analysis, and their chemical composition was also determined. The longer the roasting process, the higher the roasted flavor intensity and aroma. The IRG 417 cultivar roasted for 12 minutes showed a sweeter flavor and aroma. After roasting, the brans remained rich in protein and lipid and presented higher fiber content and lower reducing sugar and phytic acid content. Microwave roasting for 12 minutes can be a viable option for improving the sensory functional and nutritional characteristics of the rice bran considering its use in food products.

  1. [Fatty acids profile and microstructure of avocado puree after microwave heating].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Gerónimo, Rosa I; Dorantes, Lidia

    2008-09-01

    Changes in the fatty acid profile and the microstructure of avocado puree after microwave treatment were evaluated. The main components of the fatty acid profile were oleic, palmitic, linoleic and palmitoleic acids. Fatty acids profile of microwaved avocado puree did not show significant changes (p Microwaved avocado puree showed significant changes in its microstructure. Samples treated with microwaves for less than 40 s preserved the cells shape, causing only a minimal modification. On the other hand, microwave treated avocado puree using more than 40 s, showed a disruption of idioblast oil cells, releasing the oil contained on them. The results might be explained based on the sensory evaluation that was performed on the microwaved avocado puree, where samples at 60 s showed oily texture and grassy flavor.

  2. Basic principles of thermo-acoustic energy and temporal profile detection of microwave pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, V G; Vdovin, V A

    2001-01-01

    Basic principles of a thermo-acoustic method developed for the detection of powerful microwave pulses of nanosecond duration are discussed.A proposed method is based on the registration of acoustic pulse profile originated from the thermal expansion of the volume where microwave energy was absorbed.The amplitude of excited acoustic transient is proportional to absorbed microwave energy and its temporal profile resembles one of a microwave pulse when certain conditions are satisfied.The optimal regimes of microwave pulse energy detection and sensitivity of acoustic transient registration with piezo-transducer are discussed.It was demonstrated that profile of a microwave pulse could be detected with temporal resolution of 1 - 3 nanosecond.

  3. Evaluation of brightness temperature from a forward model of ground-based microwave radiometer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Rambabu; J S Pillai; A Agarwal; G Pandithurai

    2014-06-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometers are getting great attention in recent years due to their capability to profile the temperature and humidity at high temporal and vertical resolution in the lower troposphere. The process of retrieving these parameters from the measurements of radiometric brightness temperature () includes the inversion algorithm, which uses the background information from a forward model. In the present study, an algorithm development and evaluation of this forward model for a ground-based microwave radiometer, being developed by Society for Applied Microwave Electronics Engineering and Research (SAMEER) of India, is presented. Initially, the analysis of absorption coefficient and weighting function at different frequencies was made to select the channels. Further the range of variation of for these selected channels for the year 2011, over the two stations Mumbai and Delhi is discussed. Finally the comparison between forward-model simulated s and radiometer measured s at Mahabaleshwar (73.66°E and 17.93°N) is done to evaluate the model. There is good agreement between model simulations and radiometer observations, which suggests that these forward model simulations can be used as background for inversion models for retrieving the temperature and humidity profiles.

  4. Geometry for web microwave heating or drying to a desired profile in a waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habeger, Jr., Charles C.; Patterson, Timothy F.; Ahrens, Frederick W.

    2005-11-15

    A microwave heater and/or dryer has a nonlinear or curvilinear relative slot profile geometry. In one embodiment, the microwave dryer has at least one adjustable field modifier making it possible to change the geometry of the heater or dryer when drying different webs. In another embodiment, the microwave dryer provides more uniform drying of a web when the field modifier is adjusted in response to a sensed condition of the web. Finally, a method of microwave heating and/or drying a web achieves a uniform heating and/or drying profile.

  5. Frequency-temperature sensitivity reduction with optimized microwave Bragg resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Floch, J.-M.; Murphy, C.; Hartnett, J. G.; Madrangeas, V.; Krupka, J.; Cros, D.; Tobar, M. E.

    2017-01-01

    Dielectric resonators are employed to build state-of-the-art low-noise and high-stability oscillators operating at room and cryogenic temperatures. A resonator temperature coefficient of frequency is one criterion of performance. This paper reports on predictions and measurements of this temperature coefficient of frequency for three types of cylindrically symmetric Bragg resonators operated at microwave frequencies. At room temperature, microwave Bragg resonators have the best potential to reach extremely high Q-factors. Research has been conducted over the last decade on modeling, optimizing, and realizing such high Q-factor devices for applications such as filtering, sensing, and frequency metrology. We present an optimized design, which has a temperature sensitivity 2 to 4 times less than current whispering gallery mode resonators without using temperature compensating techniques and about 30% less than other existing Bragg resonators. Also, the performance of a new generation single-layered Bragg resonator, based on a hybrid-Bragg-mode, is reported with a sensitivity of about -12 ppm/K at 295 K. For a single reflector resonator, it achieves a similar level of performance as a double-Bragg-reflector resonator but with a more compact structure and performs six times better than whispering-gallery-mode resonators. The hybrid resonator promises to deliver a new generation of high-sensitivity sensors and high-stability room-temperature oscillators.

  6. Humidity Profiles' Effect On The Relationship Between Ice Scattering And Rainfall In Microwave Rainfall Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkovic, V.; Kummerow, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    Currently, satellite microwave rainfall retrievals base their algorithm on an observed global average of the relationship between high frequency brightness temperature (Tb) depression and rainfall rate. This makes them very sensitive to differences in the ratio of ice to liquid in the cloud, resulting in regional biases of rainfall estimates. To address this problem we investigate how the environmental conditions that precede raining systems influence the ice to rainfall relationship. The vertical profile of humidity was found to be a key variable in predicting this ratio. We found that dry over moist air conditions are favorable for developing intense, well organized systems such as MCSs in West Africa and the Sahel, characterized by strong Tb depressions and amounts of ice aloft significantly above the globally observed average value. As a consequence, microwave retrieval algorithms misinterpret these systems assigning them unrealistically high rainfall rates. The opposite is true in the Amazon region, where observed raining systems exhibit very little ice while producing high rainfall rates. These regional differences correspond well with a map of radar to radiometer biases of rainfall. Deeper understanding of the influence of environmental conditions on this ice to rain ratio provides a foundation for mapping a global ice-scattering to rainfall rate relationship that will improve satellite microwave rainfall retrievals and our understanding of cloud microphysics globally.

  7. Ground based lidar and microwave radiometry synergy for high vertically resolved thermodynamic profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Barrera-Verdejo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Continuous monitoring of atmospheric humidity and temperature profiles is important for many applications, e.g. assessment of atmospheric stability and cloud formation. While lidar measurements can provide high vertical resolution albeit with limited coverage, microwave radiometers receive information throughout the troposphere though their vertical resolution is poor. In order to overcome these specific limitations the synergy of a Microwave Radiometer (MWR and a Raman Lidar (RL system is presented in this work. The retrieval algorithm that combines these two instruments is an Optimal Estimation Method (OEM that allows for a uncertainty analysis of the retrieved profiles. The OEM combines measurements and a priori information taking the uncertainty of both into account. The measurement vector consists of a set of MWR brightness temperatures and RL water vapor profiles. The method is applied for a two month field campaign around Jülich, Germany for clear sky periods. Different experiments are performed to analyse the improvements achieved via the synergy compared to the individual retrievals. When applying the combined retrieval, on average the theoretically determined absolute humidity error can be reduced by 59.8% (37.9% with respect to the retrieval using only-MWR (only-RL data. The analysis in terms of degrees of freedom for signal reveals that most information is gained above the usable lidar range. The retrieved profiles are further evaluated using radiosounding and GPS water vapor measurements. Within a single case study we also explore the potential of the OEM for deriving the relative humidity profile, which is especially interesting to study cloud formation in the vicinity of cloud edges. To do so temperature information is added both from RL and MWR. For temperature, it is shown that the error is reduced by 47.1% (24.6% with respect to the only-MWR (only-RL profile. Due to the use of MWR brightness temperatures at multiple elevation

  8. Ground based lidar and microwave radiometry synergy for high vertically resolved thermodynamic profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Verdejo, M.; Crewell, S.; Löhnert, U.; Orlandi, E.; Di Girolamo, P.

    2015-05-01

    Continuous monitoring of atmospheric humidity and temperature profiles is important for many applications, e.g. assessment of atmospheric stability and cloud formation. While lidar measurements can provide high vertical resolution albeit with limited coverage, microwave radiometers receive information throughout the troposphere though their vertical resolution is poor. In order to overcome these specific limitations the synergy of a Microwave Radiometer (MWR) and a Raman Lidar (RL) system is presented in this work. The retrieval algorithm that combines these two instruments is an Optimal Estimation Method (OEM) that allows for a uncertainty analysis of the retrieved profiles. The OEM combines measurements and a priori information taking the uncertainty of both into account. The measurement vector consists of a set of MWR brightness temperatures and RL water vapor profiles. The method is applied for a two month field campaign around Jülich, Germany for clear sky periods. Different experiments are performed to analyse the improvements achieved via the synergy compared to the individual retrievals. When applying the combined retrieval, on average the theoretically determined absolute humidity error can be reduced by 59.8% (37.9%) with respect to the retrieval using only-MWR (only-RL) data. The analysis in terms of degrees of freedom for signal reveals that most information is gained above the usable lidar range. The retrieved profiles are further evaluated using radiosounding and GPS water vapor measurements. Within a single case study we also explore the potential of the OEM for deriving the relative humidity profile, which is especially interesting to study cloud formation in the vicinity of cloud edges. To do so temperature information is added both from RL and MWR. For temperature, it is shown that the error is reduced by 47.1% (24.6%) with respect to the only-MWR (only-RL) profile. Due to the use of MWR brightness temperatures at multiple elevation angles, the

  9. Determination of sea surface temperatures from microwave and IR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangaswamy, S.; Grover, J.

    1982-01-01

    Microwave measurements from the Nimbus 7 SMMR were used to derive the atmospheric precipitable water, which was then used to obtain the atmospheric correction for use with AVHRR thermal IR measurements to obtain sea surface temperature (SST). The resulting SST's were compared with the NOAA operational sea surface temperature measurements, and the two sets of measurements were found to be in reasonable agreement. The average residuals between the two sets of measurements was 0.15 K with the NOAA operational SST's being slightly greater.

  10. Vertical-structure effects on planetary microwave brightness temperature measurements - Applications to the lunar regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keihm, S. J.; Cutts, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    An attempt to constrain the effects of vertical variations in dielectric properties on lunar microwave observations is presented. A numerical approach for deriving the reflectivity and microwave weighting function of a vertically varying half-space is used, assuming variance in the dielectric properties with depth only, and negligible magnetic effects. The cases of continuous and stratified models of vertical structures are discussed, and a concentration of emitted energy in upper layers is found. The total emitted energy oscillates, varying with the thickness of the upper soil layer, but averaging out interference effects due to random variations in the substrate depth. Consideration is also given to the vertical structure effects on the lunation-mean disk-center brightness temperature, its variations, and the regolith electrical loss, and predicted reflectivity effects by feasible models of the lunar regolith dielectric profile.

  11. Thermoelectric temperature control system for the pushbroom microwave radiometer (PBMR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon-Townes, L. A.; Averill, R. D.

    1984-06-01

    A closed loop thermoelectric temperature control system is developed for stabilizing sensitive RF integrated circuits within a microwave radiometer to an accuracy of + or - 0.1 C over a range of ambient conditions from -20 C to +45 C. The dual mode (heating and cooling) control concept utilizes partial thermal isolation of the RF units from an instrument deck which is thermally controlled by thermoelectric coolers and thin film heaters. The temperature control concept is simulated with a thermal analyzer program (MITAS) which consists of 37 nodes and 61 conductors. A full scale thermal mockup is tested in the laboratory at temperatures of 0 C, 21 C, and 45 C to confirm the validity of the control concept. A flight radiometer and temperature control system is successfully flight tested on the NASA Skyvan aircraft.

  12. Retrieval of Precipitation Profiles from Multiresolution, Multifrequency, Active and Passive Microwave Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecu, Mircea; Olson, William S.; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, a technique for estimating vertical profiles of precipitation from multifrequency, multiresolution active and passive microwave observations is investigated. The technique is applicable to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) observations and it is based on models that simulate high-resolution brightness temperatures as functions of observed reflectivity profiles and a parameter related to the rain drop-size-distribution. The modeled high-resolution brightness temperatures are used to determine normalized brightness temperature polarizations at the microwave radiometer resolution. An optimal estimation procedure is employed to minimize the differences between the simulated and observed normalized polarizations by adjusting the drop-size-distribution parameter. The impact of other unknowns that are not independent variables in the optimal estimation but affect the retrievals is minimized through statistical parameterizations derived from cloud model simulations. The retrieval technique is investigated using TRMM observations collected during the Kwajalein Experiment (KWAJEX). These observations cover an area extending from 5 deg to deg N latitude and 166 deg to 172 deg E longitude from July to September 1999, and are coincident with various ground-based observations, facilitating a detailed analysis of the retrieved precipitation. Using the method developed in this study, precipitation estimates consistent with both the passive and active TRMM observations are obtained. Various parameters characterizing these estimates, i.e. the rain rate, the precipitation water content, the drop-size-distribution intercept, and the mass weighted mean drop diameter, are in good qualitative agreement with independent experimental and theoretical estimates. Combined rain estimates are in general higher than the official TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) only estimates for the area and the period considered in the study. Ground-based precipitation estimates

  13. Validation of measured microwave absorption and temperature change for development of a single-mode-type microwave heating thermogravimetry apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karisma, Achmad Dwitama; Hamaba, Taishu; Fukasawa, Tomonori; Huang, An-Ni; Segawa, Tomoomi; Fukui, Kunihiro

    2017-02-01

    The temperature distribution, microwave absorption efficiency, and dielectric properties of a copper (ii) oxide (CuO) pellet heated by microwave irradiation were investigated for use in developing a single-mode-type microwave heating thermogravimetry apparatus. The validity of the apparatus was confirmed by comparing the measured data with the results of numerical simulations. The dielectric properties and error margins of other parameters estimated using the apparatus were also examined. The temperature distribution of the CuO pellet was observed to decrease monotonously on moving from the outlet to the inlet side of the apparatus. A three-dimensional numerical simulation of the electromagnetic field accurately reproduced this temperature distribution, suggesting the one-way movement of microwaves in the single-mode-type microwave apparatus. The numerically determined dependency of the CuO absorption efficiency was also found to be in very good agreement with published data. The same was the case with the permittivity loss of the CuO at various temperatures, as estimated from the measured microwave absorption efficiency. However, a larger error was observed in the estimation of the permittivity loss of a material with a lower microwave absorption efficiency, which was apparently due to the measurement error of the absorption efficiency of such a material.

  14. Raman Lidar Temperature Profiler Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aircraft wake vortices is especially hazardous during the landing and taking-off phases of flight. It is essential to obtain an accurate atmospheric temperature...

  15. Parametric dependencies of JET electron temperature profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schunke, B. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Imre, K.; Riedel, K. [New York Univ., NY (United States)

    1994-07-01

    The JET Ohmic, L-Mode and H-Mode electron temperature profiles obtained from the LIDAR Thomson Scattering Diagnostic are parameterized in terms of the normalized flux parameter and a set of the engineering parameters like plasma current, toroidal field, line averages electron density... It is shown that the electron temperature profiles fit a log-additive model well. It is intended to use the same model to predict the profile shape for D-T discharges in JET and in ITER. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Microwave radiometric signatures of temperature anomalies in tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Patrick; Sobers, Tamara; St. Peter, Benjamin; Siqueira, Paul; Capraro, Geoffrey

    2012-03-01

    Because of its ability to measure the temperature-dependent power of electromagnetic radiation emitted from tissue down to several centimeters beneath the skin, microwave radiometry has long been of interest as a means for identifying the internal tissue temperature anomalies that arise from abnormalities in physiological parameters such as metabolic and blood perfusion rates. However, the inherent lack of specificity and resolution in microwave radiometer measurements has limited the clinical usefulness of the technique. The idea underlying this work is to make use of information (assumed to be available from some other modality) about the tissue configuration in the volume of interest to study and improve the accuracy of anomaly detection and estimation from radiometric data. In particular, knowledge of the specific anatomy and the properties of the overall measurement system enable determination of the signatures of localized physiological abnormalities in the radiometry data. These signatures are used to investigate the accuracy with which the location of an anomaly can be determined from radiometric measurements. Algorithms based on matches to entries in a signature dictionary are developed for anomaly detection and estimation. The accuracy of anomaly identification is improved when the coupling of power from the body to the sensor is optimized. We describe the design of a radiometer waveguide having dielectric properties appropriate for biomedical applications.

  17. Temperature measurements of a high-power microwave feedhorn window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Daniel J.; Perez, Raul M.; Glazer, Stuart D.

    1990-06-01

    Temperature measurements of a high-power microwave feedhorn window, obtained using an imaging IR radiometer during transmitter operation at 365 kW CW and 8.5 GHz, are discussed. The window under investigation was constructed of HTP-6, a high-thermal-performance material developed to shield the Space Shuttle Orbiter from the heat of reentry. The measurement technique is described, and experimental results are presented. The window performed adequately at 365 kW CW with a center temperature of 475 C. The tests verify that HTP-6 can be used as a window material or a support structure in high-power waveguides at power densities of 1.47 kW/sq cm for extended periods of time, with no change in its mechanical characteristics.

  18. Preliminary study on direct assimilation of cloud-affected satellite microwave brightness temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sibo; Guan, Li

    2017-02-01

    Direct assimilation of cloud-affected microwave brightness temperatures from AMSU-A into the GSI three-dimensional variational (3D-Var) assimilation system is preliminarily studied in this paper. A combination of cloud microphysics parameters retrieved by the 1D-Var algorithm (including vertical profiles of cloud liquid water content, ice water content, and rain water content) and atmospheric state parameters from objective analysis fields of an NWP model are used as background fields. Three cloud microphysics parameters (cloud liquid water content, ice water content, and rain water content) are applied to the control variable. Typhoon Halong (2014) is selected as an example. The results show that direct assimilation of cloud-affected AMSU-A observations can effectively adjust the structure of large-scale temperature, humidity and wind analysis fields due to the assimilation of more AMSU-A observations in typhoon cloudy areas, especially typhoon spiral cloud belts. These adjustments, with temperatures increasing and humidities decreasing in the movement direction of the typhoon, bring the forecasted typhoon moving direction closer to its real path. The assimilation of cloud-affected satellite microwave brightness temperatures can provide better analysis fields that are more similar to the actual situation. Furthermore, typhoon prediction accuracy is improved using these assimilation analysis fields as the initial forecast fields in NWP models.

  19. Low temperature regeneration of activated carbons using microwaves: revising conventional wisdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calışkan, E; Bermúdez, J M; Parra, J B; Menéndez, J A; Mahramanlıoğlu, M; Ania, C O

    2012-07-15

    The purpose of this work was to explore the application of microwaves for the low temperature regeneration of activated carbons saturated with a pharmaceutical compound (promethazine). Contrary to expectations, microwave-assisted regeneration did not lead to better results than those obtained under conventional electric heating. At low temperatures the regeneration was incomplete either under microwave and conventional heating, being this attributed to the insufficient input energy. At mild temperatures, a fall in the adsorption capacity upon cycling was obtained in both devices, although this was much more pronounced for the microwave. These results contrast with previous studies on the benefits of microwaves for the regeneration of carbon materials. The fall in the adsorption capacity after regeneration was due to the thermal cracking of the adsorbed molecules inside the carbon porous network, although this effect applies to both devices. When microwaves are used, along with the thermal heating of the carbon bed, a fraction of the microwave energy seemed to be directly used in the decomposition of promethazine through the excitation of the molecular bonds by microwaves (microwave-lysis). These results point out that the nature of the adsorbate and its ability to interact with microwave are key factors that control the application of microwaves for regeneration of exhausted activated carbons.

  20. 1D-Var temperature retrievals from microwave radiometer and convective scale model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Martinet

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the potential of ground-based microwave radiometers (MWR for providing accurate temperature retrievals by combining convective scale numerical models and brightness temperatures (BTs. A one-dimensional variational (1D-Var retrieval technique has been tested to optimally combine MWR and 3-h forecasts from the French convective scale model AROME. A microwave profiler HATPRO (Humidity and Temperature PROfiler was operated during 6 months at the meteorological station of Bordeaux (Météo France. MWR BTs were monitored against simulations from the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator 2 radiative transfer model. An overall good agreement was found between observations and simulations for opaque V-band channels but large errors were observed for channels the most affected by liquid water and water vapour emissions (51.26 and 52.28 GHz. 1D-Var temperature retrievals are performed in clear-sky and cloudy conditions using a screening procedure based on cloud base height retrieval from ceilometer observations, infrared radiometer temperature and liquid water path derived from the MWR observations. The 1D-Var retrievals were found to improve the AROME forecasts up to 2 km with a maximum gain of approximately 50 % in root-mean-square-errors (RMSE below 500 m. They were also found to outperform neural network retrievals. A static bias correction was proposed to account for systematic instrumental errors. This correction was found to have a negligible impact on the 1D-Var retrievals. The use of low elevation angles improves the retrievals up to 12 % in RMSE in cloudy-sky in the first layers. The present implementation achieved a RMSE with respect to radiosondes within 1 K in clear-sky and 1.3 K in cloudy-sky conditions for temperature.

  1. Neural Network Based Retrieval of Atmospheric Temperature Profile Using AMSU-A Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Gangwar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes artificial neural network (ANN based approach for the retrieval of atmospheric temperature profiles from AMSU-A microwave temperature sounder. The nonlinear relationship between the temperature profiles and satellite brightness temperatures dictates the use of ANN, which is inherently nonlinear in nature. Since latitudinal variation of temperature is dominant one in the Earth’s atmosphere, separate network configurations have been established for different latitudinal belts, namely, tropics, mid-latitudes, and polar regions. Moreover, as surface emissivity in the microwave region of electromagnetic spectrum significantly influences the radiance (or equivalently the brightness temperature at the satellite altitude, separate algorithms have been developed for land and ocean for training the networks. Temperature profiles from National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP analysis and brightness temperature observations of AMSU-A onboard NOAA-19 for the year 2010 have been used for training of the networks. Further, the algorithm has been tested on the independent dataset comprising several months of 2012 AMSU-A observations. Finally, an error analysis has been performed by comparing retrieved profiles with collocated temperature profiles from NCEP. Errors in the tropical region are found to be less than those in the mid-latitude and polar regions. Also, in each region the errors over ocean are less than the corresponding ones over land.

  2. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Temperature Profile Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides temperature profiles at 15 heights, containing the variables of virtual temperature, vertical velocity, the speed of sound, and w-bar. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean temperature profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  3. Phase Correlations in Cosmic Microwave Background Temperature Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Coles, P; Earl, J; Wright, D; Coles, Peter; Dineen, Patrick; Earl, John; Wright, Dean

    2003-01-01

    We study the statistical properties of spherical harmonic modes of temperature maps of the cosmic microwave background. Unlike other studies, which focus mainly on properties of the amplitudes of these modes, we look instead at their phases. In particular, we present a simple measure of phase correlation that can be diagnostic of departures from the standard assumption that primordial density fluctuations constitute a statistically homogeneous and isotropic Gaussian random field, which should possess phases that are uniformly random on the unit circle. The method we discuss checks for the uniformity of the distribution of phase angles using a non-parametric descriptor based on the use order statistics, which is known as Kuiper's statistic. The particular advantage of the method we present is that, when coupled to the judicious use of Monte Carlo simulations, it can deliver very interesting results from small data samples. In particular, it is useful for studying the properties of spherical harmonics at low l ...

  4. Ultrasonic Approach to Nonivasive Temperature Monitoring During Microwave Thermotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vrba

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Microwave thermotherapy (MT is an oncological treatment. At presentthe invasive thermometer probes are clinically used for temperaturemeasuring during an MT. Any invasive handling of tumors is ofhigh-risk. A new possible method of noninvasive monitoring oftemperature distribution in tissue has been developed. An MT treatmentof the experimentally induced pedicle-tumors of the rat was prepared.For 100 rat samples a strong correlation between the mean gray level inthe ROIs in the ultrasound pictures and the invasively measuredtemperature in the range 37-44 °C was found. The correlationcoefficient of the mean gray level and the invasively measuredtemperature is 0.96a0.05. A system for representation of changes ofspatial temperature distribution of the whole tumor during MT ispresented.

  5. Cosmic microwave background polarization and temperature anisotropies from symmetric structures

    CERN Document Server

    Baccigalupi, C

    1999-01-01

    I explore the undulatory properties of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) physics. I consider the cases of spherical and cylindrical symmetry of the perturbation source, or seed. Such structures could have been left by high energy symmetries breaking in the early universe. I give suitable analytic expressions for the polarization and temperature linear perturbations from this kind of seeds and I show how to get their appearence on the CMB sky. This treatment highlights the undulatory properties of the CMB. I show with numerical examples how the polarization and temperature perturbations propagate beyond the size of their seeds, reaching the CMB sound horizon at the time considered. Just like the waves from a pebble thrown in a pond, the CMB anisotropy appears as a series of temperature and polarization waves surrounding the seed, extending on the scale of the CMB sound horizon at decoupling, roughly $1^{o}$ in the sky. Each wave is characterized by its own value of the CMB perturbation, with the same mean ...

  6. Infrared fiber optic temperature monitoring of biological tissues heated in a microwave oven

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belotserkovsky, Edward; Ashkenasy, Y.; Shenfeld, Ofer; Drizlikh, S.; Zur, Albert; Katzir, Abraham

    1993-05-01

    The heating of tissue by microwave radiation has attained a place of importance in various medical fields such as the treatment of malignancies, urinary retention and hypothermia. Accurate temperature measurements in these treated tissues is important for treatment planning and for the control of the heating process. It is also important to be able to measure spacial temperature distribution in the tissues because they are heated in a non uniform way by the microwave radiation. Fiber optic radiometry makes possible accurate temperature measurement in the presence of microwave radiation and does not require contact with the tissue. Using a IR silver halide fiber optic radiometric temperature sensor we obtained accurate temperature measurements of tissues heated by microwave, enabling us to control the heating process in all regions of the tissue. We also performed temperature mapping of the heated tissues and demonstrated the non-uniform temperature distributions in them.

  7. Characterization of a Digital Microwave Radiometry System for Noninvasive Thermometry using Temperature Controlled Homogeneous Test Load

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Microwave radiometry has been proposed as a viable noninvasive thermometry approach for monitoring subsurface tissue temperatures and potentially controlling power levels of multielement heat applicators during clinical hyperthermia treatments. With the evolution of technology, several analog microwave radiometry devices have been developed for biomedical applications. In this paper, we describe a digital microwave radiometer with built-in electronics for signal processing and automatic self-...

  8. The Capability of Microwave Radiometers In Retrieving Soil Moisture Profiles Using A Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macelloni, G.; Paloscia, S.; Santi, E.; Tedesco, M.

    Hydrological models require the knowledge of land surface parameters like soil mois- ture and snow properties with a large spatial distribution and high temporal frequency. Whilst conventional methods are unable to satisfy the constraints of space and time estimation of these parameters, the use of remote sensing data represents a real im- provement. In particular the potential of data collected by microwave radiometers at low frequencies to extract soil moisture has been clearly demonstrated in several pa- pers. However, the penetration power into the soil depends on frequency and, whereas L-band is able to estimate the moisture of a relatively thick soil layer, higher frequen- cies are only sensitive to the moisture of soil layer closer to the surface. This remark leads to the hypothesis that multifrequency observations could be able to retrieve a soil moisture profile. In several experiments carried out both on agricultural fields and on samples of soil in a tank, by using the IROE multifrequency microwave radiometers, the effect of moisture and surface roughness on different frequencies was studied. From this experiments the capability of L-band in measuring the moisture of a soil layer of several centimeters, in the order of the wavelength, was confirmed, as well the sensitivity to the moisture of the first centimeters layer at C- and X-bands, and the one of the very first layer of smooth soil at Ka-band. Using an electromagnetic model (Integral Equation Model, IEM) the brightness temperatures as a function of the in- cidence angle were computed at 1.4, 6, 10, and 37 GHz for different soil moisture profiles and different surface roughness. A particular consideration was dedicated to the latter parameter, since, especially at Ka band, surface roughness strongly affects the emission and masks the effect of moisture. Different soil moisture profiles have been tested: increasing and decreasing with depth and also constant for sandy and sandy-loam soils. After this

  9. Experimental study of temperature distribution in rubber material during microwave heating and vulcanization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hai-Long; Li, Tao; Liang, Yun; Sun, Bin; Li, Qing-Ling

    2017-03-01

    Microwave technology has been employed to heat sheet rubber, the optical fiber temperature online monitor and optical fiber temperature sensor have been employed to measure the temperature in sheet rubber. The temperature of sheet rubber increased with increase of heating time during microwave heating process in which the maximum of temperature was rubber was higher than the rate of temperature rising in marginal zone of sheet rubber, and the final temperature in central zone of sheet rubber was also higher than the final temperature in marginal zone of sheet rubber. In the microwave heating and vulcanization process of sheet rubber, the maximum of rate of temperature rising and the maximum of temperature belong to the central zone of sheet rubber, so the distribution of electric field was uneven in heating chamber, which led to the uneven temperature distribution of sheet rubber. The higher electric field intensity value converges on the central zone of sheet rubber.

  10. 微波化学温度模拟研究进展%Progress of temperature simulation in microwave chemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐盼; 夏之宁; 李正华; 陈刚

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulation of the temperature distribution and variation plays an important role in microwave chemistry,which facilitates the control of microwave heating process,and possesses significance in the study of interaction between microwave irradiation and applied substances. This paper presents the methods and overall procedure in temperature profile modelling, integrally overviews the decisive issues, the application and advancement of temperature prediction in microwave chemistry. The current bottlenecks in further development are additionally propounded,and it is suggested that further theoretical research need be undertaken in order to aid deeper progress in this aspect.%在微波化学研究中,通过数学模拟分析微波作用在化学体系的温度分布及变化,有助于控制微波加热过程,了解微波与物质之间的相互作用机理.本文针对微波化学数值模拟的特点,系统介绍了各种方法及模拟过程,对数值模拟分析中的关键问题进行了讨论,综述了近年来数值模拟温度分布在微波化学中的应用,提出了目前的研究难点,并展望了发展趋势.

  11. High temperature superconducting thin films for microwave filters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO; Xinjie(赵新杰); LI; Lin(李林); LEI; Chong(雷冲); TIAN; Ybngjun(田永军)

    2002-01-01

    YBa2Cu3O7-δ and Tl2Ba2CaCu2O8 thin films for microwave filters were synthesized by pulsed laser deposition and the two-step thalliation process. Substrate quality requirements and the relation of thin film morphology, microstructure with microwave surface resistance were discussed.

  12. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Beam Measurements and the Microwave Brightness Temperatures of Uranus and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselfield, Matthew; Moodley, Kavilan; Bond, J. Richard; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Dunner, Rolando; Fowler, Joseph W.; Gallardo, Patricio; Gralla, Megan B.; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Hincks, Adam D.; Marriage, Tobias A.; Marsden, Danica; Niemack, Michael D.; Nolta, Michael R.; Page, Lyman A.; Partridge, Bruce; Schmitt, Benjamin L.; Sehgal, Neelima; Sievers, Jon; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Swetz, Daniel S.; Switzer, Eric R.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the measurement of the beam profiles and window functions for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT), which operated from 2007 to 2010 with kilopixel bolometer arrays centered at 148, 218, and 277 GHz. Maps of Saturn are used to measure the beam shape in each array and for each season of observations. Radial profiles are transformed to Fourier space in a way that preserves the spatial correlations in the beam uncertainty to derive window functions relevant for angular power spectrum analysis. Several corrections are applied to the resulting beam transforms, including an empirical correction measured from the final cosmic microwave background (CMB) survey maps to account for the effects of mild pointing variation and alignment errors. Observations of Uranus made regularly throughout each observing season are used to measure the effects of atmospheric opacity and to monitor deviations in telescope focus over the season. Using the WMAP-based calibration of the ACT maps to the CMB blackbody, we obtain precise measurements of the brightness temperatures of the Uranus and Saturn disks at effective frequencies of 149 and 219 GHz. For Uranus we obtain thermodynamic brightness temperatures T(149/U) = 106.7 +/- 2.2 K and T(219/U) = 100.1 +/- 3.1 K. For Saturn, we model the effects of the ring opacity and emission using a simple model and obtain resulting (unobscured) disk temperatures of T(149/S) = 137.3 +/- 3.2 K and T(219/S) = 137.3 +/- 4.7 K.

  13. Microwave sensor design for noncontact process monitoring at elevated temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadam, Yugandhara Rao; Arunachalam, Kavitha

    2016-02-01

    In this work we present a microwave sensor for noncontact monitoring of liquid level at high temperatures. The sensor is a high gain, directional conical lensed horn antenna with narrow beam width (BW) designed for operation over 10 GHz - 15 GHz. Sensor design and optimization was carried out using 3D finite element method based electromagnetic (EM) simulation software HFSS®. A rectangular to circular waveguide feed was designed to convert TE10 to TE11 mode for wave propagation in the conical horn. Swept frequency simulations were carried out to optimize antenna flare angle and length to achieve better than -10 dB return loss (S11), standing wave ratio (SWR) less than 2.0, 20° half power BW (HPBW) and 15 dB gain over 10 GHz - 15 GHz. The sensor was fabricated using Aluminum and was characterized in an anechoic test box using a vector network analyzer (E5071C, Agilent Technologies, USA). Experimental results of noncontact level detection are presented for boiling water in a metal canister.

  14. Cosmic microwave background: Polarization and temperature anisotropies from symmetric structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccigalupi, Carlo

    1999-06-01

    Perturbations in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) are generated by primordial inhomogeneities. I consider the case of CMB anisotropies from one single ordered perturbation source, or seed, existing well before decoupling between matter and radiation. Such structures could have been left by high energy symmetries breaking in the early universe. I focus on the cases of spherical and cylindrical symmetry of the seed. I give general analytic expressions for the polarization and temperature linear perturbations, factoring out of the Fourier integral the dependence on the photon propagation direction and on the geometric coordinates describing the seed. I show how the CMB perturbations manifestly reflect the symmetries of their seeds. In particular, polarization is uniquely linked to the shape of the source because of its tensorial nature. CMB anisotropies are obtained with a line of sight integration. They are a function of the position and orientation of the seed along the photons path. This treatment highlights the undulatory properties of the CMB. I show with numerical examples how the polarization and temperature perturbations propagate beyond the size of their seeds, reaching the CMB sound horizon at the time considered. Just like the waves from a pebble thrown in a pond, CMB anisotropy from a seed intersecting the last scattering surface appears as a series of temperature and polarization waves surrounding the seed, extending on the scale of the CMB sound horizon at decoupling, roughly 1 deg in the sky. Each wave is characterized by its own value of the CMB perturbation, with the same mean amplitude of the signal coming from the seed interior; as expected for a linear structure with size L<=H-1 and density contrast δ at decoupling, the temperature anisotropy is δT/T~=δ(L/H-1)2, roughly ten times stronger than the polarization. These waves could allow one to distinguish relics from high energy processes of the early universe from pointlike astrophysical

  15. Conductive heating and microwave hydrolysis under identical heating profiles for advanced anaerobic digestion of municipal sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdizadeh, Seyedeh Neda; Eskicioglu, Cigdem; Bobowski, Jake; Johnson, Thomas

    2013-09-15

    Microwave (2.45 GHz, 1200 W) and conventional heating (custom pressure vessel) pretreatments were applied to dewatered municipal waste sludge (18% total solids) using identical heating profiles that span a wide range of temperatures (80-160 °C). Fourteen lab-scale semi-continuous digesters were set up to optimize the energy (methane) output and sludge retention time (SRT) requirements of untreated (control) and thermally pretreated anaerobic digesters operated under mesophilic and thermophilic temperatures. Both pretreatment methods indicated that in the pretreatment range of 80-160 °C, temperature was a statistically significant factor (p-value heating, had no statistically significant effect (p-value >0.05) on sludge solubilization. With the exception of the control digesters at a 5-d SRT, all control and pretreated digesters achieved steady state at all three SRTs, corresponding to volumetric organic loading rates of 1.74-6.96 g chemical oxygen demand/L/d. At an SRT of 5 d, both mesophilic and thermophilic controls stopped producing biogas after 20 d of operation with total volatile fatty acids concentrations exceeding 1818 mg/L at pH <5.64 for mesophilic and 2853 mg/L at pH <7.02 for thermophilic controls, while the pretreated digesters continued producing biogas. Furthermore, relative (to control) organic removal efficiencies dramatically increased as SRT was shortened from 20 to 10 and then 5 d, indicating that the control digesters were challenged as the organic loading rate was increased. Energy analysis showed that, at an elevated temperature of 160 °C, the amount of methane recovered was not enough to compensate for the energy input. Among the digesters with positive net energy productions, control and pretreated digesters at 80 °C were more favorable at an SRT of 10 d.

  16. Microwave Spectroscopy of Superconductors with a Scanning Low Temperature Near-Field Microwave Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imtiaz, Atif; Anlage, Steven

    2001-03-01

    We have developed a new tool to study the microwave conductivity and other properties of superconductors: The Cryogenic scanning near-field microwave microscope integrated with STM feedback. This instrument allows localized spectroscopic measurements of these materials in a non-destructive way, at both low and high frequencies. We will discuss results that show it high spatial resolution on metal and superconducting films in the frequency range of 7-11 GHz and compare it to simultaneously-acquired topography of the surface using a scanning tunneling microscope. The high spatial resolution allows us to image the grains and grain boundaries in superconductors, while facilitating local spectroscopy. The instrument allows us to study the electronic properties from STM and the microwave spectroscopic properties of the materials from the microwave microscope simultaneously, and independently of each other. We will also discuss a model of the microscope, which gives a quantitative understanding of the frequency shift and Q, demonstrating that this microscope is qualitatively similar to our earlier version.^1 We shall present images of superconducting films in the critical state and discuss the possibility of imaging magnetic vortices at microwave frequencies. Reference: 1 [D.E.Steinhauer, C.P.vlahacos, S.K.Dutta, B.J.Feenstra, F.C.Wellstood, and Steven M.Anlage, "Quantitative Imaging of Sheet Resistance with a Scanning Near-Field Microwave Microscope," Appl. Phys. Lett. 72, 861 (1998)].

  17. An efficient empirical model for microwave-induced average temperature of liquid cylindrical reactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuqiao; Yakovlev, Vadim V

    2013-01-01

    Microwave-assisted chemical reactions have become very popular in preparative chemistry due to many advantages such as accelerated reaction rate, higher chemical yield and lower energy use. In dedicated equipment, however, the microwave units operate as "black boxes" keeping the role of the thermal effects in microwave-assisted chemical processes somewhat obscure. To address this issue, in this paper, we propose a simple mathematical model for computing microwave-induced temperature in a three-media cylindrical structure representing a core element of a typical microwave reactor with the reactant assumed to be stirred by convection flows. The model determines the average temperature of the reactant for the known absorbed microwave power and heating time. To illustrate its functionality, the model is used to compute time-temperature characteristics of water, ethanol, and methanol heated in the batch reactor MiniFlow 200SS. The curve calculated for water appears to be in an excellent agreement with an experiment. This confirms the hypothesis on temperature homogenization in liquid reactants in batch reactors due to convection and suggests that modeling can be helpful in clarifying and quantifying the details of microwave-assisted chemical processes.

  18. Influence of Temperature on the Performance of a Spin-Torque Microwave Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    temperatures. Index Terms—Microwave detector, noise properties, spin-transfer torque, temperature. I. INTRODUCTION T HE spin-transfer-torque ( STT ...oscillations under the action of a DC electric current [5]–[10], [14]. Another manifestation of STT , so-called spin torque diode effect [11]–[13], can...determination of the STT parameters [15], [16]. The spin torque diode effect is a quadratic rectification ef- fect of the input microwave current in a

  19. The Application of Microwave Low Temperature Plasma in Pretreatment of Cotton Fabric

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Xiao-guang; CUI Gui-xin; GU Zhen-ya

    2005-01-01

    The effect of microwave low temperature plasma pretreatment on desizing and removing natural impurity of cellulose fiber was studied. The influencing factors of pretreatment such as treating power, gas pressures and time were discussed in detail and the final effect had been compared with that of traditional pretreating process of cotton fabric. The results showed that better capillary effect, strength, whiteness and dyeing K/S value could be given by means of microwave low temperature plasma treatment.

  20. Sea-surface temperature and salinity mapping from remote microwave radiometric measurements of brightness temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans-Juergen, C. B.; Kendall, B. M.; Fedors, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    A technique to measure remotely sea surface temperature and salinity was demonstrated with a dual frequency microwave radiometer system. Accuracies in temperature of 1 C and in salinity of part thousand for salinity greater than 5 parts per thousand were attained after correcting for the influence of extraterrestrial background radiation, atmospheric radiation and attenuation, sea-surface roughness, and antenna beamwidth. The radiometers, operating at 1.43 and 2.65 GHz, comprise a third-generation system using null balancing and feedback noise injection. Flight measurements from an aircraft at an altitude of 1.4 km over the lower Chesapeake Bay and coastal areas of the Atlantic Ocean resulted in contour maps of sea-surface temperature and salinity with a spatial resolution of 0.5 km.

  1. Low temperature microwave-assisted vs conventional pyrolysis of various biomass feedstocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter Shuttleworth; Vitaliy Budarin; Mark Gronnow; James H. Clark; Rafael Luque

    2012-01-01

    A comparison between conventional pyrolysis and a novel developed low-temperature microwave-assisted pyrolysis methodology has been performed for the valorisation of a range of biomass feedstocks including waste residues.Microwave pyrolysis was found to efficiently deliver comparable evolution of bio-gases in the system as compared with conventional pyrolysis at significantly reduced temperatures (120-180 ℃ vs 250-400 ℃).The gas obtained from microwave-assistet pyrolysis was found to contain CO2,CH4 and CO as major components as well as other related chemicals (e.g.acids,aldehydes,alkanes) which were obtained in different proportions depending on the selected feedstock.

  2. A Microwave Technique for Mapping Ice Temperature in the Arctic Seasonal Sea Ice Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    St.Germain, Karen M.; Cavalieri, Donald J.

    1997-01-01

    A technique for deriving ice temperature in the Arctic seasonal sea ice zone from passive microwave radiances has been developed. The algorithm operates on brightness temperatures derived from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and uses ice concentration and type from a previously developed thin ice algorithm to estimate the surface emissivity. Comparisons of the microwave derived temperatures with estimates derived from infrared imagery of the Bering Strait yield a correlation coefficient of 0.93 and an RMS difference of 2.1 K when coastal and cloud contaminated pixels are removed. SSM/I temperatures were also compared with a time series of air temperature observations from Gambell on St. Lawrence Island and from Point Barrow, AK weather stations. These comparisons indicate that the relationship between the air temperature and the ice temperature depends on ice type.

  3. Ground-based lidar and microwave radiometry synergy for high vertical resolution absolute humidity profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Verdejo, María; Crewell, Susanne; Löhnert, Ulrich; Orlandi, Emiliano; Di Girolamo, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Continuous monitoring of atmospheric humidity profiles is important for many applications, e.g., assessment of atmospheric stability and cloud formation. Nowadays there are a wide variety of ground-based sensors for atmospheric humidity profiling. Unfortunately there is no single instrument able to provide a measurement with complete vertical coverage, high vertical and temporal resolution and good performance under all weather conditions, simultaneously. For example, Raman lidar (RL) measurements can provide water vapor with a high vertical resolution, albeit with limited vertical coverage, due to sunlight contamination and the presence of clouds. Microwave radiometers (MWRs) receive water vapor information throughout the troposphere, though their vertical resolution is poor. In this work, we present an MWR and RL system synergy, which aims to overcome the specific sensor limitations. The retrieval algorithm combining these two instruments is an optimal estimation method (OEM), which allows for an uncertainty analysis of the retrieved profiles. The OEM combines measurements and a priori information, taking the uncertainty of both into account. The measurement vector consists of a set of MWR brightness temperatures and RL water vapor profiles. The method is applied to a 2-month field campaign around Jülich (Germany), focusing on clear sky periods. Different experiments are performed to analyze the improvements achieved via the synergy compared to the individual retrievals. When applying the combined retrieval, on average the theoretically determined absolute humidity uncertainty is reduced above the last usable lidar range by a factor of ˜ 2 with respect to the case where only RL measurements are used. The analysis in terms of degrees of freedom per signal reveal that most information is gained above the usable lidar range, especially important during daytime when the lidar vertical coverage is limited. The retrieved profiles are further evaluated using

  4. Low-temperature-compatible tunneling-current-assisted scanning microwave microscope utilizing a rigid coaxial resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Imai, Yoshinori; Maeda, Atsutaka

    2016-06-01

    We present a design for a tunneling-current-assisted scanning near-field microwave microscope. For stable operation at cryogenic temperatures, making a small and rigid microwave probe is important. Our coaxial resonator probe has a length of approximately 30 mm and can fit inside the 2-in. bore of a superconducting magnet. The probe design includes an insulating joint, which separates DC and microwave signals without degrading the quality factor. By applying the SMM to the imaging of an electrically inhomogeneous superconductor, we obtain the spatial distribution of the microwave response with a spatial resolution of approximately 200 nm. Furthermore, we present an analysis of our SMM probe based on a simple lumped-element circuit model along with the near-field microwave measurements of silicon wafers having different conductivities.

  5. Relationships between evaprorative fraction and remotely sensed vegetation index and microwave brightness temperature for semiarid rangelands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustas, W. P.; Schimugge, T. J.; Humes, K. S.; Jackson, T. J.; Parry, R.; Weltz, M. A.; Moran, M. S.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of the microwave brightness temperature (TB) with the Pushbroom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR) over the Walnut Gulch Experiment Watershed were made on selected days during the MONSOON 90 field campaign. The PBMR is an L-band instrument (21-cm wavelength) that can provide estimates of near-surface soil moisture over a variety of surfaces. Aircraft observations in the visible and near-infrared wavelengths collected on selected days also were used to compute a vegetation index. Continuous micrometeorological measurements and daily soil moisture samples were obtained at eight locations during experimental period. Two sites were instrumented with time domain reflectometry probes to monitor the soil moisture profile. The fraction of available energy used for evapotranspiration was computed by taking the ratio of latent heat flux (LE) to the sum of net radiation (Rn) and soil heat flux (G). This ratio is commonly called the evaporative fraction (EF) and normally varies between 0 and 1 under daytime convective conditions with minimal advection. A wide range of environmental conditions existed during the field campaign, resulting in average EF values for the study area varying from 0.4 to 0.8 and values of TB ranging from 220 to 280 K. Comparison between measured TB and EF for the eight locations showed an inverse relationship. Other days were included in the analysis by estimating TB with the soil moisture data. Because transpiration from the vegetation is more strongly coupled to root zone soil moisture, significant scatter in this relationship existed at high values of TB or dry near-surface soil moisture conditions. The variation in EF under dry near-surface soil moisture conditions was correlated to the amount of vegetation cover estimated with a remotely sensed vegetation index. These findings indicate that information obtained from optical and microwave data can be used for quantifying the energy balance of semiarid areas. The microwave data can indicate

  6. Relationships between Evaporative Fraction and Remotely Sensed Vegetation Index and Microwave Brightness Temperature for Semiarid Rangelands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustas, W. P.; Schmugge, T. J.; Humes, K. S.; Jackson, T. J.; Parry, R.; Weltz, M. A.; Moran, M. S.

    1993-12-01

    Measurements of the microwave brightness temperature (TB) with the Pushbroom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR) over the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed were made on selected days during the MONSOON 90 field campaign. The PBMR is an L-band instrument (21-cm wavelength) that can provide estimates of near-surface soil moisture over a variety of surfaces. Aircraft observations in the visible and near-infrared wavelengths collected on selected days also were used to compute a vegetation index. Continuous micrometeorological measurements and daily soil moisture samples were obtained at eight locations during the experimental period. Two sites were instrumented with time domain reflectometry probes to monitor the soil moisture profile. The fraction of available energy used for evapotranspiration was computed by taking the ratio of latent heat flux (LE) to the sum of net radiation (Rn) and soil heat flux (G). This ratio is commonly called the evaporative fraction (EF) and normally varies between 0 and 1 under daytime convective conditions with minimal advection. A wide range of environmental conditions existed during the field campaign, resulting in average EF values for the study area varying from 0.4 to 0.8 and values of TB ranging from 220 to 280 K. Comparison between measured TB and EF for the eight locations showed an inverse relationship with a significant correlation (r2 = 0.69). Other days were included in the analysis by estimating TB with the soil moisture data. Because transpiration from the vegetation is more strongly coupled to root zone soil moisture, significant scatter in this relationship existed at high values of TB or dry near-surface soil moisture conditions. It caused a substantial reduction in the correlation with r2 = 0.40 or only 40% of the variation in EF being explained by TB. The variation in EF under dry near-surface soil moisture conditions was correlated to the amount of vegetation cover estimated with a remotely sensed vegetation index. These

  7. Soil moisture estimation by assimilating L-band microwave brightness temperature with geostatistics and observation localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xujun; Li, Xin; Rigon, Riccardo; Jin, Rui; Endrizzi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The observation could be used to reduce the model uncertainties with data assimilation. If the observation cannot cover the whole model area due to spatial availability or instrument ability, how to do data assimilation at locations not covered by observation? Two commonly used strategies were firstly described: One is covariance localization (CL); the other is observation localization (OL). Compared with CL, OL is easy to parallelize and more efficient for large-scale analysis. This paper evaluated OL in soil moisture profile characterizations, in which the geostatistical semivariogram was used to fit the spatial correlated characteristics of synthetic L-Band microwave brightness temperature measurement. The fitted semivariogram model and the local ensemble transform Kalman filter algorithm are combined together to weight and assimilate the observations within a local region surrounding the grid cell of land surface model to be analyzed. Six scenarios were compared: 1_Obs with one nearest observation assimilated, 5_Obs with no more than five nearest local observations assimilated, and 9_Obs with no more than nine nearest local observations assimilated. The scenarios with no more than 16, 25, and 36 local observations were also compared. From the results we can conclude that more local observations involved in assimilation will improve estimations with an upper bound of 9 observations in this case. This study demonstrates the potentials of geostatistical correlation representation in OL to improve data assimilation of catchment scale soil moisture using synthetic L-band microwave brightness temperature, which cannot cover the study area fully in space due to vegetation effects.

  8. Single-Antenna Temperature- and Humidity-Sounding Microwave Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Daniel J.; Pukala, David M.; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn H.; Soria, Mary M.; Owen, Heather R.; Tanner, Alan B.; Bruneau, Peter J.; Johnson, Alan K.; Kagaslahti, Pekka P.; Gaier, Todd C.

    2011-01-01

    For humidity and temperature sounding of Earth s atmosphere, a single-antenna/LNA (low-noise amplifier) is needed in place of two separate antennas for the two frequency bands. This results in significant mass and power savings for GeoSTAR that is comprised of hundreds of antennas per frequency channel. Furthermore, spatial anti-aliasing would reduce the number of horns. An anti-aliasing horn antenna will enable focusing the instrument field of view to the hurricane corridor by reducing spatial aliasing, and thus reduce the number of required horns by up to 50 percent. The single antenna/receiver assembly was designed and fabricated by a commercial vendor. The 118 183-GHz horn is based upon a profiled, smooth-wall design, and the OMT (orthomode transducer) on a quad-ridge design. At the input end, the OMT presents four ver y closely spaced ridges [0.0007 in. (18 m)]. The fabricated assembly contains a single horn antenna and low-noise broadband receiver front-end assembly for passive remote sensing of both temperature and humidity profiles in the Earth s atmosphere at 118 and 183 GHz. The wideband feed with dual polarization capability is the first broadband low noise MMIC receiver with the 118 to 183 GHz bandwidth. This technology will significantly reduce PATH/GeoSTAR mass and power while maintaining 90 percent of the measurement capabilities. This is required for a Mission-of-Opportunity on NOAA s GOES-R satellite now being developed, which in turn will make it possible to implement a Decadal-Survey mission for a fraction of the cost and much sooner than would otherwise be possible.

  9. Validation of the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder Temperature and Geopotential Height Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, M. J.; Lambert, A.; Manney, G. L.; Read, W. G.; Livesey, N. J.; Froidevaux, L.; Ao, C. O.; Bernath, P. F.; Boone, C. D.; Cofield, R. E.; Daffer, W. H.; Drouin, B. J.; Fetzer, E. J.; Fuller, R. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Jiang, J. H.; Jiang, Y. B.; Knosp, B. W.; Krueger, K.; Li, J.-L. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Pawson, S.; Russell, J. M., III; Santee, M. L.; Snyder, W. V.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the retrievals algorithm used to determine temperature and height from radiance measurements by the Microwave Limb Sounder on EOS Aura. MLS is a "limbscanning" instrument, meaning that it views the atmosphere along paths that do not intersect the surface - it actually looks forwards from the Aura satellite. This means that the temperature retrievals are for a "profile" of the atmosphere somewhat ahead of the satellite. Because of the need to view a finite sample of the atmosphere, the sample spans a box about 1.5km deep and several tens of kilometers in width; the optical characteristics of the atmosphere mean that the sample is representative of a tube about 200-300km long in the direction of view. The retrievals use temperature analyses from NASA's Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) data assimilation system as a priori states. The temperature retrievals are somewhat deperrdezt on these a priori states, especially in the lower stratosphere. An important part of the validation of any new dataset involves comparison with other, independent datasets. A large part of this study is concerned with such comparisons, using a number of independent space-based measurements obtained using different techniques, and with meteorological analyses. The MLS temperature data are shown to have biases that vary with height, but also depend on the validation dataset. MLS data are apparently biased slightly cold relative to correlative data in the upper troposphere and slightly warm in the middle stratosphere. A warm MLS bias in the upper stratosphere may be due to a cold bias in GEOS-5 temperatures.

  10. THE ATACAMA COSMOLOGY TELESCOPE: BEAM MEASUREMENTS AND THE MICROWAVE BRIGHTNESS TEMPERATURES OF URANUS AND SATURN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasselfield, Matthew [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Moodley, Kavilan [Astrophysics and Cosmology Research Unit, School of Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4041 (South Africa); Bond, J. Richard; Hajian, Amir; Hincks, Adam D.; Nolta, Michael R. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Das, Sudeep [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Devlin, Mark J.; Marsden, Danica; Schmitt, Benjamin L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Dunkley, Joanna [Department of Astrophysics, Oxford University, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Dünner, Rolando; Gallardo, Patricio [Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificía Universidad Católica, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Fowler, Joseph W.; Niemack, Michael D. [NIST Quantum Devices Group, 325 Broadway Mailcode 817.03, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Gralla, Megan B.; Marriage, Tobias A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-2686 (United States); Halpern, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Page, Lyman A. [Joseph Henry Laboratories of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Partridge, Bruce [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Haverford College, Haverford, PA 19041 (United States); and others

    2013-11-01

    We describe the measurement of the beam profiles and window functions for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT), which operated from 2007 to 2010 with kilopixel bolometer arrays centered at 148, 218, and 277 GHz. Maps of Saturn are used to measure the beam shape in each array and for each season of observations. Radial profiles are transformed to Fourier space in a way that preserves the spatial correlations in the beam uncertainty to derive window functions relevant for angular power spectrum analysis. Several corrections are applied to the resulting beam transforms, including an empirical correction measured from the final cosmic microwave background (CMB) survey maps to account for the effects of mild pointing variation and alignment errors. Observations of Uranus made regularly throughout each observing season are used to measure the effects of atmospheric opacity and to monitor deviations in telescope focus over the season. Using the WMAP-based calibration of the ACT maps to the CMB blackbody, we obtain precise measurements of the brightness temperatures of the Uranus and Saturn disks at effective frequencies of 149 and 219 GHz. For Uranus we obtain thermodynamic brightness temperatures T{sub U}{sup 149}= 106.7 ± 2.2 K and T{sub U}{sup 219}= 100.1 ± 3.1 K. For Saturn, we model the effects of the ring opacity and emission using a simple model and obtain resulting (unobscured) disk temperatures of T{sub S}{sup 149}= 137.3 ± 3.2 K and T{sub S}{sup 219}= 137.3 ± 4.7 K.

  11. Experimental study of temperature distribution in rubber material during microwave heating and vulcanization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hai-Long; Li, Tao; Liang, Yun; Sun, Bin; Li, Qing-Ling

    2016-07-01

    Microwave technology has been employed to heat sheet rubber, the optical fiber temperature online monitor and optical fiber temperature sensor have been employed to measure the temperature in sheet rubber. The temperature of sheet rubber increased with increase of heating time during microwave heating process in which the maximum of temperature was curves of temperature-time presented nonlinearity. The rate of temperature rising in central zone of sheet rubber was higher than the rate of temperature rising in marginal zone of sheet rubber, and the final temperature in central zone of sheet rubber was also higher than the final temperature in marginal zone of sheet rubber. In the microwave heating and vulcanization process of sheet rubber, the maximum of rate of temperature rising and the maximum of temperature belong to the central zone of sheet rubber, so the distribution of electric field was uneven in heating chamber, which led to the uneven temperature distribution of sheet rubber. The higher electric field intensity value converges on the central zone of sheet rubber.

  12. The lensing and temperature imprints of voids on the cosmic microwave background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yan-Chuan; Neyrinck, Mark; Mao, Qingqing; Peacock, John A.; Szapudi, Istvan; Berlind, Andreas A.

    2017-04-01

    We have searched for the signature of cosmic voids in the cosmic microwave background (CMB), in both the Planck temperature and lensing-convergence maps; voids should give decrements in both. We use ZOBOV voids from the Data Release 12 Sloan Digital Sky Survey CMASS galaxy sample. We base our analysis on N-body simulations, to avoid a posteriori bias. For the first time, we detect the signature of voids in CMB lensing: the significance is 3.2σ, close to Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) in both amplitude and projected density-profile shape. A temperature dip is also seen, at modest significance (2.3σ), with an amplitude about six times the prediction. This temperature signal is induced mostly by voids with radii between 100 and 150 h-1 Mpc, while the lensing signal is mostly contributed by smaller voids - as expected; lensing relates directly to density, while integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect (ISW) depends on gravitational potential. The void abundance in observations and simulations agree as well. We also repeated the analysis excluding lower significance voids: no lensing signal is detected with an upper limit of about twice the ΛCDM prediction. But the mean temperature decrement now becomes non-zero at the 3.7σ level (similar to that found by Granett et al.), with an amplitude about 20 times the prediction. However, the observed dependence of temperature on void size is in poor agreement with simulations, whereas the lensing results are consistent with ΛCDM theory. Thus, the overall tension between theory and observations does not favour non-standard theories of gravity, despite the hints of an enhanced amplitude for the ISW effect from voids.

  13. A new radiation balance microwave thermograph for simultaneous and independent temperature and emissivity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luedeke, K M; Koehler, J; Kanzenbach, J

    1979-06-01

    In the past, biomedical temperature measurements by microwave radiometry suffered from variable mismatch (emissivity less than 1) between the specimen under test and the receiving antenna. We have developed an improved radiometer, which simultaneously measures temperature and emissivity, independent by of a possible mismatch. Comparative measurements demonstrate the superiority of the new system as compared to conventional ones.

  14. 月表微波辐射对月壤厚度及其物理温度廓线的反演%Microwave brightness temperature of lunar cratered surface and inversions of physical temperature profile and thickness of regolith layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宫晓蕙; 金亚秋

    2012-01-01

    以中国"嫦娥"1号(CE-1)卫星多通道微波辐射计对月球辐射亮度温度测量数据,选取月球两极、赤道与沿经度150°W作为目标区域,结合月表面地形的数字高程模型(DEM),讨论环形山月球表面(特别是光照度低的两极区域)微波辐射亮度温度的分布。由昼夜温度变化产生的月壤物理温度分布廓线的三层辐射传输理论模型为基础,结合阿波罗登月点月壤厚度测量数据,用CE-1多通道微波辐射观测数据反演与讨论了目标区域的月壤层物理温度廓线及其月壤层厚度。%Based on the multi-channel brightness temperature observations of Chinese Chang' E-1 lunar satellite, inversions of the physical temperature profile of the lunar regolith medium and its layer thickness are discussed. As examples of two areas along the lunar equator and along the line of longitude 150°W the correspondence of the brightness temperature distribution to the lunar topography digital elevation mapping (DEM)is demonstrated, especially around lunar polar regions under poor solar illumination. Using a three-layer model of thermal radiative transfer, the physical temperature profile of regolith layer and its thickness are inverted. The results are compared with an empirical formulation of the physical temperature as a function of latitude based on some Apollo measurements.

  15. Greenhouse gas profiling by infrared-laser and microwave occultation: retrieval algorithm and demonstration results from end-to-end simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Proschek

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Measuring greenhouse gas (GHG profiles with global coverage and high accuracy and vertical resolution in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS is key for improved monitoring of GHG concentrations in the free atmosphere. In this respect a new satellite mission concept adding an infrared-laser part to the already well studied microwave occultation technique exploits the joint propagation of infrared-laser and microwave signals between Low Earth Orbit (LEO satellites. This synergetic combination, referred to as LEO-LEO microwave and infrared-laser occultation (LMIO method, enables to retrieve thermodynamic profiles (pressure, temperature, humidity and accurate altitude levels from the microwave signals and GHG profiles from the simultaneously measured infrared-laser signals. However, due to the novelty of the LMIO method, a retrieval algorithm for GHG profiling did not yet exist. Here we introduce such an algorithm for retrieving GHGs from LEO-LEO infrared-laser occultation (LIO data, applied as a second step after retrieving thermodynamic profiles from LEO-LEO microwave occultation (LMO data as recently introduced in detail by Schweitzer et al. (2011b. We thoroughly describe the LIO retrieval algorithm and unveil the synergy with the LMO-retrieved pressure, temperature, and altitude information. We furthermore demonstrate the effective independence of the GHG retrieval results from background (a priori information in discussing demonstration results from LMIO end-to-end simulations for a representative set of GHG profiles, including carbon dioxide (CO2, water vapor (H2O, methane (CH4, and ozone (O3. The GHGs except for ozone are well retrieved throughout the UTLS, while ozone is well retrieved from 10 km to 15 km upwards, since the ozone layer resides in the lower stratosphere. The GHG retrieval errors are generally smaller than 1% to 3% r.m.s., at a vertical resolution of about 1 km. The

  16. Greenhouse gas profiling by infrared-laser and microwave occultation: retrieval algorithm and demonstration results from end-to-end simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Proschek

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Measuring greenhouse gas (GHG profiles with global coverage and high accuracy and vertical resolution in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS is key for improved monitoring of GHG concentrations in the free atmosphere. In this respect a new satellite mission concept adding an infrared-laser part to the already well studied microwave occultation technique exploits the joint propagation of infrared-laser and microwave signals between Low Earth Orbit (LEO satellites. This synergetic combination, referred to as LEO-LEO microwave and infrared-laser occultation (LMIO method, enables to retrieve thermodynamic profiles (pressure, temperature, humidity and accurate altitude levels from the microwave signals and GHG profiles from the simultaneously measured infrared-laser signals. However, due to the novelty of the LMIO method, a retrieval algorithm for GHG profiling is not yet available. Here we introduce such an algorithm for retrieving GHGs from LEO-LEO infrared-laser occultation (LIO data, applied as a second step after retrieving thermodynamic profiles from LEO-LEO microwave occultation (LMO data. We thoroughly describe the LIO retrieval algorithm and unveil the synergy with the LMO-retrieved pressure, temperature, and altitude information. We furthermore demonstrate the effective independence of the GHG retrieval results from background (a priori information in discussing demonstration results from LMIO end-to-end simulations for a representative set of GHG profiles, including carbon dioxide (CO2, water vapor (H2O, methane (CH4, and ozone (O3. The GHGs except for ozone are well retrieved throughout the UTLS, while ozone is well retrieved from about 10 km to 15 km upwards, since the ozone layer resides in the lower stratosphere. The GHG retrieval errors are generally smaller than 1% to 3% r.m.s., at a vertical resolution of about 1 km. The retrieved profiles also appear unbiased, which points

  17. A Bayesian Retrieval of Greenland Ice Sheet Internal Temperature from Ultra-wideband Software-defined Microwave Radiometer (UWBRAD) Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Y.; Durand, M. T.; Jezek, K. C.; Yardim, C.; Bringer, A.; Aksoy, M.; Johnson, J.

    2015-12-01

    The ultra-wideband software-defined microwave radiometer (UWBRAD) is designed to provide ice sheet internal temperature product via measuring low frequency microwave emission. Twelve channels ranging from 0.5 to 2.0 GHz are covered by the instrument. A Bayesian framework was designed to retrieve the ice sheet internal temperature from UWBRAD brightness temperature (Tb) measurements for the Greenland air-borne demonstration scheduled for summer 2016. Several parameters would affect the ice sheet physical temperature. And the effective surface temperature, geothermal heat flux and the variance of upper layer ice density were treated as unknown random variables within the retrieval framework. Synthetic brightness temperature were calculated by the snow radiation transfer models as a function of ice temperature, ice density, and an estimate of snow grain size in the upper layers. A incoherent model-the Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS) and a coherent model were used respectively to estimate the influence of coherent effect. The inputs of the radiation transfer model were generated from a 1-D heat-flow equation developed by Robin and a exponential fit of ice density variation from Borehole measurement. The simulated Tb was corrupted with white noise and served as UWBRAD observation in retrieval. A look-up table was developed between the parameters and the corresponding Tb. In the Bayesian retrieval process, each parameter was defined with its possible range and set to be uniformly distributed. The Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach was applied to make the unknown parameters randomly walk in the parameter space. Experiment results were examined for science goals on three levels: estimation of the 10-m firn temperature, the average temperature integrated with depth, and the entire temperature profile. The 10-m temperature was estimated to within 0.77 K, with a bias of 0.6 K, across the 47 locations on the ice sheet; the 10-m "synthetic true

  18. EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION ON PREDICTING QUALITY OF MICROWAVE DEHYDRATED FOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad U. H. Joardder

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available During food drying, many other changes occur simultaneously, resulting in an improved overall quality. Among the quality attributes, the structure and its corresponding color influence directly or indirectly other properties of food. In addition, these quality attributes are affected by process conditions, material components and the raw structure of the foodstuff. In this work, the temperature distribution within food materials during microwave drying has been taken into consideration to observe its role in color modification. In order to determine the temperature distribution of microwave-dried food (apple, a thermal imaging camera has been used. The image acquired from the digital camera has been analysed using image J software in order to get the color change of fresh and dried apple. The results show that temperature distribution plays an important role in determining the quality of the food. The thermal imaging camera was deployed to observe the temperature distribution within food materials during drying. It is clearly observed from the higher value of (ERGB =102 and the uneven color change that uneven temperature distribution can influence customer perceptions of the quality of dried food. Simulation of a mathematical model of temperature distribution during microwave drying can make it possible to predict the colour and texture of the microwaved food.

  19. Influence of microwave heating on liquid-liquid phase inversion and temperature rates for immiscible mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Alvin; Tadesse, Solomon; Nunes, Janine; Reznik, Aron

    2011-01-01

    Time dependencies of component temperatures for mixtures of immiscible liquids during microwave heating were studied for acetonitrile-cyclohexane and water-toluene. For the first time, we report microwave induced liquid-liquid phase inversion for acetonitrile-cyclohexane mixture: acetonitrile layer was initially at the bottom of the mixture, after 10 sec of microwave heating its density decreased and it inverted to the top of the mixture for the remainder of the microwave heating. This phase inversion could not be achieved by conventional radiant heating. The maximum rate of temperature growth for the polar component of the mixtures was 2 - 5 times larger than for the non-polar component. This suggests that microwave energy is absorbed by polar liquids (water or acetonitrile) and heat is transferred into the non-polar liquid (toluene or cyclohexane) in the mixture by conduction (in case of cyclohexane) or conduction and convection (in case of toluene). Comparison between experimental data and semi-empirical mathematical models, proposed in [Kennedy et at., 2009] showed good correlation. Average relative error between theoretical and experimental results did not exceed 7%. These results can be used to model the temperature kinetics of components for other multiphase mixtures.

  20. Temperature anomaly detection and estimation using microwave radiometry and anatomical information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Patrick; Sobers, Tamara; St. Peter, Benjamin; Siqueira, Paul; Capraro, Geoffrey

    2011-03-01

    Many medically significant conditions (e.g., ischemia, carcinoma and inflammation) involve localized anomalies in physiological parameters such as the metabolic and blood perfusion rates. These in turn lead to deviations from normal tissue temperature patterns. Microwave radiometry is a passive system for sensing the radiation that objects emit naturally in the microwave frequency band. Since the emitted power depends on temperature, and since radiation at low microwave frequencies can propagate through several centimeters of tissue, microwave radiometry has the potential to provide valuable information about subcutaneous anomalies. The radiometric temperature measurement for a tissue region can be modeled as the inner product of the temperature pattern and a weighting function that depends on tissue properties and the radiometer's antenna. In the absence of knowledge of the weighting functions, it can be difficult to extract specific information about tissue temperature patterns (or the underlying physiological parameters) from the measurements. In this paper, we consider a scenario in which microwave radiometry works in conjunction with another imaging modality (e.g., 3D-CT or MRI) that provides detailed anatomical information. This information is used along with sensor properties in electromagnetic simulation software to generate weighting functions. It also is used in bio-heat equations to generate nominal tissue temperature patterns. We then develop a hypothesis testing framework that makes use of the weighting functions, nominal temperature patterns, and maximum likelihood estimates to detect anomalies. Simulation results are presented to illustrate the proposed detection procedures. The design and performance of an S-band (2-4 GHz) radiometer, and some of the challenges in using such a radiometer for temperature measurements deep in tissue, are also discussed.

  1. Measure of the temperature-depth profile by and S band radiometric receiver for biomedical applications; Mesure du profil de temperature en profondeur par un recepteur radiometrique a bande S pour applications biomedicales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bri, S. [Universite My, Lab. de Genie Electrique de Meknes (LGEM), Dept. Genie Electrique, Meknes (Morocco); Bri, S.; Zenkouar, L.; Bellarbi, L. [Laboratoire d' Electronique et Communications (LEC), EMI, Rabat (Morocco); Saadi, A.; Habibi, M. [Universite Ibn Tofail, Lab. d' Automatique et de Micro-ondes (LAMO), Faculte des Sciences, Dept. de Physique, Kenitra (Morocco); Mamouni, A. [Lille-1 Univ., IEMN, UMR CNRS 8520, 59 - Villeneuve-d' Ascq (France)

    2004-04-01

    The authors present a method for measuring the temperature-depth profile in a lossy material by applying Kalman algorithm to radiometric signals. The method employs a correlation microwave radiometer. It uses both short-range weighting functions and the delay times of the correlator. An experimental verification of this new thermal inversion approach is presented. The thermal noise is received in the microwave domain, by a S band radiometer by using an automatic experimental bench. A feature of this method is that it can be used in biomedical applications. (author)

  2. Temperature dependence of microwave oscillations in magnetic tunnel junctions with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Peng; Feng, Jiafeng, E-mail: hxwei@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: jiafengfeng@iphy.ac.cn; Wei, Hongxiang, E-mail: hxwei@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: jiafengfeng@iphy.ac.cn; Han, Xiufeng [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Fang, Bin; Zhang, Baoshun; Zeng, Zhongming [Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ruoshui Road 398, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2015-01-05

    We experimentally study the temperature dependence of the spin-transfer-torque-induced microwave oscillations in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction nanopillars with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer. We demonstrate that the oscillation frequency increases rapidly with decreasing temperature, which is mainly ascribed to the temperature dependence of both the saturation magnetization and the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. We also find that a strong temperature dependence of the output power while a nonmonotonic temperature dependence of spectral linewidth are maintained for a constant dc bias in measured temperature range. Possible mechanisms leading to the different dependences of oscillation frequency, output power, and linewidth are discussed.

  3. Temperature distributed micro-sensor by microwave correlation radiometry; Microcapteur distribue de temperature par radiometrie micro-onde par correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allal, D.; Bocquet, B. [Universite des Sciences et technologies de Lille, Institut d' Electronique et de Microelectronique du Nord, Dept. Hyperfrequences et Semiconducteurs UMR CNRS 9929, 59 - Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)

    1999-07-01

    We use a microwave correlation radiometer for determine the temperature on lossy transmission lines. The processing of raw information gives the physical temperature of hot spots with a poor spatial resolution and a non-complete information on the temperature gradient shape. We have developed an inversion process based on a Kalman filtering. We have defined, first, the notion of absolute functions, which allows to linearize the equations. In this paper, we show the possible improvement of the spatial and the temperature resolutions by the concept of a synthetic bandwidth radiometer. The development of a temperature distributed micro-sensor is now available. (authors)

  4. Time-resolved microplasma excitation temperature in a pulsed microwave discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, Jeffrey; Monfared, Shabnam; Hoskinson, Alan

    2013-09-01

    Microwave-driven microplasmas are usually operated in a steady-state mode such that the electron temperature is constant in time. Transient measurements of excitation temperature and helium emission lines, however, suggest that short microwave pulses can be used to raise the electron energy by 20-30% for approximately 100 ns. Time-resolved optical emission spectrometry reveals an initial burst of light emission from the igniting microplasma. This emission overshoot is also correlated with a measured increase in excitation temperature. Excimer emission lags atomic emission, however, and does not overshoot. A simple model demonstrates that an increase in electron temperature is responsible for the overshoot of atomic optical emission at the beginning of each microwave pulse. The formation of dimers and subsequent excimer emission requires slower three-body collisions with the excited rare gas atom; this is why excimer emission does not overshoot the steady state value. Similar experimental and modeling results are observed in argon gas. The overshoot in electron temperature may be used to manipulate the collisional production of species in microplasmas using short, low-duty cycle microwave pulses. This material is based upon work supported by the USAF and Physical Sciences Inc., under contract No. FA8650-C-12-C-2312. Additional support was provided by the DARPA MPD program under award FA9550-12-1-0006.

  5. The influence of snow depth and surface air temperature on satellite-derived microwave brightness temperature. [central Russian steppes, and high plains of Montana, North Dakota, and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J. L.; Hall, D. K.; Chang, A. T. C.; Rango, A.; Allison, L. J.; Diesen, B. C., III

    1980-01-01

    Areas of the steppes of central Russia, the high plains of Montana and North Dakota, and the high plains of Canada were studied in an effort to determine the relationship between passive microwave satellite brightness temperature, surface air temperature, and snow depth. Significant regression relationships were developed in each of these homogeneous areas. Results show that sq R values obtained for air temperature versus snow depth and the ratio of microwave brightness temperature and air temperature versus snow depth were not as the sq R values obtained by simply plotting microwave brightness temperature versus snow depth. Multiple regression analysis provided only marginal improvement over the results obtained by using simple linear regression.

  6. High-Energy-Low-Temperature Technologies for the Synthesis of Nanoparticles: Microwaves and High Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Lojkowski

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Microwave Solvothermal Synthesis (MSS is a chemical technology, where apart from possible effects of microwaves on the chemical reaction paths, microwave heating allows the precise planning of a time-temperature schedule, as well as to achieve high super-saturation of the reagents uniformly in the reactor vessel. Thus, MSS is suitable for production of nanoparticles with small grain size distribution and a high degree of crystallinity. A further advantage of the technology is a much lower synthesis temperature than for gas phase, plasma or sol-gel technologies. New reactors have been developed to exploit these advantages of the MSS technology of nanoparticles synthesis and to scale up the production rate. Reactor design and realization has been shown to be decisive and critical for the control of the MSS technology. Examples of oxidic and phosphatic nanoparticles synthesis have been reported.

  7. Broadband microwave measurement of electron temperature of a large coaxial gridded hollow cathode helium plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ruilin; Yuan, Chengxun; Jia, Jieshu; Zhou, Zhong-Xiang; Wang, Ying; Wang, Xiaoou; Li, Hui; Wu, Jian

    2016-10-01

    This paper reports a new kind of large coaxial gridded hollow cathode discharge at low pressure in a helium atmosphere. A method is presented to determine the electron temperature by measuring the broadband microwave properties; typically, the frequency band extends from 2 to 12 GHz. The method involves positioning the discharge device between the two antenna ports to measure the scattering parameter using a network analyzer. For a weak ionized plasma, this method is stable over the entire frequency range. A microwave signal loss of 0.27-37.83 dB was measured within the frequency range. Based on the measured attenuation of the microwaves, the electron temperature was estimated to range from 1.6-4.6 eV under different conditions, which showed good agreements with the results of Langmuir Probe measurements.

  8. Temperature Profiles and Hydrologic Implications from the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Gillespie

    2005-03-01

    In this investigation, 145 previously recorded temperature logs from 63 boreholes on or near the NTS were examined. Thirteen of these temperature logs were determined to be suitable for the determination of heat flow values. Additionally, 36 new temperature profiles were obtained in the field, either to validate existing temperature profiles, or to provide additional temperature profiles for heat flow determination. Of these, 23 boreholes were found to have temperature profiles suitable for the determination of additional heat flow values from one or more intervals within the boreholes. Comparison of the previously existing and relogged temperature profiles, in general, displayed excellent correlations, and demonstrated the usefulness and reliability of existing temperature profiles from the NTS. Heat flow values for intervals contained within the 36 boreholes from which values could be determined ranged from a low of 8.0 mW m-2 to a high of 181.6 mW m-2. Vertical variations in heat flow values, within individual boreholes, were readily explained by the advection of heat by groundwater flow. Horizontal consistencies and variations in heat flow values between various boreholes were dependent upon the geologic setting of the borehole, and the effect of vertical fluid movement. Temperature profiles are extremely easy and inexpensive to obtain. Considerable hydrologic information can be determined from the examination of a single temperature profile; however, if sufficient spatially distributed heat flow values are obtained, a heat transport model of the NTS could be used to reduce the uncertainty of nonisothermal hydrologic models.

  9. High dopant activation of phosphorus in Ge crystal with high-temperature implantation and two-step microwave annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tzu-Lang; Su, Yin-Hsien; Lee, Wen-Hsi

    2016-09-01

    In this letter, high-temperature ion implantation and low-temperature microwave annealing were employed to achieve high n-type active concentrations, approaching the solid solubility limit, in germanium. To use the characteristics of microwave annealing more effectively, a two-step microwave annealing process was employed. In the first annealing step, a high-power (1200 W; 425 °C) microwave was used to achieve solid-state epitaxial regrowth and to enhance microwave absorption. In the second annealing step, contrary to the usual process of thermal annealing with higher temperature, a lower-power (900 W; 375 °C) microwave process was used to achieve a low sheet resistance, 78Ω/◻, and a high carrier concentration, 1.025 × 1020 P/cm3, which is close to the solid solubility limit of 2 × 1020 P/cm3.

  10. All-Weather Sounding of Moisture and Temperature From Microwave Sensors Using a Coupled Surface/Atmosphere Inversion Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukabara, S. A.; Garrett, K.

    2014-12-01

    A one-dimensional variational retrieval system has been developed, capable of producing temperature and water vapor profiles in clear, cloudy and precipitating conditions. The algorithm, known as the Microwave Integrated Retrieval System (MiRS), is currently running operationally at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service (NESDIS), and is applied to a variety of data from the AMSU-A/MHS sensors on board the NOAA-18, NOAA-19, and MetOp-A/B polar satellite platforms, as well as SSMI/S on board both DMSP F-16 and F18, and from the NPP ATMS sensor. MiRS inverts microwave brightness temperatures into atmospheric temperature and water vapor profiles, along with hydrometeors and surface parameters, simultaneously. This atmosphere/surface coupled inversion allows for more accurate retrievals in the lower tropospheric layers by accounting for the surface emissivity impact on the measurements. It also allows the inversion of the soundings in all-weather conditions thanks to the incorporation of the hydrometeors parameters in the inverted state vector as well as to the inclusion of the emissivity in the same state vector, which is accounted for dynamically for the highly variable surface conditions found under precipitating atmospheres. The inversion is constrained in precipitating conditions by the inclusion of covariances for hydrometeors, to take advantage of the natural correlations that exist between temperature and water vapor with liquid and ice cloud along with rain water. In this study, we present a full assessment of temperature and water vapor retrieval performances in all-weather conditions and over all surface types (ocean, sea-ice, land, and snow) using matchups with radiosonde as well as Numerical Weather Prediction and other satellite retrieval algorithms as references. An emphasis is placed on retrievals in cloudy and precipitating atmospheres, including extreme weather events

  11. Orientation, temperature, and frequency dependence of nonresonant microwave absorption in HTSC powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gould, A.; Huang, M.; Bhagat, S.M. (Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-4111 (USA) Center for Superconductivity Research, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-4111 (USA)); Tyagi, S. (Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 11004 (USA))

    1991-04-15

    Hysteresis in the microwave-power absorption of HTSC powders was studied as a function of temperature ({ital T}), field-sweep amplitude ({ital H}{sub max}), and orientation between the dc field ({bold H}{sub dc}) and the wave vector of the microwaves ({bold k}). It was found that (i) the sizable low-temperature hysteresis effects occur only if {bold H}{sub dc}{parallel}{bold k}, (ii) the temperature and frequency dependence of the hysteresis is strongly affected by {ital H}{sub max}, (iii) the high- and low-temperature virgin curves are quite different, and (iv) the minimum of the absorption signal increases with {ital H}{sub max} and {ital T}. The low-temperature hysteresis loops were found to be similar to loops obtained from nonlinear equations describing cusp catastrophes.

  12. Global Temperature and Salinity Profile Programme (GTSPP) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Programme (GTSPP) develops and maintains a global ocean temperature and salinity resource with data that are both up-to-date...

  13. Can liquid water profiles be retrieved from passive microwave zenith observations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crewell, Susanne; Ebell, Kerstin; Löhnert, Ulrich; Turner, D. D.

    2009-03-01

    The ability to determine the cloud boundaries and vertical distribution of cloud liquid water for single-layer liquid clouds using zenith-pointing microwave radiometers is investigated. Simulations are used to demonstrate that there is little skill in determining either cloud base or cloud thickness, especially when the cloud thickness is less than 500 m. It is also shown that the different distributions of liquid water content within a cloud with known cloud boundaries results in a maximum change in the brightness temperature of less than 1 K at the surface from 20 to 150 GHz, which is on the order of the instrument noise level. Furthermore, it is demonstrated using the averaging kernel that the number of degrees of freedom for signal (i.e., independent pieces of information) is approximately 1, which implies there is no information on vertical distribution of liquid water in the microwave observations.

  14. Below and above boiling point comparison of microwave irradiation and conductive heating for municipal sludge digestion under identical heating/cooling profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini Koupaie, E; Eskicioglu, C

    2015-01-01

    This research provides a comprehensive comparison between microwave (MW) and conductive heating (CH) sludge pretreatments under identical heating/cooling profiles at below and above boiling point temperatures. Previous comparison studies were constrained to an uncontrolled or a single heating rate due to lack of a CH equipment simulating MW under identical thermal profiles. In this research, a novel custom-built pressure-sealed vessel which could simulate MW pretreatment under identical heating/cooling profiles was used for CH pretreatment. No statistically significant difference was proven between MW and CH pretreatments in terms of sludge solubilization, anaerobic biogas yield and organics biodegradation rate (p-value>0.05), while statistically significant effects of temperature and heating rate were observed (p-valueheating/cooling rates) was controlled.

  15. Temperature profile data from profiling drifter in the Indian, Southern, and Pacific Ocean (NODC Accession 9700028)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using the ALACE (Autonomous LAgrangian Circulation Explorer), which is a profiling drifter in the Indian, Southern, and...

  16. High-Temperature Probe Station Developed to Characterize Microwave Devices Through 500 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Alan N.; Schwartz, Zachary D.

    2004-01-01

    A photograph and a block diagram of the high-temperature probe station are shown. The system consists of the ceramic heater mounted on a NASA shuttle tile insulator, a direct current power supply, a personal-computer-based data acquisition and temperature controller, microwave probes, a microscope, and a network analyzer. The ability to perform microwave tests at high temperatures is becoming necessary. There is now a need for sensors and communication circuits that can operate at 500 C and above for aircraft engine development and monitoring during flight. To address this need, researchers have fabricated devices using wide bandgap semiconductors such as SiC with targeted operating temperatures of 500 to 600 C. However, the microwave properties of these devices often change drastically with temperature, so any designs that are intended to be used in such an environment must be characterized at high temperatures. For some reliability, lifetime, and direct-current testing, the device under test can be packaged and characterized in an oven. However, for RF and microwave measurements, it is usually not possible to establish a calibrated reference plane at the device terminals within a package. In addition, the characteristics of the package would vary over a 500 C temperature range, and this would have to be accounted for when the data were analyzed. A high temperature probe station allows circuits and devices to be characterized through on wafer measurements across a broad temperature range with known reference plane. The conventional, commercially available thermal wafer-probe stations that are used to evaluate microwave devices across a controlled temperature range have a typical upper limit of 200 C. Standalone thermal heating chucks are available with an extended upper temperature range of 300 to 400 C. To effectively characterize devices at temperatures up to and surpassing 500 C, Glenn researchers developed a custom probe station. In the past, custom probe

  17. Temperature measurements with two different IR sensors in a continuous-flow microwave heated system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydfjord, Jonas; Svensson, Fredrik; Fagrell, Magnus; Sävmarker, Jonas; Thulin, Måns; Larhed, Mats

    2013-01-01

    In a continuous-flow system equipped with a nonresonant microwave applicator we have investigated how to best assess the actual temperature of microwave heated organic solvents with different characteristics. This is non-trivial as the electromagnetic field will influence most traditional methods of temperature measurement. Thus, we used a microwave transparent fiber optic probe, capable of measuring the temperature inside the reactor, and investigated two different IR sensors as non-contact alternatives to the internal probe. IR sensor 1 measures the temperature on the outside of the reactor whilst IR sensor 2 is designed to measure the temperature of the fluid through the borosilicate glass that constitutes the reactor wall. We have also, in addition to the characterization of the before mentioned IR sensors, developed statistical models to correlate the IR sensor reading to a correct value of the inner temperature (as determined by the internal fiber optic probe), thereby providing a non-contact, indirect, temperature assessment of the heated solvent. The accuracy achieved with these models lie well within the range desired for most synthetic chemistry applications.

  18. Temperature measurements with two different IR sensors in a continuous-flow microwave heated system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Rydfjord

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In a continuous-flow system equipped with a nonresonant microwave applicator we have investigated how to best assess the actual temperature of microwave heated organic solvents with different characteristics. This is non-trivial as the electromagnetic field will influence most traditional methods of temperature measurement. Thus, we used a microwave transparent fiber optic probe, capable of measuring the temperature inside the reactor, and investigated two different IR sensors as non-contact alternatives to the internal probe. IR sensor 1 measures the temperature on the outside of the reactor whilst IR sensor 2 is designed to measure the temperature of the fluid through the borosilicate glass that constitutes the reactor wall. We have also, in addition to the characterization of the before mentioned IR sensors, developed statistical models to correlate the IR sensor reading to a correct value of the inner temperature (as determined by the internal fiber optic probe, thereby providing a non-contact, indirect, temperature assessment of the heated solvent. The accuracy achieved with these models lie well within the range desired for most synthetic chemistry applications.

  19. Causal Temperature Profiles in Horizon-free Collapse

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N. F. Naidu; M. Govender

    2007-12-01

    We investigate the causal temperature profiles in a recent model of a radiating star undergoing dissipative gravitational collapse without the formation of a horizon. It is shown that this simple exact model provides physically reasonable behaviour for the temperature profile within the framework of extended irreversible thermodynamics.

  20. Effects of subsurface volume scattering on the lunar microwave brightness temperature spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keihm, S. J.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of volumetric scattering on the lunar microwave brightness temperature are examined for a broad range of feasible lunar rock population distributions. Mie-scattering phase functions and the radiative transfer method are utilized. Surveyor and Apollo data relevant to lunar rock size distributions are discussed, and parameters are chosen for nine scattering models which liberally cover the range of studied rock population distributions. Scattering model brightness temperature predictions are analyzed in terms of the lunar disk center emission averaged over a lunation for wavelengths of 3-30 cm. The effects of scattering on the amplitude of disk center brightness temperature variations and resultant deductions of regolith electrical loss are examined. Constraints on the global scale variability of subsurface scatterers imposed by microwave brightness temperature maps are considered.

  1. A layer-averaged relative humidity profile retrieval for microwave observations: design and results for the Megha-Tropiques payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivira, R. G.; Brogniez, H.; Mallet, C.; Oussar, Y.

    2015-03-01

    A statistical method trained and optimized to retrieve seven-layer relative humidity (RH) profiles is presented and evaluated with measurements from radiosondes. The method makes use of the microwave payload of the Megha-Tropiques platform, namely the SAPHIR sounder and the MADRAS imager. The approach, based on a generalized additive model (GAM), embeds both the physical and statistical characteristics of the inverse problem in the training phase, and no explicit thermodynamical constraint - such as a temperature profile or an integrated water vapor content - is provided to the model at the stage of retrieval. The model is built for cloud-free conditions in order to avoid the cases of scattering of the microwave radiation in the 18.7-183.31 GHz range covered by the payload. Two instrumental configurations are tested: a SAPHIR-MADRAS scheme and a SAPHIR-only scheme to deal with the stop of data acquisition of MADRAS in January 2013 for technical reasons. A comparison to learning machine algorithms (artificial neural network and support-vector machine) shows equivalent performance over a large realistic set, promising low errors (biases 0.8) throughout the troposphere (150-900 hPa). A comparison to radiosonde measurements performed during the international field experiment CINDY/DYNAMO/AMIE (winter 2011-2012) confirms these results for the mid-tropospheric layers (correlations between 0.6 and 0.92), with an expected degradation of the quality of the estimates at the surface and top layers. Finally a rapid insight of the estimated large-scale RH field from Megha-Tropiques is presented and compared to ERA-Interim.

  2. Comparison of binning approaches for pulsed photothermal temperature profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanič, Matija; Majaron, Boris

    2009-07-01

    In experiments and numerical simulations of pulsed photothermal temperature profiling, we compare three signal binning approaches. In uniform binning n subsequent signal data points are averaged, quadratic binning follows from the characteristic of thermal diffusion, and geometrical binning utilizes geometric progression. Our experiment was performed on collagen gel samples with absorbing layers located at various subsurface depths. From measured PPTR signals laser-induced temperature profiles were reconstructed using spectrally composite kernel. The simulated PPTR signals of temperature profiles resembling experimental temperature profiles contain noise with characteristics consistent with our experimental system. In addition, we simulated PPTR signal of a biopsy-defined port-wine stain skin geometry. In PPTR temperature profiling of collagen gel samples, quadratic binning results in optimal reconstructions for shallow absorbing structures, while uniform binning performs optimally for deeper absorbing structures. Overall, geometric binning yields least accurate reconstructions, especially for deeper absorbing layers.

  3. Combining Satellite Microwave Radiometer and Radar Observations to Estimate Atmospheric Latent Heating Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecu, Mircea; Olson, William S.; Shie, Chung-Lin; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2009-01-01

    In this study, satellite passive microwave sensor observations from the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) are utilized to make estimates of latent + eddy sensible heating rates (Q1-QR) in regions of precipitation. The TMI heating algorithm (TRAIN) is calibrated, or "trained" using relatively accurate estimates of heating based upon spaceborne Precipitation Radar (PR) observations collocated with the TMI observations over a one-month period. The heating estimation technique is based upon a previously described Bayesian methodology, but with improvements in supporting cloud-resolving model simulations, an adjustment of precipitation echo tops to compensate for model biases, and a separate scaling of convective and stratiform heating components that leads to an approximate balance between estimated vertically-integrated condensation and surface precipitation. Estimates of Q1-QR from TMI compare favorably with the PR training estimates and show only modest sensitivity to the cloud-resolving model simulations of heating used to construct the training data. Moreover, the net condensation in the corresponding annual mean satellite latent heating profile is within a few percent of the annual mean surface precipitation rate over the tropical and subtropical oceans where the algorithm is applied. Comparisons of Q1 produced by combining TMI Q1-QR with independently derived estimates of QR show reasonable agreement with rawinsonde-based analyses of Q1 from two field campaigns, although the satellite estimates exhibit heating profile structure with sharper and more intense heating peaks than the rawinsonde estimates. 2

  4. Analysis and optimization of temperature distribution in carbon fiber reinforced composite materials during microwave curing process

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Vacuum assisted microwave curing technologies and modified optical sensing systems have been employed to investigate the influence of ply orientation and thickness on through-thickness temperature distribution of carbon fiber reinforced composite laminates. Two different types of epoxy systems have been studied. The results demonstrated that the ply orientation did not affect the temperature distribution of composite materials. However, the thickness was an important influencing factor. Nearl...

  5. Low dose of continuous-wave microwave irradiation did not cause temperature increase in muscles tissue adjacent to titanium alloy implants--an animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Dongmei; Xu, Yiming; Fu, Tengfei; Zhang, Han; Feng, Xianxuan; Wang, Gang; Jiang, Lan; Bai, Yuehong

    2013-12-23

    Research studies on the influence of radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation on implants in vitro have failed to investigate temperature changes in the tissues adjacent to the implants under microwave therapy. We therefore, used a rabbit model in an effort to determine the impact of microwave therapy on temperature changes in tissues adjacent to the titanium alloy implants and the safety profile thereof. Titanium alloy internal fixation plates were implanted in New Zealand rabbits in the middle of femur. Microwave therapy was performed by a 2450 MHz microwave generator 3 days after the surgery. Temperature changes of muscles adjacent to the implants were recorded under exposure to dose-gradient microwave radiation from 20w to 60w. Significant difference between control and microwave treatment group at peak temperatures (T(peak)) and temperature gap (T(gap) = T(peak)-T(vally)) were observed in deep muscles (T(peak), 41.63 ± 0.21°C vs. 44.40 ± 0.17°C, P muscles (T(peak), 41.53 ± 0.15°C vs. 42.03 ± 0.23°C, P = 0.04; T(gap), 5.23 ± 0.21°C vs. 5.80 ± 0.17°C, P = 0.013) under 60 w, and deep muscles (T(peak), 40.93 ± 0.25°C vs. 41.87 ± 0.23°C, P = 0.01; T(gap), 4.73 ± 0.20°C vs. 5.63 ± 0.35°C, P = 0.037) under 50w, but not under 20, 30 and 40w. Our results suggest that low-dose (20w-40w) continuous-wave microwave irradiation delivered by a 2450 MHz microwave generator might be a promising treatment for patients with titanium alloy internal fixation, as it did not raise temperature in muscle tissues adjacent to the titanium alloy implant.

  6. Microwave assisted flow synthesis: Coupling of electromagnetic and hydrodynamic phenomena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patil, N.G.; Benaskar, F.; Meuldijk, J.; Hulshof, L.A.; Hessel, V.; Schouten, J.C.; Esveld, D.C.; Rebrov, E.V.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the results of a modeling study performed to understand the microwave heating process in continuous-flow reactors. It demonstrates the influence of liquid velocity profiles on temperature and microwave energy dissipation in a microwave integrated milli reactor-heat exchanger.

  7. Dielectric properties measurement system at cryogenic temperatures and microwave frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molla, J.; Ibarra, A.; Margineda, J.; Zamarro, J. M.; Hernandez, A.

    1994-07-01

    A system based on the resonant cavity method has been developed to measure the permittivity and loss tangent at 12-18 GHz over the temperature range 80 K to 300 K. Changes of permittivity as low as 0.01 % in the range 1 to 30, and 3 x 10{sup 6} for loss tangent values below 10{sup 2}, can be obtained without requiring temperature stability. The thermal expansion coefficient and resistivity factor of copper have been measured between 80 K and 300 K. Permittivity of sapphire and loss tangent of alumina of 99.9 % purity in the same temperature range are presented. (Author) 23 refs.

  8. MSU (Microwave Sounding Unit) Daily Troposphere Temperatures and Precipitation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set consists of two MSU tropospheric temperatures levels and precipitation which are described in detail below. The NOAA satellites contributing to this...

  9. Numerical modeling of microwave heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukla A.K.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study compares the temperature distribution within cylindrical samples heated in microwave furnace with those achieved in radiatively-heated (conventional furnace. Using a two-dimensional finite difference approach the thermal profiles were simulated for cylinders of varying radii (0.65, 6.5, and 65 cm and physical properties. The influence of susceptor-assisted microwave heating was also modeled for the same. The simulation results reveal differences in the heating behavior of samples in microwaves. The efficacy of microwave heating depends on the sample size and its thermal conductivity.

  10. Rapid analysis of fatty acid profiles in raw nuts and seeds by microwave-ultrasonic synergistic in situ extraction-derivatisation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui-Lin; Song, Shuang-Hong; Wu, Mei; He, Tian; Zhang, Zhi-Qi

    2013-12-15

    Based on microwave-ultrasonic synergistic in situ extraction-derivatisation (MUED), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was proposed for rapid analysis of fatty acid profiles in raw nut and seed materials. Several critical experimental parameters for MUED, including reaction temperature, microwave power, amounts of catalyst and derivatisation reagent, have been optimised using response surface methodology. The results showed that the chromatographic peak areas of total fatty acids and the content of total unsaturated fatty acids obtained with MUED were markedly higher than those obtained by the conventional method (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively). The MUED method simplified the handling steps compared to the conventional procedure, shortened the sample preparation time whilst improving the extraction and derivatisation efficiency of lipids, and reduced oxidisation and decomposition of the unsaturated fatty acids. The simplicity, robustness and practicality of this method highlighted its significant potential for application in the rapid analysis of fatty acids in natural food resource samples.

  11. Microwave plasma monitoring system for the elemental composition analysis of high temperature process streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woskov, Paul P. (Bedford, MA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnuthill, MA); Titus, Charles H. (Newtown Square, PA); Surma, Jeffrey E. (Kennewick, WA)

    1997-01-01

    Microwave-induced plasma for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, high temperature capability refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury. The invention may be incorporated into a high temperature process device and implemented in situ for example, such as with a DC graphite electrode plasma arc furnace. The invention further provides a system for the elemental analysis of process streams by removing particulate and/or droplet samples therefrom and entraining such samples in the gas flow which passes through the plasma flame. Introduction of and entraining samples in the gas flow may be facilitated by a suction pump, regulating gas flow, gravity or combinations thereof.

  12. Analysis of a dryline-like feature in northern Germany detected by ground-based microwave profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spaenkuch, Dietrich [Leibniz-Soziaetet der Wissenschaften zu Berlin e.V. (Germany); Gueldner, Juergen [Deutscher Wetterdienst, Lindenberg (Germany). Meteorologisches Observatorium Lindenberg - Richard-Assmann-Observatorium; Bender, Michael [Helmholtz-Zentrum Potsdam, Potsdam (DE). Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ); Steinhagen, Hans

    2011-08-15

    Two dryline-like humidity drops without considerable temperature change were detected by the ground-based microwave radiometer profiler (MWRP) at the Richard-Assmann-Observatory Lindenberg (52.21 N, 14.12 E) on April 28, 2007. The detailed analysis of these two events includes cloud radar and radar wind profiler measurements at the site as well as data from the surface synoptic network and from integrated water vapour (IWV) maps derived from GPS. The first more pronounced humidity drop is part of a roughly 200 km long line that meets the criterion of a classical dryline or dewpoint front, namely of a moisture gradient larger 3.5 g m{sup -3} per 100 km. This dewpoint front is ahead of an approaching cold front and is caused by strong downdraft induced by low tropospheric wind shear due to weakening of a midtropospheric high over Germany. It consisted in particular in two kernels of variable size depending on their stage. The fate of the kernels - migration, speed, unification and divorce - is described in detail. Their lifetime was a bit more than 9 hours. The second humidity drop at the site was observed after the passage of the cold front and was caused by dry advection behind the front. Both events are predicted by the numerical weather prediction model COSMO-EU of the German Weather Service to some extent.

  13. Surface and Atmospheric Contributions to Passive Microwave Brightness Temperatures for Falling Snow Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Johnson, Benjamin T.

    2011-01-01

    Physically based passive microwave precipitation retrieval algorithms require a set of relationships between satellite -observed brightness temperatures (TBs) and the physical state of the underlying atmosphere and surface. These relationships are nonlinear, such that inversions are ill ]posed especially over variable land surfaces. In order to elucidate these relationships, this work presents a theoretical analysis using TB weighting functions to quantify the percentage influence of the TB resulting from absorption, emission, and/or reflection from the surface, as well as from frozen hydrometeors in clouds, from atmospheric water vapor, and from other contributors. The percentage analysis was also compared to Jacobians. The results are presented for frequencies from 10 to 874 GHz, for individual snow profiles, and for averages over three cloud-resolving model simulations of falling snow. The bulk structure (e.g., ice water path and cloud depth) of the underlying cloud scene was found to affect the resultant TB and percentages, producing different values for blizzard, lake effect, and synoptic snow events. The slant path at a 53 viewing angle increases the hydrometeor contributions relative to nadir viewing channels. Jacobians provide the magnitude and direction of change in the TB values due to a change in the underlying scene; however, the percentage analysis provides detailed information on how that change affected contributions to the TB from the surface, hydrometeors, and water vapor. The TB percentage information presented in this paper provides information about the relative contributions to the TB and supplies key pieces of information required to develop and improve precipitation retrievals over land surfaces.

  14. Recent Advancements in Microwave Imaging Plasma Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Park; C.C. Chang; B.H. Deng; C.W. Domier; A.J.H. Donni; K. Kawahata; C. Liang; X.P. Liang; H.J. Lu; N.C. Luhmann, Jr.; A. Mase; H. Matsuura; E. Mazzucato; A. Miura; K. Mizuno; T. Munsat; K. and Y. Nagayama; M.J. van de Pol; J. Wang; Z.G. Xia; W-K. Zhang

    2002-03-26

    Significant advances in microwave and millimeter wave technology over the past decade have enabled the development of a new generation of imaging diagnostics for current and envisioned magnetic fusion devices. Prominent among these are revolutionary microwave electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI), microwave phase imaging interferometers, imaging microwave scattering and microwave imaging reflectometer (MIR) systems for imaging electron temperature and electron density fluctuations (both turbulent and coherent) and profiles (including transport barriers) on toroidal devices such as tokamaks, spherical tori, and stellarators. The diagnostic technology is reviewed, and typical diagnostic systems are analyzed. Representative experimental results obtained with these novel diagnostic systems are also presented.

  15. Estimation of Soil Moisture Profile using a Simple Hydrology Model and Passive Microwave Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soman, Vishwas V.; Crosson, William L.; Laymon, Charles; Tsegaye, Teferi

    1998-01-01

    Soil moisture is an important component of analysis in many Earth science disciplines. Soil moisture information can be obtained either by using microwave remote sensing or by using a hydrologic model. In this study, we combined these two approaches to increase the accuracy of profile soil moisture estimation. A hydrologic model was used to analyze the errors in the estimation of soil moisture using the data collected during Huntsville '96 microwave remote sensing experiment in Huntsville, Alabama. Root mean square errors (RMSE) in soil moisture estimation increase by 22% with increase in the model input interval from 6 hr to 12 hr for the grass-covered plot. RMSEs were reduced for given model time step by 20-50% when model soil moisture estimates were updated using remotely-sensed data. This methodology has a potential to be employed in soil moisture estimation using rainfall data collected by a space-borne sensor, such as the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite, if remotely-sensed data are available to update the model estimates.

  16. Temperature Dependence of Biological Tissues Complex Permitivity at Microwave Frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Faktorova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper an universal overview of polarizing mechanisms with an emphasis on dipolar materials as the investigated tissues are regarded. Experimental apparatus is presented with giving its specificity as well as the method used at calculation of complex permittivity. The experimental part is aimed at temperature dependence of complex permittivity measurement of pig biological tissues with different properties. Experimental results are presented graphically with the commentary for courses of particular tissues.

  17. Temperature Dependence of Biological Tissues Complex Permitivity at Microwave Frequencies

    OpenAIRE

    Dagmar Faktorova

    2008-01-01

    In the paper an universal overview of polarizing mechanisms with an emphasis on dipolar materials as the investigated tissues are regarded. Experimental apparatus is presented with giving its specificity as well as the method used at calculation of complex permittivity. The experimental part is aimed at temperature dependence of complex permittivity measurement of pig biological tissues with different properties. Experimental results are presented graphically with the commentary for courses o...

  18. A Single 30 cm Aperture Antenna Design for the Operation of 2 Widely Separated Frequency Bands for the Active Temperature, Ozone and Moisture Microwave Spectrometer (ATOMMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanna, S.; Groppi, C.; Walker, C.; Schein, M.; Bell, S.; Wheelwright, B.; Drouet D'Aubigny, C.; Young, A.; Golish, D.; Kursinski, E.; Otarola, A.; Ward, D.; Sammler, K.; Bertiger, W.; Miller, M.; Pickett, H.

    2009-04-01

    The Active Temperature Ozone and Moisture Microwave Spectrometer (ATOMMS) is an active aircraft to aircraft remote sensing occultation instrument that is designed to accurately measure the vertically resolved profiles of temperature, pressure, density, water and ozone content of the atmosphere. It uses a complimentary set of microwave transmitters and receivers in ~22 GHz and ~183 GHz water bands installed in each aircraft to measure the absorption of water and ozone as a function of altitude. Space constraints prevent the use of two separate antennas for each of these bands, so a single, dual frequency antenna system has been designed to simultaneously transmit and receive these two widely spaced frequency bands. This paper presents a detailed design of a HDPE anti-reflection grooved lens antenna that is illuminated by 2 separate, coaxially mounted feed horns for the two different frequency bands. We present the design, optimization and initial testing of the feed and lens system.

  19. Microwave Assisted Synthesis of Ferrite Nanoparticles: Effect of Reaction Temperature on Particle Size and Magnetic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyani, S; Sangeetha, J; Philip, John

    2015-08-01

    The preparation of ferrite magnetic nanoparticles of different particle sizes by controlling the reaction temperature using microwave assisted synthesis is reported. The iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized at two different temperatures viz., 45 and 85 °C were characterized using techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The average size of iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized at 45 and 85 °C is found to be 10 and 13.8 nm, respectively, and the nanoparticles exhibited superparamagantic behavior at room temperature. The saturation magnetization values of nanoparticles synthesized at 45 and 85 °C were found to be 67 and 72 emu/g, respectively. The increase in particle size and saturation magnetization values with increase in incubation temperature is attributed to a decrease in supersaturation at elevated temperature. The Curie temperature was found to be 561 and 566 0C for the iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized at 45 and 85 °C, respectively. The FTIR spectrum of the iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized at different temperatures exhibited the characteristic peaks that corresponded to the stretching of bonds between octahedral and tetrahedral metal ions to oxide ions. Our results showed that the ferrite nanoparticle size can be varied by controlling the reaction temperature inside a microwave reactor.

  20. Temperature and microwave near field imaging by thermo-elastic optical indicator microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hanju; Arakelyan, Shant; Friedman, Barry; Lee, Kiejin

    2016-12-01

    A high resolution imaging of the temperature and microwave near field can be a powerful tool for the non-destructive testing of materials and devices. However, it is presently a very challenging issue due to the lack of a practical measurement pathway. In this work, we propose and demonstrate experimentally a practical method resolving the issue by using a conventional CCD-based optical indicator microscope system. The present method utilizes the heat caused by an interaction between the material and an electromagnetic wave, and visualizes the heat source distribution from the measured photoelastic images. By using a slide glass coated by a metal thin film as the indicator, we obtain optically resolved temperature, electric, and magnetic microwave near field images selectively with a comparable sensitivity, response time, and bandwidth of existing methods. The present method provides a practical way to characterize the thermal and electromagnetic properties of materials and devices under various environments.

  1. Characterizing the attenuation of coaxial and rectangular microwave-frequency waveguides at cryogenic temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurpiers, Philipp; Walter, Theodore; Magnard, Paul; Salathe, Yves; Wallraff, Andreas [ETH Zuerich, Department of Physics, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2017-12-15

    Low-loss waveguides are required for quantum communication at distances beyond the chip-scale for any low-temperature solid-state implementation of quantum information processors. We measure and analyze the attenuation constant of commercially available microwave-frequency waveguides down to millikelvin temperatures and single photon levels. More specifically, we characterize the frequency-dependent loss of a range of coaxial and rectangular microwave waveguides down to 0.005 dB/m using a resonant-cavity technique. We study the loss tangent and relative permittivity of commonly used dielectric waveguide materials by measurements of the internal quality factors and their comparison with established loss models. The results of our characterization are relevant for accurately predicting the signal levels at the input of cryogenic devices, for reducing the loss in any detection chain, and for estimating the heat load induced by signal dissipation in cryogenic systems. (orig.)

  2. The impact of melt ponds on summertime microwave brightness temperatures and sea-ice concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kern, Stefan; Rösel, Anja; Pedersen, Leif Toudal

    2016-01-01

    Sea-ice concentrations derived from satellite microwave brightness temperatures are less accurate during summer. In the Arctic Ocean the lack of accuracy is primarily caused by melt ponds, but also by changes in the properties of snow and the sea-ice surface itself. We investigate the sensitivity...... of eight sea-ice concentration retrieval algorithms to melt ponds by comparing sea-ice concentration with the melt-pond fraction. We derive gridded daily sea-ice concentrations from microwave brightness temperatures of summer 2009. We derive the daily fraction of melt ponds, open water between ice floes......, and the ice-surface fraction from contemporary Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) reflectance data. We only use grid cells where the MODIS sea ice concentration, which is the melt-pond fraction plus the ice-surface fraction, exceeds 90 %. For one group of algorithms, e.g., Bristol and Comiso...

  3. High temperature antigen retrieval and loss of nuclear morphology: a comparison of microwave and autoclave techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, N C; Attanoos, R; Jasani, B

    1996-01-01

    The use of high temperature antigen retrieval methods has been of major importance in increasing the diagnostic utility of immunocytochemistry. However, these techniques are not without their problems and in this report attention is drawn to a loss of nuclear morphological detail, including mitotic figures, following microwave antigen retrieval. This was not seen with an equivalent autoclave technique. This phenomenon was quantified using image analysis in a group of B cell lymphomas stained with the antibody L26. Loss of nuclear morphological detail may lead to difficulty in identifying cells accurately, which is important in the diagnostic setting-for example, when trying to distinguish a malignant lymphoid infiltrate within a mixed cell population. In such cases it would clearly be wise to consider the use of alternative high temperature retrieval methods and accept their slightly lower staining enhancement capability compared with the microwave technique. Images PMID:9038766

  4. Modeling and de-embedding the interferometric scanning microwave microscopy by means of dopant profile calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalas, L., E-mail: loukas.michalas@artov.imm.cnr.it; Marcelli, R. [National Research Council, Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems (CNR-IMM), Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Wang, F.; Brillard, C.; Theron, D. [Institut d' Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie, CNRS UMR 8520/University of Lille 1, Avenue Poincaré, CS 60069, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Chevalier, N.; Hartmann, J. M. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble, France and CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France)

    2015-11-30

    This paper presents the full modeling and a methodology for de-embedding the interferometric scanning microwave microscopy measurements by means of dopant profile calibration. A Si calibration sample with different boron-doping level areas is used to that end. The analysis of the experimentally obtained S{sub 11} amplitudes based on the proposed model confirms the validity of the methodology. As a specific finding, changes in the tip radius between new and used tips have been clearly identified, leading to values for the effective tip radius in the range of 45 nm to 85 nm, respectively. Experimental results are also discussed in terms of the effective area concept, taking into consideration details related to the nature of tip-to-sample interaction.

  5. Temperature Profile Measurements During Heat Treatment of BSCCO 2212 Coils

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2012-01-01

    The temperature profile of two different BSCCO 2212 coils has been analyzed. The profiles are obtained from thermocouples imbedded in the windings during the heat treatment that activates the 2212. The melting and freezing of the 2212 is clearly observed. A model that describes the data and can be used to guide the processing of new coils has been developed.

  6. Compensation of temperature frequency pushing in microwave resonator-meters on the basis VCO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drobakhin O. O.

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that the influence of temperature oscillations on the error of measurements of parameters in the case of the application of microwave resonator meters on the basis of a voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO can be minimized by software using a special algorithm of VCO frequency setting correction. An algorithm of VCO frequency setting correction for triangle control voltage is proposed.

  7. Improved Measurements of the Temperature and Polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background from QUaD

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, M L; Ade, P.; Bock, J.; Bowden, M.; Cahill, G.; Castro, P.G. (Patricia Garrido); Church, S.; Culverhouse, T.; Friedman, R. B.; Ganga, K.; Gear, W.K.; S. Gupta; Hinderks, J.; Kovac, John M.; Lange, A. E.

    2009-01-01

    We present an improved analysis of the final data set from the QUaD experiment. Using an improved technique to remove ground contamination, we double the effective sky area and hence increase the precision of our cosmic microwave background (CMB) power spectrum measurements by ~30% versus that previously reported. In addition, we have improved our modeling of the instrument beams and have reduced our absolute calibration uncertainty from 5% to 3.5% in temperature. The robustness of our result...

  8. Microwave absorption and resistively shunted Josephson junctions in high temperature CuO superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramachandran, J.S.; Huang, M.X.; Bhagat, S.M. (Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)); Kish, K.; Tyagi, S. (Dept. of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States))

    1992-11-01

    We report that the field dependence of the magnetoabsorption (virgin curve) in all pristine granular CuO type (HTSC) superconductors follows a one-parameter expression. This ''universal'' result is combined with previous measurements on field and temperature dependences of microwave absorption in HTSC to demonstrate that a simple model based on resistively shunted Josehpson junctions is adequate to qualitatively account for almost all the observations on powders, pellets, thin films and single crystals. (orig.).

  9. Microwave Absorption in Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ming-Hai; HU Xi-Wei; WU Qin-Chong; YU Guo-Yang

    2000-01-01

    The microwave power absorption in electron cyclotron resonance plasma reactor was investigated with a twodimensional hybrid-code. Simulation results indicated that there are two typical power deposition profiles over the entire parameter region: (1) microwave power deposition peaks on the axis and decreases in radial direction,(2) microwave power deposition has its maximum at some radial position, i.e., a hollow distribution. The spatial distribution of electron temperature resembles always to the microwave power absorption profile. The dependence of plasma parameter on the gas pressure is discussed also.

  10. Schottky Barrier Height Tuning via the Dopant Segregation Technique through Low-Temperature Microwave Annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaochao Fu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Schottky junction source/drain structure has great potential to replace the traditional p/n junction source/drain structure of the future ultra-scaled metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs, as it can form ultimately shallow junctions. However, the effective Schottky barrier height (SBH of the Schottky junction needs to be tuned to be lower than 100 meV in order to obtain a high driving current. In this paper, microwave annealing is employed to modify the effective SBH of NiSi on Si via boron or arsenic dopant segregation. The barrier height decreased from 0.4–0.7 eV to 0.2–0.1 eV for both conduction polarities by annealing below 400 °C. Compared with the required temperature in traditional rapid thermal annealing, the temperature demanded in microwave annealing is ~60 °C lower, and the mechanisms of this observation are briefly discussed. Microwave annealing is hence of high interest to future semiconductor processing owing to its unique capability of forming the metal/semiconductor contact at a remarkably lower temperature.

  11. Progress on applications of high temperature superconducting microwave filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunguang, Li; Xu, Wang; Jia, Wang; Liang, Sun; Yusheng, He

    2017-07-01

    In the past two decades, various kinds of high performance high temperature superconducting (HTS) filters have been constructed and the HTS filters and their front-end subsystems have been successfully applied in many fields. The HTS filters with small insertion loss, narrow bandwidth, flat in-band group delay, deep out-of-band rejection, and steep skirt slope are reviewed. Novel HTS filter design technologies, including those in high power handling filters, multiband filters and frequency tunable filters, are reviewed, as well as the all-HTS integrated front-end receivers. The successful applications to various civilian fields, such as mobile communication, radar, deep space detection, and satellite technology, are also reviewed.

  12. Making cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization maps with MADAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Poutanen, T.; Sirviö, A.-S.

    2010-02-01

    MADAM is a CMB map-making code, designed to make temperature and polarization maps of time-ordered data of total power experiments like Planck. The algorithm is based on the destriping technique, but it also makes use of known noise properties in the form of a noise prior. The method in its early form was presented in an earlier work by Keihänen et al. (2005, MNRAS, 360, 390). In this paper we present an update of the method, extended to non-averaged data, and include polarization. In this method the baseline length is a freely adjustable parameter, and destriping can be performed at a different map resolution than that of the final maps. We show results obtained with simulated data. This study is related to Planck LFI activities.

  13. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU)-A Brightness Temperature, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) for Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) brightness temperature in "window channels". The data cover a time period from...

  14. Landcover Based Optimal Deconvolution of PALS L-band Microwave Brightness Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Crosson, William L.; Laymon, Charles A.; Njoku, Eni G.

    2004-01-01

    An optimal de-convolution (ODC) technique has been developed to estimate microwave brightness temperatures of agricultural fields using microwave radiometer observations. The technique is applied to airborne measurements taken by the Passive and Active L and S band (PALS) sensor in Iowa during Soil Moisture Experiments in 2002 (SMEX02). Agricultural fields in the study area were predominantly soybeans and corn. The brightness temperatures of corn and soybeans were observed to be significantly different because of large differences in vegetation biomass. PALS observations have significant over-sampling; observations were made about 100 m apart and the sensor footprint extends to about 400 m. Conventionally, observations of this type are averaged to produce smooth spatial data fields of brightness temperatures. However, the conventional approach is in contrast to reality in which the brightness temperatures are in fact strongly dependent on landcover, which is characterized by sharp boundaries. In this study, we mathematically de-convolve the observations into brightness temperature at the field scale (500-800m) using the sensor antenna response function. The result is more accurate spatial representation of field-scale brightness temperatures, which may in turn lead to more accurate soil moisture retrieval.

  15. Comparison of microwave satellite humidity data and radiosonde profiles: a survey of European stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. O. John

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available A method to compare upper tropospheric humidity (UTH from satellite and radiosonde data has been applied to the European radiosonde stations. The method uses microwave data as a benchmark for monitoring the performance of the stations. The present study utilizes three years (2002–2003 of data from channel 18 (183.31±1.00 GHz of the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-B (AMSU-B aboard the satellites NOAA-15 and NOAA-16. The comparison is done in the radiance space, the radiosonde data were transformed to the channel radiances using a radiative transfer model. The comparison results confirm that there is a dry bias in the UTH measured by the radiosondes. This bias is highly variable among the stations and the years. This variability is attributed mainly to the differences in the radiosonde humidity measurements. The results also hint at a systematic difference between the two satellites, the channel 18 brightness temperature of NOAA-15 is on average 1.0 K higher than that of NOAA-16. The difference of 1 K corresponds to approximately 7% relative error in UTH which is significant for climatological applications.

  16. Calibration and brightness temperature algorithm of CE-1 Lunar Microwave Sounder (CELMS)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    CE-1 Lunar Microwave Sounder (CELMS) is the first passive microwave radiometer in the world to sound the surface of the Moon in the lunar orbit at altitude of 200 km. The scientific objective of CELMS is to obtain global brightness temperature (TB) of the Moon, to retrieve information on lunar regolith, and to evaluate the distribution of helium-3 on the Moon implanted by solar wind. Before launch of CELMS, a series of experiments were carried out in laboratories to test the performances of the systems, and to calibrate the responses between the input of TB and the output of voltage from the receivers. However, the thermal condition exposed to CELMS is more complicated in lunar orbit than on the Earth, which makes the temperatures of different parts of CELMS wave vary greatly, and the cosmic background is not very clean due to the pointing of cold space antenna to the direction of the satellite running, which brings uncertainties into data-processing of CELMS when the temperature of cold space is used as a calibrator. Furthermore, the lack of knowledge on the lunar ingredients and compositions, distributions of physical temperatures, and properties on lunar microwave radiation leads to difficulties in validating the measurements and retrievals of CELMS. By analyzing the results of ground experiments and the measurements of CELMS in-orbit, along with our knowledge of the properties of lunar surface, here we give algorithms on calibration and antenna pattern correction (APC) of CELMS. We also describe in detail the principle of microwave transfer among the elements of CELMS, and discuss the method on testing calibration parameters of the system. In addition, the theory and model on correction antenna pattern of CELMS are developed by comparing antenna temperatures by CELMS with those simulated by microwave radiative transfer models. The global distribution of TB is given and the features of TB are analyzed. Our results show rich information included in TB on the

  17. Temperature Profile of a Fluid between Two Rotating Porous Cylinders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bal Krishan

    1970-07-01

    Full Text Available An exact expression for the temperature profile between two concentric rotating porous cylinders has been obtained. The results are presented graphically. For the wide gap, there is a sharp rise in temperature when the ratio between the angular velocities of the outer and the inner cylinders tends to zero.

  18. Using Multispectral Imaging to Measure Temperature Profiles and Emissivity of Large Thermionic Dispenser, Cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.F. Simmons; C.M. Fortgang; D.B. Holtkamp

    2001-09-01

    Thermionic dispenser cathodes are widely used in modern high-power microwave tubes. Use of these cathodes has led to significant improvement in performance. In recent years these cathodes have been used in electron linear accelerators (LINACs), particularly in induction LINACs, such as the Experimental Test Accelerator at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Relativistic Test Accelerator at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. For induction LINACs, the thermionic dispenser cathode provides greater reproducibility, longer pulse lengths, and lower emittance beams than does a field emission cathode. Los Alamos National Laboratory is fabricating a dual-axis X-ray radiography machine called dual-axis radiograph hydrodynamic test (DARHT). The second axis of DARHT consists of a 2-kA, 20-MeV induction LINAC that uses a 3.2-MeV electron gun with a tungsten thermionic-dispenser cathode. Typically the DARHT cathode current density is 10 A/cm{sup 2} at 1050 C. Under these conditions current density is space-charge limited, which is desirable since current density is independent of temperature. At lower temperature (the temperature-limited regime) there are variations in the local current density due to a nonuniform temperature profile. To obtain the desired uniform current density associated with space-charge limited operation, the coolest area on the cathode must be at a sufficiently high temperature so that the emission is space-charge limited. Consequently, the rest of the cathode is emitting at the same space-charge-limited current density but is at a higher temperature than necessary. Because cathode lifetime is such a strong function of cathode temperature, there is a severe penalty for nonuniformity in the cathode temperature. For example, a temperature increase of 50 C means cathode lifetime will decrease by a factor of at least four. Therefore, we are motivated to measure the temperature profiles of our large-area cathodes.

  19. Determination of coronal temperatures from electron density profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Lemaire, J F

    2011-01-01

    The most popular method for determining coronal temperatures is the scale-height-method (shm). It is based on electron density profiles inferred from White Light (WL) brightness measurements of the corona during solar eclipses. This method has been applied to several published coronal electron density models. The calculated temperature distributions reach a maximum at r > 1.3 RS, and therefore do not satisfy one of the conditions for applying the shm method. Another method is the hydrostatic equilibrium method (hst), which enables coronal temperature distributions to be determined, providing solutions to the hydrostatic equilibrium equation. The temperature maximas using the hst method are almost equal to those obtained using the shm method, but the temperature peak is always at significantly lower altitude when the hst-method is used than when the shm-method is used. A third and more recently developed method, dyn, can be used for the same published electron density profiles. The temperature distributions ob...

  20. Studies on Excitation and Rotational Temperatures of an Oxygen-shielded Argon Microwave Plasma Torch Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Excitation( Texc ) and rotation( Trot ) temperatures were determined under different conditions for an oxygen-shielded argon microwave plasmsa torch source(OS-Ar-MPT). The Texc value, which was shown to be between 4300 and 5250 K under different operating conditions, was calculated from the slope of the Boltzmann plot with Fe as the thermometric species. The Trot value, which was in the range of 2100-2500 K, was measured with OH molecular spectra. The influences of microwave power, flow rates of the support gas, carrier gas, and shielding gas, as well as the observation height on Texc and Trot were investigated and discussed. The detailed results of Texc and Trot provided a better understanding of the performance of an OS-ArMPT as a source for atomic emission spectrometry.

  1. Weak-limit quasiparticle scattering via microwave spectroscopy of a high temperature superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, W.N.; Turner, P.J.; Harris, R.; Kamal, Saeid; Broun, D.M.; Mullins, G.K.; Liang, Ruixing; Bonn, D.A

    2004-08-01

    Recent progress in the measurement and interpretation of the low temperature microwave electrodynamics of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} is reviewed. Using a broadband bolometric technique, we have been able to measure the microwave conductivity of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6.50} and YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6.99} from 0.6 to 21 GHz. For the first time, the cusp-shaped conductivity spectra characteristic of weak-impurity scattering in a d-wave superconductor have been observed. Surprisingly, weak-limit scattering is seen from 1 to over 7 K in the underdoped sample, but develops in the fully oxygen-doped sample only below about 2.5 K. Preliminary ideas to explain this difference in terms of intermediate scattering phase shifts are presented.

  2. Characterization of a Digital Microwave Radiometry System for Noninvasive Thermometry using Temperature Controlled Homogeneous Test Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunachalam, K; Stauffer, P R; Maccarini, PF; Jacobsen, S; Sterzer, F

    2009-01-01

    Microwave radiometry has been proposed as a viable noninvasive thermometry approach for monitoring subsurface tissue temperatures and potentially controlling power levels of multielement heat applicators during clinical hyperthermia treatments. With the evolution of technology, several analog microwave radiometry devices have been developed for biomedical applications. In this paper, we describe a digital microwave radiometer with built-in electronics for signal processing and automatic self-calibration. Performance of the radiometer with an Archimedean spiral receive antenna is evaluated over a bandwidth of 3.7–4.2GHz in homogeneous and layered water test loads. Controlled laboratory experiments over the range of 30–50°C characterize measurement accuracy, stability, repeatability and penetration depth sensitivity. The ability to sense load temperature through an intervening water coupling bolus of 6mm thickness is also investigated. To assess clinical utility and sensitivity to electromagnetic interference (EMI), experiments are conducted inside standard clinical hyperthermia treatment rooms with no EM shielding. The digital radiometer provided repeatable measurements with 0.075°C resolution and standard deviation of 0.217°C for homogeneous and layered tissue loads at temperatures between 32–45°C. Within the 3.7–4.2GHz band, EM noise rejection was good other than some interference from overhead fluorescent lights in the same room as the radiometer. The system response obtained for ideal water loads suggests that this digital radiometer should be useful for estimating subcutaneous tissue temperatures under a 6mm waterbolus used during clinical hyperthermia treatments. The accuracy and stability data obtained in water test loads of several configurations support our expectation that single band radiometry should be sufficient for sub-surface temperature monitoring and power control of large multielement array superficial hyperthermia applicators. PMID

  3. Interpolation of spatial temperature profiles by sensor networks

    OpenAIRE

    Jedermann, Reiner; Palafox-Albarran, Javier; BARREIRO ELORZA, PILAR; Ruiz García, Luis; Robla Villalba, José Ignacio; Lang, Walter

    2012-01-01

    The monitoring of spatial profiles of a physical property such as temperature becomes feasible with the decreasing cost of wireless sensor nodes. But to obtain a temperature value for each point in space, it is necessary to interpolate between the existing sensor positions. Accurate spatial temperature supervision is a crucial precondition for maintaining high quality standards in the transportation of food products. The Kriging method was programmed for the ARM processor of the iMote2 sensor...

  4. EFFECTS OF MICROWAVE HYPERTHERMIA AT TWO DIFFERENT FREQUENCIES (434 AND 2450 MHZ ON HUMAN MUSCLE TEMPERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Ichinoseki-Sekine

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Heat therapy is commonly used to treat injured muscles, and recently, hyperthermia which has been used in oncology was introduced as a modality for use in sports medicine. The important physiological response which produces most of the beneficial effects of hyperthermia is increased blood flow (Sekins et al., 1984. Effective clinical response occurs when the temperature reaches 41 to 45 °C (Lehmann and de Lateur, 1982, increasing blood flow up to 15 times (Song, 1984. Sekins et al., 1984 reported that to produce observable variations in blood perfusion, temperature must rise above 41.5 °C as fast as possible. While there are several heating modalities, studies have shown that electromagnetic waves are more effective than other thermal modalities for treating injured muscles at depth of 1-4cm (Giombini et al., 2007. However, because of lack of research-based evidence of the microwave hyperthermia treatment, clinical and research studies need to be completed to confirm the therapeutic effectiveness of hyperthermia. We recently reported that hyperthermia treatment with a 434-MHz microwave and direct- contact applicator increased and maintained the muscle temperature locally by 6.3-11.4°C without causing muscle damage (Ichinoseki-Sekine et al., 2007. This system has also been found to be a highly innovative and reliable modality for treating acute muscle injuries (Giombini et al., 2001. However, most of the hyperthermia systems commonly used in clinical situations is equipped with a 2450-MHz microwave generator and a non-contact applicator. The possibility exists that the muscle temperature is influenced by the frequency and applicator style. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the changes in human muscle temperature induced by two different types of microwave hyperthermia systems. Our results could assist to solve the lack of research-based evidence for the clinical effectiveness of hyperthermia treatment. In this study two different

  5. Electrical properties of bilayer graphene synthesized using surface wave microwave plasma techniques at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takatoshi; Kato, Hiromitsu; Okigawa, Yuki; Ishihara, Masatou; Hasegawa, Masataka

    2017-01-01

    Bilayer graphene was synthesized at low temperature using surface wave microwave plasma techniques where poly(methyl metacrylate) (PMMA) and methane (CH4) were used as carbon sources. Temperature-dependent Hall effect measurements were carried out in a helium atmosphere. Sheet resistance, sheet carrier density and mobility showed weak temperature dependence for graphene from PMMA, and the highest carrier mobility is 740 cm2 V-1 s-1. For graphene from CH4, tunneling of the domain boundary limited carrier transport. The difference in average domain size was determined by Raman signal maps. In addition, residuals of PMMA were detected on graphene from PMMA. The low sheet resistances of graphene synthesized at a temperature of 280 °C using plasma techniques were explained by the PMMA related residuals rather than the domain sizes.

  6. A new algorithm for microwave radiometer remote sensing of sea surface salinity and temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN; Xiaobin; LIU; Yuguang; WANG; Zhenzhan

    2006-01-01

    The microwave radiation of the sea surface, which is denoted by the sea surface brightness temperature, is not only related with sea surface salinity (SSS) and temperature (SST), but also influenced by sea surface wind. The errors of wind detected by satellite sensor have significant influences on the accuracy of SSS and SST retrieval. The effects of sea surface wind on sea surface brightness temperature, i.e. △Th,v, and the relations among △Th,v, wind speed, sea surface temperature, sea surface salinity and incidence angle of observation are investigated. Based on the investigations, a new algorithm depending on the design of a single radiometer with double polarizations and multi-incidence angles is proposed. The algorithm excludes the influence of sea surface wind on SSS and SST retrieval, and provides a new method for remote sensing of SSS and SST.

  7. Probing Pluto's Underworld : Predicted Ice Temperatures from Microwave Radiometry Decoupled from Surface Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, Alice; Lorenz, Ralph; Leyrat, Cedric

    2015-11-01

    The Pluto dwarf planet has been successfully observed in July 2015 by the New Horizons spacecraft (NASA) during a close-targeted flyby which reavealed surprising and fascinating landscapes. While data are still being downlinked on the ground, we propose to present a prediction of the observation of the Radio Science Experiment experiment (REX) that occured on July 14, 2015 and aimed at measuring the microwave brightness temperature of Pluto’s night side.Present models admit a wide range of 2015 surface conditions at Pluto and Charon, where the atmospheric pressure may undergo dramatic seasonal variation and for which measurements have been performed by the New Horizons mission. One anticipated observation is the microwave brightness temperature, heretofore anticipated as indicating surface conditions relevant to surface-atmosphere equilibrium. However, drawing on recent experience with Cassini observations at Iapetus and Titan, we call attention to the large electrical skin depth of outer solar system materials such as methane, nitrogen or water ice, such that this observation may indicate temperatures averaged over depths of several or tens of meters beneath the surface.Using a seasonally-forced thermal model to determine microwave emission we predict that the southern hemisphere observations (in the polar night in July 2015) of New Horizons should display relatively warm effective temperatures of about 40 K. This would reflect the deep heat buried over the last century of summer, even if the atmospheric pressure suggests that the surface nitrogen frost point may be much lower. We will present our predictions and discuss their impact for the interpretation of the REX measurements.

  8. A GAS TEMPERATURE PROFILE BY INFRARED EMISSION-ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchele, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    This computer program calculates the temperature profile of a flame or hot gas. Emphasis is on profiles found in jet engine or rocket engine exhaust streams containing water vapor or carbon dioxide as radiating gases. The temperature profile is assumed to be axisymmetric with a functional form controlled by two variable parameters. The parameters are calculated using measurements of gas radiation at two wavelengths in the infrared spectrum. Infrared emission and absorption measurements at two or more wavelengths provide a method of determining a gas temperature profile along a path through the gas by using a radiation source and receiver located outside the gas stream being measured. This permits simplified spectral scanning of a jet or rocket engine exhaust stream with the instrumentation outside the exhaust gas stream. This program provides an iterative-cyclic computation in which an initial assumed temperature profile is altered in shape until the computed emission and absorption agree, within specified limits, with the actual instrument measurements of emission and absorption. Temperature determination by experimental measurements of emission and absorption at two or more wavelengths is also provided by this program. Additionally, the program provides a technique for selecting the wavelengths to be used for determining the temperature profiles prior to the beginning of the experiment. By using this program feature, the experimenter has a higher probability of selecting wavelengths which will result in accurate temperature profile measurements. This program provides the user with a technique for determining whether this program will be sufficiently accurate for his particular application, as well as providing a means of finding the solution. The input to the program consists of four types of data: (1) computer program control constants, (2) measurements of gas radiance and transmittance at selected wavelengths, (3) tabulations from the literature of gas

  9. Soil Temperature and Moisture Profile (STAMP) System Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, David R [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The soil temperature and moisture profile system (STAMP) provides vertical profiles of soil temperature, soil water content (soil-type specific and loam type), plant water availability, soil conductivity, and real dielectric permittivity as a function of depth below the ground surface at half-hourly intervals, and precipitation at one-minute intervals. The profiles are measured directly by in situ probes at all extended facilities of the SGP climate research site. The profiles are derived from measurements of soil energy conductivity. Atmospheric scientists use the data in climate models to determine boundary conditions and to estimate the surface energy flux. The data are also useful to hydrologists, soil scientists, and agricultural scientists for determining the state of the soil. The STAMP system replaced the SWATS system in early 2016.

  10. Estimating internal tissue temperature using microwave radiometry data and bioheat models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingyu; Kelly, Patrick

    2017-03-01

    An ability to noninvasively measure the temperature of internal tissue regions would be valuable for applications including the detection of malignancy, inflammation, or ischemia. The output power of a microwave radiometer with an antenna at the skin surface is a weighted average of temperature in a tissue volume beneath the antenna. It is difficult, however, to translate radiometric measurements into temperature estimates for specific internal tissue regions. The chief difficulty is insufficient data: in a realistic system there are no more than a few measurements to characterize the entire volume. Efficient use must be made of available prior information together with the radiometric data in order to generate a useful temperature map. In this work we assume that we know the tissue configuration (obtained from another modality), along with arterial blood temperature, skin temperature, and nominal tissue-specific values for metabolic and blood perfusion rates, thermal conductivity, and dielectric constants. The Pennes bioheat equation can then be used to construct a nominal temperature map, and electromagnetic simulation software to construct the radiometric weighting functions for any given radiometer configuration. We show that deviations from the nominal conditions in localized regions (due, e.g., to the presence of a tumor) lead to changes in the tissue temperature that can also be approximated in terms of the nominal bioheat model. This enables the development of algorithms that use the nominal model along with radiometric data to detect areas of elevated temperature and estimate the temperature in specified tissue regions.

  11. Key role of temperature monitoring in interpretation of microwave effect on transesterification and esterification reactions for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazubert, Alex; Taylor, Cameron; Aubin, Joelle; Poux, Martine

    2014-06-01

    Microwave effects have been quantified, comparing activation energies and pre-exponential factors to those obtained in a conventionally-heated reactor for biodiesel production from waste cooking oils via transesterification and esterification reactions. Several publications report an enhancement of biodiesel production using microwaves, however recent reviews highlight poor temperature measurements in microwave reactors give misleading reaction performances. Operating conditions have therefore been carefully chosen to investigate non-thermal microwave effects alone. Temperature is monitored by an optical fiber sensor, which is more accurate than infrared sensors. For the transesterification reaction, the activation energy is 37.1kJ/mol (20.1-54.2kJ/mol) in the microwave-heated reactor compared with 31.6kJ/mol (14.6-48.7kJ/mol) in the conventionally-heated reactor. For the esterification reaction, the activation energy is 45.4kJ/mol (31.8-58.9kJ/mol) for the microwave-heated reactor compared with 56.1kJ/mol (55.7-56.4kJ/mol) for conventionally-heated reactor. The results confirm the absence of non-thermal microwave effects for homogenous-catalyzed reactions.

  12. Short Time and Low Temperature Reaction between Metal Oxides through Microwave-Assisted Hydrothermal Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. V. Novais

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work demonstrates the possibility of synthesis of cadmium tungstate at low temperatures using oxide precursors. Cadmium tungstate (CdWO4 scintillator was produced via microwave-assisted hydrothermal reaction using the precursors CdO and WO3. The methodology was based on microwave radiation for heating, which is remarkably faster than the solid-state route or conventional hydrothermal procedure. CdWO4 monoclinic (wolframite structure was successfully obtained at 120°C for synthesis times as short as 20 min. This route does not require the use of templates or surfactants and yields self-assembled nanorods with size of around 24 ± 9 nm width and 260 ± 47 nm length. The growth mechanism for the formation of CdWO4 involves microwave-induced dissociation of the reagents and solvation of Cd2+ and WO42- ions, which are free to move and start the nucleation process. The luminescence properties of the produced nanoparticles were investigated, presenting a broad emission band at around 500 nm, which is comparable to that observed for samples produced using other chemical routes. This result highlights the great potential of the proposed method as a low-cost and time saving process to fabricate luminescent oxide nanoparticles.

  13. Temperature non-destructive testing by microwave radiometry: reduction of the frequency bandwidth; Controle non destructif de temperature par radiometrie micro-onde a bande etroite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubois, L.; Vanoverschelde, C.; Sozanski, J.P.; Chive, M. [IEMN-UMR CNRS 9929, Dept. Hyperfrequences et Semi-Conducteurs, 59 - Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)

    1999-07-01

    Temperature is an important parameter for industrial process control. With the usual methods we obtain only an invasive or superficial information about temperature. Microwave radiometry is a non-invasive way to know the temperature within dissipative body. This paper presents the design of a new radiometer. With this system, the radiometric temperature is independent of the reflection coefficient of the captor. A simplified calibration takes into account insertion losses of the microwave elements. Radiometer frequency bandwidth has been greatly reduced and we present the first results. (authors)

  14. Measurements of temperature profiles at the exit of small rockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, M; Harshbarger, F C

    1966-02-01

    The sodium line reversal technique was used to determine the reversal temperature profile across the exit of small rockets. Measurements were made on one 73-kg thrust rocket, and two 23-kg thrust rockets with different injectors. The large rocket showed little variation of reversal temperature across the plume. However, the 23-kg rockets both showed a large decrease of reversal temperature from the axis to the edge of the plume. In addition, the sodium line reversal technique of temperature measurement was compared with an infrared technique developed in these laboratories.

  15. Application of satellite microwave remote sensed brightness temperature in the regional soil moisture simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. K. Shi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available As the satellite microwave remote sensed brightness temperature is sensitive to land surface soil moisture (SM and SM is a basic output variable in model simulation, it is of great significance to use the brightness temperature data to improve SM numerical simulation. In this paper, the theory developed by Yan et al. (2004 about the relationship between satellite microwave remote sensing polarization index and SM was used to estimate the land surface SM from AMSR-E (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer – Earth Observing System brightness temperature data. With consideration of land surface soil texture, surface roughness, vegetation optical thickness, and the AMSR-E monthly SM products, the regional daily land surface SM was estimated over the eastern part of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. The results show that the estimated SM is lower than the ground measurements and the NCEP (American National Centers for Environmental Prediction reanalysis data at the Maqu Station (33.85° N, 102.57° E and the Tanglha Station (33.07° N, 91.94° E, but its regional distribution is reasonable and somewhat better than that from the daily AMSR-E SM product, and its temporal variation shows a quick response to the ground daily precipitations. Furthermore, in order to improve the simulating ability of the WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting model to land surface SM, the estimated SM was assimilated into the Noah land surface model by the Newtonian relaxation (NR method. The results indicate that, by fine tuning of the quality factor in NR method, the simulated SM values are improved most in desert area, followed by grassland, shrub and grass mixed zone. At temporal scale, Root Mean Square Error (RMSE values between simulated and observed SM are decreased 0.03 and 0.07 m3/m3 by using the NR method in the Maqu Station and the Tanglha Station, respectively.

  16. High-temperature heating and microwave pretreatments: A new light in bamboo's enzymatic hydrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Jiajia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A combined technology of high-temperature heating and microwave is proposed to treat bamboo substrates prior to enzymatic hydrolysis to overcome the limits of ei- ther technology. The combined technology helps to promote the reducing sugar yield from enzymatic hydrolysis of bamboo. The protein adsorption test indicated that more enzyme proteins could adsorb on the surface of bamboo pretreated by the combined technology. Thus, the possibility of enzymes to hydrolyze bamboo increased. Meanwhile, X-ray diffractometry tested revealed that the combined technology benefited the removal of non-cellulosic substances from bamboo and resulted in a higher crystallinity.

  17. Low Temperature Plasmas Generated and Sustained Indefinitely Using a Focused Microwave Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Remington; Hoff, Brad; Lepell, Paul; AFRL Team

    2016-10-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory has constructed a device that can initiate a plasma discharge in a focused microwave beam and sustain it indefinitely. A 10 kW, 4.5 GHz beam is passed through a vacuum chamber outfitted with pressure windows that are transparent to 4.5 GHz radiation. The pressure windows are large enough in diameter to prevent any interactions between the beam and the metallic chamber. The entire experiment is housed inside an anechoic chamber to minimize reflections. This novel plasma source generates low temperature, low density plasmas that have no contact with the walls which minimizes contamination and sheath formation.

  18. Probing Pluto's underworld: Ice temperatures from microwave radiometry decoupled from surface conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyrat, Cedric; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Le Gall, Alice

    2016-04-01

    Present models admit a wide range of 2015 surface conditions at Pluto and Charon, where the atmospheric pressure may undergo dramatic seasonal variation and for which measurements are imminent from the New Horizons mission. One anticipated observation is the microwave brightness temperature, heretofore anticipated as indicating surface conditions relevant to surface-atmosphere equilibrium. However, drawing on recent experience with Cassini observations at Iapetus and Titan, we call attention to the large electrical skin depth of outer Solar System materials such as methane, nitrogen or water ice, such that this observation may indicate temperatures averaged over depths of several or tens of meters beneath the surface. Using a seasonally-forced thermal model to determine microwave emission we predict that the southern hemisphere observations (in polar night) of New Horizons in July 2015 will suggest effective temperatures of ∼40 K, reflecting deep heat buried over the last century of summer, even if the atmospheric pressure suggests that the surface nitrogen frost point may be much lower.

  19. Cosmic microwave background temperature evolution by Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistelli, E. S.; De Petris, M.; Lamagna, L.; Melchiorri, F.; Palladino, E.; Savini, G.; Cooray, A.; Melchiorri, A.; Rephaeli, Y.; Shimon, M.

    Spectral observations of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect are now available for a few clusters of galaxies. We have deduced the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature using data of the Coma cluster (A1656, z=0.0231) and of A2163 (z=0.203) over four bands at radio and microwave frequencies. The estimated temperatures at these redshifts are T_Coma = 2.789+0.080-0.065 K and T_A2163 = 3.377+0.101-0.102 K, respectively. These values confirm the expected scaling T(z)=T0(1+z), where T0= 2.725 +/- 0.002 K is the value measured by the COBE/FIRAS experiment. At the same time alternative CMB temperature evolutions as foreseen in non-standard cosmologies can be constrained by the data; for example, if T(z) = T0(1+z)1-a or T(z)=T0[1+(1+d)z], then a=-0.16+0.34-0.32 and d = 0.17 +/- 0.36 (at 95% confidence). We briefly discuss future prospects for more precise SZ measurements of T(z) at higher redshifts.

  20. Influence of microwave vacuum drying on glass transition temperature, gelatinization temperature, physical and chemical qualities of lotus seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yingting; Jiang, Yajun; Zheng, Baodong; Zhuang, Weijing; Zheng, Yafeng; Tian, Yuting

    2017-08-01

    This study investigated the effects of microwave power density on effective moisture diffusion coefficient (Deff), glass transition temperature (Tg), gelatinization temperature (TP), physical and chemical qualities of lotus seeds during microwave vacuum drying. Deff increased by 42% and 127% at 15W/g and 20W/g, respectively, when compared with 10W/g. TP was negatively correlated with the relaxation times of T21 and T22, while Tg was negatively correlated with the relative areas A22. The rates of change of color were observed to be divided roughly into two periods, consisting of a rapid change caused by enzymatic browning and a slow change caused by non-enzymatic browning. An equation is provided to illustrate the relationship of k1 and k2 of Peleg's model depending on power density during rehydration kinetics. The samples at 20W/g exhibited the higher content of amino acid (540.19mg/100gd.b.) while lower starch (17.53g/100gd.b.).

  1. Microwave noise temperature and attenuation of clouds at frequencies below 50 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobin, S. D.

    1981-01-01

    The microwave attenuation and noise temperature effects of clouds can result in serious degradation of telecommunications link performance, especially for low-noise systems presently used in deep-space communications. Although cloud effects are generally less than rain effects, the frequent presence of clouds will cause some amount of link degradation a large portion of the time. Cloud types, water particle densities, radiative transfer, attenuation and noise temperature calculations are reviewed and examples of basic link signal to noise ratio calculations are given. Calculations for twelve different cloud models are presented for frequencies of from 1 to 50 GHz and elevation angles of 30 degrees and 90 degrees. These case results may be used as a handbook to predict noise temperature and attenuation values for known or forecast cloud conditions.

  2. Retrieving soil surface temperature under snowpack using special sensor microwave/imager brightness temperature in forested areas of Heilongjiang, China: an improved method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xingming; Li, Xiaofeng; Jiang, Tao; Ding, Yanling; Wu, Lili; Zhang, Shiyi; Zhao, Kai

    2016-04-01

    Soil surface temperature (Ts) is an important indicator of global temperature change and a key input parameter for retrieving land surface variables using remote sensing techniques. Due to the masking in the thermal infrared band and the scattering in the microwave band of snow, the temperature of soil surfaces covered by snow is difficult to infer from remote sensing data. We attempted to estimate Ts under snow cover using brightness temperature data from the special sensor microwave/imager. Ts under snow cover was underestimated due to the strong scattering effect of snow on upward soil microwave emissions at 37 GHz. The underestimated portion of Ts is related to snow properties, such as depth, grain size, and moisture. Based on the microwave emission model of layered snowpacks, the simulated results revealed a linear relationship between the underestimated Ts and the brightness temperature difference (TBD) at 19 and 37 GHz. When TBDs at 19 and 37 GHz were introduced to the Ts estimation method, accuracy improved, i.e., the root mean square error and bias of the estimated Ts decreased greatly, especially for dry snow. This improvement allows Ts estimation of snow-covered surfaces from 37 GHz microwave brightness temperature.

  3. Assessment of NOAA NUCAPS upper air temperature profiles using COSMIC GPS radio occultation and ARM radiosondes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltz, M. L.; Borg, L.; Knuteson, R. O.; Tobin, D.; Revercomb, H.; Gambacorta, A.

    2017-09-01

    The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) recently began operational processing to derive vertical temperature profiles from two new sensors, Cross-Track Infrared Sounder and Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder, which were developed for the next generation of U.S. weather satellites. The NOAA-Unique Combined Atmospheric Processing System (NUCAPS) has been developed by NOAA to routinely process data from future Joint Polar Satellite System operational satellites and the preparatory Suomi-NPP satellite. This paper assesses the NUCAPS vertical temperature profile product from the upper troposphere into the middle stratosphere using radiosonde and GPS radio occultation (RO) data. Radiosonde data from the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program are=] compared to both the NUCAPS and GPS RO temperature products to evaluate bias and RMS errors. At all three fixed ARM sites for time periods investigated the NUCAPS temperature in the 100-40 hPa range is found to have an average bias to the radiosondes of less than 0.45 K and an RMS error of less than 1 K when temperature averaging kernels are applied. At a 95% confidence level, the radiosondes and RO were found to agree within 0.4 K at the North Slope of Alaska site and within 0.83 K at Southern Great Plains and Tropical Western Pacific. The GPS RO-derived dry temperatures, obtained from the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) mission, are used as a common reference for the intercomparison of NUCAPS temperature products to similar products produced by NASA from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and by European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites from MetOp-B Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI). For seasonal and zonal scales, the NUCAPS agreement with AIRS and IASI is less than 0.5 K after application of averaging kernels.

  4. Microwave brightness temperature and thermal inertia - towards synergistic method of high-resolution soil moisture retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukowski, Mateusz; Usowicz, Boguslaw; Sagan, Joanna; Szlazak, Radoslaw; Gluba, Lukasz; Rojek, Edyta

    2017-04-01

    Soil moisture is an important parameter in many environmental studies, as it influences the exchange of water and energy at the interface between the land surface and the atmosphere. Accurate assessment of the soil moisture spatial and temporal variations is crucial for numerous studies; starting from a small scale of single field, then catchment, mesoscale basin, ocean conglomeration, finally ending at the global water cycle. Despite numerous advantages, such as fine accuracy (undisturbed by clouds or daytime conditions) and good temporal resolution, passive microwave remote sensing of soil moisture, e.g. SMOS and SMAP, are not applicable to a small scale - simply because of too coarse spatial resolution. On the contrary, thermal infrared-based methods of soil moisture retrieval have a good spatial resolution, but are often disturbed by clouds and vegetation interferences or night effects. The methods that base on point measurements, collected in situ by monitoring stations or during field campaigns, are sometimes called "ground truth" and may serve as a reference for remote sensing, of course after some up-scaling and approximation procedures that are, unfortunately, potential source of error. Presented research concern attempt to synergistic approach that join two remote sensing methods: passive microwave and thermal infrared, supported by in situ measurements. Microwave brightness temperature of soil was measured by ELBARA, the radiometer at 1.4 GHz frequency, installed at 6 meters high tower at Bubnow test site in Poland. Thermal inertia around the tower was modelled using the statistical-physical model whose inputs were: soil physical properties, its water content, albedo and surface temperatures measured by an infrared pyrometer, directed at the same footprint as ELBARA. The results coming from this method were compared to in situ data obtained during several field campaigns and by the stationary agrometeorological stations. The approach seems to be

  5. Annealing temperature effect on microstructure, magnetic and microwave properties of Fe-based amorphous alloy powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He Jinghua; Wang Wei; Wang Aimin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Guan Jianguo, E-mail: guanjg@whut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Fe{sub 74}Ni{sub 3}Si{sub 13}Cr{sub 6}W{sub 4} amorphous alloy powders were annealed at different temperature (T) for 1.5 h to fabricate the corresponding amorphous and nanocrystalline powders. The influences of T on the crystalline structure, morphology, magnetic and microwave electromagnetic properties of the resultant samples were investigated via X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer and vector network analyzer. The results show that the powder samples obtained at T of 650 Degree-Sign C or more are composed of lots of ultra-fine {alpha}-Fe(Si) grains embedded in an amorphous matrix. When T increases from 350 to 750 Degree-Sign C, the saturated magnetization and coercivity of the as-annealed powder samples both increase monotonously whereas the relative real permittivity shows a minimal value and the relative real permeability shows a maximal value at T of 650 Degree-Sign C. Thus the powder samples annealed at 650 Degree-Sign C show optimal reflection loss under -10 dB in the whole C-band. These results here suggest that the annealing heat treatment of Fe-based amorphous alloy is an effective approach to fabricate high performance microwave absorber with reasonable permittivity and large permeability simultaneously via adjusting T. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The annealing temperature effect of Fe-based amorphous alloy was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fe-based amorphous and nanocrystalline alloy has a good absorbing property in C-band. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There exists a correspondence between microwave properties and microstructure.

  6. Application of Atmospheric-Pressure Microwave Line Plasma for Low Temperature Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Haruka; Nakano, Suguru; Itoh, Hitoshi; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru; Toyoda, Hirotaka

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure (AP) plasmas have been given much attention because of its high cost benefit and a variety of possibilities for industrial applications. In various kinds of plasma production technique, pulsed-microwave discharge plasma using slot antenna is attractive due to its ability of high-density and stable plasma production. In this plasma source, however, size of the plasma has been limited up to a few cm in length due to standing wave inside a waveguide. To solve this, we have proposed a newly-developed AP microwave plasma source that utilizes not standing wave but travelling wave. By using this plasma source, spatially-uniform AP line plasma with 40 cm in length was realized by pure helium discharge in 60 cm slot and with nitrogen gas additive of 1%. Furthermore, gas temperature as low as 400 K was realized in this device. In this study, as an example of low temperature processes, hydrophilic treatment of PET films was performed. Processing speed increased with pulse frequency and a water contact angle of ~20° was easily obtained within 5 s with no thermal damage to the substrate. To evaluate treatment-uniformity of long line length, PET films were treated by 90 cm slot-antenna plasma and uniform treatment performance was confirmed.

  7. Melt Patterns and Dynamics in Alaska and Patagonia Derived from Passive Microwave Brightness Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Semmens

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glaciers and icefields are critical components of Earth’s cryosphere to study and monitor for understanding the effects of a changing climate. To provide a regional perspective of glacier melt dynamics for the past several decades, brightness temperatures (Tb from the passive microwave sensor Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I were used to characterize melt regime patterns over large glacierized areas in Alaska and Patagonia. The distinctness of the melt signal at 37V-GHz and the ability to acquire daily data regardless of clouds or darkness make the dataset ideal for studying melt dynamics in both hemispheres. A 24-year (1988–2011 time series of annual Tb histograms was constructed to (1 characterize and assess temporal and spatial trends in melt patterns, (2 determine years of anomalous Tb distribution, and (3 investigate potential contributing factors. Distance from coast and temperature were key factors influencing melt. Years of high percentage of positive Tb anomalies were associated with relatively higher stream discharge (e.g., Copper and Mendenhall Rivers, Alaska, USA and Rio Baker, Chile. The characterization of melt over broad spatial domains and a multi-decadal time period offers a more comprehensive picture of the changing cryosphere and provides a baseline from which to assess future change.

  8. Photodegradation of Rhodamine B Using the Microwave/UV/H2O2: Effect of Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Ferrari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative decoloration of Rhodamine B (RhB was performed in a photochemical reactor which enables microwave (MW and UV radiation to be applied simultaneously. We used an immersed microwave source, with no need for an oven. Controlling the temperature, MW power, and UV emission of the reactor all led to a greater overall control of the process. Due to the action of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals, the decoloration of RhB was followed online using a spectrograph. Complete decoloration occurred in four minutes, and 92% of mineralisation was obtained in 70 minutes. The experiments were performed at various temperatures (21°C, 30°C, 37°C, and 46°C, with and without hydrogen peroxide. The apparent reaction rate was used to calculate the apparent activation energy of the decoloration process: Ea=38±2 kJ/mol and 40±2 kJ/mol with (400 mg/L or without hydrogen peroxide, respectively. The lack of deviation from the linear behavior of the Arrhenius plot confirms that the application of MW does not affect the Ea of the process. The apparent activation energy value found was compared with the few data available in the literature, which were obtained in the absence of MW radiation and are inconsistent.

  9. Low-temperature deposition of transparent diamond films with a microwave cavity plasma reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulczynski, Michael J.

    1998-10-01

    Low-temperature diamond deposition with Microwave Cavity Plasma Reactor (MCPR) technology was investigated for application to temperature sensitive substrates. The substrate temperature during most CVD diamond deposition processes is typically greater then 600 C; however, there are some applications where temperature sensitive materials are used and the deposition temperature must be maintained below 550 C. These applications include materials like boro-silicate glass, which has a relatively low strain-point temperature, and integrated circuits that contain low melting point components. Experiments were conducted in three areas. The first area was MCPR development, the second was benchmark deposition and characterization of diamond films on silicon substrates and the third was deposition and characterization of diamond films on boro-silicate glass substrates. MCPR development included an investigation of various MCPR configurations that were designed and adapted for uniform, low-temperature diamond deposition over areas as large as 80-cm2. Reactors were investigated with end-feed microwave excitation and side-feed microwave excitation for maximum deposition area and uniformity. Various substrate receptor configurations were also investigated including a substrate heater and cooler. From these investigations, deposition parameters such as substrate temperature, deposition rate, deposition area and deposition uniformity were characterized. The benchmark silicon diamond deposition experiments were conducted for comparison to previous high temperature, >550 C, MCPR research and growth models. Here deposition results such as deposition rate and film quality were compared with applications of diamond growth models by Harris-Goodwin and Bachmann. Additionally, characterization experiments were conducted to investigate film attributes that are critical to optical applications, such as film surface roughness and deposition uniformity. Included as variables in these

  10. Error analysis for mesospheric temperature profiling by absorptive occultation sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Rieder

    Full Text Available An error analysis for mesospheric profiles retrieved from absorptive occultation data has been performed, starting with realistic error assumptions as would apply to intensity data collected by available high-precision UV photodiode sensors. Propagation of statistical errors was investigated through the complete retrieval chain from measured intensity profiles to atmospheric density, pressure, and temperature profiles. We assumed unbiased errors as the occultation method is essentially self-calibrating and straight-line propagation of occulted signals as we focus on heights of 50–100 km, where refractive bending of the sensed radiation is negligible. Throughout the analysis the errors were characterized at each retrieval step by their mean profile, their covariance matrix and their probability density function (pdf. This furnishes, compared to a variance-only estimation, a much improved insight into the error propagation mechanism. We applied the procedure to a baseline analysis of the performance of a recently proposed solar UV occultation sensor (SMAS – Sun Monitor and Atmospheric Sounder and provide, using a reasonable exponential atmospheric model as background, results on error standard deviations and error correlation functions of density, pressure, and temperature profiles. Two different sensor photodiode assumptions are discussed, respectively, diamond diodes (DD with 0.03% and silicon diodes (SD with 0.1% (unattenuated intensity measurement noise at 10 Hz sampling rate. A factor-of-2 margin was applied to these noise values in order to roughly account for unmodeled cross section uncertainties. Within the entire height domain (50–100 km we find temperature to be retrieved to better than 0.3 K (DD / 1 K (SD accuracy, respectively, at 2 km height resolution. The results indicate that absorptive occultations acquired by a SMAS-type sensor could provide mesospheric profiles of fundamental variables such as temperature with

  11. Characterization of a high-temperature superconducting bearing for use in a cosmic microwave background polarimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R [Energy Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Hanany, Shaul [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Matsumura, Tomotake [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Johnson, Bradley [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Jones, Terry [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2005-02-01

    We have previously presented a design for a cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarimeter in which a cryogenically cooled half-wave plate rotates by means of a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) bearing. Here, a prototype bearing, consisting of a commercially available ring-shaped permanent magnet and an array of YBCO bulk HTS material, has been constructed. We measured its coefficient of friction and vibrational property as a function of several parameters, including temperature between 15 and 83 K, rotation frequency between 0.3 and 3.5 Hz, levitation distance between 6 and 10 mm and ambient pressure of {approx}10{sup -7} Torr. We concluded that the low rotational drag of the HTS bearing would allow rotations for long periods with minimal input power and negligible wear and tear, thus making this technology suitable for a future satellite mission.

  12. Characterization of a high-temperature superconducting bearing for use in a cosmic microwave background polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, John R.; Hanany, Shaul; Matsumura, Tomotake; Johnson, Bradley; Jones, Terry

    2005-02-01

    We have previously presented a design for a cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarimeter in which a cryogenically cooled half-wave plate rotates by means of a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) bearing. Here, a prototype bearing, consisting of a commercially available ring-shaped permanent magnet and an array of YBCO bulk HTS material, has been constructed. We measured its coefficient of friction and vibrational property as a function of several parameters, including temperature between 15 and 83 K, rotation frequency between 0.3 and 3.5 Hz, levitation distance between 6 and 10 mm and ambient pressure of {\\sim }10^{- 7} Torr. We concluded that the low rotational drag of the HTS bearing would allow rotations for long periods with minimal input power and negligible wear and tear, thus making this technology suitable for a future satellite mission.

  13. Temperature Profile of Black Hole Accretion Disc with Magnetic Coupling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Wei-Hua; WANG Ding-Xiong; XIAO Kan

    2002-01-01

    Two new mapping relations between the angular coordinate on the black hole (BH) horizon and radialcoordinate on the disc are given according to the requirement of general relativity and Maxwell's equations, and theeffects of magnetic coupling (MC) on temperature of accretion disc are investigated by comparing with pure accretion.It is shown that the MC effects on the temperature profile are related intimately to the BH spin, and the influenceon the peak value of disc temperature based on the modified mapping relations is not as great as that based on thelinear mapping.The peak value and the corresponding radius of peak value ring of disc temperature do not increasemonotonically as the increasing spin of BH, each containing a maximum for the fast-spinning BH. The value ranges ofthe bolometric luminosity and color temperature of the disc are both extended by the MC effects.

  14. Retrieval of Vertical Profiles of Liquid Water and Ice Content in Mixed Clouds from Doppler Radar and Microwave Radiometer Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvageot, Henri

    1996-01-01

    A new method to retrieve vertical profiles of liquid water content Mw(z), ice water content Mi(z), and ice particle size distribution Ni(D, z), (where D is the ice particle size and z the vertical coordinate) in mixed nonprecipitating clouds using the observations of a zenith-viewing Doppler radar and of a microwave radiometer is proposed. In this method, the profile of the vertical air velocity deduced from Doppler radar measurements is used to describe the rate of production by the updrafts of water. vapor in excess of saturation with respect to ice. Using a Zi Mi power-law relation with an unknown linear parameter (let i, be this parameter) and initially assuming that Zw is negligible with respect to Zi, (where Zw and Zi are the radar reflectivity factors of liquid water and ice particles respectively), the measured radar reflectivity factor profile Zm ( Zi) is inverted to estimate Ni(D, z). From Ni(D, z), the profile of the rate of water vapor that can be consumed by pure deposition on ice particles is calculated. The difference between the rate of production of the exam water vapor and the rate of deposited water vapor is an expression of the rate of liquid water generation at each level. By writing that the integral of the liquid water along the profile has to be equal to the total liquid water deduced from the microwave radiometer measurement, an estimation of the i parameter is obtained. From i, an estimation of the profiles Mw(z), Mi(z), Zw(z), Zi(z) (=Zm Zw), and Ni(D, z) is calculated. If Zw is effectively negligible with respect to Zi, the computation of the retrieved profiles is ended. If not, Zi(z) is corrected and a new estimation of the profiles is computed. The results of the numerical simulation of the algorithm are presented.

  15. Lunar surface dielectric constant,regolith thickness, and ~3He abundance distributions retrieved from the microwave brightness temperatures of CE-1 Lunar Microwave Sounder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Lunar regolith parameters, such as physical temperature, thickness and dielectric constant, are important in studying regolith features, distribution of lunar resources and evolution of the Moon. There had been no measurement obtained by lunar-orbit-borne microwave radiometer applied to evaluate the properties of lunar regolith before CE-1 Lunar Microwave Sounder (CELMS) being launched. CEMLS is the first passive microwave radiometer in the world to sound the surface of the Moon. The brightness temperatures (TB) sensed by CELMS include complicated information on the above geophysical parameters. In this paper, algorithms of retrieving dielectric constant, regolith thickness, and 3He content from CELMS brightness temperatures are developed, and the results are compared with those from literature. The results show that the regolith thicknesses are mostly in the range of 4.0-6.0 m, and 43% of them are bigger than 5.0 m. The content of 3He evaluated by retrieved regolith thickness is about 1.03 million tons.

  16. Temperature profile around a basaltic sill intruded into wet sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Leslie; Bernard, Andrew; Rember, William C.; Milazzo, Moses; Dundas, Colin M.; Abramov, Oleg; Kestay, Laszlo P.

    2015-01-01

    The transfer of heat into wet sediments from magmatic intrusions or lava flows is not well constrained from field data. Such field constraints on numerical models of heat transfer could significantly improve our understanding of water–lava interactions. We use experimentally calibrated pollen darkening to measure the temperature profile around a basaltic sill emplaced into wet lakebed sediments. It is well known that, upon heating, initially transparent palynomorphs darken progressively through golden, brown, and black shades before being destroyed; however, this approach to measuring temperature has not been applied to volcanological questions. We collected sediment samples from established Miocene fossil localities at Clarkia, Idaho. Fossils in the sediments include pollen from numerous tree and shrub species. We experimentally calibrated changes in the color of Clarkia sediment pollen and used this calibration to determine sediment temperatures around a Miocene basaltic sill emplaced in the sediments. Results indicated a flat temperature profile above and below the sill, with T > 325 °C within 1 cm of the basalt-sediment contact, near 300 °C at 1–2 cm from the contact, and ~ 250 °C at 1 m from the sill contact. This profile suggests that heat transport in the sediments was hydrothermally rather than conductively controlled. This information will be used to test numerical models of heat transfer in wet sediments on Earth and Mars.

  17. Temperature dependent magnetic and microwave absorption properties of doubly substituted nanosized material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadiq, Imran, E-mail: khanphysics@yahoo.com [Centre of Excellence in Solid State Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore (Pakistan); Naseem, Shahzad; Rana, M.U. [Centre of Excellence in Solid State Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore (Pakistan); Ashiq, Muhammad Naeem [Institute of chemical sciences, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan (Pakistan); Ali, Irshad [Department of Physics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan (Pakistan)

    2015-07-01

    The sol gel method has been adopted to synthesize a series of X-type hexagonal ferrites with concentration Sr{sub 2−x} Gd{sub x} Ni{sub 2} Fe{sub 28−y}Cd{sub y}O{sub 46} (x=0.00, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06, 0.08, 0.10 and y=0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5). The XRD analysis reveals the single phase of the prepared material and the lattice constants a (Å) and c (Å) varies with additives. The crystallite size of the present investigated ferrite is found in the range of 20–30 nm measured from TEM image. The enhancement in the magnetic properties (saturation magnetization, remanance magnetization and coercivity) can be observed with the increase of dopping concentration and the coercivity lies in the range of (484.22–887.47) G. The saturation and remanance magnetization decreases monotonically with the temperature which is the characteristic of the hexagonal ferrites. The Gd–Cd substituted sample possesses low values of complex relative permittivity and permeability than the pure samples. The material exhibits maximum microwave absorption −23 dB at 11.87 GHz and attenuation peak is in good agreement with the reflection loss value. The microwave absorption properties reflect the applications of this material in super high frequency devices (SHF). - Highlights: • A series of X-type hexagonal ferrites were prepared by Sol–gel method. • The XRD analysis showed that the X-type hexagonal structure. • The c/a ratio of these samples falls in the range of X-type hexagonal ferrites. • The magnetic properties improved with the increase of Gd–Cd contents. • The microwave absorption properties enhanced with Gd–Cd substitution.

  18. Microwave Synthesized ZnO Nanorod Arrays for UV Sensors: A Seed Layer Annealing Temperature Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Pimentel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The present work reports the influence of zinc oxide (ZnO seed layer annealing temperature on structural, optical and electrical properties of ZnO nanorod arrays, synthesized by hydrothermal method assisted by microwave radiation, to be used as UV sensors. The ZnO seed layer was produced using the spin-coating method and several annealing temperatures, ranging from 100 to 500 °C, have been tested. X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM and spectrophotometry measurements have been used to investigate the structure, morphology, and optical properties variations of the produced ZnO nanorod arrays regarding the seed layer annealing temperatures employed. After the growth of ZnO nanorod arrays, the whole structure was tested as UV sensors, showing an increase in the sensitivity with the increase of seed layer annealing temperature. The UV sensor response of ZnO nanorod arrays produced with the seed layer annealed temperature of 500 °C was 50 times superior to the ones produced with a seed layer annealed at 100 °C.

  19. NESDIS Microwave Integrated Retrieval System (MIRS) ATMS Sounding Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains temperature and humidity profiles from the NOAA Microwave Integrated Retrieval System (MIRS) using sensor data from the Advanced Technology...

  20. Parametrization of Land Surface Temperature Fields with Optical and Microwave Remote Sensing in Brazil's Atlantic Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, K. C.; Khan, A.; Carnaval, A. C.

    2016-12-01

    Brazil is home to two of the largest and most biodiverse ecosystems in the world, primarily encompassed in forests and wetlands. A main region of interest in this project is Brazil's Atlantic Forest (AF). Although this forest is only a fraction of the size of the Amazon rainforest, it harbors significant biological richness, making it one of the world's major hotspots for biodiversity. The AF is located on the East to Southeast region of Brazil, bordering the Atlantic Ocean. As luscious and biologically rich as this region is, the area covered by the Atlantic Forest has been diminishing over past decades, mainly due to human influences and effects of climate change. We examine 1 km resolution Land Surface Temperature (LST) data from NASA's Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) combined with 25 km resolution radiometric temperature derived from NASA's Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer on EOS (AMSR-E) to develop a capability employing both in combination to assess LST. Since AMSR-E is a microwave remote sensing instrument, products derived from its measurements are minimally effected by cloud cover. On the other hand, MODIS data are heavily influenced by cloud cover. We employ a statistical downscaling technique to the coarse-resolution AMSR-E datasets to enhance its spatial resolution to match that of MODIS. Our approach employs 16-day composite MODIS LST data in combination with synergistic ASMR-E radiometric brightness temperature data to develop a combined, downscaled dataset. Our goal is to use this integrated LST retrieval with complementary in situ station data to examine associated influences on regional biodiversity

  1. Annealing temperature effect on microstructure, magnetic and microwave properties of Fe-based amorphous alloy powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinghua; Wang, Wei; Wang, Aimin; Guan, Jianguo

    2012-09-01

    Fe74Ni3Si13Cr6W4 amorphous alloy powders were annealed at different temperature (T) for 1.5 h to fabricate the corresponding amorphous and nanocrystalline powders. The influences of T on the crystalline structure, morphology, magnetic and microwave electromagnetic properties of the resultant samples were investigated via X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer and vector network analyzer. The results show that the powder samples obtained at T of 650 °C or more are composed of lots of ultra-fine α-Fe(Si) grains embedded in an amorphous matrix. When T increases from 350 to 750 °C, the saturated magnetization and coercivity of the as-annealed powder samples both increase monotonously whereas the relative real permittivity shows a minimal value and the relative real permeability shows a maximal value at T of 650 °C. Thus the powder samples annealed at 650 °C show optimal reflection loss under -10 dB in the whole C-band. These results here suggest that the annealing heat treatment of Fe-based amorphous alloy is an effective approach to fabricate high performance microwave absorber with reasonable permittivity and large permeability simultaneously via adjusting T.

  2. Temperature dependent magnetic and microwave absorption properties of doubly substituted nanosized material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiq, Imran; Naseem, Shahzad; Rana, M. U.; Ashiq, Muhammad Naeem; Ali, Irshad

    2015-07-01

    The sol gel method has been adopted to synthesize a series of X-type hexagonal ferrites with concentration Sr2-x Gdx Ni2 Fe28-yCdyO46 (x=0.00, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06, 0.08, 0.10 and y=0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5). The XRD analysis reveals the single phase of the prepared material and the lattice constants a (Å) and c (Å) varies with additives. The crystallite size of the present investigated ferrite is found in the range of 20-30 nm measured from TEM image. The enhancement in the magnetic properties (saturation magnetization, remanance magnetization and coercivity) can be observed with the increase of dopping concentration and the coercivity lies in the range of (484.22-887.47) G. The saturation and remanance magnetization decreases monotonically with the temperature which is the characteristic of the hexagonal ferrites. The Gd-Cd substituted sample possesses low values of complex relative permittivity and permeability than the pure samples. The material exhibits maximum microwave absorption -23 dB at 11.87 GHz and attenuation peak is in good agreement with the reflection loss value. The microwave absorption properties reflect the applications of this material in super high frequency devices (SHF).

  3. Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) Temperature Data Record (TDR) in netCDF

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) is a series of passive microwave conically scanning imagers and sounders onboard the DMSP satellites beginning...

  4. Extended Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) Temperature Data Record (TDR) in netCDF

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) is a seven-channel linearly polarized passive microwave radiometer that operates at frequencies of 19.36 (vertically and...

  5. Temperature dependence of microwave absorption phenomena in single and biphase soft magnetic microwires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Kammouni, Rhimou, E-mail: elkammounirhimou@gmail.com [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Vázquez, Manuel [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Lezama, Luis [Depto. Química Inorgánica, Universidad País Vasco, UPV/EHU, Bilbao (Spain); Kurlyandskaya, Galina [Depto. Electricidad y Electrónica, Universidad País Vasco, UPV/EHU, Bilbao (Spain); Dept. Magnetism and Magnetic Nanomaterials, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kraus, Ludek [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-11-15

    The microwave absorption phenomena of single and biphase magnetic microwires with soft magnetic behavior have been investigated as a function of DC applied magnetic field using two alternative techniques: (i) absorption measurements in the temperature range of 4–300 K using a spectrometer operating at X-band frequency, at 9.5 GHz, and (ii) room-temperature, RT, ferromagnetic resonance measurements in a network analyzer in the frequency range up to 20 GHz. Complementary low-frequency magnetic characterization was performed in a Vibrating Sample Magnetometer. Studies have been performed for 8 μm diameter small-magnetostriction amorphous CoFeSiB single-phase microwire, coated by micrometric Pyrex layer, and after electroplating an external shell, 2 µm or 4 µm thick, of FeNi alloys. For single phase CoFeSiB microwire, a single absorption is observed, whose DC field dependence of resonance frequency at RT fits to a Kittel-law behavior for in-plane magnetized thin film. The temperature dependence behavior shows a monotonic increase in the resonance field, H{sub r}, with temperature. A parallel reduction of the circular anisotropy field, H{sub K}, is deduced from the temperature dependence of hysteresis loops. For biphase, CoFeSiB/FeNi, microwires, the absorption phenomena at RT also follow the Kittel condition. The observed opposite evolution with temperature of resonance field, H{sub r}, in 2 and 4 µm thick FeNi samples is interpreted considering the opposite sign of magnetostriction of the respective FeNi layers. The stress-induced magnetic anisotropy field, H{sub K}, in the FeNi shell is deduced to change sign at around 130 K. - Highlights: • A single absorption phenomenon is observed for single phase CoFeSiB. • The T dependence of the microwave behavior shows a monotonic increase of H{sub r} with T. • The absorption at RT follows the Kittel condition for biphase CoFe/FeNi microwires. • The T dependence of resonant field of CoFe/FeNi is interpreted to be

  6. A broadband microwave Corbino spectrometer at $^3$He temperatures and high magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Wei; Armitage, N P

    2014-01-01

    We present the technical details of a broadband microwave spectrometer for measuring the complex conductance of thin films covering the range from 50 MHz up to 16 GHz in the temperature range 300 mK to 6 K and at applied magnetic fields up to 8 Tesla. We measure the complex reflection from a sample terminating a coaxial transmission line and calibrate the signals with three standards with known reflection coefficients. Thermal isolation of the heat load from the inner conductor is accomplished by including a section of NbTi superconducting cable (transition temperature around 8 $-$ 9 K) and hermetic seal glass bead adapters. This enables us to stabilize the base temperature of the sample stage at 300 mK. However, the inclusion of this superconducting cable complicates the calibration procedure. We document the effects of the superconducting cable on our calibration procedure and the effects of applied magnetic fields and how we control the temperature with great repeatability for each measurement. We have suc...

  7. Dyeing Behavior of Yak Hair Fiber Treated with Microwave Low Temperature Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The scales on the surface of yak hair fiber act as barriers during the dyeing process. In order to solve the scale problem and to improve the dyeability of yak hair, yak hair fiber was treated by microwave low temperature plasma (MLTP) in this study. The weight loss and the dyeing properties of the yak hair fiber modified by MLTP were investigated. Scanning Electron Microscopy ( SEM ) photographs were taken to observe the changes in the surface shape of yak hair fiber before and after treatment. Results showed that after MLTP treatment, the scale structure of yak hair was weakened and damaged greatly and the noticeable changes on the surface shape took place. At the same time, a significant improvement in dyeing properties of yak hair fiber was exhibited.

  8. Simultaneous Microwave Imaging System for Density and Temperature Fluctuation Measurements on TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Park; E. Mazzucato; T. Munsat; C.W. Domier; M. Johnson; N.C. Luhmann, Jr.; J. Wang; Z. Xia; I.G.J. Classen; A.J.H. Donne; M.J. van de Pol

    2004-05-07

    Diagnostic systems for fluctuation measurements in plasmas have, of necessity, evolved from simple 1-D systems to multi-dimensional systems due to the complexity of the MHD and turbulence physics of plasmas illustrated by advanced numerical simulations. Using the recent significant advancements in millimeter wave imaging technology, Microwave Imaging Reflectometry (MIR) and Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI), simultaneously measuring density and temperature fluctuations, are developed for TEXTOR. The MIR system was installed on TEXTOR and the first experiment was performed in September, 2003. Subsequent MIR campaigns have yielded poloidally resolved spectra and assessments of poloidal velocity. The new 2-D ECE Imaging system (with a total of 128 channels), installed on TEXTOR in December, 2003, successfully captured a true 2-D images of Te fluctuations of m=1 oscillation (''sawteeth'') near the q {approx} 1 surface for the first time.

  9. Production of electron cyclotron resonance plasma by using multifrequencies microwaves and active beam profile control on a large bore electron cyclotron resonance ion source with permanent magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yushi; Watanabe, Takeyoshi; Matsui, Yuuki; Hirai, Yoshiaki; Kutsumi, Osamu; Sakamoto, Naoki; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2010-02-01

    A new concept on magnetic field with all magnets on plasma production and confinement has been proposed to enhance efficiency of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma for broad and dense ion beam source under the low pressure. The magnetic field configuration is constructed by a pair of magnets assembly, i.e., comb-shaped magnet which cylindrically surrounds the plasma chamber. The resonance zones corresponding to the fundamental ECR for 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz frequencies are constructed at different positions. The profiles of the plasma parameters in the ECR ion source are different from each frequency of microwave. Large bore extractor is set at the opposite side against the microwave feeds. It is found that differences of their profiles also appear at those of ion beam profiles. We conducted to launch simultaneously multiplex frequencies microwaves controlled individually, and tried to control the profiles of the plasma parameters and then those of extracted ion beam.

  10. Retrieving Atmospheric Temperature Profiles from AMSU-A Data with Neural Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Zhigang; CHEN Hongbin; LIN Longfu

    2005-01-01

    Back propagation neural networks are used to retrieve atmospheric temperature profiles from NOAA-16 Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) measurements over East Asia. The collocated radiosonde observation and AMSU-A data over land in 2002-2003 are used to train the network, and the data over land in 2004 are used to test the network. A comparison with the multi-linear regression method shows that the neural network retrieval method can significantly improve the results in all weather conditions.When an offset of 0.5 K or a noise level of +0.2 K is added to all channels simultaneously, the increase in the overall root mean square (RMS) error is less than 0.1 K. Furthermore, an experiment is conducted to investigate the effects of the window channels on the retrieval. The results indicate that the brightness temperatures of window channels can provide significantly useful information on the temperature retrieval near the surface. Additionally, the RMS errors of the profiles retrieved with the trained neural network are compared with the errors from the International Advanced TOVS (ATOVS) Processing Package (IAPP).It is shown that the network-based algorithm can provide much better results in the experiment region and comparable results in other regions. It is also noted that the network can yield remarkably better results than IAPP at the low levels and at about the 250-hPa level in summer skies over ocean. Finally,the network-based retrieval algorithm developed herein is applied in retrieving the temperature anomalies of Typhoon Rananim from AMSU-A data.

  11. Cluster SIMS and the Temperature Dependence of Molecular Depth Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Dan; Wucher, Andreas; Brenes, Daniel A; Lu, Caiyan; Winograd, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    The quality of molecular depth profiles created by erosion of organic materials by cluster ion beams exhibits a strong dependence upon temperature. To elucidate the fundamental nature of this dependence, we employ the Irganox 3114/1010 organic delta layer reference material as a model system. This delta-layer system is interrogated using a 40 keV C60+ primary ion beam. Parameters associated with the depth profile such as depth resolution, uniformity of sputtering yield and topography are evaluated between 90 K and 300 K using a unique wedge-crater beveling strategy that allows these parameters to be determined as a function of erosion depth from atomic force microscope measurements. The results show that the erosion rate calibration performed using the known Δ-layer depth in connection with the fluence needed to reach the peak of the corresponding SIMS signal response is misleading. Moreover, we show that the degradation of depth resolution is linked to a decrease of the average erosion rate and the buildup of surface topography in a thermally activated manner. This underlying process starts to influence the depth profile above a threshold temperature between 210 and 250 K for the system studied here. Below that threshold, the process is inhibited and steady-state conditions are reached with constant erosion rate, depth resolution and molecular secondary ion signals from both the matrix and the Δ-layers. In particular, the results indicate that further reduction of the temperature below 90 K does not lead to further improvement of the depth profile. Above the threshold, the process becomes stronger at higher temperature, leading to an immediate decrease of the molecular secondary ion signals. This signal decay is most pronounced for the highest m/z ions but is less for the smaller m/z ions, indicating a shift toward small fragments by accumulation of chemical damage. The erosion rate decay and surface roughness buildup, on the other hand, exhibit a rather sudden

  12. Measurement of axial neutral density profiles in a microwave discharge ion thruster by laser absorption spectroscopy with optical fiber probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukizaki, Ryudo; Koizumi, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Kazutaka; Kuninaka, Hitoshi

    2011-12-01

    In order to reveal the physical processes taking place within the "μ10" microwave discharge ion thruster, internal plasma diagnosis is indispensable. However, the ability of metallic probes to access microwave plasmas biased at a high voltage is limited from the standpoints of the disturbance created in the electric field and electrical isolation. In this study, the axial density profiles of excited neutral xenon were successfully measured under ion beam acceleration by using a novel laser absorption spectroscopy system. The target of the measurement was metastable Xe I 5p(5)((2)P(0) (3/2))6s[3/2](0) (2) which absorbed a wavelength of 823.16 nm. Signals from laser absorption spectroscopy that swept a single-mode optical fiber probe along the line of sight were differentiated and converted into axial number densities of the metastable neutral particles in the plasma source. These measurements revealed a 10(18) m(-3) order of metastable neutral particles situated in the waveguide, which caused two different modes during the operation of the μ10 thruster. This paper reports a novel spectroscopic measurement system with axial resolution for microwave plasma sources utilizing optical fiber probes.

  13. Comparison of Dilution, Filtration, and Microwave Digestion Sample Pretreatments in Elemental Profiling of Wine by ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godshaw, Joshua; Hopfer, Helene; Nelson, Jenny; Ebeler, Susan E

    2017-09-25

    Wine elemental composition varies by cultivar, geographic origin, viticultural and enological practices, and is often used for authenticity validation. Elemental analysis of wine by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) is challenging due to the potential for non-spectral interferences and plasma instability arising from organic matrix components. Sample preparation mitigates these interferences, however, conflicting recommendations of best practices in ICP-MS analysis of wine have been reported. This study compared direct dilution, microwave-assisted acid digestion, and two filtration sample pretreatments, acidification prior to filtration and filtration followed by acidification, in elemental profiling of one white and three red table wines by ICP-MS. Of 43 monitored isotopes, 37 varied by sample preparation method, with significantly higher results of 17 isotopes in the microwave-digested samples. Both filtration treatments resulted in lower results for 11 isotopes compared to the other methods. Finally, isotope dilution determination of copper based on natural abundances and the (63)Cu:(65)Cu instrument response ratio agreed with external calibration and confirmed a significant sample preparation effect. Overall, microwave digestion did not compare favorably, and direct dilution was found to provide the best compromise between ease of use and result accuracy and precision, although all preparation strategies were able to differentiate the wines.

  14. Constraining the redshift evolution of the Cosmic Microwave Background black-body temperature with PLANCK data

    CERN Document Server

    de Martino, I; Atrio-Barandela, F; Ebeling, H; Kashlinsky, A; Kocevski, D; Martins, C J A P

    2015-01-01

    We constrain the deviation of adiabatic evolution of the Universe using the data on the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature anisotropies measured by the {\\it Planck} satellite and a sample of 481 X-ray selected clusters with spectroscopically measured redshifts. To avoid antenna beam effects, we bring all the maps to the same resolution. We use a CMB template to subtract the cosmological signal while preserving the Thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (TSZ) anisotropies; next, we remove galactic foreground emissions around each cluster and we mask out all known point sources. If the CMB black-body temperature scales with redshift as $T(z)=T_0(1+z)^{1-\\alpha}$, we constrain deviations of adiabatic evolution to be $\\alpha=-0.007\\pm 0.013$, consistent with the temperature-redshift relation of the standard cosmological model. This result could suffer from a potential bias associated with the CMB template, that we quantify it to be less than $-0.02$, but is free from those biases associated with using TSZ selected ...

  15. Exploration of ion temperature profile measurements at JET using the upgraded neutron profile monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marocco, D.; Esposito, B.; Riva, M. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, C.P. 65, Frascati I-00044, Roma (Italy); Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2012-10-15

    The neutron profile monitor (NPM), routinely used at the Joint European Torus for neutron emissivity profile measurements, consists of two fan-shaped arrays of collimators and each line of sight (LOS) is equipped with a NE213 liquid organic scintillator for simultaneous measurements of the 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV neutrons. A digital system developed in ENEA has replaced the analog acquisition electronics and now enables the NPM to perform spatially resolved neutron spectrometry by providing neutron pulse height spectra (PHS) for each LOS. However, the NPM was not originally designed as a spectrometer and, therefore, lacks several key features, such as detailed measurements of the detector response functions and the presence of detector stability monitors. We present a proof of principle of ion temperature profile measurements derived from the NPM PHS in high plasma current discharges using simulated detector response functions.

  16. Microwave-assisted low temperature fabrication of ZnO thin film electrodes for solar energy harvesting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nirmal Peiris, T.A.; Sagu, Jagdeep S.; Hazim Yusof, Y.; Upul Wijayantha, K.G., E-mail: U.Wijayantha@lboro.ac.uk

    2015-09-01

    Metallic Zn thin films were electrodeposited on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass substrates and oxidized under air by conventional radiant and microwave post-annealing methods to obtain ZnO thin film electrodes. The temperature of each post-annealing method was varied systematically and the photoelectrochemical (PEC) performance of electrodes was evaluated. The best photocurrent density achieved by the conventional radiant annealing method at 425 °C for 15 min was 93 μA cm{sup −2} at 1.23 V vs. NHE and the electrode showed an incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiency (IPCE) of 28.2%. X-ray diffractogram of this electrode showed that the oxidation of Zn to ZnO was not completed during the radiant annealing process as evident by the presence of metallic Zn in the electrode. For the electrode oxidized from Zn to ZnO under microwave irradiation, a photocurrent of 130 μA cm{sup −2} at 1.23 V vs. NHE and IPCE of 35.6% was observed after annealing for just 3 min, during which the temperature reached 250 °C. The photocurrent was 40% higher for the microwave annealed sample; this increase was attributed to higher surface area by preserving the nanostructure, confirmed by SEM surface topographical analysis, and better conversion yields to crystalline ZnO. Overall, it was demonstrated that oxidation of Zn to ZnO can be accomplished by microwave annealing five times faster than that of conventional annealing, thus resulting in a ~ 75% power saving. This study shows that microwave processing of materials offers significant economic and performance advantages for industrial scale up. - Highlights: • Conversion of Zn to ZnO by microwave and radiant annealing was conducted. • Microwave conversion was 5 times faster compared to radiant annealing. • Photoelectrochemical performance of microwave annealed ZnO was 40% higher. • Microwave annealing results in a 75% energy saving.

  17. A decadal microwave record of tropical air temperature from AMSU-A/aqua observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yuan; Li, King-Fai; Yung, Yuk L.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Shi, Zuoqiang; Hou, Thomas Y.

    2013-09-01

    Atmospheric temperature is one of the most important climate variables. This observational study presents detailed descriptions of the temperature variability imprinted in the 9-year brightness temperature data acquired by the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-Instrument A (AMSU-A) aboard Aqua since September 2002 over tropical oceans. A non-linear, adaptive method called the Ensemble Joint Multiple Extraction has been employed to extract the principal modes of variability in the AMSU-A/Aqua data. The semi-annual, annual, quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) modes and QBO-annual beat in the troposphere and the stratosphere have been successfully recovered. The modulation by the El Niño/Southern oscillation (ENSO) in the troposphere was found and correlates well with the Multivariate ENSO Index. The long-term variations during 2002-2011 reveal a cooling trend (-0.5 K/decade at 10 hPa) in the tropical stratosphere; the trend below the tropical tropopause is not statistically significant due to the length of our data. A new tropospheric near-annual mode (period ~1.6 years) was also revealed in the troposphere, whose existence was confirmed using National Centers for Environmental Prediction Reanalysis air temperature data. The near-annual mode in the troposphere is found to prevail in the eastern Pacific region and is coherent with a near-annual mode in the observed sea surface temperature over the Warm Pool region that has previously been reported. It remains a challenge for climate models to simulate the trends and principal modes of natural variability reported in this work.

  18. Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Radiometric Studies of Temperature, Water Vapor and Clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westwater, Edgeworth

    2011-05-06

    The importance of accurate measurements of column amounts of water vapor and cloud liquid has been well documented by scientists within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. At the North Slope of Alaska (NSA), both microwave radiometers (MWR) and the MWRProfiler (MWRP), been used operationally by ARM for passive retrievals of the quantities: Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) and Liquid Water Path (LWP). However, it has been convincingly shown that these instruments are inadequate to measure low amounts of PWV and LWP. In the case of water vapor, this is especially important during the Arctic winter, when PWV is frequently less than 2 mm. For low amounts of LWP (< 50 g/m{sup 2}), the MWR and MWRP retrievals have an accuracy that is also not acceptable. To address some of these needs, in March-April 2004, NOAA and ARM conducted the NSA Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment - Water Vapor Intensive Operational Period at the ARM NSA/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) site. After this experiment, the radiometer group at NOAA moved to the Center for Environmental Technology (CET) of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. During this 2004 experiment, a total of 220 radiosondes were launched, and radiometric data from 22.235 to 380 GHz were obtained. Primary instruments included the ARM MWR and MWRP, a Global Positioning System (GPS), as well as the CET Ground-based Scanning Radiometer (GSR). We have analyzed data from these instruments to answer several questions of importance to ARM, including: (a) techniques for improved water vapor measurements; (b) improved calibration techniques during cloudy conditions; (c) the spectral response of radiometers to a variety of conditions: clear, liquid, ice, and mixed phase clouds; and (d) forward modeling of microwave and millimeter wave brightness temperatures from 22 to 380 GHz. Many of these results have been published in the open literature. During the third year of

  19. Uniform temperature profile for a dense array CPV receiver under non uniform illumination profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera, Sara; Barrau, Jérôme; Perona, Arnaud; Dollet, Alain; Rosell, Joan I.; Fréchette, Luc

    2014-09-01

    Previous experimental and numerical studies of hybrid cooling devices for CPV receivers were developed under uniform illumination profile conditions; but literature review shows that this uniformity assumption is difficult to satisfy in real conditions. This investigation presents the design and the validation of a hybrid cooling device able to tailor its local heat extraction capacity to 2D illumination profiles in order to provide a uniform temperature profile of the PV receiver as well as a low global thermal resistance coefficient. The inputs of the design procedure are the solar concentration, the coolant flow rate and its inlet temperature. As the illumination profile is 2D dependent, a matrix of pin fins is implemented and a hybrid Jet Impingement /Matrix of Pin Fins cooling device is experimentally tested and compared to a hybrid Jet Impingement / Microchannels cooling device developed previously. The results demonstrate similar performances for both designs. Furthermore, in contrast to the cooling scheme using longitudinal fins, the distribution of the pin fins can be tailored, in two dimensions, to the local need of heat extraction capacity.

  20. Synthetic tests of passive microwave brightness temperature assimilation over snow covered land using machine learning algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    A novel data assimilation framework is evaluated that assimilates passive microwave (PMW) brightness temperature (Tb) observations into an advanced land surface model for the purpose of improving snow depth and snow water equivalent (SWE) estimates across regional- and continental-scales. The multifrequency, multipolarization framework employs machine learning algorithms to predict PMW Tb as a function of land surface model state information and subsequently merges the predicted PMW Tb with observed PMW Tb from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E). The merging procedure is predicated on conditional probabilities computed within a Bayesian statistical framework using either an Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) or an Ensemble Kalman Smoother (EnKS). The data assimilation routine produces a conditioned (updated) estimate of modeled SWE that is more accurate and contains less uncertainty than the model without assimilation. A synthetic case study is presented for select locations in North America that compares model results with and without assimilation against synthetic observations of snow depth and SWE. It is shown that the data assimilation framework improves modeled estimates of snow depth and SWE during both the accumulation and ablation phases of the snow season. Further, it is demonstrated that the EnKS outperforms the EnKF implementation due to its ability to better modulate high frequency noise into the conditioned estimates. The overarching findings from this study demonstrate the feasibility of machine learning algorithms for use as an observation model operator within a data assimilation framework in order to improve model estimates of snow depth and SWE across regional- and continental-scales.

  1. High-Dose Phosphorus-Implanted 4H-SiC: Microwave and Conventional Post-Implantation Annealing at Temperatures ≥1700°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nipoti, R.; Nath, A.; Qadri, S. B.; Tian, Y.-L.; Albonetti, C.; Carnera, A.; Rao, Mulpuri V.

    2012-03-01

    Semi-insulating 4H-SiC ⟨0001⟩ wafers have been phosphorus ion implanted at 500°C to obtain phosphorus box depth profiles with dopant concentration from 5 × 1019 cm-3 to 8 × 1020 cm-3. These samples have been annealed by microwave and conventional inductively heated systems in the temperature range 1700°C to 2050°C. Resistivity, Hall electron density, and Hall mobility of the phosphorus-implanted and annealed 4H-SiC layers have been measured in the temperature range from room temperature to 450°C. The high-resolution x-ray diffraction and rocking curve of both virgin and processed 4H-SiC samples have been analyzed to obtain the sample crystal quality up to about 3 μm depth from the wafer surface. For both increasing implanted phosphorus concentration and increasing post-implantation annealing temperature the implanted material resistivity decreases to an asymptotic value of about 1.5 × 10-3 Ω cm. Increasing the implanted phosphorus concentration and post-implantation annealing temperature beyond 4 × 1020 cm-3 and 2000°C, respectively, does not bring any apparent benefit with respect to the minimum obtainable resistivity. Sheet resistance and sheet electron density increase with increasing measurement temperature. Electron density saturates at 1.5 × 1020 cm-3 for implanted phosphorus plateau values ≥4 × 1020 cm-3, irrespective of the post-implantation annealing method. Implantation produces an increase of the lattice parameter in the bulk 4H-SiC underneath the phosphorus-implanted layer. Microwave and conventional annealing produce a further increase of the lattice parameter in such a depth region and an equivalent recovered lattice in the phosphorus-implanted layers.

  2. The impact of melt ponds on summertime microwave brightness temperatures and sea-ice concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Stefan; Rösel, Anja; Toudal Pedersen, Leif; Ivanova, Natalia; Saldo, Roberto; Tage Tonboe, Rasmus

    2016-09-01

    Sea-ice concentrations derived from satellite microwave brightness temperatures are less accurate during summer. In the Arctic Ocean the lack of accuracy is primarily caused by melt ponds, but also by changes in the properties of snow and the sea-ice surface itself. We investigate the sensitivity of eight sea-ice concentration retrieval algorithms to melt ponds by comparing sea-ice concentration with the melt-pond fraction. We derive gridded daily sea-ice concentrations from microwave brightness temperatures of summer 2009. We derive the daily fraction of melt ponds, open water between ice floes, and the ice-surface fraction from contemporary Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) reflectance data. We only use grid cells where the MODIS sea-ice concentration, which is the melt-pond fraction plus the ice-surface fraction, exceeds 90 %. For one group of algorithms, e.g., Bristol and Comiso bootstrap frequency mode (Bootstrap_f), sea-ice concentrations are linearly related to the MODIS melt-pond fraction quite clearly after June. For other algorithms, e.g., Near90GHz and Comiso bootstrap polarization mode (Bootstrap_p), this relationship is weaker and develops later in summer. We attribute the variation of the sensitivity to the melt-pond fraction across the algorithms to a different sensitivity of the brightness temperatures to snow-property variations. We find an underestimation of the sea-ice concentration by between 14 % (Bootstrap_f) and 26 % (Bootstrap_p) for 100 % sea ice with a melt-pond fraction of 40 %. The underestimation reduces to 0 % for a melt-pond fraction of 20 %. In presence of real open water between ice floes, the sea-ice concentration is overestimated by between 26 % (Bootstrap_f) and 14 % (Bootstrap_p) at 60 % sea-ice concentration and by 20 % across all algorithms at 80 % sea-ice concentration. None of the algorithms investigated performs best based on our investigation of data from summer 2009. We suggest that those algorithms which are

  3. An Inter-calibrated Passive Microwave Brightness Temperature Data Record and Ocean Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilburn, K. A.; Wentz, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    Inter-calibration of passive microwave sensors has been the subject of on-going activity at Remote Sensing Systems (RSS) since 1974. RSS has produced a brightness temperature TB data record that spans the last 28 years (1987-2014) from inter-calibrated passive microwave sensors on 14 satellites: AMSR-E, AMSR2, GMI, SSMI F08-F15, SSMIS F16-F18, TMI, WindSat. Accompanying the TB record are a suite of ocean products derived from the TBs that provide a 28-year record of wind speed, water vapor, cloud liquid, and rain rate; and 18 years (1997-2014) of sea surface temperatures, corresponding to the period for which 6 and/or 10 GHz measurements are available. Crucial to the inter-calibration and ocean product retrieval are a highly accurate radiative transfer model RTM. The RSS RTM has been continually refined for over 30 years and is arguably the most accurate model in the 1-100 GHz spectrum. The current generation of TB and ocean products, produced using the latest version of the RTM, is called Version-7. The accuracy of the Version-7 inter-calibration is estimated to be 0.1 K, based on inter-satellite comparisons and validation of the ocean products against in situ measurements. The data record produced by RSS has had a significant scientific impact. Over just the last 14 years (2000-2013) RSS data have been used in 743 peer-reviewed journal articles. This is an average of 4.5 peer-reviewed papers published every month made possible with RSS data. Some of the most important scientific contributions made by RSS data have been to the study of the climate. The AR5 Report "Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis" by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the internationally accepted authority on climate change, references 20 peer-reviewed journal papers from RSS scientists. The report makes direct use of RSS water vapor data, RSS atmospheric temperatures from MSU/AMSU, and 9 other datasets that are derived from RSS data. The RSS TB data record is

  4. Microwave diagnostic for the determination of the electron temperature of a low density shock-heated argon plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, C. P.; Exberger, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    The diffraction, defocusing and beam bending effects of microwaves transmitted through a bounded shock-heated argon plasma with low electron density are investigated with the purpose of developing an accurate method for electron temperature (Te) determination. This report describes the evaluation technique and presents results for an argon plasma with pressure between 3 and 10 torr, and T2 between 5500 and 9500 K. The electron temperature values obtained have a range of uncertainty between -20% and +10% only. The electron temperature is equal or lower by approximately 1000 K in comparison to the heavy particle temperature (T2).

  5. Numerical simulation of the temperature field of titania-bearing BF slag heated in a microwave oven

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liangying Wen; Chenguang Bai; Guibao Qiu; Jian Zhang; Shengfu Zhang; Zhanjun Long

    2008-01-01

    Considering the characteristic of selective heating of microwave and the treatment of titania-bearing BF slag, a mathematical model for the heating of a slag specimen is developed. The temperature distribution in the specimen is studied by numerical simulation. The temperature in the center of the cylindrical slag specimen is the highest and the temperature decreases when the radins increases rapidly. In this case, the temperature rising rate decreases with heating time rapidly, and it tends to zero when the heating time is up to 150 s.

  6. Atmospheric Temperature Profile Measurements Using Mobile High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razenkov, Ilya I.; Eloranta, Edwin W.

    2016-06-01

    The High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) designed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison discriminates between Mie and Rayleigh backscattering [1]. It exploits the Doppler effect caused by thermal motion of molecules, which broadens the spectrum of the transmitted laser light. That allows for absolute calibration of the lidar and measurements of the aerosol volume backscatter coefficient. Two iodine absorption filters with different absorption line widths (a regular iodine vapor filter and Argon buffered iodine filter) allow for atmospheric temperature profile measurements. The sensitivity of the measured signal-to-air temperature ratio is around 0.14%/K. The instrument uses a shared telescope transmitter-receiver design and operates in eyesafe mode (the product of laser average power and telescope aperture equals 0.1 Wm2 at 532 nm).

  7. Atmospheric Temperature Profile Measurements Using Mobile High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razenkov Ilya I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL designed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison discriminates between Mie and Rayleigh backscattering [1]. It exploits the Doppler effect caused by thermal motion of molecules, which broadens the spectrum of the transmitted laser light. That allows for absolute calibration of the lidar and measurements of the aerosol volume backscatter coefficient. Two iodine absorption filters with different absorption line widths (a regular iodine vapor filter and Argon buffered iodine filter allow for atmospheric temperature profile measurements. The sensitivity of the measured signal-to-air temperature ratio is around 0.14%/K. The instrument uses a shared telescope transmitter-receiver design and operates in eyesafe mode (the product of laser average power and telescope aperture equals 0.1 Wm2 at 532 nm.

  8. A model for quantification of temperature profiles via germination times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pipper, Christian Bressen; Adolf, Verena Isabelle; Jacobsen, Sven-Erik

    2013-01-01

    Current methodology to quantify temperature characteristics in germination of seeds is predominantly based on analysis of the time to reach a given germination fraction, that is, the quantiles in the distribution of the germination time of a seed. In practice interpolation between observed...... time and a specific type of accelerated failure time models is provided. As a consequence the observed number of germinated seeds at given monitoring times may be analysed directly by a grouped time-to-event model from which characteristics of the temperature profile may be identified and estimated...... germination fractions at given monitoring times is used to obtain the time to reach a given germination fraction. As a consequence the obtained value will be highly dependent on the actual monitoring scheme used in the experiment. In this paper a link between currently used quantile models for the germination...

  9. Recycling of automobile shredder residue with a microwave pyrolysis combined with high temperature steam gasification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaj, Pawel; Yang, Weihong; Błasiak, Włodzimierz; Forsgren, Christer

    2010-10-15

    Presently, there is a growing need for handling automobile shredder residues--ASR or "car fluff". One of the most promising methods of treatment ASR is pyrolysis. Apart of obvious benefits of pyrolysis: energy and metals recovery, there is serious concern about the residues generated from that process needing to be recycled. Unfortunately, not much work has been reported providing a solution for treatment the wastes after pyrolysis. This work proposes a new system based on a two-staged process. The ASR was primarily treated by microwave pyrolysis and later the liquid and solid products become the feedstock for the high temperature gasification process. The system development is supported within experimental results conducted in a lab-scale, batch-type reactor at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH). The heating rate, mass loss, gas composition, LHV and gas yield of producer gas vs. residence time are reported for the steam temperature of 1173 K. The sample input was 10 g and the steam flow rate was 0.65 kg/h. The conversion reached 99% for liquids and 45-55% for solids, dependently from the fraction. The H(2):CO mol/mol ratio varied from 1.72 solids and 1.4 for liquid, respectively. The average LHV of generated gas was 15.8 MJ/Nm(3) for liquids and 15 MJ/Nm(3) for solids fuels.

  10. Measurements of the cosmic microwave background temperature at 1. 47 GHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensadoun, M.J.

    1991-11-01

    A radiofrequency-gain total power radiometer measured the intensity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at a frequency of 1.47 GHz (20.4 cm wavelength) from White Mountain, California, in September 1988 and from the South Pole, Antarctica, in December 1989. The CMB thermodynamic temperature, TCMB, is 2.27 {plus minus} 0.25 K (68% C.L.) measured from White Mountain and 2.26 {plus minus} 0.21 K from the South Pole site. The combined result is 2.27 {plus minus} 0.19 K. The correction for galactic emission has been derived from scaled low-frequency maps and constitutes the main source, of error. The atmospheric signal is found by extrapolation from zenith scan measurements at higher frequencies. The result is consistent with previous low-frequency measurements, including a measurement at 1.41 GHz (Levin et al. 1988) made with an earlier version of this instrument. The result is {approximately}2.5 {sigma} ({approximately}l% probability) from the 2.74 {plus minus} 0.02,K global average CMB temperature.

  11. Measurements of the cosmic microwave background temperature at 1.47 GHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensadoun, M.J.

    1991-11-01

    A radiofrequency-gain total power radiometer measured the intensity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at a frequency of 1.47 GHz (20.4 cm wavelength) from White Mountain, California, in September 1988 and from the South Pole, Antarctica, in December 1989. The CMB thermodynamic temperature, TCMB, is 2.27 {plus_minus} 0.25 K (68% C.L.) measured from White Mountain and 2.26 {plus_minus} 0.21 K from the South Pole site. The combined result is 2.27 {plus_minus} 0.19 K. The correction for galactic emission has been derived from scaled low-frequency maps and constitutes the main source, of error. The atmospheric signal is found by extrapolation from zenith scan measurements at higher frequencies. The result is consistent with previous low-frequency measurements, including a measurement at 1.41 GHz (Levin et al. 1988) made with an earlier version of this instrument. The result is {approximately}2.5 {sigma} ({approximately}l% probability) from the 2.74 {plus_minus} 0.02,K global average CMB temperature.

  12. Taking the Universe's Temperature with Spectral Distortions of the Cosmic Microwave Background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, J Colin; Battaglia, Nick; Chluba, Jens; Ferraro, Simone; Schaan, Emmanuel; Spergel, David N

    2015-12-31

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) energy spectrum is a near-perfect blackbody. The standard model of cosmology predicts small spectral distortions to this form, but no such distortion of the sky-averaged CMB spectrum has yet been measured. We calculate the largest expected distortion, which arises from the inverse Compton scattering of CMB photons off hot, free electrons, known as the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (TSZ) effect. We show that the predicted signal is roughly one order of magnitude below the current bound from the COBE-FIRAS experiment, but it can be detected at enormous significance (≳1000σ) by the proposed Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE). Although cosmic variance reduces the effective signal-to-noise ratio to 230σ, this measurement will still yield a subpercent constraint on the total thermal energy of electrons in the observable Universe. Furthermore, we show that PIXIE can detect subtle relativistic effects in the sky-averaged TSZ signal at 30σ, which directly probe moments of the optical depth-weighted intracluster medium electron temperature distribution. These effects break the degeneracy between the electron density and the temperature in the mean TSZ signal, allowing a direct inference of the mean baryon density at low redshift. Future spectral distortion probes will thus determine the global thermodynamic properties of ionized gas in the Universe with unprecedented precision. These measurements will impose a fundamental "integral constraint" on models of galaxy formation and the injection of feedback energy over cosmic time.

  13. A precise and accurate determination of the cosmic microwave background temperature at z=0.89

    CERN Document Server

    Muller, S; Black, J H; Curran, S J; Horellou, C; Aalto, S; Combes, F; Guelin, M; Henkel, C

    2012-01-01

    According to the Big Bang theory and as a consequence of adiabatic expansion of the Universe, the temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) increases linearly with redshift. This relation is, however, poorly explored, and detection of any deviation would directly lead to (astro-)physics beyond the standard model. We aim at measuring the temperature of the CMB with an accuracy of a few percent at z=0.89 toward the molecular absorber in the galaxy lensing the quasar PKS1830-211. We adopt a Monte-Carlo Markov Chain approach, coupled with predictions from the non-LTE radiative transfer code RADEX, to solve the excitation of a set of various molecular species directly from their spectra. We determine Tcmb=5.08 pm 0.10 K at 68% confidence level. Our measurement is consistent with the value Tcmb=5.14 K predicted by the standard cosmological model with adiabatic expansion of the Universe. This is the most precise determination of Tcmb at z>0 to date.

  14. Using Microwave Observations to Estimate Land Surface Temperature during Cloudy Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, T. R.; Crow, W. T.; Hain, C.; Anderson, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    Land surface temperature (LST), a key ingredient for physically-based retrieval algorithms of hydrological states and fluxes, remains a poorly constrained parameter for global scale studies. The main two observational methods to remotely measure T are based on thermal infrared (TIR) observations and passive microwave observations (MW). TIR is the most commonly used approach and the method of choice to provide standard LST products for various satellite missions. MW-based LST retrievals on the other hand are not as widely adopted for land applications; currently their principle use is in soil moisture retrieval algorithms. MW and TIR technologies present two highly complementary and independent means of measuring LST. MW observations have a high tolerance to clouds but a low spatial resolution, and TIR has a high spatial resolution with temporal sampling restricted to clear skies. The nature of the temperature at the very surface layer of the land makes it difficult to combine temperature estimates between different methods. The skin temperature is characterized by a strong diurnal cycle that is dependant in timing and amplitude on the exact sensing depth and thermal properties of the vegetation. This paper builds on recent progress in characterizing the main structural components of the DTC that explain differences in TIR and MW estimates of LST. Spatial patterns in DTC timing (phase lag with solar noon) and DTC amplitude have been calculated for TIR, MW and compared to weather prediction estimates. Based on these comparisons MW LST can be matched to the TIR record. This paper will compare in situ measurements of LST with satellite estimates from (downscaled) TIR and (reconciled) MW products. By contrasting the validation results of clear sky days with those of cloudy days the expected tolerance to clouds of the MW observations will be tested. The goal of this study is to determine the weather conditions in which MW can supplement the TIR LST record.

  15. Artificial neural network approach for estimation of surface specific humidity and air temperature using Multifrequency Scanning Microwave Radiometer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Randhir Singh; B G Vasudevan; P K Pal; P C Joshi

    2004-03-01

    Microwave sensor MSMR (Multifrequency Scanning Microwave Radiometer) data onboard Oceansat-1 was used for retrieval of monthly averages of near surface specific humidity (a) and air temperature (a) by means of Artificial Neural Network (ANN). The MSMR measures the microwave radiances in 8 channels at frequencies of 6.6, 10.7, 18 and 21 GHz for both vertical and horizontal polarizations. The artificial neural networks (ANN) technique is employed to find the transfer function relating the input MSMR observed brightness temperatures and output (a and a) parameters. Input data consist of nearly 28 months (June 1999 — September 2001) of monthly averages of MSMR observed brightness temperature and surface marine observations of a and a from Comprehensive Ocean- Atmosphere Data Set (COADS). The performance of the algorithm is assessed with independent surface marine observations. The results indicate that the combination of MSMR observed brightness temperatures as input parameters provides reasonable estimates of monthly averaged surface parameters. The global root mean square (rms) differences are 1.0°C and 1.1 g kg−1 for air temperature and surface specific humidity respectively.

  16. A Brightness-Temperature-Variance-Based Passive Microwave Algorithm for Monitoring Soil Freeze/Thaw State on the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, M.; Yang, K.; Qin, J.; Jin, R.; Ma, Y.; Wen, J.; Chen, Y.; Zhao, L.; La, Z.; Tang, W.

    2014-12-01

    The land surface on the Tibetan Plateau experiences typical diurnal and seasonal freeze/thaw processes that play important roles in the regional water and energy exchanges, and recent passive microwave satellites provide opportunities to detect the soil state for the unique region. With the support of three soil moisture and temperature networks in the Tibetan Plateau, a dual-index microwave algorithm with AMSR-E (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System) data is developed for the detection of soil surface freeze/thaw state. One index is the standard deviation index (SDI) of brightness temperature (TB), which is defined as the standard deviation of horizontally polarized brightness temperatures at all AMSR-E frequencies. It is the major index and is used to reflect the reduction of liquid water content after soils get frozen. The other index is the 36.5 GHz vertically-polarized brightness temperature, which is linearly correlated with ground temperature and thus is utilized to detect it. The threshold values of the two indices (SDI and the brightness temperature at 36.5 GHz vertically-polarized) are determined based on a part of in situ data from the network located in a semi-arid climate, and the algorithm was validated against other in situ data from this network. Further validations were conducted based on the other two networks located in different climates (semi-humid and arid, respectively). Results show that this algorithm has accuracy of more than 90% for the semi-humid and semi-arid regions, and misclassifications mainly occur at the transition period between unfrozen and frozen seasons. Nevertheless, the microwave signals have limited capability in identifying the soil surface freeze/thaw state in the arid region, because they can penetrate deep dry soils and thus embody the bulk information beneath the surface.

  17. Cyanogen Excitation Measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background Temperature at 2.64 mm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, K. C.; Meyer, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    We have measured CN excitation temperatures in the diffuse lines of sight toward the stars zeta Ophiuchi, zeta Persei, HD 27778, HD 21483 and HD 154368. We find respective 2.64 mm rotational excitation temperatures of 2.737 +/- 0.025, 2.774 +/- 0.086, 2.769 +/- (0.093}_{0.099), 2.771 +/- (0.057}_{0.060) and 2.68 +/- (0.22}_{0.33)K. The fact that these values are all consistent with each other even though the associated CN column densities range over an order of magnitude strongly suggests that local processes contribute little to the excitation. We have corrected our temperatures for the small local collisional effects utilizing millimeter searches for CN line emission. The resulting values give a weighted average temperature for the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) at 2.64 mm of 2.733 +/- (0.023}_{0.031)K. We also find a CMBR temperature at 1.32 mm of 2.657 +/- 0.057 K. Our result is entirely consistent with the CMBR temperature results from COBE (Mather et al. 1990, Ap.J. 354, L37) and the COBRA rocket experiment (Gush, Halpern and Wishnow 1990, Phys. Rev. Lett. 65, 537) of 2.735 +/- 0.06 and 2.736 +/- 0.017 K, respectively. CN excitation determinations are not susceptible to the same systematic errors as are the direct measurement experiments. In addition, our temperatures originate in physically separate Galactic locations far from the near-Earth environment. The excellent agreement among the results from these independent methods attests to the accuracy of each approach and reaffirms the global nature of the background radiation. Our measurements stem from a large set of observations utilizing CCD detectors with various telescope and instrument combinations. The data were analyzed in a consistent manner designed to expose systematic equivalent width measurement errors resulting from the different instrumental configurations. We have found no evidence for such a bias and feel this illustrates the potential for using CCD detectors in sensitive

  18. Validation of brightness and physical temperature from two scanning microwave radiometers in the 60 GHz O2 band using radiosonde measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas-Guzmán, Francisco; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Haefele, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we address the assessment of the tropospheric performance of a new temperature radiometer (TEMPERA) at 60 GHz. With this goal, an intercomparison campaign was carried out at the aerological station of MeteoSwiss in Payerne (Switzerland). The brightness temperature and the tropospheric temperature were assessed by means of a comparison with simultaneous and collocated radiosondes that are launched twice a day at this station. In addition, the TEMPERA performances are compared with the ones from a commercial microwave radiometer (HATPRO), which has some different instrumental characteristics and uses a different inversion algorithm. Brightness temperatures from both radiometers were compared with the ones simulated using a radiative transfer model and atmospheric profiles from radiosondes. A total of 532 cases were analyzed under all weather conditions and evidenced larger brightness temperature deviations between the two radiometers and the radiosondes for the most transparent channels. Two different retrievals for the TEMPERA radiometer were implemented in order to evaluate the effect of the different channels on the temperature retrievals. The comparison with radiosondes evidenced better results very similar to the ones from HATPRO, when the eight more opaque channels were used. The study shows the good performance of TEMPERA to retrieve temperature profiles in the troposphere. The inversion method of TEMPERA is based on the optimal estimation method. The main advantage of this algorithm is that there is no necessity for radiosonde information to achieve good results in contrast to conventional methods as neural networks or lineal regression. Finally, an assessment of the effect of instrumental characteristics as the filter response and the antenna pattern on the brightness temperature showed that they can have an important impact on the most transparent channels.

  19. Tomographic measurement of temperature change in phantoms of the human body by chirp radar-type microwave computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakawa, M

    1993-07-01

    The chirp radar-type microwave computed tomograph (CT) measures the temperature change in a human body noninvasively. The paper examines its feasibility. A chirp pulse signal between 1 and 2 GHz is radiated from the transmitting antenna to the phantom. The transmitted waves are detected by the receiving antenna, which is placed on the opposite side of the object, and the beat signal between the incident wave and the transmitted wave is produced by the mixer. By spectral analysis of the beat signal, only those signals transmitted on the straight line between the transmitting antenna and the receiving antenna are discriminated from multipath signals. The microwave tomogram can therefore be reconstructed easily using the conventional algorithms for an X-ray CT image. The microwave CT can use the chirp signal to remove the influence of multipath signals caused by diffraction and reflection. The imaging of dielectric materials with complicated structures is thus possible. The experimental results using phantoms show that the spatial resolution of this microwave CT is about 10 mm and that a two-dimensional distribution of temperature change can be measured.

  20. Temperature Profile Measurements During Heat Treatment of BSCCO 2212 Coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tollestrup, Alvin; /Fermilab

    2011-04-14

    The temperature profile of two different BSCCO 2212 coils has been analyzed. The profiles are obtained from thermocouples imbedded in the windings during the heat treatment that activates the 2212. The melting and freezing of the 2212 is clearly observed. A model that describes the data and can be used to guide the processing of new coils has been developed. We have obtained the thermal history of two BSCCO coils, one from NHMFL (1) that had 10 layers of 1 mm diameter wire with 0.15 mm insulation and a second coil from OST that had 24 layers with similar insulation and conductor size. Both coils had thermocouples imbedded in the windings and excellent recordings of the temperature over the whole reaction cycle were available for analysis. There are several features that we will address in this note. Measurements have shown that the I{sub c} of the conductor is a sensitive function of its thermal history. This brings up the question of the absolute accuracy of the thermometry in the range around 882 C, the MP of 2212. The reference for the treatment profile is really related to this MP and to small deviations around it. Since the heat of fusion of 2212 is rather large, it generates a clear signal during the melting and cooling transition that automatically generates the relative temperature markers. The physics is the same as the way ice in water maintains an isothermal environment until it is all melted. A related question is the thermal response time of the coil package. The temperature cycles that are being used to optimize strand and small coils can have rapid changes easily implemented whereas a large coil may have such a large thermal time constant that the optimum cycle may not be attainable. A simple analytical model that works well for small solenoids has been developed and an ANSYS (5) program that works for larger coils with more complicated geometry has been set up but will not be discussed in this note.

  1. Retrieval and validation of stratospheric temperature data from a limb-scanning microwave radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Deborah Joy

    The measurements taken by the Millimeter Atmospheric Sounder (MAS), flown on the Shuttle in 1992, 1993 and 1994 as part of the ATLAS (Atmospheric Laboratory for Application and Science) missions, are used to estimate stratospheric temperatures. A Bayesian statistical retrieval technique, following Rodgers Optimal Estimation [Rodgers et al., 1976], is used to estimate atmospheric temperature from the measured radiance emitted from O2 around the spectral range of 60 GHz. This approach uses a detailed forward model of the atmosphere and instrument to simultaneously retrieve temperature and pressure profiles assuming hydrostatic equilibrium Concentrating on 10-13 April 1993 (ATLAS 2), the estimates represent a global distribution (70°S-70°N) of atmospheric temperature in the stratosphere (20-65 km). From the formal error analysis the uncertainty of the retrieved temperature estimates was determined to be to be 2-4 K. The inaccuracy is as high as 7 K and as low as 1 K, depending on the altitude. The temperature data accuracy in the lower stratosphere is severely affected by a baseline spectral error. By characterizing the retrieval the vertical resolution of the temperature profile was found to be between 3 and 6 km. Comparisons are made with coincident satellite data: Millimeter Limb Sounder (MLS), Cyrogenic Umb Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES), and Halogen Limb Experiment (HALOE) on board the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS). In addition, MAS temperatures are compared to ground-based lidars and radiosondes, along with model-instrument assimilated temperature data products from the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) and the United Kingdom Meteological Office (UKMO). All of the comparisons show consistently that the MAS data has a warm bias of about 4 K at 50 mbars and 10 mbars. The major contribution of this thesis work is the estimation, error analysis, and validation of the stratospheric temperature; and the development of a technique to

  2. Measuring the Redshift Dependence of The Cosmic Microwave Background Monopole Temperature With Planck Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Martino, I.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Da Silva, A.; Ebling, H.; Kashlinsky, A.; Kocevski, D.; Martins, C. J. A. P.

    2012-01-01

    We study the capability of Planck data to constrain deviations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) blackbody temperature from adiabatic evolution using the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich anisotropy induced by clusters of galaxies. We consider two types of data sets depending on how the cosmological signal is removed: using a CMB template or using the 217 GHz map. We apply two different statistical estimators, based on the ratio of temperature anisotropies at two different frequencies and on a fit to the spectral variation of the cluster signal with frequency. The ratio method is biased if CMB residuals with amplitude approximately 1 microK or larger are present in the data, while residuals are not so critical for the fit method. To test for systematics, we construct a template from clusters drawn from a hydro-simulation included in the pre-launch Planck Sky Model. We demonstrate that, using a proprietary catalog of X-ray-selected clusters with measured redshifts, electron densities, and X-ray temperatures, we can constrain deviations of adiabatic evolution, measured by the parameter a in the redshift scaling T (z) = T0(1 + z)(sup 1-alpha), with an accuracy of sigma(sub alpha) = 0.011 in the most optimal case and with sigma alpha = 0.018 for a less optimal case. These results represent a factor of 2-3 improvement over similar measurements carried out using quasar spectral lines and a factor 6-20 with respect to earlier results using smaller cluster samples.

  3. Microwave-assisted Preparation of Temperature Sensitive Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) Hydrogel with Improved Responsive Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-based hydrogel was prepared under microwave irradiation.The hydrogel thus prepared, comparing with that prepared by thermal heating method, exhibits faster swelling and shrinking kinetics. The improved responsive properties are due to the more heterogeneous and porous networks formed under microwave irradiation.

  4. Temperature profiles of different cooling methods in porcine pancreas procurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weegman, Bradley P; Suszynski, Thomas M; Scott, William E; Ferrer Fábrega, Joana; Avgoustiniatos, Efstathios S; Anazawa, Takayuki; O'Brien, Timothy D; Rizzari, Michael D; Karatzas, Theodore; Jie, Tun; Sutherland, David E R; Hering, Bernhard J; Papas, Klearchos K

    2014-01-01

    Porcine islet xenotransplantation is a promising alternative to human islet allotransplantation. Porcine pancreas cooling needs to be optimized to reduce the warm ischemia time (WIT) following donation after cardiac death, which is associated with poorer islet isolation outcomes. This study examines the effect of four different cooling Methods on core porcine pancreas temperature (n = 24) and histopathology (n = 16). All Methods involved surface cooling with crushed ice and chilled irrigation. Method A, which is the standard for porcine pancreas procurement, used only surface cooling. Method B involved an intravascular flush with cold solution through the pancreas arterial system. Method C involved an intraductal infusion with cold solution through the major pancreatic duct, and Method D combined all three cooling Methods. Surface cooling alone (Method A) gradually decreased core pancreas temperature to pancreas temperature profiles during procurement and histopathology scores. These data may also have implications on human pancreas procurement as use of an intraductal infusion is not common practice. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Estimating the Retrievability of Temperature Profiles from Satellite Infrared Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A method is developed to assess retrievability, namely the retrieval potential for atmospheric temperature profiles, from satellite infrared measurements in clear-sky conditions. This technique is based upon generalized linear inverse theory and empirical orthogonal function analysis. Utilizing the NCEP global temperature reanalysis data in January and July from 1999 to 2003, the retrievabilities obtained with the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and the High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder/3 (HIRS/3)sounding channel data are derived respectively for each standard pressure level on a global scale. As an incidental result of this study, the optimum truncation number in the method of generalized linear inverse is deduced too. The results show that the retrievabilities of temperature obtained with the two datasets are similar in spatial distribution and seasonal change characteristics. As for the vertical distribution, the retrievabilities are low in the upper and lower atmosphere, and high between 400 hPa and 850 hPa. For the geographical distribution, the retrievabilities are low in the low-latitude oceanic regions and in some regions in Antarctica, and relatively high in mid-high latitudes and continental regions. Compared with the HIRS/3 data, the retrievability obtained with the AIRS data can be improved by an amount between 0.15 and 0.40.

  6. Microwave imaging for thermal therapy monitoring: temperature accuracy and image reconstruction time improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaney, Paul M.; Fanning, Margaret W.; Li, Dun; Fang, Qianqian; Pendergrass, Sarah; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2003-06-01

    Microwave imaging has been investigated as a method of non-invasively estimating tissue electrical properties especially the conductivity, which is highly temperature dependent, as a means of monitoring thermal therapy. The technique we have chosen utilizes an iterative Gauss-Newton approach to converge on the correct property distribution. A previous implementation utilizing the complex form (CF) of the electric fields along with a sub-optimal phantom experimental configuration resulted in imaging temperature accuracy of only 1.6°C. Applying the log-magnitude/phase form (LMPF) of the algorithm has resulted in imaging accuracy on the order of 0.3°C which is a significant advance for the area of treatment monitoring. The LMPF algorithm was originally introduced as a way to reconstruct images of large, high-contrast scatterers as is the case in breast imaging. However, recent analysis of the Jacobian matrices for the comparable implementations has shown that the reconstruction problem in the new formulation more closely resembles a linear task as is the case in x-ray computed tomography. The comparisons were performed by examining plots of the Jacobian matrix terms for fixed transmit and receive antennas which demonstrated higher sensitivity in the center of the imaging zone along with narrower paths of senstivity between the atnenna pair for the LMPF algorithm. Animal model experiments have also been performed to validate these capabilities in a more realistic setting. Finally, the overall computational efficiency has been significantly enhanced through the use of the adjoint image reconstruction approach. This enables us to reconstruct images in roughly one minute which is essential if the approach is to be used as a therapy feedback mechanism.

  7. A soil moisture assimilation scheme based on the ensemble Kalman filter using microwave brightness temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA BingHao; XIE ZhengHui; TIAN XiangJun; SHI ChunXiang

    2009-01-01

    This study presents a soil moisture assimilation scheme,which could assimilate microwave brightness temperature directly,based on the ensemble Kalman filter and the shuffled complex evolution method (SCE-UA).It uses the soil water model of the land surface model CLM3.0 as the forecast operator,and a radiative transfer model (RTM) as the observation operator in the assimilation system.The assimilation scheme is implemented in two phases:the parameter calibration phase and the pure soil moisture assimilation phase.The vegetation optical thickness and surface roughness parameters in the RTM are calibrated by SCE-UA method and the optimal parameters are used as the final model parameters of the observation operator in the assimilation phase.The ideal experiments with synthetic data indicate that this scheme could significantly improve the simulation of soil moisture at the surface layer.Furthermore,the estimation of soil moisture in the deeper layers could also be improved to a certain extent.The real assimilation experiments with AMSR-E brightness temperature at 10.65 GHz (vertical polarization) show that the root mean square error (RMSE) of soil moisture in the top layer (0-10 cm) by asms.msimilation is 0.03355 m~3·m~(-3),which is reduced by 33.6% compared with that by simulation (0.05052m~3·m~(-3)).The mean RMSE by assimilation for the deeper layers (10-50 cm) is also reduced by 20.9%.All these experiments demonstrate the reasonability of the assimilation scheme developed in this study.

  8. A soil moisture assimilation scheme based on the ensemble Kalman filter using microwave brightness temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This study presents a soil moisture assimilation scheme, which could assimilate microwave brightness temperature directly, based on the ensemble Kalman filter and the shuffled complex evolution method (SCE-UA). It uses the soil water model of the land surface model CLM3.0 as the forecast operator, and a radiative transfer model (RTM) as the observation operator in the assimilation system. The assimilation scheme is implemented in two phases: the parameter calibration phase and the pure soil moisture assimilation phase. The vegetation optical thickness and surface roughness parameters in the RTM are calibrated by SCE-UA method and the optimal parameters are used as the final model parameters of the observation operator in the assimilation phase. The ideal experiments with synthetic data indicate that this scheme could significantly improve the simulation of soil moisture at the surface layer. Further- more, the estimation of soil moisture in the deeper layers could also be improved to a certain extent. The real assimilation experiments with AMSR-E brightness temperature at 10.65 GHz (vertical polariza- tion) show that the root mean square error (RMSE) of soil moisture in the top layer (0―10 cm) by as- similation is 0.03355 m3·m-3, which is reduced by 33.6% compared with that by simulation (0.05052 m3·m-3). The mean RMSE by assimilation for the deeper layers (10―50 cm) is also reduced by 20.9%. All these experiments demonstrate the reasonability of the assimilation scheme developed in this study.

  9. Intercomparison of stratospheric ozone and temperature profiles during the October 2005 Hohenpeissenberg Ozone Profiling Experiment (HOPE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrecht, W.; McGee, T. J.; Twigg, L. W.; Claude, H.; Schönenborn, F.; Sumnicht, G. K.; Silbert, D.

    2009-01-01

    Thirteen clear nights in October 2005 allowed successful intercomparison of the stationary lidar operated since 1987 by the German Weather Service (DWD) at Hohenpeissenberg (47.8° N, 11.0° E) with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) travelling standard lidar operated by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. Both lidars provide ozone profiles in the stratosphere, and temperature profiles in the strato- and mesosphere. Additional ozone profiles came from on-site Brewer/Mast ozonesondes, additional temperature profiles from Vaisala RS92 radiosondes launched at Munich (65 km north-east), and from operational analyses by the US National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). The intercomparison confirmed a low bias for ozone from the DWD lidar in the 33 to 43 km region, by up to 10%. This bias is caused by the DWD ozone algorithm. It will be removed in a future version. Between 20 and 33 km, agreement between both lidars, and ozonesondes below 30 km, is good with ozone differences less than 3 to 5%. Results are consistent with previous comparisons of the DWD lidar with SAGE, GOMOS and other satellite instruments. The intercomparison did uncover a 290 m upward shift of the DWD lidar data. When this shift is removed, agreement with ozone from the NASA lidar improves below 20 km, with remaining differences usually less than 5%, and not statistically significant. Precision (repeatability) for the lidar ozone data is better than 5% between 20 and 40 km altitude, dropping to 10% near 45 km, and 50% near 50 km. Temperature from the DWD lidar has a 1 to 2 K cold bias from 30 to 65 km against the NASA lidar, and a 2 to 4 K cold bias against radiosondes and NCEP. This is consistent with previous intercomparisons against NCEP or radiosondes. The cold bias against the NASA lidar disappears when the DWD lidar data are corrected for the afore-mentioned 290 m range error, and more appropriate values for the Earth's gravity acceleration are

  10. Intercomparison of stratospheric ozone and temperature profiles during the October 2005 Hohenpeissenberg Ozone Profiling Experiment (HOPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Steinbrecht

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirteen clear nights in October 2005 allowed successful intercomparison of the stationary lidar operated since 1987 by the German Weather Service (DWD at Hohenpeissenberg (47.8° N, 11.0° E with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC travelling standard lidar operated by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. Both lidars provide ozone profiles in the stratosphere, and temperature profiles in the strato- and mesosphere. Additional ozone profiles came from on-site Brewer/Mast ozonesondes, additional temperature profiles from Vaisala RS92 radiosondes launched at Munich (65 km north-east, and from operational analyses by the US National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP. The intercomparison confirmed a low bias for ozone from the DWD lidar in the 33 to 43 km region, by up to 10%. This bias is caused by the DWD ozone algorithm. It will be removed in a future version. Between 20 and 33 km, agreement between both lidars, and ozonesondes below 30 km, is good with ozone differences less than 3 to 5%. Results are consistent with previous comparisons of the DWD lidar with SAGE, GOMOS and other satellite instruments. The intercomparison did uncover a 290 m upward shift of the DWD lidar data. When this shift is removed, agreement with ozone from the NASA lidar improves below 20 km, with remaining differences usually less than 5%, and not statistically significant. Precision (repeatability for the lidar ozone data is better than 5% between 20 and 40 km altitude, dropping to 10% near 45 km, and 50% near 50 km. Temperature from the DWD lidar has a 1 to 2 K cold bias from 30 to 65 km against the NASA lidar, and a 2 to 4 K cold bias against radiosondes and NCEP. This is consistent with previous intercomparisons against NCEP or radiosondes. The cold bias against the NASA lidar disappears when the DWD lidar data are corrected for the afore-mentioned 290 m range error, and more appropriate values for the Earth's gravity

  11. Novel Design Integrating a Microwave Applicator into a Crystallizer for Rapid Temperature Cycling. A Direct Nucleation Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The control of nucleation in crystallization processes is a challenging task due to the often lacking knowledge on the process kinetics. Inflexible (predetermined) control strategies fail to grow the nucleated crystals to the desired quality because of the variability in the process conditions, disturbances, and the stochastic nature of crystal nucleation. Previously, the concept of microwave assisted direct nucleation control (DNC) was demonstrated in a laboratory setup to control the crystal size distribution in a batch crystallization process by manipulating the number of particles in the system. Rapid temperature cycling was used to manipulate the super(under)saturation and hence the number of crystals. The rapid heating response achieved with the microwave heating improved the DNC control efficiency, resulting in halving of the batch time. As an extension, this work presents a novel design in which the microwave applicator is integrated in the crystallizer, hence avoiding the external loop though the microwaves oven. DNC implemented in the 4 L unseeded crystallizer, at various count set points, resulted in strong efficiency enhancement of DNC, when compared to the performance with a slow responding system. The demonstrated crystallizer design is a basis for extending the enhanced process control opportunity to other applications. PMID:28729813

  12. Interpretation of Temperature Profiles during Soak Periods in Steam-stimulated Wells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Huiqing; Zhang Hongling; Wang Peixi

    2007-01-01

    To address the problems existing in testing steam injection profiles in a steam-stimulated well during steam injection and production periods, this paper proposes that the temperature profile in the completion interval could be tested during the soak period. A mathematical model for calculating the vertical distribution of temperature in a single layer reservoir is established based on the temperature characteristics of steam stimulated reservoirs, and the vertical distribution of temperature in a single layer reservoir could be obtained and heat loss could be calculated.The temperature, which is disturbed by thermal conduction in a multilayer reservoir, and heat loss could be derived based on the superposition principle of temperature potential. This paper establishes a multilayer testing temperature profile interpretation method and interprets the actual test temperature profile of Well Gao 3-7-66. The results indicate that the temperature profile in the soak period can reflect the thermal absorption conditions in various reservoir beds.

  13. Channel Temperature Model for Microwave AlGaN/GaN HEMTs on SiC and Sapphire MMICs in High Power, High Efficiency SSPAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Jon C.

    2004-01-01

    A key parameter in the design trade-offs made during AlGaN/GaN HEMTs development for microwave power amplifiers is the channel temperature. An accurate determination can, in general, only be found using detailed software; however, a quick estimate is always helpful, as it speeds up the design cycle. This paper gives a simple technique to estimate the channel temperature of a generic microwave AlGaN/GaN HEMT on SiC or Sapphire, while incorporating the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity. The procedure is validated by comparing its predictions with the experimentally measured temperatures in microwave devices presented in three recently published articles. The model predicts the temperature to within 5 to 10 percent of the true average channel temperature. The calculation strategy is extended to determine device temperature in power combining MMICs for solid-state power amplifiers (SSPAs).

  14. Experimental analysis of temperature profiles in ceramic brickwork elements subjected to high temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciá, M. E.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses heat transfer through a brick element in order to know the thermal behavior of onedimensional brickwork masonry samples exposed to high temperatures. The object of the tests is to build time-temperature curves according to different thermal steps in transient to experimentally determine the temperature profiles in the interior of a wall. Through this study, it is possible to demonstrate absolute moisture of a factory item from 300 °C (variation of temperatures in the interior of the element, avoid the associated phenomenon of evaporation of water during the thermal process as well as to obtain profiles of temperatures that help calculate the cross section of a factory element subjected to high temperatures.En este artículo se analiza la transferencia de calor a través de un elemento de fábrica de ladrillo con el fin de conocer el comportamiento térmico de secciones de fábrica unidimensionales expuestas a altas temperaturas. El objeto de los ensayos es construir curvas tiempo-temperatura en función de diversos escalones térmicos en régimen transitorio para determinar experimentalmente los perfiles de temperatura en el interior de un muro. A través de este estudio es posible evidenciar el contenido de humedad absoluta de un elemento de fábrica a partir de los 300 ºC (variación de las temperaturas en el interior del elemento, evitar el fenómeno asociado de la evaporación del agua durante el proceso térmico así como obtener perfiles de temperaturas que ayuden a calcular la sección eficaz de un elemento de fábrica sometido a altas temperaturas.

  15. Microwave activation of electrochemical processes: High temperature phenol and triclosan electro-oxidation at carbon and diamond electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghanem, Mohamed A.; Marken, Frank [Department of Chemistry, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Compton, Richard G.; Coles, Barry A. [Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Oxford University, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Psillakis, Elefteria [Laboratory of Aquatic Chemistry, Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Polytechnioupolis, 73100 Chania-Crete (Greece); Kulandainathan, M. Anbu [Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi (India)

    2007-12-20

    The electrochemical oxidation of phenolic compounds in aqueous media is known to be affected by the formation of electro-polymerized organic layers which lead to partial or complete electrode blocking. In this study the effect of high intensity microwave radiation applied locally at the electrode surface is investigated for the oxidation of phenol and triclosan in alkaline solution at a 500 {mu}m diameter glassy carbon or at a 500 {mu}m x 500 {mu}m boron-doped diamond electrode. The temperature at the electrode surface and mass transport enhancement are determined by calibration with the Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 3-/4-} redox system in aqueous 0.3 M NaOH and 0.2 NaCl (pH 12) solution. The calibration shows that strong thermal and mass transport effects occur at both glassy carbon and boron-doped diamond electrodes. The average electrode temperature reaches up to 390 K and mass transport enhancements of more than 20-fold are possible. For the phenol electro-oxidation at glassy carbon electrodes and at a concentration below 2 mM a multi-electron oxidation (ca. 4 electrons) occurs in the presence of microwave radiation. For the electro-oxidation of the more hydrophobic triclosan only the one-electron oxidation occurs. Although currents are enhanced in presence of microwave radiation, rapid blocking of the electrode surface in particular at high phenol concentrations still occurs. (author)

  16. 3D Online Submicron Scale Observation of Mixed Metal Powder's Microstructure Evolution in High Temperature and Microwave Compound Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Kang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the influence on the mechanical properties caused by microstructure evolution of metal powder in extreme environment, 3D real-time observation of the microstructure evolution of Al-Ti mixed powder in high temperature and microwave compound fields was realized by using synchrotron radiation computerized topography (SR-CT technique; the spatial resolution was enhanced to 0.37 μm/pixel through the designed equipment and the introduction of excellent reconstruction method for the first time. The process of microstructure evolution during sintering was clearly distinguished from 2D and 3D reconstructed images. Typical sintering parameters such as sintering neck size, porosity, and particle size of the sample were presented for quantitative analysis of the influence on the mechanical properties and the sintering kinetics during microwave sintering. The neck size-time curve was obtained and the neck growth exponent was 7.3, which indicated that surface diffusion was the main diffusion mechanism; the reason was the eddy current loss induced by the external microwave fields providing an additional driving force for mass diffusion on the particle surface. From the reconstructed images and the curve of porosity and average particle size versus temperature, it was believed that the presence of liquid phase aluminum accelerated the densification and particle growth.

  17. 3D online submicron scale observation of mixed metal powder's microstructure evolution in high temperature and microwave compound fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dan; Xu, Feng; Hu, Xiao-fang; Dong, Bo; Xiao, Yu; Xiao, Ti-qiao

    2014-01-01

    In order to study the influence on the mechanical properties caused by microstructure evolution of metal powder in extreme environment, 3D real-time observation of the microstructure evolution of Al-Ti mixed powder in high temperature and microwave compound fields was realized by using synchrotron radiation computerized topography (SR-CT) technique; the spatial resolution was enhanced to 0.37  μm/pixel through the designed equipment and the introduction of excellent reconstruction method for the first time. The process of microstructure evolution during sintering was clearly distinguished from 2D and 3D reconstructed images. Typical sintering parameters such as sintering neck size, porosity, and particle size of the sample were presented for quantitative analysis of the influence on the mechanical properties and the sintering kinetics during microwave sintering. The neck size-time curve was obtained and the neck growth exponent was 7.3, which indicated that surface diffusion was the main diffusion mechanism; the reason was the eddy current loss induced by the external microwave fields providing an additional driving force for mass diffusion on the particle surface. From the reconstructed images and the curve of porosity and average particle size versus temperature, it was believed that the presence of liquid phase aluminum accelerated the densification and particle growth.

  18. Similarity of the Temperature Profile formed by Fluid Flow along a Wall

    CERN Document Server

    Weyburne, David

    2016-01-01

    A new approach to the study of similarity of temperature profiles is presented. It is applicable for any 2-D fluid flow along an isothermal heated (cooled) wall. The approach is based on a simple concept; the area under a set of scaled temperature profile curves that show similar behavior must be equal. This leads to a new integral-based definition of temperature profile similarity. By taking simple area integrals of the scaled temperature profile and its first derivative, we also obtain a number of new results pertaining to similarity of the temperature profiles. For example, it is shown that if similarity exists, then: 1) the similarity temperature and length scaling parameters are interdependent, 2) the thermal displacement thickness must be a similar length scaling parameter, and 3) the temperature scaling parameter must be proportional to the free stream minus wall temperature values.

  19. Simultaneous recovery of organic and inorganic content of paper deinking residue through low-temperature microwave-assisted pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhanrong; Macquarrie, Duncan J; Aguiar, Pedro M; Clark, James H; Matharu, Avtar S

    2015-02-17

    Significant amounts of paper deinking residue (DIR) has been and is still being generated from paper deinking processes, representing both an economic and environmental burden for recycled paper mills. Our research on low-temperature (chromatography-mass spectrometry, liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), X-ray diffraction, solid-state cross-polarization/magic-angle spinning (13)C NMR, and Bloch-decay (13)C NMR). The results reveal that the process efficiently separates the inorganic minerals as microwave residue (mainly calcite and kaolinite) from organic matter, and hence the microwave residue could be reused to produce new paper/cardboard products. The organic fraction bio-oil generated is energy-densified and rich in carbohydrates and is a potential source for valuable aromatic compounds.

  20. High Q-factor Sapphire Whispering Gallery Mode Microwave Resonator at Single Photon Energies and milli-Kelvin Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Creedon, Daniel L; Farr, Warrick; Martinis, John M; Duty, Timothy L; Tobar, Michael E

    2011-01-01

    The microwave properties of a crystalline sapphire dielectric whispering gallery mode resonator have been measured at very low excitation strength (E/hf=1) and low temperatures (T = 30 mK). The measurements were sensitive enough to observe saturation due to a highly detuned electron spin resonance, which limited the loss tangent of the material to about 2e-8 measured at 13.868 and 13.259 GHz. Small power dependent frequency shifts were also measured which correspond to an added magnetic susceptibility of order 1e-9. This work shows that quantum limited microwave resonators with Q-factors > 1e8 are possible with the implementation of a sapphire whispering gallery mode system.

  1. Characterization of a digital microwave radiometry system for noninvasive thermometry using a temperature-controlled homogeneous test load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunachalam, K; Stauffer, P R; Maccarini, P F; Jacobsen, S; Sterzer, F

    2008-07-21

    Microwave radiometry has been proposed as a viable noninvasive thermometry approach for monitoring subsurface tissue temperatures and potentially controlling power levels of multielement heat applicators during clinical hyperthermia treatments. With the evolution of technology, several analog microwave radiometry devices have been developed for biomedical applications. In this paper, we describe a digital microwave radiometer with built-in electronics for signal processing and automatic self-calibration. The performance of the radiometer with an Archimedean spiral receive antenna is evaluated over a bandwidth of 3.7-4.2 GHz in homogeneous and layered water test loads. Controlled laboratory experiments over the range of 30-50 degrees C characterize measurement accuracy, stability, repeatability and penetration depth sensitivity. The ability to sense load temperature through an intervening water coupling bolus of 6 mm thickness is also investigated. To assess the clinical utility and sensitivity to electromagnetic interference (EMI), experiments are conducted inside standard clinical hyperthermia treatment rooms with no EM shielding. The digital radiometer provided repeatable measurements with 0.075 degrees C resolution and standard deviation of 0.217 degrees C for homogeneous and layered tissue loads at temperatures between 32-45 degrees C. Within the 3.7-4.2 GHz band, EM noise rejection was good other than some interference from overhead fluorescent lights in the same room as the radiometer. The system response obtained for ideal water loads suggests that this digital radiometer should be useful for estimating subcutaneous tissue temperatures under a 6 mm waterbolus used during clinical hyperthermia treatments. The accuracy and stability data obtained in water test loads of several configurations support our expectation that single band radiometry should be sufficient for sub-surface temperature monitoring and power control of large multielement array superficial

  2. Characterization of a digital microwave radiometry system for noninvasive thermometry using a temperature-controlled homogeneous test load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arunachalam, K; Stauffer, P R; Maccarini, P F [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Jacobsen, S [Department of Physics and Technology, University of Tromso, N-9037 (Norway); Sterzer, F [MMTC, Inc. Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)], E-mail: kavitha.arunachalam@duke.edu

    2008-07-21

    Microwave radiometry has been proposed as a viable noninvasive thermometry approach for monitoring subsurface tissue temperatures and potentially controlling power levels of multielement heat applicators during clinical hyperthermia treatments. With the evolution of technology, several analog microwave radiometry devices have been developed for biomedical applications. In this paper, we describe a digital microwave radiometer with built-in electronics for signal processing and automatic self-calibration. The performance of the radiometer with an Archimedean spiral receive antenna is evaluated over a bandwidth of 3.7-4.2 GHz in homogeneous and layered water test loads. Controlled laboratory experiments over the range of 30-50 deg. C characterize measurement accuracy, stability, repeatability and penetration depth sensitivity. The ability to sense load temperature through an intervening water coupling bolus of 6 mm thickness is also investigated. To assess the clinical utility and sensitivity to electromagnetic interference (EMI), experiments are conducted inside standard clinical hyperthermia treatment rooms with no EM shielding. The digital radiometer provided repeatable measurements with 0.075 deg. C resolution and standard deviation of 0.217 deg. C for homogeneous and layered tissue loads at temperatures between 32-45 deg. C. Within the 3.7-4.2 GHz band, EM noise rejection was good other than some interference from overhead fluorescent lights in the same room as the radiometer. The system response obtained for ideal water loads suggests that this digital radiometer should be useful for estimating subcutaneous tissue temperatures under a 6 mm waterbolus used during clinical hyperthermia treatments. The accuracy and stability data obtained in water test loads of several configurations support our expectation that single band radiometry should be sufficient for sub-surface temperature monitoring and power control of large multielement array superficial hyperthermia

  3. Characterization of a digital microwave radiometry system for noninvasive thermometry using a temperature-controlled homogeneous test load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunachalam, K.; Stauffer, P. R.; Maccarini, P. F.; Jacobsen, S.; Sterzer, F.

    2008-07-01

    Microwave radiometry has been proposed as a viable noninvasive thermometry approach for monitoring subsurface tissue temperatures and potentially controlling power levels of multielement heat applicators during clinical hyperthermia treatments. With the evolution of technology, several analog microwave radiometry devices have been developed for biomedical applications. In this paper, we describe a digital microwave radiometer with built-in electronics for signal processing and automatic self-calibration. The performance of the radiometer with an Archimedean spiral receive antenna is evaluated over a bandwidth of 3.7-4.2 GHz in homogeneous and layered water test loads. Controlled laboratory experiments over the range of 30-50 °C characterize measurement accuracy, stability, repeatability and penetration depth sensitivity. The ability to sense load temperature through an intervening water coupling bolus of 6 mm thickness is also investigated. To assess the clinical utility and sensitivity to electromagnetic interference (EMI), experiments are conducted inside standard clinical hyperthermia treatment rooms with no EM shielding. The digital radiometer provided repeatable measurements with 0.075 °C resolution and standard deviation of 0.217 °C for homogeneous and layered tissue loads at temperatures between 32-45 °C. Within the 3.7-4.2 GHz band, EM noise rejection was good other than some interference from overhead fluorescent lights in the same room as the radiometer. The system response obtained for ideal water loads suggests that this digital radiometer should be useful for estimating subcutaneous tissue temperatures under a 6 mm waterbolus used during clinical hyperthermia treatments. The accuracy and stability data obtained in water test loads of several configurations support our expectation that single band radiometry should be sufficient for sub-surface temperature monitoring and power control of large multielement array superficial hyperthermia applicators.

  4. Neural network control method for thermoelectric converters with controlled profile temperature field

    OpenAIRE

    Кочан, Орест Володимирович

    2012-01-01

    There is method of control of temperature field of thermocouple based sensor with controlled profile of temperature field (TBS with CPTF) along electrodes of main thermocouple (MTC) considered in this paper. This mentioned above method is based on neural networks. MTC measure temperature of an object directly.Stable profile of the temperature field along electrodes of MTC doesn’t allow to the heterogeneity error of thermoelectrodes of MTC appear itself. Such stability of the temperature field...

  5. Critical body temperature profile as indicator of heat stress vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, P K; Dutta, Priya; Nag, Anjali

    2013-01-01

    Extreme climatic heat is a major health concern among workers in different occupational pursuits. People in the regions of western India confront frequent heat emergencies, with great risk of mortality and morbidity. Taking account of informal occupational groups (foundry and sheet metal, FSM, N=587; ceramic and pottery, CP, N=426; stone quarry, SQ, N=934) in different seasons, the study examined the body temperature profiling as indicator of vulnerability to environmental warmth. About 3/4th of 1947 workers had habitual exposure at 30.1-35.5°C WBGT and ~10% of them were exposed to 38.2-41.6°C WBGT. The responses of FSM, CP and SQ workers indicated prevailing high heat load during summer and post-monsoon months. Local skin temperatures (T(sk)) varied significantly in different seasons, with consistently high level in summer, followed by post-monsoon and winter months. The mean difference of T(cr) and T(sk) was ~5.2°C up to 26.7°C WBGT, and ~2.5°C beyond 30°C WBGT. Nearly 90% of the workers had T(cr) within 38°C, suggesting their self-adjustment strategy in pacing work and regulating T(cr). In extreme heat, the limit of peripheral adjustability (35-36°C T(sk)) and the narrowing down of the difference between T(cr) and T(sk) might indicate the limit of one's ability to withstand heat exposure.

  6. The lensing and temperature imprints of voids on the Cosmic Microwave Background

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Yan-Chuan; Mao, Qingqing; Peacock, John A; Szapudi, Istvan; Berlind, Andreas A

    2016-01-01

    We have searched for the signature of cosmic voids in the CMB, in both the Planck temperature and lensing-convergence maps; voids should give decrements in both. We use zobov voids from the DR12 SDSS CMASS galaxy sample. We base our analysis on N-body simulations, to avoid a posteriori bias. For the first time, we detect the signature of voids in CMB lensing: the significance is $4.0\\sigma$, close to $\\Lambda$CDM in both amplitude and projected density-profile shape. A temperature dip is also seen, at modest significance ($1.6\\sigma$), with amplitude about 6 times the prediction. This temperature signal is induced mostly by voids with radius between 100 and 150 Mpc/h, while the lensing signal is mostly contributed by smaller voids -- as expected; lensing relates directly to density, while ISW depends on gravitational potential. The void abundance in observations and simulations agree, as well. We also repeated the analysis excluding lower-significance voids: no lensing signal is detected, with an upper limit ...

  7. Microwave combustion and sintering without isostatic pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years interest has grown rapidly in the application of microwave energy to the processing of ceramics, composites, polymers, and other materials. Advances in the understanding of microwave/materials interactions will facilitate the production of new ceramic materials with superior mechanical properties. One application of particular interest is the use of microwave energy for the mobilization of uranium for subsequent redeposition. Phase III (FY98) will focus on the microwave assisted chemical vapor infiltration tests for mobilization and redeposition of radioactive species in the mixed sludge waste. Uranium hexachloride and uranium (IV) borohydride are volatile compounds for which the chemical vapor infiltration procedure might be developed for the separation of uranium. Microwave heating characterized by an inverse temperature profile within a preformed ceramic matrix will be utilized for CVI using a carrier gas. Matrix deposition is expected to commence from the inside of the sample where the highest temperature is present. The preform matrix materials, which include aluminosilicate based ceramics and silicon carbide based ceramics, are all amenable to extreme volume reduction, densification, and vitrification. Important parameters of microwave sintering such as frequency, power requirement, soaking temperature, and holding time will be investigated to optimize process conditions for the volatilization of uranyl species using a reactive carrier gas in a microwave chamber.

  8. The Mathematical Representation of Wind Speed and Temperature Profiles in the Unstable Atmospheric Surface Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulson, C.A.

    1970-01-01

    Analytical expressions which specify non-dimensionalized wind speed and potential temperature gradients as functions of stability are integrated. The integrated equations are tested against Swinhank's wind and temperature profiles measured at Kerang, Australia. It is found that a representation s...... suggested independently by Businger and by Dyer gives the best fit to temperature profiles and describes the wind profiles equally as well as a relation suggested by Panofsky et al....

  9. Interactive Matching between the Temperature Profile and Secondary Reactions of Oil Shale Pyrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yu; Han, Zhennan; Wu, Hao;

    2016-01-01

    degrees C and a shale char bed operating at different temperatures. At low temperatures (550 degrees C), severe cracking occurred, converting both heavy and light oil to carbon and gas. The desirably matched reactor temperature profile for high oil yield is discussed via analysis of the tendency......This article investigates the effect of the reactor temperature profile on the distribution and characteristics of the products from fixed-bed pyrolysis of oil shale. Experiments were performed in a one-stage fixed-bed reactor and in a two-stage fixed-bed reactor. In the one-stage reactor......, the shale oil yield reached 7.40 wt % with a reactor temperature profile from 900 to 550 degrees C and decreased to 2.23 wt % with the reverse temperature profile. The effect of the temperature profile was investigated further in the two-stage fixed-bed reactor combining a pyrolysis stage operating at 550...

  10. Problems Faced with High-Temperature Microwave Absorbing M aterials%高温吸波材料研究面临的问题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周万城; 王婕; 罗发; 朱冬梅; 黄智斌; 卿玉长

    2013-01-01

    The problems in researches of high-temperature microwave absorbing materials are discussed .It is indicated that raising absorbance in high temperature has been the goal of researches of high-temperature microwave absorbing mate-rials.The way to further increase the absorbance of high-temperature microwave absorbing materials is in-depth under-standing the basic phenomenon and mechanisms of the response of various lattice defects in a material to microwave elec-tromagnetic field.The designable ability of periodical structure microwave absorbing materials , including metamaterial, makes them potential good high-temperature microwave absorbing materials.Oxidation, chemical reaction, and diffusion are problems of research and application of high-temperature microwave absorbing material .As for high-temperature mi-crowave absorbing coatings, bonding strength and thermal shocking resistance are also major problems .Since the measures that optimize the application properties of high-temperature microwave absorbing composites often decrease the microwave absorbance of the material, so comprehensive optimization of application properties and microwave absorbance is the most difficult problem to be solved with high-temperature microwave absorbing composites .Compared with materials with a simi-lar application environment, high-temperature microwave absorbing materials have the same property-requirement for appli-cation, in addition to the requirement for good microwave absorbance at high temperatures .Therefore, high-temperature microwave absorbing materials have more degree of difficulty than materials with a similar application environment .%分析了目前高温吸波材料研究面临的问题,指出提高高温吸波材料的高温吸波性能一直都是高温吸波材料研究追求的方向,深入基础研究,认清各种材料微观缺陷在电磁场中的响应及其机理,是进一步提高吸波材料高温吸波性能的主要方向,周期结构吸

  11. Effect of e-beam irradiation and microwave heating on the fatty acid composition and volatile compound profile of grass carp surimi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongfei; Wang, Wei; Wang, Haiyan; Ye, Qingfu

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effects of e-beam irradiation(1-7 kGy) and irradiation coupled to microwave heating (e-I-MC, 70 °C internal temperature) on the fatty acid composition and volatile compound profile of grass carp surimi. Compared to control samples, e-beam irradiation generated three novel volatile compounds (heptane, 2,6-dimethyl-nonane, and dimethyl disulfide) and increased the relative proportions of alcohols, aldehydes, and ketones. Meanwhile, e-I-MC significantly increased aldehyde levels and generated five heterocyclic compounds along with these three novel compounds. No significant difference in volatile compounds were detected in e-I-MC samples with increasing irradiation dose (p>0.05), comparing to the control group. E-beam irradiation at 5 and 7 kGy increased the levels of saturated fatty acids (SFAs) and decreased the levels of unsaturated fatty acids (p≤0.05), but did not affect the content of trans fatty acid levels (p>0.05). Irradiation, which had no significant effects on (Eicosapentaenoic acid) EPA, decreased (Docose Hexaenoie Acid) DHA levels. In the e-I-MC group, SFA levels increased and PUFA levels decreased. Additionally, MUFA levels were unaffected and trans fatty acid levels increased slightly following e-I-MC.

  12. Microwave joining of SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silberglitt, R.; Ahmad, I. [FM Technologies, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States); Black, W.M. [George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to optimize the properties of SiC-SiC joints made using microwave energy. The current focus is on optimization of time-temperature profiles, production of SiC from chemical precursors, and design of new applicators for joining of long tubes.

  13. Near-field scanning microwave microscopy of microwave devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahacos, C. P.; Steinhauer, David E.; Dutta, S.; Anlage, S. M.; Wellstood, F. C.; Newman, H.

    1997-03-01

    We have developed a scanning microwave microscope which can presently image features with a spatial resolution of 10-100 μm in the frequency range 5-15 GHz.(C. P. Vlahacos, et al.), Appl. Phys. Lett. 69, 3272 (1996).^,(S. M. Anlage, et al.), IEEE. Trans. Appl. Supercond. (1997). The microscope consists of a resonant section of a coaxial cable which is terminated with a small-diameter open-ended coaxial probe. Images are made by scanning the sample under the probe while recording the induced near-field microwave voltage as a function of sample position. We will present images for several microwave devices, including an X-band microstrip planar ferrite circulator and a high-temperature superconducting microstrip YBa_2Cu_3O_7-δ resonator, and compare them to the calculated field profiles.

  14. The Improved NRL Tropical Cyclone Monitoring System with a Unified Microwave Brightness Temperature Calibration Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Yang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The near real-time NRL global tropical cyclone (TC monitoring system based on multiple satellite passive microwave (PMW sensors is improved with a new inter-sensor calibration scheme to correct the biases caused by differences in these sensor’s high frequency channels. Since the PMW sensor 89 GHz channel is used in multiple current and near future operational and research satellites, a unified scheme to calibrate all satellite PMW sensor’s ice scattering channels to a common 89 GHz is created so that their brightness temperatures (TBs will be consistent and permit more accurate manual and automated analyses. In order to develop a physically consistent calibration scheme, cloud resolving model simulations of a squall line system over the west Pacific coast and hurricane Bonnie in the Atlantic Ocean are applied to simulate the views from different PMW sensors. To clarify the complicated TB biases due to the competing nature of scattering and emission effects, a four-cloud based calibration scheme is developed (rain, non-rain, light rain, and cloudy. This new physically consistent inter-sensor calibration scheme is then evaluated with the synthetic TBs of hurricane Bonnie and a squall line as well as observed TCs. Results demonstrate the large TB biases up to 13 K for heavy rain situations before calibration between TMI and AMSR-E are reduced to less than 3 K after calibration. The comparison stats show that the overall bias and RMSE are reduced by 74% and 66% for hurricane Bonnie, and 98% and 85% for squall lines, respectively. For the observed hurricane Igor, the bias and RMSE decrease 41% and 25% respectively. This study demonstrates the importance of TB calibrations between PMW sensors in order to systematically monitor the global TC life cycles in terms of intensity, inner core structure and convective organization. A physics-based calibration scheme on TC’s TB corrections developed in this study is able to significantly reduce the

  15. Understanding Discrepancies between Simulated and Measured Upwelling Microwave Brightness Temperatures: A Sensitivity Study on the Impact of Cloud Ice Microphysical and Scattering Parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, D.; Hashino, T.; Mugnai, A.; Sanò, P.; Smith, E. A.; Tripoli, G. J.

    2009-09-01

    Most physically-based Bayesian algorithms for precipitation retrieval from satellite-borne microwave (MW) radiometers use cloud-radiation databases (CRD’s) that are composed of numerous detailed microphysical cloud profiles obtained from cloud resolving model (CRM) simulations, coupled with the simulated upwelling brightness temperatures (TB’s) at several MW frequencies. These TB’s are computed by applying radiative transfer (RT) schemes to the CRM profiles for the same frequencies and polarizations of the satellite MW radiometer measurements in use. Then, the ensemble of simulations is compared with the measurements to estimate the precipitation rate. A good agreement between simulations and measurements is obviously needed. Nevertheless, depending on frequency, there are several sources of discrepancy between simulated and measured TB’s. Here, we show the results of a sensitivity study on the impact of several different parameterizations that are used to compute the radiative properties of ice particles, as well as on the CRM skill in providing realistic descriptions of the microphysical structures of precipitating clouds. To this end, we use 2D-simulations of a case study of the KWAJEX campaign (that took place from 23 July to 14 September 1999), that were performed by the University of Wisconsin - Nonhydrostatic Modeling System (UW-NMS) using both a bulk microphysics scheme, as well as a new microphysical scheme called Advanced Microphysical Prediction System (AMPS) that explicitly predicts ice particle properties (such as size, particle density, and crystal habits).

  16. Transparent Yb:(YLa)2O3 ceramics produced by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis and microwave sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balabanov, S. S.; Bykov, Yu. V.; Egorov, S. V.; Eremeev, A. G.; Gavrishchuk, E. M.; Khazanov, E. A.; Mukhin, I. B.; Palashov, O. V.; Permin, D. A.; Zelenogorsky, V. V.

    2013-02-01

    A new self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) technique for production of yttrium oxide nanopowders, doped with rare-earth ions, from metal acetatonitrates was developed. The synthesized powders were used for preparing transparent ceramic samples by microwave sintering. Optical properties (transmittance, absorption, scattering, refraction) of Yb0.1(Y, La)1.9O3 ceramics depending on the content of lanthanum oxide, have been investigated. For the first time lasing at 1030 nm in Yb0.1Y1.7La0.2O3 ceramics, prepared by these methods, has been attained.

  17. Microwave-assisted liquefaction of rape straw for the production of bio-oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing-Yan Huang; Feng Li; Jiu-Long Xie; Cornelis F. De Hoop; Chung-Yun Hse; Jin-Qiu Qi; Hui. Xiao

    2017-01-01

    The acid-catalyzed liquefaction of rape straw in methanol using microwave energy was examined. Conversion yield and energy consumption were evaluated to profile the microwave-assisted liquefaction process. Chemical components of the bio-oils from various liquefaction conditions were identified. A higher reaction temperature was found to be beneficial to obtain higher...

  18. Temperature profile and producer gas composition of high temperature air gasification of oil palm fronds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guangul, F. M.; Sulaiman, S. A.; Ramli, A.

    2013-06-01

    Environmental pollution and scarcity of reliable energy source are the current pressing global problems which need a sustainable solution. Conversion of biomass to a producer gas through gasification process is one option to alleviate the aforementioned problems. In the current research the temperature profile and composition of the producer gas obtained from the gasification of oil palm fronds by using high temperature air were investigated and compared with unheated air. By preheating the gasifying air at 500°C the process temperature were improved and as a result the concentration of combustible gases and performance of the process were improved. The volumetric percentage of CO, CH4 and H2 were improved from 22.49, 1.98, and 9.67% to 24.98, to 2.48% and 13.58%, respectively. In addition, HHV, carbon conversion efficiency and cold gas efficiency were improver from 4.88 MJ/Nm3, 83.8% and 56.1% to 5.90 MJ/Nm3, 87.3% and 62.4%, respectively.

  19. Nonlinearities in Microwave Superconductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Ledenyov, Dimitri O.; Ledenyov, Viktor O.

    2012-01-01

    The research is focused on the modeling of nonlinear properties of High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) thin films, using Bardeen, Cooper, Schrieffer and Lumped Element Circuit theories, with purpose to enhance microwave power handling capabilities of microwave filters and optimize design of microwave circuits in micro- and nano- electronics.

  20. Temporal profile of body temperature in acute ischemic stroke: Relation to infarct size and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Geurts (Marjolein); Scheijmans, F.E.V. (Féline E.V.); T. van Seeters (Tom); G.J. Biessels; L.J. Kappelle (Jaap); B.K. Velthuis (Birgitta K.); H.B. van der Worp (Bart); C.B. Majoie (Charles); Y.B.W.E.M. Roos (Y. B W E M); L.E.M. Duijm (Lucien); K. Keizer (Koos); A. van der Lugt (Aad); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); Greve, D. (Droogh-de); H.P. Bienfait; M.A. van Walderveen (M.); M.J.H. Wermer (Marieke); G.J. Lycklama à Nijeholt (Geert); J. Boiten (Jelis); A. Duyndam (Anita); V.I.H. Kwa; F.J. Meijer (F.); E.J. van Dijk (Ewoud); A.M. Kesselring (Anouk); J. Hofmeijer; J.A. Vos (Jan Albert); W.J. Schonewille (W.); W.J. van Rooij (W.); P.L.M. de Kort (Paul); C.C. Pleiter (C.); S.L.M. Bakker (Stef); Bot, J.; M.C. Visser (Marieke); B.K. Velthuis (Birgitta); I.C. van der Schaaf (Irene); J.W. Dankbaar (Jan); W.P. Mali (Willem); van Seeters, T.; A.D. Horsch (Alexander D.); J.M. Niesten (Joris); G.J. Biessels (Geert Jan); L.J. Kappelle (Jaap); J.S.K. Luitse; Y. van der Graaf (Yolanda)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: High body temperatures after ischemic stroke have been associated with larger infarct size, but the temporal profile of this relation is unknown. We assess the relation between temporal profile of body temperature and infarct size and functional outcome in patients with acute

  1. Optimal temperature profiles for minimum residual stress in the cure process of polymer composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gopal, AK

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Manufacturing of polymer composites using a curing process requires the specification of the temperature as a function of time, i.e., the temperature profile. It is of utmost importance that the selected profile satisfies a number of criteria which...

  2. Temporal profile of body temperature in acute ischemic stroke: Relation to infarct size and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Geurts (Marjolein); Scheijmans, F.E.V. (Féline E.V.); T. van Seeters (Tom); G.J. Biessels; L.J. Kappelle (Jaap); B.K. Velthuis (Birgitta K.); H.B. van der Worp (Bart); C.B. Majoie (Charles); Y.B.W.E.M. Roos (Yvo); L.E.M. Duijm (Lucien); K. Keizer (Koos); A. van der Lugt (Aad); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); Greve, D. (Droogh-de); H.P. Bienfait; M.A. van Walderveen (M.); M.J.H. Wermer (Marieke); G.J. Lycklama à Nijeholt (Geert); J. Boiten (Jelis); A. Duyndam (Anita); V.I.H. Kwa; F.J. Meijer (F.); E.J. van Dijk (Ewoud); A.M. Kesselring (Anouk); J. Hofmeijer; J.A. Vos (Jan Albert); W.J. Schonewille (W.); W.J. van Rooij (W.); P.L.M. de Kort (Paul); C.C. Pleiter (C.); S.L.M. Bakker (Stef); Bot, J.; M.C. Visser (Marieke); B.K. Velthuis (Birgitta); I.C. van der Schaaf (Irene); J.W. Dankbaar (Jan); W.P. Mali (Willem); van Seeters, T.; A.D. Horsch (Alexander D.); J.M. Niesten (Joris); G.J. Biessels (Geert Jan); L.J. Kappelle (Jaap); J.S.K. Luitse; Y. van der Graaf (Yolanda)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: High body temperatures after ischemic stroke have been associated with larger infarct size, but the temporal profile of this relation is unknown. We assess the relation between temporal profile of body temperature and infarct size and functional outcome in patients with acute

  3. Prediction of high spatio-temporal resolution land surface temperature under cloudy conditions using microwave vegetation index and ANN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shwetha, H. R.; Kumar, D. Nagesh

    2016-07-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) with high spatio-temporal resolution is in demand for hydrology, climate change, ecology, urban climate and environmental studies, etc. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is one of the most commonly used sensors owing to its high spatial and temporal availability over the globe, but is incapable of providing LST data under cloudy conditions, resulting in gaps in the data. In contrast, microwave measurements have a capability to penetrate under clouds. The current study proposes a methodology by exploring this property to predict high spatio-temporal resolution LST under cloudy conditions during daytime and nighttime without employing in-situ LST measurements. To achieve this, Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) based models are employed for different land cover classes, utilizing Microwave Polarization Difference Index (MPDI) at finer resolution with ancillary data. MPDI was derived using resampled (from 0.25° to 1 km) brightness temperatures (Tb) at 36.5 GHz channel of dual polarization from Advance Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR)-Earth Observing System and AMSR2 sensors. The proposed methodology is tested over Cauvery basin in India and the performance of the model is quantitatively evaluated through performance measures such as correlation coefficient (r), Nash Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE). Results revealed that during daytime, AMSR-E(AMSR2) derived LST under clear sky conditions corresponds well with MODIS LST resulting in values of r ranging from 0.76(0.78) to 0.90(0.96), RMSE from 1.76(1.86) K to 4.34(4.00) K and NSE from 0.58(0.61) to 0.81(0.90) for different land cover classes. During nighttime, r values ranged from 0.76(0.56) to 0.87(0.90), RMSE from 1.71(1.70) K to 2.43(2.12) K and NSE from 0.43(0.28) to 0.80(0.81) for different land cover classes. RMSE values found between predicted LST and MODIS LST during daytime under clear sky conditions were within acceptable

  4. Advances in microwaves 7

    CERN Document Server

    Young, Leo

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Microwaves, Volume 7 covers the developments in the study of microwaves. The book discusses the effect of surface roughness on the propagation of the TEM mode, as well as the voltage breakdown of microwave antennas. The text also describes the theory and design considerations of single slotted-waveguide linear arrays and the techniques and theories that led to the achievement of wide bandwidths and ultralow noise temperatures for communication applications. The book will prove invaluable to microwave engineers.

  5. Velocity profiles inside volcanic clouds from three-dimensional scanning microwave dual-polarization Doppler radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montopoli, Mario

    2016-07-01

    In this work, velocity profiles within a volcanic tephra cloud obtained by dual-polarization Doppler radar acquisitions with three-dimensional (3-D) mechanical scanning capability are analyzed. A method for segmenting the radar volumes into three velocity regimes: vertical updraft, vertical fallout, and horizontal wind advection within a volcanic tephra cloud using dual-polarization Doppler radar moments is proposed. The horizontal and vertical velocity components within the regimes are retrieved using a novel procedure that makes assumptions concerning the characteristics of the winds inside these regimes. The vertical velocities retrieved are combined with 1-D simulations to derive additional parameters including particle fallout, mass flux, and particle sizes. The explosive event occurred on 23 November 2013 at the Mount Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy), is considered a demonstrative case in which to analyze the radar Doppler signal inside the tephra column. The X-band radar (3 cm wavelength) in the Catania, Italy, airport observed the 3-D scenes of the Etna tephra cloud ~32 km from the volcano vent every 10 min. From the radar-derived vertical velocity profiles of updraft, particle fallout, and horizontal transportation, an exit velocity of 150 m/s, mass flux rate of 1.37 • 107 kg/s, particle fallout velocity of 18 m/s, and diameters of precipitating tephra particles equal to 0.8 cm are estimated on average. These numbers are shown to be consistent with theoretical 1-D simulations of plume dynamics and local reports at the ground, respectively. A thickness of 3 ± 0.36 km for the downwind ash cloud is also inferred by differentiating the radar-derived cloud top and the height of transition between the convective and buoyancy regions, the latter being inferred by the estimated vertical updraft velocity profile. The unique nature of the case study as well as the novelty of the segmentation and retrieval methods presented potentially give new insights into the

  6. Optimization for Dwarf Banana with Microwave Low Temperature Carbon Dioxide Flash Puffing Process by Response Surface Methodology and Factor Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Bao-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A three factors quadratic regression rotation combination design was adopted to optimize the technical conditions of microwave low temperature carbon dioxide flash puffing (MLTCDFP process for dwarf banana in the single factor’s foundation. This paper analyzed the effect of puffing temperature, puffing pressure, vacuum drying temperature and the interaction of the three factors on color, crispness, and the effect of hardness and water content. Based on the experimental data, the quadratic regression model of four indexes was deduced, then variables were analyzed with response surface methodology (RSM. The weights of four evaluation indexes was determined by factor analysis. The regression square was obtained by the comprehensive score as follow: Y=0.955+0.109X1+0.16X3−0.09X12+0.015X22 −0.15X32−0.018X1X2−0.056X1X3+0.016X2X3(R2=0.837.Through factor analysis, the range of the optimal technical conditions of MLTCDFP for dwarf banana obtained. The result indicated the four indexes were affected significantly by the puffing temperature and vacuum drying temperature, and the interactions of the three factors did not affect the product obviously. The optimal technical parameters were as follows: puffing temperature 91~95°C, puffing pressure 0.11~0.19MPa, vacuum temperature 81~85°C.

  7. Low-temperature solid-state microwave reduction of graphene oxide for transparent electrically conductive coatings on flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qizhen; Hsie, Sinsar Alec; Wong, Ching Ping

    2012-11-12

    Microwaves (MWs) are applied to initialize deoxygenation of graphene oxide (GO) in the solid state and at low temperatures (∼165 °C). The Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of MW-reduced graphene oxide (rGO) show a significantly reduced concentration of oxygen-containing functional groups, such as carboxyl, hydroxyl and carbonyl. X-ray photoelectron spectra confirm that microwaves can promote deoxygenation of GO at relatively low temperatures. Raman spectra and TGA measurements indicate that the defect level of GO significantly decreases during the isothermal solid-state MW-reduction process at low temperatures, corresponding to an efficient recovery of the fine graphene lattice structure. Based on both deoxygenation and defect-level reduction, the resurgence of interconnected graphene-like domains contributes to a low sheet resistance (∼7.9×10(4) Ω per square) of the MW-reduced GO on SiO(2) -coated Si substrates with an optical transparency of 92.7 % at ∼547 nm after MW reduction, indicating the ultrahigh efficiency of MW in GO reduction. Moreover, the low-temperature solid-state MW reduction is also applied in preparing flexible transparent conductive coatings on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates. UV/Vis measurements indicate that the transparency of the thus-prepared MW-reduced GO coatings on PDMS substrates ranges from 34 to 96 %. Correspondingly, the sheet resistance of the coating ranges from 10(5) to 10(9) Ω per square, indicating that MW reduction of GO is promising for the convenient low-temperature preparation of transparent conductors on flexible polymeric substrates.

  8. Mechanism of microwave sterilization in the dry state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, D K; Kaczmarek, K A; Woodworth, A G; Balasky, G

    1987-01-01

    With an automated computerized temperature control and a specialized temperature measurement system, dry spores of Bacillus subtilis subsp. niger were treated with heat simultaneously in a convection dry-heat oven and a microwave oven. The temperature of the microwave oven was monitored such that the temperature profiles of the spore samples in both heat sources were nearly identical. Under these experimental conditions, we unequivocally demonstrated that the mechanism of sporicidal action of the microwaves was caused solely by thermal effects. Nonthermal effects were not significant in a dry microwave sterilization process. Both heating systems showed that a dwelling time of more than 45 min was required to sterilize 10(5) inoculated spores in dry glass vials at 137 degrees C. The D values of both heating systems were 88, 14, and 7 min at 117, 130, and 137 degrees C, respectively. The Z value was estimated to be 18 degrees C. PMID:3118807

  9. Microwave properties of YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) high-transition-temperature superconducting thin films measured by the power transmission method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, F. A.; Gordon, W. L.; Bhasin, K. B.; Heinen, V. O.; Warner, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    The microwave response of YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) superconducting thin films deposited on LaAlO3, MgO, YSZ, and LaGaO3 substrates are studied. It is found that the microwave transmission properties are very weakly dependent on temperature in the normal state but change drastically upon transition to the superconducting state. In particular, the transmission decreases and there is a negative phase shift with respect to the phase at room temperature when the sample is cooled through its transition temperature. The magnetic penetration depth for all the films was determined from the surface reactance of the films. The microwave complex conductivity is determined in both the normal and the superconducting state. It is observed that both sigma1 and sigma2 increase in transition to the superconducting state. The surface resistivity is calculated for all the films.

  10. Self-similarity of temperature profiles in distant galaxy clusters: the quest for a Universal law

    CERN Document Server

    Baldi, Alessandro; Molendi, Silvano; Gastaldello, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    We present the XMM-Newton temperature profiles of 12 bright clusters of galaxies at 0.4=0.6 as NCC clusters. The profiles of CC and NCC clusters differ mainly in the central regions, with the latters exhibiting a marginally flatter central profile. A significant dependence of the temperature profiles on the pseudo-entropy ratio sigma is detected by fitting a function of both r and sigma, showing an indication that the outer part of the profiles becomes steeper for higher values of sigma (i.e. transitioning towards the NCC clusters). No significant evidence of redshift evolution could be found within the redshift range sampled by our clusters (0.40.4 has been attempted, as we were able to define the closest possible relation to a Universal law for the temperature profiles of galaxy clusters at 0.1

  11. Microwave-enhanced electrochemical cycling performance of the LiNi0.2Mn1.8O4 spinel cathode material at elevated temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Kumar; Nkosi, Funeka P; Viswanathan, Elumalai; Mathe, Mkhulu K; Damodaran, Krishnan; Ozoemena, Kenneth I

    2016-05-14

    The well-established poor electrochemical cycling performance of the LiMn2O4 (LMO) spinel cathode material for lithium-ion batteries at elevated temperature stems from the instability of the Mn(3+) concentration. In this work, a microwave-assisted solid-state reaction has been used to dope LMO with a very low amount of nickel (i.e., LiNi0.2Mn1.8O4, herein abbreviated as LMNO) for lithium-ion batteries from Mn3O4 which is prepared from electrolytic manganese oxide (EMD, γ-MnO2). To establish the impact of microwave irradiation on the electrochemical cycling performance at an elevated temperature (60 °C), the Mn(3+) concentration in the pristine and microwave-treated LMNO samples was independently confirmed by XRD, XPS, (6)LiMAS-NMR and electrochemical studies including electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The microwave-treated sample (LMNOmic) allowed for the clear exposure of the {111} facets of the spinel, optimized the Mn(3+) content, promoting structural and cycle stability at elevated temperature. At room temperature, both the pristine (LMNO) and microwave-treated (LMNOmic) samples gave comparable cycling performance (>96% capacity retention and ca. 100% coulombic efficiency after 100 consecutive cycling). However, at an elevated temperature (60 °C), the LMNOmic gave an improved cycling stability (>80% capacity retention and ca. 90% coulombic efficiency after 100 consecutive cycling) compared to the LMNO. For the first time, the impact of microwave irradiation on tuning the average manganese redox state of the spinel material to enhance the cycling performance of the LiNi0.2Mn1.8O4 at elevated temperature and lithium-ion diffusion kinetics has been clearly demonstrated.

  12. Normal domain temperature profile in second generation HTS tape wire

    OpenAIRE

    Malginov, Andrey V; Kuntsevich, Alexander Yu; Malginov, Vladimir A; Fleishman, Leonid S

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies of the normal zone in high-temperature superconducting wires are extremely important for power applications, such as fault current limiters, motors, cables etc. We studied the temperature distribution and normal domain propagation in high-temperature superconducting YBCO tape with highly resistive substrate. Findings For applied voltages exceeding a certain threshold value the normal domain was found to become unstable and started to propagate along the tape. Conclusions Th...

  13. Synthesis of quinoxaline 1,4-di-n-oxide derivatives on solid support using room temperature and microwave-assisted solvent-free procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Caro, Lilia C.; Sanchez-Sanchez, Mario; Bocanegra-Garcia, Virgilio; Rivera, Gildardo [Universidad Autonoma de Tamaulipas, Reynosa (Mexico). Dept. de Farmacia y Quimica Medicinal; Monge, Antonio [Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain). Centro de Investigacion en Farmacobiologia Aplicada. Unidad de Investigacion y Desarrollo de Medicamentos

    2011-07-01

    We describe the synthesis of 12 new ethyl and methyl quinoxaline-7-carboxylate 1,4-di-N-oxide derivatives on solid supports with room temperature and microwave-assisted solvent-free procedures. Results show that solid supports have good catalytic activity in the formation of quinoxaline 1,4-di-N-oxide derivatives. We found that florisil and montmorillonite KSF and K10 could be used as new, easily available, inexpensive alternatives of catalysts. Additionally, room temperature and microwave-irradiation solvent-free synthesis was more efficient than a conventional procedure (Beirut reaction), reducing reaction time and increasing yield. (author)

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of temperature profile in partially hydrogenated graphene and graphene with grain boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Erfan; Neek-Amal, M; Elahi, M

    2015-11-01

    Temperature profile in graphene, graphene with grain boundary and vacancy defects and hydrogenated graphene with different percentage of H-atoms are determined using molecular dynamics simulation. We also obtained the temperature profile in a graphene nanoribbon containing two types of grain boundaries with different misorientation angles, θ=21.8° and θ=32.2°. We found that a temperature gap appears in the temperature profile of a graphene nanoribbon with a grain boundary at the middle. Moreover, we found that the temperature profile in the partially hydrogenated graphene varies with the percentage of hydrogens, i.e. the C:H ratio. Our results show that a grain boundary line in the graphene sheet can change the thermal transport through the system which might be useful for controlling thermal flow in nanostructured graphene.

  15. Computation of temperature elevation in rabbit eye irradiated by 2.45-GHz microwaves with different field configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Watanabe, Soichi; Taki, Masao; Fujiwara, Osamu; Kojima, Masami; Sasaki, Kazuyuki

    2008-02-01

    This study calculated the temperature elevation in the rabbit eye caused by 2.45-GHz near-field exposure systems. First, we calculated specific absorption rate distributions in the eye for different antennas and then compared them with those observed in previous studies. Next, we re-examined the temperature elevation in the rabbit eye due to a horizontally-polarized dipole antenna with a C-shaped director, which was used in a previous study. For our computational results, we found that decisive factors of the SAR distribution in the rabbit eye were the polarization of the electromagnetic wave and antenna aperture. Next, we quantified the eye average specific absorption rate as 67 W kg(-1) for the dipole antenna with an input power density at the eye surface of 150 mW cm(-2), which was specified in the previous work as the minimum cataractogenic power density. The effect of administrating anesthesia on the temperature elevation was 30% or so in the above case. Additionally, the position where maximum temperature in the lens appears is discussed due to different 2.45-GHz microwave systems. That position was found to appear around the posterior of the lens regardless of the exposure condition, which indicates that the original temperature distribution in the eye was the dominant factor.

  16. The influence of microwave irradiation on rocks for microwave-assisted underground excavation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferri Hassani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Demand is growing for explosive-free rock breakage systems for civil and mining engineering, and space industry applications. This paper highlights the work being undertaken in the Geomechanics Laboratory of McGill University to make a real application of microwave-assisted mechanical rock breakage to full-face tunneling machines and drilling. Comprehensive laboratory tests investigated the effect of microwave radiation on temperature profiles and strength reduction in hard rocks (norite, granite, and basalt for a range of exposure times and microwave power levels. The heating rate on the surface of the rock specimens linearly decreased with distance between the sample and the microwave antenna, regardless of microwave power level and exposure time. Tensile and uniaxial compressive strengths were reduced with increasing exposure time and power level. Scanning electron micrographs (SEMs highlighted fracture development in treated basalt. It was concluded that the microwave power level has a strong positive influence on the amount of heat damage induced to the rock surface. Numerical simulations of electric field intensity and wave propagation conducted with COMSOL Multiphysics® software generated temperature profiles that were in close agreement with experimental results.

  17. Imaging Techniques for Microwave Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donne, T. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Luhmann Jr, N.C. [University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Park, H.K. [POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Tobias, B.

    2011-07-01

    Advances in microwave technology have made it possible to develop a new generation of microwave imaging diagnostics for measuring the parameters of magnetic fusion devices. The most prominent of these diagnostics is electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECE-I). After the first generation of ECE-I diagnostics utilized at the TEXT-U, RTP and TEXTOR tokamaks and the LHD stellarator, new systems have recently come into operation on ASDEX-UG and DIII-D, soon to be followed by a system on KSTAR. The DIII-D and KSTAR systems feature dual imaging arrays that observe different parts of the plasma. The ECE-I diagnostic yields two-dimensional movies of the electron temperature in the plasma and has given already new insights into the physics of sawtooth oscillations, tearing modes and edge localized modes. Microwave Imaging Reflectometry (MIR) is used on LHD to measure electron density fluctuations. A pilot MIR system has been tested at TEXTOR and, based on the promising results, a new system is now under design for KSTAR. The system at TEXTOR was used to measure the plasma rotation velocity. The system at KSTAR and also the one on LHD will be/are used for measuring the profile of the electron density fluctuations in the plasma. Other microwave imaging diagnostics are phase imaging interferometry, and imaging microwave scattering. The emphasis in this paper will be largely focused on ECE-I. First an overview of the advances in microwave technology are discussed, followed by a description of a typical ECE-I system along with some typical experimental results. Also the utilization of imaging techniques in other types of microwave diagnostics will be briefly reviewed. This document is composed of the slides of the presentation. (authors)

  18. Ice hydrometeor profile retrieval algorithm for high frequency microwave radiometers: application to the CoSSIR instrument during TC4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. F. Evans

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A Bayesian algorithm to retrieve profiles of cloud ice water content (IWC, ice particle size (Dme, and relative humidity from millimeter-wave/submillimeter-wave radiometers is presented. The first part of the algorithm prepares an a priori file with cumulative distribution functions (CDFs and empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs of profiles of temperature, relative humidity, three ice particle parameters (IWC, Dme, distribution width, and two liquid cloud parameters. The a priori CDFs and EOFs are derived from CloudSat radar reflectivity profiles and associated ECMWF temperature and relative humidity profiles combined with three cloud microphysical probability distributions obtained from in situ cloud probes. The second part of the algorithm uses the CDF/EOF file to perform a Bayesian retrieval with a hybrid technique that uses Monte Carlo integration (MCI or, when too few MCI cases match the observations, uses optimization to maximize the posterior probability function. The very computationally intensive Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC method also may be chosen as a solution method. The radiative transfer model assumes mixtures of several shapes of randomly oriented ice particles, and here random aggregates of hexagonal plates, spheres, and dendrites are used for tropical convection. A new physical model of stochastic dendritic snowflake aggregation is developed. The retrieval algorithm is applied to data from the Compact Scanning Submillimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSSIR flown on the ER-2 aircraft during the Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling (TC4 experiment in 2007. Example retrievals with error bars are shown for nadir profiles of IWC, Dme, and relative humidity, and nadir and conical scan swath retrievals of ice water path and average Dme. The ice cloud retrievals are evaluated by retrieving integrated 94 GHz backscattering from CoSSIR for comparison

  19. Ice hydrometeor profile retrieval algorithm for high frequency microwave radiometers: application to the CoSSIR instrument during TC4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, K. F.; Wang, J. R.; O'C Starr, D.; Heymsfield, G.; Li, L.; Tian, L.; Lawson, R. P.; Heymsfield, A. J.; Bansemer, A.

    2012-04-01

    A Bayesian algorithm to retrieve profiles of cloud ice water content (IWC), ice particle size (Dme), and relative humidity from millimeter-wave/submillimeter-wave radiometers is presented. The first part of the algorithm prepares an a priori file with cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) and empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) of profiles of temperature, relative humidity, three ice particle parameters (IWC, Dme, distribution width), and two liquid cloud parameters. The a priori CDFs and EOFs are derived from CloudSat radar reflectivity profiles and associated ECMWF temperature and relative humidity profiles combined with three cloud microphysical probability distributions obtained from in situ cloud probes. The second part of the algorithm uses the CDF/EOF file to perform a Bayesian retrieval with a hybrid technique that uses Monte Carlo integration (MCI) or, when too few MCI cases match the observations, uses optimization to maximize the posterior probability function. The very computationally intensive Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method also may be chosen as a solution method. The radiative transfer model assumes mixtures of several shapes of randomly oriented ice particles, and here random aggregates of hexagonal plates, spheres, and dendrites are used for tropical convection. A new physical model of stochastic dendritic snowflake aggregation is developed. The retrieval algorithm is applied to data from the Compact Scanning Submillimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSSIR) flown on the ER-2 aircraft during the Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling (TC4) experiment in 2007. Example retrievals with error bars are shown for nadir profiles of IWC, Dme, and relative humidity, and nadir and conical scan swath retrievals of ice water path and average Dme. The ice cloud retrievals are evaluated by retrieving integrated 94 GHz backscattering from CoSSIR for comparison with the Cloud Radar System (CRS) flown on the same aircraft. The rms difference in

  20. Fiber optic temperature profiling for thermal protection heat shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Richard J.; Costa, Joannes M.; Moslehi, Behzad; Zarnescu, Livia; Hackney, Drew; Peters, Kara

    2014-04-01

    Reliable Thermal Protection System (TPS) sensors are needed to achieve better designs for spacecraft (probe) heatshields for missions requiring atmospheric aero-capture or entry/reentry. In particular, they will allow both reduced risk and heat-shield mass minimization, which will facilitate more missions and allow increased payloads and returns. For thermal measurements, Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS) is providing a temperature monitoring system involving innovative lightweight, EMI-immune, high-temperature resistant Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors with a thermal mass near that of TPS materials together with fast FBG sensor interrogation. The IFOS fiber optic sensing technology is highly sensitive and accurate. It is also low-cost and lends itself to high-volume production. Multiple sensing FBGs can be fabricated as arrays on a single fiber for simplified design and reduced cost. In this paper, we provide experimental results to demonstrate the temperature monitoring system using multi-sensor FBG arrays embedded in small-size Super-Light Ablator (SLA) coupon, which was thermally loaded to temperatures in the vicinity of the SLA charring temperature. In addition, a high temperature FBG array was fabricated and tested for 1000°C operation.

  1. Self-similarity of temperature profiles in distant galaxy clusters: the quest for a universal law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, A.; Ettori, S.; Molendi, S.; Gastaldello, F.

    2012-09-01

    Context. We present the XMM-Newton temperature profiles of 12 bright (LX > 4 × 1044 erg s-1) clusters of galaxies at 0.4 law to describe the temperature radial profiles in galaxy clusters as a function of both cosmic time and their state of relaxation. Methods: We performed a spatially resolved spectral analysis, using Cash statistics, to measure the temperature in the intracluster medium at different radii. Results: We extracted temperature profiles for the clusters in our sample, finding that all profiles are declining toward larger radii. The normalized temperature profiles (normalized by the mean temperature T500) are found to be generally self-similar. The sample was subdivided into five cool-core (CC) and seven non cool-core (NCC) clusters by introducing a pseudo-entropy ratio σ = (TIN/TOUT) × (EMIN/EMOUT)-1/3 and defining the objects with σ 0.4 has been attempted. We were able to define the closest possible relation to a universal law for the temperature profiles of galaxy clusters at 0.1 < z < 0.9, showing a dependence on both the relaxation state of the clusters and the redshift. Appendix A is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  2. Temperature dependence of the electromagnetic properties and microwave absorption of carbonyl iron particles/silicone resin composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yingying; Zhou, Wancheng; Qing, Yuchang; Luo, Fa; Zhu, Dongmei

    2015-01-15

    Microwave absorbing composites with thin thickness and wideband absorption were successfully prepared by a spraying method using carbonyl iron particles (CIPs) as absorbers and silicone resin as the matrix. The value of reflection loss (RL) below −5 dB can be obtained in the frequency range of 5.76–18 GHz for the composite with 0.8 mm thickness. The temperature dependence of electromagnetic properties and RL of the composites were investigated. The RL of the composite showed a slight variation when the temperature reached up to 200 °C while decreased at 300 °C. The room temperature RL of the composite did not display significant difference before and after the heat treatment at 300 °C for 10 h; the mechanism was also discussed. - Highlights: • Carbonyl iron particles/silicone resin composites are prepared by a spraying method. • Reflection loss values exceed −5 dB at 5.76–18 GHz for an absorber of 0.8 mm thickness. • The variation of reflection loss was studied from room temperature to 300 °C.

  3. NODC Standard Product: Global ocean temperature and salinity profiles (2 disc set) (NODC Accession 0098058)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This set of CD-ROMs contains global ocean temperature and salinity profiles derived from NODC archive data files. It includes oceanographic station (bottle) data,...

  4. Temperature profile data collected from 03 May 1962 to 15 September 1990 (NODC Accession 0000049)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bottle casts in a world wide distribution from 03 May 1962 to 15 September 1990. Data were collected and submitted by...

  5. Oceanographic profile temperature and salinity from JCAD-6 drifting buoy 2003-2004 (NODC Accession 0002236)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic profile temperature and salinity measurements collected using a drifting buoy in the Arctic from 2003 to 2004 (NODC Accession 0002236).

  6. A chirped-pulse Fourier-transform microwave/pulsed uniform flow spectrometer. I. The low-temperature flow system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldham, James M; Abeysekera, Chamara; Joalland, Baptiste; Zack, Lindsay N; Prozument, Kirill; Sims, Ian R; Park, G Barratt; Field, Robert W; Suits, Arthur G

    2014-10-21

    We report the development of a new instrument that combines chirped-pulse microwave spectroscopy with a pulsed uniform supersonic flow. This combination promises a nearly universal detection method that can deliver isomer and conformer specific, quantitative detection and spectroscopic characterization of unstable reaction products and intermediates, product vibrational distributions, and molecular excited states. This first paper in a series of two presents a new pulsed-flow design, at the heart of which is a fast, high-throughput pulsed valve driven by a piezoelectric stack actuator. Uniform flows at temperatures as low as 20 K were readily achieved with only modest pumping requirements, as demonstrated by impact pressure measurements and pure rotational spectroscopy. The proposed technique will be suitable for application in diverse fields including fundamental studies in spectroscopy, kinetics, and reaction dynamics.

  7. Simulation of nitrogen concentration depth profiles in low temperature nitrided stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2006-01-01

    A numerical model is presented, which simulates nitrogen concentration-depth profiles as obtained with low temperature gaseous nitriding of stainless steel. The evolution of the calculated nitrogen concentration-depth profiles is compared with experimental nitriding kinetics. It is shown that the...

  8. Modelling of Temperature Profiles and Transport Scaling in Auxiliary Heated Tokamaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callen, J.D.; Christiansen, J.P.; Cordey, J.G.;

    1987-01-01

    The temperature profiles produced by various heating profiles are calculated from local heat transport models. The models take the heat flux to be the sum of heat diffusion and a non-diffusive heat flow, consistent with local measurements of heat transport. Two models are developed analytically i...

  9. Measurement of deuterium ion temperature profiles at TEXTOR-94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busche, E.; Euringer, H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, Juelich (Germany). Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik; Jaspers, R. [FOM Inst. voor Plasmafysica `Rijnhuizen`, Association EURATOM-FOM, Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    1997-09-01

    Charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) has been used to compare results on ion temperatures from several diagnostics at TEXTOR-94. The question of whether the typically measured width of impurity spectral lines is representative for the main ion temperature T{sub I}, is addressed by applying CXRS to the Balmer-alpha spectrum of deuterium. The importance of the halo effect is found not to be severe for the T{sub I} measurements. T{sub I} is lower than the impurity temperatures for low-density discharges with neutral beam heating. The time evolution of T{sub I} and the toroidal rotation were also measured during sawtooth oscillations. From this a lower bound for the ion heat diffusivity {chi}{sub I}{sup HP} of {approx} 2 m{sup 2} s{sup -1} has been deduced. (author).

  10. A microwave power absorption characterization of YMnO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, G. [Departamento de Materiales Metalicos y Ceramicos, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-360, Coyoacan DF 04510 (Mexico)], E-mail: memodin@yahoo.com; Montiel, H. [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico de la Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico DF 04510 (Mexico); Castellanos, M.A. [Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Cd. Universitaria, Mexico DF 04510 (Mexico); Heiras, J. [Centro de Ciencias de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 2681, Ensenada BC 22800 (Mexico); Valenzuela, R. [Departamento de Materiales Metalicos y Ceramicos, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-360, Coyoacan DF 04510 (Mexico)

    2008-05-25

    We report on the effects of temperature and dc magnetic field on the microwave power absorption measurements at X-band (8.8-9.8 GHz), in powder samples of YMnO{sub 3} (YM). Two techniques are used: magnetically modulated microwave absorption spectroscopy (MAMMAS) and low-field microwave absorption spectroscopy (LFMAS). The measurements were performed in the 77-520 K temperature range. MAMMAS response showed distinctive features associated with microwave absorption by magnetic and electric dipoles; at low and high temperatures, the paramagnetic and dielectric absorptions of microwave are dominant, respectively. The profiles obtained by plotting the slope vs. temperature of the LFMAS line, while cooling or heating, are similar to those detected by the MAMMAS technique. We conclude that both measurements are a manifestation of the same response to electromagnetic absorption, in which the same physical processes take place.

  11. Measurement of the temperature profile during evaporation of water and ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korbanova Ekaterina G.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature profiles across a liquid–gas layers at normal atmospheric conditions are measured for water and ethanol. A thin liquid layer is locally heated from the bottom and evaporates from the liquid–gas interface. Micro-thermocouple with the sensor element thickness of 3 μm is used for measurements. It is shown that the temperature profile has a different character for different liquids.

  12. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Upper Atmospheric Temperature 4 Layer Microwave, Version 3.3

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 4 Layer Upper Atmosphere Temperature (UAT) Climate Data Record (CDR) dataset is a monthly analysis of the tropospheric and stratospheric data using temperature...

  13. Thermal Simulation of the Component Rework Profile Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Nurminen, Janne

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the possibilities and feasibility of the ther-mal simulation for the modeling of the rework process. The rework process modeling could enable an easy and fast access to the component and PWB level thermally critical effects like over and under heating of the component during the rework process. The modeling could also be used as a help of the real rework profile definition at an early phase of the electrical device development. The work includes a...

  14. Optical measurement system for non-contact temperature profile

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masina, BN

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available being viewed by converting radiant heat energy from the object into a signal that can be display on a monitor. The radiant heat emitted from the object is directly proportional to its temperature. Thermal image come into view as zones of different...

  15. Calibration and Temperature Profile of a Tungsten Filament Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Izarra, Charles; Gitton, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this work proposed for undergraduate students and teachers is the calibration of a tungsten filament lamp from electric measurements that are both simple and precise, allowing to determine the temperature of tungsten filament as a function of the current intensity. This calibration procedure was first applied to a conventional filament…

  16. Validation of MIPAS IMK/IAA temperature, water vapor, and ozone profiles with MOHAVE-2009 campaign measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Stiller

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available MIPAS observations of temperature, water vapor, and ozone in October 2009 as derived with the scientific level-2 processor run by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT, Institute for Meteorology and Climate Research (IMK and CSIC, Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (IAA and retrieved from version 4.67 level-1b data have been compared to co-located field campaign observations obtained during the MOHAVE-2009 campaign at the Table Mountain Facility near Pasadena, California in October 2009. The MOHAVE-2009 measurement campaign provided measurements of atmospheric profiles of temperature, water vapor/relative humidity, and ozone from the ground to the mesosphere by a suite of instruments including radio sondes, frost point hygrometers, lidars, microwave radiometers and FTIR spectrometers. For MIPAS temperatures (version V4O_T_204, no significant bias was detected in the middle stratosphere; between 22 km and the tropopause MIPAS temperatures were found to be biased low by up to 2 K, while below the tropopause, they were found to be too high by the same amount. Above 12 km up to 45 km, MIPAS water vapor (version V4O_H2O_203 is well within 10 % of the data of all correlative instruments, while a high bias of up to 10 % is found in comparison to ground-based microwave instruments around 45 km. The well-known dry bias of MIPAS water vapor above 50 km due to neglect of non-LTE effects in the current retrievals has been confirmed. Some instruments indicate that MIPAS water vapor might be biased high by 20 to 40 % around 10 km (or 5 km below the tropopause, but a consistent picture from all comparisons could not be derived. MIPAS ozone (version V4O_O3_202 has a high bias of up to +0.9 ppmv around 37 km which is due to a non-identified continuum like radiance contribution. No further significant biases have been detected. Cross-comparison to co-located observations of other satellite instruments (Aura/MLS, ACE-FTS, AIRS is provided as well.

  17. Reproducing the Solar Wind proton temperature profile via DNS of MHD turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagud-Camps, Victor; Grappin, Roland; Verdini, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Context: The Solar Wind proton temperature Tp shows a radial profile R-0.9 significantly shallower than the adiabatic R-4/3 profile [Totten et al 1996]. This temperature profile has been attributed to turbulent heating, which requires a dissipation rate equal to Q = 3.610-5TpU/R[J/(kg s)] (1) [Vasquez et al 2007]. The possibility of a turbulent heating large enough to modify the radial profile of the temperature has not been verified yet via direct numerical simulations. Aim: We want to test if MHD turbulence developing in the range [0.2,1] AU is able to reproduce the observed R-0.9 temperature profile. Method: We use the expanding box model (EBM) [Grappin & Velli 1996] which incorporates the effects of expansion into the compressible MHD equations, and so allows to follow the evolution of the plasma advected by the solar wind between 0.2 and 1 AU. In the absence of turbulence, the R-4/3 temperature profile is obtained. We start at 0.2 AU with mean field almost aligned with the radial and k⊥-1 spectrum perpendicular to the mean field [Verdini, Grappin 2016]. Simple phenomenology (Kolmogorov) suggests that the ratio between turbulent heating and the required heating (1) is close to M2/ɛ, where M is the Mach number of the large eddies and ɛ is the nonlinear time normalized by the transport time of the plasma by the wind. We thus explore the (M,ɛ) parameter space and examine whether a large enough value of M2/ɛ indeed allows to recover the temperature profile observed by Totten et al (1996). Results: We have obtained significant slowing down of the adiabatic cooling by considering increasing Mach numbers and/or decreasing ɛ and approach in some cases the R-0.9 temperature profile. The role of the compressibility in the cascade is examined.

  18. Calibration and temperature profile of a tungsten filament lamp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Izarra, Charles [Groupe de Recherche sur l' Energetique des Milieux Ionises, UMR6606 Universite d' Orleans, CNRS, Faculte des Sciences, Site de Bourges, rue Gaston Berger, BP 4043, 18028 Bourges Cedex (France); Gitton, Jean-Michel, E-mail: Charles.De_Izarra@univ-orleans.f [College Littre, 10 rue Littre, Bourges (France)

    2010-07-15

    The goal of this work proposed for undergraduate students and teachers is the calibration of a tungsten filament lamp from electric measurements that are both simple and precise, allowing to determine the temperature of tungsten filament as a function of the current intensity. This calibration procedure was first applied to a conventional filament lamp (lamp used in automotive lighting) and then tested on a standard tungsten ribbon lamp. The calibration procedure developed was checked by determining the calibration point of the tungsten ribbon lamp with an accuracy of 2%. In addition, for low current intensity, it was observed that the temperature of the filament was not uniform; an explanation is proposed by considering a simple heat transfer model.

  19. Influence of absorbed pump profile on the temperature distribution within a diode side-pumped laser rod

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M H MOGHTADER DINDARLU; H TEHRANI M KAVOS; H SAGHAFIFAR; A MALEKI; GH SOLOOKINEJAD; M JABBARI

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, an analytical model for temperature distribution of the side-pumped laser rod is extracted. This model can be used for side-pumped laser rods whose absorbed pump profile is a Gaussian profile. Then, it is validated by numerical results which exhibit a good agreement with the analytical results. Afterwards, by considering a general expression for super-Gaussian and top-hat profiles, and solving the heat equation, the influence of profile width and super-Gaussian exponent of the profile on temperature distribution are investigated.Consequently, the profile width turns out to have a greater influence on the temperature compared to the type of the profile.

  20. Influence of absorbed pump profile on the temperature distribution within a diode side-pumped laser rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghtader Dindarlu, M. H.; Tehrani, M. Kavosh; Saghafifar, H.; Maleki, A.; Solookinejad, Gh; Jabbari, M.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, an analytical model for temperature distribution of the side-pumped laser rod is extracted. This model can be used for side-pumped laser rods whose absorbed pump profile is a Gaussian profile. Then, it is validated by numerical results which exhibit a good agreement with the analytical results. Afterwards, by considering a general expression for super-Gaussian and top-hat profiles, and solving the heat equation, the influence of profile width and super-Gaussian exponent of the profile on temperature distribution are investigated. Consequently, the profile width turns out to have a greater influence on the temperature compared to the type of the profile.

  1. A finite element method based microwave heat transfer modeling of frozen multi-component foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchai, Krishnamoorthy

    Microwave heating is fast and convenient, but is highly non-uniform. Non-uniform heating in microwave cooking affects not only food quality but also food safety. Most food industries develop microwavable food products based on "cook-and-look" approach. This approach is time-consuming, labor intensive and expensive and may not result in optimal food product design that assures food safety and quality. Design of microwavable food can be realized through a simulation model which describes the physical mechanisms of microwave heating in mathematical expressions. The objective of this study was to develop a microwave heat transfer model to predict spatial and temporal profiles of various heterogeneous foods such as multi-component meal (chicken nuggets and mashed potato), multi-component and multi-layered meal (lasagna), and multi-layered food with active packages (pizza) during microwave heating. A microwave heat transfer model was developed by solving electromagnetic and heat transfer equations using finite element method in commercially available COMSOL Multiphysics v4.4 software. The microwave heat transfer model included detailed geometry of the cavity, phase change, and rotation of the food on the turntable. The predicted spatial surface temperature patterns and temporal profiles were validated against the experimental temperature profiles obtained using a thermal imaging camera and fiber-optic sensors. The predicted spatial surface temperature profile of different multi-component foods was in good agreement with the corresponding experimental profiles in terms of hot and cold spot patterns. The root mean square error values of temporal profiles ranged from 5.8 °C to 26.2 °C in chicken nuggets as compared 4.3 °C to 4.7 °C in mashed potatoes. In frozen lasagna, root mean square error values at six locations ranged from 6.6 °C to 20.0 °C for 6 min of heating. A microwave heat transfer model was developed to include susceptor assisted microwave heating of a

  2. Spectral filtering in pulsed photothermal temperature profiling of collagen tissue phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanič, Matija; Majaron, Boris

    2009-11-01

    We present an experimental comparison of pulsed photothermal (PPT) profiling in collagen-based tissue phantoms utilizing different midinfrared spectral bands. Laser-induced temperature profiles are reconstructed using a custom optimization code within the customary monochromatic approximation. Both experimental results and a detailed numerical simulation of the procedure demonstrate that, despite the associated reduction of signal-to-noise ratio, appropriate spectral filtering reduces the broadening of temperature peaks and thus improves the accuracy of temperature profiling. For our experimental system, best performance is obtained when applying a long-pass filter with cut-on wavelength at 3.4-3.8 μm. Because our collagen gel mimics infrared and thermal properties of human skin, we believe that this conclusion is transferrable to PPT radiometric profiling of human skin in vivo.

  3. Spectral filtering in pulsed photothermal temperature profiling of collagen tissue phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanic, Matija; Majaron, Boris

    2009-01-01

    We present an experimental comparison of pulsed photothermal (PPT) profiling in collagen-based tissue phantoms utilizing different midinfrared spectral bands. Laser-induced temperature profiles are reconstructed using a custom optimization code within the customary monochromatic approximation. Both experimental results and a detailed numerical simulation of the procedure demonstrate that, despite the associated reduction of signal-to-noise ratio, appropriate spectral filtering reduces the broadening of temperature peaks and thus improves the accuracy of temperature profiling. For our experimental system, best performance is obtained when applying a long-pass filter with cut-on wavelength at 3.4-3.8 microm. Because our collagen gel mimics infrared and thermal properties of human skin, we believe that this conclusion is transferrable to PPT radiometric profiling of human skin in vivo.

  4. Linear dimensional change, compressive strength and detail reproduction in type IV dental stone dried at room temperature and in a microwave oven.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Marcos Aurélio Bomfim da; Vitti, Rafael Pino; Consani, Simonides; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek

    2012-01-01

    The type IV dental stone is widely used for the fabrication of dyes and master casts for fixed and removable partial prostheses. It is typically normal to wait at least 24 hours for the casts to dry prior to beginning the laboratory procedures. The waiting time has been shown to be greatly reduced by using microwave drying. This study evaluated the influence of drying techniques at room temperature and microwave oven on the linear dimensional change, compressive strength and detail reproduction in type IV dental stones. Three type IV dental stone brands were selected; elite Rock, Shera Premium and Durone IV. Two different drying protocols were tested in 4 groups (n=10); G-room temperature (25±4 ºC) dried for 2 hours; G2--room temperature dried for 24 hours; G3-room temperature dried for 7 days and G4--microwave oven dried at 800 W for 5 minutes and after 2 hours at room temperature. After drying, the samples were assayed for dimensional charges. The sample surface was submitted to the ImageTool 3.0 software for compressive strength in a universal testing machine with a cell load of 50 KN at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minutes and the detail reproduction was analyzed with a stereomicroscope at 25x magnification. The statistical analysis of the linear dimensional change and compressive strength data were conducted by the ANOVA test followed by the Tukey test (pmicrowave oven drying showed a linear dimensional change similar to after room temperature drying for 24 hours and 7 days. The compressive strength of the stone dried in the microwave oven was similar to those dried at room temperature for 24 hours, with the exception of Shera Premium, which had similar results for microwave and room temperature drying for 7 days. For the microwave drying method the detail reproduction levels for samples dried at room temperature for 24 hours and 7 days were similar, except for the Durone IV.

  5. Profiles of ion beams and plasma parameters on a multi-frequencies microwaves large bore electron cyclotron resonance ion source with permanent magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yushi; Sakamoto, Naoki; Kiriyama, Ryutaro; Takenaka, Tomoya; Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2012-02-01

    In order to contribute to various applications of plasma and beams based on an electron cyclotron resonance, a new concept on magnetic field with all magnets on plasma production and confinement has been proposed with enhanced efficiency for broad and dense ion beam. The magnetic field configuration consists of a pair of comb-shaped magnet surrounding plasma chamber cylindrically. Resonance zones corresponding for 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz frequencies are positioned at spatially different positions. We launch simultaneously multiplex frequencies microwaves operated individually, try to control profiles of the plasma parameters and the extracted ion beams, and to measure them in detail.

  6. Equilibrium Temperature Profiles within Fission Product Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminski, Michael D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-10-01

    We studied waste form strategies for advanced fuel cycle schemes. Several options were considered for three waste streams with the following fission products: cesium and strontium, transition metals, and lanthanides. These three waste streams may be combined or disposed separately. The decay of several isotopes will generate heat that must be accommodated by the waste form, and this heat will affect the waste loadings. To help make an informed decision on the best option, we present computational data on the equilibrium temperature of glass waste forms containing a combination of these three streams.

  7. A lidar system for measuring atmospheric pressure and temperature profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Dombrowski, Mark; Korb, C. Laurence; Milrod, Jeffry; Walden, Harvey

    1987-01-01

    The design and operation of a differential absorption lidar system capable of remotely measuring the vertical structure of tropospheric pressure and temperature are described. The measurements are based on the absorption by atmospheric oxygen of the spectrally narrowband output of two pulsed alexandrite lasers. Detailed laser output spectral characteristics, which are critical to successful lidar measurements, are presented. Spectral linewidths of 0.026 and 0.018 per cm for the lasers were measured with over 99.99 percent of the energy contained in three longitudinal modes.

  8. Direct synthesis of multi-layer graphene film on various substrates by microwave plasma at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Jae [Plasma Technology Research Center, 814-2 Osickdo-dong (SGFEZ), Gunsan, Jeollabuk-do 573-540 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Byung Wook; Kim, Tae Yoo; Lee, Jung Woo [School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Advanced Materials and Process Research Center (AMPRC), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Yong Ho; Choi, Yong Sup [Plasma Technology Research Center, 814-2 Osickdo-dong (SGFEZ), Gunsan, Jeollabuk-do 573-540 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Young Il, E-mail: physein01@skku.edu [School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Advanced Materials and Process Research Center (AMPRC), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Su Jeong, E-mail: suhsj@skku.edu [School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Advanced Materials and Process Research Center (AMPRC), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-31

    We introduce a possible route for vertically standing multi-layer graphene films (VMGs) on various substrates at low temperature by electron cyclone resonance microwave plasma. VMG films on various substrates, including copper sheet, glass and silicon oxide wafer, were analyzed by studying their structural, electrical, and optical properties. The density and temperature of plasma were measured using Cylindrical Langmuir probe analysis. The morphologies and microstructures of multi-layer graphene were characterized using field emission scattering electron microscope, high resolution transmission electron microscope, and Raman spectra measurement. The VMGs on different substrates at the same experimental conditions synthesized the wrinkled VMGs with different heights. In addition, the transmittance and electrical resistance were measured using ultra-violet visible near-infrared spectroscopy and 4 probe point surface resistance measurement. The VMGs on glass substrate obtained a transmittance of 68.8% and sheet resistance of 796 Ω/square, whereas the VMGs on SiO{sub 2} wafer substrate showed good sheet resistance of 395 Ω/square and 278 Ω/square. The results presented herein demonstrate a simple method of synthesizing of VMGs on various substrates at low temperature for mass production, in which the VMGs can be used in a wide range of application fields for energy storage, catalysis, and field emission due to their unique orientation. - Highlights: • We present for synthesis method of graphene at low temperature on various substrates. • We grow the graphene films at low temperature under of 432 °C. • Structural information of graphene films were studied upon Raman spectroscopy. • Inter-layer spacing of vertically standing graphene relies on synthesis time. • We measured a transmittance and a resistance for graphene films on difference substrate.

  9. Determination of water vapor and ozone profiles in the middle atmosphere by microwave-spectroscopy. Bestimmung von Wasserdampf- und Ozonprofilen in der mittleren Atmosphaere durch Millimeterwellenspektroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puliafito, S.E.

    1989-10-17

    This work was performed at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Aeronomie (F.R.G.) and treats the following points: 1. Satellite borne microwave radiometry. Principles for a real-time evaluation of the MAS-Limb-Sounding measurements. (MAS: Millimeter Wave Atmospheric Sounder from Space Shuttle as part of the NASA ATLAS Missions, 1991-1997). (a) Deconvolution of the 60 GHz-antenna. (b) Test of different inversion proceedings. A detailed study of the boundary conditions and 'error influence' as well as a discussion of the radiometer specifications. (c) Near real time inversion of microwave spectral lines of the Earth atmosphere. i. The possibility of a (near) real time evaluation (retrieval of the profiles of the atmospheric components) was proved for the first time with a space proof microprocessor. ii. Data reduction of about a factor > 10{sup 3} in comparison with other methods. 2. Airborne and ground based microwave radiometry. (a) Study of the possibilities of ground- and aircraft based measurements for validation and cross calibration of the satellite measurements. (b) Study of the possibilities of ground based radiometric measurements of water vapour in the Artic or Antartica. Precise boundary conditions were given for the first time in order to perform ground based millimeter radiometric measurements in these areas. (orig.).

  10. Intercomparison of stratospheric ozone and temperature profiles during the October 2005 Hohenpeißenberg Ozone Profiling Experiment (HOPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Silbert

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Thirteen clear nights in October 2005 allowed successful intercomparison of the lidar operated since 1987 by the German Weather Service (DWD at Hohenpeißenberg (47.8° N, 11.0° E with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC travelling standard lidar operated by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. Both lidars provide ozone profiles in the stratosphere, and temperature profiles in the strato- and mesosphere. Additional ozone profiles came from on-site Brewer/Mast ozonesondes, additional temperature profiles from Vaisala RS92 radiosondes launched at Munich (65 km north-east, and from operational analyses by the US National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP.

    The intercomparison confirmed a low bias for ozone from the DWD lidar in the 33 to 43 km region, by up to 10%. This bias is caused by the DWD ozone algorithm, and is consistent with previous comparisons of the DWD lidar with SAGE, GOMOS and other instruments. During HOPE, precision (repeatability for ozone data from both lidars was better than 5% between 20 and 40 km altitude, dropping to 10% near 45 km, and to 50% near 50 km. These results are consistent with previous NDACC intercomparisons, and confirm the reliability of the NASA NDACC travelling standard lidar.

    Temperature from the DWD lidar showed a 1 to 2 K cold bias from 30 to 65 km against the NASA lidar, and a 2 to 4 K cold bias against radiosondes and NCEP. This is also consistent with previous intercomparisons. Temperature precision (repeatability for the DWD lidar was better than 2 K from 30 to 50 km, decreasing to 10 K near 70 km. For the NASA lidar, precision is expected to be better than 1 K over the 30 to 70 km range. However, due to the much lower temperature precision of the DWD lidar, this could not be checked during HOPE. It was noted that the current DWD algorithm over-estimates temperature uncertainty, which should be reduced by a factor of 2.2 (e.g. from 22 K to 10

  11. Direct assimilation of Chinese FY-3C Microwave Temperature Sounder-2 radiances in the global GRAPES system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Liu, Guiqing

    2016-07-01

    FengYun-3C (FY-3C) is an operational polar-orbiting satellite carrying the new-generation microwave sounding instruments in China. This paper describes the assimilation of the FY-3C Microwave Temperature Sounder-2 (MWTS-2) radiances in the Global and Regional Assimilation and PrEdiction System (GRAPES) of China Meteorological Administration. A quality control (QC) procedure for the assimilation of MWTS-2 radiance is proposed. Extensive monitoring before assimilation shows that MWTS-2 observations exhibit a clear striping pattern. A technique combining principal component analysis (PCA) and ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) is applied to the observations to remove the striping noise. Cloudy field-of-views (FOVs) are identified by applying the Visible and InfrarRed Radiometer (VIRR) cloud fraction threshold of 76 %. Other QC steps are conducted in the follow order: (i) coastal FOVs are removed, (ii) eight outmost FOVs are not used, (iii) channel 5 data over sea ice and land are not used, (iv) channel 6 observations are not used if the terrain altitudes are higher than 500 m, and (v) outliers with large differences between observations and model simulations are removed. Approximately 83, 75, 40, and 40 % of the observations are removed by the proposed QC for channels 5-8, respectively. After QC, the global biases and standard deviations are reduced significantly. The assimilation of the MWTS-2 radiances shows a positive impact when the control experiment assimilates only conventional observations. The experiments also show that the analysis and forecast errors are slightly reduced when the striping noise is removed from the observations. The quality control scheme of extracting the striping noise may contribute to the analysis and forecast accuracy. The impact of MWTS-2 is neutral when the conventional data and other satellite data are all assimilated.

  12. Single-scattering properties of ice particles in the microwave regime: Temperature effect on the ice refractive index with implications in remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jiachen; Bi, Lei; Yang, Ping; Kattawar, George W.; Weng, Fuzhong; Liu, Quanhua; Greenwald, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    An ice crystal single-scattering property database is developed in the microwave spectral region (1 to 874 GHz) to provide the scattering, absorption, and polarization properties of 12 ice crystal habits (10-plate aggregate, 5-plate aggregate, 8-column aggregate, solid hexagonal column, hollow hexagonal column, hexagonal plate, solid bullet rosette, hollow bullet rosette, droxtal, oblate spheroid, prolate spheroid, and sphere) with particle maximum dimensions from 2 μm to 10 mm. For each habit, four temperatures (160, 200, 230, and 270 K) are selected to account for temperature dependence of the ice refractive index. The microphysical and scattering properties include projected area, volume, extinction efficiency, single-scattering albedo, asymmetry factor, and six independent nonzero phase matrix elements (i.e. P11, P12, P22, P33, P43 and P44). The scattering properties are computed by the Invariant Imbedding T-Matrix (II-TM) method and the Improved Geometric Optics Method (IGOM). The computation results show that the temperature dependence of the ice single-scattering properties in the microwave region is significant, particularly at high frequencies. Potential active and passive remote sensing applications of the database are illustrated through radar reflectivity and radiative transfer calculations. For cloud radar applications, ignoring temperature dependence has little effect on ice water content measurements. For passive microwave remote sensing, ignoring temperature dependence may lead to brightness temperature biases up to 5 K in the case of a large ice water path.

  13. An analysis of the numerical model influence on the ground temperature profile determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaszczur, Marek; Polepszyc, Inga; Sapińska-Śliwa, Aneta; Gonet, Andrzej

    2017-02-01

    The estimation of the ground temperature profile with respect to the depth and time is the key issue in many engineering applications which use the ground as a source of thermal energy. In the present work, the influence of the model components on the calculated ground temperature distribution has been analysed in order to develop an accurate and robust model for the prediction of the ground temperature profile. The presented mathematical model takes into account all the key phenomena occurring in the soil and on its top surface. The impact of individual model elements on the temperature of the soil has been analysed. It has been found that the simplest models and the most complex model result in a similar temperature variation over the simulation period, but only at a low depth. A detailed analysis shows that a larger depth requires more complex models and the calculation with the use of simple models results in an incorrect temperature and a theoretical COP estimation.

  14. Temperature Profiles During Quenches in LHC Superconducting Dipole Magnets Protected by Quench Heaters

    CERN Document Server

    Maroussov, V; Siemko, A

    2000-01-01

    The efficiency of the magnet protection by quench heaters was studied using a novel method which derives the temperature profile in a superconducting magnet during a quench from measured voltage signals. In several Large Hadron Collider single aperture dipole models, temperature profiles and temperature gradients in the magnet coil have been evaluated in the case of protection by different sets of quench heaters and different powering and protection parameters. The influence of the insulation thickness between the quench heaters and the coil has also been considered. The results show clear correlation between the positions of quench heaters, magnet protection parameters and temperature profiles. This study allowed a better understanding of the quench process mechanisms and the efficiency assessment of the different protection schemes.

  15. Evolution of the electron temperature profile of ohmically heated plasmas in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, G.; Efthimion, P.C.; Arunasalam, V.; Goldston, R.J.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.W.; Johnson, D.W.; McGuire, K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Stauffer, F.J.

    1985-08-01

    Blackbody electron cyclotron emission was used to ascertain and study the evolution and behavior of the electron temperature profile in ohmically heated plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The emission was measured with absolutely calibrated millimeter wavelength radiometers. The temperature profile normalized to the central temperature and minor radius is observed to broaden substantially with decreasing limiter safety factor q/sub a/, and is insensitive to the plasma minor radius. Sawtooth activity was seen in the core of most TFTR discharges and appeared to be associated with a flattening of the electron temperature profile within the plasma core where q less than or equal to 1. Two types of sawtooth behavior were identified in large TFTR plasmas (minor radius, a less than or equal to 0.8 m) : a typically 35 to 40 msec period ''normal'' sawtooth, and a ''compound'' sawtooth with 70 to 80 msec period.

  16. Research on temperature profiles of honeycomb regenerator with asymptotic analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AI Yuan-fang; MEI Chi; HUANG Guo-dong; JIANG Shao-jian; CHEN Hong-rong

    2006-01-01

    An asymptotic semi-analytical method for heat transfer in counter-flow honeycomb regenerator is proposed. By introducing a combined heat-transfer coefficient between the gas and solid phase, a heat transfer model is built based on the thin-walled assumption. The dimensionless thermal equation is deduced by considering solid heat conduction along the passage length. The asymptotic analysis is used for the small parameter of heat conduction term in equation. The first order asymptotic solution to temperature distribution under weak solid heat conduction is achieved after Laplace transformation through the multiple scales method and the symbolic manipulation function in MATLAB. Semi-analytical solutions agree with tests and finite-difference numerical results. It is proved possible for the asymptotic analysis to improve the effectiveness, economics and precision of thermal research on regenerator.

  17. The temperature profile of an apple supply chain: A case study of the Ceres district

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.G. Du Toit Valentine

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a logistical gap in the first section of the apple supply chain that affects the temperature profiles of apples further downstream in the supply chain.Objectives: This article’s main objective is to confirm whether the logistics processes, in terms of the temperature profile of apples for the first 48 hours post-harvest, have an influence on the yield and/or quality of the fruit.Method: Observations were made and informal interviews were conducted on three different farms to ascertain their perspective of the first section of the supply chain. Temperature trials were conducted to analyse the temperature profile of two apple varieties, namely Golden Delicious and Granny Smith on three different farms. These trials were conducted by placing an iButton® device on the inside and outside of an apple to measure the temperature readings every minute for the first 48 hours after picking.Results: The research identified that it is not only at what time the apples are being harvested, but also at what time the apples are placed under cooling conditions to remove the field heat to obtain the recommended temperature profile within 48 hours. In addition, it was determined that effective and efficient picking at the right time (especially between 07:00 and 09:00 and the transportation of the apples directly, or as soon as possible after the apples came out of the orchard to the centralised cold storage facility, are key in ensuring the quality of the fruit and the temperature profile necessary for export.Conclusion: This article identifies the need to improve operational procedures along the cold chain. From this research, it is clear that there are problem areas that affect the temperature profile of apples. 

  18. Validation of MIPAS IMK/IAA temperature, water vapor, and ozone profiles with MOHAVE-2009 campaign measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Stiller

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available MIPAS observations of temperature, water vapor, and ozone in October 2009 as derived with the scientific level-2 processor run by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT, Institute for Meteorology and Climate Research (IMK and CSIC, Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (IAA and retrieved from version 4.67 level-1b data have been compared to co-located field campaign observations obtained during the MOHAVE-2009 campaign at the Table Mountain Facility near Pasadena, California in October 2009. The MIPAS measurements were validated regarding any potential biases of the profiles, and with respect to their precision estimates. The MOHAVE-2009 measurement campaign provided measurements of atmospheric profiles of temperature, water vapor/relative humidity, and ozone from the ground to the mesosphere by a suite of instruments including radiosondes, ozonesondes, frost point hygrometers, lidars, microwave radiometers and Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR spectrometers. For MIPAS temperatures (version V4O_T_204, no significant bias was detected in the middle stratosphere; between 22 km and the tropopause MIPAS temperatures were found to be biased low by up to 2 K, while below the tropopause, they were found to be too high by the same amount. These findings confirm earlier comparisons of MIPAS temperatures to ECMWF data which revealed similar differences. Above 12 km up to 45 km, MIPAS water vapor (version V4O_H2O_203 is well within 10% of the data of all correlative instruments. The well-known dry bias of MIPAS water vapor above 50 km due to neglect of non-LTE effects in the current retrievals has been confirmed. Some instruments indicate that MIPAS water vapor might be biased high by 20 to 40% around 10 km (or 5 km below the tropopause, but a consistent picture from all comparisons could not be derived. MIPAS ozone (version V4O_O3_202 has a high bias of up to +0.9 ppmv around 37 km which is due to a non-identified continuum like radiance contribution

  19. Validation of MIPAS IMK-IAA Temperature, Water Vapor, and Ozone Profiles with MOHAVE-2009 Campaign Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiller, Gabrielle; Kiefer, M.; Eckert, E.; von Clarmann, T.; Kellmann, S.; Garcia-Comas, M.; Funke, B.; Leblanc, T.; Fetzer, E.; Froidevaux, L.; hide

    2012-01-01

    MIPAS observations of temperature, water vapor, and ozone in October 2009 as derived with the scientific level-2 processor run by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Meteorology and Climate Research (IMK) and CSIC, Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (IAA) and retrieved from version 4.67 level-1b data have been compared to co-located field campaign observations obtained during the MOHAVE-2009 campaign at the Table Mountain Facility near Pasadena, California in October 2009. The MIPAS measurements were validated regarding any potential biases of the profiles, and with respect to their precision estimates. The MOHAVE-2009 measurement campaign provided measurements of atmospheric profiles of temperature, water vapor/relative humidity, and ozone from the ground to the mesosphere by a suite of instruments including radiosondes, ozonesondes, frost point hygrometers, lidars, microwave radiometers and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometers. For MIPAS temperatures (version V4O_T_204), no significant bias was detected in the middle stratosphere; between 22 km and the tropopause MIPAS temperatures were found to be biased low by up to 2 K, while below the tropopause, they were found to be too high by the same amount. These findings confirm earlier comparisons of MIPAS temperatures to ECMWF data which revealed similar differences. Above 12 km up to 45 km, MIPAS water vapor (version V4O_H2O_203) is well within 10% of the data of all correlative instruments. The well-known dry bias of MIPAS water vapor above 50 km due to neglect of non-LTE effects in the current retrievals has been confirmed. Some instruments indicate that MIPAS water vapor might be biased high by 20 to 40% around 10 km (or 5 km below the tropopause), but a consistent picture from all comparisons could not be derived. MIPAS ozone (version V4O_O3_202) has a high bias of up to +0.9 ppmv around 37 km which is due to a non-identified continuum like radiance contribution. No further

  20. Investigation of the effects of temperature and time on reduction of graphene oxide by microwave hydrothermal reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Salimeh Kimiagar; Nasim Rashidi; Ehsan Ezzatpour Ghadim

    2015-12-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) sheets were synthesized by modified Hummers method. Microwave hydrothermal reactor (MHR) was applied to reduce graphene oxide. Different temperatures 50 and 180°C were applied to fabricate four samples with 4, 10, 25 and 60 min exposure times. The deoxygenation of the GO sheets after exposure to MHR was revealed by using UV–visible, Fourier transform infrared, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Raman spectroscopy. Based on XPS analysis, the O/C ratio of the GO sheets decreased from 49 to 17% after exposure to MHR. On the other hand, characterization by TGA illustrated that the O/C ratio of the GO dramatically decreases after exposure ofMHR and reached from 37 to 7%. Raman spectroscopy demonstrated that there was no increase in defects' density after reduction. The results confirmed that sample with 180°C exposure temperature and 60 min exposure time was reduced completely. Therefore this can help to advance using MHR as the green technique of GO reduction.

  1. An improved temperature-dependent large signal model of microwave GaN HEMTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changsi, Wang; Yuehang, Xu; Zhang, Wen; Zhikai, Chen; Ruimin, Xu

    2016-07-01

    Accurate modeling of the electrothermal effects of GaN electronic devices is critical for reliability design and assessment. In this paper, an improved temperature-dependent model for large signal equivalent circuit modeling of GaN HEMTs is proposed. To accurately describe the thermal effects, a modified nonlinear thermal sub-circuit which is related not only to power dissipation, but also ambient temperature is used to calculate the variations of channel temperature of the device; the temperature-dependent parasitic and intrinsic elements are also taken into account in this model. The parameters of the thermal sub-circuit are extracted by using the numerical finite element method. The results show that better performance can be achieved by using the proposed large signal model in the range of -55 to 125 °C compared with the conventional model with a linear thermal sub-circuit. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61106115).

  2. Stable microwave radiometry system for long term monitoring of deep tissue temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, Paul R.; Rodriques, Dario B.; Salahi, Sara; Topsakal, Erdem; Oliveira, Tiago R.; Prakash, Aniruddh; D'Isidoro, Fabio; Reudink, Douglas; Snow, Brent W.; Maccarini, Paolo F.

    2013-02-01

    Background: There are numerous clinical applications for non-invasive monitoring of deep tissue temperature. We present the design and experimental performance of a miniature radiometric thermometry system for measuring volume average temperature of tissue regions located up to 5cm deep in the body. Methods: We constructed a miniature sensor consisting of EMI-shielded log spiral microstrip antenna with high gain onaxis and integrated high-sensitivity 1.35GHz total power radiometer with 500 MHz bandwidth. We tested performance of the radiometry system in both simulated and experimental multilayer phantom models of several intended clinical measurement sites: i) brown adipose tissue (BAT) depots within 2cm of the skin surface, ii) 3-5cm deep kidney, and iii) human brain underlying intact scalp and skull. The physical models included layers of circulating tissue-mimicking liquids controlled at different temperatures to characterize our ability to quantify small changes in target temperature at depth under normothermic surface tissues. Results: We report SAR patterns that characterize the sense region of a 2.6cm diameter receive antenna, and radiometric power measurements as a function of deep tissue temperature that quantify radiometer sensitivity. The data demonstrate: i) our ability to accurately track temperature rise in realistic tissue targets such as urine refluxed from prewarmed bladder into kidney, and 10°C drop in brain temperature underlying normothermic scalp and skull, and ii) long term accuracy and stability of +0.4°C over 4.5 hours as needed for monitoring core body temperature over extended surgery or monitoring effects of brown fat metabolism over an extended sleep/wake cycle. Conclusions: A non-invasive sensor consisting of 2.6cm diameter receive antenna and integral 1.35GHz total power radiometer has demonstrated sufficient sensitivity to track clinically significant changes in temperature of deep tissue targets underlying normothermic surface

  3. Microwave Treatment for Cardiac Arrhythmias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Moya, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    NASA seeks to transfer the NASA developed microwave ablation technology, designed for the treatment of ventricular tachycardia (irregular heart beat), to industry. After a heart attack, many cells surrounding the resulting scar continue to live but are abnormal electrically; they may conduct impulses unusually slowly or fire when they would typically be silent. These diseased areas might disturb smooth signaling by forming a reentrant circuit in the muscle. The objective of microwave ablation is to heat and kill these diseased cells to restore appropriate electrical activity in the heart. This technology is a method and apparatus that provides for propagating microwave energy into heart tissues to produce a desired temperature profile therein at tissue depths sufficient for thermally ablating arrhythmogenic cardiac tissue while preventing excessive heating of surrounding tissues, organs, and blood. A wide bandwidth double-disk antenna is effective for this purpose over a bandwidth of about six gigahertz. A computer simulation provides initial screening capabilities for an antenna such as antenna, frequency, power level, and power application duration. The simulation also allows optimization of techniques for specific patients or conditions. In comparison with other methods that involve direct-current pulses or radio frequencies below 1 GHz, this method may prove more effective in treating ventricular tachycardia. This is because the present method provides for greater control of the location, cross-sectional area, and depth of a lesion via selection of the location and design of the antenna and the choice of microwave power and frequency.

  4. Temperature field simulation and phantom validation of a Two-armed Spiral Antenna for microwave thermotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yongxing; Zhang, Lingze; Sang, Lulu; Wu, Daocheng

    2016-04-29

    In this paper, an Archimedean planar spiral antenna for the application of thermotherapy was designed. This type of antenna was chosen for its compact structure, flexible application and wide heating area. The temperature field generated by the use of this Two-armed Spiral Antenna in a muscle-equivalent phantom was simulated and subsequently validated by experimentation. First, the specific absorption rate (SAR) of the field was calculated using the Finite Element Method (FEM) by Ansoft's High Frequency Structure Simulation (HFSS). Then, the temperature elevation in the phantom was simulated by an explicit finite difference approximation of the bioheat equation (BHE). The temperature distribution was then validated by a phantom heating experiment. The results showed that this antenna had a good heating ability and a wide heating area. A comparison between the calculation and the measurement showed a fair agreement in the temperature elevation. The validated model could be applied for the analysis of electromagnetic-temperature distribution in phantoms during the process of antenna design or thermotherapy experimentation.

  5. Computer Program for Calculation of a Gas Temperature Profile by Infrared Emission: Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchele, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program to calculate the temperature profile of a flame or hot gas was presented in detail. Emphasis was on profiles found in jet engine or rocket engine exhaust streams containing H2O or CO2 radiating gases. The temperature profile was assumed axisymmetric with an assumed functional form controlled by two variable parameters. The parameters were calculated using measurements of gas radiation at two wavelengths in the infrared. The program also gave some information on the pressure profile. A method of selection of wavelengths was given that is likely to lead to an accurate determination of the parameters. The program is written in FORTRAN IV language and runs in less than 60 seconds on a Univac 1100 computer.

  6. A Temperature-Profile Method for Estimating Flow Processes in Geologic Heat Pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.T. Birkholzer

    2005-01-21

    Above-boiling temperature conditions, as encountered, for example, in geothermal reservoirs and in geologic repositories for the storage of heat-producing nuclear wastes, may give rise to strongly altered liquid and gas flow processes in porous subsurface environments. The magnitude of such flow perturbation is extremely hard to measure in the field. We therefore propose a simple temperature-profile method that uses high-resolution temperature data for deriving such information. The energy that is transmitted with the vapor and water flow creates a nearly isothermal zone maintained at about the boiling temperature, referred to as a heat pipe. Characteristic features of measured temperature profiles, such as the differences in the gradients inside and outside of the heat pipe regions, are used to derive the approximate magnitude of the liquid and gas fluxes in the subsurface, for both steady-state and transient conditions.

  7. A Temperature-Profile Method for Estimating Flow Processes inGeologic Heat Pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkholzer, Jens T.

    2004-12-06

    Above-boiling temperature conditions, as encountered, forexample, in geothermal reservoirs and in geologic repositories for thestorage of heat-producing nuclear wastes, may give rise to stronglyaltered liquid and gas flow processes in porous subsurface environments.The magnitude of such flow perturbation is extremely hard to measure inthe field. We therefore propose a simple temperature-profile method thatuses high-resolution temperature data for deriving such information. Theenergy that is transmitted with the vapor and water flow creates a nearlyisothermal zone maintained at about the boiling temperature, referred toas a heat pipe. Characteristic features of measured temperature profiles,such as the differences in the gradients inside and outside of the heatpipe regions, are used to derive the approximate magnitude of the liquidand gas fluxes in the subsurface, for both steady-state and transientconditions.

  8. Low-temperature sintering of silica-boric acid-doped willemite and microwave dielectric properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Minato; Ohsato, Hitoshi; Igimi, Daisuke; Higashida, Yutaka; Kan, Akinori; Suzuki, Sadahiko; Yasufuku, Yoshitoyo; Kagomiya, Isao

    2015-10-01

    Millimeter-wave wireless communications in a high-level information society have been expanding in terms of high-density data transfer and radar for pre-crash safety systems. For these communications, millimeter-wave dielectrics have been expected for the development of substrates with high quality factor (Qf), low dielectric constant (ɛr), and near-zero temperature coefficient of resonance frequency (TCf). We have been studying several silicates such as forsterite, willemite, diopside, wollastonite, and cordierite/indialite glass ceramics. In this study, the synthesis of willemite and low-temperature-sintered willemite for low temperature co-fired ceramics (LTCC) is examined. The raw materials used for preparing slurries in doctor blade tape casting are also analyzed.

  9. Measuring centimeter-resolution air temperature profiles above land and water using fiber-optic Distributed Temperature Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmund, Armin; Pfister, Lena; Olesch, Johannes; Thomas, Christoph K.

    2016-04-01

    The precise determination of near-surface air temperature profiles is of special importance for the characterization of airflows (e.g. cold air) and the quantification of sensible heat fluxes according to the flux-gradient similarity approach. In contrast to conventional multi-sensor techniques, measuring temperature profiles using fiber-optic Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) provides thousands of measurements referenced to a single calibration standard at much reduced costs. The aim of this work was to enhance the vertical resolution of Raman scatter DTS measurements up to the centimeter-scale using a novel approach for atmospheric applications: the optical fiber was helically coiled around a meshed fabric. In addition to testing the new fiber geometry, we quantified the measurement uncertainty and demonstrated the benefits of the enhanced-resolution profiles. The fiber-optic cable was coiled around a hollow column consisting of white reinforcing fabric supported by plexiglass rings every meter. Data from two columns of this type were collected for 47 days to measure air temperature vertically over 3.0 and 5.1 m over a gently inclined meadow and over and in a small lake, respectively. Both profiles had a vertical resolution of 1 cm in the lower section near the surface and 5 cm in the upper section with an along-fiber instrument-specific averaging of 1.0 m and a temporal resolution of 30 s. Measurement uncertainties, especially from conduction between reinforcing fabric and fiber-optic cable, were estimated by modeling the fiber temperature via a detailed energy balance approach. Air temperature, wind velocity and radiation components were needed as input data and measured separately. The temperature profiles revealed valuable details, especially in the lowest 1 m above surface. This was best demonstrated for nighttime observations when artefacts due to solar heating did not occur. For example, the dynamics of a cold air layer was detected in a clear night

  10. A Mathematical Model for the Exhaust Gas Temperature Profile of a Diesel Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, C. H. G.; Maia, C. B.; Sodré, J. R.

    2015-09-01

    This work presents a heat transfer model for the exhaust gas of a diesel power generator to determine the gas temperature profile in the exhaust pipe. The numerical methodology to solve the mathematical model was developed using a finite difference method approach for energy equation resolution and determination of temperature profiles considering turbulent fluid flow and variable fluid properties. The simulation was carried out for engine operation under loads from 0 kW to 40 kW. The model was compared with results obtained using the multidimensional Ansys CFX software, which was applied to solve the governor equations of turbulent fluid flow. The results for the temperature profiles in the exhaust pipe show a good proximity between the mathematical model developed and the multidimensional software.

  11. Prediction of Stratified Flow Temperature Profiles in a Fully Insulated Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad S. Awad

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to present an analytical model to predict the temperature profiles in thermal stratified environment. Thermal stratification is encountered in many situations. The flow of contaminants and hydrocarbons in environment often get stratified. The prediction of temperature profiles and flow characteristics are essential for HVAC applications, environment and energy management. The temperature profiles in the stratified region are successfully obtained, in terms of flow-operating functions. The analytical model agrees well with the published experimental data as well as the related closed-form solutions, which is helpful for HVAC applications. The model will be further developed and incorporated within a numerical model in order to investigate the flow field characteristics and establish correlations for a wide range of parameters.

  12. Effect of etchant concentration on microwave induced chemical etching (MICE) of CR-39 detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahoo, G.S. [Health Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Tripathy, S.P., E-mail: sam.tripathy@gmail.com [Health Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Sharma, S.D. [Radiological Physics and Advisor Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai 400094 (India); Bandyopadhyay, T. [Health Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai 400094 (India)

    2015-11-11

    The recently introduced microwave induced chemical etching (MICE) has been found to be a fast and effective etching technique for CR-39 detector. In the present work, the MICE technique was used to develop the neutron induced recoil tracks in CR-39 detectors. Special attention was paid in carrying out a systematic investigation to study the effect of etchant concentration and microwave power on the development of tracks and various track parameters. NaOH solution of different concentrations, viz. 3–8 N was tested at 300, 450, 600 and 900 W of microwave power. Temperature profiles for 200 ml solution of each concentration were generated to maintain a fixed operating condition for all concentrations at each microwave power. The bulk etch rate was found to increase with the microwave power as well as with the etchant concentration. Empirical relations were established to relate the variation of bulk etch rate with microwave power and etchant concentration.

  13. Anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste combining two pretreatment modalities, high temperature microwave and hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriari, Haleh; Warith, Mostafa; Hamoda, Mohamed; Kennedy, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    In order to enhance anaerobic digestion (AD) of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW), pretreatment combining two modalities, microwave (MW) heating in presence or absence of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) were investigated. The main pretreatment variables affecting the characteristics of the OFMSW were temperature (T) via MW irradiation and supplemental water additions of 20% and 30% (SWA20 and SW30). Subsequently, the focus of this study was to evaluate mesophilic batch AD performance in terms of biogas production, as well as changes in the characteristics of the OFMSW post digestion. A high MW induced temperature range (115-175°C) was applied, using sealed vessels and a bench scale MW unit equipped with temperature and pressure controls. Biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests were conducted on the whole OFMSW as well as the liquid fractions. The whole OFMSW pretreated at 115°C and 145°C showed 4-7% improvement in biogas production over untreated OFMSW (control). When pretreated at 175°C, biogas production decreased due to formation of refractory compounds, inhibiting the digestion. For the liquid fraction of OFMSW, the effect of pretreatment on the cumulative biogas production (CBP) was more pronounced for SWA20 at 145°C, with a 26% increase in biogas production after 8days of digestion, compared to the control. When considering the increased substrate availability in the liquid fraction after MW pretreatment, a 78% improvement in biogas production vs. the control was achieved. Combining MW and H(2)O(2) modalities did not have a positive impact on OFMSW stabilization and enhanced biogas production. In general, all samples pretreated with H(2)O(2) displayed a long lag phase and the CBP was usually lower than MW irradiated only samples. First order rate constant was calculated.

  14. Using microwave observations to estimate land surface temperature during cloudy conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land surface temperature (LST), a key ingredient for physically-based retrieval algorithms of hydrological states and fluxes, remains a poorly constrained parameter for global scale studies. The main two observational methods to remotely measure T are based on thermal infrared (TIR) observations and...

  15. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Beam Measurements and the Microwave Brightness Temperatures of Uranus and Saturn

    CERN Document Server

    Hasselfield, Matthew; Bond, J Richard; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J; Dunkley, Joanna; Dunner, Rolando; Fowler, Joseph W; Gallardo, Patricio; Gralla, Megan B; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Hincks, Adam D; Marriage, Tobias A; Marsden, Danica; Niemack, Michael D; Nolta, Michael R; Page, Lyman A; Partridge, Bruce; Schmitt, Benjamin L; Sehgal, Neelima; Sievers, Jon; Staggs, Suzanne T; Swetz, Daniel S; Switzer, Eric R; Wollack, Edward J

    2013-01-01

    We describe the measurement of the beam profiles and window functions for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT), which operated from 2007 to 2010 with kilo-pixel bolometer arrays centered at 148, 218, and 277 GHz. Maps of Saturn are used to measure the beam shape in each array and for each season of observations. Radial profiles are transformed to Fourier space in a way that preserves the spatial correlations in the beam uncertainty, to derive window functions relevant for angular power spectrum analysis. Several corrections are applied to the resulting beam transforms, including an empirical correction measured from the final CMB survey maps to account for the effects of mild pointing variation and alignment errors. Observations of Uranus made regularly throughout each observing season are used to measure the effects of atmospheric opacity and to monitor deviations in telescope focus over the season. Using the WMAP-based calibration of the ACT maps to the CMB blackbody, we obtain precise measurements of the ...

  16. Fitting of the Thomson scattering density and temperature profiles on the COMPASS tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanikova, E.; Peterka, M.; Bohm, P.; Bilkova, P.; Aftanas, M.; Sos, M.; Urban, J.; Hron, M.; Panek, R.

    2016-11-01

    A new technique for fitting the full radial profiles of electron density and temperature obtained by the Thomson scattering diagnostic in H-mode discharges on the COMPASS tokamak is described. The technique combines the conventionally used modified hyperbolic tangent function for the edge transport barrier (pedestal) fitting and a modification of a Gaussian function for fitting the core plasma. Low number of parameters of this combined function and their straightforward interpretability and controllability provide a robust method for obtaining physically reasonable profile fits. Deconvolution with the diagnostic instrument function is applied on the profile fit, taking into account the dependence on the actual magnetic configuration.

  17. Kinetic effect of high energy ions on the temperature profile in the boundary plasma region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezumi, N., E-mail: ezumi@nagano-nct.ac.jp [Nagano National College of Technology, 716 Tokuma, Nagano 381-8550 (Japan); Hayashi, Y.; Todoroki, K. [Nagano National College of Technology, 716 Tokuma, Nagano 381-8550 (Japan); Okazaki, K. [Graduated School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Tanaka, H.; Masuzaki, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Ohno, N. [Graduated School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2013-07-15

    Importance of ion dynamics in the boundary region has been discussed with experimental results of ion temperature (T{sub i}) measurements in linear plasma devices and its analytical model. Radial profiles of T{sub i} have been measured by using an ion sensitive probe in the linear devices CTP-HC and NAGDIS-II. The experiments indicate that T{sub i} is growing radially. Analytical ion-mean-energy profiles based on the ion Larmor motion are qualitatively consistent with the experimental T{sub i} profiles. These results clarify that the higher energy ions exist in the outside region of plasma flux tube.

  18. Spectroscopic study of low pressure, low temperature H2-CH4-CO2 microwave plasmas used for large area deposition of nanocrystalline diamond films. Part I: on temperature determination and energetic aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nave, A. S. C.; Baudrillart, B.; Hamann, S.; Bénédic, F.; Lombardi, G.; Gicquel, A.; van Helden, J. H.; Röpcke, J.

    2016-12-01

    In a distributed antenna array (DAA) reactor, microwave H2 plasmas with admixtures of 2.5% CH4 and 1% CO2 used for the deposition of nanocrystalline diamond films have been studied by infrared absorption and optical emission spectroscopy (OES) techniques. The experiments were carried out in order to analyze the dependence of plasma chemical phenomena on power and pressure at relatively low pressures, up to 0.55 mbar, and power values, up to 3 kW. The evolution of the concentration of the methyl radical, CH3, and of five stable molecules, CH4, CO2, CO, C2H2 and C2H6, was monitored in the plasma processes by in situ infrared laser absorption spectroscopy using lead salt diode lasers (TDL) and external-cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL) as radiation sources. OES was applied simultaneously to obtain complementary information about the degree of dissociation of the H2 precursor gas and of its gas temperature. The experimental results are presented in two separate parts. In Part I, the present paper, the measurement of the gas (T gas), rotational (T rot) and vibrational (T vib) temperatures of the various species in the complex plasma was the main focus of interest. To achieve reliable values for the gas temperature inside and outside the plasma bulk as well as for the rotational and vibrational temperatures in the plasma hot zones, which are of great importance for calculation of species concentrations, five different methods based on the emission and absorption spectroscopy data of H2, CH4, CH3 and CO have been used. In these, line profile analysis has been combined with Boltzmann plot methods. Based on the wide tuning range of the EC-QCL, a variety of CO lines in the ground and three excited states was measured enabling extensive temperature analysis providing new insight into the energetic aspects of this multi-component plasma. Depending on the different plasma zones the gas temperature was found to range between about 360 and 1000 K inside the DAA reactor

  19. Novel ultra-low temperature co-fired microwave dielectric ceramic at 400 degrees and its chemical compatibility with base metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    di, Zhou; Li-Xia, Pang; Ze-Ming, Qi; Biao-Bing, Jin; Xi, Yao

    2014-08-01

    A novel NaAgMoO4 material with spinel-like structure was synthesized by using the solid state reaction method and the ceramic sample was well densified at an extreme low sintering temperature about 400°C. Rietveld refinement of the crystal structure was performed using FULLPROF program and the cell parameters are a = b = c = 9.22039 Å with a space group F D -3 M (227). High performance microwave dielectric properties, with a permittivity ~7.9, a Qf value ~33,000 GHz and a temperature coefficient of resonant frequency ~-120 ppm/°C, were obtained. From X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) analysis of the co-fired sample, it was found that the NaAgMoO4 ceramic is chemically compatible with both silver and aluminum at the sintering temperature and this makes it a promising candidate for the ultra-low temperature co-fired ceramics technology. Analysis of infrared and THz spectra indicated that dielectric polarizability at microwave region of the NaAgMoO4 ceramic was equally contributed by ionic displasive and electronic polarizations. Its small microwave dielectric permittivity can also be explained well by the Shannon's additive rule.

  20. Depth profiling of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin films grown at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufmann, C.A.; Caballero, R.; Unold, T.; Hesse, R.; Klenk, R.; Schorr, S.; Nichterwitz, M.; Schock, H.-W. [Hahn-Meinter-Institut Berlin GmbH, Glienicker Strasse 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    In order to understand the effect of the process temperature on the growth of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGSe) thin films via the 3-stage co-evaporation process, absorber layers have been fabricated on glass using a set of different maximum process temperatures in the nominal temperature range between 330 and 525 C. Using energy dispersive X-ray analysis, depth profiles could be recorded on cross-sections of finished devices and were correlated to the device performance. The effect of the process temperature on the gallium gradient in the CIGSe layer is evident in the gallium distribution across the depth of the device. (author)

  1. Effects of Magnetic Field and Nonlinear Temperature Profile on Marangoni Convection in Micropolar Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Mahmud

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The combined effects of a uniform vertical magnetic field and a nonuniform basic temperature profile on the onset of steady Marangoni convection in a horizontal layer of micropolar fluid are studied. The closed-form expression for the Marangoni number M for the onset of convection, valid for polynomial-type basic temperature profiles upto a third order, is obtained by the use of the single-term Galerkin technique. The critical conditions for the onset of convection have been presented graphically.

  2. Influence of carrier flow on the temperature-dependent capacitance-voltage profiles of heterojunction structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, S. D.; Lim, H.; Shin, H. K.; Choe, Byung-Doo

    1996-10-01

    We suggest a model which can explain the shifting of carrier concentration peaks in the temperature-dependent capacitance-voltage carrier profiles of heterojunction (HJ) structures. The shift of concentration peaks, which was frequently observed in the inverted isotype HJs was previously attributed to the traps at the heterointerface. The main feature of our model is the role of band offset as a limiter to the test signal current. The model can explain the difference of the peak shift in the carrier profiles of the normal and inverted type HJs. According to this model, the peak shifts at low temperatures occur naturally for the inverted type HJs.

  3. Critical Rayleigh number of for error function temperature profile with a quasi-static assumption

    CERN Document Server

    Kerr, Oliver S

    2016-01-01

    When a semi-infinite body is heated from below by a sudden increase in temperature (or cooled from above) an error function temperature profile grows as the heat diffuses into the fluid. The stability of such a profile is investigated using a large-wavelength asymptotic expansion under the quasi-static, or frozen-time, approximation. The critical Rayleigh number for this layer is found to be $Ra=\\pi^{1/2}$ based on the length-scale $(\\kappa t)^{1/2}$ where $\\kappa$ is the thermal diffusivity and $t$ the time since the onset of heating.

  4. The Cosmic Microwave Background

    OpenAIRE

    Silk, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    This set of lectures provides an overview of the basic theory and phenomenology of the cosmic microwave background. Topics include a brief historical review; the physics of temperature and polarization fluctuations; acoustic oscillations of the primordial plasma; the space of inflationary cosmological models; current and potential constraints on these models from the microwave background; and constraints on inflation.

  5. A new temperature profiling probe for investigating groundwater-surface water interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Ramon C.; Robert Turcotte,

    2015-01-01

    Measuring vertically nested temperatures at the streambed interface poses practical challenges that are addressed here with a new discrete subsurface temperature profiling probe. We describe a new temperature probe and its application for heat as a tracer investigations to demonstrate the probe's utility. Accuracy and response time of temperature measurements made at 6 discrete depths in the probe were analyzed in the laboratory using temperature bath experiments. We find the temperature probe to be an accurate and robust instrument that allows for easily installation and long-term monitoring in highly variable environments. Because the probe is inexpensive and versatile, it is useful for many environmental applications that require temperature data collection for periods of several months in environments that are difficult to access or require minimal disturbance.

  6. The Development of Geostationary Microwave Observation in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    LU, Naimeng; GUO, Yang; GU, Songyan; WU, Xuebao; LI, Xiaoqing

    2015-04-01

    Great achievements have been made in the regime of microwave observation from polar orbiting meteorological satellites and their microwave data have been successfully used in the retrieval of precipitation and temperature/humidity profile, as well as data assimilation. But right now, there is no microwave observation in GEO due to its technical difficulty even through some plans such as GEM, GOMAS were proposed. The plan to develop microwave instruments for geostationary meteorological satellites have been approved by Chinese government and this presentation will introduce the status of its development, including the requirement consideration, microwave forward model simulation, the retrieval of precipitation, instrument specification, potential data application.. The followings are concluded in this presentation, •Microwave observation on GEO will greatly improve the capacity of current meteorological satellites •The 54GHz and 183GHz bands are on the top of the priority for temperature and humidity profiling, followed by 118, 425 and 325,380 GHz respectively. •Combined the 54 and 183 band together, better precipitation retrieval results could be expected •Regarding the strong convective precipitation retrieval, the 54GHz and 183GHz bands can provide basic information for precipitation retrieval and the improvement with additional window channels is not very significant. •The satisfied resolution for precipitation estimation is 5 to 10 Km and the tolerant value is 50km.

  7. Cleaning of SiC surfaces by low temperature ECR microwave hydrogen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Lingqin; Zhu Qiaozhi; Gao Mingchao [School of Electronic Science and Technology, Faculty of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, 116024 (China); Qin Fuwen [State Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Ministry of Education), Dalian University of Technology, 116024 (China); Wang Dejun, E-mail: dwang121@dlut.edu.cn [School of Electronic Science and Technology, Faculty of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, 116024 (China)

    2011-09-15

    N-type 4H-SiC (0 0 0 1) surfaces were cleaned by low temperature hydrogen plasma in electronic cyclotron resonance (ECR) microware plasma system. The effects of the hydrogen plasma treatment (HPT) on the structure, chemical and electronic properties of surfaces were characterized by in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The RHEED results indicate that the structures of the films are strongly dependent on the treatment temperature and time. Significant improvements in quality of 4H-SiC films can be obtained with the temperature ranging from 200 deg. C to 700 deg. C for an appropriate treatment period. The XPS results show that the surface oxygen is greatly reduced and the carbon contamination is completely removed from the 4H-SiC surfaces. The hydrogenated SiC surfaces exhibit an unprecedented stability against oxidation in the air. The surface Fermi level moves toward the conduction band in 4H-SiC after the treatment indicating an unpinning Fermi level with the density of surfaces states as low as 8.09 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}.

  8. Temperature-dependent microwave dielectric relaxation studies of hydrogen bonded polar binary mixtures of propan-1-ol and propionaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwam, T; Parvateesam, K; Sreeharisastry, S; Murthy, V R K

    2013-10-01

    The molecular interaction between the polar systems of propan-1-ol and propionaldehyde for various mole fractions at different temperatures were studied by determining the frequency dependent complex dielectric permittivity by using the open-ended coaxial probe technique method in the microwave frequency range from 20 MHz to 20 GHz. The geometries are optimized at HF, B3LYP and MP2 with 6-311G and 6-311G+ basis sets. Dipole moments of the binary mixtures are calculated from the dielectric data using Higasi's method and compared with the theoretical results. Conformational analysis of the formation of hydrogen bond between the propan-1-ol and propionaldehyde is supported by the FT-IR and molecular polarizability calculations. The average relaxation times are calculated from their respective Cole-Cole plots. The activation entropy, activation enthalpy and Kirkwood correlation 'g' factor, excess permittivity (ε(E)), excess inverse relaxation time (1/τ)(E), Bruggeman parameter (f(B)) have also been determined for propan-1-ol and propionaldehyde and the results were correlated.

  9. Microwave Medical Treatment Apparatus and Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Ngo, Phong H. (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor); George, W. Rflfoul (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Methods, simulations, and apparatus are provided that may be utilized for medical treatments which are especially suitable for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). In a preferred embodiment, a plurality of separate microwave antennas are utilized to heat prostatic tissue to promote necrosing of the prostatic tissue that relieves the pressure of the prostatic tissue against the urethra as the body reabsorbs the necrosed or dead tissue. By utilizing constructive and destructive interference of the microwave transmission, the energy can be deposited on the tissues to be necrosed while protecting other tissues such as the urethra. Saline injections to alter the conductivity of the tissues may also be used to further focus the energy deposits. A computer simulation is Provided that can be used to Predict the resulting temperature profile produced in the prostatic tissue. By changing the various control features of one or more catheters and the methods of applying microwave energy, a temperature profile can be predicted and produced that is similar to the temperature profile desired for the particular patient.

  10. Microwave induced fast pyrolysis of scrap rubber tires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ani, Farid Nasir; Mat Nor, Nor Syarizan

    2012-06-01

    Pyrolysis is the thermal degradation of carbonaceous solid by heat in the absence of oxygen. The feedstocks, such as biomass or solid wastes are heated to a temperature between 400 and 600°C, without introducing oxygen to support the reaction. The reaction produces three products: gas, pyro-fuel oil and char. This paper presents the techniques of producing pyro-oil from waste tires, as well as investigation of the fuel properties suitable for diesel engine applications. In this study, microwave heating technique is employed to pyrolyse the used rubber tires into pyro-oil. Thermal treatment of as received used rubber tires is carried out in a modified domestic microwave heated fixed bed technology. It has been found that, rubber tires, previously used by various researchers, are poor microwave absorbers. Studies have shown that an appropriate microwave-absorbing material, such as biomass char or activated carbon, could be added to enhance the pyrolysis process; thus producing the pyro-oil. The characteristics of pyro-oil, as well as the effect of microwave absorber on its yield, are briefly described in this paper. The temperature profiles during the microwave heating process are also illustratively emphasized. The study provides a means of converting scrap tires into pyro-oil and pyrolytic carbon black production. The proposed microwave thermal conversion process therefore has the potentials of substantially saving time and energy.

  11. In-situ Microwave Brightness Temperature Variability from Ground-based Radiometer Measurements at Dome C in Antarctica Induced by Wind-formed Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, A.; Picard, G.; Arnaud, L.; Brucker, L.; Fily, M..

    2014-01-01

    Space-borne microwave radiometers are among the most useful tools to study snow and to collect information on the Antarctic climate. They have several advantages over other remote sensing techniques: high sensitivity to snow properties of interest (temperature, grain size, density), subdaily coverage in the polar regions, and their observations are independent of cloud conditions and solar illumination. Thus, microwave radiometers are widely used to retrieve information over snow-covered regions. For the Antarctic Plateau, many studies presenting retrieval algorithms or numerical simulations have assumed, explicitly or not, that the subpixel-scale heterogeneity is negligible and that the retrieved properties were representative of whole pixels. In this presentation, we investigate the spatial variations of brightness temperature over arange of a few kilometers in the Dome C area (Antarctic Plateau).

  12. Retrieval of humidity and temperature profiles over the oceans from INSAT 3D satellite radiances

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C Krishnamoorthy; Deo Kumar; C Balaji

    2016-03-01

    In this study, retrieval of temperature and humidity profiles of atmosphere from INSAT 3D-observed radiances has been accomplished. As the first step, a fast forward radiative transfer model using an Artificial neural network has been developed and it was proven to be highly effective, giving a correlationcoefficient of 0.97. In order to develop this, a diverse set of physics-based clear sky profiles of pressure (P), temperature (T) and specific humidity (q) has been developed. The developed database was further used for geophysical retrieval experiments in two different frameworks, namely, an ANN and Bayesianestimation. The neural network retrievals were performed for three different cases, viz., temperature only retrieval, humidity only retrieval and combined retrieval. The temperature/humidity only ANN retrievals were found superior to combined retrieval using an ANN. Furthermore, Bayesian estimation showed superior results when compared with the combined ANN retrievals.

  13. Effects of Magnetic Coupling on Temperature Profile of Black-Hole Accretion Disc

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷卫华; 汪定雄; 肖看

    2002-01-01

    We propose a model of the magnetic coupling (MC) of a rotating black hole (BH) with the surrounding accretion disc in order to study the radial temperature profile in the inner region of the disc, in which a linear map from the angular coordinate on the BH horizon to the radial coordinate on the thin disc is given by closed magnetic field lines. The MC power and torque are derived using a modified equivalent circuit. It is shown that the MC effects on the temperature profile are related intimately to the BH spin, resulting in the variation of the value and the position of the peak temperature. It turns out that the value range of the colour temperature of the disc is extended by the MC effects.

  14. Temperature profile evolution in quenching high-c superconducting composite tape

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ziauddin Khan; Subrata Pradhan; Irfan Ahmad

    2013-06-01

    Irreversible normal zones leading to quench is an important aspect of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) in all practical applications. As a consequence of quench, transport current gets diverted to the matrix stabilizer material of the high-c composite and causes Joule heating till the original conditions are restored. The nature of growth of the resistive zone in the superconductor greatly influences the temperature evolution of the quenched zone. In this investigation, a complete mathematical analysis of the temperature profile evolution following a quench in a HTS has been carried out. Such prediction in temperature profile would aid the design of HTS tape-based practical applications in limiting the thermal stress-induced damages in off-normal scenarios.

  15. Synoptic monthly gridded Global Temperature and Salinity Profile Programme (GTSPP) water temperature and salinity from January 1990 to December 2009 (NCEI Accession 0138647)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The synoptic gridded Global Temperature and Salinity Profile Programme (SG-GTSPP) provides world ocean 3D gridded temperature and salinity data in monthly increment...

  16. The cosmic microwave background temperature bispectrum from scalar perturbations induced by primordial magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Caprini, Chiara; Paoletti, Daniela; Riotto, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    We evaluate the angular bispectrum of the CMB temperature anisotropy at large angular scale due to a stochastic background of primordial magnetic fields. The shape of non-Gaussianity depends on the spectral index of the magnetic field power spectrum and is peaked in the squeezed configuration for a scale-invariant magnetic spectrum. By using the large angular part of the bispectrum generated by magnetic fields, the present bounds on non-Gaussianity set a limit on the amplitude of the primordial magnetic field of the order of 10 nGauss for the scale-invariant case and 20 nGauss for the other spectral indexes.

  17. Borehole paleoclimatology – the effect of deep lakes and "heat islands" on temperature profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Kutasov

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available It is known that changes in ground surface temperatures could be caused by many non-climatic effects. In this study we propose a method based on utilization of Laplace equation with nonuniform boundary conditions. The proposed method makes possible to estimate the maximum effect of deep lakes and "heat islands" (areas of deforestation, urbanization, farming, mining and wetland drainage on the borehole temperature profiles.

  18. Heat Exchange with Air and Temperature Profile of a Moving Oversize Tire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinchuk, P. S.; Fisenko, S. P.

    2016-11-01

    A one-dimensional mathematical model of heat transfer in a tire with account for the deformation energy dissipation and heat exchange of a moving tire with air has been developed. The mean temperature profiles are calculated and transition to a stationary thermal regime is considered. The influence of the rate of energy dissipation and of effective thermal conductivity of rubber on the temperature field is investigated quantitatively.

  19. Mesoscale eddies in the South China Sea and their impact on temperature profiles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Guihua; SU Jilan; LI Rongfeng

    2005-01-01

    Some life history statistics of the mesoscale eddies ofthe South China Sea (SCS) derived from altimetry data will be further discussed according their different formation periods.A total of three ATLAS (autonomous temperature line acquisition system)mooring buoys data will be analyzed to discuss eddies' impact on temperature profiles.They identify that the intraseasonal variation of SCSthermocline is partly controlled by mesoscale eddies.

  20. Volatile organo-selenium speciation in biological matter by solid phase microextraction–moderate temperature multicapillary gas chromatography with microwave induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry detection

    OpenAIRE

    Dietz, Christian; Sanz Landaluze, Jon; Ximenez Embun, Pilar; Madrid Albarrán, Yolanda; Cámara, Carmen

    2004-01-01

    Microwave induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry (MIP-AES) in combination with multicapillary (MC) gas chromatography could be proven to be useful for element specific detection of volatile species. Solid phase microextraction (SPME) was used for preconcentration and sample-matrix separation. The fiber desorption unit as well as the heating control for the MCcolumn were in-house developed and multicapillary column was operated at moderate temperatures (30–100 ◦C). The method was...

  1. Control of nanoparticle agglomeration through variation of the time-temperature profile in chemical vapor synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djenadic, Ruzica; Winterer, Markus

    2017-02-01

    The influence of the time-temperature history on the characteristics of nanoparticles such as size, degree of agglomeration, or crystallinity is investigated for chemical vapor synthesis (CVS). A simple reaction-coagulation-sintering model is used to describe the CVS process, and the results of the model are compared to experimental data. Nanocrystalline titania is used as model material. Titania nanoparticles are generated from titanium-tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in a hot-wall reactor. Pure anatase particles and mixtures of anatase, rutile (up to 11 vol.%), and brookite (up to 29 vol.%) with primary particle sizes from 1.7 nm to 10.5 nm and agglomerate particle sizes from 24.3 nm to 55.6 nm are formed depending on the particle time-temperature history. An inductively heated furnace with variable inductor geometry is used as a novel system to control the time-temperature profile in the reactor externally covering a large wall temperature range from 873 K to 2023 K. An appropriate choice of inductor geometry, i.e. time-temperature profile, can significantly reduce the degree of agglomeration. Other particle characteristics such as crystallinity are also substantially influenced by the time-temperature profile.

  2. Effects of inlet distortion on gas turbine combustion chamber exit temperature profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqsood, Omar Shahzada

    Damage to a nozzle guide vane or blade, caused by non-uniform temperature distributions at the combustion chamber exit, is deleterious to turbine performance and can lead to expensive and time consuming overhaul and repair. A test rig was designed and constructed for the Allison 250-C20B combustion chamber to investigate the effects of inlet air distortion on the combustion chamber's exit temperature fields. The rig made use of the engine's diffuser tubes, combustion case, combustion liner, and first stage nozzle guide vane shield. Rig operating conditions simulated engine cruise conditions, matching the quasi-non-dimensional Mach number, equivalence ratio and Sauter mean diameter. The combustion chamber was tested with an even distribution of inlet air and a 4% difference in airflow at either side. An even distribution of inlet air to the combustion chamber did not create a uniform temperature profile and varying the inlet distribution of air exacerbated the profile's non-uniformity. The design of the combustion liner promoted the formation of an oval-shaped toroidal vortex inside the chamber, creating localized hot and cool sections separated by 90° that appeared in the exhaust. Uneven inlet air distributions skewed the oval vortex, increasing the temperature of the hot section nearest the side with the most mass flow rate and decreasing the temperature of the hot section on the opposite side. Keywords: Allison 250, Combustion, Dual-Entry, Exit Temperature Profile, Gas Turbine, Pattern Factor, Reverse Flow.

  3. Experimental study on temperature profile of fixed - bed gasification of oil-palm fronds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atnaw, Samson M.; Sulaiman, Shaharin A.; Moni, M. Nazmi Z.

    2012-06-01

    Currently the world's second largest palm oil producer Malaysia produces large amount of oil palm biomass each year. The abundance of the biomass introduces a challenge to utilize them as main feedstock for heat and energy generation. Although some oil palm parts and derivatives like empty fruit bunch and fibre have been commercialized as fuel, less attention has been given to oil palm fronds (OPF). Initial feasibility and characterization studies of OPF showed that it is highly feasible as fuel for gasification to produce high value gaseous fuel or syngas. This paper discusses the experimental gasification attempt carried out on OPF using a 50 kW lab scale downdraft gasifier and its results. The conducted study focused on the temperature distributions within the reactor and the characteristics of the dynamic temperature profile for each temperature zones during operation. OPF feedstock of one cubic inch in individual size with 15% average moisture content was utilized. An average pyrolysis zone temperature of 324°Cand an average oxidation zone temperature of 796°Cwere obtained over a total gasification period of 74 minutes. A maximum oxidation zone temperature of 952°Cwas obtained at 486 lpm inlet air flow rate and 10 kg/hr feedstock consumption rate. Stable bluish flare was produced for more than 70% of the total gasification time. The recorded temperature profiles produced closely similar patterns with the temperature profiles recorded from the gasification of woody materials. Similar temperature profile was obtained comparing the results from OPF gasification with that of woody biomass. Furthermore, the successful ignition of the syngas produced from OPF gasification ascertained that OPF indeed has a higher potential as gasification feedstock. Hence, more detailed studies need to be done for better understanding in exploiting the biomass as a high prospect alternative energy solution. In addition, a study of the effect of initial moisture content of OPF

  4. Microwave engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Pozar, David M

    2012-01-01

    The 4th edition of this classic text provides a thorough coverage of RF and microwave engineering concepts, starting from fundamental principles of electrical engineering, with applications to microwave circuits and devices of practical importance.  Coverage includes microwave network analysis, impedance matching, directional couplers and hybrids, microwave filters, ferrite devices, noise, nonlinear effects, and the design of microwave oscillators, amplifiers, and mixers. Material on microwave and RF systems includes wireless communications, radar, radiometry, and radiation hazards. A large

  5. Characterisation of Special Sensor Microwave Water Vapor Profiler (SSM/T-2) radiances using radiative transfer simulations from global atmospheric reanalyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shinya; Poli, Paul; John, Viju O.

    2017-02-01

    The near-global and all-sky coverage of satellite observations from microwave humidity sounders operating in the 183 GHz band complement radiosonde and aircraft observations and satellite infrared clear-sky observations. The Special Sensor Microwave Water Vapor Profiler (SSM/T-2) of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program began operations late 1991. It has been followed by several other microwave humidity sounders, continuing today. However, expertise and accrued knowledge regarding the SSM/T-2 data record is limited because it has remained underused for climate applications and reanalyses. In this study, SSM/T-2 radiances are characterised using several global atmospheric reanalyses. The European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Interim Reanalysis (ERA-Interim), the first ECMWF reanalysis of the 20th-century (ERA-20C), and the Japanese 55-year Reanalysis (JRA-55) are projected into SSM/T-2 radiance space using a fast radiative transfer model. The present study confirms earlier indications that the polarisation state of SSM/T-2 antenna is horizontal (not vertical) in the limit of nadir viewing. The study also formulates several recommendations to improve use of the SSM/T-2 measurement data in future fundamental climate data records or reanalyses. Recommendations are (1) to correct geolocation errors, especially for DMSP 14; (2) to blacklist poor quality data identified in the paper; (3) to correct for inter-satellite biases, estimated here on the order of 1 K, by applying an inter-satellite recalibration or, for reanalysis, an automated (e.g., variational) bias correction; and (4) to improve precipitating cloud filtering or, for reanalysis, consider an all-sky assimilation scheme where radiative transfer simulations account for the scattering effect of hydrometeors.

  6. Gene expression profiling of a temperature-sensitive strain of Neospora caninum

    Science.gov (United States)

    To understand the genetic basis of virulence, gene expression profiles of a temperature-sensitive clone (NCts-8, relatively avirulent) and its wild type (NC-1) of Neospora caninum were characterized and compared using a high-density microarray with approximately 63,000 distinct oligonucleotides. Thi...

  7. Measurement of Plasma Ion Temperature and Flow Velocity from Chord-Averaged Emission Line Profile

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xu Wei

    2011-03-01

    The distinction between Doppler broadening and Doppler shift has been analysed, the differences between Gaussian fitting and the distribution of chord-integral line shape have also been discussed. Local ion temperature and flow velocity have been derived from the chord-averaged emission line profile by a chosen-point Gaussian fitting technique.

  8. Theoretical and Experimental Research of Error of Method of Thermocouple with Controlled Profile of Temperature Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Su; Kochan, O.; Chunzhi, Wang; Kochan, R.

    2015-12-01

    The method of study and experimental researches of the error of method of the thermocouple with controlled profile of temperature field along the main thermocouple are considered in this paper. Experimentally determined values of error of method are compared to the theoretical estimations done using Newton's law of cooling. They converge well.

  9. Theoretical and Experimental Research of Error of Method of Thermocouple with Controlled Profile of Temperature Field

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Su; Kochan O.; Chunzhi Wang; Kochan R.

    2015-01-01

    The method of study and experimental researches of the error of method of the thermocouple with controlled profile of temperature field along the main thermocouple are considered in this paper. Experimentally determined values of error of method are compared to the theoretical estimations done using Newton’s law of cooling. They converge well.

  10. Ion temperature profile stiffness: non-linear gyrokinetic simulations and comparison with experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Citrin, J.; Jenko, F.; Mantica, P.; Told, D.; Bourdelle, C.; Dumont, R.; Garcia, J.; Haverkort, J. W.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Johnson, T.; Pueschel, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent experimental observations at JET show evidence of reduced ion temperature profile stiffness. An extensive set of nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations are performed based on the experimental discharges, investigating the physical mechanism behind the observations. The impact on the ion heat flux

  11. Microwave irradiation induced changes in protein molecular structures of barley grains: relationship to changes in protein chemical profile, protein subfractions, and digestion in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiaogang; Khan, Nazir A; Zhang, Fangyu; Yang, Ling; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-07-16

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate microwave irradiation (MIR) induced changes in crude protein (CP) subfraction profiles, ruminal CP degradation characteristics and intestinal digestibility of rumen undegraded protein (RUP), and protein molecular structures in barley (Hordeum vulgare) grains. Samples from hulled (n = 1) and hulless cultivars (n = 2) of barley, harvested from four replicate plots in two consecutive years, were evaluated. The samples were either kept as raw or irradiated in a microwave for 3 min (MIR3) or 5 min (MIR5). Compared to raw grains, MIR5 decreased the contents of rapidly degradable CP subfraction (from 45.22 to 6.36% CP) and the ruminal degradation rate (from 8.16 to 3.53%/h) of potentially degradable subfraction. As a consequence, the effective ruminal degradability of CP decreased (from 55.70 to 34.08% CP) and RUP supply (from 43.31 to 65.92% CP) to the postruminal tract increased. The MIR decreased the spectral intensities of amide 1, amide II, α-helix, and β-sheet and increased their ratios. The changes in protein spectral intensities were strongly correlated with the changes in CP subfractions and digestive kinetics. These results show that MIR for a short period (5 min) with a lower energy input can improve the nutritive value and utilization of CP in barely grains.

  12. Environmental profile and critical temperature effects on milk production of Holstein cows in desert climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igono, M. O.; Bjotvedt, G.; Sanford-Crane, H. T.

    1992-06-01

    The environmental profile of central Arizona is quantitatively described using meteorological data between 1971 and 1986. Utilizing ambient temperature criteria of hours per day less than 21° C, between 21 and 27° C, and more than 27° C, the environmental profile of central Arizona consists of varying levels of thermoneutral and heat stress periods. Milk production data from two commercial dairy farms from March 1990 to February 1991 were used to evaluate the seasonal effects identified in the environmental profile. Overall, milk production is lower during heat stress compared to thermoneutral periods. During heat stress, the cool period of hours per day with temperature less than 21° C provides a margin of safety to reduce the effects of heat stress on decreased milk production. Using minimum, mean and maximum ambient temperatures, the upper critical temperatures for milk production are 21, 27 and 32° C, respectively. Using the temperature-humidity index as the thermal environment indicator, the critical values for minimum, mean and maximum THI are 64, 72 and 76, respectively.

  13. Microwave Radiometer - high frequency

    Data.gov (United States)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory — The Microwave Radiometer-High Frequency (MWRHF) provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from two channels centered at 90 and 150 GHz. These two...

  14. A Facile Synthesis of Arylazonicotinates for Dyeing Polyester Fabrics under Microwave Irradiation and Their Biological Activity Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh M. Al-Mousawi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A as textile dyes and the fastness properties of the dyed samples were measured. Most of the dyed fabrics tested displayed very good washing and perspiration fastness and series of 2-hydroxy- and 2-amino-6-substituted-5-arylazonicotinate monoazo compounds 7a–e and 9a–c were prepared via condensation of 3-oxo-3-substituted-2-arylhydrazonals 2a–e with active methylene nitriles 3a–d using microwave irradiation as an energy source. These substances were then tested moderate light fastness. Finally, the biological activity of the synthesized compounds against Gram positive bacteria, Gram negative bacteria and yeast were evaluated.

  15. A facile synthesis of arylazonicotinates for dyeing polyester fabrics under microwave irradiation and their biological activity profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mousawi, Saleh M; El-Apasery, Morsy A; Mahmoud, Huda M

    2012-09-27

    A as textile dyes and the fastness properties of the dyed samples were measured. Most of the dyed fabrics tested displayed very good washing and perspiration fastness and series of 2-hydroxy- and 2-amino-6-substituted-5-arylazonicotinate monoazo compounds 7a-e and 9a-c were prepared via condensation of 3-oxo-3-substituted-2-arylhydrazonals 2a-e with active methylene nitriles 3a-d using microwave irradiation as an energy source. These substances were then tested moderate light fastness. Finally, the biological activity of the synthesized compounds against gram positive bacteria, gram negative bacteria and yeast were evaluated.

  16. A New Weighting Function for Estimating Microwave Sounding Unit Channel 4 Temperature Trends Simulated by CMIP5 Climate Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xuanze; ZHENG Xiaogu; YANG Chi; LUO San

    2013-01-01

    A new static microwave sounding unit (MSU) channel 4 weighting function is obtained from using Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project,Phase 5 (CMIP5) historical multimodel simulations as inputs into the fast Radiative Transfer Model for TOVS (RTTOV vl0).For the same CMIP5 model simulations,it is demonstrated that the computed MSU channel 4 brightness temperature (T4) trends in the lower stratosphere over both the globe and the tropics using the proposed weighting function are equivalent to those calculated by RTTOV,but show more cooling than those computed using the traditional UAH (University of Alabama at Huntsville) or RSS (Remote Sensing Systems in Santa Rosa,California) static weighting functions.The new static weighting function not only reduces the computational cost,but also reveals reasons why trends using a radiative transfer model are different from those using a traditional static weighting function.This study also shows that CMIP5 model simulated T4 trends using the traditional UAH or RSS static weighting functions show less cooling than satellite observations over the globe and the tropics.Although not completely removed,this difference can be reduced using the proposed weighting function to some extent,especially over the tropics.This work aims to explore the reasons for the trend differences and to see to what extent they are related to the inaccurate weighting functions.This would also help distinguish other sources for trend errors and thus better understand the climate change in the lower stratosphere.

  17. CMB anisotropies generated by cosmic voids and great attractors. [Cosmic microwave background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Sanz, J.L. (Cantabria Univ., Santander (Spain). Dept. Fisica Moderna)

    1990-12-01

    A recent result, based on the potential approximation, concerning the effect of a non-static gravitational potential on the propagation of light, is used to study the influence of compensated and uncompensated non-linear structures on the cosmic microwave background radiation. We obtain the temperature profile as well as the deflection of the microwave photons produced by the cosmic voids and great attractors whose existence has recently been claimed in the literature. (author).

  18. Isolation of Salmonella from ready-to-eat poultry meat and evaluation of its survival at low temperature, microwaving and simulated gastric fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Ali; Anal, Anil Kumar

    2015-05-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the risk of Salmonella contamination and its survival at different stages in chill ready-to-eat poultry meat products chain. Samples (n = 181) were collected and examined for the presence of Salmonella species. The bacteria were initially identified against polyvalent antisera "O" and "H", followed by confirmation with 16 s rDNA. The single Salmonella, isolate from the tested food samples showed 99.8 % phylogenetic similarity with Salmonella enterica. It was further evaluated for antibiotic sensitivity pattern and found resistant to four antibiotics including ampicillin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline and nalidixic acid. Salmonella associated with ready-to-eat poultry meat products were found active at storage temperature ≥4 °C in a challenge study. It was revealed that shape and weight of the meat pieces have direct influence on the reduction of pathogens during microwave heating. The 30 and 60 s microwaving (with radiation power fixed at 900 W) was found ineffective for the elimination of target bacteria (10(6)-10(7) CFU/g) in meat pieces with weight ≥90 g. Salmonella enterica was able to survive in simulated gastric fluid. The storage temperature and microwaving were found critical point for the transfer of pathogens through ready-to-eat poultry meat products to consumer in chill ready-to-eat poultry meat chain.

  19. Controlled Microwave Heating Accelerates Rolling Circle Amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Takeo; Suzuki, Takamasa; Mineki, Shigeru; Ohuchi, Shokichi

    2015-01-01

    Rolling circle amplification (RCA) generates single-stranded DNAs or RNA, and the diverse applications of this isothermal technique range from the sensitive detection of nucleic acids to analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Microwave chemistry is widely applied to increase reaction rate as well as product yield and purity. The objectives of the present research were to apply microwave heating to RCA and indicate factors that contribute to the microwave selective heating effect. The microwave reaction temperature was strictly controlled using a microwave applicator optimized for enzymatic-scale reactions. Here, we showed that microwave-assisted RCA reactions catalyzed by either of the four thermostable DNA polymerases were accelerated over 4-folds compared with conventional RCA. Furthermore, the temperatures of the individual buffer components were specifically influenced by microwave heating. We concluded that microwave heating accelerated isothermal RCA of DNA because of the differential heating mechanisms of microwaves on the temperatures of reaction components, although the overall reaction temperatures were the same.

  20. Development of ultrasonic thermometry for high-temperature high-resolution temperature profiling applications in LMFBR safety research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, M. E.

    1986-05-01

    Ultrasonic thermometry was developed as a high temperature profiling diagnostic for use in the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Debris Coolability Program at Sandia National Laboratories. These instruments were used successfully in the DC series experiments and the D10 experiment. Temperatures approaching 3000 C with spatial resolution of 10 mm and indicated temperature gradients of 700 C/cm were measured. Instruments were operated in molten sodium, molten steel, and molten UO2 environments. Up to 14 measurement zones on a single instrument in molten sodium were used with 12 mm and 15 mm spatial resolution. Hermetically sealed units operating at elevated temperatures were used. Post-test examination revealed very little systematic calibration drifts (less than 10 C) with random drifts occuring with less than 40 C standard deviation in a 10 to 12 mm measured zone. The stability of the system varies from +/- 1 C to +/- 15 C depending on the sensor design constraints for a particular application. Doped tungsten sensors were developed to permit operation of total measurement zone length of 30 cm at temperatures above 2500 C.

  1. Microwave Assisted Synthesis of ZnO Nanoparticles: Effect of Precursor Reagents, Temperature, Irradiation Time, and Additives on Nano-ZnO Morphology Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gastón P. Barreto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of different variables (precursor reagents, temperature, irradiation time, microwave radiation power, and additives addition on the final morphology of nano-ZnO obtained through the microwave assisted technique has been investigated. The characterization of the samples has been carried out by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM in transmission mode, infrared (FTIR, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD. The results showed that all the above-mentioned variables influenced to some extent the shape and/or size of the synthetized nanoparticles. In particular, the addition of an anionic surfactant (sodium di-2-ethylhexyl-sulfosuccinate (AOT to the reaction mixture allowed the synthesis of smaller hexagonal prismatic particles (100 nm, which show a significant increase in UV absorption.

  2. Sensitivity of the atmospheric temperature profile to the aerosol absorption in the presence of dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Amo, J. L.; di Sarra, A.; Meloni, D.

    2014-12-01

    Radiative transfer simulations in the shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) spectral regions have been carried out to investigate the time evolution of the atmospheric heating/cooling rates and their influence on the temperature profiles under different vertical distributions of the aerosol absorption. The case study is based on measurements made at Rome, Italy, on 20 June 2007, when a dust layer was present above the urban boundary layer (BL) and the column aerosol optical depth at 550 nm was about 0.37. Column-integrated aerosol optical depth and single scattering albedo, as well as vertical profiles of aerosol extinction and meteorological variables have been derived from observations and used in the simulations. Different profiles of the aerosol absorption are considered by varying the absorption of the BL aerosols and of the desert dust, without changing the overall columnar properties. Three scenarios have been considered, with absorbing (ABL) or scattering (SBL) particles in the BL, and with a vertically homogeneous case (HL), which is taken as the reference. Calculations show that, for the selected case, about 25% of the SW heating is offset by the LW cooling within the dust layer. Different longwave/all-wave contributions are observed in the BL, depending on the BL aerosol absorption. Changes of atmospheric temperature induced by aerosol-radiation interactions only, have been investigated, while interactions with the surface through changes of the latent and sensible heat flux have been neglected. The evolution of temperature is similar for the three scenarios within the dust layer, with a daytime increase and a smaller nighttime decrease. After 24 h, the increase of the atmospheric temperature due to the aerosol radiative processes is about 1 K. In the BL, the increase of temperature is strongly dependent on the aerosol absorption capability. The oscillatory behaviour of the temperature with time in the dust layer, and the different evolution in the BL are

  3. Modeling of the thermal expansion behaviour of ZERODUR at arbitrary temperature profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Johansson, Thoralf; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    Modeling of the thermal expansion behavior of ZERODUR® for the site conditions of the upcoming Extremely Large Telescope's (ELT's) allows an optimized material selection to yield the best performing ZERODUR® for the mirror substrates. The thermal expansion of glass ceramics is a function of temperature and a function of time, due to the structural relaxation behavior of the materials. The application temperature range of the upcoming ELT projects varies depending on the possible construction site between -13°C and +27°C. Typical temperature change rates during the night are in the range between 0.1°C/h and 0.3°C/h. Such temperature change rates are much smaller than the typical economic laboratory measurement rate, therefore the material behavior under these conditions can not be measured directly. SCHOTT developed a model approach to describe the structural relaxation behavior of ZERODUR®. With this model it is possible to precisely predict the thermal expansion behavior of the individual ZERODUR® material batches at any application temperature profile T(t). This paper presents results of the modeling and shows ZERODUR® material behavior at typical temperature profiles of different applications.

  4. Analytical solution and computer program (FAST) to estimate fluid fluxes from subsurface temperature profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurylyk, Barret L.; Irvine, Dylan J.

    2016-02-01

    This study details the derivation and application of a new analytical solution to the one-dimensional, transient conduction-advection equation that is applied to trace vertical subsurface fluid fluxes. The solution employs a flexible initial condition that allows for nonlinear temperature-depth profiles, providing a key improvement over most previous solutions. The boundary condition is composed of any number of superimposed step changes in surface temperature, and thus it accommodates intermittent warming and cooling periods due to long-term changes in climate or land cover. The solution is verified using an established numerical model of coupled groundwater flow and heat transport. A new computer program FAST (Flexible Analytical Solution using Temperature) is also presented to facilitate the inversion of this analytical solution to estimate vertical groundwater flow. The program requires surface temperature history (which can be estimated from historic climate data), subsurface thermal properties, a present-day temperature-depth profile, and reasonable initial conditions. FAST is written in the Python computing language and can be run using a free graphical user interface. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of the analytical solution and FAST using measured subsurface temperature and climate data from the Sendia Plain, Japan. Results from these illustrative examples highlight the influence of the chosen initial and boundary conditions on estimated vertical flow rates.

  5. Integrated modeling of temperature profiles in L-mode tokamak discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, T.; Kritz, A. H.; Tangri, V.; Pankin, A. Y.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Budny, R. V.

    2014-12-01

    Simulations of doublet III-D, the joint European tokamak, and the tokamak fusion test reactor L-mode tokamak plasmas are carried out using the PTRANSP predictive integrated modeling code. The simulation and experimental temperature profiles are compared. The time evolved temperature profiles are computed utilizing the Multi-Mode anomalous transport model version 7.1 (MMM7.1) which includes transport associated with drift-resistive-inertial ballooning modes (the DRIBM model [T. Rafiq et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 082511 (2010)]). The tokamak discharges considered involved a broad range of conditions including scans over gyroradius, ITER like current ramp-up, with and without neon impurity injection, collisionality, and low and high plasma current. The comparison of simulation and experimental temperature profiles for the discharges considered is shown for the radial range from the magnetic axis to the last closed flux surface. The regions where various modes in the Multi-Mode model contribute to transport are illustrated. In the simulations carried out using the MMM7.1 model it is found that: The drift-resistive-inertial ballooning modes contribute to the anomalous transport primarily near the edge of the plasma; transport associated with the ion temperature gradient and trapped electron modes contribute in the core region but decrease in the region of the plasma boundary; and neoclassical ion thermal transport contributes mainly near the center of the discharge.

  6. Integrated modeling of temperature profiles in L-mode tokamak discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafiq, T.; Kritz, A. H.; Tangri, V. [Department of Physics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Pankin, A. Y. [Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Voitsekhovitch, I. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Budny, R. V. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Simulations of doublet III-D, the joint European tokamak, and the tokamak fusion test reactor L-mode tokamak plasmas are carried out using the PTRANSP predictive integrated modeling code. The simulation and experimental temperature profiles are compared. The time evolved temperature profiles are computed utilizing the Multi-Mode anomalous transport model version 7.1 (MMM7.1) which includes transport associated with drift-resistive-inertial ballooning modes (the DRIBM model [T. Rafiq et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 082511 (2010)]). The tokamak discharges considered involved a broad range of conditions including scans over gyroradius, ITER like current ramp-up, with and without neon impurity injection, collisionality, and low and high plasma current. The comparison of simulation and experimental temperature profiles for the discharges considered is shown for the radial range from the magnetic axis to the last closed flux surface. The regions where various modes in the Multi-Mode model contribute to transport are illustrated. In the simulations carried out using the MMM7.1 model it is found that: The drift-resistive-inertial ballooning modes contribute to the anomalous transport primarily near the edge of the plasma; transport associated with the ion temperature gradient and trapped electron modes contribute in the core region but decrease in the region of the plasma boundary; and neoclassical ion thermal transport contributes mainly near the center of the discharge.

  7. Microwave Ovens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ovens heat food using microwaves, a form of electromagnetic radiation similar to radio waves. Microwaves have three characteristics ... that their microwave oven products meet the strict radiation safety standard ... if your microwave oven has damage to its door hinges, latches, or seals, or ...

  8. 1,2,3-Triazole-Functionalized Polysulfone Synthesis through Microwave-Assisted Copper-Catalyzed Click Chemistry: A Highly Proton Conducting High Temperature Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Rakhi; Donnadio, Anna; Giancola, Stefano; Kreisz, Aurélien; Jones, Deborah J; Cavaliere, Sara

    2016-07-06

    Microwave heating holds all the aces regarding development of effective and environmentally friendly methods to perform chemical transformations. Coupling the benefits of microwave-enhanced chemistry with highly reliable copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) click chemistry paves the way for a rapid and efficient synthesis procedure to afford high performance thermoplastic materials. We describe herein fast and high yielding synthesis of 1,2,3-triazole-functionalized polysulfone through microwave-assisted CuAAC as well as explore their potential as phosphoric acid doped polymer electrolyte membranes (PEM) for high temperature PEM fuel cells. Polymers with various degrees of substitution of the side-chain functionality of 1,4-substituted 1,2,3-triazole with alkyl and aryl pendant structures are prepared by sequential chloromethylation, azidation, and microwave-assisted CuAAC using a range of alkynes (1-pentyne, 1-nonyne, and phenylacetylene). The completeness of reaction at each step and the purity of the clicked polymers were confirmed by (1)H-(13)C NMR, DOSY-NMR and FTIR-ATR spectroscopies. The thermal and thermochemical properties of the modified polymers were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis coupled with mass spectroscopy (TG-MS), respectively. TG-MS analysis demonstrated that the commencement of the thermal degradation takes place with the decomposition of the triazole ring while its substituents have critical influence on the initiation temperature. Polysulfone functionalized with 4-phenyl-1,2,3-triazole demonstrates significantly higher Tg, Td, and elastic modulus than the ones bearing 4-propyl-1,2,3-triazole and 4-heptyl-1,2,3-triazole groups. After doping with phosphoric acid, the functionalized polymers with acid doping level of 5 show promising performance with high proton conductivity in anhydrous conditions (in the range of 27-35 mS/cm) and satisfactorily high elastic modulus (in the range

  9. Microwave imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Pastorino, Matteo

    2010-01-01

    An introduction to the most relevant theoretical and algorithmic aspects of modern microwave imaging approaches Microwave imaging-a technique used in sensing a given scene by means of interrogating microwaves-has recently proven its usefulness in providing excellent diagnostic capabilities in several areas, including civil and industrial engineering, nondestructive testing and evaluation, geophysical prospecting, and biomedical engineering. Microwave Imaging offers comprehensive descriptions of the most important techniques so far proposed for short-range microwave imaging-in

  10. SIMULATION TOOL OF VELOCITY AND TEMPERATURE PROFILES IN THE ACCELERATED COOLING PROCESS OF HEAVY PLATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Adel dos Santos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to develop and apply mathematical models for determining the velocity and temperature profiles of heavy plates processed by accelerated cooling at Usiminas’ Plate Mill in Ipatinga. The development was based on the mathematical/numerical representation of physical phenomena occurring in the processing line. Production data from 3334 plates processed in the Plate Mill were used for validating the models. A user-friendly simulation tool was developed within the Visual Basic framework, taking into account all steel grades produced, the configuration parameters of the production line and these models. With the aid of this tool the thermal profile through the plate thickness for any steel grade and dimensions can be generated, which allows the tuning of online process control models. The simulation tool has been very useful for the development of new steel grades, since the process variables can be related to the thermal profile, which affects the mechanical properties of the steels.

  11. Ion temperature profile stiffness: non-linear gyrokinetic simulations and comparison with experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Citrin, J; Haverkort, J W; Hogeweij, G M D; Jenko, F; Mantica, P; Pueschel, M J; Told, D; contributors, JET-EFDA

    2013-01-01

    Recent experimental observations at JET show evidence of reduced ion temperature profile stiffness at low magnetic shear (s) in the presence of flow shear. Non-linear gyrokinetic simulations are performed, aiming to investigate the physical mechanism behind the observations. The sensitivity of profile stiffness to the variations of plasma parameters experimentally observed when transitioning to the low-stiffness regime is assessed. It is found that non-linear electromagnetic effects, even at low beta_e, can significantly reduce the profile stiffness, although not by a degree sufficient to explain the experimental observations. The effect of toroidal flow shear itself is not predicted by the simulations to lead to a significant reduction in flux due to significant parallel gradient velocity destabilisation. For the majority of discharges studied, the simulated and experimental ion heat flux values do agree within reasonable variations of input parameters around the experimental uncertainties. However, no such ...

  12. Mars dayside temperature from airglow limb profiles : comparison with in situ measurements and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérard, Jean-Claude; Bougher, Stephen; Montmessin, Franck; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Stiepen, A.

    The thermal structure of the Mars upper atmosphere is the result of the thermal balance between heating by EUV solar radiation, infrared heating and cooling, conduction and dynamic influences such as gravity waves, planetary waves, and tides. It has been derived from observations performed from different spacecraft. These include in situ measurements of orbital drag whose strength depends on the local gas density. Atmospheric temperatures were determined from the altitude variation of the density measured in situ by the Viking landers and orbital drag measurements. Another method is based on remote sensing measurements of ultraviolet airglow limb profiles obtained over 40 years ago with spectrometers during the Mariner 6 and 7 flybys and from the Mariner 9 orbiter. Comparisons with model calculations indicate that they both reflect the CO_2 scale height from which atmospheric temperatures have been deduced. Upper atmospheric temperatures varying over the wide range 270-445 K, with a mean value of 325 K were deduced from the topside scale height of the airglow vertical profile. We present an analysis of limb profiles of the CO Cameron (a(3) Pi-X(1) Sigma(+) ) and CO_2(+) doublet (B(2) Sigma_u(+) - X(2) PiΠ_g) airglows observed with the SPICAM instrument on board Mars Express. We show that the temperature in the Mars thermosphere is very variable with a mean value of 270 K, but values ranging between 150 and 400 K have been observed. These values are compared to earlier determinations and model predictions. No clear dependence on solar zenith angle, latitude or season is apparent. Similarly, exospheric variations with F10.7 in the SPICAM airglow dataset are small over the solar minimum to moderate conditions sampled by Mars Express since 2005. We conclude that an unidentified process is the cause of the large observed temperature variability, which dominates the other sources of temperature variations.

  13. Remote sensing of temperature profiles in vegetation canopies using multiple view angles and inversion techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimes, D. S.

    1981-01-01

    A mathematical method is presented which allows the determination of vertical temperature profiles of vegetation canopies from multiple sensor view angles and some knowledge of the vegetation geometric structure. The technique was evaluated with data from several wheat canopies at different stages of development, and shown to be most useful in the separation of vegetation and substrate temperatures with greater accuracy in the case of intermediate and dense vegetation canopies than in sparse ones. The converse is true for substrate temperatures. Root-mean-square prediction accuracies of temperatures for intermediate-density wheat canopies were 1.8 C and 1.4 C for an exact and an overdeterminate system, respectively. The findings have implication for remote sensing research in agriculture, geology or other earth resources disciplines.

  14. Modelling of composition and stress profiles in low temperature surface engineered stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Freja Nygaard; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    stresses are introduced in the developing case, arising from the volume expansion that accompanies the dissolution of high interstitial contents in expanded austenite. Modelling of the composition and stress profiles developing during low temperature surface engineering from the processing parameters...... temperature, time and gas composition is a prerequisite for targeted process optimization. A realistic model to simulate the developing case has to take the following influences on composition and stress into account: - a concentration dependent diffusion coefficient - trapping of nitrogen by chromium atoms...... - the effect of residual stress on diffusive flux - the effect of residual stress on solubility of interstitials - plastic accommodation of residual stress. The effect of all these contributions on composition and stress profiles will be addressed....

  15. Monitoring of temperature profiles and surface morphologies during laser sintering of alumina ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Qian

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing of alumina by laser is a delicate process and small changes of processing parameters might cause less controlled and understood consequences. The real-time monitoring of temperature profiles, spectrum profiles and surface morphologies were evaluated in off-axial set-up for controlling the laser sintering of alumina ceramics. The real-time spectrometer and pyrometer were used for rapid monitoring of the thermal stability during the laser sintering process. An active illumination imaging system successfully recorded the high temperature melt pool and surrounding area simultaneously. The captured images also showed how the defects form and progress during the laser sintering process. All of these real-time monitoring methods have shown a great potential for on-line quality control during laser sintering of ceramics.

  16. Experimental and numerical results for CO2 concentration and temperature profiles in an occupied room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotel, Aline; Junghans, Lars; Wang, Xiaoxiang

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, a recognition of the scope of the negative environmental impact of existing buildings has spurred academic and industrial interest in transforming existing building design practices and disciplinary knowledge. For example, buildings alone consume 72% of the electricity produced annually in the United States; this share is expected to rise to 75% by 2025 (EPA, 2009). Significant reductions in overall building energy consumption can be achieved using green building methods such as natural ventilation. An office was instrumented on campus to acquire CO2 concentrations and temperature profiles at multiple locations while a single occupant was present. Using openFOAM, numerical calculations were performed to allow for comparisons of the CO2 concentration and temperature profiles for different ventilation strategies. Ultimately, these results will be the inputs into a real time feedback control system that can adjust actuators for indoor ventilation and utilize green design strategies. Funded by UM Office of Vice President for Research.

  17. Normal range and lateral symmetry in the skin temperature profile of pregnant women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Tânia; Nogueira-Silva, Cristina; Simoes, Ricardo

    2016-09-01

    Body skin temperature is a useful parameter for diagnosing diseases and infrared thermography can be a powerful tool in providing important information to detect body temperature changes in a noninvasive way. The aim of this work was to study the pattern of skin temperature during pregnancy, to establish skin temperature reference values and to find correlations between these and the pregnant population characteristics. Sixty-one healthy pregnant women (mean age 30.6 ± 5.1 years) in the 8th-40th gestational week with normal pregnancies were examined in 31 regions of interest (ROI). The ROIs were defined all over the body in order to determine the most influenced by factors such as age or body mass index (BMI). The results obtained in this work highlight that in normal pregnant women the skin temperature is symmetrically distributed, with the symmetrical areas differing less than 0.5 °C , with a mean value of 0.25 ± 0.23 °C . This study identified a significant negative correlation between the BMI and temperature. Age has been shown to have great influence on the skin temperature, with a significant increase of temperature observed with age. This work explores a novel medical application of infrared thermography and provides a characterization of thermal skin profile in human pregnancy for a large set of ROIs while also evaluating the effects of age and BMI.

  18. Atmospheric pressure and temperature profiling using near IR differential absorption lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, C. L.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Dombrowski, M.; Weng, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with differential absorption lidar techniques for remotely measuring the atmospheric temperature and pressure profile, surface pressure, and cloud top pressure-height. The procedure used in determining the pressure is based on the conduction of high-resolution measurements of absorption in the wings of lines in the oxygen A band. Absorption with respect to these areas is highly pressure sensitive in connection with the mechanism of collisional line broadening. The method of temperature measurement utilizes a determination of the absorption at the center of a selected line in the oxygen A band which originates from a quantum state with high ground state energy.

  19. Pyrolysis and combustion behaviour of wood: temperature profiles and solid conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceamanos, J.; Bilbao, R.; Aldea, M.E.; Betran, M.; Mastral, J.F. [University of Zaragoza (Spain)

    1999-07-01

    The development of techniques for the production of electricity by pyrolysis and combustion of biomass must take into account the behaviour of large particles under very different experimental conditions. In this work the influences of the variable heat flux, the moisture content of the sample and the atmosphere surrounding the particle have been studied. The mathematical model developed takes into account variable thermal properties, variation of temperature and enthalpy of water vaporization with water content, and thermal decomposition kinetics previously obtained by thermogravimetry. It predicts temperature and moisture profiles inside the solid as well as the global conversion. The results obtained agree with the experimental results for most conditions. (author)

  20. Tailoring order–disorder temperature and microwave dielectric properties of Ba[(Co0.6Zn0.41/3Nb2/3]O3 ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tu Lai Sun

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The order–disorder temperature (To–d of Ba[(Co0.6Zn0.41/3Nb2/3]O3 ceramics was determined via X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and differential thermal analysis, respectively. To–d was determined to be between 1425 and 1450 °C by a quenching method. The endothermic peak in the DTA curve shows the order–disorder transition. B2O3 was applied to tune the densification temperature (Ts and tailor the microwave dielectric properties. The ordering degree and unloaded quality factor (Qf are improved when Ts is reduced to 1400 °C at B2O3 content of 0.25 mol%. Ts is further decreased and the ordering degree and Qf are decreased when B2O3 content is increased to 0.5 mol%. The dielectric constant (εr and temperature coefficient of resonant frequency (τf decrease slightly with increasing B2O3 content. The optimum microwave dielectric properties (i.e., εr = 34.0, Qf = 50,400 GHz, τf = 5.5 × 10−6/°C are obtained for the Ba[(Co0.6Zn0.41/3Nb2/3]O3-0.25 mol% B2O3 ceramics sintered at a lower temperature.

  1. Isoflavone Profiles and Kinetic Changes during Ultra-High Temperature Processing of Soymilk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Chang, Sam K C

    2016-03-01

    Isoflavone profile is greatly affected by heating process. However, kinetic analyses of isoflavone conversion and degradation using a continuous industry processing method have never been characterized. In this study, Proto soybean was soaked and blanched at 80 °C for 2 min and then processed into soymilk, which underwent UHT (ultra-high temperature) at 135 to 150 °C for 10 to 50 s with a pilot plant-scale Microthermics processor. The isoflavone profile was determined at different time/temperature combinations. The results showed that all isoflavone forms exhibited distinct changing patterns over time. In the soymilk under UHT conditions, the degradation (disappearance) of malonyldaizin and malonylgenistin exhibited first-order kinetics with activation energies of 59 and 84 kj/mole, respectively. At all UHT temperatures, malonylgenistin showed higher rate constants than malonyldaidzin. However, malonylglycitin changed irregularly under these UHT temperatures. The increase of genistin, daidzin, glycitein and acetlydaidzin during heating demonstrated zero-order kinetics and the rate constants increased with temperature except for the conditions of 145 to 150 °C for 50 s. Overall, genistein series exhibited higher stability than daidzein series. Under all UHT conditions, total isoflavone decreased from 12% to 24%.

  2. Patch Antenna for Measuring the Internal Temperature of Biological Objects Using the Near-Field Microwave Radiometric Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubaichin, A.; Bespalko, A.; Filatov, A.; Alexeev, E.; Zhuk, G.

    2016-01-01

    The near-field microwave antenna with central frequency of 2.23 GHz has been designed and manufactured to be used as a part of the medical microwave radiometric system. Experimental studies of the reflection coefficient in different parts of the human body were conducted using the developed antenna. The experimental studies were carried out in a group of volunteers with normal somatic growth. The results of the experiments were used to perform the analysis of the potential errors in the measurements obtained via the developed antenna.

  3. Heat-Modeling of Microwave Assisted Epoxidation of Palm Acid Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Saifuddin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: While microwave chemistry could well be the most convenient, rapid and energy-saving way to initiate a chemical reaction, the issues of thermal versus microwave specific effect remain unaddressed. Approach: A three-dimensional Finite Element Model (FEM was developed to predict temperature profile during the enzymatic epoxidation of palm acid oil using microwave heating. Three-dimensional partial differential equations are formulated for the electromagnetic field and heat and mass transfer processes. The temperature profile of the FEM generated from the commercial software (ANSYS Emag was verified using experimental data from microwave oven heated samples containing palm acid oil and reactants in cylindrical bottles and has compared favorably with real time data. An Infra Red thermometer was used to measure temperature of the reactants during the real time experiment to ensure less contact with the reaction vessel. Results: Apart from ascertaining the temperature profile of the epoxidation process in the cylindrical bottle, the heat-modeling of this reaction can predict the Energy required during the reaction and provide insights to non-thermal microwave effects. It has shown the possibility of Microwave Non-Thermal Effects and Microwave Selectivity in Substrate Specificity. The energy used by the microwave irradiated reaction is by far much lesser than the energy used in conventional heating. This study has also improved the epoxidation process of Palm Acid Oil by incorporating enzyme as a catalyst and using microwave heating. Epoxidation can be done rapidly and at a lower level of activation energy of 27.767 kJ mol−1. It is a green process with increased efficiency as it reduced a typically 5-hour reaction to less than an hour. Conclusion: In this study, a quantitative view of a microwave assisted process of enzymatic epoxidation has been established. We have successfully developed and experimentally

  4. Optimization of the accelerated curing process of concrete using a fibre Bragg grating-based control system and microwave technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, Matthias; Jia, Yaodong; Shi, Shi; McCague, Colum; Bai, Yun; Sun, Tong; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, an investigation into the suitability of using fibre Bragg gratings (FBGs) for monitoring the accelerated curing process of concrete in a microwave heating environment is presented. In this approach, the temperature data provided by the FBGs are used to regulate automatically the microwave power so that a pre-defined temperature profile is maintained to optimize the curing process, achieving early strength values comparable to those of conventional heat-curing techniques but with significantly reduced energy consumption. The immunity of the FBGs to interference from the microwave radiation used ensures stable readings in the targeted environment, unlike conventional electronic sensor probes.

  5. Effect of CuO addition on the sintering temperature and microwave dielectric properties of CaSiO3–Al2O3 ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denghao Li

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available CuO-doped CaSiO3–1 wt% Al2O3 ceramics were synthesized via a traditional solid-state reaction method, and their sintering behavior, microstructure and microwave dielectric properties were investigated. The results showed that appropriate CuO addition could accelerate the sintering process and assist the densification of CaSiO3–1 wt% Al2O3 ceramics, which could effectively lower the densification temperature from 1250 °C to 1050 °C. However, the addition of CuO undermined the microwave dielectric properties. The optimal amount of CuO addition was found to be 0.8 wt%, and the derived CaSiO3–Al2O3 ceramic sintered at 1100 °C presented good microwave dielectric properties of εr=7.27, Q×f=16,850 GHz and τf=−39.53 ppm/°C, which is much better than those of pure CaSiO3 ceramic sintered at 1340 oC (Q×f=13,109 GHz. The chemical compatibility of the above ceramic with 30 Pd/70 Ag during the cofiring process has also been investigated, and the result showed that there was no chemical reaction between palladium–silver alloys and ceramics.

  6. Effect of CuO addition on the sintering temperature and microwave dielectric properties of CaSiO3-Al2O3 ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Denghao Li; Huanping Wang; Zuopeng He; Zhen Xiao; Ruoshan Lei; Shiqing Xu

    2014-01-01

    CuO-doped CaSiO3-1 wt% Al2O3 ceramics were synthesized via a traditional solid-state reaction method, and their sintering behavior, microstructure and microwave dielectric properties were investigated. The results showed that appropriate CuO addition could accelerate the sintering process and assist the densification of CaSiO3-1 wt%Al2O3 ceramics, which could effectively lower the densification temperature from 1250 1C to 1050 1C. However, the addition of CuO undermined the microwave dielectric properties. The optimal amount of CuO addition was found to be 0.8 wt%, and the derived CaSiO3-Al2O3 ceramic sintered at 1100 1C presented good microwave dielectric properties ofεr ¼ 7.27, Q ? f ¼ 16,850 GHz andτf ¼ ? 39.53 ppm/1C, which is much better than those of pure CaSiO3 ceramic sintered at 1340 oC (Q ? f ¼ 13,109 GHz). The chemical compatibility of the above ceramic with 30 Pd/70 Ag during the cofiring process has also been investigated, and the result showed that there was no chemical reaction between palladium-silver alloys and ceramics.

  7. PROGRAMMING THE MICROWAVE-OVEN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOK, LP; VISSER, PE; BOON, ME

    1994-01-01

    Microwaves can be used to stimulate chemical bonding, diffusion of reagents into and out of the specimen, and coagulation processes in preparatory techniques. Temperature plays an important role in these processes. There are several ways of controlling the temperature of microwave-exposed tissue, fl

  8. PROGRAMMING THE MICROWAVE-OVEN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOK, LP; VISSER, PE; BOON, ME

    1994-01-01

    Microwaves can be used to stimulate chemical bonding, diffusion of reagents into and out of the specimen, and coagulation processes in preparatory techniques. Temperature plays an important role in these processes. There are several ways of controlling the temperature of microwave-exposed tissue,

  9. Preliminary observation of temperature profiles by radio acoustic sounding system (RASS) with a 1280 MHz lower atmospheric wind profiler at Gadanki, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar Sarma, T. V.; Srinivasulu, P.; Tsuda, T.

    2012-06-01

    A UHF wind profiler operating at 1280 MHz has been developed at NARL for atmospheric studies in the planetary boundary layer. In order to explore application of radio acoustic sounding system (RASS) technique to this profiler, a suitable acoustic attachment was designed and preliminary experiments were conducted on 27-30 August 2010. Height profiles of virtual temperature, Tv, in the planetary boundary layer were derived with 1 μs and 0.25 μs pulse transmission, corresponding to a height resolution of 150 m and about 40 m, respectively. Diurnal variation of Tv is clearly recognized, and perturbations of Tv are also seen in association with a precipitation event. Simultaneous profiles obtained from the MST Radar-RASS and an onsite 50 m tower demonstrate the capability to continuously profile the atmospheric temperature from near the ground to upper tropospheric altitudes.

  10. NOAA Climate Data Record of Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU-A) Mean Layer Temperature, Version 3.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset contains three channel-based, monthly gridded atmospheric layer temperature Climate Data Records generated by merging nine MSU NOAA polar orbiting...

  11. Wound temperature profiles of coaxial mini-incision versus sleeveless microincision phacoemulsification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkin, Avner; Abulafia, Adi; Michaeli, Adi; Ofir, Shay; Assia, Ehud I

    2017-04-01

    Temperature profiles at the corneal wound of coaxial mini-incision (2.4 mm) cataract surgery and sleeveless microincision (1.1 mm) cataract surgery were compared. Prospective, controlled, paired-eye clinical trial conducted in a tertiary care hospital. Twenty patients with mild-to-moderate bilateral nuclear sclerotic cataract. Twenty patients underwent bilateral cataract surgery within a 1-month period. One eye was operated on by conventional coaxial mini-incision (2.4 mm) phacoemulsification. The second eye underwent microincision surgery by using a naked phacoemulsification tip and a specialized 19-gauge anterior chamber maintainer as the sole fluid source (three-port microincision cataract surgery technique). Patients had moderate bilateral cataracts with no other anterior segment pathology. Temperature at the corneal wound was constantly recorded by using infrared thermal imaging. Temperatures at the corneal wound. Mean temperatures at the corneal surgical wound were not significantly different between the coaxial and sleeveless groups (31.1 °C ± 2.3 vs. 31.0 °C ± 2. 0; P = 0.89). There was also no difference in maximum temperatures reached during phaco-emulsification. Temperatures did not rise above 40 °C during any surgery, and there were no corneal burns. Final visual acuity and intraoperative and postoperative complication rates were similar between the two groups. The temperature profile at the surgical wound using a microincisional sleeveless phacoemulsification technique is comparable with that of the conventional coaxial mini-incision method. © 2016 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  12. Impact of deforestation on subsurface temperature profiles: implications for the borehole paleoclimate record

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougall, Andrew H.; Beltrami, Hugo

    2017-07-01

    Subsurface temperature profiles measured in boreholes are one of the important archives of paleoclimate data for reconstructing the climate of the past 2000 years. Subsurface temperatures are a function of past ground surface temperatures (GST), however GSTs are influenced both by changes in land-use and changes in regional climate. Thus the history of deforestation at borehole sampling locations represents a potential uncertainty in the reconstructed temperature history at the site. Here a fully coupled Earth system model is used estimate the magnitude of the subsurface temperature anomaly from deforestation events from a global perspective. The model simulations suggest that warming of the ground surface is the dominant response to deforestation, consistent with the limited field data that exist. The magnitude of the temperature anomaly varies by environment with a global average anomaly of 0.85 °C with a range of -0.48 °C to 1.78 °C. The warming originates from a reduction in the efficiency of turbulent energy flux to the atmosphere overcompensating an increase in albedo. Overall our simulations suggest that deforestation has a large impact on subsurface temperatures for centuries following deforestation and thus GST reconstructions should take into account previous deforestation events.

  13. Radiometric temperature reading of a hot ellipsoidal object inside the oral cavity by a shielded microwave antenna put flush to the cheek

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemetsen, Øystein; Jacobsen, Svein; Birkelund, Yngve

    2012-05-01

    A new scheme for detection of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in children has recently been proposed in the literature. The idea is to warm bladder urine via microwave exposure to at least fever temperatures and observe potential urine reflux from the bladder back to the kidney(s) by medical radiometry. As a preliminary step toward realization of this detection device, we present non-invasive temperature monitoring by use of microwave radiometry in adults to observe temperature dynamics in vivo of a water-filled balloon placed within the oral cavity. The relevance of the approach with respect to detection of VUR in children is motivated by comparing the oral cavity and cheek tissue with axial CT images of young children in the bladder region. Both anatomical locations reveal a triple-layered tissue structure consisting of skin-fat-muscle with a total thickness of about 8-10 mm. In order to mimic variations in urine temperature, the target balloon was flushed with water coupled to a heat exchanger, that was moved between water baths of different temperatures, to induce measurable temperature gradients. The applied radiometer has a center frequency of 3.5 GHz and provides a sensitivity (accuracy) of 0.03 °C for a data acquisition time of 2 s. Three different scenarios were tested and included observation through the cheek tissue with and without an intervening water bolus compartment present. In all cases, radiometric readings observed over a time span of 900 s were shown to be highly correlated (R ˜ 0.93) with in situ temperatures obtained by fiberoptic probes.

  14. Assimilation of Quality Controlled AIRS Temperature Profiles using the NCEP GFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susskind, Joel; Reale, Oreste; Iredell, Lena; Rosenberg, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We have previously conducted a number of data assimilation experiments using AIRS Version-5 quality controlled temperature profiles as a step toward finding an optimum balance of spatial coverage and sounding accuracy with regard to improving forecast skill. The data assimilation and forecast system we used was the Goddard Earth Observing System Model , Version-5 (GEOS-5) Data Assimilation System (DAS), which represents a combination of the NASA GEOS-5 forecast model with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) operational Grid Point Statistical Interpolation (GSI) global analysis scheme. All analyses and forecasts were run at a 0.5deg x 0.625deg spatial resolution. Data assimilation experiments were conducted in four different seasons, each in a different year. Three different sets of data assimilation experiments were run during each time period: Control; AIRS T(p); and AIRS Radiance. In the "Control" analysis, all the data used operationally by NCEP was assimilated, but no AIRS data was assimilated. Radiances from the Aqua AMSU-A instrument were also assimilated operationally by NCEP and are included in the "Control". The AIRS Radiance assimilation adds AIRS observed radiance observations for a select set of channels to the data set being assimilated, as done operationally by NCEP. In the AIRS T(p) assimilation, all information used in the Control was assimilated as well as Quality Controlled AIRS Version-5 temperature profiles, i.e., AIRS T(p) information was substituted for AIRS radiance information. The AIRS Version-5 temperature profiles were presented to the GSI analysis as rawinsonde profiles, assimilated down to a case-by-case appropriate pressure level p(sub best) determined using the Quality Control procedure. Version-5 also determines case-by-case, level-by-level error estimates of the temperature profiles, which were used as the uncertainty of each temperature measurement. These experiments using GEOS-5 have shown that forecasts

  15. Cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry and the temperature dependence of molecular depth profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Dan; Wucher, Andreas; Brenes, Daniel A; Lu, Caiyan; Winograd, Nicholas

    2012-05-01

    The quality of molecular depth profiles created by erosion of organic materials by cluster ion beams exhibits a strong dependence upon temperature. To elucidate the fundamental nature of this dependence, we employ the Irganox 3114/1010 organic delta-layer reference material as a model system. This delta-layer system is interrogated using a 40 keV C(60)(+) primary ion beam. Parameters associated with the depth profile such as depth resolution, uniformity of sputtering yield, and topography are evaluated between 90 and 300 K using a unique wedge-crater beveling strategy that allows these parameters to be determined as a function of erosion depth from atomic force microscope (AFM) measurements. The results show that the erosion rate calibration performed using the known Δ-layer depth in connection with the fluence needed to reach the peak of the corresponding secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) signal response is misleading. Moreover, we show that the degradation of depth resolution is linked to a decrease of the average erosion rate and the buildup of surface topography in a thermally activated manner. This underlying process starts to influence the depth profile above a threshold temperature between 210 and 250 K for the system studied here. Below that threshold, the process is inhibited and steady-state conditions are reached with constant erosion rate, depth resolution, and molecular secondary ion signals from both the matrix and the Δ-layers. In particular, the results indicate that further reduction of the temperature below 90 K does not lead to further improvement of the depth profile. Above the threshold, the process becomes stronger at higher temperature, leading to an immediate decrease of the molecular secondary ion signals. This signal decay is most pronounced for the highest m/z ions but is less for the smaller m/z ions, indicating a shift toward small fragments by accumulation of chemical damage. The erosion rate decay and surface roughness buildup

  16. Microwave-Plasma-Coupled Re-Ignition of Methane-and-Oxygen Mixture Under Auto-Ignition Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    setup and the components for the microwave power supply , and the measurement system are shown. It consists of a power supply , two directional couplers...dramatically increase through Stage II. Calculations show that, in our configuration, 18% of the total methane undergoes reforming to syngas at 30 W of

  17. Barriers to internal rotation from relative intensity measurements as a function of temperature on microwave absorption lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruitenberg, G.

    1972-01-01

    A variant is presented of the relative intensity method (RIM) in microwave spectroscopy to determine barriers to internal rotation. In this method torsional energies are determined directly from the slope of the straight line relating the logarithm of the intensity ratio and the reciprocal of the te

  18. Microwave Dielectric Sensing of Moisture Content in Shelled Peanuts Independent of Bulk Density and with Temperature Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A dielectric method for rapid and nondestructive sensing of moisture content in shelled peanuts from free space measurement of attenuation, phase shift, and their corresponding dielectric properties at microwave frequencies is presented. Results of moisture prediction with three density-independent...

  19. Temperature profile during the alkaline dissolution of Al for the production of Mo-99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Izilda C.; Camilo, Ruth L.; Mindrisz, Ana C.; Forbicini, Christina A.L.G. de O., E-mail: cruzaraujo22@gmail.com, E-mail: rcamilo@ipen.br, E-mail: acmindri@ipen.br, E-mail: cforbici@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Since September 2008 Brazil is developing the project called Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB), having as main objective to produce about 1000 Ci/week of {sup 99}Mo. The {sup 99m}Tc, daughter of {sup 99}Mo, is most often used in nuclear medicine as tracer element because of its favorable nuclear properties; accounting for about 80% of all diagnostic procedures in vivo. This study is part of the project to obtain {sup 99}Mo by alkaline dissolution of UAl{sub x}-Al targets. Al corresponds to about 79% of the total weight of the UAl{sub x}-Al target. The initial reaction temperature is an important parameter, since it has great influence on the value of the maximum temperature and dissolution time. The heat of reaction must be removed from the dissolving system by controlled cooling. According to literature as a safety condition, the dissolution process must have its temperature controlled so that the maximum temperature to be around 90 deg C.The behavior of the temperature during dissolution using a thermostatic bath with continuous circulation to maintain its value at around 90 deg C was studied. The alkaline solution of NaOH{sub 3} mol.L{sup -1} and NaNO{sub 3} 2 mol.L{sup -1}. As initial temperatures were: 70, 75 and 80 deg C and initial temperatures of the thermostatic bath were: 40,45, 50, 60 and 70 deg C. The results indicate that none of the studies it was possible to maintain the temperature of dissolution near 90 deg C. In the studies where the maximum temperature was around 93 deg C dissolution was incomplete. It may be necessary an intermittent cooling rather than continuous to ensure that the temperature profile is maintained around 90 deg C. (author)

  20. Volatile compound profile of sous-vide cooked lamb loins at different temperature-time combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán, Mar; Ruiz, Jorge; Del Pulgar, José Sánchez; Pérez-Palacios, Trinidad; Antequera, Teresa

    2015-02-01

    Lamb loins were subjected to sous-vide cooking at different combinations of temperature (60 and 80°C) and time (6 and 24h) to assess the effect on the volatile compound profile. Major chemical families in cooked samples were aliphatic hydrocarbons and aldehydes. The volatile compound profile in sous-vide cooked lamb loin was affected by the cooking temperature and time. Volatile compounds arising from lipid oxidation presented a high abundance in samples cooked at low or moderate cooking conditions (60°C for 6 and 24h, 80°C for 6h), while a more intense time and temperature combination (80°C for 24h) resulted on a higher concentration of volatile compounds arising from Strecker degradations of amino acids, as 2-methylpropanal and 3-methylbutanal. Therefore, sous-vide cooking at moderately high temperatures for long times would result in the formation of a stronger meaty flavor and roast notes in lamb meat. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Two-stage numerical simulation for temperature profile in furnace of tangentially fired pulverized coal boiler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Nai-jun; XU Qiong-hui; ZHOU Ping

    2005-01-01

    Considering the fact that the temperature distribution in furnace of a tangential fired pulverized coal boiler is difficult to be measured and monitored, two-stage numerical simulation method was put forward. First, multi-field coupling simulation in typical work conditions was carried out off-line with the software CFX-4.3, and then the expression of temperature profile varying with operating parameter was obtained. According to real-time operating parameters, the temperature at arbitrary point of the furnace can be calculated by using this expression. Thus the temperature profile can be shown on-line and monitoring for combustion state in the furnace is realized. The simul-ation model was checked by the parameters measured in an operating boiler, DG130-9.8/540. The maximum of relative error is less than 12% and the absolute error is less than 120 ℃, which shows that the proposed two-stage simulation method is reliable and able to satisfy the requirement of industrial application.

  2. Intercomparison of Ozone and Temperature Profiles During OZITOS+ 2014 Campaign in Río Gallegos, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Jacobo; Wolfram, Elian; Orte, Facundo; D'Elia, Raúl; Quiroga, Jonathan; Quel, Eduardo; Zamorano, Felix; Pérez, Raúl; Villa, Israel; Oyama, Hirofumi; Mizuno, Akira

    2016-06-01

    In the framework of SAVER-Net project, the OZone profIle aT Río GallegOS (OZITOS+) campaign was held in the city of Río Gallegos, Argentina (51.5 S; 69.1 W). This experiment was conducted on October 14 -18, 2014 and its main goal was to compare the ozone and temperature profiles using three different measurement techniques such as Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL), ozonesonde and Millimeter Wave Radiometer (MWR). Also other ground-based and satellite-based instruments were included in the experiment but in this work we only present preliminary results from ground-based instruments deployed in the site. The DIAL instrument is part of Network Data for Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) network, and the usual protocols of quality assurance imposed for the network involve regular validation/comparisons experiments. The lidar ozone profiles measured with the lidar are compared with ozone profiles obtained with independent techniques, usually with higher or same resolution as lidar. The experiment are made collocated spatial and temporally. For that reason the Chilean team joined to Japanese and Argentine team at Río Gallegos to develop the experiment. On October 2014, the Río Gallegos Observatory station was inside the polar vortex during first two weeks and after that polar vortex have moved far away from Río Gallegos during the 3rd week of October, when the intercomparison campaign was held. In this paper we are present a preliminary results of the campaign, computing the ozone and temperature profiles from DIAL with ozonesondes and MWR.

  3. Laboratory to pilot scale: Microwave extraction for polyphenols lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Périno, Sandrine; Pierson, Jean T; Ruiz, Karine; Cravotto, Giancarlo; Chemat, Farid

    2016-08-01

    Microwave hydrodiffusion and gravity (MHG) technique has been applied to pilot-scale solvent-free microwave extraction (SFME) of polyphenols from Lettuce sativa. Following the dictates of green extraction and with the aim to save time and energy, the lab-scale knowledge on SFME was exploited for the development of a pilot-scale process. The investigation entailed the optimization of all main parameters (temperature, time, extracted water volume, etc.) and we showed that the polyphenols composition profile under SFME was similar to the classic methods though a bit lower in total content. The energy consumption in the optimized procedure (30min) was 1W/g of fresh matrix.

  4. Coherent heat patterns revealed by unsupervised classification of Argo temperature profiles in the North Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maze, Guillaume; Mercier, Herlé; Fablet, Ronan; Tandeo, Pierre; Lopez Radcenco, Manuel; Lenca, Philippe; Feucher, Charlène; Le Goff, Clément

    2017-02-01

    A quantitative understanding of the integrated ocean heat content depends on our ability to determine how heat is distributed in the ocean and identify the associated coherent patterns. This study demonstrates how this can be achieved using unsupervised classification of Argo temperature profiles. The classification method used is a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) that decomposes the Probability Density Function of a dataset into a weighted sum of Gaussian modes. It is determined that the North Atlantic Argo dataset of temperature profiles contains 8 groups of vertically coherent heat patterns, or classes. Each of the temperature profile classes reveals unique and physically coherent heat distributions along the vertical axis. A key result of this study is that, when mapped in space, each of the 8 classes is found to define an oceanic region, even if no spatial information was used in the model determination. The classification result is independent of the location and time of the ARGO profiles. Two classes show cold anomalies throughout the water column with amplitude decreasing with depth. They are found to be localized in the subpolar gyre and along the poleward flank of the Gulf Stream and North Atlantic Current (NAC). One class has nearly zero anomalies and a large spread throughout the water column. It is found mostly along the NAC. One class has warm anomalies near the surface (50 m) and cold ones below 200 m. It is found in the tropical/equatorial region. The remaining four classes have warm anomalies throughout the water column, one without depth dependance (in the southeastern part of the subtropical gyre), the other three with clear maximums at different depths (100 m, 400 m and 1000 m). These are found along the southern flank of the North Equatorial Current, the western part of the subtropical gyre and over the West European Basin. These results are robust to both the seasonal variability and to method parameters such as the size of the analyzed domain.

  5. Data Fusion Between Microwave and Thermal Infrared Radiometer Data and Its Application to Skin Sea Surface Temperature, Wind Speed and Salinity Retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Arai

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Method for data fusion between Microwave Scanning Radiometer: MSR and Thermal Infrared Radiometer: TIR derived skin sea surface temperature: SSST, wind speed: WS and salinity is proposed. SSST can be estimated with MSR and TIR radiometer data. Although the contribution ocean depth to MSR and TIR radiometer data are different each other, SSST estimation can be refined through comparisons between MSR and TIR derived SSST. Also WS and salinity can be estimated with MSR data under the condition of the refined SSST. Simulation study results support the idea of the proposed data fusion method.

  6. Impact of Radio Frequency, Microwaving, and High Hydrostatic Pressure at Elevated Temperature on the Nutritional and Antinutritional Components in Black Soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yu; Wang, Zhuyi; Zhao, Yanyun

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the effects of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) at elevated temperature (60 °C) and 2 dielectric heating (DH) methods (radio frequency [RF], and microwaving [MW]) on the nutritional compositions and removal of antinutritional factors in black soybeans were studied. Each treatment caused phytic acid were all declined by the 3 treatments, and DH treatment was generally more efficient. The most abundant saponins was decreased >22% in DH treated samples. MW and HHP led to higher in vitro protein digestibility, RF and MW promoted protein aggregation from atomic force microscope topography, but HHP caused more damages on protein subunits as seen from SDS-PAGE image.

  7. Phase Transition and Microwave Dielectric Properties of Low-Temperature Sintered BiCu2VO6 Ceramic and its Chemical Compatibility with Silver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunchun; Xiang, Huaicheng; Fang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a low-firing microwave dielectric ceramic BiCu2VO6 with monoclinic structure was prepared through a solid state reaction method. Dense ceramic could be obtained when sintered at 740°C with a relative density about 96.7%. A diffusive phase transition was observed from the temperature dependence of the relative permittivity and loss tangent. The best sintered sample at 740°C exhibited the optimum microwave dielectric properties with a relative permittivity ~22.7, a quality factor ~11,960 GHz (at 11.0 GHz), and a temperature coefficient of resonant frequency of -17.2 ppm/°C. From the x-ray diffraction, backscattered electron imaging results of the cofired sample with 20 wt.% silver, the BiCu2VO6 ceramic was found not to react with Ag at 740°C. It might be promising for the low-temperature cofired ceramics and dielectric resonator applications.

  8. Microwave noise temperature and attenuation of clouds - Statistics of these effects at various sites in the United States, Alaska, and Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobin, S. D.

    1982-01-01

    The microwave attenuation and noise temperature effects of clouds can result in serious degradation of telecommunications link performance, especially for low-noise systems presently used in deep-space communications. Although cloud effects are generally less than rain effects, the frequent presence of clouds will cause some amount of link degradation a large portion of the time. This paper presents a general review of cloud types and their water particle densities, attenuation and noise temperature calculations, and basic link signal-to-noise ratio calculations. Tabular results of calculations for 12 different cloud models are presented for frequencies in the range 10-50 GHz. Curves of average-year attenuation and noise temperature statistics at frequencies ranging from 10 to 90 GHz, calculated from actual surface and radiosonde observations, are given for 15 climatologically distinct regions in the contiguous United States, Alaska, and Hawaii. Nonuniform sky cover is considered in these calculations.

  9. Evolution of temperature and moisture profiles of wood exposed to infrared radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erzsébet Cserta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article we studied the mechanism of wood drying using infrared (IR heat transfer. Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst. samples of 50 mm and 200 mm thickness were exposed to IR radiation, and the temperature and moisture profiles were recorded at the surface and at the core of the samples under controlled experimental conditions. It is proposed that the moisture transport in wood during drying is governed by osmotic effects. Based on such a hypothesis, the temperature stagnation was explained by a lower localized pressure at the core, which reduced the boiling point temperature of water. As moisture is drawn away due to osmosis from the central region, it cannot fill the empty lumens again; therefore, the pressure decreases locally. The evaporation of the internal moisture is brought about by a partial vacuum resulting in the disappearance of the liquid water.

  10. Temperature profile of ex-vivo organs during radio frequency thermal ablation by fiber Bragg gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Giovanna; Iadicicco, Agostino; Tosi, Daniele; Verze, Paolo; Carlomagno, Nicola; Tammaro, Vincenzo; Ippolito, Juliet; Campopiano, Stefania

    2016-11-01

    We report on the integration of fiber optic sensors with commercial medical instrumentation for temperature monitoring during radio frequency ablation for tumor treatment. A suitable configuration with five fiber Bragg grating sensors bonded to a bipolar radio frequency (RF) probe has been developed to monitor the area under treatment. A series of experiments were conducted on ex-vivo animal kidney and liver and the results confirm that we were able to make a multipoint measurement and to develop a real-time temperature profile of the area, with a temperature resolution of 0.1°C and a spatial resolution of 5 mm during a series of different and consecutive RF discharges.

  11. Detection and Classification of Ozone Laminae Using Vertical Profiles of Ozone and Potential Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giljum, A. T., III; Minschwaner, K. R.; Manney, G. L.; Petropavlovskikh, I. V.

    2016-12-01

    We quantify ozone variability in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) by analyzing lamination features in balloon measurements of ozone mixing ratio and potential temperature. Laminae are identified as sufficiently strong perturbations from basic state vertical profiles, which are derived on a case-by-case basis using smoothing methods applied within a vertical coordinate system relative to the WMO (temperature gradient) tropopause. The perturbations consistently show extensive lamination features in both ozone and potential temperature. We will describe methods that have been developed to minimize the contamination of lamina features by sharp changes in ozone and potential gradients near the tropopause. A laminae correlation technique is used to classify those particular features associated with gravity wave phenomena. We will present results of this analysis for the 25-year record of ozonesonde measurements from Boulder, Colorado, emphasizing the role of gravity waves on ozone variability in the UTLS region.

  12. Theory-based transport simulations of TFTR L-mode temperature profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateman, G.

    1991-10-24

    The temperature profiles from a selection of TFTR L-mode discharges are simulated with the 1-1/2-D BALDUR transport code using a combination of theoretically derived transport models, called the Multi-Mode Model. The present version of the Multi-Mode Model consists of effective thermal diffusivities resulting from trapped electron modes and ion temperature gradient ({eta}{sub i}) modes, which dominate in the core of the plasma, together with resistive ballooning modes, which dominate in the periphery. Within the context of this transport model and the TFTR simulations reported here, the scaling of confinement with heating power comes from the temperature dependence of the {eta}{sub i} and trapped electron modes, while the scaling with current comes mostly from resistive ballooning modes. 24 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. A Three-Dimensional Satellite Retrieval Method for Atmospheric Temperature and Moisture Profiles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lei; QIU Chongjian; HUANG Jianping

    2008-01-01

    A three-dimensional variational method iS proposed to simultaneously retrieve the 3-D atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles from satellite radiance measurements.To include both vertical structure and the horizontal patterns of the atmospheric temperature and moisture.an EOF technique iS used to decompose the temperature and moisture field in a 3-D space.A number of numerical simulations are conducted and they demonstrate that the 3-D method iS less sensitive to the observation errors compared to the 1-D method.When the observation error iS more than 2.0 K.to get the best results.the truncation number for the EOF'S expansion have to be restricted to 2 in the 1-D method.while it can be set as large as 40 in a 3-D method.This results in the truncation error being reduced and the retrieval accuracy being improved in the 3-D method.Compared to the 1-D method.the rlTLS errors of the 3-D method are reduced by 48%and 36%for the temperature and moisture retrievals,respectively.Using the real satellite measured brightness temperatures at 0557 UTC 31 July 2002,the temperature and moisture profiles are retrieved over a region(20°-45°N,100°-125°E)and compared with 37 collocated radiosonde observations.The results show that the retrieval accuracy with a 3-D method iS significantly higher than those with the 1-D method.

  14. Texture Profile Analysis of Sliced Cheese in relation to Chemical Composition and Storage Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanrong Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The quantitative relationships among chemical composition, storage temperature, and texture of cheese were not fully understood. In this study, the effects of composition and temperature on textural properties of eight common varieties of sliced cheese were examined. The textural properties of sliced cheeses, including firmness, cohesiveness, adhesiveness, springiness, chewiness, and resilience, were measured by texture profile analysis after storage at 4 and 25°C for 4 h. Multivariate logistic regression models were established to describe the quantitative relationships of textural properties (dependent variables to chemical composition and storage temperature (independent variables of sliced cheeses. Results showed that protein, fat, moisture, and sodium chloride contents as well as storage temperature significantly affected the texture of sliced cheeses (P<0.05. In particular, fat in the dry matter and moisture in the nonfat substances were negatively correlated with firmness of sliced cheeses (P<0.05. As storage temperature rose from 4 to 25°C, the average values of firmness, chewiness, and resilience substantially declined by 42%, 45%, and 17%, respectively (P<0.05. This study provided reference data for adjusting chemical composition and storage temperature of common cheese products to obtain favorable texture for Chinese consumers, which thereby facilitated the localization of cheese industry in Chinese market.

  15. CosmoTransitions: Computing cosmological phase transition temperatures and bubble profiles with multiple fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, Carroll L.

    2012-09-01

    I present a numerical package (CosmoTransitions) for analyzing finite-temperature cosmological phase transitions driven by single or multiple scalar fields. The package analyzes the different vacua of a theory to determine their critical temperatures (where the vacuum energy levels are degenerate), their supercooling temperatures, and the bubble wall profiles which separate the phases and describe their tunneling dynamics. I introduce a new method of path deformation to find the profiles of both thin- and thick-walled bubbles. CosmoTransitions is freely available for public use.Program summaryProgram Title: CosmoTransitionsCatalogue identifier: AEML_v1_0Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEML_v1_0.htmlProgram obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. IrelandLicensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.htmlNo. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 8775No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 621096Distribution format: tar.gzProgramming language: Python.Computer: Developed on a 2009 MacBook Pro. No computer-specific optimization was performed.Operating system: Designed and tested on Mac OS X 10.6.8. Compatible with any OS with Python installed.RAM: Approximately 50 MB, mostly for loading plotting packages.Classification: 1.9, 11.1.External routines: SciPy, NumPy, matplotLibNature of problem: I describe a program to analyze early-Universe finite-temperature phase transitions with multiple scalar fields. The goal is to analyze the phase structure of an input theory, determine the amount of supercooling at each phase transition, and find the bubble-wall profiles of the nucleated bubbles that drive the transitions.Solution method: To find the bubble-wall profile, the program assumes that tunneling happens along a fixed path in field space. This reduces the equations of motion to one dimension, which can then be solved using the overshoot

  16. Determination of stratospheric temperature and density by GOMOS: Verification with respect to high latitude LIDAR profiles from Thule, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Sarra, A.; Iannone, R. Q.; Casadio, S.; Di Biagio, C.; Pace, G.; Cacciani, M.; Muscari, G.; Dehn, A.; Bojkov, B.

    2017-02-01

    High resolution temperature profiles (HRTP) have been derived from measurements performed by Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars (GOMOS) onboard ENVISAT. HRTP are derived from measurements with two fast photometers whose signal is sampled at 1 kHz, and allows investigating the role of irregularities in the density and temperature profiles, such as those associated with gravity waves. In this study high resolution temperature and density profiles measured at high latitude by GOMOS are compared with observations made with the ground-based aerosol/temperature LIDAR at Thule, Greenland. The LIDAR at Thule contributes to the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change. The LIDAR profiles are analyzed in the height interval overlapping with GOMOS data (22-35 km), and the density and temperature profiles are obtained with 250 m vertical resolution. The comparison is focused on data collected during the 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 Arctic winters. Profiles measured within 6 hours and 500 km are selected. The profiles are classified based on spatial and temporal variability of dynamical indicators over Thule and at the GOMOS tangent height position. Several corresponding features can be identified in the GOMOS and LIDAR profiles, suggesting that the GOMOS HRTP could be used to investigate the global distribution of small scale fluctuations. As an example, two cases corresponding to inner and outer vortex conditions during the 2008-2009 winter are discussed, also in relation with the very intense sudden stratospheric warming occurred in this season.

  17. Microwave Photonics

    OpenAIRE

    Seeds, A.J.; Liu, C. P.; T. Ismail; Fice, M. J.; Pozzi, F; Steed, R. J.; Rouvalis, E.; Renaud, C.C.

    2010-01-01

    Microwave photonics is the use of photonic techniques for the generation, transmission, processing and reception of signals having spectral components at microwave frequencies. This tutorial reviews the technologies used and gives applications examples.

  18. Iterative noise removal from temperature and density profiles in the TJ-II Thomson scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, G., E-mail: gonzalo.farias@ucv.cl [Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Av. Brasil 2147, Valparaíso (Chile); Dormido-Canto, S., E-mail: sebas@dia.uned.es [Departamento de Informática y Automática, UNED, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Vega, J., E-mail: jesus.vega@ciemat.es [Asociación EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusión, Avd. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Santos, M., E-mail: msantos@ucm.es [Departamento de Arquitectura de Computadores y Automática, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pastor, I., E-mail: ignacio.pastor@ciemat.es [Asociación EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusión, Avd. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Fingerhuth, S., E-mail: sebastian.fingerhuth@ucv.cl [Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Av. Brasil 2147, Valparaíso (Chile); Ascencio, J., E-mail: j_ascencio21@hotmail.com [Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Av. Brasil 2147, Valparaíso (Chile)

    2014-05-15

    TJ-II Thomson Scattering diagnostic provides temperature and density profiles of plasma. The CCD camera acquires images that are corrupted with some kind of noise called stray-light. This noise degrades both image contrast and measurement accuracy, which could produce unreliable profiles of the diagnostic. So far, several approaches have been applied in order to decrease the noise in the TJ-II Thomson scattering images. Since the presence of the noise is not global but located in some particular regions of the image, advanced processing techniques are needed. However such methods require of manual fine-tuning of parameters to reach a good performance. In this contribution, an iterative image processing approach is applied in order to reduce the stray light effects in the images of the TJ-II Thomson scattering diagnostic. The proposed solution describes how the noise can be iteratively reduced in the images when a key parameter is automatically adjusted during the iterative process.

  19. The New Weather Radar for America's Space Program in Florida: A Temperature Profile Adaptive Scan Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, L. D.; Petersen, W. A.; Deierling, W.; Roeder, W. P.

    2009-01-01

    A new weather radar is being acquired for use in support of America s space program at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, NASA Kennedy Space Center, and Patrick AFB on the east coast of central Florida. This new radar replaces the modified WSR-74C at Patrick AFB that has been in use since 1984. The new radar is a Radtec TDR 43-250, which has Doppler and dual polarization capability. A new fixed scan strategy was designed to best support the space program. The fixed scan strategy represents a complex compromise between many competing factors and relies on climatological heights of various temperatures that are important for improved lightning forecasting and evaluation of Lightning Launch Commit Criteria (LCC), which are the weather rules to avoid lightning strikes to in-flight rockets. The 0 C to -20 C layer is vital since most generation of electric charge occurs within it and so it is critical in evaluating Lightning LCC and in forecasting lightning. These are two of the most important duties of 45 WS. While the fixed scan strategy that covers most of the climatological variation of the 0 C to -20 C levels with high resolution ensures that these critical temperatures are well covered most of the time, it also means that on any particular day the radar is spending precious time scanning at angles covering less important heights. The goal of this project is to develop a user-friendly, Interactive Data Language (IDL) computer program that will automatically generate optimized radar scan strategies that adapt to user input of the temperature profile and other important parameters. By using only the required scan angles output by the temperature profile adaptive scan strategy program, faster update times for volume scans and/or collection of more samples per gate for better data quality is possible, while maintaining high resolution at the critical temperature levels. The temperature profile adaptive technique will also take into account earth curvature and refraction

  20. Estimating Liquid Fluxes in Thermally Perturbed Fractured Rock Using Measured Temperature Profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.T. Birkholzer

    2005-02-14

    A new temperature-profile method was recently developed for analyzing perturbed flow conditions in superheated porous media. The method uses high-resolution temperature data to estimate the magnitude of the heat-driven liquid and gas fluxes that form as a result of boiling, condensation, and recirculation of pore water. In this paper, we evaluate the applicability of this new method to the more complex flow behavior in fractured formations with porous rock matrix. In such formations, with their intrinsic heterogeneity, the porous but low-permeable matrix provides most of the mass and heat storage capacity, and dominates conductive heat transfer, Fractures, on the other hand, offer highly effective conduits for gas and liquid flow, thereby generating significant convective heat transfer. After establishing the accuracy of the temperature-profile method for fractured porous formations, we apply the method in analyzing the perturbed flow conditions in a large-scale underground heater test conducted in unsaturated fractured porous tuff. The flux estimates for this test indicate a significant reflux of water near the heat source, on the order of a few hundred millimeter per year-much larger than the ambient percolation flux of only a few millimeter per year.

  1. Asymptotic solutions of glass temperature profiles during steady optical fibre drawing

    KAUST Repository

    Taroni, M.

    2013-03-12

    In this paper we derive realistic simplified models for the high-speed drawing of glass optical fibres via the downdraw method that capture the fluid dynamics and heat transport in the fibre via conduction, convection and radiative heating. We exploit the small aspect ratio of the fibre and the relative orders of magnitude of the dimensionless parameters that characterize the heat transfer to reduce the problem to one- or two-dimensional systems via asymptotic analysis. The resulting equations may be readily solved numerically and in many cases admit exact analytic solutions. The systematic asymptotic breakdown presented is used to elucidate the relative importance of furnace temperature profile, convection, surface radiation and conduction in each portion of the furnace and the role of each in controlling the glass temperature. The models derived predict many of the qualitative features observed in real industrial processes, such as the glass temperature profile within the furnace and the sharp transition in fibre thickness. The models thus offer a desirable route to quick scenario testing, providing valuable practical information about the dependencies of the solution on the parameters and the dominant heat-transport mechanism. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  2. A small temperature rise may contribute towards the apparent induction by microwaves of heat-shock gene expression in the nematode Caenorhabditis Elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawe, Adam S; Smith, Brette; Thomas, David W P; Greedy, Steve; Vasic, Nebojsa; Gregory, Andrew; Loader, Benjamin; de Pomerai, David I

    2006-02-01

    We have previously reported that low intensity microwave exposure (0.75-1.0 GHz CW at 0.5 W; SAR 4-40 mW/kg) can induce an apparently non-thermal heat-shock response in Caenorhabditis elegans worms carrying hsp16-1::reporter genes. Using matched copper TEM cells for both sham and exposed groups, we can detect only modest reporter induction in the latter exposed group (15-20% after 2.5 h at 26 degrees C, rising to approximately 50% after 20 h). Traceable calibration of our copper TEM cell by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) reveals significant power loss within the cell (8.5% at 1.0 GHz), accompanied by slight heating of exposed samples (approximately 0.3 degrees C at 1.0 W). Thus, exposed samples are in fact slightly warmer (by microwaves (1.0 GHz and 0.5 W) in the silver-plated cell also show no detectable induction of reporter expression relative to sham controls in the copper cell. Thus, the 20% "microwave induction" observed using two copper cells may be caused by a small temperature difference between sham and exposed conditions. In worms incubated for 2.5 h at 26.0, 26.2, and 27.0 degrees C with no microwave field, there is a consistent and significant increase in reporter expression between 26.0 and 26.2 degrees C (by approximately 20% in each of the six independent runs), but paradoxically expression levels at 27.0 degrees C are similar to those seen at 26.0 degrees C. This surprising result is in line with other evidence pointing towards complex regulation of hsp16-1 gene expression across the sub-heat-shock range of 25-27.5 degrees C in C. elegans. We conclude that our original interpretation of a non-thermal effect of microwaves cannot be sustained; at least part of the explanation appears to be thermal.

  3. Novel low temperature sintered Li4Ti5O12 microwave dielectric ceramics with MoO2 addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng; Zhang, Huaiwu; Su, Hua; Jin, Lichuan; Li, Jie; Liao, Yulong; Jia, Lijun; Li, Yuanxun

    2016-08-01

    Li4Ti5O12 ceramics with different amount of MoO2 addition were densified at 850∘C via a solid-state reaction route. Pure phases and dense crystal morphology were obtained. Our experimental results indicated that the τf value of the Li4Ti5O12 ceramic can be adjusted to near zero via adopting suitable amount of MoO2 addition. Among all the modified Li4Ti5O12 specimens, the sample with 4 wt.% of MoO2 addition (marked as LM4 in this paper) possessed good microwave dielectric properties: 𝜀r = 20.76, Q × f = 18308 GHz (7.99 GHz), τf = (+)2.96 ppm/∘C. It is suggested that the MoO2 modified Li4Ti5O12 ceramics are suitable candidates for LTCC applications in microwave devices.

  4. Inverse Estimation of Temperature Profiles in Landfills Using Heat Recovery Fluids Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Solisio

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to leachate and gas emission analysis, temperature variations in municipal solid waste landfills are routinely monitored for safety and health reasons, such as the increased production of biogas or the danger of spontaneous combustion phenomena if the temperature exceeds 70–75°C. The increasing constraints on greenhouse gas emissions and the convenience of fuel and heat recovery have helped develop a global approach to landfills' operation and maintenance, generally referred to as bioreactor landfill management. The heat recovery piping we are presently designing can be a significant part of this approach. The heat gained by a fluid circulated in a closed network through the landfill is transferred to an external heat exchanger or used directly as warm water. Additionally, it can help reduce landfill temperature levels and control biogas generation. Since the pipes diameter is large enough to allow for a radial temperature gradient, this information can be used for an inverse estimation of the temperature profile in the landfill which constitutes the boundary conditions of the resulting heat transfer problem. In this paper, we describe an algorithm for regularising the resulting ill-posed free boundary estimation problem using sampled data of the heat recovery fluid on exiting the landfill.

  5. Using a Support Vector Machine and a Land Surface Model to Estimate Large-Scale Passive Microwave Temperatures over Snow-Covered Land in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Barton A.; Reichle, Rolf Helmut

    2014-01-01

    A support vector machine (SVM), a machine learning technique developed from statistical learning theory, is employed for the purpose of estimating passive microwave (PMW) brightness temperatures over snow-covered land in North America as observed by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) satellite sensor. The capability of the trained SVM is compared relative to the artificial neural network (ANN) estimates originally presented in [14]. The results suggest the SVM outperforms the ANN at 10.65 GHz, 18.7 GHz, and 36.5 GHz for both vertically and horizontally-polarized PMW radiation. When compared against daily AMSR-E measurements not used during the training procedure and subsequently averaged across the North American domain over the 9-year study period, the root mean squared error in the SVM output is 8 K or less while the anomaly correlation coefficient is 0.7 or greater. When compared relative to the results from the ANN at any of the six frequency and polarization combinations tested, the root mean squared error was reduced by more than 18 percent while the anomaly correlation coefficient was increased by more than 52 percent. Further, the temporal and spatial variability in the modeled brightness temperatures via the SVM more closely agrees with that found in the original AMSR-E measurements. These findings suggest the SVM is a superior alternative to the ANN for eventual use as a measurement operator within a data assimilation framework.

  6. Temperature-dependent electrical and photo-sensing properties of horizontally-oriented carbon nanotube networks synthesized by sandwich-growth microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, I-Ju [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Hui-Lin [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto M5S 3G4 (Canada); Jian, Sheng-Rui, E-mail: srjian@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung 84041, Taiwan (China); Wang, Li-Chun; Chen, Kai-Ling [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Cheng-Tzu, E-mail: kurt.kuotw@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Pan, Fu-Ming [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Wang, Wei-Hsiang [Teraxtal Technology Corporation, Hsinchu 30075, Taiwan (China); Juang, Jenh-Yih [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China)

    2013-02-01

    The electrical and photo-sensing properties of horizontally-oriented interconnected carbon nanotube networks (CNT-NWs) prepared by means of a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition sandwich-growth process are investigated. The temperature-dependent dark and illuminated current–voltage and transfer characteristics of CNT-NW-assisted devices are measured. Results show that the current–voltage characteristics of the devices exhibit nonlinear behavior, and the current can be further modulated by a gate voltage, revealing p-type semiconducting behavior with a device mobility of ∼ 14.5 cm{sup 2}/V·s and an on-off current ratio of ∼ 10{sup 3}. Moreover, when the CNT-NW-assisted devices are irradiated with 1.25–25 μm infrared (IR) from 300 to 11 K, the photo currents increase approximately 1.1- to 2.7-fold compared to the dark currents at ± 2 V bias voltage. Such results demonstrate that the presented CNT-NWs have high potential for IR photo-sensor applications. - Highlights: ► Horizontally-oriented interconnected carbon nanotube networks (CNT-NWs) were grown. ► A microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition sandwich-growth process was employed. ► Temperature-dependent electrical and photo-sensing properties were investigated. ► Devices based on CNT-NWs exhibit promising transistor characteristics. ► CNT-NWs are capable to detect light in the infrared wavelength range.

  7. Ozone profiles obtained by DIAL technique at Maïdo Observatory in La Reunion Island: comparisons with ECC ozone-sondes, ground-based FTIR spectrometer and microwave radiometer measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Portafaix T.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A DIAL lidar system performing stratospheric ozone profile measurements from 15 to 45 km is installed at Reunion Island (southwest of Indian Ocean. The purpose of this communication is to present this DIAL system mounted now at the new Maïdo Observatory since February 2013, and the ozone profile retrieval. The first stratospheric ozone profiles obtained during 2013 and 2014 will be presented and discussed. Inter-comparison and differences observed with other high vertical resolution ozone profiles performed by ECC ozonesonde will be shown. Finally, comparisons with low vertical resolution ozone profiles retrieved from microwave and FTIR remote sensing measurements performed at Maïdo will be carried out, making appropriate use of the associated averaging kernels

  8. Ozone profiles obtained by DIAL technique at Maïdo Observatory in La Reunion Island: comparisons with ECC ozone-sondes, ground-based FTIR spectrometer and microwave radiometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portafaix, T.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Payen, G.; de Mazière, M.; Langerock, B.; Fernandez, S.; Posny, F.; Cammas, J. P.; Metzger, J. M.; Bencherif, H.; Vigouroux, C.; Marquestaut, N.

    2016-06-01

    A DIAL lidar system performing stratospheric ozone profile measurements from 15 to 45 km is installed at Reunion Island (southwest of Indian Ocean). The purpose of this communication is to present this DIAL system mounted now at the new Maïdo Observatory since February 2013, and the ozone profile retrieval. The first stratospheric ozone profiles obtained during 2013 and 2014 will be presented and discussed. Inter-comparison and differences observed with other high vertical resolution ozone profiles performed by ECC ozonesonde will be shown. Finally, comparisons with low vertical resolution ozone profiles retrieved from microwave and FTIR remote sensing measurements performed at Maïdo will be carried out, making appropriate use of the associated averaging kernels

  9. Microwave remote sensing: Active and passive. Volume 3 - From theory to applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Moore, R. K.; Fung, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Aspects of volume scattering and emission theory are discussed, taking into account a weakly scattering medium, the Born approximation, first-order renormalization, the radiative transfer method, and the matrix-doubling method. Other topics explored are related to scatterometers and probing systems, the passive microwave sensing of the atmosphere, the passive microwave sensing of the ocean, the passive microwave sensing of land, the active microwave sensing of land, and radar remote sensing applications. Attention is given to inversion techniques, atmospheric attenuation and emission, a temperature profile retrieval from ground-based observations, mapping rainfall rates, the apparent temperature of the sea, the emission behavior of bare soil surfaces, the emission behavior of vegetation canopies, the emission behavior of snow, wind-vector radar scatterometry, radar measurements of sea ice, and the back-scattering behavior of cultural vegetation canopies.

  10. Modeling the microbial growth and temperature profile in a fixed-bed bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silveira, Christian L; Mazutti, Marcio A; Salau, Nina P G

    2014-10-01

    Aiming to scale up and apply control and optimization strategies, currently is required the development of accurate plant models to forecast the process nonlinear dynamics. In this work, a mathematical model to predict the growth of the Kluyveromyces marxianus and temperature profile in a fixed-bed bioreactor for solid-state fermentation using sugarcane bagasse as substrate was built up. A parameter estimation technique was performed to fit the mathematical model to the experimental data. The estimated parameters and the model fitness were evaluated with statistical analyses. The results have shown the estimated parameters significance, with 95 % confidence intervals, and the good quality of process model to reproduce the experimental data.

  11. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity and other measurements collected using bottle in the Arctic in 1934 (NODC Accession 0001244)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and meteorological data were collected using bottle casts in the Barents Sea, Kara Sea, Laptev Sea, White Sea, and Arctic Ocean. Data were...

  12. Oceanographic profile temperature and salinity measurements collected using bottle from the UGLOMER in the Arctic in 1961 (NCEI Accession 0001128)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and meteorological data were collected using bottle casts from the UGLOMER in the Barents Sea, Kara Sea, Laptev Sea, and White Sea. Data were...

  13. NODC Standard Product: Experimental Compact Disk NODC-01 Pacific Ocean Temperature-Salinity Profiles (1900-1988) (NODC Accession 0086259)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) created a compact disk containing over 1.3 million temperature-depth and salinity-depth profiles taken in the Pacific...

  14. Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) profile data in the National Park of American Samoa, Tutuila, American Samoa, 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Spatial surveys of water column physical properties were acquired with a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) profiler for four days in February 2015 and one day in...

  15. Oceanographic profile temperature and salinity measurements collected using bottle from the LITKE in the Arctic in 1948 (NODC Accession 0001088)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity and other profile data digitized at NODC on 05/02/03, received by Igor Smolyar from Matishov, G., A. Zuyev, V. Golubev, N. Adrov, S. Timofeev,...

  16. Oceanographic profile temperature and salinity measurements collected using bottle from the Zarnitsa in the Barents Sea (NODC Accession 0002235)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity profile data from the SCIENTIFIC ICHTIOLOGICAL INSTITUTE OF LENINGRAD (RUSSIA), digitized from "Bulletin of the Institute of Ichthyology,...

  17. Temperature profile data from XBT casts by SEAS program participating vessels, November 2001 - January 2002 (NODC Accession 0000661)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the OLEANDER and other platforms from a world-wide distribution from 22 November 2001 to 23 January 2002....

  18. Further Developments in Microwave Ablation of Prostate Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, G. Dickey; Ngo, Phong

    2005-01-01

    A report presents additional information about the subject matter of Microwave Treatment of Prostate Cancer and Hyperplasia (MSC-23049), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 6 (June 2005), page 62. To recapitulate: the basic idea is to use microwaves to heat and thereby kill small volumes of unhealthy prostate tissue. The prostate is irradiated with microwaves from one or more antennas positioned near the prostate by means of catheters inserted in the urethra and/or colon. The microwave frequency, power, and exposure time, phasing, positions, and orientations of the antennas may be chosen to obtain the desired temperature rise in the heated region and to ensure that the location and extent of the heated region coincides with the region to be treated to within a few millimeters. Going beyond the description in the cited previous article, the report includes a diagram that illustrates typical placement of urethra and colon antenna catheters and presents results of computationally simulated prostate-heating profiles for several different combinations of antenna arrangements, frequencies, and delivered- energy levels as well as experimental results within phantom materials. The advantage of the two-antenna technology is that the heat generated at each antenna is significantly reduced from that associated with only one antenna. The microwave energy radiated from each antenna is focused at the tumor center by adjusting the phasing of the irradiated microwave signal from the antennas.

  19. First middle-atmospheric zonal wind profile measurements with a new ground-based microwave Doppler-spectro-radiometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rüfenacht

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We report on the wind radiometer WIRA, a new ground-based microwave Doppler-spectro-radiometer specifically designed for the measurement of middle-atmospheric horizontal wind by observing ozone emission spectra at 142.17504 GHz. Currently, wind speeds in five levels between 30 and 79 km can be retrieved which makes WIRA the first instrument able to continuously measure horizontal wind in this altitude range. For an integration time of one day the measurement error on each level lies at around 25 m s−1. With a planned upgrade this value is expected to be reduced by a factor of 2 in the near future. On the altitude levels where our measurement can be compared to wind data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF very good agreement in the long-term statistics as well as in short time structures with a duration of a few days has been found.

    WIRA uses a passive double sideband heterodyne receiver together with a digital Fourier transform spectrometer for the data acquisition. A big advantage of the radiometric approach is that such instruments can also operate under adverse weather conditions and thus provide a continuous time series for the given location. The optics enables the instrument to scan a wide range of azimuth angles including the directions east, west, north, and south for zonal and meridional wind measurements. The design of the radiometer is fairly compact and its calibration does not rely on liquid nitrogen which makes it transportable and suitable for campaign use. WIRA is conceived in a way that it can be operated remotely and does hardly require any maintenance.

    In the present paper, a description of the instrument is given, and the techniques used for the wind retrieval based on the determination of the Doppler shift of the measured atmospheric ozone emission spectra are outlined. Their reliability was tested using Monte Carlo simulations. Finally, a time series of 11

  20. Force-free collisionless current sheet models with non-uniform temperature and density profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, F.; Neukirch, T.; Allanson, O.

    2017-09-01

    We present a class of one-dimensional, strictly neutral, Vlasov-Maxwell equilibrium distribution functions for force-free current sheets, with magnetic fields defined in terms of Jacobian elliptic functions, extending the results of Abraham-Shrauner [Phys. Plasmas 20, 102117 (2013)] to allow for non-uniform density and temperature profiles. To achieve this, we use an approach previously applied to the force-free Harris sheet by Kolotkov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 112902 (2015)]. In one limit of the parameters, we recover the model of Kolotkov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 112902 (2015)], while another limit gives a linear force-free field. We discuss conditions on the parameters such that the distribution functions are always positive and give expressions for the pressure, density, temperature, and bulk-flow velocities of the equilibrium, discussing the differences from previous models. We also present some illustrative plots of the distribution function in velocity space.

  1. Preliminary study of the offshore wind and temperature profiles at the North of the Yucatan Peninsula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soler-Bientz, Rolando, E-mail: sbientz@msn.com [CREST, Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Loughborough University (United Kingdom); Energy Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, Autonomous University of Yucatan (Mexico); Watson, Simon [CREST, Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Loughborough University (United Kingdom); Infield, David [Institute of Energy and Environment, University of Strathclyde (United Kingdom); Ricalde-Cab, Lifter [Energy Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, Autonomous University of Yucatan (Mexico)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} This is the first study that reports the properties of the vertical wind resources for the offshore conditions of the North coast of the Yucatan Peninsula. {yields} A significant and detailed analysis of the thermal patterns has revealed a complex structure of the atmospheric boundary layer close to the shore. {yields} The structure of the diurnal wind patterns was assessed to produce an important reference for the wind resource availability in the study region. {yields} It was identified that the sea breeze blows in directions almost parallel to the shoreline of the North of the Yucatan Peninsula during the majority of the 24 h cycle. {yields} The analysis of the offshore data revealed a persistent non-uniform surface boundary layer developed as result of the advection of a warn air over a cold sea. - Abstract: The stability conditions in the atmospheric boundary layer, the intensity of the wind speeds and consequently the energy potential available in offshore conditions are highly influenced by the distance from the coastline and the differences between the air and sea temperatures. This paper presents a preliminary research undertook to study the offshore wind and temperature vertical profiles at the North-West of the Yucatan Peninsula coast. Ten minute averages were recorded over approximately 2 years from sensors installed at two different heights on a communication tower located at 6.65 km from the coastline. The results have shown that the offshore wind is thermally driven by differential heating of land and sea producing breeze patterns which veer to blow parallel to the coast under the action of the Coriolis force. To investigate further, a dataset of hourly sea surface temperatures derived from GEOS Satellite thermal maps was combined with the onsite measured data to study its effect on the vertical temperature profile. The results suggested largely unstable conditions and the potentially development of a shallow Stable Internal

  2. Real-time measurements of temperature, pressure and moisture profiles in High-Performance Concrete exposed to high temperatures during neutron radiography imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toropovs, N., E-mail: nikolajs.toropovs@rtu.lv [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Dübendorf (Switzerland); Riga Technical University, Institute of Materials and Structures, Riga (Latvia); Lo Monte, F. [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Milan (Italy); Wyrzykowski, M. [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Dübendorf (Switzerland); Lodz University of Technology, Department of Building Physics and Building Materials, Lodz (Poland); Weber, B. [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Dübendorf (Switzerland); Sahmenko, G. [Riga Technical University, Institute of Materials and Structures, Riga (Latvia); Vontobel, P. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory for Neutron Scattering and Imaging, Villigen (Switzerland); Felicetti, R. [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Milan (Italy); Lura, P. [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Dübendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Institute for Building Materials (IfB), Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-02-15

    High-Performance Concrete (HPC) is particularly prone to explosive spalling when exposed to high temperature. Although the exact causes that lead to spalling are still being debated, moisture transport during heating plays an important role in all proposed mechanisms. In this study, slabs made of high-performance, low water-to-binder ratio mortars with addition of superabsorbent polymers (SAP) and polypropylene fibers (PP) were heated from one side on a temperature-controlled plate up to 550 °C. A combination of measurements was performed simultaneously on the same sample: moisture profiles via neutron radiography, temperature profiles with embedded thermocouples and pore pressure evolution with embedded pressure sensors. Spalling occurred in the sample with SAP, where sharp profiles of moisture and temperature were observed. No spalling occurred when PP-fibers were introduced in addition to SAP. The experimental procedure described here is essential for developing and verifying numerical models and studying measures against fire spalling risk in HPC.

  3. Speckle measurements of density and temperature profiles in a model gas circuit breaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, P. C.; Panousis, E.; Carstensen, J.; Doiron, C. B.; Färber, R.

    2015-01-01

    Speckle imaging was used to measure the density and temperature distribution in the arc zone of a model high voltage circuit breaker during the high current phase and under conditions simulating those present during current-zero crossings (current-zero-like arc); the arc was stabilized by a transonic, axial flow of synthetic air. A single probe beam was used; thus, accurate reconstruction was only possible for axially symmetric gas flows and arc channels. The displacement of speckles with respect to a reference image was converted to a line-of-sight integrated deflection angle, which was in turn converted into an axially symmetric refractive index distribution using a multistep process that made use of the inverse Radon transform. The Gladstone-Dale relation, which gives the index of refraction as a function of density, was extended to high temperatures by taking into account dissociation and ionization processes. The temperature and density were determined uniquely by assuming that the pressure distribution in the case of cold gas flow (in the absence of an arc) is not modified significantly by the arc. The electric conductivity distribution was calculated from the temperature profile and compared to measurements of the arc voltage and to previous results published in the literature for similar experimental conditions.

  4. Diagnosing shock temperature with NH$_3$ and H$_2$O profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez-Ruiz, A I; Viti, S; Jiménez-Serra, I; Navarra, G; Bachiller, R; Caselli, P; Fuente, A; Gusdorf, A; Lefloch, B; Lorenzani, A; Nisini, B

    2016-01-01

    In a previous study of the L1157 B1 shocked cavity, a comparison between NH$_3$(1$_0$-$0_0$) and H$_2$O(1$_{\\rm 10}$--1$_{\\rm 01}$) transitions showed a striking difference in the profiles, with H$_2$O emitting at definitely higher velocities. This behaviour was explained as a result of the high-temperature gas-phase chemistry occurring in the postshock gas in the B1 cavity of this outflow. If the differences in behaviour between ammonia and water are indeed a consequence of the high gas temperatures reached during the passage of a shock, then one should find such differences to be ubiquitous among chemically rich outflows. In order to determine whether the difference in profiles observed between NH$_3$ and H$_2$O is unique to L1157 or a common characteristic of chemically rich outflows, we have performed Herschel-HIFI observations of the NH$_3$(1$_0$-0$_0$) line at 572.5 GHz in a sample of 8 bright low-mass outflow spots already observed in the H$_2$O(1$_{\\rm 10}$--1$_{\\rm 01}$) line within the WISH KP. We d...

  5. Expression profiling the temperature-dependent amphibian response to infection by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Ribas

    Full Text Available Amphibians are experiencing a panzootic of unprecedented proportions caused by the emergence of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd. However, all species are not equally at risk of infection, and risk is further modified by environmental variables, specifically temperature. In order to understand how, and when, hosts mount a response to Bd we analysed infection dynamics and patterns of gene expression in the model amphibian species Silurana (Xenopus tropicalis. Mathematical modelling of infection dynamics demonstrate the existence of a temperature-dependent protective response that is largely independent of the intrinsic growth-rate of Bd. Using temporal expression-profiling by microarrays and qRT-PCR, we characterise this response in the main amphibian lymphoid tissue, the spleen. We demonstrate that clearance of Bd at the host-optimal temperature is not clearly associated with an adaptive immune response, but rather is correlated with the induction of components of host innate immunity including the expression of genes that are associated with the production of the antimicrobial skin peptide preprocareulein (PPCP as well as inflammatory responses. We find that adaptive immunity appears to be lacking at host-optimal temperatures. This suggests that either Bd does not stimulate, or suppresses, adaptive immunity, or that trade-offs exist between innate and adaptive limbs of the amphibian immune system. At cold temperatures, S. tropicalis loses the ability to mount a PPCP-based innate response, and instead manifests a more pronounced inflammatory reaction that is characterised by the production of proteases and higher pathogen burdens. This study demonstrates the temperature-dependency of the amphibian response to infection by Bd and indicates the influence that changing climates may exert on the ectothermic host response to pathogens.

  6. Design and Evaluation of a Medical Microwave Radiometer for Observing Temperature Gradients Subcutaneously in the Human Body

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Papers 1,3,4 and 5 of this thesis are not available in Munin: 1. Ø. Klemetsen, Y. Birkelund, and S. K. Jacobsen: 'Design of medical radiometer front-end for improved performance', Progress In Electromagnetics Research B (2011) Vol. 27, 289–306. Available at http://www.jpier.org/PIERB/pier.php?paper=10101204 3. Øystein Klemetsen and Svein Jacobsen: 'Improved Radiometric Performance Attained by an Elliptical Microwave Antenna With Suction', IEEE transactions on biomedical engineering (2012)59(1...

  7. Microwave pre-heating of natural rubber using a rectangular wave guide (MODE: TE10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doo-ngam, N.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an application of microwave radiation for pre-heating of natural rubbercompounding with various sulphur contents. The natural rubber-compounding was pre-heated by microwave radiation using a rectangular wave guide system (MODE: TE10 operating at frequency of 2.45 GHz in which the power can vary from 0 to 1500 W. In the present work, the influence of power input, sample thickness, and sulphur content were examined after applying microwave radiation to the rubber samples. Results are discussed regarding the thermal properties, 3-D network, dielectric properties and chemical structures. From the result, firstly, it was found that microwave radiation can be applied to pre-heating natural rubber-compounding before the vulcanization process. Secondly, microwave radiation was very useful for pre-heating natural rubber-compounding that has a thickness greater than 5mm. Thirdly, crosslinking in natural rubber-compounding may occurs after pre-heating by microwave radiation though Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy(FTIR. Finally, there a little effect of sulphur content on temperature profiles after applying microwave radiation to the natural rubber-compounding. Moreover, natural rubber-compounding without carbon black showed a lower heat absorption compared with natural rubbercompounding filled carbon black. This is due to the difference in dielectric loss factor. This preliminary result will be useful information in terms of microwave radiation for pre-heating natural rubber-compounding and rubber processing in industry.

  8. On the meaning of peak temperature profiles in inverted metamorphic sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duprat-Oualid, Sylvia; Yamato, Philippe

    2017-07-01

    Inverted metamorphic sequences (IMS) are common features of main thrust systems on Earth. They exhibit an upwards continuous increase in peak temperature conditions and thereby constitute evidence of the close relationship between the thermal field evolution and tectonic processes. Heat advection and shear heating are known to allow the formation of such metamorphic signatures. Heat diffusion also plays an important role in temperature distribution on both sides of the thrust. Other advection processes such as erosion or accretion may also cause a local peak temperature inversion. Each one of these processes therefore affects the thermal field around the thrust. However, despite the crucial importance of all these processes for the interpretation of the inverted peak temperature signatures, their respective influences have never been quantified and compared all together. To address this issue, we propose an innovative coupled approach. (i) We use two-dimensional numerical models that simulate various thrust systems, allowing for a wide diversity of setups. To illustrate this study, we focus on intracontinental thrust systems for which all processes listed are likely to play a key role in the thermal evolution. We perform a parametric study including kinematic settings (i.e. convergence, erosion and accretion), thermal properties, mechanical strength and heat sources. (ii) Dimensionless numbers based on parameters are used to quantify the relative contributions of each process to the thermal budget evolution. Hence, the three thermal processes (i.e. heat diffusion, heat advection and shear heating) are compared with each other via three dimensionless combinations of the Peclet and Brinkman numbers: RDif, RAdv and RPro, respectively. Erosion and accretion are compared separately, based on a fourth dimensionless number Rea. (iii) We analytically examine the inverted peak temperature recorded along profiles that are perpendicular to the thrust zone defined in our

  9. Low-Temperature Sintering and Microwave Dielectric Properties of Zn2SiO4 Ceramic Added with Crystalline Zinc Borate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaware, Varsha; Deshmukh, Ravindra; Sarode, Chetan; Gokhale, Suresh; Phatak, Girish

    2015-07-01

    The physical and dielectric properties of composites of known microwave materials, Zn2SiO4 and Zn3B2O6, prepared by solid-state reaction, were investigated with the purpose of developing a low-loss dielectric material for low-temperature co-fired ceramic applications. An off-stoichiometric phase of Zn2SiO4 with extra SiO2 was used to avoid the occurrence of unreacted ZnO. During sintering, zinc borate was found to partially react with residual SiO2 to form Zn2SiO4. The residual zinc borate was converted to a boron-rich glassy phase which helped to reduce the sintering temperature of the composite. Good relative sintering density (>90%) at temperatures below the melting temperature of zinc borate is indicative of a sintering mechanism of diffusion-based mass transfer. Composites containing 15 wt.% zinc borate, 2.5 wt.% lithium carbonate and 20 wt.% zinc borate in zinc silicate had dielectric constants of 6.8 and 6.1, quality factors (Q×f) of 48,800 and 94,300 GHz when sintered at 900°C and 950°C, respectively. These quality factor results are close to the best values reported for zinc silicate at these sintering temperatures.

  10. Measurements of complex permittivity of microwave substrates in the 20 to 300 K temperature range from 26.5 to 40.0 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Felix A.; Gordon, William L.; Heinen, Vernon O.; Ebihara, Ben T.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    1990-01-01

    A knowledge of the dielectric properties of microwve substrates at low temperatures is useful in the design of superconducting microwave circuits. Results are reported for a study of the complex permittivity of sapphire (Al2O3), magnesium oxide (MgO), silicon oxide (SiO2), lanthanum aluminate (LaAlO3), and zirconium oxide (ZrO2), in the 20 to 300 Kelvin temperature range, at frequencies from 26.5 to 40.0 GHz. The values of the real and imaginary parts of the complex permittivity were obtained from the scattering parameters, which were measured using an HP-8510 automatic network analyzer. For these measurements, the samples were mounted on the cold head of a helium gas closed cycle refrigerator, in a specially designated vacuum chamber. An arrangement of wave guides, with mica windows, was used to connect the cooling system to the network analyzer. A decrease in the value of the real part of the complex permittivity of these substrates, with decreasing temperature, was observed. For MgO and Al2O3, the decrease from room temperature to 20 K was of 7 and 15 percent, respectively. For LaAlO3, it decreased by 14 percent, for ZrO2 by 15 percent, and for SiO2 by 2 percent, in the above mentioned temperature range.

  11. Extraction time and temperature affect the extraction efficiencies of coumarin and phenylpropanoids from Cinnamomum cassia bark using a microwave-assisted extraction method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Hoon

    2017-09-15

    Microwave-assisted extraction (MAE), an efficient extraction tool, was employed to extract a coumarin and five phenylpropanoids (cinnamic acid, cinnamyl alcohol, cinnamaldehyde, 2-hydroxycinnamadehyde, and 2-methoxycinnamaldehyde) from Cinnamomum cassia bark using water as the extraction solvent. Six marker compounds were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector using a validated analytical method. To investigate the influences of temperature and time on the extraction yields of the six marker compounds, the water extracts of C. cassia bark were prepared using a MAE method at six different extraction temperatures (70, 75, 80, 85, 90, and 95°C) and times (2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12min). Their influences were assessed by multiple regression analysis. The results obtained demonstrated that higher extraction temperature and longer extraction time positively affected coumarin and cinnamyl alcohol contents, but negatively affected extract contents of cinnamic acid, cinnamaldehyde and 2-hydroxycinnamaldehyde (all p-extraction of 2-methoxycinnamaldehyde was affected by both positively and negatively by increasing temperature and time. These changes during MAE were assumed by the chemical natures of the marker compounds with various functional groups. In conclusion, temperature and times significantly affected the extraction efficiencies of a coumarin and five phenylpropanoids from C. cassia bark when a water-based MAE method was used. This study provides a novel approach to the preparation of the water extract of C. cassia bark using MAE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Observation of bubble formation in water during microwave irradiation by dynamic light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakuma, Yusuke; Munenaga, Takuya; Nakata, Ryosuke

    2016-09-01

    A microwave reactor was designed for in situ observation of nano- and micro-bubbles, and size profiles during and after irradiation were measured with respect to irradiation power and time. Bubble formation in water during irradiation was observed even at temperatures below the boiling point of water. The maximum size strongly depended on radiation power and time, even at a given temperature. Nano-particles in the dispersion medium were found to play an important role in achieving more stable nucleation of bubbles around particles, and stable size distributions were obtained from clear autocorrelation by a dynamic light scattering system. Moreover, a combination of microwave induction heating and the addition of nano-particles to the dispersion medium can prevent heterogeneous nucleation of bubbles on the cell wall. Quantitative nano-bubble size profiles obtained by in situ observation provide useful information regarding microwave-based industrial processes for nano-particle production.

  13. Effect of Microwave Drying on Quality and Volatile Profiles of Rapeseeds%微波干燥对油菜籽品质及气味成分的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    和珊; 丁超; 杨国峰; 朱江明; 赵娟

    2013-01-01

    利用不同的微波功率将菜籽干燥至安全水分8%,测定干燥后菜籽发芽势、发芽率、油的酸值和过氧化值,并使用固相微萃取-气质联用仪分析菜籽挥发性成分.结果表明:微波功率越高,干燥速率越大;高功率的微波对菜籽的生命力有显著的破坏作用;在110~1 480 W微波功率范围内,菜籽油的酸值变化在合理范围之内,过氧化值在1 170W功率干燥后呈显著上升趋势;微波功率的增加会导致硫甙分解有害产物的相对含量增加.菜籽的挥发性气体成分中含有硫甙分解生成物、烃类、醛类、酯类、醇类、杂环类、酮类等,其相对含量依次降低.%The rapeseeds were dried to final moisture content of 8% (wet basis)with different microwave power levels. Then the germinating capacity of seeds, acid value and peroxide value of rapeseed oil were determined. Volatile profiles of rapeseeds were analyzed by using SPME/GC -MS method. The results were as follows:The higher the microwave power level was, the faster the drying rate was; high microwave power could distinctively destroy germinating capacity; the acid value of rapeseed oil remained in a reasonable range within 110~1 480 W microwave power levels; peroxide value of rapeseed oil rise distinctively above 1 170 W microwave power level; content of glucosinolate decomposition products increased with higher microwave power level. After microwave drying, the volatile profiles of rapeseeds consisted of glucosinolate decomposition products, hydrocarbons, aldehydes, esters, alcohols, heterocycles, ketones,etc. The relative content decreased successively.

  14. Rapid, Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of Cubic, Three-Dimensional, Highly Porous MOF-205 for Room Temperature CO2 Fixation