WorldWideScience

Sample records for microstrip detectors irradiated

  1. Performance of irradiated silicon microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catacchini, E.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Lenzi, M.; Meschini, M.; Parrini, G.; Pieri, M.

    1999-01-01

    Silicon microstrip devices to be installed in Large Hadron Collider (LHC) tracking detectors will have to operate in a high radiation environment. We report on performance studies of silicon microstrip detectors irradiated with neutrons or protons, up to fluences comparable to the first ten years of running at LHC. Obtained results show that irradiated detectors can still be operated with satisfactory signal-to-noise ratio,and in the case of inhomogeneously type inverted detector a very good position resolution is achieved regardless of the zone crossed by the particle

  2. Signal generation in highly irradiated silicon microstrip detectors for the ATLAS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, Gennaro

    2003-01-01

    Silicon detectors are the most diffused tracking devices in High Energy Physics (HEP). The reason of such success can be found in the characteristics of the material together with the existing advanced technology for the fabrication of these devices. Nevertheless in many modem HEP experiments the observation of vary rare events require data taking at high luminosity with a consequent extremely intense hadron radiation field that damages the silicon and degrades the performance of these devices. In this thesis work a detailed study of the signal generation in microstrip detectors has been produced with a special care for the ATLAS semiconductor tracker geometry. This has required a development of an appropriate setup to perform measurements with Transient Current/ Charge Technique. This has allowed studying the evolution of the signal in several microstrips detector samples irradiated at fluences covering the range expected in the ATLAS Semiconductor Tracker. For a better understanding of these measurements a powerful software package that simulates the signal generation in these devices has been developed. Moreover in this thesis it has been also shown that the degradation due to radiation in silicon detectors can be strongly reduced if the data taking is done with detectors operated at 130 K. This makes low temperature operation that benefits of the recovery of the charge collection efficiency in highly irradiated silicon detectors (also known as Lazarus effect) an optimal option for future high luminosity experiments. (author)

  3. The results of the irradiations of microstrip detectors for the ATLAS tracker (SCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dervan, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    The SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) of ATLAS will operate in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which will reach luminosities of 10 34 cm 2 s -1 . Silicon single-sided microstrip detectors will be used for particle tracking. Due to the proximity to the beam, the silicon detectors need to withstand damage from ionising radiation (10 Mrad total dose) and from non-ionising radiation such as neutrons (2x10 14 1 MeV equivalent neutrons/cm 2 total fluence). The final characteristics of the silicon SCT detectors which are needed to operate under LHC conditions and the conclusions reached after various years of test irradiation studies will be reported. The integration and performance of these detectors in complete SCT modules is also discussed

  4. Characterisation of an inhomogeneously irradiated microstrip detector using a fine spot infrared laser

    CERN Document Server

    Casse, G; Bowcock, T J V; Greenall, A; Phillips, JP; Turner, PR; Wright, V

    2001-01-01

    A prototype silicon microstrip detector for the LHCb vertex locator (VELO) has been partially irradiated using a 24 GeV/c proton beam at the CERN-PS accelerator. The detector possesses a radial strip geometry designed to measure the azimuthal coordinate (Phi) of tracks within the VELO. The peak fluence received by the detector was measured to be 4.6×10 14 p/cm 2 though the non-uniform nature of the exposure left part of the detector unirradiated. The inhomogeneous irradiation introduced a damage profile in the detector approximating to that expected in the VELO. High irradiation gradients are important to study as they can modify the electric field within the silicon. Of special interest are changes in the component of the electric field parallel to the strip plane but perpendicular to the strips which lead to systematic shifts in the reconstructed cluster position. If these (flux and position dependent) shifts are sufficiently large they could contribute to a degraded spatial resolution of the detector. In ...

  5. ATLAS irradiation studies of n-in-n and p-in-n silicon microstrip detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Allport, P P; Buttar, C M; Carter, J; Drage, L M; Ferrère, D; Morgan, D; Riedler, P; Robinson, D

    1999-01-01

    Prior to the module production of the ATLAS silicon microstrip tracker for the barrel and the forward wheels, the characterisation of full-size prototype silicon detectors after radiation to fluences corresponding to 10 years of ATLAS operation is required. The behaviour of p-in-n and n-in-n detectors produced by several manufacturers before and after irradiation to a fluence of 3*10/sup 14/ protons/cm/sup 2/ at the CERN PS facility is discussed. This article summarises some recent results from the ATLAS SCT collaboration. The measurements of leakage current, full depletion voltage, signal-to-noise ratio and charge collection efficiency are presented. Despite the better efficiency performance of n-in-n detectors below depletion, the collaboration chose the p-in-n technology due to its simpler and less costly production since good charge collection efficiencies were achieved at the desired maximum bias voltage. (14 refs).

  6. Silicon microstrip detectors for the ATLAS SCT

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Robinson, D.; Allport, P.; Andricek, L.; Böhm, Jan; Buttar, C.; Carter, J. R.; Chilingarov, A.; Clark, A. G.; Feriere, D.; Fuster, J.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 485, 1-2 (2002), s. 84-88 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MPO RP-4210/69 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010920 Keywords : ATLAS SCT * silicon microstrip detectors * irradiation * quality control Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.167, year: 2002

  7. Aleph silicon microstrip vertex detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    This microstrip vertex locator was located at the heart of the ALEPH experiment, one of the four experiments at the Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider. In the experiments at CERN's LEP, which ran from 1989 to 2000, modern silicon microvertex detectors, such as those used at ALEPH, monitored the production of short-lived particles close to the beam pipe.

  8. Charge collection efficiency and resolution of an irradiated double-sided silicon microstrip detector operated at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borer, K.; Janos, S.; Palmieri, V.G.; Buytaert, J.; Chabaud, V.; Chochula, P.; Collins, P.; Dijkstra, H.; Niinikoski, T.O.; Lourenco, C.; Parkes, C.; Saladino, S.; Ruf, T.; Granata, V.; Pagano, S.; Vitobello, F.; Bell, W.; Bartalini, P.; Dormond, O.; Frei, R.; Casagrande, L.; Bowcock, T.; Barnett, I.B.M.; Da Via, C.; Konorov, I.; Paul, S.; Schmitt, L.; Ruggiero, G.; Stavitski, I.; Esposito, A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents results on the measurement of the cluster shapes, resolution and charge collection efficiency of a double-sided silicon microstrip detector after irradiation with 24 GeV protons to a fluence of 3.5x10 14 p/cm 2 and operated at cryogenic temperatures. An empirical model is presented which describes the expected cluster shapes as a function of depletion depth, and is shown to agree with the data. It is observed that the clusters on the p-side broaden if the detector is under-depleted, leading to a degradation of resolution and efficiency. The model is used to make predictions for detector types envisaged for the LHC experiments. The results also show that at cryogenic temperature the charge collection efficiency varies depending on the operating conditions of the detector and can reach values of 100% at unexpectedly low bias voltage. By analysing the cluster shapes it is shown that these variations are due to changes in depletion depth. This phenomenon, known as the 'Lazarus effect', can be related to similar recent observations on diode behaviour

  9. Microstrip detector for the ALICE experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1996-01-01

    This photo shows a close up of one of the silicon microstrip detectors that will be installed on the ALICE experiment at the LHC. 1698 double-sided modules of these silicon microstrips will be installed in the two outermost layers of the ALICE inner tracking system. The microstrips have to be specially designed to withstand the high resolution levels at the heart of the detector.

  10. Two-dimensional microstrip detector for neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oed, A [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1997-04-01

    Because of their robust design, gas microstrip detectors, which were developed at ILL, can be assembled relatively quickly, provided the prefabricated components are available. At the beginning of 1996, orders were received for the construction of three two-dimensional neutron detectors. These detectors have been completed. The detectors are outlined below. (author). 2 refs.

  11. Characterisation of micro-strip and pixel silicon detectors before and after hadron irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Allport, P.P

    2012-01-01

    The use of segmented silicon detectors for tracking and vertexing in particle physics has grown substantially since their introduction in 1980. It is now anticipated that roughly 50,000 six inch wafers of high resistivity silicon will need to be processed into sensors to be deployed in the upgraded experiments in the future high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) at CERN. These detectors will also face an extremely severe radiation environment, varying with distance from the interaction point. The volume of required sensors is large and their delivery is required during a relatively short time, demanding a high throughput from the chosen suppliers. The current situation internationally, in this highly specialist market, means that security of supply for large orders can therefore be an issue and bringing additional potential vendors into the field can only be an advantage. Semiconductor companies that could include planar sensors suitable for particle physics in their product lines will, however, need to prove their pro...

  12. Development of ALICE microstrip detectors at IRST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boscardin, M.; Bosisio, L.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Gregori, P.; Rachevskaia, I.; Zorzi, N.

    2001-01-01

    We report on the development of double-sided, AC-coupled, microstrip detectors oriented to the A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE). The main design and processing issues are presented, together with some selected results from the electrical characterization of detectors and related test structures

  13. Integrated double-sided silicon microstrip detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perevertailo V. L.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The problems of design, technology and manufacturing double-sided silicon microstrip detectors using standard equipment production line in mass production of silicon integrated circuits are considered. The design of prototype high-energy particles detector for experiment ALICE (CERN is presented. The parameters of fabricated detectors are comparable with those of similar foreign detectors, but they are distinguished by lesser cost.

  14. Silicon microstrip detectors on 6'' technology

    CERN Document Server

    Bölla, G; Günther, M; Martignon, G; Bacchetta, N; Bisello, D; Leonardi, G L; Lucas, T; Wilburn, C

    1999-01-01

    The fabrication of microstrip detectors on 4'' high-resistivity wafers that allow for a maximum workable area of about 42 cm sup 2 has been well established. Using 6'' wafers the workable area increases up to 100 cm sup 2 (more than twice the area of a 4'' wafer) allowing a larger number of detectors to be processed at the same time on the same wafer resulting in a sizable reduction of cost. After a prototyping stage, the CDF silicon tracker upgrade is now receiving final production sensors from Micron Semiconductor Ltd. The performance of double-sided single-metal small stereo angle sensors for the CDF SVXII and ISL detectors has been studied. Results include probe station measurements and test beam results. The problems encountered from prototyping to the final devices are described. A brief overview of the response of the sensors to irradiation with gamma-rays and p sup + up to a dose of 0.5 Mrad (well above the doses expected during Run II of the Tevatron) is included. (author)

  15. Cryogenic Silicon Microstrip Detector Modules for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Perea-Solano, B

    2004-01-01

    CERN is presently constructing the LHC, which will produce collisions of 7 TeV protons in 4 interaction points at a design luminosity of 1034 cm-2 s-1. The radiation dose resulting from the operation at high luminosity will cause a serious deterioration of the silicon tracker performance. The state-of-art silicon microstrip detectors can tolerate a fluence of about 3 1014 cm-2 of hadrons or charged leptons. This is insufficient, however, for long-term operation in the central parts of the LHC trackers, in particular after the possible luminosity upgrade of the LHC. By operating the detectors at cryogenic temperatures the radiation hardness can be improved by a factor 10. This work proposes a cryogenic microstrip detector module concept which has the features required for the microstrip trackers of the upgraded LHC experiments at CERN. The module can hold an edgeless sensor, being a good candidate for improved luminosity and total cross-section measurements in the ATLAS, CMS and TOTEM experiments. The design o...

  16. Characterization and spice simulation of a single-sided, p+ on n silicon microstrip detector before and after low-energy photon irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jiaguo; Klanner, Robert; Fretwurst, Eckhart [Institute for Experimental Physics, Detector Laboratory, University of Hamburg, Hamburg 22761 (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    As preparation for the development of silicon detectors for the harsh radiation environment at the European XFEL (up to 1 GGY 12 keV X-rays) p{sup +} on n silicon microstrip detectors were characterized as function of dose. The measurements, which include dark current, coupling capacitance, interstrip capacitance and interstrip resistance, are compared to a detailed SPICE model, so that the performance for particle detection can be estimated.

  17. ATLAS silicon microstrip detector system (SCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unno, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The S CT together with the pixel and the transition radiation tracker systems and with a central solenoid forms the central tracking system of the ATLAS detector at LHC. Series production of SCT Silicon microstrip sensors is near completion. The sensors have been shown to be robust against high voltage operation to the 500 V required after fluences of 3x10 14 protons/cm 2 . SCT barrel modules are in series production. A low-noise CCD camera has been used to debug the onset of leakage currents

  18. Gas microstrip detectors on resistive plastic substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixit, M.S.; Oakham, F.G.; Armitage, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    Plastics are desirable as substrates for gas microstrip detectors (GMDs) because of their flexibility, low density and long radiation length. GMDs have been fabricated on white Tedlar which has bulk electrical conductivity and ion-implanted Upilex which has a thin electrically conductive layer on the surface of an insulator. The effect of back plane voltage on the gain of such GMDs is investigated. Three 200 μm pitch, ion-implanted Upilex GMDs were recently tested in a high intensity beam at CERN. The anode signals were read out using fast, low noise, high gain amplifiers. Preliminary results of the test are presented

  19. Thermal Properties of the Silicon Microstrip Endcap Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Feld, Lutz; Hammarström, R

    1998-01-01

    Irradiated silicon detectors must be cooled in order to guarantee stable short and long term operation. Using the SiF1 milestone prototype we have performed a detailed analysis of the thermal properties of the silicon microstrip endcap detector. The strongest constraint on the cooling system is shown to be set by the need to avoid thermal runaway of the silicon detectors. We show that, taking into account the radiation damage to the silicon after 10 years of LHC operation and including some safety margin, the detector will need a cooling fluid temperature of around -20 C. The highest temperature on the silicon will then be in the range -15 C to -10 C. This sets an upper limit on the ambient temperature in the tracker volume.

  20. A data acquisition system for silicon microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adriani, O.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Meschini, M.; Pieri, M.; Castellini, G.

    1998-01-01

    Following initial work on the readout of the L3 silicon microvertex detector, the authors have developed a complete data acquisition system for silicon microstrip detectors for use both in their home institute and at the various test beam facilities at the CERN laboratory. The system uses extensive decoupling schemes allowing a fully floating connection to the detector. This feature has many advantages especially in the readout of the latest double-sided silicon microstrip detectors

  1. New results on silicon microstrip detectors of CMS tracker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaria, N.; Albergo, S.; Angarano, M.; Azzi, P.; Babucci, E.; Bacchetta, N.; Bader, A.; Bagliesi, G.; Basti, A.; Biggeri, U.; Bilei, G.M.; Bisello, D.; Boemi, D.; Bolla, G.; Bosi, F.; Borrello, L.; Bortoletto, D.; Bozzi, C.; Braibant, S.; Breuker, H.; Bruzzi, M.; Buffini, A.; Busoni, S.; Candelori, A.; Caner, A.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Catacchini, E.; Checcucci, B.; Ciampolini, P.; Civinini, C.; Creanza, D.; D'Alessandro, R.; Da Rold, M.; De Palma, M.; Dell'Orso, R.; Marina, R. Della; Dutta, S.; Eklund, C.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Favro, G.; Feld, L.; Fiore, L.; Focardi, E.; French, M.; Freudenreich, K.; Fuertjes, A.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M.; Giraldo, A.; Glessing, B.; Gu, W.H.; Hall, G.; Hammerstrom, R.; Hebbeker, T.; Hrubec, J.; Huhtinen, M.; Kaminsky, A.; Karimaki, V.; Koenig, St.; Krammer, M.; Lariccia, P.; Lenzi, M.; Loreti, M.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Lustermann, W.; Maettig, P.; Maggi, G.; Mannelli, M.; Mantovani, G.; Marchioro, A.; Mariotti, C.; Martignon, G.; Evoy, B. Mc; Meschini, M.; Messineo, A.; Migliore, E.; My, S.; Paccagnella, A.; Palla, F.; Pandoulas, D.; Papi, A.; Parrini, G.; Passeri, D.; Pieri, M.; Piperov, S.; Potenza, R.; Radicci, V.; Raffaelli, F.; Raymond, M.; Santocchia, A.; Schmitt, B.; Selvaggi, G.; Servoli, L.; Sguazzoni, G.; Siedling, R.; Silvestris, L.; Skog, K.; Starodumov, A.; Stavitski, I.; Stefanini, G.; Tempesta, P.; Tonelli, G.; Tricomi, A.; Tuuva, T.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P.G.; Viertel, G.; Xie, Z.; Li Yahong; Watts, S.; Wittmer, B.

    2000-01-01

    Interstrip and backplane capacitances on silicon microstrip detectors with p + strip on n substrate of 320 μm thickness were measured for pitches between 60 and 240 μm and width over pitch ratios between 0.13 and 0.5. Parametrisations of capacitance w.r.t. pitch and width were compared with data. The detectors were measured before and after being irradiated to a fluence of 4x10 14 protons/cm 2 of 24 GeV/c momentum. The effect of the crystal orientation of the silicon has been found to have a relevant influence on the surface radiation damage, favouring the choice of a substrate. Working at high bias (up to 500 V in CMS) might be critical for the stability of detector, for a small width over pitch ratio. The influence found to enhance the stability

  2. Gas microstrip detectors based on flexible printed circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomon, M.; Crowe, K.; Faszer, W.; Lindsay, P.; Curran Maier, J.M.

    1995-09-01

    Microstrip Gas Detectors (MSGC's) were introduced some years ago as position sensitive detectors capable of operating at very high rates. The authors have studied the properties of a new type of Gas Microstrip Counter built using flexible printed circuit technology. They describe the manufacturing procedures, the assembly of the device, as well as its operation under a variety of conditions, gases and types of radiation. They also describe two new passivation materials, tantalum and niobium, which produce effective surfaces

  3. Degradation of silicon AC-coupled microstrip detectors induced by radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Canali, C.; Fuochi, P. G.; Gotra, Y.; Paccagnella, A.; Verzellesi, G.

    1993-12-01

    Results are presented showing the radiation response of AC-coupled FOXFET biased microstrip detectors and related test patterns to be used in the microvertex detector of the CDF experiment at Fermi National Laboratory. Radiation tolerance of detectors to gamma and proton irradiation has been tested, and the radiation-induced variations of the DC electrical parameters have been analyzed. The long-term postirradiation behavior of detector characteristics has been studied, and the relevant room-temperature annealing phenomena have been examined. The main radiation damage effects after gamma or proton irradiation of FOXFET biased microstrip detectors consist of an increase in the total leakage current, while both the detector dynamic resistance and FOXFET switching voltage decrease.

  4. Dismantling the silicon microstrip detector on L3

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2001-01-01

    The silicon microstrip detector is located at the heart of the detector and must be kept cool to prevent thermal noise. The work shown here is the removal of the cooling system. L3 was dismantled as part of the closure of the entire LEP accelerator in 2000 to make way for the new LHC.

  5. An Uncoventional Approach for a Straw Tube-Microstrip Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Basile, E.; Bellucci, F.; Benussi, L.; Bertani, M.; Bianco, S.; Caponero, M. A.; Colonna, D.; Di Falco, F.; Fabbri, F. L.; Felli, F.; Giardoni, M.; La Monaca, A.; Mensitieri, G.; Ortenzi, B.; Pallotta, M.

    2004-01-01

    We report on a novel concept of silicon microstrips and straw tubes detector, where integration is accomplished by a straw module with straws not subjected to mechanical tension in a Rohacell lattice and carbon fiber reinforced plastic shell. Results on mechanical and test beam performances are reported on as well.

  6. Radiation hard silicon microstrip detectors for Tevatron experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korjenevski, Sergey

    2004-01-01

    The Silicon Microstrip Tracking detectors at the CDF and D0 experiments have now been operating for almost three years at Fermilab. These detectors were designed originally for an integrated luminosity of 2fb -1 . As the expected luminosity for Run IIb at the Tevatron collider was initially envisioned to reach 15fb -1 , radiation tolerances of both devices were revisited, culminating in proposals for new systems. With reduced expectations for total luminosity at ∼6fb -1 , the full detector-replacement projects were terminated. The CDF detector is expected nevertheless to cope efficiently with the lower anticipated dose, however, the D0 experiment is planning a smaller-scale project: a Layer-0 (L0) upgrade of the silicon tracker (D0SMT). The new device will fit between the beam line and the inner layer of the current Tracker. Built of single-sided sensors, this upgrade is expected to perform well in the harsh radiation environment, and be able to withstand an integrated luminosity of 15fb -1 . Prototypes of Run IIb sensors were irradiated using 10MeV protons at the tandem Van de Graaff at the James R. McDonald Laboratory at Kansas State University. A fit to the 10MeV proton data yields a damage parameter αp=11x10-17Acm. This is consistent with results from RD48 (αp=9.9x10-17Acm). The scaling of damage to 1MeV neutron fluence uses a hardness factor (κ) derived from the non-ionizing components of the energy loss (NEIL). NEIL predicts a hardness factor of 3.87 for 10MeV protons. We obtained an experimental value of this factor of 2.54, or 34% smaller than scaling predictions from NEIL

  7. Performance of the ALIBAVA portable readout system with irradiated and non-irradiated microstrip silicon sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marco-Hernadez, R.

    2009-01-01

    A readout system for microstrip silicon sensors has been developed as a result of collaboration among the University of Liverpool, the CNM of Barcelona and the IFIC of Valencia. The name of this collaboration is ALIBAVA and it is integrated in the RD50 Collaboration. This system is able to measure the collected charge in one or two microstrip silicon sensors by reading out all the channels of the sensor(s), up to 256, as an analogue measurement. The system uses two Beetle chips to read out the detector(s). The Beetle chip is an analogue pipelined readout chip used in the LHCb experiment. The system can operate either with non-irradiated and irradiated sensors as well as with n-type and p-type microstrip silicon sensors. Heavily irradiated sensors will be used at the SLHC, so this system is being to research the performance of microstrip silicon sensors in conditions as similar as possible to the SLHC operating conditions. The system has two main parts: a hardware part and a software part. The hardware part acquires the sensor signals either from external trigger inputs, in case of a radioactive source setup is used, or from a synchronised trigger output generated by the system, if a laser setup is used. This acquired data is sent by USB to be stored in a PC for a further processing. The hardware is a dual board based system. The daughterboard is a small board intended for containing two Beetle readout chips as well as fan-ins and detector support to interface the sensors. The motherboard is intended to process the data, to control the whole hardware and to communicate with the software by USB. The software controls the system and processes the data acquired from the sensors in order to store it in an adequate format file. The main characteristics of the system will be described. Results of measurements acquired with n-type and p-type irradiated and non-irradiated detectors using both the laser and the radioactive source setup will be also presented and discussed

  8. Production of ALICE microstrip detectors at ITC-irst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregori, Paolo; Bellutti, Pierluigi; Boscardin, Maurizio; Collini, Amos; Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco; Pucker, Georg; Zorzi, Nicola

    2007-01-01

    We report on the results from the production of 600 double-sided silicon microstrip detectors for the ALICE experiment. We present the fabrication process and some selected results from the electrical characterization of detectors and test structures. The large amount of experimental data allowed a statistically relevant analysis to be performed. The main technological aspects related to production yield optimization will also be addressed

  9. Characterization procedures for double-sided silicon microstrip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruner, N.L. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). New Mexico Center for Particle Phys.; Frautschi, M.A. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). New Mexico Center for Particle Phys.; Hoeferkamp, M.R. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). New Mexico Center for Particle Phys.; Seidel, S.C. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). New Mexico Center for Particle Phys.

    1995-08-15

    Since double-sided silicon microstrip detectors are still evolving technologically and are not yet commercially available, they require extensive electrical evaluation by the user to ensure they were manufactured to specifications. In addition, measurements must be performed to determine detector operating conditions. Procedures for measuring the following quantities are described: - Leakage current, - Depletion voltage, - Bias resistance, - Interstrip resistance, - Coupling capacitance, - Coupling capacitor breakdown voltage. (orig.).

  10. Characterization procedures for double-sided silicon microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruner, N.L.; Frautschi, M.A.; Hoeferkamp, M.R.; Seidel, S.C.

    1995-01-01

    Since double-sided silicon microstrip detectors are still evolving technologically and are not yet commercially available, they require extensive electrical evaluation by the user to ensure they were manufactured to specifications. In addition, measurements must be performed to determine detector operating conditions. Procedures for measuring the following quantities are described: - Leakage current, - Depletion voltage, - Bias resistance, - Interstrip resistance, - Coupling capacitance, - Coupling capacitor breakdown voltage. (orig.)

  11. Substrate-induced instability in gas microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, J.E.; Connolly, J.F.

    1992-12-01

    The results of a programme of research into substrate-induced gain instability in gas microstrip detectors are reported. Information has been collected on a wide range of substrates including many commonly available glasses and ceramics. A theoretical model of the gain instability is proposed. While we have not yet found an acceptable substrate for the construction of high flux detectors our experience points to electronically conductive glasses as the most promising source of a stable substrate. (Author)

  12. Breakdown of coupling dielectrics for Si microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candelori, A.; Paccagnella, A.; Padova Univ.; Saglimbeni, G.

    1999-01-01

    Double-layer coupling dielectrics for AC-coupled Si microstrip detectors have been electrically characterized in order to determine their performance in a radiation-harsh environment, with a focus on the dielectric breakdown. Two different dielectric technologies have been investigated: SiO 2 /TEOS and SiO 2 /Si 3 N 4 . Dielectrics have been tested by using a negative gate voltage ramp of 0.2 MV/(cm·s). The metal/insulator/Si I-V characteristics show different behaviours depending on the technology. The extrapolated values of the breakdown field for unirradiated devices are significantly higher for SiO 2 /Si 3 N 4 dielectrics, but the data dispersion is lower for SiO 2 /TEOS devices. No significant variation of the breakdown field has been measured after a 10 Mrad (Si) γ irradiation for SiO 2 /Si 3 N 4 dielectrics. Finally, the SiO 2 /Si 3 N 4 DC conduction is enhanced if a positive gate voltage ramp is applied with respect to the negative one, due to the asymmetric conduction of the double-layer dielectric

  13. A counting silicon microstrip detector for precision compton polarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Doll, D W; Hillert, W; Krüger, H; Stammschroer, K; Wermes, N

    2002-01-01

    A detector for the detection of laser photons backscattered off an incident high-energy electron beam for precision Compton polarimetry in the 3.5 GeV electron stretcher ring ELSA at Bonn University has been developed using individual photon counting. The photon counting detector is based on a silicon microstrip detector system using dedicated ASIC chips. The produced hits by the pair converted Compton photons are accumulated rather than individually read out. A transverse profile displacement can be measured with mu m accuracy rendering a polarization measurement of the order of 1% on the time scale of 10-15 min possible.

  14. Performance of p-type micro-strip detectors after irradiation to $7.5x10^{15} p/cm^{2}$

    CERN Document Server

    Allport, Philip P; Lozano-Fantoba, Manuel; Sutcliffe, Peter; Velthuis, J J; Vossebeld, Joost Herman

    2004-01-01

    Exploiting the advantages of reading out segmented silicon from the n-side, we have produced test detectors with LHC pitch but 1 cm long strips which even after proton irradiation at the CERN PS to 7.5*10 /sup 15/ cm/sup -2/ show signal to noise greater than 8:1 using LHC speed electronics. This dose exceeds by a factor of 2 that required for a replacement of the ATLAS semiconductor tracker to cope with an upgrade of the LHC to a Super-LHC with 10 times greater luminosity. These detectors were processed on p-type starting material of resistivity ~ 2 k Omega cm and, unlike n-in-n designs, only required single-sided processing. Such technology should therefore provide a relatively inexpensive route to replacing the central tracking at both ATLAS and CMS for Super-LHC. The shorter strip length is required to limit the noise. Even at these extreme doses 30% of the non-irradiated signal is seen. This 7000e/sup -/ signal (in 280 mu m thick sensors) is very competitive with the post irradiation performance of other,...

  15. Spatial resolution of wedge shaped silicon microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anticic, T.; Barnett, B.; Blumenfeld, B.; Chien, C.Y.; Fisher, P.; Gougas, A.; Krizmanic, J.; Madansky, L.; Newman, D.; Orndorff, J.; Pevsner, A.; Spangler, J.

    1995-01-01

    Several wedge-shaped silicon microstrip detectors with pitches from 30 to 100 μm have been designed by our group and beam tested at the CERN SPS. We find the spatial resolution σ becomes larger at the rate of 0.21 μm per 1 μm increase in pitch, but the number of strips per cluster remains about the same as the pitch varies from 30 to 100 μm. (orig.)

  16. Silicon microstrip detectors with SVX chip readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueckner, W.; Dropmann, F.; Godbersen, M.; Konorov, I.; Koenigsmann, K.; Masciocchi, S.; Newsom, C.; Paul, S.; Povh, B.; Russ, J.S.; Timm, S.; Vorwalter, K.; Werding, R.

    1995-01-01

    A new silicon strip detector has been designed for the fixed target experiment WA89 at CERN. The system of about 30 000 channels is equipped with SVX chips and read out via a double buffer into a FASTBUS memory. The detector provides a fast readout by offering zero-suppressed data extraction on the chip. The silicon counters are the largest detectors built on a monocrystal so far in order to achieve good transversal acceptance. Construction and performance during the 1993 data taking run are discussed. ((orig.))

  17. The charge collection in single side silicon microstrip detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Eremin, V V; Roe, S; Ruggiero, G; Weilhammer, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The transient current technique has been used to investigate signal formation in unirradiated silicon microstrip detectors, which are similar in geometry to those developed for the ATLAS experiment at LHC. Nanosecond pulsed infrared and red lasers were used to induce the signals under study. Two peculiarities in the detector performance were observed: an unexpectedly slow rise to the signal induced in a given strip when signals are injected opposite to the strip, and a long duration of the induced signal in comparison with the calculated drift time of charge carriers through the detector thickness - with a significant fraction of the charge being induced after charge carrier arrival. These major effects and details of the detector response for different positions of charge injection are discussed in the context of Ramo's theorem and compared with predictions arising from the more commonly studied phenomenon of signal formation in planar pad detectors.

  18. Technology development of p-type microstrip detectors with radiation hard p-spray isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrini, G.; Fleta, C.; Campabadal, F.; Diez, S.; Lozano, M.; Rafi, J.M.; Ullan, M.

    2006-01-01

    A technology for the fabrication of p-type microstrip silicon radiation detectors using p-spray implant isolation has been developed at CNM-IMB. The p-spray isolation has been optimized in order to withstand a gamma irradiation dose up to 50 Mrad (Si), which represents the ionization radiation dose expected in the middle region of the SCT-Atlas detector of the future Super-LHC during 10 years of operation. The best technological options for the p-spray implant were found by using a simulation software package and dedicated calibration runs. Using the optimized technology, detectors have been fabricated in the Clean Room facility of CNM-IMB, and characterized by reverse current and capacitance measurements before and after irradiation. The average full depletion voltage measured on the non-irradiated detectors was V FD =41±3 V, while the leakage current density for the microstrip devices at V FD +20 V was 400 nA/cm 2

  19. Design, characterization and beam test performance of different silicon microstrip detector geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catacchini, E.; Ciampolini, L.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Lenzi, M.; Meschini, M.; Parrini, G.; Pieri, M.

    1998-01-01

    During the last few years a large number of silicon microstrip detectors has been especially designed and tested in order to study and optimize the performances of the tracking devices to be used in the forward-backward part of the CMS (technical proposal, CERN/LHCC 94-38 LHCC/Pl, 15 December 1994) experiment. Both single and double sided silicon detectors of a trapezoidal ('wedge') shape and with different strip configurations, including prototypes produced with double metal technology, were characterized in the laboratory and tested using high-energy beams. Furthermore, due to the high-radiation environment where the detectors should operate, particular care was devoted to the study of the characteristics of heavily irradiated detectors. The main results of detector performances (charge response, signal-to-noise ratio, spatial resolution etc.) will be reviewed and discussed. (author)

  20. Tracking with heavily irradiated silicon detectors operated at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casagrande, L.; Barnett, B.M.; Bartalina, P.

    1999-01-01

    In this work, the authors show that a heavily irradiated double-sided silicon microstrip detector recovers its performance when operated at cryogenic temperatures. A DELPHI microstrip detector, irradiated to a fluence of ∼4 x 10 14 p/cm 2 , no longer operational at room temperature, cannot be distinguished from a non-irradiated one when operated at T < 120 K. Besides confirming the previously observed Lazarus effect in single diodes, these results establish, for the first time, the possibility of using standard silicon detectors for tracking applications in extremely demanding radiation environments

  1. Radiation hard silicon microstrip detectors for use in ATLAS at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansen, Lars Gimmestad

    2005-07-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Geneva, Switzerland) will accelerate protons in colliding beams to a center of mass energy of 14 TeV at very high luminosities. The ATLAS detector is being built to explore the physics in this unprecedented energy range. Tracking of charged particles in high-energy physics (HEP) experiments requires a high spatial resolution and fast signal readout, all with as little material as possible. Silicon microstrip detectors meet these requirements well and have been chosen for the Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) which is part of the inner tracking system of ATLAS and has a total area of 61 m2. During the 10 years of operation at LHC, the total fluence received by the detectors is sufficiently large that they will suffer a severe degradation from radiation induced damage. The damage affects both the physics performance of the detectors as well as their operability and a great challenge has been to develop radiation hard detectors for this environment. An extensive irradiation programme has been carried out where detectors of various designs, including defect engineering by oxygen enriched silicon, have been irradiated to the expected fluence. A subsequent thermal annealing period is included to account for a realistic annual maintenance schedule at room temperature, during which the radiation induced defects alter the detector properties significantly. This thesis presents work that has been carried out in the Bergen ATLAS group with results both from the irradiation programme and from detector testing during the module production. (Author)

  2. Radiation hard silicon microstrip detectors for use in ATLAS at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, Lars Gimmestad

    2005-06-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Geneva, Switzerland) will accelerate protons in colliding beams to a center of mass energy of 14 TeV at very high luminosities. The ATLAS detector is being built to explore the physics in this unprecedented energy range. Tracking of charged particles in high-energy physics (HEP) experiments requires a high spatial resolution and fast signal readout, all with as little material as possible. Silicon microstrip detectors meet these requirements well and have been chosen for the Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) which is part of the inner tracking system of ATLAS and has a total area of 61 m2. During the 10 years of operation at LHC, the total fluence received by the detectors is sufficiently large that they will suffer a severe degradation from radiation induced damage. The damage affects both the physics performance of the detectors as well as their operability and a great challenge has been to develop radiation hard detectors for this environment. An extensive irradiation programme has been carried out where detectors of various designs, including defect engineering by oxygen enriched silicon, have been irradiated to the expected fluence. A subsequent thermal annealing period is included to account for a realistic annual maintenance schedule at room temperature, during which the radiation induced defects alter the detector properties significantly. This thesis presents work that has been carried out in the Bergen ATLAS group with results both from the irradiation programme and from detector testing during the module production. (Author)

  3. Gas microstrip detectors on polymer, silicon and glass substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barasch, E.F.; Demroff, H.P.; Drew, M.M.; Elliott, T.S.; Gaedke, R.M.; Goss, L.T.; Kasprowicz, T.B.; Lee, B.; Mazumdar, T.K.; McIntyre, P.M.; Pang, Y.; Smith, D.D.; Trost, H.J.; Vanstraelen, G.; Wahl, J.

    1993-01-01

    We present results on the performance of Gas Microstrip Detectors on various substrates. These include a 300 μm anode-anode pitch pattern on Tempax borosilicate glass and ABS/copolyether, a 200 μm pattern on Upilex ''S'' polyimide, Texin 4215, Tedlar, ion-implanted Kapton, orientation-dependent etched flat-topped silicon (''knife-edge chamber''), and iron-vanadium glass, and a 100 μm pitch pattern on Upilex ''S'' and ion-implanted Kapton. (orig.)

  4. Gas microstrip detectors for X-ray tomographic flow imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Key, M J; Luggar, R D; Kundu, A

    2003-01-01

    A investigation into the suitability of gas microstrip detector technology for a high-speed industrial X-ray tomography system is reported. X-ray energies in the region 20-30 keV are well suited to the application, which involves imaging two-dimensional slices through gas/liquid multiphase pipeline flows for quantitative component fraction measurement. Stable operation over a period representing several hundred individual tomographic scans at gas gains of 500 is demonstrated using a Penning gas mixture of krypton/propylene.

  5. Performance of microstrip and microgap gas detectors at high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraga, F.A.F.; Fraga, M.M.F.R.; Marques, R.F.; Margato, L.M.S.; Goncalo, J.R.; Policarpo, A.J.P.L.

    1997-01-01

    A study of the operation of microstrip and microgap detectors at various gas pressures up to 6 bar with Kr-CO 2 , Xe-CO 2 and Xe-CH 4 is presented. The data were collected with a microstrip (1000 μm pitch) and a microgap (200 μm pitch) detector using a clean chamber and gas system. It is shown that maximum gain is strongly dependent on pressure and gains as high as 9 x 10 3 were obtained with Kr-CO 2 at 6 bar with a MSGC. With the smaller-pitch MGC we could get a gain of 180 with Xe-CH 4 at 6 bar; the typical energy resolution at 22 keV being about 15%. From the present work one can conclude that microstructures can operate at high pressure and that their application in high-efficiency, low-granularity X-ray detectors with an energy range up to a few tens of keV can be seriously considered. (orig.)

  6. Development of Microstrip Silicon Detectors for Star and ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, L; Coffin, J P; Guillaume, G; Guthneck, L; Higueret, S; Hundt, F; Kühn, C E; Lutz, Jean Robert; Pozdniakov, S; Rami, F; Tarchini, A; Boucham, A; Bouvier, S; Erazmus, B; Germain, M; Giliberto, S; Martin, L; Le Moal, C; Roy, C; Colledani, C; Dulinski, W; Turchetta, R

    1998-01-01

    The physics program of STAR and ALICE at ultra-relativistic heavy ion colliders, RHIC and LHC respectively, requires very good tracking capabilities. Some specific quark gluon plasma signatures, based on strange matter measurements implies quite a good secondary vertex reconstruction.For this purpose, the inner trackers of both experiments are composed of high-granularity silicon detectors. The current status of the development of double-sided silicon microstrip detectors is presented in this work.The global performance for tracking purpose adn particle identification are first reviewed. Then tests of the detectors and of the associated readout electronics are described. In-beam measurements of noise, spatial resolution, efficiency and charge matching capability, as well as radiation hardness, are examined.

  7. Accelerated life test of an ONO stacked insulator film for a silicon micro-strip detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Shoji; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Saitoh, Yutaka

    1996-01-01

    We have used to acquire the signal through an integrated capacitor for a silicon micro-strip detector. When we have been using a double-sided silicon micro-strip detector, we have required a long-term stability and a high feasibility for the integrated capacitor. An oxide-nitride-oxide (ONO) insulator film was theoretically expected to have a superior nature in terms of long term reliability. In order to test long term reliability for integrated capacitor of a silicon micro-strip detector, we made a multi-channel measuring system for capacitors

  8. Study of silicon microstrips detector quantum efficiency using mathematical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyva Pernia, Diana; Cabal Rodriguez, Ana Ester; Pinnera Hernandez, Ibrahin; Fabelo, Antonio Leyva; Abreu Alfonso, Yamiel; Cruz Inclan, Carlos M.

    2011-01-01

    The paper shows the results from the application of mathematical simulation to study the quantum efficiency of a microstrips crystalline silicon detector, intended for medical imaging and the development of other applications such as authentication and dating of cultural heritage. The effects on the quantum efficiency of some parameters of the system, such as the detector-source geometry, X rays energy and detector dead zone thickness, were evaluated. The simulation results were compared with the theoretical prediction and experimental available data, resulting in a proper correspondence. It was concluded that the use of frontal configuration for incident energies lower than 17 keV is more efficient, however the use of the edge-on configuration for applications requiring the detection of energy above this value is recommended. It was also found that the reduction of the detector dead zone led to a considerable increase in quantum efficiency for any energy value in the interval from 5 to 100 keV.(author)

  9. A SPICE model of double-sided Si microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candelori, A.; Paccagnella, A.; Bonin, F.

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a SPICE model for the ohmic side of AC-coupled Si microstrip detectors with interstrip isolation via field plates. The interstrip isolation has been measured in various conditions by varying the field plate voltage. Simulations have been compared with experimental data in order to determine the values of the model parameters for different voltages applied to the field plates. The model is able to predict correctly the frequency dependence of the coupling between adjacent strips. Furthermore, we have used such model for the study of the signal propagation along the detector when a current signal is injected in a strip. Only electrical coupling is considered here, without any contribution due to charge sharing derived from carrier diffusion. For this purpose, the AC pads of the strips have been connected to a read-out electronics and the current signal has been injected into a DC pad. Good agreement between measurements and simulations has been reached for the central strip and the first neighbors. Experimental tests and computer simulations have been performed for four different strip and field plate layouts, in order to investigate how the detector geometry affects the parameters of the SPICE model and the signal propagation

  10. A gas microstrip X-ray detector for soft energy fluorescence EXAFS

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, A D; Derbyshire, G E; Duxbury, D M; Lipp, J; Spill, E J; Stephenson, R

    2001-01-01

    Gas microstrip detectors have been previously developed by the particle physics community, where their robustness, compactness and high counting speed have been recognised. These features are particularly attractive to synchrotron radiation use. In this paper, we describe a gas microstrip detector employing multi-element readout and specifically developed for high count rate fluorescence EXAFS at soft X-ray energies below 4 keV.

  11. Development of a fabrication technology for double-sided AC-coupled silicon microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Boscardin, M.; Bosisio, L.; Rachevskaia, I.; Zen, M.; Zorzi, N.

    2001-01-01

    We report on the development of a fabrication technology for double-sided, AC-coupled silicon microstrip detectors for tracking applications. Two batches of detectors with good electrical figures and a low defect rate were successfully manufactured at IRST Laboratory. The processing techniques and the experimental results obtained from these detector prototypes are presented and discussed

  12. Noise and signal processing in a microstrip detector with a time variant readout system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cattaneo, P.W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper treats the noise and signal processing by a time variant filter in a microstrip detector. In particular, the noise sources in the detector-electronics chain and the signal losses that cause a substantial decrease of the original signal are thoroughly analyzed. This work has been motivated by the analysis of the data of the microstrip detectors designed for the ALEPH minivertex detector. Hence, even if the discussion will be kept as general as possible, concrete examples will be presented referring to the specific ALEPH design. (orig.)

  13. Double-sided FoxFET biased microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allport, P.P.; Carter, J.R.; Dunwoody, U.C.; Gibson, V.; Goodrick, M.J.; Beck, G.A.; Carter, A.A.; Martin, A.J.; Pritchard, T.W.; Bullough, M.A.; Greenwood, N.M.; Lucas, A.D.; Wilburn, C.D.

    1994-01-01

    The use of the field effect transistor, integrated onto AC-coupled silicon detectors, as a novel technique for biasing the implanted p + strips [P.P. Allport et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 310 (1991) 155], was first employed for the OPAL microvertex detector. The detector has proved very successful, with ladders of three single-sided detectors showing signal/noise of 22 : 1 with MX5 readout electronics [P.P. Allport et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 324 (1993) 34; Nucl. Phys. B (Proc. Suppl.) 32 (1993) 208]. This technique has been extended to bias also the n + strips and p strips on the ohmic side of a double-sided detector [P.P. Allport et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A, to be submitted]. Full-size detectors with orthogonal readout have been fabricated by Micron and tested with MX7 readout on both sides. Both the junction and ohmic sides of these detectors have similar signal/noise values to those for single-sided wafers [P.P. Allport et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A, to be submitted]. Test structures have been irradiated with beta particles to study the radiation hardness of the devices, and probe station electrical measurements of the detectors and test structures are presented. ((orig.))

  14. Performance of irradiated CVD diamond micro-strip sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, W.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bertuccio, G.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; D'Angelo, P.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Hallewell, G.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Kass, R.; Koeth, T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Mac Lynne, L.; Manfredotti, C.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Moroni, L.; Noomen, J.; Oh, A.; Pan, L.S.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Perera, L.; Pirollo, S.; Procario, M.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Rousseau, L.; Rudge, A.; Russ, J.; Sala, S.; Sampietro, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Trischuk, W.; Tromson, D.; Vittone, E.; Walsh, A.M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; Wetstein, M.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Zoeller, M.; Plano, R.; Somalwar, S.V.; Thomson, G.B.

    2002-01-01

    CVD diamond detectors are of interest for charged particle detection and tracking due to their high radiation tolerance. In this article, we present, for the first time, beam test results from recently manufactured CVD diamond strip detectors and their behavior under low doses of electrons from a β-source and the performance before and after intense (>10 15 /cm 2 ) proton- and pion-irradiations. We find that low dose irradiation increase the signal-to-noise ratio (pumping of the signal) and slightly deteriorate the spatial resolution. Intense irradiation with protons 2.2x10 15 p/cm 2 lowers the signal-to-noise ratio slightly. Intense irradiation with pions 2.9x10 15 π/cm 2 lowers the signal-to-noise ratio more. The spatial resolution of the diamond sensors improves after irradiations

  15. Performance of irradiated CVD diamond micro-strip sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, W.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bertuccio, G.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; D' Angelo, P.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Hallewell, G.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Kass, R.; Koeth, T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Mac Lynne, L.; Manfredotti, C.; Meier, D. E-mail: dirk.meier@cern.ch; Mishina, M.; Moroni, L.; Noomen, J.; Oh, A.; Pan, L.S.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Perera, L.; Pirollo, S.; Procario, M.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Rousseau, L.; Rudge, A.; Russ, J.; Sala, S.; Sampietro, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Trischuk, W.; Tromson, D.; Vittone, E.; Walsh, A.M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; Wetstein, M.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Zoeller, M.; Plano, R.; Somalwar, S.V.; Thomson, G.B

    2002-01-11

    CVD diamond detectors are of interest for charged particle detection and tracking due to their high radiation tolerance. In this article, we present, for the first time, beam test results from recently manufactured CVD diamond strip detectors and their behavior under low doses of electrons from a {beta}-source and the performance before and after intense (>10{sup 15}/cm{sup 2}) proton- and pion-irradiations. We find that low dose irradiation increase the signal-to-noise ratio (pumping of the signal) and slightly deteriorate the spatial resolution. Intense irradiation with protons 2.2x10{sup 15} p/cm{sup 2} lowers the signal-to-noise ratio slightly. Intense irradiation with pions 2.9x10{sup 15} {pi}/cm{sup 2} lowers the signal-to-noise ratio more. The spatial resolution of the diamond sensors improves after irradiations.

  16. Performance of irradiated CVD diamond micro-strip sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, W; Bergonzo, P; Bertuccio, G; Bogani, F; Borchi, E; Brambilla, A; Bruzzi, Mara; Colledani, C; Conway, J; D'Angelo, P; Dabrowski, W; Delpierre, P A; Deneuville, A; Dulinski, W; van Eijk, B; Fallou, A; Fizzotti, F; Foulon, F; Friedl, M; Gan, K K; Gheeraert, E; Hallewell, G D; Han, S; Hartjes, F G; Hrubec, Josef; Husson, D; Kagan, H; Kania, D R; Kaplon, J; Kass, R; Koeth, T W; Krammer, Manfred; Lo Giudice, A; Lü, R; MacLynne, L; Manfredotti, C; Meier, D; Mishina, M; Moroni, L; Noomen, J; Oh, A; Pan, L S; Pernicka, Manfred; Peitz, A; Perera, L P; Pirollo, S; Procario, M; Riester, J L; Roe, S; Rousseau, L; Rudge, A; Russ, J; Sala, S; Sampietro, M; Schnetzer, S R; Sciortino, S; Stelzer, H; Stone, R; Suter, B; Tapper, R J; Tesarek, R J; Trischuk, W; Tromson, D; Vittone, E; Walsh, A M; Wedenig, R; Weilhammer, Peter; Wetstein, M; White, C; Zeuner, W; Zöller, M

    2002-01-01

    CVD diamond detectors are of interest for charged particle detection and tracking due to their high radiation tolerance. In this article we present, for the first time, beam test results from recently manufactured CVD diamond strip detectors and their behavior under low doses of electrons from a $\\beta$-source and the performance before and after intense ($>10^{15}/{\\rm cm^2}$) proton- and pion-irradiations. We find that low dose irradiations increase the signal-to-noise ratio (pumping of the signal) and slightly deteriorate the spatial resolution. Intense irradiations with protons ($2.2\\times 10^{15}~p/{\\rm cm^2}$) lowers the signal-to-noise ratio slightly. Intense irradiation with pions ($2.9\\times 10^{15}~\\pi/{\\rm cm^2}$) lowers the signal-to-noise ratio more. The spatial resolution of the diamond sensors improves after irradiations.

  17. Performance of irradiated CVD diamond micro-strip sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, W.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bertuccio, G.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; D'Angelo, P.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; van Eijk, B.; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K. K.; Gheeraert, E.; Hallewell, G.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Kass, R.; Koeth, T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; mac Lynne, L.; Manfredotti, C.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Moroni, L.; Noomen, J.; Oh, A.; Pan, L. S.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Perera, L.; Pirollo, S.; Procario, M.; Riester, J. L.; Roe, S.; Rousseau, L.; Rudge, A.; Russ, J.; Sala, S.; Sampietro, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R. J.; Tesarek, R.; Trischuk, W.; Tromson, D.; Vittone, E.; Walsh, A. M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; Wetstein, M.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Zoeller, M.; Plano, R.; Somalwar, S. V.; Thomson, G. B.

    2002-01-01

    CVD diamond detectors are of interest for charged particle detection and tracking due to their high radiation tolerance. In this article, we present, for the first time, beam test results from recently manufactured CVD diamond strip detectors and their behavior under low doses of electrons from a β-source and the performance before and after intense (>10 15/cm 2) proton- and pion-irradiations. We find that low dose irradiation increase the signal-to-noise ratio (pumping of the signal) and slightly deteriorate the spatial resolution. Intense irradiation with protons 2.2×10 15 p/ cm2 lowers the signal-to-noise ratio slightly. Intense irradiation with pions 2.9×10 15 π/ cm2 lowers the signal-to-noise ratio more. The spatial resolution of the diamond sensors improves after irradiations.

  18. Cross-talk studies on FPCB of double-sided silicon micro-strip detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Lei; Li, Zhankui; Li, Haixia; Wang, Pengfei; Wang, Zhusheng; Chen, Cuihong; Liu, Fengqiong; Li, Ronghua; Wang, Xiuhua; Li, Chunyan; Zu, Kailing

    2014-01-01

    Double-sided silicon micro-strip detector's parameters and a test method and the results of cross-talk of FPCB are given in this abstract. In addition, the value of our detector's readout signal has little relation to FPCB's cross-talk.

  19. Linearity discontinuities in Xe-filled X-ray microstrip detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zavattini, G.; Feroci, M.; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl

    1997-01-01

    A prototype Xe + 10% CH4 microstrip detector was used to study the K-edge discontinuity in the pulse-height distribution as a function of the energy of incident X-rays. The electronics used was such that a pulse-shape rejection could be made of K-fluorescence reabsorption in the detector. The mea...

  20. Assembly and validation of the SSD silicon microstrip detector of ALICE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, A.P.; Kuijer, P.G.; Nooren, G.J.L.; Oskamp, C.J.; Sokolov, A.N.; van den Brink, A.

    2006-01-01

    The Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) forms the two outermost layers of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) of ALICE. The SSD detector consists of 1698 double-sided silicon microstrip modules. The electrical connection between silicon sensor and front-end electronics is made via TAB-bonded

  1. Enabling technologies for silicon microstrip tracking detectors at the HL-LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feld, L.; Karpinski, W.; Klein, K.

    2016-04-01

    While the tracking detectors of the ATLAS and CMS experiments have shown excellent performance in Run 1 of LHC data taking, and are expected to continue to do so during LHC operation at design luminosity, both experiments will have to exchange their tracking systems when the LHC is upgraded to the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) around the year 2024. The new tracking systems need to operate in an environment in which both the hit densities and the radiation damage will be about an order of magnitude higher than today. In addition, the new trackers need to contribute to the first level trigger in order to maintain a high data-taking efficiency for the interesting processes. Novel detector technologies have to be developed to meet these very challenging goals. The German groups active in the upgrades of the ATLAS and CMS tracking systems have formed a collaborative ''Project on Enabling Technologies for Silicon Microstrip Tracking Detectors at the HL-LHC'' (PETTL), which was supported by the Helmholtz Alliance ''Physics at the Terascale'' during the years 2013 and 2014. The aim of the project was to share experience and to work together on key areas of mutual interest during the R and D phase of these upgrades. The project concentrated on five areas, namely exchange of experience, radiation hardness of silicon sensors, low mass system design, automated precision assembly procedures, and irradiations. This report summarizes the main achievements.

  2. Enabling technologies for silicon microstrip tracking detectors at the HL-LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feld, L.; Karpinski, W.; Klein, K. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). 1. Physikalisches Institut B; Collaboration: The PETTL Collaboration; and others

    2016-04-15

    While the tracking detectors of the ATLAS and CMS experiments have shown excellent performance in Run 1 of LHC data taking, and are expected to continue to do so during LHC operation at design luminosity, both experiments will have to exchange their tracking systems when the LHC is upgraded to the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) around the year 2024. The new tracking systems need to operate in an environment in which both the hit densities and the radiation damage will be about an order of magnitude higher than today. In addition, the new trackers need to contribute to the first level trigger in order to maintain a high data-taking efficiency for the interesting processes. Novel detector technologies have to be developed to meet these very challenging goals. The German groups active in the upgrades of the ATLAS and CMS tracking systems have formed a collaborative ''Project on Enabling Technologies for Silicon Microstrip Tracking Detectors at the HL-LHC'' (PETTL), which was supported by the Helmholtz Alliance ''Physics at the Terascale'' during the years 2013 and 2014. The aim of the project was to share experience and to work together on key areas of mutual interest during the R and D phase of these upgrades. The project concentrated on five areas, namely exchange of experience, radiation hardness of silicon sensors, low mass system design, automated precision assembly procedures, and irradiations. This report summarizes the main achievements.

  3. P-spray implant optimization for the fabrication of n-in-p microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleta, Celeste; Lozano, Manuel; Pellegrini, Giulio; Campabadal, Francesca; Rafi, Joan Marc; Ullan, Miguel

    2007-01-01

    This work reports on an optimization study of the p-spray profile for the fabrication of n-in-p microstrip silicon detectors. A thorough simulation process of the expected electrical performance of different p-spray technologies was carried out. The best technological options for the p-spray implantation were chosen for the fabrication of miniature n-in-p microstrip detectors on high resistivity FZ wafers at the IMB-CNM clean room. The main conclusions derived from the simulations, and the electrical performance of a sample of the fabricated devices is presented

  4. Developing a fast simulator for irradiated silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Diez Gonzalez-Pardo, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Simulation software for irradiated silicon detectors has been developed on the basis of an already existing C++ simulation software called TRACS[1]. This software has been already proven useful in understanding non-irradiated silicon diodes and microstrips. In addition a wide variety of user-focus features has been implemented to improve on TRACS flexibility. Such features include an interface to allow any program to leverage TRACS functionalities, a configuration file and improved documentation.

  5. Gas microstrip detectors based on flexible printed circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomon, M.; Crowe, K.; Faszer, W.; Lindsay, P.; Curran Maier, J.M.

    1995-09-01

    We have studied the properties of a new type of Gas Microstrip Counter built using flexible printed circuit technology. We describe the manufacturing procedures, the assembly of the device, as well as its operation under a variety of conditions, gases and types of radiation. We also describe two new passivation materials, Tantalum and Niobium, which produce effective surfaces. (author)

  6. Performance of a silicon microstrip detector in a high radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, C.S.; Brown, C.N.; Kapustinsky, J.; Leitch, M.J.; McGaughey, P.L.; Peng, J.C.; Sailor, W.; Holzscheiter, K.; Sadler, M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the performance of a silicon microstrip detector that has been studied in a high rate environment using electron, pion, and proton beams. The pulse height, time response, and leakage current have been studied as a function of particle fluence up to a total integrated flus of about 4 x 10 14 protons/cm 2

  7. Automated testing of microstrip detectors readout system for dual x-ray dual energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolanos, L.; Cabal, A. E.; Diaz, A.; Swientek, K.; Giubellino, P.; Marzari-Chiesa, A.; Prino, F.; Ramello, L.

    2008-01-01

    Circuits that carry out the signal acquisition and processing by multiple channels are required in digital radiography. These circuits should be tested in order to characterize their performance. This paper describes an automated system to control (by a software, from a personal computer) the characterization of a system based on RX64DTH specific integrated circuits with microstrip detectors. The results are shown. (Author)

  8. A Novel Approach for an Integrated Straw Tube-Microstrip Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, E.; Bellucci, F.; Benussi, L.; Bertani, M.; Bianco, S.; Caponero, M. A.; Colonna, D.; Di Falco, F.; Fabbri, F. L.; Felli, F.; Giardoni, M.; La Monaca, A.; Mensitieri, G.; Ortenzi, B.; Pallotta, M.; Paolozzi, A.; Passamonti, L.; Pierluigi, D.; Pucci, C.; Russo, A.; Saviano, G.; Casali, F.; Bettuzzi, M.; Bianconi, D.; Baruffaldi, F.; Perilli, E.; Massa, F.

    2006-06-01

    We report on a novel concept of silicon microstrips and straw tubes detector, where integration is accomplished by a straw module with straws not subjected to mechanical tension in a Rohacell/spl reg/ lattice and carbon fiber reinforced plastic shell. Results on mechanical and test beam performances are reported as well.

  9. A Novel Approach for an Integrated Straw tube-Microstrip Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Basile, E.; Bellucci, F.; Benussi, L.; Bertani, M.; Bianco, S.; Caponero, M. A.; Colonna, D.; Di Falco, F.; Fabbri, F. L.; Felli, F.; Giardoni, M.; La Monaca, A.; Mensitieri, G.; Ortenzi, B.; Pallotta, M.

    2005-01-01

    We report on a novel concept of silicon microstrips and straw tubes detector, where integration is accomplished by a straw module with straws not subjected to mechanical tension in a Rohacell $^{\\circledR}$ lattice and carbon fiber reinforced plastic shell. Results on mechanical and test beam performances are reported on as well.

  10. The bipolar silicon microstrip detector: A proposal for a novel precision tracking device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horisberger, R.

    1990-01-01

    It is proposed to combine the technology of fully depleted microstrip detectors fabricated on n doped high resistivity silicon with the concept of the bipolar transistor. This is done by adding a n ++ doped region inside the normal p + implanted region of the reverse biased p + n diode. The resulting structure has amplifying properties and is referred to as bipaolar pixel transistor. The simplest readout scheme of a bipolar pixel array by an aluminium strip bus leads to the bipolar microstrip detector. The bipolar pixel structure is expected to give a better signal-to-noise performance for the detection of minimum ionizing charged particle tracks than the normal silicon diode strip detector and therefore should allow in future the fabrication of thinner silicon detectors for precision tracking. (orig.)

  11. Analysis and optimal design of Si microstrip detector with overhanging metal electrode

    CERN Document Server

    Ranjan, Kirti; Chatterji, S; Srivastava-Ajay, K; Shivpuri, R K

    2001-01-01

    The harsh radiation environment to be encountered at LHC (large hadron collider) and RHIC (relativistic heavy ion collider) poses a challenging task for the fabrication of Si microstrip detectors. Due to high luminosities, detectors are required to sustain very high voltage operation well exceeding the bias voltage needed to fully deplete them. The "overhanging" metal contact is now a well established technique for improving the breakdown performance of the Si microstrip detector. Based on computer simulation, the influence of various physical and geometrical parameters on the electrical breakdown of the Si detectors equipped with metal overhangs is extensively analysed. Furthermore, optimization of design parameters is performed to achieve breakdown voltages close to maximum realizable values. The simulation results are found to be in good agreement with experimental data. (17 refs).

  12. Passivation of gas microstrip detectors and stability of long-term operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomon, M.; Armitage, J.; Chapman, G.; Dixit, M.; Dubeau, J.; Faszer, W.; Hamel, L.A.; Oakham, G.

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the long-term operation of gas microstrip detectors which have been passivated with a layer of nickel oxide. We have used as the active gas CF 4 /isobutane (80 : 20) and three different types of substrates: Tedlar, glass and Upilex. In all three cases we found that the detectors are stable after passivation and can operate for a month without changes in gain at rates of MHz. The total accumulated charge was approximately 100 mC. ((orig.))

  13. High gain gas microstrip detectors for soft x-ray detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, J.; Barlow, R.; Derbyshire, G.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes development work in which systematic changes in the pitch of the electrode pattern of a Gas Microstrip Detector are explored in the search for higher avalanche gains and enhanced stability. With the cathode width set to half of the pitch, gas gains of >50 000 are comfortably attainable with low detector noise so that x-rays can potentially be detected down to the limit of a single x-ray-produced photoelectron. (author)

  14. Electrical production testing of the D0 Silicon microstrip tracker detector modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D0, SMT Production Testing Group; /Fermilab

    2006-03-01

    The D0 Silicon Microstrip Tracker (SMT) is the innermost system of the D0 detector in Run 2. It consists of 912 detector units, corresponding to 5 different types of assemblies, which add up to a system with 792,576 readout channels. The task entrusted to the Production Testing group was to thoroughly debug, test and grade each detector module before its installation in the tracker. This note describes the production testing sequence and the procedures by which the detector modules were electrically tested and characterized at the various stages of their assembly.

  15. Design optimization of a breast imaging system based on silicon microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stres, S.; Mikuz, M.

    2000-01-01

    A mammographic imaging set-up using silicon microstrip detectors in edge-on geometry was simulated using the GEANT package. Deposited energy in tissue of various thicknesses was evaluated and shown to agree to within 10% with reference calculations. Optimal energies as well as spectra for mammography with silicon detectors were determined by maximizing the figure of merit of a realistic imaging set-up. The scattered to primary radiation ratio was studied for various detector geometries. It was found that fan-shaped detectors are needed to maintain the image quality for divergent photon beams. (author)

  16. Design and development of a vertex reconstruction for the CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) data. Study of gaseous and silicon micro-strips detectors (MSGC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, St.

    2002-12-01

    The work presented in this thesis has contributed to the development of the Compact Muon Solenoid detector (CMS) that will be installed at the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which will start running in summer 2007. This report is organised in three parts: the study of gaseous detectors and silicon micro-strips detectors, and a development of a software for the reconstruction and analysis of CMS data in the framework of ORCA. First, the micro-strips gaseous detectors (MSGC) study was on the ultimate critical irradiation test before their substitution in the CMS tracker. This test showed a really small number of lost anodes and a stable signal to noise ratio. This test proved that the described MSGC fulfill all the requirements to be integrated in the CMS tracker. The following contribution described a study of silicon micro-strips detectors and its electronics exposed to a 40 MHz bunched LHC like beam. These tests indicated a good behaviour of the data acquisition and control system. The signal to noise ratio, the bunch crossing identification and the cluster finding efficiency had also be analysed. The last study concern the design and the development of an ORCA algorithm dedicates to secondary vertex reconstruction. This iterative algorithm aims to be use for b tagging. This part analyse also primary vertex reconstruction in events without and with pile up. (author)

  17. Optimising the design of gas microstrip detectors for soft x-ray detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, J.; Barlow, R.; Derbyshire, G.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes development work in which systematic changes in the electrode pattern of a Gas Microstrip Detector are explored in the search for higher avalanche gains and enhanced stability. It is found that the width of the cathode structure is the main determinant of the detector stability. With the correct cathode width, gas gains of >50 000 are comfortably attainable with low detector noise so that x-rays can potentially be detected down to the limit of a single x-ray-produced photoelectron. (author)

  18. A gas microstrip wide angle X-ray detector for application in synchrotron radiation experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Bateman, J E; Derbyshire, G E; Duxbury, D M; Lipp, J; Mir, J A; Simmons, J E; Spill, E J; Stephenson, R; Dobson, B R; Farrow, R C; Helsby, W I; Mutikainen, R; Suni, I

    2002-01-01

    The Gas Microstrip Detector has counting rate capabilities several orders of magnitude higher than conventional wire proportional counters while providing the same (or better) energy resolution for X-rays. In addition the geometric flexibility provided by the lithographic process combined with the self-supporting properties of the substrate offers many exciting possibilities for X-ray detectors, particularly for the demanding experiments carried out on Synchrotron Radiation Sources. Using experience obtained in designing detectors for Particle Physics we have developed a detector for Wide Angle X-ray Scattering studies. The detector has a fan geometry which makes possible a gas detector with high detection efficiency, sub-millimetre spatial resolution and good energy resolution over a wide range of X-ray energy. The detector is described together with results of experiments carried out at the Daresbury Laboratory Synchrotron Radiation Source.

  19. Use of silicon microstrip detectors in medical diagnostic x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabal Rodriguez, Ana Ester

    2004-11-01

    This work presents the development and characterization of a single photon counting system based on silicon microstrip detectors, used in High Energy Physics experiments, and on low noise multichannel readout electronics. The thesis evaluates the feasibility of dual energy X-ray imaging with silicon microstrip detectors to be applied on medical diagnosis. Dual energy mammographic and angiographic experimental tests have been performed using the developed counting systems proto types, properly phantoms and quasi-monochromatic X ray beams, obtained on a compact dichromatic source based on a conventional X-ray tube and a mosaic crystal. A Monte Carlo simulation of the performance of the experimental setup for dual X-ray imaging has also been carried out using MCNP-4C transport code. We obtained good agreement between MCNP results and the experimental data. (Author)

  20. Performance characteristics and radiation damage results from the Fermilab E706 silicon microstrip detector system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engels, E Jr; Mani, S; Orris, D; Shepard, P F; Weerasundara, P D; Choudhary, B C; Joshi, U; Kapoor, V; Shivpuri, R; Baker, W

    1989-07-01

    A charged particle spectrometer containing a 7120-channel silicon microstrip detector system, one component of Fermilab experiment E706 to study direct photon production in hadron-hadron collisions, was utilized in a run in which 6 million events were recorded. We describe the silicon system, provide early results of track and vertex reconstruction, and present data on the radiation damage to the silicon wafers resulting from the narrow high intensity beam. (orig.).

  1. Design and characterization of integrated front-end transistors in a micro-strip detector technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simi, G.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Boscardin, M.; Bosisio, L.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Dittongo, S.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M.; Gregori, P.; Manghisoni, M.; Morganti, M.; U. Pignatel, G.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Rizzo, G.; Speziali, V.; Zorzi, N.

    2002-01-01

    We present the developments in a research program aimed at the realization of silicon micro-strip detectors with front-end electronics integrated in a high resistivity substrate to be used in high-energy physics, space and medical/industrial imaging applications. We report on the fabrication process developed at IRST (Trento, Italy), the characterization of the basic wafer parameters and measurements of the relevant working characteristics of the integrated transistors and related test structures

  2. Radiation tolerance of the FOXFET biasing scheme for AC-coupled Si microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacchetta, N.; Gotra, Yu.; Bisello, D.; Da Ros, R.; Giraldo, A.; Fusaro, G.; Paccagnella, A.; Univ. di Cagliari; Verzellesi, G.; Univ. di Padova

    1993-01-01

    The radiation response of FOXFETs has been studied for proton, gamma and neutron exposures. The punch-through behavior, which represents the normal FET operating conditions in Si microstrip detectors, has been found to be much less sensitive to radiation damage than threshold voltage. The device performance has been elucidated by means of two-dimensional simulations. The main radiation effects have been also taken into account in the numerical analysis and separately examined

  3. Studies of double-sided silicon microstrip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, S.C. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for Particle Phys.; Bruner, N.L. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for Particle Phys.; Frautschi, M.A. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for Particle Phys.; Hoeferkamp, M.R. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for Particle Phys.; Patton, A. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for Particle Phys.

    1996-12-01

    The electrical characteristics of detectors manufactured by SINTEF/SI with a variety of geometrical and processing options have been investigated. The detectors` leakage current, depletion voltage, bias resistance, interstrip and coupling capacitance, and coupling capacitor breakdown voltage were studied. (orig.).

  4. Studies of double-sided silicon microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, S.C.; Bruner, N.L.; Frautschi, M.A.; Hoeferkamp, M.R.; Patton, A.

    1996-01-01

    The electrical characteristics of detectors manufactured by SINTEF/SI with a variety of geometrical and processing options have been investigated. The detectors' leakage current, depletion voltage, bias resistance, interstrip and coupling capacitance, and coupling capacitor breakdown voltage were studied. (orig.)

  5. Performance of a beam telescope using double sided silicon microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, P.; Menke, S.; Wermes, N.

    1995-04-01

    A beam telescope consisting of four double sided, DC coupled microstrip detectors with VLSI readout electronics has been built and tested in a 70 GeV μ - beam at CERN. A signal to noise ratio of 53:1 and a spatial resolution of 2.7 μm (junction side) and 4.8 μm (ohmic side) have been observed on the best detectors. A telescope performance for a particle track of σ xy =2-3 μm and σ slope =2-3 μrad on the front face of a test object was achieved. (orig.)

  6. SPICE evaluation of the S/N ratio for Si microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candelori, A.; Paccagnella, A.; Padova Univ.; Nardi, F.

    1999-01-01

    SPICE simulations of AC-coupled single-sided Si microstrip detectors connected to the Pre-Shape 32 read-out chip have been performed in order to determine the geometrical characteristics which maximize the signal-to-noise ratio at room temperature. All the resistive and capacitive elements of the detector have been determined as a function of the ω/ρ ratio, by considering experimental and simulated data available in the literature. The SPICE model takes into account all the main noise source in the detector and read-out electronics. The minimum ionizing particle current signal shape characteristics have been introduced in the simulations. Two read-out configurations have been investigated for 6.4 cm and 12.8 cm long detectors. Finally, general guidelines in the detector design have been proposed starting from the simulation results

  7. Study of Silicon Microstrip Detector Properties for the LHCb Silicon Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Lois-Gómez, C; Vázquez-Regueiro, P

    2006-01-01

    The LHCb experiment, at present under construction at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, has been designed to perform high-precision measurements of CP violating phenomena and rare decays in the B meson systems. The need of a good tracking performance and the high density of particles close to the beam pipe lead to the use of silicon microstrip detectors in a significant part of the LHCb tracking system. The Silicon Tracker (ST) will be built using p-on-n silicon detectors with strip pitches of approximately 200 $\\mu$m and readout strips up to 38 cm in length. This thesis describes the tests carried out on silicon microstrip detectors for the ST, starting from the characterization of different prototypes up to the final tests on the detectors that are being installed at CERN. The results can be divided in three main blocks. The first part comprises an exhaustive characterization of several prototype sensors selected as suitable candidates for the detector and was performed in order to decide some design param...

  8. Development of Technique for Testing the Long-Term Stability of Silicon Microstrip Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosinov, A.V.; Maslov, N.I.; Naumov, S.V.; Ovchinnik, V.D.; Starodubtsev, A.F.; Vasiliev, G.P.; Yalovenko, V.I.; Bosisio, L.

    2006-01-01

    An automatic multi-channel set-up prototype for simultaneous testing of the Long-Term Stability (LTS) of more than ten detectors is described. The Inner Tracking System of the ALICE experiment will include about two thousand Double-sided Microstrip Detectors (DSMD). Efficient automatic measurement techniques are crucial for the LTS test, because the corresponding test procedure should be performed on each detector and requires long time, at least two days. By using special adapters for supporting and connecting the bare DSMDs, failing detectors can be screened out before module assembly, thus minimizing the cost. Automated probe stations developed for a special purpose or for microelectronics industry are used for measuring physical static DSMD characteristics and check good-to-bad elements ratio for DSMD. However, automated (or semi-automatic)test benches for studying LTS or testing DSMD long-term stability before developing a detecting module are absent

  9. A possible role for silicon microstrip detectors in nuclear medicine Compton imaging of positron emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Scannavini, M G; Royle, G J; Cullum, I; Raymond, M; Hall, G; Iles, G

    2002-01-01

    Collimation of gamma-rays based on Compton scatter could provide in principle high resolution and high sensitivity, thus becoming an advantageous method for the imaging of radioisotopes of clinical interest. A small laboratory prototype of a Compton camera is being constructed in order to initiate studies aimed at assessing the feasibility of Compton imaging of positron emitters. The design of the camera is based on the use of a silicon collimator consisting of a stack of double-sided, AC-coupled microstrip detectors (area 6x6 cm sup 2 , 500 mu m thickness, 128 channels/side). Two APV6 chips are employed for signal readout on opposite planes of each detector. This work presents the first results on the noise performance of the silicon strip detectors. Measurements of the electrical characteristics of the detector are also reported. On the basis of the measured noise, an angular resolution of approximately 5 deg. is predicted for the Compton collimator.

  10. Build-up of the silicon micro-strip detector array in ETF of HIRFL-CSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Pengfei; Li Zhankui; Li Haixia

    2014-01-01

    Silicon micro-strip detectors have been widely used in the world-famous nuclear physics laboratories due to their better position resolution and energy resolution. Double-sided silicon micro-strip detectors with a position resolution of 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm, have been fabricated in the IMP (Institute of Modern Physics, CAS) by using microelectronics technology. These detectors have been used in the ETF (External Target Facility) of HIRFL-CSR, as ΔE detectors of the ΔE-E telescope system and the track detectors. With the help of flexibility printed circuit board (FPCB) and the integrated ASIC chips, a compact multi-channel front-end electronic board has been designed to fulfill the acquisition of the energy and position information of the Silicon micro-strip detectors. It is described in this paper that the build-up of the Silicon micro-strip detector array in ETF of HIRFL-CSR, the determination of the energy resolution of the detector units, and the energy resolution of approximately 1% obtained for 5∼9 MeV α particles in vacuum. (authors)

  11. A silicon microstrip detector in a magnetic spectrometer for high-resolution electron scattering experiments at the S-DALINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenhardt, A.W.; Bonnes, U.; Burda, O.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Platz, M.; Richter, A.; Watzlawik, S.

    2006-01-01

    A silicon microstrip detector was developed as focal plane detector of the 169.7 deg. magic angle double-focussing spectrometer at the superconducting Darmstadt electron linear accelerator (S-DALINAC). It allows experiments with minimum ionizing electrons at data rates up to 100 kHz, utilizing the maximum resolution of the spectrometer achievable in dispersion-matching mode

  12. Microstrip silicon detectors of the monitoring and triggering systems in the E-161 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogolyubskij, M.Yu.; Kurchaninov, L.L.; Moiseev, A.M.; Semenov, P.A.; Leflat, A.K.; Sekhniaidze, G.G.

    1991-01-01

    A monitoring and triggering system based on microstrip silicon detectors (MSD) and fast-response low-noise electronics with the number of the readout channels equal to 896, is described. The PMS noise is ENC=25x10 3 e - with the signal integration time of 50 ns. The probability of registering a noise pulse by one channel during data readout cycle is not more than 2.5x10 -6 . The time resolution (FWHM) is (16±3) ns. 17 refs.; 7 figs

  13. FILTRES: a 128 channels VLSI mixed front-end readout electronic development for microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anstotz, F.; Hu, Y.; Michel, J.; Sohler, J.L.; Lachartre, D.

    1998-01-01

    We present a VLSI digital-analog readout electronic chain for silicon microstrip detectors. The characteristics of this circuit have been optimized for the high resolution tracker of the CERN CMS experiment. This chip consists of 128 channels at 50 μm pitch. Each channel is composed by a charge amplifier, a CR-RC shaper, an analog memory, an analog processor, an output FIFO read out serially by a multiplexer. This chip has been processed in the radiation hard technology DMILL. This paper describes the architecture of the circuit and presents test results of the 128 channel full chain chip. (orig.)

  14. An X-ray imager based on silicon microstrip detector and coded mask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Monte, E.; Costa, E.; Di Persio, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Frutti, M.; Lapshov, I.; Lazzarotto, F.; Mastropietro, M.; Morelli, E.; Pacciani, L.; Porrovecchio, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Rubini, A.; Soffitta, P.; Tavani, M.; Argan, A.

    2007-01-01

    SuperAGILE is the X-ray monitor of AGILE, a satellite mission for gamma-ray astronomy, and it is the first X-ray imaging instrument based on the technology of the silicon microstrip detectors combined with a coded aperture imaging technique. The SuperAGILE detection plane is composed of four 1-D silicon microstrip detector modules, mechanically coupled to tungsten coded mask units. The detector strips are separately and individually connected to the input analogue channels of the front-end electronics, composed of low-noise and low-power consumption VLSI ASIC chips. SuperAGILE can produce 1-D images with 6 arcmin angular resolution and ∼2-3 arcmin localisation capability, for intense sources, in a field of view composed of two orthogonal areas of 107 deg. x 68 deg. The time resolution is 2 μs, the overall dead time is ∼5 μs and the electronic noise is ∼7.5 keV full-width at half-maximum. The resulting instrument is very compact (40x40x14 cm 3 ), light (10 kg) and has low power consumption (12 W). AGILE is a mission of the Agenzia Spaziale Italiana and its launch is planned in 2007 in a low equatorial Earth orbit. In this contribution we present SuperAGILE and discuss its performance and scientific objectives

  15. Prototype Si microstrip sensors for the CDF-II ISL detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hara, K; Kanao, K; Kim, S; Ogasawara, M; Ohsugi, T; Shimojima, M; Takikawa, K

    1999-01-01

    Prototype Si microstrip sensors for the CDF-II ISL were fabricated by Hamamatsu Photonics and SEIKO Instruments using 4'' technology. The sensor is AC coupled and double-sided forming a stereo angle of 1.207 degree sign . The strip pitch is 112 mu m on both sides. The main differences between the two manufacturers lie on the technologies of passivation and the structure of coupling capacitors. We describe the design of the sensor and evaluation results of the performance. The evaluations include the total and individual strip currents and interstrip capacitance measured before and after sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma irradiation. (author)

  16. Silicon microstrip detector development in the Institute for High Energy Physics Zeuthen, GDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, W.; Nowak, W.D.; Truetzschler, K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that in regard of the growing interest to study short living particles demanding for high resolution vertex detectors the authors started to build Si microstrip detectors. The first detector generation was characterized by a small area of silicon and a readout via printed circuit board fan out. Now they can assemble detectors with larger areas and VLSI readout. A special cleanroom has been built. Equipment and tools necessary are available. Silicon wafers and thick film hybrid circuits are fabricated under collaboration by the GDR industry. Applications of their detectors were several test-runs at CERN to calibrate the L3 time expansion chamber (TEC) and the L3 muon chambers. A 10-layer telescope is designed now and it is planned to calibrate a high resolution scintillation fiber target. Future applications will be high resolution vertex detectors, e.g. L3 upgrading (LEP, CERN) or KEDR (VEPP-5, Novosibirsk). Further investigations will concern AC coupled strip detectors (single and double sided) and pixel and/or pad detectors

  17. Scientific performances of the XAA1.2 front-end chip for silicon microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Monte, Ettore; Soffitta, Paolo; Morelli, Ennio; Pacciani, Luigi; Porrovecchio, Geiland; Rubini, Alda; Uberti, Olga; Costa, Enrico; Di Persio, Giuseppe; Donnarumma, Immacolata; Evangelista, Yuri; Feroci, Marco; Lazzarotto, Francesco; Mastropietro, Marcello; Rapisarda, Massimo

    2007-01-01

    The XAA1.2 is a custom ASIC chip for silicon microstrip detectors adapted by Ideas for the SuperAGILE instrument on board the AGILE space mission. The chip is equipped with 128 input channels, each one containing a charge preamplifier, shaper, peak detector and stretcher. The most important features of the ASIC are the extended linearity, low noise and low power consumption. The XAA1.2 underwent extensive laboratory testing in order to study its commandability and functionality and evaluate its scientific performances. In this paper we describe the XAA1.2 features, report the laboratory measurements and discuss the results emphasizing the scientific performances in the context of the SuperAGILE front-end electronics

  18. Beam splash effects on ATLAS silicon microstrip detectors evaluated using 1-w Nd YAG laser

    CERN Document Server

    Hara, K; Kohriki, T; Kuwano, T; Moorhead, G F; Terada, S; Unno, Y

    2005-01-01

    On an incident of accelerator beam loss, the tracking detector located close to the beam line is subjected to receive intensive radiation in a short period. We used a 1-W focused Nd: YAG laser and simulated the effects on the ATLAS microstrip detector. The laser corresponds to intensity of up to 1 multiplied by 109mips/pulse with a pulse width of about 10 ns. We observed breaks on Al strips on extreme conditions, depending on the laser intensity and bias voltage applied to the silicon sensor. The break can be interpreted as the oxide breakdown due to a large voltage locally created across the oxide by the intensive signal charges. The robustness of the Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) module including readout ASICs is also evaluated.

  19. A VLSI front-end circuit for microstrip silicon detectors for medical imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beccherle, R.; Cisternino, A.; Guerra, A. Del; Folli, M.; Marchesini, R.; Bisogni, M.G.; Ceccopieri, A.; Rosso, V.; Stefanini, A.; Tripiccione, R.; Kipnis, I.

    1999-01-01

    An analog CMOS-Integrated Circuit has been developed as Front-End for a double-sided microstrip silicon detector. The IC processes and discriminates signals in the 5-30 keV energy range. Main features are low noise and precise timing information. Low noise is achieved by optimizing the cascoded integrator with the 8 pF detector capacitance and by using an inherently low noise 1.2 μm CMOS technology. Timing information is provided by a double discriminator architecture. The output of the circuit is a digital pulse. The leading edge is determined by a fixed threshold discriminator, while the trailing edge is provided by a zero crossing discriminator. In this paper we first describe the architecture of the Front-End chip. We then present the performance of the chip prototype in terms of noise, minimum discrimination threshold and time resolution

  20. Construction of the new silicon microstrips tracker for the Phase-II ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Zhijun; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The inner detector of the present ATLAS detector has been designed and developed to function in the environment of the present Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At the next-generation tracking detector proposed for the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the so-called ATLAS Phase-II Upgrade, the particle densities and radiation levels will be higher by as much as a factor of ten. The new detectors must be faster, they need to be more highly segmented, and covering more area. They also need to be more resistant to radiation, and they require much greater power delivery to the front-end systems. For those reasons, the inner tracker of the ATLAS detector must be redesigned and rebuilt completely. The design of the ATLAS Upgrade inner tracker (ITk) has already been defined. It consists of several layers of silicon particle detectors. The innermost layers will be composed of silicon pixel sensors, and the outer layers will consist of silicon microstrip sensors. This paper will focus on the latest research and development act...

  1. The depletion properties of silicon microstrip detectors with variable strip pitch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krizmanic, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the depletion properties of trapezoidal shaped silicon microstrip detectors which have variable strip pitch. Four types of detectors were examined: three detectors have constant strip width and a fourth has a varying strip width. The detectors are single sided with readout performed via p + strips. The depletion properties of the devices were measured using two different methods. The first used capacitance versus voltage measurements, while the second used a 1060 nm wavelength laser coupled to a single mode fiber with a mode field diameter less than 10 μm. The small laser spot size allowed for the depletion depth to be measured in a localized area of the detector. The laser induced charge on an electrode was measured as a function of reverse bias voltage using a sensitive charge preamplifier. The depletion voltages of the detectors demonstrate a strong dependence upon the ratio of strip width to strip pitch. Moreover, these measurements show that a large value of this ratio yields a lower depletion voltage and vice versa. (orig.)

  2. SPICE evaluation of the S/N ratio for Si microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candelori, A.; Paccagnella, A.; Nardi, F.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.

    1999-01-01

    SPICE simulations of ac-coupled single-sided Si microstrip detectors connected to the PreShape 32 read-out chip have been performed in order to determine the geometrical characteristics (i.e., the strip pitch p and width w) which maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. All of the resistive and capacitive elements of the detector have been determined as a function of the w/p ratio by considering experimental and simulated data available in literature. The SPICE model the authors propose in this work takes into account all the main noise sources in the detector and read-out electronics. The minimum ionizing particle current signal shape has been introduced in the simulations. Two read-out configurations (every strip or every second strip) have been investigated for 6.4- and 12.8-cm-long detectors. The equivalent noise charge as determined by the simulations has been compared with analytical calculations, in order to determine the limits and the corrections to a simplified analytical noise model. Finally, general guidelines for the detector design have been proposed, based on the simulation results

  3. The 40x40cm2 gaseous microstrip detector Micromegas for the high-luminosity COMPASS experiment at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernet, C.; Abbon, P.; Ball, J.; Bedfer, Y.; Delagnes, E.; Giganon, A.; Kunne, F.; Le Goff, J.-M.; Magnon, A.; Marchand, C.; Neyret, D.; Panebianco, S.; Pereira, H.; Platchkov, S.; Procureur, S.; Rebourgeard, P.; Tarte, G.; Thers, D.

    2005-01-01

    The measurements in the COMPASS experiment at CERN require high-resolution tracking detectors, with low radiation length and high-rate capability. For this purpose we have developed and optimized a gaseous microstrip detector 'Micromegas'. Twelve planes with 1024 strips each, assembled in 3 stations of 4 views XYUV, are now being operated with success in the COMPASS environment. We describe here the performances and results obtained

  4. Model analysis and experimental characterization of a microstrip vertex detector for a e+e- collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, C.P.

    1989-09-01

    This thesis is constituted by several topics, apparently weakly correlated, but that are all addressed to improve the performances of the ALEPH microvertex detector both in the present version and in the upgraded one with JFET-CMOS electronics. A wide program of computer simulations about the upgraded JFET-CMOS version of the read-out electronics have been carried out to test its working principle and radiation hardness measurements have been performed on the prototypes of the same electronics to test its capability to stand the radiation environment foreseen in ALEPH. Extensive calculations of the capacitances in a microstrip detector are presented and their influence on the detector, both from the point of view of its noise performances and of the capacitive charge division method, has been analyzed theoretically, both through analytic calculations and numerical simulations; experimental measurements on the same relevant capacitances are discussed. Strictly connected to this point a computer code simulating the interaction of a minimum ionizing particle with the detector has been written and algorithms to determine the interaction point have been studied. This code has been later inserted in the Monte Carlo program of ALEPH. A point not strictly connected to ALEPH and still treated here is the analysis of the noise of two JFET devices, that is however interesting not as much for the results themselves, as for the analysis technique used that brought to identify noise sources that are usually difficult to detect and neglected. (orig.)

  5. Improvement in breakdown characteristics with multiguard structures in microstrip silicon detectors for CMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Candelori, A.; Rold, M. Da; Descovich, M.; Kaminski, A.; Messineo, A.; Rizzo, F.; Verzellesi, G.

    2001-01-01

    To obtain full charge collection the CMS silicon detectors should be able to operate at high bias voltage. We observed that multiguard structures enhance the breakdown performance of the devices on several tens of baby detectors designed for CMS. The beneficial effects of the multiguard structures still remains after the strong neutron irradiation performed to simulate the operation at the LHC

  6. Improvement in breakdown characteristics with multiguard structures in microstrip silicon detectors for CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Bacchetta, N; Candelori, A; Da Rold, M; Descovich, M; Kaminski, A; Messineo, A; Rizzo, F; Verzellesi, G

    2001-01-01

    To obtain full charge collection the CMS silicon detectors should be able to operate at high bias voltage. We observed that multiguard structures enhance the breakdown performance of the devices on several tens of baby detectors designed for CMS. The beneficial effects of the multiguard structures still remains after the strong neutron irradiation performed to simulate the operation at the LHC. (3 refs).

  7. Study of a microstrip gas detector for the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clergeau, J. F.

    1997-01-01

    The micro-strip gas chambers (MSGC) were realized due to the technological advances in the field of micro-electronics. The wire of usual gas counters is replaced in these detectors by metallic stripes as a periodic sequence of electrodes (anodes and cathodes) spaced by around 200 μm. At a distance of 3 mm above the strip containing substrate, a metallic plane is placed, thus defining the gaseous room where the passage of a charged particle produces by ionization a primary electron signal collected by the detector anodes. Due to its granularity a MSGC can operate under very high particle fluxes since charge can be collected very rapidly. Also, the impact parameters can be determined with high accuracy due to the high space and time resolutions. The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) or the MSGC detectors planned to equip one of the experiments proposed for LHC should detect, in extreme operational conditions, the particle impacts in a 4 Tesla magnetic field, for around ten years and for a particle flux of around 10 4 Hz/mm 2 . The CMS detector is described in chapter 2. The operation principle and the problems encountered in the development of MSGC detectors are summarized in chapter 3. The chapter 4 is dedicated to the study of the performances of MSGCs in magnetic fields. In the chapters 5 to 7 the processing of the signal from detectors of this type is described, particularly, the performances of various ways of treat the signal in terms of detection efficiency and counting loads are presented.The chapter 8 presents the results obtained with the prototype obtained at IPNL while the chapter 9 gives the conclusions of the performed works. (author)

  8. Development of the microstrip silicon detector for imaging of fast processes at a synchrotron radiation beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aulchenko, V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russian Federtion (Russian Federation); Pruuel, E. [Lavrentiev Institute of Hydrodynamics, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russian Federtion (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russian Federtion (Russian Federation); Shekhtman, L. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russian Federtion (Russian Federation); Ten, K. [Lavrentiev Institute of Hydrodynamics, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russian Federtion (Russian Federation); Tolochko, B. [Institute of Solid State chemistry and Mechanochemistry, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russian Federtion (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russian Federtion (Russian Federation); Zhulanov, V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russian Federtion (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-11

    In situ imaging of explosions allows to study material properties under very high pressures and temperatures. Synchrotron radiation (SR) is a powerful tool for such studies because of its unique time structure. Flashes of X-rays from individual bunches in a storage ring are so short that an object under study does not move more than 1–10 μm during exposure. If a detector is able to store images synchronously with bunches of an SR source the time resolution of such method will be determined by the duration of SR flash from individual bunch. New beam line at the VEPP-4M storage ring will allow to get X-Ray flux from each bunch close to 10{sup 6} photons/channel where channel area is 0.05×0.5 mm{sup 2} and average beam energy is about 30 keV. Bunches in the machine can be grouped into trains with 20 ns time gap. In order to meet these requirements a new detector development was started based on Si microstrip technology. The detector with a new dedicated front-end chip will be able to record images with maximum signal equivalent to 10{sup 6} photons/channel, with signal to noise ratio of ∼10{sup 3}, spatial resolution of 50 μm and maximum frame rate of 50 MHz. The detector has to drive very high peak and average currents without affecting the front-end chip, therefore a specific design of Si sensor should be developed. The front-end chip has to provide signal measurements with the dynamic range of about 10{sup 4} or more and recording of the signal to an analogue memory with the rate of 50 MHz. The concept of such detector is discussed in the paper. The results of the simulations of the main detector parameters and the results of the first measurements with the prototype sensors are presented.

  9. Enabling Technologies for Silicon Microstrip Tracking Detectors at the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Barth, C; Bloch, I.; Bögelspacher, F.; de Boer, W.; Daniels, M.; Dierlamm, A.; Eber, R.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Erfle, J.; Feld, L.; Garutti, E.; Gregor, I. -M.; Guthoff, M.; Hartmann, F.; Hauser, M.; Husemann, U.; Jakobs, K.; Junkes, A.; Karpinski, W.; Klein, K.; Kuehn, S.; Lacker, H.; Mahboubi, K.; Müller, Th.; Mussgiller, A.; Nürnberg, A.; Parzefall, U.; Poehlsen, T.; Poley, L.; Preuten, M.; Rehnisch, L.; Sammet, J.; Schleper, P.; Schuwalow, S.; Sperlich, D.; Stanitzki, M.; Steinbrück, G.; Wlochal, M.

    2016-01-01

    While the tracking detectors of the ATLAS and CMS experiments have shown excellent performance in Run 1 of LHC data taking, and are expected to continue to do so during LHC operation at design luminosity, both experiments will have to exchange their tracking systems when the LHC is upgraded to the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) around the year 2024. The new tracking systems need to operate in an environment in which both the hit densities and the radiation damage will be about an order of magnitude higher than today. In addition, the new trackers need to contribute to the first level trigger in order to maintain a high data-taking efficiency for the interesting processes. Novel detector technologies have to be developed to meet these very challenging goals. The German groups active in the upgrades of the ATLAS and CMS tracking systems have formed a collaborative "Project on Enabling Technologies for Silicon Microstrip Tracking Detectors at the HL-LHC" (PETTL), which was supported by the Helmholtz Alliance "Phys...

  10. A gas microstrip detector for X-ray imaging with readout of the anode by resistive division

    CERN Document Server

    Bateman, J E; Lodge, A B; Stephenson, R; Mutikainen, R; Suni, I; Morse, J

    2002-01-01

    The results are presented of a development programme aimed at the validation of the key concepts and technologies for the construction of a two-dimensional X-ray detector based on gas microstrip detector technology using resistive division along the anode to achieve the second dimension. A prototype detector and its associated electronic readout system have been developed which demonstrate the capability of a spatial resolution (standard deviation) of approximately ((1)/(1000)) of the working aperture combined with readout rates of up to 400 kHz per anode. Test results and a description of the position sensing circuitry are given.

  11. A time digitizer for the microstrip detectors of the PANDA MVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riccardi, Alberto; Brinkmann, Kai-Thomas; Di Pietro, Valentino [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen (Germany); Garbolino, Sara; Rivetti, Angelo; Rolo, Manuel [INFN Sezione di Torino, Torino (Italy); Collaboration: PANDA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    In nuclear detectors the information on the energy of the particle is usually obtained by measuring the amplitude of the signal delivered by the sensor. The low voltage power supply used in modern deep submicron technologies constrain the maximum dynamic range of the ADC. Still, the energy information can be obtained with time-based techniques, in which the energy is associated with the duration of the signal through the Time over Threshold method. This work is focused on the PANDA Micro Vertex Detector and explores the possibility of applying a time-based readout approach for the microstrip sensors. In PANDA, the strip system must cope with hit rates up to 50 kHz per channel. Therefore, the front-end output must be relatively short, this implies that the clock resolution is not enough to measure the signal duration, so it is necessary to use a Time to Digital Converter. The front-end and the TDC structure are designed in a 0.11μm CMOS process. The TDC chosen is based on an analog clock interpolator because it combines good time resolution with a fairly simple implementation and low power consumption. In the presentation an overview of the analog part of the PASTA (PANDA strip ASIC) is presented.

  12. Development of radiation hard microstrip detectors for the CBM silicon tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterji, Sudeep [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Radiation damage in Silicon microstrip detectors is of the one main concerns for the development of the Silicon Tracking System (STS) in the planned Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR. The STS will consist of Double Sided Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSD) having pitch around 60 {mu}m, width 20 {mu}m, stereo angle of {+-}7.5{sup 0} on n and p sides with double metallization on either side making it challenging to fabricate.We are using 3-dimensional TCAD simulation tools from SYNOPSYS to carry out process (using Sentaurus Process) and device (using Sentaurus Device) simulations.We have simulated the impact of radiation damage in DSSDs by changing the effective carrier concentration (N{sub eff}) with fluence using the Hamburg model. The change in minority carrier life time has been taken into account using the Kraners model and the Perugia trap model has been used to simulate the traps. We have also extracted macroscopic parameters like Coupling Capacitance, Interstrip Capacitance (both DC and AC), Interstrip Resistance of DSSDs using Mixed Mode simulation (using SPICE with Sentaurus Device) and studied the variation of these parameters with fluence. The simulation results have been compared to the experimental results. We also simulated transients by passing a Heavy Ion through a DSSD and studied the charge collection performance.

  13. Microstrip silicon detectors in a bent crystal based collimation system: The UA9 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolognini, D.

    2010-01-01

    In a hadron accelerator like Lhc, a collimation system needs to be developed to protect the accelerator itself from the beam loss damage, increasing the beam luminosity. At present, a classical robust multi-stage collimation system (based on amorphous jaws) allows to protect Lhc, but limits the luminosity to the 40% of the nominal value. In order to solve this problem, a series of low-impedance collimation systems is being developed for the second Lhc collimation phase: among these, a key role could be played by bent crystals. In a bent crystal, in fact, charged particles can be deviated in a given direction with a high efficiency, reducing the impedance and increasing the luminosity. After the satisfactory results on extracted beams, it was decided to test bent crystals on a circular accelerator (the Super Proton Synchrotron Sps at CERN): the UA9 experiment was born. In order to qualify the crystal behavior, a tracking system has been developed: the system is based on microstrip silicon detectors readout by self-triggering ASICs with a spatial resolution of the order of 5 μm; the system, completely remotely controlled and based on the optical fiber transmission, would be able to measure the beam halo phase space x - x 1 . This paper, after a brief introduction of the UA9 experiment, will describe the tracking system and the first results obtained in the commissioning phase and data takings with a detector prototype.

  14. Photon counting microstrip X-ray detectors with GaAs sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruat, M.; Andrä, M.; Bergamaschi, A.; Barten, R.; Brückner, M.; Dinapoli, R.; Fröjdh, E.; Greiffenberg, D.; Lopez-Cuenca, C.; Lozinskaya, A. D.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Novikov, V. A.; Ramilli, M.; Redford, S.; Ruder, C.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Thattil, D.; Tinti, G.; Tolbanov, O. P.; Tyazhev, A.; Vetter, S.; Zarubin, A. N.; Zhang, J.

    2018-01-01

    High-Z sensors are increasingly used to overcome the poor efficiency of Si sensors above 15 keV, and further extend the energy range of synchrotron and FEL experiments. Detector-grade GaAs sensors of 500 μm thickness offer 98% absorption efficiency at 30 keV and 50% at 50 keV . In this work we assess the usability of GaAs sensors in combination with the MYTHEN photon-counting microstrip readout chip developed at PSI. Different strip length and pitch are compared, and the detector performance is evaluated in regard of the sensor material properties. Despite increased leakage current and noise, photon-counting strips mounted with GaAs sensors can be used with photons of energy as low as 5 keV, and exhibit excellent linearity with energy. The charge sharing is doubled as compared to silicon strips, due to the high diffusion coefficient of electrons in GaAs.

  15. Non-invasive characterization and quality assurance of silicon micro-strip detectors using pulsed infrared laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, P.

    2016-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR is composed of 8 tracking stations consisting of roughly 1300 double sided silicon micro-strip detectors of 3 different dimensions. For the quality assurance of prototype micro-strip detectors a non-invasive detector charaterization is developed. The test system is using a pulsed infrared laser for charge injection and characterization, called Laser Test System (LTS). The system is aimed to develop a set of characterization procedures which are non-invasive (non-destructive) in nature and could be used for quality assurances of several silicon micro-strip detectors in an efficient, reliable and reproducible way. The procedures developed (as reported here) uses the LTS to scan sensors with a pulsed infra-red laser driven by step motor to determine the charge sharing in-between strips and to measure qualitative uniformity of the sensor response over the whole active area. The prototype detector modules which are tested with the LTS so far have 1024 strips with a pitch of 58 μm on each side. They are read-out using a self-triggering prototype read-out electronic ASIC called n-XYTER. The LTS is designed to measure sensor response in an automatized procedure at several thousand positions across the sensor with focused infra-red laser light (spot size ≈ 12 μm, wavelength = 1060 nm). The pulse with a duration of ≈ 10 ns and power ≈ 5 mW of the laser pulse is selected such, that the absorption of the laser light in the 300 μm thick silicon sensor produces ≈ 24000 electrons, which is similar to the charge created by minimum ionizing particles (MIP) in these sensors. The laser scans different prototype sensors and various non-invasive techniques to determine characteristics of the detector modules for the quality assurance is reported.

  16. Development of microstrip gas chamber and application to imaging gamma-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimori, T.; Minami, S.; Nagae, T.; Takahashi, T.; Miyagi, T.

    1992-07-01

    We have developed Microstrip Gas Chamber (MSGC) by using Multi-Chip technology which enables high-density assembly of bare LSI chips on a silicon board. Our MSGC was operated steadily with ∼ 10 3 gain more than one week. An energy resolution of 15% (FWHM) for 5.9 keV X-ray of 55 Fe was obtained. With very thin polyimide substrate of 16 μm thickness, two interesting phenomena were observed; one is a strong dependence of gains on the back plane potential, and the other is little time variation of gains. New type of MSGC with a guarding mask of a thin polyimide layer on the cathode edges has been examined to reduce incidental electrical discharges between anode and cathode strips. Furthermore, new approach to reduce the resistivity of the substrate has been examined. By these approaches, the stability of the high gain operation of ∼ 10 4 has been drastically improved. In addition, we discuss the possibility of the application of MSGC to the coded mask X-ray imaging detector for astrophysics. (author)

  17. Micro-strip Metal Foil Detectors for the Beam Profile Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Pugatch, V M; Fedorovitch, O A; Mikhailenko, A V; Prystupa, S V; Pylypchenko, Y

    2005-01-01

    The Micro-strip Metal Foil Detectors (MMFD) designed and used for the Beam Profile Monitoring (BPM) are discussed. Fast particles hitting a metal strip initiate Secondary Electron Emission (SEE) which occurs at 10 - 50 nm surface layers of a strip. The SEE yield is measured by a sensitive Charge Integrator with built-in current-to-frequency converter (1 Hz per 1 fA). The MMFD (deposited onto the 20 μm thick Si-wafer) with 32 Al strips (10 μm wide, 32 μm pitch) has been used for the BPM of the 32 MeV alpha-particle beam at the MPIfK (Heidelberg) Tandem generator for Single-Event-Upset studies of the BEETLE micro-chip. Similar MMFD (0.5 μm thick Ni-strips) with totally removed Si-wafer (by plasma-chemistry, at the working area of 8 x 10 mm2) has been applied for the on-line X-ray BPM at the HASYLAB (DESY). The number of photons (11.3 GeV, mean X-ray energy 18 keV) producing out of a strip a single SEE was evaluated as (1.5 ±0.5)* 104. MMFD has demonstrated stable...

  18. Study the radiation damage effects in Si microstrip detectors for future HEP experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalwani, Kavita, E-mail: kavita.phy@mnit.ac.in [Malaviya National Institute of Technology (MNIT) Jaipur, Jaipur-302017 (India); Jain, Geetika; Dalal, Ranjeet; Ranjan, Kirti; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh [University of Delhi (DU), Delhi-110007 (India)

    2016-07-15

    Silicon (Si) detectors are playing a key role in High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments due to their superior tracking capabilities. In future HEP experiments, like upgrade of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN, the silicon tracking detectors will be operated in a very intense radiation environment. This leads to both surface and bulk damage in Si detectors, which in turn will affect the operating performance of Si detectors. It is important to complement the measurements of the irradiated Si strip detectors with device simulation, which helps in understanding of both the device behavior and optimizing the design parameters needed for the future Si tracking system. An important ingredient of the device simulation is to develop a radiation damage model incorporating both bulk and surface damage. In this work, a simplified two-trap model is incorporated in device simulation to describe the type-inversion. Further, an extensive simulation of effective doping density as well as electric field profile is carried out at different temperatures for various fluences.

  19. Study the radiation damage effects in Si microstrip detectors for future HEP experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalwani, Kavita; Jain, Geetika; Dalal, Ranjeet; Ranjan, Kirti; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    Silicon (Si) detectors are playing a key role in High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments due to their superior tracking capabilities. In future HEP experiments, like upgrade of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN, the silicon tracking detectors will be operated in a very intense radiation environment. This leads to both surface and bulk damage in Si detectors, which in turn will affect the operating performance of Si detectors. It is important to complement the measurements of the irradiated Si strip detectors with device simulation, which helps in understanding of both the device behavior and optimizing the design parameters needed for the future Si tracking system. An important ingredient of the device simulation is to develop a radiation damage model incorporating both bulk and surface damage. In this work, a simplified two-trap model is incorporated in device simulation to describe the type-inversion. Further, an extensive simulation of effective doping density as well as electric field profile is carried out at different temperatures for various fluences.

  20. Performance of a single photon counting microstrip detector for strip pitches down to 10 μm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergamaschi, A.; Broennimann, Ch.; Dinapoli, R.; Eikenberry, E.; Gozzo, F.; Henrich, B.; Kobas, M.; Kraft, P.; Patterson, B.; Schmitt, B.

    2008-01-01

    The MYTHEN detector is a one-dimensional microstrip detector with single photon counting readout optimized for time resolved powder diffraction experiments at the Swiss Light Source (SLS). The system has been successfully tested for many different synchrotron radiation applications including phase contrast and tomographic imaging, small angle scattering, diffraction and time resolved pump and probe experiments for X-ray energies down to 5 keV and counting rate up to 3 MHz. The frontend electronics is designed in order to be coupled to 50 μm pitch microstrip sensors but some interest in enhancing the spatial resolution is arising for imaging and powder diffraction experiments. A test structure with strip pitches in the range 10-50 μm has been tested and the gain and noise on the readout electronics have been measured for the different strip pitches, observing no large difference down to 25 μm. Moreover, the effect of the charge sharing between neighboring strips on the spatial resolution has been quantified by measuring the Point Spread Function (PSF) of the system for the different pitches

  1. Towards Gotthard-II: development of a silicon microstrip detector for the European X-ray Free-Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Andrä, M.; Barten, R.; Bergamaschi, A.; Brückner, M.; Dinapoli, R.; Fröjdh, E.; Greiffenberg, D.; Lopez-Cuenca, C.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Ramilli, M.; Redford, S.; Ruat, M.; Ruder, C.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Thattil, D.; Tinti, G.; Turcato, M.; Vetter, S.

    2018-01-01

    Gotthard-II is a 1-D microstrip detector specifically developed for the European X-ray Free-Electron Laser. It will not only be used in energy dispersive experiments but also as a beam diagnostic tool with additional logic to generate veto signals for the other 2-D detectors. Gotthard-II makes use of a silicon microstrip sensor with a pitch of either 50 μm or 25 μm and with 1280 or 2560 channels wire-bonded to adaptive gain switching readout chips. Built-in analog-to-digital converters and digital memories will be implemented in the readout chip for a continuous conversion and storage of frames for all bunches in the bunch train. The performance of analogue front-end prototypes of Gotthard has been investigated in this work. The results in terms of noise, conversion gain, dynamic range, obtained by means of infrared laser and X-rays, will be shown. In particular, the effects of the strip-to-strip coupling are studied in detail and it is found that the reduction of the coupling effects is one of the key factors for the development of the analogue front-end of Gotthard-II.

  2. Performance of a single photon counting microstrip detector for strip pitches down to 10 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamaschi, A.; Broennimann, Ch.; Dinapoli, R.; Eikenberry, E.; Gozzo, F.; Henrich, B.; Kobas, M.; Kraft, P.; Patterson, B.; Schmitt, B.

    2008-06-01

    The MYTHEN detector is a one-dimensional microstrip detector with single photon counting readout optimized for time resolved powder diffraction experiments at the Swiss Light Source (SLS). The system has been successfully tested for many different synchrotron radiation applications including phase contrast and tomographic imaging, small angle scattering, diffraction and time resolved pump and probe experiments for X-ray energies down to 5 keV and counting rate up to 3 MHz. The frontend electronics is designed in order to be coupled to 50 μm pitch microstrip sensors but some interest in enhancing the spatial resolution is arising for imaging and powder diffraction experiments. A test structure with strip pitches in the range 10-50 μm has been tested and the gain and noise on the readout electronics have been measured for the different strip pitches, observing no large difference down to 25 μm. Moreover, the effect of the charge sharing between neighboring strips on the spatial resolution has been quantified by measuring the Point Spread Function (PSF) of the system for the different pitches.

  3. Evaluation of the x-ray response of a position-sensitive microstrip detector with an integrated readout chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossington, C.; Jaklevic, J.; Haber, C.; Spieler, H.; Reid, J.

    1990-08-01

    The performance of an SVX silicon microstrip detector and its compatible integrated readout chip have been evaluated in response to Rh Kα x-rays (average energy 20.5 keV). The energy and spatial discrimination capabilities, efficient data management and fast readout rates make it an attractive alternative to the CCD and PDA detectors now being offered for x-ray position sensitive diffraction and EXAFS work. The SVX system was designed for high energy physics applications and thus further development of the existing system is required to optimize it for use in practical x-ray experiments. For optimum energy resolution the system noise must be decreased to its previously demonstrated low levels of 2 keV FWHM at 60 keV or less, and the data handling rate of the computer must be increased. New readout chips are now available that offer the potential of better performance. 15 refs., 7 figs

  4. Characterization of silicon microstrip sensors, front-end electronics, and prototype tracking detectors for the CBM experiment at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorokin, Iurii

    2013-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment will explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter in the region of high net baryonic densities. The matter at the extreme conditions will be studied in collisions of a heavy ion beam with a fixed heavy element target. The present work is devoted to the development of the main component of the CBM experiment - the Silicon Tracking System (STS). The STS has to enable reconstruction of up to 1000 charged particle tracks per nucleus-nucleus interaction at the rate of up to 10 MHz, provide a momentum resolution Δp/p of 1 %, and withstand the radiation load of up to 10 14 n eq /cm 2 (n eq -neutron equivalent). The STS will be based on double-sided silicon microstrip sensors, that will be arranged in 8 planes in the aperture of the dipole magnet. Selftriggering readout electronics will be located on the periphery of the detecting planes, and connected to the sensors with low mass microcables. In the stage of R and D, as well as in the stages of pre-series and series production, characterization of the sensors, of the front-end electronics, and of the complete detector modules has to be performed. In the present work the required techniques were developed, and the performance of the latest detector prototypes was evaluated. A particular attention is paid to evaluation of the signal amplitude, as it is one of the most important detector characteristics. Techniques for measuring the passive electrical characteristics of the sensors were developed. These include: the coupling and the interstrip capacitances, the interstrip resistance, the bias resistance, the strip leakage current, the bulk capacitance, and the bulk leakage current. The techniques will be applied for the quality assurance of the sensors during the pre-series and the series production. Extensive characterization of the prototype readout chip, n-XYTER, was performed. The register settings were optimized, and the dependence of the amplitude response on

  5. Characterization of silicon microstrip sensors, front-end electronics, and prototype tracking detectors for the CBM experiment at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorokin, Iurii

    2013-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment will explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter in the region of high net baryonic densities. The matter at the extreme conditions will be studied in collisions of a heavy ion beam with a fixed heavy element target. The present work is devoted to the development of the main component of the CBM experiment - the Silicon Tracking System (STS). The STS has to enable reconstruction of up to 1000 charged particle tracks per nucleus-nucleus interaction at the rate of up to 10 MHz, provide a momentum resolution Δp/p of 1 %, and withstand the radiation load of up to 10{sup 14} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2} (n{sub eq}-neutron equivalent). The STS will be based on double-sided silicon microstrip sensors, that will be arranged in 8 planes in the aperture of the dipole magnet. Selftriggering readout electronics will be located on the periphery of the detecting planes, and connected to the sensors with low mass microcables. In the stage of R and D, as well as in the stages of pre-series and series production, characterization of the sensors, of the front-end electronics, and of the complete detector modules has to be performed. In the present work the required techniques were developed, and the performance of the latest detector prototypes was evaluated. A particular attention is paid to evaluation of the signal amplitude, as it is one of the most important detector characteristics. Techniques for measuring the passive electrical characteristics of the sensors were developed. These include: the coupling and the interstrip capacitances, the interstrip resistance, the bias resistance, the strip leakage current, the bulk capacitance, and the bulk leakage current. The techniques will be applied for the quality assurance of the sensors during the pre-series and the series production. Extensive characterization of the prototype readout chip, n-XYTER, was performed. The register settings were optimized, and the dependence of the

  6. Silicon microstrip detectors in 3D technology for the sLHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parzefall, Ulrich [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany)], E-mail: ulrich.parzefall@physik.uni-freiburg.de; Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco [INFN and Universita' di Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Eckert, Simon [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Eklund, Lars; Fleta, Celeste [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Jakobs, Karl; Kuehn, Susanne; Pahn, Gregor [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Parkes, Chris; Pennicard, David [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Ronchin, Sabina [FBK-irst, Center for Materials and Microsystems, via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Zoboli, Andrea [INFN and Universita' di Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Zorzi, Nicola [FBK-irst, Center for Materials and Microsystems, via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy)

    2009-08-01

    The projected luminosity upgrade of the large hadron collider (LHC), the sLHC, will constitute a challenging radiation environment for tracking detectors. Massive improvements in radiation hardness are required with respect to the LHC. In the layout for the new ATLAS tracker, silicon strip detectors (SSDs) with short strips cover the region from 28 to 60 cm distance to the beam. These SSDs will be exposed to fluences up to 10{sup 15}N{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}, hence radiation resistance is the major concern. It is advantageous to fuse the superior radiation hardness of the 3D design originally conceived for pixel-style applications with the benefits of the well-known planar technology for strip detectors. This is achieved by ganging rows of 3D columns together to form strips. Several prototype sLHC detector modules using 3D SSD with short strips, processed on p-type silicon, and LHC-speed front-end electronics from the present ATLAS semi-conductor tracker (SCT) were built. The modules were tested before and after irradiation to fluences of 10{sup 15}N{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}. The tests were performed with three systems: a highly focused IR-laser with 5{mu}m spot size to make position-resolved scans of the charge collection efficiency (CCE), a Sr{sup 90}{beta}-source set-up to measure the signal levels for a minimum ionizing particles (MIPs), and a beam test with 180 GeV pions at CERN. This article gives a brief overview of the performance of these 3D modules, and draws conclusions about options for using 3D strip sensors as tracking detectors at the sLHC.

  7. Silicon microstrip detectors in 3D technology for the sLHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parzefall, Ulrich; Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco; Eckert, Simon; Eklund, Lars; Fleta, Celeste; Jakobs, Karl; Kuehn, Susanne; Pahn, Gregor; Parkes, Chris; Pennicard, David; Ronchin, Sabina; Zoboli, Andrea; Zorzi, Nicola

    2009-01-01

    The projected luminosity upgrade of the large hadron collider (LHC), the sLHC, will constitute a challenging radiation environment for tracking detectors. Massive improvements in radiation hardness are required with respect to the LHC. In the layout for the new ATLAS tracker, silicon strip detectors (SSDs) with short strips cover the region from 28 to 60 cm distance to the beam. These SSDs will be exposed to fluences up to 10 15 N eq /cm 2 , hence radiation resistance is the major concern. It is advantageous to fuse the superior radiation hardness of the 3D design originally conceived for pixel-style applications with the benefits of the well-known planar technology for strip detectors. This is achieved by ganging rows of 3D columns together to form strips. Several prototype sLHC detector modules using 3D SSD with short strips, processed on p-type silicon, and LHC-speed front-end electronics from the present ATLAS semi-conductor tracker (SCT) were built. The modules were tested before and after irradiation to fluences of 10 15 N eq /cm 2 . The tests were performed with three systems: a highly focused IR-laser with 5μm spot size to make position-resolved scans of the charge collection efficiency (CCE), a Sr 90 β-source set-up to measure the signal levels for a minimum ionizing particles (MIPs), and a beam test with 180 GeV pions at CERN. This article gives a brief overview of the performance of these 3D modules, and draws conclusions about options for using 3D strip sensors as tracking detectors at the sLHC.

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of the X-ray response of a germanium microstrip detector with energy and position resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, G; Fajardo, P; Morse, J

    1999-01-01

    We present Monte Carlo computer simulations of the X-ray response of a micro-strip germanium detector over the energy range 30-100 keV. The detector consists of a linear array of lithographically defined 150 mu m wide strips on a high purity monolithic germanium crystal of 6 mm thickness. The simulation code is divided into two parts. We first consider a 10 mu m wide X-ray beam striking the detector surface at normal incidence and compute the interaction processes possible for each photon. Photon scattering and absorption inside the detector crystal are simulated using the EGS4 code with the LSCAT extension for low energies. A history of events is created of the deposited energies which is read by the second part of the code which computes the energy histogram for each detector strip. Appropriate algorithms are introduced to account for lateral charge spreading occurring during charge carrier drift to the detector surface, and Fano and preamplifier electronic noise contributions. Computed spectra for differen...

  9. Charge-partitioning study of a wide-pitch silicon micro-strip detector with a 64-channel CMOS preamplifier array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, H.; Tsuboyama, T.; Okuno, S.; Saitoh, Y.; Akamine, T.; Satoh, K.; Inoue, M.; Yamanaka, J.; Mandai, M.; Takeuchi, H.; Kitta, T.; Miyahara, S.; Kamiya, M.

    1996-01-01

    The wider pitch readout operation of a 50 μm-pitch double-sided silicon micro-strip detector has been studied specifically concerning its ohmic side. Every second readout and ganged configuration was examined by employing a newly developed 64-channel preamplifier array. The observed charge responses for collimated IR light were compared with a numerical model. (orig.)

  10. Signal development in irradiated silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Kramberger, Gregor; Mikuz, Marko

    2001-01-01

    This work provides a detailed study of signal formation in silicon detectors, with the emphasis on detectors with high concentration of irradiation induced defects in the lattice. These defects give rise to deep energy levels in the band gap. As a consequence, the current induced by charge motion in silicon detectors is signifcantly altered. Within the framework of the study a new experimental method, Charge correction method, based on transient current technique (TCT) was proposed for determination of effective electron and hole trapping times in irradiated silicon detectors. Effective carrier trapping times were determined in numerous silicon pad detectors irradiated with neutrons, pions and protons. Studied detectors were fabricated on oxygenated and non-oxygenated silicon wafers with different bulk resistivities. Measured effective carrier trapping times were found to be inversely proportional to fuence and increase with temperature. No dependence on silicon resistivity and oxygen concentration was observ...

  11. Development of a Test System for the Quality Assurance of Silicon Microstrip Detectors for the Inner Tracking System of the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Axer, Markus

    2003-01-01

    The inner tracking system of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which is being built at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics CERN (Geneva, Switzerland) will be equipped with two different technologies of silicon detectors. While the innermost tracker will be composed of silicon pixel detectors, silicon microstrip detectors are envisaged for the outer tracker architecture. The silicon microstrip tracker will house about 15,000 single detector modules each composed of a set of silicon sensors, the readout electronics (front end hybrid), and a support frame. It will provide a total active area of 198 m2 and ten million analogue channels read out at the collider frequency of 40 MHz. This large number of modules to be produced and integrated into the tracking system is an unprecedented challenge involving industrial companies and various research institutes from many different countries. This thesis deals with the physics of silicon sensors and the preparation of ...

  12. Collected charge and Lorentz angle measurement on non-irradiated ATLAS silicon micro-strip sensors for the HL-LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yildirim, Eda

    2017-02-15

    In this thesis, the collected charge and the Lorentz angle on non-irradiated and the irradiated miniature of the current test silicon micro-strip sensors (ATLAS12) of the future ATLAS inner tracker are measured. The samples are irradiated up to 5 x 10{sup 15} 1 MeV n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2} and some of them also measured after short-term annealing (80 min at 60 C). The measurements are performed at the DESY II test beam, which provides the advantage of tracking to suppress noise hits. The collected charge is measured at various bias voltages for each sample. The results are compared with the measurements performed using a Sr{sup 90} radioactive source. It is shown that the measurements with beam and radioactive source are consistent with each other, and the advantage of tracking at the beam measurements provides the measurement of collected charge on highly irradiated sensors at lower bias voltages. The Lorentz angle is measured for each sample at different magnetic field strengths between 0 T and 1 T, the results are extrapolated to 2 T, which is the magnetic field in the inner tracker of the ATLAS detector. Most of the measurements are performed at -500 V bias voltage, which is the planned operation bias voltage of the future strip tracker. Some samples are also measured at different bias voltages to observe the effect of bias voltage on the Lorentz angle. The signal reconstruction of the strip sensors are performed using the lowest possible signal-to-noise thresholds. For non-irradiated samples, the measured Lorentz angle agrees with the prediction of the BFK model. On the irradiated samples, the results suggest that the Lorentz angle decreases with increasing bias voltage due to the increasing electric field in the sensor. The Lorentz angle decreases with increasing irradiation level; however, if the sample is under-depleted, the effect of electric field dominates and the Lorentz angle increases. Once the irradiation level becomes too high, hence the collected charge

  13. Radiography imaging by 64 and 128 micro-strips crystalline detectors at different X-ray energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyva, A.; Cabal, A.; Montano, L. M.; Fontaine, M.; Mora, R. de la; Padilla, F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper summarizes some results obtained in the evaluation of the performance of position sensitive detectors in track reconstruction in particle physics experiments. Crystalline silicon micro-strips detectors with 64 and 128 channels and 100 μm pitch were used to obtain radiographic digital images of different objects. The more relevant figures for spectrometry applications were measured and reported. Two-dimensional images were obtained by scanning the object with a collimated beam using different source-target-detector positioning and three sources of X-rays (8.04, 18.55 and 22.16 keV). The counts acquired by each strip correspond to a particular collimator position during the scan, thus serving to reconstruct the image of the exposed to X-ray object and to reveal its internal structure. The use of some techniques for image processing allow the further improvement of the radiography quality. The preliminary results obtained using in-house made and accreditation mammography phantoms allow to infer that such detectors can be successfully introduced in the digital mammography practice. (Author)

  14. Study of the physical processes involved in the operating mode of the micro-strips gas detector Micromegas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barouch, G.

    2001-04-01

    Micromegas is a micro-strip gaseous detector invented in 1996. It consists of two volumes of gas separated by a micro-mesh. The first volume of gas, 3 mm thick, is used to liberate ionization electrons from the incident charged particle. In the second volume, only 100 μm thick, an avalanche phenomenon amplifies the electrons produced in the first volume. Strips printed on an insulating substrate collect the electrons from the avalanche. The geometrical configuration of Micromegas showed many advantages. The short anode-cathode distance combined with a high granularity provide high rate capabilities due to a fast collection of ions produced during the avalanche development. Moreover, the possibility to localize the avalanche with strips printed about every hundreds of micrometers allows to measure the position of the incident particle with a good resolution. In this work, experimental tests of Micromegas are presented along with detailed Monte Carlo simulations used to understand and optimize the detector's performances. The prototypes were tested several times at the PS accelerator at CERN. The analysis of the date showed a stable and efficient behavior of Micromegas combined with an excellent space resolution. In fact, spatial resolutions of less than 15 μm were obtained. In parallel with the in-beam tests, several simulations have been developed in order to gain a better understanding of the detector's response. (author)

  15. Design and development of a vertex reconstruction for the CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) data. Study of gaseous and silicon micro-strips detectors (MSGC); Conception d'un algorithme de reconstruction de vertex pour les donnees de CMS. Etude de detecteurs gazeux (MSGC) et silicium a micropistes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau, St

    2002-12-01

    The work presented in this thesis has contributed to the development of the Compact Muon Solenoid detector (CMS) that will be installed at the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which will start running in summer 2007. This report is organised in three parts: the study of gaseous detectors and silicon micro-strips detectors, and a development of a software for the reconstruction and analysis of CMS data in the framework of ORCA. First, the micro-strips gaseous detectors (MSGC) study was on the ultimate critical irradiation test before their substitution in the CMS tracker. This test showed a really small number of lost anodes and a stable signal to noise ratio. This test proved that the described MSGC fulfill all the requirements to be integrated in the CMS tracker. The following contribution described a study of silicon micro-strips detectors and its electronics exposed to a 40 MHz bunched LHC like beam. These tests indicated a good behaviour of the data acquisition and control system. The signal to noise ratio, the bunch crossing identification and the cluster finding efficiency had also be analysed. The last study concern the design and the development of an ORCA algorithm dedicates to secondary vertex reconstruction. This iterative algorithm aims to be use for b tagging. This part analyse also primary vertex reconstruction in events without and with pile up. (author)

  16. Germanium microstrip detectors with 50 and 100 μm pitch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amendolia, S.R.; Bedeschi, F.; Bertolucci, E.; Bettoni, D.; Bosisio, L.; Bottigli, U.; Bradaschia, C.; Dell'Orso, M.; Fidecaro, F.; Foa, L.; Focardi, E.; Giannetti, P.; Giorgi, M.A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Menzione, A.; Raso, G.; Ristori, L.; Scribano, A.; Stefanini, A.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Haller, E.E.; Hansen, W.L.; Luke, P.N.

    1984-01-01

    Multi-electrode germanium detectors are being used as an active target for decay path measurements of charmed mesons. The procedure used to fabricate such detectors is described and a brief analysis of their performance is given. (orig.)

  17. A low-power front-end amplifier for the microstrip sensors of the PANDA microvertex detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Pietro, Valentino; Brinkmann, Kai-Thomas; Riccardi, Alberto [II. Physikalisches Institut, JLU Giessen, Giessen (Germany); Rivetti, Angelo; Rolo, Manuel; Garbolino, Sara [INFN Sezione di Torino, Torino (Italy); Collaboration: PANDA-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    The most common readout systems designed for nuclear physics detectors are based on amplitude measurements. The information that needs to be preserved is the charge delivered by a particle hitting the sensor. The electronic chain employed in these cases is made of two main building blocks: front-end amplifier and ADC. An issue in the implementation of such an architecture in scaled CMOS technologies is the dynamic range, because the charge information is extrapolated through the sampling of the peak of the front-end output signal. It is therefore interesting to explore the use of time-based architectures that offer better performances. In fact, in these topologies the linearity between the charge and the signal duration can be maintained even if some building blocks in the chain saturate. The main drawback is the loss in resolution since a duration measurement involves the difference between two time measurements. This work presents the design of a front-end optimized for fast Time-over-Threshold applications. The circuit has been developed for the microstrip detectors of the PANDA experiment. The architecture of the front-end amplifier is presented, and simulations in a 110 nm CMOS technology are discussed.

  18. Measurements on irradiated L1 sensor prototypes for the D0 Run IIb silicon detector project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahsan, M.; Bolton, T.; Carnes, K.; /Kansas State U.; Demarteau, M.; /Fermilab; Demina, R.; /Rochester U.; Gray, T.; /Kansas State U.; Korjenevski, S.; /Rochester U.; Lehner, F.; /Zurich U.; Lipton, R.; Mao, H.S.; /Fermilab; McCarthy, R.; /SUNY, Stony Brook /Kansas State U. /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    We report on irradiation studies of Hamamatsu prototype silicon microstrip detectors for layer 1 of the D0 upgrade project for Run IIb. The irradiation was carried out with 10 MeV protons up to proton fluence of 10{sup 14} p/cm{sup 2} at the J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Manhatten, KS. The flux calibration was carefully checked using different dose normalization techniques. The results based on the obtained sensor leakage currents after irradiation show that the NIEL scaling hypothesis for low energy protons has to be applied with great care. We observe 30-40% less radiation damage in silicon for 10 MeV proton exposure than is expected from the predicted NIEL scaling.

  19. Measurements on irradiated L1 sensor prototypes for the D0 Run IIb silicon detector project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahsan, M.; Bolton, T.; Carnes, K.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Gray, T.; Korjenevski, S.; Lehner, F.; Lipton, R.; Mao, H.S.; McCarthy, R.

    2010-01-01

    We report on irradiation studies of Hamamatsu prototype silicon microstrip detectors for layer 1 of the D0 upgrade project for Run IIb. The irradiation was carried out with 10 MeV protons up to proton fluence of 10 14 p/cm 2 at the J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Manhatten, KS. The flux calibration was carefully checked using different dose normalization techniques. The results based on the obtained sensor leakage currents after irradiation show that the NIEL scaling hypothesis for low energy protons has to be applied with great care. We observe 30-40% less radiation damage in silicon for 10 MeV proton exposure than is expected from the predicted NIEL scaling.

  20. Tuning of the silicon microstrip detector (SCT) digitization parameters at ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishwakarma, Akanksha [Humboldt University, Unter den Linden 6, 10099 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The increased luminosity of LHC in RUN-2 causes high radiation exposure of the ATLAS detector. This might bring about changes in the detector responses, especially of the pixel and the silicon strip detector. To study this, several digitization parameters are varied in the simulation and are analysed by comparing with data. In particular, the impact on the reconstructed cluster and track is considered. This investigation is used to optimize data-Monte Carlo agreement.

  1. Spectral Irradiance Measurements Based on Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, M S; Menegotto, T; Duarte, I; Da Silva, T Ferreira; Alves, L C; Alvarenga, A D; Almeida, G B; Couceiro, I B; Teixeira, R N

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary results of the realization of absolute spectral irradiance scale at INMETRO in the ultraviolet, visible and infrared regions using filter radiometers as secondary standards. In the construction of these instruments are used, at least, apertures, interference filters and a trap detector. In the assembly of the trap detectors it was necessary to characterize several photocells in spatial uniformity and shunt resistance. All components were calibrated and these results were analyzed to mount the filter radiometer

  2. Development of a silicon microstrip detector with single photon sensitivity for fast dynamic diffraction experiments at a synchrotron radiation beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakcheev, A.; Aulchenko, V.; Kudashkin, D.; Shekhtman, L.; Tolochko, B.; Zhulanov, V.

    2017-06-01

    Time-resolved experiments on the diffraction of synchrotron radiation (SR) from crystalline materials provide information on the evolution of a material structure after a heat, electron beam or plasma interaction with a sample under study. Changes in the material structure happen within a microsecond scale and a detector with corresponding parameters is needed. The SR channel 8 of the VEPP-4M storage ring provides radiation from the 7-pole wiggler that allows to reach several tens photons within one μs from a tungsten crystal for the most intensive diffraction peak. In order to perform experiments that allow to measure the evolution of tungsten crystalline structure under the impact of powerful laser beam, a new detector is developed, that can provide information about the distribution of a scattered SR flux in space and its evolution in time at a microsecond scale. The detector is based on the silicon p-in-n microstrip sensor with DC-coupled metal strips. The sensor contains 1024 30 mm long strips with a 50 μm pitch. 64 strips are bonded to the front-end electronics based on APC128 ASICs. The APC128 ASIC contains 128 channels that consist of a low noise integrator with 32 analogue memory cells each. The integrator equivalent noise charge is about 2000 electrons and thus the signal from individual photons with energy above 40 keV can be observed. The signal can be stored at the analogue memory with 10 MHz rate. The first measurements with the beam scattered from a tungsten crystal with energy near 60 keV demonstrated the capability of this prototype to observe the spatial distribution of the photon flux with the intensity from below one photon per channel up to 0~10 photons per channel with a frame rate from 10 kHz up to 1 MHz.

  3. Short p-type silicon microstrip detectors in 3D-stc technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckert, S. [Physikalisches Institut, Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder Strasse 3b, D-79104 Freiburg i. Br. (Germany)], E-mail: simon.eckert@physik.uni-freiburg.de; Jakobs, K.; Kuehn, S.; Parzefall, U. [Physikalisches Institut, Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder Strasse 3b, D-79104 Freiburg i. Br. (Germany); Dalla-Betta, G.-F.; Zoboli, A. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Scienza dell' Informazione, Universita degli Studi di Trento, via Sommarive 14, I-38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Pozza, A.; Zorzi, N. [FBK-irst Trento, Microsystems Division, via Sommarive 18, I-38050 Povo di Trento (Italy)

    2008-10-21

    The luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the sLHC, will constitute an extremely challenging radiation environment for tracking detectors. Significant improvements in radiation hardness are needed to cope with the increased radiation dose, requiring new tracking detectors. In the upgraded ATLAS detector the region from 20 to 50 cm distance to the beam will be covered by silicon strip detectors (SSD) with short strips. These will have to withstand a 1 MeV neutron equivalent fluence of about 1x10{sup 15}n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}, hence extreme radiation resistance is necessary. For the short strips, we propose to use SSD realised in the radiation tolerant 3D technology, where rows of columns-etched into the silicon bulk-are joined together to form strips. To demonstrate the feasibility of 3D SSD for the sLHC, we have built prototype modules using 3D-single-type-column (stc) SSD with short strips and front-end electronics from the present ATLAS SCT. The modules were read out with the SCT Data Acquisition system and tested with an IR-laser. We report on the performance of these 3D modules, in particular the noise at 40 MHz which constitutes a measurement of the effective detector capacitance. Conclusions about options for using 3D SSD detectors for tracking at the sLHC are drawn.

  4. Mechanical studies towards a silicon micro-strip super module for the ATLAS inner detector upgrade at the high luminosity LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbier, G; Cadoux, F; Clark, A; Favre, Y; Ferrere, D; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S; Iacobucci, G; Marra, D La; Perrin, E; Seez, W; Endo, M; Hanagaki, K; Hara, K; Ikegami, Y; Nakamura, K; Takubo, Y; Terada, S; Jinnouchi, O; Nishimura, R; Takashima, R

    2014-01-01

    It is expected that after several years of data-taking, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) physics programme will be extended to the so-called High-Luminosity LHC, where the instantaneous luminosity will be increased up to 5 × 10 34  cm −2  s −1 . For the general-purpose ATLAS experiment at the LHC, a complete replacement of its internal tracking detector will be necessary, as the existing detector will not provide the required performance due to the cumulated radiation damage and the increase in the detector occupancy. The baseline layout for the new ATLAS tracker is an all-silicon-based detector, with pixel sensors in the inner layers and silicon micro-strip detectors at intermediate and outer radii. The super-module (SM) is an integration concept proposed for the barrel strip region of the future ATLAS tracker, where double-sided stereo silicon micro-strip modules (DSM) are assembled into a low-mass local support (LS) structure. Mechanical aspects of the proposed LS structure are described

  5. Development and Evaluation of Test Stations for the Quality Assurance of the Silicon Micro-Strip Detector Modules for the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Pöttgens, Michael

    2007-01-01

    CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) is one of four large-scale detectors which will be operated at the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN). For the search for new physics the reconstruction of the collision products and their properties is essential. In the innermost part of the CMS detector the traces of ionizing particles are measured utilizing a silicon tracker. A large fraction of this detector is equipped with silicon micro-strip modules which provide a precise space resolution in 1-dimension. A module consists of a sensor for detection of particles, the corresponding read-out electronics (hybrid) and a mechanical support structure. Since the 15,148 modules, which will be installed in the silicon micro-strip detector, have a total sensitive surface area of about 198 m2, the inner tracker of CMS is the largest silicon tracking detector, which has ever been built. While the sensors and hybrids are produced in industry, the construction of the modules and the control o...

  6. Development and evaluation of test stations for the quality assurance of the silicon micro-strip detector modules for the CMS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poettgens, M.

    2007-01-01

    CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) is one of four large-scale detectors which will be operated at the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN). For the search for new physics the reconstruction of the collision products and their properties is essential. In the innermost part of the CMS detector the traces of ionizing particles are measured utilizing a silicon tracker. A large fraction of this detector is equipped with silicon micro-strip modules which provide a precise space resolution in 1-dimension. A module consists of a sensor for detection of particles, the corresponding read-out electronics (hybrid) and a mechanical support structure. Since the 15,148 modules, which will be installed in the silicon micro-strip detector, have a total sensitive surface area of about 198 m 2 , the inner tracker of CMS is the largest silicon tracking detector, which has ever been built. While the sensors and hybrids are produced in industry, the construction of the modules and the control of the quality is done by the members of the 21 participating institutes. Since the access to the silicon micro-strip tracker will be very limited after the installation in the CMS detector the installed modules must be of high quality. For this reason the modules are thoroughly tested and the test results are uploaded to a central database. By the development of a read-out system and the corresponding software the III. Physikalisches Institut made an important contribution for the electrical and functional quality control of hybrids and modules. The read-out system provides all features for the operation and test of hybrids and modules and stands out due to high reliability and simple handling. Because a very user-friedly and highly automated software it became the official test tool and was integrated in various test stands. The test stands, in which the read-out system is integrated in, are described and the tests which are implemented in the corresponding

  7. Performance of microstrip gas chambers passivated by thin semiconducting glass and plastic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishai, M.R.; Gerndt, E.K.E.; Shipsey, I.P.J.; Wang, P.N.; Bagulya, A.V.; Grishin, V.M.; Negodaev, M.A.; Geltenbort, P.

    1995-01-01

    Patterned microstrip gas chamber substrates have been covered with ion-beam sputtered glass with electronic conductivity or a polymer which was subsequently irradiated with an ion-beam. The sputtering procedure is described in detail. The performance of several detectors is reported. (orig.)

  8. Testbeam studies of silicon microstrip sensor architectures modified to facilitate detector module mass production

    CERN Document Server

    Poley, Anne-luise; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    For the High Luminosity Upgrade of the LHC, the Inner Detector of the ATLAS detector will be replaced by an all-silicon tracker, consisting of pixel and strip sensor detector modules. Silicon strip sensors are being developed to meet both the tracking requirements in a high particle density environment and constraints imposed by the construction process. Several thousand wire bonds per module, connecting sensor strips and readout channels, need to be produced with high reliability and speed, requiring wire bond pads of sufficient size on each sensor strip. These sensor bond pads change the local sensor architecture and the resulting electric field and thus alter the sensor performance. These sensor regions with bond pads, which account for up to 10 % of a silicon strip sensor, were studied using both an electron beam at DESY and a micro-focused X-ray beam at the Diamond Light Source. This contribution presents measurements of the effective strip width in sensor regions where the structure of standard parallel...

  9. MCNPX calculations for electron irradiated semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlackova, K.; Necas, V.; Sagatova, A.; Zatko, B.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to treat some practical problems of (not only) semiconductor material irradiation by high energy electron beam using MCNPX simulation code. The relation between the absorbed dose and the fluency was found and the energy distribution of electron flux density was simulated on the top and back side of 270 μm thick GaAs, SiC and Si detectors. Furthermore, the dose depth profiles were calculated for GaAs, SiC and Si materials irradiated by 4 and 5 MeV electron beams. For the GaAs detector, a very good agreement with the experiment was shown. To match the absolute values of the absorbed dose with experimentally obtained values, the electron source emissivity has to be determined in relation to the electron beam setting parameters. (authors)

  10. Charge transport in non-irradiated and irradiated silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, C.; Roy, P.; Casse, G.L.; Glaser, M.; Grigoriev, E.; Lemeilleur, F.

    1999-01-01

    A model describing the transport of the charge carriers generated in n-type silicon detectors by ionizing particles is presented. In order to reproduce the experimental current pulse responses induced by α and β particles in non-irradiated and irradiated detectors up to fluences (PHI) much beyond the n to p-type inversion, an n-type region 15 μm deep is introduced on the p + side of the diode. This model also gives mobilities which decrease linearly up to fluences of around 5x10 13 particles/cm 2 and beyond, converging to saturation values of about 1000 and 450 cm 2 /V s for electrons and holes, respectively. The charge carrier lifetime degradation with increased fluence, due to trapping, is responsible for a predicted charge collection deficit for β particles and for α particles which is found to agree with direct CCE measurements. (author)

  11. Central tracker for BM@N experiment based on double side Si-microstrip detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, Yu.; Kapishin, M.; Khabarov, S.; Shafronovskaia, A.; Tarasov, O.; Makankin, A.; Zamiatin, N.; Zubarev, E.

    2017-07-01

    Design of central tracker system based on Double-Sided Silicon Detectors (DSSD) for BM@N experiment is described. A coordinate plane with 10240 measuring channels, pitch adapter, reading electronics was developed. Each element was tested and assembled into a coordinate plane. The first tests of the plane with 106Ru source were carried out before installation for the BM@N experiment. The results of the study indicate that noisy channels and inefficient channels are less than 3%. In general, single clusters 87% (one group per module of consecutive strips) and 75% of clusters with a width equal to one strip.

  12. Thick silicon microstrip detectors simulation for PACT: Pair and Compton Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, M.; Laurent, P.; Lebrun, F.; Tatischeff, V.; Dolgorouky, Y.; Bertoli, W.; Breelle, E.

    2016-11-01

    PACT is a space borne Pair and Compton Telescope that aims to make a sensitive survey of the gamma-ray sky between 100 keV and 100 MeV. It is based upon two main components: a silicon-based gamma-ray tracker and a crystal-based calorimeter. In this paper we will explain the imaging technique of PACT as a Multi-layered Compton telescope (0.1-10 MeV) and its major improvements over its predecessor COMPTEL. Then we will present a simulation study to optimize the silicon tracker of PACT. This tracker is formed of thousands of identical silicon double sided strip detectors (DSSDs). We have developed a simulation model (using SILVACO) to simulate the DSSD performance while varying its thickness, impurity concentration of the bulk material, electrode pitch, and electrode width. We will present a comprehensive overview of the impact of each varied parameter on the DSSD performance, in view of the application to PACT. The considered DSSD parameters are its depletion voltage, capacitance, and leakage current. After the selection of the PACT DSSD, we will present a simulation of the performance of the PACT telescope in the 0.1-10 MeV range.

  13. Thick silicon microstrip detectors simulation for PACT: Pair and Compton Telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, M.; Laurent, P.; Lebrun, F.; Tatischeff, V.; Dolgorouky, Y.; Bertoli, W.; Breelle, E.

    2016-01-01

    PACT is a space borne Pair and Compton Telescope that aims to make a sensitive survey of the gamma-ray sky between 100 keV and 100 MeV. It is based upon two main components: a silicon-based gamma-ray tracker and a crystal-based calorimeter. In this paper we will explain the imaging technique of PACT as a Multi-layered Compton telescope (0.1–10 MeV) and its major improvements over its predecessor COMPTEL. Then we will present a simulation study to optimize the silicon tracker of PACT. This tracker is formed of thousands of identical silicon double sided strip detectors (DSSDs). We have developed a simulation model (using SILVACO) to simulate the DSSD performance while varying its thickness, impurity concentration of the bulk material, electrode pitch, and electrode width. We will present a comprehensive overview of the impact of each varied parameter on the DSSD performance, in view of the application to PACT. The considered DSSD parameters are its depletion voltage, capacitance, and leakage current. After the selection of the PACT DSSD, we will present a simulation of the performance of the PACT telescope in the 0.1–10 MeV range.

  14. Thick silicon microstrip detectors simulation for PACT: Pair and Compton Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, M., E-mail: khalilmohammad@hotmail.com [APC Laboratory, 10rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Laurent, P.; Lebrun, F. [APC Laboratory, 10rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); CEA, Centre de Saclay, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Tatischeff, V. [CSNSM, IN2P3/CNRSand Paris-Sud University, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Dolgorouky, Y.; Bertoli, W.; Breelle, E. [APC Laboratory, 10rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France)

    2016-11-01

    PACT is a space borne Pair and Compton Telescope that aims to make a sensitive survey of the gamma-ray sky between 100 keV and 100 MeV. It is based upon two main components: a silicon-based gamma-ray tracker and a crystal-based calorimeter. In this paper we will explain the imaging technique of PACT as a Multi-layered Compton telescope (0.1–10 MeV) and its major improvements over its predecessor COMPTEL. Then we will present a simulation study to optimize the silicon tracker of PACT. This tracker is formed of thousands of identical silicon double sided strip detectors (DSSDs). We have developed a simulation model (using SILVACO) to simulate the DSSD performance while varying its thickness, impurity concentration of the bulk material, electrode pitch, and electrode width. We will present a comprehensive overview of the impact of each varied parameter on the DSSD performance, in view of the application to PACT. The considered DSSD parameters are its depletion voltage, capacitance, and leakage current. After the selection of the PACT DSSD, we will present a simulation of the performance of the PACT telescope in the 0.1–10 MeV range.

  15. Intermediate Energies for Nuclear Astrophysics and the Development of a Position Sensitive Microstrip Detector System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobotka, Lee G. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Blackmon, J. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Bertulani, C. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2015-12-30

    The chemical elements are made at astrophysical sites through a sequence of nuclear reactions often involving unstable nuclei. The overarching aim of this project is to construct a system that allows for the inverse process of nucleosynthesis (i.e. breakup of heavier nuclei into lighter ones) to be studied in high efficiency. The specific problem to be overcome with this grant is inadequate dynamic range and (triggering) threshold to detect the products of the breakup which include both heavy ions (with large energy and large deposited energy in a detector system) and protons (with little energy and deposited energy.) Early on in the grant we provided both TAMU and RIKEN (the site of the eventual experiments) with working systems based on the existing technology. This technology could be used with either an external preamplifier that was to be designed and fabricated by our RIKEN collaborators or upgraded by replacing the existing chip with one we designed. The RIKEN external preamplifier project never can to completion but our revised chip was designed, fabricated, used in a test experiment and performs as required.

  16. Development and evaluation of test stations for the quality assurance of the silicon micro-strip detector modules for the CMS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poettgens, M.

    2007-11-22

    CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) is one of four large-scale detectors which will be operated at the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN). For the search for new physics the reconstruction of the collision products and their properties is essential. In the innermost part of the CMS detector the traces of ionizing particles are measured utilizing a silicon tracker. A large fraction of this detector is equipped with silicon micro-strip modules which provide a precise space resolution in 1-dimension. A module consists of a sensor for detection of particles, the corresponding read-out electronics (hybrid) and a mechanical support structure. Since the 15,148 modules, which will be installed in the silicon micro-strip detector, have a total sensitive surface area of about 198 m{sup 2}, the inner tracker of CMS is the largest silicon tracking detector, which has ever been built. While the sensors and hybrids are produced in industry, the construction of the modules and the control of the quality is done by the members of the 21 participating institutes. Since the access to the silicon micro-strip tracker will be very limited after the installation in the CMS detector the installed modules must be of high quality. For this reason the modules are thoroughly tested and the test results are uploaded to a central database. By the development of a read-out system and the corresponding software the III. Physikalisches Institut made an important contribution for the electrical and functional quality control of hybrids and modules. The read-out system provides all features for the operation and test of hybrids and modules and stands out due to high reliability and simple handling. Because a very user-friedly and highly automated software it became the official test tool and was integrated in various test stands. The test stands, in which the read-out system is integrated in, are described and the tests which are implemented in the

  17. Development and operation of a novel PC-based high speed beam telescope for particle tracking using double sided silicon microstrip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treis, J.

    2002-08-01

    A PC based high speed silicon microstrip beam telescope consisting of several independent modules is presented. Every module contains an AC-coupled double sided silicon microstrip sensor and a complete set of analog and digital signal processing electronics. A digital bus connects the modules with the DAQ PC. A trigger logic unit coordinates the operation of all modules of the telescope. The system architecture allows easy integration of any kind of device under test into the data acquisition chain. Signal digitization, pedestal correction, hit detection and zero suppression are done by hardware inside the modules, so that the amount of data per event is reduced by a factor of 80 compared to conventional readout systems. In combination with a two level data acquisition scheme, this allows event rates up to 7.6 kHz. This is a factor of 40 faster than conventional VME based beam telescopes while comparable analog performance is maintained achieving signal to noise ratios of up to 70:1. The telescope has been tested in the SPS testbeam at CERN. It has been adopted as the reference instrument for testbeam studies for the ATLAS pixel detector development. (orig.)

  18. Evaluation of Irradiated Barrel Detector Modules for the Upgrade of the CMS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Sibille, Jennifer Ann

    2013-01-01

    Prototype detector modules comprising sensors and the new readout chips were assembled and irradiated with protons at the CERN PS, and readout chips without sensors have been irradiated with protons at the Karls...

  19. Thermal Module Tests with Irradiated 070 Detectors.

    CERN Document Server

    HOWCROFT, C L F

    1998-01-01

    Four n-in-n detectors were irradiated at KEK to a fluence of 3*1014 protons cm-2. These were used to construct a thermal barrel module to 070 drawings with an A3-90 baseboard at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. Thermal testes were conducted on the module, examining the runaway point and the temperatures across the silicon. The results obtained were used to calculate the runaway point under ATLAS conditions. It was concluded that this module meets the specifications in the Technical Design Report, of 160 mW mm-2@ 0°C for runaway and less than 5°C across the silicon. The module was also compared to a Finite Element Analysis, and showed a good agreement.

  20. A portable readout system for silicon microstrip sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marco-Hernandez, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    This system can measure the collected charge in one or two microstrip silicon sensors by reading out all the channels of the sensor(s), up to 256. The system is able to operate with different types (p- and n-type) and different sizes (up to 3 cm 2 ) of microstrip silicon sensors, both irradiated and non-irradiated. Heavily irradiated sensors will be used at the Super Large Hadron Collider, so this system can be used to research the performance of microstrip silicon sensors in conditions as similar as possible to the Super Large Hadron Collider operating conditions. The system has two main parts: a hardware part and a software part. The hardware part acquires the sensor signals either from external trigger inputs, in case of a radioactive source setup is used, or from a synchronised trigger output generated by the system, if a laser setup is used. The software controls the system and processes the data acquired from the sensors in order to store it in an adequate format. The main characteristics of the system are described. Results of measurements acquired with n- and p-type detectors using both the laser and the radioactive source setup are also presented and discussed.

  1. Study of a microstrip gas detector for the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment; Etude d`un detecteur a micropistes pour l`experience Compact Muon Solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clergeau, J F [Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire

    1997-06-19

    The micro-strip gas chambers (MSGC) were realized due to the technological advances in the field of micro-electronics. The wire of usual gas counters is replaced in these detectors by metallic stripes as a periodic sequence of electrodes (anodes and cathodes) spaced by around 200 {mu}m. At a distance of 3 mm above the strip containing substrate, a metallic plane is placed, thus defining the gaseous room where the passage of a charged particle produces by ionization a primary electron signal collected by the detector anodes. Due to its granularity a MSGC can operate under very high particle fluxes since charge can be collected very rapidly. Also, the impact parameters can be determined with high accuracy due to the high space and time resolutions. The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) or the MSGC detectors planned to equip one of the experiments proposed for LHC should detect, in extreme operational conditions, the particle impacts in a 4 Tesla magnetic field, for around ten years and for a particle flux of around 10{sup 4} Hz/mm{sup 2}. The CMS detector is described in chapter 2. The operation principle and the problems encountered in the development of MSGC detectors are summarized in chapter 3. The chapter 4 is dedicated to the study of the performances of MSGCs in magnetic fields. In the chapters 5 to 7 the processing of the signal from detectors of this type is described, particularly, the performances of various ways of treat the signal in terms of detection efficiency and counting loads are presented.The chapter 8 presents the results obtained with the prototype obtained at IPNL while the chapter 9 gives the conclusions of the performed works. (author) 55 refs.

  2. ATLAS Silicon Microstrip Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Haefner, Petra; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The SemiConductor Tracker (SCT), made up from silicon micro-strip detectors is the key precision tracking device in ATLAS, one of the experiments at CERN LHC. The completed SCT is in very good shape: 99.3% of the SCT strips are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specifications. In the talk the current status of the SCT will be reviewed. We will report on the operation of the detector and observed problems, with stress on the sensor and electronics performance. TWEPP Summary In December 2009 the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) recorded the first proton- proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 900 GeV and this was followed by the unprecedented energy of 7 TeV in March 2010. The SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) is the key precision tracking device in ATLAS, made up from silicon micro-strip detectors processed in the planar p-in-n technology. The signal from the strips is processed in the front-end ASICS ABCD3TA, working in the binary readout mode. Data i...

  3. Design,construction and commissioning of a cylinder of double-sided silicon micro-strips detectors for the Star experiment at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedon, M.

    2005-05-01

    This study has been performed in the frame of quark gluon plasma physics research in the STAR experiment at RHIC. It deals with the design, the construction and the commissioning of a barrel of silicon-strip detectors (SSD). Added to the Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) of the STAR detector, it extends the capabilities of track reconstruction for charged particles emitted in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. It also contributes to the general study of the quark-gluon plasma production undertaken at STAR. The SSD is a cylinder of 1 m long and of 23 cm radius, and it is composed of 320 compact identical modules. Each module includes one double-sided silicon micro-strip detector, 12 readout chips ALICE 128C, 12 TAB ribbons, 2 COSTAR control chips and 2 hybrids supporting all the components. The document explains why the SSD is an important and relevant element, and justifies the technological choices as well as their validation by in-beam characterization. All component functionalities, characteristics and test procedures are presented. The data and test results are stored in a database for tracing purpose. Component and module production is described. Two parallel studies have been performed, analysed and described. One on the temperature dependence of the module performances and the other one on the optimal adjustments of the analogue blocks inside the ALICE 128C chip. The SSD installation on the RHIC site as well as the commissioning are presented together with the first data takings. (author)

  4. Pulse laser irradiation into superconducting MgB2 detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Daisuke; Miki, Shigehito; Satoh, Kazuo; Yotsuya, Tsutomu; Shimakage, Hisashi; Wang, Zhen; Okayasu, Satoru; Katagiri, Masaki; Machida, Masahiko; Kato, Masaru; Ishida, Takekazu

    2005-01-01

    We performed 20-ps pulse laser irradiation experiments on a MgB 2 neutron detector to know a thermal-relaxation process for designing a MgB 2 neutron detector. The membrane-type structured MgB 2 device was fabricated to minimize the heat capacity of sensing part of a detector as well as to enhance its sensitivity. We successfully observed a thermal-relaxation signal resulting from pulse laser irradiation by developing a detection circuit. The response time was faster than 1 μs, meaning that the detector would be capable of counting neutrons at a rate of more than 10 6 events per second

  5. Performances of the Si microstrip detector of the STAR experiment at RHIC; Performances du detecteur en silicium a micropistes de l'experience STAR a RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchet, J

    2007-10-15

    The Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) is the fourth layer of detector using a double-sided microstrip technology of the STAR experiment at RHIC, completing STAR's inner tracking device. The goal of STAR is to study heavy ions collisions in order to probe the existence of the quark gluon plasma (QGP), a deconfined state of nuclear matter. Strangeness enhancement, such as {kappa}{sub S}{sup 0}, {lambda}, {xi} and {omega}, for particles production, has been proposed to sign the formation of QGP. Then precise measurement of secondary vertices is needed. The SSD will also permit an attempt to use the inner tracking device to measure charm and beauty with direct topological identification. It was proposed to enhance the STAR tracking capabilities by providing a better connection between reconstructed tracks in the main tracking device (TPC) and the initial vertex detector (SVT). In this thesis, we will present the intrinsic performances of the SSD and its impact on the inner tracking system performances by studying Cu-Cu collisions occurred at RHIC in 2005. We show that the SSD detector has excellent performances in terms of resolution: (945 {+-} 18) {mu}m in azimuth and (1021 {+-} 13) {mu}m along the beam axis. For the final result when SSD is associated to the SVT the resolutions are (281 {+-} 1) {mu}m and (213 {+-} 0.8) {mu}m in azimuth and along the beam axis respectively. The resolution reached by the addition of the Silicon Vertex detectors of STAR will allow the search for rare particles like charm and beauty, which have a decay-length of the order of hundred microns.

  6. Degradation of charge sharing after neutron irradiation in strip silicon detectors with different geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casse, G.; Dervan, P.; Forshaw, D.; Greenall, A.; Huse, T.; Tsurin, I.; Wormald, M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the CERN/RD50 collaboration is the improvement of the radiation tolerance of semiconductor detectors for future experiments at high-luminosity colliders. In the RD50 framework, evidence of enhanced signal charge in severely irradiated silicon detectors (diodes, segmented planar and 3D devices) was found. The underlying mechanism was labelled charge multiplication. This has been one of the most exciting results from the research activity of RD50 because it could allow for a greatly extended radiation tolerance, if the mechanism is to be found controllable and tuneable. The charge multiplication mechanism is governed by impact ionisation from electrons drifting in high electric field. The electric field profile is influenced by the geometry of the implanted electrodes. In order to investigate the influence of the diode implantation geometry on charge multiplication, the RD50 collaboration has commissioned the production of miniature microstrip silicon sensors with various choices of strip pitch and strip width over pitch (w/p) ratios. Moreover, some of the sensors were produced interleaving readout strips with dummy intermediate ones in order to modify the electric field profile. These geometrical solutions can influence both charge multiplication and charge sharing between adjacent strips. The initial results of this study are here presented

  7. Development and Evaluation of a Test System for the Quality Assurance during the Mass Production of Silicon Microstrip Detector Modules for the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Franke, Torsten

    2005-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of four large-scale experiments that is going to be installed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN). For CMS an inner tracking system entirely equipped with silicon microstrip detectors was chosen. With an active area of about 198 m2 it will be the largest tracking device of the world that was ever constructed using silicon sensors. The basic components in the construction of the tracking system are approximately 16,000 so-called modules, which are pre-assembled units consisting of the sensors, the readout electronics and a support structure. The module production is carried out by a cooperation of number of institutes and industrial companies. To ensure the operation of the modules within the harsh radiation environment extensive tests have to be performed on all components. An important contribution to the quality assurance of the modules is made by a test system of which all components were developed in Aachen. In ad...

  8. ATLAS Silicon Microstrip Tracker Operation and Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Rosendahl, P L; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The Semi-Conductor Tracker (SCT) is a silicon microstrip detector part of the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Together with the rest for the ATLAS Inner Detector (ID) it provides vital precision tracking information of charged particles. In this paper the performance and operational status of the SCT in the last two years of ATLAS data taking are reviewed.

  9. Radiation damage of pixelated photon detector by neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Isamu [KEK, 1-1 Oho Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)], E-mail: isamu.nakamura@kek.jp

    2009-10-21

    Radiation Damage of Pixelated Photon Detector by neutron irradiation is reported. MPPC, one of PPD or Geiger-mode APD, developed by Hamamatsu Photonics, is planned to be used in many high energy physics experiments. In such experiments radiation damage is a serious issue. A series of neutron irradiation tests is performed at the Reactor YAYOI of the University of Tokyo. MPPCs were irradiated at the reactor up to 10{sup 12}neutron/cm{sup 2}. In this paper, the effect of neutron irradiation on the basic characteristics of PPD including gain, noise rate, photon detection efficiency is presented.

  10. Charge Collection Efficiency Simulations of Irradiated Silicon Strip Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Peltola, T.

    2014-01-01

    During the scheduled high luminosity upgrade of LHC, the world's largest particle physics accelerator at CERN, the position sensitive silicon detectors installed in the vertex and tracking part of the CMS experiment will face more intense radiation environment than the present system was designed for. Thus, to upgrade the tracker to required performance level, comprehensive measurements and simulations studies have already been carried out. Essential information of the performance of an irradiated silicon detector is obtained by monitoring its charge collection efficiency (CCE). From the evolution of CCE with fluence, it is possible to directly observe the effect of the radiation induced defects to the ability of the detector to collect charge carriers generated by traversing minimum ionizing particles (mip). In this paper the numerically simulated CCE and CCE loss between the strips of irradiated silicon strip detectors are presented. The simulations based on Synopsys Sentaurus TCAD framework were performed ...

  11. Response of Superheated Droplet Detector (SDD) and Bubble Detector (BD) to interrupted irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondal, Prasanna Kumar, E-mail: prasanna_ind_82@yahoo.com; Sarkar, Rupa, E-mail: sarkar_rupa2003@yahoo.com; Chatterjee, Barun Kumar, E-mail: barun_k_chatterjee@yahoo.com

    2017-06-11

    Superheated droplet detectors (SDD) and bubble detectors (BD) are suspensions of micron-sized superheated liquid droplets in inert medium. The metastable droplets can vaporise upon interaction with ionising radiation generating visible bubbles. In this work, we investigated the response of SDD and BD to interrupted neutron irradiations. We observed that the droplet vaporisation rates for SDD and BD are different in nature. The unusual increase in droplet vaporisation rate observed when the SDD is exposed to neutrons after few minutes of radiation-off period is absent for BD. - Highlights: • Superheated droplet detectors (SDD) and bubble detectors (BD) are suspensions of superheated liquid droplets in inert medium. • The bubble nucleation in superheated droplets can be induced by ionising radiation. • The droplet vaporisation rate for SDD is non-monotonic when it is irradiated periodically to neutrons. • For BD the droplet vaporisation rate decrease monotonically when it is irradiated periodically to neutrons.

  12. Temperature detectors on irradiated silicon base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimov, M.; Dzhalelov, M.A.; Kurbanov, A.O.

    2005-01-01

    It is well known, that the most suitable for thermal resistors production is compensated silicon with impurities forming deep lying in forbidden zone, having big negative resistance temperature coefficients (RTC). In the capacity of initial materials for thermal resistors with negative RTC the n-type monocrystalline silicon with specific resistance ∼30 Ω·cm at 300 K is applied. Before the irradiation the phosphorus diffusion is realizing at temperature ∼1000 deg. C for 10 min. Irradiation is putting into practise by WWR-SM reactor fast neutrons within the range (7-10)·10 13 cm -2 . The produced resistors have nominal resistance range (8-20)·10 3 Ω·cm, coefficient of the thermal sensitivity B=4000-6000 deg. C., RTC α 300K =4-6.6 %/grad. It is shown, that offered method allows to obtain same type resistors characteristics on the base of neutron-irradiated material

  13. Isotropic irradiation of detectors from point sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, Helle Karina

    1997-01-01

    NaI(Tl) scintillator detectors have been exposed to gamma rays from 8 different point sources from different directions. Background and backscatter of gamma-rays from the surroundings have been subtracted in order to produce clean spectra. By adding spectra obtained from exposures from different ...

  14. Study of charge transport in silicon detectors: Non-irradiated and irradiated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, C.; Roy, P.; Casse, G.; Glaser, M.; Grigoriev, E.; Lemeilleur, F.

    1999-01-01

    The electrical characteristics of silicon detectors (standard planar float zone and MESA detectors) as a function of the particle fluence can be extracted by the application of a model describing the transport of charge carriers generated in the detectors by ionizing particles. The current pulse response induced by α and β particles in non-irradiated detectors and detectors irradiated up to fluences PHI ∼ 3 · 10 14 particles/cm 2 is reproduced via this model: i) by adding a small n-type region 15 μm deep on the p + side for the detectors at fluences beyond the n to p-type inversion and ii) for the MESA detectors, by considering one additional dead layer of 14 μm (observed experimentally) on each side of the detector, and introducing a second (delayed) component to the current pulse response. For both types of detectors, the model gives mobilities decreasing linearily up to fluences of about 5·10 13 particles/cm 2 and converging, beyond, to saturation values of about 1050 cm 2 /Vs and 450 cm 2 /Vs for electrons and holes, respectively. At a fluence PHI ∼ 10 14 particles/cm 2 (corresponding to about ten years of operation at the CERN-LHC), charge collection deficits of about 14% for β particles, 25% for α particles incident on the front and 35% for α particles incident on the back of the detector are found for both type of detectors

  15. Micro-strip sensors based on CVD diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, W.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bertuccio, G.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; D' Angelo, P.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Hallewell, G.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Kass, R.; Koeth, T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Mac Lynne, L.; Manfredotti, C.; Meier, D. E-mail: dirk.meier@cern.ch; Mishina, M.; Moroni, L.; Oh, A.; Pan, L.S.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Perera, L.; Pirollo, S.; Procario, M.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Rousseau, L.; Rudge, A.; Russ, J.; Sala, S.; Sampietro, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Trischuk, W.; Tromson, D.; Vittone, E.; Walsh, A.M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; Wetstein, M.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Zoeller, M

    2000-10-11

    In this article we present the performance of recent chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond micro-strip sensors in beam tests. In addition, we present the first comparison of a CVD diamond micro-strip sensor before and after proton irradiation.

  16. Micro-strip sensors based on CVD Diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, W; Bergonzo, P; Bertuccio, G; Bogani, F; Borchi, E; Brambilla, A; Bruzzi, Mara; Colledani, C; Conway, J; D'Angelo, P; Dabrowski, W; Delpierre, P A; Deneuville, A; Dulinski, W; van Eijk, B; Fallou, A; Fizzotti, F; Foulon, F; Friedl, M; Gan, K K; Gheeraert, E; Hallewell, G D; Han, S; Hartjes, F G; Hrubec, Josef; Husson, D; Kagan, H; Kania, D R; Kaplon, J; Kass, R; Koeth, T W; Krammer, Manfred; Lo Giudice, A; Lü, R; MacLynne, L; Manfredotti, C; Meier, D; Mishina, M; Moroni, L; Oh, A; Pan, L S; Pernicka, Manfred; Peitz, A; Perera, L P; Pirollo, S; Procario, M; Riester, J L; Roe, S; Rousseau, L; Rudge, A; Russ, J; Sala, S; Sampietro, M; Schnetzer, S R; Sciortino, S; Stelzer, H; Stone, R; Suter, B; Tapper, R J; Tesarek, R J; Trischuk, W; Tromson, D; Vittone, E; Walsh, A M; Wedenig, R; Weilhammer, Peter; Wetstein, M; White, C; Zeuner, W; Zoeller, M M

    2000-01-01

    In this article we present the performance of recent chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond micro-strip sensors in beam tests. In addition we present the first comparison of a CVD diamond micro-strip sensor before and after proton irradiation.

  17. Micro-strip sensors based on CVD diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, W.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bertuccio, G.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; D'Angelo, P.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Hallewell, G.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Kass, R.; Koeth, T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Mac Lynne, L.; Manfredotti, C.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Moroni, L.; Oh, A.; Pan, L.S.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Perera, L.; Pirollo, S.; Procario, M.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Rousseau, L.; Rudge, A.; Russ, J.; Sala, S.; Sampietro, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Trischuk, W.; Tromson, D.; Vittone, E.; Walsh, A.M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; Wetstein, M.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Zoeller, M.

    2000-01-01

    In this article we present the performance of recent chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond micro-strip sensors in beam tests. In addition, we present the first comparison of a CVD diamond micro-strip sensor before and after proton irradiation

  18. Micro-strip sensors based on CVD diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, W.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bertuccio, G.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; D'Angelo, P.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; van Eijk, B.; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K. K.; Gheeraert, E.; Hallewell, G.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Kass, R.; Koeth, T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; mac Lynne, L.; Manfredotti, C.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Moroni, L.; Oh, A.; Pan, L. S.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Perera, L.; Pirollo, S.; Procario, M.; Riester, J. L.; Roe, S.; Rousseau, L.; Rudge, A.; Russ, J.; Sala, S.; Sampietro, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R. J.; Tesarek, R.; Trischuk, W.; Tromson, D.; Vittone, E.; Walsh, A. M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; Wetstein, M.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Zoeller, M.; RD42 Collaboration

    2000-10-01

    In this article we present the performance of recent chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond micro-strip sensors in beam tests. In addition, we present the first comparison of a CVD diamond micro-strip sensor before and after proton irradiation.

  19. UV-irradiation effects on polyester nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Chhavi; Kalsi, P.C.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of UV irradiation (λ=254 nm) on polyester nuclear track detector have been investigated employing bulk-etch technique, UV-visible spectrophotometry and infra-red spectrometry (FTIR). The activation energy values for bulk-etching were found to decrease with the UV-irradiation time indicating the scission of the polymer. Not much shift in the absorption edge due to UV irradiation was seen in the UV-visible spectra. FTIR studies also indicate the scission of the chemical bonds, thereby further validating the bulk-etch rate results.

  20. Neutron irradiation test of depleted CMOS pixel detector prototypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandić, I.; Cindro, V.; Gorišek, A.; Hiti, B.; Kramberger, G.; Mikuž, M.; Zavrtanik, M.; Hemperek, T.; Daas, M.; Hügging, F.; Krüger, H.; Pohl, D.-L.; Wermes, N.; Gonella, L.

    2017-01-01

    Charge collection properties of depleted CMOS pixel detector prototypes produced on p-type substrate of 2 kΩ cm initial resistivity (by LFoundry 150 nm process) were studied using Edge-TCT method before and after neutron irradiation. The test structures were produced for investigation of CMOS technology in tracking detectors for experiments at HL-LHC upgrade. Measurements were made with passive detector structures in which current pulses induced on charge collecting electrodes could be directly observed. Thickness of depleted layer was estimated and studied as function of neutron irradiation fluence. An increase of depletion thickness was observed after first two irradiation steps to 1 · 10 13 n/cm 2 and 5 · 10 13 n/cm 2 and attributed to initial acceptor removal. At higher fluences the depletion thickness at given voltage decreases with increasing fluence because of radiation induced defects contributing to the effective space charge concentration. The behaviour is consistent with that of high resistivity silicon used for standard particle detectors. The measured thickness of the depleted layer after irradiation with 1 · 10 15 n/cm 2 is more than 50 μm at 100 V bias. This is sufficient to guarantee satisfactory signal/noise performance on outer layers of pixel trackers in HL-LHC experiments.

  1. Test beam demonstration of silicon microstrip modules with transverse momentum discrimination for the future CMS tracking detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Hoch, M.; Hrubec, J.; König, A.; Steininger, H.; Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Alderweireldt, S.; Beaumont, W.; Janssen, X.; Lauwers, J.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Beghin, D.; Brun, H.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Luetic, J.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Postiau, N.; Randle-Conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vanlaer, P.; Vannerom, D.; Yonamine, R.; Wang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; De Bruyn, I.; De Clercq, J.; D'Hondt, J.; Deroover, K.; Lowette, S.; Moortgat, S.; Moreels, L.; Python, Q.; Skovpen, K.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Parijs, I.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Delaere, C.; Delcourt, M.; De Visscher, S.; Francois, B.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Cabrera Jamoulle, J.; De Favereau De Jeneret, J.; Komm, M.; Krintiras, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Magitteri, A.; Mertens, A.; Michotte, D.; Musich, M.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Quertenmont, L.; Szilasi, N.; Vidal Marono, M.; Wertz, S.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Härkönen, J.; Lampén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuovinen, E.; Eerola, P.; Baulieu, G.; Boudoul, G.; Caponetto, L.; Combaret, C.; Contardo, D.; Dupasquier, T.; Gallbit, G.; Lumb, N.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Vander Donckt, M.; Viret, S.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bonnin, C.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E.; Chanon, N.; Charles, L.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-Ch.; Gross, L.; Hosselet, J.; Jansova, M.; Tromson, D.; Autermann, C.; Feld, L.; Karpinski, W.; Kiesel, K. M.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Pierschel, G.; Preuten, M.; Rauch, M.; Schael, S.; Schomakers, C.; Schulz, J.; Schwering, G.; Wlochal, M.; Zhukov, V.; Pistone, C.; Fluegge, G.; Kuensken, A.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya, M.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Beernaert, K.; Bertsche, D.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Hansen, K.; Haranko, M.; Harb, A.; Hauk, J.; Keaveney, J.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Kleinwort, C.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Maser, H.; Mittag, G.; Muhl, C.; Mussgiller, A.; Pitzl, D.; Reichelt, O.; Savitskyi, M.; Schuetze, P.; Walsh, R.; Zuber, A.; Biskop, H.; Buhmann, P.; Centis-Vignali, M.; Garutti, E.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Klanner, R.; Matysek, M.; Perieanu, A.; Scharf, Ch.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schwandt, J.; Sonneveld, J.; Steinbrück, G.; Vormwald, B.; Wellhausen, J.; Abbas, M.; Amstutz, C.; Barvich, T.; Barth, Ch.; Boegelspacher, F.; De Boer, W.; Butz, E.; Casele, M.; Colombo, F.; Dierlamm, A.; Freund, B.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S.; Husemann, U.; Kornmeyer, A.; Kudella, S.; Muller, Th.; Printz, M.; Simonis, H. J.; Steck, P.; Weber, M.; Weiler, Th.; Anagnostou, G.; Asenov, P.; Assiouras, P.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Paspalaki, L.; Siklér, F.; Veszprémi, V.; Bhardwaj, A.; Dalal, R.; Jain, G.; Ranjan, K.; Dutta, S.; Chowdhury, S. Roy; Bakhshiansohl, H.; Behnamian, H.; Khakzad, M.; Naseri, M.; Cariola, P.; Creanza, D.; De Palma, M.; De Robertis, G.; Fiore, L.; Franco, M.; Loddo, F.; Sala, G.; Silvestris, L.; Maggi, G.; My, S.; Selvaggi, G.; Albergo, S.; Costa, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Saizu, M. A.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Brianzi, M.; Ciaranfi, R.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Latino, G.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Russo, L.; Scarlini, E.; Sguazzoni, G.; Strom, D.; Viliani, L.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Robutti, E.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Pedrini, D.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Dall'Osso, M.; Pozzobon, N.; Tosi, M.; De Canio, F.; Gaioni, L.; Manghisoni, M.; Nodari, B.; Riceputi, E.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Comotti, D.; Ratti, L.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Cecchi, C.; Checcucci, B.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Gentsos, C.; Ionica, M.; Leonardi, R.; Manoni, E.; Mantovani, G.; Marconi, S.; Mariani, V.; Menichelli, M.; Modak, A.; Morozzi, A.; Moscatelli, F.; Passeri, D.; Placidi, P.; Postolache, V.; Rossi, A.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Storchi, L.; Spiga, D.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Arezzini, S.; Bagliesi, G.; Basti, A.; Boccali, T.; Borrello, L.; Bosi, F.; Castaldi, R.; Ciampa, A.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Magazzu, G.; Martini, L.; Mazzoni, E.; Messineo, A.; Moggi, A.; Morsani, F.; Palla, F.; Palmonari, F.; Raffaelli, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Bellan, R.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Da Rocha Rolo, M.; Demaria, N.; Rivetti, A.; Dellacasa, G.; Mazza, G.; Migliore, E.; Monteil, E.; Pacher, L.; Ravera, F.; Solano, A.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Jaramillo Echeverria, R.; Moya, D.; Gonzalez Sanchez, F. J.; Vila, I.; Virto, A. L.; Abbaneo, D.; Ahmed, I.; Albert, E.; Auzinger, G.; Berruti, G.; Bianchi, G.; Blanchot, G.; Bonnaud, J.; Caratelli, A.; Ceresa, D.; Christiansen, J.; Cichy, K.; Daguin, J.; D'Auria, A.; Detraz, S.; Deyrail, D.; Dondelewski, O.; Faccio, F.; Frank, N.; Gadek, T.; Gill, K.; Honma, A.; Hugo, G.; Jara Casas, L. M.; Kaplon, J.; Kornmayer, A.; Kottelat, L.; Kovacs, M.; Krammer, M.; Lenoir, P.; Mannelli, M.; Marchioro, A.; Marconi, S.; Mersi, S.; Martina, S.; Michelis, S.; Moll, M.; Onnela, A.; Orfanelli, S.; Pavis, S.; Peisert, A.; Pernot, J.-F.; Petagna, P.; Petrucciani, G.; Postema, H.; Rose, P.; Tropea, P.; Troska, J.; Tsirou, A.; Vasey, F.; Vichoudis, P.; Verlaat, B.; Zwalinski, L.; Bachmair, F.; Becker, R.; di Calafiori, D.; Casal, B.; Berger, P.; Djambazov, L.; Donega, M.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meinhard, M.; Perozzi, L.; Roeser, U.; Starodumov, A.; Tavolaro, V.; Wallny, R.; Zhu, D.; Amsler, C.; Bösiger, K.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, F.; Chiochia, V.; de Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Maier, R.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Robmann, P.; Taroni, S.; Yang, Y.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Kaestli, H.-C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Meier, B.; Rohe, T.; Streuli, S.; Chen, P.-H.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Lu, R.-S.; Moya, M.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Jacob, J.; Seif El Nasr-Storey, S.; Cole, J.; Hoad, C.; Hobson, P.; Morton, A.; Reid, I. D.; Auzinger, G.; Bainbridge, R.; Dauncey, P.; Fulcher, J.; Hall, G.; James, T.; Magnan, A.-M.; Pesaresi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Uchida, K.; Braga, D.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Jones, L.; Ilic, J.; Murray, P.; Prydderch, M.; Tomalin, I. R.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Narain, M.; Nelson, J.; Sagir, S.; Speer, T.; Swanson, J.; Tersegno, D.; Watson-Daniels, J.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Flores, C.; Lander, R.; Pellett, D.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Squires, M.; Thomson, J.; Yohay, R.; Burt, K.; Ellison, J.; Hanson, G.; Olmedo, M.; Si, W.; Yates, B. R.; Gerosa, R.; Sharma, V.; Vartak, A.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Dutta, V.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Kyre, S.; Mullin, S.; Qu, H.; White, D.; Dominguez, A.; Bartek, R.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Leontsinis, S.; Mulholland, T.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Apresyan, A.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chramowicz, J.; Christian, D.; Cooper, W. E.; Deptuch, G.; Derylo, G.; Gingu, C.; Grünendahl, S.; Hasegawa, S.; Hoff, J.; Howell, J.; Hrycyk, M.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Kahlid, F.; Lei, C. M.; Lipton, R.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Liu, T.; Los, S.; Matulik, M.; Merkel, P.; Nahn, S.; Prosser, A.; Rivera, R.; Schneider, B.; Sellberg, G.; Shenai, A.; Spiegel, L.; Tran, N.; Uplegger, L.; Voirin, E.; Berry, D. R.; Chen, X.; Ennesser, L.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, O.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Makauda, S.; Mills, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Alimena, J.; Antonelli, L. J.; Francis, B.; Hart, A.; Hill, C. S.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bubna, M.; Hinton, N.; Jones, M.; Miller, D. H.; Shi, X.; Tan, P.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Khalil, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Majumder, D.; Wilson, G.; Ivanov, A.; Mendis, R.; Mitchell, T.; Skhirtladze, N.; Taylor, R.; Anderson, I.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Nash, K.; Osherson, M.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Acosta, J. G.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Oliveros, S.; Perera, L.; Summers, D.; Bloom, K.; Claes, D. R.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Monroy, J.; Siado, J.; Hahn, K.; Sevova, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Bartz, E.; Gershtein, Y.; Halkiadakis, E.; Kyriacou, S.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Osherson, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Stone, R.; Walker, M.; Malik, S.; Norberg, S.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Nguyen, D.; Parker, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alexander, J.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; McDermott, K.; Mirman, N.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Tao, Z.; Thom, J.; Tucker, J.; Zientek, M.; Akgün, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Kilpatrick, M.; Nussbaum, T.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Covarelli, R.; Demina, R.; Hindrichs, O.; Petrillo, G.; Eusebi, R.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Delannoy, A. G.; D'Angelo, P.; Johns, W.

    2018-03-01

    A new CMS Tracker is under development for operation at the High Luminosity LHC from 2026 onwards. It includes an outer tracker based on dedicated modules that will reconstruct short track segments, called stubs, using spatially coincident clusters in two closely spaced silicon sensor layers. These modules allow the rejection of low transverse momentum track hits and reduce the data volume before transmission to the first level trigger. The inclusion of tracking information in the trigger decision is essential to limit the first level trigger accept rate. A customized front-end readout chip, the CMS Binary Chip (CBC), containing stub finding logic has been designed for this purpose. A prototype module, equipped with the CBC chip, has been constructed and operated for the first time in a 4 GeemVem/emc positron beam at DESY. The behaviour of the stub finding was studied for different angles of beam incidence on a module, which allows an estimate of the sensitivity to transverse momentum within the future CMS detector. A sharp transverse momentum threshold around 2 emVem/emc was demonstrated, which meets the requirement to reject a large fraction of low momentum tracks present in the LHC environment on-detector. This is the first realistic demonstration of a silicon tracking module that is able to select data, based on the particle's transverse momentum, for use in a first level trigger at the LHC . The results from this test are described here.

  2. Hyperon production in proton-nucleus collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 41.6 GeV at HERA-B and design of silicon microstrip detectors for tracking at LHCb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agari, Michaela

    2006-07-01

    The topics of this thesis are the measurements of hyperon production in protonnucleus collisions at {radical}(s)=41.6 GeV with the Hera-B detector located at DESY, Hamburg (Germany), and the design of silicon microstrip sensors for the LHCb experiment at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland). {lambda}, {xi} and {omega} hyperons and their antiparticles were reconstructed from 113.5 . 10{sup 6} inelastic collisions of protons with fixed carbon, titanium and tungsten targets. With these samples, antiparticle-to-particle ratios, cross sections integrated for the accessible kinematic region of Hera-B and single differential cross sections as function of transverse momentum, d{sigma}/dp{sub T}{sup 2} (for {lambda} and {xi}) and rapidity, d{sigma}/dy (for {lambda} only), have been been measured as well as the dependence of these quantities on the atomic number of the target nucleus, as parameterized using the Glauber model. The obtained ratios follow the same trend as found for the energy dependence of measurements from nucleus-nucleus collisions. Silicon microstrip sensors have been designed for the tracking system of the LHCb detector. Evaluating the performance in beam tests at CERN, the strip geometry and sensor thickness were varied optimizing for a large signal-to-noise ratio, a small number of read-out channels and a low occupancy. The detector is currently being built to be operational for first proton-proton collisions in autumn 2007. (orig.)

  3. Hyperon production in proton-nucleus collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √(sNN) = 41.6 GeV at HERA-B and design of silicon microstrip detectors for tracking at LHCb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agari, Michaela

    2006-01-01

    The topics of this thesis are the measurements of hyperon production in protonnucleus collisions at √(s)=41.6 GeV with the Hera-B detector located at DESY, Hamburg (Germany), and the design of silicon microstrip sensors for the LHCb experiment at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland). Λ, Ξ and Ω hyperons and their antiparticles were reconstructed from 113.5 . 10 6 inelastic collisions of protons with fixed carbon, titanium and tungsten targets. With these samples, antiparticle-to-particle ratios, cross sections integrated for the accessible kinematic region of Hera-B and single differential cross sections as function of transverse momentum, dσ/dp T 2 (for Λ and Ξ) and rapidity, dσ/dy (for Λ only), have been been measured as well as the dependence of these quantities on the atomic number of the target nucleus, as parameterized using the Glauber model. The obtained ratios follow the same trend as found for the energy dependence of measurements from nucleus-nucleus collisions. Silicon microstrip sensors have been designed for the tracking system of the LHCb detector. Evaluating the performance in beam tests at CERN, the strip geometry and sensor thickness were varied optimizing for a large signal-to-noise ratio, a small number of read-out channels and a low occupancy. The detector is currently being built to be operational for first proton-proton collisions in autumn 2007. (orig.)

  4. Detector trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpak, G.

    1986-01-01

    The author describes briefly the development of detectors for high energy physics experiments. Especially considered are semiconductor microstrip detectors, drift tubes, holographic bubble chambers, scintillating fiber optics, and calorimeters. (HSI).

  5. Charge collection properties of heavily irradiated epitaxial silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramberger, G.; Cindro, V.; Dolenc, I.; Fretwurst, E.; Lindstroem, G.; Mandic, I.; Mikuz, M.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2005-01-01

    Detectors processed on epitaxial silicon seem to be a viable solution for the extreme radiation levels in the innermost layers of tracking detectors at upgraded LHC (SLHC). A set of epitaxial pad detectors of 50 and 75μm thicknesses (ρ=50Ωcm) was irradiated with 24GeV/c protons and reactor neutrons up to equivalent fluences of 10 16 cm -2 . Charge collection for minimum ionizing electrons from a 90 Sr source was measured using a charge sensitive preamplifier and a 25ns shaping circuit. The dependence of collected charge on annealing time and operation temperature was studied. Results were used to predict the performance of fine pitch pixel detectors proposed for SLHC

  6. Charge collection properties of heavily irradiated epitaxial silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramberger, G. [Institute Jozef Stefan, Jamova 39, SI-1111 Ljubljana (Slovenia)]. E-mail: Gregor.Kramberger@ijs.si; Cindro, V. [Institute Jozef Stefan, Jamova 39, SI-1111 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Dolenc, I. [Institute Jozef Stefan, Jamova 39, SI-1111 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Fretwurst, E. [University of Hamburg, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany); Lindstroem, G. [University of Hamburg, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany); Mandic, I. [Institute Jozef Stefan, Jamova 39, SI-1111 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Mikuz, M. [Institute Jozef Stefan, Jamova 39, SI-1111 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Zavrtanik, M. [Institute Jozef Stefan, Jamova 39, SI-1111 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2005-12-01

    Detectors processed on epitaxial silicon seem to be a viable solution for the extreme radiation levels in the innermost layers of tracking detectors at upgraded LHC (SLHC). A set of epitaxial pad detectors of 50 and 75{mu}m thicknesses ({rho}=50{omega}cm) was irradiated with 24GeV/c protons and reactor neutrons up to equivalent fluences of 10{sup 16}cm{sup -2}. Charge collection for minimum ionizing electrons from a {sup 90}Sr source was measured using a charge sensitive preamplifier and a 25ns shaping circuit. The dependence of collected charge on annealing time and operation temperature was studied. Results were used to predict the performance of fine pitch pixel detectors proposed for SLHC.

  7. Development of the specialized integrated circuit for signal readout from micro-strip structures of a coordinate detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aulchenko, V.; Shekhtman, L.; Zhulanov, V.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents current status of development of a specialized 64-channel integrated circuit (IC, ASIC) for front-end electronics of coordinate detectors in the Budker INP. The ASIC is produced using 180 nm process. During the recording phase the IC allows integration of short current pulses from strips of a coordinate sensor, and storing of up to 100 corresponding charge values in the analogue memory with minimum time interval of 100 ns. Maximum input charge is equal to 2×10 6 electrons, equivalent noise charge is ∼2.7×10 3 electrons. Conversion of the data, stored in the analogue memory, to digital form is performed by an external ADC during the readout through an analogue multiplexer

  8. Dose Response of Alanine Detectors Irradiated with Carbon Ion Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Rochus; Jäkel, Oliver; Palmans, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The dose response of the alanine detector shows a dependence on particle energy and type, when irradiated with ion beams. The purpose of this study is to investigate the response behaviour of the alanine detector in clinical carbon ion beams and compare the results with model predictions......-dose curves deviate from predictions in the peak region, most pronounced at the distal edge of the peak. Conclusions: The used model and its implementation show a good overall agreement for quasi mono energetic measurements. Deviations in depth-dose measurements are mainly attributed to uncertainties...

  9. TOSCA simulation of some effects observed in irradiated silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moszczynski, A.S.

    2001-12-01

    TOSCA package has been used to simulate some effects observed recently in heavily irradiated silicon detectors. In particular, unexpected possibility of α-particle registration at p+ contact has been explained without presented elsewhere assumption that there was p-n junction of unknown origin beneath p+ layer. Performed simulations showed that assumption on relaxation-like character of irradiated silicon material is also not necessary to explain such effects like low-voltage capacitance peak in reverse bias and negative capacitance in forward bias. (author)

  10. Improvement of radiation response characteristic on CdTe detectors using fast neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamaru, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Akito; Iida, Toshiyuki

    1999-01-01

    The treatment of fast neutron pre-irradiation was applied to a CdTe radiation detector in order to improve radiation response characteristic. Electron transport property of the detector was changed by the irradiation effect to suppress pulse amplitude fluctuation in risetime. Spectroscopic performance of the pre-irradiated detector was compared with the original. Additionally, the pre-irradiated detector was employed with a detection system using electrical signal processing of risetime discrimination (RTD). Pulse height spectra of 241 Am, 133 Ba, and 137 Cs gamma rays were measured to examine the change of the detector performance. The experimental results indicated that response characteristic for high-energy photons was improved by the pre-irradiation. The combination of the pre-irradiated detector and the RTD processing was found to provide further enhancement of the energy resolution. Application of fast neutron irradiation effect to the CdTe detector was demonstrated. (author)

  11. 3D detectors at ITC-irst: first irradiation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronchin, S.; Boscardin, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cindro, V.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Piemonte, C.; Pozza, A.; Zoboli, A.; Zorzi, N.

    2007-01-01

    In the past two years, we have developed 3D detector technologies at ITC-irst (Trento, Italy). We have proposed a new 3D architecture, having columnar electrodes of one doping type only, allowing for a simplified fabrication process. In this paper, we report on preliminary results from the electrical characterization of devices irradiated with neutrons, showing that low depletion voltage values can be achieved even after very large fluences

  12. High irradiation and ageing properties of resistive Micromegas detectors at the new CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Andreou, Dimitra

    2016-01-01

    Resistive Micromegas have been developed in recent years with the aim of making this technology usable in HEP experiments where the high sparking rate of classical Micromegas is not tolerable. A resistive Micromegas with four layers and an active surface of 0.5 m2 each, has been designed and built at CERN as prototype of the detectors to be used for the upgrade of the ATLAS experiment. The detector has been exposed to an intense gamma source of 16 TBq in order to study the effects of ageing and evaluate the detector behavior under high irradiation.

  13. Suppression of irradiation effects in gold-doped silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McPherson, M.; Sloan, T.; Jones, B.K.

    1997-01-01

    Two sets of silicon detectors were irradiated with 1 MeV neutrons to different fluences and then characterized. The first batch were ordinary p-i-n photodiodes fabricated from high-resistivity (400 Ω cm) silicon, while the second batch were gold-doped powder diodes fabricated from silicon material initially of low resistivity (20 Ω cm). The increase in reverse leakage current after irradiation was found to be more in the former case than in the latter. The fluence dependence of the capacitance was much more pronounced in the p-i-n diodes than in the gold-doped diodes. Furthermore, photo current generation by optical means was less in the gold doped devices. All these results suggest that gold doping in silicon somewhat suppresses the effects of neutron irradiation. (author)

  14. Measurement of the Inclusive $b$-jet cross section in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at CDF RunII and Development of silicon microstrip detectors for the ATLAS silicon tracker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Onofrio, Monica [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland)

    2005-01-01

    In the past twenty years, the study of events with bottom quark has led to many important Tevatron results- as the discovery of the top quark- and it will be as well crucial at the LHC for the search of new physics phenomena. This analysis exploits the good tracking capabilities of the detector and relies on b-jet identification made by secondary vertex reconstruction. The study of the Inner Tracker system performance and in particular the Semi conductor Tracker (SCT), can be considered one of the fundamental issues in the construction of the apparatus. The second part of this thesis work reports some of the crucial tests performed during the development of the silicon microstrip detectors composing the SCT.

  15. A comprehensive analysis of irradiated silicon detectors at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Santocchia, A; Hall, G; MacEvoy, B; Moscatelli, F; Passeri, D; Pignatel, Giogrio Umberto

    2003-01-01

    The effect of particle irradiation on high-resistivity silicon detectors has been extensively studied with the goal of engineering devices able to survive the very challenging radiation environment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The main aspect under investigation has been the changes observed in detector effective doping concentration (N/sub eff/). We have previously proposed a mechanism to explain the evolution of N/sub eff/, whereby charge is exchanged directly between closely-spaced defect centres in the dense terminal clusters formed by hadron irradiation. This model has been implemented in both a commercial finite-element device simulator (ISE-TCAD) and a purpose-built simulation of interdefect charge exchange. To control the risk of breakdown due to the high leakage currents foreseen during ten years of LHC operation, silicon detectors will be operated below room temperature (around -10 degrees C). This, and more general current interest in the field of cryogenic operation, has led us to inve...

  16. The silicon tracking system of the CBM experiment at FAIR. Development of microstrip sensors and signal transmission lines for a low-mass, low-noise system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singla, Minni

    2014-01-01

    construction of the silicon microstrip sensors. For the evaluation of the performance of the silicon microstrip sensors in the harsh radiation environment during experimental operation, a radiation damage model has been included. It reproduces the behavior of the irradiated CBM prototype sensors. In addition to the static characteristics, the interstrip parameters relevant to understand strip isolation and cross-talk issues have been extracted. The transient simulations have been performed to estimate the charge collection performance of the irradiated sensors. The signal transmission in the readout cables has been evaluated with the finite element simulation tool RAPHAEL. Based on the performance of the front-end electronics used for early prototyping in the CBM experiment, capacitive and resistive noise contributions from the silicon microstrip sensors and multi-line readout cables have been extracted. To validate the aforementioned simulations, numerous tests have been performed both on the multi-line readout cables and silicon microstrip sensors. Characterizations of multi-line readout cables and silicon microstrip sensors in laboratory conditions have been found to agree reasonably well with the simulations. Considering the expected radiation environment the behavior of silicon microstrip sensors have been studied especially in terms of noise and charge collection efficiency. scan of the silicon microstrip sensors using 241 Am is presented. In order to test a first system of detector stations including the data acquisition system, slow control and online monitoring software and for track reconstruction, in-beam tests have been performed at the COSY synchrotron of the Research Center Juelich, Germany. Further, different design parameters have been suggested to improve the sensor and readout cable design on the basis of the simulations and the measurements. Many of these parameters have been implemented in the new prototypes under production. These new prototypes were

  17. Study of micro-strip gas ionisation chambers substrates for CMS experiment at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pallares, A.

    1996-01-01

    High luminosity, expected interaction and dose rates of the future LHC collider require the development of micro-strips gas chambers. In addition to optimization of this new detector, this work is concerned with understanding of gain loss phenomena. Influence of the gas substrate is carefully analysed, as well as theoretical concepts concerning glasses and their behaviour under polarization and irradiation, and the consequence on detection operations.Electron spin resonance is used to study, in standard glass, creation of radiation induced defects which may be charged. (D.L.)

  18. Hyperon production in proton-nucleus collisions at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt(S_NN)=41.6 GeV$ at HERA-B and design of silicon microstrip detectors for tracking at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Agari, M

    2006-01-01

    The topics of this thesis are the measurements of hyperon production in protonnucleus collisions at ps = 41.6 GeV with the Hera-B detector located at DESY, Hamburg (Germany), and the design of silicon microstrip sensors for the LHCb experiment at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland), and hyperons and their antiparticles were reconstructed from 113.5A.106 inelastic collisions of protons with fixed carbon, titanium and tungsten targets. With these samples, antiparticle-to-particle ratios, cross sections integrated for the accessible kinematic region of Hera-B and single differential cross sections as function of transverse momentum, $d\\sigma /dp^{2}_{T}$ (for and) and rapidity, $d\\sigma /dy$ (for only), have been been measured as well as the dependence of these quantities on the atomic number of the target nucleus, as parameterized using the Glauber model. The obtained ratios follow the same trend as found for the energy dependence of measurements from nucleus-nucleus collisions. Silicon microstrip sensors have been desi...

  19. The silicon microstrip sensors of the ATLAS semiconductor tracker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ATLAS SCT Collaboration; Spieler, Helmuth G.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the AC-coupled, single-sided, p-in-n silicon microstrip sensors used in the Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) of the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The sensor requirements, specifications and designs are discussed, together with the qualification and quality assurance procedures adopted for their production. The measured sensor performance is presented, both initially and after irradiation to the fluence anticipated after 10 years of LHC operation. The sensors are now successfully assembled within the detecting modules of the SCT, and the SCT tracker is completed and integrated within the ATLAS Inner Detector. Hamamatsu Photonics Ltd. supplied 92.2percent of the 15,392 installed sensors, with the remainder supplied by CiS

  20. The silicon microstrip sensors of the ATLAS semiconductor tracker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ATLAS SCT Collaboration; Spieler, Helmuth G.

    2007-04-13

    This paper describes the AC-coupled, single-sided, p-in-n silicon microstrip sensors used in the Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) of the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The sensor requirements, specifications and designs are discussed, together with the qualification and quality assurance procedures adopted for their production. The measured sensor performance is presented, both initially and after irradiation to the fluence anticipated after 10 years of LHC operation. The sensors are now successfully assembled within the detecting modules of the SCT, and the SCT tracker is completed and integrated within the ATLAS Inner Detector. Hamamatsu Photonics Ltd. supplied 92.2percent of the 15,392 installed sensors, with the remainder supplied by CiS.

  1. ATLAS Silicon Microstrip Tracker Operation and Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Yamada, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The SemiConductor Tracker (SCT), comprising of silicon micro-strip detectors is one of the key precision tracking devices in the ATLAS Inner Detector. ATLAS is one of the experiments at CERN LHC. The completed SCT is in very good shapes with 99.3% of the SCT’s 4088 modules (a total of 6.3 million strips) are operational. The noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specifications. In the talk the current status of the SCT will be reviewed. We will report on the operation of the detector, its performance and observed problems, with stress on the sensor and electronics performance.

  2. A time projection chamber with microstrip read-out

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bootsma, T.M.V.; Van den Brink, A.; De Haas, A.P.; Kamermans, R.; Kuijer, P.G.; De Laat, C.T.A.M.; Van Nieuwenhuizen, G.J.; Ostendorf, R.; Snellings, R.J.M.; Twenhoefel, C.J.W.; Peghaire, A.

    1994-01-01

    The design and testing of a novel detector for heavy-ion physics in the intermediate-energy regime is described. This detector consists of a large drift chamber with microstrip read-out in combination with thick plastic scintillators. With this system particle identification and energy determination with high spatial resolution and multiple hit capacity is achieved. ((orig.))

  3. Simulation of medical irradiation and X-ray detector signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreisler, Bjoern

    2010-02-08

    This thesis aims for an improved understanding of medical irradiation. Two major parts are investigated: the beam shaping components of a medical linear accelerator, i.e. the source of the radiation, and the signal generation inside semiconductor sensors, i.e. the detection of the radiation. The direct measurement of the spatial and spectral particle distribution in the irradiation beam is not possible with state of the art detectors due to the high particle flux. The development of new advanced detectors is the goal of the first part of this thesis. The focus is set on the signal generation inside the sensor volume of a semiconductor detector. Incoming particles interact with the sensor material and generate clouds of electron hole pairs. These pairs get separated by an applied bias voltage. The motion of the charge clouds is simulated with a finite element programme taking into account the drift and diffusion. Mirror charges are induced on the electrodes which move due to the motion of the charge cloud. The motion of the induced mirror charges leads to the signal that is detected. The transient calculation of the signals is based on Ramo's theorem. The efficient adjoint formulation of the induction solution is adjusted to doped materials, as for example the electric bias field and hence the motion of the charge cloud is changing with the doping level. The effect of the doping of the material on the signal shape is shown together with influences of different voltages and pixel geometries. Smaller pixels and higher bias voltages can lead to shorter signals which is preferable for high flux measurements. Possible count rate improvements are limited by electric break through, high dark current across the sensor layer and charge sharing. Another option to shorten the signals is the use of steering grid electrodes which modify the electric and the weighting field. This results in shorter signals and thus in a higher possible rate. The detailed Monte

  4. Simulation of medical irradiation and X-ray detector signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreisler, Bjoern

    2010-01-01

    This thesis aims for an improved understanding of medical irradiation. Two major parts are investigated: the beam shaping components of a medical linear accelerator, i.e. the source of the radiation, and the signal generation inside semiconductor sensors, i.e. the detection of the radiation. The direct measurement of the spatial and spectral particle distribution in the irradiation beam is not possible with state of the art detectors due to the high particle flux. The development of new advanced detectors is the goal of the first part of this thesis. The focus is set on the signal generation inside the sensor volume of a semiconductor detector. Incoming particles interact with the sensor material and generate clouds of electron hole pairs. These pairs get separated by an applied bias voltage. The motion of the charge clouds is simulated with a finite element programme taking into account the drift and diffusion. Mirror charges are induced on the electrodes which move due to the motion of the charge cloud. The motion of the induced mirror charges leads to the signal that is detected. The transient calculation of the signals is based on Ramo's theorem. The efficient adjoint formulation of the induction solution is adjusted to doped materials, as for example the electric bias field and hence the motion of the charge cloud is changing with the doping level. The effect of the doping of the material on the signal shape is shown together with influences of different voltages and pixel geometries. Smaller pixels and higher bias voltages can lead to shorter signals which is preferable for high flux measurements. Possible count rate improvements are limited by electric break through, high dark current across the sensor layer and charge sharing. Another option to shorten the signals is the use of steering grid electrodes which modify the electric and the weighting field. This results in shorter signals and thus in a higher possible rate. The detailed Monte-Carlo simulation of

  5. Design,construction and commissioning of a cylinder of double-sided silicon micro-strips detectors for the Star experiment at RHIC; Developpement et mise en oeuvre de detecteurs silicium a micropistes pour l'experience star

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guedon, M

    2005-05-15

    This study has been performed in the frame of quark gluon plasma physics research in the STAR experiment at RHIC. It deals with the design, the construction and the commissioning of a barrel of silicon-strip detectors (SSD). Added to the Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) of the STAR detector, it extends the capabilities of track reconstruction for charged particles emitted in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. It also contributes to the general study of the quark-gluon plasma production undertaken at STAR. The SSD is a cylinder of 1 m long and of 23 cm radius, and it is composed of 320 compact identical modules. Each module includes one double-sided silicon micro-strip detector, 12 readout chips ALICE 128C, 12 TAB ribbons, 2 COSTAR control chips and 2 hybrids supporting all the components. The document explains why the SSD is an important and relevant element, and justifies the technological choices as well as their validation by in-beam characterization. All component functionalities, characteristics and test procedures are presented. The data and test results are stored in a database for tracing purpose. Component and module production is described. Two parallel studies have been performed, analysed and described. One on the temperature dependence of the module performances and the other one on the optimal adjustments of the analogue blocks inside the ALICE 128C chip. The SSD installation on the RHIC site as well as the commissioning are presented together with the first data takings. (author)

  6. Study of the physical processes involved in the operating mode of the micro-strips gas detector Micromegas; Analyse des phenomenes physiques lies au fonctionnement du detecteur gazeux a micropistes micromegas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barouch, G

    2001-04-01

    Micromegas is a micro-strip gaseous detector invented in 1996. It consists of two volumes of gas separated by a micro-mesh. The first volume of gas, 3 mm thick, is used to liberate ionization electrons from the incident charged particle. In the second volume, only 100 {mu}m thick, an avalanche phenomenon amplifies the electrons produced in the first volume. Strips printed on an insulating substrate collect the electrons from the avalanche. The geometrical configuration of Micromegas showed many advantages. The short anode-cathode distance combined with a high granularity provide high rate capabilities due to a fast collection of ions produced during the avalanche development. Moreover, the possibility to localize the avalanche with strips printed about every hundreds of micrometers allows to measure the position of the incident particle with a good resolution. In this work, experimental tests of Micromegas are presented along with detailed Monte Carlo simulations used to understand and optimize the detector's performances. The prototypes were tested several times at the PS accelerator at CERN. The analysis of the date showed a stable and efficient behavior of Micromegas combined with an excellent space resolution. In fact, spatial resolutions of less than 15 {mu}m were obtained. In parallel with the in-beam tests, several simulations have been developed in order to gain a better understanding of the detector's response. (author)

  7. Design,construction and commissioning of a cylinder of double-sided silicon micro-strips detectors for the Star experiment at RHIC; Developpement et mise en oeuvre de detecteurs silicium a micropistes pour l'experience star

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guedon, M

    2005-05-15

    This study has been performed in the frame of quark gluon plasma physics research in the STAR experiment at RHIC. It deals with the design, the construction and the commissioning of a barrel of silicon-strip detectors (SSD). Added to the Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) of the STAR detector, it extends the capabilities of track reconstruction for charged particles emitted in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. It also contributes to the general study of the quark-gluon plasma production undertaken at STAR. The SSD is a cylinder of 1 m long and of 23 cm radius, and it is composed of 320 compact identical modules. Each module includes one double-sided silicon micro-strip detector, 12 readout chips ALICE 128C, 12 TAB ribbons, 2 COSTAR control chips and 2 hybrids supporting all the components. The document explains why the SSD is an important and relevant element, and justifies the technological choices as well as their validation by in-beam characterization. All component functionalities, characteristics and test procedures are presented. The data and test results are stored in a database for tracing purpose. Component and module production is described. Two parallel studies have been performed, analysed and described. One on the temperature dependence of the module performances and the other one on the optimal adjustments of the analogue blocks inside the ALICE 128C chip. The SSD installation on the RHIC site as well as the commissioning are presented together with the first data takings. (author)

  8. Resistivity measurements on the neutron irradiated detector grade silicon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zheng

    1993-11-01

    Resistivity measurements under the condition of no or low electrical field (electrical neutral bulk or ENB condition) have been made on various device configurations on detector grade silicon materials after neutron irradiation. Results of the measurements have shown that the ENB resistivity increases with neutron fluence ({Phi}{sub n}) at low {phi}{sub n} (<10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}) and saturates at a value between 300 and 400 k{Omega}-cm at {phi}{sub n} {approximately}10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}. Meanwhile, the effective doping concentration N{sub eff} in the space charge region (SCR) obtained from the C-V measurements of fully depleted p{sup +}/n silicon junction detectors has been found to increase nearly linearly with {phi}{sub n} at high fluences ({phi}{sub n} > 10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}). The experimental results are explained by the deep levels crossing the Fermi level in the SCR and near perfect compensation in the ENB by all deep levels, resulting in N{sub eff} (SCR) {ne} n or p (free carrier concentrations in the ENB).

  9. Gas microstrip chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntyre, P.M.; Barasch, E.F.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Demroff, H.P.; Elliott, S.M.; Howe, M.R.; Lee, B.; Mazumdar, T.K.; Pang, Y.; Smith, D.D.; Wahl, J.; Wu, Y.; Yue, W.K.; Gaedke, R.M.; Vanstraelen, G.

    1992-01-01

    The gas microstrip chamber has been developed from concept to experimental system during the past three years. A pattern of anode and grid lines are microfabricated onto a dielectric substrate and configured as a high-resolution MWPC. Four recent developments are described: Suitable plastic substrates and lithography techniques for large-area chambers; non-planar silicon-based chambers for 20 μm resolution; integrated on-board synchronous front-end electronics and data buffering; and a porous silicon active cathode for enhanced efficiency and time response. The microstrip chamber appears to be a promising technology for applications in microvertex, tracking spectrometer, muon spectrometer, and transition radiation detection. (orig.)

  10. CR-39 as induced track detector in reactor: irradiation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zylberberg, H.

    1989-07-01

    A systematic study about reactor's neutrons radiation effect and gamma radiation effect on the properties of CR-39 that are significant for its use as induced fission track detector is showed. The following studies deserved attention: kinetics of the fission track chemical development; efficiency to register and to develop fission track; losses of developable tracks; variation in the number of developable tracks and variation in the visible and ultraviolet radiation spectrum. The dissertation is organized in seven specific chapters: solid state nuclear tracks (SSNT); CR-39 as SSNT; objectives and problems presentation; preparation and characterization of CR-39 as SSNT; gamma irradiation effect on the properties of CR-39 as SSNT; reactor neutron irradiation effect on the properties of CR-39 as SSNT and, results discussions and conclusions. The main work contributions are the use of CR-39 in the determination of fissionable nuclide as thorium and uranium in solid and liquid samples; gamma radiation damage on CR-39 as well as the reactor's neutron damage on CR-39. (B.C.A.) 62 refs, 53 figs, 21 tabs

  11. Development of microstrip gas chambers on substrata with electronic conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouclier, R.; Garabatos, C.; Manzin, G.; Sauli, F.; Shekhtman, L.; Temmel, T.; Della Mea, G.; Maggioni, G.; Rigato, V.; Logachenko, I.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes several recent developments on Microstrip Gas Chambers (MSGCs). The authors have studied the operating behavior of the detectors in different gas mixtures; maximum stable gains have been achieved in mixtures of argon and dimethyl-ether (DME) in almost equal proportions. Using detectors manufactured on semi-conducting glass substrates, capable of withstanding very high rates (above 10 6 mm -2 s -1 ), they have demonstrated extended lifetime without gain modifications up to a collected charge of 130 mC cm -1 in clean laboratory operating conditions. They have also verified that relaxing the requirements on cleanness conditions, either in the gas mixing system or in the detector construction, may result in fast aging of the devices under irradiation. As an alternative to the semi-conducting glass, they have developed a novel technique to coat regular glass with a thin lead silicate layer having electron conductivity; a new development consisting in coating already manufactured MSGCs with the thin semi-conducting layer is also described. The preliminary results show an excellent rate capability of this kind of devices, intrinsically simpler to manufacture

  12. Study on effects of gamma-ray irradiation on TlBr semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Motohiro; Watanabe, Kenichi; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Uritani, Akira; Kimura, Norihisa; Nagano, Nobumichi; Hitomi, Keitaro

    2016-01-01

    Radiation hardness of thallium bromide (TlBr) semiconductor detectors to 60 Co gamma-ray irradiation was evaluated. The energy spectra and μτ products of electrons were measured to evaluate the irradiation effects. No significant degradation of spectroscopic performance of the TlBr detector for 137 Cs gamma-rays was observed up to 45 kGy irradiation. Although the μτ products of electrons in the TlBr detector slightly decreased, position of the photo-peak was stable without significant degradation after the gamma-ray irradiation. We confirmed that the TlBr semiconductor detector has a high tolerance for gamma-ray irradiation at least up to 45 kGy. (author)

  13. The ATLAS Silicon Microstrip Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Haefner, Petra

    2010-01-01

    In December 2009 the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) recorded the first proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 900 GeV. This was followed by collisions at the unprecedented energy of 7 TeV in March 2010. The SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) is a precision tracking device in ATLAS made up from silicon micro-strip detectors processed in the planar p-in-n technology. The signal from the strips is processed in the front-end ASICs working in binary readout mode. Data is transferred to the off-detector readout electronics via optical fibers. The completed SCT has been installed inside the ATLAS experiment. Since then the detector was operated for two years under realistic conditions. Calibration data has been taken and analysed to determine the performance of the system. In addition, extensive commissioning with cosmic ray events has been performed both with and without magnetic field. The sensor behaviour in magnetic field was studied by measurements of the Lorentz angle. After ...

  14. Performance of silicon pad detectors after mixed irradiations with neutrons and fast charged hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramberger, G. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Department of Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)], E-mail: Gregor.Kramberger@ijs.si; Cindro, V.; Dolenc, I.; Mandic, I.; Mikuz, M.; Zavrtanik, M. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Department of Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2009-10-11

    A large set of silicon pad detectors produced on MCz and FZ wafer of p- and n-type was irradiated in two steps, first by fast charged hadrons followed by reactor neutrons. In this way the irradiations resemble the real irradiation fields at LHC. After irradiations controlled annealing started in steps during which the evolution of full depletion voltage, leakage current and charge collection efficiency was monitored. The damage introduced by different irradiation particles was found to be additive. The most striking consequence of that is a decrease of the full depletion voltage for n-type MCz detectors after additional neutron irradiation. This confirms that effective donors introduced by charged hadron irradiation are compensated by acceptors from neutron irradiation.

  15. Performance of silicon pad detectors after mixed irradiations with neutrons and fast charged hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramberger, G.; Cindro, V.; Dolenc, I.; Mandic, I.; Mikuz, M.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2009-01-01

    A large set of silicon pad detectors produced on MCz and FZ wafer of p- and n-type was irradiated in two steps, first by fast charged hadrons followed by reactor neutrons. In this way the irradiations resemble the real irradiation fields at LHC. After irradiations controlled annealing started in steps during which the evolution of full depletion voltage, leakage current and charge collection efficiency was monitored. The damage introduced by different irradiation particles was found to be additive. The most striking consequence of that is a decrease of the full depletion voltage for n-type MCz detectors after additional neutron irradiation. This confirms that effective donors introduced by charged hadron irradiation are compensated by acceptors from neutron irradiation.

  16. The OSMOND detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateman, J.E. [Technology Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Dalgliesh, R. [ISIS Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Duxbury, D.M., E-mail: dom.duxbury@stfc.ac.uk [Technology Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Helsby, W.I. [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Daresbury Laboratory, Keckwick Lane, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Holt, S.A.; Kinane, C.J. [ISIS Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Marsh, A.S. [Diamond Light Source LTD, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Diamond House, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Rhodes, N.J.; Schooneveld, E.M. [ISIS Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Spill, E.J.; Stephenson, R. [Technology Dept. Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2013-01-11

    The development and testing of the Off Specular MicrOstrip Neutron Detector (OSMOND) is described. Based on a microstrip gas chamber the aim of the project was to produce a high counting rate detector capable of replacing the existing rate limited scintillator detectors currently in use on the CRISP reflectometer for off specular reflectometry experiments. The detector system is described together with results of neutron beam tests carried out at the ISIS spallation neutron source.

  17. Study of natural diamond detector spectrometric properties under neutron irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Alekseyev, A B; Kaschuck, Y; Krasilnikov, A; Portnov, D; Tugarinov, S

    2002-01-01

    Natural diamond detector (NDD) performance was studied up to a neutron fluence of 10 sup 1 sup 5 neutron/cm sup 2. The variations of the NDD spectrometric response to incident alpha-particles from sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am source after exposure to fast neutron fluences up to 3x10 sup 1 sup 6 n/cm sup 2 were examined. No significant variations up to the level of 10 sup 1 sup 4 n/cm sup 2 were observed. Degradation of charge collection efficiency at higher fluences is reported. No remarkable increase of the NDD leakage current and count rate change had been observed up to a neutron fluence of 3x10 sup 1 sup 6 n/cm sup 2. The charge collection efficiency variations of neutron irradiated diamond spectrometer were studied ex situ under gamma-rays, beta-radiation and visible light excitation. Charge collection efficiency restoration up to 75% level and the NDD performance stabilization by extrinsic low-intensity visible light (550 nm

  18. Effect of radiation-induced substrate defects on microstrip gas chamber gain behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pallares, A.; Brom, J.M.; Bergdolt, A.M.; Coffin, J.; Eberle, H.; Sigward, M.H.; Fontaine, J.C.; Barthe, S.; Schunck, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this work was to quantify the influence of radiation-induced substrate defects on microstrip gas chamber (MSGC) gain behaviour. The first part of this paper focuses on radiation effects on a typical MSGC substrate: Desag D263 glass. Defect generation was studied for Desag D263 with pure silica (Suprasil 1) as a reference. We studied the evolution of defect concentration with respect to accumulated doses up to 480 kGy. Annealing studies of defects in Desag D263 were also performed. In the second part, the radiation sensitivity of Desag D263 glass has been linked to the behaviour of the detector under irradiation. Comparative gain measurements were taken before and after substrate irradiation at 10 and 80 kGy the minimal dose received during LHC operation and the dose for which defect density is maximum (respectively). (orig.)

  19. Effect of radiation-induced substrate defects on microstrip gas chamber gain behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallares, A.; Brom, J.M.; Bergdolt, A.M.; Coffin, J.; Eberle, H.; Sigward, M.H. [Institute de Recherches Subatomiques, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Fontaine, J.C. [Universite de Haute Alsace, GRPHE, 61 rue Albert Camus, 68093 Mulhouse Cedex (France); Barthe, S.; Schunck, J.P. [Laboratoire PHASE (UPR 292 du CNRS), 23 rue du Loess, BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)

    1998-08-01

    The aim of this work was to quantify the influence of radiation-induced substrate defects on microstrip gas chamber (MSGC) gain behaviour. The first part of this paper focuses on radiation effects on a typical MSGC substrate: Desag D263 glass. Defect generation was studied for Desag D263 with pure silica (Suprasil 1) as a reference. We studied the evolution of defect concentration with respect to accumulated doses up to 480 kGy. Annealing studies of defects in Desag D263 were also performed. In the second part, the radiation sensitivity of Desag D263 glass has been linked to the behaviour of the detector under irradiation. Comparative gain measurements were taken before and after substrate irradiation at 10 and 80 kGy the minimal dose received during LHC operation and the dose for which defect density is maximum (respectively). (orig.) 26 refs.

  20. Scanning transient current study of the I-V stabilization phenomena in silicon detectors irradiated by fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eremin, V.; Verbitskaya, E.; Sidorov, A.; Fretwurst, E.; Lindstrom, G.

    1996-03-01

    Investigation of the I-V stabilization phenomena in neutron irradiated silicon detectors has been carried out using scanning transient current technique (STCT) on non-irradiated PP + -p-n + detectors. The PP + -p-n + detectors were used to simulate the PP + -n-n + detectors irradiated beyond the space charge sign inversion (SCSI). Two mechanisms partially responsible for the I- V stabilization have been identified

  1. Effect of SiO$_{2}$ passivating layer in segmented silicon planar detectors on the detector response

    CERN Document Server

    Verbitskaya, Elena; Eremin, Vladimir; Golubkov, S; Konkov, K; Roe, Shaun; Ruggiero, G; Sidorov, A; Weilhammer, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Silicon detectors with a fine segmentation (micropixel and microstrip) are the main type of detectors used in the inner trackers of LHC experiments. Due to the high luminosity of the LHC machines they are required to have a fast response to fit the short shaping time of 25 ns and to be radiation hard. Evaluation of silicon microstrip detectors developed for the ATLAS silicon tracker and carried out under collaboration of CERN and PTI has shown the reversal of the pulse polarity in the detector response to short- range radiation. Since the negative signal is of about 30% of the normal positive one, the effect strongly reduces the charge collection efficiency in irradiated detectors. The investigation presents the consideration on the origin of a negative response in Si microstrip detectors and the experimental proof of the model. The study of the effect has been carried out using "baby" strip detectors with a special design: each strip has a window in a metallization, which covers the p/sup +/ implant. The sca...

  2. ATLAS Silicon Microstrip Tracker Operation and Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Yamada, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The SemiConductor Tracker (SCT), comprising of silicon micro-strip detectors is one of the key precision tracking devices in the ATLAS Inner Detector. ATLAS is one of the experiments at CERN LHC. The completed SCT is in very good shapes with 99.3% of the SCT’s 4088 modules (a total of 6.3 million strips) are operational. The noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specifications. In the talk the current status of the SCT will be reviewed. We will report on the operation of the detector, its performance and observed problems, with stress on the sensor and electronics performance. In December 2009 the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) recorded the first proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 900 GeV and this was followed by the unprecedented energy of 7 TeV in March 2010. The Semi-Conductor Tracker (SCT) is the key precision tracking device in ATLAS, made from silicon micro-strip detectors processed in the planar p-in-n technology. The signals from the strip...

  3. Charge collection in Si detectors irradiated in situ at superfluid helium temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbitskaya, Elena; Eremin, Vladimir; Zabrodskii, Andrei; Dehning, Bernd; Kurfürst, Christoph; Sapinski, Mariusz; Bartosik, Marcin R.; Egorov, Nicolai; Härkönen, Jaakko

    2015-10-01

    Silicon and diamond detectors operated in a superfluid helium bath are currently being considered for the upgrade of the LHC beam loss monitoring system. The detectors would be installed in immediate proximity of the superconducting coils of the triplet magnets. We present here the results of the in situ irradiation test for silicon detectors using 23 GeV protons while keeping the detectors at a temperature of 1.9 K. Red laser (630 nm) Transient Current Technique and DC current measurements were used to study the pulse response and collected charge for silicon detectors irradiated to a maximum radiation fluence of 1×1016 p/cm2. The dependence between collected charge and irradiation fluence was parameterized using the Hecht equation and assumption of a uniform electric field distribution. The collected charge was found to degrade with particle fluence for both bias polarities. We observed that the main factor responsible for this degradation was related to trapping of holes on the donor-type radiation-induced defects. In contrast to expectations, along with formation of donors, acceptor-type defects (electron traps) are introduced into the silicon bulk. This suggests that the current models describing charge collection in irradiated silicon detectors require an extension for taking into account trapping at low temperatures with a contribution of shallow levels. New in situ irradiation tests are needed and planned now to extend statistics of the results and gain a deeper insight into the physics of low temperature detector operation in harsh radiation environment.

  4. Operation of heavily irradiated silicon detectors in non-depletion mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verbitskaya, E.; Eremin, V.; Ilyashenko, I.; Li, Z.; Haerkoenen, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Luukka, P.

    2006-01-01

    The non-depletion detector operation mode has generally been disregarded as an option in high-energy physics experiments. In this paper, the non-depletion operation is examined by detailed analysis of the electric field distribution and the current pulse response of heavily irradiated silicon (Si) detectors. The previously reported model of double junction in heavily irradiated Si detector is further developed and a simulation of the current pulse response has been performed. It is shown that detectors can operate in a non-depletion mode due to the fact that the value of the electric field in a non-depleted region is high enough for efficient carrier drift. This electric field originates from the current flow through the detector and a consequent drop of the potential across high-resistivity bulk of a non-depleted region. It is anticipated that the electric field in a non-depleted region, which is still electrically neutral, increases with fluence that improves the non-depleted detector operation. Consideration of the electric field in a non-depleted region allows the explanation of the recorded double-peak current pulse shape of heavily irradiated Si detectors and definition of the requirements for the detector operational conditions. Detailed reconstruction of the electric field distribution gives new information on radiation effects in Si detectors

  5. Beam tests with microstrip gas counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landry, M.R.; Birchall, J.; Crow, K.; Davis, C.A.; Faszer, W.; Gan, L.; Lee, L.; van Oers, W.T.H.; Page, S.A.; Ramsay, W.D.; Salomon, M.

    1994-10-01

    We have measured the efficiency, timing and pulse heights in several types of microstrip Gas Chambers with plastic substrates passivated with a thin Nickel layer. We used as active gas mixtures Argon/Isobutane and CF 4 /Isobutane. We placed the detectors in a secondary beam at TRIUMF tuned to a momentum of 100 MeV/c of pions, muons and electrons. Preliminary results indicate good efficiency for minimum ionizing particles in Argon/Isobutane mixtures but lesser efficiency in CF 4 based gases indicating the importance of high quality preamplifiers to increase the signal to noise ratio. (author). 20 refs., 6 figs

  6. Radiation damage studies for the D0 silicon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehner, F.

    2004-01-01

    We report on irradiation studies performed on spare production silicon detector modules for the current D0 silicon detector. The lifetime expectations due to radiation damage effects of the existing silicon detector are reviewed. A new upgrade project was started with the goal of a complete replacement of the existing silicon detector. In that context, several investigations on the radiation hardness of new prototype silicon microstrip detectors were carried out. The irradiation on different detector types was performed with 10 MeV protons up to fluences of 10 14 p/cm 2 at the J.R. Mcdonald Laboratory at Kansas State University. The flux calibration was carefully checked using different normalization techniques. As a result, we observe roughly 40-50% less radiation damage in silicon for 10 MeV p exposure than it is expected by the predicted NIEL scaling

  7. Radiation damage studies for the DOe silicon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehner, Frank

    2004-01-01

    We report on irradiation studies performed on spare production silicon detector modules for the current DOe silicon detector. The lifetime expectations due to radiation damage effects of the existing silicon detector are reviewed. A new upgrade project was started with the goal of a complete replacement of the existing silicon detector. In that context, several investigations on the radiation hardness of new prototype silicon microstrip detectors were carried out. The irradiation on different detector types was performed with 10 MeV protons up to fluences of 10 14 p/cm 2 at the J.R. Mcdonald Laboratory at Kansas State University. The flux calibration was carefully checked using different normalisation techniques. As a result, we observe roughly 40-50% less radiation damage in silicon for 10 MeV p exposure than it is expected by the predicted NIEL scaling

  8. Characterisation of silicon microstrip detectors for the ATLAS Phase-II Upgrade with a micro-focused X-ray beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poley, Luise; Blue, Andrew; Bates, Richard

    2016-03-01

    The planned HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) in 2025 is being designed to maximise the physics potential through a sizable increase in the luminosity, totalling 1 x 10 35 cm -2 s -1 after 10 years of operation. A consequence of this increased luminosity is the expected radiation damage at 3000 fb -1 , requiring the tracking detectors to withstand hadron equivalences to over 1 x 10 16 1 MeV neutrons per cm 2 . With the addition of increased readout rates, a complete re-design of the current ATLAS Inner Detector (ID) is being developed as the Inner Tracker (ITk). Two proposed detectors for the ATLAS strip tracker region of the ITk were characterized at the Diamond Light Source with a 3 μm FWHM 15 keV micro focused X-ray beam. The devices under test were a 320 μm thick silicon stereo (Barrel) ATLAS12 strip mini sensor wire bonded to a 130 nm CMOS binary readout chip (ABC130) and a 320 μm thick full size radial (Endcap) strip sensor - utilizing bi-metal readout layers - wire bonded to 250 nm CMOS binary readout chips (ABCN-25). Sub-strip resolution of the 74.5 μm strips was achieved for both detectors. Investigation of the p-stop diffusion layers between strips is shown in detail for the wire bond pad regions. Inter strip charge collection measurements indicate that the effective width of the strip on the silicon sensors is determined by p-stops regions between the strips rather than the strip pitch. The collected signal allowed for the identification of operating thresholds for both devices, making it possible to compare signal response between different versions of silicon strip detector modules.

  9. Characterisation of silicon microstrip detectors for the ATLAS Phase-II Upgrade with a micro-focused X-ray beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poley, Luise [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Blue, Andrew; Bates, Richard [Glasgow Univ. (United Kingdom). SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy; and others

    2016-03-15

    The planned HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) in 2025 is being designed to maximise the physics potential through a sizable increase in the luminosity, totalling 1 x 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} after 10 years of operation. A consequence of this increased luminosity is the expected radiation damage at 3000 fb{sup -1}, requiring the tracking detectors to withstand hadron equivalences to over 1 x 10{sup 16} 1 MeV neutrons per cm{sup 2}. With the addition of increased readout rates, a complete re-design of the current ATLAS Inner Detector (ID) is being developed as the Inner Tracker (ITk). Two proposed detectors for the ATLAS strip tracker region of the ITk were characterized at the Diamond Light Source with a 3 μm FWHM 15 keV micro focused X-ray beam. The devices under test were a 320 μm thick silicon stereo (Barrel) ATLAS12 strip mini sensor wire bonded to a 130 nm CMOS binary readout chip (ABC130) and a 320 μm thick full size radial (Endcap) strip sensor - utilizing bi-metal readout layers - wire bonded to 250 nm CMOS binary readout chips (ABCN-25). Sub-strip resolution of the 74.5 μm strips was achieved for both detectors. Investigation of the p-stop diffusion layers between strips is shown in detail for the wire bond pad regions. Inter strip charge collection measurements indicate that the effective width of the strip on the silicon sensors is determined by p-stops regions between the strips rather than the strip pitch. The collected signal allowed for the identification of operating thresholds for both devices, making it possible to compare signal response between different versions of silicon strip detector modules.

  10. A normalization of the physical tests for external irradiation measuring detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-05-01

    This report is the result of a normalization work, realized within the Radioprotection Services of the C.E.A., of the physical tests for detectors measuring external irradiation. Among the various tests mentionned are treated more in details, calibration and the establishment of the relative spectral response. As far as calibration is concerned, the normalization refers to: the reference detector, the reference radiation source, the installation and calibration procedure. As for the relative spectral response the normalization refers to: the reference detector, the radiation sources to be used. Finally, a chapter is consecrated to the high flux detectors and to those for pulsed electromagnetic radiations [fr

  11. Use of semiconductor detector c-Si microstrip type in obtaining the digital radiographic imaging of phantoms and biological samples of mammary glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyva, A.; Cabal, A.; Pinera, I.; Abreu, Y.; Cruz, C. M.; Montano, L. M.; Diaz, C. C.; Fontaine, M.; Ortiz, C. M.; Padilla, F.; De la Mora, R.

    2009-01-01

    The present work synthesizes the experimental results obtained in the characterization of 64 micro strips crystalline silicon detector designed for experiments in high energies physics, with the objective of studying its possible application in advanced medical radiography, specifically in digital mammography and angiography. The research includes the acquisition of two-dimensional radiography of a mammography phantom using the scanning method, and its comparison with similar images simulated mathematically for different X rays sources. The paper also shows the experimental radiography of two biological samples taken from biopsies of mammas, where it is possible to identify the presence of possible pathological lesions. The results reached in this work point positively toward the effective possibility of satisfactorily introducing those advanced detectors in medical digital imaging applications. (Author)

  12. Microstrip gas detectors development for the CMS tracker and branching fractions measurement of hadronic B decays with the BaBar experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zghiche, A.

    2007-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the two detectors, designed for the search of the Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), to operate late 2007 at CERN. Micro Strip Gas Counters (MSGC) have been extensively studied to qualify as part of the CMS tracker. When exposed to highly ionizing particles and to high rates of incident particles, MSGCs have shown a good behavior allowing them to cope with the LHC environment. Similar micro pattern gaseous detectors such as Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) and Micro Mesh gas detectors (MicroMegas) are developed to be used in high energy physics. BaBar, the detector for the Slac PEP-II asymmetric e + e - B Factory operating at the Y(4S) resonance, was designed to allow comprehensive studies of CP-violation in B-meson decays. First observation of CP violation has been realized in 2001. Since then an impressive amount of B decays measurements has been performed. Among those, we present here the branching fraction measurements of charged and neutral B decays to Dπ - , D * π - , and D ** π - with a missing mass method, based on a sample of 231 million Y(4S) → BB-bar pairs. In order to do this, one of the B mesons is fully reconstructed and the 'recoil' one decays into a reconstructed charged pion and a companion charmed meson identified by its recoil mass, inferred by kinematics. The same sample is used to reconstruct charmed mesons (D, Ds) and baryons (Λ c ) in the 'recoil side' allowing the measurement of the charm number in the B decays. (author)

  13. Breakup of loosely bound nuclei at intermediate energies for nuclear astrophysics and the development of a position sensitive microstrip detector system and its readout electronics using ASICs technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertulani, Carlos A. [Texas A & M Univ., Commerce, TX (United States)

    2016-01-12

    The work performed under this grant has led to the development of a detection system that will be used to measure reaction rates for proton or neutron capture reactions at stellar energies on radioactive ions far from stability. The reaction rates are needed to better understand the physics of nucleosynthesis in explosive stellar processes such as supernovae and x-ray burst events. The radioactive ions will be produced at the Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (RIBF) at RIKEN near Tokyo, Japan. During the course of this work, the group involved in this project has expanded by several institutions in Europe and Japan and now involves collaborators from the U.S., Japan, Hungary, Romania, Germany, Spain, Italy, China, and South Korea. As part of the project, a novel design based on large-area silicon detectors has been built and tested. The work has involved mechanical construction of a special purpose vacuum chamber, with a precision mounting system for the silicon detectors, development of a new ASICs readout system that has applications with a wide variety of silicon detector systems, and the development of a data acquisition system that is integrated into the computer system being used at RIBF. The parts noted above that are needed to carry out the research program are completed and ready for installation. Several approved experiments that will use this system will be carried out in the near future. The experimental work has been delayed due to a large increase in the cost and availability of electrical power for RIBF that occurred following the massive earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan in the spring of 2011. Another component of the research carried out with this grant involved developing the theoretical tools that are required to extract the information from the experiments that is needed to determine the stellar reaction rates. The tools developed through this part of the work will be made freely available for general use.

  14. The Silicon Microstrip Sensors of the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmad, A; Allport, P P; Alonso, J; Andricek, L; Apsimon, R J; Barr, A J; Bates, R L; Beck, G A; Bell, P J; Belymam, A; Benes, J; Berg, C M; Bernabeu, J; Bethke, S; Bingefors, N; Bizzell, J P; Bohm, J; Brenner, R; Brodbeck, T J; Bruckman De Renstrom, P; Buttar, C M; Campbell, D; Carpentieri, C; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Charlton, D G; Casse, G-L; Chilingarov, A; Cindro, V; Ciocio, A; Civera, J V; Clark, A G; Colijn, A-P; Costa, M J; Dabrowski, W; Danielsen, K M; Dawson, I; Demirkoz, B; Dervan, P; Dolezal, Z; Dorholt, O; Duerdoth, I P; Dwuznik, M; Eckert, S; Ekelöf, T; Eklund, L; Escobar, C; Fasching, D; Feld, L; Ferguson, D P S; Ferrere, D; Fortin, R; Foster, J M; Fox, H; French, R; Fromant, B P; Fujita, K; Fuster, J; Gadomski, S; Gallop, B J; Garcia, C; Garcia-Navarro, J E; Gibson, M D; Gonzalez, S; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S; Goodrick, M J; Gornicki, E; Green, C; Greenall, A; Grigson, C; Grillo, A A; Grosse-Knetter, J; Haber, C; Handa, T; Hara, K; Harper, R S; Hartjes, F G; Hashizaki, T; Hauff, D; Hessey, N P; Hill, J C; Hollins, T I; Holt, S; Horazdovsky, T; Hornung, M; Hovland, K M; Hughes, G; Huse, T; Ikegami, Y; Iwata, Y; Jackson, J N; Jakobs, K; Jared, R C; Johansen, L G; Jones, R W L; Jones, T J; de Jong, P; Joseph, J; Jovanovic, P; Kaplon, J; Kato, Y; Ketterer, C; Kindervaag, I M; Kodys, P; Koffeman, E; Kohriki, T; Kohout, Z; Kondo, T; Koperny, S; van der Kraaij, E; Kral, V; Kramberger, G; Kudlaty, J; Lacasta, C; Limper, M; Linhart, V; Llosa, G; Lozano, M; Ludwig, I; Ludwig, J; Lutz, G; Macpherson, A; McMahon, S J; Macina, D; Magrath, C A; Malecki, P; Mandic, I; Marti-Garcia, S; Matsuo, T; Meinhardt, J; Mellado, B; Mercer, I J; Mikestikova, M; Mikuz, M; Minano, M; Mistry, J; Mitsou, V; Modesto, P; Mohn, B; Molloy, S D; Moorhead, G; Moraes, A; Morgan, D; Morone, M C; Morris, J; Moser, H-G; Moszczynski, A; Muijs, A J M; Nagai, K; Nakamura, Y; Nakano, I; Nicholson, R; Niinikoski, T; Nisius, R; Ohsugi, T; O'Shea, V; Oye, O K; Parzefall, U; Pater, J R; Pernegger, H; Phillips, P W; Posisil, S; Ratoff, P N; Reznicek, P; Richardson, J D; Richter, R H; Robinson, D; Roe, S; Ruggiero, G; Runge, K; Sadrozinski, H F W; Sandaker, H; Schieck, J; Seiden, A; Shinma, S; Siegrist, J; Sloan, T; Smith, N A; Snow, S W; Solar, M; Solberg, A; Sopko, B; Sospedra, L; Spieler, H; Stanecka, E; Stapnes, S; Stastny, J; Stelzer, F; Stradling, A; Stugu, B; Takashima, R; Tanaka, R; Taylor, G; Terada, S; Thompson, R J; Titov, M; Tomeda, Y; Tovey, D R; Turala, M; Turner, P R; Tyndel, M; Ullan, M; Unno, Y; Vickey, T; Vos, M; Wallny, R; Weilhammer, P; Wells, P S; Wilson, J A; Wolter, M; Wormald, M; Wu, S L; Yamashita, T; Zontar, D; Zsenei, A

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the AC-coupled, single-sided, p-in-n silicon microstrip sensors used in the SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) of the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The sensor requirements, specifications and designs are discussed, together with the qualification and quality assurance procedures adopted for their production. The measured sensor performance is presented, both initially and after irradiation to the fluence anticipated after 10 years of LHC operation. The sensors are now successfully assembled within the detecting modules of the SCT, and the SCT tracker is completed and integrated within the ATLAS Inner Detector. Hamamatsu Photonics Ltd supplied 92.2% of the 15,392 installed sensors, with the remainder supplied by CiS.

  15. Processing and first characterization of detectors made with high resistivity n- and p-type Czochralski silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruzzi, M.; Bisello, D.; Borrello, L.; Borchi, E.; Boscardin, M.; Candelori, A.; Creanza, D.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; DePalma, M.; Dittongo, S.; Focardi, E.; Khomenkov, V.; Litovchenko, A.; Macchiolo, A.; Manna, N.; Menichelli, D.; Messineo, A.; Miglio, S.; Petasecca, M.; Piemonte, C.; Pignatel, G.U.; Radicci, V.; Ronchin, S.; Scaringella, M.; Segneri, G.; Sentenac, D.; Tosi, C.; Zorzi, N.

    2005-01-01

    We report on the design, manufacturing and first characterisation of pad diodes, test structures and microstrip detectors processed with high resistivity magnetic Czochralski (MCz) p- and n-type Si. The pre-irradiation study on newly processed microstrip detectors and test structures show a good overall quality of the processed wafers. After irradiation with 24 GeV/c protons up to 4x10 14 cm -2 the characterisation of n-on-p and p-on-n MCz Si sensors with the C-V method show a decrease of the full depletion voltage and no space charge sign inversion. Microscopic characterisation has been performed to study the role of thermal donors in Czochralski Si. No evidence of thermal donor activation was observed in n-type MCz Si detectors if contact sintering was performed at a temperature lower than 380 deg. C and the final passivation oxide was omitted

  16. Evidence for plasma effect on charge collection efficiency in proton irradiated GaAs detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Nava, F; Canali, C; Vittone, E; Polesello, P; Biggeri, U; Leroy, C

    1999-01-01

    The radiation damage in 100 mu m thick Schottky diodes made on semi-insulating undoped GaAs materials, were studied using alpha-, beta-, proton- and gamma-spectroscopy as well as I-V measurements. The results have been analysed within the framework of the Hecht model to investigate the influence of the plasma produced by short-range strongly ionising particles on the detector performance after 24 GeV proton irradiation. It has been found that with the mean free drift lengths for electrons and holes determined from alpha-spectra in overdepleted detectors, the charge collection efficiency for beta-particles, cce subbeta, is well predicted in the unirradiated detectors, while in the most irradiated ones, the cce subbeta is underestimated by more than 40%. The observed disagreement can be explained by assuming that the charge carrier recombination in the plasma region of such detectors, becomes significant.

  17. Beam test results of the irradiated Silicon Drift Detector for ALICE

    OpenAIRE

    Kushpil, S.; Crescio, E.; Giubellino, P.; Idzik, M.; Kolozhvari, A.; Kushpil, V.; Martinez, M. I.; Mazza, G.; Mazzoni, A.; Meddi, F.; Nouais, D.; Petracek, V.; Piemonte, C.; Rashevsky, A.; Riccati, L.

    2005-01-01

    The Silicon Drift Detectors will equip two of the six cylindrical layers of high precision position sensitive detectors in the ITS of the ALICE experiment at LHC. In this paper we report the beam test results of a SDD irradiated with 1 GeV electrons. The aim of this test was to verify the radiation tolerance of the device under an electron fluence equivalent to twice particle fluence expected during 10 years of ALICE operation.

  18. Breakup of loosely bound nuclei at intermediate energies for nuclear astrophysics and the development of a position sensitive microstrip detector system and its readout electronics using ASICs technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tribble, Robert E. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Sobotka, Lee G. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Blackmon, Jeff C. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Bertulani, Carlos A. [Texas A & M Univ., Commerce, TX (United States)

    2015-12-29

    The work performed under this grant has led to the development of a detection system that will be used to measure reaction rates for proton or neutron capture reactions at stellar energies on radioactive ions far from stability. The reaction rates are needed to better understand the physics of nucleosynthesis in explosive stellar processes such as supernovae and x-ray burst events. The radioactive ions will be produced at the Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (RIBF) at RIKEN near Tokyo, Japan. During the course of this work, the group involved in this project has expanded by several institutions in Europe and Japan and now involves collaborators from the U.S., Japan, Hungary, Romania, Germany, Spain, Italy, China, and South Korea. As part of the project, a novel design based on large-area silicon detectors has been built and tested and the performance characterized in a series of tests using particle beams with a variety of atomic numbers at the Cyclotron Institute of Texas A&M University and the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba facility (HIMAC) in Chiba, Japan. The work has involved mechanical construction of a special purpose vacuum chamber, with a precision mounting system for the silicon detectors, development of a new ASICs readout system that has applications with a wide variety of silicon detector systems, and the development of a data acquisition system that is integrated into the computer system being used at RIBF. The parts noted above that are needed to carry out the research program are completed and ready for installation. Several approved experiments that will use this system will be carried out in the near future. The experimental work has been delayed due to a large increase in the cost and availability of electrical power for RIBF that occurred following the massive earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan in the spring of 2011. Another component of the research carried out with this grant involved developing the theoretical tools that are required

  19. Charge collection efficiency of irradiated silicon detector operated at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borer, K.; Janos, S.; Palmieri, V.G.; Dezillie, B.; Li, Z.; Collins, P.; Niinikoski, T.O.; Lourenco, C.; Sonderegger, P.; Borchi, E.; Bruzzi, M.; Pirollo, S.; Granata, V.; Pagano, S.; Chapuy, S.; Dimcovski, Z.; Grigoriev, E.; Bell, W.; Devine, S.R.H.; O'Shea, V.; Smith, K.; Berglund, P.; Boer, W. de; Hauler, F.; Heising, S.; Jungermann, L.; Casagrande, L.; Cindro, V.; Mikuz, M.; Zavartanik, M.; Via, C. da; Esposito, A.; Konorov, I.; Paul, S.; Schmitt, L.; Buontempo, S.; D'Ambrosio, N.; Pagano, S.; Ruggiero, G.; Eremin, V.; Verbitskaya, E.

    2000-01-01

    The charge collection efficiency (CCE) of heavily irradiated silicon diode detectors was investigated at temperatures between 77 and 200 K. The CCE was found to depend on the radiation dose, bias voltage value and history, temperature, and bias current generated by light. The detector irradiated to the highest fluence 2x10 15 n/cm 2 yields a MIP signal of at least 15000 e - both at 250 V forward bias voltage, and at 250 V reverse bias voltage in the presence of a light-generated current. The 'Lazarus effect' was thus shown to extend to fluences at least ten times higher than was previously studied

  20. Foundations for microstrip circuit design

    CERN Document Server

    Edwards, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Building on the success of the previous three editions, Foundations for Microstrip Circuit Design offers extensive new, updated and revised material based upon the latest research. Strongly design-oriented, this fourth edition provides the reader with a fundamental understanding of this fast expanding field making it a definitive source for professional engineers and researchers and an indispensable reference for senior students in electronic engineering. Topics new to this edition: microwave substrates, multilayer transmission line structures, modern EM tools and techniques, microstrip and planar transmision line design, transmission line theory, substrates for planar transmission lines, Vias, wirebonds, 3D integrated interposer structures, computer-aided design, microstrip and power-dependent effects, circuit models, microwave network analysis, microstrip passive elements, and slotline design fundamentals.

  1. Cryogenic Semiconductor Detectors: Simulation of Signal Formation & Irradiation Beam Test

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2091318; Stamoulis, G; Vavougios, D

    The Beam Loss Monitoring system of the Large Hadron Collider is responsible for the pro- tection of the machine from damage and for the prevention of a magnet quench. Near the interaction points of the LHC, in the triplet magnets area, the BLMs are sensitive to the collision debris, limiting their ability to distinguish beam loss signal from signal caused due to the collision products. Placing silicon & diamond detectors inside the cold mass of the mag- nets, in liquid helium temperatures, would provide significant improvement to the precision of the measurement of the energy deposition in the superconducting coil of the magnet. To further study the signal formation and the shape of the transient current pulses of the aforementioned detectors in cryogenic temperatures, a simulation application has been developed. The application provides a fast way of determining the electric field components inside the detectors bulk and then introduces an initial charge distribution based on the properties of the radiat...

  2. ATLAS silicon microstrip Semiconductor Tracker (SCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unno, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Silicon microstrip semiconductor tracking system (SCT) will be in operation in the ATLAS detector in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Challenging issues in the SCT are the radiation tolerance to the fluence of 2x10 14 1-MeV-neutron-equivalent particles/cm 2 at the designed luminosity of 1x10 34 cm -2 /s of the proton-proton collisions and the speed of the electronics to identify the crossing bunches at 25 ns. The developments and the status of the SCT are presented from the point of view of these issues. Series production of the SCT will start in the year 2001 and the SCT will be installed into the ATLAS detector during 2003-2004

  3. Frequency scanning microstrip antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Magnus; Jørgensen, Rolf

    1979-01-01

    The principles of using radiating microstrip resonators as elements in a frequency scanning antenna array are described. The resonators are cascade-coupled. This gives a scan of the main lobe due to the phase-shift in the resonator in addition to that created by the transmission line phase......-shift. Experimental results inX-band, in good agreement with the theory, show that it is possible to scan the main lobe an angle ofpm30degby a variation of the frequencypm300MHz, and where the 3 dB beamwidth is less than10deg. The directivity was 14.7 dB, while the gain was 8.1 dB. The efficiency might be improved...

  4. Scanning of irradiated silicon detectors using $\\alpha$ particles and low energy protons

    CERN Document Server

    Casse, G L; Glaser, M; Kohout, Z; Konícek, J; Lemeilleur, F; Leroy, C; Linhart, V; Mares, J J; Pospísil, S; Roy, P; Sopko, B; Sinor, M; Svejda, J; Vorobel, V; Wilhelm, I

    1999-01-01

    In a spectroscopic study of non-irradiated and proton-irradiated silicon diodes, the detectors were illuminated from the front side and from the rear side by various alpha particle sources (mainly ThC') and by monoenergetic protons with energies from 1.0 to 2.5~MeV. Their response characteristics have been studied as a function of the incoming particle energy and the applied bias voltage. The charge collection efficiency was determined as a function of fluence

  5. Vibration of signal wires in wire detectors under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojko, I.R.; Shelkov, G.A.; Dodonov, V.I.; Ignatenko, M.A.; Nikolenko, M.Yu.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation-induced vibration of signal wires in wire detectors is found and explained. The phenomenon is based on repulsion of a signal wire with a positive potential and a cloud of positive ions that remains after neutralization of the electron part of the avalanche formed in the course of gas amplification. Vibration with a noticeable amplitude may arise from fluctuations of repulsive forces, which act on the wire and whose sources are numerous ion clusters. A formula is obtained which allows wire oscillations to be estimated for all types of wire detectors. Calculation shows that oscillations of signal wires can be substantial for the coordinate accuracy of a detector working in the limited streamer mode at fluxes over 10 5 particles per second per wire. In the proportional mode an average oscillation amplitude can be as large as 20-30 μm at some detector parameters and external radiation fluxes over 10 5 . The experimental investigations show that the proposed model well describes the main features of the phenomenon. 6 refs., 8 figs

  6. The influence of fast neutron irradiation on the noise properties of silicon surface-barrier detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabrowski, W.; Korbel, K.

    1988-01-01

    The susceptibility to the fast neutron irradiation of silicon surface-barrier detectors has been investigated. It was shown that the 1/f-noise decreases substantially with increasing fluence in the range from 10 10 n/cm 2 to 10 11 n/cm 2 . The deterioration of the detector performance is caused mainly by the positively-charged defects induced by the radiation. The critical value of the neutron fluence, at which the detector performance begins to be worsened was also determined. 5 refs., 5 figs. (author)

  7. A standardization of the physical tests for external irradiation measuring detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-05-01

    This report is the result of a standardization work, realized within the Radioprotection Services of the A.E.C., of the physical tests for dectors measuring external irradiations. Among the various tests mentionned, calibration and the establishment of the relative spectral response are treated in details. As far as calibration is concerned, the standardization refers to: the reference detector, the reference radiation source, the installation and calibration procedure. As for the relative spectral response the standardization refers to: the reference detector, the radiation sources to be used. High flux detectors and those for pulse electromagnetic radiations are also dealt with [fr

  8. Radiation Damage in Silicon Detectors Caused by Hadronic and Electromagnetic Irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Fretwurst, E.; Stahl, J.; Pintilie, I.

    2002-01-01

    The report contains various aspects of radiation damage in silicon detectors subjected to high intensity hadron and electromagnetic irradiation. It focuses on improvements for the foreseen LHC applications, employing oxygenation of silicon wafers during detector processing (result from CERN-RD48). An updated survey on hadron induced damage is given in the first article. Several improvements are outlined especially with respect to antiannealing problems associated with detector storage during LHC maintenance periods. Open questions are outlined in the final section, among which are a full understanding of differences found between proton and neutron induced damage, process related effects changing the radiation tolerance in addition to the oxygen content and the lack of understanding the changed detector properties on the basis of damage induced point and cluster defects. In addition to float zone silicon, so far entirely used for detector fabrication,Czochralski silicon was also studied and first promising re...

  9. Charge collection and charge pulse formation in highly irradiated silicon planar detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dezillie, B.; Li, Z.; Eremin, V.

    1998-06-01

    The interpretation of experimental data and predictions for future experiments for high-energy physics have been based on conventional methods like capacitance versus voltage (C-V) measurements. Experiments carried out on highly irradiated detectors show that the kinetics of the charge collection and the dependence of the charge pulse amplitude on the applied bias are deviated too far from those predicted by the conventional methods. The described results show that in highly irradiated detectors, at a bias lower than the real full depletion voltage (V fd ), the kinetics of the charge collection (Q) contains a fast and a slow component. At V = V fd *, which is the full depletion voltage traditionally determined by the extrapolation of the fast component amplitude of q versus bias to the maximum value or from the standard C-V measurements, the pulse has a slow component with significant amplitude. This slow component can only be eliminated by applying additional bias that amounts to the real full depletion voltage (V fd ) or more. The above mentioned regularities are explained in this paper in terms of a model of an irradiated detector with multiple regions. This model allows one to use C-V, in a modified way, as well as TChT (transient charge technique) measurements to determine the V fd for highly irradiated detectors

  10. Charge collection in Si detectors irradiated in situ at superfluid helium temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verbitskaya, Elena, E-mail: elena.verbitskaya@cern.ch [Ioffe Institute, 26 Politekhnicheskaya str., St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Eremin, Vladimir; Zabrodskii, Andrei [Ioffe Institute, 26 Politekhnicheskaya str., St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Dehning, Bernd; Kurfürst, Christoph; Sapinski, Mariusz; Bartosik, Marcin R. [CERN, CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Egorov, Nicolai [Research Institute of Material Science and Technology, 4 Passage 4806, Moscow, Zelenograd 124460 (Russian Federation); Härkönen, Jaakko [Helsinki Institute of Physics, P.O.Box 64 (Gustaf Hallströmin katu 2) FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2015-10-01

    Silicon and diamond detectors operated in a superfluid helium bath are currently being considered for the upgrade of the LHC beam loss monitoring system. The detectors would be installed in immediate proximity of the superconducting coils of the triplet magnets. We present here the results of the in situ irradiation test for silicon detectors using 23 GeV protons while keeping the detectors at a temperature of 1.9 K. Red laser (630 nm) Transient Current Technique and DC current measurements were used to study the pulse response and collected charge for silicon detectors irradiated to a maximum radiation fluence of 1×10{sup 16} p/cm{sup 2}. The dependence between collected charge and irradiation fluence was parameterized using the Hecht equation and assumption of a uniform electric field distribution. The collected charge was found to degrade with particle fluence for both bias polarities. We observed that the main factor responsible for this degradation was related to trapping of holes on the donor-type radiation-induced defects. In contrast to expectations, along with formation of donors, acceptor-type defects (electron traps) are introduced into the silicon bulk. This suggests that the current models describing charge collection in irradiated silicon detectors require an extension for taking into account trapping at low temperatures with a contribution of shallow levels. New in situ irradiation tests are needed and planned now to extend statistics of the results and gain a deeper insight into the physics of low temperature detector operation in harsh radiation environment. - Highlights: • Si detectors irradiated in situ at 1.9 K by 23 GeV protons are further studied. • Trapping parameters are derived from the fits of collected charge vs. fluence data. • Acceptor-type defects are likely to be induced along with donor-type ones. • Trapping of holes has a dominating effect on the collected charge degradation. • New tests are planned to gain deeper insight

  11. ASTRO-H CdTe detectors proton irradiation at PIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limousin, O.; Renaud, D.; Horeau, B.; Dubos, S.; Laurent, P.; Lebrun, F.; Chipaux, R.; Boatella Polo, C.; Marcinkowski, R.; Kawaharada, M.; Watanabe, S.; Ohta, M.; Sato, G.; Takahashi, T.

    2015-01-01

    Asbstract: The French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), with the support of the European Space Agency (ESA), is partner of the Soft Gamma-Ray Detector (SGD) and the Hard X-ray Imager (HXI) onboard the 6th Japanese X-ray scientific satellite ASTRO-H (JAXA) initiated by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS). Both scientific instruments, one hosting a series of Compton Gamma Cameras and the other being a focal plane of a grazing incidence mirror telescope in the hard X-ray domain, are equipped with Cadmium Telluride based detectors. ASTRO-H will be operated in a Low Earth Orbit with a 31° inclination at ~550 km altitude, thus passing daily through the South Atlantic Anomaly radiation belt, a specially harsh environment where the detectors are suffering the effect of the interaction with trapped high energy protons. As CdTe detector performance might be affected by the irradiation, we investigate the effect of the accumulated proton fluence on their spectral response. To do so, we have characterized and irradiated representative samples of SGD and HXI detector under different conditions. The detectors in question, from ACRORAD, are single-pixels having a size of 2 mm by 2 mm and 750 µm thick. The Schottky contact is either made of an Indium or Aluminum for SGD and HXI respectively. We ran the irradiation test campaign at the Proton Irradiation Facility (PIF) at PSI, and ESA approved equipment to evaluate the radiation hardness of flight hardware. We simulated the proton flux expected on the sensors over the entire mission, and secondary neutrons flux due to primary proton interactions into the surrounding BGO active shielding. We eventually characterized the detector response evolution, emphasizing each detector spectral response as well as its stability by studying the so-called Polarization effect. The latter is provoking a spectral response degradation against time as a charge accumulation process occurs in Schottky type CdTe sensors. In this paper

  12. Developments, characterization and proton irradiation damage tests of AlN detectors for VUV solar observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BenMoussa, A., E-mail: ali.benmoussa@stce.be [Solar Terrestrial Center of Excellence (STCE), Royal Observatory of Belgium, Circular Avenue 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Soltani, A.; Gerbedoen, J.-C [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), F-59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Saito, T. [Department of Environment and Energy, Tohoku Institute of Technology, 35-1, Yagiyama-Kasumi-cho, Taihaku-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 982-8577 (Japan); Averin, S. [Fryazino Branch of the Kotel’nikov Institute of Radioengineering and Electronics of Russian Academy of Sciences, 141190 Square Vvedenski 1, Fryazino, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Gissot, S.; Giordanengo, B. [Solar Terrestrial Center of Excellence (STCE), Royal Observatory of Belgium, Circular Avenue 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Berger, G. [Catholic University of Louvain-la-Neuve, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain la Neuve (Belgium); Kroth, U. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestr. 2-12, D-10587 Berlin (Germany); De Jaeger, J.-C. [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), F-59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Gottwald, A. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestr. 2-12, D-10587 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    For next generation spaceborne solar ultraviolet radiometers, innovative metal–semiconductor–metal detectors based on wurtzite aluminum nitride are being developed and characterized. A set of measurement campaigns and proton irradiation damage tests was carried out to obtain their ultraviolet-to-visible characterization and degradation mechanisms. First results on large area prototypes up to 4.3 mm diameter are presented here. In the wavelength range of interest, this detector is reasonably sensitive and stable under brief irradiation with a negligible low dark current (3–6 pA/cm{sup 2}). No significant degradation of the detector performance was observed after exposure to protons of 14.4 MeV energy, showing a good radiation tolerance up to fluences of 1 × 10{sup 11} protons/cm{sup 2}.

  13. Modeling of displacement damage in silicon carbide detectors resulting from neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorsandi, Behrooz

    There is considerable interest in developing a power monitor system for Generation IV reactors (for instance GT-MHR). A new type of semiconductor radiation detector is under development based on silicon carbide (SiC) technology for these reactors. SiC has been selected as the semiconductor material due to its superior thermal-electrical-neutronic properties. Compared to Si, SiC is a radiation hard material; however, like Si, the properties of SiC are changed by irradiation by a large fluence of energetic neutrons, as a consequence of displacement damage, and that irradiation decreases the life-time of detectors. Predictions of displacement damage and the concomitant radiation effects are important for deciding where the SiC detectors should be placed. The purpose of this dissertation is to develop computer simulation methods to estimate the number of various defects created in SiC detectors, because of neutron irradiation, and predict at what positions of a reactor, SiC detectors could monitor the neutron flux with high reliability. The simulation modeling includes several well-known---and commercial---codes (MCNP5, TRIM, MARLOWE and VASP), and two kinetic Monte Carlo codes written by the author (MCASIC and DCRSIC). My dissertation will highlight the displacement damage that may happen in SiC detectors located in available positions in the OSURR, GT-MHR and IRIS. As extra modeling output data, the count rates of SiC for the specified locations are calculated. A conclusion of this thesis is SiC detectors that are placed in the thermal neutron region of a graphite moderator-reflector reactor have a chance to survive at least one reactor refueling cycle, while their count rates are acceptably high.

  14. Radiation damage in proton-irradiated epitaxial silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, Joern

    2009-07-01

    In this work radiation hardness of 75 μm, 100 μm and 150 μm thick epitaxial silicon pad diodes of both standard and oxygenated material was investigated. Damage after 24 GeV/c proton irradiation in a 1MeV neutron equivalent fluence range between 10 14 cm -2 and 10 16 cm -2 was studied and isothermal annealing experiments at 80 C were carried out. Standard CV/IV measurements could be performed up to 4 x 10 15 cm -2 . The volume-normalised reverse current was found to increase linearly with fluence with a slope independent of the thickness and impurity concentration. However, due to large fluctuations the fluences had to be renormalised using the current-related damage parameter. Concerning the depletion voltage, nearly all materials remained at a moderate level up to 4 x 10 15 cm -2 . During short-term annealing acceptors annealed out, whereas others were introduced during the long-term annealing. The stable damage was characterised by donor removal at low fluences and fluence-proportional predominant donor introduction for highly irradiated diodes, depending on the oxygen level. No type inversion was observed. Time-resolved measurements with a new 670 nm laser-TCT setup made the determination of the trapping time constant with the charge correction method possible. The results agreed with expectations and showed a linear increase of trapping probability with fluence. The electric field exhibited a double peak structure in highly irradiated diodes. Charge collection efficiency measurements with α-particles were independent of oxygen concentration, but showed an improved efficiency for thinner diodes. A comparison to simulation revealed systematic discrepancies. A non-constant trapping time parameter was proposed as possible solution. (orig.)

  15. Radiation damage in proton-irradiated epitaxial silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lange, Joern

    2009-07-15

    In this work radiation hardness of 75 {mu}m, 100 {mu}m and 150 {mu}m thick epitaxial silicon pad diodes of both standard and oxygenated material was investigated. Damage after 24 GeV/c proton irradiation in a 1MeV neutron equivalent fluence range between 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} and 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} was studied and isothermal annealing experiments at 80 C were carried out. Standard CV/IV measurements could be performed up to 4 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. The volume-normalised reverse current was found to increase linearly with fluence with a slope independent of the thickness and impurity concentration. However, due to large fluctuations the fluences had to be renormalised using the current-related damage parameter. Concerning the depletion voltage, nearly all materials remained at a moderate level up to 4 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. During short-term annealing acceptors annealed out, whereas others were introduced during the long-term annealing. The stable damage was characterised by donor removal at low fluences and fluence-proportional predominant donor introduction for highly irradiated diodes, depending on the oxygen level. No type inversion was observed. Time-resolved measurements with a new 670 nm laser-TCT setup made the determination of the trapping time constant with the charge correction method possible. The results agreed with expectations and showed a linear increase of trapping probability with fluence. The electric field exhibited a double peak structure in highly irradiated diodes. Charge collection efficiency measurements with {alpha}-particles were independent of oxygen concentration, but showed an improved efficiency for thinner diodes. A comparison to simulation revealed systematic discrepancies. A non-constant trapping time parameter was proposed as possible solution. (orig.)

  16. Irradiation tests of optoelectronic components for LHC inner-detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, I.; Oglesby, S.J.; Dowell, J.D.; Homer, R.J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Shaylor, H.R.; Wilson, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    Two kinds of optical-link technologies have been investigated for the readout of data at LHC experiments; one based on LEDs and the other on Multi-Quantum-Well modulators. Presented in this paper are the results of irradiating LEDs and MQW modulators with 1 MeV-equivalent neutrons and 24 GeV protons. The devices were biased and the performances of the optical links were monitored throughout the tests. The fluences achieved were ∝5 x 10 14 n cm -2 and ∝6 x 10 13 p cm -2 . (orig.)

  17. Proton irradiation of CVD diamond detectors for high-luminosity experiments at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, D.; Adam, W.; Bauer, C.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; van Eijk, B.; Fallou, A.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Jany, C.; Gan, K. K.; Gheeraert, E.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Kass, R.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Krammer, M.; Manfredi, P. F.; Marshall, R. D.; Mishina, M.; Le Normand, F.; Pan, L. S.; Palmieri, V. G.; Pernegger, H.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Pirollo, S.; Pretzl, K.; Re, V.; Riester, J. L.; Roe, S.; Roff, D.; Rudge, A.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Speziali, V.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Tapper, R. J.; Tesarek, R.; Thomson, G. B.; Trawick, M.; Trischuk, W.; Turchetta, R.; Walsh, A. M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; Ziock, H.; Zoeller, M.; RD42 Collaboration

    1999-04-01

    CVD diamond shows promising properties for use as a position-sensitive detector for experiments in the highest radiation areas at the Large Hadron Collider. In order to study the radiation hardness of diamond we exposed CVD diamond detector samples to 24 Gev/ c and 500 Mev protons up to a fluence of 5×10 15 p/cm 2. We measured the charge collection distance, the average distance electron-hole pairs move apart in an external electric field, and leakage currents before, during, and after irradiation. The charge collection distance remains unchanged up to 1×10 15 p/cm 2 and decreases by ≈40% at 5×10 15 p/cm 2. Leakage currents of diamond samples were below 1 pA before and after irradiation. The particle-induced currents during irradiation correlate well with the proton flux. In contrast to diamond, a silicon diode, which was irradiated for comparison, shows the known large increase in leakage current. We conclude that CVD diamond detectors are radiation hard to 24 GeV/ c and 500 MeV protons up to at least 1×10 15p/cm 2 without signal loss.

  18. Proton irradiation of CVD diamond detectors for high-luminosity experiments at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, D. E-mail: dirk.meier@cern.ch.; Adam, W.; Bauer, C.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Jany, C.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Kass, R.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Krammer, M.; Manfredi, P.F.; Marshall, R.D.; Mishina, M.; Le Normand, F.; Pan, L.S.; Palmieri, V.G.; Pernegger, H.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Pirollo, S.; Pretzl, K.; Re, V.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Roff, D.; Rudge, A.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Speziali, V.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Thomson, G.B.; Trawick, M.; Trischuk, W.; Turchetta, R.; Walsh, A.M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; Ziock, H.; Zoeller, M

    1999-04-21

    CVD diamond shows promising properties for use as a position-sensitive detector for experiments in the highest radiation areas at the Large Hadron Collider. In order to study the radiation hardness of diamond we exposed CVD diamond detector samples to 24 Gev/c and 500 Mev protons up to a fluence of 5x10{sup 15} p/cm{sup 2}. We measured the charge collection distance, the average distance electron-hole pairs move apart in an external electric field, and leakage currents before, during, and after irradiation. The charge collection distance remains unchanged up to 1x10{sup 15} p/cm{sup 2} and decreases by {approx}40% at 5x10{sup 15} p/cm{sup 2}. Leakage currents of diamond samples were below 1 pA before and after irradiation. The particle-induced currents during irradiation correlate well with the proton flux. In contrast to diamond, a silicon diode, which was irradiated for comparison, shows the known large increase in leakage current. We conclude that CVD diamond detectors are radiation hard to 24 GeV/c and 500 MeV protons up to at least 1x10{sup 15}p/cm{sup 2} without signal loss.

  19. Proton irradiation of CVD diamond detectors for high-luminosity experiments at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, D.; Adam, W.; Bauer, C.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Jany, C.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Kass, R.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Krammer, M.; Manfredi, P.F.; Marshall, R.D.; Mishina, M.; Le Normand, F.; Pan, L.S.; Palmieri, V.G.; Pernegger, H.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Pirollo, S.; Pretzl, K.; Re, V.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Roff, D.; Rudge, A.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Speziali, V.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Thomson, G.B.; Trawick, M.; Trischuk, W.; Turchetta, R.; Walsh, A.M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; Ziock, H.; Zoeller, M.

    1999-01-01

    CVD diamond shows promising properties for use as a position-sensitive detector for experiments in the highest radiation areas at the Large Hadron Collider. In order to study the radiation hardness of diamond we exposed CVD diamond detector samples to 24 Gev/c and 500 Mev protons up to a fluence of 5x10 15 p/cm 2 . We measured the charge collection distance, the average distance electron-hole pairs move apart in an external electric field, and leakage currents before, during, and after irradiation. The charge collection distance remains unchanged up to 1x10 15 p/cm 2 and decreases by ∼40% at 5x10 15 p/cm 2 . Leakage currents of diamond samples were below 1 pA before and after irradiation. The particle-induced currents during irradiation correlate well with the proton flux. In contrast to diamond, a silicon diode, which was irradiated for comparison, shows the known large increase in leakage current. We conclude that CVD diamond detectors are radiation hard to 24 GeV/c and 500 MeV protons up to at least 1x10 15 p/cm 2 without signal loss

  20. Proton Irradiation of CVD Diamond Detectors for High Luminosity Experiments at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Meier, D; Bauer, C; Berdermann, E; Bergonzo, P; Bogani, F; Borchi, E; Bruzzi, Mara; Colledani, C; Conway, J; Dabrowski, W; Delpierre, P A; Deneuville, A; Dulinski, W; van Eijk, B; Fallou, A; Foulon, F; Friedl, M; Gan, K K; Gheeraert, E; Grigoriev, E A; Hallewell, G D; Hall-Wilton, R; Han, S; Hartjes, F G; Hrubec, Josef; Husson, D; Jany, C; Kagan, H; Kania, D R; Kaplon, J; Kass, R; Knöpfle, K T; Krammer, Manfred; Manfredi, P F; Marshall, R D; Mishina, M; Le Normand, F; Pan, L S; Palmieri, V G; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Peitz, A; Pirollo, S; Pretzl, Klaus P; Re, V; Riester, J L; Roe, S; Roff, D G; Rudge, A; Schnetzer, S R; Sciortino, S; Speziali, V; Stelzer, H; Stone, R; Tapper, R J; Tesarek, R J; Thomson, G B; Trawick, M L; Trischuk, W; Turchetta, R; Walsh, A M; Wedenig, R; Weilhammer, Peter; Ziock, H J; Zöller, M

    1999-01-01

    CVD diamond shows promising properties for use as a position sensitive detector for experiments in the highest radiation areas at the Large Hadron Collider. In order to study the radiation hardn ess of diamond we exposed CVD diamond detector samples to 24~GeV/$c$ and 500~MeV protons up to a fluence of $5\\times 10^{15}~p/{\\rm cm^2}$. We measured the charge collection distance, the ave rage distance electron hole pairs move apart in an external electric field, and leakage currents before, during, and after irradiation. The charge collection distance remains unchanged up to $1\\ times 10^{15}~p/{\\rm cm^2}$ and decreases by $\\approx$40~\\% at $5\\times 10^{15}~p/{\\rm cm^2}$. Leakage currents of diamond samples were below 1~pA before and after irradiation. The particle indu ced currents during irradiation correlate well with the proton flux. In contrast to diamond, a silicon diode, which was irradiated for comparison, shows the known large increase in leakage curren t. We conclude that CVD diamond detectors are radia...

  1. Gas filled detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephan, C.

    1993-01-01

    The main types of gas filled nuclear detectors: ionization chambers, proportional counters, parallel-plate avalanche counters (PPAC) and microstrip detectors are described. New devices are shown. A description of the processes involved in such detectors is also given. (K.A.) 123 refs.; 25 figs.; 3 tabs

  2. ATLAS Silicon Microstrip Tracker Operation and Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Chalupkova, I; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The Semi-Conductor Tracker (SCT) is a silicon strip detector and one of the key precision tracking devices in the Inner Detector of the ATLAS experiment at CERN LHC. The SCT is constructed of 4088 silicon detector modules for a total of 6.3 million strips. Each module is designed, constructed and tested to operate as a stand-alone unit, mechanically, electrically, optically and thermally. The modules are mounted into two types of structures: one barrel (4 cylinders) and two end-cap systems (9 disks on each end of the barrel). The SCT silicon micro-strip sensors are processed in the planar p-in-n technology. The signals from the strips are processed in the front-end ASICS ABCD3TA, working in the binary readout mode. Data is transferred to the off-detector readout electronics via optical fibers. The completed SCT has been installed inside the ATLAS experimental cavern since 2007 and has been operational since then. Calibration data has been taken regularly and analyzed to determine the noise performance of the ...

  3. ATLAS Silicon Microstrip Tracker Operation and Performance

    CERN Document Server

    NAGAI, K; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The Semi-Conductor Tracker (SCT) is a silicon strip detector and one of the key precision tracking devices in the Inner Detector of the ATLAS experiment at CERN LHC. The SCT is constructed of 4088 silicon detector modules for a total of 6.3 million strips. Each module is designed, constructed and tested to operate as a stand-alone unit, mechanically, electrically, optically and thermally. The modules are mounted into two types of structures: one barrel (4 cylinders) and two end-cap systems (9 disks on each end of the barrel). The SCT silicon micro-strip sensors are processed in the planar p-in-n technology. The signals from the strips are processed in the front-end ASICS ABCD3TA, working in the binary readout mode. Data is transferred to the off-detector readout electronics via optical fibres. The completed SCT has been installed inside the ATLAS experimental cavern since 2007 and has been operational since then. Calibration data has been taken regularly and analysed to determine the noise performance of the ...

  4. ATLAS Silicon Microstrip Tracker Operation and Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Chalupkova, I; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The Semi-Conductor Tracker (SCT) is a silicon strip detector and one of the key precision tracking devices in the Inner Detector (ID) of the ATLAS experiment at CERN LHC. The SCT is constructed of 4088 silicon detector modules with a total of 6.3 million strips. Each module is designed, constructed and tested to operate as a stand-alone unit, mechanically, electrically, optically and thermally. The modules are mounted into two types of structures: one barrel (4 cylinders) and two end-cap systems (9 disks on each side of the barrel). The SCT silicon microstrip sensors are processed in the planar p-in-n technology. The signals from the strips are processed in the front-end ASICs ABCD3TA, working in the binary readout mode. Data is transferred to the off-detector readout electronics via optical fibres. SCT has been installed inside the ATLAS experimental cavern since 2007 and has been operational ever since. Calibration data has been taken regularly and analysed to determine the noise performance of the system. ...

  5. Operation of high rate microstrip gas chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Barr, A J; Bouclier, Roger; Capéans-Garrido, M; Dominik, Wojciech; Manzin, G; Million, Gilbert; Hoch, M; Ropelewski, Leszek; Sauli, Fabio; Sharma, A

    1996-01-01

    We describe recent measurements carried out in well controlled and reproducible conditions to help understanding the factors affecting the short and long term behaviour of Microstrip Gas Chambers. Special care has been taken concerning the gas purity and choice of materials used in the system and for the detectors construction. Detectors built on glasses with surface resistivity in the range $10^{13}-10^{15} \\Omega/\\Box$ have shown satisfactory performance as they do not show charging-up process at high rate and stand the large doses required for the future high luminosity experiments (~10 mC·cm-1·yr-1). Concerning the lifetime measurements, it has been observed that chambers manufactured on high-resistivity glass are far more susceptible of suffering ageing than detectors made on low resistivity, electron-conducting supports, independently of the metal used for the artwork (chromium or gold) at least in clean gas conditions. The successfully operation in the laboratory of detectors manufactured on diamond-...

  6. Planned studies of charge collection in non-uniformly irradiated Si and GaAs detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenfeld, A.; Reinhard, M.; Carolan, M.; Kaplan, G.; Lerch, M.; Alexiev, D.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this project is to study the time and amplitude characteristics of silicon ion-implanted detectors non-uniformly irradiated with fast neutrons in order to predict their radiation behaviour in the LHC and space. It is expected in such detectors increases of the charge deficit due to trapping by large scale traps and transient time increases due to the reduction of the mobility. The theoretical model will be modified to describe the charge kinetics in the electrical field of the detector created by a non uniform space charge distribution. Experimental confirmation techniques are needed to develop non uniform predictable damage of silicon detectors using fast neutron sources (accelerators, reactors) and to study peculiarities of the charge transport in different parts of the detector. In parallel to experimental research will be started the theoretical development of the charge transport model for non-uniform distribution of space charge in the depletion layer (Neff). The model will include the linear distribution of Neff(y) along the detector as well as the change of sign of Neff (conversion from n to p type of silicon) inside the detector

  7. Testbeam and laboratory test results of irradiated 3D CMS pixel detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bubna, Mayur [Purdue University, Department of Physics, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1396 (United States); Purdue University, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1396 (United States); Alagoz, Enver, E-mail: enver.alagoz@cern.ch [Purdue University, Department of Physics, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1396 (United States); Cervantes, Mayra; Krzywda, Alex; Arndt, Kirk [Purdue University, Department of Physics, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1396 (United States); Obertino, Margherita; Solano, Ada [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Torino, 10125 Torino (Italy); Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco [INFN Padova (Gruppo Collegato di Trento) (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Scienzadella Informazione, Universitá di Trento, I-38123 Povo di Trento (Italy); Menace, Dario; Moroni, Luigi [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano Bicocca (Italy); Universitá degli Studi di Milano Bicocca, 20126 Milano (Italy); Uplegger, Lorenzo; Rivera, Ryan [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510-0500 (United States); Osipenkov, Ilya [Texas A and M University, Department of Physics, College Station, TX 77843-4242 (United States); Andresen, Jeff [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510-0500 (United States); Bolla, Gino; Bortoletto, Daniela [Purdue University, Department of Physics, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1396 (United States); Boscardin, Maurizio [Centro per i Materiali e i Microsistemi Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK), Trento, I-38123 Povo di Trento (Italy); Marie Brom, Jean [Strasbourg IPHC, Institut Pluriedisciplinaire Hubert Curien, F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Brosius, Richard [State University of New York at Buffalo (SUNY), Department of Physics, Buffalo, NY 14260-1500 (United States); Chramowicz, John [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510-0500 (United States); and others

    2013-12-21

    The CMS silicon pixel detector is the tracking device closest to the LHC p–p collisions, which precisely reconstructs the charged particle trajectories. The planar technology used in the current innermost layer of the pixel detector will reach the design limit for radiation hardness at the end of Phase I upgrade and will need to be replaced before the Phase II upgrade in 2020. Due to its unprecedented performance in harsh radiation environments, 3D silicon technology is under consideration as a possible replacement of planar technology for the High Luminosity-LHC or HL-LHC. 3D silicon detectors are fabricated by the Deep Reactive-Ion-Etching (DRIE) technique which allows p- and n-type electrodes to be processed through the silicon substrate as opposed to being implanted through the silicon surface. The 3D CMS pixel devices presented in this paper were processed at FBK. They were bump bonded to the current CMS pixel readout chip, tested in the laboratory, and testbeams carried out at FNAL with the proton beam of 120 GeV/c. In this paper we present the laboratory and beam test results for the irradiated 3D CMS pixel devices. -- Highlights: •Pre-irradiation and post-irradiation electrical properties of 3D sensors and 3D diodes from various FBK production batches were measured and analyzed. •I–T measurements of gamma irradiated diodes were analyzed to understand leakage current generation mechanism in 3D diodes. •Laboratory measurements: signal to noise ratio and charge collection efficiency of 3D sensors before and after irradiation. •Testbeam measurements: pre- and post-irradiation pixel cell efficiency and position resolution of 3D sensors.

  8. Fast neutron irradiation effects on CR-39 nuclear track detector for dosimetric applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kader, M.H.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of neutron irradiation on the dosimetric properties of CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detector have been investigated. CR-39 samples were irradiated with neutrons of energies follow a Maxwellian distribution centered about 2 MeV. These samples were irradiated with different doses in the range 0.1-1 Sv. The background and track density were measured as a function of etching time. In addition, the dependence of sensitivity of CR-39 detector on the neutrons dose has been investigated. The results show that the Sensitivity started to increase at 0.4 Sv neutrons dose, so this sample were chosen to be a subject for further study to investigate the effect of gamma dose on its properties. The sample irradiated with 0.4 Sv were exposed to different doses of gamma rays at levels between 10 and 80 kGy. The effect of gamma doses on the bulk etching rate VB, the track diameter and the sensitivity of the CR-39 samples was investigated. The results show that the dosimetric properties of CR-39 SSNTD are greatly affected by both neutron and gamma irradiation

  9. Comparison of pad detectors produced on different silicon materials after irradiation with neutrons, protons and pions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramberger, G.; Cindro, V.; Dolenc, I.; Mandic, I.; Mikuz, M.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2010-01-01

    A set of 44 pad detectors produced on p- and n-type MCz and Fz wafers was irradiated with 23 GeV protons, 200 MeV pions and reactor neutrons up to the equivalent fluences of Φ eq =3x10 15 cm -2 . The evolution of the full depletion voltage and the leakage current were monitored during short- and long-term annealing. At selected representative annealing steps, charge collection measurements were performed for all samples with LHC speed electronics. Measurements of full depletion voltage, leakage current and charge collection efficiency were compared for different irradiation particles and silicon materials.

  10. Comparison of pad detectors produced on different silicon materials after irradiation with neutrons, protons and pions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramberger, G., E-mail: Gregor.Kramberger@ijs.s [Jozef Stefan Institute and Department of Physics, University of Ljubljana, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Cindro, V.; Dolenc, I.; Mandic, I.; Mikuz, M.; Zavrtanik, M. [Jozef Stefan Institute and Department of Physics, University of Ljubljana, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2010-01-01

    A set of 44 pad detectors produced on p- and n-type MCz and Fz wafers was irradiated with 23 GeV protons, 200 MeV pions and reactor neutrons up to the equivalent fluences of PHI{sub eq}=3x10{sup 15}cm{sup -2}. The evolution of the full depletion voltage and the leakage current were monitored during short- and long-term annealing. At selected representative annealing steps, charge collection measurements were performed for all samples with LHC speed electronics. Measurements of full depletion voltage, leakage current and charge collection efficiency were compared for different irradiation particles and silicon materials.

  11. Self-Powered Neutron Detector Calibration Using a Large Vertical Irradiation Hole of HANARO

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Myong-Seop; Park Byung-Gun; Kang Gi-Doo

    2018-01-01

    A calibration technology of the self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) using a large vertical irradiation hole of HANARO is developed. The 40 Rh-SPNDs are installed on the polycarbonate plastic support, and the gold wires with the same length as the effective length of the rhodium emitter of the SPND are also installed to measure the neutron flux on the SPND. They are irradiated at a low reactor power, and the SPND current is measured using the pico-ammeter. The external gamma-rays which affe...

  12. Gamma irradiation effects on the thermal, optical and structural properties of Cr-39 nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouh, S.A.; Said, A.F.; Atta, M.R.; EL-Mellegy, W.M.; EL-Meniawi, S.

    2006-01-01

    A study of the effect of gamma irradiation on the thermal, optical and structural properties of CR-39 diglycol carbonate solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) has been carried out. Samples from CR-39 polymer were irradiated with gamma doses at levels between 20 and 300 KGy. Non-isothermal studies were carried out using thermo-gravimetry (TG), differential thermo-gravimetry (DTG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) to obtain the activation energy of decomposition and the transition temperatures for the non-irradiated and irradiated CR-39 samples. In addition, optical and structural property studies were performed on non-irradiated and irradiated CR-39 samples using refractive index and X-ray diffraction measurements. The variation of onset temperature of decomposition (To) thermal activation energy of decomposition (Ea) melting temperature (Tm) refractive index (n) and the mass fraction of the amorphous phase with the gamma dose were studied. It was found that many changes in the thermal, optical and structural properties of the CR-39 polymer could be produced by gamma irradiation via the degradation and cross linking mechanisms. Also, the gamma dose gave an advantage for increasing the correlation between the thermal stability of CR-39 polymer and the bond formation created by the ionizing effect of gamma radiation

  13. The effect of charge collection recovery in silicon p-n junction detectors irradiated by different particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verbitskaya, E.; Abreu, M.; Anbinderis, P.; Anbinderis, T.; D'Ambrosio, N.; Boer, W. de; Borchi, E.; Borer, K.; Bruzzi, M.; Buontempo, S.; Casagrande, L.; Chen, W.; Cindro, V.; Dezillie, B.; Dierlamm, A.; Eremin, V.; Gaubas, E.; Gorbatenko, V.; Granata, V.; Grigoriev, E.; Grohmann, S.; Hauler, F.; Heijne, E.; Heising, S.; Hempel, O.; Herzog, R.; Haerkoenen, J.; Ilyashenko, I.; Janos, S.; Jungermann, L.; Kalesinskas, V.; Kapturauskas, J.; Laiho, R.; Li, Z.; Mandic, I.; De Masi, Rita; Menichelli, D.; Mikuz, M.; Militaru, O.; Niinikoski, T.O.; O'Shea, V.; Pagano, S.; Palmieri, V.G.; Paul, S.; Perea Solano, B.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pirollo, S.; Pretzl, K.; Rato Mendes, P.; Ruggiero, G.; Smith, K.; Sonderegger, P.; Sousa, P.; Tuominen, E.; Vaitkus, J.; Da Via, C.; Wobst, E.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2003-01-01

    The recovery of the charge collection efficiency (CCE) at low temperatures, the so-called 'Lazarus effect', was studied in Si detectors irradiated by fast reactor neutrons, by protons of medium and high energy, by pions and by gamma-rays. The experimental results show that the Lazarus effect is observed: (a) after all types of irradiation; (b) before and after space charge sign inversion; (c) only in detectors that are biased at voltages resulting in partial depletion at room temperature. The experimental temperature dependence of the CCE for proton-irradiated detectors shows non-monotonic behaviour with a maximum at a temperature defined as the CCE recovery temperature. The model of the effect for proton-irradiated detectors agrees well with that developed earlier for detectors irradiated by neutrons. The same midgap acceptor-type and donor-type levels are responsible for the Lazarus effect in detectors irradiated by neutrons and by protons. A new, abnormal 'zigzag'-shaped temperature dependence of the CCE was observed for detectors irradiated by all particles (neutrons, protons and pions) and by an ultra-high dose of γ-rays, when operating at low bias voltages. This effect is explained in the framework of the double-peak electric field distribution model for heavily irradiated detectors. The redistribution of the space charge region depth between the depleted regions adjacent to p + and n + contacts is responsible for the 'zigzag'- shaped curves. It is shown that the CCE recovery temperature increases with reverse bias in all detectors, regardless of the type of radiation

  14. An X-Ray facility to perform irradiation tests and TID studies on electronics and detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Brundu, Davide; Cadeddu, Sandro; Wyllie, Ken; Ciambrone, Paolo

    2018-01-01

    The X-Ray irradiation system of the LHCb group, installed in Cagliari, is presented; with a particular focus on the setup configuration and dose rate calibration. The system can be used to perform Total Ionizing Dose (TID) studies for detectors, readout and front-end electronics. It was already used to test the nSYNC chip, an ASIC for the readout of the LHCb upgraded muon system.

  15. Microstrip microwave band gap structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The periodic lattice of PTFE–air combination has the dielectric contrast (defined as the ratio between the dielectric constant of the substrate to that of the background, air) of 2.08. At both ends of the microstrip. MBG, two sub-miniature adapter (SMA) coaxial connectors were placed. The measurements as well as theoretical ...

  16. Self-Powered Neutron Detector Calibration Using a Large Vertical Irradiation Hole of HANARO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Myong-Seop

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A calibration technology of the self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs using a large vertical irradiation hole of HANARO is developed. The 40 Rh-SPNDs are installed on the polycarbonate plastic support, and the gold wires with the same length as the effective length of the rhodium emitter of the SPND are also installed to measure the neutron flux on the SPND. They are irradiated at a low reactor power, and the SPND current is measured using the pico-ammeter. The external gamma-rays which affect the SPND current response are analyzed using the Monte Carlo simulation for various irradiation conditions in HANARO. It is confirmed that the effect of the external gamma-rays to the SPND current is dependent on the reactor characteristics, and that it is affected by materials around the detector. The current signals due to the external gamma-rays can be either positive or negative, in that the net flow of the current may be either in the same or the opposite direction as the neutron-induced current by the rhodium emitter. From the above procedure, the effective calibration methodology of multiple SPNDs using the large hole of HANARO is developed. It could be useful for the calibration experiment of the neutron detectors in the research reactors.

  17. Self-Powered Neutron Detector Calibration Using a Large Vertical Irradiation Hole of HANARO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myong-Seop; Park, Byung-Gun; Kang, Gi-Doo

    2018-01-01

    A calibration technology of the self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) using a large vertical irradiation hole of HANARO is developed. The 40 Rh-SPNDs are installed on the polycarbonate plastic support, and the gold wires with the same length as the effective length of the rhodium emitter of the SPND are also installed to measure the neutron flux on the SPND. They are irradiated at a low reactor power, and the SPND current is measured using the pico-ammeter. The external gamma-rays which affect the SPND current response are analyzed using the Monte Carlo simulation for various irradiation conditions in HANARO. It is confirmed that the effect of the external gamma-rays to the SPND current is dependent on the reactor characteristics, and that it is affected by materials around the detector. The current signals due to the external gamma-rays can be either positive or negative, in that the net flow of the current may be either in the same or the opposite direction as the neutron-induced current by the rhodium emitter. From the above procedure, the effective calibration methodology of multiple SPNDs using the large hole of HANARO is developed. It could be useful for the calibration experiment of the neutron detectors in the research reactors.

  18. Study of micro-strip gas ionisation chambers substrates for CMS experiment at LHC; Etude de substrats pour chambres gazeuses a micropistes dans le cadre de l`experience CMS au LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallares, A.

    1996-06-14

    High luminosity, expected interaction and dose rates of the future LHC collider require the development of micro-strips gas chambers. In addition to optimization of this new detector, this work is concerned with understanding of gain loss phenomena. Influence of the gas substrate is carefully analysed, as well as theoretical concepts concerning glasses and their behaviour under polarization and irradiation, and the consequence on detection operations.Electron spin resonance is used to study, in standard glass, creation of radiation induced defects which may be charged. (D.L.). 14 refs.

  19. Opto-structural characterization of gamma irradiated Bayfol polymer track detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tayel, A. [Physics Department, Faculty of Industrial Education, Helwan University, Cairo (Egypt); Zaki, M.F., E-mail: moha1016@yahoo.com [Experimental Nuclear Physics Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, P.O. 13759, Abu Zaabal, Cairo (Egypt); El Basaty, A.B. [Physics Department, Faculty of Industrial Education, Helwan University, Cairo (Egypt); Hegazy, Tarek M. [Physics Department, College of Women for Arts, Science and Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2013-11-15

    Bayfol CR 1-4 is one of polymeric solid state nuclear track detector which has numerous applications due to its outstanding optical, mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. In the present study, Bayfol polymer is irradiated with different doses of gamma rays ranging from 0 to 1000 KGy. The effects of gamma irradiations on the optical, structural and chemical properties of Bayfol were studied using Ultraviolet and visible (UV/Vis) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The UV–Vis spectra of irradiated samples show that the absorption edge is shifted towards longer wavelength comparing to pristine sample spectrum. This behavior indicates that there is a decrease in the band gap after irradiation. The maximum decrease in the band gap is about 0.8 eV. The XRD patterns of amorphous halo of pristine and irradiated samples show a fluctuation of integrated intensity of amorphous halo. This indicates a change in the structure due to gamma irradiation. In order to understand that structure change mechanism, we used the FTIR spectroscopy.

  20. Study of intense pulse irradiation effects on silicon targets considered as ground matter for optical detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, O.

    1994-12-01

    This study aim was centered on morphological and structural alterations induced by laser irradiation on silicon targets considered as ground matter for optical detectors. First we recalled the main high light intensity effects on the condensed matter. Then we presented the experimental aspects. The experimental studies were achieved on two sample types: SiO 2 /Si and Si. Two topics were studied: the defect chronology according to wavelength and pulse length, and the crystalline quality as well as the structure defects of irradiated zones by Raman spectroscopy. Finally, irradiation of Si targets by intense pulsed beams may lead to material fusion. This phenomenon is particularly easy when the material is absorbent, when the pulse is short and when the material is superficially oxidized. (MML). 204 refs., 93 figs., 21 tabs., 1 appendix

  1. Charge collection efficiency recovery in heavily irradiated silicon detectors operated at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Da Vià, C; Berglund, P; Borchi, E; Borer, K; Bruzzi, Mara; Buontempo, S; Casagrande, L; Chapuy, S; Cindro, V; Dimcovski, Zlatomir; D'Ambrosio, N; de Boer, Wim; Dezillie, B; Esposito, A P; Granat, V; Grigoriev, E; Heijne, Erik H M; Heising, S; Janos, S; Koivuniemi, J H; Konotov, I; Li, Z; Lourenço, C; Mikuz, M; Niinikoski, T O; Pagano, S; Palmieri, V G; Paul, S; Pirollo, S; Pretzl, Klaus P; Ropotar, I; Ruggiero, G; Salmi, J; Seppä, H; Suni, I; Smith, K; Sonderegger, P; Valtonen, M J; Zavrtanik, M

    1998-01-01

    The charge collection efficiency (CCE) of high resistivity silicon detectors, previously neutron irradiated up to 2*10/sup 15/ n/cm/sup 2/, was measured at different cryogenic temperatures and different bias voltages. In order to $9 study reverse annealing (RA) effects, a few samples were heated to 80 degrees C and kept at room temperature for several months after irradiation. For comparison other samples (NRA) where kept at -10 C after irradiation. The RA and $9 NRA samples, measured at 250 V forward and reverse bias voltage, present a common temperature threshold at 150 K. Below 120 K the CCE is constant and ranges between 55and 65 0.000000or the RA and NRA sample respectively. Similar CCE $9 was measured for a device processed with low resistivity contacts (OHMIC), opening the prospect for a consistent reduction of the cost of large area particle tracking. (7 refs).

  2. Is the Spencer-Attix cavity equation applicable for solid-state detectors irradiated in megavoltage electron beams?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mobit, P.N.; Sandison, G.A.; Calgary Univ., AB

    2001-01-01

    The applicability of the Spencer-Attix cavity equation in determining absorbed doses in water using solid state detectors irradiated by megavoltage electron beams have been examined. The calculations were performed using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. This work is an extension of a recently published article examining the perturbation of dose by solid state detectors in megavoltage electron beams. (orig.)

  3. Modifications induced by gamma irradiation to Makrofol polymer nuclear track detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tayel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was extended from obtaining information about the interaction of gamma rays with Makrofol DE 7-2 track detector to introduce the basis that can be used in concerning simple sensor for gamma irradiation and bio-engineering applications. Makrofol polymer samples were irradiated with 1.25 MeV 60Co gamma radiations at doses ranging from 20 to 1000 kG y. The modifications of irradiated samples so induced were analyzed using UV–vis spectrometry, photoluminescence spectroscopy, and the measurements of Vickers’ hardness. Moreover, the change in wettability of irradiated Makrofol was investigated by the contact angle determination of the distilled water. UV–vis spectroscopy shows a noticeable decrease in the energy band gap due to gamma irradiation. This decrease could be attributed to the appearance of a shift to UV spectra toward higher wavelength region after irradiation. Photoluminescence spectra reveal a remarkable change in the integrated photoluminescence intensity with increasing gamma doses, which may be resulted from some matrix disorder through the creation of some defected states in the irradiated polymer. The hardness was found to increase from 4.78 MPa for the unirradiated sample to 23.67 MPa for the highest gamma dose. The contact angle investigations show that the wettability of the modified samples increases with increasing the gamma doses. The result obtained from present investigation furnishes evidence that the gamma irradiations are a successful technique to modify the Makrofol DE 7-2 polymer properties to use it in suitable applications.

  4. Influence for high intensity irradiation on characteristics of silicon strip-detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anokhin, I.E.; Pugatch, V.M.; Zinets, O.S.

    1995-01-01

    Full text: Silicon strip detectors (SSD) are widely used for the coordinate determination of short-range as well as minimum ionizing particles with high spatial resolution. Submicron position sensitivity of strip-detectors for short-range particles has been studied by means of two dimensional analyses of charges collected by neighboring strips as well as by measurement of charge collection times [1]. Silicon strip detectors was also used for testing high energy electron beam [2]. Under large fluences the radiation defects are stored and such characteristics of strip-detectors as an accuracy of the coordinate determination and the registration efficiency are significantly changed. Radiation defects lead to a decrease of the lifetime and mobility of charge carriers and therefore to changes of conditions for the charge collection in detectors. The inhomogeneity in spatial distribution if defects and electrical field plays an important role in the charge collection. In this report the role of the diffusion and drift in the charge collection in silicon strip-detectors under irradiation up to 10 Mrad has been studied. The electric field distribution and its dependence on the radiation dose in the detector have been calculated. It is shown that for particles incident between adjacent strips the coordinate determination precision depends strongly on the detector geometry and the electric field distribution, particularly in the vicinity of strips. Measuring simultaneously the collected charges and collection times on adjacent strips one can essentially improve reliability of the coordinate determination for short-range particles. Usually SSD are fabricated on n-type wafers. It is well known that under high intensity irradiation n-Si material converts into p-Si as far as p-type silicon is more radiative hard than n-type silicon [3] it is reasonable to fabricate SSD using high resistivity p-Si. Characteristics of SSD in basis n-and P-Si have been compared and higher

  5. Characterization of 150μm thick epitaxial silicon detectors from different producers after proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoedlmoser, H.; Moll, M.; Haerkoenen, J.; Kronberger, M.; Trummer, J.; Rodeghiero, P.

    2007-01-01

    Epitaxial (EPI) silicon has recently been investigated for the development of radiation tolerant detectors for future high-luminosity HEP experiments. A study of 150μm thick EPI silicon diodes irradiated with 24GeV/c protons up to a fluence of 3x10 15 p/cm 2 has been performed by means of Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE) measurements, investigations with the Transient Current Technique (TCT) and standard CV/IV characterizations. The aim of the work was to investigate the impact of radiation damage as well as the influence of the wafer processing on the material performance by comparing diodes from different manufacturers. The changes of CCE, full depletion voltage and leakage current as a function of fluence are reported. While the generation of leakage current due to irradiation is similar in all investigated series of detectors, a difference in the effective doping concentration can be observed after irradiation. In the CCE measurements an anomalous drop in performance was found even for diodes exposed to very low fluences (5x10 13 p/cm 2 ) in all measured series. This result was confirmed for one series of diodes in TCT measurements with an infrared laser. TCT measurements with a red laser showed no type inversion up to fluences of 3x10 15 p/cm 2 for n-type devices whereas p-type diodes undergo type inversion from p- to n-type for fluences higher than ∼2x10 14 p/cm 2

  6. Characterization of 150 $\\mu$m thick epitaxial silicon detectors from different producers after proton irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Hoedlmoser, H; Haerkoenen, J; Kronberger, M; Trummer, J; Rodeghiero, P

    2007-01-01

    Epitaxial (EPI) silicon has recently been investigated for the development of radiation tolerant detectors for future high-luminosity HEP experiments. A study of 150 mm thick EPI silicon diodes irradiated with 24GeV=c protons up to a fluence of 3 1015 p=cm2 has been performed by means of Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE) measurements, investigations with the Transient Current Technique (TCT) and standard CV=IV characterizations. The aim of the work was to investigate the impact of radiation damage as well as the influence of the wafer processing on the material performance by comparing diodes from different manufacturers. The changes of CCE, full depletion voltage and leakage current as a function of fluence are reported. While the generation of leakage current due to irradiation is similar in all investigated series of detectors, a difference in the effective doping concentration can be observed after irradiation. In the CCE measurements an anomalous drop in performance was found even for diodes exposed to ...

  7. Studies on irradiated pixel detectors for the ATLAS IBL and HL-LHC upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallrapp, Christian

    2015-07-01

    The constant demand for higher luminosity in high energy physics is the reason for the continuous effort to adapt the accelerators and the experiments. The upgrade program for the experiments and the accelerators at CERN already includes several expansion stages of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which will increase the luminosity and the energy of the accelerator. Simultaneously the LHC experiments prepare the individual sub-detectors for the increasing demands in the coming years. Especially the tracking detectors have to cope with fluence levels unprecedented for high energy physics experiments. Correspondingly to the fluence increases the impact of the radiation damage which reduces the life time of the detectors by decreasing the detector performance and efficiency. To cope with this effect new and more radiation hard detector concepts become necessary to extend the life time. This work concentrates on the impact of radiation damage on the pixel sensor technologies to be used in the next upgrade of the ATLAS Pixel Detector as well as for applications in the ATLAS Experiment at HL-LHC conditions. The sensors considered in this work include various designs based on silicon and diamond as sensor material. The investigated designs include a planar silicon pixel design currently used in the ATLAS Experiment as well as a 3D pixel design which uses electrodes penetrating the entire sensor material. The diamond designs implement electrodes similar to the design used by the planar technology with diamond sensors made out of single- and poly-crystalline material. To investigate the sensor properties characterization tests are performed before and after irradiation with protons or neutrons. The measurements are used to determine the interaction between the read-out electronics and the sensors to ensure the signal transfer after irradiation. Further tests focus on the sensor performance itself which includes the analysis of the leakage current behavior and the charge

  8. Studies on irradiated pixel detectors for the ATLAS IBL and HL-LHC upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallrapp, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The constant demand for higher luminosity in high energy physics is the reason for the continuous effort to adapt the accelerators and the experiments. The upgrade program for the experiments and the accelerators at CERN already includes several expansion stages of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which will increase the luminosity and the energy of the accelerator. Simultaneously the LHC experiments prepare the individual sub-detectors for the increasing demands in the coming years. Especially the tracking detectors have to cope with fluence levels unprecedented for high energy physics experiments. Correspondingly to the fluence increases the impact of the radiation damage which reduces the life time of the detectors by decreasing the detector performance and efficiency. To cope with this effect new and more radiation hard detector concepts become necessary to extend the life time. This work concentrates on the impact of radiation damage on the pixel sensor technologies to be used in the next upgrade of the ATLAS Pixel Detector as well as for applications in the ATLAS Experiment at HL-LHC conditions. The sensors considered in this work include various designs based on silicon and diamond as sensor material. The investigated designs include a planar silicon pixel design currently used in the ATLAS Experiment as well as a 3D pixel design which uses electrodes penetrating the entire sensor material. The diamond designs implement electrodes similar to the design used by the planar technology with diamond sensors made out of single- and poly-crystalline material. To investigate the sensor properties characterization tests are performed before and after irradiation with protons or neutrons. The measurements are used to determine the interaction between the read-out electronics and the sensors to ensure the signal transfer after irradiation. Further tests focus on the sensor performance itself which includes the analysis of the leakage current behavior and the charge

  9. Studies of frequency dependent C-V characteristics of neutron irradiated p+-n silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zheng; Kraner, H.W.

    1990-10-01

    Frequency-dependent capacitance-voltage fluence (C-V) characteristics of neutron irradiated high resistivity silicon p + -n detectors have been observed up to a fluence of 8.0 x 10 12 n/cm 2 . It has been found that frequency dependence of the deviation of the C-V characteristic (from its normal V -1/2 dependence), is strongly dependent on the ratio of the defect density and the effective doping density N t /N' d . As the defect density approaches the effective dopant density, or N t /N' d → 1, the junction capacitance eventually assumes the value of the detector geometry capacitance at high frequencies (f ≤ 10 5 Hz), independent of voltage. A two-trap-level model using the concept of quasi-fermi levels has been developed, which predicts both the effects of C-V frequency dependence and dopant compensation observed in this study

  10. Time development and flux dependence of neutron-irradiation induced defects in silicon pad detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Zontar, D; Kramberger, G; Mikuz, M

    1999-01-01

    1x1 cm sup 2 silicon pad p sup + -n-n sup + detectors were irradiated with fast neutrons from the TRIGA research reactor in Ljubljana to fluences from 5x10 sup 1 sup 3 to 10 sup 1 sup 4 n/cm sup 2. The observed time development of annealing of the full-depletion voltage (FDV) could be fitted by a constant and two exponentials. The characteristic time of the fast component is 4 h, independent of temperature in the interval 0-15 deg. C. A comparison of MESA and planar pad detectors shows a 20-30% lower FDV for the MESA. A search for a flux dependence of the radiation damage was performed in the range from 2x10 sup 8 to 5x10 sup 1 sup 5 n/cm sup 2 s and no systematic differences were observed.

  11. Characterization of hybrid self-powered neutron detector under neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamichi, M. E-mail: masaru@oarai.jaeri.go.jp; Nagao, Y.; Yamamura, C.; Nakazawa, M.; Kawamura, H

    2000-11-01

    To evaluate the irradiation behaviour of a blanket mock-up on in-pile functional test, it is necessary to measure the neutron flux change in the in-pile mock-up by a neutron detector, such as the self-powered neutron detector (SPND). With its small-sized emitter, which has high sensitivity and fast response time, SPND is an indispensable tool in order to measure the local neutron flux change. In the case of an in-pile functional test, it is necessary that response time is less than 1s and ratio of SPND output current is more than 0.3 of output current of SPND with Rh emitter. Therefore, a hybrid SPND with high sensitivity and fast response time was developed. This hybrid SPND used a hybrid emitter, i.e. Co cladded Pt-13%R000.

  12. Characterization of hybrid self-powered neutron detector under neutron irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamichi, M; Yamamura, C; Nakazawa, M; Kawamura, H

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the irradiation behaviour of a blanket mock-up on in-pile functional test, it is necessary to measure the neutron flux change in the in-pile mock-up by a neutron detector, such as the self-powered neutron detector (SPND). With its small-sized emitter, which has high sensitivity and fast response time, SPND is an indispensable tool in order to measure the local neutron flux change. In the case of an in-pile functional test, it is necessary that response time is less than 1s and ratio of SPND output current is more than 0.3 of output current of SPND with Rh emitter. Therefore, a hybrid SPND with high sensitivity and fast response time was developed. This hybrid SPND used a hybrid emitter, i.e. Co cladded Pt-13%Rh.

  13. Pre- and post-irradiation performance of FBK 3D silicon pixel detectors for CMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krzywda, A.; Alagoz, E.; Bubna, M.; Obertino, M.; Solano, A.; Arndt, K.; Uplegger, L.; Betta, G.F. Dalla; Boscardin, M.; Ngadiuba, J.; Rivera, R.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Terzo, S.; Bortoletto, D.; Prosser, A.; Adreson, J.; Kwan, S.; Osipenkov, I.; Bolla, G.

    2014-01-01

    In preparation for the tenfold luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (the HL-LHC) around 2020, three-dimensional (3D) silicon pixel sensors are being developed as a radiation-hard candidate to replace the planar ones currently being used in the CMS pixel detector. This study examines an early batch of FBK sensors (named ATLAS08) of three 3D pixel geometries: 1E, 2E, and 4E, which respectively contain one, two, and four readout electrodes for each pixel, passing completely through the bulk. We present electrical characteristics and beam test performance results for each detector before and after irradiation. The maximum fluence applied is 3.5×10 15 n eq /cm 2

  14. Signal height in silicon pixel detectors irradiated with pions and protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohe, T.; Acosta, J.; Bean, A.; Dambach, S.; Erdmann, W.; Langenegger, U.; Martin, C.; Meier, B.; Radicci, V.; Sibille, J.; Trueb, P.

    2010-01-01

    Pixel detectors are used in the innermost part of multi-purpose experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and are therefore exposed to the highest fluences of ionising radiation, which in this part of the detectors consists mainly of charged pions. The radiation hardness of the detectors has been tested thoroughly up to the fluences expected at the LHC. In case of an LHC upgrade the fluence will be much higher and it is not yet clear up to which radii the present pixel technology can be used. To establish such a limit, pixel sensors of the size of one CMS pixel readout chip (PSI46V2.1) have been bump bonded and irradiated with positive pions up to 6x10 14 n eq /cm 2 at PSI and with protons up to 5x10 15 n eq /cm 2 . The sensors were taken from production wafers of the CMS barrel pixel detector. They use n-type DOFZ material with a resistance of about 3.7kΩcm and an n-side read out. As the performance of silicon sensors is limited by trapping, the response to a Sr-90 source was investigated. The highly energetic beta-particles represent a good approximation to minimum ionising particles. The bias dependence of the signal for a wide range of fluences will be presented.

  15. Lorentz angle measurements in irradiated silicon detectors between 77 K and 300 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartsch, V.; Boer, W. de; Bol, J.

    2001-01-01

    Future experiments are using silicon detectors in a high radiation environment and in high magnetic fields. The radiation tolerance of silicon improves by cooling it to temperatures below 180 K. However, at low temperatures the mobility increases, which leads to larger deflections of the charge carriers by the Lorentz force. We present measurements of the Lorentz angle between 77 K and 300 K before and after irradiation with a primary beam of 21 MeV protons to a flux of 10 13 /cm 2 . (author)

  16. Investigation of the charge collection for strongly irradiated silicon strip detectors of the CMS ECAL Preshower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloch, Ph.; Peisert, A.; Chang, Y.H.; Chen, A.E.; Hou, S.; Lin, W.T.; Cheremukhin, A.E.; Golutvin, I.A.; Urkinbaev, A.R.; Zamyatin, N.I.; Loukas, D.

    2001-01-01

    Strongly irradiated (2.3·10 14 n/cm 2 ) silicon strip detectors of different size, thickness and different design options were tested in a muon beam at CERN in 1999. A charge collection efficiency in excess of 85% and a signal-to-noise ratio of about 6 are obtained in all cases at high enough bias voltage. Details of the charge collection in the interstrip and the guard ring region and cross-talk between strips were also studied. We find that the charge collection efficiency and the cross-talk between strips depend on the interstrip distance

  17. Irradiation of 4H-SiC UV detectors with heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinina, E. V.; Lebedev, A. A.; Bogdanova, E.; Berenquier, B.; Ottaviani, L.; Violina, G. N.; Skuratov, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) photodetectors based on Schottky barriers to 4H-SiC are formed on lightly doped n-type epitaxial layers grown by the chemical vapor deposition method on commercial substrates. The diode structures are irradiated at 25°C by 167-MeV Xe ions with a mass of 131 amu at a fluence of 6 × 10 9 cm −2 . Comparative studies of the optical and electrical properties of as-grown and irradiated structures with Schottky barriers are carried out in the temperature range 23–180°C. The specific features of changes in the photosensitivity and electrical characteristics of the detector structures are accounted for by the capture of photogenerated carriers into traps formed due to fluctuations of the conduction-band bottom and valence-band top, with subsequent thermal dissociation

  18. Radiation-damage studies, irradiations and high-dose dosimetry for LHC detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Coninckx, F; León-Florián, E; Leutz, H; Schönbacher, Helmut; Sonderegger, P; Tavlet, Marc; Sopko, B; Henschel, H; Schmidt, H U; Boden, A; Bräunig, D; Wulf, F; Cramariuc, R; Ilie, D; Fattibene, P; Onori, S; Miljanic, S; Paic, G; Razen, B; Razem, D; Rendic, D; CERN. Geneva. Detector Research and Development Committee

    1991-01-01

    The proposal is divided into a main project and special projects. The main project consists of a service similar to the one given in the past to accelerator construction projects at CERN (ISR,SPS,LEP) on high-dose dosimetry, material irradiations, irradiations tests, standardization of test procedures and data compilations. Large experience in this field and numerous radiation damage test data of insulating and structural materials are available. The special projects cover three topics which are of specific interest for LHC detector physicists and engineers at CERN and in other high energy physics institutes, namely: Radiation effects in scintillators; Selection of radiation hard optical fibres for data transmission; and Selection and testing of radiation hard electronic components.

  19. Noise behaviour of semiinsulating GaAs particle detectors at various temperatures before and after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenbusch, F.; Braunschweig, W.; Chu, Z.; Krais, R.; Kubicki, T.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Pandoulas, D.; Rente, C.; Syben, O.; Toporowski, M.; Wittmer, B.; Xiao, W.J.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the noise behaviour of surface barrier detectors (double sided Schottky contact) made of semiinsulating GaAs. Two types of measurements were performed: equivalent noise charge (ENC) and noise power density spectra in a frequency range from 10 Hz to 500 kHz. The shape of the density spectra are a powerful tool to examine the physical origin of the noise, before irradiation it is dominated by generation-recombination processes caused by deep levels. Temperature dependent noise measurements reveal the deep level parameters like activation energy and cross section, which are also extracted by analyzing the time transients of the charge pulse from α-particles. After irradiation with protons, neutrons and pions the influence of the deep levels being originally responsible for the noise is found to decrease and a reduction of the noise over the entire frequency range with increasing fluence is observed. (orig.)

  20. Neutron irradiation effects on silicon detectors structure, electrical and mechanical characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinovich, E.; Golan, G.; Axelevich, A.; Inberg, A.; Oksman, M.; Rosenwaks, I.; Lubarsky, G.; Seidman, A.; Croitoru, N.; Rancoita, P.G.; Rattaggi, M.

    1999-01-01

    Neutron irradiation effects on (p-n) and Schottky-junction silicon detectors were studied. It was shown that neutron interactions with monocrystalline silicon create specific types of microstructure defects with morphology differing according to the level of neutron fluences (Φ). The isolated dislocation loops, formed by interstitial atoms were observed in microstructure images for 10 10 ≤ Φ ≤ 10 12 n/cm 2 . A strong change in the dislocation loops density and a cluster formation was observed for Φ ≥ 10 13 n/cm 2 . A drastic silicon damage was found for fluences over 10 14 n/cm 2 . These fluences created zones enriched with all types of dislocations, covering more than 50 % of the total surface area. A mechanical fragility appeared in that fluence range in a form of microcracks. 10 14 n/cm 2 appears to be a critical value of neutron irradiation because of the radiation damage described above and because the characteristics I f -V f of silicon detectors can be differentiated from those obtained at low fluences. (A.C.)

  1. Simulation of new p-type strip detectors with trench to enhance the charge multiplication effect in the n-type electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández-Martínez, P.; Pellegrini, G.; Balbuena, J.P.; Quirion, D.; Hidalgo, S.; Flores, D.; Lozano, M.; Casse, G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper shows the simulation results of new p-type strip detectors with trench electrodes to enhance the charge multiplication effect in the irradiated detector. The new design includes baby microstrip detectors (area=1 cm 2 ) with a strip pitch of 80 μm and p-stop isolation structures. The strip has a 5 μm-wide trench along all its length, filled and doped with polysilicon to create a deep N + contact into the material bulk. The trench depth can be varied in order to study the influence of the electric field on the charge multiplication effect in heavily irradiated samples. Some alternative designs have also been studied to establish a comparison between various structures using different technologies. Simulation reproduce the electrical behaviour under different irradiation conditions, taking into account the damage accumulated after irradiation with neutrons and protons with several fluence values. The investigation of these effects provides important indications on the ability of this modified electrode geometry to control and optimise the charge multiplication effect, in order to fully recover the collection efficiency of heavily irradiated microstrip detectors, at reasonable bias voltage compatible with the voltage feed limitation of the CERN SLHC experiments.

  2. Charge collection and space charge distribution in neutron-irradiated epitaxial silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poehlsen, Thomas

    2010-04-15

    In this work epitaxial n-type silicon diodes with a thickness of 100 {mu}m and 150 {mu}m are investigated. After neutron irradiation with fluences between 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} and 4 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} annealing studies were performed. CV-IV curves were taken and the depletion voltage was determined for different annealing times. All investigated diodes with neutron fluences greater than 2 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} showed type inversion due to irradiation. Measurements with the transient current technique (TCT) using a pulsed laser were performed to investigate charge collection effects for temperatures of -40 C, -10 C and 20 C. The charge correction method was used to determine the effective trapping time {tau}{sub eff}. Inconsistencies of the results could be explained by assuming field dependent trapping times. A simulation of charge collection could be used to determine the field dependent trapping time {tau}{sub eff}(E) and the space charge distribution in the detector bulk. Assuming a linear field dependence of the trapping times and a linear space charge distribution the data could be described. Indications of charge multiplication were seen in the irradiated 100 {mu}m thick diodes for all investigated fluences at voltages above 800 V. The space charge distribution extracted from TCT measurements was compared to the results of the CV measurements and showed good agreement. (orig.)

  3. Charge collection and space charge distribution in neutron-irradiated epitaxial silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poehlsen, Thomas

    2010-04-01

    In this work epitaxial n-type silicon diodes with a thickness of 100 μm and 150 μm are investigated. After neutron irradiation with fluences between 10 14 cm -2 and 4 x 10 15 cm -2 annealing studies were performed. CV-IV curves were taken and the depletion voltage was determined for different annealing times. All investigated diodes with neutron fluences greater than 2 x 10 14 cm -2 showed type inversion due to irradiation. Measurements with the transient current technique (TCT) using a pulsed laser were performed to investigate charge collection effects for temperatures of -40 C, -10 C and 20 C. The charge correction method was used to determine the effective trapping time τ eff . Inconsistencies of the results could be explained by assuming field dependent trapping times. A simulation of charge collection could be used to determine the field dependent trapping time τ eff (E) and the space charge distribution in the detector bulk. Assuming a linear field dependence of the trapping times and a linear space charge distribution the data could be described. Indications of charge multiplication were seen in the irradiated 100 μm thick diodes for all investigated fluences at voltages above 800 V. The space charge distribution extracted from TCT measurements was compared to the results of the CV measurements and showed good agreement. (orig.)

  4. Commissioning and first data with the ATLAS silicon microstrip tracker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohne, Ole Myren

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the CERN large hadron collider (LHC) has started taking data this autumn with the inauguration of the LHC. The semiconductor tracker (SCT) is the key precision tracking device in ATLAS, made up from silicon micro-strip detectors processed in the planar p-in-n technology. The completed SCT has recently been installed inside the ATLAS experimental hall. Quick tests were performed last year to verify the connectivity of the electrical and optical services. Problems observed with the heaters for the evaporative cooling system have been resolved. This has enabled extended operation of the full detector under realistic conditions. Calibration data has been taken and analysed to determine the noise performance of the system. In addition, extensive commissioning with cosmic ray events has been performed. The cosmic muon data has been used to align the detector, to check the timing of the front-end electronics as well as to measure the hit efficiency of modules. The current status of the SCT will be reviewed, including results from the latest data-taking periods in autumn 2008, and from the detector alignment. We will report on the commissioning of the detector, including overviews on services, connectivity and observed problems. Particular emphasis will also be placed on the SCT data taken in the latest running period with the entire ATLAS detector participating. The SCT commissioning and running experience will then be used to extract valuable lessons for future silicon strip detector projects.

  5. Study on Silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gervino, G.; Boero, M.; Manfredotti, C.; Icardi, M.; Gabutti, A.; Bagnolatti, E.; Monticone, E.

    1990-01-01

    Prototypes of Silicon microstrip detectors and Silicon large area detectors (3x2 cm 2 ), realized directly by our group, either by ion implantation or by diffusion are presented. The physical detector characteristics and their performances determined by exposing them to different radioactive sources and the results of extensive tests on passivation, where new technological ways have been investigated, are discussed. The calculation of the different terms contributing to the total dark current is reported

  6. Study of the response of a silicon detector irradiated with 1 MeV neutrons; Etude de la reponse d`un detecteur Si irradie par des neutrons de 1 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, P [Montreal Univ., PQ (Canada). Lab. de Physique Nucleaire

    1994-12-31

    The author studied the response of an n-type silicon detector irradiated with 1 MeV neutrons at fluences ranging from 0.26x10{sup 13} to 11.19x10{sup 13} neutrons/cm{sup 2}. The response of the irradiated detector to {sup 241}Am alpha particles was measured. 13 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Development of gas micro-strip chambers for high rate radiation detection and tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Bouclier, Roger; Gaudaen, J; Florent, J J; Ropelewski, Leszek; Sauli, Fabio; Bondar, A E; Groshev, V R; Minakov, G D; Onuchin, A P; Pestov, Yu N; Shekhtman, L I; Sidorov, V A; Dixit, M S; Oakham, G K; Møller, S; Sørensen, G; Uggerhøj, Erik; Brons, S; Brückner, W; Godbersen, M; Heidrich, M; Paul, S; Trombini, A; Werding, R; Armitage, J A; Karlen, D A; Stewart, G; Barasch, E F; McIntyre, P; Pang, Y; Trost, H J; Salomon, M; Breskin, Amos; Chechik, R; Pansky, A; CERN. Geneva. Detector Research and Development Committee

    1992-01-01

    Gas Micro-Strip Chambers (GMSC) are a promising high-rate, high resolution position detector suited for use in high luminosity hadron collider experiments, as general purpose tracker or to improve the performances of pre-shower counters, transition radiation and inner muon detectors. Large GMSC arrays have been included in proposed LHC and SSC experimental setups. The operating characteristics of GMSC make their use very attractive also for detectors at tau/charm/beauty factories, as well as for synchrotron radiation facilities and for medical applications. At the present state of the art, some problems limiting the usefulness of microstrip chambers are the observed gain changes due to charging up of the support, possible long-term degradation due to ageing, limited sizes imposed by fabrication technologies and unavailability of dedicated high-speed, high-density readout electronics. Limited experience exists of operation of GMSC in real experimental conditions, and little if anything is known about performan...

  8. Development of Gas Micro-Strip Chambers for Radiation Detection and Tracking at High Rates

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % RD28 \\\\ \\\\ Micro-Strip Gas Chambers (GMSC) are a promising high rate, high resolution position detector suited for use in high luminosity hadron collider experiments, as general purpose tracker or to improve the performances of preshower counters, transition radiation and inner muon detectors. Large GMSC arrays have been included in proposed LHC and SSC experimental setups. The operating characteristics of GMSC make their use very attractive also for detectors at tau/beauty/charm factories, as well as for synchrotron radiation facilities and medical applications. At the present state of the art, some problems limiting the usefulness of microstrip chambers are the observed gain changes due to charging up of the support, possible long-term degradation due to ageing, limited sizes imposed by fabrication technologies and unavailability of dedicated high-speed, high-density readout electronics. Limited experience exists of operation of GMSC in real experimental conditions, and little if anything is known about p...

  9. Study etching characteristics of a track detector CR-39 with ultraviolet laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwaikat, Nidal; Iida, Toshiyuki; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Ishikawa, Ippei; Kada, Wataru; Kishi, Atsuya; Sakai, Makoto; Ihara, Yohei

    2007-01-01

    The effect of pulsed ultraviolet Indium-doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (UV-In:YAG) laser of λ=266 nm, pulse energy 42 mJ/pulse at repetition rate10 Hz on the etching characteristics of Japanese CR-39 was studied at various energy intensities. Fifteen detectors were divided into two sets, each of seven samples and one sample was kept as a reference.The first set (post-exposed) was first exposed to alpha radiation with close contact to 241 Am and then treated in air with laser in the energy intensity range from 40 to160 J/cm 2 , 20 J/cm 2 in step. The second set (pre-exposed) was irradiated in reverse process (laser+alpha) with the same sources as the first set and under the same condition. The laser energy intensities ranged between 20 and 140 J/cm 2 , 20 J/cm 2 in step. For post-exposed samples (alpha+laser) bulk etch rate decreases up to 60 J/cm 2 and increases thereafter, while for pre-exposed samples (laser+alpha) the bulk etch rate oscillates without showing any precise periodicity. The bulk etch rate for both sets was found to be the same at 60≤energy intensity≤80 J/cm 2 and this may indicate that the same structural changes have happened. The track etch rate was found to be equal to the bulk etch rate for both sets, so the sensitivity is constant. In both sets several changes on the detector surfaces: tracks of different sizes and shapes and high density within the laser spot were observed. Out of the laser spot, the tracks become larger and lower density, indicating cross-linking and scission have happened, simultaneously, on the same surface as a result of UV-laser irradiation

  10. A suitable material for the substrate of micro-strip gas chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Minglong; Xia Yiben; Wang Linjun; Zhang Weili

    2004-01-01

    Micro-strip Gas Chamber (MSGC) used as a position sensitive detector has perfect performances in the detection of nuclear irradiations. However, it encounters a severe problem, that is, positive charge accumulation which can be avoided by reducing the surface resistivity of insulating substrate. So, diamond-like carbon (DLC) film is coated on D263 glass to modify its electrical properties as substrate for MSGC. Raman spectroscopy demonstrates that DLC film is of sp 3 (σ bounding) and sp 2 bonding (π bonding), and therefore it is a type of electronically conducting material. It also reveals that the film deposited on D263 glass possesses very large of sp 3 content and consequently is a high quality DLC film. I-V plots indicate that samples with DLC film enjoy very steady and suitable resistivities in the range of 10 9 -10 12 Ω·cm. C-F characteristics also show that samples coated by DLC film have low and stable capacitance with frequency. These excellent performances of the new material, DLC film/D263 glass, meet the optimum requirements of MSGC. DLC film/D263 glass used as the substrate of MSGC should effectively avoid the charge pile-up effect and substrate instability and then improve its performances

  11. The origin of double peak electric field distribution in heavily irradiated silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Eremin, V; Li, Z

    2002-01-01

    The first observation of double peak (DP) electric field distribution in heavily neutron irradiated (>10 sup 1 sup 4 n/cm sup 2) semiconductor detectors has been published about 6 yr ago. However, this effect was not quantitatively analyzed up to now. The explanation of the DP electric field distribution presented in this paper is based on the properties of radiation induced deep levels in silicon, which act as deep traps, and on the distribution of the thermally generated free carrier concentration in the detector bulk. In the frame of this model, the earlier published considerations on the so-called 'double junction (DJ) effect' are discussed as well. The comparison of the calculated electric field profiles at different temperatures with the experimental ones allows one to determine a set of deep levels. This set of deep levels, and their charge filling status are essential to the value and the distribution of space charge in the space charge region in the range of 305-240 K, which is actual temperature ran...

  12. Some Recent Developments of Microstrip Antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the microstrip antenna has been extensively studied in the past few decades as one of the standard planar antennas, it still has a huge potential for further developments. The paper suggests three areas for further research based on our previous works on microstrip antenna elements and arrays. One is exploring the variety of microstrip antenna topologies to meet the desired requirement such as ultrawide band (UWB, high gain, miniaturization, circular polarization, multipolarized, and so on. Another is to apply microstrip antenna to form composite antenna which is more potent than the individual antenna. The last is growing towards highly integration of antenna/array and feeding network or operating at relatively high frequencies, like sub-millimeter wave or terahertz (THz wave regime, by using the advanced machining techniques. To support our points of view, some examples of antennas developed in our group are presented and discussed.

  13. Microstrip monopulse antenna for land mobile communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Q.; Martin, C.; Delvalle, J. C.; Jongejans, A.; Rinous, P.; Travers, M. N.

    1993-01-01

    Low cost is one of the main requirements in a communication system suitable for mass production, as it is the case for satellite land mobile communications. Microstrip technology fulfills this requirement which must be supported by a low cost tracking system design. The tradeoff led us to a prototype antenna composed of microstrip patches based on electromechanical closed-loop principle; the design and the results obtained are described.

  14. Characterization of gaseous detectors at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility: GEM performance in presence of high background radiation

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2097588

    Muon detection is an efficient tool to recognize interesting physics events over the high background rate expected at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The muon systems of the LHC experiments are based on gaseous ionization detectors. In view of the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) upgrade program, the increasing of background radiation could affect the gaseous detector performance, especially decreasing the efficiency and shortening the lifetime through ageing processes. The effects of charge multiplication, materials and gas composition on the ageing of gaseous detectors have been studied for decades, but the future upgrade of LHC requires additional studies on this topic. At the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF++), a radioactive source of cesium-137 with an activity of 14 TBq is used to reproduce reasonably well the expected background radiation at HL-LHC. A muon beam has been made available to study detector performance. The characterization of the beam trigger will be discussed in the present w...

  15. The ARGUS silicon vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, E.; Ball, S.; Ehret, K.; Geyer, C.; Hesselbarth, J.; Hoelscher, A.; Hofmann, W.; Holzer, B.; Huepper, A.; Khan, S.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Seeger, M.; Spengler, J.; Brogle, M.; Horisberger, R.

    1994-01-01

    A silicon microstrip vertex detector has been built as an upgrade to the ARGUS detector for increased precision and efficiency in the reconstruction of decay vertices. This paper discusses the mechanical and electronic design of this device and presents first results from its successful test operation yielding an impact parameter resolution of about 18 μm. ((orig.))

  16. Treatment verification and in vivo dosimetry for total body irradiation using thermoluminescent and semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, F.F.; Amaral, L.L.; Costa, A.M.; Netto, T.G.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work is the characterization of thermoluminescent and semiconductor detectors and their applications in treatment verification and in vivo dosimetry for total body irradiation (TBI) technique. Dose measurements of TBI treatment simulation performed with thermoluminescent detectors inserted in the holes of a “Rando anthropomorphic phantom” showed agreement with the prescribed dose. For regions of the upper and lower chest where thermoluminescent detectors received higher doses it was recommended the use of compensating dose in clinic. The results of in vivo entrance dose measurements for three patients are presented. The maximum percentual deviation between the measurements and the prescribed dose was 3.6%, which is consistent with the action level recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), i.e., ±5%. The present work to test the applicability of a thermoluminescent dosimetric system and of a semiconductor dosimetric system for performing treatment verification and in vivo dose measurements in TBI techniques demonstrated the value of these methods and the applicability as a part of a quality assurance program in TBI treatments. - Highlights: • Characterization of a semiconductor dosimetric system. • Characterization of a thermoluminescent dosimetric system. • Application of the TLDs for treatment verification in total body irradiation treatments. • Application of semiconductor detectors for in vivo dosimetry in total body irradiation treatments. • Implementation of in vivo dosimetry as a part of a quality assurance program in radiotherapy

  17. The effect of ArF laser irradiation (193 nm) on the photodegradation and etching properties of alpha-irradiated CR-39 detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakeri Jooybari, B. [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSRT), Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghergherehchi, M. [College of Information and Technology/ school of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Afarideh, H., E-mail: hafarideh@aut.ac.ir [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Lamehi-Rachti, M. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSRT), Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-01-01

    The effects of ArF laser irradiation (λ=193nm) at various fluences (energy dose or energy density) on the etching properties of pre-exposed (laser + alpha) CR-39 detectors were studied. First, UV–Vis and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra were acquired for non-laser-irradiated and laser-irradiated samples to detect the influence of the ArF laser on the chemical modification of the CR-39. Changes observed in the spectra indicated that the predominant process that occurred upon ArF laser irradiation was a bond-scission process. Thereafter, the mean track and bulk etching parameters were experimentally measured in ArF-laser-irradiated CR-39 detectors exposed to an alpha source ({sup 241}Am, E = 5.49 MeV). Inhomogeneous regions in the laser-irradiated side of the CR-39 demonstrated a variable etching rate on only the front side of the CR-39 detector. New equations are also presented for the average bulk etching rate for these inhomogeneous regions (front side). The mean bulk and track etching rates and the mean track dimensions increased in a fluence range of 0–37.03 mJ/cm{sup 2} because of photodegradation and the scission of chemical bonds, which are the predominant processes in this range. When the fluence was increased from 37.03 to 123.45 mJ/cm{sup 2}, the bulk and track etching rates and the track dimensions slowly decreased because of the formation of cross-linked structures on the CR-39 surface. The behavior of the bulk and track etching rates and the track dimensions appears to be proportional to the dose absorbed on the detector surface. It was observed that as the etching time was increased, the bulk and track etching rates and the track dimensions of the laser-irradiated samples decreased because of the shallow penetration depth of the 193 nm laser and the reduction in the oxygen penetration depth.

  18. New 2-D dosimetric technique for radiotherapy based on planar thermoluminescent detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olko, P.; Marczewska, B.; Czopyk, L.; Czermak, M. A.; Klosowski, M.; Waligorski, M. P. R.

    2006-01-01

    At the Inst. of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences (IFJ) in Krakow, a two-dimensional (2-D) thermoluminescence (TL) dosimetry system was developed within the MAESTRO (Methods and Advanced Equipment for Simulation and Treatment in Radio-Oncology) 6 Framework Programme and tested by evaluating 2-D dose distributions around radioactive sources. A thermoluminescent detector (TLD) foil was developed, of thickness 0.3 mm and diameter 60 mm, containing a mixture of highly sensitive LiF:Mg,Cu,P powder and Ethylene Tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE) polymer. Foil detectors were irradiated with 226 Ra brachytherapy sources and a 90 Sr/ 90 Y source. 2-D dose distributions were evaluated using a prototype planar (diameter 60 mm) reader, equipped with a 12 bit Charge Coupled Devices (CCD) PCO AG camera, with a resolution of 640 x 480 pixels. The new detectors, showing a spatial resolution better than 0.5 mm and a measurable dose range typical for radiotherapy, can find many applications in clinical dosimetry. Another technology applicable to clinical dosimetry, also developed at IFJ, is the Si microstrip detector of size 95 x 95 mm 2 , which may be used to evaluate the dose distribution with a spatial resolution of 120 μm along one direction, in real-time mode. The microstrip and TLD technology will be further improved, especially to develop detectors of larger area, and to make them applicable to some advanced radiotherapy modalities, such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or proton radiotherapy. (authors)

  19. Operation of sealed microstrip gas chambers at the ILL

    CERN Document Server

    Clergeau, J F; Feltin, D; Fischer, H E; Guérard, B; Hansen, T; Manzin, G; Oed, A; Palleau, P

    2001-01-01

    Microstrip Gas Counters (MSGCs) were introduced at the ILL as a response to the problem of fabricating the large area neutron detector of the D20 neutron powder diffractometer. This banana-like detector consists of 48 MSGCs, each comprising 32 counting cells. It was in operation during 18 months before being stopped due to the progressive deterioration of the anode strips. In order to increase its lifetime, significant modifications were introduced in the recently assembled new version. Another instrument, D4C, was recently equipped with a modular detector made of nine MSGCs, each of them in an individual gas vessel. Besides the unidimensional individual readout MSGC of D20 and D4C, the ILL has developed bidimensional MSGCs with a charge division readout. All these detectors employ sealed vessels containing a gas mixture at a pressure which can be as high as 15 bar, necessitating very clean conditions. This paper describes the experience acquired at the ILL in the fabrication and operation of these detectors.

  20. Irradiation induced effects in the FE-I4 front-end chip of the ATLAS IBL detector

    CERN Document Server

    La Rosa, Alessandro; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Insertable B-Layer (IBL) detector was installed into the ATLAS experiment in 2014 and has been in operation since 2015. During the first year of IBL data taking an increase of the low voltage currents produced by the FE-I4 front-end chip was observed and this increase was traced back to the radiation damage in the chip. The dependence of the current on the total-ionising dose and temperature has been tested with Xray and proton irradiations and will be presented in this paper together with the detector operation guidelines.

  1. Strip defect recognition in electrical tests of silicon microstrip sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentan, Manfred, E-mail: valentan@mpp.mpg.de

    2017-02-11

    This contribution describes the measurement procedure and data analysis of AC-coupled double-sided silicon microstrip sensors with polysilicon resistor biasing. The most thorough test of a strip sensor is an electrical measurement of all strips of the sensor; the measured observables include e.g. the strip's current and the coupling capacitance. These measurements are performed to find defective strips, e.g. broken capacitors (pinholes) or implant shorts between two adjacent strips. When a strip has a defect, its observables will show a deviation from the “typical value”. To recognize and quantify certain defects, it is necessary to determine these typical values, i.e. the values the observables would have without the defect. As a novel approach, local least-median-of-squares linear fits are applied to determine these “would-be” values of the observables. A least-median-of-squares fit is robust against outliers, i.e. it ignores the observable values of defective strips. Knowing the typical values allows to recognize, distinguish and quantify a whole range of strip defects. This contribution explains how the various defects appear in the data and in which order the defects can be recognized. The method has been used to find strip defects on 30 double-sided trapezoidal microstrip sensors for the Belle II Silicon Vertex Detector, which have been measured at the Institute of High Energy Physics, Vienna (Austria).

  2. Irradiation effects in fused quartz 'Suprasil' as a detector of fission fragments under high flux of reactor neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, O.M.G. de.

    1984-01-01

    A systematic study about the registration characteristics of synthetic fused quartz 'Suprasil I' use as a detector of fission fragments under high flux of reactor neutrons and the effects of irradiation on it was performed. Fission fragments of 252 Cf, gamma radiation doses of of 60 Co up to 150 MGy, and integrated neutrons fluxes up to 10 20 n/cm 2 were used. A model to explain the effects on track registration and development characteristics of 'Suprasil I' irradiated on reactors were proposed, based on the obtained results for efficiency an for annealing. (C.G.C.) [pt

  3. A micro-strip gas counter test with the RD20 front-end

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clergeau, J.F.; Contardo, D.; Haroutunian, R.; Smadja, G.

    1994-05-01

    A Micro-Strip Gas Counter equipped with the VLSI preamplifier of the RD20 chip has been tested with minimum ionizing particles. The measured pulse shape and the signal to noise ratio are presented. The time resolution of the detector is compared for the Ar/DME and DME/CO 2 gas mixtures. Three methods for the bunch crossing identification at LHC are discussed. (authors). 5 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Quality assurance of the silicon microstrip sensors for the CBM experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panasenko, Iaroslav [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Institute for Nuclear Research, Kiev (Ukraine); Larionov, Pavel [University of Frankfurt (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The CBM experiment at FAIR will investigate the properties of nuclear matter at extreme conditions created in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. Its core detector - the Silicon Tracking System (STS) - will determine the momentum of charged particles from beam-target interactions. The track multiplicity will reach up to 700 within the detector aperture covering the polar angle 2.5 and 25 . High track density as well as stringent requirements to the momentum resolution (∝1%) require a system with high channel granularity and low material budget. The STS will be constructed of about 1200 double-sided silicon microstrip sensors with 58 μm pitch and a total area of ∝4 m{sup 2} with all together 2.1 million channels will be read out. In this talk the quality assurance of double-sided silicon microstrip sensors is discussed. This includes both visual and electrical characterization. For this purpose dedicated equipment has been set up in the clean rooms of the GSI Detector Laboratory and at Tuebingen University. Results of the electrical characterization of prototype microstrip sensors CBM06 are presented.

  5. The effects of intense gamma-irradiation on the alpha-particle response of silicon carbide semiconductor radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddy, Frank H.; Seidel, John G.

    2007-01-01

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) semiconductor radiation detectors are being developed for alpha-particle, X-ray and Gamma-ray, and fast-neutron energy spectrometry. SiC detectors have been operated at temperatures up to 306 deg. C and have also been found to be highly resistant to the radiation effects of fast-neutron and charged-particle bombardments. In the present work, the alpha-particle response of a SiC detector based on a Schottky diode design has been carefully monitored as a function of 137 Cs gamma-ray exposure. The changes in response have been found to be negligible for gamma exposures up to and including 5.4 MGy, and irradiations to higher doses are in progress

  6. GIF++: A new CERN Irradiation Facility to test large-area particle detectors for the High-Luminosity LHC program

    CERN Document Server

    Guida, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) upgrade is setting a new challenge for particle detector technologies. The increase in luminosity will produce a higher particle background with respect to present conditions. To study performance and stability of detectors at LHC and future HL-LHC upgrades, a new dedicated facility has been built at CERN: the new Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF++). The GIF++ is a unique place where high energy charged particle beams (mainly muons) are combined with gammas from a 14 TBq 137Cesium source which simulates the background radiation expected at the LHC experiments. Several centralized services and infrastructures are made available to the LHC detector community to facilitate the different R&D; programs.

  7. Signal integrity analysis on discontinuous microstrip line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao, Qingyang; Dai, Yawen; Chen, Zipeng

    2013-01-01

    In high speed PCB design, microstirp lines were used to control the impedance, however, the discontinuous microstrip line can cause signal integrity problems. In this paper, we use the transmission line theory to study the characteristics of microstrip lines. Research results indicate that the discontinuity such as truncation, gap and size change result in the problems such as radiation, reflection, delay and ground bounce. We change the discontinuities to distributed parameter circuits, analysed the steady-state response and transient response and the phase delay. The transient response cause radiation and voltage jump.

  8. Systematic characterization and quality assurance of silicon micro-strip sensors for the Silicon Tracking System of the CBM experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, P.

    2014-07-01

    The Silicon Tracking System (STS) is the central detector of the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at future Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt. The task of the STS is to reconstruct trajectories of charged particles originating at relatively high multiplicities from the high rate beam-target interactions. The tracker comprises of 300 μm thick silicon double-sided micro-strip sensors. These sensors should be radiation hard in order to reconstruct charged particles up to a maximum radiation dose of 1 × 1014neqcm-2. Systematic characterization allows us to investigate the sensor response and perform quality assurance (QA) tests. In this paper, systematic characterization of prototype double-sided silicon micro-strip sensors will be discussed. This procedure includes visual, passive electrical, and radiation hardness test. Presented results include tests on three different prototypes of silicon micro-strip sensors.

  9. Systematic characterization and quality assurance of silicon micro-strip sensors for the Silicon Tracking System of the CBM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, P

    2014-01-01

    The Silicon Tracking System (STS) is the central detector of the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at future Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt. The task of the STS is to reconstruct trajectories of charged particles originating at relatively high multiplicities from the high rate beam-target interactions. The tracker comprises of 300 μm thick silicon double-sided micro-strip sensors. These sensors should be radiation hard in order to reconstruct charged particles up to a maximum radiation dose of 1 × 10 14 n eq cm −2 . Systematic characterization allows us to investigate the sensor response and perform quality assurance (QA) tests. In this paper, systematic characterization of prototype double-sided silicon micro-strip sensors will be discussed. This procedure includes visual, passive electrical, and radiation hardness test. Presented results include tests on three different prototypes of silicon micro-strip sensors

  10. Trapping induced Neff and electrical field transformation at different temperatures in neutron irradiated high resistivity silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eremin, V.; Li, Z.; Iljashenko, I.

    1994-02-01

    The trapping of both non-equilibrium electrons and holes by neutron induced deep levels in high resistivity silicon planar detectors have been observed. In the experiments Transient Current and Charge Techniques, with short laser light pulse excitation have been applied at temperature ranges of 77--300 k. Light pulse illumination of the front (p + ) and back (n + ) contacts of the detectors showed effective trapping and detrapping, especially for electrons. At temperatures lower than 150 k, the detrapping becomes non-efficient, and the additional negative charge of trapped electrons in the space charge region (SCR) of the detectors leads to dramatic transformations of the electric field due to the distortion of the effective space charge concentration N eff . The current and charge pulses transformation data can be explained in terms of extraction of electric field to the central part of the detector from the regions near both contacts. The initial field distribution may be recovered immediately by dropping reverse bias, which injects both electrons and holes into the space charge region. In the paper, the degree of the N eff distortions among various detectors irradiated by different neutron fluences are compared

  11. Investigation of the effectiveness of standard materials used to the performance evaluation of the PSL detectors for irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiguchi, Masayuki; Nakagawa, Seiko; Goto, Michiko; Yamazaki, Masao

    2009-01-01

    Six different minerals (dolomite, bentonite, montmorillonite, kaolin, talc, activated clay), gloss sheets for laser(LP) and ink-Jet printer(IP), and four types of glass fiber filters (GA-100, GB-100R, GD-120, GF/C) have been investigated for availability as the standard material for maintenance and calibration of photostimulated luminescence (PSL) detectors for irradiated foods. Montmorillonite applied to a paper disc had an adequate PSL intensity caused by natural radiation in comparison with other minerals, but the stability of the PSL was affected by light exposure in the manufacturing process. The PSL intensity of IP was drastically decreased one day after irradiation but LP had an adequate PSL intensity with the exception of high level background counts just after irradiation. The glass fiber filters, except for GF/C, differed little in PSL intensities between the upper and under side, but compression in the filter caused fluctuation in the PSL intensity. Changes in PSL intensities of LP and GA-100 with time differences after irradiation were further studied. The cumulate photon counts were markedly decreased in the first two months for GA-100, and in the first month for LP after irradiation. GA-100 showed relatively less variation in cumulate photon counts compared with LP and the paprika standard in a series of studies. (author)

  12. The Upgraded D0 detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, D.L.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahmed, S.N.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, J.T.; Anderson, S.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U.

    2005-07-01

    The D0 experiment enjoyed a very successful data-collection run at the Fermilab Tevatron collider between 1992 and 1996. Since then, the detector has been upgraded to take advantage of improvements to the Tevatron and to enhance its physics capabilities. We describe the new elements of the detector, including the silicon microstrip tracker, central fiber tracker, solenoidal magnet, preshower detectors, forward muon detector, and forward proton detector. The uranium/liquid-argon calorimeters and central muon detector, remaining from Run I, are discussed briefly. We also present the associated electronics, triggering, and data acquisition systems, along with the design and implementation of software specific to D0.

  13. 2D position sensitive microstrip sensors with charge division along the strip Studies on the position measurement error

    CERN Document Server

    Bassignana, D; Fernandez, M; Jaramillo, R; Lozano, M; Munoz, F.J; Pellegrini, G; Quirion, D; Vila, I; Vitorero, F

    2013-01-01

    Position sensitivity in semiconductor detectors of ionizing radiation is usually achieved by the segmentation of the sensing diode junction in many small sensing elements read out separately as in the case of conventional microstrips and pixel detectors. Alternatively, position sensitivity can be obtained by splitting the ionization signal collected by one single electrode amongst more than one readout channel with the ratio of the collected charges depending on the position where the signal was primary generated. Following this later approach, we implemented the charge division method in a conventional microstrip detector to obtain position sensitivity along the strip. We manufactured a proofof-concept demonstrator where the conventional aluminum electrodes were replaced by slightly resistive electrodes made of strongly doped poly-crystalline silicon and being readout at both strip ends. Here, we partially summarize the laser characterization of this first proof-of-concept demonstrator with special emphasis ...

  14. Heavy-ion irradiation effects on passivated implanted planar silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coster, W. de; Brijs, B.; Vandervorst, W.; Burger, P.

    1992-01-01

    Commercially available p + nn + passivated implanted planar silicon detectors have been shown to be very performing for standard RBS-analysis with 4 He beams. Lifetimes are found to range up till >10 9 particles. The end of lifetime occurs concurrent with internal breakdown of the detector. Inverted n + np + detectors where the junction is located well outside the damage region, are expected to be less sensitive to the radiation damage and to have a higher lifetime. In the present paper the characteristics for heavy-ion detection of both types of detector are investigated and discussed upon. (orig.)

  15. The application of a microstrip gas counter to energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veloso, J.F.C.A.; Santos, J.M.F. dos; Conde, C.A.N.

    1996-01-01

    Performance characteristics of a microstrip gas counter operated as a x-ray fluorescence spectrometer are reported. Gas amplification as a function of microstrip anode-cathode voltage was measured, and the breakdown threshold voltage was determined in pure xenon. The detector temporal stability and the effect of gas purity were assessed. Energy resolution and linearity, detection efficiency, and uniformity of spatial response in the 2- to 60-keV x-ray energy range were determined from the pulse-height distributions of the fluorescence x-ray spectra induced in a variety of single- and multi-element sample materials. Energy resolution similar to conventional proportional counters was achieved at 6 keV

  16. Studies on irradiated pixel detectors for the ATLAS IBL and HL-LHC upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00371978; Gößling, Claus; Pernegger, Heinz

    The constant demand for higher luminosity in high energy physics is the reason for the continuous effort to adapt the accelerators and the experiments. The upgrade program for the experiments and the accelerators at CERN already includes several expansion stages of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which will increase the luminosity and the energy of the accelerator. Simultaneously the LHC experiments prepare the individual sub-detectors for the increasing demands in the coming years. Especially the tracking detectors have to cope with fluence levels unprecedented for high energy physics experiments. Correspondingly to the fluence increases the impact of the radiation damage which reduces the life time of the detectors by decreasing the detector performance and efficiency. To cope with this effect new and more radiation hard detector concepts become necessary to extend the life time. This work concentrates on the impact of radiation damage on the pixel sensor technologies to be used in the next upgrade of the ...

  17. Comparison of relevant parameters of multi-pixel sensors for tracker detectors after irradiation with high proton and neutron fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergholz, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    The further increase of the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN requires new sensors for the tracking detector of the Compact Muon Soleniod (CMS) experiment. These sensors must be more radiation hard and of a finer granularity to lower the occupancy. In addition the new sensor modules must have a lower material budget and have to be self triggering. Sensor prototypes, the so called ''MPix''-sensors, produced on different materials were investigated for their radiation hardness. These sensors were fully characterized before and after irradiation. Of particular interest was the comparison of different bias methods, different materials and the influence of various geometries. The degeneration rate differs for the different sensor materials. The increase of the dark current of Float-Zone-Silicon is stronger for thicker sensors and less than for Magnetic-Czochralski-Silicon sensors. Both tested bias structures are damaged by the irradiation. The poly silicon resistance increases after irradiation by fifty percent. The Punch-Through-Structure is more effected by irradiation. The punch-through voltage increase by a factor of two. Due to the higher pixel current, the working point of the sensor is shifted to smaller differential resistances.

  18. The development of p-type silicon detectors for the high radiation regions of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Hanlon, M D L

    1998-01-01

    This thesis describes the production and characterisation of silicon microstrip detectors and test structures on p-type substrates. An account is given of the production and full parameterisation of a p-type microstrip detector, incorporating the ATLAS-A geometry in a beam test. This detector is an AC coupled device incorporating a continuous p-stop isolation frame and polysilicon biasing and is typical of n-strip devices proposed for operation at the LHC. It was successfully read out using the FELix-128 analogue pipeline chip and a signal to noise (s/n) of 17+-1 is reported, along with a spatial resolution of 14.6+-0.2 mu m. Diode test structures were fabricated on both high resistivity float zone material and on epitaxial material and subsequently irradiated with 24 GeV protons at the CERN PS up to a dose of (8.22+-0.23) x 10 sup 1 sup 4 per cm sup 2. An account of the measurement program is presented along with results on the changes in the effective doping concentration (N sub e sub f sub f) with irradiat...

  19. 5G MIMO Conformal Microstrip Antenna Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of wireless communication technology, 5G will develop into a new generation of wireless mobile communication systems. MIMO (multiple-input multiple-output technology is expected to be one of the key technologies in the field of 5G wireless communications. In this paper, 4 pairs of microstrip MIMO conformal antennas of 35 GHz have been designed. Eight-element microstrip Taylor antenna array with series-feeding not only achieves the deviation of the main lobe of the pattern but also increases the bandwidth of the antenna array and reduces sidelobe. MIMO antennas have been fabricated and measured. Measurement results match the simulation results well. The return loss of the antenna at 35 GHz is better than 20 dB, the first sidelobe level is −16 dB, and the angle between the main lobe and the plane of array is 60°.

  20. Design Study and Optimization of Irradiation Facilities for Detector and Accelerator Equipment Testing in the SPS North Area at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2079748; Stekl, Ivan

    Due to increasing performance of LHC during the last years, the strong need of new detector and electronic equipment test areas at CERN appeared from user communities. This thesis reports on two test facilities: GIF++ and H4IRRAD. GIF++, an upgrade of GIF facility, is a combined high-intensity gamma and particle beam irradiation facility for testing detectors for LHC. It combines a high-rate 137Cs source, providing photons with energy of 662 keV, together with the high-energy secondary particle beam from SPS. H4IRRAD is a new mixed-field irradiation area, designed for testing LHC electronic equipment for radiation damage effects. In particular, large volume assemblies such as full electronic racks of high current power converters can be tested. The area uses alternatively an attenuated primary 400 GeV/c proton beam from SPS, or a secondary, mainly proton, beam of 280 GeV/c directed towards a copper target. Different shielding layers are used to reproduce a radiation field similar to the LHC “tunnel” and �...

  1. A scintillating fiber detector for the D0 upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wayne, M.

    1993-03-01

    In the Step 1 version of the D0 upgrade, the inner vertex chamber will be replaced by a system of silicon microstrips surrounded by a scintillating fiber detector. Details of the detector design and status of R ampersand D and construction programs for the detector are presented. Progress on the upcoming large-scale cosmic ray test at Fermilab is also reported

  2. Measurements of possible type inversion in silicon junction detectors by fast neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Z.; Kraner, H.W.

    1991-05-01

    The successful application of silicon position sensitive detectors in experiments at the SSC or LHC depends on an accurate assessment of the radiation tolerance of this detector species. In particular, fast neutrons (E av = 1 MeV) produce bulk displacement damage that is projected, from estimated fluences, to cause increased generation (leakage) current, charge collection deficiencies, resistivity changes and possibly semiconductor type change or inversion. Whereas the leakage current increase was believed to be the major concern for estimated fluences of 10 12 n/cm 2 experiment year at the initial SSC luminosity of 10 33 /cm 2 -sec, increased luminosity and exposure time has raised the possible exposure to 10 14 n/cm 2 , which opens the door for the several other radiation effects suggested above to play observable and significant roles in detector degradation or change. 17 refs., 19 figs

  3. Current problems in semiconductor detectors for high energy physics after particle irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazanu, Ionel

    2002-01-01

    The use of semiconductor materials as detectors in high radiation environments, as expected in future high energy accelerators or in space missions, poses severe problems in long-time operations, due to changes in the properties of the material, and consequently in the performances of detectors. This talk presents the major theoretical areas of current problems, reviews the works in this field and the stage of their understanding, including author's contributions The mechanisms of interaction of the projectile with the semiconductor, the production of primary defects, the physical quantities and the equations able to characterise and describe the radiation effects, and the equations of kinetics of defects are considered. Correlation between microscopic damage and detector performances and the possible ways to optimise the radiation hardness of materials are discussed. (author)

  4. Silicon micropattern detector: a dream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijne, E H.M.; Jarron, P; Olsen, A; Redaelli, N

    1988-12-15

    The present use of silicon microstrip detectors in elementary particle physics experiments is described and future needs are evaluated. Possibilities and problems to be encountered in the development of a true two-dimensional detector with intelligent data collection are discussed. This paper serves as an introduction to various other contributions to the conference proceedings, either dealing with futuristic device designs or with cautious steps on the road of technology development.

  5. The solenoidal detector collaboration silicon detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziock, H.J.; Gamble, M.T.; Miller, W.O.; Palounek, A.P.T.; Thompson, T.C.

    1992-01-01

    Silicon tracking systems (STS) will be fundamental components of the tracking systems for both planned major SSC experiments. The STS is physically a small part of the central tracking system and the calorimeter of the detector being proposed by the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC). Despite its seemingly small size, it occupies a volume of more than 5 meters in length and 1 meter in diameter and is an order of magnitude larger than any silicon detector system previously built. The STS will consist of silicon microstrip detectors and possibly silicon pixel detectors. The other two components are an outer barrel tracker, which will consist of straw tubes or scintillating fibers; and an outer intermediate angle tracker, which will consist of gas microstrips. The components are designed to work as an integrated system. Each componenet has specific strengths, but is individually incapable of providing the overall performance required by the physics goals of the SSC. The large particle fluxes, the short times between beam crossing, the high channel count, and the required very high position measurement accuracy pose challenging problems that must be solved. Furthermore, to avoid degrading the measurements, the solutions must be achieved using only a minimal amount of material. An additional constraint is that only low-Z materials are allowed. If that were not difficlut enough, the solutions must also be affordable

  6. Detectors for Particle Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinknecht, Konrad

    1999-01-01

    This textbook provides a clear, concise and comprehensive review of the physical principles behind the devices used to detect charged particles and gamma rays, and the construction and performance of these many different types of detectors. Detectors for high-energy particles and radiation are used in many areas of science, especially particle physics and nuclear physics experiments, nuclear medicine, cosmic ray measurements, space sciences and geological exploration. This second edition includes all the latest developments in detector technology, including several new chapters covering micro-strip gas chambers, silicion strip detectors and CCDs, scintillating fibers, shower detectors using noble liquid gases, and compensating calorimeters for hadronic showers. This well-illustrated textbook contains examples from the many areas in science in which these detectors are used. It provides both a coursebook for students in physics, and a useful introduction for researchers in other fields.

  7. Fabrication and impact performance of three-dimensionally integrated microstrip antennas with microstrip and coaxial feeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Lan; Wang, Xin; Xu, Fujun; Zhao, Da; Jiang, Muwen; Qiu, Yiping

    2009-01-01

    A conformal load-bearing antenna structure (CLAS) combines the antenna into a composite structure such that it can carry the designed load while functioning as an antenna. In this paper, two types of new 3D integrated microstrip antennas (3DIMAs) with different feeding methods are designed to work at the radar L-band. Different from the conventional CLAS, the radiating patch and the ground plane of the 3DIMA are both composed of woven conductive wires and are bonded into the 3D composite physically by Z-yarns, greatly improving the damage tolerance of the antenna. The return loss of the coaxial-fed antenna is −13.15 dB with a resonant frequency of 1.872 GHz, while that of the microstrip-fed antenna is −31.50 dB with a resonant frequency of 1.33 GHz. Both of the 3DIMAs have similar radiation patterns to that of the traditionally designed microstrip antenna. In addition, an experimental investigation of the impact response of the coaxial-fed 3DIMA was carried out and the results showed the radiation pattern had almost no change even when the antenna received an impact energy of 15 J, exhibiting superior impact resistance to that of a conventional microstrip antenna

  8. Neutron beam test of multi-grid-type microstrip gas chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, K.; Takahashi, H.; Siritiprussamee, P.; Niko, H.; Kai, M.; Nakazawa, M.; Ino, T.; Sato, S.; Yokoo, T.; Furusaka, M.; Kanazawa, M.

    2006-01-01

    Multi-grid-type microstrip gas chambers (M-MSGCs) are being developed for the next-generation pulsed neutron source. Two new concepts, a global-local-grouping (GLG) method and a graded cathode pattern readout method, were applied to the M-MSGC design for realizing higher counting rate than traditional 3 He proportional counters. One-dimensional detectors with 700 mm-long test plates were fabricated and tested with X-ray and neutron beams, which demonstrated position detection capability based on these concepts

  9. A multi-channel integrated circuit for the readout of a microstrip gas chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krummenacher, F.; Enz, C. (Smart Silicon Systems S.A., Lausanne (Switzerland)); Bellazzini, R. (Dipt. di Fisica, Pisa (Italy) INFN, Pisa (Italy))

    1992-03-15

    The design and test of an 8 channel integrated circuit for the readout of the microstrip gas chamber and other multielectrode detectors are described. The circuit is composed of 8 identical channels, each providing the amplification and the shaping of the signal delivered by the detector. The peaking time of the shaper is 25 ns and the overall amplifier gain is 8 mV/1000 e{sup -}. In addition to the analog output, each channel provides a TTL compatible digital output. The equivalent input noise is less than 700 e{sup -} rms and the total dc power consumption is about 5 mW/channel. To avoid a baseline shift due to the tail of the current issued from the detector, an adjustable pole-zero cancellation circuit has been included. (orig.).

  10. Microstrip electrode readout noise for load-dominated long shaping-time systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, Kelsey; Cunnington, Taylor; Crosby, Sean; Fadeyev, Vitaliy; Martinez-McKinney, Forest; Mistry, Khilesh; Schumm, Bruce A.; Spencer, Edwin; Taylor, Aaron; Wilder, Max

    2013-01-01

    In cases such as that of the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC), for which the beam-delivery and detector-occupancy characteristics permit a long shaping-time readout of the microstrip sensors, it is possible to envision long (∼1 meter) daisy-chained ‘ladders’ of fine-pitch sensors read out by a single front-end amplifier. In this study, a long shaping-time (∼2μsec) front-end amplifier has been used to measure readout noise as a function of detector load. Comparing measured noise to that expected from lumped and distributed models of the load network, it is seen that network effects significantly mitigate the amount of readout noise contributed by the detector load. Further reduction in noise is demonstrated for the case that the sensor load is read out from its center rather than its end

  11. Microstrip electrode readout noise for load-dominated long shaping-time systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collier, Kelsey; Cunnington, Taylor; Crosby, Sean; Fadeyev, Vitaliy; Martinez-McKinney, Forest; Mistry, Khilesh; Schumm, Bruce A., E-mail: baschumm@ucsc.edu; Spencer, Edwin; Taylor, Aaron; Wilder, Max

    2013-11-21

    In cases such as that of the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC), for which the beam-delivery and detector-occupancy characteristics permit a long shaping-time readout of the microstrip sensors, it is possible to envision long (∼1 meter) daisy-chained ‘ladders’ of fine-pitch sensors read out by a single front-end amplifier. In this study, a long shaping-time (∼2μsec) front-end amplifier has been used to measure readout noise as a function of detector load. Comparing measured noise to that expected from lumped and distributed models of the load network, it is seen that network effects significantly mitigate the amount of readout noise contributed by the detector load. Further reduction in noise is demonstrated for the case that the sensor load is read out from its center rather than its end.

  12. Changes in the long-term delayed response of platinum self-powered detector with irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parent, G.; Serdula, K.J.; Eng, P.

    1989-01-01

    Two long-term delayed response characteristics have been observed for platinum, Pt, detectors in the Gentilly-2 600 MW(e) CANDU PHWR reactor. The first effect is a dip in the signal two to three hours after a shutdown, due to the (n,beta) interactions of Mn-55 and Ni-64 which exist as impurities in the detector assembly. The second effect is an increase of the delayed fraction of the signal. The low neutron absorption cross-section of Pt-196 combined with the conversion of the Pt-194 and Pt-195 results in build-up of the Pt-196. The long half-lives associated with the beta-emission in the transmutation of Pt-196 to Hg-198 or Hg-199 give rise to the observed long-term delayed response

  13. Study of the effects of neutron irradiation on silicon strip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giubellino, P.; Panizza, G.; Hall, G.; Sotthibandhu, S.; Ziock, H.J.; Ferguson, P.; Sommer, W.F.; Edwards, M.; Cartiglia, N.; Hubbard, B.; Leslie, J.; Pitzl, D.; O'Shaughnessy, K.; Rowe, W.; Sadrozinski, H.F.W.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E.

    1992-01-01

    Silicon strip detectors and test structures were exposed to neutron fluences up to Φ=6.1x10 14 n/cm 2 , using the ISIS neutron source at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK). In this paper we report some of our results concerning the effects of displacement damage, with a comparison of devices made of silicon of different resistivity. The various samples exposed showed a very similar dependence of the leakage current on the fluence received. We studied the change of effective doping concentration, and observed a behaviour suggesting the onset of type inversion at a fluence of ∝2.0x10 13 n/cm 2 , a value which depends on the initial doping concentration. The linear increase of the depletion voltage for fluences higher than the inversion point could eventually determine the maximum fluence tolerable by silicon detectors. (orig.)

  14. Study of the effects of neutron irradiation on silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giubellino, P.; Panizza, G. (INFN Torino (Italy)); Hall, G.; Sotthibandhu, S. (Imperial Coll., London (United Kingdom)); Ziock, H.J.; Ferguson, P.; Sommer, W.F. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Edwards, M. (Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton (United Kingdom)); Cartiglia, N.; Hubbard, B.; Leslie, J.; Pitzl, D.; O' Shaughnessy, K.; Rowe, W.; Sadrozinski, H.F.W.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E. (Santa Cruz Inst. for Particle Physics, Univ. California, CA (United States))

    1992-05-01

    Silicon strip detectors and test structures were exposed to neutron fluences up to {Phi}=6.1x10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}, using the ISIS neutron source at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK). In this paper we report some of our results concerning the effects of displacement damage, with a comparison of devices made of silicon of different resistivity. The various samples exposed showed a very similar dependence of the leakage current on the fluence received. We studied the change of effective doping concentration, and observed a behaviour suggesting the onset of type inversion at a fluence of {proportional to}2.0x10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}, a value which depends on the initial doping concentration. The linear increase of the depletion voltage for fluences higher than the inversion point could eventually determine the maximum fluence tolerable by silicon detectors. (orig.).

  15. Modeling the impact of preflushing on CTE in proton irradiated CCD-based detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philbrick, R. H.

    2002-04-01

    A software model is described that performs a "real world" simulation of the operation of several types of charge-coupled device (CCD)-based detectors in order to accurately predict the impact that high-energy proton radiation has on image distortion and modulation transfer function (MTF). The model was written primarily to predict the effectiveness of vertical preflushing on the custom full frame CCD-based detectors intended for use on the proposed Kepler Discovery mission, but it is capable of simulating many other types of CCD detectors and operating modes as well. The model keeps track of the occupancy of all phosphorous-silicon (P-V), divacancy (V-V) and oxygen-silicon (O-V) defect centers under every CCD electrode over the entire detector area. The integrated image is read out by simulating every electrode-to-electrode charge transfer in both the vertical and horizontal CCD registers. A signal level dependency on the capture and emission of signal is included and the current state of each electrode (e.g., barrier or storage) is considered when distributing integrated and emitted signal. Options for performing preflushing, preflashing, and including mini-channels are available on both the vertical and horizontal CCD registers. In addition, dark signal generation and image transfer smear can be selectively enabled or disabled. A comparison of the charge transfer efficiency (CTE) data measured on the Hubble space telescope imaging spectrometer (STIS) CCD with the CTE extracted from model simulations of the STIS CCD show good agreement.

  16. Microstrip Antenna Design for Femtocell Coverage Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afaz Uddin Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A mircostrip antenna is designed for multielement antenna coverage optimization in femtocell network. Interference is the foremost concern for the cellular operator in vast commercial deployments of femtocell. Many techniques in physical, data link and network-layer are analysed and developed to settle down the interference issues. A multielement technique with self-configuration features is analyzed here for coverage optimization of femtocell. It also focuses on the execution of microstrip antenna for multielement configuration. The antenna is designed for LTE Band 7 by using standard FR4 dielectric substrate. The performance of the proposed antenna in the femtocell application is discussed along with results.

  17. Radiation hard detectors from silicon enriched with both oxygen and thermal donors improvements in donor removal and long-term stability with regard to neutron irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Z; Eremin, V; Dezillie, B; Chen, W; Bruzzi, M

    2002-01-01

    Detectors made on the silicon wafers with high concentration of thermal donors (TD), which were introduced during the high temperature long time (HTLT) oxygenation procedure, have been investigated in the study of radiation hardness with regard to neutron irradiation and donor removal problems in irradiated high resistivity Si detectors. Two facts have been established as the evidence of radiation hardness improvement of HTLT(TD) Si detectors irradiated below approx 10 sup 1 sup 4 n/cm sup 2 compared to detectors made on standard silicon wafers: the increase of space charge sign inversion fluence (of 1 MeV neutrons) due to lower initial Si resistivity dominated by TD, and the gain in the reverse annealing time constant tau favourable for this material. Coupled with extremely high radiation tolerance to protons observed earlier ('beta zero' behaviour in a wide range of fluence), detectors from HTLT(TD) Si may be unique for application in the experiments with multiple radiations. The changes in the effective sp...

  18. Transmutation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viererbl, L., E-mail: vie@ujv.c [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Lahodova, Z. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Klupak, V. [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Sus, F. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Kucera, J. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Physics Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (Czech Republic); Kus, P.; Marek, M. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic)

    2011-03-11

    We have designed a new type of detectors, called transmutation detectors, which can be used primarily for neutron fluence measurement. The transmutation detector method differs from the commonly used activation detector method in evaluation of detector response after irradiation. Instead of radionuclide activity measurement using radiometric methods, the concentration of stable non-gaseous nuclides generated by transmutation in the detector is measured using analytical methods like mass spectrometry. Prospective elements and nuclear reactions for transmutation detectors are listed and initial experimental results are given. The transmutation detector method could be used primarily for long-term measurement of neutron fluence in fission nuclear reactors, but in principle it could be used for any type of radiation that can cause transmutation of nuclides in detectors. This method could also be used for measurement in accelerators or fusion reactors.

  19. Transmutation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viererbl, L.; Lahodova, Z.; Klupak, V.; Sus, F.; Kucera, J.; Kus, P.; Marek, M.

    2011-01-01

    We have designed a new type of detectors, called transmutation detectors, which can be used primarily for neutron fluence measurement. The transmutation detector method differs from the commonly used activation detector method in evaluation of detector response after irradiation. Instead of radionuclide activity measurement using radiometric methods, the concentration of stable non-gaseous nuclides generated by transmutation in the detector is measured using analytical methods like mass spectrometry. Prospective elements and nuclear reactions for transmutation detectors are listed and initial experimental results are given. The transmutation detector method could be used primarily for long-term measurement of neutron fluence in fission nuclear reactors, but in principle it could be used for any type of radiation that can cause transmutation of nuclides in detectors. This method could also be used for measurement in accelerators or fusion reactors.

  20. Precision rectifier detectors for ac resistance bridge measurements with application to temperature control systems for irradiation creep experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, M. G.

    1977-05-01

    The suitability of several temperature measurement schemes for an irradiation creep experiment is examined. It is found that the specimen resistance can be used to measure and control the sample temperature if compensated for resistance drift due to radiation and annealing effects. A modified Kelvin bridge is presented that allows compensation for resistance drift by periodically checking the sample resistance at a controlled ambient temperature. A new phase-insensitive method for detecting the bridge error signals is presented. The phase-insensitive detector is formed by averaging the magnitude of two bridge voltages. Although this method is substantially less sensitive to stray reactances in the bridge than conventional phase-sensitive detectors, it is sensitive to gain stability and linearity of the rectifier circuits. Accuracy limitations of rectifier circuits are examined both theoretically and experimentally in great detail. Both hand analyses and computer simulations of rectifier errors are presented. Finally, the design of a temperature control system based on sample resistance measurement is presented. The prototype is shown to control a 316 stainless steel sample to within a 0.15/sup 0/C short term (10 sec) and a 0.03/sup 0/C long term (10 min) standard deviation at temperatures between 150 and 700/sup 0/C. The phase-insensitive detector typically contributes less than 10 ppM peak resistance measurement error (0.04/sup 0/C at 700/sup 0/C for 316 stainless steel or 0.005/sup 0/C at 150/sup 0/C for zirconium).

  1. Deep defect levels in standard and oxygen enriched silicon detectors before and after **6**0Co-gamma-irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Stahl, J; Lindström, G; Pintilie, I

    2003-01-01

    Capacitance Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (C-DLTS) measurements have been performed on standard and oxygen-doped silicon detectors manufactured from high-resistivity n-type float zone material with left angle bracket 111 right angle bracket and left angle bracket 100 right angle bracket orientation. Three different oxygen concentrations were achieved by the so-called diffusion oxygenated float zone (DOFZ) process initiated by the CERN-RD48 (ROSE) collaboration. Before the irradiation a material characterization has been performed. In contrast to radiation damage by neutrons or high- energy charged hadrons, were the bulk damage is dominated by a mixture of clusters and point defects, the bulk damage caused by **6**0Co-gamma-radiation is only due to the introduction of point defects. The dominant electrically active defects which have been detected after **6**0Co-gamma-irradiation by C-DLTS are the electron traps VO//i, C//iC//s, V//2( = /-), V //2(-/0) and the hole trap C//i O//i. The main difference betwe...

  2. Vertex detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lueth, V.

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of a vertex detector is to measure position and angles of charged particle tracks to sufficient precision so as to be able to separate tracks originating from decay vertices from those produced at the interaction vertex. Such measurements are interesting because they permit the detection of weakly decaying particles with lifetimes down to 10 -13 s, among them the τ lepton and charm and beauty hadrons. These two lectures are intended to introduce the reader to the different techniques for the detection of secondary vertices that have been developed over the past decades. The first lecture includes a brief introduction to the methods used to detect secondary vertices and to estimate particle lifetimes. It describes the traditional technologies, based on photographic recording in emulsions and on film of bubble chambers, and introduces fast electronic registration of signals derived from scintillating fibers, drift chambers and gaseous micro-strip chambers. The second lecture is devoted to solid state detectors. It begins with a brief introduction into semiconductor devices, and then describes the application of large arrays of strip and pixel diodes for charged particle tracking. These lectures can only serve as an introduction the topic of vertex detectors. Time and space do not allow for an in-depth coverage of many of the interesting aspects of vertex detector design and operation

  3. The target theory applied to the analysis of irradiation damages in organic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesquita, Carlos Henrique de

    2005-01-01

    The Target Theory was used to explain the radiation damage in samples containing 1% (g//L) of 2,5-diphenyl-oxazolyl (PPO) diluted in toluene and irradiated with 60 Co (1.8 Gy/s). The survival molecules of irradiated PPO obeys the bi-exponential mathematical model [74.3 x exp(-D/104.3) + 25.7 x exp(-D/800,0)]. It indicates that 74.3% of the molecules decay with D37=104.3 kGy and 25.7% decay with D37=800 kGy. From the Target Theory it was inferred the energies involved in the irradiation damages which were 0.239 ± 0.031 eV (G=418.4 ± 54.1. damages/100 eV) and 1.83 ± 0.30 eV (54.5 ± 8.9 damages/100 eV). The diameter of PPO molecule estimated from the Target Theory is in the interval of 45.5 to 64.9 angstrom. (author)

  4. Technology developments and first measurements of Low Gain Avalanche Detectors (LGAD) for high energy physics applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrini, G.; Fernández-Martínez, P.; Baselga, M.; Fleta, C.; Flores, D.; Greco, V; Hidalgo, S.; Mandić, I.; Kramberger, G.; Quirion, D.; Ullan, M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a new concept of silicon radiation detector with intrinsic multiplication of the charge, called Low Gain Avalanche Detector (LGAD). These new devices are based on the standard Avalanche Photo Diodes (APD) normally used for optical and X-ray detection applications. The main differences to standard APD detectors are the low gain requested to detect high energy charged particles, and the possibility to have fine segmentation pitches: this allows fabrication of microstrip or pixel devices which do not suffer from the limitations normally found [1] in avalanche detectors. In addition, a moderate multiplication value will allow the fabrication of thinner devices with the same output signal of standard thick substrates. The investigation of these detectors provides important indications on the ability of such modified electrode geometry to control and optimize the charge multiplication effect, in order to fully recover the collection efficiency of heavily irradiated silicon detectors, at reasonable bias voltage, compatible with the voltage feed limitation of the CERN High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) experiments [2]. For instance, the inner most pixel detector layers of the ATLAS tracker will be exposed to fluences up to 2×10 16 1 MeV n eq /cm 2 , while for the inner strip detector region fluences of 1×10 15 n eq /cm 2 are expected. The gain implemented in the non-irradiated devices must retain some effect also after irradiation, with a higher multiplication factor with respect to standard structures, in order to be used in harsh environments such those expected at collider experiments

  5. Construction of the CDF silicon vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skarha, J.; Barnett, B.; Boswell, C.; Snider, F.; Spies, A.; Tseng, J.; Vejcik, S.; Carter, H.; Flaugher, B.; Gonzales, B.; Hrycyk, M.; Nelson, C.; Segler, S.; Shaw, T.; Tkaczyk, S.; Turner, K.; Wesson, T.; Carithers, W.; Ely, R.; Haber, C.; Holland, S.; Kleinfelder, S.; Merrick, T.; Schneider, O.; Wester, W.; Wong, M.; Amidei, D.; Derwent, P.; Gold, M.; Matthews, J.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Busetto, G.; Castro, A.; Loreti, M.; Pescara, L.; Bedeschi, F.; Bolognesi, V.; Dell'Agnello, S.; Galeotti, S.; Mariotti, M.; Menzione, A.; Punzi, G.; Raffaelli, F.; Risotri, L.; Tartarelli, F.; Turini, N.; Wenzel, H.; Zetti, F.; Bailey, M.; Garfinkel, A.; Shaw, N.; Tipton, P.; Watts, G.

    1992-04-01

    Technical details and methods used in constructing the CDF silicon vertex detector are presented. This description includes a discussion of the foam-carbon fiber composite structure used to silicon microstrip detectors and the procedure for achievement of 5 μm detector alignment. The construction of the beryllium barrel structure, which houses the detector assemblies, is also described. In addition, the 10 μm placement accuracy of the detectors in the barrel structure is discussed and the detector cooling and mounting systems are described. 12 refs

  6. Undepleted silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rancoita, P.G.; Seidman, A.

    1985-01-01

    Large-size silicon detectors employing relatively low resistivity material can be used in electromagnetic calorimetry. They can operate in strong magnetic fields, under geometric constraints and with microstrip detectors a high resolution can be achieved. Low noise large capacitance oriented electronics was developed to enable good signal-to-noise ratio for single relativistic particles traversing large area detectors. In undepleted silicon detectors, the charge migration from the field-free region has been investigated by comparing the expected peak position (from the depleted layer only) of the energy-loss of relativistic electrons with the measured one. Furthermore, the undepleted detectors have been employed in a prototype of Si/W electromagnetic colorimeter. The sensitive layer was found to be systematically larger than the depleted one

  7. High Performance Circularly Polarized Microstrip Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondyopadhyay, Probir K. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A microstrip antenna for radiating circularly polarized electromagnetic waves comprising a cluster array of at least four microstrip radiator elements, each of which is provided with dual orthogonal coplanar feeds in phase quadrature relation achieved by connection to an asymmetric T-junction power divider impedance notched at resonance. The dual fed circularly polarized reference element is positioned with its axis at a 45 deg angle with respect to the unit cell axis. The other three dual fed elements in the unit cell are positioned and fed with a coplanar feed structure with sequential rotation and phasing to enhance the axial ratio and impedance matching performance over a wide bandwidth. The centers of the radiator elements are disposed at the corners of a square with each side of a length d in the range of 0.7 to 0.9 times the free space wavelength of the antenna radiation and the radiator elements reside in a square unit cell area of sides equal to 2d and thereby permit the array to be used as a phased array antenna for electronic scanning and is realizable in a high temperature superconducting thin film material for high efficiency.

  8. Comprehensive device Simulation modeling of heavily irradiated silicon detectors at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Moscatelli, F; MacEvoy, B; Hall, G; Passeri, D; Petasecca, M; Pignatel, Giogrio Umberto

    2004-01-01

    Radiation hardness is a critical design concern for present and future silicon detectors in high energy physics. Tracking systems at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are expected to operate for ten years and to receive fast hadron fluences equivalent to 10/sup 15/cm /sup -2/ 1-MeV neutrons. Recently, low temperature operating conditions have been suggested as a means of suppressing the negative effects of radiation damage on detector charge collection properties. To investigate this effect, simulations have been carried out using the ISE-TCAD DESSIS device simulator. The so-called "three-level model" has been used. A comprehensive analysis of the influence of the V/sub 2/, C/sub i/O/sub i/ and V/sub 2/O capture cross sections on the effective doping concentration (N/sub eff/) as a function of temperature and fluence has been carried out. The capture cross sections have been varied in the range 10/sup -18/-10/sup -12/ cm/sup 2/. The simulated results are compared with charge collection spectra obtained wit...

  9. A Monte Carlo based development of a cavity theory for solid state detectors irradiated in electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mobit, P.

    2002-01-01

    Recent Monte Carlo simulations have shown that the assumption in the small cavity theory (and the extension of the small cavity theory by Spencer-Attix) that the cavity does not perturb the electron fluence is seriously flawed. For depths beyond d max not only is there a significant difference between the energy spectra in the medium and in the solid cavity materials but there is also a significant difference in the number of low-energy electrons which cannot travel across the solid cavity and hence deposit their dose in it (i.e. stopper electrons whose residual range is less than the cavity thickness). The number of these low-energy electrons that are not able to travel across the solid state cavity increases with depth and effective thickness of the detector. This also invalidates the assumption in the small cavity theory that most of the dose deposited in a small cavity is delivered by crossers. Based on Monte Carlo simulations, a new cavity theory for solid state detectors irradiated in electron beams has been proposed as: D med (p)=D det (p) x s S-A med.det x gamma(p) e x S T , where D med (p) is the dose to the medium at point, p, D det (p) is the average detector dose to the same point, s S-A med.det is the Spencer-Attix mass collision stopping power ratio of the medium to the detector material, gamma(p) e is the electron fluence perturbation correction factor and S T is a stopper-to-crosser correction factor to correct for the dependence of the stopper-to-crosser ratio on depth and the effective cavity size. Monte Carlo simulations have been computed for all the terms in this equation. The new cavity theory has been tested against the Spencer-Attix cavity equation as the small cavity limiting case and also Monte Carlo simulations. The agreement between this new cavity theory and Monte Carlo simulations is within 0.3%. (author)

  10. Feasibility studies of microelectrode silicon detectors with integrated electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Boscardin, M.; Bosisio, L.; Carpinelli, M.; Dittongo, S.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M.; Gregori, P.; Lusiani, A.; Manghisoni, M.; Pignatel, G.U.; Rama, M.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Sandrelli, F.; Speziali, V.; Svelto, F.; Zorzi, N.

    2002-01-01

    We describe our experience on design and fabrication, on high-resistivity silicon substrates, of microstrip detectors and integrated electronics, devoted to high-energy physics experiments and medical/industrial imaging applications. We report on the full program of our collaboration, with particular regards to the tuning of a new fabrication process, allowing for the production of good quality transistors, while keeping under control the basic detector parameters, such as leakage current. Experimental results on JFET and bipolar transistors are presented, and a microstrip detector with an integrated JFET in source-follower configuration is introduced

  11. A new micro-strip tracker for the new generation of experiments at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinardo, Mauro E.; Milan U.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis concerns the development and characterization of a prototype Silicon micro-strip detector that can be used in the forward (high rapidity) region of a hadron collider. These detectors must operate in a high radiation environment without any important degradation of their performance. The innovative feature of these detectors is the readout electronics, which, being completely data-driven, allows for the direct use of the detector information at the lowest level of the trigger. All the particle hits on the detector can be readout in real-time without any external trigger and any particular limitation due to dead-time. In this way, all the detector information is available to elaborate a very selective trigger decision based on a fast reconstruction of tracks and vertex topology. These detectors, together with the new approach to the trigger, have been developed in the context of the BTeV RandD program; our aim was to define the features and the design parameters of an optimal experiment for heavy flavour physics at hadron colliders

  12. Study of gamma irradiation effects on the etching and optical properties of CR-39 solid state nuclear track detector and its application to uranium assay in soil samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amol Mhatre; Kalsi, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    The gamma irradiation effects in the dose range of 2.5-43.0 Mrad on the etching and optical characteristics of CR-39 solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) have been studied by using etching and UV-Visible spectroscopic techniques. From the measured bulk etch rates at different temperatures, the activation energies for bulk etching at different doses have also been determined. It is seen that the bulk etch rates increase and the activation energies for bulk etching decrease with the increase in gamma dose. The optical band gaps of the unirradiated and the gamma -irradiated detectors determined from the UV-Visible spectra were found to decrease with the increase in gamma dose. These results have been explained on the basis of scission of the detector due to gamma irradiation. The present studies can be used for the estimation of gamma dose in the range of 2.5-43.0 Mrad and can also be used for estimating track registration efficiency in the presence of gamma dose. The CR-39 detector has also been applied for the assay of uranium in some soil samples of Jammu city. (author)

  13. Performance of microstrip gas chambers in BNL-E885: a search for LAMBDA LAMBDA-hypernuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Landry, M; Davis, C A; Faszer, W; Gan, L; Lee, L; Page, S A; Ramsay, W D; Salomon, M; Oers, W T H

    1999-01-01

    The performance of MicroStrip Gas Chambers (MSGC) in BNL Experiment 885, a search for LAMBDA LAMBDA-hypernuclei, is detailed. Chambers with an active area of 80x50 mm sup 2 were instrumented and operated as a vertex detector in the experiment. Furthermore, two distinct types of microstrip prints were utilized in these chambers. Prints manufactured with Integrated Circuit (IC) photolithographic technology have fine tolerances and thin minimum trace widths, but can suffer from a high rate of defects per print and are more costly. Prints constructed with Printed Circuit (PC) photolithographic technology have coarser tolerances but relatively few defects per print, and are extremely cost-effective. Results of bench and beam tests of both IC and PC based MSGCs are presented and their performance in BNL-E885 is discussed. E885 marks the first use of PC based MSGCs in an experiment.

  14. Test-Beam Results on <100> Silicon Prototype Detectors with APV6 Front-End Chip Readout

    CERN Document Server

    Winkler, Matthias

    2000-01-01

    Results are presented using data collected during the X5 test-beam performed in August 1999. To achieve a good estimate of signal and noise values, the raw data are processed off-line by a dedicated reconstruction program. In particular, an efficient algorithm for pedestal, noise and common mode calculation was developed and tested. The intrinsic performances of an AC-coupled CMS silicon micro-strip multi-geometry prototype detector, with a <100> crystal orientation and a low resistivity ( 1~k Omega cm), are investigated. This detector was exposed to an irradiation fluence of 3 imes10^{14} p/cm ^2 , equivalent to 10 years of operation at LHC. The signal-to-noise ratio and the ghost rates per strip and per cm ^2 are presented, as a function of the bias voltage.

  15. Wideband RCS Reduction of Microstrip Array Antenna Based on Absorptive Frequency Selective Surface and Microstrip Resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Xue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An approach for wideband radar cross section (RCS reduction of a microstrip array antenna is presented and discussed. The scheme is based on the microstrip resonators and absorptive frequency selective surface (AFSS with a wideband absorptive property over the low band 1.9–7.5 GHz and a transmission characteristic at high frequency 11.05 GHz. The AFSS is designed to realize the out-of-band RCS reduction and preserve the radiation performance simultaneously, and it is placed above the antenna with the operating frequency of 11.05 GHz. Moreover, the microstrip resonators are loaded to obtain the in-band RCS reduction. As a result, a significant RCS reduction from 1.5 GHz to 13 GHz for both types of polarization has been accomplished. Compared with the reference antenna, the simulated results exhibit that the monostatic RCS of the proposed array antenna in x- and y-polarization can be reduced as much as 17.6 dB and 21.5 dB, respectively. And the measured results agree well with the simulated ones.

  16. Analysis of Microstrip Line Fed Patch Antenna for Wireless Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Ashish

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, theoretical analysis of microstrip line fed rectangular patch antenna loaded with parasitic element and split-ring resonator is presented. The proposed antenna shows that the dualband operation depends on gap between parasitic element, split-ring resonator, length and width of microstrip line. It is found that antenna resonates at two distinct resonating modes i.e., 0.9 GHz and 1.8 GHz for lower and upper resonance frequencies respectively. The antenna shows dual frequency nature with frequency ratio 2.0. The characteristics of microstrip line fed rectangular patch antenna loaded with parasitic element and split-ring resonator antenna is compared with other prototype microstrip line fed antennas. Further, the theoretical results are compared with simulated and reported experimental results, they are in close agreement.

  17. Superconducting microstrip antennas: An experimental comparison of two feeding methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, M.A.; Claspy, P.C.; Bhasin, K.B.

    1993-01-01

    The recent discovery of high-temperature superconductors (HTS's) has generated a substantial amount of interest in microstrip antenna applications. However, the high permittivity of substrates compatible with HTS causes difficulty in feeding such antennas because of the high patch edge impedance. In this paper, two methods for feeding HTS microstrip antennas at K and Ka-band are examined. Superconducting microstrip antennas that are directly coupled and gap-coupled to a microstrip transmission line have been designed and fabricated on lanthanum aluminate substrates using Y-Ba-Cu-O superconducting thin films. Measurements from these antennas, including input impedance, bandwidth, efficiency, and patterns, are presented and compared with published models. The measured results demonstrate that usable antennas can be constructed using either of these architectures, although the antennas suffer from narrow bandwidths. In each case, the HTS antenna shows a substantial improvement over an identical antenna made with normal metals

  18. CBC3: a CMS microstrip readout ASIC with logic for track-trigger modules at HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Prydderch, Mark Lyndon; Bell, Stephen Jean-marc; Key-Charriere, M; Jones, Lawrence; Auzinger, Georg; Borg, Johan; Hall, Geoffrey; Pesaresi, Mark Franco; Raymond, David Mark; Uchida, Kirika; Goldstein, Joel; Seif El Nasr, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    The CBC3 is the latest version of the CMS Binary Chip ASIC for readout of the outer radial region of the upgraded CMS Tracker at HL-LHC. This 254-channel, 130nm CMOS ASIC is designed to be bump-bonded to a substrate to which sensors will be wire-bonded. It will instrument double-layer 2S-modules, consisting of two overlaid silicon microstrip sensors with aligned microstrips. On-chip logic identifies first level trigger primitives from high transverse-momentum tracks by selecting correlated hits in the two sensors. Delivered in late 2016, the CBC3 has been under test for several months, including X-ray irradiations and SEU testing. Results and performance are reported.

  19. High rate operation of micro-strip gas chambers on diamond-coated glass

    CERN Document Server

    Bouclier, Roger; Million, Gilbert; Ropelewski, Leszek; Sauli, Fabio; Temmel, T; Cooke, R A; Donnel, S; Sastri, S A; Sonderer, N

    1996-01-01

    Very high rate operation of micro­strip gas chambers can be achieved using slightly conducting substrates. We describe preliminary measurements realized with detectors manufactured on boro-silicate glass coated, before the photo-lithographic processing, with a diamond layer having a surface resistivity of around 1014 ‡/o. Stable medium-term operation, and a rate capability largely exceeding the one obtained with identical plates manufactured on uncoated glass are demonstrated. If these results are confirmed by long-term measurements the diamond coating technology appears very attractive since it allows, with a moderate cost overhead, to use thin, commercially available glass with the required surface quality for the large-scale production of gas micro-strip detectors.

  20. "Diamond" over-coated Microstrip Gas Chambers for high rate operation

    CERN Document Server

    Barr, A J; Bouclier, Roger; Capéans-Garrido, M; Dominik, Wojciech; Hoch, M; Manzin, G; Million, Gilbert; Ropelewski, Leszek; Sauli, Fabio; Sharma, A

    1997-01-01

    We describe the recent developments on the diamond-like carbon (DLC) over-coated Microstrip Gas Chambers made on drawn glass substrates. MSGC surface coating with thin DLC layer of stable and controlled resistivity was proposed to overcome the limitation of detector operation due to surface charging-up under avalanches. This brings also advantages for the detector manufacturing technology. The thin layer, deposited on top of a manufactured MSGC (over-coating), demonstrates excellent mechanical properties and very good stability. We report on recent measurements with DLC over-coated MSGCs of various surface resistivities (ranging from 1013W/r to 1016W/r) on D-263 and AF45 glass substrates. Over-coated MSGCs exhibit good rate capability for the resistivity of the surface around 1015W/r. Stable operation up to 50 mC/cm of accumulated charge from avalanches has been demonstrated.

  1. Test of the CMS microstrip silicon tracker readout and control system

    CERN Document Server

    Zghiche, A

    2001-01-01

    The Microstrip Silicon tracker of the CMS detector is designed to provide robust particle tracking and vertex reconstruction within a strong magnetic field in the high luminosity environment of the LHC. The Tracker readout system employs Front-End Driver cards to digitize and buffer the analogue data arriving via optical links from on detector pipeline chips. The control chain of the front-end electronic is built to operate via optical fibers in order to shield the communications from the outside noise. Components close to the final design have been assembled to be tested in the X5 beam area at CERN where a dedicated 25 ns temporal structure beam has been made available by the SPS. This paper describes the hardware and the software developed for readout and control of data acquired by the front-end electronics operating at 40 MHz, Some preliminary results of the tests performed in the 25 ns beam are also given. (8 refs).

  2. Metamaterial Embedded Wearable Rectangular Microstrip Patch Antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Joshi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an indigenous low-cost metamaterial embedded wearable rectangular microstrip patch antenna using polyester substrate for IEEE 802.11a WLAN applications. The proposed antenna resonates at 5.10 GHz with a bandwidth and gain of 97 MHz and 4.92 dBi, respectively. The electrical size of this antenna is 0.254λ×0.5λ. The slots are cut in rectangular patch to reduce the bending effect. This leads to mismatch the impedance at WLAN frequency band; hence, a metamaterial square SRR is embedded inside the slot. A prototype antenna has been fabricated and tested, and the measured results are presented in this paper. The simulated and measured results of the proposed antenna are found to be in good agreement. The bending effect on the performance of this antenna is experimentally verified.

  3. High rate behavior and discharge limits in micro-pattern detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bressan, A; Pagano, P; Ropelewski, Leszek; Sauli, Fabio; Biagi, S F; Buzulutskov, A F; Gruwé, M; De Lentdecker, G; Mörmann, D; Sharma, A

    1999-01-01

    We present and discuss a set of systematic measurements, carried out with gaseous proportional micro-pattern detectors, in order to assess their maximum gain when irradiated with high-rate soft X-rays and heavily ionizing alpha particles. The inventory of detectors tested includes: micro-strip micromegas, micro-dot, gas electron multiplier, CAT (compteur à trous), trench (or groove), micro-CAT (or WELL) detectors, as well as systems with two elements of gaseous amplification in cascade. We confirm the general trend of all single-stage detectors to follow Raether's criterion, i.e. a spontaneous transition from avalanche to streamer, followed by a discharge, when the avalanche size reaches a value of a few 10 7 ; a noticeable exception is the micro-dot counter holding more than 10 8. In multiple structures, where the gain under irradiation is increased by at least one order of magnitude; we speculate this to be a consequence of a voltage dependence of Raether's limit, larger for low operating potentials. Our c...

  4. High rate behavior and discharge limits in micro-pattern detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bressan, A.; Hoch, M.; Pagano, P.; Ropelewski, L.; Sauli, F.; Biagi, S.; Buzulutskov, A.; Gruwe, M.; De Lentdecker, G.; Moermann, D.; Sharma, A.

    1999-01-01

    We present and discuss a set of systematic measurements, carried out with gaseous proportional micro-pattern detectors, in order to assess their maximum gain when irradiated with high-rate soft X-rays and heavily ionizing alpha particles. The inventory of detectors tested includes: micro-strips, micromegas, micro-dot, gas electron multiplier, CAT (compteur a trous), trench (or groove), micro-CAT (or WELL) detectors, as well as systems with two elements of gaseous amplification in cascade. We confirm the general trend of all single-stage detectors to follow Raether's criterion, i.e. a spontaneous transition from avalanche to streamer, followed by a discharge, when the avalanche size reaches a value of a few 10 7 ; a noticeable exception is the micro-dot counter holding more than 10 8 . In multiple structures, where the gain is shared between two devices in cascade, the maximum overall gain under irradiation is increased by at least one order of magnitude; we speculate this to be a consequence of a voltage dependence of Raether's limit, larger for low operating potentials. Our conclusion is that only multiple devices can guarantee a sufficient margin of reliability for operation in harsh LHC running conditions

  5. Microstrip natural wave spectrum mathematical model using partial inversion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogarsky, S.A.; Litvinenko, L.N.; Prosvirnin, S.L.

    1995-01-01

    It is generally agreed that both microstrip lines itself and different discontinuities based on microstrips are the most difficult problem for accurate electrodynamic analysis. Over the last years much has been published about principles and accurate (or full wave) methods of microstrip lines investigations. The growing interest for this problem may be explained by the microstrip application in the millimeter-wave range for purpose of realizing interconnects and a variety of passive components. At these higher operating rating frequencies accurate component modeling becomes more critical. A creation, examination and experimental verification of the accurate method for planar electrodynamical structures natural wave spectrum investigations are the objects of this manuscript. The moment method with partial inversion operator method using may be considered as a basical way for solving this problem. This method is outlook for accurate analysis of different planar discontinuities in microstrip: such as step discontinuities, microstrip turns, Y- and X-junctions and etc., substrate space steps dielectric constants and other anisotropy types

  6. Photomask specifications for high energy physics detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Pindo, M

    2002-01-01

    Planar technologies used for radiation detector fabrication imply an extensive use of photomasks whose characteristics are critical in determining final detector performance. Compatibly with their manufacturing process, photomasks must satisfy the application-specific requirements dictated both by wafer manufacturers and detector final users. The design and realization of microstrip and pixel detectors, widely used in high energy physics experiments, ask for intensive scientific effort, advanced technology and important economical investments. Photomask specification definition is one of the fundamental steps to optimize detector fabrication processes and fulfill experimental requirements at the most appropriate cost.

  7. Results on a 10 micron pitch detector with individual strip readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antinori, F.; Dameri, M.; Olcese, A.; Osculati, B.; Rossi, L.; Forino, A.; Marioli, D.; Meroni, C.; Redaelli, N.; Torretta, D.

    1990-01-01

    A 10 μm pitch silicon microstrip detector with individual strip readout via hybrid electronics has been produced and operated. Connections to digital and analog electronics is realized through an insensitive fan-out structure on the detector itself. The detector has been used in the WA82 experiment at the CERN Ω' spectrometer. (orig.)

  8. Effect of neutron irradiation on etching, optical and structural properties of microscopic glass slide used as a solid state nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Surinder; Kaur Sandhu, Amanpreet; Prasher, Sangeeta; Prakash Pandey, Om

    2007-01-01

    Microscopic glass slides are soda-lime glasses which are readily available and are easy to manufacture with low production cost. The application of these glasses as nuclear track detector will help us to make use of these glasses as solid-state nuclear track detector. The present paper describes the variation in the etching, optical and structural properties of the soda-lime microscopic glass slides due to neutron irradiation of different fluences. The color transformation and an increase in the optical absorption with neutron irradiation are observed. Both the bulk and track etch rates are found to increase with neutron fluence, thus showing a similar dependence on neutron fluence, but the sensitivity remains almost constant

  9. Utilization of plastic detector for pool water radioactivity control of IEA-R1 reactor. Examination of fuel element irradiation behaviour fabricated at IPEN/CNEN-SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berretta, J.R.; Mesquita, C.H. de; Madi Filho, T.

    1989-01-01

    For the examination of fuel element irradiation behavior that were fabricated at IPEN/CNEN/SP Metalurgical Departament, it was provided a detection system for pool water radioactivity measurements. This system uses a plastic scintillator detector produced at IPEN/CNEN-SP Health Physics Department, with dimensions and shape apropriated for such work. The detection system shows a sensibility of 4.125x10 -2 dps/cm 3 and 20% of efficiency for 131 I radiations. (author) [pt

  10. Amorphous silicon based particle detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Wyrsch, N.; Franco, A.; Riesen, Y.; Despeisse, M.; Dunand, S.; Powolny, F.; Jarron, P.; Ballif, C.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation hard monolithic particle sensors can be fabricated by a vertical integration of amorphous silicon particle sensors on top of CMOS readout chip. Two types of such particle sensors are presented here using either thick diodes or microchannel plates. The first type based on amorphous silicon diodes exhibits high spatial resolution due to the short lateral carrier collection. Combination of an amorphous silicon thick diode with microstrip detector geometries permits to achieve micromete...

  11. Operation of Silicon, Diamond and liquid Helium Detectors in the range of Room Temperature to 1.9 K and after an Irradiation Dose of several Mega Gray

    CERN Document Server

    Kurfuerst, C; Dehning, B; Eisel, T; Sapinski, M; Eremin, V

    2013-01-01

    At the triplet magnets, close to the interaction regions of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the current Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system is sensitive to the debris from the collision points. For future beams, with higher energy and intensity the expected increase in luminosity implicate an increase of the debris from interaction products covering the quench-provoking beam losses from the primary proton beams. The investigated option is to locate the detectors as close as possible to the superconducting coil, where the signal ratio of both is optimal. Therefore the detectors have to be located inside the cold mass of the superconducting magnets in superfluid helium at 1.9 Kelvin. Past measurements have shown that a liquid helium ionisation chamber, diamond and silicon detectors are promising candidates for cryogenic beam loss monitors. The carrier parameter, drift velocity, and the leakage current changes will be shown as a function of temperature. New high irradiation test beam measurements at room temperat...

  12. High-rate irradiation of 15 mm muon drift tubes and development of an ATLAS compatible readout driver for micromegas detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zibell, Andre

    2014-01-01

    The upcoming luminosity upgrades of the LHC accelerator at CERN demand several upgrades to the detectors of the ATLAS muon spectrometer, mainly due to the proportionally increasing rate of uncorrelated background irradiation. This concerns also the ''Small Wheel'' tracking stations of the ATLAS muon spectrometer, where precise muon track reconstruction will no longer be assured when around 2020 the LHC luminosity is expected to reach values 2 to 5 times the design luminosity of 1 x 10 34 cm -2 s -1 , and when background hit rates will exceed 10 kHz/cm 2 . This, together with the need of an additional triggering station in this area with an angular resolution of 1 mrad, requires the construction of ''New Small Wheel'' detectors for a complete replacement during the long maintenance period in 2018 and 2019. As possible technology for these New Small Wheels, high-rate capable sMDT drift tubes have been investigated, based on the ATLAS 30 mm Monitored Drift Tube technology, but with a smaller diameter of 15 mm. In this work, a prototype sMDT chamber has been tested under the influence of high-rate irradiation with protons, neutrons and photons at the Munich tandem accelerator, simulating the conditions within a high luminosity LHC experiment. Tracking resolution and detection efficiency for minimum ionizing muons are presented as a function of irradiation rate. The experimental muon trigger geometry allows to distinguish between efficiency degradation due to deadtime effects and space charge in the detectors. Using modified readout electronics the analog pulse shape of the detector has been investigated for gain reduction and potential irregularities due to the high irradiation rates and ionization doses. This study shows that the sMDT detectors would fulfill all requirements for successful use in the ATLAS New Small Wheel endcap detector array, with an average spatial resolution of 140 μm and a track reconstruction efficiency

  13. High-rate irradiation of 15 mm muon drift tubes and development of an ATLAS compatible readout driver for micromegas detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zibell, Andre

    2014-06-06

    The upcoming luminosity upgrades of the LHC accelerator at CERN demand several upgrades to the detectors of the ATLAS muon spectrometer, mainly due to the proportionally increasing rate of uncorrelated background irradiation. This concerns also the ''Small Wheel'' tracking stations of the ATLAS muon spectrometer, where precise muon track reconstruction will no longer be assured when around 2020 the LHC luminosity is expected to reach values 2 to 5 times the design luminosity of 1 x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, and when background hit rates will exceed 10 kHz/cm{sup 2}. This, together with the need of an additional triggering station in this area with an angular resolution of 1 mrad, requires the construction of ''New Small Wheel'' detectors for a complete replacement during the long maintenance period in 2018 and 2019. As possible technology for these New Small Wheels, high-rate capable sMDT drift tubes have been investigated, based on the ATLAS 30 mm Monitored Drift Tube technology, but with a smaller diameter of 15 mm. In this work, a prototype sMDT chamber has been tested under the influence of high-rate irradiation with protons, neutrons and photons at the Munich tandem accelerator, simulating the conditions within a high luminosity LHC experiment. Tracking resolution and detection efficiency for minimum ionizing muons are presented as a function of irradiation rate. The experimental muon trigger geometry allows to distinguish between efficiency degradation due to deadtime effects and space charge in the detectors. Using modified readout electronics the analog pulse shape of the detector has been investigated for gain reduction and potential irregularities due to the high irradiation rates and ionization doses. This study shows that the sMDT detectors would fulfill all requirements for successful use in the ATLAS New Small Wheel endcap detector array, with an average spatial resolution of 140 μm and a track

  14. Study of intense pulse irradiation effects on silicon targets considered as ground matter for optical detectors; Etude des effets d`irradiations pulsees intenses sur des cibles de silicium considere en tant que materiau de base pour detecteurs optiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, O

    1994-12-01

    This study aim was centered on morphological and structural alterations induced by laser irradiation on silicon targets considered as ground matter for optical detectors. First we recalled the main high light intensity effects on the condensed matter. Then we presented the experimental aspects. The experimental studies were achieved on two sample types: SiO{sub 2}/Si and Si. Two topics were studied: the defect chronology according to wavelength and pulse length, and the crystalline quality as well as the structure defects of irradiated zones by Raman spectroscopy. Finally, irradiation of Si targets by intense pulsed beams may lead to material fusion. This phenomenon is particularly easy when the material is absorbent, when the pulse is short and when the material is superficially oxidized. (MML). 204 refs., 93 figs., 21 tabs., 1 appendix.

  15. A radiographic imaging system based upon a 2-D silicon microstrip sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Papanestis, A; Corrin, E; Raymond, M; Hall, G; Triantis, F A; Manthos, N; Evagelou, I; Van den Stelt, P; Tarrant, T; Speller, R D; Royle, G F

    2000-01-01

    A high resolution, direct-digital detector system based upon a 2-D silicon microstrip sensor has been designed, built and is undergoing evaluation for applications in dentistry and mammography. The sensor parameters and image requirements were selected using Monte Carlo simulations. Sensors selected for evaluation have a strip pitch of 50mum on the p-side and 80mum on the n-side. Front-end electronics and data acquisition are based on the APV6 chip and were adapted from systems used at CERN for high-energy physics experiments. The APV6 chip is not self-triggering so data acquisition is done at a fixed trigger rate. This paper describes the mammographic evaluation of the double sided microstrip sensor. Raw data correction procedures were implemented to remove the effects of dead strips and non-uniform response. Standard test objects (TORMAX) were used to determine limiting spatial resolution and detectability. MTFs were determined using the edge response. The results indicate that the spatial resolution of the...

  16. A New Defected Ground Structure for Different Microstrip Circuit Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Das

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a microstrip transmission line combined with a new U-headed dumb-bell defected ground structure (DGS is investigated. The proposed DGS of two U-shape slots connected by a thin transverse slot is placed in the ground plane of a microstrip line. A finite cutoff frequency and attenuation pole is observed and thus, the equivalent circuit of the DGS unit can be represented by a parallel LC resonant circuit in series with the transmission line. A two-cell DGS microstrip line yields a better lowpass filtering characteristics. The simulation is carried out by the MoM based IE3D software and in the experimental measurements a vector network analyzer is used. The effects of the transverse slot width and the distance between arms of the U-slot on the filter response curve are studied. This DGS is utilized for different microstrip circuit applications. The DGS is placed in the ground of a capacitive loaded microstrip line and a very low cutoff frequency is obtained. The DGS is adopted under the coupled lines of a parallel line coupler and an improvement in coupling coefficient is noticed. The proposed DGS is also incorporated in the ground plane under the feed lines and the coupled lines of a bandpass filter to improve separately the stopband and passband performances.

  17. Ultra-compact microwave filters using kinetic inductance microstrip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pond, J.M.; Carroll, K.R.; Cukauskas, E.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on multi-pole microwave filters designed and fabricated using microstrip transmission line sections which consist of two very thin films of sputtered niobium nitride (NbN) separated by another very thin film of sputtered Si. Since the thicknesses of all three films are much less than the superconducting penetration depth, the kinetic inductance is significantly greater than the magnetic inductance. As a result, the phase velocity of a microstrip transmission line is much less than the free space speed of light. Since resonant structures are reduced in size proportionately, the size and weight of microstrip circuits can be greatly reduced. Prototype filters consisting of four open circuit half-wavelength microstrip stubs separated by full-wavelength microstrip sections have been measured. The circuits are connected to 34 mil diameter coaxial cable via an intermediate coplanar waveguide section. Passbands of 4 GHz separated by 3 GHz reject bands have been measured in a structure which occupies less than 0.5 cm 2 including the coplanar waveguide transitions. Higher-order passbands, although possessing an increased insertion loss, maintain filter passband characteristics through 20.0 GHz

  18. Voltage-carrying states in superconducting microstrips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuivinga, M.E.C.

    1983-01-01

    When the critical current is exceeded in a superconducting microstrip, voltage-carrying states with a resistance significantly below the normal state resistance can occur. Phase-slip centers (PSC) appear at about the critical temperature. These are successive local voltage units which manifest themselves as strip-like increments in voltage in the I-V characteristic. For temperatures off the critical temperature the PSC regime degenerates into a region of normal material, a so-called hot spot. These two phenomena, PSC and hot spots, form the subject of this thesis. To gain a better understanding of the phase-slip center process, an experiment was designed to measure local values of the quasi-particle and pair potential. The results of local potential and gap measurements at a PSC in aluminium are presented and discussed. Special attention is paid to pair-breaking interactions which can shorten the relaxation time. A non-linear differential equation is derived which describes the development of a PSC into a normal hot spot under the influence of Joule heating. It incorporates the temperature rise due to the dissipative processes occurring in the charge imbalance tails. Numerical solutions are presented for a set of parameters, including those for aluminium and tin. Subsequently, they are compared with experiments. (Auth.)

  19. Microstrip resonators for electron paramagnetic resonance experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrezan, A. C.; Mayer Alegre, T. P.; Medeiros-Ribeiro, G.

    2009-07-01

    In this article we evaluate the performance of an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) setup using a microstrip resonator (MR). The design and characterization of the resonator are described and parameters of importance to EPR and spin manipulation are examined, including cavity quality factor, filling factor, and microwave magnetic field in the sample region. Simulated microwave electric and magnetic field distributions in the resonator are also presented and compared with qualitative measurements of the field distribution obtained by a perturbation technique. Based on EPR experiments carried out with a standard marker at room temperature and a MR resonating at 8.17 GHz, the minimum detectable number of spins was found to be 5×1010 spins/GHz1/2 despite the low MR unloaded quality factor Q0=60. The functionality of the EPR setup was further evaluated at low temperature, where the spin resonance of Cr dopants present in a GaAs wafer was detected at 2.3 K. The design and characterization of a more versatile MR targeting an improved EPR sensitivity and featuring an integrated biasing circuit for the study of samples that require an electrical contact are also discussed.

  20. Microstrip resonators for electron paramagnetic resonance experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrezan, A C; Mayer Alegre, T P; Medeiros-Ribeiro, G

    2009-07-01

    In this article we evaluate the performance of an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) setup using a microstrip resonator (MR). The design and characterization of the resonator are described and parameters of importance to EPR and spin manipulation are examined, including cavity quality factor, filling factor, and microwave magnetic field in the sample region. Simulated microwave electric and magnetic field distributions in the resonator are also presented and compared with qualitative measurements of the field distribution obtained by a perturbation technique. Based on EPR experiments carried out with a standard marker at room temperature and a MR resonating at 8.17 GHz, the minimum detectable number of spins was found to be 5 x 10(10) spins/GHz(1/2) despite the low MR unloaded quality factor Q0=60. The functionality of the EPR setup was further evaluated at low temperature, where the spin resonance of Cr dopants present in a GaAs wafer was detected at 2.3 K. The design and characterization of a more versatile MR targeting an improved EPR sensitivity and featuring an integrated biasing circuit for the study of samples that require an electrical contact are also discussed.

  1. The ATLAS Inner Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gray, HM; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC is equipped with a charged particle tracking system, the Inner Detector, built on three subdetectors, which provide high precision measurements made from a fine detector granularity. The Pixel and microstrip (SCT) subdetectors, which use the silicon technology, are complemented with the Transition Radiation Tracker. Since the LHC startup in 2009, the ATLAS inner tracker has played a central role in many ATLAS physics analyses. Rapid improvements in the calibration and alignment of the detector allowed it to reach nearly the nominal performance in the timespan of a few months. The tracking performance proved to be stable as the LHC luminosity increased by five orders of magnitude during the 2010 proton run, New developments in the offline reconstruction for the 2011 run will improve the tracking performance in high pile-up conditions as well as in highly boosted jets will be discussed.

  2. The development of p-type silicon detectors for the high radiation regions of the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanlon, M.D.L.

    1998-04-01

    This thesis describes the production and characterisation of silicon microstrip detectors and test structures on p-type substrates. An account is given of the production and full parameterisation of a p-type microstrip detector, incorporating the ATLAS-A geometry in a beam test. This detector is an AC coupled device incorporating a continuous p-stop isolation frame and polysilicon biasing and is typical of n-strip devices proposed for operation at the LHC. It was successfully read out using the FELix-128 analogue pipeline chip and a signal to noise (s/n) of 17±1 is reported, along with a spatial resolution of 14.6±0.2 μm. Diode test structures were fabricated on both high resistivity float zone material and on epitaxial material and subsequently irradiated with 24 GeV protons at the CERN PS up to a dose of (8.22±0.23) x 10 14 per cm 2 . An account of the measurement program is presented along with results on the changes in the effective doping concentration (N eff ) with irradiation and the changes in bulk current. Changes in the effective doping concentration and leakage current for high resistivity p-type material under irradiation were found to be similar to to that of n-type material. Values of α=(3.30±0.08) x 10 -17 A cm -1 for the leakage current parameter and g c =(1.20±0.05)x10 -2 cm -1 for the effective dopant introduction rate were found for this material. The epitaxial material did not perform better than the float zone material for the range of doses studied. Surprising results were obtained for highly irradiated p-type diodes illuminated on the ohmic side with an α-source, in that signals were observed well below the full depletion voltage. The processing that had been used to fabricate the test structures and the initial prototype that was studied in the test beam was based on the process used to fabricate devices on n-type material. Presented in this thesis are the modifications that were made to the process, which centred on the oxidation

  3. Silicon position sensitive detectors for the Helios (NA 34) experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engels, E Jr; Mani, S; Manns, T; Plants, D; Shepard, P F; Thompson, J A; Tosh, R; Chand, T; Shivpuri, R; Baker, W

    1987-01-15

    The design construction and testing of X-Y tracking modules for a silicon microstrip vertex detector for use in Fermilab experiment E706 is discussed. A successful adaptation of various technologies, essential for instrumenting this class of detectors at a university laboratory is described. Emphasis is placed on considerable cost reduction, design flexibiity and more rapid turnover with a view toward large detectors for the future.

  4. Tracking and vertexing with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, F.

    2011-01-01

    The Inner Detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN contains three tracking systems: The silicon Pixel Detector, the Silicon Microstrip Tracker and the Transition Radiation Tracker. In combination these detectors provide excellent track and vertex reconstruction efficiencies and resolutions. This paper describes studies which show the performance of track and vertex reconstruction on data collected at 7 TeV center-of-mass energy.

  5. X-ray detectors for structure investigations constructed at JINR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernenko, S P [LHE Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Cheremukhina, G A [LHE Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Fateev, O V [LHE Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Smykov, L P [LHE Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Vasiliev, S E [LHE Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Zanevsky, Yu V [LHE Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Kheiker, D M [Institute of Crystallography, Leninsky prosp. 59, 117333 Moscow (Russian Federation); Popov, A N [Institute of Crystallography, Leninsky prosp. 59, 117333 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1994-09-01

    The performance characteristics of a few high resolution position-sensitive detectors constructed at JINR are presented. The detectors supplied with original software operate with an IBM PC/AT. One of these devices has been succesfully applied for protein molecule structure investigations and the other for studies of the structure-forming process during combustion. The preliminary parameters of the high count rate MWPC with parallel electronics and the testing results of the microstrip detector are given. ((orig.))

  6. Perturbation approach to design of circularly polarised microstrip antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Y. T.; Richards, W. F.

    1981-05-01

    One of the most interesting applications of microstrip antennas is its use for transmitting or receiving circularly polarized (CP) waves. A description is given of a simple but accurate method to determine the critical dimensions needed to produce circular polarization for nearly square and nearly circular microstrip antennas. Shen (1981) in connection with the determination of the proper dimensions of an elliptical patch CP microstrip antenna first expressed the modal field in terms of Mathieu functions. To avoid the complicated numerical computation of the Mathieu functions, he approximated these functions in terms of Bessel functions. It is pointed out that the computation of Mathieu functions, or their approximate expressions can be avoided altogether if a perturbation method is applied to find the resonant frequencies of the two orthogonal modes. The implementation of this approach is demonstrated.

  7. The design and simulation of UHF RFID microstrip antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiangqun; Huang, Rui; Shen, Liman; Liu, Liping; Xiong, Dezhi; Xiao, Xiangqi; Liu, Mouhai; Renheng, Xu

    2018-02-01

    At present, China has delineated UHF RFID communicating frequency range which is 840 ∼ 845 MHz and 920 ∼ 925 MHz, but most UHF microstrip antenna don’t carry out this standard, that leads to radio frequency pollution. In order to solve the problems above, a method combining theory and simulation is adopted. Combining with a new ceramic material, a 925.5 MHz RFID microstrip antenna is designed, which is optimized and simulated by HFSS software. The results show that the VSWR of this RFID microstrip antenna is relatively small in the vicinity of 922.5 MHz, the gain is 2.1 dBi, which can be widely used in China’s UHF RFID communicating equipments.

  8. Wireless OAM transmission system based on elliptical microstrip patch antenna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia Jia; Lu, Qian Nan; Dong, Fei Fei; Yang, Jing Jing; Huang, Ming

    2016-05-30

    The multiplexing transmission has always been a focus of attention for communication technology. In this paper, the radiation characteristics of circular microstrip patch antenna was firstly analyzed based on cavity model theory, and then spiral beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) were generated, using elliptical microstrip patch antenna, with a single feed probe instead of a standard circular patch with two feedpoints. Moreover, by combining the proposed elliptic microstrip patch antenna with Universal Software Radio Peripheral (USRP), a wireless OAM transmission system was established and the real-time transmission of text, image and video in a real channel environment was realized. Since the wireless OAM transmission has the advantage of good safety and high spectrum utilization efficiency, this work has theoretical significance and potential application.

  9. Excitation of propagating magnetization waves by microstrip antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, V. F.; Kalinikos, B. A.

    1988-11-01

    We discuss the self-consistent theory of excitation of dipole-exchange magnetization waves by microstrip antennas in a metal-dielectric-ferrite-dielectric-metal stratified structure, magnetized under an arbitrary angle to the surface. Spin-wave Green's functions are derived, describing the response of the spin-system to a spatially inhomogeneous varying magnetic field. The radiative resistance of microstrip antenna is calculated. In this case the distribution of surface current density in the antenna is found on the basis of the analytic solution of a singular integral equation. The nature of the effect of metallic screens and redistributed surface current densities in the antenna on the frequency dependence of the resistive radiation is investigated. Approximate relations are obtained, convenient for practical calculations of radiative resistance of microstrip antennas both in a free and in a screened ferromagnetic film. The theoretical calculations are verified by data of experiments carried out on monocrystalline films of iron-yttrium garnet.

  10. Signals from fluorescent materials on the surface of silicon micro-strip sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Sperlich, Dennis; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    For the High-Luminosity Upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the ATLAS Inner Detector will be replaced with a new, all-silicon tracker. In order to minimise the amount of material in the detector, circuit boards with readout electronics will be glued on to the active area of the sensor. Several adhesives investigated to be used for the construction of detector modules were found to become fluorescent when exposed to UV light. These adhesives could become a light source in the high-radiation environment of the ATLAS detector. The effect of fluorescent material covering the sensor surface in a high- radiation environment has been studied for a silicon micro-strip sensor using a micro-focused X-ray beam. By pointing the beam both inside the sensor and parallel to the sensor surface, the sensor responses from direct hits and fluorescence can be compared with high precision. This contribution presents a setup to study the susceptibility of silicon strip sensors to light contamination from fluorescent mate...

  11. Microstrip gas chamber on thin-film Pestov glass and micro gap chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, W.G.; Harris, J.W.; Wieman, H.

    1994-07-01

    The authors report developments of the Microstrip Gas Chamber on thin-film Pestov glass and the Micro Gap Chamber. By coating a thin-layer of low-resistive, electronically-conductive glass on various substrates (including quartz and ceramics), they built MSGCs of high gain stability and low leakage current. They were tested in Ar-CH 4 (10%) and He-C 2 H 6 (50%) gas mixtures. Energy resolutions of 17-20% were measured for 6keV x-rays. This design can make the choice of substrate less important, save the cost of ion-implantation, and use less glass material. Micro Gap Chamber was successfully tested in He-C 2 H 6 (50%) and Ar-C 2 H 6 (50%) gas mixtures. Energy resolutions of about 20% were obtained. Both detectors are expected to have high rate capability

  12. Analysis of superconducting microstrip resonator at various microwave power levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, G.P.; Jacob, M.V.; Jayakumar, M.; Bhatnagar, P.K.; Kataria, N.D.

    1997-01-01

    The real and imaginary parts of the surface impedance of YBCO superconductors have been studied at different microwave power levels. Using the relations for the critical current density and the grain boundary resistance, a relation for calculating the power dependence of the surface resistance has been obtained. Also, a relation to find the resonant frequency of a superconducting microstrip resonator at various input power levels has been derived. Measurements have been carried out on various microstrip resonators to study the variation of surface resistance and resonant frequency at different rf power levels. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical results. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  13. Microstrip Patch Sensor for Salinity Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kibae; Hassan, Arshad; Lee, Chong Hyun; Bae, Jinho

    2017-12-18

    In this paper, a compact microstrip feed inset patch sensor is proposed for measuring the salinities in seawater. The working principle of the proposed sensor depends on the fact that different salinities in liquid have different relative permittivities and cause different resonance frequencies. The proposed sensor can obtain better sensitivity to salinity changes than common sensors using conductivity change, since the relative permittivity change to salinity is 2.5 times more sensitive than the conductivity change. The patch and ground plane of the proposed sensor are fabricated by conductive copper spray coating on the masks made by 3D printer. The fabricated patch and the ground plane are bonded to a commercial silicon substrate and then attached to 5 mm-high chamber made by 3D printer so that it contains only 1 mL seawater. For easy fabrication and testing, the maximum resonance frequency was selected under 3 GHz and to cover salinities in real seawater, it was assumed that the salinity changes from 20 to 35 ppt. The sensor was designed by the finite element method-based ANSYS high-frequency structure simulator (HFSS), and it can detect the salinity with 0.01 ppt resolution. The designed sensor has a resonance frequency separation of 37.9 kHz and reflection coefficients under -20 dB at the resonant frequencies. The fabricated sensor showed better performance with average frequency separation of 48 kHz and maximum reflection coefficient of -35 dB. By comparing with the existing sensors, the proposed compact and low-cost sensor showed a better detection capability. Therefore, the proposed patch sensor can be utilized in radio frequency (RF) tunable sensors for salinity determination.

  14. Microstrip Patch Sensor for Salinity Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kibae Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a compact microstrip feed inset patch sensor is proposed for measuring the salinities in seawater. The working principle of the proposed sensor depends on the fact that different salinities in liquid have different relative permittivities and cause different resonance frequencies. The proposed sensor can obtain better sensitivity to salinity changes than common sensors using conductivity change, since the relative permittivity change to salinity is 2.5 times more sensitive than the conductivity change. The patch and ground plane of the proposed sensor are fabricated by conductive copper spray coating on the masks made by 3D printer. The fabricated patch and the ground plane are bonded to a commercial silicon substrate and then attached to 5 mm-high chamber made by 3D printer so that it contains only 1 mL seawater. For easy fabrication and testing, the maximum resonance frequency was selected under 3 GHz and to cover salinities in real seawater, it was assumed that the salinity changes from 20 to 35 ppt. The sensor was designed by the finite element method-based ANSYS high-frequency structure simulator (HFSS, and it can detect the salinity with 0.01 ppt resolution. The designed sensor has a resonance frequency separation of 37.9 kHz and reflection coefficients under −20 dB at the resonant frequencies. The fabricated sensor showed better performance with average frequency separation of 48 kHz and maximum reflection coefficient of −35 dB. By comparing with the existing sensors, the proposed compact and low-cost sensor showed a better detection capability. Therefore, the proposed patch sensor can be utilized in radio frequency (RF tunable sensors for salinity determination.

  15. ATLAS Silicon Microstrip Tracker Operation and Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Barone, G; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The Semi-Conductor Tracker (SCT) is a silicon strip detector and one of the key precision tracking devices in the Inner Detector of the ATLAS experiment at CERN LHC. The SCT is constructed of 4088 silicon detector modules for a total of 6.3 million strips. Each module is designed, constructed and tested to operate as a stand-alone unit, mechanically, electrically, optically and thermally. The modules are mounted into two types of structures: one barrel (4 cylinders) and two end-cap systems (9 disks on each end of the barrel). In the talk the current results from the successful operation of the SCT Detector at the LHC and its status after three years of operation will be presented. We will report on the operation of the detector including an overview of the issues we encountered and the observation of significant increases in leakage currents (as expected) from bulk damage due to non-ionising radiation. The main emphasis will be given to the tracking performance of the SCT and the data quality during the >2 ye...

  16. ATLAS Silicon Microstrip Tracker Operation and Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Barone, G; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The Semi-Conductor Tracker (SCT) is a silicon strip detector and one of the key precision tracking devices of the Inner Detector of the ATLAS experiment at CERN LHC. The SCT is constructed of $4088$ silicon detector modules for a total of 6.3 million channels. Each module is designed, constructed and tested to operate as a stand-alone unit, mechanically, electrically, optically and thermally. The modules are mounted into two types of structures: one barrel ($4$ cylinders) and two end-cap systems (9 disks on each). The current results from the successful operation of the SCT Detector at the LHC and its status after three years of operation will be presented. The operation of the detector including an overview of the main issues encountered is reported. The main emphasis is be given to the tracking performance of the SCT and the data quality during the $>2$ years of data taking of proton-proton collision data at $7$ TeV (and short periods of heavy ion collisions). The SCT has been fully operational throughout a...

  17. Analysis of Rectangular Microstrip Antennas with Air Substrates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents an analysis of rectangular microstrip antennas with air substrates. The effect of the substrate thickness on the bandwidth and the efficiency are examined. An additional thin layer supporting the dielectric material is added to the air substrate in order to make the antenna mechanically rigid and easy to ...

  18. Wearable Inset-Fed FR4 Microstrip Patch Antenna Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaini, S. R. Mohd; Rani, K. N. Abdul

    2018-03-01

    This project proposes the design of a wireless body area network (WBAN) microstrip patch antenna covered by the jeans fabric as the outer layer operating at the center frequency, fc of 2.40 GHz. Precisely, the microstrip patch antenna with the inset-fed edge technique is designed and simulated systematically by using the Keysight Advanced Design System (ADS) software where the FR4 board with the dielectric constant, ɛr of 4.70, dissipation factor or loss tangent, tan δ of 0.02 and height, h of 1.60 mm is the chosen dielectric substrate. The wearable microstrip patch antenna design is then fabricated using the FR4 printed circuit board (PCB) material, hidden inside the jeans fabric, and attached to clothing, such as a jacket accordingly. Simulation and fabrication measurement results show that the designed microstrip patch antenna characteristics can be applied significantly within the industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM) radio band, which is at fc = 2.40 GHz.

  19. The silicon microstrip sensors of the ATLAS semiconductor tracker

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ahmad, A.; Albrechtskirchinger, Z.; Allport, P.; Böhm, Jan; Mikeštíková, Marcela; Šťastný, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 578, - (2007), s. 98-118 ISSN 0168-9002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : ATLAS * SCT * silicon * microstrip * module * LHC Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.114, year: 2007

  20. Simply folded band chaos in a VHF microstrip oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blakely, Jonathan N. [US Army Research, Development, and Engineering Command, AMSRD-AMR-WS-ST, Redstone Arsenal, AL 35898 (United States)]. E-mail: jonathan.blakely@us.army.mil; Holder, J. Darryl [US Army Research, Development, and Engineering Command, AMSRD-AMR-WS-ST, Redstone Arsenal, AL 35898 (United States); Corron, Ned J. [US Army Research, Development, and Engineering Command, AMSRD-AMR-WS-ST, Redstone Arsenal, AL 35898 (United States); Pethel, Shawn D. [US Army Research, Development, and Engineering Command, AMSRD-AMR-WS-ST, Redstone Arsenal, AL 35898 (United States)

    2005-10-10

    We present experimental observations of a microstrip circuit that produces Roessler-like chaos with center frequency of 175 MHz. A simply folded band chaotic attractor is created through a period doubling route. The circuit provides an experimental realization of a chaotic neutral delay differential equation, a largely unexplored type of nonlinear dynamical system.

  1. Geometrical optimization of microstripe arrays for microbead magnetophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Anders Dahl; Rozlosnik, Noemi; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2015-01-01

    Manipulation of magnetic beads plays an increasingly important role in molecular diagnostics. Magnetophoresis is a promising technique for selective transportation of magnetic beads in lab-on-a-chip systems. We investigate periodic arrays of exchange-biased permalloy microstripes fabricated using...

  2. Primary and aggregate color centers in proton irradiated LiF crystals and thin films for luminescent solid state detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piccinini, M; Ambrosini, F; Ampollini, A; Bonfigli, F; Libera, S; Picardi, L; Ronsivalle, C; Vincenti, M A; Montereali, R M

    2015-01-01

    Proton beams of 3 MeV energy, produced by the injector of a linear accelerator for proton therapy, were used to irradiate at room temperature lithium fluoride crystals and polycrystalline thin films grown by thermal evaporation. The irradiation fluence range was 10 11 -10 15 protons/cm 2 . The proton irradiation induced the stable formation of primary and aggregate color centers. Their formation was investigated by optical absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The F 2 and F 3 + photoluminescence intensities, carefully measured in LiF crystals and thin films, show linear behaviours up to different maximum values of the irradiation fluence, after which a quenching is observed, depending on the nature of the samples (crystals and films). The Principal Component Analysis, applied to the absorption spectra of colored crystals, allowed to clearly identify the formation of more complex aggregate defects in samples irradiated at highest fluences. (paper)

  3. Primary and aggregate color centers in proton irradiated LiF crystals and thin films for luminescent solid state detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinini, M.; Ambrosini, F.; Ampollini, A.; Bonfigli, F.; Libera, S.; Picardi, L.; Ronsivalle, C.; Vincenti, M. A.; Montereali, R. M.

    2015-04-01

    Proton beams of 3 MeV energy, produced by the injector of a linear accelerator for proton therapy, were used to irradiate at room temperature lithium fluoride crystals and polycrystalline thin films grown by thermal evaporation. The irradiation fluence range was 1011-1015 protons/cm2. The proton irradiation induced the stable formation of primary and aggregate color centers. Their formation was investigated by optical absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The F2 and F3+ photoluminescence intensities, carefully measured in LiF crystals and thin films, show linear behaviours up to different maximum values of the irradiation fluence, after which a quenching is observed, depending on the nature of the samples (crystals and films). The Principal Component Analysis, applied to the absorption spectra of colored crystals, allowed to clearly identify the formation of more complex aggregate defects in samples irradiated at highest fluences.

  4. Control and data acquisition electronics for the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, K.J.; Nelson, C.A.; Shaw, T.M.; Wesson, T.R.

    1991-11-01

    A control and data acquisition system has been designed for the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector (SVX) at Fermilab. The system controls the operation of the SVX Rev D integrated circuit (SVX IC) that is used to instrument a 46,000 microstrip silicon detector. The system consists of a Fastbus Sequencer, a Crate Controller and Digitizer modules. 11 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Control and data acquisition electronics for the CDF silicon vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    urner, K.J.; Nelson, C.A.; Shaw, T.M.; Wesson, T.R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on a control and data acquisition system that has been designed for the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector (SVX) at Fermilab. The system controls the operation of the SVX Rev D integrated circuit (SVX IC) that is used to instrument a 46,000 microstrip silicon detector. The system consists of a Fastbus Sequencer, a Crate Controller and Digitizer modules

  6. Control and data acquisition electronics for the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, K.J.; Nelson, C.A.; Shaw, T.M.; Wesson, T.R.

    1991-11-01

    A control and data acquisition system has been designed for the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector (SVX) at Fermilab. The system controls the operation of the SVX Rev D integrated circuit (SVX IC) that is used to instrument a 46,000 microstrip silicon detector. The system consists of a Fastbus Sequencer, a Crate Controller and Digitizer modules. 11 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Signals from fluorescent materials on the surface of silicon micro-strip sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Sperlich, Dennis; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    For the High-Luminosity Upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the ATLAS Inner Detector will be replaced with a new, all-silicon tracker (ITk). In order to minimise the amount of material in the ITk, circuit boards with readout electronics will be glued onto the active area of the sensor. Several adhesives, investigated to be used for the construction of detector modules, were found to become fluorescent when exposed to UV light. These adhesives could become a light source in the high-radiation environment of the ATLAS detector. The effect of fluorescent material covering the sensor surface in a high-radiation environment has been studied for a silicon micro-strip sensor using a micro-focused X-ray beam. By positioning the beam parallel to the sensor surfave and pointing it both inside the sensor and above the sensor surface inside the deposited glue, the sensor responses from direct hits and fluorescence can be compared with high precision. This contribution presents a setup to study the susceptibilit...

  8. Experience with the silicon strip detector of ALICE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nooren, G.J.L.

    2009-01-01

    The Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) forms the two outermost layers of the ALICE Inner Track- ing System (ITS), connecting the TPC with the inner layers of the ITS. The SSD consists of 1698 double-sided silicon microstrip modules, 95 μm pitch, distributed in two cylindrical bar- rels, whose radii are

  9. SVX II a silicon vertex detector for run II of the tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortoletto, D.

    1994-11-01

    A microstrip silicon detector SVX II has been proposed for the upgrade of the vertex detector of the CDF experiment to be installed for run II of the Tevatron in 1998. Three barrels of four layers of double sided detectors will cover the interaction region. The requirement of the silicon tracker and the specification of the sensors are discussed together with the proposed R ampersand D to verify the performance of the prototypes detectors produced by Sintef, Micron and Hamamatsu

  10. Recent results on the development of radiation-hard diamond detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Conway, J S; Bauer, C; Berdermann, E; Bergonzo, P; Bogani, F; Borchi, E; Brambilla, A; Bruzzi, Mara; Colledani, C; Dabrowski, W; Da Graca, J; Delpierre, P A; Deneuville, A; Dulinski, W; van Eijk, B; Fallou, A; Fizzotti, F; Foulon, F; Friedl, M; Gan, K K; Gheeraert, E; Grigoriev, E; Hallewell, G D; Hall-Wilton, R; Han, S; Hartjes, F G; Hrubec, Josef; Husson, D; Jamieson, D; Kagan, H; Kania, D R; Kaplon, J; Karl, C; Kass, R; Knöpfle, K T; Krammer, Manfred; Lo Giudice, A; Lü, R; Manfredi, P F; Manfredotti, C; Marshall, R D; Meier, D; Mishina, M; Oh, A; Pan, L S; Palmieri, V G; Pernicka, Manfred; Peitz, A; Pirollo, S; Plano, R; Polesello, P; Prawer, S; Pretzl, Klaus P; Procario, M; Re, V; Riester, J L; Roe, S; Roff, D G; Rudge, A; Russ, J; Schnetzer, S; Sciortino, S; Somalwar, S V; Speziali, V; Stelzer, H; Stone, R; Suter, B; Tapper, R J; Tesarek, R; Thomson, G B; Trawick, M; Trischuk, W; Vittone, E; Walsh, A M; Wedenig, R; Weilhammer, Peter; White, C; Ziock, H J; Zöller, M

    1999-01-01

    Charged particle detectors made from chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond have radiation hardness greatly exceeding that of silicon- based detectors. The CERN-based RD42 Collaboration has developed and tested CVD diamond microstrip and pixel detectors with an eye to their application in the intense radiation environment near the interaction region of hadron colliders. This paper presents recent results from tests of these detectors. (4 refs).

  11. BI-ground microstrip array coil vs. conventional microstrip array coil for mouse imaging at 7 tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Ricardo; Terrones, M. A. López; Jakob, P. M.

    2012-10-01

    At high field strengths, the need for more efficient high frequency coils has grown. Since the radiation losses and the interaction between coil and sample increase proportionally to field strength, the quality factor (Q) and the sensitivity of the coil decrease as consequence of these negative effects. Since Zhang et al proposed in 2001 a new surface coil based on the microstrip transmission line for high frequency, different Tx-Rx phased arrays based on this concept have been already introduced in animal and whole body systems at high field strengths, each of them with different modifications in order to get better field homogeneity, SNR or isolation between coil elements in the array. All these arrays for animals systems have been built for rat imaging. One of these modifications is called BI-Ground Microstrip Array Coil (BIGMAC). The implementation of a smaller two-channel BIGMAC design for mouse imaging is studied and its performance compared to a two-channel conventional Microstrip array at 7 Tesla, the higher isolation by using BIGMAC elements in comparison with conventional Microstrip elements is shown in this work.

  12. Performance of n-in-p pixel detectors irradiated at fluences up to $5x10^{15} n_{eq}/cm^{2}$ for the future ATLAS upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00219560; La Rosa, A.; Nisius, R.; Pernegger, H.; Richter, R.H.; Weigell, P.

    We present the results of the characterization of novel n-in-p planar pixel detectors, designed for the future upgrades of the ATLAS pixel system. N-in-p silicon devices are a promising candidate to replace the n-in-n sensors thanks to their radiation hardness and cost effectiveness, that allow for enlarging the area instrumented with pixel detectors. The n-in-p modules presented here are composed of pixel sensors produced by CiS connected by bump-bonding to the ATLAS readout chip FE-I3. The characterization of these devices has been performed with the ATLAS pixel read-out systems, TurboDAQ and USBPIX, before and after irradiation with 25 MeV protons and neutrons up to a fluence of 5x10**15 neq /cm2. The charge collection measurements carried out with radioactive sources have proven the feasibility of employing this kind of detectors up to these particle fluences. The collected charge has been measured to be for any fluence in excess of twice the value of the FE-I3 threshold, tuned to 3200 e. The first result...

  13. Detection of irradiated foods with the photo-stimulated luminescence technique. Selection of a glass fiber filter for evaluating the performance of the PSL detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiguchi, Masayuki; Yamazaki, Masao; Goto, Michiko

    2008-01-01

    The PSL method is useful as a screening technique of irradiated foods to support efficient uses of TL analysis. Recently, there has been the growing need for the system check or calibration using the standard materials with spread of domestically -produced PSL detector. In this research, we characterized the PSL of several types of glass fiber filters and compared the cumulate photon counts of a selected filter of them (GA-100) with those of the SUERC paprika standard for PSL measurements. GA-100 filter showed a linear relationship between cumulate photon counts and irradiation doses, and the cumulate photon counts in the first 2 months after gamma rays irradiation (261Gy) were markedly decreased and reduced to about 5000 counts (the upper threshold of PSL) after 4 months. However, further long-term storage and dose increase was necessary to produce the filter with more adequate PSI property as a standard material. Light exposure (630Lux) within 3 minutes to GA-100 had little effect on the cumulate photon counts. GA-100 showed relatively less variation in cumulate photon counts compared with the paprika standard in a series of studies. (author)

  14. Gain and time resolution of 45 μm thin Low Gain Avalanche Detectors before and after irradiation up to a fluence of 1015 neq/cm2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, J.; Cavallaro, E.; Förster, F.; Grinstein, S.; Carulla, M.; Flores, D.; Hidalgo, S.; Merlos, A.; Pellegrini, G.; Quirion, D.; Chytka, L.; Komarek, T.; Nozka, L.; Davis, P.M.; Kramberger, G.; Mandić, I.; Sykora, T.

    2017-01-01

    Low Gain Avalanche Detectors (LGADs) are silicon sensors with a built-in charge multiplication layer providing a gain of typically 10 to 50. Due to the combination of high signal-to-noise ratio and short rise time, thin LGADs provide good time resolutions. LGADs with an active thickness of about 45 μm were produced at CNM Barcelona. Their gains and time resolutions were studied in beam tests for two different multiplication layer implantation doses, as well as before and after irradiation with neutrons up to 10 15 n eq /cm 2 . The gain showed the expected decrease at a fixed voltage for a lower initial implantation dose, as well as for a higher fluence due to effective acceptor removal in the multiplication layer. Time resolutions below 30 ps were obtained at the highest applied voltages for both implantation doses before irradiation. Also after an intermediate fluence of 3×10 14 n eq /cm 2 , similar values were measured since a higher applicable reverse bias voltage could recover most of the pre-irradiation gain. At 10 15 n eq /cm 2 , the time resolution at the maximum applicable voltage of 620 V during the beam test was measured to be 57 ps since the voltage stability was not good enough to compensate for the gain layer loss. The time resolutions were found to follow approximately a universal function of gain for all implantation doses and fluences.

  15. Space charge sign inversion and electric field reconstruction in 24 GeV/c proton-irradiated MCZ Si p+-n(TD)-n+ detectors processed via thermal donor introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Z.; Verbitskaya, E.; Carini, G.; Chen, W.; Eremin, V.; Gul, R.; Haerkoenen, J.; Li, M.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is the evaluation of radiation effects in detectors based on p-type magnetic czochralski (MCZ) Si that was converted to n-type by thermal donor (TD) introduction. As-processed p + -p-n + detectors were annealed at 430 deg. C resulting in p + -n(TD)-n + structures. The space charge sign and the electric field distribution E(x) in MCz Si p + -n(TD)-n + detectors irradiated by 24 GeV/c protons were analyzed using the data on the current pulse response and the Double Peak (DP) electric field distribution model for heavily irradiated detectors. The approach considers an irradiated detector as a structure with three regions in which the electric field depends on the coordinate, and the induced current pulse response arises from the drift process of free carriers in the detector with variable electric field. Reconstruction of the E(x) profile from the pulse response shapes is performed employing a new method for DP electric field reconstruction. This method includes: (a) a direct extraction of charge loss due to trapping and (b) the fitting of a simulated pulse response to the 'corrected' pulse by adjusting the electric field profiles in the three regions. Reconstruction of E(x) distribution showed that in the diodes irradiated by a proton fluence of (2-4)x10 14 p/cm 2 space charge sign inversion has occurred. This is the evidence that the influence of 24 GeV/c proton radiation on MCz Si p + -n(TD)-n + detectors is similar to that on p + -n-n + detectors based on FZ or diffusion oxygenated n-type Si.

  16. First charge collection and position-precision data on the medium-resistivity silicon strip detectors before and after neutron irradiation up to 2x10 sup 1 sup 4 n/cm sup 2

    CERN Document Server

    Li Zheng; Eremin, V; Li, C J; Verbitskaya, E

    1999-01-01

    Test strip detectors of 125 mu m, 500 mu m, and 1 mm pitches with about 1 cm sup 2 areas have been made on medium-resistivity silicon wafers (1.3 and 2.7 k OMEGA cm). Detectors of 500 mu m pitch have been tested for charge collection and position precision before and after neutron irradiation (up to 2x10 sup 1 sup 4 n/cm sup 2) using 820 and 1030 nm laser lights with different beam-spot sizes. It has been found that for a bias of 250 V a strip detector made of 1.3 k OMEGA cm (300 mu m thick) can be fully depleted before and after an irradiation of 2x10 sup 1 sup 4 n/cm sup 2. For a 500 mu m pitch strip detector made of 2.7 k OMEGA cm tested with an 1030 nm laser light with 200 mu m spot size, the position reconstruction error is about 14 mu m before irradiation, and 17 mu m after about 1.7x10 sup 1 sup 3 n/cm sup 2 irradiation. We demonstrated in this work that medium resistivity silicon strip detectors can work just as well as the traditional high-resistivity ones, but with higher radiation tolerance. We als...

  17. THERMAL, STRUCTURAL AND OPTICAL INVESTIGATION OF THE EFFECT OF GAMMA IRRADIATION IN PM-355 NUCLEAR TRACK DETECTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABUTALIB, M.M.

    2009-01-01

    Samples from PM-355 sheets were irradiated with gamma doses at levels between 10 and 120 kGy. The modifications in the irradiated samples have been studied as a function of dose using different characterization techniques such as thermogravimetric analysis, differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and colour difference studies. The gamma irradiation of PM-355 in the dose range 20-80 kGy resulted in an improvement in its thermal stability with an increase in the activation energy of thermal decomposition. The melting temperature (T m ) of the PM-355 polymer was found to be a probe of the crystalline domains of the polymer. At the dose range 20-80 kGy, the generated defects destroyed the crystalline structure and so, reducing the melting temperature.In addition, structural property studies using X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were performed on irradiated and non-irradiated PM-355 samples. The results indicated that both the degree of ordering and the absorbance of the PM-355 polymer are dependent on the gamma dose. Further, the transmission of these samples in the wavelength range 200-2500 nm, as well as any colour changes, was studied. The colour difference ( δE) was greatly increased with increasing the gamma dose accompanied by a significant increase in the whiteness and yellow colour components.

  18. Resonance of Superconducting Microstrip Antenna with Aperture in the Ground Plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Benkouda

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a rigorous full-wave analysis of a high Tc superconducting rectangular microstrip antenna with a rectangular aperture in the ground plane. To include the effect of the superconductivity of the microstrip patch in the full-wave analysis, a complex surface impedance is considered. The proposed approach is validated by comparing the computed results with previously published data. Results showing the effect of the aperture on the resonance of the superconducting microstrip antenna are given.

  19. Silicon Strip detectors for the ATLAS End-Cap Tracker at the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00232570

    Inside physics programme of the LHC different experiment upgrades are foreseen. After the phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS detector the luminosity will be increased up to 5-7.5x10E34 cm-2s-1. This will mean a considerable increase in the radiation levels, above 10E16 neq/cm2 in the inner regions. This thesis is focused on the development of silicon microstrip detectors enough radiation hard to cope with the particle fluence expected at the ATLAS detector during HL-LHC experiment. In particular on the electrical characterization of silicon sensors for the ATLAS End-Caps. Different mechanical and thermal tests are shown using a Petal core as well as the electrical characterization of the silicon sensors that will be used with the Petal structure. Charge collection efficiency studies are carried out on sensors with different irradiation fluences using the ALiBaVa system and two kinds of strips connection are also analized (DC and AC ganging) with a laser system. The Petalet project is presented and the electrical c...

  20. Simulation study of signal formation in position sensitive planar p-on-n silicon detectors after short range charge injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peltola, T.; Eremin, V.; Verbitskaya, E.; Härkönen, J.

    2017-01-01

    Segmented silicon detectors (micropixel and microstrip) are the main type of detectors used in the inner trackers of Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments at CERN. Due to the high luminosity and eventual high fluence of energetic particles, detectors with fast response to fit the short shaping time of 20–25 ns and sufficient radiation hardness are required. Charge collection measurements carried out at the Ioffe Institute have shown a reversal of the pulse polarity in the detector response to short-range charge injection. Since the measured negative signal is about 30–60% of the peak positive signal, the effect strongly reduces the CCE even in non-irradiated detectors. For further investigation of the phenomenon the measurements have been reproduced by TCAD simulations. As for the measurements, the simulation study was applied for the p-on-n strip detectors similar in geometry to those developed for the ATLAS experiment and for the Ioffe Institute designed p-on-n strip detectors with each strip having a window in the metallization covering the p + implant, allowing the generation of electron-hole pairs under the strip implant. Red laser scans across the strips and the interstrip gap with varying laser diameters and Si-SiO 2 interface charge densities ( Q f ) were carried out. The results verify the experimentally observed negative response along the scan in the interstrip gap. When the laser spot is positioned on the strip p + implant the negative response vanishes and the collected charge at the active strip increases respectively. The simulation results offer a further insight and understanding of the influence of the oxide charge density in the signal formation. The main result of the study is that a threshold value of Q f , that enables negligible losses of collected charges, is defined. The observed effects and details of the detector response for different charge injection positions are discussed in the context of Ramo's theorem.

  1. Simulation study of signal formation in position sensitive planar p-on-n silicon detectors after short range charge injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltola, T.; Eremin, V.; Verbitskaya, E.; Härkönen, J.

    2017-09-01

    Segmented silicon detectors (micropixel and microstrip) are the main type of detectors used in the inner trackers of Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments at CERN. Due to the high luminosity and eventual high fluence of energetic particles, detectors with fast response to fit the short shaping time of 20-25 ns and sufficient radiation hardness are required. Charge collection measurements carried out at the Ioffe Institute have shown a reversal of the pulse polarity in the detector response to short-range charge injection. Since the measured negative signal is about 30-60% of the peak positive signal, the effect strongly reduces the CCE even in non-irradiated detectors. For further investigation of the phenomenon the measurements have been reproduced by TCAD simulations. As for the measurements, the simulation study was applied for the p-on-n strip detectors similar in geometry to those developed for the ATLAS experiment and for the Ioffe Institute designed p-on-n strip detectors with each strip having a window in the metallization covering the p+ implant, allowing the generation of electron-hole pairs under the strip implant. Red laser scans across the strips and the interstrip gap with varying laser diameters and Si-SiO2 interface charge densities (Qf) were carried out. The results verify the experimentally observed negative response along the scan in the interstrip gap. When the laser spot is positioned on the strip p+ implant the negative response vanishes and the collected charge at the active strip increases respectively. The simulation results offer a further insight and understanding of the influence of the oxide charge density in the signal formation. The main result of the study is that a threshold value of Qf, that enables negligible losses of collected charges, is defined. The observed effects and details of the detector response for different charge injection positions are discussed in the context of Ramo's theorem.

  2. Experimental data from irradiation of physical detectors disclose weaknesses in basic assumptions of the δ ray theory of track structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, K. J.; Hansen, Jørgen-Walther

    1985-01-01

    The applicability of track structure theory has been tested by comparing predictions based on the theory with experimental high-LET dose-response data for an amino acid alanine and a nylon based radiochromic dye film radiation detector. The linear energy transfer LET, has been varied from 28...

  3. Strip detectors read-out system user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claus, G.; Dulinski, W.; Lounis, A.

    1996-01-01

    The Strip Detector Read-out System consists of two VME modules: SDR-Flash and SDR-seq completed by a fast logic SDR-Trig stand alone card. The system is a self-consistent, cost effective and easy use solution for the read-out of analog multiplexed signals coming from some of the front-end electronics chips (Viking/VA chips family, Premus 128 etc...) currently used together with solid (silicon) or gas microstrip detectors. (author)

  4. Implementation of the k0 technique using multi-detectors on diverse irradiation facilities of TRIGA Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldera C, M. de G.

    2013-01-01

    The k 0 method with the technique of neutron activation analysis allows obtaining important characteristics parameters that describe a nuclear reactor. Among these parameters are the form factor of epithermal neutron flux, α and the ratio of thermal neutron flux with respect to the epithermal neutron flux, f. These parameters were obtained by irradiation of two different monitors, one of Au-Zr and the other of Au-Mo-Cr, where the last one was made and implemented for the first time. Both monitors were irradiated in different positions in the TRIGA Mark III Reactor at the National Institute of Nuclear Research. (Author)

  5. Semiconductor detectors in the low countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heijne, Erik H.M.

    2003-01-01

    Several milestones in the development of semiconductor radiation imaging detectors are attributed to scientists from the Low Countries, the Netherlands and Belgium, and a few historical details will be highlighted. The very first usable semiconductor nuclear detector was made in Utrecht, around 1943, in the form of an AgCl crystal. The earliest large-scale application of monolithic, double-sided silicon strip detectors was in the BOL experiment around 1968 at IKO, now NIKHEF, in Amsterdam. The technology developed and patented by Philips and IKO was adapted by the author and coworkers in 1980 to produce the first silicon microstrip detector used for the reconstruction of events in a CERN fixed target experiment. An avalanche of developments then led to worldwide use of silicon microstrip detectors in elementary particle physics, motivated by the capability to reconstruct particles with lifetime ∼10 -12 s, which decay on sub-millimeter scale. The intensive activity in silicon detector R and D culminated in 1991 in the construction of fine-grained 2D monolithic and hybrid pixel detectors that incorporate sophisticated electronic functions in each microscopic detection element, with typical dimensions of 25-100 μm. Besides being a powerful high intensity tracker for particle physics, this device can also be designed as a new X-ray imager, which allows selective counting of individual photons in each pixel at MHz frequency

  6. Slotted Circularly Polarized Microstrip Antenna for RFID Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kumar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A single layer coaxial fed rectangular microstrip slotted antenna for circular polarization (CP is proposed for radio frequency identification (RFID application. Two triangular shaped slots and one rectangular slot along the diagonal axis of a square patch have been embedded. Due to slotted structure along the diagonal axis and less surface area, good quality of circular polarization has been obtained with the reduction in the size of microstrip antenna by 4.04 %. Circular polarization radiation performance has been studied by size and angle variation of diagonally slotted structures. The experimental result found for 10-dB return loss is 44 MHz with 10MHz of 3dB Axial Ratio (AR bandwidth respectively at the resonant frequency 910 MHz. The overall proposed antenna size including the ground plane is 80 mm x 80 mm x 4.572 mm.

  7. Design of microstrip patch antennas using knowledge insertion through retraining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divakar, T. V. S.; Sudhakar, A.

    2018-04-01

    The traditional way of analyzing/designing neural network is to collect experimental data and train neural network. Then, the trained neural network acts as global approximate function. The network is then used to calculate parameters for unknown configurations. The main drawback of this method is one does not have enough experimental data, cost of prototypes being a major factor [1-4]. Therefore, in this method the author collected training data from available approximate formulas with in full design range and trained the network with it. After successful training, the network is retrained with available measured results. This simple way inserts experimental knowledge into the network [5]. This method is tested for rectangular microstrip antenna and circular microstrip antenna.

  8. Radiation damage in silicon. Defect analysis and detector properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoenniger, F.

    2008-01-01

    Silicon microstrip and pixel detectors are vital sensor-components as particle tracking detectors for present as well as future high-energy physics (HEP) experiments. All experiments at the large Hadron Collider (LHC) are equipped with such detectors. Also for experiments after the upgrade of the LHC (the so-called Super-LHC), with its ten times higher luminosity, or the planned International Linear Collider (ILC) silicon tracking detectors are forseen. Close to the interaction region these detectors have to face harsh radiation fields with intensities above the presently tolerable level. defect engineering of the used material, e. g. oxygen enrichment of high resistivity float zone silicon and growing of thin low resistivityepitaxial layers on Czochralski silicon substrates has been established to improve the radiation hardness of silicon sensors. This thesis focuses mainly on the investigation of radiation induced defects and their differences observed in various kinds of epitaxial silicon material. Comparisons with other materials like float zone or Czochralski silicon are added. Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) and Thermally Stimulated Current (TSC) measurements have been performed after γ-, electron-, proton- and neutron-irradiation. The differenced in the formation of vacancy and interstitial related defects as well as so-called clustered regions were investigated for various types of irradiation. In addition to the well known defects VO i , C i O i , C i C s , VP or V 2 several other defect complexes have been found and investigated. Also the material dependence of the defect introduction rates and the defect annealing behavior has been studied by isothermal and isochronal annealing experiments. Especially the IO 2 defect which is an indicator for the oxygen-dimer content of the material has been investigated in detail. On the basis of radiation induced defects like the bistable donor (BD) defect and a deep acceptor, a model has been introduced to

  9. Radiation damage in silicon. Defect analysis and detector properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoenniger, F.

    2008-01-15

    Silicon microstrip and pixel detectors are vital sensor-components as particle tracking detectors for present as well as future high-energy physics (HEP) experiments. All experiments at the large Hadron Collider (LHC) are equipped with such detectors. Also for experiments after the upgrade of the LHC (the so-called Super-LHC), with its ten times higher luminosity, or the planned International Linear Collider (ILC) silicon tracking detectors are forseen. Close to the interaction region these detectors have to face harsh radiation fields with intensities above the presently tolerable level. defect engineering of the used material, e. g. oxygen enrichment of high resistivity float zone silicon and growing of thin low resistivityepitaxial layers on Czochralski silicon substrates has been established to improve the radiation hardness of silicon sensors. This thesis focuses mainly on the investigation of radiation induced defects and their differences observed in various kinds of epitaxial silicon material. Comparisons with other materials like float zone or Czochralski silicon are added. Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) and Thermally Stimulated Current (TSC) measurements have been performed after {gamma}-, electron-, proton- and neutron-irradiation. The differenced in the formation of vacancy and interstitial related defects as well as so-called clustered regions were investigated for various types of irradiation. In addition to the well known defects VO{sub i}, C{sub i}O{sub i}, C{sub i}C{sub s}, VP or V{sub 2} several other defect complexes have been found and investigated. Also the material dependence of the defect introduction rates and the defect annealing behavior has been studied by isothermal and isochronal annealing experiments. Especially the IO{sub 2} defect which is an indicator for the oxygen-dimer content of the material has been investigated in detail. On the basis of radiation induced defects like the bistable donor (BD) defect and a deep

  10. A microstrip gas avalanche chamber with two-dimensional readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelini, F.; Bellazzini, R.; Brez, A.; Massai, M.M.; Spandre, G.; Torquati, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    A microstrip gas avalanche chamber with a 200 μm anode pitch has been built and successfully tested in our laboratory. A gas gain of 10 4 and an energy resolution of 18% (FWHM) at 6 keV have been measured using a gas mixture of argon-CO 2 at atmospheric pressure. A preliminary measurement of the positional sensitivity indicates that a spatial resolution of 50 μm can be obtained. (orig.)

  11. Factors influencing the performances of micro-strips gas chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, V.; Brom, J.M.; Fang, R.; Fontaine, J.C.; Huss, D.; Kachelhoffer, T.; Kettunen, H.; Levy, J.M.; Pallares, A.; Bergdolt, A.M.; Cailleret, J.; Christophel, E.; Coffin, J.; Eberle, H.; Osswald, F.; Sigward, M.H.

    1995-01-01

    Damages to MSGCs (Micro-Strips Gas Chambers) induced by discharges have been investigated. Optimization of electrode shapes and/or deposition of a protective coating allows the potential difference between anode and cathode, thus increasing the gain. For prototypes of MSGCs made at the Centre de Recherches Nucleaires, each step of the manufacturing processes was carefully controlled. Results are presented on the influence of cleaning processes on the surface resistance of glass substrates. (author). 21 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  12. The front-end amplifier for the silicon microstrip sensors of the PANDA MVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Pietro, Valentino; Brinkmann, Kai-Thomas; Riccardi, Alberto [II. Physikalisches Institut, JLU Giessen (Germany); Rivetti, Angelo; Rolo, Manuel [INFN Sezione di Torino (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    The most common readout systems designed for the nuclear physics detectors are based on amplitude measurements. The information that needs to be preserved is the charge delivered by a particle hitting the sensor. The electronic chain employed in these cases is made from two main building blocks: front-end amplifier and ADC. One of the issues associated with the implementation of such an architecture in scaled CMOS technologies is the dynamic range, because the charge information is extrapolated through the sampling of the peak of the front-end output signal. It is therefore interesting to explore the possibility of using time-based architectures offering better performances from that point of view. In fact, in these topologies the linearity between the charge and the signal duration can be maintained even if some building blocks in the chain saturate. The main drawback is the loss in resolution since a duration measurement involves the difference between two time measurements. This work will present the design of a front-end optimized for fast Time-over-Threshold applications. The circuit has been developed for the microstrip detectors of the PANDA experiment. The key features of the front-end amplifier are illustrated and both schematic level, and post-layout simulations are discussed.

  13. Operation of microstrip gas chambers manufactured on glass coated with high resistivity diamond-like layers

    CERN Document Server

    Boimska, B; Dominik, Wojciech; Hoch, M; Million, Gilbert; Ropelewski, Leszek; Sauli, Fabio; Sharma, A

    1997-01-01

    We describe recent observations and measurements realized with micro-strip gas chambers (MSGCs) manufactured on boro-silicate glass coated with a thin layer of diamond-like carbon (DLC) having a surface resistivity around 4.10$^{16}\\Omega/\\Box$. The role of the back-pla electrode configuration and potential in the detector performance has been studied. Even for this very high resistivity of the coatings, MSGCs operate differently from those manufactured on bare boro-silicate glass; the charge gain increases with the radiation flux for counting rates above 103 Hz/mm2, reaching a value 60% higher for 105 Hz/mm2. This behavior does not depend on the presence and potential of the back plane electrode; however, both maximum gain and rate capability are influenced by the drift field. From this study, compared with measurements realized previously with other detectors, we deduce that for stable high rate operation of MSGCs the resistivity of the coating should not exceed ~10$^{15}\\Omega/\\Box$.

  14. Radial microstrip slotline feed network for circular mobile communications array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Kelly, Eron S.; Lee, Richard Q.; Taub, Susan R.

    1994-01-01

    In mobile and satellite communications there is a need for low cost and low profile antennas which have a toroidal pattern. Antennas that have been developed for mobile communications include a L-Band electronically steered stripline phased array, a Ka-Band mechanically steered elliptical reflector antenna and a Ka-Band printed dipole. In addition, a L-Band mechanically steered microstrip array, a L-Band microstrip phased array tracking antenna for mounting on a car roof and an X-Band radial line slotted waveguide antenna have been demonstrated. In the above electronically scanned printed arrays, the individual element radiates normally to the plane of the array and hence require a phase shifter to scan the beam towards the horizon. Scanning in the azimuth is by mechanical or electronic steering. An alternate approach is to mount microstrip patch radiators on the surface of a cone to achieve the required elevation angle. The array then scans in the azimuth by beam switching.

  15. Optically controlled photonic bandgap structures for microstrip circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadman, Darren Arthur

    2003-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the optical control of microwave photonic bandgap circuits using high resistivity silicon. Photoconducting processes that occur within silicon are investigated. The influence of excess carrier density on carrier mobility and lifetime is examined. In addition, electron-hole pair recombination mechanisms (Shockley-Read-Hall, Auger, radiative and surface) are investigated. The microwave properties of silicon are examined, in particular the variation of silicon reflectivity with excess carrier density. Filtering properties of microstrip photonic bandgap structures and how they may be controlled optically are studied. A proof-of-concept microstrip photonic bandgap structure with optical control is designed, simulated and measured. With no optical illumination incident upon the silicon, the microstrip photonic bandgap structure's filtering properties are well-defined; a 3dB stopband width of 2.6GHz, a 6dB bandwidth of 2GHz and stopband depth of -11.6dB at the centre frequency of 9.9GHz. When the silicon is illuminated, the structure's filtering properties are suppressed. Under illumination the experimental results display an increase in S 21 of 6.5dB and a reduction in S 11 of more than 10dB at 9.9GHz. A comparison of measured and simulated results reveal that the photogenerated excess carrier density is between 4 x 10 15 cm -3 and 1.1 x 10 16 cm -3 . (author)

  16. SiC-based neutron detector in quasi-realistic working conditions: efficiency and stability at room and high temperature under fast neutron irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferone, Raffaello; Issa, Fatima; Ottaviani, Laurent; Biondo, Stephane; Vervisch, Vanessa [IM2NP, UMR CNRS 7334, Aix-Marseille University, Case 231,13397 Marseille Cedex 20, (France); Szalkai, Dora; Klix, Axel [KIT- Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology Karlsruhe 76344, (Germany); Vermeeren, Ludo [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol, (Belgium); Saenger, Richard [Schlumberger, Clamart, (France); Lyoussi, Abadallah [CEA, DEN, Departement d' Etudes des Reacteurs, Service de Physique Experimentale, Laboratoire Dosimetrie Capteurs Instrumentation, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, (France)

    2015-07-01

    In the framework of the European I SMART project, we have designed and made new SiC-based nuclear radiation detectors able to operate in harsh environments and to detect both fast and thermal neutrons. In this paper, we report experimental results of fast neutron irradiation campaign at high temperature (106 deg. C) in quasi-realistic working conditions. Our device does not suffer from high temperature, and spectra do show strong stability, preserving features. These experiments, as well as others in progress, show the I SMART SiC-based device skills to operate in harsh environments, whereas other materials would strongly suffer from degradation. Work is still demanded to test our device at higher temperatures and to enhance efficiency in order to make our device fully exploitable from an industrial point of view. (authors)

  17. High-rate irradiation of 15mm muon drift tubes and development of an ATLAS compatible readout driver for micromegas detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Zibell, Andre

    The upcoming luminosity upgrades of the LHC accelerator at CERN demand several upgrades to the detectors of the ATLAS muon spectrometer, mainly due to the proportionally increasing rate of uncorrelated background irradiation. This concerns also the "Small Wheel" tracking stations of the ATLAS muon spectrometer, where precise muon track reconstruction will no longer be assured when around 2020 the LHC luminosity is expected to reach values 2 to 5 times the design luminosity of $1 \\times 10^{34} \\text{cm}^{-2}\\text{s}^{-1}$, and when background hit rates will exceed 10 kHz/cm$^2$. This, together with the need of an additional triggering station in this area with an angular resolution of 1 mrad, requires the construction of "New Small Wheel" detectors for a complete replacement during the long maintenance period in 2018 and 2019. As possible technology for these New Small Wheels, high-rate capable sMDT drift tubes have been investigated, based on the ATLAS 30 mm Monitored Drift Tube technology, but with a smalle...

  18. Development of a high-count-rate neutron detector with position sensitivity and high efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, R.; Sandoval, J.

    1996-01-01

    While the neutron scattering community is bombarded with hints of new technologies that may deliver detectors with high-count-rate capability, high efficiency, gamma-ray insensitivity, and high resolution across large areas, only the time-tested, gas-filled 3 He and scintillation detectors are in widespread use. Future spallation sources with higher fluxes simply must exploit some of the advanced detector schemes that are as yet unproved as production systems. Technologies indicating promise as neutron detectors include pixel arrays of amorphous silicon, silicon microstrips, microstrips with gas, and new scintillation materials. This project sought to study the competing neutron detector technologies and determine which or what combination will lead to a production detector system well suited for use at a high-intensity neutron scattering source

  19. Belle II silicon vertex detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamczyk, K. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Aihara, H. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Angelini, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Aziz, T.; Babu, V. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Bacher, S. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Bahinipati, S. [Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar, Satya Nagar (India); Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, Ti.; Baroncelli, To. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Basith, A.K. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Batignani, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bauer, A. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Behera, P.K. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Bergauer, T. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Bettarini, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bhuyan, B. [Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Assam 781039 (India); Bilka, T. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, 121 16 Prague (Czech Republic); Bosi, F. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bosisio, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); INFN Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); and others

    2016-09-21

    The Belle II experiment at the SuperKEKB collider in Japan is designed to indirectly probe new physics using approximately 50 times the data recorded by its predecessor. An accurate determination of the decay-point position of subatomic particles such as beauty and charm hadrons as well as a precise measurement of low-momentum charged particles will play a key role in this pursuit. These will be accomplished by an inner tracking device comprising two layers of pixelated silicon detector and four layers of silicon vertex detector based on double-sided microstrip sensors. We describe herein the design, prototyping and construction efforts of the Belle-II silicon vertex detector.

  20. Evaluation of the performance of irradiated silicon strip sensors for the forward detector of the ATLAS Inner Tracker Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, R., E-mail: riccardo.mori@physik.uni-freiburg.de [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Allport, P.P.; Baca, M.; Broughton, J.; Chisholm, A.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Pyatt, S.; Thomas, J.P.; Wilson, J.A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Kierstead, J.; Kuczewski, P.; Lynn, D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department and Instrumentation Division, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Arratia-Munoz, M.I.; Hommels, L.B.A. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Ullan, M.; Fleta, C.; Fernandez-Tejero, J. [Centro Nacional de Microelectronica (IMB-CNM, CSIC), Campus UAB-Bellaterra, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Bloch, I.; Gregor, I.M.; Lohwasser, K. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hambrug (Germany); and others

    2016-09-21

    The upgrade to the High-Luminosity LHC foreseen in about ten years represents a great challenge for the ATLAS inner tracker and the silicon strip sensors in the forward region. Several strip sensor designs were developed by the ATLAS collaboration and fabricated by Hamamatsu in order to maintain enough performance in terms of charge collection efficiency and its uniformity throughout the active region. Of particular attention, in the case of a stereo-strip sensor, is the area near the sensor edge where shorter strips were ganged to the complete ones. In this work the electrical and charge collection test results on irradiated miniature sensors with forward geometry are presented. Results from charge collection efficiency measurements show that at the maximum expected fluence, the collected charge is roughly halved with respect to the one obtained prior to irradiation. Laser measurements show a good signal uniformity over the sensor. Ganged strips have a similar efficiency as standard strips.

  1. Estimation of track registration efficiency in solution medium and study of gamma irradiation effects on the bulk-etch rate and the activation energy for bulk etching of CR-39 (DOP) Solid State Nuclear Track Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalsi, P.C.

    2010-01-01

    The fission track registration efficiency of diethylene glycol bis allyl carbonate (dioctyl phthalate doped) (CR-39 (DOP)) solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) in solution medium (K wet ) has been experimentally determined and is found to be (9.7 ± 0.5).10 -4 cm. This is in good agreement with the values of other SSNTDs. The gamma irradiation effects in the dose range of 50.0-220.0 kGy on the bulk etch rate, V b and the activation energy for bulk etching, E of this solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) have also been studied. It is observed that the bulk etch rates increase and the activation energies for bulk etching decrease with the increase in gamma dose. These results have been explained on the basis of scission of the detector due to gamma irradiation

  2. Effect of gamma-ray and electron irradiation on the response of solid-state track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Kyue

    1980-01-01

    Specimens of muscovite mica were first exposed to fission fragments and then to various gamma-ray fields from a 60 Co source ranging from 1.9 x 10 3 to 1.6 x 10 4 Mrad dose. The results show that the average etched width of fission-fragment tracks decreases with increasing gamma-ray dose. Shallow pits were observed in etched specimens when the gamma-ray dose exceeded 5 x 10 3 Mrad. Numerous shallow etch pits caused by the gamma-ray irradiation interfered with the observation of fission tracks in the specimens. No shallow etch pits were observed in the specimen annealed for 100 min at 600 0 C before the gamma-ray irradiation. Pre-annealing extends the ''safety limits'' of gamma background below which muscovite mica can be used to observe fission tracks without any gamma-ray interference. Gamma-ray and electron irradiation caused significant increase of the resistance to thermal decomposition of muscovite mica. The resistance increased markedly in the dose range from 5 x 10 3 to 8 x 10 3 Mrad. These phenomena suggest the use of mica to assess radiation doses of gamma rays and electrons up to several thousand megarads. (author)

  3. Antihydrogen annihilation reconstruction with the ALPHA silicon detector

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D.R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Hayano, R S; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jonsell, S; Jorgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Sarid, E; Seif el Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Yamazaki, Y

    2012-01-01

    The ALPHA experiment has succeeded in trapping antihydrogen, a major milestone on the road to spectroscopic comparisons of antihydrogen with hydrogen. An annihilation vertex detector, which determines the time and position of antiproton annihilations, has been central to this achievement. This detector, an array of double-sided silicon microstrip detector modules arranged in three concentric cylindrical tiers, is sensitive to the passage of charged particles resulting from antiproton annihilation. This article describes the method used to reconstruct the annihilation location and to distinguish the annihilation signal from the cosmic ray background. Recent experimental results using this detector are outlined.

  4. Antihydrogen annihilation reconstruction with the ALPHA silicon detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andresen, G.B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Ashkezari, M.D. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada V5A 1S6 (Canada); Bertsche, W. [Department of Physics, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Bowe, P.D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Butler, E. [European Laboratory for Particle Physics, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cesar, C.L. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-972 (Brazil); Chapman, S. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S. [Department of Physics, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Fajans, J. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Friesen, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada T2N 1N4 (Canada); Fujiwara, M.C. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada T2N 1N4 (Canada); Gill, D.R. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 2A3 (Canada); Gutierrez, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Hangst, J.S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Hardy, W.N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Hayden, M.E. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada V5A 1S6 (Canada); Hayano, R.S. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Humphries, A.J. [Department of Physics, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); and others

    2012-08-21

    The ALPHA experiment has succeeded in trapping antihydrogen, a major milestone on the road to spectroscopic comparisons of antihydrogen with hydrogen. An annihilation vertex detector, which determines the time and position of antiproton annihilations, has been central to this achievement. This detector, an array of double-sided silicon microstrip detector modules arranged in three concentric cylindrical tiers, is sensitive to the passage of charged particles resulting from antiproton annihilation. This article describes the method used to reconstruct the annihilation location and to distinguish the annihilation signal from the cosmic ray background. Recent experimental results using this detector are outlined.

  5. Semiconductor detectors in the low countries

    CERN Document Server

    Heijne, Erik H M

    2003-01-01

    Several milestones in the development of semiconductor radiation imaging detectors are attributed to scientists from the Low Countries, the Netherlands and Belgium, and a few historical details will be highlighted. The very first usable semiconductor nuclear detector was made in Utrecht, around 1943, in the form of an AgCl crystal. The earliest large-scale application of monolithic, double- sided silicon strip detectors was in the BOL experiment around 1968 at IKO, now NIKHEF, in Amsterdam. The technology developed and patented by Philips and IKO was adapted by the author and coworkers in 1980 to produce the first silicon microstrip detector used for the reconstruction of events in a CERN fixed target experiment. An avalanche of developments then led to worldwide use of silicon microstrip detectors in elementary particle physics, motivated by the capability to reconstruct particles with lifetime similar to 10**- **1**2s, which decay on sub-millimeter scale. The intensive activity in silicon detector R&D c...

  6. Peculiarities occurrence and microstrip gas chambers studied through experiment WA97; La production d`etrangete et les chambres gazeuses a micropistes dans le cadre de l`experience WA97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachelhoffer, T.

    1995-04-01

    This paper presents the studies on development of a Monte-Carlo type generator used for inclusive production of odd baryons and antibaryons through proton- proton and proton- nucleus collisions. Experiment WA97 consisted in designing simulation software for MSGCs (Micro-strips Gas Chambers) as well as the redefining of particle paths with the help of these chambers. This work made it possible to design the MSGC detector for experiment WA97. (TEC). 71 refs., 88 figs.

  7. Silicon position-sensitive detectors for the Helios (NA 34) experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engels, E Jr; Mani, S; Manns, T; Plants, D; Shepard, P F; Thompson, J A; Tosh, R; Chand, T; Shivpuri, R; Baker, W

    1987-01-15

    The design construction and testing of X-Y tracking modules for a silicon microstrip vertex detector for use in Fermilab experiment E706 is discussed. A successful adaptation of various technologies, essential for instrumenting this class of detectors at a university laboratory is described. Emphasis is placed on considerable cost reduction, design flexibiity and more rapid turnover with a view toward large detectors for the future.

  8. A 1024 pad silicon detector to solve tracking ambiguities in high multiplicity events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simone, S.; Catanesi, M.G.; Di Bari, D.; Didonna, V.; Elia, D.; Ghidini, B.; Lenti, V.; Manzari, V.; Nappi, E.

    1996-01-01

    Silicon detectors with two-dimensional pad readout have been designed and constructed for the WA97 experiment at CERN, in order to solve ambiguities for track reconstruction in a silicon microstrip telescope. A high density fanouts has been developed on a glass support to allow the electrical contacts between the detector and the front end electronics. Silicon pad detectors have been successfully operated both during the proton-Pb and Pb-Pb runs of the WA97 experiment. (orig.)

  9. Comparison and limitations of three different bulk etch rate measurement methods used for gamma irradiated PM-355 detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazal-ur-Rehman E-mail: fazalr@kfupm.edu.sa; Abu-Jarad, F.; Al-Jarallah, M.I.; Farhat, M

    2001-06-01

    Samples of Nuclear Track Detectors (PM-355) were exposed to high gamma doses from 1x10{sup 5} Gy (10 Mrad) up to 1.2x10{sup 6} Gy (120 Mrad) at an incremental dose of 1x10{sup 5} Gy (10 Mrad). The gamma source was a 9.03 PBq (244 kCi) Co-60 source used for sterilization of medical syringes. The bulk etch rate (V{sub b}) was measured for various high gamma doses by three different methods: 1--thickness change method; 2--mass change method; 3--fission track diametric method. The study gives a comparison and limitations of these three methods used for bulk etch rate measurements in the detectors as a function of high gamma doses. The track etch rate (V{sub t}) and the sensitivity (V) of the detector were also measured using the fission track diametric method. It was observed that V{sub b} increases with the increase of the gamma absorbed dose at a fixed etching time in each bulk etch measuring method. The bulk etch rate decreases exponentially with the etching time at a fixed gamma absorbed dose in all three methods. The thickness change and mass change methods have successfully been applied to measure V{sub b} at higher gamma doses up to 1.2x10{sup 6} Gy (120 Mrad). The bulk etch rate determined by the mass change and thickness change methods was almost the same at a certain gamma dose and etching time whereas it was quite low in the case of the fission track diametric method due to its limitations at higher doses. Also in this method it was not possible to measure the fission fragment track diameters at higher doses due to the quick disappearance of the fission tracks and therefore the V{sub b} could not be estimated at higher gamma doses.

  10. Beam Test Results for Single- and Double-Sided Silicon Detector Prototypes of the CMS Central Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Adriani, O

    1997-01-01

    We report the results of two beam tests performed in July and September 1995 at CERN using silicon microstrip detectors of various types: single sided, double sided with small angle stereo strips, double sided with orthogonal strips, double sided with pads. For the read-out electronics use was made of Preshape32, Premux128 and VA1 chips. The signal to noise ratio and the resolution of the detectors was studied for different incident angles of the incoming particles and for different values of the detector bias voltage. The goal of these tests was to check and improve the performances of the prototypes for the CMS Central Detector.

  11. Advanced Alignment of the ATLAS Inner Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Stahlman, JM; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The primary goal of the ATLAS Inner Detector (ID) is to measure the trajectories of charged particles in the high particle density environment of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) collisions. This is achieved using a combination of different technologies, including silicon pixels, silicon microstrips, and gaseous drift-tubes, all immersed in a 2 Tesla magnetic field. With over one million alignable degrees of freedom, it is crucial that an accurate model of the detector positions be produced using an automated and robust algorithm in order to achieve good tracking performance. This has been accomplished using a variety of alignment techniques resulting in near optimal hit and momentum resolutions.

  12. Preliminary results from a novel CVD diamond detector system for molecular imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahon, A.R.

    1996-01-01

    A novel biomolecular imaging system incorporating a Chemical Vapour Deposition diamond detector is in development. The synthetic diamond is used as a UV detector to image nucleic acids in electrophoresis gels. The microstrip diamond detector currently has a spatial resolution of 30 μm. Preliminary results are presented which include: QE measurements of diamond detectors, detector time response, detector UV response and current detection limits of biomolecules in gel. The potential applications of the technology, and its significant advantages in speed and sensitivity over the current systems are discussed

  13. Microstrip gas detectors development for the CMS tracker and branching fractions measurement of hadronic B decays with the BaBar experiment; Developpement de detecteur gazeux a micropistes pour le trajectographe de l'experience CMS et mesures de rapports d'embranchement de desintegrations hadroniques du meson B dans l'experience BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zghiche, A

    2007-01-15

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the two detectors, designed for the search of the Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), to operate late 2007 at CERN. Micro Strip Gas Counters (MSGC) have been extensively studied to qualify as part of the CMS tracker. When exposed to highly ionizing particles and to high rates of incident particles, MSGCs have shown a good behavior allowing them to cope with the LHC environment. Similar micro pattern gaseous detectors such as Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) and Micro Mesh gas detectors (MicroMegas) are developed to be used in high energy physics. BaBar, the detector for the Slac PEP-II asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} B Factory operating at the Y(4S) resonance, was designed to allow comprehensive studies of CP-violation in B-meson decays. First observation of CP violation has been realized in 2001. Since then an impressive amount of B decays measurements has been performed. Among those, we present here the branching fraction measurements of charged and neutral B decays to D{pi}{sup -}, D{sup *}{pi}{sup -}, and D{sup **}{pi}{sup -} with a missing mass method, based on a sample of 231 million Y(4S) {yields} BB-bar pairs. In order to do this, one of the B mesons is fully reconstructed and the 'recoil' one decays into a reconstructed charged pion and a companion charmed meson identified by its recoil mass, inferred by kinematics. The same sample is used to reconstruct charmed mesons (D, Ds) and baryons ({lambda}{sub c}) in the 'recoil side' allowing the measurement of the charm number in the B decays. (author)

  14. Quality assurance of double-sided silicon microstrip sensors for the silicon tracking system in the CBM experiment at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larionov, Pavel [Goethe Universitaet, Frankfurt (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The Silicon Tracking System (STS) is the core tracking detector of the CBM experiment at FAIR. The system's task is to reconstruct the trajectories of the charged particles produced in the beam-target interactions, provide their momentum determination, and enable the detection of decay topologies. The STS will comprise 1220 double-sided silicon microstrip sensors. After production each sensor will go through a number of Quality Assurance procedures to verify their validity for performance in the STS and also to confirm the manufacturer's data. In this talk, results of the quality assurance procedures that are being applied to the latest STS prototype sensors, including detailed tests of the quality of each single strip, long-term stability and preparations for volume tests during series production, are presented.

  15. First charge collection and position-precision data on the medium-resistivity silicon strip detectors before and after neutron irradiation up to 2x1014 n/cm2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zheng; Dezillie, B.; Eremin, V.; Li, C.J.; Verbitskaya, E.

    1999-01-01

    Test strip detectors of 125 μm, 500 μm, and 1 mm pitches with about 1 cm 2 areas have been made on medium-resistivity silicon wafers (1.3 and 2.7 kΩ cm). Detectors of 500 μm pitch have been tested for charge collection and position precision before and after neutron irradiation (up to 2x10 14 n/cm 2 ) using 820 and 1030 nm laser lights with different beam-spot sizes. It has been found that for a bias of 250 V a strip detector made of 1.3 kΩ cm (300 μm thick) can be fully depleted before and after an irradiation of 2x10 14 n/cm 2 . For a 500 μm pitch strip detector made of 2.7 kΩ cm tested with an 1030 nm laser light with 200 μm spot size, the position reconstruction error is about 14 μm before irradiation, and 17 μm after about 1.7x10 13 n/cm 2 irradiation. We demonstrated in this work that medium resistivity silicon strip detectors can work just as well as the traditional high-resistivity ones, but with higher radiation tolerance. We also tested charge sharing and position reconstruction using a 1030 nm wavelength (300 μm absorption length in Si at RT) laser, which provides a simulation of MIP particles in high-physics experiments in terms of charge collection and position reconstruction

  16. Coherent quantum cascade laser micro-stripe arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. de Naurois

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We have fabricated InP-based coherent quantum cascade laser micro-stripe arrays. Phase-locking is provided by evanescent coupling between adjacent stripes. Stripes are buried into semi-insulating iron doped InP. Lasing at room temperature is obtained at 8.4μm for stripe arrays comprising up to 16 emitters. Pure supermode emission is demonstrated via farfield measurements and simulations. The farfield pattern shows a dual-lobe emission, corroborating the predicted phase-locked antisymmetric supermode emission.

  17. Modelado de secciones curvas con tecnología microstrip

    OpenAIRE

    Aires Casas, Fco. Manuel

    2008-01-01

    El fin de algunos dispositivos electrónicos es ocupar el menor espacio posible, sin que la calidad de su función se devalúe apreciablemente, y para conseguirlo es necesario utilizar técnicas de miniaturización. Así, el objetivo principal del proyecto es analizar el efecto que tienen diferentes tipos de curvas en estructuras microstrip (líneas de transmisión constituidas por una franja conductora y un plano de tierra separados por un medio dieléctrico). El proceso se ha efectuado m...

  18. Snaps to Connect Coaxial and Microstrip Lines in Wearable Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiiti Kellomäki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Commercial snaps (clothing fasteners can be used to connect a coaxial cable to a microstrip line. This is useful in the context of wearable antennas, especially in consumer applications and disposable connections. The measured S-parameters of the transition are presented, and an equivalent circuit and approximate equations are derived for system design purposes. The proposed connection is usable up to 1.5 GHz (10 dB return loss condition, and the frequency range can be extended to 2 GHz if a thinner, more flexible coaxial cable is used.

  19. Microstripes for transport and separation of magnetic particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donolato, Marco; Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple technique for creating an on-chip magnetic particle conveyor based on exchange-biased permalloy microstripes. The particle transportation relies on an array of stripes with a spacing smaller than their width in conjunction with a periodic sequence of four different externally...... applied magnetic fields. We demonstrate the controlled transportation of a large population of particles over several millimeters of distance as well as the spatial separation of two populations of magnetic particles with different magnetophoretic mobilities. The technique can be used for the controlled...... selective manipulation and separation of magnetically labelled species. (C) 2012 American Institute of Physics....

  20. Laminated NbTi-on-Kapton Microstrip Cables for Flexible Sub-Kelvin RF Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Alex B.; Bockstiegel, Clinton; Mazin, Benjamin A.; Daal, Miguel

    2017-11-01

    Large arrays of superconducting devices such as microwave kinetic inductance detectors require high density interconnects from higher temperatures with minimal heat load, low loss, and negligible crosstalk capable of carrying large and overlapping bandwidth signals. We report the fabrication of superconducting 53 wt% Nb-47 wt% Ti (Nb-47Ti) microstrip transmission lines laminated onto flexible polyimide substrates with lengths up to 40 cm and up to ten traces. The 50 Ω traces terminate in G3PO coaxial push-on connectors. We found transmission losses of 2.5 dB and a nearest-neighbor forward crosstalk of -25 dB at 8 GHz on a typical 5 trace, 1.8-cm-wide, 0.198-mm-thick, 22-cm-long flex cable at 30 mK. A simple two-port analytical model and subsequent Sonnet simulations indicate that this loss is mainly due to a complex impedance mismatch from wirebonds at the end connector without which the insertion loss would be data show that the 0.198-mm-thick flex cables tested have roughly equivalent thermal conductance per trace below 4 K compared to the 0.86 mm Nb-47Ti coaxial cables.

  1. High resistivity ZnSe coated substrates for microstrip gas chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudharsanan, R.; Greenwald, A.C.; Vakerlis, G.; Yoganathan, M.; Cho, H.S.; Kadyk, J.; Dubeau, J.; Dixit, M.

    1998-01-01

    Microstrip gas chambers (MSGCs) require substrates with sheet resistance in the range of 10 13 --10 16 ohms/square to eliminate polarization and surface charging effects between the electrodes. Thin films of II-VI semiconductors deposited on glass or plastic substrates are attractive for this application since bulk resistivity of these semiconductors vary in the range 10 9 --10 12 ohm-cm and films with good uniformity can be deposited over large-areas using inexpensive deposition techniques. In this paper, deposition, characterization, and fabrication of MSGCs using ZnSe thin films are reported for the first time. ZnSe thin films were deposited on glass and plastic substrates by thermal evaporation. Sheet resistance of ZnSe varied in the range of 10 15 to 10 16 ohms/square depending on the deposition conditions. A MSGC detector fabricated using a 0.5 microm thick ZnSe layer on glass substrate exhibited best values; gas gain of 25,000 and an energy resolution of about 16.7% FWHM at a gain of 1,080 for a 55 Fe source

  2. MULTIOBJECTIVE EVOLUTIONARY ALGORITHMS APPLIED TO MICROSTRIP ANTENNAS DESIGN ALGORITMOS EVOLUTIVOS MULTIOBJETIVO APLICADOS A LOS PROYECTOS DE ANTENAS MICROSTRIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Rodrigues Brianeze

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This work presents three of the main evolutionary algorithms: Genetic Algorithm, Evolution Strategy and Evolutionary Programming, applied to microstrip antennas design. Efficiency tests were performed, considering the analysis of key physical and geometrical parameters, evolution type, numerical random generators effects, evolution operators and selection criteria. These algorithms were validated through design of microstrip antennas based on the Resonant Cavity Method, and allow multiobjective optimizations, considering bandwidth, standing wave ratio and relative material permittivity. The optimal results obtained with these optimization processes, were confirmed by CST Microwave Studio commercial package.Este trabajo presenta tres de los principales algoritmos evolutivos: Algoritmo Genético, Estrategia Evolutiva y Programación Evolutiva, aplicados al diseño de antenas de microlíneas (microstrip. Se realizaron pruebas de eficiencia de los algoritmos, considerando el análisis de los parámetros físicos y geométricos, tipo de evolución, efecto de generación de números aleatorios, operadores evolutivos y los criterios de selección. Estos algoritmos fueron validados a través del diseño de antenas de microlíneas basado en el Método de Cavidades Resonantes y permiten optimizaciones multiobjetivo, considerando ancho de banda, razón de onda estacionaria y permitividad relativa del dieléctrico. Los resultados óptimos obtenidos fueron confirmados a través del software comercial CST Microwave Studio.

  3. SUPPLEMENTARY COMPARISON: Final report on APMP.PR-S1.1: Bilateral comparison of irradiance responsivity of UVA detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xuebo

    2009-01-01

    In order to assess the performance of the standards and techniques used for calibration and measurement of UVA irradiance responsivity of photodetectors in NMISA, South Africa, a new comparison was decided as a follow-up to comparison APMP.PR-S1. It is registered in the Key Comparison Data Base (KCDB) of BIPM as a bilateral supplementary comparison, with the identifier APMP.PR-S1.1. The comparison was carried out following the same technical protocol as that of supplementary comparison APMP PR-S1. The principle, organization and method of the comparison, as well as the preliminary measurements at the pilot laboratory NMC-A*STAR Singapore, were described in the Final Report of the APMP.PR-S1 comparison. The results of this bilateral comparison show that the NMISA's results lie within ±2% against the comparison reference values of APMP.PR-S1, which is a great improvement. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the APMP, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  4. The DELPHI Microvertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bingefors, N.; Borner, H.; Boulter, R.; Caccia, M.; Chabaud, V.; Dijkstra, H.; Eerola, P.; Gross, E.; Horisberger, R.; Hubbeling, L.; Hyams, B.; Karlsson, M.; Maehlum, G.; Ratz, K.; Roditi, I.; Straver, J.; Trischuk, W.; Weilhammer, P.; Dufour, Y.; Brueckman, P.; Jalocha, P.; Kapusta, P.; Turala, M.; Zalewska, A.; Lindgren, J.; Orava, R.; Oesterberg, K.; Ronnqvist, C.; Saarikko, H.; Saarikko, J.P.; Tuuva, T.; Almagne, B. d'; Bambade, P.; Couchot, F.; Fulda, F.; Amery, A.; Booth, P.S.L.; Campion, A.R.; McNulty, R.; Smith, N.A.; Andreazza, A.; Battaglia, M.; Biffi, P.; Bonvicini, V.; Kucewicz, W.; Meroni, C.; Redaelli, N.; Stocchi, A.; Troncon, C.; Vegni, G.; Dauncey, P.; Mazzucato, M.; Pegoraro, M.; Peisert, A.; Baubillier, M.; Chauveau, J.; Silva, W. da; Genat, J.F.; Rossel, F.; Adye, T.; Apsimon, R.; Bizell, J.; Denton, L.; Kalmus, G.E.; Lidbury, J.; Seller, P.; Tyndel, M.; Dulinski, W.; Husson, D.; Lounis, A.; Schaeffer, M.; Turchetta, R.; Brenner, R.; Sundell, E.

    1993-01-01

    The DELPHI Microvertex detector, which has been in operation since the start of the 1990 LEP run, consists of three layers of silicon microstrip detectors at average radii of 6.3, 9.0 and 11.0 cm. The 73 728 readout strips, oriented along the beam, have a total active area of 0.42 m 2 . The strip pitch is 25 μm and every other strip is read out by low power charge amplifiers, giving a signal to noise ratio of 15:1 for minimum ionizing particles. On-line zero suppression results in an average data size of 4 kbyte for Z 0 events. After a mechanical survey and an alignment with tracks, the impact parameter uncertainty as determined from hadronic Z 0 decays is well described by √(69/p t ) 2 +24 2 μm, with p t in GeV/c. For the 45 GeV/c tracks from Z 0 →μ + μ - decays we find an uncertainty of 21 μm for the impact parameter, which corresponds to a precision of 8 μm per point. The stability during the run is monitored using light spots and capacitive probes. An analysis of tracks through sector overlaps provides an additional check of the stability. The same analysis also results in a value of 6 μm for the intrinsic precision of the detector. (orig.)

  5. Full Ka Band Waveguide-to-Microstrip Inline Transition Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianxing; Li, Lei; Qiao, Yu; Chen, Juan; Chen, Jianzhong; Zhang, Anxue

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, a compact and broadband inline waveguide-to-microstrip transition is proposed to cover the full Ka band. The transition can be segmented from the electric point of view into three building blocks, comprising a microstrip line to rectangular coaxial line, a wedged rectangular coaxial line to ridged waveguide, and a final tapered ridged waveguide impedance transformer to standard waveguide. Both good electrical performance and simple modular assembly without any soldering have been simultaneously obtained. The validation of the design concept has been conducted by numerical simulations and experimental measurements. The experimental results of a fabricated back-to-back transition prototype coincide with the simulated results. It shows that the proposed transition achieves good return loss of lower than 15.5 dB and low insertion loss with a fluctuation between 0.23 to 0.60 dB across the entire Ka band. Details of design considerations and operation mechanism as well as simulation and measurement results are presented.

  6. An Ultra-Wideband Schottky Diode Based Envelope Detector for 2.5 Gbps signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cimoli, Bruno; Valdecasa, Guillermo Silva; Granja, Angel Blanco

    2016-01-01

    to 2.5 Gbps at 6-9 GHz carrier frequency. The detector uses microstrip and surface-mount device (SMD) components and it is fabricated on a Rogers 6002 substrate. Experimental results show error free transmissions up to 2.5 Gbps at an input power level of -11 dBm. The highest measured conversion gain...

  7. Evaluation of silicon micro strip detectors with large read-out pitch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senyo, K.; Yamamura, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Avrillon, S.; Asano, Y.; Bozek, A.; Natkaniec, Z.; Palka, H.; Rozanska, M.; Rybicki, K.

    1996-01-01

    For the development of the silicon micro-strip detector with the pitch of the readout strips as large as 250 μm on the ohmic side, we made samples with different structures. Charge collection was evaluated to optimize the width of implant strips, aluminum read-out strips, and/or the read-out scheme among strips. (orig.)

  8. Theoretical and experimental study of microstrip-to-slot line uniplanar transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yook, Jong-Gwan; Dib, Nihad I.; Katehi, Linda P. B.; Simons, Rainee N.; Taub, Susan R.

    1994-05-01

    Recent advances in MMCI technology make it possible to construct transitions from CPW-to-microstrip with via hole, microstrip-to-slot line and microshield line-to-CPW all of which have potential applications in the feed network of antennas. In this study we investigate the characteristics of the microstrip-to-slot line uniplanar transition using the finite element methods (FEM) and finite difference time domain (FDTD) techniques, and compared the theoretical results with the measurements. In both cases, the results agree with the measurements within a few percent.

  9. Radiation damage in silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lindström, G

    2003-01-01

    Radiation damage effects in silicon detectors under severe hadron and gamma-irradiation are surveyed, focusing on bulk effects. Both macroscopic detector properties (reverse current, depletion voltage and charge collection) as also the underlying microscopic defect generation are covered. Basic results are taken from the work done in the CERN-RD48 (ROSE) collaboration updated by results of recent work. Preliminary studies on the use of dimerized float zone and Czochralski silicon as detector material show possible benefits. An essential progress in the understanding of the radiation-induced detector deterioration had recently been achieved in gamma irradiation, directly correlating defect analysis data with the macroscopic detector performance.

  10. A Detector for Cosmic Microwave Background Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollack, E.; Cao, N.; Chuss, D.; Hsieh, W.-T.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Stevenson, T.; U-yen, K.

    2008-01-01

    We present preliminary design and development work on polarized detectors intended to enable Cosmic Microwave Background polarization measurements that will probe the first moments of the universe. The ultimate measurement will be challenging, requiring background-limited detectors and good control of systematic errors. Toward this end, we are integrating the beam control of HE-11 feedhorns with the sensitivity of transition-edge sensors. The coupling between these two devices is achieved via waveguide probe antennas and superconducting microstrip lines. This implementation allows band-pass filters to be incorporated on the detector chip. We believe that a large collection of single-mode polarized detectors will eventually be required for the reliable detection of the weak polarized signature that is expected to result from gravitational waves produced by cosmic inflation. This focal plane prototype is an important step along the path to this detection, resulting in a capability that will enable various future high performance instrument concepts.

  11. Laser and beta source setup characterization of 3D-DDTC detectors fabricated at FBK-irst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoboli, A. [INFN, Sezione di Padova (Gruppo Collegato di Trento), and Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Scienza dell' Informazione, Universita di Trento, Via Sommarive, 14, I-38050 Povo (Trento) (Italy)], E-mail: zoboli@disi.unitn.it; Dalla Betta, G.-F. [INFN, Sezione di Padova (Gruppo Collegato di Trento), and Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Scienza dell' Informazione, Universita di Trento, Via Sommarive, 14, I-38050 Povo (Trento) (Italy); Boscardin, M. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Centro per i Materiali e i Microsistemi, Via Sommarive, 18, I-38050 Povo (Trento) (Italy); Bosisio, L. [Dip. di Fisica e INFN, Universita di Trieste, I-34127, Trieste (Italy); Eckert, S.; Kuehn, S.; Parzefall, U. [Institute of Physics, University of Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Piemonte, C.; Ronchin, S.; Zorzi, N. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Centro per i Materiali e i Microsistemi, Via Sommarive, 18, I-38050 Povo (Trento) (Italy)

    2009-06-01

    We report on the functional characterization of the first batch of 3D Double-Sided Double Type Column (3D-DDTC) detectors fabricated at FBK, Trento. This detector concept represents the evolution of the previous 3D-STC detectors towards full 3D detectors, and is expected to achieve a performance which is comparable to standard 3D detectors, but with a simpler fabrication process. Measurements were performed on detectors in the microstrip configuration coupled to the ATLAS ABCD3T binary readout. This paper reports spatially resolved signal efficiency tests made with a pulsed infrared laser setup and charge collection efficiency tests made with a Beta source.

  12. Laser and beta source setup characterization of 3D-DDTC detectors fabricated at FBK-irst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoboli, A.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Boscardin, M.; Bosisio, L.; Eckert, S.; Kuehn, S.; Parzefall, U.; Piemonte, C.; Ronchin, S.; Zorzi, N.

    2009-01-01

    We report on the functional characterization of the first batch of 3D Double-Sided Double Type Column (3D-DDTC) detectors fabricated at FBK, Trento. This detector concept represents the evolution of the previous 3D-STC detectors towards full 3D detectors, and is expected to achieve a performance which is comparable to standard 3D detectors, but with a simpler fabrication process. Measurements were performed on detectors in the microstrip configuration coupled to the ATLAS ABCD3T binary readout. This paper reports spatially resolved signal efficiency tests made with a pulsed infrared laser setup and charge collection efficiency tests made with a Beta source.

  13. Radiation damage status of the ATLAS silicon strip detectors (SCT)

    CERN Document Server

    Kondo, Takahiko; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Silicon microstrip detector system (SCT) of the ATLAS experiment at LHC has been working well for about 7 years since 2010. The innermost layer has already received a few times of 10**13 1-MeV neutron-equivalent fluences/cm2. The evolutions of the radiation damage effects on strip sensors such as leakage current and full depletion voltages will be presented.

  14. A Quarter Ellipse Microstrip Resonator for Filters in Microwave Frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Á. Jaramillo-Flórez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the results of computational simulations and construction of quadrant elliptical resonators excited by coplanar slot line waveguide for designing microwave filters in RF communications systems. By means of the equation of optics, are explained the fundamentals of these geometry of resonators proposed. Are described the construction of quadrant elliptical resonators, one of microstrip and other two of cavity, of size different, and an array of four quadrant elliptical resonators in cascade. The results of the measures and the computational calculus of scattering S11 and S21 of elliptical resonators is made for to identify the resonant frequencies of the resonators studied, proving that these have performance in frequency as complete ellipses by the image effect due to their two mirror in both semiaxis, occupying less area, and the possible applications are discussed.

  15. Frequency selective surfaces based high performance microstrip antenna

    CERN Document Server

    Narayan, Shiv; Jha, Rakesh Mohan

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on performance enhancement of printed antennas using frequency selective surfaces (FSS) technology. The growing demand of stealth technology in strategic areas requires high-performance low-RCS (radar cross section) antennas. Such requirements may be accomplished by incorporating FSS into the antenna structure either in its ground plane or as the superstrate, due to the filter characteristics of FSS structure. In view of this, a novel approach based on FSS technology is presented in this book to enhance the performance of printed antennas including out-of-band structural RCS reduction. In this endeavor, the EM design of microstrip patch antennas (MPA) loaded with FSS-based (i) high impedance surface (HIS) ground plane, and (ii) the superstrates are discussed in detail. The EM analysis of proposed FSS-based antenna structures have been carried out using transmission line analogy, in combination with the reciprocity theorem. Further, various types of novel FSS structures are considered in desi...

  16. The construction of a microstrip gas tracker for Hermes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brand, J. van den

    1994-01-01

    To measure the spin structure of the nucleon, the HERMES experiment is planned at the HERA electron beam using a polarised internal gas target. A tracker is being built to reconstruct the vertex of the exciting particles. It consists of two drift chambers and two microstrip gas counter (MSGC) systems. The MSGC systems are housed into two gas gatight containers surrounding the beam pipe and located immediately after the exit flange of the target housing. The active area of the upper MSGC system covers an angular range of 40 mrad≤θ v ≤ 140 mrad by -170 mrad≤θ h ≤170 mrad. Below the beam pipe a second system is situated with the same acceptance. Each track within the acceptance is measured by two stations of three MSCGs having a strip orientation, of 0 , and +30 and -30 respectively with respect to the vertical axis. (HSI)

  17. Microstrip Cross-coupled Interdigital SIR Based Bandpass Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Maharjan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A simple and compact 4.9 GHz bandpass filter for C-band applications is proposed. This paper presents a novel microstrip cross-coupled interdigital half-wavelength stepped impedance resonator (SIR based bandpass filter (BPF.The designed structure is similar to that of a combination of two parallel interdigital capacitors. The scattering parameters of the structure are measured using vector network analyzer (VNA. The self generated capacitive and inductive reactances within the interdigital resonators exhibited in a resonance frequency of 4.9 GHz. The resonant frequency and bandwidth of the capacitive cross-coupled resonator is directly optimized from the physical arrangement of the resonators. The measured insertion loss (S21 and return loss (S11 were 0.3 dB and 28 dB, respectively, at resonance frequency which were almost close to the simulation results.

  18. Measurements of Silicon Detector Thermal Runaway

    CERN Document Server

    Heusch, C A; Moser, H G

    1999-01-01

    We measured thermal runaway properties of previously irradiated silicon detectors cooled by TPG bars. We simulated their expected behaviour to measure the energy gap in the detector material and to test the validity of various underlying assumptions.

  19. The signal shape from the LHCb vertex locator prototype detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charles, M.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of the SCT128A ASIC pulse shape, when reading out non-irradiated and irradiated prototype detectors for the LHCb VELO, are presented. The detectors studied were two n-on-n prototype detectors fabricated by Hamamatsu, and a p-on-n prototype detector fabricated by MICRON

  20. Radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This sixth chapter presents the operational principles of the radiation detectors; detection using photographic emulsions; thermoluminescent detectors; gas detectors; scintillation detectors; liquid scintillation detectors; detectors using semiconductor materials; calibration of detectors; Bragg-Gray theory; measurement chain and uncertainties associated to measurements