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Sample records for microscopy tem study

  1. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of minerals in coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Kuang-Chien

    1982-01-01

    Minerals in eight coals from different mines were characterized in the micron-size range by using analytical transmission electron microscopy. Specimens were thinned by ion-milling wafers cut from these coals; a cold stage cooled by liquid nitrogen was used to reduce thermal degradation of the minerals by the ion-beam. Different mineral compounds were observed in different coals. The major minerals are clays, sulfides, oxides, carbonates and some minor-element-bearing phosphates. Clays (kaolinite, illite and others) have been most commonly found as either flat sheets or round globules. Iron sulfide was mostly found in the No. 5 and No. 6 coals from Illinois, distributed as massive polycrystals, as clusters of single crystals (framboids) or as isolated single crystals with size range down to some 0.25 microns. Other sulfides and some oxides were found in other coals with particle size as small as some 200 angstroms. Quartz, titanium oxides and many other carbonates and phosphate compounds were also characterized. Brief TEM work in the organic mass of coal was also introduced to study the nature of the coal macerals.

  2. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) for studying the morphology of colloidal drug delivery systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuntsche, Judith; Horst, Jennifer C; Bunjes, Heike

    2011-01-01

    Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) has evolved into an indispensable tool for the characterization of colloidal drug delivery systems. It can be applied to study the size, shape and internal structure of nanoparticulate carrier systems as well as the overall colloidal composition...

  3. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) investigations of ancient Egyptian cosmetic powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeb, C.; Walter, P.; Castaing, J.; Penhoud, P.; Veyssière, P.

    The processing technologies available during the time of ancient Egypt are of present concern to the field of Archaeology and Egyptology. Materials characterization is the best tool for establishing the processing history of archaeological objects. In this study, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used, in addition to other techniques, for phase identification and study of the microstructure and characteristic defect structures in ancient Egyptian cosmetic powders. These powders generally consist of a mix of Pb-containing mineral phases: galena (PbS), cerussite (PbCO3), and phosgenite (Pb2Cl2CO3), among others. Modern materials are fabricated according to recipes found in ancient texts to mimic the processing of ancient times and to compare with the archaeological specimens. In particular, a comparison between the dislocation structures of PbS crystals deformed in the laboratory and PbS from archaeological specimens from the collections of the Louvre Museum is presented .

  4. Nanoscale intracellular mass-density alteration as a signature of the effect of alcohol on early carcinogenesis: A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study

    CERN Document Server

    Ghimire, Hemendra M; Sahay, Peeyush; Almabadi, Huda; Tripathi, Vibha; Skalli, Omar; Rao, R K; Pradhan, Prabhakar

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol consumption interferes with the functioning of multiple organ systems, causing changes in the chemistry, physiology and pathology of tissues and cellular organelles. Although epigenetic modifications underlie the development of cancer, exposure to carcinogenic chemicals, such as alcohol, can also contribute to disease development. However, the effects of chronic alcoholism on normal or pre-carcinogenic cells/tissues in different organelles are not well understood. Therefore, we herein study the effect of alcohol consumption on colonic nucleus using control and azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) treated carcinogenic mice. Previous studies showed that progression of carcinogenesis is associated with increase in the degree of intranuclear nanoscale structural disorder. In the present work, we quantify the degree of nanostructural disorder as a measure of carcinogenesis. To accomplish this, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging of respective colonic epithelial cell nuclei are use...

  5. Electron microscopy of Microsporum cookei after 'in vitro' treatment with protoanemonin: a combined SEM and TEM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mares, D

    1989-10-01

    The ranunculaceous derivative protoanemonin (PrA) was studied as an antifungal agent on the dermatophyte Microsporum cookei. The ultrastructural changes that PrA brought about in this fungus were observed with both the transmission and scanning electron microscopes. The main anomalies noted were abnormally shaped hyphae and within the cytoplasm, multimembranous bodies which were irregular in shape and size, and tubules of 25 and 60 nm in diameters. Mitochondria, nuclei and vacuoles were also variously affected by PrA. Although multifarious, the observed cellular alterations in M. cookei can be considered the result of a PrA interaction with cytoplasmic microtubules. Since these cell structures contain a great number of ASH groups, our previous hypothesis, that sulphydryl groups are the primary targets of this molecule, appears to be supported.

  6. In-situ TEM Studies: Heat-treatment and Corrosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malladi, S.R.K.

    2014-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been well known as a powerful characterisation tool to understand the structure and composition of various materials down to the atomic level. Over the years, several TEM studies have been carried out to understand the compositional, structural and morpholo

  7. SEM, TEM and SLEEM (scanning low energy electron microscopy) of CB2 steel after creep testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasl, J.; Mikmeková, Š.; Jandová, D.

    2014-03-01

    The demand to produce electrical power with higher efficiency and with lower environmental pollution is leading to the use of new advanced materials in the production of power plant equipment. To understand the processes taking place in parts produced from these materials during their operation under severe conditions (such as high temperature, high stress, and environmental corrosion) requires detailed evaluation of their substructure. It is usually necessary to use transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, this method is very exacting and time-consuming. So there is an effort to use new scanning electron microscopy techniques instead of TEM. One of them is scanning low energy electron microscopy (SLEEM). This paper deals with an assessment of the possibility to use SLEEM for describing the substructure of creep resistant steel CB2 after long-term creep testing. In the SLEEM images more information is contained about the microstructure of the material in comparison with standard scanning electron microscopy. Study of materials using slow and very slow electrons opens the way to better understanding their microstructures.

  8. A TEM Study on the Ti-Alloyed Grey Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moumeni, Elham; Tiedje, Niels Skat; Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg;

    2014-01-01

    The microstructure of graphite flakes in titanium alloyed cast iron is studied using electron microscopy techniques. Dual beam SEM/FIB has been used for TEM sample preparation. A TEM study has been carried out on graphite flakes in grey cast iron using selected area electron diffraction. Based...... on the selected area diffraction pattern analysis, crystallographic orientations are identified and compared. The orientation relationship between iron and graphite crystals at the interface is studied and discussed. It is found that graphite in the Ti-containing iron is extremely fine grained...

  9. eV-TEM: Transmission electron microscopy in a low energy cathode lens instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geelen, Daniël, E-mail: geelen@physics.leidenuniv.nl [Huygens-Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Leiden Institute of Physics, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9504, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Thete, Aniket [Huygens-Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Leiden Institute of Physics, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9504, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Schaff, Oliver; Kaiser, Alexander [SPECS GmbH, Voltastrasse 5, D-13355 Berlin (Germany); Molen, Sense Jan van der [Huygens-Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Leiden Institute of Physics, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9504, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Tromp, Rudolf [IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, P.O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    We are developing a transmission electron microscope that operates at extremely low electron energies, 0–40 eV. We call this technique eV-TEM. Its feasibility is based on the fact that at very low electron energies the number of energy loss pathways decreases. Hence, the electron inelastic mean free path increases dramatically. eV-TEM will enable us to study elastic and inelastic interactions of electrons with thin samples. With the recent development of aberration correction in cathode lens instruments, a spatial resolution of a few nm appears within range, even for these very low electron energies. Such resolution will be highly relevant to study biological samples such as proteins and cell membranes. The low electron energies minimize adverse effects due to radiation damage. - Highlights: • We present a new way of performing low energy transmission electron microscopy in an aberration corrected LEEM/PEEM instrument. • We show a proof of principle where we measure transmitted electrons through a suspended graphene monolayer with a preliminary setup. • We present an improved setup design that provides better control of the incident electron beam.

  10. Surprising microscopy subtleties: Measuring picoscale thicknesses, visualizing core orbitals, and detecting charge transfer using the TEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odlyzko, Michael Luke

    50 years ago, Richard Feynman delivered a now-famous address outlining why there was "plenty of room left at the bottom": there remained much progress to be made in seeing and manipulating matter all the way down to the atomic scale. One of many means to that end, argued Feynman, was to make electron microscopes better. Why could not electrons with wavelengths of a few picometers not be used to clearly image atoms hundreds of picometers in size? Why could not electron beams be used to pattern miniscule wires a handful of metal atoms across? Over the course of decades, Feynman's vision has been pursued zealously with rich reward, not least in the electron microscopy field. Enabled by the development of bright field-emission electron sources, high-resolution polepieces, and now aberration correctors, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at atomic resolution has become routine. Seemingly, there is little room left at the bottom; after all, once you can clearly see atoms, what more is there left to do? Thankfully, there is plenty. Much of the hard work has been in the development of equipment that expands TEM to allow unprecedented spatially resolved analysis of elemental composition, inelastic scattering, and temporal processes. But there are also many opportunities to uncover new information using now widely available techniques and equipment. In the studies presented here, there has been some success in following the latter path. In tandem with careful computational analysis, selected-area electron diffraction allows not only determination of crystal symmetry, lattice parameter, and microstructure, but also measurements of material thickness on the scale of atomic layers. Supported by careful data processing and rigorous simulations, spatially resolved X-ray spectroscopy data is converted into real-space measurements of core-level electronic orbitals, in addition to providing routine atomic resolution chemical mapping. And aided by the development of novel bonding

  11. Confocal/TEM overlay microscopy: a simple method for correlating confocal and electron microscopy of cells expressing GFP/YFP fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, Douglas R; Tufa, Sara F; Lunstrum, Gregory P; Holden, Paul; Horton, William A

    2008-08-01

    Genetic manipulation allows simultaneous expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its derivatives with a wide variety of cellular proteins in a variety of living systems. Epifluorescent and confocal laser scanning microscopy (confocal) localization of GFP constructs within living tissue and cell cultures has become routine, but correlation of light microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on components within identical cells has been problematic. In this study, we describe an approach that specifically localizes the position of GFP/yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) constructs within the same cultured cell imaged in the confocal and transmission electron microscopes. We present a simplified method for delivering cell cultures expressing fluorescent fusion proteins into LR White embedding media, which allows excellent GFP/YFP detection and also high-resolution imaging in the TEM. Confocal images from 0.5-microm-thick sections are overlaid atop TEM images of the same cells collected from the next serial ultrathin section. The overlay is achieved in Adobe Photoshop by making the confocal image somewhat transparent, then carefully aligning features within the confocal image over the same features visible in the TEM image. The method requires no specialized specimen preparation equipment; specimens are taken from live cultures to embedding within 8 h, and confocal transmission overlay microscopy can be completed within a few hours.

  12. Atom-counting in High Resolution Electron Microscopy:TEM or STEM - That's the question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnissen, J; De Backer, A; den Dekker, A J; Sijbers, J; Van Aert, S

    2016-10-27

    In this work, a recently developed quantitative approach based on the principles of detection theory is used in order to determine the possibilities and limitations of High Resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR STEM) and HR TEM for atom-counting. So far, HR STEM has been shown to be an appropriate imaging mode to count the number of atoms in a projected atomic column. Recently, it has been demonstrated that HR TEM, when using negative spherical aberration imaging, is suitable for atom-counting as well. The capabilities of both imaging techniques are investigated and compared using the probability of error as a criterion. It is shown that for the same incoming electron dose, HR STEM outperforms HR TEM under common practice standards, i.e. when the decision is based on the probability function of the peak intensities in HR TEM and of the scattering cross-sections in HR STEM. If the atom-counting decision is based on the joint probability function of the image pixel values, the dependence of all image pixel intensities as a function of thickness should be known accurately. Under this assumption, the probability of error may decrease significantly for atom-counting in HR TEM and may, in theory, become lower as compared to HR STEM under the predicted optimal experimental settings. However, the commonly used standard for atom-counting in HR STEM leads to a high performance and has been shown to work in practice.

  13. Nanopipes in GaN: photo-etching and TEM study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazar, S.; Weyher, J.L.; Macht, L.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Zandbergen, H.W.

    2004-01-01

    Photochemical (PEC) etching and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used to study the defects in hetero-epitaxial GaN layers. TEM proved that PEC etching reveals not only dislocations but also nanopipes in the form of protruding, whisker-like etch features. It is shown by diffraction co

  14. Tem study of thermal ageing of ferrite in cast duplex stainless steel; Etude par microscopie electronique en transmission du vieillissement thermique de la ferrite d'aciers inoxydables austenoferritiques moules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenonen, P. [VTT Industrial Systems (Finland); Massoud, J.P. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France); Timofeev, B.T. [ZNIIKM, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2002-07-01

    The changes in the microstructure and composition of ferrite in two types of cast duplex stainless steels and in an austenitic-ferritic weld metal after long term thermal ageing has been studied using analytical transmission electron microscope (FEGTEM). A cast test steel containing Mo was investigated first as a reference material in three different conditions: as solution annealed, aged at 300 C and aged at 400 C. This investigation was carried out to gain experience of how EDS (X-ray analyser) analyser and TEM (transmission electron microscope) can be used to study elemental inhomogeneity, which is usually investigated with an atom probe (APFIM). The two other materials, an austenitic-ferritic weld metal and a cast duplex Ti-stabilised stainless steel used for long time at NPP operation temperature were investigated using the experience obtained with the test steel. The results showed that analytical TEM can be used to investigate elemental inhomogeneity of ferrite, but there are several important things to be taken into account when the spectra for this purpose are collected. These things are, such as the thickness of the specimen, probe size, contamination rate, 'elemental background' of the spectrum and possible enrichment of certain alloying elements in the surface oxide layer of the TEM-specimens. If minor elements are also analysed, it may increase the scattering of the results. (authors)

  15. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) Sample Preparation of Si(1-x)Gex in c-Plane Sapphire Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Choi, Sang H.; Bae, Hyung-Bin; Lee, Tae Woo

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration-invented X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods, including the total defect density measurement method and the spatial wafer mapping method, have confirmed super hetero epitaxy growth for rhombohedral single crystalline silicon germanium (Si1-xGex) on a c-plane sapphire substrate. However, the XRD method cannot observe the surface morphology or roughness because of the method s limited resolution. Therefore the authors used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with samples prepared in two ways, the focused ion beam (FIB) method and the tripod method to study the structure between Si1-xGex and sapphire substrate and Si1?xGex itself. The sample preparation for TEM should be as fast as possible so that the sample should contain few or no artifacts induced by the preparation. The standard sample preparation method of mechanical polishing often requires a relatively long ion milling time (several hours), which increases the probability of inducing defects into the sample. The TEM sampling of the Si1-xGex on sapphire is also difficult because of the sapphire s high hardness and mechanical instability. The FIB method and the tripod method eliminate both problems when performing a cross-section TEM sampling of Si1-xGex on c-plane sapphire, which shows the surface morphology, the interface between film and substrate, and the crystal structure of the film. This paper explains the FIB sampling method and the tripod sampling method, and why sampling Si1-xGex, on a sapphire substrate with TEM, is necessary.

  16. Direct Observations of Oxygen-induced Platinum Nanoparticle Ripening Studied by In Situ TEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Søren Bredmose; Chorkendorff, Ib; Dahl, Søren

    2010-01-01

    This study addresses the sintering mechanism of Pt nanoparticles dispersed on a planar, amorphous Al2O3 support as a model system for a catalyst for automotive exhaust abatement. By means of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the model catalyst was monitored during the exposure to 10...

  17. Electron microscopy study of refractory ceramic fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, P A; Lentz, T J; Rice, C H; Lockey, J E; Lemasters, G K; Gartside, P S

    2001-10-01

    In epidemiological studies designed to identify potential health risks of exposures to synthetic vitreous fibers, the characterization of airborne fiber dimensions may be essential for assessing mechanisms of fiber toxicity. Toward this end, air sampling was conducted as part of an industry-wide study of workers potentially exposed to airborne fibrous dusts during the manufacture of refractory ceramic fibers (RCF) and RCF products. Analyses of a subset of samples obtained on the sample filter as well as on the conductive sampling cowl were performed using both scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to characterize dimensions of airborne fibers. Comparison was made of bivariate fiber size distributions (length and diameter) from air samples analyzed by SEM and by TEM techniques. Results of the analyses indicate that RCF size distributions include fibers small enough in diameter ( 60 microm) may go undetected by TEM, as evidenced by the proportion of fibers in this category for TEM and SEM analyses (1% and 5%, respectively). Limitations of the microscopic techniques and differences in fiber-sizing rules for each method are believed to have contributed to the variation among fiber-sizing results. It was concluded from these data that further attempts to characterize RCF exposure in manufacturing and related operations should include analysis by TEM and SEM, since the smallest diameter fibers are not resolved with SEM and the fibers of longer length are not sized by TEM.

  18. Structure and Dynamics of Domains in Ferroelectric Nanostructures. In-situ TEM Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Xiaoqing [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-06-30

    The goal of this project was to explore the structure and dynamic behaviors of ferroelectric domains in ferroelectric thin films and nanostructures by advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques in close collaboration with phase field modeling. The experimental techniques used include aberration-corrected sub-Å resolution TEM and in-situ TEM using a novel scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) - TEM holder that allows the direct observation of nucleation and dynamic evolution of ferroelectric domains under applied electric field. Specifically, this project was aimed to (1) to study the roles of static electrical boundary conditions and electrical charge in controlling the equilibrium domain structures of BiFeO3 thin films with controlled substrate constraints, (2) to explore the fundamental mechanisms of ferroelectric domain nucleation, growth, and switching under an applied electric field in both uniform thin films and nanostructures, and to understand the roles of crystal defects such as dislocations and interfaces in these processes, (3) to understand the physics of ferroelectric domain walls and the influence of defects on the electrical switching of ferroelectric domains.

  19. A TEM Study on the Microstructure of Fine Flaky Graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moumeni, Elham; Tiedje, Niels Skat; Horsewell, Andy

    In this investigation the microstructure of the graphite flakes in titanium alloyed cast iron is studied using electron microscopy techniques. Based on this information, growth models for the platelets in the fine graphite flakes in cast iron are considered. Detailed crystallographic analysis of ...... of the defects observed such as multiple twin boundaries and possible spiral growth configurations are required...

  20. TEM studies of plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stróz, D; Psoda, M

    2010-03-01

    Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and X-ray phase analysis were used to study the structure of a layer formed during nitriding the AISI 316L stainless steel at temperature 440 degrees C. It was found that the applied treatment led to the formation of 6-microm-thick layer of the S-phase. There is no evidence of CrN precipitation. The X-ray diffraction experiments proved that the occurred austenite lattice expansion - due to nitrogen atoms - depended on the crystallographic direction. The cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy studies showed that the layer consisted of a single cubic phase that contained a lot of defects such as dislocations, stacking faults, slip bands and twins. The high-resolution electron microscopy observations were applied to study the defect formation due to the nitriding process. It was shown that the presence of great number of stacking faults leads to formation of nanotwins. Weak, forbidden {100} reflections were still another characteristic feature of the S-phase. These were not detected in the X-ray spectra of the phase. Basing on the high-resolution electron microscopy studies it can be suggested that the short-range ordering of the nitrogen atoms in the octahedral sites inside the f.c.c. matrix lattice takes place and gives rise to appearance of these spots. It is suggested that the cubic lattice undergoes not only expansion but also slight rombohedral distortion that explains differences in the lattice expansion for different crystallographic directions.

  1. AFM, SEM and TEM Studies on Porous Anodic Alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuan Yuan; Ding, Gu Qiao; Ding, Jian Ning; Yuan, Ning Yi

    2010-04-01

    Porous anodic alumina (PAA) has been intensively studied in past decade due to its applications for fabricating nanostructured materials. Since PAA’s pore diameter, thickness and shape vary too much, a systematical study on the methods of morphology characterization is meaningful and essential for its proper development and utilization. In this paper, we present detailed AFM, SEM and TEM studies on PAA and its evolvements with abundant microstructures, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each method. The sample preparation, testing skills and morphology analysis are discussed, especially on the differentiation during characterizing complex cross-sections and ultrasmall nanopores. The versatility of PAAs is also demonstrated by the diversity of PAAs’ microstructure.

  2. AFM, SEM and TEM Studies on Porous Anodic Alumina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu YuanYuan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Porous anodic alumina (PAA has been intensively studied in past decade due to its applications for fabricating nanostructured materials. Since PAA’s pore diameter, thickness and shape vary too much, a systematical study on the methods of morphology characterization is meaningful and essential for its proper development and utilization. In this paper, we present detailed AFM, SEM and TEM studies on PAA and its evolvements with abundant microstructures, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each method. The sample preparation, testing skills and morphology analysis are discussed, especially on the differentiation during characterizing complex cross-sections and ultrasmall nanopores. The versatility of PAAs is also demonstrated by the diversity of PAAs’ microstructure.

  3. SOFC anode reduction studied by in situ TEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Søren Bredmose; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Hansen, Thomas Willum;

    active Ni surface before operating the fuel cells. The reduction process was followed in the TEM while exposing a NiO/YSZ (YSZ = Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2) model anode to H2 at T = 250-1000⁰C. Pure NiO was used in reference experiments. Previous studies have shown that the reduction of pure NiO...... is a relatively rapid autocatalytic process. On the contrary, the reduction of NiO/YSZ is significantly slower, which indicates that the presence of YSZ inhibits the reduction of NiO. This study aims to obtain fundamental insight into this reduction mechanism and to explain the inhibitive influence of YSZ...

  4. A TEM study on the crystallization of amorphous Fe 73Si 3B 24 alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lijun, Wu; Lihua, Zhao; Wangyu, Hu; Lingling, Wang; Juemin, Xiao

    1994-02-01

    The crystallization of Fe 73Si 3B 24 amorphous alloys has been studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A metastable phase P has been found and determined by a double tilting method in TEM. This phase belongs to a primitive tetragonal lattice with a = 0.62 nm and c = 1.43 nm. Its probable space group is P4nc or P4/mnc. In the Fe 2B phase, we found threefold twins which are rotated 120° around the [ overline1 1 0] axis. The crystallization process of this alloy is suggested to be Amorphous→Amorphous + α-Fe(Si) + Fe 3B + P → α-Fe(Si) + Fe 3B + Fe 2B → α-Fe(Si) + Fe 2B.

  5. TEM study of impurity segregations in beryllium pebbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenkov, M.; Chakin, V.; Moeslang, A.; Rolli, R.

    2014-12-01

    Beryllium is planned to be used as a neutron multiplier in the Helium-cooled Pebble Bed European concept of a breeding blanket of demonstration power reactor DEMO. In order to evaluate the irradiation performance, individual pebbles and constrained pebble beds were neutron-irradiated at temperatures typical of fusion blankets. Beryllium pebbles 1 mm in diameter produced by the rotating electrode method were subjected to a TEM study before and after irradiation at High Flux Reactor, Petten, Netherlands at 861 K. The grain size varied in a wide range from sub-micron size up to several tens of micrometers, which indicated formation bimodal grain size distribution. Based on the application of combined electron energy loss spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy methods, we suggest that impurity precipitates play an important role in controlling the mechanical properties of beryllium. The impurity elements were present in beryllium at a sub-percent concentration form beryllide particles of a complex (Fe/Al/Mn/Cr)B composition. These particles are often ordered along dislocations lines, forming several micron-long chains. It can be suggested that fracture surfaces often extended along these chains in irradiated material.

  6. TEM study of impurity segregations in beryllium pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimenkov, M., E-mail: michael.klimenkov@kit.edu [Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Chakin, V.; Moeslang, A. [Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Rolli, R. [Institute for Applied Materials – Materials and Biomechanics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Beryllium is planned to be used as a neutron multiplier in the Helium-cooled Pebble Bed European concept of a breeding blanket of demonstration power reactor DEMO. In order to evaluate the irradiation performance, individual pebbles and constrained pebble beds were neutron-irradiated at temperatures typical of fusion blankets. Beryllium pebbles 1 mm in diameter produced by the rotating electrode method were subjected to a TEM study before and after irradiation at High Flux Reactor, Petten, Netherlands at 861 K. The grain size varied in a wide range from sub-micron size up to several tens of micrometers, which indicated formation bimodal grain size distribution. Based on the application of combined electron energy loss spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy methods, we suggest that impurity precipitates play an important role in controlling the mechanical properties of beryllium. The impurity elements were present in beryllium at a sub-percent concentration form beryllide particles of a complex (Fe/Al/Mn/Cr)B composition. These particles are often ordered along dislocations lines, forming several micron-long chains. It can be suggested that fracture surfaces often extended along these chains in irradiated material.

  7. Synthesis, XRD, TEM, EPR, and Optical Absorption Spectral Studies of CuZnO2 Nanocompound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ravindra Reddy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of nano CuZnO2 compound is carried out by thermal decomposition method. The crystalline phase of the material is characterized by XRD. The calculated unit cell constants are a=3.1 Å and c=3.4786 Å and are of tetragonal structure. The unit cell constants are different from wurtzite (hexagonal which indicate that a nanocompound is formed. Further TEM images reveal that the metal ion is in tetragonal structure with oxygen ligands. The prepared CuZnO2 is then characterized for crystallite size analysis by employing transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The size is found to be 100 nm. Uniform bright rings are noticed in the TEM picture suggesting that the nanocrystals have preferential instead of random orientations. The selected-area electron diffraction (SAED pattern clearly indicates the formation of CuO-ZnO nanocompound. The nature of bonding is studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR. The covalency character is about 0.74 and thus the compound is electrically less conductive. Optical absorption spectral studies suggest that Cu(II is placed in tetragonal elongation crystal field. The spin-orbit coupling constant, λ, is calculated using the EPR and optical absorption spectral results suggest some covalent bond between metal and ligand. Near infrared (NIR spectra are due to hydroxyl and water fundamentals.

  8. In Situ and Ex Situ TEM Study of Lithiation Behaviours of Porous Silicon Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chenfei; Ge, Mingyuan; Luo, Langli; Fang, Xin; Liu, Yihang; Zhang, Anyi; Rong, Jiepeng; Wang, Chongmin; Zhou, Chongwu

    2016-08-30

    In this work, we study the lithiation behaviours of both porous silicon (Si) nanoparticles and porous Si nanowires by in situ and ex situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and compare them with solid Si nanoparticles and nanowires. The in situ TEM observation reveals that the critical fracture diameter of porous Si particles reaches up to 1.52 μm, which is much larger than the previously reported 150 nm for crystalline Si nanoparticles and 870 nm for amorphous Si nanoparticles. After full lithiation, solid Si nanoparticles and nanowires transform to crystalline Li15Si4 phase while porous Si nanoparticles and nanowires transform to amorphous LixSi phase, which is due to the effect of domain size on the stability of Li15Si4 as revealed by the first-principle molecular dynamic simulation. Ex situ TEM characterization is conducted to further investigate the structural evolution of porous and solid Si nanoparticles during the cycling process, which confirms that the porous Si nanoparticles exhibit better capability to suppress pore evolution than solid Si nanoparticles. The investigation of structural evolution and phase transition of porous Si nanoparticles and nanowires during the lithiation process reveal that they are more desirable as lithium-ion battery anode materials than solid Si nanoparticles and nanowires.

  9. In Situ and Ex Situ TEM Study of Lithiation Behaviours of Porous Silicon Nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Chenfei; Ge, Mingyuan; Luo, Langli; Fang, Xin; Liu, Yihang; Zhang, Anyi; Rong, Jiepeng; Wang, Chongmin; Zhou, Chongwu

    2016-08-30

    In this work, we study the lithiation behaviours of both porous silicon (Si) nanoparticles and porous Si nanowires by in situ and ex situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and compare them with solid Si nanoparticles and nanowires. The in situ TEM observation reveals that the critical fracture diameter of porous Si particles reaches up to 1.52 μm, which is much larger than the previously reported 150 nm for crystalline Si nanoparticles and 870 nm for amorphous Si nanoparticles. After full lithiation, solid Si nanoparticles and nanowires transform to crystalline Li15Si4 phase while porous Si nanoparticles and nanowires transform to amorphous LixSi phase, which is due to the effect of domain size on the stability of Li15Si4 as revealed by the first-principle molecular dynamic simulation. Ex situ TEM characterization is conducted to further investigate the structural evolution of porous and solid Si nanoparticles during the cycling process, which confirms that the porous Si nanoparticles exhibit better capability to suppress pore evolution than solid Si nanoparticles. The investigation of structural evolution and phase transition of porous Si nanoparticles and nanowires during the lithiation process reveal that they are more desirable as lithium-ion battery anode materials than solid Si nanoparticles and nanowires.

  10. Cellular distribution of uranium after acute exposure of renal epithelial cells: SEM, TEM and nuclear microscopy analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrière, Marie; Gouget, Barbara; Gallien, Jean-Paul; Avoscan, Laure; Gobin, Renée; Verbavatz, Jean-Marc; Khodja, Hicham

    2005-04-01

    The major health effect of uranium exposure has been reported to be chemical kidney toxicity, functional and histological damages being mainly observed in proximal tubule cells. Uranium enters the proximal tubule as uranyl-bicarbonate or uranyl-citrate complexes. The aim of our research is to investigate the mechanisms of uranium toxicity, intracellular accumulation and repartition after acute intoxication of rat renal proximal tubule epithelial cells, as a function of its chemical form. Microscopic observations of renal epithelial cells after acute exposure to uranyl-bicarbonate showing the presence of intracellular precipitates as thin needles of uranyl-phosphate localized in cell lysosomes have been published. However the initial site of precipitates formation has not been identified yet: they could either be formed outside the cells before internalization, or directly inside the cells. Uranium solubility as a function and initial concentration was specified by ICP-MS analysis of culture media. In parallel, uranium uptake and distribution in cell monolayers exposed to U-bicarbonate was investigated by nuclear microprobe analyses. Finally, the presence of uranium precipitates was tested out by scanning electron microscopic observations (SEM), while extracellular and/or intracellular precipitates were observed on thin sections of cells by transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  11. Cellular distribution of uranium after acute exposure of renal epithelial cells: SEM, TEM and nuclear microscopy analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carriere, Marie [Laboratoire Pierre Suee, CEA-CNRS UMR 9956, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)]. E-mail: carriere@drecam.cea.fr; Gouget, Barbara [Laboratoire Pierre Suee, CEA-CNRS UMR 9956, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gallien, Jean-Paul [Laboratoire Pierre Suee, CEA-CNRS UMR 9956, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Avoscan, Laure [Laboratoire Pierre Suee, CEA-CNRS UMR 9956, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gobin, Renee [Laboratoire d' imagerie cellulaire et moleculaire, DBJC/SBFM/LTMD, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Verbavatz, Jean-Marc [Laboratoire d' imagerie cellulaire et moleculaire, DBJC/SBFM/LTMD, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Khodja, Hicham [Laboratoire Pierre Suee, CEA-CNRS UMR 9956, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2005-04-01

    The major health effect of uranium exposure has been reported to be chemical kidney toxicity, functional and histological damages being mainly observed in proximal tubule cells. Uranium enters the proximal tubule as uranyl-bicarbonate or uranyl-citrate complexes. The aim of our research is to investigate the mechanisms of uranium toxicity, intracellular accumulation and repartition after acute intoxication of rat renal proximal tubule epithelial cells, as a function of its chemical form. Microscopic observations of renal epithelial cells after acute exposure to uranyl-bicarbonate showing the presence of intracellular precipitates as thin needles of uranyl-phosphate localized in cell lysosomes have been published. However the initial site of precipitates formation has not been identified yet: they could either be formed outside the cells before internalization, or directly inside the cells. Uranium solubility as a function and initial concentration was specified by ICP-MS analysis of culture media. In parallel, uranium uptake and distribution in cell monolayers exposed to U-bicarbonate was investigated by nuclear microprobe analyses. Finally, the presence of uranium precipitates was tested out by scanning electron microscopic observations (SEM), while extracellular and/or intracellular precipitates were observed on thin sections of cells by transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

  12. Correlative Microscopy of Bone in Implant Osteointegration Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Triré

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Routine morphological analyses usually include investigations by light microscopy (LM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Each of these techniques provides specific information on tissue morphology and all the obtained results are then combined to give an in-depth morphological overview of the examined sample. The limitations of this traditional comparative microscopy lie in the fact that each technique requires a different experimental sample, so that many specimens are necessary and the combined results come from different samples. The present study describes a technical procedure of correlative microscopy, which allows us to examine the same bone section first by LM and then, after appropriate processing, by SEM or TEM. Thanks to the possibility of analyzing the same undecalcified bone sections both by LM and SEM, the approach described in the present study allows us to make very accurate evaluations of old/new bone morphology at the bone-implant interface.

  13. TEM study of mechanically alloyed ODS steel powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Jan, E-mail: j.hoffmann@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-AWP), Karlsruhe (Germany); Klimenkov, Michael; Lindau, Rainer; Rieth, Michael [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-AWP), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    Compared to present reactors, modern nuclear power plant concepts are based on materials which can be operated at higher temperatures and up to higher neutron doses. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels - produced by mechanical alloying - with chromium contents of 9 and 14 wt.% (or even more) are typical candidate materials. As the preparation of TEM samples from milled powders is usually very difficult, a new approach has been successfully adopted coming from the TEM sample preparation of biological tissues. Here, the alloyed powder is first embedded and then cut into thin films of 60-90 nm thickness using a microtom. The focal point is to gain a better knowledge of the solution mechanism of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the steel powder during mechanical alloying. Investigations on mechanically alloyed powders containing 13% Cr and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} were made using a Tecnai Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (STEM) with EDX detector. Detailed elemental mappings of the powder particles show the presence of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles after different milling times. The non-dissolved Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase was detected on the surface of the mechanically alloyed powder particles in the specimen alloyed at times down to 24 h. After mechanically alloying of 80 h, no Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase has been detected. Inside the mechanically alloyed powder, no particles were detected. All further results of the elemental mappings after different milling times are analyzed, compared, and discussed in this paper.

  14. TEM Study of High-Temperature Precipitation of Delta Phase in Inconel 718 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moukrane Dehmas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inconel 718 is widely used because of its ability to retain strength at up to 650∘C for long periods of time through coherent metastable  Ni3Nb precipitation associated with a smaller volume fraction of  Ni3Al precipitates. At very long ageing times at service temperature,  decomposes to the stable Ni3Nb phase. This latter phase is also present above the  solvus and is used for grain control during forging of alloy 718. While most works available on precipitation have been performed at temperatures below the  solvus, it appeared of interest to also investigate the case where phase precipitates directly from the fcc matrix free of  precipitates. This was studied by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. TEM observations confirmed the presence of rotation-ordered domains in plates, and some unexpected contrast could be explained by double diffraction due to overlapping phases.

  15. TEM and HRTEM studies of ball milled 6061 aluminium alloy powder with Zr addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lityńska-Dobrzyńska, L; Dutkiewicz, J; Maziarz, W; Rogal, Ł

    2010-03-01

    The effect of mechanical alloying on the microstructure of atomized 6061 aluminium alloy powder and 6061 powder with a zirconium addition was studied in the work. The atomized 6061 aluminium alloy powder and 6061 powder with addition of 2 wt.% Zr were milled in a planetary ball mill and investigated using X-ray diffraction measurements, conventional and high-resolution electron microscopy (TEM/HRTEM) and high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. An increase of stresses was observed in milled powders after the refinement of crystallites beyond 100 nm. In the powder with zirconium addition, some part of the Zr atoms diffused in aluminium forming a solid solution containing up to 0.5 wt.% Zr. The remaining was found to form Zr-rich particles containing up to 88 wt.% Zr and were identified as face centred cubic (fcc) phase with lattice constant a= 0.48 nm. That fcc phase partially transformed into the L1(2) ordered phase. Eighty-hour milling brought an increase of microhardness (measured with Vickers method) from about 50 HV (168 MPa) for the initial 6061 powder to about 170 HV (552 MPa). The addition of zirconium had no influence on the microhardness.

  16. A TEM and DLTS study of a near. Sigma. 25 CdTe bicrystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, N.; Haasen, P. (Inst. fuer Metallphysik, Univ. Goettingen (Germany))

    1991-11-16

    Cadmium precipitates are observed at the grain boundary (GB) of a CdTe bicrystal by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In a simple model based on the theory of electron hopping, electrons can be excited by thermal activation and flow from boundary states to precipitates in the boundary. This model gives, in particular, a simple explanation for the emission properties of the precipitates, as determined by deep-level-transient spectroscopy (DLTS) on the bicrystal. (orig.).

  17. TEM Study of Aerosol Particles in Brown Haze Episodes over Northern China in Spring 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W.; Shao, L.; Buseck, P. R.

    2008-12-01

    Airborne aerosol collections were performed in eight brown haze episodes from 31 May to 21 June 2007 in Beijing, China. Morphologies, compositions, and mixing states of individual aerosol particles having different sizes were obtained using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Aerosol particle types less than 2 μ m in diameter include mineral dust, fly ash, soot, organic material, and K-rich, S-rich, and metal particles (Fe- and Zn-rich). Mineral dust particles dominate in the range of 2 to 10 μ m. In addition to finding contributions from vehicle emissions and soil dust in Beijing, TEM results from the study provide new insights into sources such as agricultural biomass burning, industrial activities, and waste incineration. These sources can contribute not only great amounts of K-rich and metal particles but also reactive gases such as NH3, NOx, SO2, and VOCs to the haze. More than 80% of the analyzed aerosol particles are internally mixed. K- and S-rich particles tend to be coagulated with fly ash, soot, metal, and fine-grained mineral dust particles. Organic materials can act as inclusions in the K- and S-rich particles and their coatings. Over 90% of the analyzed internally mixed mineral particles are covered with Ca-, Mg-, or Na-rich coatings, and only 8% are associated with K- or S-rich coatings. The compositions of Ca-, Mg-, and Na-rich coatings suggest that they are possibly nitrates mixed with minor sulfates and chlorides. Calcium sulfate particles with diameters from 10 to 500 nm were also detected within Ca(NO3)2 and Mg(NO3)2 coatings. These results indicate that mineral dust particles in the brown haze episodes participated in heterogeneous reactions in the atmosphere with one or more of SO2, NO2, HCl, and HNO3. The development of coatings altered some mineral dust particles from hydrophobic to hydrophilic.

  18. Correlated NanoSIMS, TEM, and XANES Studies of Presolar Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groopman, Evan Edward

    The objective of this thesis is to describe the correlated study of individual presolar grains via Nano-scale Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (NanoSIMS), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) utilizing X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES), with a focus on connecting these correlated laboratory studies to astrophysical phenomena. The correlated isotopic, chemical, and microstructural studies of individual presolar grains provide the most detailed description of their formation environments, and help to inform astrophysical models and observations of stellar objects. As a part of this thesis I have developed and improved upon laboratory techniques for micromanipulating presolar grains and embedding them in resin for ultramicrotomy after NanoSIMS analyses and prior to TEM characterization. The new methods have yielded a 100% success rate and allow for the specific correlation of microstructural and isotopic properties of individual grains. Knowing these properties allows for inferences to be made regarding the condensation sequences and the origins of the stellar material that condensed to form these grains. NanoSIMS studies of ultramicrotomed sections of presolar graphite grains have revealed complex isotopic heterogeneities that appear to be primary products of the grains' formation environments and not secondary processing during the grains' lifetimes. Correlated excesses in 15N and 18O were identified as being carried by TiC subgrains within presolar graphite grains from supernovae (SNe). These spatially-correlated isotopic anomalies pinpoint the origin of the material that formed these grains: the inner He/C zone. Complex microstructures and isotopic heterogeneities also provide evidence for mixing in globular SN ejecta, which is corroborated by models and telescopic observations. In addition to these significant isotopic discoveries, I have also observed the first reported nanocrystalline core

  19. Microstructure of Fe implanted yttria stabilised zirconia studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy and TEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burggraaf, A.J.; Scholten, D.; Hassel, B.A. van

    1988-05-01

    Single crystalline and ceramic solid solutions of (1-0.chi)(ZrO/sub 2/)-(0.chi)(YO/sub 1.5/) with chi = 14-17 were implanted with high doses of Fe. Specific profile shapes were realised. The microstructure of the material before and after annealing was studied by conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy (CEMS), ion channeling and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Initially Fe is present as metallic particles Fe/sup 0/ and as Fe/sup 2+/ and Fe/sup 3+/ ions. Their relative abundancy depends on the implantation conditions. Annealing leads to complete oxidation (Fe/sup 3+/) at low temperature and to the formation of microprecipitates of Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ (< 5 nm). A maximum of 4.5x10/sup 21/ Fe cm/sup -3/ can be substitutionally incorporated for Zr. This Fe is present in a metastable state. Ion channeling and electron diffraction experiments revealed that high fluence Fe implantation does not result in amorphisation but in recrystallisation of the matrix.

  20. Study on the hydration product of cement in early age using TEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Song; YAN PeiYu; LIU RengGuang

    2012-01-01

    The morphology,crystallization and elemental composition of cement hydration products in early age including Ca(OH)2,CSH gel,AFt and AFm were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM).Compared with the results from SEM and XRD,the TEM method and its advantage in the investigation of early hydration products were discussed.The results showed that TEM method is more accurate and reliable than SEM in the investigation of early hydration products.The CSH gel was confirmed to be amorphous foil-like shape product with a lot of crumples in early hydration age.Its Ca/Si ratio is 1.3±0.2.The morphology difference of AFt and AFm was clarified.AFt and AFm are both poly-crystal with layered structure,composed of disordered nano crystal.The size of nano crystal is less than 20 nm.The difference of Ca/Si ratio results between SEM and TEM was investigated,and its reason was explained.

  1. A Study on the Washback of TEM 8 on Business English Majors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余红英; 胡叶洲

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the specific washback effects of TEM8 on Business English Majors (BE Majors) under the theoretical framework of washback mechanism.The aim is to research on the feasibility of the current TEM8 for evaluating BE Majors’ highest language proficiency level.To this end,an empirical study by means of questionnaire surveys is conducted among 120 senior BE majors in SUIBE and some suggestions are made to develop a highest proficiency test system for BE majors.

  2. A Study on the Washback of TEM 8 on Business English Majors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余红英; 胡叶洲

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the specific washback effects of TEM8 on Business English Majors(BE Majors) under the theoretical framework of washback mechanism.The aim is to research on the feasibility of the current TEM8 for evaluating BE Majors’ highest language proficiency level.To this end,an empirical study by means of questionnaire surveys is conducted among 120 senior BE majors in SUIBE and some suggestions are made to develop a highest proficiency test system for BE majors.

  3. First ultrastructural data on the human tapeworm Taenia asiatica eggs by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán-Puchades, M Teresa; Yang, Yichao; Marcilla, Antonio; Choe, Seongjun; Park, Hansol; Osuna, Antonio; Eom, Keeseon S

    2016-09-01

    Humans are definitive hosts of three species of the Taenia genus, namely Taenia solium, Taenia saginata and Taenia asiatica. The relative novelty of the latter explains the lack of knowledge concerning certain relevant aspects related to this parasite, such as its definite geographical distribution and whether its eggs can infect humans or not. So far, only the eggs of T. solium are known to be infective for humans, producing cysticercosis. Although eggs contain the infective stage, the oncosphere, there is a lack of research on the ultrastructure of eggs of human taeniids. We show, for the first time, the ultrastructure of eggs of T. asiatica by means of SEM and TEM analyses. We detected all the envelopes, namely the egg shell, vitelline layer, outer embryophoric membrane, embryophore, granular layer, basal membrane, oncospheral membrane and oncospheral tegument. Hooks surrounded by myofibrils and glycogen-like particles, the two types of secretory granules of the penetration glands, as well as several nuclei and mitochondria were also revealed in the oncospheres. In addition to the already known structures in eggs from other Taenia species, the presence of two types of small vesicles is described herein, possibly corresponding to exosomes and ectosomes because of their shape and size, which could participate in the host/parasite intercellular communication.

  4. From olivine to ringwoodite: a TEM study of a complex process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittarello, Lidia; Ji, Gang; Yamaguchi, Akira; Schryvers, Dominique; Debaille, Vinciane; Claeys, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    The study of shock metamorphism of olivine might help to constrain impact events in the history of meteorites. Although shock features in olivine are well known, so far, there are processes that are not yet completely understood. In shock veins, olivine clasts with a complex structure, with a ringwoodite rim and a dense network of lamellae of unidentified nature in the core, have been reported in the literature. A highly shocked (S5-6), L6 meteorite, Asuka 09584, which was recently collected in Antarctica by a Belgian-Japanese joint expedition, contains this type of shocked olivine clasts and has been, therefore, selected for detailed investigations of these features by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Petrographic, geochemical, and crystallographic studies showed that the rim of these shocked clasts consists of an aggregate of nanocrystals of ringwoodite, with lower Mg/Fe ratio than the unshocked olivine. The clast's core consists of an aggregate of iso-oriented grains of olivine and wadsleyite, with higher Mg/Fe ratio than the unshocked olivine. This aggregate is crosscut by veinlets of nanocrystals of olivine, with extremely low Mg/Fe ratio. The formation of the ringwoodite rim is likely due to solid-state, diffusion-controlled, transformation from olivine under high-temperature conditions. The aggregate of iso-oriented olivine and wadsleyite crystals is interpreted to have formed also by a solid-state process, likely by coherent intracrystalline nucleation. Following the compression, shock release is believed to have caused opening of cracks and fractures in olivine and formation of olivine melt, which has lately crystallized under postshock equilibrium pressure conditions as olivine.

  5. Microstructure of organic–inorganic composite coatings studied by TEM and XANES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etsuo Hamada, Masayasu Nagoshi, Kaoru Sato, Akira Matsuzaki, Takafumi Yamaji and Kotaro Kuroda

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromate coatings on Zn or Zn alloy coated steel sheets often include silica for the aim to improve corrosion resistance. In the case of dry-in-place chromate coatings containing acrylic resin (hereafter referred to as an organic–inorganic composite coating, an addition of silica, however, did not show an improvement in corrosion resistance. The microstructures of the organic–inorganic composite coatings were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and the chemical states of Cr were investigated by the total electron yield X-ray absorption near edge structure (TEY-XANES method. TEM samples were successfully prepared by dry ultramicrotomy preventing water-soluble components in the coatings from dissolving out. TEY-XANES revealed the chemical states of components even in the organic matrix. Using these methods, it was found that the addition of silica changed just the morphology of the chromium compound in the organic–inorganic composite coating but not the chemical state of Cr. This is a reason for the addition of silica being not effective at improving corrosion resistance. The combination of dry ultramicrotomy-TEM and TEY-XANES spectroscopy was proven to be a powerful tool for characterizing organic–inorganic composite coatings.

  6. Gold clusters on WO{sub 3} nanoneedles grown via AACVD: XPS and TEM studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navio, Cristina [Laboratory of Interaction Chemistry on Plasma Surfaces, University of Mons (Belgium); Vallejos, Stella [MINOS, EMaS, Departament d' Enginyeria Electronica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona (Spain); Department of Chemistry, University College London, London, WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Stoycheva, Toni; Llobet, Eduard; Correig, Xavier [MINOS, EMaS, Departament d' Enginyeria Electronica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona (Spain); Snyders, Rony [Laboratory of Interaction Chemistry on Plasma Surfaces, University of Mons (Belgium); Blackman, Christopher [Department of Chemistry, University College London, London, WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Umek, Polona [Solid State Physcis Department Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamov cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Ke Xiaoxing; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf [Electron Microscopy for Material Science, University of Antwerp, Antwerp (Belgium); Bittencourt, Carla, E-mail: carla.bittencourt@umons.ac.be [Electron Microscopy for Material Science, University of Antwerp, Antwerp (Belgium)

    2012-06-15

    We have prepared tungsten oxide films decorated with gold particles on Si substrates by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) and characterized them using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). SEM shows that the films are composed of needle-like structures and TEM shows that both the needles and the gold particles are crystalline. XPS indicates the presence of oxygen vacancies, i.e. the films are WO{sub 3-x}, and hence the deposited material is composed of semiconducting nanostructures and that the interaction between the gold particles and the WO{sub 3} needles surface is weak. The synthesis of semiconducting tungsten oxide nanostructures decorated with metal particles represents an important step towards the development of sensing devices with optimal properties. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterization of WO{sub 3} needle-like structures decorated with gold nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer WO{sub 3} needle-like structures are crystalline. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer WO{sub 3} needle-like structures are semiconducting.

  7. Experimental Space Weathering: A coordinated LIBS, TEM, VIS and NIR/MIR study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojic, Aleksandra N.; Pavlov, Sergey; Markus, Kathrin; Morlok, Andreas; Wirth, Richard; Weber, Iris; Schreiber, Anja; Hiesinger, Harald; Sohn, Martin; Huebers, Heinz-Wilhelm

    2016-04-01

    We conducted pulsed infrared laser irradiation experiments, in order to simulate space weathering triggered modifications of planetary surfaces not protected by an enveloping atmosphere [1,2], e.g., Mercury. Our work is embedded in the framework of the BepiColombo space mission to Mercury [3]. The MErcury Radiometer and Thermal Infrared Spectrometer (MERTIS), an onboard spectrometer will deliver surface data in the range of 7 - 14 μm once it reaches orbit in 2024 [4]. Space weathering effects known from other Solar System bodies are likely to be very prominent on Mercury due to its proximity to the Sun, the lack of a protective atmosphere and its weak magnetic field [5]. Space weathering effects, e.g., implantation of solar wind in regolith material, sputtering and (micro) meteorite impacts modify the planetary surface and thus, therefrom obtained spectral data in the VIS/NIR range considerably (e.g., reddening and darkening of spectra) [6-9]. We expect modifications induced by space weathering, known from the VIS/NIR range also to show in the mid infrared range, probably by amorphisation or similar still unknown effects [2,10]. Our approach is therefore threefold: a) alter analog material artificially by pulsed laser experiments, b) investigate altered analog material spectrally (VIS/NIR and MIR range) and c) conduct transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies on selected weathered grains to better understand the nanostratigraphy developed by irradiation and its impact on the resulting infrared spectra. Here, we report on results obtained from the first set of experiments. Characteristic upper mantle minerals were taken as analog material, Mg-rich olivine and pyroxene, were ground into a powder (Earth, Planets Sp. 1255-1265. [7] Brucato et al. (2003) Earth, Moon, and Planets. 307-314. [8] Sasaki et al. (2003) Adv Sp Res. 2537-2542. [9] Brunetto et al. (2007) Icarus. 381-393. [10] Morlok et al. (2016) Icarus. 352-368.

  8. AFM, ESEM, TEM, and CLSM in liposomal characterization: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Ruozi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Barbara Ruozi1, Daniela Belletti1, Andrea Tombesi2, Giovanni Tosi1, Lucia Bondioli1, Flavio Forni1, Maria Angela Vandelli11Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy; 2C.I.G.S., University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, ItalyAbstract: An outstanding aspect of pharmaceutical nanotechnology lies in the characterization of nanocarriers for targeting of drugs and other bioactive agents. The development of microscopic techniques has made the study of the surface and systems architecture more attractive. In the field of pharmaceutical nanosystems, researchers have collected vital information on size, stability, and bilayer organization through the microscopic characterization of liposomes. This paper aims to compare the results obtained by atomic force microscopy, environmental scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy to point out the limits and advantages of these applications in the evaluation of vesicular systems. Besides this comparative aim, our work proposes a simple confocal laser scanning microscopy procedure to rapidly and easily detect the liposomal membrane.Keywords: atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, environmental scanning electron microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy

  9. Electron microscopy methods in studies of cultural heritage sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliev, A. L.; Kovalchuk, M. V.; Yatsishina, E. B.

    2016-11-01

    The history of the development and application of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDXMA) in studies of cultural heritage sites is considered. In fact, investigations based on these methods began when electron microscopes became a commercial product. Currently, these methods, being developed and improved, help solve many historical enigmas. To date, electron microscopy combined with microanalysis makes it possible to investigate any object, from parchment and wooden articles to pigments, tools, and objects of art. Studies by these methods have revealed that some articles were made by ancient masters using ancient "nanotechnologies"; hence, their comprehensive analysis calls for the latest achievements in the corresponding instrumental methods and sample preparation techniques.

  10. TEM and NanoSIMS Study of Hydrated/Anhydrous Phase Mixed IDPs: Cometary or Asteroidal Origin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K.; Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.

    2005-01-01

    Chondritic interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are subdivided into (1) particles that form highly porous aggregates (chondritic porous "CP" IDPs), and (2) smooth particles ("CS" IDPs). Infrared (IR) spectroscopy has been a valuable tool for non-destructively determining the bulk mineralogy of IDPs. Most IDPs fall within three distinct IR groups: (1) olivine-rich particles, (2) pyroxene-rich particles, and (3) phyllosilicate-rich particles. From the IR studies, IDPs dominated by anhydrous minerals tend to be fine grained (CP), while phyllosilicate-rich IDPs are mostly CS. CP IDPs have been linked to cometary sources based on their compositions, spectral properties, and atmospheric entry velocities. Since no spectral signatures of hydrated minerals have been detected in comets, CS IDPs are thought to derive from primitive asteroids. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies have revealed that the mineralogical distinctions between CP and CS IDPs are not always clear. Previous investigators have reported trace amounts of hydrous minerals in dominantly anhydrous particles. A better understanding of these particles will help to elucidate whether there is a genetic relationship between anhydrous and hydrated IDPs, provide insight into the earliest stages of aqueous alteration of primitive materials, and may help to determine whether comets have experienced any aqueous processing. Here we report a combined TEM and isotopic imaging study of an unusual anhydrous IDP with hydrated phases. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  11. Combined TEM and NC-AFM study of Al2O3-supported Pt nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Nørregaard; Simonsen, Søren Bredmose; Chorkendorff, Ib

    on planar, amorphous Al2O3. Characterization of the size and shape of the Pt nanoparticles has been done by combining transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM), because of the great complementarity between these techniques. TEM measurements very accurately give...

  12. Sintering of oxide-supported Pt and Pd nanoparticles in air studied by in situ TEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Søren Bredmose

    at elevated temperatures. The time-resolved TEM images are presented and these offer direct insight into the fundamental dynamics of the sintering process at the nano-scale. For Pt, Pd and bimetallic Pt-Pd nanoparticles it is shown that the sintering process is governed by the Ostwald ripening mechanism...... correlations between neighbouring nanoparticles in the atom-exchange process. The sintering process was also presented statistically by particle size distributions extracted from the TEM images. The statistical data agreed only partly with the mean-field kinetic models for ripening, but the deviations could......This thesis presents a fundamental study of the sintering of supported nanoparticles in relation to diesel oxidation catalysts. The sintering of supported nanoparticles is an important challenge in relation to this catalyst, as well as many other catalyst systems, and a fundamental understanding...

  13. Conventional transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winey, Mark; Meehl, Janet B; O'Toole, Eileen T; Giddings, Thomas H

    2014-02-01

    Researchers have used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to make contributions to cell biology for well over 50 years, and TEM continues to be an important technology in our field. We briefly present for the neophyte the components of a TEM-based study, beginning with sample preparation through imaging of the samples. We point out the limitations of TEM and issues to be considered during experimental design. Advanced electron microscopy techniques are listed as well. Finally, we point potential new users of TEM to resources to help launch their project.

  14. TOPICAL REVIEW: Present status and future prospects of spherical aberration corrected TEM/STEM for study of nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuo Tanaka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present status of Cs-corrected TEM/STEM is described from the viewpoint of the observation of nanomaterials. Characteristic features in TEM and STEM are explained using the experimental data obtained by our group and other research groups. Cs correction up to the 3rd-order aberration of an objective lens has already been established and research interest is focused on correcting the 5th-order spherical aberration and the chromatic aberration in combination with the development of a monochromator below an electron gun for smaller point-to-point resolution in optics. Another fundamental area of interest is the limitation of TEM and STEM resolution from the viewpoint of the scattering of electrons in crystals. The minimum size of the exit-wave function below samples undergoing TEM imaging is determined from the calculation of scattering around related atomic columns in the crystals. STEM does not have this limitation because the resolution is, in principle, determined by the probe size. One of the future prospects of Cs-corrected TEM/STEM is the possibility of extending the space around the sample holder by correcting the chromatic and spherical aberrations. This wider space will contribute to the ease of performing in situ experiments and various combinations of TEM and other analysis methods. High-resolution, in situ dynamic and 3D observations/analysis are the most important keywords in the next decade of high-resolution electron microscopy.

  15. TEM Nanostructural Study of Al-6Si-3Cu-Mg Melt-Spun Ribbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismeli Alfonso López

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Three quaternary Al-6Si-3Cu-xMg (x = 0.59, 3.80, and 6.78 wt.% alloys were produced by melt-spun and characterized using X-ray diffractometry (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and microhardness techniques. Obtained second phases were Al2Cu( for the alloy with 0.59% Mg and Al5Cu2Mg8Si6 (Q for the alloys with 3.80 and 6.78% Mg. These phases are present as 30–50 nm or as 5–10 nm nanoparticles. Alloying elements content in solid solution increased, mainly for Si and Mg. The high alloying elements content in solid solution and the small -Al cell size for melt-spun alloys leads to microhardness values about 2 times higher than those of ingot counterparts. The microhardness increase for melt-spun alloys with 3.80 and 6.78% Mg depends on Mg content in solid solution.

  16. In-situ TEM Study on Microstructural Evolution of Nanostructured TiO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Yanqun; TANG Dian; XIONG Weihao

    2007-01-01

    The effect of electron beam on the microstructures and phase transformation of nanostructured TiO2 heat treated at various temperatures for different time was studied by in-situ TEM and SAED. Anatase ex-situ heated at 250℃ and 360℃ transformed to rutile while irradiated by the electron beam. With the increasing sizes and distribution of the powders on the amorphous carbon, the process of phase transformation by the electron beam was encumbered. These evolutions may be due to the changes of vacuum atmosphere and the properties of powders.

  17. Tantalum oxide nanoscale resistive switching devices: TEM/EELS study (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Kate J.; Zhang, Jiaming; Merced-Grafals, Emmanuelle; Musunuru, Srinitya; Zhang, Max; Samuels, Katy; Yang, Jianhua J.; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P.

    2015-08-01

    The field of non-volatile memory devices has been boosted by resistive switching, a reversible change in electrical resistance of a dielectric layer through the application of a voltage potential. Tantalum oxide being one of the leading candidates for the dielectric component of resistance switching devices was investigated in this study. 55nm TaOx devices in all states were compared through cross sectional TEM techniques including HRTEM, EELS, and EFTEM and will be discussed in this presentation. Based on the chemical and physical features found in the cross sectioned nanodevices we will discuss the switching mechanism of these nanoscale devices.

  18. A STUDY OF THE CORRELATION BETWEEN ENGLISH MAJORS' SCORES OF TEM4 AND TOLERANCE OF AMBIGUITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChenWencun

    2004-01-01

    This is a study of the effect of English majors' tolerance ofambiguity on their scores of TEM4. The subjects for the surveyare 193 English major students. Statistical results of the surveyshow that the students' tolerance of ambiguity distributesnormally and their scores of listening comprehension and totalscores are significantly correlated with their tolerance ofambiguity. A weak positive correlation is also found betweentheir scores of dictation, cloze as well as reading comprehensionand tolerance of ambiguity. Students' scores in writing,structure and vocabulary are not significantly correlated withtolerance of ambiguity. The author makes some analysesassociating the results of the investigation with some scholarlyinferences and gives some suggestions on foreign languageteaching.

  19. A TEM Study on Fluid Inclusions in Coesite-bearing Jadeite Quartzite in Shuanghe in the Dabie Mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xiuling; MENG Dawei; HAN Yujing

    2004-01-01

    Fluid inclusions at a nano to sub-micron scale in quartz from jadeite quartzite at Shuanghe, Dabie Mountains,have been investigated by using the transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Most fluid inclusions are spherical or negative crystal shaped, forming wide swarm-like trails. The TEM reveals that the relationship between coesite and the host quartz is syntaxic and provides strong evidence of the occurrence of high-salty fluids at peak metamorphic conditions.The fluid inclusions are often connected to dislocations, which are undetected at the scale of optical microscopy. Nondecrepitation leakage of fluid inclusions may occur by pipe diffusion of molecule H2O or CO2 along dislocations from the inclusions into the host quartz, thus leading to original inclusion density and composition changes. It should be taken into full account for the correct petrological interpretation of micro-thermometric results.

  20. Comparative study of electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy in photosynthetic research

    OpenAIRE

    MATĚNOVÁ, Martina

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the ability of transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy to visualize individual protein complexes. The principle of electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy is explained. For comparision of these methods well characterized photosynthetic complexes LH1, LH2, PSI and PSII were selected.

  1. Microstructural studies of dental amalgams using analytical transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooghan, Tejpal Kaur

    Dental amalgams have been used for centuries as major restorative materials for decaying teeth. Amalgams are prepared by mixing alloy particles which contain Ag, Sn, and Cu as the major constituent elements with liquid Hg. The study of microstructure is essential in understanding the setting reactions and improving the properties of amalgams. Until the work reported in this dissertation, optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray diffractometry (XRD) were used commonly to analyze amalgam microstructures. No previous systematic transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study has been performed due to sample preparation difficulties and composite structure of dental amalgams. The goal of this research was to carry out detailed microstructural and compositional studies of dental amalgams. This was accomplished using the enhanced spatial resolution of the TEM and its associated microanalytical techniques, namely, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) and micro-microdiffraction (mumuD). A new method was developed for thinning amalgam samples to electron transparency using the "wedge technique." Velvalloy, a low-Cu amalgam, and Tytin, a high-Cu amalgam, were the two amalgams characterized. Velvalloy is composed of a Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1)/HgSnsb{7-9}\\ (gammasb2) matrix surrounding unreacted Agsb3Sn (gamma) particles. In addition, hitherto uncharacterized reaction layers between Agsb3Sn(gamma)/Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb2)\\ and\\ Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1)/HgSnsb{7-9}\\ (gammasb2) were observed and analyzed. An Ag-Hg-Sn (betasb1) phase was clearly identified for the first time. In Tytin, the matrix consists of Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1) grains. Fine precipitates of Cusb6Snsb5\\ (etasp') are embedded inside the gammasb1 and at the grain boundaries. These precipitates are responsible for the improved creep resistance of Tytin compared to Velvalloy. The additional Cu has completely eliminated the gammasb

  2. A Rapid Method for Viral Particle Detection in Viral-Induced Gastroenteritis: A TEM Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, M. John; Barrish, James P.; Hayes, Elizabeth S.; Leer, Laurie C.; Estes, Mary K.; Cubitt, W. D.

    1995-10-01

    Infectious gastroenteritis is a common cause of hospitalization in the pediatric population. The most frequent cause of gastroenteritis is viral in origin. The purpose of this study was to compare a rapid modified negative-staining TEM method with the conventional pseudoreplica technique in detection of viral particles in fecal samples from children with viral gastroenteritis. The modified negative-staining method resulted in a significantly higher (2.5 ± 0.5, p = 0.02) viral rating score than that for the conventional pseudoreplica technique (1.7 ± 0.4). In addition, the preparation time for the negative-staining method was approximately one fifth that for the conventional pseudoreplica technique. Rapid diagnosis of viral gastroenteritis may be made by ultrastructural detection of viral particles in fecal samples using the negative staining technique.

  3. Study on Low-Frequency TEM Effect of Coal during Dynamic Rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-wu Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic loads provided by the SHPB test system were applied to coal specimens, and the TEM signals that emerged during coal rupture were recorded by the TMVT system. Experiments on coal-mass blasting rupture in excavating workface were also carried out, and the emerged TEM signal was analyzed. The results indicate that the low-frequency TEM signals were detected close to the coal specimens under high strain dynamic load applied by the SHPB, initially rising sharply and dropping rapidly, followed by a small tailing turbulence. And the field test results obtained during coal blasting process coincided with the results from the SHPB tests. Furthermore, its initial part shaped like a pulse cluster had a more pronounced tail and lasted even longer. And the generation mechanism of the low-frequency TEM effect was analyzed. It suggests that the low-frequency TEM effect of coal during dynamic rupture is contributed by the fractoemission mechanism and the resonance or waveguide effects. Because its wavelength is longer than the higher ones, the low-frequency TEM has a good anti-interference performance. That can expand the scope and performance of the coal-rock dynamic disaster electromagnetic monitoring technique.

  4. [Pili annulati. A scanning electron microscopy study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalević-Vasić, B; Polić, D

    1988-01-01

    A case of ringed hair studied by light and electron microscopy is reported. The patient, a 20-year old girl, had been presenting with the hair abnormality since birth. At naked eye examination the hairs were dry, 6 to 7 cm long, and they showed dull and shining areas giving the scalp hair a scintillating appearance (fig. 1). Several samples of hair were taken and examined by light microscopy under white and polarized light. Hair shafts and cryo-fractured surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS. 1. Light microscopy. Lesions were found in every hair examined. There were abnormal, opaque and fusiform areas alternating with normal areas all along the hair shaft (fig. 2). The abnormal areas resulted from intracortical air-filled cavities. Fractures similar to those of trichorrhexis nodosa were found in the opaque areas of the distal parts of the hairs. 2. Scanning electron microscopy. A. Hair shaft surface. The abnormal areas showed a longitudinal, "curtain-like" folding of the cuticular cells which had punctiform depressions on their surface and worn free edges (fig. 4, 5, 6); trichorrhexis-type fractures were seen in the distal parts of the hair shafts (fig. 7, 8). Normal areas regularly presented with longitudinal, superficial, short and non-systematized depressions (fig. 9); the cuticular cells were worn, and there were places where the denuded cortex showed dissociated cortical fibres (fig. 10).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Fluorescence microscopy: A tool to study autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Shashank; Manjithaya, Ravi

    2015-08-01

    Autophagy is a cellular recycling process through which a cell degrades old and damaged cellular components such as organelles and proteins and the degradation products are reused to provide energy and building blocks. Dysfunctional autophagy is reported in several pathological situations. Hence, autophagy plays an important role in both cellular homeostasis and diseased conditions. Autophagy can be studied through various techniques including fluorescence based microscopy. With the advancements of newer technologies in fluorescence microscopy, several novel processes of autophagy have been discovered which makes it an essential tool for autophagy research. Moreover, ability to tag fluorescent proteins with sub cellular targets has enabled us to evaluate autophagy processes in real time under fluorescent microscope. In this article, we demonstrate different aspects of autophagy in two different model organisms i.e. yeast and mammalian cells, with the help of fluorescence microscopy.

  6. Changes in background aerosol composition in Finland during polluted and clean periods studied by TEM/EDX individual particle analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. V. Niemi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol samples were collected at a rural background site in southern Finland in May 2004 during pollution episode (PM1~16 µg m−3, backward air mass trajectories from south-east, intermediate period (PM1~5 µg m−3, backtrajectories from north-east and clean period (PM1~2 µg m−3, backtrajectories from north-west/north. The elemental composition, morphology and mixing state of individual aerosol particles in three size fractions were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM coupled with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX microanalyses. The TEM/EDX results were complemented with the size-segregated bulk chemical measurements of selected ions and organic and elemental carbon. Many of the particles in PM0.2–1 and PM1–3.3 size fractions were strongly internally mixed with S, C and/or N. The major particle types in PM0.2–1 samples were 1 soot and 2 (ammoniumsulphates and their mixtures with variable amounts of C, K, soot and/or other inclusions. Number proportions of those two particle groups in PM0.2–1 samples were 0–12% and 83–97%, respectively. During the pollution episode, the proportion of Ca-rich particles was very high (26–48% in the PM1–3.3 and PM3.3–11 samples, while the PM0.2–1 and PM1–3.3 samples contained elevated proportions of silicates (22–33%, metal oxides/hydroxides (1–9% and tar balls (1–4%. These aerosols originated mainly from polluted areas of Eastern Europe, and some open biomass burning smoke was also brought by long-range transport. During the clean period, when air masses arrived from the Arctic Ocean, PM1–3.3 samples contained mainly sea salt particles (67–89% with a variable rate of Cl substitution (mainly by NO3−. During the intermediate period, the PM1–3.3 sample contained porous (sponge-like Na-rich particles (35% with abundant S, K and O. They might originate from the burning of wood pulp wastes of paper industry. The proportion of biological particles and C-rich fragments

  7. Formation and manipulation of regular metallic nanoparticle arrays on bacterial surface layers: an advanced TEM study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertig, M.; Wahl, R.; Lehmann, M.; Simon, P.; Pompe, W.

    The template-directed formation of regular nanoparticle arrays on two-dimensional crystalline protein layers after their treatment with metal salt complexes was studied by transmission electron microscopy. For these investigations, bacterial surface layers (S layers), recrystallized in vitro into sheets and tube-shaped protein crystals with typical dimensions in the micrometer range, were used as the template. As identified by electron holography and scanning force microscopy, the S-layer tubes form alternating double layers when deposited onto a solid substrate surface. Two distinct pathways for the metal particle formation at the templates have been found: the site-specific growth of metal clusters by chemical reduction of the metal salt complexes, and the electron-beam induced growth of nanoparticles in the transmission electron microscope. Both mechanisms lead to regular arrays with particle densities > 6×1011cm-2. Nanoparticle formation by electron exposure takes exclusively place in the flat-lying double-layered protein tubes, where a sufficient amount of metal complexes can be accumulated during sample preparation.

  8. TEM-EDS study of metals' partition at particle level after their sorption in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipos, Peter; Kovács Kis, Viktória; Németh, Tibor; Balázs, Réka

    2016-04-01

    Association of soil mineral particles could significantly modify the sorption capacity of the individual soil components. We studied this phenomena using single element and competitive batch Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn sorption experiments on six soil samples with contrasting characteristics. Their sorption properties were characterized by XRD and FTIRS analyses, as well as sorption curve evaluation. TEM-EDS analyses were used to characterize the soil mineral particle associations and their metal sorption capacities. Submicron sized smectite particles were found to be associated to tiny ferryhidrite and goethite patches in the acidic forest soil samples, whereas the alkaline meadow soils could be characterized by goethite and smectite particles attached to large carbonate grains. Point chemical analyses carried out on such associations showed that significant metal separation may occur at particle level within the mineral associations observed. This is primarily obvious for Cu and Pb, which are preferentially sorbed by iron oxides over clay mineral particles. This phenomenon is more pronounced in competitive situation. Highest affinity to clay minerals was found for Zn and it may be also characteristic for Cd in acid conditions. However, decrease in available sorption sites and increase in pH may result in enhanced precipitation for the studied metals. Our results suggest that estimation of the role of soil components in metals' sorption can not be adequate enough when the sorption properties of a set of bulk soils are studied exclusively. Direct observation of metals' partition at particle level may result in a deeper insight into soil-metal interaction. This study was financially supported by the Hungarian Scientific Research Fund (OTKA K105009).

  9. Chemical and structural analysis of the bone-implant interface by TOF-SIMS, SEM, FIB and TEM: Experimental study in animal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmquist, Anders; Emanuelsson, Lena; Sjövall, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Although bone-anchored implants are widely used in reconstructive medicine, the mechanism of osseointegration is still not fully understood. Novel analytical tools are needed to further understand this process, where both the chemical and structural aspects of the bone-implant interface are important. The aim of this study was to evaluate the advantages of combining time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS) with optical (LM), scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques for studying the bone-implant interface of bone-anchored implants. Laser-modified titanium implants with surrounded bone retrieved after 8 weeks healing in rabbit were dehydrated and resin embedded. Three types of sample preparation were studied to evaluate the information gained by combining TOF-SIMS, SEM, FIB and TEM. The results show that imaging TOF-SIMS can provide detailed chemical information, which in combination with structural information from microscopy methods provide a more complete characterization of anatomical structures at the bone-implant interface. By investigating various sample preparation techniques, it is shown that grinded cross section samples can be used for chemical imaging using TOF-SIMS, if careful consideration of potential preparation artifacts is taken into account. TOF-SIMS analysis of FIB-prepared bone/implant cross section samples show distinct areas corresponding to bone tissue and implant with a sharp interface, although without chemical information about the organic components.

  10. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy nanostructural study of shed microparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liron Issman

    Full Text Available Microparticles (MPs are sub-micron membrane vesicles (100-1000 nm shed from normal and pathologic cells due to stimulation or apoptosis. MPs can be found in the peripheral blood circulation of healthy individuals, whereas elevated concentrations are found in pregnancy and in a variety of diseases. Also, MPs participate in physiological processes, e.g., coagulation, inflammation, and angiogenesis. Since their clinical properties are important, we have developed a new methodology based on nano-imaging that provides significant new data on MPs nanostructure, their composition and function. We are among the first to characterize by direct-imaging cryogenic transmitting electron microscopy (cryo-TEM the near-to-native nanostructure of MP systems isolated from different cell types and stimulation procedures. We found that there are no major differences between the MP systems we have studied, as most particles were spherical, with diameters from 200 to 400 nm. However, each MP population is very heterogeneous, showing diverse morphologies. We investigated by cryo-TEM the effects of standard techniques used to isolate and store MPs, and found that either high-g centrifugation of MPs for isolation purposes, or slow freezing to -80 °C for storage introduce morphological artifacts, which can influence MP nanostructure, and thus affect the efficiency of these particles as future diagnostic tools.

  11. TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY STUDY OF HELIUM BEARING FUSION WELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosten, M; Michael Morgan, M

    2008-12-12

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study was conducted to characterize the helium bubble distributions in tritium-charged-and-aged 304L and 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn stainless steel fusion welds containing approximately 150 appm helium-3. TEM foils were prepared from C-shaped fracture toughness test specimens containing {delta} ferrite levels ranging from 4 to 33 volume percent. The weld microstructures in the low ferrite welds consisted mostly of austenite and discontinuous, skeletal {delta} ferrite. In welds with higher levels of {delta} ferrite, the ferrite was more continuous and, in some areas of the 33 volume percent sample, was the matrix/majority phase. The helium bubble microstructures observed were similar in all samples. Bubbles were found in the austenite but not in the {delta} ferrite. In the austenite, bubbles had nucleated homogeneously in the grain interiors and heterogeneously on dislocations. Bubbles were not found on any austenite/austenite grain boundaries or at the austenite/{delta} ferrite interphase interfaces. Bubbles were not observed in the {delta} ferrite because of the combined effects of the low solubility and rapid diffusion of tritium through the {delta} ferrite which limited the amount of helium present to form visible bubbles.

  12. MICROORGANISMS FOUND IN SECONDARY CATARACT MATERIAL OF ECCE PATIENTS, A STUDY WITH SEM AND TEM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KALICHARAN, D; JONGEBLOED, WL; LOS, LI; WORST, JGF

    1993-01-01

    Globular secondary cataract material, removed from 24 patients with ECCE after ophthalmic cleaning of the anterior capsule, were investigated with SEM and TEM. Besides spherical, somewhat oval shaped bodies of various shape and size comparable with those found in cataractous lenses, (an)aerobic

  13. Low-pressure Environmental TEM (ETEM) studies of Au assisted MgO nanorod growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duchstein, Linus Daniel Leonhard; Damsgaard, Christian Danvad; Hansen, Thomas Willum;

    2012-01-01

    where they become inactive for CO oxidation. Here, we present an environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) study of shape changes of Au nanoparticles supported on MgO in a controlled gas atmosphere, in order to elucidate the mobility of surface species and the configuration of the Au....../MgO interface. The particles are synthesized by depositing a thin layer of Au onto MgO smoke particles. The Au agglomerates into particles that are a few nanometers in size, providing a model system for the investigation of nanoparticle surface and interface properties. Ajayan et al. [4], Kizuka [5......] and Nasibulin et al. [6] reported growth of nanorods on MgO smoke particles driven by the electron beam in high vacuum. However, the growth is strongly dependent on the gaseous environment. Here we investigate the relation between the surrounding environment and MgO nanorod growth. The electron beam induced...

  14. TEM study of layered defects in high J_c MTG-YBCO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王葛亚; 施天生; 傅耀先; 蔡传兵; 杨宏川

    1995-01-01

    The microstructure and defects in melt-textured growth (MTG) YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) bulk material have been studied systematically using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HREM), and the relationship between the anisotropic critical current density Jc and the microstructure has been explored. The results indicate that there are numerous dense and nonunifonnly-distributed intergrowth-type layered defects orienting parallel to the ab plane in MTG-YBCO. These defects may serve as effective flux pinning centres for H//ab. The layered defects parallel to the ab plane together with the {110} twin boundaries are probably responsible for the anisotiopic behaviour of Jc depending upon the orientation of the external magnetic field.

  15. Extensive FE-SEM/EDS, HR-TEM/EDS and ToF-SIMS studies of micron- to nano-particles in anthracite fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Joana [Centro de Geologia, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); DaBoit, Kátia [Institute of Environmental Research and Human Development, IPADHC, Capivari de Baixo, Santa Catarina (Brazil); Flores, Deolinda [Centro de Geologia, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Departamento de Geociências, Ambiente e Ordenamento do Território, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Kronbauer, Marcio A. [Laboratory of Environmental Researches and Nanotechnology Development, Centro Universitário La Salle, Victor Barreto, 2288 Centro 92010-000, Canoas, RS (Brazil); Silva, Luis F.O., E-mail: felipeqma@hotmail.com [Laboratory of Environmental Researches and Nanotechnology Development, Centro Universitário La Salle, Victor Barreto, 2288 Centro 92010-000, Canoas, RS (Brazil); Environmental Science and Nanotechnology Department, Catarinense Institute of Environmental Research and Human Development, IPADHC, Capivari de Baixo, Santa Catarina (Brazil)

    2013-05-01

    The generation of anthropogenic carbonaceous matter and mixed crystalline/amorphous mineral ultrafine/nano-particles in the 1 to 100 nm size range by worldwide coal power plants represents serious environmental problems due to their potential hazards. Coal fly ash (CFA) that resulted from anthracite combustion in a Portuguese thermal power plant was studied in this work. The physico-chemical characterization of ultrafine/nano-particles present in the CFA samples and their interaction with environment are the aim of this study. The methodologies applied for this work were field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (HR-TEM/EDS) and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Some hazardous volatile elements, C, N, S and Hg contents were also determined in the studied samples. Generally, the CFA samples comprise carbonaceous, glassy and metallic solid spheres with some containing mixed amorphous/crystalline phases. The EDS analysis coupled with the FE-SEM and HR-TEM observations of the fly ash particles with 100 to 0.1 nm demonstrates that these materials contain a small but significant proportion of encapsulated HVEs. In addition, the presence of abundant multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and amorphous carbon particles, both containing hazardous volatile elements (HVEs), was also evidenced by the FE-SEM/EDS and HR-TEM/EDS analysis. A wide range of organic and inorganic compounds was determined by chemical maps obtained in ToF-SIMS analysis. - Highlights: ► We examine changes in the level of ultrafine and nanoparticles of coal mining. ► Increasing geochemical information will increase human health information in this area. ► Electron bean and Tof-SIMS increase area information.

  16. In situ TEM and STEM studies of reversible electromigration in thin palladium–platinum bridges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kozlova, T.; Rudneva, M.; Zandbergen, H.W.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the reversible electromigration in Pd–Pt nanobridges by means of in situ electron microscopy. Real-time nanometer-scale imaging with scanning transmission electron microscopy was used to determine the material transport. For high current densities (3–5 × 107 A cm−2), material

  17. Fault detection by Turam TEM survey. Numerical model studies and a case history; TEM ho Turam sokutei haichi ni yoru danso kenshutsu no kokoromi. Model keisan to jisshirei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, K.; Tsutsui, T. [Mitsui Mineral Development Engineering Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Ito, T. [Chiba Univ., Chiba (Japan). Faculty of Science; Takeuchi, A. [Toyama University, Toyama (Japan). Faculty of Science; He, P. [Power Reactor and Nuclear fuel Development Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    With an objective to detect faults estimated to exist along the Shigesumi valley in the Kamioka mine, discussions were given by using electromagnetic survey, which uses the Turam measurement arrangement based on the TEM method, and three-dimensional model calculations. The Turam measurement arrangement, which installs transmission loop fixedly, is used to identify nature and distribution of electrically conductive objects upon noticing abnormal portions in magnetic fields in the measurement data. In the model calculation, the plate model calculation method and the FDTD method were used, and so was the calculation code TEM3DL. The result revealed that strong topographical influence is seen from steep V-shaped valley existing along the traverse line in the measurement data, but an abnormal resistivity band accompanying remarkable distortion in the curve was detected. According to the result of the model calculation, anomaly detection may be found difficult in locations where a low resistivity band has not grown enough locally. It was possible from these facts to assume a model in which the low resistivity band exists directly below the Shigesumi valley, suggesting existence of faults. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Stability of Porous Platinum Nanoparticles: Combined In Situ TEM and Theoretical Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Shery L. Y.; Barnard, Amanda S.; Dwyer, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Porous platinum nanoparticles provide a route for the development of catalysts that use less platinum without sacrificing catalytic performance. Here, we examine porous platinum nanoparticles using a combination of in situ transmission electron microscopy and calculations based on a first...

  19. In Situ TEM Nanoindentation Studies on Stress-Induced Phase Transformations in Metallic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2016-01-01

    Although abundant phase transformations are in general thermally driven processes, there are many examples wherein stresses can induce phase transformations. Numerous in situ techniques, such as in situ x-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction, have been applied to reveal phase transformations. Recently, an in situ nanoindentation technique coupled with transmission electron microscopy demonstrated the capability to directly correlating stresses with phase transformations and microstructural evolutions at a submicron length scale. Here we briefly review in situ studies on stress-induced diffusional and diffusionless phase transformations in amorphous CuZrAl alloy and NiFeGa shape memory alloy. In the amorphous CuZrAl, in situ nanoindentation studies show that the nucleation of nanocrystals (a diffusional process) occurs at ultra-low stresses manifested by a prominent stress drop. In the NiFeGa shape memory alloy, two distinctive types of martensitic (diffusionless) phase transformations accompanied by stress plateaus are observed, including a reversible gradual phase transformation at low stress levels, and an irreversible abrupt phase transition at higher stress levels.

  20. Comparative microscopy study of Vibrio cholerae flagella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konnov, Nikolai P.; Baiburin, Vil B.; Zadnova, Svetlana P.; Volkov, Uryi P.

    1999-06-01

    A fine structure of bacteria flagella is an important problem of molecular cell biology. Bacteria flagella are the self-assembled structures that allow to use the flagellum protein in a number of biotechnological applications. However, at present, there is a little information about high resolution scanning probe microscopy study of flagellum structure, in particular, about investigation of Vibrio cholerae flagella. In our lab have been carried out the high resolution comparative investigation of V. cholerae flagella by means of various microscopes: tunneling (STM), scanning force (SFM) and electron transmission. As a scanning probe microscope is used designed in our lab versatile SPM with replaceable measuring heads. Bacteria were grown, fixed and treated according to the conventional techniques. For STM investigations samples were covered with Pt/Ir thin films by rotated vacuum evaporation, in SFM investigations were used uncovered samples. Electron microscopy of the negatively stained bacteria was used as a test procedure.

  1. Swelling induced by alpha decay in monazite and zirconolite ceramics: A XRD and TEM comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deschanels, X., E-mail: xavier.deschanels@cea.fr [ICSM, UMR 5257, BP 17171, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Seydoux-Guillaume, A.M., E-mail: anne-magali.seydoux@get.obs-mip.fr [GET, UMR 5563CNRS, UPS, IRD, OMP-14 Avenue Édouard Belin, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Magnin, V. [ISTerre, UMR 5275, BP53, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Mesbah, A. [ICSM, UMR 5257, BP 17171, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Tribet, M. [CEA/DTCD/LMPA Centre de Marcoule, BP 17171, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Moloney, M.P. [ICSM, UMR 5257, BP 17171, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Serruys, Y. [CEA, SRMP, DEN, Lab JANNUS, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Peuget, S. [CEA/DTCD/LMPA Centre de Marcoule, BP 17171, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France)

    2014-05-01

    Zirconolite and monazite matrices are potential ceramics for the containment of actinides (Np, Cm, Am, Pu) which are produced over the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. Actinides decay mainly through the emission of alpha particles, which in turn causes most ceramics to undergo structural and textural changes (amorphization and/or swelling). In order to study the effects of alpha decays on the above mentioned ceramics two parallel approaches were set up. The first involved the use of an external irradiation source, Au, which allowed the deposited recoil energy to be simulated. The second was based on short-lived actinide doping with {sup 238}Pu, (i.e. an internal source), via the incorporation of plutonium oxide into both the monazite and zirconolite structures during synthesis. In both types of irradiation experiments, the zirconolite samples became amorphous at room temperature with damage close to 0.3 dpa; corresponding to a critical dose of 4 × 10{sup 18} α g{sup −1} (i.e. ∼1.3 × 10{sup 21} keV cm{sup −3}). Both zirconolite samples also showed the same degree of macroscopic swelling at saturation (∼6%), with ballistic processes being the predominant damaging effect. In the case of the monazite however, the macroscopic swelling and amorphization were dependent on the nature of the irradiation. Externally, (Au), irradiated samples became amorphous while also demonstrating a saturation swelling of up to 8%. In contrast to this, the swelling of the {sup 238}Pu doped samples was much smaller at ∼1%. Also, unlike the externally (Au) irradiated monazite these {sup 238}Pu doped samples remained crystalline up to 7.5 × 10{sup 18} α g{sup −1} (0.8 dpa). XRD, TEM and swelling measurements were used to fully characterize and interpret this behavior. The low swelling and the conservation of the crystalline state of {sup 238}Pu doped monazite samples indicates that alpha annealing took place within this material.

  2. In situ TEM study of microplasticity and Bauschinger effect in nanocrystalline metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopalan, Jagannathan [Mechanical Science and Engineering Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Rentenberger, Christian; Peter Karnthaler, H. [Physics of Nanostructured Materials, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Dehm, Gerhard [Erich Schmid Institute of Materials Science, Austrian Academy of Sciences, and Dept. Materials Physics, University of Leoben, Jahnstr.12, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Saif, M. Taher A., E-mail: saif@illinois.edu [Mechanical Science and Engineering Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2010-08-15

    In situ transmission electron microscopy straining experiments with concurrent macroscopic stress-strain measurements were performed to study the effect of microstructural heterogeneity on the deformation behavior of nanocrystalline metal films. In microstructurally heterogeneous gold films (mean grain size d{sub m} = 70 nm) comprising randomly oriented grains, dislocation activity is confined to relatively larger grains, with smaller grains deforming elastically, even at applied strains approaching 1.2%. This extended microplasticity leads to build-up of internal stresses, inducing a large Bauschinger effect during unloading. Microstructurally heterogeneous aluminum films (d{sub m} = 140 nm) also show similar behavior. In contrast, microstructurally homogeneous aluminum films comprising mainly two grain families, both favorably oriented for dislocation glide, show limited microplastic deformation and minimal Bauschinger effect despite having a comparable mean grain size (d{sub m} = 120 nm). A simple model is proposed to describe these observations. Overall, our results emphasize the need to consider both microstructural size and heterogeneity in modeling the mechanical behavior of nanocrystalline metals.

  3. Microorganisms found in secondary cataract material of ECCE patients, a study with SEM and TEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalicharan, D; Jongebloed, W L; Los, L I; Worst, J G

    1993-01-01

    Globular secondary cataract material, removed from 24 patients with ECCE after ophthalmic cleaning of the anterior capsule, were investigated with SEM and TEM. Besides spherical, somewhat oval shaped bodies of various shape and size comparable with those found in cataractous lenses, (an)aerobic bacteria and yeast cells were found in approximately 70% of the cases, all of them in eyes without intra-ocular inflammation. Probably these bacteria have been transferred from the conjunctiva during IOL.-implantation and were encapsulated without starting an inflammation.

  4. Thermophysical ESEM and TEM Characterization of Carbon Fibers CTE, Spectroscopy and Roughness Studies at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Ozden O.

    2004-01-01

    Accurate determination of the transverse properties of carbon fibers is important for assessment and prediction of local material as well as global structural response of composite components. However the measurements are extremely difficult due to the very small diameters of the fibers (few microns only) and must be conducted within a microscope. In this work, environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) are used to determine the transverse coefficient of thermal expansion of different carbon fibers as a function of temperature.

  5. In situ TEM and STEM studies of reversible electromigration in thin palladium-platinum bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlova, Tatiana; Rudneva, Maria; Zandbergen, Henny W.

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the reversible electromigration in Pd-Pt nanobridges by means of in situ electron microscopy. Real-time nanometer-scale imaging with scanning transmission electron microscopy was used to determine the material transport. For high current densities (3-5 × 107 A cm-2), material transport occurs from the cathode towards the anode side, indicating a negative effective charge. The electromigration is dominated by atom diffusion at grain boundaries on the free surface. The reversal of material transport upon a change of the electric field direction could be the basis of a memristor.

  6. Characterization of microbially Fe(III)-reduced nontronite: Environmental cell-transmission electron microscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.-W.; Furukawa, Y.; Daulton, T.L.; Lavoie, D.; Newell, S.W.

    2003-01-01

    Microstructural changes induced by the microbial reduction of Fe(III) in nontronite by Shewanella oneidensis were studied using environmental cell (EC)-transmission electron microscopy (TEM), conventional TEM, and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). Direct observations of clays by EC-TEM in their hydrated state allowed for the first time an accurate and unambiguous TEM measurement of basal layer spacings and the contraction of layer spacing caused by microbial effects, most likely those of Fe(III) reduction. Non-reduced and Fe(III)-reduced nontronite, observed by EC-TEM, exhibited fringes with mean d001 spacings of 1.50 nm (standard deviation, ?? = 0.08 nm) and 1.26 nm (?? = 0.10 nm), respectively. In comparison, the same samples embedded with Nanoplast resin, sectioned by microtome, and observed using conventional TEM, displayed layer spacings of 1.0-1.1 nm (non-reduced) and 1.0 nm (reduced). The results from Nanoplast-embedded samples are typical of conventional TEM studies, which have measured nearly identical layer spacings regardless of Fe oxidation state. Following Fe(III) reduction, both EC- and conventional TEM showed an increase in the order of nontronite selected area electron diffraction patterns while the images exhibited fewer wavy fringes and fewer layer terminations. An increase in stacking order in reduced nontronite was also suggested by XRD measurements. In particular, the ratio of the valley to peak intensity (v/p) of the 1.7 nm basal 001 peak of ethylene glycolated nontronite was measured at 0.65 (non-reduced) and 0.85 (microbially reduced).

  7. On the Nature of Tintinnid Loricae (Ciliophora: Spirotricha: Tintinnina): a Histochemical, Enzymatic, EDX, and High-resolution TEM Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agatha, Sabine; Simon, Paul

    2012-06-01

    Tintinnids (Ciliophora: Spirotricha: Tintinnina) are occasionally the dominant ciliates in the marine plankton. The tintinnid loricae are minute artworks fascinating scientists for more than 230 years, but their chemical composition remained unclear, viz., chitinous or proteinaceous substances were discussed. Since sedimenting loricae contribute to the flux of elements and organic compounds in the oceans, knowledge about their nature is necessary in assessing their ecological role. Previous techniques and new methods, e.g. enzymatic digestion and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, are applied in the present study. A chitinous nature of the loricae is rejected by the Van-Wisselingh test and failure of chitinase digestion. Only proteins might show a resistance against strong hot bases (KOH at 160°C for ~ 40 min. in tintinnid loricae) similar to that of chitin. Actually, the presence of nitrogen in the EDX analyses and the digestion of at least some loricae by proteinase K strongly indicate a proteinaceous nature. Furthermore, the crystal lattice revealed by high-resolution TEM in Eutintinnus loricae is similar to the proteinaceous surface layer (S-layer) of archaea, and the striation recognizable in transverse sections of Eutintinnus loricae has a periodicity resembling that of the crystalline proteins in the extruded trichocysts of Paramecium and Frontonia. The proteolytic resistance of some loricae does not reject the idea of a proteinaceous nature, as proteins in S-layers of some archaea and in most naturally occurring prions show comparable reactions. The data from the present study and the literature indicate proteins in the loricae of thirteen genera. Differences in the proteolytic resistance and staining properties between genera and congeners are probably due to deviations in the protein composition and the additional substances, e.g. lipids, carbohydrates. At the present state of knowledge, correlations between lorica structure, wall texture

  8. A study on the microstructure of Pt/TaN/Si films by high resolution TEM analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, K N; Oh, J E; Park, C S; Lee, S I; Lee, M Y

    1998-01-01

    The microstructure change of Pt/amorphous TaN/Si films after various heat treatments has been investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) analysis. TaN thin films are deposited by remote plasma metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (RP-MOCVD) using pentakis-dimethyl-amino-tantalum (PDMATa) and radical sources, hydrogen and ammonia plasma. Deposited TaN thin film shows excellent barrier properties such as good resistance against oxidation after post-heat treatment at high temperature. In the case of hydrogen plasma, however, diffusion of Pt into TaN layer was observed, which was caused by the out-diffusion of carbon through the grain boundaries of Pt. In the case of ammonia plasma, the formation of thin oxide layer at the Pt/TaN interface was observed.

  9. The outcome of rectal cancer after early salvage TME following TEM compared with primary TME: a case-matched study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levic, K; Bulut, O; Hesselfeldt, P; Bülow, S

    2013-08-01

    Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) allows locally complete resection of early rectal cancer as an alternative to conventional radical surgery. In case of unfavourable histology after TEM, or positive resection margins, salvage surgery can be performed. However, it is unclear if the results are equivalent to primary treatment with total mesorectal excision (TME). The aim of this retrospective study was to determine whether there is a difference in outcome between patients who underwent early salvage resection with TME after TEM, and those who underwent primary TME for rectal cancer. From 1997 to 2011, early salvage surgery with TME after TEM was performed in 25 patients in our institution. These patients were compared with 25 patients who underwent primary TME, matched according to gender, age (±2 years), cancer stage and operative procedure. Data were obtained from the patients' charts and reviewed retrospectively. No patients received preoperative chemotherapy. Perioperative data and oncological outcome were analysed. The Mann-Whitney U-test and Fisher's exact test were used to compare the results between the two groups. There was no significant difference between the two groups in median operating time (P = 0.39), median blood loss (P = 0.19) or intraoperative complications (P = 1.00). The 30-day mortality was 8 % (n = 2) among patients who underwent salvage TME after TEM, and no patients died in the primary TME group (P = 0.49). There was no significant difference between two groups of patients in the median number of harvested lymph nodes (P = 0.34), median circumferential resection margin (CRM) (P = 0.99) or the completeness of the mesorectal fascia plane. No local recurrences occurred among the patients with salvage TME, and there were 2 patients (8 %) with local recurrences among the patients with primary TME (P = 0.49). Distant metastasis occurred in one patient (4 %) after salvage TME and in 3 patients (12 %) with primary TME (P = 0.61). The median

  10. Dynamic study of carbon nanotube growth and catalyst morphology evolution during acetylene decomposition on Co/SBA-15 in an environmental TEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    s Aires, F. J. Cadete Santo; Epicier, T.; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2012-01-01

    In situ studies of micro- and nano-objects in their characteristic environment have been performed ever since the early days of electron microscopy [1]. Over several decades the in situ observation of the synthesis of filamentous carbon (nanotubes/nanofilaments) during hydrocarbon decomposition has...... been one of the most popular topics [2] for investigation in the environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM). In this work we study the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by the decomposition of acetylene on Co nanoparticles inserted into mesoporous silicas (SBA-15) using both conventional...... post mortem TEM measurements and real-time in situ ETEM observations. In situ observation of the formation of the carbon nanotubes was performed in an FEI Titan 80-300 ETEM equipped with an objective lens spherical aberration corrector [3]. Prior to acetylene decomposition, the catalyst nanoparticles...

  11. Effect of He implantation on the microstructure of zircaloy-4 studied using in situ TEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunes, M. A.; Harrison, R. W.; Greaves, G.; Hinks, J. A.; Donnelly, S. E.

    2017-09-01

    Zirconium alloys are of great importance to the nuclear industry as they have been widely used as cladding materials in light-water reactors since the 1960s. This work examines the behaviour of these alloys under He ion implantation for the purposes of developing understanding of the fundamental processes behind their response to irradiation. Characterization of zircaloy-4 samples using TEM with in situ 6 keV He irradiation up to a fluence of 2.7 ×1017ions ·cm-2 in the temperature range of 298 to 1148 K has been performed. Ordered arrays of He bubbles were observed at 473 and 1148 K at a fluence of 1.7 ×1017ions ·cm-2 in αZr, the hexagonal compact (HCP) and in βZr, the body centred cubic (BCC) phases, respectively. In addition, the dissolution behaviour of cubic Zr hydrides under He irradiation has been investigated.

  12. TEM and HREM study on the fine structure and the interfacial structure of bainite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李凤照; 敖青; 顾英妮; 姜江; 孙东升; 戴吉岩; 彭红樱

    1996-01-01

    The fine structure of bainite,the morphology and distribution of carbide in steels and the morphology of bainite in Cu-Zn-Al alloys have been investigated with TEM.The interfacial structure ledges and interfacial crystal lattice images of Cu-Zn-Al alloys have also been investigated with HREM.The addition of alloying microelements can fine the structure of bainitic ferrite markedly.The bainitic ferrite is composed of subunits or subchunks.The carbides differ in morphologies and are distributed in between laths,inside the plates and on the boundaries of subunits.There are abundant fine structures in bainitic ferrite.In the primary bainite of Cu-Zn-Al alloy there are interfacial structure ledges,the height of which is about 3 -40 nm,equal to 15-200 atomic layers.The phase transformation mechanism of bainite is discussed.

  13. Studying the Kinetics of Crystalline Silicon Nanoparticle Lithiation with In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    McDowell, Matthew T.

    2012-09-04

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used to study the electrochemical lithiation of high-capacity crystalline Si nanoparticles for use in Li-ion battery anodes. The lithiation reaction slows down as it progresses into the particle interior, and analysis suggests that this behavior is due not to diffusion limitation but instead to the influence of mechanical stress on the driving force for reaction. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Detection of mucus glycoconjugates in human conjunctiva by using the lectin-colloidal gold technique in TEM. II. A quantitative study in dry-eye patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versura, P; Maltarello, M C; Cellini, M; Caramazza, R; Laschi, R

    1986-08-01

    The mucus glycoconjugates produced by conjunctival goblet cells in dry-eye patients were studied by a specific cytochemical reaction in Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Four lectins, proteins of vegetal origin which specifically bind glycosidic residues, (WGA, PNA, SBA and ConA) were used conjugated with colloidal gold as ultrastructural marker. We performed a quantitative analysis by counting the colloidal gold particles present on mucus granules. The results were compared with normal conditions. We found a decrease in sialic acid, N-acetyl-glucosamine, N-acetyl-galactosamine and galactose-N-acetyl-galactosamine and an increase in mannose. The different content of glycoconjugates in goblet cells may reflect in the change of physical and functional properties of mucus. We think these data may be useful in the search for a therapeutic mucomimetic drug.

  15. TEM, HRTEM, electron holography and electron tomography studies of gamma' and gamma'' nanoparticles in Inconel 718 superalloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubiel, B; Kruk, A; Stepniowska, E; Cempura, G; Geiger, D; Formanek, P; Hernandez, J; Midgley, P; Czyrska-Filemonowicz, A

    2009-11-01

    The aim of the study was the identification of gamma' and gamma'' strengthening precipitates in a commercial nickel-base superalloy Inconel 718 (Ni-19Fe-18Cr-5Nb-3Mo-1Ti-0.5Al-0.04C, wt %) using TEM dark-field, HRTEM, electron holography and electron tomography imaging. To identify gamma' and gamma'' nanoparticles unambiguously, a systematic analysis of experimental and theoretical diffraction patterns were performed. Using HRTEM method it was possible to analyse small areas of precipitates appearance. Electron holography and electron tomography techniques show new possibilities of visualization of gamma' and gamma'' nanoparticles. The analysis by means of different complementary TEM methods showed that gamma'' particles exhibit a shape of thin plates, while gamma' phase precipitates are almost spherical.

  16. XRD and TEM study of bainitic ferrite plate thickness in nanostructured, carbide free bainitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoozbashi, M.N., E-mail: n_yoozbashi@sut.ac.ir [University of Applied Science and Technology, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yazdani, S., E-mail: yazdani@sut.ac.ir [Faculty of Materials Engineering, Sahand University of Technology, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    It is well documented that much of the strength and hardness of nanostructured, carbide free bainitic steels come from the very small thickness of bainitic ferrite plates. In the current work, the Williamson–Hall method has been used to determine the bainitic ferrite plate thickness. The fitting of X-ray peaks to various functions showed good coefficient of determination values for Gaussian function compared to the Cauchy and Pseudo-Voigt functions. The thickness of bainitic ferrite plates was measured by distinguishing the contribution of very small plates on peak broadening from the lattice microstrain and instrumental effects. The results showed that by decreasing the transformation temperature the bainitic ferrite plate thickness decreases. The determined thicknesses were compared with that of measured from transmission electron microscope micrographs. There is a good qualitative and quantitative agreement between the thicknesses measured using both methods. - Highlights: • A Williamson–Hall technique is proposed for bainitic ferrite thickness measurement. • The technique relies on full width at half maximum of XRD peaks. • The measured sizes were compared with that of determined from TEM micrographs. • There is a good qualitative and quantitative agreement between both methods. • Austenite strength and nucleation driving force lead to microstructural refinement.

  17. A FIB/TEM study of butterfly crack formation and white etching area (WEA) microstructural changes under rolling contact fatigue in 100Cr6 bearing steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, M.-H., E-mail: martin.evans@soton.ac.uk [National Centre for Advanced Tribology at Southampton (nCATS), University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Walker, J.C.; Ma, C.; Wang, L.; Wood, R.J.K. [National Centre for Advanced Tribology at Southampton (nCATS), University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-15

    Butterflies are microscopic damage features forming at subsurface material imperfections induced during rolling contact fatigue (RCF) in rolling element bearings. Butterflies can lead to degradation of the load bearing capacity of the material by their associated cracks causing premature spalling failures. Recently, butterfly formation has been cited to be related to a premature failure mode in wind turbine gearbox bearings; white structure flaking (WSF). Butterflies consist of cracks with surrounding microstructural change called ‘white etching area’ (WEA) forming wings that revolve around their initiators. The formation mechanisms of butterflies in bearing steels have been studied over the last 50 years, but are still not fully understood. This paper presents a detailed microstructural analysis of a butterfly that has initiated from a void in standard 100Cr6 bearing steel under rolling contact fatigue on a laboratory two-roller test rig under transient operating conditions. Analysis was conducted using focused ion beam (FIB) tomography, 3D reconstruction and transmission electron microscopy (STEM/TEM) methods. FIB tomography revealed an extensive presence of voids/cavities immediately adjacent to the main crack on the non-WEA side and at the crack tip. This provides evidence for a void/cavity coalescence mechanism for the butterfly cracks formation. Spherical M{sub 3}C carbide deformation and dissolution as part of the microstructural change in WEA were observed in both FIB and STEM/TEM analyses, where TEM analyses also revealed the formation of superfine nano-grains (3–15 nm diameter) intersecting a dissolving spherical M{sub 3}C carbide. This is evidence of the early formation of nano-grains associated with the WEA formation mechanism.

  18. A study of the microstructure of CTAB/1-butanol/octane/ water system by PGSE-NMR and Cryo-TEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this work, the effect of octane concentration on the phase behavior of CTAB/water/1-butanol system was studied by using pulsed field gradient spin-echo NMR measurements and freeze fracture electron microscopy (Cryo- TEM and FFEM). When the octane concentration increases, the liquid crystalline phase is destabilized and a continuous single-phase microemulsion region from the water apex to the oil apex is formed. The conductivity behavior has a distinct percolative phenomenon, which indicates that the single-phase microemulsion is changed continuously from oil- in-water (o/w) structure via a bicontinuous structure to water-in-oil (w/o) structure. This result is consistent with those of the PGSE-NMR, Cryo-TEM, and FFEM. In the w/o region, the self-diffusion coefficient of water is relatively high ((1-6)×10-10 m·s-1) due to the higher solubility of water in the continuous phase consisting of octane (10% by weight) and 1-butanol. The penetration of a large amount of octane molecules between surfactant chains results in the much lower self-diffusion coefficient of octane.

  19. Comparative study of helium effects on EU-ODS EUROFER and EUROFER97 by nanoindentation and TEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roldán, M., E-mail: marcelo.roldan@ciemat.es [National Fusion Laboratory – CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Fernández, P. [National Fusion Laboratory – CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Rams, J. [Departamento de Matemática Aplicada, Ciencia e Ingeniería de Materiales y Tecnología Electrónica, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/Tulipán s/n, Móstoles, Madrid 28933 (Spain); Jiménez-Rey, D. [Centre for Micro-Analysis of Materials (CMAM, UAM), C/Faraday 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Materna-Morris, E.; Klimenkov, M. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Advanced Materials (IAM-AWP), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz, 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • EU-ODS EUROFER has been studied before and after He implantation by nanoindentation. • Specimens implanted in stair-like profile from 15 to 2 MeV (750 to 350 appm He). • Exhaustive comparison of nanoindentation results with EUROFER97 is presented. • TEM on EUROFER97 and EU-ODSEUROFER to correlate microstructure with hardness results. - Abstract: Helium effects on EU-ODS EUROFER were studied by means of nanoindentation and TEM. The results were compared with those of EUROFER97. Both steels were implanted in a stair-like profile configuration using energies from 2 MeV (maximum He content ∼750 appm He) to 15 MeV (minimum He ∼350 appm He) at room temperature. The nanoindentation tests on He implanted samples showed a hardness increase that depended on the He concentration. The maximum hardness increase observed at 5 mN was 21% in EU-ODS EUROFER and 41% in EUROFER97; it corresponded with the zone with the highest He concentration which was around 750 appm, according to MARLOWE simulation. In addition, FIB lamellae were prepared from EUROFER97 and EU-ODS EUROFER containing the aforementioned zones with maximum (750 appm) and minimum (300 appm) He. TEM investigations carried out showed small and homogeneously distributed He nanobubbles on both alloys in the zone corresponding with maximum He content. These microstructural features seem to be the cause of the hardness increase measured by nanoindentation.

  20. Grain Nucleation and Growth in Deformed NiTi Shape Memory Alloys: An In Situ TEM Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burow, J.; Frenzel, J.; Somsen, C.; Prokofiev, E.; Valiev, R.; Eggeler, G.

    2017-09-01

    The present study investigates the evolution of nanocrystalline (NC) and ultrafine-grained (UFG) microstructures in plastically deformed NiTi. Two deformed NiTi alloys were subjected to in situ annealing in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) at 400 and 550 °C: an amorphous material state produced by high-pressure torsion (HPT) and a mostly martensitic partly amorphous alloy produced by wire drawing. In situ annealing experiments were performed to characterize the microstructural evolution from the initial nonequilibrium states toward energetically more favorable microstructures. In general, the formation and evolution of nanocrystalline microstructures are governed by the nucleation of new grains and their subsequent growth. Austenite nuclei which form in HPT and wire-drawn microstructures have sizes close to 10 nm. Grain coarsening occurs in a sporadic, nonuniform manner and depends on the physical and chemical features of the local environment. The mobility of grain boundaries in NiTi is governed by the local interaction of each grain with its microstructural environment. Nanograin growth in thin TEM foils seems to follow similar kinetic laws to those in bulk microstructures. The present study demonstrates the strength of in situ TEM analysis and also highlights aspects which need to be considered when interpreting the results.

  1. The primitive matrix components of the unique carbonaceous chondrite Acfer 094: a TEM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greshake, A

    1997-01-01

    The mineralogical and chemical characteristics of the fine-grained matrix (chondrite Acfer 094 have been investigated in detail by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM). Generally, the fine-grained matrix represents a highly unequilibrated assemblage of an amorphous material, small forsteritic olivines (200-300 nm), low Ca-pyroxenes (300-400 nm), and Fe,Ni-sulfides (100-300 nm). The matrix is basically unaffected by secondary processes. Only minor amounts of serpentine and ferrihydrite, as products of hydrous alteration, are present. Texturally, the amorphous material acts as a groundmass to olivines, pyroxenes, and sulfides, mostly exhibiting rounded or elongated morphologies. Only very few clastic mineral grains have been found. The texture and chemical composition of the amorphous material are consistent with an origin by disequilibrium condensation in either the cooling solar nebula or a circumstellar environment. As such, the amorphous material may be considered as a possible precursor of matrix materials in other types of chondrites. The non-clastic matrix olivines (Fo98-99) and pyroxenes (En97-100) are suggested to have formed either by condensation in the solar nebula under highly oxidizing conditions or by recrystallization from the amorphous material. The formation of these grains by fragmentation of chondrule components is unlikely due to chemical and microstructural reasons. Rapid cooling caused the observed intergrowths of clino/orthoenstatite in the Mg-rich matrix pyroxenes. Although some similarities exist comparing the fine-grained matrix of Acfer 094 with the matrices of the unequilibrated CO3 chondrite ALHA77307 and the unique type 3 chondrite Kakangari, Acfer 094 remains unique. Since it contains the highest measured concentrations of circumstellar SiC and the second highest of diamond (highest is Orgueil), it seems reasonable to suggested that at least parts of the amorphous material in the

  2. Transmission electron microscopy study of Listeria monocytogenes serotype 1/2a cells exposed to sublethal heat stress and carvacrol

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to investigate the morphological changes that occurred in Listeria monocytogenes serotype 1/2a cells as visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) after exposure to sublethal heat stress at 48°C for 60 min and in combination with lethal concentration of carv...

  3. Some Analyses Concerning Interpretation Quality Assessment Criteria——A Case Study of TEM8 Interpretation Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李瑞英

    2011-01-01

    This paper,through analyzing the current TEM8 interpretation test,concludes that the present TEM 8 interpretation test has various unsatisfactory points in its interpretation quality assessment criteria.Therefore,in light of the interpretation quality ass

  4. An electron microscopy appraisal of tensile fracture in metallic glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matthews, D. T. A.; Ocelik, V.; Bronsveld, P. M.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2008-01-01

    Three glass-forming alloy compositions were chosen for ribbon production and subsequent electron microscopy studies. In situ tensile testing with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), followed by ex situ TEM and ex situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM), allowed the deformation processes in tensi

  5. An electron microscopy appraisal of tensile fracture in metallic glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matthews, D. T. A.; Ocelik, V.; Bronsveld, P. M.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    Three glass-forming alloy compositions were chosen for ribbon production and subsequent electron microscopy studies. In situ tensile testing with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), followed by ex situ TEM and ex situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM), allowed the deformation processes in

  6. Xenon behavior in TiN: A coupled XAS/TEM study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bès, R.; Gaillard, C.; Millard-Pinard, N.; Gavarini, S.; Martin, P.; Cardinal, S.; Esnouf, C.; Malchère, A.; Perrat-Mabilon, A.

    2013-03-01

    Titanium nitride is a refractory material that is being considered as an inert matrix in future Generation IV nuclear reactors, in particular in relation to the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor. The main role of this matrix would be to act as a barrier against the release of fission products, in particular gaseous ones like xenon. This release phenomenon will be enhanced by high temperatures expected in the fuel vicinity: 1200 °C under normal conditions, and up to 1800 °C under accidental conditions. It is therefore necessary to investigate the behavior of volatile fission products in TiN under high temperature and irradiation. Indeed, these basic data are very useful to predict the volatile fission products released under these extreme conditions. Our previous work has shown that Xe introduced by ion implantation in sintered TiN tends to be released as a result of annealing, due to a transport mechanism towards the sample surface. The aim of the present work is to determine under which physical state Xe is in TiN. Xenon was first introduced using ion implantation at 800 keV in TiN samples obtained by hot pressing at several concentrations ranging from 0.4 to 8 at.%. Secondly, samples were annealed at high temperature, from 1000 °C to 1500 °C. Xe was then characterized by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The formation of intragranular xenon bubbles was demonstrated, and the xenon concentration which is sufficient to form bubbles is found to be lower than 0.4 at.% under our experimental conditions. These bubbles were found unpressurised at 15 K. Their size increases with the temperature and the local xenon concentration. For the highest xenon concentrations, a mechanism involving the formation of a Xe interconnected bubble network is proposed to explain Xe massive release observed by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry experiments.

  7. Implementing atomic force microscopy (AFM) for studying kinetics of gold nanoparticle's growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgiev, P.; Bojinova, A.; Kostova, B.

    2013-01-01

    In a novel experimental approach Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was applied as a tool for studying the kinetics of gold nanoparticle growth. The gold nanoparticles were obtained by classical Turkevich citrate synthesis at two different temperatures. From the analysis of AFM images during the synth......In a novel experimental approach Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was applied as a tool for studying the kinetics of gold nanoparticle growth. The gold nanoparticles were obtained by classical Turkevich citrate synthesis at two different temperatures. From the analysis of AFM images during...... approach. We also compared AFM experimental data with Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) and with Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) data. The experimental data from all the applied methods were fitted with two step Finke-Watzky kinetics model and the corresponding kinetics constants were obtained...

  8. FE-SEM, FIB and TEM Study of Surface Deposits of Apollo 15 Green Glass Volcanic Spherules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Daniel K.; Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Rahman, Z.; Wentworth, S. J.; McKay, D. S.

    2011-01-01

    Surface deposits on lunar pyroclastic green (Apollo 15) and orange (Apollo 17) glass spherules have been attributed to condensation from the gas clouds that accompanied fire-fountain eruptions. The fire fountains cast molten lava high above the lunar surface and the silicate melt droplets quenched before landing producing the glass beads. Early investigations showed that these deposits are rich in sulfur and zinc. The deposits are extremely fine-grained and thin, so that it was never possible to determine their chemical compositions cleanly by SEM/EDX or electron probe x-ray analysis because most of the excited volume was in the under-lying silicate glass. We are investigating the surface deposits by TEM, using focused ion beam (FIB) microscopy to extract and thin the surface deposits. Here we report on chemical mapping of a FIB section of surface deposits of an Apollo green glass bead 15401using the ultra-high resolution JEOL 2500 STEM located at NASA Johnson Space Center.

  9. Implementation of a Light Source in a TEM Sample Holder for In-situ Studies of Photocatalytic Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalca, Filippo; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    constructed a specimen holder capable of shining light onto samples inside the TEM. The holder contains a laser diode and an optical system that guides light onto a sample with maximum power transmission. The source can be changed and tuned, in principle spanning the whole visible and UV spectrum. The device...... metal nanoparticle photodeposition, light-driven particle discharging and photodegradation. We concentrate on phase transitions of Cu2O nanocubes under visible light exposure in the presence of water vapor, which we study in situ. Cu2O is an active photocatalyst for water splitting under visible light...

  10. In Situ TEM Electrical Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canepa, Silvia; Alam, Sardar Bilal; Ngo, Duc-The

    2016-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) offers high spatial and temporal resolution that provides unique information for understanding the function and properties of nanostructures on their characteristic length scales. Under controlled environmental conditions and with the ability to dynamically...... influence the sample by external stimuli, e.g. through electrical connections, the TEM becomes a powerful laboratory for performing quantitative real time in situ experiments. Such TEM setups enable the characterization of nanostructures and nanodevices under working conditions, thereby providing a deeper...... materials and devices with the specimen being contacted by electrical, mechanical or other means, with emphasis on in situ electrical measurements performed in a gaseous or liquid environment. We will describe the challenges and prospects of electrical characterization of devices and processes induced...

  11. Structural studies of glasses by transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashchieva, E.P. [University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this work is to present information about the applications of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron diffraction (ED) for structural investigations of glasses. TEM investigations have been carried out on some binary and on a large number of ternary borate-telluride systems where glass-forming oxides, oxides of transitional elements and modified oxides of elements from I, II and III groups in the periodic table, are used as third component. The large experimental data given by TEM method allows the fine classification of the micro-heterogeneities. A special case of micro-heterogeneous structure with technological origin occurs near the boundary between the 2 immiscible liquids obtained at macro-phase separation. TEM was also used for the direct observation of the glass structure and we have studied the nano-scale structure of borate glasses obtained at slow and fast cooling of the melts. The ED possesses advantages for analysis of amorphous thin films or micro-pastilles and it is a very useful technique for study in materials containing simultaneously light and heavy elements. A comparison between the possibilities of the 3 diffraction techniques (X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction and ED) is presented.

  12. TEM Video Compressive Sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Andrew J.; Kovarik, Libor; Abellan, Patricia; Yuan, Xin; Carin, Lawrence; Browning, Nigel D.

    2015-08-02

    One of the main limitations of imaging at high spatial and temporal resolution during in-situ TEM experiments is the frame rate of the camera being used to image the dynamic process. While the recent development of direct detectors has provided the hardware to achieve frame rates approaching 0.1ms, the cameras are expensive and must replace existing detectors. In this paper, we examine the use of coded aperture compressive sensing methods [1, 2, 3, 4] to increase the framerate of any camera with simple, low-cost hardware modifications. The coded aperture approach allows multiple sub-frames to be coded and integrated into a single camera frame during the acquisition process, and then extracted upon readout using statistical compressive sensing inversion. Our simulations show that it should be possible to increase the speed of any camera by at least an order of magnitude. Compressive Sensing (CS) combines sensing and compression in one operation, and thus provides an approach that could further improve the temporal resolution while correspondingly reducing the electron dose rate. Because the signal is measured in a compressive manner, fewer total measurements are required. When applied to TEM video capture, compressive imaging couled improve acquisition speed and reduce the electron dose rate. CS is a recent concept, and has come to the forefront due the seminal work of Candès [5]. Since the publication of Candès, there has been enormous growth in the application of CS and development of CS variants. For electron microscopy applications, the concept of CS has also been recently applied to electron tomography [6], and reduction of electron dose in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging [7]. To demonstrate the applicability of coded aperture CS video reconstruction for atomic level imaging, we simulate compressive sensing on observations of Pd nanoparticles and Ag nanoparticles during exposure to high temperatures and other environmental

  13. TEM study of the nucleation of bubbles induced by He implantation in 316L industrial austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jublot-Leclerc, S.; Lescoat, M.-L.; Fortuna, F.; Legras, L.; Li, X.; Gentils, A.

    2015-11-01

    10 keV He ions were implanted in-situ in a TEM into thin foils of 316L industrial austenitic stainless steel at temperatures ranging from 200 to 550 °C. As a result, overpressurized nanometric bubbles are created with density and size depending strongly on both the temperature and fluence of implantation. An investigation on their nucleation and growth is reported through a rigorous statistical analysis whose procedure, including the consideration of free surface effects, is detailed. In the parameter range considered, the results show that an increase of fluence promotes both the nucleation and growth of the bubbles whilst an increase of temperature enhances the growth of the bubbles at the expense of their nucleation. The confrontation of resulting activation energies with existing models for bubble nucleation enables the identification of the underlying mechanisms. In spite of slight differences resulting from different conditions of implantation among which the He concentration, He production rate and He/dpa ratio, it appears that the dominating mechanisms are the same as those obtained in metals in previous studies, which, in addition to corroborating literature results, shows the suitability of in-situ TEM experiments to simulate the production of helium in nuclear materials.

  14. Anterior lens epithelium in intumescent white cataracts - scanning and transmission electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andjelic, Sofija; Drašlar, Kazimir; Hvala, Anastazija; Hawlina, Marko

    2016-02-01

    Our purpose was to study the structure of the lens epithelial cells (LECs) of intumescent white cataracts (IC) in comparison with nuclear cataracts (NC) in order to investigate possible structural reasons for development of IC. The anterior lens capsule (aLC: basement membrane and associated LECs) were obtained from cataract surgery and prepared for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We observed by SEM that in IC, LEC swelling was pronounced with the clefts surrounding the groups of LECs. Another structural feature was spherical formations, that were observed on the apical side of LEC's, towards the fibre cell layer, both by SEM and TEM. Development of these structures, bulging out from the apical cell membrane of the LEC's and disrupting it, could be followed in steps towards the sphere formation. The degeneration of the lens epithelium and the structures of the aLC in IC similar to Morgagnian globules were also observed. None of these structural changes were observed in NC. We show by SEM and TEM that, in IC, LECs have pronounced structural features not observed in NC. This supports the hypothesis that the disturbed structure of LECs plays a role in water accumulation in the IC lens. We also suggest that, in IC, LECs produce bulging spheres that represent unique structures of degenerated material, extruded from the LEC.

  15. Microstructure of Fe implanted yttria stabilised zirconia studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy and TEM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burggraaf, A.J.; Scholten, D.; van Hassel, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    Single crystalline and ceramic solid solutions of (1−0.x)(ZrO2)−(0.x)(YO1.5) with x = 14−17 were implanted with high doses of Fe. Specific profile shapes were realised. The microstructure of the material before and after annealing was studied by conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS), ion

  16. Microstructure of Fe implanted yttria stabilised zirconia studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy and TEM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burggraaf, A.J.; Scholten, D.; Hassel, van B.A.

    1988-01-01

    Single crystalline and ceramic solid solutions of (1−0.x)(ZrO2)−(0.x)(YO1.5) with x = 14−17 were implanted with high doses of Fe. Specific profile shapes were realised. The microstructure of the material before and after annealing was studied by conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS), ion

  17. Microscopy studies on pronton exchange membrane fuel cell electrodes with different ionomer contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Shuang; Solterbeck, Claus Henning; Odgaard, Madeleine;

    2009-01-01

    content in the catalyst layer. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was carried out on selective electrodes to provide additional information and confirmed with the AFM results. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) showed that the electrode containing 30 wt.% ionomer has maximum catalyst utilization....

  18. NiO/YSZ Reduction for SOFC/SOEC Studied In Situ by Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Søren Bredmose; Agersted, Karsten; Hansen, Karin Vels

    2014-01-01

    SOFCs/SOECs are typically composed of ceramic materials, which are highly complex at the nano-scale. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) are routinely applied for studying these nano-scaled structures post mortem, but only few SOFC/SOEC studies have applied environmental TEM...... the reduction of NiO/YSZ is slower, which indicates that the presence of YSZ inhibits the reduction of NiO. In the presents in situ experiments the temperature dependent reduction profile are found similar for the both nano-scaled NiO and NiO/YSZ sample. The apparent inhibitive effect of YSZ on NiO reduction...

  19. Cross-sectional TEM studies of YBa2Cu3O7-x superlattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李贻杰; 连贵君; 甘子钊; 冯景伟

    1995-01-01

    Microstructure of high-quality YBa2Cu3O7-x superlattices has been investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The observations revealed that the superlattioes had atomic sharp interfaces between YBCO and PrBCO layers without interdiffusion. But undulations and. steps of the layer thickness existed in the specimen. An intermediate layer about 1 nm in thickness with many defects, which was caused by the surface steps and dislocations at SrTiO3 substrate surface, was observed at the film-substrate interfaces. However, the films did not have large extended defects beyond several unit cells. The results suggested that when studying the two-dimensional transport properties and superconducting mechanism of YACO using YBCO/PrBCO superlattioes or ultra-thin YBCO films, the influence of the micro-structural elements must be taken into account.

  20. Experimental analysis of a TEM plane transmission line for DNA studies at 900 MHz EM fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belloni, F [Dipartimento di Fisica, Laboratorio di Elettronica Applicata e Strumentazione, LEAS INFN sez. di Lecce, Universita degli Studi di Lecce, Via Provinciale Lecce-Arnesano, CP 193, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Doria, D [Dipartimento di Fisica, Laboratorio di Elettronica Applicata e Strumentazione, LEAS INFN sez. di Lecce, Universita degli Studi di Lecce, Via Provinciale Lecce-Arnesano, CP 193, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Lorusso, A [Dipartimento di Fisica, Laboratorio di Elettronica Applicata e Strumentazione, LEAS INFN sez. di Lecce, Universita degli Studi di Lecce, Via Provinciale Lecce-Arnesano, CP 193, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Nassisi, V [Dipartimento di Fisica, Laboratorio di Elettronica Applicata e Strumentazione, LEAS INFN sez. di Lecce, Universita degli Studi di Lecce, Via Provinciale Lecce-Arnesano, CP 193, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Velardi, L [Dipartimento di Fisica, Laboratorio di Elettronica Applicata e Strumentazione, LEAS INFN sez. di Lecce, Universita degli Studi di Lecce, Via Provinciale Lecce-Arnesano, CP 193, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Alifano, P [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche ed Ambientali, Laboratorio di Microbiologia, Universita degli Studi di Lecce, Via Provinciale Lecce-Monteroni, CP 193, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Monaco, C [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche ed Ambientali, Laboratorio di Microbiologia, Universita degli Studi di Lecce, Via Provinciale Lecce-Monteroni, CP 193, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Tala, A [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche ed Ambientali, Laboratorio di Microbiologia, Universita degli Studi di Lecce, Via Provinciale Lecce-Monteroni, CP 193, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Tredici, M [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche ed Ambientali, Laboratorio di Microbiologia, Universita degli Studi di Lecce, Via Provinciale Lecce-Monteroni, CP 193, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Raino, A [Dipartimento di Fisica, INFN sez. di Bari, Universita degli Studi di Bari, Via Amendola, 173, 70126 Bari (Italy)

    2006-07-07

    A suitable plane transmission line was developed and its behaviour analysed at 900 MHz radiofrequency fields to study DNA mutability and the repair of micro-organisms. In this work, utilizing such a device, we investigated the behaviour of DNA mutability and repair of Escherichia coli strains. The transmission line was very simple and versatile in changing its characteristic resistance and field intensity by varying its sizes. In the absence of cell samples inside the transmission line, the relative modulation of the electric and/or magnetic field was {+-}31% with respect to the mean values, allowing the processing of more samples at different exposure fields in a single run. A slight decrease in spontaneous mutability to rifampicin-resistance of the E. coli JC411 strain was demonstrated in mismatch-repair proficient samples exposed to the radio-frequency fields during their growth on solid medium.

  1. Electrical sintering of silver nanoparticle ink studied by in-situ TEM probing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Hummelgård

    Full Text Available Metallic nanoparticle inks are used for printed electronics, but to reach acceptable conductivity the structures need to be sintered, usually using a furnace. Recently, sintering by direct resistive heating has been demonstrated. For a microscopic understanding of this Joule heating sintering method, we studied the entire process in real time inside a transmission electron microscope equipped with a movable electrical probe. We found an onset of Joule heating induced sintering and coalescence of nanoparticles at power levels of 0.1-10 mW/μm³. In addition, a carbonization of the organic shells that stabilize the nanoparticles were found, with a conductivity of 4 10⁵ Sm⁻¹.

  2. NanoSIMS, TEM, and XANES studies of a Unique Presolar Supernova Graphite Grain

    CERN Document Server

    Groopman, Evan; Bernatowicz, Thomas; Zinner, Ernst

    2014-01-01

    We report on isotopic and microstructural investigations of a unique presolar supernova (SN) graphite grain, referred to as G6, isolated from the Orgueil CI chondrite. G6 contains complex heterogeneities in its isotopic composition and in its microstructure. Nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometer isotope images of ultramicrotome sections reveal heterogeneities in its C, N, and O isotopic compositions, including anomalous shell-like structures. Transmission electron microscope studies reveal a nanocrystalline core surrounded by a turbostratic graphite mantle, the first reported nanocrystalline core from a low-density SN graphite grain. Electron diffraction analysis shows that the nanocrystalline core consists of randomly oriented 2-4 nm graphene particles, similar to those in cores of high-density (HD) presolar graphite grains from asymptotic giant branch stars. G6's core also exhibits evidence for planar stacking of these graphene nano-sheets with a domain size up to 4.5 nm, which was unobserved in the na...

  3. NanoSIMS, TEM, and XANES studies of a unique presolar supernova graphite grain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groopman, Evan; Bernatowicz, Thomas; Zinner, Ernst [Laboratory for Space Sciences, Physics Department, Washington University, One Brookings Drive, Campus Box 1105, Saint Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Nittler, Larry R., E-mail: eegroopm@physics.wustl.edu [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road, NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)

    2014-07-20

    We report on isotopic and microstructural investigations of a unique presolar supernova (SN) graphite grain, referred to as G6, isolated from the Orgueil CI chondrite. G6 contains complex heterogeneities in its isotopic composition and in its microstructure. Nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometer isotope images of ultramicrotome sections reveal heterogeneities in its C, N, and O isotopic compositions, including anomalous shell-like structures. Transmission electron microscope studies reveal a nanocrystalline core surrounded by a turbostratic graphite mantle, the first reported nanocrystalline core from a low-density SN graphite grain. Electron diffraction analysis shows that the nanocrystalline core consists of randomly oriented 2-4 nm graphene particles, similar to those in cores of high-density (HD) presolar graphite grains from asymptotic giant branch stars. G6's core also exhibits evidence for planar stacking of these graphene nano-sheets with a domain size up to 4.5 nm, which was unobserved in the nanocrystalline cores of HD graphite grains. We also report on X-ray absorption near-edge structure measurements of G6. The complex isotopic- and micro-structure of G6 provides evidence for mixing and/or granular transport in SN ejecta.

  4. Applications of orientation mapping by scanning and transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Jensen, D.

    1997-01-01

    The potentials of orientation mapping techniques (in the following referred to as OIM) for studies of thermomechanical processes are analysed. Both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) based OIM techniques are considered. Among the thermomechanical processes...

  5. Mechanical and field-emission properties of individual ZnO nanowires studied in situ by transmission electron microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The mechanical and field-emission properties of individual ZnO nanowires,grown by a solid-vapour phase thermal sublimation process,were studied in situ by transmission electron microscopy(TEM)using a home-made TEM specimen holder.The mechanical resonance is electrically induced by applying an oscillating voltage,and in situ imaging has been achieved simultaneously.The mechanical results indicate that the elastic bending modulus of individual ZnO nanowires were measured to be~58 GPa.A nanobalance was buil...

  6. Defects in paramagnetic Co-doped ZnO films studied by transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacs, Andras; Ney, A.; Duchamp, Martial; Ney, V.; Boothroyd, Chris; Galindo, Pedro L.; Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Chambers, Scott A.; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal

    2013-12-23

    We have studied planar defects in epitaxial Co:ZnO dilute magnetic semiconductor thin films deposited on c-plane sapphire (Al2O3) and the Co:ZnO/Al2O3 interface structure at atomic resolution using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). Comparing Co:ZnO samples deposited by pulsed laser deposition and reactive magnetron sputtering, both exhibit extrinsic stacking faults, incoherent interface structures, and compositional variations within the first 3-4 Co:ZnO layers at the interface.. In addition, we have measured the local strain which reveals the lattice distortion around the stacking faults.

  7. Interfacial microstructure and reaction at the spin-coated fluorinated polyimide/Al interface: surface-enhanced X-ray diffraction and TEM studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, H. Y.; Shi, F. G.; Zhao, B.; Wang, S.-Q.; Brongo, M.; Vasudev, P. K.

    Fluorinated polyimides (FPIs) are being investigated as interlevel dielectrics (ILDs) in future multilevel interconnect technologies because of their low intrinsic dielectric constant. This study investigates the effect of thermal treatment in a pure nitrogen atmosphere on the interfacial microstructure and chemistry at the interface between a FPI thin film and its contacted Al layer in FPI/Al/Ti/SiO2 multilayers by means of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and an ellipsometer. The FPI precursor, a solution of PMDA/6FDA/TFMOB/PPD was spin-coated onto the Al layer and then cured at 400 °C for one hour. It is found that the moisture and oxygen from the FPI layer released during thermal treatment can lead to the oxidation of the interface between the Al and the FPI. The TEM cross-sectional images and the electron diffraction patterns indicate that the oxidized interface is amorphous. The oxidation product is identified to be Al2O3. The oxidation onset temperature is determined to be 415 °C, which is slightly higher than the curing temperature. The oxidation of the FPI/Al interface results in an increase in the electrical resistance of the Al layer, and thus may lead to a reduction in its effective electrical thickness.

  8. In Situ Laser Crystallization of Amorphous Silicon for TFT Applications: Controlled Ultrafast Studies in the Dynamic TEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taheri, M; Teslich, N; Lu, J P; Morgan, D; Browning, N

    2008-02-08

    An in situ method for studying the role of laser energy on the microstructural evolution of polycrystalline Si is presented. By monitoring both laser energy and microstructural evolution simultaneously in the dynamic transmission electron microscope, information on grain size and defect concentration can be correlated directly with processing conditions. This proof of principle study provides fundamental scientific information on the crystallization process that has technological importance for the development of thin film transistors. In conclusion, we successfully developed a method for studying UV laser processing of Si films in situ on nanosecond time scales, with ultimate implications for TFT application improvements. In addition to grain size distribution as a function of laser energy density, we found that grain size scaled with laser energy in general. We showed that nanosecond time resolution allowed us to see the nucleation and growth front during processing, which will help further the understanding of microstructural evolution of poly-Si films for electronic applications. Future studies, coupled with high resolution TEM, will be performed to study grain boundary migration, intergranular defects, and grain size distribution with respect to laser energy and adsorption depth.

  9. Compositional and Microstructural Evolution of Olivine During Pulsed Laser Irradiation: Insights Based on a FIB/Field-Emission TEM Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, R.; Loeffler, M. J.; Dukes, C. A.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The use of pulsed laser irradiation to simulate the short duration, high-energy conditions characteristic of micrometeorite impacts is now an established approach in experimental space weathering studies. The laser generates both melt and vapor deposits that contain nanophase metallic Fe (npFe(sup 0)) grains with size distributions and optical properties similar to those in natural impact-generated melt and vapor deposits. There remains uncertainty, however, about how well lasers simulate the mechanical work and internal (thermal) energy partitioning that occurs in actual impacts. We are currently engaged in making a direct comparison between the products of laser irradiation and experimental/natural hypervelocity impacts. An initial step reported here is to use analytical TEM is to attain a better understanding of how the microstructure and composition of laser deposits evolve over multiple cycles of pulsed laser irradiation. Experimental Methods: We irradiated pressed-powder pellets of San Carlos olivine (Fo(sub 90)) with up to 99 rastered pulses of a GAM ArF excimer laser. The irradiated surface of the sample were characterized by SEM imaging and areas were selected for FIB cross sectioning for TEM study using an FEI Quanta dual-beam electron/focused ion beam instrument. FIB sections were characterized using a JEOL2500SE analytical field-emission scanning transmission electron microscope (FE-STEM) optimized for quantitative element mapping at less than 10 nm spatial resolutions. Results: In the SEM the 99 pulse pressed pellet sample shows a complex, inhomogeneous, distribution of laser-generated material, largely concentrated in narrow gaps and larger depressions between grains. Local concentrations of npFe0 spherules 0.1 to 1 micrometers in size are visible within these deposits in SEM back-scatter images. Fig. 1 shows bright-field STEM images of a FIB cross-section of a one of these deposits that continuously covers the top and sloping side of an

  10. Investigating materials formation with liquid-phase and cryogenic TEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Yoreo, J. J.; N. A. J. M., Sommerdijk

    2016-08-01

    The recent advent of liquid-phase transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and advances in cryogenic TEM are transforming our understanding of the physical and chemical mechanisms underlying the formation of materials in synthetic, biological and geochemical systems. These techniques have been applied to study the dynamic processes of nucleation, self-assembly, crystal growth and coarsening for metallic and semiconductor nanoparticles, (bio)minerals, electrochemical systems, macromolecular complexes, and organic and inorganic self-assembling systems. New instrumentation and methodologies that are currently on the horizon promise new opportunities for advancing the science of materials synthesis.

  11. Cryogenic Electron Microscopy Studies: Structure and Formation of Self-assembled Nanostructures in Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han Seung

    Cryogenic electron microscopy (Cryo-EM) techniques are among the most powerful to characterize self-assembling soft materials (colloids, polymers, and microemulsions, etc.) at the nanometer scale, without any need for implicit models or assumptions about the structure. We can even visualize structure under dynamic conditions, capturing each stage of development. In this thesis, cryo-EM has been used to investigate the formation and structure of a variety of self-assembling soft materials. Visualization is complemented by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), dynamic light scattering, and conductivity measurements. In each case, cryo-EM provides new insights, not otherwise available, into the nanostructure development. Self-assembly phenomena at the molecular level are critical to the performance of tremendous number of applied systems ranging from personal care products to industrial products. To evaluate these self-assembled materials, multiple characterization techniques are required. We investigated aggregation behavior of cesium dodecyl sulfate (CsDS) ionic surfactant in aqueous solution. Coupled with the real space data from cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM) and the inverse space data from SAXS, the experimental result of CsDS in aqueous solution gave a new insight in CsDS micellar structures and their development as a function of concentration. Cryo-TEM showed the presence of the liquid-like hydrocarbon core in the CsDS micelles and relatively thick shell structures at a low CsDS concentration. The core-shell sphere structure micelle shifted to core-shell cylindrical micelle structure at high concentration. The morphology and structure of paclitaxel silicate (PTX) prodrug, encapsulated with amphiphilic poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) diblock copolymers were studied. The six different silicate PTX prodrug candidates were characterized with cryo-TEM. Direct imaging with cryo-TEM illustrated structure of prodrug

  12. Electron microscopy study of direct laser deposited IN718

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, R.G., E-mail: r.ding@bham.ac.uk [School of Metallurgy and Materials, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Huang, Z.W.; Li, H.Y. [School of Metallurgy and Materials, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Mitchell, I.; Baxter, G. [Rolls-Royce plc., Derby DE24 8BJ (United Kingdom); Bowen, P. [School of Metallurgy and Materials, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    The microstructure of direct laser deposited (DLD) IN718 has been investigated in detail using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results confirm that the dendrite core microstructure can be linked to the cooling rate experienced during the deposition. A ~ 100 μm wide δ partially dissolved region in the IN718 substrate was observed close to the substrate/deposit boundary. In the deposited IN718, γ/Laves eutectic constituent is the predominant minor microconstituent. Irregular and regular (small) (Nb,Ti)C carbides and a mixture of the carbides and Laves were observed. Most M{sub 3}B{sub 2} borides were nucleated around a (Nb,Ti)C carbide. Needles of δ phase precipitated from the Laves phase were also observed. A complex constituent (of Laves, δ, α-Cr, γ″, and γ matrix) is reported in IN718 for the first time. The formation of α-Cr particles could be related to Cr rejection during the formation and growth of Cr-depleted δ phase. - Highlights: • Secondary phases in IN718 deposits were identified using electron diffraction and EDS. • MC, M{sub 3}B{sub 2}, γ/Laves eutectic and γ/NbC/Laves eutectic were observed. • Needle-like δ phases were precipitated from the Laves phase. • A complex constituent (Laves, δ, α-Cr, γ″ and γ) was reported for the first time.

  13. Environmental TEM in Materials Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    Over the last decades, electron microscopy has played a large role in materials research. The increasing use of particularly environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) in materials science provides new possibilities for investigating nanoscale components at work. Careful experimentation...... provides input for the development of new materials for e.g. energy production. In order to design experiments with the highest chance of a successful outcome, a detailed understanding of both the interaction of electrons with gas molecules, the effect of gas on high‐resolution imaging and the behavior...... in this environment is necessary. If data is to be interpreted quantitatively, interaction of the electrons with gas molecules must be taken into account. Whereas conventional TEM samples are usually thin (below 10‐20 nm), the dilute gas fills the entire gap between the pole pieces and is thus not spatially localized...

  14. In situ transmission electron microscopy for magnetic nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngo, Duc-The; Kuhn, Luise Theil

    2016-01-01

    Nanomagnetism is a subject of great interest because of both application and fundamental aspects in which understanding of the physical and electromagnetic structure of magnetic nanostructures is essential to explore the magnetic properties. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a powerful tool......-structure correlation. This paper aims at reviewing and discussing in situ TEM magnetic imaging studies, including Lorentz microscopy and electron holography in TEM, applied to the research of magnetic nanostructures....

  15. TEM study of green rust sodium sulphate (GR{sub Na,SO4}) interacted with neptunyl ions (NpO{sub 2}{sup +})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bach, David; Schild, Dieter; Geckeis, Horst [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Nuclear Waste Disposal; Christiansen, Bo C. [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Nano-Science Center

    2014-07-01

    Green rust (GR) as sodium sulphate form, NaFe(II){sub 6}Fe(III){sub 3}(OH){sub 18}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} . 12H{sub 2}O, is reacted with an aqueous solution of neptunyl ions (NpO{sub 2}{sup +}) and the resulting Np(IV) solid phase is investigated at a nanometer scale by different transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, including high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), high-angle annular dark-field scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS), and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). The aim of the analyses is to achieve insight into the potential immobilization mechanism for Np(V) in the context of safety assessment of a nuclear-waste repository. The neptunium is found to be immobilized at the edge of the green rust platelets, in a rim composed of nanocrystallites about 2-3.5 nm in size. The EELS results and more particularly the HRTEM findings are consistent with NpO{sub 2} crystallizing in a fluorite-type structure. Furthermore, the Np-O{sub 4,5} edges recorded by EELS at the Np(IV) phase are presented, expanding the EELS-data set currently available in the literature for Np. (orig.)

  16. In situ TEM studies of oxygen vacancy migration for electrically induced resistance change effect in cerium oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng; Wang, Zhenzhong; Fu, Wangyang; Liao, Zhaoliang; Liu, Kaihui; Wang, Wenlong; Bai, Xuedong; Wang, Enge

    2010-06-01

    Oxide materials with resistance hysteresis are very promising for next generation memory devices. However, the microscopic dynamic process of the resistance change is still elusive. Here, we use in situ transmission electron microscopy method to study the role of oxygen vacancies for the resistance switching effect in cerium oxides. The structure change during oxygen vacancy migration in CeO(2) induced by electric field was in situ imaged inside high-resolution transmission electron microscope, which gives a direct evidence for oxygen migration mechanism for the microscopic origin of resistance change effect in CeO(2). Our results have implications for understanding the nature of resistance change in metal oxides with mixed valence cations, such as fluorite, rutile and perovskite oxides. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Magnetic-field-modulated written bits in TbFeCo thin films: Transmission electron microscopy Lorentz and scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeschlimann, M.; Scheinfein, M.; Unguris, J.; Greidanus, F. J. A. M.; Klahn, S.

    1990-11-01

    Domains written thermomagnetically in TbFeCo thin films are studied with Lorentz transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis (SEMPA). Four different rare-earth/transition-metal compositions TbxFeyCo1-x-y are examined. The domain structures observed with both techniques are similar even though TEM Lorentz only detects the transverse component of the net magnetic field along the electron's trajectory through the sample, while SEMPA detects the surface electron-spin polarization (magnetization). We find that the magnetic contrast in the SEMPA measurements is proportional to the magnetization of the transition-metal (TM) subnetwork which is antiferromagnetically coupled to the rare-earth (RE) subnetwork. This allows high-contrast SEMPA images to be acquired even when the system is magnetically compensated (Ms=‖MRE-MTM‖=0). The surface magnetization can be explained by assuming that the surface of the TbFeCo alloy consists of an outermost thin oxide layer followed by an Fe-rich subsurface layer. The importance of the demagnetizing field on the switching and domain nucleation process for thermomagnetically written bits is examined.

  18. Magnetic-field-modulated written bits in TbFeCo thin films: Transmission electron microscopy Lorentz and scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aeschlimann, M.; Scheinfein, M.; Unguris, J. (National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (USA) Greidanus, F.J.A.M. (Philips Research Laboratories, P.O. Box 80.000, 5600 JA, Eindhoven (The Netherlands)))

    1990-11-01

    Domains written thermomagnetically in TbFeCo thin films are studied with Lorentz transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis (SEMPA). Four different rare-earth/transition-metal compositions Tb{sub {ital x}}Fe{sub {ital y}}Co{sub 1{minus}{ital x}{minus}{ital y}} are examined. The domain structures observed with both techniques are similar even though TEM Lorentz only detects the transverse component of the net magnetic field along the electron's trajectory through the sample, while SEMPA detects the surface electron-spin polarization (magnetization). We find that the magnetic contrast in the SEMPA measurements is proportional to the magnetization of the transition-metal (TM) subnetwork which is antiferromagnetically coupled to the rare-earth (RE) subnetwork. This allows high-contrast SEMPA images to be acquired even when the system is magnetically compensated ({ital M}{sub {ital s}}={vert bar}{ital M}{sub RE}{minus}{ital M}{sub TM}{vert bar}=0). The surface magnetization can be explained by assuming that the surface of the TbFeCo alloy consists of an outermost thin oxide layer followed by an Fe-rich subsurface layer. The importance of the demagnetizing field on the switching and domain nucleation process for thermomagnetically written bits is examined.

  19. Dark field X-ray microscopy for studies of recrystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahl, Sonja Rosenlund; Simons, Hugh; Jakobsen, Anders Clemen;

    2015-01-01

    We present the recently developed technique of Dark Field X-Ray Microscopy that utilizes the diffraction of hard X-rays from individual grains or subgrains at the (sub)micrometre- scale embedded within mm-sized samples. By magnifying the diffracted signal, 3D mapping of orientations and strains i...... external influences. The capabilities of Dark Field X- Ray Microscopy are illustrated by examples from an ongoing study of recrystallization of 50% cold-rolled Al1050 specimens....

  20. What is the best tool for transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM)? A case-matched study in 74 patients comparing a standard platform and a disposable material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mege, Diane; Bridoux, Valérie; Maggiori, Léon; Tuech, Jean-Jacques; Panis, Yves

    2017-07-01

    Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) is the gold standard for local excision of rectal lesions, but no study exists concerning the best material. The objective was to compare TEM using a disposable material vs a standard platform through a case-matched study. Patients who underwent TEM for rectal neoplasms were identified from prospective databases in two tertiary referral centers and matched according to four criteria (sex, tumor location, size, distance from the anal verge): TEM using a disposable material (GelPoint Applied®; group A) and TEM using a standard TEO® platform (Karl Storz, Tuttlingen, Germany; group B). A total of 74 patients were included and divided into group A (n = 33) and group B (n = 41). Full-thickness resection was less frequent in group A (85%) than B (100%; p = 0.01). Adenocarcinoma was less frequent in group A than B: 27 vs 42% (p = 0.03). No difference was noted regarding median operative time (53 vs 53 min; p = 0.6) and a peritoneal perforation rate (6 vs 20%; p = 0.17). Median length of stay was shorter in group A than B (4 vs 5 days; p study suggested that TEM can be performed using either a TEO® platform or a disposable material, with similar surgical results. The TEO® platform seems to be superior to obtain full-thickness and R0 resection.

  1. Positron annihilation and transmission electron microscopy study of the evolution of microstructure in cold-rolled and nitrided FeNiTi foils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chechenin, N.G.; Veen, A. van; Escobar Galindo, R.; Schut, H.; Chezan, A.R.; Bronsveld, P.M.; Hosson, J.Th.M. de; Boerma, D.O.

    2001-01-01

    Positron beam analysis (PBA) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were applied to study structural transformations in cold-rolled Fe0.94Ni0.04Ti0.02 foils, which were subjected to different thermal treatments in an atmosphere of a gas mixture of NH3 + H2 (nitriding). Positrons proved to be sen

  2. TEM studies of Ge nanocrystal formation in PECVD grown SiO2:Ge/SiO2 multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agan, S.; Dana, A.; Aydinli, A.

    2006-06-01

    We investigate the effect of annealing on the Ge nanocrystal formation in multilayered germanosilicate-oxide films grown on Si substrates by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). The multilayered samples were annealed at temperatures ranging from 750 to 900 °C for 5 min under nitrogen atmosphere. The onset of formation of Ge nanocrystals, at 750 °C, can be observed via high resolution TEM micrographs. The diameters of Ge nanocrystals were observed to be between 5 and 14 nm. As the annealing temperature is raised to 850 °C, a second layer of Ge nanocrystals forms next to the original precipitation band, positioning itself closer to the substrate SiO2 interface. High resolution cross section TEM images, electron diffraction and electron energy-loss spectroscopy as well as energy-dispersive x-ray analysis (EDAX) data all indicate that Ge nanocrystals are present in each layer.

  3. TEM study on Si0.65Ge0.35/p-Si HIP infrared detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Microstructure of P+ -Si0.65Ge0.35/p-Si HIP infrared detector has been studied by using localization cross-section transmission electron microscopy. The photosensitive region of the detector consists of 6 P+ -Si0.65Ge0.35 layers and 5 UD-Si layers, whichare flat and have thickness of 6 nm and 32 nm, respectively. A stress field exists on the interface between Si0.65Ge0.35 and UD-Si layers, but no any crystal defect has been found in this region, except the edges of this region. Both Si0.65Ge0.35 and UD-Si layers on amorphous SiO2 layer consist of polycrystals and are in wave. There is defect area in the edges of photosensitive region.The area appears in a shape of inverse triangle and the maximum width is less than 120 nm. The crystal defects are stacking faults and microtwins.

  4. A transmission electron microscopy study of presolar hibonite

    CERN Document Server

    Zega, Thomas J; Nittler, Larry R; Stroud, Rhonda M

    2011-01-01

    We report isotopic and microstructural data on five presolar hibonite grains identified in an acid residue of the Krymka LL3.1 ordinary chondrite. Isotopic measurements by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) verified a presolar circumstellar origin for the grains. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination of the crystal structure and chemistry of the grains was enabled by in situ sectioning and lift-out with a focused-ion-beam scanning-electron microscope. Comparisons of isotopic compositions with models indicate that four of the five grains formed in low-mass stars that evolved through the red-giant/asymptotic-giant branches, whereas one grain formed in the ejecta of a Type II supernova. Selected-area electron-diffraction patterns show that all grains are single crystals of hibonite. Some grains contain stacking faults and small spreads in orientation that can be attributed to a combination of growth defects and mechanical processing by grain-grain collisions. The similar structure of the superno...

  5. Preliminary Study of In Vivo Formed Dental Plaque Using Confocal Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KA. Al-Salihi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM is relatively a new light microscopical imaging technique with a wide range of applications in biological sciences. The primary value of CLSM for the biologist is its ability to provide optical sections from athree-dimensional specimen. The present study was designed to assess the thickness and content of in vivo accumulated dental plaque using CLSM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM.Materials and Methods: Acroflat lower arch splints (acrylic appliance were worn by five participants for three days without any disturbance. The formed plaques were assessed using CLSM combined with vital fluorescence technique and SEM.Results: In this study accumulated dental plaque revealed varied plaque microflora vitality and thickness according to participant’s oral hygiene. The thickness of plaque smears ranged from 40.32 to 140.72 μm and 65.00 to 128.88 μm for live (vital and dead accumulated microorganisms, respectively. Meanwhile, the thickness of plaque on the appliance ranged from 101 μm to 653 μm. CLSM revealed both dead and vital bacteria on the surface of the dental plaque. In addition, SEM revealed layers of various bacterial aggregations in all dental plaques.Conclusion: This study offers a potent non-invasive tool to evaluate and assess the dental plaque biofilm, which is a very important factor in the development of dental caries.

  6. Interactions of mineral dust with pollution and clouds: An individual-particle TEM study of atmospheric aerosol from Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pósfai, Mihály; Axisa, Duncan; Tompa, Éva; Freney, Evelyn; Bruintjes, Roelof; Buseck, Peter R.

    2013-03-01

    Aerosol particles from desert dust interact with clouds and influence climate on regional and global scales. The Riyadh (Saudi Arabia) aerosol campaign was initiated to study the effects of dust particles on cloud droplet nucleation and cloud properties. Here we report the results of individual-particle studies of samples that were collected from an aircraft in April 2007. We used analytical transmission electron microscopy, including energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry, electron diffraction, and imaging techniques for the morphological, chemical, and structural characterization of the particles. Dust storms and regional background conditions were encountered during four days of sampling. Under dusty conditions, the coarse (supermicrometer) fraction resembles freshly crushed rock. The particles are almost exclusively mineral dust grains and include common rock-forming minerals, among which clay minerals, particularly smectites, are most abundant. Unaltered calcite grains also occur, indicating no significant atmospheric processing. The particles have no visible coatings but some contain traces of sulfur. The fine (submicrometer) fraction is dominated by particles of anthropogenic origin, primarily ammonium sulfate (with variable organic coating and some with soot inclusions) and combustion-derived particles (mostly soot). In addition, submicrometer, iron-bearing clay particles also occur, many of which are internally mixed with ammonium sulfate, soot, or both. We studied the relationships between the properties of the aerosol and the droplet microphysics of cumulus clouds that formed above the aerosol layer. Under dusty conditions, when a large concentration of coarse-fraction mineral particles was in the aerosol, cloud drop concentrations were lower and droplet diameters larger than under regional background conditions, when the aerosol was dominated by submicrometer sulfate particles.

  7. TEM study of pseudo-twin in an off-stoichiometric Ni{sub 2}MnGa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Hidefumi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Department of Mechanical and Systems Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ryukoku University, Yokotani 1-5, Seta Oe-cyo, Otsu, Shiga 520-2194 (Japan); Taguchi, Eiji [Research Center for Ultra-High Voltage Electron Microscopy, Osaka University, 7-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Fukuda, Takashi; Kakeshita, Tomoyuki [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: ► In Ni–Mn–Ga alloy which has transformation temperature around room temperature, it is difficult to observe in static by using transmission electron microscope. ► In a condition that the magnetic field in TEM hardly influences to the sample transformation, the TEM bright field micrograph of uniform texture in Ni{sub 55.5}Mn{sub 20.0}Ga{sub 24.5} (T{sub M} at 360 K) was captured along [0 1 0] and [1 1 1] direction. ► This texture was revealed that a twin-like banded structure composed of two orthorhombic lattice. ► The precisely measuring of angles subtended by diffraction spots on the [1 1 1] diffraction pattern revealed that two crystals which constructed a twin-like structure have different crystal structure in a microscopic region. -- Abstract: We have investigated twin-like microstructure of the martensite phase in a Ni{sub 55.5}Mn{sub 20.0}Ga{sub 24.5} (at.%) alloy by using transmission electron microscope (TEM). The bright field image of the martensite phase showed striped microstructure composed of two crystals. Assuming that both crystals have orthorhombic structures, we calculated the axial ratios c/a and b/a from the 1 1 1 diffraction patterns by using angles between reflections. As a result, we found that the axial ratios of one crystal are slightly different from those of the other crystal. This result implies that the twin-like (striped) microstructure of Ni{sub 55.5}Mn{sub 20.0}Ga{sub 24.5} is not true twin but is pseudo-twin.

  8. A TEM study of morphological and structural degradation phenomena in LiFePO4-CB cathodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngo, Duc-The; Scipioni, Roberto; Simonsen, Søren Bredmose

    2016-01-01

    LiFePO4-based cathodes suffer from various degradation mechanisms, which influences the battery performance. In this paper, morphological and structural degradation phenomena in laboratory cathodes made of LiFePO4 mixed with carbon black (CB) in a 1 mol/L LiPF6 in EC : DMC (1:1 by weight......) electrolyte are investigated by transmission electron microscopy at various preparation, assembling, storage, and cycling stages. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging shows that continuous SEI layers are formed on the LiFePO4 particles and that both storage and cycling affect the formation...

  9. Super-resolution optical microscopy study of telomere structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Mary Lisa; Goodwin, Peter M.; Martinez, Jennifer S.; Goodwin, Edwin H.

    2016-09-01

    Chromosome ends are shielded from exonucleolytic attack and inappropriate end-joining by terminal structures called telomeres; these structures are potential targets for anticancer drugs. Telomeres are composed of a simple DNA sequence (5‧-TTAGGG-3‧ in humans) repeated more than a thousand times, a short 3‧ single-stranded overhang, and numerous proteins. Electron microscopy has shown that the 3‧ overhang pairs with the complementary strand at an internal site creating a small displacement loop and a large double-stranded "t-loop." Our goal is to determine whether all telomeres adopt the t-loop configuration, or whether there are two or more distinct configurations. Progress in optimizing super-resolution (SR) microscopy for this ongoing investigation is reported here. Results suggest that under certain conditions sample preparation procedures may disrupt chromatin by causing loss of nucleosomes. This finding may limit the use of SR microscopy in telomere studies.

  10. Study of nanoscale structural biology using advanced particle beam microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boseman, Adam J.

    This work investigates developmental and structural biology at the nanoscale using current advancements in particle beam microscopy. Typically the examination of micro- and nanoscale features is performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), but in order to decrease surface charging, and increase resolution, an obscuring conductive layer is applied to the sample surface. As magnification increases, this layer begins to limit the ability to identify nanoscale surface structures. A new technology, Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM), is used to examine uncoated surface structures on the cuticle of wild type and mutant fruit flies. Corneal nanostructures observed with HIM are further investigated by FIB/SEM to provide detailed three dimensional information about internal events occurring during early structural development. These techniques are also used to reconstruct a mosquito germarium in order to characterize unknown events in early oogenesis. Findings from these studies, and many more like them, will soon unravel many of the mysteries surrounding the world of developmental biology.

  11. Transmission electron microscopy study of high temperature bainitic transformation in 1 wt.% Mn ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadabadi, M.N. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan); Niyama, E. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan); Echigoya, J. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)

    1995-04-01

    A 1 wt.% Mn ductile iron austenitized at 900 C for 90 min and austempered at 375 C for different periods was used to study some aspects of bainitic reaction in high Mn austempered ductile iron with reference to carbide precipitation in bainitic ferrite. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA) study shows that precipitation of carbide in the ferritic component of bainite is a function of the local concentration of alloying elements. In other words, in the region near graphite where Si segregates and there is negative Mn segregation as well as carbon, the bainitic ferrite is carbide free. However, in the intercellular region where Mn segregates and Si is depleted, the ferritic component of bainite occurs together with very fine and almost uniformly distributed carbide. Furthermore, TEM-EDXA results show that the increase in Mn content not only delays stage I (the initial transformation of austenite to ferrite and retained austenite) of the bainitic reaction, but also delays stage II (decomposition of retained austenite to ferrite and carbide). ((orig.))

  12. Metals on BN Studied by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangert, U.; Zan, R.; Ramasse, Q.; Jalil, Rashid; Riaz, Ibstam; Novoselov, K. S.

    2012-07-01

    Metal impurities, gold and nickel, have been deliberately introduced into boron-nitride (BN) sheets. The structural and topographic properties of doped BN have been studied by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Analysis revealed that metal atoms cluster preferentially in/on contaminated areas. The metal coverage on BN is almost the same for the same evaporated amount of 1 Å.

  13. Electron microscopy studies on MoS2 nanocrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Pilsgaard

    Industrial-style MoS2-based hydrotreating catalysts are studied using electron microscopy. The MoS2 nanostructures are imaged with single-atom sensitivity to reveal the catalytically important edge structures. Furthermore, the in-situ formation of MoS2 crystals is imaged for the first time....

  14. Electron microscopy studies on MoS2 nanocrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Pilsgaard

    Industrial-style MoS2-based hydrotreating catalysts are studied using electron microscopy. The MoS2 nanostructures are imaged with single-atom sensitivity to reveal the catalytically important edge structures. Furthermore, the in-situ formation of MoS2 crystals is imaged for the first time....

  15. Raman and TEM studies of Ge nanocrystal formation in SiO{sub x}:Ge/SiO{sub x} multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dana, A.; Aydinli, A. [Physics Department and National Nanotechnology Research Center, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Agan, S.; Tokay, S. [Physics Department, Kirikkale University, 71450 Kirikkale (Turkey); Finstad, T.G. [Physics Department, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 - Blindern, 0316 Oslo (Norway)

    2007-07-01

    Alternating germanosilicate-siliconoxide layers of 10-30 nm thickness were grown on Si substrates by plasma enhanced chemically vapor deposition (PECVD). The compositions of the grown films were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. The films were annealed at temperatures varying from 670 to 1000 C for 5 to 45 minutes under nitrogen atmosphere. High resolution cross section TEM images, electron diffraction and electron energy-loss spectroscopy as well as energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) data confirm presence of Ge nanocrystals in each layer. The effect of annealing on the Ge nanocrystal formation in multilayers was investigated by Raman spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). As the annealing temperature is raised to 850 C, single layer of Ge nanocrystals observed at lower annealing temperatures is transformed into a double layer with the smaller sized nanocrystals closer to the substrate SiO{sub 2} interface. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. TEM study of 〈110〉-type 35.26° dislocations specially induced by polishing of SrTiO₃ single crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, L; Guo, X; Jia, C L

    2013-11-01

    The dislocations created by mechanical polishing of SrTiO₃ (100) single crystals were investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques combined with scanning TEM (STEM) techniques. A high density of dislocations was observed in the surface layer with a thickness of about 5 μm. These dislocations were found to be straight and highly aligned along the 〈111〉 directions. In most cases they appear in pairs or as a bundle. The nature of the dislocations was determined as mixed 〈110〉-type with the line vector t=〈111〉. They are 〈110〉-type 35.26° dislocations. The isolated 〈110〉-type 35.26° dislocations possess a compact core structure with a core spreading of ~0.5 nm. Dissociation of the dislocation occurs on the {1−10} glide plane, leading to the formation of two b=a/2〈110〉 partials separated by a stacking fault. The separation of the two partials was estimated to be 2.53 ± 0.32 nm based on a cross-correlation analysis of atomic-resolution images. Our results provide a solid experimental evidence for this special type of dislocation in SrTiO₃. The high density of straight and highly 〈111〉-orientated dislocations is expected to have an important influence on the anisotropy in electrical and mass transport properties.

  17. Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of Individual Carbon Nanotube Breakdown Caused by Joule Heating in Air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Kristian; Gudnason, S.B.; Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier

    2006-01-01

    We present repeated structural and electrical measurements on individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes, alternating between electrical measurements under ambient conditions and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The multiwalled carbon nanotubes made by chemical vapor deposition were manipulated...... conductors with remarkably predictable electrical properties despite extensive structural damage....

  18. Is transmission electron microscopy (TEM) a promising approach for qualitative and quantitative investigations of polymyxin B and miconazole interactions with cellular and subcellular structures of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Malassezia pachydermatis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voget, Michael; Lorenz, Dorothea; Lieber-Tenorio, Elisabeth; Hauck, Ruediger; Meyer, Michael; Cieslicki, Michael

    2015-12-31

    Antimicrobial therapy using a combination of polymyxin B and miconazole is effective against the main bacterial pathogens associated with otitis externa in dogs, and a synergistic effect of both drugs has been shown previously. The objective of the present investigation was to visualize ultrastructural changes after exposure of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and Malassezia pachydermatis to polymyxin B and miconazole by transmission electron microscopic (TEM). For this, cultures of E. coli, P. aeruginosa, S. pseudintermedius and M. pachydermatis were exposed to polymyxin B and miconazole, alone or in combination for 24 h. Ultrastructural changes were observed most frequently in the cell envelope of the four microorganisms. Exposure to polymyxin B seemed to cause more damage than miconazole within the range of concentrations applied. Treatment resulted in changes of the cell size: in E. coli, cell size increased significantly after treatment with either compound alone; in P. aeruginosa, cell size decreased significantly after treatment with polymyxin B and with miconazole; exposure of S. pseudintermedius to miconazole caused a decrease in cell size; in M. pachydermatis, cell size increased significantly after treatment with polymyxin B.; in E.coli, S. pseudintermedius and M. pachydermatis, cell size changed highly significant, in P. aeruginosa significantly after exposure to the combination of both compounds. In conclusion, by using a different approach than previous investigations, this study confirmed a clear combinatory effect of polymyxin B and miconazole against the tested microorganisms involved in canine otitis externa. It is the first time that visualization technologies were applied to compare the effect of single drugs to their combinatory effects on cellular and subcellular entities of selected bacterial and yeast species.

  19. Anterior lens epithelium in cataract patients with retinitis pigmentosa - scanning and transmission electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andjelic, Sofija; Drašlar, Kazimir; Hvala, Anastazija; Hawlina, Marko

    2017-05-01

    In retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patients, relatively minor lens opacity in central part of posterior pole of the lens may cause disproportionate functional symptoms requiring cataract operation. To investigate the possible structural reasons for this opacity development, we studied the structure of the lens epithelium of patients with RP. The anterior lens capsule (aLC: basement membrane and associated lens epithelial cells, LECs) was obtained from cataract surgery and prepared for scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM). Both SEM and TEM show a number of abnormal features in the anterior lens epithelium of cataract patients with RP. The abnormalities appear mainly as holes, thinning and degradation of the epithelium, with the dimensions from <1 μm to more than 50 μm. Other types of holes in size up to 20 μm were seen that may be formed by gradual stretching of the lens epithelium. Another type of abnormalities was cracks that were seen between adjacent LECs, with dimensions 0.1-2 μm × up to 10 μm. Abnormal structural features were observed in the anterior lens epithelium that may cause water influx into the lens. This may lead to clouding along the water clefts leading towards the posterior pole in the RP cataractous lens. We suggest that the lens epithelium has a role in the development of the cataract in patients with RP. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. A series of Nano-sized metal ion – thiouracil complexes, tem, spectral, γ- irradiation, molecular modelingand biological studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khlood Saad Abou- Melha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available VO(II, Ni(II, Pd(II, Pt(IV and UO2(II complexes were prepared using H5L ligand (C21H15N9S2O3S2. All the prepared complexes are deliberately discussed using different tools(IR, Uv-Vis, 1HNMR, ESR 13CNMR, TGA, TEM, XRD.The octadentate is the main mod of ligand donation, as a neural or trinegativetowards the metal ion. This is verified using molecular modeling as a theoretical tool assert on the stereo structure of the ligand proposed leads to the donation mod. The structural formulas of the complexes were varied in between four to six coordination no. except the VO(II complex is five. Most investigated complexes are thermally unstable due to the presence of crystal water occluded the coordinating crystal. All the spin Hamiltonian parameters as well as molecular orbital parameters were calculated for VO(II complex. XRD patterns were investigated to calculate the particle size of each compound and display their nanosized by distinguish values. TEM scenes are also supporting the XRD data. Finally the biological activities were carried out on different bacteria as well as on fungi. The toxic effect was observed especially with Gram positive bacterium (Bacillus subtilis. Also, the effect on DNA degradation was recorded and display a complete degradation by the use of Pt(IV and Pd(II complexes. Whereas, a partial degradation was observed with Ni(II and UO2(II complexes. But, there is no effect observed with the use of ligand and VO(II complex.

  1. Electron microscopy studies of activation mechanisms in hydrotreating catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl-Petersen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work is to remedy the limited fundamental insight that exists in terms of the activation and formation of hydrotreating catalysts utilized in industrial oil refining of crude oil. This is done through numerous studies of the conversion of industrially relevant molybdenum oxide...... it is an excellent choice for studies of the formation of hydrotreating catalysts. Through in situ TEM sulfidation of molybdenum dioxide nanoparticles, it is shown that the particle surface is converted into MoS2 by exposure to H2S and H2O at low temperature. Increasing the temperature leads to an increasingly...... sites are easily accessible for the reaction species. It is found that a crystallographic relationship is present between the MoO2 and MoS2 and that a topotactic conversion from the oxidic to the sulfuric phase enables orientational control. In addition, density functional theory studies shows...

  2. A study of the construct validity of TEM-4 cloze test: A process approach%TEM-4完型填空测试结构效度研究--答题过程分析法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓扣; 李绍山

    2006-01-01

    针对目前结构效度定量研究方法的不足,本文尝试从受试答题过程的角度对TEM-4完型填空测试进行了结构效度研究.实验结果表明,TEM-4完型填空测试很好地考查了受试运用冗余信息的能力,但是在考查受试辨析词汇能力方面尚有改进的余地.在分析受试答题过程的基础上,结合Bachman和Cohen对结构效度的定义,我们尝试性地提出了一个计算结构效度系数的公式.

  3. Toward Ending the Guessing Game: Study of the Formation of Nanostructures Using In Situ Liquid Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Thao; Yang, Hong

    2015-12-17

    The field of synthetic nanochemistry has grown tremendously in the past three decades since the discovery of nonaqueous synthesis of monodispersed particles. Almost all classes of materials, from II-VI semiconductor to metal, alloy, and metal oxide can now be prepared in various sizes and shapes. One major challenge has been the development of a technique for direct real-time recording of data during the formation of nanostructures in liquid reaction media where nucleation and growth occur. A viable solution finally arrived with the recent development of static and flow liquid cells for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This Perspective will showcase a few selected examples in this rapidly growing area, with a focus on using the new capabilities of liquid TEM (LTEM) for quantitative study of nucleation and growth, as well as shape formation of nanocrystals in solution. A discussion on future direction is also presented.

  4. TEM and HRTEM study of oxide particles in an Al-alloyed high-Cr oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel with Hf addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Peng; Kimura, Akihiko; Kasada, Ryuta; Okuda, Takanari; Inoue, Masaki; Ukai, Shigeharu; Ohnuki, Somei; Fujisawa, Toshiharu; Abe, Fujio; Jiang, Shan; Yang, Zhigang

    2017-03-01

    The nanoparticles in an Al-alloyed high-Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with Hf addition, i.e., SOC-16 (Fe-15Cr-2W-0.1Ti-4Al-0.62Hf-0.35Y2O3), have been examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Relative to an Al-alloyed high-Cr ODS ferritic steel without Hf addition, i.e., SOC-9 (Fe-15.5Cr-2W-0.1Ti-4Al-0.35Y2O3), the dispersion morphology and coherency of the oxide nanoparticles in SOC-16 were significantly improved. Almost all the small nanoparticles (diameter anion-deficient fluorite structure and coherent with the bcc steel matrix. The larger particles (diameter >10 nm) were also mainly identified as cubic Y2Hf2O7 oxides with the anion-deficient fluorite structure. The results presented here are compared with those of SOC-9 with a brief discussion of the underlying mechanisms of the unusual thermal and irradiation stabilities of the oxides as well as the superior strength, excellent irradiation tolerance and extraordinary corrosion resistance of SOC-16.

  5. In Situ TEM Creation of Nanowire Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Sardar Bilal

    Integration of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) as active components in devices requires that desired mechanical, thermal and electrical interfaces can be established between the nanoscale geometry of the SiNW and the microscale architecture of the device. In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM...... of SiNW were also investigated in situ. SiNWs were grown on silicon microcantilever heaters using the VLS mechanism. When grown across a gap between adjacent cantilevers, contact was formed when the SiNW impinged on the sidewall of an adjacent cantilever. Using in situ TEM, SiNW contact formation...

  6. TEM study of the cooling rate dependent crystallization behavior of (Zr{sub 65}Al{sub 10}Ni{sub 10}Cu{sub 15}){sub 98}Nb{sub 2} metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yingmin, E-mail: apwangym@dlut.edu.c [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, No. 2 Lingggong Road, Ganjingzi District, Dalian, Liaoning 116024 (China); Shek, Chan Hung [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Wang, Qing; Qiang, Jianbing; Dong, Chuang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, No. 2 Lingggong Road, Ganjingzi District, Dalian, Liaoning 116024 (China)

    2010-08-15

    The crystallization of (Zr{sub 65}Al{sub 10}Ni{sub 10}Cu{sub 15}){sub 98}Nb{sub 2} metallic glasses has been studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The ribbon glass and bulk metallic glass (BMG) of this alloy exhibit different crystallization behaviors. For ribbon glass in the first stage crystallization, icosahedral quasicrystal (I-phase) precipitated together with the {eta}-Zr{sub 2}Ni (a = 1.226 nm) phase. The BMG alloy transforms into the I-phase and two coherently coexisted phases, namely, the Al{sub 2}Zr{sub 3} phase and an unknown primitive cubic phase (a = 0.76 nm) in this stage. The experimental evidence indicates that the liquid cooling rate for sample preparation has a significant effect on its crystallization behavior of this alloy glass.

  7. In situ TEM study of G-phase precipitates under heavy ion irradiation in CF8 cast austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wei-Ying [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Li, Meimei; Zhang, Xuan; Kirk, Marquis A.; Baldo, Peter M. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Lian, Tiangan [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Thermally-aged cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) CF8 was irradiated with 1 MeV Kr ions at 300, 350 and 400 °C to 1.88 × 10{sup 19} ions/m{sup 2} (∼3 dpa) at the IVEM-Tandem Facility at the Argonne National Laboratory. Before irradiation, the distribution of G-phase precipitates in the ferrite showed spatial variations, and both their size and density were affected by the ferrite–austenite phase boundary and presence of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides. Under 300 °C irradiation, in situ TEM observation showed G-phase precipitates were relatively unchanged in the vicinity of the phase boundary M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides, while the density of G-phase precipitates increased with increasing dose within the ferrite matrix. Coarsening of G-phase precipitates was observed in the vicinity of phase boundary M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides at 350 °C and 400 °C.

  8. Studying Dynamic Processes of Nano-sized Objects in Liquid using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermannsdörfer, Justus; de Jonge, Niels

    2017-02-05

    Samples fully embedded in liquid can be studied at a nanoscale spatial resolution with Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) using a microfluidic chamber assembled in the specimen holder for Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and STEM. The microfluidic system consists of two silicon microchips supporting thin Silicon Nitride (SiN) membrane windows. This article describes the basic steps of sample loading and data acquisition. Most important of all is to ensure that the liquid compartment is correctly assembled, thus providing a thin liquid layer and a vacuum seal. This protocol also includes a number of tests necessary to perform during sample loading in order to ensure correct assembly. Once the sample is loaded in the electron microscope, the liquid thickness needs to be measured. Incorrect assembly may result in a too-thick liquid, while a too-thin liquid may indicate the absence of liquid, such as when a bubble is formed. Finally, the protocol explains how images are taken and how dynamic processes can be studied. A sample containing AuNPs is imaged both in pure water and in saline.

  9. Importance of microscopy in durability studies of solidified and stabilized contaminated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klich, I.; Wilding, L.P.; Drees, L.R.; Landa, E.R.

    1999-01-01

    Solidification/stabilization (S/S) is recognized by the U.S. EPA as a best demonstrated available technology for the containment of contaminated soils and other hazardous wastes that cannot be destroyed by chemical, thermal, or biological means. Despite the increased use of S/S technologies, little research has been conducted on the weathering and degradation of solidified and stabilized wastes once the treated materials have been buried. Published data to verify the performance and durability of landfilled treated wastes over time are rare. In this preliminary study, optical and electron microscopy (scanning electron microscopy [SEM], transmission electron microscopy [TEM] and electron probe microanalyses [EPMA]) were used to evaluate weathering features associated with metal-bearing contaminated soil that had been solidified and stabilized with Portland cement and subsequently buried on site, stored outdoors aboveground, or achieved in a laboratory warehouse for up to 6 yr. Physical and chemical alteration processes identified include: freeze-thaw cracking, cracking caused by the formation of expansive minerals such as ettringite, carbonation, and the movement of metals from waste aggregates into the cement micromass. Although the extent of degradation after 6 yr is considered slight to moderate, results of this study show that the same environmental concerns that affect the durability of concrete must be considered when evaluating the durability and permanence of the solidification and stabilization of contaminated soils with cement. In addition, such evaluations cannot be based on leaching and chemical analyses alone. The use of all levels of microscopic analyses must be incorporated into studies of the long-term performance of S/S technologies.Solidification/stabilization (S/S) is recognized by the U.S. EPA as a best demonstrated available technology for the containment of contaminated soils and other hazardous wastes that cannot be destroyed by chemical

  10. Holographic microscopy for in situ studies of microorganism motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, J.; Hu, S.; Jericho, S.; Lindensmith, C.

    2011-12-01

    Robust technologies for the detection and identification of microorganisms at low concentrations in complex liquid media are needed for numerous applications: environmental and medical microbiology, food safety, and for the search for microbial life elsewhere in the Solar System. The best current method for microbial enumeration is specific labeling with fluorescent dyes followed by high-resolution light microscopy. However, fluorescent techniques are difficult to use in situ in extreme environments (such as the Arctic and Antarctic or the open ocean) due to the fragility of the instruments and their high power demands. In addition, light microscopic techniques rarely provide insight into microbial motility behaviors. Tracking single cells would provide important insight into the physics of micron-scale motility as well as into key microbial phenomena such as surface attachment and invasiveness. An alternative to traditional light microscopy that is attracting increasing attention is holographic microscopy. Holographic microscopy works by illuminating the object of interest with coherent light from a laser. The light reflected from (or transmitted through) the object is then combined with a coherent reference beam to create an interference pattern that contains the phase and intensity information required to reconstruct a three dimensional image of the object. The interference pattern is recorded on a high resolution detector and can be used to computationally reconstruct a 3D image of the object. The lateral resolution of the image depends upon the wavelength of the light used, the laser power, camera quality, and external noise sources (vibration, stray light, and so forth). Although the principle is simple, technological barriers have prevented wider use of holographic microscopy. Laser sources and CCD cameras with the appropriate properties have only very recently become affordable. In addition, holographic microscopy leads to large data sets that are

  11. Reflections on the value of electron microscopy in the study of heterogeneous catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, John Meurig

    2017-01-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) is arguably the single most powerful method of characterizing heterogeneous catalysts. Irrespective of whether they are bulk and multiphasic, or monophasic and monocrystalline, or nanocluster and even single-atom and on a support, their structures in atomic detail can be visualized in two or three dimensions, thanks to high-resolution instruments, with sub-Ångstrom spatial resolutions. Their topography, tomography, phase-purity, composition, as well as the bonding, and valence-states of their constituent atoms and ions and, in favourable circumstances, the short-range and long-range atomic order and dynamics of the catalytically active sites, can all be retrieved by the panoply of variants of modern EM. The latter embrace electron crystallography, rotation and precession electron diffraction, X-ray emission and high-resolution electron energy-loss spectra (EELS). Aberration-corrected (AC) transmission (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) have led to a revolution in structure determination. Environmental EM is already playing an increasing role in catalyst characterization, and new advances, involving special cells for the study of solid catalysts in contact with liquid reactants, have recently been deployed.

  12. Structure and composition of magnetocaloric Ni-Mn-In-Co thin films on the nanoscale - a TEM study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erkartal, Burak; Schuermann, Ulrich; Kienle, Lorenz [Institute for Materials Science, Synthesis and Real Structure, Christian Albrechts University, Kiel (Germany); Duppel, Viola [Nanochemistry Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Stuttgart (Germany); Niemann, Robert; Schultz, Ludwig; Faehler, Sebastian [IFW Dresden (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    A complementary set of electron microscopy techniques is applied for the determination of structural and chemical segregation phenomena within a 300 nm thick metamagnetic Ni-Mn-In-Co thin film. The structure is predominantly composed of distinct modulated martensites of the 5M-, 6M-, 7M-, and 8M-type. Additionally these modulated structures exhibit twinning and stacking disordering. The nature of the disordering and the structural misfit at the twin interface were analyzed via high resolution micrographs. Next to an adhesion layer of Cr interdiffusion on the nanoscale was observed producing a penternary chemically and structurally homogeneous precipitate. The structure can be assigned to a twinned non-modulated pseudocubic model. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Gentle transfer method for water- and acid/alkali-sensitive 2D materials for (S)TEM study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Junhao; Lin, Yung-Chang; Wang, Xinsheng; Xie, Liming; Suenaga, Kazutomo

    2016-11-01

    We report a method in making transmission electron microscopy sample for both CVD-grown and exfoliated 2D materials without etching process, thus gentle to those 2D materials that are sensitive to water and reactive etchants. Large-scale WS2 monolayer grown on glass, NbS2 atomic layers grown on exfoliated h-BN flakes, and water-sensitive exfoliated TiS2 flakes are given as representative examples. We show that the as-transferred samples not only retain excellent structural integrity down to atomic scale but also have little oxidations, presumably due to the minimum contact with water/etchants. This method paves the way for atomic scale structural and chemical investigations in sensitive 2D materials.

  14. Transmission Electron Microscopy and Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopy Studies on the Bioaccumulation and Tissue Level Absorption of TiO2 Nanoparticles in Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Dongwook; Nho, Hyun Woo; Yoon, Tae Hyun

    2015-06-01

    In this study, bioaccumulation and tissue-level absorption of TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) in freshwater invertebrates were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). The TiO2 NPs were used to test impacts of core sizes (i.e., 5 ± 2 nm and 23 ± 7 nm for TiO2(SYN) and TiO2(P25), respectively) and agglomerations (i.e., well dispersed vs. highly agglomerated) on the uptake of TiO2 NPs in Daphnia magna (D. magna). Highly agglomerated TiO2 NPs, regardless of their core sizes, were heavily taken up into the digestive tract of D. magna and no detectable penetration of both TiO2 NPs into the gut epithelial cells of D. magna was observed in TEM and STXM images. However, significant damages involving morphological changes in the microvilli and gut epithelial cells (e.g., irregular shaped microvilli, epithelial cell protrusion, and dilatation of cytoplasmic inclusion) were observed only with the commercial TiO2 NPs (TiO2(P25)) with larger core size and mixed crystalline phase, while the laboratory synthesized TiO2 NPs (TiO2(Syn)) with smaller core size and single crystalline phase showed slight morphological changes in the gut microvilli and epithelial cells. In the case of D. magna exposed to the well dispersed synthetic TiO2 NP ((Cit)TiO2(Syn)), only a negligible amount of TiO2 NPs were found within the digestive tract of the D. magna without any significant damages in the gut microvilli and epithelial cells and any detectable penetrations of TiO2 NPs into epithelial cells of D. magna gut. These TEM and STXM observations confirmed us that uptake of NP into D. magna are strongly dependent on their agglomeration (i.e., hydrodynamic sizes), rather than their core sizes, while direct penetration of NPs into tissues of digestive tract seems unlikely without significant morphological changes (e.g., collapse of the epithelial tissue) caused by high toxicity of NPs or released metal ions.

  15. High resolution FESEM and TEM reveal bacterial spore attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panessa-Warren, Barbara J; Tortora, George T; Warren, John B

    2007-08-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies in the 1960s and early 1970s using conventional thin section and freeze fracture methodologies revealed ultrastructural bacterial spore appendages. However, the limited technology at that time necessitated the time-consuming process of imaging serial sections and reconstructing each structure. Consequently, the distribution and function of these appendages and their possible role in colonization or pathogenesis remained unknown. By combining high resolution field emission electron microscopy with TEM images of identical bacterial spore preparations, we have been able to obtain images of intact and sectioned Bacillus and Clostridial spores to clearly visualize the appearance, distribution, resistance (to trypsin, chloramphenicol, and heat), and participation of these structures to facilitate attachment of the spores to glass, agar, and human cell substrates. Current user-friendly commercial field emission scanning electron microscopes (FESEMs), permit high resolution imaging, with high brightness guns at lower accelerating voltages for beam sensitive intact biological samples, providing surface images at TEM magnifications for making direct comparisons. For the first time, attachment structures used by pathogenic, environmental, and thermophile bacterial spores could be readily visualized on intact spores to reveal how specific appendages and outer spore coats participated in spore attachment, colonization, and invasion.

  16. An experimental study of pathologist's navigation patterns in virtual microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romero Eduardo

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In virtual microscopy, a sequential process of captures of microscopical fields, allows to construct a virtual slide which is visualized using a specialized software, called the virtual microscopy viewer. This tool allows useful exploration of images, composed of thousands of microscopical fields of view at different levels of magnification, emulating an actual microscopical examination. The aim of this study was to establish the main pathologist's navigation patterns when exploring virtual microscopy slides, using a graphical user interface, adapted to the pathologist's workflow. Four pathologists with a similar level of experience, graduated from the same pathology program, navigated six virtual slides. Different issues were evaluated, namely, the percentage of common visited image regions, the time spent at each and its coincidence level, that is to say, the region of interest location. In addition, navigation patterns were also assessed, i.e., mouse movement velocities and linearity of the diagnostic paths. Results suggest that regions of interest are determined by a complex combination of the visited area, the time spent at each visit and the coincidence level among pathologists. Additionally, linear trajectories and particular velocity patterns were found for the registered diagnostic paths.

  17. A study of internal oxidation in carburized steels by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    An, X; Rainforth, W M; Chen, L

    2003-01-01

    The internal oxidation of Cr-Mn carburizing steel was studied. Internal oxidation was induced using a commercial carburizing process. Sputter erosion coupled with glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) was used to determine the depth profile elemental distribution within the internal oxidation layer (<10 mu m). In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) studies were carried out on selected sputter eroded surfaces. Oxide type was identified primarily by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The carburized surface was found to consist of a continuous oxide layer, followed by a complex internal oxidation layer, where Cr and Mn oxides were found to populate grain boundaries in a globular form in the near surface region. At greater depths (5-10 mu m), Si oxides formed as a grain boundary network. The internal oxides (mainly complex oxides) grew quickly during the initial stages of the carburizing process (2 h, 800 deg. C+3 h, 930 deg. C). G...

  18. Study of the crystallographic architecture of corals at the nanoscale by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzerara, Karim; Menguy, Nicolas; Obst, Martin; Stolarski, Jarosław; Mazur, Maciej; Tylisczak, Tolek; Brown, Gordon E; Meibom, Anders

    2011-07-01

    We have investigated the nanotexture and crystallographic orientation of aragonite in a coral skeleton using synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Polarization-dependent STXM imaging at 40-nm spatial resolution was used to obtain an orientation map of the c-axis of aragonite on a focused ion beam milled ultrathin section of a Porites coral. This imaging showed that one of the basic units of coral skeletons, referred to as the center of calcification (COC), consists of a cluster of 100-nm aragonite globules crystallographically aligned over several micrometers with a fan-like distribution and with the properties of single crystals at the mesoscale. The remainder of the skeleton consists of aragonite single-crystal fibers in crystallographic continuity with the nanoglobules comprising the COC. Our observation provides information on the nm-scale processes that led to biomineral formation in this sample. Importantly, the present study illustrates how the methodology described here, which combines HRTEM and polarization-dependent synchrotron-based STXM imaging, offers an interesting new approach for investigating biomineralizing systems at the nm-scale.

  19. Imaging of intact MOF-5 nanocrystals by advanced TEM at liquid

    OpenAIRE

    Wiktor, Christian; Turner, Stuart; Zacher, Denise; Fischer, Roland A.; Tendeloo, van, G.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: First results on the imaging of intact metalorganic framework (MOF) pores in MOF-5 nanocrystals by aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM) under liquid nitrogen conditions are presented. The applied technique is certainly transferable to other MOF systems, permitting detailed studies of MOF interfaces, MOFnanoparticle interaction and MOF thin films.

  20. Effects of diagnostic ionizing radiation on pregnancy via TEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammed, W H; Artoli, A M [Al Neelain University Department of Medical and Biophysics 11121 Khartoum (Sudan)], E-mail: wasilhashim@yahoo.com

    2008-08-15

    In Sudan, X-rays are routinely used at least once for measurements of pelvis during the gestation period, though this is highly prohibited worldwide, except for a few life threatening cases. To demonstrate the effect of diagnostic ionizing radiation on uterus, fetus and neighboring tissues to the ovaries, two independent experiments on pregnant rabbits were conducted. The first experiment was a proof of concept that diagnostic ionizing radiation is hazardous throughout the gestation period. The second experiment was done through Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) to elucidate the morphological changes in the ultra structure of samples taken from irradiated pregnant rabbits. This study uses TEM to test the effect of diagnostic radiation of less than 0.6 Gray on the cellular level. Morphological changes have been captured and the images were analyzed to quantify these effects.

  1. Application and development of advanced Lorentz microscopy techniques for the study of magnetic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beacham, Robert J.

    This PhD project presents an investigation into the development of magnetic imaging methods in the TEM and their application in imaging narrow domain walls in multilayer magnetic structures. Lorentz microscopy techniques are limited in quantitative magnetic imaging as this generally requires using scanning imaging modes which limits the capability of imaging dynamic processes. The first imaging method developed in this study is a phase gradient technique with the aim of producing quantitative magnetic contrast proportional to the magnetic induction of the sample whilst maintaining a live imaging mode. This method uses a specifically engineered, semi-electron-transparent graded wedge aperture to controllably perturb intensity in the back focal plane. The results of this study found that this method could produce magnetic contrast proportional to the sample induction, however the required gradient of the wedge aperture made this contrast close to the noise level with large associated errors. In the second part of this study we investigated the development of a technique aimed at gaining sub-microsecond temporal resolution within TEMs based on streak imaging. We are using ramped pulsed magnetic fields, applied across nanowire samples to both induce magnetic behaviour and detect the electron beam across the detector with respect to time. We are coupling this with a novel pixelated detector on the TEM in the form of a Medipix/Timepix chip capable of microsecond exposure times without adding noise. Running this detector in integral mode and allowing for practical limitations such as experiment time and aperture stability, the resultant streak images were taken in Fresnel, Foucault and low angle diffraction imaging modes. We found that while this method is theoretically viable, the limiting factor was the contrast of the magnetic signal in the streak and therefore the total image counts. Domain walls (DWs) in synthetic antiferromagnetically (SAF) coupled films patterned

  2. Tubular textures in pillow lavas from a Caledonian west Norwegian ophiolite: A combined TEM, LA-ICP-MS, and STXM study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliegel, Daniel; Wirth, Richard; Simonetti, Antonio; Schreiber, Anja; Furnes, Harald; Muehlenbachs, Karlis

    2011-02-01

    Tubular alteration textures, mineralized by titanite, in glassy rims of pillow lavas from a Norwegian ophiolite (Solund-Stavfjord ophiolite complex (SSOC)) are described and characterized by a multimethod approach. Tubular alteration textures, mineralized by titanite, have been previously proposed to result from bioalteration. The microstructure of the titanite and the tubes is investigated using focused ion beam milling in combination with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). These indicate an assemblage of submicrometer-sized (about 500 nm) titanite single crystals with no organic film or residue in between the grains. In situ U-Pb radiometric dating of the titanite, using laser ablation-multicollector-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS), yielded a metamorphic age of 442 ± 13 Ma. An isotope dilution-thermal ionization mass spectrometric age obtained previously for zircons from the SSOC plutonic rocks yielded a magmatic age of 443 ± 3 Ma. The overlap in ages indicates that subseafloor metamorphism, responsible for titanite formation, occurred during seafloor or subseafloor formation of the tubular alteration textures. The rare earth element contents of the titanite were determined using LA-ICP-MS and chondrite-normalized patterns are similar to those of the SSOC volcanics; hence these do not reflect hydrothermal or seawater influence. The Y/Ho ratio of ˜20-30 in the titanite is also consistent with an upper mantle-derived origin. The sum of all of the spatial resolved data reported here neither supports nor refutes a biogenic origin for the tubular textures.

  3. Fluctuation electron microscopy studies of complex structured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gongpu; Rougée, Annick; Buseck, Peter; Treacy, Michael

    2008-03-01

    Fluctuation electron microscopy (FEM) is a hybrid imaging-diffraction technique. This technique is particularly sensitive to paracrystalline structures of dimension 0.5-2 nm, which are difficult to detect by either imaging or diffraction techniques alone. It has been successfully deployed to study paracrystalline structures in amorphous silicon, germanium thin film. This technique has also been used to study metallic glasses and oxide glasses. Until now, FEM has not been used to study disordered geological materials. In this talk we present our FEM studies of shungite, a naturally occurring disordered carbonaceous material, reveal that trace quantities of tightly curved graphene structures such as C60, or fragments of C60, is present in shungite. We also present results from our study of metamict zircon, whose crystal structure is destroyed by self-radiation during naturally occurring α decay events. Work is in progress to study the structural evolution during the metamictization process.

  4. Nanoscale chromatin structure characterization for optical applications: a transmission electron microscopy study (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Cherkezyan, Lusik; Zhang, Di; Almassalha, Luay; Roth, Eric; Chandler, John; Bleher, Reiner; Subramanian, Hariharan; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Backman, Vadim

    2017-02-01

    Structural and biological origins of light scattering in cells and tissue are still poorly understood. We demonstrate how this problem might be addressed through the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). For biological samples, TEM image intensity is proportional to mass-density, and thus proportional to refractive index (RI). By calculating the autocorrelation function (ACF) of TEM image intensity of a thin-section of cells, we essentially maintain the nanoscale ACF of the 3D cellular RI distribution, given that the RI distribution is statistically isotropic. Using this nanoscale 3D RI ACF, we can simulate light scattering through biological samples, and thus guiding many optical techniques to quantify specific structures. In this work, we chose to use Partial Wave Spectroscopy (PWS) microscopy as a one of the nanoscale-sensitive optical techniques. Hela cells were prepared using standard protocol to preserve nanoscale ultrastructure, and a 50-nm slice was sectioned for TEM imaging at 6 nm resolution. The ACF was calculated for chromatin, and the PWS mean sigma was calculated by summing over the power spectral density in the visible light frequency of a random medium generated to match the ACF. A 1-µm slice adjacent to the 50-nm slice was sectioned for PWS measurement to guarantee identical chromatin structure. For 33 cells, we compared the calculated PWS mean sigma from TEM and the value measured directly, and obtained a strong correlation of 0.69. This example indicates the great potential of using TEM measured RI distribution to better understand the quantification of cellular nanostructure by optical methods.

  5. Protein-nanoparticle interaction in bioconjugated silver nanoparticles: A transmission electron microscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reymond-Laruinaz, Sébastien; Saviot, Lucien; Potin, Valérie; Marco de Lucas, María del Carmen

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of interaction between proteins and noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) is crucial to extend the use of NPs in biological applications and nanomedicine. We report the synthesis of Ag-NPs:protein bioconjugates synthesized in total absence of citrates or other stabilizing agents in order to study the NP-protein interaction. Four common proteins (lysozyme, bovine serum albumin, cytochrome-C and hemoglobin) were used in this work. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) were mainly used to study these bioconjugated NPs. TEM images showed Ag NPs with sizes in the 5-40 nm range. The presence of a protein layer surrounding the Ag NPs was also observed by TEM. Moreover, the composition at different points of single bioconjugated NPs was probed by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The thickness of the protein layer varies in the 3-15 nm range and the Ag NPs are a few nanometers away. This allowed to obtain an enhancement of the Raman signal of the proteins in the analysis of water suspensions of bioconjugates. SERS results showed a broadening of the Raman bands of the proteins which we attribute to the contribution of different configurations of the proteins adsorbed on the Ag NPs surface. Moreover, the assignment of an intense and sharp peak in the low-frequency range to Ag-N vibrations points to the chemisorption of the proteins on the Ag-NPs surface.

  6. Synthesis of nanocrystalline MgH{sub 2} powder by gas-phase condensation and in situ hydridation: TEM, XPS and XRD study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrichs, O. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, CSIC-Universidad de Sevilla, Isla de la Cartuja, Avda. Americo Vespucio 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain)]. E-mail: veroil@icmse.csic.es; Kolodziejczyk, L. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, CSIC-Universidad de Sevilla, Isla de la Cartuja, Avda. Americo Vespucio 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Sanchez-Lopez, J.C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, CSIC-Universidad de Sevilla, Isla de la Cartuja, Avda. Americo Vespucio 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Lopez-Cartes, C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, CSIC-Universidad de Sevilla, Isla de la Cartuja, Avda. Americo Vespucio 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Fernandez, A. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, CSIC-Universidad de Sevilla, Isla de la Cartuja, Avda. Americo Vespucio 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain)

    2007-05-31

    In this work, a two-step method for the preparation of nanocrystalline MgH{sub 2} is presented, where the first step consists of synthesis of nanocrystalline Mg powder by the gas-phase condensation method (GPC) and the second of in situ hydridation leading to the formation of MgH{sub 2} nanoparticles. By transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron diffraction (ED), crystalline Mg nanoparticles from GPC were found to have mean size within the range of 30-50 nm, while in the case of MgH{sub 2} nanoparticles these values increase approximately 2-3 times mainly due to particles growth during the hydridation step. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows the high conversion into the MgH{sub 2} phase after hydridation. By X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) metallic magnesium was detected below a magnesium oxide layer of 3-4 nm for the Mg sample prepared by GPC, which shows the efficiency of a novel sample transfer system without air exposure between N{sub 2}-glove-box, preparation chamber and experimental apparatus.

  7. Formation of aligned nanosilicide structures in a MBE-grown Au/Si(110) system: a real-time temperature-dependent TEM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatta, Umananda M; Dash, J K; Roy, Anupam; Rath, A; Satyam, P V

    2009-05-20

    Thin Au films (∼2 nm) were deposited on an Si(110) substrate epitaxially under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions in a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system. Real-time in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements were carried out at various temperatures (from room temperature to 700 °C), which shows the formation and growth of aligned gold silicide nanorod-like structures. The real-time selected-area electron diffraction patterns show the presence of silicon and unreacted gold at lower temperatures (up to 363 °C), while at higher temperatures only the signature of silicon has been observed. The diffraction analysis from room temperature cooled systems show the presence of gold silicide structures. Around 700 °C, 97% of the nanostructures were found to be aligned nanosilicide-rod-like structures with a longer side of ≈37 nm and aspect ratio of 1.38. For a high temperature annealed system (at 600 °C), selected-area diffraction (SAD) and high resolution lattice (after cooling down to room temperature) confirmed the formation of nano- Au(5)Si(2) structures. The alignment of gold silicide structures has been explained on the basis of lattice matching between the substrate silicon and silicide structures.

  8. Study of Interactions Between Microbes and Minerals by Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopy (STXM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benzerara, K.; /Paris U., VI-VII, LMCP; Tyliszczak, T.; /LBNL, ALS; Brown, G.E., Jr.; /Stanford U., Geo. Environ. Sci. /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-01-03

    Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were combined to characterize various samples of geomicrobiological interest down to the nanometer scale. An approach based on energy-filtered imaging was used to examine microbe-mineral interactions and the resulting biominerals, as well as biosignatures in simplified laboratory samples. This approach was then applied to natural samples, including natural biofilms entombed in calcium carbonate precipitates and bioweathered silicates and facilitated location of bacterial cells and provided unique insights about their biogeochemical interactions with minerals at the 30-40 nm scale.

  9. Characterization nanoparticles-based vaccines and vaccine candidates: a Transmission Electron Microscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Menéndez I

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM is a valuable tool for the biotech industry. This paper summarizes some of the contributions of MET in the characterization of the recombinant antigens are part of vaccines or vaccine candidates obtained in the CIGB. It mentions the use of complementary techniques MET (Negative staining, and immunoelectron that enhance visualization and ultrastructural characterization of the recombinant proteins obtained by Genetic Engineering.

  10. Transmission electron microscopy study on silicon nitride/stainless steel bonded interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poza, P. [Departamento de Ciencia e Ingenieria de los Materiales, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Miranzo, P. [Institute of Ceramics and Glass, CSIC, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Osendi, M.I. [Institute of Ceramics and Glass, CSIC, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: miosendi@icv.csic.es

    2008-11-28

    The reaction zone of a diffusion bonded Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/stainlees steel (ss) interface formed at 1100 deg. C was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Besides the formation of various iron silicides, iron nitride and chromium nitride phases detected by XRD, Cr{sub 3}Ni{sub 5}Si{sub 2} crystals were identified at the interface by TEM.

  11. Indium hydroxide to oxide decomposition observed in one nanocrystal during in situ transmission electron microscopy studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miehe, Gerhard; Lauterbach, Stefan; Kleebe, Hans-Joachim [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Fachbereich Material- und Geowissenschaften, Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Gurlo, Aleksander, E-mail: gurlo@materials.tu-darmstadt.de [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Fachbereich Material- und Geowissenschaften, Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) is used to study, in situ, spatially resolved decomposition in individual nanocrystals of metal hydroxides and oxyhydroxides. This case study reports on the decomposition of indium hydroxide (c-In(OH){sub 3}) to bixbyite-type indium oxide (c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The electron beam is focused onto a single cube-shaped In(OH){sub 3} crystal of {l_brace}100{r_brace} morphology with ca. 35 nm edge length and a sequence of HR-TEM images was recorded during electron beam irradiation. The frame-by-frame analysis of video sequences allows for the in situ, time-resolved observation of the shape and orientation of the transformed crystals, which in turn enables the evaluation of the kinetics of c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystallization. Supplementary material (video of the transformation) related to this article can be found online at (10.1016/j.jssc.2012.09.022). After irradiation the shape of the parent cube-shaped crystal is preserved, however, its linear dimension (edge) is reduced by the factor 1.20. The corresponding spotted selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern representing zone [001] of c-In(OH){sub 3} is transformed to a diffuse strongly textured ring-like pattern of c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3} that indicates the transformed cube is no longer a single crystal but is disintegrated into individual c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3} domains with the size of about 5-10 nm. The induction time of approximately 15 s is estimated from the time-resolved Fourier transforms. The volume fraction of the transformed phase (c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3}), calculated from the shrinkage of the parent c-In(OH){sub 3} crystal in the recorded HR-TEM images, is used as a measure of the kinetics of c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystallization within the framework of Avrami-Erofeev formalism. The Avrami exponent of {approx}3 is characteristic for a reaction mechanism with fast nucleation at the beginning of the reaction and subsequent three-dimensional growth of

  12. TEM Imaging of Mass-selected Polymer Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasibulin, Albert G.; Kauppinen, Esko I. [Aerosol Technology Group, VTT Processes (Finland); Thomson, Bruce A. [MDS Sciex (Canada); Fernandez de la Mora, J. [Yale University, Mechanical Engineering (United States)], E-mail: juan.delamora@yale.edu

    2002-10-15

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecules with masses below 1300 amu are electrosprayed (ES) from solution, mobility-selected at high resolution in a differential mobility analyzer (DMA), collected on a grid and imaged by transmission electron microscopy (ES-DMA-TEM). The DMA resolves individual n-mers, and selects only one out of the many present in the original sample. Ion identity is established from parallel mass spectra (ES-MS). The images reveal spherical particles 1.46 nm in diameter, in good agreement with the known ion mass and bulk density. The DMA-selection technique opens new paths for the study of very small particles.

  13. Particle size distributions by transmission electron microscopy: an interlaboratory comparison case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Stephen B; Chan, Christopher; Brown, Scott C; Eschbach, Peter; Han, Li; Ensor, David S; Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Bonevich, John; Vladár, András E; Hight Walker, Angela R; Zheng, Jiwen; Starnes, Catherine; Stromberg, Arnold; Ye, Jia; Grulke, Eric A

    2013-11-01

    This paper reports an interlaboratory comparison that evaluated a protocol for measuring and analysing the particle size distribution of discrete, metallic, spheroidal nanoparticles using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The study was focused on automated image capture and automated particle analysis. NIST RM8012 gold nanoparticles (30 nm nominal diameter) were measured for area-equivalent diameter distributions by eight laboratories. Statistical analysis was used to (1) assess the data quality without using size distribution reference models, (2) determine reference model parameters for different size distribution reference models and non-linear regression fitting methods and (3) assess the measurement uncertainty of a size distribution parameter by using its coefficient of variation. The interlaboratory area-equivalent diameter mean, 27.6 nm ± 2.4 nm (computed based on a normal distribution), was quite similar to the area-equivalent diameter, 27.6 nm, assigned to NIST RM8012. The lognormal reference model was the preferred choice for these particle size distributions as, for all laboratories, its parameters had lower relative standard errors (RSEs) than the other size distribution reference models tested (normal, Weibull and Rosin-Rammler-Bennett). The RSEs for the fitted standard deviations were two orders of magnitude higher than those for the fitted means, suggesting that most of the parameter estimate errors were associated with estimating the breadth of the distributions. The coefficients of variation for the interlaboratory statistics also confirmed the lognormal reference model as the preferred choice. From quasi-linear plots, the typical range for good fits between the model and cumulative number-based distributions was 1.9 fitted standard deviations less than the mean to 2.3 fitted standard deviations above the mean. Automated image capture, automated particle analysis and statistical evaluation of the data and fitting coefficients provide a

  14. [Study of human leucine-rich amelogenin peptide and its regulation of mineralization by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kun, Tian; Xiaoyun, Feng; Qin, Du; Chuhang, Liao; Xiaohua, Ren

    2017-02-01

    Recombinant human leucine-rich amelogenin peptide (LRAP) was studied by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (TEM); evaluation focused on its self-assembly and crystal growth in vitro. Human LRAP was recombined through prokaryotic expression vector pCold-SUMO and transformed into Escherichia coli BL21plys to acquire purified proteins. Cryogen TEM recorded assembly and self-assembling of LRAP from pH 3.5 to pH 8.0, and the hydroxyapatite crystal growth in the mixture of LRAP protein solution and artificial saliva was observed using TEM and selected area electron diffraction. More than 90% purity LRAP was expressed, purified and identified as described in methods. LRAP linked into oligomers, nanospheres, nanochains, and microribbons, whereas pH value increased from 3.5 to 8.0. Mature hydroxyapatite crystal growth was guided in artificial saliva filled with calcium phosphate. LRAP is simplified amelogenin functional domain and conserved the basic characters of amelogenin such as self-assembling and inducing crystallization along c axis. In the area of acellular synthesis of hydroxyapatite using extracellular enamel matrix protein, LRAP is one of candidate repair materials for irregular hard tissue defection.
.

  15. Nanomechanics of Cells and Biomaterials Studied by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Jason I; Revenko, Irène; Rodriguez, Brian J

    2015-11-18

    The behavior and mechanical properties of cells are strongly dependent on the biochemical and biomechanical properties of their microenvironment. Thus, understanding the mechanical properties of cells, extracellular matrices, and biomaterials is key to understanding cell function and to develop new materials with tailored mechanical properties for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has emerged as an indispensable technique for measuring the mechanical properties of biomaterials and cells with high spatial resolution and force sensitivity within physiologically relevant environments and timescales in the kPa to GPa elastic modulus range. The growing interest in this field of bionanomechanics has been accompanied by an expanding array of models to describe the complexity of indentation of hierarchical biological samples. Furthermore, the integration of AFM with optical microscopy techniques has further opened the door to a wide range of mechanotransduction studies. In recent years, new multidimensional and multiharmonic AFM approaches for mapping mechanical properties have been developed, which allow the rapid determination of, for example, cell elasticity. This Progress Report provides an introduction and practical guide to making AFM-based nanomechanical measurements of cells and surfaces for tissue engineering applications.

  16. Environmental TEM Study of Electron Beam Induced Electrochemistry of Pr0.64Ca0.36MnO3 Catalysts for Oxygen Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mildner, Stephanie; Beleggia, Marco; Mierwaldt, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEVI) studies offer great potential for gathering atomic scale information on the electronic state of electrodes in contact with reactants. It also poses big challenges due to the impact of the high energy electron beam. In this article, we present...... of beam induced potentials is an important step for future controlled electrochemical experiments in an ETEM....

  17. Mössbauer, XRD and TEM Study on the Intercalation and the Release of Drugs in/from Layered Double Hydroxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kuzmann

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Layered double hydroxides (LDHs are one of the very important nano-carriers for drug delivery, due to their many advantageous features, such as the ease and low-cost of preparation, low cytotoxicity, good biocompatibility, protection for the intercalated drugs, and the capacity to facilitate the uptake of the loaded drug in the cells. In our previous studies, Mössbauer spectroscopy was applied to monitor structural changes occurring during the incorporation of Fe(III in MgFe- and CaFe-LDHs, and the intercalation of various organic compounds in anionic form. Recently, we have successfully elaborated a protocol for the intercalation and release of indol-2-carboxylate and L-cysteinate in CaFe-LDH. The corresponding structural changes in the LDH samples were studied by XRD, HR-TEM and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. The Mössbauer spectra reflected small but significant changes upon both the intercalation and the release of drugs. The changes in the basal distances could be followed by XRD measurements, and HR-TEM images made these changes visible.

  18. Underwater microscopy for in situ studies of benthic ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Andrew D.; Treibitz, Tali; Roberts, Paul L. D.; Kelly, Emily L. A.; Horwitz, Rael; Smith, Jennifer E.; Jaffe, Jules S.

    2016-07-01

    Microscopic-scale processes significantly influence benthic marine ecosystems such as coral reefs and kelp forests. Due to the ocean's complex and dynamic nature, it is most informative to study these processes in the natural environment yet it is inherently difficult. Here we present a system capable of non-invasively imaging seafloor environments and organisms in situ at nearly micrometre resolution. We overcome the challenges of underwater microscopy through the use of a long working distance microscopic objective, an electrically tunable lens and focused reflectance illumination. The diver-deployed instrument permits studies of both spatial and temporal processes such as the algal colonization and overgrowth of bleaching corals, as well as coral polyp behaviour and interspecific competition. By enabling in situ observations at previously unattainable scales, this instrument can provide important new insights into micro-scale processes in benthic ecosystems that shape observed patterns at much larger scales.

  19. Thrombin generation assay and transmission electron microscopy: a useful combination to study tissue factor-bearing microvesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheldof, Damien; Hardij, Julie; Cecchet, Francesca; Chatelain, Bernard; Dogné, Jean-Michel; Mullier, François

    2013-01-01

    Patients with cancer have a 7- to 10-fold increased risk of developing venous thromboembolism. Circulating microvesicles could be a useful predictive biomarker for venous thromboembolism in cancer. Validated and standardised techniques that could be used to determine the complete microvesicle phenotype are required. These were two-fold: a) to characterise tissue factor (TF)-bearing microvesicles released by cultured breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 by flow cytometry (FCM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thrombin generation assay (TGA); and b) to validate the sensitivity and variability intra/inter-assay of TGA as a useful method to study the procoagulant activity (PCA) of microvesicles. Cultured breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 were incubated for 45 minutes at 37°C. Samples were then centrifuged or not at 4,500 g for 15 minutes, and cells and MVs or MV-containing supernatants were used for TEM, FCM and TGA. In activity assays, microvesicles (i.e. cell-depleted supernatants) were incubated with anti-TF antibodies or with annexin V to assess the contribution of TF and phospholipids to the PCA. Alternatively, supernatants were filtered through 0.1, 0.22, 0.45 or 0.65 µm membranes and subjected to TGA. The majority of the PCA was associated with microvesicles smaller than 0.1 µm, and the mean microvesicle size estimated by TEM after 10,000 g centrifugation was 121±54 nm with a majority of vesicles between 100 and 200 nm. Microvesicles derived from 5,000 MDA-MB-231cells/ml were sufficient to significantly increase the thrombin generation of normal pooled plasma. TEM, FCM and filtration coupled to TGA represent a useful combination to study the PCA of TF-bearing microvesicles, whatever their size. And it will be interesting to implement these techniques in patients.

  20. Comparative study of human erythrocytes by digital holographic microscopy, confocal microscopy, and impedance volume analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaz, Benjamin; Barbul, Alexander; Emery, Yves; Korenstein, Rafi; Depeursinge, Christian; Magistretti, Pierre J; Marquet, Pierre

    2008-10-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) parameters such as morphology, volume, refractive index, and hemoglobin content are of great importance for diagnostic purposes. Existing approaches require complicated calibration procedures and robust cell perturbation. As a result, reference values for normal RBC differ depending on the method used. We present a way for measuring parameters of intact individual RBCs by using digital holographic microscopy (DHM), a new interferometric and label-free technique with nanometric axial sensitivity. The results are compared with values achieved by conventional techniques for RBC of the same donor and previously published figures. A DHM equipped with a laser diode (lambda = 663 nm) was used to record holograms in an off-axis geometry. Measurements of both RBC refractive indices and volumes were achieved via monitoring the quantitative phase map of RBC by means of a sequential perfusion of two isotonic solutions with different refractive indices obtained by the use of Nycodenz (decoupling procedure). Volume of RBCs labeled by membrane dye Dil was analyzed by confocal microscopy. The mean cell volume (MCV), red blood cell distribution width (RDW), and mean cell hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) were also measured with an impedance volume analyzer. DHM yielded RBC refractive index n = 1.418 +/- 0.012, volume 83 +/- 14 fl, MCH = 29.9 pg, and MCHC 362 +/- 40 g/l. Erythrocyte MCV, MCH, and MCHC achieved by an impedance volume analyzer were 82 fl, 28.6 pg, and 349 g/l, respectively. Confocal microscopy yielded 91 +/- 17 fl for RBC volume. In conclusion, DHM in combination with a decoupling procedure allows measuring noninvasively volume, refractive index, and hemoglobin content of single-living RBCs with a high accuracy.

  1. Multiple sectioning and perforation techniques for TEM sub-surface studies. [4 MeV Ni/sup +2/ ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, E. H.; Rowcliffe, A. F.

    1978-01-01

    Techniques for preparing multiple electron transparent regions at several depth levels below the surface of a metal disk specimen are described. These techniques are relatively rapid and find application in many areas involving surface studies. Examples are shown of multiple thin areas produced at intervals of approximately 200 nm below the original surface of a stainless steel bombarded with 4 MeV Ni/sup +2/ ions for void swelling studies.

  2. Photoemission Electron Microscopy as a Tool for Studying Steel Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roese, Peter; Keutner, Christoph; Berges, Ulf; Espeter, Philipp; Westphal, Carsten

    2017-03-01

    Key properties of steel like stability, weldability, or ability for absorbing deformation energy are defined by their grain structure. The knowledge about their micrometer and submicrometer structure is of particular interest for tailor-cut macroscopic steel properties. We report on photoemission electron microscopy studies which in principle yield a higher magnification than comparable optical techniques. A flat surface without any topographic features was obtained by applying a non-etching preparation procedure. PEEM images showed very tiny phase islands embedded within a steel phase matrix. Furthermore, we developed an analysis procedure for PEEM images for dual-phase steels. As a result, it is possible to identify the individual work functions of different steel phases at the surface.

  3. Multifrequency scanning probe microscopy study of nanodiamond agglomerates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravind, Vasudeva; Lippold, Stephen; Li, Qian; Strelcov, Evgheny; Okatan, Baris; Legum, Benjamin; Kalinin, Sergei; Clarion University Team; Oak Ridge National Laboratory Team

    Due to their rich surface chemistry and excellent mechanical properties and non-toxic nature, nanodiamond particles have found applications such as biomedicine, tribology and lubrication, targeted drug delivery systems, tissue scaffolds and surgical implants. Although single nanodiamond particles have diameters about 4-5nm, they tend to form agglomerates. While these agglomerates can be useful for some purposes, many applications of nanodiamonds require single particle, disaggregated nanodiamonds. This work is oriented towards studying forces and interactions that contribute to agglomeration in nanodiamonds. In this work, using multifrequency scanning probe microscopy techniques, we show that agglomerate sizes can vary between 50-100nm in raw nanodiamonds. Extremeties of particles and Interfaces between agglomerates show dissipative forces with scanning probe microscope tip, indicating agglomerates could act as points of increased adhesion, thus reducing lubricating efficiency when nanodiamonds are used as lubricant additives. This research was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which is a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

  4. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy studies of graphite edges

    CERN Document Server

    Niimi, Y; Kambara, H; Tagami, K; Tsukada, M; Fukuyama, H; Fukuyama, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    We studied experimentally and theoretically the electronic local density of states (LDOS) near single step edges at the surface of exfoliated graphite. In scanning tunneling microscopy measurements, we observed the $(\\sqrt{3} \\times \\sqrt{3}) R 30^{\\circ}$ and honeycomb superstructures both extending over 3$-$4 nm either from the zigzag or armchair edge. Calculations based on a density-functional derived non-orthogonal tight-binding model show that these superstructures can coexist if the two types of edge admix each other in real graphite step edges. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements near the zigzag edge reveal a clear peak in the LDOS at an energy below the Fermi energy by 20 meV. No such a peak was observed near the armchair edge. We concluded that this peak corresponds to the "edge state" theoretically predicted for graphene ribbons, since a similar prominent LDOS peak due to the edge state is obtained by the first principles calculations.

  5. Photoemission Electron Microscopy as a Tool for Studying Steel Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roese, Peter; Keutner, Christoph; Berges, Ulf; Espeter, Philipp; Westphal, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Key properties of steel like stability, weldability, or ability for absorbing deformation energy are defined by their grain structure. The knowledge about their micrometer and submicrometer structure is of particular interest for tailor-cut macroscopic steel properties. We report on photoemission electron microscopy studies which in principle yield a higher magnification than comparable optical techniques. A flat surface without any topographic features was obtained by applying a non-etching preparation procedure. PEEM images showed very tiny phase islands embedded within a steel phase matrix. Furthermore, we developed an analysis procedure for PEEM images for dual-phase steels. As a result, it is possible to identify the individual work functions of different steel phases at the surface.

  6. Optimized Negative-Staining Electron Microscopy for Lipoprotein Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Tong, Huimin; Garewal, Mark; Ren, Gang

    2012-01-01

    Background Negative-staining (NS), a rapid, simple and conventional technique of electron microscopy (EM), has been commonly used to initially study the morphology and structure of proteins for half a century. Certain NS protocols however can cause artifacts, especially for structurally flexible or lipid-related proteins, such as lipoproteins. Lipoproteins were often observed in the form of rouleau as lipoprotein particles appeared to be stacked together by conventional NS protocols. The flexible components of lipoproteins, i.e. lipids and amphipathic apolipoproteins, resulted in the lipoprotein structure being sensitive to the NS sample preparation parameters, such as operational procedures, salt concentrations, and the staining reagents. Scope of review The most popular NS protocols that have been used to examine lipoprotein morphology and structure were reviewed. Major conclusions The comparisons show that an optimized NS (OpNS) protocol can eliminate the rouleau artifacts of lipoproteins, and that the lipoproteins are similar in size and shape as statistically measured from two EM methods, OpNS and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). OpNS is a high-throughput, high-contrast and high-resolution (near 1 nm, but rarely better than 1 nm) method which has been used to discover the mechanics of a small protein, 53 kDa cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP), and the structure of an individual particle of a single protein by individual-particle electron tomography (IPET), i.e. a 14 Å-resolution IgG antibody three-dimensional map. General significance It is suggested that OpNS can be used as a general protocol to study the structure of proteins, especially highly dynamic proteins with equilibrium-fluctuating structures. PMID:23032862

  7. Investigation of III-V Nanowires by Plan-View Transmission Electron Microscopy: InN Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Luna, E; Grandal, J.; Gallardo, E; Calleja, J.M.; Sánchez-García, M A; Calleja, E.; Trampert, A

    2013-01-01

    We discuss observations of InN nanowires (NWs) by plan-view high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The main difficulties arise from suitable methods available for plan-view specimen preparation. We explore different approaches and find that the best results are obtained using a refined preparation method based on the conventional procedure for plan-view TEM of thin films, specifically modified for the NW morphology. The fundamental aspects of such a preparation are the initia...

  8. Morphology and chemical characteristics of micro- and Nano-particles in the haze in Beijing studied by XPS and TEM/EDX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Peng [Beijing Key Laboratory for Green Catalysis and Separation, Key Laboratory of Beijing on Regional Air Pollution Control, Key Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, Education Ministry of China, and Laboratory of Catalysis Chemistry and Nanoscience, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, College of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); CAS Key Laboratory of Standardization and Measurement for Nanotechnology, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing, 100190 (China); Xu, Jianxun; He, Meng [CAS Key Laboratory of Standardization and Measurement for Nanotechnology, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing, 100190 (China); Song, Lexin [Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, 230026 (China); Chen, Dongliang, E-mail: chendl@mail.buct.edu.cn [College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Guo, Guangsheng, E-mail: guogs@bjut.edu.cn [Beijing Key Laboratory for Green Catalysis and Separation, Key Laboratory of Beijing on Regional Air Pollution Control, Key Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, Education Ministry of China, and Laboratory of Catalysis Chemistry and Nanoscience, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, College of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Dai, Hongxing, E-mail: hxdai@bjut.edu.cn [Beijing Key Laboratory for Green Catalysis and Separation, Key Laboratory of Beijing on Regional Air Pollution Control, Key Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, Education Ministry of China, and Laboratory of Catalysis Chemistry and Nanoscience, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, College of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China)

    2016-09-15

    X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) is a useful surface sensitive tool to explore the particulate matter with different particle sizes. In this work, we report the analysis of elemental species in particulate matter with size ranging from 100 nm to 10 μm during the autumn haze of 2014 in Beijing. The size dependence of element composition and chemical state distribution on the particle surface was investigated. It was found that the number of investigated element species decreased from 8 (at stage 2) to 4 (at stage 10) with the decrease of particle sizes down to 100 nm, which is in accordance with the result from Transmission electron microscopy (TEM/EDX) observations. Three chemical states of nitrogen, the amide group (399.9 eV), the ammonium group (401.6 eV), and the nitrate group (407.2 eV), were confirmed according to the different binding energies. Nitrate was the main composition on the coarse particles, while the percentage of amide and ammonium at stage 3 (13.9% and 10.8% respectively) increased on the fine particles at stage 9 (46.8% and 38.8% respectively). The relative ratio of sulfate and ammonium (calculated 1:1) in the fine particles suggests that there is no enough NH{sub 4}{sup +} to neutralize the sulfuric acid and the surface of the PM is acidic. The result is useful to investigate the generation processes and the sources of collected particles. - Highlights: • The element composition of particles from 100 nm to 10 μm in haze was discussed • The chemical state was dominated by the particle size • The surface of PM was acidity • XPS was shown a useful tool in the aerosol research.

  9. Advanced transmission electron microscopy studies in low-energy ion implanted Si Semiconductors; Junctions; Silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, T S

    2002-01-01

    As the dimensions of semiconductor devices shrink down to 0.1 mu m and beyond, low energy ion implantation is required to introduce shallower junctions to match such small devices. In this work, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is employed to analyse low energy implanted junctions with both structural and chemical analyses. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) has been employed to observe Si crystal damage and amorphization due to low energy B sup + /As sup + ion implantations, and also, defect formation/annihilation during rapid thermal annealing (RTA). The damage effects due to different implant temperatures between 300 deg C and -150 deg C are also discussed. Since knowledge of the distribution of low energy ion implanted dopants in Si is extremely important for semiconductor device processing, energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) has been employed to determine implanted B distributions in Si while Z-contrast imaging and X-ray analytical mapping techniques are ...

  10. Quantification of small, convex particles by TEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Sigmund J. [SINTEF Materials and Chemistry, Department of Synthesis and Properties, Material Physics, NO-7465 Trondheim (Norway)], E-mail: sigmund.j.andersen@sintef.no; Holme, Borge [SINTEF Materials and Chemistry, P.O. Box 124, Blindern, NO-0314 Oslo (Norway); Marioara, Calin D. [SINTEF Materials and Chemistry, Department of Synthesis and Properties, Material Physics, NO-7465 Trondheim (Norway)

    2008-07-15

    It is shown how size distributions of arbitrarily oriented, convex, non-overlapping particles extracted from conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images may be determined by a variation of the Schwartz-Saltykov method. In TEM, particles cut at the surfaces have diminished projections, which alter the observed size distribution. We represent this distribution as a vector and multiply it with the inverse of a matrix comprising thickness-dependent Scheil or Schwartz-Saltykov terms. The result is a corrected size distribution of the projections of uncut particles. It is shown how the real (3D) distribution may be estimated when particle shape is considered. Computer code to generate the matrix is given. A log-normal distribution of spheres and a real distribution of pill-box-shaped dispersoids in an Al-Mg-Si alloy are given as examples. The errors are discussed in detail.

  11. TEM turbulence optimisation in stellarators

    CERN Document Server

    Proll, J H E; Xanthopoulos, P; Lazerson, S A; Faber, B J

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of neoclassically optimised stellarators, optimising stellarators for turbulent transport is an important next step. The reduction of ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence has been achieved via shaping of the magnetic field, and the reduction of trapped-electron mode (TEM) turbulence is adressed in the present paper. Recent analytical and numerical findings suggest TEMs are stabilised when a large fraction of trapped particles experiences favourable bounce-averaged curvature. This is the case for example in Wendelstein 7-X [C.D. Beidler $\\textit{et al}$ Fusion Technology $\\bf{17}$, 148 (1990)] and other Helias-type stellarators. Using this knowledge, a proxy function was designed to estimate the TEM dynamics, allowing optimal configurations for TEM stability to be determined with the STELLOPT [D.A. Spong $\\textit{et al}$ Nucl. Fusion $\\bf{41}$, 711 (2001)] code without extensive turbulence simulations. A first proof-of-principle optimised equilibrium stemming from the TEM-dominated stella...

  12. Transmission electron microscopy study of as-grown MgB{sub 2} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, T. [Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Harada, Y. [Iwate Industry Promotion Center, 3-35-2 Iioka-shinden, Morioka 020-0852 (Japan)]. E-mail: yharada@luck.ocn.ne.jp; Iriuda, H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Kuroha, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Oba, T. [Faculty of Materials science and Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Seki, M. [Faculty of Materials science and Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Nakanishi, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Echigoya, J. [Faculty of Materials science and Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Yoshizawa, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan)

    2006-10-01

    The intermetallic superconductor magnesium diboride (MgB{sub 2}) is a promising candidate for use in superconducting electronic devices because of its high transition temperature (T{sub c}). These applications require the development of a high-quality film fabrication process. We have previously reported the growth of MgB{sub 2} films deposited on MgO (1 0 0), SrTiO{sub 3} (1 0 0) and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0 0 0 1) substrate using a co-evaporation method and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) apparatus. In this paper, we will report the correlation between structural properties and physical properties of as-grown MgB{sub 2} films deposited on MgO (1 0 0), ZnO (0 0 0 1), and Si (1 1 1) substrate. The films' basal properties have been confirmed by reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), X-ray diffraction (XRD), resistivity measurements and SQUID magnetometry. The details of the interfacial structure were studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We will then discuss the most important parameters for fabricating high quality as-grown MgB{sub 2} films and junctions.

  13. An Evaluation of Web-Based Case Studies in Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Merkel

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available It is often difficult to provide students in introductory science courses with opportunities that mimic the investigative learning experience of doing research. This is particularly true in microbiology courses where advanced microscopy techniques are expensive and difficult to do. To that end, we developed three computer-based case studies around real-life scenarios. Our goals were to: (i improve students’ understanding of advanced microscopic techniques, (ii give students practice analyzing and interpreting data, and (iii model a scientific approach to how these techniques are applied to current issues in microbiology. Each case requires students to use references and interpret actual microscopic images, thus giving them a more realistic experience than we could previously provide. We analyzed student learning and perceptions to these case studies. After doing the case studies, students were more able to apply microscopic methods to a realistic problem, thus demonstrating an understanding of how the methods are used. Students appreciated the intellectual challenges presented by having to interpret and analyze actual microscopic images. This approach has allowed us to introduce new areas of content to our course and to stimulate critical thinking skills, a difficult task in a large introductory microbiology course.

  14. Atomic force microscopy study of biaxially oriented polypropylene films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, H.-Y.; Walzak, M. J.; McIntyre, N. S.

    2004-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) uses a very sharp pointed mechanical probe to collect real-space morphological information of solid surfaces. AFM was used in this study to image the surface morphology of a biaxially oriented polypropylene film. The polymer film is characterized by a nanometer-scale, fiberlike network structure, which reflects the drawing process used during the fabrication of the film. AFM was used to study polymer-surface treatment to improve wettability by exposing the polymer to ozone with or without ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Surface-morphology changes observed by AFM are the result of the surface oxidation induced by the treatment. Due to the topographic features of the polymer film, the fiberlike structure has been used to check the performance of the AFM tip. An AFM image is a mixture of the surface morphology and the shape of the AFM tip. Therefore, it is important to check the performance of a tip to ensure that the AFM image collected reflects the true surface features of the sample, rather than contamination on the AFM tip.

  15. Digital in-line holographic microscopy applied to microfluidic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Sucerquia, J.; Xu, W.; Jericho, S. K.; Jericho, M. H.; Kreuzer, H. J.

    2006-01-01

    Digital In-line Holographic Microscopy (DIHM) is a technique that provides depth and lateral resolution of the order of the wavelength throughout a volume of several cubic centimeters for visible light. This outstanding characteristic is reached by means of a simple optical setup and numerical reconstruction of the recorded holograms. It makes DIHM the right tool for applications in many microscopic studies. In this paper we study microfluidic phenomena by means of DIHM. To this end we seed a fluid with micron-size trackers (latex microspheres) and follow their displacement within an observation volume. We apply this technique to several situations such as the flow around a big sphere, flow through microchannels, bubbles in a fluid, bacterial motion in a diatom and the swimming behavior of paramecia and algae in water. By taking advantage in DIHM of the plane-to-plane reconstruction through a large depth of field, we generate 3D renderings of the paths followed by the trackers to produce a complete picture of the flow pattern, i.e. streamlines and velocity fields.

  16. Transmission electron microscopy study on ion-beam-synthesized amorphous Fe-Si thin layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Muneyuki; Ishimaru, Manabu; Hirotsu, Yoshihiko; Valdez, James A.; Sickafus, Kurt E.

    2005-12-01

    Ion-beam-synthesized amorphous Fe-Si thin layers have been characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in combination with imaging plate techniques. Si single crystals with a (111) orientation were irradiated with 120keV Fe+ ions to a fluence of 4.0×1017cm-2 at cryogenic temperature (120K). Cross-sectional TEM observations indicated the formation of an amorphous bilayer on the topmost layer of the Si substrate. It was found that the upper layer is an amorphous Fe-Si with the composition, in terms of atomic ratio, of Fe /Si ˜1/2, while the lower one is an amorphous Si. Atomic pair-distribution functions extracted from microbeam electron diffraction patterns revealed that the nature of short-range order in amorphous Fe-Si thin layer can be well described by the atomic arrangements of crystalline iron silicides.

  17. A nonlinear filtering algorithm for denoising HR(S)TEM micrographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Hongchu, E-mail: h.du@fz-juelich.de [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich Research Centre, Jülich, 52425 (Germany); Central Facility for Electron Microscopy (GFE), RWTH Aachen University, Aachen 52074 (Germany); Peter Grünberg Institute, Jülich Research Centre, Jülich 52425 (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Noise reduction of micrographs is often an essential task in high resolution (scanning) transmission electron microscopy (HR(S)TEM) either for a higher visual quality or for a more accurate quantification. Since HR(S)TEM studies are often aimed at resolving periodic atomistic columns and their non-periodic deviation at defects, it is important to develop a noise reduction algorithm that can simultaneously handle both periodic and non-periodic features properly. In this work, a nonlinear filtering algorithm is developed based on widely used techniques of low-pass filter and Wiener filter, which can efficiently reduce noise without noticeable artifacts even in HR(S)TEM micrographs with contrast of variation of background and defects. The developed nonlinear filtering algorithm is particularly suitable for quantitative electron microscopy, and is also of great interest for beam sensitive samples, in situ analyses, and atomic resolution EFTEM. - Highlights: • A nonlinear filtering algorithm for denoising HR(S)TEM images is developed. • It can simultaneously handle both periodic and non-periodic features properly. • It is particularly suitable for quantitative electron microscopy. • It is of great interest for beam sensitive samples, in situ analyses, and atomic resolution EFTEM.

  18. Tribology studies of organic thin films by scanning force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bar, G. [Albert-Ludwigs Univ., Freiburg (Germany). Freiburger Materialforschungszentrum; Rubin, S.; Parikh, A.N.; Swanson, B.I.; Zawodzinski, T.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The use of organic thin films as lubricants on solid surfaces is important in many modern technologies including magnetic storage and micromachines. Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films and self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are attractive candidates for lubricant layers and for model studies of lubrication because of their strong adsorption to the surface. The recent interest on the properties of LB films and SAMs has been also motivated by their potential applications in sensors, non-linear optical devices, lithography and microelectronics. Using the micro-contact printing method the authors prepared patterned SAMs consisting of methyl-terminated alkanethiols of different chain lengths. The samples were characterized using lateral force microscopy (LFM) and the force modulation technique (FMT). In general, higher friction is observed over the short chain regions than over the long chain regions when a low or moderate load is applied to the SFM tip. For such cases the high friction (short chain) regions are also ``softer`` as measured by FMT. A high loads, a reversal of the image contrast is observed and the short chain regions show a lower friction than the long chain regions. This image contrast is reversible upon reduction of the applied load.

  19. Fluorescent ligands for studying neuropeptide receptors by confocal microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beaudet A.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the use of confocal microscopy as it pertains to the identification of G-protein coupled receptors and the study of their dynamic properties in cell cultures and in mammalian brain following their tagging with specific fluorescent ligands. Principles that should guide the choice of suitable ligands and fluorophores are discussed. Examples are provided from the work carried out in the authors' laboratory using custom synthetized fluoresceinylated or BODIPY-tagged bioactive peptides. The results show that confocal microscopic detection of specifically bound fluorescent ligands permits high resolution appraisal of neuropeptide receptor distribution both in cell culture and in brain sections. Within the framework of time course experiments, it also allows for a dynamic assessment of the internalization and subsequent intracellular trafficking of bound fluorescent molecules. Thus, it was found that neurotensin, somatostatin and mu- and delta-selective opioid peptides are internalized in a receptor-dependent fashion and according to receptor-specific patterns into their target cells. In the case of neurotensin, this internalization process was found to be clathrin-mediated, to proceed through classical endosomal pathways and, in neurons, to result in a mobilization of newly formed endosomes from neural processes to nerve cell bodies and from the periphery of cell bodies towards the perinuclear zone. These mechanisms are likely to play an important role for ligand inactivation, receptor regulation and perhaps also transmembrane signaling.

  20. Comparative study on the effects of two antifungal drugs against Candida albicans by microcalorimetry and transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Qing-Lian [Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Zhang, Juan [Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Department of Stomatology, Hubei Provincial Maternal and Child Health Hospital, Wuhan 430070 (China); Xu, Zi-Qiang; Li, Ran [State Key Laboratory of Virology and Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Jiang, Feng-Lei, E-mail: fljiang@whu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Virology and Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Xiao, Qi, E-mail: qi.xiao@whu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Life Science, Guangxi Teachers Education University, Nanning 530001 (China); Liu, Yi [State Key Laboratory of Virology and Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2012-09-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microcalorimetry is a fast, simple method to study the antibiotic property of drugs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We noticed that the antibiotic effect of ITZ was slightly better than that of KTZ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We perform the TEM to study the morphology changes of C. albicans cells. - Abstract: In this work, a multi-channel thermal activity monitor (TAM 2277) was applied to study the growth metabolism of Candida albicans (C. albicans) in vitro in the absence and presence of different concentrations of ketoconazole (KTZ) and itraconazole (ITZ). The results showed that the half inhibiting concentrations (IC{sub 50}) of C. albicans by KTZ and ITZ are 73.5 and 66.3 {mu}mol L{sup -1}, respectively. So the antibiotic effect of ITZ was slightly better than that of KTZ. The morphology of C. albicans cells both in the absence and presence of antifungal agents was examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our research also suggests that microcalorimetry is a fast, simple, non-invasive, non-destructive and more sensitive method, and can be easily performed to study the antibiotic property of different species of drugs on microorganism compared to other biological and clinical methods.

  1. Mechanisms of Clostridium tyrobutyricum removal through natural creaming of milk: A microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Incecco, P; Faoro, F; Silvetti, T; Schrader, K; Pellegrino, L

    2015-08-01

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum is the main spoilage agent of late blowing defect (LBD) in Grana Padano and Parmigiano-Reggiano cheeses; LBD is characterized by openings and holes and is sometimes accompanied by cracks and an undesirable flavor. Even a very few spores remaining in the cheese curd may cause LBD; thus, it is essential to eradicate them during milk natural creaming. By this process, most of the bacteria, somatic cells, and spores rise to the top of the milk, together with the fat globules, and are removed with the cream. Previous studies suggested that milk immunoglobulins mediate the interactions between fat globules and bacteria that occur upon creaming but no direct evidence for this has been found. Moreover, other physical chemical interactions could be involved; for example, physical entrapment of spores among globule clusters. To maximize the efficiency of the natural creaming step in removing Cl. tyrobutyricum, it is essential to understand the nature of spore-globule interactions. With this aim, raw milk was contaminated with spores of Cl. tyrobutyricum before going to creaming overnight at 8°C, after which spore and bacteria removal was >90%. The obtained cream was analyzed by light interference contrast and fluorescence microscopy and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results showed that most of the vegetative cells and spores, which were stained with malachite green before addition to milk, adhered tightly to the surface of single fat globules, the membranes of which appeared heterogeneous when stained with the fluorescent dye DilC18(3)-DS. Using the same dye, we observed transient and persistent interactions among globules, with formation of clusters of different sizes and partial coalescence of adhering membranes. Transmission electron microscopy examination of replicates of freeze-fractured cream allowed us to observe tight adhesion of spores to fat globules. Ultrathin sections revealed that this adhesion is mediated by an amorphous

  2. TEM study of the (SbS){sub 1+δ}(NbS{sub 2}){sub n}, (n=1, 2, 3; δ~1.14, 1.20) misfit layer phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez-Herrero, A., E-mail: adriangh@pdi.ucm.es [ICTS Centro Nacional de Microscopía Electrónica, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Landa-Cánovas, A.R. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Otero-Díaz, L.C. [Dpto. Química Inorgánica, Fac. CC. Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    In the Sb–Nb–S system four new misfit layer phases have been found and carefully investigated via Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Their structures are of composite modulated structure type with stoichiometries that can be formulated as (SbS){sub 1+δ}(NbS{sub 2}){sub n}; for n=1, δ~1.14 and 1.19; for n=2, δ~1.18 and for n=3, δ~1.19. Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED) patterns show an almost commensurate fit between the pseudo-tetragonal (SbS) and the pseudo-orthohexagonal (NbS{sub 2}){sub n} subcells along the misfit direction a, with 3(SbS)≈5(NbS{sub 2}), being b the same for both sub-lattices and c the stacking direction. For n=1, a commensurate phase with 4a{sub SbS}=7a{sub NbS2} has also been observed. In addition to the characteristic misfit and associated modulation of the two sub-structures, a second modulation is also present which appears to be primarily associated with the (SbS) sub-structure of both the n=1 and n=2 phases. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) images show ordered stacking sequences between the (SbS) and (NbS{sub 2}){sub n} lamellae for each of the four phases, however, disordered intergrowths were also occasionally found. Most of the crystals showed different kinds of twinning defects on quite a fine scale. Many crystals showed curled up edges. In some cases the lamellar crystals were entirely folded giving rise to similar diffraction patterns as found for cylindrical crystals. - Graphical abstract: Idealized structure models of the first three members of the homologous series (SbS){sub 1+δ}(NbS{sub 2}){sub n}. - Highlights: • Transmission Electron Microscopy study of misfit layer sulfides (SbS){sub 1+δ}(NbS{sub 2}){sub n}. • The structures consist of a (SbS) layer interleaved between n (NbS{sub 2}) layers. • Two different members n=1, one n=2 and one n=3 have been studied. • Twinning, intergrowths and different modulations in the (SbS) substructure.

  3. In situ electron microscopy studies of electromechanical behavior in metals at the nanoscale using a novel microdevice-based system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Wonmo, E-mail: wonmo.kang.ctr.ks@nrl.navy.mil; Beniam, Iyoel; Qidwai, Siddiq M. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Electrically assisted deformation (EAD) is an emerging technique to enhance formability of metals by applying an electric current through them. Despite its increasing importance in manufacturing applications, there is still an unresolved debate on the nature of the fundamental deformation mechanisms underlying EAD, mainly between electroplasticity (non-thermal effects) and resistive heating (thermal effects). This status is due to two critical challenges: (1) a lack of experimental techniques to directly observe fundamental mechanisms of material deformation during EAD, and (2) intrinsic coupling between electric current and Joule heating giving rise to unwanted thermally activated mechanisms. To overcome these challenges, we have developed a microdevice-based electromechanical testing system (MEMTS) to characterize nanoscale metal specimens in transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our studies reveal that MEMTS eliminates the effect of Joule heating on material deformation, a critical advantage over macroscopic experiments, owing to its unique scale. For example, a negligible change in temperature (<0.02 °C) is predicted at ∼3500 A/mm{sup 2}. Utilizing the attractive features of MEMTS, we have directly investigated potential electron-dislocation interactions in single crystal copper (SCC) specimens that are simultaneously subjected to uniaxial loading and electric current density up to 5000 A/mm{sup 2}. Our in situ TEM studies indicate that for SCC, electroplasticity does not play a key role as no differences in dislocation activities, such as depinning and movement, are observed.

  4. In situ electron microscopy studies of electromechanical behavior in metals at the nanoscale using a novel microdevice-based system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Wonmo; Beniam, Iyoel; Qidwai, Siddiq M

    2016-09-01

    Electrically assisted deformation (EAD) is an emerging technique to enhance formability of metals by applying an electric current through them. Despite its increasing importance in manufacturing applications, there is still an unresolved debate on the nature of the fundamental deformation mechanisms underlying EAD, mainly between electroplasticity (non-thermal effects) and resistive heating (thermal effects). This status is due to two critical challenges: (1) a lack of experimental techniques to directly observe fundamental mechanisms of material deformation during EAD, and (2) intrinsic coupling between electric current and Joule heating giving rise to unwanted thermally activated mechanisms. To overcome these challenges, we have developed a microdevice-based electromechanical testing system (MEMTS) to characterize nanoscale metal specimens in transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our studies reveal that MEMTS eliminates the effect of Joule heating on material deformation, a critical advantage over macroscopic experiments, owing to its unique scale. For example, a negligible change in temperature (<0.02 °C) is predicted at ∼3500 A/mm(2). Utilizing the attractive features of MEMTS, we have directly investigated potential electron-dislocation interactions in single crystal copper (SCC) specimens that are simultaneously subjected to uniaxial loading and electric current density up to 5000 A/mm(2). Our in situ TEM studies indicate that for SCC, electroplasticity does not play a key role as no differences in dislocation activities, such as depinning and movement, are observed.

  5. In situ electron microscopy studies of electromechanical behavior in metals at the nanoscale using a novel microdevice-based system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Wonmo; Beniam, Iyoel; Qidwai, Siddiq M.

    2016-09-01

    Electrically assisted deformation (EAD) is an emerging technique to enhance formability of metals by applying an electric current through them. Despite its increasing importance in manufacturing applications, there is still an unresolved debate on the nature of the fundamental deformation mechanisms underlying EAD, mainly between electroplasticity (non-thermal effects) and resistive heating (thermal effects). This status is due to two critical challenges: (1) a lack of experimental techniques to directly observe fundamental mechanisms of material deformation during EAD, and (2) intrinsic coupling between electric current and Joule heating giving rise to unwanted thermally activated mechanisms. To overcome these challenges, we have developed a microdevice-based electromechanical testing system (MEMTS) to characterize nanoscale metal specimens in transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our studies reveal that MEMTS eliminates the effect of Joule heating on material deformation, a critical advantage over macroscopic experiments, owing to its unique scale. For example, a negligible change in temperature (<0.02 °C) is predicted at ˜3500 A/mm2. Utilizing the attractive features of MEMTS, we have directly investigated potential electron-dislocation interactions in single crystal copper (SCC) specimens that are simultaneously subjected to uniaxial loading and electric current density up to 5000 A/mm2. Our in situ TEM studies indicate that for SCC, electroplasticity does not play a key role as no differences in dislocation activities, such as depinning and movement, are observed.

  6. TEM Investigations on Layered Ternary Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhijun LIN; Meishuan LI; Yanchun ZHOU

    2007-01-01

    Layered ternary ceramics represent a new class of solids that combine the merits of both metals and ceramics.These unique properties are strongly related to their layered crystal structures and microstructures. The combination of atomic-resolution Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) represents a powerful method to link microstructures of materials to macroscopic properties, allowing layered ternary ceramics to be investigated in an unprecedented detail. Vicrostructural information obtained using TEM is useful in understanding the formation mechanism, layered stacking characteristics, and defect structures for layered ternary ceramics down to atomic-scale level; and thus provides insight into understanding the "Processing-Structure-Property" relationship of layered ternary ceramics. Transmission electron microscopic characterizations of layered ternary ceramics in Ti-Si-C, Ti-Al-C, Cr-Al-C, Zr-Al-C, Ta-Al-C and Ti-Al-N systems are reviewed.

  7. Effects of Topography in Nano-Structured Thin Films : A Lorentz Transmission Electron Microscopy and Electron Holography Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosson, Jeff Th.M. De; Raedt, Hans A. De

    2003-01-01

    This paper aims at applying advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to functional materials, such as ultra-soft magnetic films for high-frequency inductors, to reveal the structure-property relationship. The ultimate goal is to delineate a more quantitative way to obtain information of the

  8. LM and TEM study of the orthokeratinized and parakeratinized epithelium of the tongue in the domestic duck (Anas platyrhynchos f. domestica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skieresz-Szewczyk, Kinga; Jackowiak, Hanna; Ratajczak, Marlena

    2014-12-01

    The previous histological studies of the lingual mucosa in birds characterized two types of keratinized epithelium, i.e. orthokeratinized and parakeratinized. These epithelia are composed of three layers: basal, intermediate and keratinized. The present study showed detailed ultrastructural features of cells in particular layers of two types of keratinized epithelia on the tongue in the domestic duck and defined structural differences. TEM observations showed a gradual reduction in cell organelles in the following layers, at increasing amounts of keratin fibers. The characteristic feature of the ortho- and parakeratinized epithelium is the presence of sub-layers in the intermediate layer, i.e. the upper and lower part, which results from the different shape of cell nuclei and dye affinity of the cytoplasm. The keratinized layer of ortho- and parakeratinized epithelium is built of two types of cells such as electron dark and light cells, which undergo exfoliation. The basic difference between the keratinized epithelia is the presence of flattened cell nuclei in the keratinized layer of the parakeratinized epithelium. The differentiating feature is also an arrangement of keratin fibers in the cell cytoplasm of the keratinized layer. The analysis of the thickness of the epithelium and the keratinized layer, indicated differences between keratinized epithelia, which result from two variants of performing protective functions, either through a thick keratinized layer or by a higher epithelium. Differences in the ultrastructure of the ortho- and parakeratinized epithelium are associated with mechanical functions of the epithelium resulting from different forces acting on the tongue during feeding activities.

  9. Synchronizing atomic force microscopy force mode and fluorescence microscopy in real time for immune cell stimulation and activation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazaux, Séverine; Sadoun, Anaïs; Biarnes-Pelicot, Martine; Martinez, Manuel; Obeid, Sameh [Aix Marseille Université, LAI UM 61, Marseille F-13288 (France); Inserm, UMR-S 1067, Marseille F-13288 (France); CNRS, UMR 7333, Marseille F-13288 (France); Bongrand, Pierre [Aix Marseille Université, LAI UM 61, Marseille F-13288 (France); Inserm, UMR-S 1067, Marseille F-13288 (France); CNRS, UMR 7333, Marseille F-13288 (France); APHM, Hôpital de la Conception, Laboratoire d’Immunologie, Marseille F-13385 (France); Limozin, Laurent [Aix Marseille Université, LAI UM 61, Marseille F-13288 (France); Inserm, UMR-S 1067, Marseille F-13288 (France); CNRS, UMR 7333, Marseille F-13288 (France); Puech, Pierre-Henri, E-mail: pierre-henri.puech@inserm.fr [Aix Marseille Université, LAI UM 61, Marseille F-13288 (France); Inserm, UMR-S 1067, Marseille F-13288 (France); CNRS, UMR 7333, Marseille F-13288 (France)

    2016-01-15

    A method is presented for combining atomic force microscopy (AFM) force mode and fluorescence microscopy in order to (a) mechanically stimulate immune cells while recording the subsequent activation under the form of calcium pulses, and (b) observe the mechanical response of a cell upon photoactivation of a small G protein, namely Rac. Using commercial set-ups and a robust signal coupling the fluorescence excitation light and the cantilever bending, the applied force and activation signals were very easily synchronized. This approach allows to control the entire mechanical history of a single cell up to its activation and response down to a few hundreds of milliseconds, and can be extended with very minimal adaptations to other cellular systems where mechanotransduction is studied, using either purely mechanical stimuli or via a surface bound specific ligand. - Highlights: • A signal coupling AFM and fluorescence microscopy was characterized for soft cantilevers. • It can be used as an intrinsic timer to synchronize images and forces. • Mechanical stimulation of single immune cells while recording calcium fluxes was detailed. • Light-induced mechanical modifications of lymphocytes using a PA-Rac protein were demonstrated. • The precautions and limitations of use of this effect were presented.

  10. Order-disorder transformation in Fe-Pd alloy nanoparticles studied by in situ transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Kazuhisa, E-mail: ksato@imr.tohoku.ac.j [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, Ibaraki 567-0047 (Japan); Kovacs, Andras; Hirotsu, Yoshihiko [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, Ibaraki 567-0047 (Japan)

    2011-03-01

    We have studied order-disorder transformation in Fe-Pd alloy nanoparticles by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron diffraction. The transformation is size-dependent, and the transformation temperatures are lower than those of the bulk alloys. The transformation proceeds continuously but rather steeply as the temperature increases, which differs from the first-order transformation observed in a bulk alloy or gradual transformation predicted by simulations for nanoparticles. Experimental results indicated that the continuous nature can be attributed to the distribution of the transformation temperature due to the distributions of both particle size and alloy composition. Quantitative intensity analyses of nanobeam electron diffraction (NBD) patterns indicated the existence of short-range order (SRO) inside disordered nanoparticles. The SRO as well as particle size distribution are responsible for the remaining weak superlattice reflections above the transformation temperature. In situ high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) observation revealed the existence of the SRO, which was consistent with the results obtained by NBD. We show that the disorder may not necessarily proceed continuously from the surface toward the center of the nanoparticle. Ordering from the disordered phase upon cooling was also observed by in situ HRTEM, which can be attributed to growth of the SRO.

  11. Observation of Pt-{10 0}-p(2 ? 2)-O reconstruction by an environmental TEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hengbo Li; Wentao Yuan; Ying Jiang; Zhengfei Zhang; Ze Zhang; Yong Wang n

    2016-01-01

    The surface structure of noble metal nanoparticles usually plays a crucial role during the catalytic process in the fields of energy and environment. It has been studied extensively by surface analytic methods, such as scanning tunneling microscopy. However, it is still challenging to secure a direct observation of the structural evolution of surfaces of nanocatalysts in reaction (gas and heating) conditions at the atomic scale. Here we report an in-situ observation of atomic reconstruction on Pt {100} surfaces exposed to oxygen in an environmental transmission electron microscope (TEM). Our high-resolution TEM images revealed that Pt-{100}-p(2 ? 2)-O reconstruction occurs during the reaction between oxygen atoms and{100} facets. A reconstruction model was proposed, and TEM images simulated according to this model with different defocus values match the experimental results well.

  12. A MEMS Device for in-situ TEM Test of SCS Nanobeam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN QinHua; WANG YueLin; LI Tie; LI XinXin; XU FangFang

    2008-01-01

    In-situ tensile testing in TEM (transmission electron microscopy) is a useful tool for studying mechanical properties of nano-structures because it can provide quanti- tative information on sample deformation at atomic scale. To facilitate in-situ TEM tensile testa of SCS (single crystal silicon) nanobeam, a MEMS tensile-testing chip was designed and fabricated. The chip was fabricated by means of bulk micro- machining and wafer bonding techniques. An SCS nanobeam, a comb drive ac- tuator, a force sensor beam and an electron beam window were integrated into the chip. With the on-chip comb-drive-actuator stretching the nanobeam and in-situ TEM observation, tensile test on a 90 nm-thick nanobeam was performed and the strain-stress relationship was obtained. The Young's modulus was fitted to be 161 GPa and did not show the size effect.

  13. A MEMS Device for in-situ TEM Test of SCS Nanobeam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In-situ tensile testing in TEM (transmission electron microscopy) is a useful tool for studying mechanical properties of nano-structures because it can provide quanti-tative information on sample deformation at atomic scale. To facilitate in-situ TEM tensile tests of SCS (single crystal silicon) nanobeam, a MEMS tensile-testing chip was designed and fabricated. The chip was fabricated by means of bulk micro-machining and wafer bonding techniques. An SCS nanobeam, a comb drive ac-tuator, a force sensor beam and an electron beam window were integrated into the chip. With the on-chip comb-drive-actuator stretching the nanobeam and in-situ TEM observation, tensile test on a 90 nm-thick nanobeam was performed and the strain-stress relationship was obtained. The Young’s modulus was fitted to be 161 GPa and did not show the size effect.

  14. Observation of Pt-{100}-p(2×2-O reconstruction by an environmental TEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengbo Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The surface structure of noble metal nanoparticles usually plays a crucial role during the catalytic process in the fields of energy and environment. It has been studied extensively by surface analytic methods, such as scanning tunneling microscopy. However, it is still challenging to secure a direct observation of the structural evolution of surfaces of nanocatalysts in reaction (gas and heating conditions at the atomic scale. Here we report an in-situ observation of atomic reconstruction on Pt {100} surfaces exposed to oxygen in an environmental transmission electron microscope (TEM. Our high-resolution TEM images revealed that Pt-{100}-p(2×2-O reconstruction occurs during the reaction between oxygen atoms and {100} facets. A reconstruction model was proposed, and TEM images simulated according to this model with different defocus values match the experimental results well.

  15. Practical workflow for cryo focused-ion-beam milling of tissues and cells for cryo-TEM tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chyongere; Schmelzer, Thomas; Kishchenko, Gregory; Wagenknecht, Terence; Marko, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Vitreous freezing offers a way to study cells and tissue in a near-native state by cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), which is important when structural information at the macromolecular level is required. Many cells -- especially those in tissue -- are too thick to study intact in the cryo-TEM. Cryo focused-ion-beam (cryo-FIB) milling is being used in a few laboratories to thin vitreously frozen specimens, thus avoiding the artifacts and difficulties of cryo-ultramicrotomy. However, the technique is challenging because of the need to avoid devitrification and frost accumulation during the entire process, from the initial step of freezing to the final step of loading the specimen into the cryo-TEM. We present a robust workflow that makes use of custom fixtures and devices that can be used for high-pressure-frozen bulk tissue samples as well as for samples frozen on TEM grids. PMID:24211822

  16. Stress-induced martensitic transformation in nanometric NiTi shape memory alloy strips: An in situ TEM study of the thickness/size effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, S.C., E-mail: scmao@bjut.edu.cn [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Li, H.X. [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Liu, Y., E-mail: yinong.liu@uwa.edu.au [School of Mechanical and Chemical Engineering, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Deng, Q.S.; Wang, L.H.; Zhang, Y.F. [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Zhang, Z. [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Han, X.D. [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China)

    2013-12-05

    Highlights: •An in situ deformation technique in TEM was designed. •The martensitic transformation shows strong size effect. •The size effect is attributed to the effect of damaged surfaces. •The “size effect” is not an intrinsic but of extrinsic influences. -- Abstract: Ultrathin NiTi miniature strips of 40–83 nm in thickness were fabricated by means of focused ion beam milling from a polycrystalline NiTi shape memory alloy. The NiTi strips were subjected to tensile deformation inside a transmission electron microscope using a self-designed tension apparatus for in situ examination of the effect of thickness on the stress induced martensitic transformation behavior in the strips. The study revealed that the transformation was completely suppressed in a strip of 40 nm in thickness whereas it was possible in thicker strips. In these strips, the stress induced martensitic transformation was found to commence sequentially in thicker strips first and then in thinner strips at higher strain (stress) levels, demonstrating the size effect. This size effect is attributed to the effect of damaged surfaces, including a Ga{sup +}-impregnated amorphous layer on one side of the strip caused by sample fabrication using FIB and oxidation affected layers on both sides. This means that the observed “size effect” is not an intrinsic behavior of the martensitic transformation in NiTi but of extrinsic influences.

  17. SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY STUDY OF FILLED SILICONE RUBBER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yufu; YANG Qiyun; LI Guangliang

    1988-01-01

    The fracture surfaces of a number of silicone vulcanizates were investigated by the use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that the difference in the presence and absence of filler, the variation of its surface modification as well as the history of thermal aging of the vulcanizates, all of these factors made difference in surface morphology of the fractured surface. This was correlated with the strength of the vulcanizates. The reinforcing effect of filler and the process of fracture were discussed.

  18. X-ray and electron microscopy studies on the biodistribution and biomodification of iron oxide nanoparticles in Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Dongwook; Nho, Hyun Woo; Yoon, Tae Hyun

    2014-10-01

    Biodistribution and biomodification of iron oxide (Fe3O4 and α-Fe2O3) nanoparticles (NPs) in a well-known toxicity test organism, Daphnia magna (D. magna), were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). In addition to the morphological changes in the gut tissues of D. magna, biodistribution and biomodification of iron oxide NPs in the digestive tract of D. magna were also monitored in this study. Upon exposures to both iron oxide NPs, unique morphological changes (e.g., irregular shaped microvilli, epithelial cell protrusion, and dilatation of cytoplasmic inclusion) in the gut tissues of D. magna were observed along with bacterial colonization of the gut lumen. However, despite their heavy accumulations in the digesitive tract, TEM and STXM images confirmed us that both Fe3O4 and α-Fe2O3 NPs were not penetrating into the gut tissues of D. magna. Moreover, for the Fe3O4 NPs in direct contact with the gut microvilli of D. magna, slight but significant spectral changes were observed in their Fe L-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra, which indicated that there were biomodifications of Fe3O4 NPs, probably involving oxidative dissolution of Fe3O4 NPs followed by rapid precipitation of ferric oxide or hydroxide. However, no significant changes were observed in the Fe L-edge XANES spectra of the α-Fe2O3 NPs present in the gut lumen of D. magna. These X-ray and electron microscopic observations confirmed us that, despite similarities in core sizes and chemical compositions, NPs with different crystalline phase and dissolution rates can interact quite differently with their local environment, may result in different biodistribution and cause completely dissimilar toxicities.

  19. Transmission electron microscopy study of focused ion beam damage in small intrinsic Josephson junctions of single crystalline Bi2Sr2CaCu2O y

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakizaki, Yoshihiro; Koyama, Junpei; Yamaguchi, Ayami; Umegai, Shunpei; Ayukawa, Shin-ya; Kitano, Haruhisa

    2017-04-01

    We report a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study on the damage produced by the focused ion beam (FIB) etching for small Bi2Sr2CaCu2O y (Bi2212) intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs). The selected area diffraction patterns of TEM images demonstrate that the FIB damage causes the formation of an amorphous layer. The thickness of FIB damage is at least 30 nm for the Ga+ ion beam emitted at 50 pA and 30 kV, independent of the incident direction of the Ga+ ion beam. We also confirmed that the damage or the redeposition due to the FIB etching was effectively removed by the additional irradiation of Ar ions after the FIB etching. This suggests the advantage of the combinatorial method of the FIB and Ar-ion etchings in the successful fabrication of small and high-quality IJJs.

  20. Liquid Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hong-Gang; Zheng, Haimei

    2016-05-01

    Liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has attracted significant interest in recent years. With nanofabricated liquid cells, it has been possible to image through liquids using TEM with subnanometer resolution, and many previously unseen materials dynamics have been revealed. Liquid cell TEM has been applied to many areas of research, ranging from chemistry to physics, materials science, and biology. So far, topics of study include nanoparticle growth and assembly, electrochemical deposition and lithiation for batteries, tracking and manipulation of nanoparticles, catalysis, and imaging of biological materials. In this article, we first review the development of liquid cell TEM and then highlight progress in various areas of research. In the study of nanoparticle growth, the electron beam can serve both as the illumination source for imaging and as the input energy for reactions. However, many other research topics require the control of electron beam effects to minimize electron beam damage. We discuss efforts to understand electron beam-liquid matter interactions. Finally, we provide a perspective on future challenges and opportunities in liquid cell TEM.

  1. Confocal laser scanning microscopy in study of bone calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, Tetsunari, E-mail: tetsu-n@cc.osaka-dent.ac.jp [Department of Oral Pathology, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan); Kokubu, Mayu; Kato, Hirohito [Department of Oral Pathology, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan); Imai, Koichi [Department of Biomaterials, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan); Tanaka, Akio [Department of Oral Pathology, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-magnification images with depth selection, and thin sections were observed using CLSM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The direction and velocity of calcification of the bone was observed by administration of 2 fluorescent dyes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In dog femora grafted with coral blocks, newly-formed bone was observed in the coral block space with a rough surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Twelve weeks after dental implant was grafted in dog femora, the space between screws was filled with newly-formed bones. - Abstract: Bone regeneration in mandible and maxillae after extraction of teeth or tumor resection and the use of rough surface implants in bone induction must be investigated to elucidate the mechanism of calcification. The calcified tissues are subjected to chemical decalcification or physical grinding to observe their microscopic features with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy where the microscopic tissue morphology is significantly altered. We investigated the usefulness of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for this purpose. After staggering the time of administration of calcein and alizarin red to experimental rats and dogs, rat alveolar bone and dog femur grafted with coral as scaffold or dental implants were observed with CLSM. In rat alveolar bone, the calcification of newly-formed bone and net-like canaliculi was observed at the mesial bone from the roots progressed at the rate of 15 {mu}m/day. In dog femur grafted with coral, newly-formed bones along the space of coral were observed in an orderly manner. In dog femur with dental implants, after 8 weeks, newly-formed bone proceeded along the rough surface of the implants. CLSM produced high-magnification images of newly-formed bone and thin sections were not needed.

  2. ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY STUDIES OF POLYCAPROLACTONE RINGED SPHERULITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-bin Zhang; De-zhu Ma; Hua Zhong; Xiao-lie Luo

    2000-01-01

    The surface morphology of free-surface PCL ringed spherulites was investigated by using atomic force microscopy. The spherulites were obtained by crystallization of PCL/PVC blends of different compositions. It was found that the ringed spherulite exhibited regularly fluctuating rings on its surface. Compared with the bright-dark ring pattern of the spherulite under a polarizing microscope, it was proved that the optical characteristics of the ringed spherulite under polarizing microscope coincided with its surface characteristics. The bright rings in polarizing micrographs of the spherulite coincided with the convex rings on its surface, while the dark rings coincided with the concave rings.

  3. Cu and Fe metallic ions-mediated oxidation of low-density lipoproteins studied by NMR, TEM and Z-scan technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, S L; Monteiro, A M; Rabbani, S R; Bloise, A C; Carneiro, S M; Alves, S; Gidlund, M; Abdalla, D S P; Neto, A M Figueiredo

    2010-06-01

    In this work we report on a study of the morphological changes of LDL induced in vitro by metallic ions (Cu(2+) and Fe(3+)). These modifications were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance and the Z-scan technique. The degree of oxidative modification of LDL was determined by the TBARS and lipid hydroperoxides assays. It is shown that distinct pathways for modifying lipoproteins lead to different morphological transformations of the particles characterized by changes in size and/or shape of the resulting particles, and by the tendency to induce aggregation of the particles. There were no evidence of melting of particles promoted by oxidative processes with Cu and Fe. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Tomographic heating holder for in situ TEM: study of Pt/C and PtPd/Al2O3 catalysts as a function of temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontard, Lionel C; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; Fernández, Asunción; Ozkaya, Dogan; Kasama, Takeshi

    2014-06-01

    A tomographic heating holder for transmission electron microscopy that can be used to study supported catalysts at temperatures of up to ~1,500°C is described. The specimen is placed in direct thermal contact with a tungsten filament that is oriented perpendicular to the axis of the holder without using a support film, allowing tomographic image acquisition at high specimen tilt angles with minimum optical shadowing. We use the holder to illustrate the evolution of the active phases of Pt nanoparticles on carbon black and PtPd nanoparticles on γ-alumina with temperature. Particle size distributions and changes in active surface area are quantified from tilt series of images acquired after subjecting the specimens to increasing temperatures. The porosity of the alumina support and the sintering mechanisms of the catalysts are shown to depend on distance from the heating filament.

  5. Numerical study of super-resolved optical microscopy with partly staggered beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinping; Wang, Nan; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2016-12-01

    The resolving power of optical microscopy involving two or even more beams, such as pump-probe microscopy and nonlinear optical microscopy, can be enhanced both laterally and longitudinally with partly staggered beams. A numerical study of the new super-resolution imaging technology is performed with vector diffraction theory. The influence of polarization is discussed. A resolving power of sub-100 nm and sub-300 nm in the lateral and longitudinal directions, respectively, is achievable.

  6. Interferometric Scattering Microscopy for the Study of Molecular Motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrecka, J; Takagi, Y; Mickolajczyk, K J; Lippert, L G; Sellers, J R; Hancock, W O; Goldman, Y E; Kukura, P

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of molecular motor function has been greatly improved by the development of imaging modalities, which enable real-time observation of their motion at the single-molecule level. Here, we describe the use of a new method, interferometric scattering microscopy, for the investigation of motor protein dynamics by attaching and tracking the motion of metallic nanoparticle labels as small as 20nm diameter. Using myosin-5, kinesin-1, and dynein as examples, we describe the basic assays, labeling strategies, and principles of data analysis. Our approach is relevant not only for motor protein dynamics but also provides a general tool for single-particle tracking with high spatiotemporal precision, which overcomes the limitations of single-molecule fluorescence methods.

  7. Hydration of magnesia cubes: a helium ion microscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Schwaiger

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Physisorbed water originating from exposure to the ambient can have a strong impact on the structure and chemistry of oxide nanomaterials. The effect can be particularly pronounced when these oxides are in physical contact with a solid substrate such as the ones used for immobilization to perform electron or ion microscopy imaging. We used helium ion microscopy (HIM and investigated morphological changes of vapor-phase-grown MgO cubes after vacuum annealing and pressing into foils of soft and high purity indium. The indium foils were either used as obtained or, for reference, subjected to vacuum drying. After four days of storage in the vacuum chamber of the microscope and at a base pressure of p −7 mbar, we observed on these cubic particles the attack of residual physisorbed water molecules from the indium substrate. As a result, thin magnesium hydroxide layers spontaneously grew, giving rise to characteristic volume expansion effects, which depended on the size of the particles. Rounding of the originally sharp cube edges leads to a significant loss of the morphological definition specific to the MgO cubes. Comparison of different regions within one sample before and after exposure to liquid water reveals different transformation processes, such as the formation of Mg(OH2 shells that act as diffusion barriers for MgO dissolution or the evolution of brucite nanosheets organized in characteristic flower-like microstructures. The findings underline the significant metastability of nanomaterials under both ambient and high-vacuum conditions and show the dramatic effect of ubiquitous water films during storage and characterization of oxide nanomaterials.

  8. Parques temáticos

    OpenAIRE

    Ashton, Mary; Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul

    2008-01-01

    O mundo contemporâneo globalizou-se, destruiu fronteiras, tornou o impossível de ontem no possível de hoje. Aproximou distâncias, desenvolveu tecnologia, informação e um novo conceito de divertimento e lazer em família, em grupos ou até mesmo individual. Entre as novas propostas  estão os parques temáticos.

  9. High-resolution imaging by scanning electron microscopy of semithin sections in correlation with light microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Daisuke; Kusumi, Satoshi; Shodo, Ryusuke; Dan, Yukari; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we introduce scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of semithin resin sections. In this technique, semithin sections were adhered on glass slides, stained with both uranyl acetate and lead citrate, and observed with a backscattered electron detector at a low accelerating voltage. As the specimens are stained in the same manner as conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the contrast of SEM images of semithin sections was similar to TEM images of ultrathin sections. Using this technique, wide areas of semithin sections were also observed by SEM, without the obstruction of grids, which was inevitable for traditional TEM. This study also applied semithin section SEM to correlative light and electron microscopy. Correlative immunofluorescence microscopy and immune-SEM were performed in semithin sections of LR white resin-embedded specimens using a FluoroNanogold-labeled secondary antibody. Because LR white resin is hydrophilic and electron stable, this resin is suitable for immunostaining and SEM observation. Using correlative microscopy, the precise localization of the primary antibody was demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy and SEM. This method has great potential for studies examining the precise localization of molecules, including Golgi- and ER-associated proteins, in correlation with LM and SEM.

  10. TEM studies of Ge nanocrystal formation in PECVD grown SiO{sub 2}:Ge/SiO{sub 2} multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agan, S [Physics Department, Kirikkale University, 71450 Kirikkale (Turkey); Dana, A [Physics Department, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Aydinli, A [Physics Department, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2006-06-07

    We investigate the effect of annealing on the Ge nanocrystal formation in multilayered germanosilicate-oxide films grown on Si substrates by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). The multilayered samples were annealed at temperatures ranging from 750 to 900 {sup 0}C for 5 min under nitrogen atmosphere. The onset of formation of Ge nanocrystals, at 750 {sup 0}C, can be observed via high resolution TEM micrographs. The diameters of Ge nanocrystals were observed to be between 5 and 14 nm. As the annealing temperature is raised to 850 {sup 0}C, a second layer of Ge nanocrystals forms next to the original precipitation band, positioning itself closer to the substrate SiO{sub 2} interface. High resolution cross section TEM images, electron diffraction and electron energy-loss spectroscopy as well as energy-dispersive x-ray analysis (EDAX) data all indicate that Ge nanocrystals are present in each layer.

  11. TEM study of flux pinning defects in YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7-. delta. produced by 580 MeV Sn ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, R.; Kirk, M.A.; Brown, R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Marwick, A.D.; Civale, L.; Holtzberg, F.H. (International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY (United States). Thomas J. Watson Research Center)

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies of high {Tc} superconductors irradiated with high energy heavy ions have indicated that a defect structure is produced which is extremely effective in pinning magnetic flux lines. In attempting to develop models to account for these observations, it is imperative to have a complete characterization of the defects responsible for the property enhancements. Hence, the defect microstructure produced in single crystal YBCO by 580 MeV Sn{sup 30+} irradiation, recently demonstrated to provide highly effective flux pinning at high fields and temperatures, has been investigated by conventional transmission electron microscopy. This irradiation condition is shown to produce linear, yet segmented, tracks of damaged material, approximately aligned with the incident irradiation direction, throughout the entire crystal thickness of 22{mu}m. The cross sectional density of damage tracks is in close agreement with the ion fluence. Two specific characteristics of the track morphology have been studied, namely, their continuity and angular spread. The continuity of the tracks does not appear to follow threshold-like behavior within the electronic loss range studied here and the angular distribution of the defect track directions is only approximated by the Monte Carlo calculations of TRIM.

  12. Microscopy study of the interface between concrete and conductive coating used as anode for cathodic protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Peelen, W.H.A.; Schuten, G.

    2003-01-01

    Samples were studied of conductive coatings that had served as anode material in concrete cathodic protection (CP) systems in Norway and The Netherlands for up to about 9 years. Techniques used were light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), carried out on thin section samples of about

  13. Scanning electron microscopy and roughness study of dental composite degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; Cortez, Louise Ribeiro; Zarur, Raquel de Oliveira; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2012-04-01

    Our aim was to test the hypothesis that the use of mouthwashes, consumption of soft drinks, as well as the type of light curing unit (LCU), would change the surface roughness (Ra) and morphology of a nanofilled composite resin (Z350® 3M ESPE). Samples (80) were divided into eight groups: Halogen LCU, group 1, saliva (control); group 2, Pepsi Twist®; group 3, Listerine®; group 4, Colgate Plax®; LED LCU, group 5, saliva; group 6, Pepsi Twist®; group 7, Listerine®; group 8, Colgate Plax®. Ra values were measured at baseline, and after 7 and 14 days. One specimen of each group was prepared for scanning electron microscopy analysis after 14 days. The data were subjected to multifactor analysis of variance at a 95% confidence followed by Tukey's honestly significant difference post-hoc test. All the treatments resulted in morphological changes in composite resin surface, and the most significant change was in Pepsi Twist® groups. The samples of G6 had the greatest increase in Ra. The immersion of nanofilled resin in mouthwashes with alcohol and soft drink increases the surface roughness. Polymerization by halogen LCU (reduced light intensity) associated with alcohol contained mouthwash resulted in significant roughness on the composite.

  14. Atomic Force Microscopy Application in Biological Research: A Review Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surena Vahabi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Atomic force microscopy (AFM is a three-dimensional topographic technique with a high atomic resolution to measure surface roughness. AFM is a kind of scanning probe microscope, and its near-field technique is based on the interaction between a sharp tip and the atoms of the sample surface. There are several methods and many ways to modify the tip of the AFM to investigate surface properties, including measuring friction, adhesion forces and viscoelastic properties as well as determining the Young modulus and imaging magnetic or electrostatic properties. The AFM technique can analyze any kind of samples such as polymers, adsorbed molecules, films or fibers, and powders in the air whether in a controlled atmosphere or in a liquid medium. In the past decade, the AFM has emerged as a powerful tool to obtain the nanostructural details and biomechanical properties of biological samples, including biomolecules and cells. The AFM applications, techniques, and -in particular- its ability to measure forces, are not still familiar to most clinicians. This paper reviews the literature on the main principles of the AFM modality and highlights the advantages of this technique in biology, medicine, and- especially- dentistry. This literature review was performed through E-resources, including Science Direct, PubMed, Blackwell Synergy, Embase, Elsevier, and Scholar Google for the references published between 1985 and 2010.

  15. Microbial biofilm study by synchrotron X-ray microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennafirme, S.; Lima, I.; Bitencourt, J. A.; Crapez, M. A. C.; Lopes, R. T.

    2015-11-01

    Microbial biofilm has already being used to remove metals and other pollutants from wastewater. In this sense, our proposal was to isolate and cultivate bacteria consortia from mangrove's sediment resistant to Zn (II) and Cu (II) at 50 mg L-1 and to observe, through synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy (microXRF), whether the biofilm sequestered the metal. The biofilm area analyzed was 1 mm2 and a 2D map was generated (pixel size 20×20 μm2, counting time 5 s/point). The biofilm formation and retention followed the sequence Zn>Cu. Bacterial consortium zinc resistant formed dense biofilm and retained 63.83% of zinc, while the bacterial consortium copper resistant retained 3.21% of copper, with lower biofilm formation. Dehydrogenase activity of Zn resistant bacterial consortium was not negatively affect by 50 mg ml-1 zinc input, whereas copper resistant bacterial consortium showed a significant decrease on dehydrogenase activity (50 mg mL-1 of Cu input). In conclusion, biofilm may protect bacterial cells, acting as barrier against metal toxicity. The bacterial consortia Zn resistant, composed by Nitratireductor spp. and Pseudomonas spp formed dense biofilm and sequestered metal from water, decreasing the metal bioavailability. These bacterial consortia can be used in bioreactors and in bioremediation programs.

  16. Advanced 2D and 3D Electron Microscopy Analysis of Clay/PP Nanocomposites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosca, Alessandra; Roberts, Ashley; Daviðsdóttir, Svava

    2011-01-01

    consisting of 3 wt% modified clay in a PP matrix was studied. Prior to microscopy analyses, SEM or TEM samples were cryo-microtomed to a flat surface or thin sections (70 nm), respectively. An FEI Titan T20 TEM microscope operating at 200 kV was used for 2D imaging. An FEI Helios focussed ion beam (FIB...... and high resolution) as compared to TEM in the study of polymer nanocomposites. Both microscopy techniques are powerful tools to study these materials and provide a clear, quantitative measurement of the morphology, size distributions, and dispersion of the clay nanoparticles....

  17. 18,X,Y aneuploidies and transmission electron microscopy studies in spermatozoa from five carriers of different reciprocal translocations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elena Moretti; Nicola Antonio Pascarelli; Valentina Giannerini; Michela Geminiani; Cecilia Anichini; Oiulia Collodel

    2009-01-01

    We analysed ejaculated spermatozoa from five infertile men with different balanced reciprocal translocations to contribute to the study of meiotic segregation of chromosomes 18, X and Y and also to evaluate sperm morphology by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Conventional lymphocyte karyotype analyses highlighted dif-ferent reciprocal balanced translocations: t(12; 13), t(4;9), t(X;8), t(8; 10) and t(3; 16). Semen analysis was performed by light and TEM. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed directly on sperm nuclei using centromeric probes for chromosomes 18, X and Y. The carriers of the balanced reciprocal translocations considered in the pres-ent study showed a very similar pattern of sperm pathologies: diffused presence of apoptosis and immaturity. All patients showed meiotic segregation derangements, highlighted by the presence of sperm diploidies and sex chro-mosome disomies particularly related to the failure of the first meiotic division. However, an increased incidence of chromosome 18 aneuploidy was detected in spermatozoa from t(X;8) and t(8;10) carriers. We have also reported values from sex chromosomes such as t(X;8), although the X chromosome was involved in translocation. Since pa-tients with reciprocal translocations and spermatogenetic impairment are candidates for intracytoplasmic sperm in-jection cycles, the study of sperm parameters, and particularly of the level of aneuploidy rates, would provide better information for couples at risk and would contribute to the data in the literature for a better understanding of the ef-fects of chromosomal rearrangement on the whole meiotic process and, in particular, on chromosomes not involved in translocation.

  18. Polymorphism of Two-Dimensional Cyanine Dye J-Aggregates and Its Genesis: Fluorescence Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokhorov, Valery V; Perelygina, Olga M; Pozin, Sergey I; Mal'tsev, Eugene I; Vannikov, Anatoly V

    2015-12-01

    Polymorphic J-aggregates of monomethine cyanine dye 3,3'-di(γ-sulfopropyl)-5,5'-dichlorotiamonomethinecyanine (TC) have been studied by fluorescence optical microscopy (FOM) and by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The in situ FOM observations in a solution drop distinguish two J-aggregate morphology classes: flexible strips and rigid rods. The AFM imaging of dried samples reveals a strong J-aggregate structural rearrangement under adsorption on a mica surface with the strips self-folding and the rods squashing into rectangular bilayers and much deeper destruction. In the present work, the following structural conclusions have been drawn on the basis of careful consideration of strip crystal habits and various structural features of squashed/destructed rods: (1) the tubular morphology of TC rods is directly proved by FOM measurements in the solution bulk; (2) the staircase model of molecular arrangement in strips is proposed explaining the characteristic ∼44° skew angle in strip vertices; (3) a model of tube formation by a close-packed helical winding of flexible monolayer strips is proposed and justified which explains the observed J-aggregate polymorphism and strip-to-rod polymorphic transformations in a wide spatiotemporal scale; (4) at a nanoscale, an unexpectedly complex quasi-one-dimensional organization in J-aggregate two-dimensional monolayers is observed by high-resolution AFM imaging of constituent nanostrips separated by a characteristic distance in the range of 6-10 nm. The obtained results indicate that the underlying monolayer structure is the same for all J-aggregate polymorphs.

  19. Annealing of hydrogen-induced defects in RF-plasma-treated Si wafers: ex situ and in situ transmission electron microscopy studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghica, C; Nistor, L C [National Institute of Materials Physics, Atomistilor 105 bis, 077125 Magurele-Bucharest (Romania); Vizireanu, S; Dinescu, G, E-mail: cghica@infim.ro [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Atomistilor 409, 077125 Magurele-Bucharest (Romania)

    2011-07-27

    The smart-cut(TM) process is based on inducing and processing structural defects below the free surface of semiconductor wafers. The necessary defects are currently induced by implantation of light elements such as hydrogen or helium. An alternative softer way to induce shallow subsurface defects is by RF-plasma hydrogenation. To facilitate the smart-cut process, the wafers containing the induced defects need to be subjected to an appropriate thermal treatment. In our experiments, (0 0 1) Si wafers are submitted to 200 and 50 W hydrogen RF-plasma and are subsequently annealed. The samples are studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), before and after annealing. The plasma-introduced defects are {l_brace}1 1 1{r_brace} and {l_brace}1 0 0{r_brace} planar-like defects and nanocavities, all of them involving hydrogen. Many nanocavities are aligned into strings almost parallel to the wafer surface. The annealing is performed either by furnace thermal treatment at 550 deg. C, or by in situ heating in the electron microscope at 450, 650 and 800 deg. C during the TEM observations. The TEM microstructural studies indicate a partial healing of the planar defects and a size increase of the nanometric cavities by a coalescence process of the small neighbouring nanocavities. By annealing, the lined up nanometric voids forming chains in the as-hydrogenated sample coalesced into well-defined cracks, mostly parallel to the wafer surface.

  20. Electron microscopy study of microtexture in Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys processed by powder metallurgy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, P. P.; San Jean, J.; Iza-Mendia, A.; Recarte, V.; Pérez-Landazabal, J. J.; No, M. L.

    2003-10-01

    Cu-AI-Ni shape memory alloys processed by powder metallurgy show very good thermomechanical properties, being the mechanical behavior similar to the one observed in single crystals. In this paper we present the microstructural characterization of a sample elaborated by powder metallurgy in two different stages of the process: after being compacted by Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) and after compaction and hot rolling, in order to find the microscopic mechanisms responsible of their mechanical behavior. The characterization has been carried out by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy using Backscattered Electron Imaging (SEM-BSE) and Electron BackScattered Diffraction (EBSD), as well as Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM).

  1. Analytical Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2006-06-01

    In the Analytical Microscopy group, within the National Center for Photovoltaic's Measurements and Characterization Division, we combine two complementary areas of analytical microscopy--electron microscopy and proximal-probe techniques--and use a variety of state-of-the-art imaging and analytical tools. We also design and build custom instrumentation and develop novel techniques that provide unique capabilities for studying materials and devices. In our work, we collaborate with you to solve materials- and device-related R&D problems. This sheet summarizes the uses and features of four major tools: transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, the dual-beam focused-ion-beam workstation, and scanning probe microscopy.

  2. Characterization of the system MoS{sub 2} + C, HAADF vs Tem conventional; Cracterizacion del sistema MoS{sub 2} + C, HAADF vs TEM convencional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reza, C.; Cruz, G. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Santiago, P.; Rendon, L. [IFUNAM, A.P. 20-364, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    A study is presented about the synthesis and characterization of unidimensional nano systems composed of MoS{sub 2} and C with potential use as solid lubricant. The synthesis process was developed for the mold method, via thermal decomposition, which uses a film of nano porous aluminium oxide. Such systems were characterized by two analysis methods that involve Transmission Electron Microscopy, HRTEM (Conventional TEM) and HAADF (Z Contrast). The results obtained in the structural and morphological characterization were supplemented to determine the structure type obtained in the unidimensional systems. (Author)

  3. Vacuum annealing phenomena in ultrathin TiDy/Pd bi-layer films evaporated on Si(100) as studied by TEM and XPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisowski, W; Keim, E G

    2010-04-01

    Using a combination of TEM and XPS, we made an analysis of the complex high-temperature annealing effect on ultrathin titanium deuteride (TiD(y)) films evaporated on a Si(100) substrate and covered by an ultrathin palladium layer. Both the preparation and annealing of the TiD(y)/Pd bi-layer films were performed in situ under UHV conditions. It was found that the surface and bulk morphology of the bi-layer film as well as that of the Si substrate material undergo a microstructural and chemical conversion after annealing and annealing-induced deuterium evolution from the TiD(y) phase. Energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM) mapping of cross-section images and argon ion sputter depth profiling XPS analysis revealed both a broad intermixing between the Ti and Pd layers and an extensive inter-diffusion of Si from the substrate into the film bulk area. Segregation of Ti at the Pd top layer surface was found to occur by means of angle-resolved XPS (ARXPS) and the EFTEM analyses. Selected area diffraction (SAD) and XPS provided evidence for the formation of a new PdTi(2) bimetallic phase within the top region of the annealed film. Moreover, these techniques allowed to detect the initial stages of TiSi phase formation within the film-substrate interlayer.

  4. Molecular shape of Lumbricus terrestris erythrocruorin studied by electron microscopy and image analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, Egbert J.; Heel, Marin van

    1989-01-01

    The molecular structure of erythrocruorin (hemoglobin) from Lumbricus terrestris has been studied by electron microscopy of negatively stained particles. Over 1000 molecular projections were selected from a number of electron micrographs and were then classified by multivariate statistical

  5. The replication of Rocio virus in brain tissue of suckling mice. Study by electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, H; Weigl, D R; de Souza Lopes, O

    1983-01-01

    By electron microscopy studies, Rocio virus particles were about 43 nm and spherically shaped. They were found within the cisternae of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex of infected neurons. No precursor particles were detected nor virus budding was evident.

  6. Cross-sectional TEM study of the microstructure of superconducting X-ray detectors based on thin W-Al layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safran, G. E-mail: safran@mfa.kfki.hu; Loidl, M.; Meier, O.; Seidel, W.; Proebst, F

    2002-06-01

    The relation between structural and morphological properties and the performance of X-ray detectors have been studied by means of cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) and low temperature electrical measurements. The detectors consist of a strip of an aluminium thin film in contact with superconducting phase transition thermometers based on tungsten films at its both ends. Soft X-ray photons are absorbed in the sapphire substrate underneath the Al film and create high energy phonons. These phonons enter the superconducting film and break up Cooper-pairs into quasiparticles which then diffuse into the W films and create correlated thermal signals in both thermometers. XTEM investigations revealed a polycrystalline structure of the Al films above both the bare sapphire and chemically etched areas of the highly oriented W films, while the Al is single crystalline above the intact W film surface showing an orientational relationship: (2 0 0)Al parallel (0 2 0)W parallel (0 1 1-bar 2)Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and [0 2-bar 2]Al parallel [2 0 0]W parallel [1 0 1-bar 2-bar]Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. No remarkable difference in morphology and structure of the layers of the two detector sides was observed. On the other hand, irregular saw-tooth-like interfaces of different profiles of low slope were found between the chemically etched regions of the W sensor films and the overlapping Al diffusion film. The observed strong asymmetry of the correlated signals is attributed to the disturbed quasiparticle propagation through the observed different interface structures of the two detector sides.

  7. Quantitative in situ magnetization reversal studies in Lorentz microscopy and electron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez, L.A. [Laboratorio de Microscopías Avanzadas (LMA), Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Transpyrenean Associated Laboratory for Electron Microscopy (TALEM), CEMES-INA, CNRS-Universidad de Zaragoza, Toulouse (France); CEMES-CNRS 29, rue Jeanne Marvig, B.P. 94347, F-31055 Toulouse Cedex (France); Magén, C., E-mail: cmagend@unizar.es [Laboratorio de Microscopías Avanzadas (LMA), Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Transpyrenean Associated Laboratory for Electron Microscopy (TALEM), CEMES-INA, CNRS-Universidad de Zaragoza, Toulouse (France); Fundación ARAID, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Snoeck, E.; Gatel, C. [Transpyrenean Associated Laboratory for Electron Microscopy (TALEM), CEMES-INA, CNRS-Universidad de Zaragoza, Toulouse (France); CEMES-CNRS 29, rue Jeanne Marvig, B.P. 94347, F-31055 Toulouse Cedex (France); Marín, L. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Serrano-Ramón, L. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón (ICMA), Universidad de Zaragoza-CSIC, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); and others

    2013-11-15

    A generalized procedure for the in situ application of magnetic fields by means of the excitation of the objective lens for magnetic imaging experiments in Lorentz microscopy and electron holography is quantitatively described. A protocol for applying magnetic fields with arbitrary in-plane magnitude and orientation is presented, and a freeware script for Digital Micrograph{sup ™} is provided to assist the operation of the microscope. Moreover, a method to accurately reconstruct hysteresis loops is detailed. We show that the out-of-plane component of the magnetic field cannot be always neglected when performing quantitative measurements of the local magnetization. Several examples are shown to demonstrate the accuracy and functionality of the methods. - Highlights: • Generalized procedure for application of magnetic fields with the TEM objective lens. • Arbitrary in-plane magnetic field magnitude and orientation can be applied. • Method to accurately reconstruct hysteresis loops by electron holography. • Out-of-plane field component should be considered in quantitative measurements. • Examples to illustrate the method in Lorentz microscopy and electron holography.

  8. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube/Polymer Nanocomposites: A First-Principles Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola, Francisco; Xia, Zhenhai; Lebrion-Colon, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    The physics of HRTEM image formation and electron diffraction of SWCNT in a polymer matrix were investigated theoretically on the basis of the multislice method, and the optics of a FEG Super TWIN Philips CM 200 TEM operated at 80 kV. The effect of nanocomposite thickness on both image contrast and typical electron diffraction reflections of nanofillers were explored. The implications of the results on the experimental applicability to study dispersion, chirality and diameter of nanofillers are discussed.

  9. Construction of tunable supramolecular networks studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this review we describe a family of organic-based host frameworks which can accommodate guest molecules. The aim of the study is to test the adjustability of this class of mimic structures that may lead to new interesting functions. Emphasis of our research is placed upon four aspects: 1) thermal properties, 2) surface photochemistry, 3) fullerene adsorption, and 4) guest inclusion. It is envisioned that such approach of nanoporous molecular networks might be developed into a new family of useful soft frameworks for studies toward shape-selective catalysis, molecular recognition, self-assembly, and host-guest supramolecular chemistry.

  10. Contribution of electron microscopy to the study of sealing processes in oxalic anodised aluminium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartolomé, Mª J.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Transmission electron microscopy (TEM of anodic coatings reveals a substructure in which three regions are clearly differentiated: a very thin band at the hexagonal cell boundaries; the cell walls contaminated with anions from the anodising bath; and the hydrated alumina that fills the pores with a certain amount of retained water. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM appears to be a highly suitable tool to observe, at the surface and at more internal levels, the structural changes associated with each sealing degree. Both types of electron microscopy allow the possibility to visualise the different stages of the very complex sealing and ageing mechanisms indirectly determined by gravimetric and electrochemical techniques

    La microscopía electrónica de transmisión (MET de los recubrimientos anódicos revela una subestructura en la cual se diferencian claramente tres regiones: una banda muy delgada en los límites de las celdas hexagonales; las paredes de las celdas contaminadas con los aniones procedentes del baño de anodización; y la alúmina hidratada que llena los poros con una cierta cantidad de agua retenida. La microscopía electrónica de barrido (MEB parece ser una herramienta muy adecuada para observar, tanto en la superficie como en los níveles más internos, los cambios estructurales asociados con cada grado de sellado. Ambos tipos de microscopía electrónica permiten la posibilidad de visualizar las diferentes etapas de los muy complejos mecanismos de sellado y envejecimiento indirectamente determinados por técnicas gravimétricas y electroquímicas.

  11. Early studies of placental ultrastructure by electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, A M; Enders, A C

    2016-01-01

    many other scientists to Washington University in St. Louis. Work on human placental ultrastructure was initiated at Cambridge and Kyoto whilst domestic animals were initially studied by Björkman in Stockholm and electron micrographs of bat placenta were published by Wimsatt of Cornell University...

  12. The endolymphatic sac: a scanning and transmission electron microscopy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvortrup, Klaus; Bretlau, Poul

    2002-01-01

    A recent investigation has suggested that the chief cells of the endolymphatic sac produce an endogenous inhibitor of sodium resorption in the kidneys, tentatively named saccin. In the current study, the ultrastructure of the endolymphatic sac and in particular the chief cells are described to de...

  13. The scanning probe microscopy study of thin polymer films

    CERN Document Server

    Harron, H R

    1995-01-01

    spherulites fibrils was influenced by the chemical nature of the solvent Results reported here confirm that the fibril structure and spherulite size was significantly affected by the chemical nature of the plasticizing solvent. Detailed observations of the spherulites are included herein. A tapping mode AFM was used in conjunction with the usual contact mode AFM to image the fine spherulitic lamellae structure. It was found that the AFM operated in the tapping mode was less destructive than when operated in the contact mode and gave higher resolution images of the lamellae structure. The lamellae were found to be structurally very similar to the features observed in the study using STM indicating that under certain circumstances, the STM was less destructive over the 'insulating' polymer than the contact mode AFM. technique. Furthermore, images of the crystalline film contained elongated units that were attributed to the lamellae formations that form the basic building blocks of polymer spherulites. The study...

  14. Confocal microscopy indentation system for studying in situ chondrocyte mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang-Kuy; Colarusso, Pina; Herzog, Walter

    2009-10-01

    Chondrocytes synthesize extracellular matrix molecules, thus they are essential for the development, adaptation and maintenance of articular cartilage. Furthermore, it is well accepted that the biosynthetic activity of chondrocytes is influenced by the mechanical environment. Therefore, their response to mechanical stimuli has been studied extensively. Much of the knowledge in this area of research has been derived from testing of isolated cells, cartilage explants, and fixed cartilage specimens: systems that differ in important aspects from chondrocytes embedded in articular cartilage and observed during loading conditions. In this study, current model systems have been improved by working with the intact cartilage in real time. An indentation system was designed on a confocal microscope that allows for simultaneous loading and observation of chondrocytes in their native environment. Cell mechanics were then measured under precisely controlled loading conditions. The indentation system is based on a light transmissible cylindrical glass indentor of 0.17 mm thickness and 1.64 mm diameter that is aligned along the focal axis of the microscope and allows for real time observation of live cells in their native environment. The system can be used to study cell deformation and biological responses, such as calcium sparks, while applying prescribed loads on the cartilage surface. It can also provide novel information on the relationship between cell loading and cartilage adaptive/degenerative processes in the intact tissue.

  15. Cellulose fibril aggregation studies of eucalyptus dissolving pulps using atomic force microscopy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chunilall, Viren

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available STUDIES OF Eucalyptus DISSOLVING PULPS USING ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY V. Chunilall1, J.Wesley-Smith2, T. Bush1 1CSIR, Forestry and Forest Product Research Centre, P.O. Box 17001, Congella, 4013, South Africa. 2Electron Microscope Unit, University of Kwa... pulp using atomic force microscopy (AFM) have reported increased cellulose fibril aggregation during processing, and a concomitant decrease in surface area available for chemical reaction1,2. These findings were subsequently confirmed...

  16. HUMAN CORONARY ARTERIES- A STUDY BASED ON MICROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayamma Kunnath Narayanan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The coronary arteries are the biggest vasa vasora in the body since the heart is considered to be a modified blood vessel. The increased myocardial oxygen demand of the heart is met wholly by two coronary arteries. Hence, patients with coronary artery disease are prone to develop myocardial ischemia. The study is aimed at the structural changes of this vessels in the population of middle Kerala of various age groups from birth to seventy years. MATERIALS AND METHODS The specimen for histological study were fixed in 10% formalin and subjected to tissue processing. The sections were taken at the thickness of 5 microns and stained by using Haematoxylin- Eosin method and Verhoeff’s method for elastic fibers. The thickness of arterial wall were measured using ocular micrometer. RESULTS Structural changes of the three layered vessel walls were observed. Intimal proliferation, splitting, fragmentation and reduplication of internal elastic lamina were the important histological observation in the arterial wall as age advances. It was observed that there was a sixty fold increase in the thickness of intima from foetal to sixth decade of life. Tunica media exhibit a six fold increase in thickness probably due to muscular hypertrophy. The tunica adventitia have a threefold increase in thickness which least compared with other tunics. CONCLUSION These changes may favour atherosclerosis resulting in myocardial ischemia. Ischemic heart disease is the major cause of death and disability among the age group of third to sixth decade of life.

  17. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy study of hot-deformed gamma-TiAl-based alloy microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrapoński, J; Rodak, K

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the changes in the microstructure of hot-deformed specimens made of alloys containing 46-50 at.% Al, 2 at.% Cr and 2 at.% Nb (and alloying additions such as carbon and boron) with the aid of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. After homogenization and heat treatment performed in order to make diverse lamellae thickness, the specimens were compressed at 1000 degrees C. Transmission electron microscopy examinations of specimens after the compression test revealed the presence of heavily deformed areas with a high density of dislocation. Deformation twins were also observed. Dynamically recrystallized grains were revealed. For alloys no. 2 and no. 3, the recovery and recrystallization processes were more extensive than for alloy no. 1.

  18. Microfluidic traction force microscopy to study mechanotransduction in angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldock, Luke; Wittkowske, Claudia; Perrault, Cecile M

    2017-07-01

    The formation of new blood vessels from existing vasculature, angiogenesis, is driven by coordinated endothelial cell migration and matrix remodeling in response to local signals. Recently, a growing body of evidence has shown that mechanotransduction, along with chemotransduction, is a major regulator of angiogenesis. Mechanical signals, such as fluid shear stress and substrate mechanics, influence sprouting and network formation, but the mechanisms behind this relationship are still unclear. Here, we present cellular traction forces as possible effectors activated by mechanosensing to mediate matrix remodeling, and encourage the use of TFM to study mechanotransduction in angiogenesis. We also suggest that deciphering the response of EC to mechanical signals could reveal an optimal angiogenic mechanical environment, and provide insight into development, wound healing, the initiation and growth of tumors, and new strategies for tissue engineering. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Simulation study of secondary electron images in scanning ion microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ohya, K

    2003-01-01

    The target atomic number, Z sub 2 , dependence of secondary electron yield is simulated by applying a Monte Carlo code for 17 species of metals bombarded by Ga ions and electrons in order to study the contrast difference between scanning ion microscopes (SIM) and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). In addition to the remarkable reversal of the Z sub 2 dependence between the Ga ion and electron bombardment, a fine structure, which is correlated to the density of the conduction band electrons in the metal, is calculated for both. The brightness changes of the secondary electron images in SIM and SEM are simulated using Au and Al surfaces adjacent to each other. The results indicate that the image contrast in SIM is much more sensitive to the material species and is clearer than that for SEM. The origin of the difference between SIM and SEM comes from the difference in the lateral distribution of secondary electrons excited within the escape depth.

  20. A simple algorithm for measuring particle size distributions on an uneven background from TEM images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gontard, Lionel Cervera; Ozkaya, Dogan; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticles have a wide range of applications in science and technology. Their sizes are often measured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or X-ray diffraction. Here, we describe a simple computer algorithm for measuring particle size distributions from TEM images in the presence of a...

  1. TEM and SANS investigation of age hardened Nimonic PE16 after cyclic loading at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundararaman, M.; Chen, W.; Wahi, R.P.; Wiedenmann, A.; Wagner, W.; Petry, W. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India) Berlin, Technische Universitaet, (Germany) Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin GmbH, (Germany) Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland) Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin, Grenoble (France))

    1992-05-01

    A nickel-base superalloy Nimonic PE16 shows softening when subjected to low cycle fatigue (LCF) at room temperature. In this work, small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to study the morphology of gamma-prime precipitates in the Nimonic PE16 after LCF at room temperature. In TEM dark-field images using superlattice reflections, deformation bands free of gamma-prime precipitates in the Nimonic PE16 after LCF at room temperature. In TEM dark-field images using superlattice reflections, deformation bands free of gamma-prime precipitates are observed. SANS measurements allowed the characterization of the disappeared precipitates with regard to their average size, size distribution and volume fraction by comparing the scattered intensities of loaded and unloaded specimens. An analysis of the results shows that the gamma-prime precipitates within the deformation bands have completely dissolved and not just disordered or cut to sizes smaller than the TEM resolution limit. 14 refs.

  2. A flexible multi-stimuli in situ (S)TEM: Concept, optical performance, and outlook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Börrnert, Felix, E-mail: felix.boerrnert@triebenberg.de [Speziallabor Triebenberg, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); IFW Dresden, PF 27 01 16, 01171 Dresden (Germany); Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Müller, Heiko; Riedel, Thomas; Linck, Martin [CEOS GmbH, Englerstraße 28, 69126 Heidelberg (Germany); Kirkland, Angus I. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Haider, Max. [CEOS GmbH, Englerstraße 28, 69126 Heidelberg (Germany); Büchner, Bernd [IFW Dresden, PF 27 01 16, 01171 Dresden (Germany); Lichte, Hannes [Speziallabor Triebenberg, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    The progress in (scanning) transmission electron microscopy development had led to an unprecedented knowledge of the microscopic structure of functional materials at the atomic level. Additionally, although not widely used yet, electron holography is capable to map the electric and magnetic potential distributions at the sub-nanometer scale. Nevertheless, in situ studies inside a (scanning) transmission electron microscope ((S)TEM) are extremely challenging because of the much restricted size and accessibility of the sample space. Here, we introduce a concept for a dedicated in situ (S)TEM with a large sample chamber for flexible multi-stimuli experimental setups and report about the electron optical performance of the instrument. We demonstrate a maximum resolving power of about 1 nm in conventional imaging mode and substantially better than 5 nm in scanning mode while providing an effectively usable “pole piece gap” of 70 mm. - Highlights: • A concept for a (S)TEM with a large sample chamber is outlined. • An actual microscope is modified and has now a 70 mm high sample space. • The resolving power is about 1 nm in TEM and better than 5 nm in STEM mode. • Possible dedicated in situ microscopes with present technology are discussed.

  3. Progress in the preparation of cross-sectional TEM specimens by ion-beam thinning

    CERN Document Server

    Strecker, A; Kelsch, M; Salzberger, U; Sycha, M; Gao, M; Richter, G; Benthem, K V

    2003-01-01

    In transmission electron microscopy (TEM), often the preparation of samples is the most critical part. Specimens have to have disk geometries of 3 mm diameter laterally, and they have to be transparent for the electron beam vertically. Therefore, a specimen thickness in the range of some 1-10 nm has to be achieved by the preparation process. While shrinking the specimen dimensions, care has to be taken to recover the materials properties in the nm-regime. We report and shortly discuss some TEM specimen preparation techniques mainly used in the Stuttgart TEM specimen preparation laboratory. Furthermore, we demonstrate how more advanced techniques lead to a more reliable preparation of weakly-bonded metal/SrTiO sub 3 interfaces. In addition, the advantage of low-voltage ion-milling is demonstrated by a case study for bulk SrTiO sub 3. As a result, low-voltage ion polishing as a final step in the TEM specimen preparation by conventional ion-thinning turns out to significantly increase the specimen quality. In tu...

  4. A study on microstructures and extended defects in Ni- and Co-base superalloys. Development and application of advanced TEM techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Julian

    2016-04-21

    To improve the efficiency of stationary gas turbines and air craft jet engines, it is crucial to increase the maximum temperature capabilities of single crystalline superalloys by appropriate alloy design and microstructure tuning. The mechanical properties of superalloys are largely influenced by the physical constitution of the microstructure. To develop a better understanding of fundamental aspects of creep deformation, like the stress states, defect structures and other degradation processes, it is necessary to employ scale-bridging characterization. In the present work, Ni- and Co-based superalloys are investigated by a series of advanced transmission electron microscopy techniques and by the application of specifically developed characterization methods to identify dominating processes on atomic scale and hence to make a direct correlation to the macroscopic creep behavior. For instance, the misfit between γ and γ' in the initial microstructure is of great importance, since it strongly influences the rafting process and the interfacial dislocation network. To address the stress state, on the one hand misfit measurements in undeformed samples are conducted and are directly compared to finite-element simulations. On the other hand, deformed samples are investigated to assess the influence of an initial rafting process and the formation of an interface dislocation network. For this, characterization methods are used which are based on the evaluation of atomically resolved images and on electron diffraction. Moreover, the temperature dependency of the misfit and of the microstructure stability is specifically investigated for different Co-base alloys in in situ heating experiments. The characterization of defect structures in Ni-base superalloys after creep deformation builds the second pillar of this work. Specific cutting processes of superdislocations are studied to elucidate which atomic processes take place. A series of left angle 100 right angle and

  5. Shedding new light on viruses: super-resolution microscopy for studying human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Barbara; Heilemann, Mike

    2013-10-01

    For more than 70 years electron microscopy (EM) techniques have played an important role in investigating structures of enveloped viruses. By contrast, use of fluorescence microscopy (FM) methods for this purpose was limited by the fact that the size of virus particles is generally around or below the diffraction limit of light microscopy. Various super-resolution (SR) fluorescence imaging techniques developed over the past two decades bypass the diffraction limit of light microscopy, allowing visualization of subviral details and bridging the gap between conventional FM and EM methods. We summarize here findings on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) obtained using SR-FM techniques. Although the number of published studies is currently limited and some of the pioneering analyses also covered methodological or descriptive aspects, recent publications clearly indicate the potential to approach open questions in HIV-1 replication from a new angle.

  6. NEXAFS microscopy studies of the association of hydrocarbon thin films with fine clay particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covelli, Danielle [Department of Chemistry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5C9 (Canada); Hernandez-Cruz, Daniel [Brockhouse Institute for Material Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, L8S 4M1 (Canada); Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Haines, Brian M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5C9 (Canada); Munoz, Vincente; Omotoso, Oladipo; Mikula, Randy [CANMET Energy Technology Centre Natural Resources Canada, Devon, AB, T9G 1A8 (Canada); Urquhart, Stephen [Department of Chemistry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5C9 (Canada)], E-mail: stephen.urquhart@usask.ca

    2009-06-15

    The nature of organic species associated with clay minerals plays a significant role in several processes, from hydrocarbon recovery in oil sands to contaminated soil remediation and water treatment. In this work, we address the use of scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) in conjunction with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy to study the microstructure and chemistry of organic-clay associations in situ. A model system based on methylene blue and illite is used to explore the sensitivity of NEXAFS microscopy to these interactions, and to identify and resolve experimental challenges in these measurements. We find that sample contamination from X-ray induced photodeposition is a significant problem in STXM microscopy, but also that this problem can be substantially reduced with a liquid nitrogen cooled anticontaminator. With appropriate sample preparation and experimental procedures, we find that STXM microscopy is sensitive to thin carbon adsorbates on clay surfaces.

  7. Bauxite and bauxite residue, characterization and electron microscopy study; Bauxita e seu residuo, caracterizacao e estudo por microscopia eletronica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antunes, M.L.P.; Conceicao, F.T., E-mail: malu@sorocaba.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Toledo, S.P.; Kiyohara, P.K. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/LME/USP), SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Through the Bayer process, bauxite is refined and alumina is produced. In this process, a highly alkaline residue, red mud is generated and its disposal represents an environmental problem. The aim of this paper is to present the characterization of Brazilian bauxite and Brazilian red mud by: X-ray diffraction, specific surface area, chemical composition analysis by ICP-MS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and discuss possible applications of this residue. The results identify as a constituent of both materials: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} and the presence of Na{sub 2}O in residue. The analysis by electron microscopy of Bauxite shows particles with hexagonal shape and red mud shows small particles size. (author)

  8. Size Dependent Pore Formation in Germanium Nanowires Undergoing Reversible Delithiation Observed by In Situ TEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xiaotang; He, Yang; Mao, Scott X.; Wang, Chong-min; Korgel, Brian A.

    2016-12-22

    Germanium (Ge) nanowires coated with an amorphous silicon (Si) shell undergoing lithiation and delithiation were studied using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Delithiation creates pores in nanowires with diameters larger than ~25 nm, but not in smaller diameter nanowires. The formation of pores in Ge nanowires undergoing delithiation has been observed before in in situ TEM experiments, but there has been no indication that a critical diameter exists below which pores do not form. Pore formation occurs as a result of fast lithium diffusion compared to vacancy migration. We propose that a short diffusion path for vacancies to the nanowire surface plays a role in limiting pore formation even when lithium diffusion is fast.

  9. XRD and TEM analysis of the microstructure in the brazing joint of 3003 cladding aluminum alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Feng; Songnian Lou; Luhai Wu; Yajiang Li

    2005-01-01

    The material used in this experiment was 3003 cladding aluminum alloy, the cladding metal was 4004 aluminum alloy.The aluminum plate was brazed by means of vacuum brazing. The microstructure in the brazing joint was studied by means of X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The test result indicates that the suitable brazing technique parameters are brazing temperature, 628℃; keeping time, 10 min; vacuum degree, 6.5×10-4 Pa. XRD test indicates that there are new intermetallic compounds different from the base metal. TEM analysis indicates that Cu2Mg and Cu3Mn2Mg are formed in the brazing joint. The shape of Cu2Mg is irregular and the shape of Cu3Mn2Mg is circle, and there are tiny particles in it.

  10. SANS and TEM investigation of laser-synthesized photoluminescent Si nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botti, S. [ENEA-Frascati, FIS, CP 2400, 00100 Roma (Italy); Coppola, R. [ENEA-Casaccia, FIS, CP 2400, Roma (Italy); Gourbilleau, F.; Rizk, R. [LERMAT, ISMRA, 14050 Caen (France); May, R.P. [Institut Max von Laue Paul Langevin, 156 X, 38042 Grenoble (France); Valli, M. [ENEA-Bologna, FIS, V. Don Fiammelli 2, 40128 Bologna (Italy)

    2002-07-01

    Laser-synthesized photoluminescent Si nanopowders, of interest for application in optoelectronics, have been studied by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to characterize their size-distribution function, which correlates with emission spectra and optical performances. The SANS measurements were carried out over a wide Q-range by using the D22 instrument at ILL. The analysis of the size distributions obtained from the SANS data reveals that the microstructure of such powders includes particles as large as those observed by TEM (30-200 A in diameter) and a distribution of tiny inhomogeneities (5-10 A in diameter), possibly micropores, which can have relevant consequences on material performance. (orig.)

  11. Studies on the Performance of English Major Students in TEM8 at Universities:a Case Study at 8 Universities from the Perspective of Attribution Theory%高校英语专业学生TEM8成败的归因研究--以8所高校英语本科专业为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段学勤; 刘玉梅

    2014-01-01

    以我国8所普通院校69名基础相似但TEM8结果不同的学生为被试,调研其归因倾向和学习策略对TEM8成绩的影响。研究结果表明:低分组和高分组的学习动机和兴趣同等强烈,但归因倾向不同,低分组消极归因于内部不稳定因素和外部不可控因素,且不重视语言基础学习;低分组各项学习策略使用率低于高分组,认知能力差异最大。调查结果启示应关注TEM8考试对教学的反拨效应。%Based upon the survey of 69 subjects from eight general universities in China who have similar language competence in TEM4 but get different marks in TEM8,this paper investigates to what degree attribution preference and learning strategy affect the mark gained in TEM8. The results reveal that: learning motivation and interest of students with poor marks is as strong as that of students with high marks. However,the attribution preference between the two groups diverges:the negative attribution of the poor-mark group is due to unstable internal factors,uncontrollable external factors,and little attention to the basic knowledge of language as well. Meanwhile,the frequency of employing different learning strategies in the poor-mark group is lower than that in the high-mark group. Besides,the two groups differ from each other considerably in terms of cognitive competence. Finally,the results of the research enlighten us to concern about the backwash effect of TEM8 on daily teaching.

  12. Correlative transmission electron microscopy and electrical properties study of switchable phase-change random access memory line cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oosthoek, J. L. M.; Kooi, B. J., E-mail: B.J.Kooi@rug.nl [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials and Materials innovation institute M2i, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Voogt, F. C.; Attenborough, K. [NXP, Gerstweg 2, 6534 AE Nijmegen (Netherlands); Verheijen, M. A. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Philips Innovation Services Eindhoven, High Tech Campus 11, NL-5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Hurkx, G. A. M. [NXP Semiconductors, High Tech Campus 60, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Gravesteijn, D. J. [NXP Semiconductors, Kapeldreef 75, B 3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-02-14

    Phase-change memory line cells, where the active material has a thickness of 15 nm, were prepared for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation such that they still could be switched and characterized electrically after the preparation. The result of these observations in comparison with detailed electrical characterization showed (i) normal behavior for relatively long amorphous marks, resulting in a hyperbolic dependence between SET resistance and SET current, indicating a switching mechanism based on initially long and thin nanoscale crystalline filaments which thicken gradually, and (ii) anomalous behavior, which holds for relatively short amorphous marks, where initially directly a massive crystalline filament is formed that consumes most of the width of the amorphous mark only leaving minor residual amorphous regions at its edges. The present results demonstrate that even in (purposely) thick TEM samples, the TEM sample preparation hampers the probability to observe normal behavior and it can be debated whether it is possible to produce electrically switchable TEM specimen in which the memory cells behave the same as in their original bulk embedded state.

  13. TEM and EELS study of deuterated carbon: application to the fuel retention in tokamaks; Etude couplee MET-EELS du carbone deutere: application a la retention du combustible dans les tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernier, N

    2007-12-15

    We developed a methodology, based on the combination of TEM and EELS techniques, for a structural and chemical characterization, at a high spatial resolution, of a wide range of carbon materials. We i) optimized, in the framework of theoretical models, the sp2 fraction quantification from pure carbons by EELS ii) transferred this quantification to deuterated amorphous carbon layers iii) showed, from graphitized carbons, how the TEM-EELS combination allows to detect low concentrations of implanted D. Due to the accomplishment of these developments, we applied our approach to the study of D retention in composites C/C, which are the plasma-facing materials in TS. We showed that specific localized retention sites correspond to relatively large ({approx} 3 mm.) cracks between fibres and matrix; such cracks offer a simple and direct path for deuterated amorphous carbon. The particle balance performed in TS is discussed in the light of this trapping mechanism. (author)

  14. Vacancy ordered γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles functionalized with nanohydroxyapatite: XRD, FTIR, TEM, XPS and Mössbauer studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Guivar, Juan A.; Sanches, Edgar A.; Bruns, Florian; Sadrollahi, Elaheh; Morales, M. A.; López, Elvis O.; Litterst, F. Jochen

    2016-12-01

    Vacancy ordered maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles functionalized with nanohydroxyapatite (HAp - Ca10(PO4) 6(OH)2) have been successfully synthesized using an inexpensive co-precipitation chemical route. Evidence for the presence of vacancy order in maghemite was shown by the superstructure lines observed in X-ray diffraction. The adsorption of carboxyl groups of citric acid (C6H8O7) onto γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles was investigated by FTIR, XPS and Mössbauer spectroscopy. From XPS surface analysis, two binding energies related to oxygen were attributed to bindings between C6H8O7/γ- Fe2O3 and C6H8O7/HAp from an interfacial reaction promoted by strongly adsorbed H2O molecules at the surface of these nanomaterials. Le Bail refinement of the XRD patterns showed the formation of well-crystallized pure tetragonal maghemite before and after functionalization with nanoHAp. The temperature dependence of hyperfine parameters of pure and functionalized γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles was investigated via Mössbauer spectroscopy. TEM revealed the formation of quasi-spherical γ- Fe2O3 nanoparticles with an average diameter of ca. 12 nm and 16 nm before and after functionalization with nanoHAp in agreement with Le Bail refinement. Magnetometry measurements showed a saturation magnetization of 12 emu/g and a blocking temperature of 340 K for the functionalized γ- Fe2O3 nanoparticles.

  15. TEM and XPS studies on the faceted nanocrystals of Ce{sub 0.8}Zr{sub 0.2}O{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prusty, Debadutta; Pathak, Abhishek [Research & Development, Tata Steel Limited, Jamshedpur 831001 (India); Mukherjee, Manabendra [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Mukherjee, Bratindranath [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, 221005 (India); Chowdhury, Anirban, E-mail: anirban.chowdhury@gmail.com [Research & Development, Tata Steel Limited, Jamshedpur 831001 (India)

    2015-02-15

    Faceted nanocrystals of Ce{sub 0.8}Zr{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} synthesised by co-precipitation method were characterised by X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetry–differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques. The nanocrystals were highly faceted and exhibited a cubic phase. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses confirmed the presence of vacancy related defects and revealed the presence of ~ 22% of Ce{sup 3} {sup +} in the nanopowders. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy results confirmed that the nanocrystal sizes are around 31 ± 5 nm and the obtained hexagonal cross-section shape is bound by hexagonal (111) and square (100) facets. The shape-controlled nanocrystals were synthesised without using any surfactants or complexing agents and retained their morphology beyond 800 °C. This is a simple and easy method for producing shape-controlled Ce{sub 0.8}Zr{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} nanoparticles which can be used for catalytic conversion and other related advanced technological areas. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Synthesis of Ce{sub 0.8}Zr{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} faceted nanocrystal of hexagonal morphology. • Nanopowders synthesised without any surfactant; retained morphology beyond 800 °C. • XPS analyses confirm the potential of these powders for catalytic applications.

  16. Solid State Reaction Mechanism and Microstructure Evolution of Ni-Al Powders during High Energy Ball Milling Revisited by TEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Guohua; Geng, Lin; Feng, Yicheng; Cui, Xiping; Yan, Xudong

    2015-08-01

    Microstructure evolution during the formation of B2-NiAl by high energy ball milling of equiatomic elemental mixtures was studied by X-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The crystallite size, lattice defects and ordering of the B2-NiAl were monitored via TEM as function of milling time. The diffusion reaction, Ni+Al→NiAl3 or/and Ni2Al3, occurred during high energy ball milling, and to a certain extent offered the stored energy for the explosive exothermic reaction, Ni+Al→B2-NiAl. The fine microstructure of newly formed B2-NiAl after 5 h milling involved high density defects, e.g. antiphase boundary, long range ordering domains, vacancies, and dislocations.

  17. Identical locations transmission electron microscopy study of Pt/C electrocatalyst degradation during oxygen reduction reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pérez Alonso, Francisco; Elkjær, Christian Fink; Shim, Signe Sarah

    2011-01-01

    The degradation mechanisms of Pt nanoparticles supported on Carbon have been characterized during oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) conditions using IL-TEM. A TEM grid is used as the sole working electrode allowing a direct correlation between the electrochemical response and the TEM analysis. We...

  18. Quantitative optical microscopy and micromanipulation studies on the lipid bilayer membranes of giant unilamellar vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis; Needham, David

    2014-01-01

    some of their most important contributions to our understanding of lipid bilayer membranes; and (iii) outline studies that would utilize both techniques simultaneously on the same vesicle thus bringing the ability to characterize structure and strain responses together with the direct application......This manuscript discusses basic methodological aspects of optical microscopy and micromanipulation methods to study membranes and reviews methods to generate giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). In particular, we focus on the use of fluorescence microscopy and micropipette manipulation techniques...... to study composition-structure-property materials relationships of free-standing lipid bilayer membranes. Because their size (~5 to 100 m diameter) that is well above the resolution limit of regular light microscopes, GUVs are suitable membrane models for optical microscopy and micromanipulation...

  19. A Survey of Jet Aircraft PM by TEM in APEX III

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderWal, Randy L.; Bryg, Victoria M.

    2014-01-01

    Based upon field testing during the NASA led APEX III campaign conducted in November 2005 at the NASA Glenn Research Center in coordination with Continental Airlines and Cleveland Hopkins International Airport. This paper reports observations of particulate emissions collected from a suite of jet engine aircraft to assess differences and similarities in soot macro- micro- and nanostructure using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Aggregates are compact, primary particle sizes varied and nanostructure mixed. Comparisons are made to more familiar laboratory flame-generated soot as a well-studied point of reference. Results are interpreted in terms of turbulence interacting with the different stages of particle formation and growth.

  20. Detection of mucus glycoconjugates in human conjunctiva by using the lectin-colloidal gold technique in TEM. III. A quantitative study in asymptomatic contact lens wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versura, P; Maltarello, M C; Cellini, M; Marinelli, F; Caramazza, R; Laschi, R

    1987-12-01

    We characterized the mucus glycoconjugates produced by goblet and non-goblet epithelial cells in asymptomatic contact lens (CL) wearers. We employed four lectins (proteins of vegetal origin which specifically recognize glycosidic residues: WGA, PNA, SBA and ConA) conjugated with colloidal gold as ultrastructural marker, at Transmission Electron Microscopy. A computerized quantitative analysis was carried out in order to compare the results from the CL wearers to those from the control patients. Goblet cells produce different amount of glycosidic residues, in particular, a significant decrease in the distribution of sialic acid, N-acetylglucosamine, N-acetylgalactosamine, galactose-N-acetylgalactosamine and mannose was observed. The content of glycosidic residues in the mucus vesicles of the non-goblet epithelial cells appeared unchanged as to the normal situation. We speculate that the CL could possibly contribute to the failure of the tear film stability by altering the production of mucus.

  1. Structure and Stability of Pt-Y Alloy Particles for Oxygen Reduction Studied by Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deiana, Davide; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Hansen, Thomas Willum

    2015-01-01

    Platinum-yttrium alloy nanoparticles show both a high activity and stability for the oxygen reduction reaction. The catalysts were prepared by magnetron sputter aggregation and mass filtration providing a model catalyst system with a narrow size distribution. The structure and stability...... of nanostructured Pt-Y alloy catalysts were studied using transmission electron microscopy techniques. Using elemental X-ray mapping and high-resolution electron microscopy, the specific compositional structure and distribution of the individual nanoparticles was unraveled and the stability assessed. Studying...... the catalyst after reaction and after aging tests shows the development of a core-shell type structure after being exposed to reaction conditions....

  2. Structure and Stability of Pt-Y Alloy Particles for Oxygen Reduction Studied by Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deiana, Davide; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Hansen, Thomas Willum

    2015-01-01

    Platinum-yttrium alloy nanoparticles show both a high activity and stability for the oxygen reduction reaction. The catalysts were prepared by magnetron sputter aggregation and mass filtration providing a model catalyst system with a narrow size distribution. The structure and stability...... of nanostructured Pt-Y alloy catalysts were studied using transmission electron microscopy techniques. Using elemental X-ray mapping and high-resolution electron microscopy, the specific compositional structure and distribution of the individual nanoparticles was unraveled and the stability assessed. Studying...... the catalyst after reaction and after aging tests shows the development of a core-shell type structure after being exposed to reaction conditions....

  3. A Study of the Probe Effect on the Apparent Image of Biological Atomic Force Microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The probe effect on the apparent image of biological atomic force microscopy was explored in this study, and the potential of AFM in conformational study of gene related biological processes was illustrated by the specific nanostructural information of a new antitumor drug binding to DNA.

  4. Magnetic force microscopy and simulation studies on Co$_{50}$Fe$_{50}$ elliptical nanomagnets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N V S S SESHAGIRI RAO; V SATYA NARAYANA MURTHY; Y J V S RAMAKRISHNA SHARMA

    2016-06-01

    We studied the magnetization reversal mechanism of single-layered Co50Fe50 nanomagnets by measuring the magnetization reversal and using the micromagnetic simulations. The magnetization reversal strongly depends on the thickness of the nanomagnets. In the remanent state, the magnetic force microscopy studies and the simulation data showed the formation of single and vortex states depending on the thickness of nanomagnets.

  5. Applying two-photon excitation fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy to study photosynthesis in plant leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broess, K.; Borst, J.W.; Amerongen, van H.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates to which extent two-photon excitation (TPE) fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy can be applied to study picosecond fluorescence kinetics of individual chloroplasts in leaves. Using femtosecond 860 nm excitation pulses, fluorescence lifetimes can be measured in leaves of

  6. Tomographic Heating Holder for In Situ TEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gontard, Lionel C.; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Fernández, Asunción

    2014-01-01

    A tomographic heating holder for transmission electron microscopy that can be used to study supported catalysts at temperatures of up to ~1,500°C is described. The specimen is placed in direct thermal contact with a tungsten filament that is oriented perpendicular to the axis of the holder withou...

  7. Sub-cellular structure studied by combined atomic force-fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trache, Andreea

    2009-03-01

    A novel experimental technique that integrates atomic force microscopy (AFM) with fluorescence imaging was used to study the role of extracellular matrix proteins in cellular organization. To understand the mechanism by which living cells sense mechanical forces, and how they respond and adapt to their environment, we developed a new technology able to investigate cellular behavior at sub-cellular level that integrates an AFM with total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and fast-spinning disk (FSD) confocal microscopy. Live smooth muscle cells exhibited differences in focal adhesions and actin pattern depending on the extracellular matrix used for substrate coating. Data obtained by using the AFM-optical imaging integrated technique offer novel quantitative information that allows understanding the fundamental processes of cellular reorganization in response to extracellular matrix modulation. The integrated microscope presented here is broadly applicable across a wide range of molecular dynamic studies in any adherent live cells.

  8. Characterization of isolated polyamide thin films of RO and NF membranes using novel TEM techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Pacheco, Federico A.

    2010-08-15

    Achieving a better understanding of transport and rejection mechanisms in RO and NF membranes requires more detailed information of the nanostructure of polyamide thin films. This study reports on two novel transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques for characterizing polyamide nanostructure. The first technique produces cross-sectional images of isolated polyamide thin films by removing the polysulfone support from regular TEM cross-sections. In the second technique called " projected area" TEM (PA-TEM), isolated polyamide thin films are placed with their surface perpendicular to the electron beam. The resulting images capture the thickness, morphology and mass density of the entire thin film. In combination, these new techniques provide information on polyamide nanostructure that is not evident using conventional methods. For the commercial RO membrane ESPA3, the cross-sectional view of the isolated polyamide thin film shows a 30-60. nm thick base of nodular polyamide (presumably the separation barrier) that forms a relatively smooth interface with the polysulfone support. Above this, a more open structure of loose polyamide extends outward giving rise to the ridge-and-valley surface structure. In PA-TEM images, the ridges and valleys correspond to the dark and bright regions, respectively; the polyamide nodular base appears as round features forming an irregular honeycomb pattern throughout the images. Membrane cross-sections were prepared with a simple resin embedding protocol using the acrylic resin LR White. The protocol did not require dehydration steps, and was applicable to both dry and wet membrane samples. Artifacts that may be produced during sample preparation were also documented. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  9. Investigating the role of microbes in mineral weathering: nanometre-scale characterisation of the cell-mineral interface using FIB and TEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Michael B; Kapitulčinová, Dana; Brown, Andrew P; Heard, Peter J; Cherns, David; Cockell, Charles S; Hallam, Keith R; Ragnarsdóttir, K Vala

    2013-04-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) sample preparation in combination with subsequent transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis are powerful tools for nanometre-scale examination of the cell-mineral interface in bio-geological samples. In this study, we used FIB-TEM to investigate the interaction between a cyanobacterium (Hassallia byssoidea) and a common sheet silicate mineral (biotite) following a laboratory-based bioweathering, incubation experiment. We discuss the FIB preparation of cross-sections of the cell mineral interface for TEM investigation. We also establish an electron fluence threshold (at 200keV) in biotite for the transition from scanning (S)TEM electron beam induced contamination build up on the surface of biotite thin sections to mass loss, or hole-drilling within the sections. Working below this threshold fluence nanometre-scale structural and elemental information has been obtained from biotite directly underneath cyanobacterial cells incubated on the biotite for 3 months. No physical alteration of the biotite was detected by TEM imaging and diffraction with little or no elemental alteration detected by STEM-energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) elemental line-scanning or by energy filtered TEM (EF-TEM) jump ratio elemental mapping. As such we present evidence that the cyanobacterial strain of H. byssoidea did not cause any measurable alteration of biotite, within the resolution limits of the analysis techniques used, after 3 months of incubation on its surface.

  10. Detection of mucus glycoconjugates in human conjunctiva by using the lectin colloidal gold technique in TEM. I. A quantitative study in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versura, P; Maltarello, M C; Bonvicini, F; Caramazza, R; Laschi, R

    1986-08-01

    We applied a specific cytochemical reaction to characterize the glycoconjugates produced by goblet and non-goblet epithelial cells of normal human conjunctiva. For this purpose we utilized the lectins, proteins of vegetal origin, which are extremely sensitive in binding glycosidic residues. In particular, we used WGA, PNA, SBA and ConA conjugated with colloidal gold as ultrastructural marker for Transmission Electron Microscopy. This technique allowed us also to perform a quantitative analysis, by counting colloidal gold particles present on mucus granules. In this way we analyzed the content both of goblet and non-goblet epithelial cells. In the former, WGA, PNA, SBA and ConA receptors, here reported in decreasing density, were present. In the latter WGA was always positive, SBA and PNA sometimes were negative, ConA was always negative. We speculate the different contribution to mucus production by these two sources may be important in evaluating tear film stability alterations occurring in those diseases in which non-goblet epithelial cell vesicles increase.

  11. In Situ TEM Study of Microstructure Evolution of Zr-Nb-Fe Alloy Irradiated by 800 keV Kr(2+) Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Penghui; Ran, Guang; Liu, Chenwei; Ye, Chao; Lv, Dong; Lin, Jianxin; Wu, Yizhen; Xu, Jiangkun

    2017-04-22

    The microstructure evolution of Zr-1.1Nb-1.51Fe-0.26Cu-0.72Ni zirconium alloy, irradiated by 800 keV Kr(2+) ions at 585 K using the IVEM-Tandem Facility at Argonne National Laboratory, was observed by in situ transmission electron microscopy. A number of β-Nb precipitates with a body-centered cubic (BCC) structure were distributed in the as-received zirconium alloy with micrometer-size grains. Kr(2+) ion irradiation induced the growth of β-Nb precipitates, which could be attributed to the segregation of the dissolved niobium atoms in the zirconium lattice and the migration to the existing precipitates. The size of precipitates was increased with increasing Kr(2+) ion fluence. During Kr(2+) iron irradiation, the zirconium crystals without Nb precipitates tended to transform to the nanocrystals, which was not observed in the zirconium crystals with Nb nanoparticles. The existing Nb nanoparticles were the key factor that constrained the nanocrystallization of zirconium crystals. The thickness of the formed Zr-nanocrystal layer was about 300 nm, which was consistent with the depth of Kr(2+) iron irradiation. The mechanism of the precipitate growth and the formation of zirconium nanocrystal was analyzed and discussed.

  12. Use of confocal microscopy in the study of ischemia-induced hippocampal neuronal damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radenović Lidija

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to reveal by means of confocal laser microscopy the cytoarchitecture of hippocampal CA3 neurons in Mongolian gerbils before and after cerebral ischemia of different duration. The common carotid arteries of gerbils were occluded for 5, 10, or 15 min. On the 4th, 14th and 28th day after reperfusion, neuronal damage was examined by laser scanning confocal microscopy in the CA3 region of hippocampus (30 μm slices. Slices were stained with fluorescent Nissl staining and fluorescent membrane tracer DiI. Increased duration of cerebral ischemia resulted in a progressive loss of hippocampal CA3 neurons. Four days after the ischemic insult, neuronal damage in the hippocampal CA3 region was mild but visible. On the 28th day after reperfusion, neuronal damage in the observed brain structure was most severe. These results demonstrate the temporal profile of neuronal damage after an ischemic insult as observed using confocal microscopy.

  13. Intrinsic structure and friction properties of graphene and graphene oxide nanosheets studied by scanning probe microscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yan-Huai Ding; Hu-Ming Ren; Fei-Hu Chang; Ping Zhang; Yong Jiang

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, atomic structure of single-layered graphene oxide (GO) and chemically reduced graphene oxide (CRGO) nanosheets was investigated using atomic force microscopy and scanning tunnelingmicroscopy (AFM and STM). Furthermore, friction properties of the graphene and GO nanosheets were studied by frictional force microscopy (FFM). STM imaging provided direct evidence and the morphology was influenced by oxygen-containing groups and defects. The atomic scale structural disorder in a hexagonal two-dimensional network of carbon atoms changes the surface condition, which also caused the frictional property variations of the samples.

  14. Cellulose fibril aggregation studies of Eucalyptus dissolving pulps using atomic force microscopy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chunilall, Viren

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available AGGREGATION STUDIES OF Eucalyptus DISSOLVING PULPS USING ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY V. Chunilall1,3, J.Wesley-Smith2 and T. Bush1,3 1CSIR, Forestry and Forest Product Research Centre, P.O. Box 17001, Congella, 4013, South Africa. 2Electron Microscope... individual fibrils (cellulose molecules) and these, in turn, form fibril aggregates. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has revealed that there is a marked increase in the lateral fibril aggregate dimension (LFAD) during pulping and bleaching1. Furthermore...

  15. A structural study of solid electrolyte interface on negative electrode of lithium-Ion battery by electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Tadashi; Watanabe, Jiro; Nakao, Tatsuya; Yamashita, Seiichi

    2014-11-01

    For the last decades, the performance of the lithium-ion battery (LIB) has been significantly improved and its applications have been expanding rapidly. However, its performance has yet to be enhanced.In the lithium-ion battery development, it is important to elucidate the electrode structure change in detail during the charge and discharge cycling. In particular, solid electrolyte interface (SEI) formed by decomposition of the electrolytes on the graphite negative electrode surface should play an important role for battery properties. Therefore, it is essential to control the structure and composition of SEI to improve the battery performance. Here, we conducted a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) study to elucidate the structures of the SEI during the charge and discharge process using LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 [1] cathode and graphite anode. [2] Since SEI is a lithium-containing compound with high activity, it was observed without being exposed to the atmosphere. The electrodes including SEI were sampled after dismantling batteries with cutoff voltages of 3V and 4.2V for the charge process and 3V for the discharge process. Fig.1 shows SEM images of the graphite electrode surface during the charge and discharge process. The change of the SEI structure during the process was clearly observed. Further, TEM images showed that the SEI grew thicker during the charge process and becomes thinner when discharged. These results with regard to the reversible SEI structure could give a new insight for the battery development.jmicro;63/suppl_1/i21/DFU056F1F1DFU056F1Fig. 1.SEM images of the graphite electrode surface:(a) before charge process;(b) with charge-cutoff voltage of 3.0V; (c) with charge-cutoff voltage of 4.2V; (d) with discharge-cutoff voltage of 3.0V. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Stochastic and photochromic switching of diarylethenes studied by scanning tunnelling microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molen, S.J. van der; Vegte, H. van der; Kudernac, T.; Amin, I.; Feringa, B.L.; Wees, B.J. van

    2006-01-01

    We investigate switching of photochromic, thiophene-substituted diarylethene switches on gold. For this, the conjugated isomer is inserted in a dodecanethiol self-assembled monolayer. This layer is subsequently scanned by tunnelling microscopy. First, we study the statistics of stochastic switching

  17. Adsorption of Cu phthalocyanine on Pt modified Ge(001): A scanning tunneling microscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saedi, Amirmehdi; Berkelaar, Robin P.; Kumar, Avijit; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Harold J.W.

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption configurations of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules on platinum-modified Ge(001) have been studied using scanning tunneling microscopy. After deposition at room temperature and cooling down to 77 K the CuPc molecules are still dynamic. However, after annealing at 550±50 K, the ad

  18. Structural dynamics of gas-phase molybdenum nanoclusters : A transmission electron microscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vystavel, T; Koch, SA; Palasantzas, G; De Hosson, JTM

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we study structural aspects of molybdenum clusters by transmission electron microscopy. The deposited clusters with sizes 4 nm or larger show a body-centered crystal (bcc) structure. The clusters are self-assembled from smaller structural units and form cuboids with a typical size of 4

  19. Comparative study of four species of Trichuris roederer, 1761 (Nematoda, Trichurinae by scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinalda Marisa Lanfredti

    1995-08-01

    Full Text Available A comparative morphological study of Trichuris travassosi, T. vulpis, T. discolor and T. suis was perfomed using scanning electron microscopy. Cuticular inflation associated with the bacillar band, vulva and male external genital appendages were analyzed. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of these structures were made for each species; they are of taxonomic value.

  20. Scanning-tunneling-microscopy studies of the S-induced reconstruction of Cu(100)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colaianni, Maria Loredana; Chorkendorff, Ib

    1994-01-01

    This study utilizes Auger-electron spectroscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to examine sulfur coverages above theta(S)=0.25 on the Cu(100) surface. These large sulfur coverages are observed to induce a restructuring of the copper surface through the r...

  1. Adsorption of Cu phthalocyanine on Pt modified Ge(001): A scanning tunneling microscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saedi, A.; Berkelaar, Robin P.; Kumar, Avijit; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption configurations of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules on platinum-modified Ge(001) have been studied using scanning tunneling microscopy. After deposition at room temperature and cooling down to 77 K the CuPc molecules are still dynamic. However, after annealing at 550±50 K, the

  2. Structure of the light harvesting antenna from Rhodospirillum molischianum studied by electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, Arjen F.; Germeroth, Lothar; Boekema, Egbert J.

    1994-01-01

    The structure of two types of isolated light-harvesting antenna complexes from Rhodospirillum molischianum was studied by electron microscopy and image analysis. The B870 reaction center complex forms an almost circular particle with a diameter in the plane of the membrane of about 10.7-11.2 nm. A

  3. Magnetic anisotropy and microscopy studies in magnetostrictive Tb-(Fe,Co) thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umadevi, K.; Talapatra, A.; Arout Chelvane, J.; Palit, Mithun; Mohanty, J.; Jayalakshmi, V.

    2017-08-01

    This paper reports the effect of the film thickness on the magnetostrictive behavior of (Fe,Co) rich Tb-(Fe,Co) films grown on Si ⟨100⟩ by electron beam evaporation. Magnetostriction was found to decrease with an increase in film thicknesses. To understand the variation of magnetostriction with the film thickness, detailed structural, microstructural, magnetization, and magnetic microscopy studies were carried out. X-ray diffraction studies indicated the presence of two phases, viz., Tb2 (Fe, Co)17 and Fe-Co phases, for all the films. With the increase in the film thickness, the peak intensity of the Tb2 (Fe, Co)17 phase decreased and that of the Fe-Co phase increased. Magnetization studies showed the presence of strong in-plane anisotropy for all the films. In addition to this, the presence of the out-of-plane component of magnetization was also observed for the films grown with higher thicknesses. This anisotropic behavior was also validated through magnetic microscopy studies carried out along the in-plane and out-of-plane directions employing magneto-optic Kerr microscopy and magnetic force microscopy, respectively. The decrease in magnetostriction was explained on the basis of dual phase formation and complex interplay between the in-plane and out-of-plane magnetic anisotropies present in the film.

  4. Adsorption of Cu phthalocyanine on Pt modified Ge(001): A scanning tunneling microscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saedi, A.; Berkelaar, Robin P.; Kumar, Avijit; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption configurations of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules on platinum-modified Ge(001) have been studied using scanning tunneling microscopy. After deposition at room temperature and cooling down to 77 K the CuPc molecules are still dynamic. However, after annealing at 550±50 K, the ad

  5. Study of the leakage field of magnetic force microscopy thin-film tips using electron holography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frost, B.G.; Hulst, van N.F.; Lunedei, E.; Matteucci, G.; Rikkers, E.

    1996-01-01

    Electron holography is applied for the study of the leakage field of thin-film ferromagnetic tips used as probes in magnetic force microscopy. We used commercially available pyramidal tips covered o­n o­ne face with a thin NiCo film, which were then placed in a high external magnetic field directed

  6. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Topological Insulators Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Qikun

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We summarize our recent scanning tunneling microscopy (STM study of topological insulator thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE, which includes the observation of electron standing waves on topological insulator surface and the Landau quantization of topological surface states. The work has provided valuable information to the understanding of intriguing properties of topological insulators, as predicted by theory.

  7. The Structural Bases of Antibiotic Resistance in the Clinically Derived Mutant beta-Lactamases TEM-30, TEM-32, and TEM-34

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaojun; Minasov, George; Shoichet, Brian K. (NWU)

    2010-03-08

    ; bacteria expressing these enzymes have become widespread in hospitals and in the community. Beginning in 1980s, three mechanism-based class A {beta}-lactamase inhibitors, clavulanate, tazobactam, and sulbactam, have been used in combination with conventional penicillins to reverse this resistance (Fig.1, A-C). However, since 1992, more than 26 so-called inhibitor-resistant TEM (IRT)1 mutants have been selected, reversing susceptibility to these three mechanism-based inhibitors in the clinic (www.lahey.org/studies/temtable.stm).

  8. The development of optical microscopy techniques for the advancement of single-particle studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchuk, Kyle

    Single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) has recently become a powerful optical microscopy tool that can expose many molecular motions. Unfortunately, there is not yet a single microscopy technique that can decipher all particle motions in all environmental conditions, thus there are limitations to current technologies. Within, the two powerful microscopy tools of total internal reflection and interferometry are advanced to determine the position, orientation, and optical properties of metallic nanoparticles in a variety of environments. Total internal reflection is an optical phenomenon that has been applied to microscopy to produce either fluorescent or scattered light. The non-invasive far-field imaging technique is coupled with a near-field illumination scheme that allows for better axial resolution than confocal microscopy and epi-fluorescence microscopy. By controlling the incident illumination angle using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, a new type of imaging probe called "non-blinking" quantum dots (NBQDs) were super-localized in the axial direction to sub-10-nm precision. These particles were also used to study the rotational motion of microtubules being propelled by the motor protein kinesin across the substrate surface. The same instrument was modified to function under total internal reflection scattering (TIRS) microscopy to study metallic anisotropic nanoparticles and their dynamic interactions with synthetic lipid bilayers. Utilizing two illumination lasers with opposite polarization directions at wavelengths corresponding to the short and long axis surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the nanoparticles, both the in-plane and out-of-plane movements of many particles could be tracked simultaneously. When combined with Gaussian point spread function (PSF) fitting for particle super-localization, the binding status and rotational movement could be resolved without degeneracy. TIRS microscopy was also used to

  9. The development of optical microscopy techniques for the advancement of single-particle studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchuk, Kyle [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) has recently become a powerful optical microscopy tool that can expose many molecular motions. Unfortunately, there is not yet a single microscopy technique that can decipher all particle motions in all environmental conditions, thus there are limitations to current technologies. Within, the two powerful microscopy tools of total internal reflection and interferometry are advanced to determine the position, orientation, and optical properties of metallic nanoparticles in a variety of environments. Total internal reflection is an optical phenomenon that has been applied to microscopy to produce either fluorescent or scattered light. The non-invasive far-field imaging technique is coupled with a near-field illumination scheme that allows for better axial resolution than confocal microscopy and epi-fluorescence microscopy. By controlling the incident illumination angle using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, a new type of imaging probe called “non-blinking” quantum dots (NBQDs) were super-localized in the axial direction to sub-10-nm precision. These particles were also used to study the rotational motion of microtubules being propelled by the motor protein kinesin across the substrate surface. The same instrument was modified to function under total internal reflection scattering (TIRS) microscopy to study metallic anisotropic nanoparticles and their dynamic interactions with synthetic lipid bilayers. Utilizing two illumination lasers with opposite polarization directions at wavelengths corresponding to the short and long axis surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the nanoparticles, both the in-plane and out-of-plane movements of many particles could be tracked simultaneously. When combined with Gaussian point spread function (PSF) fitting for particle super-localization, the binding status and rotational movement could be resolved without degeneracy. TIRS microscopy was also used to

  10. A TEM investigation of the lattice defects and exfoliation in hydrogen-implanted CdTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berndt, P.R. [Department of Physics, University of Port Elizabeth, P.O. Box 1600, Port Elizabeth 6001 (South Africa)]. E-mail: pearl.berndt@upe.ac.za; Neethling, J.H. [Department of Physics, University of Port Elizabeth, P.O. Box 1600, Port Elizabeth 6001 (South Africa); Franklyn, C.B. [Radiation Utilisation Group, Nuclear Technology Department, NECSA, Pretoria (South Africa); Zandbergen, H.W. [National Centre for HREM, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

    2004-11-15

    This study focuses on characterizing the defects associated with 400 keV hydrogen-implantation of CdTe, at a dose of 1 x 10{sup 16} H{sup +} cm{sup -2} to 5 x 10{sup 16} H{sup +} cm{sup -2}, with subsequent annealing. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and a hybrid diffraction technique, large-angle convergent-beam electron diffraction (LACBED), were used in the characterization process. Extended defects resulting from the hydrogen-implantation and annealing process include dislocations, microcracks and bubbles. Microcrack and bubble formation occurs on the cleavage planes of CdTe. Exfoliation is achieved at the higher implantation dose. High-resolution electron microscopy was used in the microstructural analysis of the microcracks. LACBED of the implanted material containing bubbles revealed a highly strained lattice with evidence of lattice distortion in-plane and in the direction of implantation.

  11. Immunoelectron microscopy study of superficial skin nerves in drug-induced acute urticaria

    OpenAIRE

    Criado, Paulo Ricardo; CRIADO, Roberta Fachini Jardim; TAKAKURA, CLEUSA F.H.; Pagliari, Carla; SOTTO, Mirian Nacagami; Cidia VASCONCELLOS

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few studies have evaluated the ultrastructure of the superficial skin nerves in urticaria. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to describe findings in superficial skin nerves in cases of drug-induced acute urticaria. METHODS: Seven patients with drug-induced acute urticaria were included in the study. Skin biopsies were obtained from the urticarial lesion and from the apparently normal skin. The 14 fragments collected were processed for immunogold electron microscopy using ...

  12. 3D TEM reconstruction and segmentation process of laminar bio-nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iturrondobeitia, M., E-mail: maider.iturrondobeitia@ehu.es; Okariz, A.; Fernandez-Martinez, R.; Jimbert, P.; Guraya, T.; Ibarretxe, J. [eMERG, University of the Basque Country, Rafael Moreno Pitxitxi street 2 and 3, 48013, Bilbao (Spain)

    2015-03-30

    The microstructure of laminar bio-nanocomposites (Poly (lactic acid)(PLA)/clay) depends on the amount of clay platelet opening after integration with the polymer matrix and determines the final properties of the material. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique is the only one that can provide a direct observation of the layer dispersion and the degree of exfoliation. However, the orientation of the clay platelets, which affects the final properties, is practically immeasurable from a single 2D TEM image. This issue can be overcome using transmission electron tomography (ET), a technique that allows the complete 3D characterization of the structure, including the measurement of the orientation of clay platelets, their morphology and their 3D distribution. ET involves a 3D reconstruction of the study volume and a subsequent segmentation of the study object. Currently, accurate segmentation is performed manually, which is inefficient and tedious. The aim of this work is to propose an objective/automated segmentation methodology process of a 3D TEM tomography reconstruction. In this method the segmentation threshold is optimized by minimizing the variation of the dimensions of the segmented objects and matching the segmented V{sub clay} (%) and the actual one. The method is first validated using a fictitious set of objects, and then applied on a nanocomposite.

  13. Investigation of III-V Nanowires by Plan-View Transmission Electron Microscopy: InN Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Esperanza; Grandal, Javier; Gallardo, Eva; Calleja, José M.; Sánchez-García, Miguel Á.; Calleja, Enrique; Trampert, Achim

    2014-10-01

    We discuss observations of InN nanowires (NWs) by plan-view high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The main difficulties arise from suitable methods available for plan-view specimen preparation. We explore different approaches and find that the best results are obtained using a refined preparation method based on the conventional procedure for plan-view TEM of thin films, specifically modified for the NW morphology. The fundamental aspects of such a preparation are the initial mechanical stabilization of the NWs and the minimization of the ion-milling process after dimpling the samples until perforation. The combined analysis by plan-view and cross-sectional TEM of the NWs allows determination of the degree of strain relaxation and reveals the formation of an unintentional shell layer (2-3 nm thick) around the InN NWs. The shell layer is composed of bcc-In2O3 nanocrystals with a preferred orientation with respect to the wurtzite InN: In2O3 [111] || InN [0001] and In2O3 || InN .

  14. Fluorescence microscopy studies of a peripheral-benzodiazepine-receptor-targeted molecular probe for brain tumor imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcu, Laura; Vernier, P. Thomas; Manning, H. Charles; Salemi, Sarah; Li, Aimin; Craft, Cheryl M.; Gundersen, Martin A.; Bornhop, Darryl J.

    2003-10-01

    This study investigates the potential of a new multi-modal lanthanide chelate complex for specifically targeting brain tumor cells. We report here results from ongoing studies of up-take, sub-cellular localization and binding specificity of this new molecular imaging probe. Fluorescence microscopy investigations in living rat C6 glioma tumor cells demonstrate that the new imaging agent has affinity for glioma cells and binds to mitochondria.

  15. 2.5 D Transrotational Microcrystals and Nanostructures Revealed by TEM in Crystallizing Amorphous Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolosov, Vladimir

    2015-03-01

    Unexpected transrotational microcrystals can be grown in thin 10-100 nm amorphous films. Crystals of different morphology (from nanowhiskers to spherulites, complex textures) and chemical nature (oxides, chalcogenides, metals and alloys) grown in thin films prepared by various methods are studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We use primarily our TEM bend-contour method and SAED (HREM, AFM are also performed). The phenomenon resides in strong (up to 300 degrees/ μm) regular internal bending of crystal lattice planes in a growing crystal. It can be traced inside TEM in situ. Usual translation is complicated by slight regular rotation of the crystal unit cell (transrotation) most prominent at the mesoscale. Different geometries of transrotation of positive and negative curvature are revealed. Transrotational crystal resembles ideal single crystal enclosed in a curved space. It can be also considered similar to hypothetical endless 2.5 D analogy of MW nanotube/nano-onion halves. Transrotation is strongly increasing as the film gets thinner in the range 100-15 nm. Transrotations supplement dislocations and disclinations. New transrotational nanocrystalline model of amorphous state is proposed. Support of Ministry of Higher Education and Science is acknowledged.

  16. Edge-melting: nanoscale key-mechanism to explain nanoparticle formation from heated TEM grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaria, Maura; Taurino, Antonietta; Catalano, Massimo; Caricato, Anna Paola; Martino, Maurizio

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we examine at both experimental and fundamental levels, the experimental evidence of nanoparticle formation in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) metal grids annealed at temperatures lower than the melting point of the corresponding metal bulk material. Our experimental investigation considers the most thermally unstable TEM grids (i.e. Cu-grids) and inspects the possible sources and mechanisms of contamination of thin films, conventionally deposited on carbon-coated Cu-grids. The investigations are supported by morphological-compositional analyses performed in different regions of the TEM sample. Then, a general model is formulated and discussed in order to explain the grid thermal instability, based on the critical role of edge-melting (i.e. melting initiated at edges and corners of the grid bars), the enhanced rate of evaporation from a liquid surface and the polycristallinity of the grid bars. Hence, we totally disregard conventional arguments such as bulk evaporation and metal vapor pressure and, in order to emphasize and clarify the alternative point of view of our model, we also overview the nano-scale melting phenomenology relevant to our discussion and survey the discrepancies reported in the literature.

  17. In Situ Environmental TEM in Imaging Gas and Liquid Phase Chemical Reactions for Materials Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianbo; Shan, Hao; Chen, Wenlong; Gu, Xin; Tao, Peng; Song, Chengyi; Shang, Wen; Deng, Tao

    2016-11-01

    Gas and liquid phase chemical reactions cover a broad range of research areas in materials science and engineering, including the synthesis of nanomaterials and application of nanomaterials, for example, in the areas of sensing, energy storage and conversion, catalysis, and bio-related applications. Environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) provides a unique opportunity for monitoring gas and liquid phase reactions because it enables the observation of those reactions at the ultra-high spatial resolution, which is not achievable through other techniques. Here, the fundamental science and technology developments of gas and liquid phase TEM that facilitate the mechanistic study of the gas and liquid phase chemical reactions are discussed. Combined with other characterization tools integrated in TEM, unprecedented material behaviors and reaction mechanisms are observed through the use of the in situ gas and liquid phase TEM. These observations and also the recent applications in this emerging area are described. The current challenges in the imaging process are also discussed, including the imaging speed, imaging resolution, and data management.

  18. Atomic Force Microscopy Study of the Interactions of Indolicidin with Model Membranes and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fojan, Peter; Gurevich, Leonid

    2017-01-01

    The cell membrane is the first barrier and quite often the primary target that antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have to destroy or penetrate to fulfill their mission. Upon penetrating through the membrane, the peptides can further attack intracellular targets, in particular DNA. Studying the interaction of an antimicrobial peptide with a cell membrane and DNA holds keys to understanding its killing mechanisms. Commonly, these interactions are studied by using optical or scanning electron microscopy and appropriately labeled peptides. However, labeling can significantly affect the hydrophobicity, conformation, and size of the peptide, hence altering the interaction significantly. Here, we describe the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) for a label-free study of the interactions of peptides with model membranes under physiological conditions and DNA as a possible intracellular target.

  19. TEM-145 and TEM-146 β-lactamases produced by Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    2007-03-05

    Mar 5, 2007 ... responsible for their resistance to β-lactamase inhibitors. The isolates were ... molecular modifications introduced to overcome this resistance .... following changes compared to TEM-1: TEM-145 had two changes; L221M and ...

  20. Scanning Electron Microscopy Study of Hair Shaft Damage Secondary to Cosmetic Treatments of the Hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliyadan, Feroze; Gosai, B B; Al Melhim, Walid Naief; Feroze, Kaberi; Qureshi, Habib Ahmad; Ibrahim, Sayed; Kuruvilla, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Cosmetic procedures for hair, such as bleaching, dyeing, and straightening, are commonly used around the world. It has been suggested that excessive use of such procedures can cause damage to the hair shaft. We aimed to assess hair shaft changes using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in female volunteers who frequently use hair treatment procedures such as bleaching, dyeing, or straightening. A cross-sectional, controlled study in a sample of 25 female volunteers (19 study group and 6 controls) in the age group of 18-45 years. The study group was composed of volunteers who regularly used different cosmetic hair treatment procedures such as bleaching, dyeing, and straightening (any one of these or a combination). The control group had never used any specific hair treatment procedure. The hair shaft damage as seen on SEM was assessed using a standardized scoring system and compared among the two groups statistically. The hair shafts were also examined clinically and with light microscopy. No significant differences were seen between the test and control groups with regard to normal clinical examination and light microscopy findings. A higher degree of hair shaft damage was evident under SEM in the study group as compared to the control group. This difference was statistically significant. Regular use of procedures such as bleaching, dyeing, or straightening can lead to subtle changes in the hair shaft which can be detected early by SEM.

  1. Intravital Microscopy in the Cremaster Muscle Microcirculation for Endothelial Dysfunction Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rius, Cristina; Sanz, María J

    2015-01-01

    The intravital microscopy in the mouse cremaster muscle microcirculation is a method widely used to visualize in vivo blood cells interacting with the endothelium and within the vessels. Therefore, it is a suitable technique to study leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions along every stage of the canonical leukocyte recruitment cascade: rolling, adhesion, intravascular crawling, and migration both in postcapillary venules and arterioles of the mouse cremasteric microcirculation. This technique also enables to assess vessel functionality, since hemodynamic parameters such as shear stress, flow rate, and vasodilatation/vasoconstriction, among other vascular events, can be additionally determined. Furthermore, response to multiple drugs and mechanisms underlying blood cells interactions within the vascular system can be studied in a real scenario. This chapter describes a protocol for intravital microscopy in the mouse cremaster muscle microcirculation.

  2. Ultra structural studies of the surface of Hymenolepis nana by scanning and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouzakham, A A; Romia, S A; Hegazi, M M

    1990-06-01

    Scanning electron microscopy of the surface of Hymenolepis nana indicated that dense populations of microtriches occur on scolex proper, suckers and strobila, with an average density of 20/micron2. The excellent preservation of microtriches proves the efficacy of the critical point drying method for preparing cestodes for study of SEM. The cytological structure of the tegument of H. nana corresponds in general to that of other tapeworms.

  3. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY STUDY OF BIOLOGICAL PECULIARITIES OF SCAFFOLD MADE FROM RECOMBINANT SPIDER SILK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. L. Pustovalova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the viability and dynamic of cell distribution during long-term cultivation of broblasts 3T3 in spider silk spidroin 1-based scaffold. Laser scanning confocal microscopy is shown to have advantages for visualization of cells situated on the external and internal surfaces of scaffold. Fibroblasts maintain high proliferative ability and viability during long term cultivation. Spidroin 1-based scaffold are the perspective materials for bioengineering. 

  4. Pulse Plating on Gold Surfaces Studied by In Situ Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Bech-Nielsen, Gregers; Møller, Per

    1994-01-01

    Deposition of bulk copper on thin film gold surfaces is carried out by computer-aided pulse plating. It is demonstrated that the morphology of the copper deposit can be studied by in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy both in potentiostatic experiments and in galvanostatic experiments. Optimized...... procedures for obtaining smooth deposits by pulse plating are explained in terms of a levelling effect. Possible non-faradaic processes observed in measurements with high frequency pulse plating are discussed....

  5. Pulse Plating on Gold Surfaces Studied by In Situ Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Bech-Nielsen, Gregers; Møller, Per

    1994-01-01

    Deposition of bulk copper on thin film gold surfaces is carried out by computer-aided pulse plating. It is demonstrated that the morphology of the copper deposit can be studied by in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy both in potentiostatic experiments and in galvanostatic experiments. Optimized...... procedures for obtaining smooth deposits by pulse plating are explained in terms of a levelling effect. Possible non-faradaic processes observed in measurements with high frequency pulse plating are discussed....

  6. Atomic force microscopy study of cellulose surface interaction controlled by cellulose binding domains

    OpenAIRE

    Nigmatullin, R.; Lovitt, R.; Wright, C; Linder, M.; Nakari-Setälä, T; Gama, F. M.

    2004-01-01

    Colloidal probe microscopy has been used to study the interaction between model cellulose surfaces and the role of cellulose binding domain (CBD), peptides specifically binding to cellulose, in interfacial interaction of cellulose surfaces modified with CBDs. The interaction between pure cellulose surfaces in aqueous electrolyte solution is dominated by double layer repulsive forces with the range and magnitude of the net force dependent on electrolyte concentration. AFM imaging reve...

  7. Scanning electron microscopy study of adhesion in sea urchin blastulae. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Susan D.

    1988-01-01

    The dissociation supernatant (DS) isolated by disaggregating Strongylocentrotus purpuratus blastulae in calcium- and magnesium-free seawater specifically promotes reaggregation of S. purpuratus blastula cells. The purpose of this study was to use scanning electron microscopy to examine the gross morphology of aggregates formed in the presence of DS to see if it resembles adhesion in partially dissociated blastulae. A new reaggregation procedure developed here, using large volumes of cell suspension and a large diameter of rotation, was utilized to obtain sufficient quantities of aggregates for scanning electron microscopy. The results indicate that aggregates formed in the presence of DS resemble partially dissociated intact embryos in terms of the direct cell-cell adhesion observed. DS did not cause aggregation to form as a result of the entrapment of cells in masses of extracellular material. These studies provide the groundwork for further studies using transmission electron microscopy to more precisely define the adhesive contacts made by cells in the presence of the putative adhesion molecules present in DS.

  8. Scanning electron microscopy study of adhesion in sea urchin blastulae. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Susan D.

    1988-01-01

    The dissociation supernatant (DS) isolated by disaggregating Strongylocentrotus purpuratus blastulae in calcium- and magnesium-free seawater specifically promotes reaggregation of S. purpuratus blastula cells. The purpose of this study was to use scanning electron microscopy to examine the gross morphology of aggregates formed in the presence of DS to see if it resembles adhesion in partially dissociated blastulae. A new reaggregation procedure developed here, using large volumes of cell suspension and a large diameter of rotation, was utilized to obtain sufficient quantities of aggregates for scanning electron microscopy. The results indicate that aggregates formed in the presence of DS resemble partially dissociated intact embryos in terms of the direct cell-cell adhesion observed. DS did not cause aggregation to form as a result of the entrapment of cells in masses of extracellular material. These studies provide the groundwork for further studies using transmission electron microscopy to more precisely define the adhesive contacts made by cells in the presence of the putative adhesion molecules present in DS.

  9. TEM sample preparation by femtosecond laser machining and ion milling for high-rate TEM straining experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voisin, Thomas; Grapes, Michael D; Zhang, Yong; Lorenzo, Nicholas; Ligda, Jonathan; Schuster, Brian; Weihs, Timothy P

    2016-12-05

    To model mechanical properties of metals at high strain rates, it is important to visualize and understand their deformation at the nanoscale. Unlike post mortem Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), which allows one to analyze defects within samples before or after deformation, in situ TEM is a powerful tool that enables imaging and recording of deformation and the associated defect motion during mechanical loading. Unfortunately, all current in situ TEM mechanical testing techniques are limited to quasi-static strain rates. In this context, we are developing a new test technique that utilizes a rapid straining stage and the Dynamic TEM (DTEM) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The new straining stage can load samples in tension at strain rates as high as 4×10(3)/s using two piezoelectric actuators operating in bending while the DTEM at LLNL can image in movie mode with a time resolution as short as 70ns. Given the piezoelectric actuators are limited in force, speed, and displacement, we have developed a method for fabricating TEM samples with small cross-sectional areas to increase the applied stresses and short gage lengths to raise the applied strain rates and to limit the areas of deformation. In this paper, we present our effort to fabricate such samples from bulk materials. The new sample preparation procedure combines femtosecond laser machining and ion milling to obtain 300µm wide samples with control of both the size and location of the electron transparent area, as well as the gage cross-section and length.

  10. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) differentiation study by confocal Raman microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, H.; Collart-Dutilleul, P.-Y.; Gergely, C.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.

    2014-03-01

    Regenerative medicine brings a huge application for Mesenchymal stem cells such as Dental Pulp Stem Cells (DPSCs). Confocal Raman microscopy, a non-invasive, label free , real time and high spatial resolution imaging technique is used to study osteogenic differentiation of DPSCs. Integrated Raman intensities in the 2800-3000 cm-1 region (C-H stretching) and 960 cm-1 peak (phosphate PO4 3-) were collected. In Dental Pulp Stem Cells 21st day differentiated in buffer solution, phosphate peaks ν1 PO4 3- (first vibrational mode) at 960cm-1 and ν2 PO4 3- at 430cm-1 and ν4 PO4 3- at 585cm-1 are obviously present. Confocal Raman microscopy enables the detection of cell differentiation and it can be used to investigate clinical stem cell research.

  11. Transfer doping of single isolated nanodiamonds, studied by scanning probe microscopy techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolker, Asaf; Saguy, Cecile; Kalish, Rafi

    2014-09-26

    The transfer doping of diamond surfaces has been applied in various novel two-dimensional electronic devices. Its extension to nanodiamonds (ND) is essential for ND-based applications in many fields. In particular, understanding the influence of the crystallite size on transfer doping is desirable. Here, we report the results of a detailed study of the electronic energetic band structure of single, isolated transfer-doped nanodiamonds with nanometric resolution using a combination of scanning tunneling spectroscopy and Kelvin force microscopy measurements. The results show how the band gap, the valence band maximum, the electron affinity and the work function all depend on the ND's size and nanoparticle surface properties. The present analysis, which combines information from both scanning tunneling spectroscopy and Kelvin force microscopy, should be applicable to any nanoparticle or surface that can be measured with scanning probe techniques.

  12. Transfer doping of single isolated nanodiamonds, studied by scanning probe microscopy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolker, Asaf; Saguy, Cecile; Kalish, Rafi

    2014-09-01

    The transfer doping of diamond surfaces has been applied in various novel two-dimensional electronic devices. Its extension to nanodiamonds (ND) is essential for ND-based applications in many fields. In particular, understanding the influence of the crystallite size on transfer doping is desirable. Here, we report the results of a detailed study of the electronic energetic band structure of single, isolated transfer-doped nanodiamonds with nanometric resolution using a combination of scanning tunneling spectroscopy and Kelvin force microscopy measurements. The results show how the band gap, the valence band maximum, the electron affinity and the work function all depend on the ND’s size and nanoparticle surface properties. The present analysis, which combines information from both scanning tunneling spectroscopy and Kelvin force microscopy, should be applicable to any nanoparticle or surface that can be measured with scanning probe techniques.

  13. Electron and scanning probe microscopy study of S-layers of plague microbes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konnov, Nikolai P.; Baiburin, Vil B.; Djatlov, Ivan A.; Antonova, Oksana A.; Volkov, Uryi P.

    1999-01-01

    Microscopy investigations of S-layers of plague microbes have been carried out. A protein forming S-layer was isolated, purified and its biochemical properties were studied. Images of plague cells with and without S-layer and images of isolated S-layer protein arrays on solid supports were obtained by transmission electron microscopy. An isolated protein forming the layer is self-assembled into crystalline structure with hexagonal pores are of regular size about 4 - 8 nm, which was observed by transmission electron micrographs. The STM images of plague microbes with S-layer and without one and the STM and AFM images of isolated S-layer protein arrays on mica surface were obtained.

  14. Recording experiments on rare-earth transition-metal thin films studied with Lorentz microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greidanus, F.J.A.M.; Jacobs, B.A.J.; Spruit, J.H.M. (Philips Research Labs., Eindhoven (Netherlands)); Klahn, S. (Philips GmbH Forschungslaboratorium Hamburg, D-2000 Hamburg (DE))

    1989-09-01

    Domains written thermomagnetically under recording conditions in rare-earth transition-metal thin films are studied with Lorentz microscopy. New technique in which the magneto-optical layer is deposited on specially prepared silicon wafer disks, provided with Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ windows is described. This technique allows direct observation of the written domain patterns in the electron microscope. It is demonstrated that the nucleation process plays a crucial role when writing in TbFeCo. Different compositions, having different temperature dependencies of the magnetic properties, lead to remarkably different domain-formation behaviour. With the detailed insight into the shape and structure of domains obtained by Lorentz microscopy, carrier and noise levels obtained from recording experiments can be understood. This is demonstrated with data on GdTbFe. It is shown that magnetic-field modulation, apart from the advantage of direct overwrite, offers the possibility of very high density recording.

  15. The surface magnetization study of Cr2O3 by spin polarized low energy electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shi; Wu, Ning; Zhang, Xin; N'diaye, Alpha; Chen, Gong; Schmid, Andreas; Echtenkamp, Will; Lauter, Valeria; Binek, Christian; Dowben, Peter

    2014-03-01

    The boundary magnetization at the surface of a Cr2O3 single crystal has been demonstrated by using spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy (SPLEEM), indicating net surface spin polarization. This work shows that the placement of Cr2O3 single crystal in the single domain state, will result in net Cr2O3 spin polarization at the boundary, even in the presence of a gold overlayer. There are indications that the spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy (SPLEEM) contrast for the two polarizations states is different. In addition, the boundary magnetization protected by the symmetry exists despite of the surface roughness/softness which was studied by the non-spin neutron reflectometry and low energy electron diffraction. Unoccupied surface oxygen sites and chromium sites are possible mechanism contributing to the surface ``softness,'' which will be discussed.

  16. Combined ion conductance and fluorescence confocal microscopy for biological cell membrane transport studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchuk, A. I.; Novak, P.; Velazquez, M. A.; Fleming, T. P.; Korchev, Y. E.

    2013-09-01

    Optical visualization of nanoscale morphological changes taking place in living biological cells during such important processes as endo- and exocytosis is challenging due to the low refractive index of lipid membranes. In this paper we summarize and discuss advances in the powerful combination of two complementary live imaging techniques, ion conductance and fluorescence confocal microscopy, that allows cell membrane topography to be related with molecular-specific fluorescence at high spatial and temporal resolution. We demonstrate the feasibility of the use of ion conductance microscopy to image apical plasma membrane of mouse embryo trophoblast outgrowth cells at a resolution sufficient to depict single endocytic pits. This opens the possibility to study individual endocytic events in embryo trophoblast outgrowth cells where endocytosis plays a crucial role during early stages of embryo development.

  17. Application of the fluorescence light microscopy in the textural study of portland cement clinker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montoto San Miguel, Modesto

    1987-03-01

    Full Text Available The application of fluorescence light microscopy in the textural study of Portland cement clinker, specially its porosity, is presented. Principles and types of the technique are commented and the suggested sample preparation method is described. The use of fluorescence microscopy allows an easier study of the clinker porosity, and very proper images for automated quantification can be obtained. Besides, the samples can also be observed by reflected-light polarizing microscopy.

    Se presenta la utilidad de la microscopía óptica de fluorescencia para el estudio textural del clínker de cemento Portland, especialmente su porosidad. Se comentan los fundamentos y modalidades de la técnica, y se describe el método recomendado de preparación de muestras. La utilización de la microscopía de fluorescencia permite un estudio más fácil de la porosidad, obteniéndose imágenes muy apropiadas para su cuantificación mediante técnicas automatizadas. Además, las muestras para fluorescencia pueden ser estudiadas complementariamente por microscopía óptica de polarización por luz reflejada.

  18. Recent advances in cryo-TEM imaging of soft lipid nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helvig, Shen Yu; Mat Azmi, Intan Diana Binti; Moghimi, Seyed Moien;

    2015-01-01

    Cryo-transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM), and its technological variations thereof, have become a powerful tool for detailed morphological characterization and 3D tomography of soft lipid and polymeric nanoparticles as well as biological materials such as viruses and DNA without chemical...... fixation. Here, we review and discuss recent advances in Cryo-TEM analysis of lipid-based drug nanocarriers with particular emphasis on morphological and internal nanostructure characterization of lyotropic liquid crystalline nanoparticles such as cubosomes and hexosomes....

  19. Study of fossil bones by synchrotron radiation micro-spectroscopic techniques and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zougrou, I M; Katsikini, M; Pinakidou, F; Paloura, E C; Papadopoulou, L; Tsoukala, E

    2014-01-01

    Earlymost Villafranchian fossil bones of an artiodactyl and a perissodactyl from the Milia excavation site in Grevena, Greece, were studied in order to evaluate diagenetic effects. Optical microscopy revealed the different bone types (fibro-lamellar and Haversian, respectively) of the two fragments and their good preservation state. The spatial distribution of bone apatite and soil-originating elements was studied using micro-X-ray fluorescence (µ-XRF) mapping and scanning electron microscopy. The approximate value of the Ca/P ratio was 2.2, as determined from scanning electron microscopy measurements. Bacterial boring was detected close to the periosteal region and Fe bearing oxides were found to fill bone cavities, e.g. Haversian canals and osteocyte lacunae. In the perissodactyl bone considerable amounts of Mn were detected close to cracks (the Mn/Fe weight ratio takes values up to 3.5). Goethite and pyrite were detected in both samples by means of metallographic microscopy. The local Ca/P ratio determined with µ-XRF varied significantly in metal-poor spots indicating spatial inhomogeneities in the ionic substitutions. XRF line scans that span the bone cross sections revealed that Fe and Mn contaminate the bones from both the periosteum and medullar cavity and aggregate around local maxima. The formation of goethite, irrespective of the local Fe concentration, was verified by the Fe K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra. Finally, Sr K-edge extended XAFS (EXAFS) revealed that Sr substitutes for Ca in bone apatite without obvious preference to the Ca1 or Ca2 unit-cell site occupation.

  20. Correlating cation ordering and voltage fade in a lithium-manganese-rich lithium-ion battery cathode oxide: a joint magnetic susceptibility and TEM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Debasish; Sefat, Athena S; Li, Jianlin; Meisner, Roberta A; Rondinone, Adam J; Payzant, E Andrew; Abraham, Daniel P; Wood, David L; Daniel, Claus

    2013-11-28

    Structure-electrochemical property correlation is presented for lithium-manganese-rich layered-layered nickel manganese cobalt oxide (LMR-NMC) having composition Li1.2Co0.1Mn0.55Ni0.15O2 (TODA HE5050) in order to examine the possible reasons for voltage fade during short-to-mid-term electrochemical cycling. The Li1.2Co0.1Mn0.55Ni0.15O2 based cathodes were cycled at two different upper cutoff voltages (UCV), 4.2 V and 4.8 V, for 1, 10, and 125 cycles; voltage fade was observed after 10 and 125 cycles only when the UCV was 4.8 V. Magnetic susceptibility and selected-area electron diffraction data showed the presence of cation ordering in the pristine material, which remained after 125 cycles when the UCV was 4.2 V. When cycled at 4.8 V, the magnetic susceptibility results showed the suppression of cation ordering after one cycle; the cation ordering diminished upon further cycling and was not observed after 125 cycles. Selected-area electron diffraction data from oxides oriented towards the [0001] zone axis revealed a decrease in the intensity of cation-ordering reflections after one cycle and an introduction of spinel-type reflections after 10 cycles at 4.8 V; after 125 cycles, only the spinel-type reflections and the fundamental O3 layered oxide reflections were observed. A significant decrease in the effective magnetic moment of the compound after one cycle at 4.8 V indicated the presence of lithium and/or oxygen vacancies; analysis showed a reduction of Mn(4+) (high spin/low spin) in the pristine oxide to Mn(3+) (low spin) after one cycle. The effective magnetic moment was higher after 10 and 125 cycles at 4.8 V, suggesting the presence of Mn(3+) in a high spin state, which is believed to originate from distorted spinel (Li2Mn2O4) and/or spinel (LiMn2O4) compounds. The increase in effective magnetic moments was not observed when the oxide was cycled at 4.2 V, indicating the stability of the structure under these conditions. This study shows that structural

  1. A first-principles study on polar hexagonal Cs2TeM3O12 (M = W, Mo): New visible-light responsive photocatalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahedi, Ehsan; Hojamberdiev, Mirabbos

    2017-08-01

    The crystal structures, electro-optical properties, and charge carrier effective masses of Cs2TeW3O12 and Cs2TeMo3O12 with hexagonal, polar and non-centrosymmetric crystal structure were investigated based on density functional theory. Cs2TeW3O12 and Cs2TeMo3O12 are found to be indirect K (1/3, 1/3, 0) → G (0, 0, 0) band gap semiconductors (Eg > 3 eV) with small effective masses of photogenerated charge carriers. The mixing of octahedrally coordinated d° transition metal cations (W6+ and Mo6+) with the filled p orbitals of the oxygen ligands leads to the formation of some W5+/Mo5+ sites and splitting of d orbitals into the partially filled t2g (dxy, dyz, and dzx) orbitals and empty eg (dz2 and dx2-y2) orbitals. The top of the valence bond is mainly contributed by O 2p orbital of the oxygen ligands mixed with the partially filled t2g orbitals of W 5d/Mo 4d, while the conduction band mainly consists of empty eg orbitals of W 5d/Mo 4d with a little contribution of O 2p orbitals. The dielectric function exhibits a slight anisotropic behavior and optical absorption peak for Cs2TeW3O12 and Cs2TeMo3O12 belonging to the strong electronic transition O 2p → W 5d/Mo 4d within the octahedral units. According to the estimated valence band and conduction band edges, Cs2TeW3O12 and Cs2TeMo3O12 can be applied as visible-light-responsive photocatalysts for the decomposition of organic pollutants and dye molecules. Also, Cs2TeMo3O12 can be used in water splitting for hydrogen generation but Cs2TeW3O12 requires further experimental studies to confirm its ability for water splitting.

  2. Towards an integrative structural biology approach: combining Cryo-TEM, X-ray crystallography, and NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengyel, Jeffrey; Hnath, Eric; Storms, Marc; Wohlfarth, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Cryo-transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM) and particularly single particle analysis is rapidly becoming the premier method for determining the three-dimensional structure of protein complexes, and viruses. In the last several years there have been dramatic technological improvements in Cryo-TEM, such as advancements in automation and use of improved detectors, as well as improved image processing techniques. While Cryo-TEM was once thought of as a low resolution structural technique, the method is currently capable of generating nearly atomic resolution structures on a routine basis. Moreover, the combination of Cryo-TEM and other methods such as X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics modeling are allowing researchers to address scientific questions previously thought intractable. Future technological developments are widely believed to further enhance the method and it is not inconceivable that Cryo-TEM could become as routine as X-ray crystallography for protein structure determination.

  3. Electron and Light Microscopy Techniques Suitable for Studying Fatigue Damage in a Crystallized Glass Ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, Shelley; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1961-01-01

    The crystals of Pyroceram are randomly oriented and highly reflective so that standard microscopy techniques are not satisfactory for studying this material. Standard replicating procedures proved difficult to use. New microscopy techniques and procedures have therefore been developed. A method for locating, orienting, and identifying specific areas to be viewed with an electron microscope is described. This method not require any special equipment. Plastic replicas were found to be unsatisfactory because of their tendency to adhere to Pryoceram. This caused them to tear when released or resulted in artifacts. Preshadowed silicon monoxide replicas were satisfactory but required a releasing agent. A method of depositing the releasing agent is described. To polish specimens without evidence of fire-polishing, it was found necessary to use a vibratory polishing technique. Chrome oxide was used as the abrasive and either water or kerosene as the lubricant. Vibratory polishing is extremely slow, but surfaces so polished show no evidence of fire polishing, even when examined by electron microscopy. The most satisfactory etching process used for Pyroceram 9608 consisted of a primary etch of 5 milliliters of hydrochloric acid (concentrated), 5 milliliters of hydrogen fluoride (45 percent), and 45 milliliters of water, and a secondary etch with methyl alcohol replacing the water. Best results were obtained with total etching times from 25 to 30 seconds. Staining of the Pyroceram surface with a Sanford's marker was found to be an expedient way to reduce the glare of reflected light.

  4. Physics of Hard Sphere Experiment: Scattering, Rheology and Microscopy Study of Colloidal Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Z.-D.; Zhu, J.; Phan, S.-E.; Russel, W. B.; Chaikin, P. M.; Meyer, W. V.

    2002-01-01

    The Physics of Hard Sphere Experiment has two incarnations: the first as a scattering and rheology experiment on STS-83 and STS-94 and the second as a microscopy experiment to be performed in the future on LMM on the space station. Here we describe some of the quantitative and qualitative results from previous flights on the dynamics of crystallization in microgravity and especially the observed interaction of growing crystallites in the coexistance regime. To clarify rheological measurements we also present ground based experiments on the low shear rate viscosity and diffusion coefficient of several hard sphere experiments at high volume fraction. We also show how these experiments will be performed with confocal microscopy and laser tweezers in our lab and as preparation for the phAse II experiments on LMM. One of the main aims of the microscopy study will be the control of colloidal samples using an array of applied fields with an eye toward colloidal architectures. Temperature gradients, electric field gradients, laser tweezers and a variety of switchable imposed surface patterns are used toward this control.

  5. TEM contrast of dissociated screw dislocations in silicon nearby a free surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boussaid, Ahlem; Youssef, Sami; Fnaiech, Mustapha [Unite de Recherche de Physique du Solide, Faculte des Sciences, Avenue de l' Environnement, 5019 Monastir (Tunisia); Rouviere, J.L. [CEA (DRFMC/SP2M, Groupe de Microscopie Electronique), 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble, cedex 9 (France); Bonnet, Roland [Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble (LTPCM/ENSEEG, UMR 5614), D.U., BP 75, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres (France)

    2006-03-01

    Dislocations are commonly analyzed by weak-beam or high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) from the observation of the thinnest parts of TEM samples. In this work, it is shown that faint contrasts of dissociated screw dislocations running parallel to the surfaces of a silicon TEM sample reveal free surface relaxation. The contrast features are fully explained from an approach involving an N-beam theory of the electron diffraction and an appropriate elastic field. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. On the lipid-bacterial protein interaction studied by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Delcea, Mihaela; Pum, Dietmar; Sleytr, Uwe Bernd; Toca-Herrera, Jose Luis

    2009-01-01

    The interaction between the bacterial S-protein SbpA on different types of lipid membranes has been studied using atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation. On one hand, It has been found that the bacterial forms two dimensional nanocrystals on zwitterionic DOPC bilayers and negatively charged DMPG vesicles adsorbed on mica, on zwitterionic DPPC and charged DPPC/DMPG (1:1) monolayers adsorbed on carbon grids. On the other hand, SbpA protein adsorption took place on zwitterionic DOPC bilayers and DOPC/DOPS (4:1) bilayers, previously adsorbed on silicon supports. SbpA adsorption also took place on DPPC/DOPS (1:1) monolayers adsorbed on carbon grids. Finally, neither SbpA adsorption, nor recrystallization was observed on zwitterionic DMPC vesicles (previously adsorbed on polyelectrolyte multilayers), and on DPPC vesicles supported on silicon.

  7. Investigation of the agglomeration and amorphous transformation effects of neutron irradiation on the nanocrystalline silicon carbide (3C-SiC) using TEM and SEM methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huseynov, Elchin M., E-mail: elchin.h@yahoo.com [Department of Nanotechnology and Radiation Material Science, National Nuclear Research Center, Inshaatchilar pr. 4, AZ 1073 Baku (Azerbaijan); Institute of Radiation Problems of Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, B.Vahabzade 9, AZ 1143 Baku (Azerbaijan)

    2017-04-01

    Nanocrystalline 3C-SiC particles irradiated by neutron flux during 20 h in TRIGA Mark II light water pool type research reactor. Silicon carbide nanoparticles were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) devices before and after neutron irradiation. The agglomeration of nanoparticles was studied comparatively before and after neutron irradiation. After neutron irradiation the amorphous layer surrounding the nanoparticles was analyzed in TEM device. Neutron irradiation defects in the 3C-SiC nanoparticles and other effects investigated by TEM device. The effect of irradiation on the crystal structure of the nanomaterial was studied by selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and electron diffraction patterns (EDP) analysis.

  8. Investigation of the agglomeration and amorphous transformation effects of neutron irradiation on the nanocrystalline silicon carbide (3C-SiC) using TEM and SEM methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huseynov, Elchin M.

    2017-04-01

    Nanocrystalline 3C-SiC particles irradiated by neutron flux during 20 h in TRIGA Mark II light water pool type research reactor. Silicon carbide nanoparticles were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) devices before and after neutron irradiation. The agglomeration of nanoparticles was studied comparatively before and after neutron irradiation. After neutron irradiation the amorphous layer surrounding the nanoparticles was analyzed in TEM device. Neutron irradiation defects in the 3C-SiC nanoparticles and other effects investigated by TEM device. The effect of irradiation on the crystal structure of the nanomaterial was studied by selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and electron diffraction patterns (EDP) analysis.

  9. Optimisation of superconducting thin films by TEM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bals, S.; van Tendeloo, G.; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.; Blank, David H.A.; Leca, V.; Salluzzo, M.

    2002-01-01

    High-resolution electron microscopy is used to study the initial growth of different REBa2Cu3O7−δ thin films. In DyBa2Cu3O7−δ ultra-thin films, deposited on TiO2 terminated SrTiO3, two different types of interface arrangements occur: bulk–SrO–TiO2–BaO–CuO–BaO–CuO2–Dy–CuO2–BaO–bulk and bulk–SrO–TiO2–

  10. Nickel oxide reduction studied by environmental TEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeangros, Q.; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal;

    2012-01-01

    In situ reduction of an industrial NiO powder is performed under 1.3 mbar of H2 (2 mlN/min) in a differentially pumped FEI Titan 80-300 environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM). Images, diffraction patterns and electron energy loss spectra (EELS) are acquired to monitor the structura...

  11. Study of Black Sand Particles from Sand Dunes in Badr, Saudi Arabia Using Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider Abbas Khwaja

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Particulate air pollution is a health concern. This study determines the microscopic make-up of different varieties of sand particles collected at a sand dune site in Badr, Saudi Arabia in 2012. Three categories of sand were studied: black sand, white sand, and volcanic sand. The study used multiple high resolution electron microscopies to study the morphologies, emission source types, size, and elemental composition of the particles, and to evaluate the presence of surface “coatings or contaminants” deposited or transported by the black sand particles. White sand was comprised of natural coarse particles linked to wind-blown releases from crustal surfaces, weathering of igneous/metamorphic rock sources, and volcanic activities. Black sand particles exhibited different morphologies and microstructures (surface roughness compared with the white sand and volcanic sand. Morphological Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM analyses revealed that the black sand contained fine and ultrafine particles (50 to 500 nm ranges and was strongly magnetic, indicating the mineral magnetite or elemental iron. Aqueous extracts of black sands were acidic (pH = 5.0. Fe, C, O, Ti, Si, V, and S dominated the composition of black sand. Results suggest that carbon and other contaminant fine particles were produced by fossil-fuel combustion and industrial emissions in heavily industrialized areas of Haifa and Yanbu, and transported as cloud condensation nuclei to Douf Mountain. The suite of techniques used in this study has yielded an in-depth characterization of sand particles. Such information will be needed in future environmental, toxicological, epidemiological, and source apportionment studies.

  12. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction studies of the detonation soot of high explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashkarov, A. O.; Pruuel, E. R.; Ten, K. A.; Rubtsov, I. A.; Gerasimov, E. Yu; Zubkov, P. I.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the results of electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction studies of the recovered carbonaceous residue (soot) from the detonation of some high explosives: TNT, a mixture of TNT and RDX (50/50), benzotrifuroxane, and triaminotrinitrobenzene. The use of the same experimental setup allowed a qualitative and quantitative comparison of the detonation products formed under similar conditions. The results clearly show differences in the morphology of graphite-like and diamond inclusions and in the quantitative content of nanodiamonds for the explosives used in this study.

  13. Atomic Force Microscopy Studies on DNA Structural Changes Induced by Vincristine Sulfate and Aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yi; Zeng, Hu; Xie, Jianming; Ba, Long; Gao, Xiang; Lu, Zuhong

    2004-04-01

    We report that atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies on structural variations of a linear plasmid DNA interact with various concentrations of vincristine sulfate and aspirin. The different binding images show that vincrinstine sulfate binding DNA chains caused some loops and cleavages of the DNA fragments, whereas aspirin interaction caused the width changes and conformational transition of the DNA fragments. Two different DNA structural alternations could be explained by the different mechanisms of the interactions with these two components. Our work indicates that the AFM is a powerful tool in studying the interaction between DNA and small molecules.

  14. Integrated atomic force microscopy techniques for analysis of biomaterials: Study of membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, Laura S.

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is the prominent techniques for structural studies of biological materials in physiological relevant fluidic environments. AFM has been used to resolve the three-dimensional (3D) surface structure of cells, membranes, and proteins structures. Ion channels, formed by membrane proteins, are the key structures that control the activity of all living systems. This dissertation focuses on the structural evaluation of membrane proteins through atomic force microscopy. In Part I, AFM is utilized to study one of the most prominent medical issues facing our society, Alzheimer's Disease (AD). AD is a misfolded protein disease characterized by the accumulation of beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptide as senile plaques, progressive neurodegeneration, and memory loss. Recent evidence suggests that AD pathology is linked to the destabilization of cellular ionic homeostasis mediated by toxic channel structures composed of Abeta peptides. Selectively engineered sequences of Abeta were examined by AFM to elucidate the substructures and thus activity Abeta channels. Key residues were evaluated with the intent better understand the exact nature by which these pores conduct electrical and molecular signals, which could aid in identifying potential therapeutic targets for the prevention/treatment of AD. Additionally, AFM was used to analyze brain derived Abeta and newly developed pharmacological agents to study membranes and Abeta. Part II, presents a novel technology that incorporates electrophysiology into the AFM interface, enabling simultaneous imaging and complementary conductance measurements. The activity of ion channels is studied by various techniques, including patch clamp, free standing lipid bilayers, droplet interface bilayers, and supported lipid bilayers. However, direct correlation with channel structures has remained a challenge. The integrated atomic force microscopy system presented offers a solution to this challenge. The functionality of the

  15. Shocked chromites in fossil L chondrites: A Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Surya S.; Heck, Philipp R.; Zaluzec, Nestor J.; Ishii, Takayuki; Wen, Jianguo; Miller, Dean J.; Schmitz, Birger

    2017-09-01

    Chromites from Middle Ordovician fossil L chondrites and from matrix and shock-melt veins in Catherwood, Tenham, and Coorara L chondrites were studied using Raman spectroscopy and TEM. Raman spectra of chromites from fossil L chondrites showed similarities with chromites from matrix and shock-melt veins in the studied L chondrite falls and finds. Chromites from shock-melt veins of L chondrites show polycrystallinity, while the chromite grains in fossil L chondrites are single crystals. In addition, chromites from shock-melt veins in the studied L chondrites have high densities of planar fractures within the subgrains and many subgrains show intergrowths of chromite and xieite. Matrix chromite of Tenham has similar dislocation densities and planar fractures as a chromite from the fossil meteorite Golvsten 001 and higher dislocation densities than in chromite from the fossil meteorite Sextummen 003. Using this observation and knowing that the matrix of Tenham experienced 20-22 GPa and shock stage S3-S6) and 20 GPa and 1000° C (S3-S5), respectively, and we conclude that the studied fossil meteorite chromites are from matrix.

  16. Ion-beam implantation and cross-sectional TEM characterization of Gd 2Ti 2O 7 pyrochlore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Jie; Wang, L. M.; Ewing, R. C.; Boatner, L. A.

    2006-01-01

    Radiation effects in a wide range of pyrochlore compositions have been extensively investigated due to the potential application of pyrochlores as host matrices for the immobilization of actinides - particularly Pu. In this study, we have performed 1.0 MeV Kr2+ ion implantations in bulk samples of single crystal Gd2Ti2O7 at room temperature at different ion fluences of 1.875, 3.125 and 5 × 1014 ions/cm2. The microstructural evolution upon ion-beam implantation was examined by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The critical amorphization dose at room temperature for 1 MeV Kr2+ implanted Gd2Ti2O7 was determined to be ∼0.143 dpa, which is significantly lower than the dose obtained by ion-irradiation under in situ TEM observation.

  17. Application of atomic force microscopy to the study of natural and model soil particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, S; Bryant, R; Doerr, S H; Rhodri Williams, P; Wright, C J

    2008-09-01

    The structure and surface chemistry of soil particles has extensive impact on many bulk scale properties and processes of soil systems and consequently the environments that they support. There are a number of physiochemical mechanisms that operate at the nanoscale which affect the soil's capability to maintain native vegetation and crops; this includes soil hydrophobicity and the soil's capacity to hold water and nutrients. The present study used atomic force microscopy in a novel approach to provide unique insight into the nanoscale properties of natural soil particles that control the physiochemical interaction of material within the soil column. There have been few atomic force microscopy studies of soil, perhaps a reflection of the heterogeneous nature of the system. The present study adopted an imaging and force measurement research strategy that accounted for the heterogeneity and used model systems to aid interpretation. The surface roughness of natural soil particles increased with depth in the soil column a consequence of the attachment of organic material within the crevices of the soil particles. The roughness root mean square calculated from ten 25 microm(2) images for five different soil particles from a Netherlands soil was 53.0 nm, 68.0 nm, 92.2 nm and 106.4 nm for the respective soil depths of 0-10 cm, 10-20 cm, 20-30 cm and 30-40 cm. A novel analysis method of atomic force microscopy phase images based on phase angle distribution across a surface was used to interpret the nanoscale distribution of organic material attached to natural and model soil particles. Phase angle distributions obtained from phase images of model surfaces were found to be bimodal, indicating multiple layers of material, which changed with the concentration of adsorbed humic acid. Phase angle distributions obtained from phase images of natural soil particles indicated a trend of decreasing surface coverage with increasing depth in the soil column. This was consistent with

  18. Vibrational spectroscopy and analytical electron microscopy studies of Fe-V-O and In-V-O thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Vuk, A S; Drazic, G; Colomban, P

    2002-01-01

    Orthovanadate (M sup 3 sup + VO sub 4; M= Fe, In) and vanadate (Fe sub 2 V sub 4 O sub 1 sub 3) thin films were prepared using sol-gel synthesis and dip coating deposition. Using analytical electron microscopy (AEM), the chemical composition and the degree of crystallization of the phases present in the thin Fe-V-O films were investigated. TEM samples were prepared in both orientations: parallel (plan view) and perpendicular (cross section) to the substrate. In the first stages of crystallization, when the particle sizes were in the nanometer range, the classical identification of phases using electron diffraction was not possible. Instead of measuring d values, experimentally selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns were compared to calculated (simulated) patterns in order to determine the phase composition. The problems of evaluating the ratio of amorphous and crystalline phases in thin films are reported. Results of TEM and XRD as well as IR and Raman spectroscopy showed that the films made at lo...

  19. Structure and Reactions of Carbon and Hydrogen on Ru(0001): A Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Tomoko K.; Mugarza, Aitor; Cerda, Jorge; Salmeron, Miquel

    2008-09-09

    The interaction between carbon and hydrogen atoms on a Ru(0001) surface was studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), Density Functional Theory (DFT) and STM image calculations. Formation of CH species by reaction between adsorbed H and C was observed to occur readily at 100 K. When the coverage of H increased new complexes of the form CH+nH (n = 1, 2 and 3) were observed. These complexes, never observed before, might be precursors for further hydrogenation reactions. DFT analysis reveals that a considerable energy barrier exists for the CH+H {yields} CH{sub 2} reaction.

  20. Transmission electron microscopy study of vertical quantum dots molecules grown by droplet epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Maldonado, D., E-mail: david.hernandez@uca.es [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e I.M. y Q.I., Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus Rio San Pedro, s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Herrera, M.; Sales, D.L. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e I.M. y Q.I., Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus Rio San Pedro, s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Alonso-Gonzalez, P.; Gonzalez, Y.; Gonzalez, L. [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM-CSIC), Isaac Newton 8 (PTM), 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain); Pizarro, J.; Galindo, P.L. [Departamento de Lenguajes y Sistemas Informaticos, CASEM, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus Rio San Pedro, s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Molina, S.I. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e I.M. y Q.I., Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus Rio San Pedro, s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain)

    2010-07-01

    The compositional distribution of InAs quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs capped InAs quantum dots has been studied in this work. Upper quantum dots are nucleated preferentially on top of the quantum dots underneath, which have been nucleated by droplet epitaxy. The growth process of these nanostructures, which are usually called as quantum dots molecules, has been explained. In order to understand this growth process, the analysis of the strain has been carried out from a 3D model of the nanostructure built from transmission electron microscopy images sensitive to the composition.

  1. Scanning tunneling microscopy of monoatomic gold chains on vicinal Si(335) surface: experimental and theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krawiec, M.; Kwapinski, T.; Jalochowski, M. [Institute of Physics and Nanotechnology Center, M. Curie-Sklodowska University, pl. M. Curie-Sklodowskiej 1, 20-031 Lublin (Poland)

    2005-02-01

    We study electronic and topographic properties of the Si(335) surface, containing Au wires parallel to the steps. We use scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) supplemented by reflection of high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) technique. The STM data show the space and voltage dependent oscillations of the distance between STM tip and the surface which can be explained within one band tight binding Hubbard model. We calculate the STM current using nonequilibrium Keldysh Green function formalism. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Atomic force microscopy based nanoindentation study of onion abaxial epidermis walls in aqueous environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Xiaoning; Tittmann, Bernhard [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Kim, Seong H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2015-01-14

    An atomic force microscopy based nanoindentation method was employed to study how the structure of cellulose microfibril packing and matrix polymers affect elastic modulus of fully hydrated primary plant cell walls. The isolated, single-layered abaxial epidermis cell wall of an onion bulb was used as a test system since the cellulose microfibril packing in this cell wall is known to vary systematically from inside to outside scales and the most abundant matrix polymer, pectin, can easily be altered through simple chemical treatments such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and calcium ions. Experimental results showed that the pectin network variation has significant impacts on the cell wall modulus, and not the cellulose microfibril packing.

  3. Network formation in colloid-liquid crystal mixtures studied by confocal microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleaver, J; Poon, W C K [School of Physics and the Collaborative Optical Spectroscopy, Micromanipulation and Imaging Centre (COSMIC), JCMB, University of Edinburgh, Kings Buildings, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom)

    2004-05-19

    We studied the formation of particle networks in colloid + liquid crystal mixtures cooled below the isotropic-nematic transition temperature by time-resolved laser scanning confocal microscopy. Our observations confirm a recent suggestion that alkane impurities play a crucial role in slowing down the speed of the isotropic-nematic interface. This enables the growing nematic droplets to 'push' particles into increasingly concentrated regions, ultimately resulting in a cellular network solid. We also found that faster cooling rates resulted in increasingly hierarchical cellular structures.

  4. Detecting flaws in Portland cement concrete using TEM horn antennae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qadi, Imad L.; Riad, Sedki M.; Su, Wansheng; Haddad, Rami H.

    1996-11-01

    To understand the dielectric properties of PCC and better correlate them with type and severity of PCC internal defects, a study was conducted to evaluate PCC complex permittivity and magnetic permeability over a wideband of frequencies using both time domain and frequency domain techniques. Three measuring devices were designed and fabricated: a parallel plate capacitor, a coaxial transmission line, and transverse electromagnetic (TEM) horn antennae. The TEM horn antenna covers the microwave frequencies. The measurement technique involves a time domain setup that was verified by a frequency domain measurement. Portland cement concrete slabs, 60 by 75 by 14 cm, were cast; defects include delamination, delamination filled with water, segregation, and chloride contamination. In this paper, measurements using the TEM horn antennae and the feasibility of detecting flaws at microwave frequency are presented.

  5. Shining light on the Environmental TEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Cavalca, Filippo; Hansen, Thomas Willum

    Digging into the world of photocatalysts by means of electron microscopy gives rise to new challenges. In order to study photocatalysts under working conditions, a holder capable of exposing a sample to visible light in situ during gas exposure in the ETEM has been developed at DTU Cen1. One......, the case study of in situ Cu2O photocorrosion is presented together with our ongoing work involving systematic measured images, diffraction patterns and energy-loss spectra acquired in gases in order to elucidate the influence of gas-electron interaction under imaging conditions suitable for in situ light...... of the major challenges when studying the effects of visible light in the electron microscope is to differentiate between the effect of visible light and that of high-energy electrons. New protocols for acquisition and robust interpretation of in situ data on photocatalysts are needed to minimize the effect...

  6. Compressive Classification for TEM-EELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Weituo; Stevens, Andrew; Yang, Hao; Gehm, Michael; Browning, Nigel D.

    2017-07-01

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is typically conducted in STEM mode with a spectrometer, or in TEM mode with energy selction. These methods produce a 3D data set (x, y, energy). Some compressive sensing [1,2] and inpainting [3,4,5] approaches have been proposed for recovering a full set of spectra from compressed measurements. In many cases the final form of the spectral data is an elemental map (an image with channels corresponding to elements). This means that most of the collected data is unused or summarized. We propose a method to directly recover the elemental map with reduced dose and acquisition time. We have designed a new computational TEM sensor for compressive classification [6,7] of energy loss spectra called TEM-EELS.

  7. Polarization-resolved SHG microscopy in cardiac hypertrophy study (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhonghai; Yuan, Cai; Shao, Yonghong; Bradshaw, Amy D.; Borg, Thomas K.; Gao, Bruce Z.

    2017-02-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy, a process initiated by mechanical alterations, is hypothesized to cause long-term molecular-level alteration in the sarcomere lattice, which is the main force-generating component in the heart muscle. This molecular-level alteration is beyond the resolving capacity of common light microscopy. Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy has unique capability for visualizing ordered molecular structures in biological tissues without labeling. Combined with polarization imaging technique, SHG microscopy is able to extract structural details of myosin at the molecular level so as to reveal molecular-level alterations that occur during hypertrophy. The myosin filaments are believed to possess C6 symmetry; thus, the nonlinear polarization response relationship between generated second harmonic light I^2ωand incident fundamental light I^ω is determined by nonlinear coefficients, χ_15, χ_31 and χ_33. χ_31/χ_15 is believed to be an indicator of the molecular symmetry of myosin filament, whileχ_33/χ_15represents the intramyosin orientation angle of the double helix. By changing the polarization of the incident light and evaluating the corresponding SHG signals, the molecular structure of the myosin, reflected by the χ coefficients, can be revealed. With this method, we studied the structural properties of heart tissues in different conditions, including those in normal, physiologically hypertrophic (heart tissue from postpartum female rats), and pathologically hypertrophic (heart tissue from transverse-aorta constricted rats) conditions. We found that ratios of χ_31/χ_15 showed no significant difference between heart tissues from different conditions; their values were all close to 1, which demonstrated that Kleinman symmetry held for all conditions. Ratios of χ_33/χ_15 from physiologically or pathologically hypertrophic heart tissues were raised and showed significant difference from those from normal heart tissues, which indicated that

  8. Serial block face scanning electron microscopy for the study of cardiac muscle ultrastructure at nanoscale resolutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinali, Christian; Kitmitto, Ashraf

    2014-11-01

    Electron microscopy techniques have made a significant contribution towards understanding muscle physiology since the 1950s. Subsequent advances in hardware and software have led to major breakthroughs in terms of image resolution as well as the ability to generate three-dimensional (3D) data essential for linking structure to function and dysfunction. In this methodological review we consider the application of a relatively new technique, serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM), for the study of cardiac muscle morphology. Employing SBF-SEM we have generated 3D data for cardiac myocytes within the myocardium with a voxel size of ~15 nm in the X-Y plane and 50 nm in the Z-direction. We describe how SBF-SEM can be used in conjunction with selective staining techniques to reveal the 3D cellular organisation and the relationship between the t-tubule (t-t) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) networks. These methods describe how SBF-SEM can be used to provide qualitative data to investigate the organisation of the dyad, a specialised calcium microdomain formed between the t-ts and the junctional portion of the SR (jSR). We further describe how image analysis methods may be applied to interrogate the 3D volumes to provide quantitative data such as the volume of the cell occupied by the t-t and SR membranes and the volumes and surface area of jSR patches. We consider the strengths and weaknesses of the SBF-SEM technique, pitfalls in sample preparation together with tips and methods for image analysis. By providing a 'big picture' view at high resolutions, in comparison to conventional confocal microscopy, SBF-SEM represents a paradigm shift for imaging cellular networks in their native environment.

  9. Atomic force microscopy as analytical tool to study physico-mechanical properties of intestinal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christa Schimpel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The small intestine is a complex system that carries out various functions. The main function of enterocytes is absorption of nutrients, whereas membranous cells (M cells are responsible for delivering antigens/foreign substances to the mucosal lymphoid tissues. However, to get a fundamental understanding of how cellular structures contribute to physiological processes, precise knowledge about surface morphologies, cytoskeleton organizations and biomechanical properties is necessary. Atomic force microscopy (AFM was used here as a powerful tool to study surface topographies of Caco-2 cells and M cells. Furthermore, cell elasticity (i.e., the mechanical response of a cell on a tip indentation, was elucidated by force curve measurements. Besides elasticity, adhesion was evaluated by recording the attraction and repulsion forces between the tip and the cell surface. Organization of F-actin networks were investigated via phalloidin labeling and visualization was performed with confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy (CLSM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results of these various experimental techniques revealed significant differences in the cytoskeleton/microvilli arrangements and F-actin organization. Caco-2 cells displayed densely packed F-actin bundles covering the entire cell surface, indicating the formation of a well-differentiated brush border. In contrast, in M cells actins were arranged as short and/or truncated thin villi, only available at the cell edge. The elasticity of M cells was 1.7-fold higher compared to Caco-2 cells and increased significantly from the cell periphery to the nuclear region. Since elasticity can be directly linked to cell adhesion, M cells showed higher adhesion forces than Caco-2 cells. The combination of distinct experimental techniques shows that morphological differences between Caco-2 cells and M cells correlate with mechanical cell properties and provide useful information to understand

  10. Deformation of nanotubes in peeling contact with flat substrate: An in situ electron microscopy nanomechanical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoming; Zheng, Meng; Wei, Qing; Signetti, Stefano; Pugno, Nicola M.; Ke, Changhong

    2016-04-01

    Peeling of one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures from flat substrates is an essential technique in studying their adhesion properties. The mechanical deformation of the nanostructure in the peeling experiment is critical to the understanding of the peeling process and the interpretation of the peeling measurements, but it is challenging to measure directly and quantitatively at the nanoscale. Here, we investigate the peeling deformation of a bundled carbon nanotube (CNT) fiber by using an in situ scanning electron microscopy nanomechanical peeling technique. A pre-calibrated atomic force microscopy cantilever is utilized as the peeling force sensor, and its back surface acts as the peeling contact substrate. The nanomechanical peeling scheme enables a quantitative characterization of the deformational behaviors of the CNT fiber in both positive and negative peeling configurations with sub-10 nm spatial and sub-nN force resolutions. Nonlinear continuum mechanics models and finite element simulations are employed to interpret the peeling measurements. The measurements and analysis reveal that the structural imperfections in the CNT fiber may have a substantial influence on its peeling deformations and the corresponding peeling forces. The research findings reported in this work are useful to the study of mechanical and adhesion properties of 1D nanostructures by using nanomechanical peeling techniques.

  11. Rock Magnetic and Oxide Microscopy Studies of two South American Iron-Ore Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alva-Valdivia, L. M.

    2005-05-01

    Microscopy and rock-magnetic studies of the iron oxide-ore and host rocks in the Cristales-Pleito Melon (Chile) and Jacupiranga (Brazil) deposits were carried out to characterize and compare the magnetic mineralogy and the processes that affected the natural remanent magnetization (NRM) during emplacement and evolution of the iron-ore deposits. The microscopy study under reflected light shows that magnetic carriers are mainly magnetites, with minor amounts of ilmenite-hematite minerals. Titanomagnetite, shows trellis texture, which is compatible with high temperature oxy-exsolution processes. Grain sizes range from a few microns to >100 µm, and dominant magnetic state pseudo-single-domain, in agreement with hysteresis measurements. Thermal spectra, continuous susceptibility measurements, and isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) acquisition suggest a predominance of some spinels (titanomagnetite or titanomaghemite) with low-Ti content as magnetic carriers. These data help to investigate the magnetic domain states and the remanence acquisition processes, and to assess their significance as a source of magnetic anomalies.

  12. Multiphoton microscopy for skin wound healing study in terms of cellular metabolism and collagen regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, Gitanjal; Okano, Kazunori; Wu, Wei-Wen; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2014-02-01

    Multiphoton microscopy was employed to study normal skin wound healing in live rats noninvasively. Wound healing is a process involving series of biochemical events. This study evaluates the regeneration of collagen and change in cellular metabolic activity during wound healing in rats, with second harmonic generation (SHG) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), respectively. In eukaryotic cells ATP is the molecule that holds the energy for cellular functioning. Whereas NADH is an electron donor in the metabolic pathways, required to generate ATP. Fluorescence lifetime of NADH free to protein bound ratio was evaluated to determine the relative metabolic activity. The FLIM data were acquired by a TCSPC system using SPCM software and analyzed by SPCImage software. Additionally, polarization resolved SHG signals were also collected to observe the changes in optical birefringence and hence the anisotropy of regenerated collagens from rat wound biopsy samples. Mat lab programming was used to process the data to construct the anisotropy images. Results indicated that, cells involved in healing had higher metabolic activity during the first week of healing, which decreases gradually and become equivalent to normal skin upon healing completes. A net degradation of collagen during the inflammatory phase and net regeneration starting from day 5 were observed in terms of SHG signal intensity change. Polarization resolved SHG imaging of the wound biopsy sample indicates higher value of anisotropy in proliferative phase, from day 4th to 8th, of wound formation; however the anisotropy decreases upon healing.

  13. Interaction of light and surface plasmon polaritons in Ag Islands studied by nonlinear photoemission microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckanie, N.M.; Kirschbaum, P.; Sindermann, S.; Heringdorf, F.-J. Meyer zu, E-mail: meyerzh@uni-due.de

    2013-07-15

    Two photon photoemission microscopy was used to study the interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with Ag islands prepared using different strategies on Si(111) and SiO{sub 2}. The femtosecond laser pulses initiate surface plasmon polariton (SPP) waves at the edges of the island. The superposition of the electrical fields of the femtosecond laser pulses with the electrical fields of the SPP results in a moiré pattern that is comparable despite the rather different methods of preparation and that gives access to the wavelength and direction of the SPP waves. If the SPPs reach edges of the Ag islands, they can be converted back into light waves. The incident and refracted light waves result in an interference pattern that can again be described with a moiré pattern, demonstrating that Ag islands can be used as plasmonic beam deflectors for light. - Highlights: • Surface plasmon polaritons were studied on Ag islands in two photon photoemission microscopy. • Ag islands were prepared using self-assembly, electron beam lithography, and a focused ion beam. • The SPP pattern on Ag islands can be described with a simple moiré concept. • SPP output coupling results in a pattern that can again be described by the moiré effect.

  14. In situ Transmission Electron Microscopy of catalyst sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeLaRiva, Andrew T.; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Challa, Sivakumar R.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancements in the field of electron microscopy, such as aberration correctors, have now been integrated into Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopes (TEMs), making it possible to study the behavior of supported metal catalysts under operating conditions at atomic resolution. Here......, we focus on in situ electron microscopy studies of catalysts that shed light on the mechanistic aspects of catalyst sintering. Catalyst sintering is an important mechanism for activity loss, especially for catalysts that operate at elevated temperatures. Literature from the past decade is reviewed...

  15. Probing intracellular mass density fluctuation through confocal microscopy: application in cancer diagnostics as a case study

    CERN Document Server

    Sahay, Peeyush; Ghimire, Hemendra M; Almabadi, Huda; Yallappu, Murali M; Skalli, Omar; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C; Pradhan, Prabhakar

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular structural alterations are hallmark of several disease conditions and treatment modalities. However, robust methods to quantify these changes are scarce. In view of this, we introduce a new method to quantify structural alterations in biological cells through the widely used confocal microscopy. This novel method employs optical eigenfunctions localization properties of cells and quantifies the degree of structural alterations, in terms of nano- to micron scale intracellular mass density fluctuations, in one single parameter. Such approach allows a powerful way to compare changing structures in heterogeneous cellular media irrespective of the origin of the cause. As a case study, we demonstrate its applicability in cancer detection with breast and prostate cancer cases of different tumorigenicity levels. Adding new dimensions to the confocal based studies, this technique has potentially significant applications in areas ranging from disease diagnostics to therapeutic studies, such as patient pro...

  16. Semiclassical TEM image formation in phase space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lubk, Axel; Röder, Falk

    2015-04-15

    Current developments in TEM such as high-resolution imaging at low acceleration voltages and large fields of view, the ever larger capabilities of hardware aberration correction and the systematic shaping of electron beams require accurate descriptions of TEM imaging in terms of wave optics. Since full quantum mechanic solutions have not yet been established for, e.g., the theory of aberrations, we are exploring semiclassical image formation in the TEM from the perspective of quantum mechanical phase space, here. Firstly, we use two well-known semiclassical approximations, Miller's semiclassical algebra and the frozen Gaussian method, for describing the wave optical generalization of arbitrary geometric aberrations, including nonisoplanatic and slope aberrations. Secondly, we demonstrate that the Wigner function representation of phase space is well suited to also describe incoherent aberrations as well as the ramifications of partial coherence due to the emission process at the electron source. We identify a close relationship between classical phase space and Wigner function distortions due to aberrations as well as classical brightness and quantum mechanical purity. - Highlights: • We discuss several semiclassical approximations to describe image formation in the TEM. • We provide laws how aberrations modify quantum mechanical phase space. • We exhibit the close relation between quantum mechanical purity and axial brightness.

  17. A novel converter topology for TEM applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Kedarnath; Krishna Vasudevan

    2008-10-01

    Time-domain Electro Magnetic (TEM) systems, are used for remote sensing of conductive mineral deposits buried under the surface of the earth. A low frequency trapezoidal current excitation set-up in an exciter coil loop causes a flux that penetrates deep into the earth. When the excitation is cut off sharply, conductive deposits in the earth carrying flux react by causing eddy current flows within them. The flux produced by such eddy currents is picked up by a sensor coil. By comparing the emf induced in the sensor coil with a priori known emf patterns for mineral deposits, the presence of mineral deposits can be ascertained. The voltage, current and energy levels of the TEM system, require special type of excitation technique. Power converters for such non-standard requirements are not reported in the literature, particularly for TEM applications. This paper introduces TEM systems to the reader and presents the requirements for excitation. A converter topology to meet the requirements, it’s analysis, control and performance are presented. Among other alternatives that the authors have attempted, the topology presented features reduced number of passive elements, high voltage gain and low losses. These features enable the sensor head to be operated from the normal low level battery.

  18. Electron Microscopy Studies, Surface Analysis and Microbial Culturing Experiments on a Depth Profile Through Martian Meteorite Nakhla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toporski, J. K. W.; Steele, A.; Westall, F.; Griffin, C.; Whitby, C.; Avci, R.; McKay, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    Combined electron microscopy studies and culturing experiments have shown that Nakhla became contaminated with recent terrestrial microorganisms. Additional surface analysis detected an as yet unknown organic species which may represent a biomarker.

  19. Correlative scanning-transmission electron microscopy reveals that a chimeric flavivirus is released as individual particles in secretory vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlaud-Gaillard, Julien; Sellin, Caroline; Georgeault, Sonia; Uzbekov, Rustem; Lebos, Claude; Guillaume, Jean-Marc; Roingeard, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular morphogenesis of flaviviruses has been well described, but flavivirus release from the host cell remains poorly documented. We took advantage of the optimized production of an attenuated chimeric yellow fever/dengue virus for vaccine purposes to study this phenomenon by microscopic approaches. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed the release of numerous viral particles at the cell surface through a short-lived process. For transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of the intracellular ultrastructure of the small number of cells releasing viral particles at a given time, we developed a new correlative microscopy method: CSEMTEM (for correlative scanning electron microscopy - transmission electron microscopy). CSEMTEM analysis suggested that chimeric flavivirus particles were released as individual particles, in small exocytosis vesicles, via a regulated secretory pathway. Our morphological findings provide new insight into interactions between flaviviruses and cells and demonstrate that CSEMTEM is a useful new method, complementary to SEM observations of biological events by intracellular TEM investigations.

  20. Evidence of apoptotic effects of 2,4-D and butachlor on walking catfish, Clarias batrachus, by transmission electron microscopy and DNA degradation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateeq, Bushra; Farah, M Abul; Ahmad, Waseem

    2006-01-25

    Apoptosis or programmed cell death is characterized morphologically by chromatin condensation, cell shrinkage, fragmentation of the nucleus and cytoplasm, and consequently formation of apoptotic bodies. It has also been best characterized by the cleavage of DNA into nucleosomal size fragments of 180-200 bp or multiples of the same. Contrary to this, under extreme conditions, the cells were found to show adaptive response to apoptosis and unable to regulate their own death; necrosis is therefore predominantly observed. In the present study, we showed induction of apoptosis in Clarias batrachus due to sublethal concentration of 2,4-D and butachlor at multiple exposure time. The first phase of the study involved light microscopy (LM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for ultrastructural abnormalities of the germinal tissues. While, in the second phase of the study, DNA degradation of blood and hepatic tissue was resolved on agarose gel electrophoresis. In histopathological studies, large numbers of stage II oocytes were noted for nuclear blebbing irrespective of the test chemical. Some of the butachlor-exposed oocytes showed vacuolation and electron dense cytoplasm along with thickened nuclear envelope, having close association with the lysosomes on the cytoplasmic side. Some oocytes undergo nuclear blebbing having inner dense core and translucent cytoplasm. Leydig cells were slightly hypertrophied and few appeared pycnotic, a process involving necrotic changes in which the cell nuclei were characterized by rounding up and condensation resulting in hyperchromatic staining or pycnosis. In testicular tissue, spermatogonial nuclei had irregular large clumps of heterochromatin adjoining the nuclear membrane indicating initial stage of apoptotic cell death. Electrophoretic separation resulted in a ladder pattern of blood DNA and smear like pattern of hepatic DNA. These results indicate that the above herbicides are able to induce apoptosis both at molecular as

  1. Reflectance confocal microscopy for the diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis: a pilot study conducted on biopsy specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hongki; Kang, DongKyun; Katz, Aubrey J; Lauwers, Gregory Y; Nishioka, Norman S; Yagi, Yukako; Tanpowpong, Pornthep; Namati, Jacqueline; Bouma, Brett E; Tearney, Guillermo J

    2011-11-01

    Diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) currently requires endoscopic biopsy and histopathologic analysis of the biopsy specimens to count intraepithelial eosinophils. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is an endomicroscopy technology that is capable of obtaining high-resolution, optically sectioned images of esophageal mucosa without the administration of exogenous contrast. In this study, we investigated the capability of a high-speed form of RCM, termed spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM), to count intraepithelial esophageal eosinophils and characterize other microscopic findings of EoE. A total of 43 biopsy samples from 35 pediatric patients and 8 biopsy samples from 8 adult patients undergoing EGD for EoE were imaged by SECM immediately after their removal and then processed for routine histopathology. Two SECM readers, trained on adult cases, prospectively counted intraepithelial eosinophils and detected the presence of abscess, degranulation, and basal cell hyperplasia on SECM images from the pediatric patients. A pathologist blinded to the SECM data analyzed the same from corresponding slides. The Gastrointestinal Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital. Eosinophils by SECM demonstrated a higher reflectance than the surrounding cells and other inflammatory cells. There was good correlation between SECM and histology maximum eosinophil counts/high-power field (R = 0.76, P biopsy samples. These findings suggest that RCM may be developed into a tool for assessing eosinophilic infiltration in the esophagus in vivo. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Layer-dependent nanoscale electrical properties of graphene studied by conductive scanning probe microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Shihua

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The nanoscale electrical properties of single-layer graphene (SLG, bilayer graphene (BLG and multilayer graphene (MLG are studied by scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM and electrostatic force microscopy (EFM. The quantum capacitance of graphene deduced from SCM results is found to increase with the layer number (n at the sample bias of 0 V but decreases with n at -3 V. Furthermore, the quantum capacitance increases very rapidly with the gate voltage for SLG, but this increase is much slowed down when n becomes greater. On the other hand, the magnitude of the EFM phase shift with respect to the SiO2 substrate increases with n at the sample bias of +2 V but decreases with n at -2 V. The difference in both quantum capacitance and EFM phase shift is significant between SLG and BLG but becomes much weaker between MLGs with a different n. The layer-dependent quantum capacitance behaviors of graphene could be attributed to their layer-dependent electronic structure as well as the layer-varied dependence on gate voltage, while the layer-dependent EFM phase shift is caused by not only the layer-dependent surface potential but also the layer-dependent capacitance derivation.

  3. Real-time charge carrier motion in P3HT studied with Kelvin Probe Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaneda, Chloe; Zaidi, Alyina; Moscatello, Jason; Aidala, Katherine

    We have developed a technique that uses scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to study the real-time injection and extraction of charge carriers in organic semiconductor devices. We investigate P3HT (full name) in an inverted field effect transistor geometry with gold electrodes. By positioning the SPM tip at an individual location and using Kelvin probe microscopy to record the potential over time, we can record how the charge carriers respond to changing the backgate voltage while the source and drain electrodes are grounded. We see relatively fast screening for negative backgate voltages because holes are quickly injected into the P3HT film. The screening is slower for positive gate voltages, because some of these holes are trapped and therefore less mobile. We compare P3HT transistors with different fabrication procedures that are expected to change the trap distribution: no silanization of the oxide and no annealing, silanization and no annealing, and both silanization and annealing. By incrementally stepping the gate voltage, we probe different trap depths. The recorded change in potential over time is best fit by a double exponential, suggesting two physical mechanisms involved in screening. This work is supported by NSF Grant DMR-0955348, and the Center for Heirarchical Manufacturing at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst (NSF CMMI-1025020).

  4. Membrane distribution of the glycine receptor α3 studied by optical super-resolution microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notelaers, Kristof; Rocha, Susana; Paesen, Rik; Swinnen, Nina; Vangindertael, Jeroen; Meier, Jochen C; Rigo, Jean-Michel; Ameloot, Marcel; Hofkens, Johan

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the effect of glycine receptor (GlyR) α3 alternative RNA splicing on the distribution of receptors in the membrane of human embryonic kidney 293 cells is investigated using optical super-resolution microscopy. Direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy is used to image both α3K and α3L splice variants individually and together using single- and dual-color imaging. Pair correlation analysis is used to extract quantitative measures from the resulting images. Autocorrelation analysis of the individually expressed variants reveals clustering of both variants, yet with differing properties. The cluster size is increased for α3L compared to α3K (mean radius 92 ± 4 and 56 ± 3 nm, respectively), yet an even bigger difference is found in the cluster density (9,870 ± 1,433 and 1,747 ± 200 μm(-2), respectively). Furthermore, cross-correlation analysis revealed that upon co-expression, clusters colocalize on the same spatial scales as for individually expressed receptors (mean co-cluster radius 94 ± 6 nm). These results demonstrate that RNA splicing determines GlyR α3 membrane distribution, which has consequences for neuronal GlyR physiology and function.

  5. Reflected electron energy loss microscopy (REELM) studies of metals, semiconductors and insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paparazzo, E. [Istituto di Sruttura della Materia del CNR, Area della Ricerca di Roma, Tor Vergata, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy)]. E-mail: paparazzo@ism.cnr.it

    2005-05-15

    The potential of reflected electron energy loss microscopy (REELM) are tested in surface and interface studies of metals, semiconductors and insulators. We present spectroscopic analyses of loss signals occurring at {approx}5-30 eV of the elastic peak, and microscopic analyses based on the same signals performed via spot mode, as well as via linescanning and imaging modes. Materials investigated include a UHV cleaved InSb surface, InP/SiO{sub 2} and GaAs/Au systems, W tips for use in an STM microscope, a ZrO{sub 2} single crystal, and an archaeological bronze covered with a thick patina. Advantages and shortcomings of REELM are outlined against the diagnostic value of parallel results obtained by scanning Auger microscopy (SAM) techniques. Although comparatively poor focussing powers preclude the attainment of high spatial resolution, and spectral interference problems may hinder the chemical characterization of multi-phase materials, REELM features unique capabilities. Among others, these include a chemical contrast that is much superior to that of SAM, the possibility of characterizing the coverage distribution of adlayer surface species, as well as of investigating the microchemistry of insulators' surfaces. The first application of REELM in the analysis of archaeological materials is presented.

  6. Epitaxial Graphene and Graphene–Based Devices Studied by Electrical Scanning Probe Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim L. Burnett

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We present local electrical characterization of epitaxial graphene grown on both Si- and C-faces of 4H-SiC using Electrostatic Force Microscopy and Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy in ambient conditions and at elevated temperatures. These techniques provide a straightforward identification of graphene domains with various thicknesses on the substrate where topographical determination is hindered by adsorbates and SiC terraces. We also use Electrostatic Force Spectroscopy which allows quantitative surface potential measurements with high spatial resolution. Using these techniques, we study evolution of a layer of atmospheric water as a function of temperature, which is accompanied by a significant change of the absolute surface potential difference. We show that the nanoscale wettability of the material is strongly dependent on the number of graphene layers, where hydrophobicity increases with graphene thickness. We also use micron-sized graphene Hall bars with gold electrodes to calibrate work function of the electrically conductive probe and precisely and quantitatively define the work functions for single- and double-layer graphene.

  7. Microstructure and properties of laser clad coatings studied by orientation imaging microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocelik, V.; Furar, I. [Department of Applied Physics, Materials Innovation Institute (M2i), University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, Groningen 9747 AG (Netherlands); De Hosson, J.Th.M., E-mail: j.t.m.de.hosson@rug.nl [Department of Applied Physics, Materials Innovation Institute (M2i), University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, Groningen 9747 AG (Netherlands)

    2010-12-15

    In this work orientation imaging microscopy (OIM), based on electron backscatter diffraction in scanning electron microscopy, was employed to examine in detail the relationship between laser cladding processing parameters and he properties and the microstructure of single and overlapping laser tracks. The study was performed on thick ({approx}1 mm) Co-based coatings prepared by 2 kW Nd:YAG laser cladding a 42CrMo4 steel substrate using different laser beam scanning speeds (1.0-15 mm s{sup -1}). It was found that the directional growth of individual primary grains led to the formation of a typical solidification fiber texture. The dependence of this texture on the processing speed and the shape of the solidification front were investigated in detail. Strong epitaxial growth of Co grains on austenitic steel substrate grains was found, which did not depend on the laser beam scanning velocity. During laser cladding a strong temperature gradient exists just below the coating-substrate interface that promotes the formation of a Greninger-Troiano orientation relationship between martensitic plates and the original austenitic grain inside the heat affected zone: {l_brace}1 1 1{r_brace}{sub {gamma}} {approx} 1{sup o} to {l_brace}1 1 0{r_brace}{sub {alpha}} and <1-bar 21-bar >{sub {gamma}} {approx} 2{sup o} to <11-bar 0>{sub {alpha}}. Relatively drastic changes in grain size at the internal coating interfaces did not exhibit sharp changes in microhardness.

  8. Confocal reflectance quantitative phase microscopy system for cell biology studies (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijay Raj; So, Peter T. C.

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative phase microscopy (QPM), used to measure the refractive index, provides the optical path delay measurement at each point of the specimen under study and becomes an active field in biological science. In this work we present development of confocal reflection phase microscopy system to provide depth resolved quantitative phase information for investigation of intracellular structures and other biological specimen. The system hardware development is mainly divided into two major parts. First, creates a pinhole array for parallel confocal imaging of specimen at multiple locations simultaneously. Here a digital micro mirror device (DMD) is used to generate pinhole array by turning on a subset micro-mirrors arranged on a grid. Second is the detection of phase information of confocal imaging foci by using a common path interferometer. With this novel approach, it is possible to measure the nuclei membrane fluctuations and distinguish them from the plasma membrane fluctuations. Further, depth resolved quantitative phase can be correlated to the intracellular contents and 3D map of refractive index measurements.

  9. Transmission electron microscopy study of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 in apple tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janes, Marlene E; Kim, K S; Johnson, M G

    2005-02-01

    We investigated the ability of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 to spread in wounded apple tissue by transmission electron microscopy. Red Delicious apples were wounded with an artist knife (7 mm depth) and either inoculated with 10 microl per wound of decimally diluted E. coli O157:H7 or submerged into E. coli O157:H7 suspended in sterile distilled water and then stored at 37 degrees C for 24 h. Transmission electron microscopy showed E. coli O157:H7 formed bacterial aggregates near the apple cell walls, and single cells were in close proximity to the apple cell wall surfaces and to plasma membranes. E. coli O157:H7 presence caused degradation of plasma membranes and release of the cytoplasm contents of the apple cortical cells into the central vacuole. Apple tissue turgor pressure tests showed that the apple cells infected with E. coli O157:H7 isolates were more likely to rupture than the control noninoculated apple cells. E. coli O157:H7 cells grown in apple tissue showed the formation of granules and vesicles within the bacterial cytoplasma and separation of the plasma membranes. Our study shows that E. coli O157:H7 can grow and survive in the apple tissue environment by causing degradation of the apple cellular components.

  10. Aptamers provide superior stainings of cellular receptors studied under super-resolution microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höbartner, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Continuous improvements in imaging techniques are challenging biologists to search for more accurate methods to label cellular elements. This is particularly relevant for diffraction-unlimited fluorescence imaging, where the perceived resolution is affected by the size of the affinity probes. This is evident when antibodies, which are 10–15 nm in size, are used. Previously it has been suggested that RNA aptamers (~3 nm) can be used to detect cellular proteins under super-resolution imaging. However, a direct comparison between several aptamers and antibodies is needed, to clearly show the advantages and/or disadvantages of the different probes. Here we have conducted such a comparative study, by testing several aptamers and antibodies using stimulated emission depletion microscopy (STED). We have targeted three membrane receptors, EGFR, ErbB2 and Epha2, which are relevant to human health, and recycle between plasma membrane and intracellular organelles. Our results suggest that the aptamers can reveal more epitopes than most antibodies, thus providing a denser labeling of the stained structures. Moreover, this improves the overall quality of the information that can be extracted from the images. We conclude that aptamers could become useful fluorescent labeling tools for light microscopy and super-resolution imaging, and that their development for novel targets is imperative. PMID:28235049

  11. Correlated micro-photoluminescence and electron microscopy studies of the same individual heterostructured semiconductor nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todorovic, J; Van Helvoort, A T J [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NO-7491, Trondheim (Norway); Moses, A F; Karlberg, T; Olk, P; Dheeraj, D L; Fimland, B O; Weman, H, E-mail: a.helvoort@ntnu.no [Department of Electronics and Telecommunications, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NO-7491, Trondheim (Norway)

    2011-08-12

    To correlate optical properties to structural characteristics, we developed a robust strategy for characterizing the same individual heterostructured semiconductor nanowires (NWs) by alternating low temperature micro-photoluminescence ({mu}-PL), low voltage scanning (transmission) electron microscopy and conventional transmission electron microscopy. The NWs used in this work were wurtzite GaAs core with zinc blende GaAsSb axial insert and AlGaAs radial shell grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The series of experiments demonstrated that high energy (200 kV) electrons are detrimental for the optical properties, whereas medium energy (5-30 kV) electrons do not affect the PL response. Thus, such medium energy electrons can be used to select NWs for correlated optical-structural studies prior to {mu}-PL or in NW device processing. The correlation between the three main {mu}-PL bands and crystal phases of different compositions, present in this heterostructure, is demonstrated for selected NWs. The positions where a NW fractures during specimen preparation can considerably affect the PL spectra of the NW. The effects of crystal-phase variations and lattice defects on the optical properties are discussed. The established strategy can be applied to other nanosized electro-optical materials, and other characterization tools can be incorporated into this routine.

  12. Super-resolution photoacoustic microscopy using photonic nanojets: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upputuri, Paul Kumar; Wen, Zhuo-Bin; Wu, Zhe; Pramanik, Manojit

    2014-01-01

    Optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (ORPAM) is important for various biomedical applications, such as the study of cellular structures, microcirculation systems, and tumor angiogenesis. However, the lateral resolution of a conventional ORPAM is limited by optical diffraction. In this work, we report a simulation study to achieve subdiffraction-limited super-resolution in ORPAM using microspheres. Laser radiation is focused through a microsphere to generate a photonic nanojet, which provides the possibility to break the diffraction limit in ORPAM by reducing the size of the excitation volume. In our simulations using microspheres, we observed improvement in the lateral resolution up to compared to conventional ORPAM. The method is simple, cost effective, and can provide far-field resolution. This approach may provide new opportunities for many biomedical imaging applications that require finer resolution.

  13. Structural and dynamical aspects of skin studied by multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy-based methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Bagatolli, Luis

    2013-01-01

    This mini-review reports on applications of particular multiphoton excitation microscopy-based methodologies employed in our laboratory to study skin. These approaches allow in-depth optical sectioning of the tissue, providing spatially resolved information on specific fluorescence probes......' parameters. Specifically, by applying these methods, spatially resolved maps of water dipolar relaxation (generalized polarization function using the 6-lauroyl-2-(N,N-dimethylamino)naphthale probe), activity of protons (fluorescence lifetime imaging using a proton sensitive fluorescence probe--2,7-bis-(2...... excised skin, including applications of fluctuation correlation spectroscopy on transdermal penetration of liposomes are presented and discussed. The data from the different studies reported reveal the intrinsic heterogeneity of skin and also prove these strategies to be powerful noninvasive tools...

  14. Electromigration in integrated circuit interconnects studied by X-ray microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, G. E-mail: gschnei1@gwdg.de; Denbeaux, G.; Anderson, E.; Bates, W.; Salmassi, F.; Nachimuthu, P.; Pearson, A.; Richardson, D.; Hambach, D.; Hoffmann, N.; Hasse, W.; Hoffmann, K

    2003-01-01

    To study mass transport phenomena in advanced microelectronic devices with X-rays requires penetration of dielectric and Si layers up to 30 {mu}m thick. X-ray imaging at 1.8 keV photon energy provides a high amplitude contrast between Cu or Al interconnects and dielectric layers and can penetrate through the required thickness. To perform X-ray microscopy at 1.8 keV, a new Ru/Si multilayer was designed for the transmission X-ray microscope XM-1 installed at the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley. The mass flow in a passivated Cu interconnect was studied at current densities up to 10{sup 7} A/cm{sup 2}. In addition, we demonstrated the high material contrast from different elements in integrated circuits with a resolution of about 40 nm.

  15. Surface morphology study on CdZnTe crystals by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azoulay, M.; George, M.A.; Burger, A.; Collins, W.E.; Silberman, E. [Fisk Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

    1993-03-01

    The study of the crystal surface morphology of CdZnTe is important for the understanding of the fundamentals of crystal growth in order to improve the crystal quality which is essential in applications such as substrates for epitaxy or performance of devices, i.e., room temperature nuclear spectrometers. We present a first atomic force microscopy study on CdZnTe. Cleaved (110) surfaces were imaged in the ambient and an atomic layer step structure was revealed. The effects of thermal annealing on the atomic steps together with Te precipitation along these steps are discussed in terms of deformation due to stress relief and the diffusion of tellurium precipitates. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Compositional analysis of multi-element magnetic nanoparticles with a combined NMR and TEM approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellesch, Markus; Hammerath, Franziska; Süß, Vicky; Haft, Marcel; Hampel, Silke; Wurmehl, Sabine; Büchner, Bernd

    2017-09-01

    The increasing interest in nanoscale materials goes hand in hand with the challenge to reliably characterize the chemical compositions and structural features of nanosized objects in order to relate those to their physical properties. Despite efforts, the analysis of the chemical composition of individual multi-element nanoparticles remains challenging—from the technical point of view as well as from the point of view of measurement statistics. Here, we demonstrate that zero-field solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) complements local, single particle transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies with information on a large assembly of chemically complex nanoparticles. The combination of both experimental techniques gives information on the local composition and structure and provides an excellent measurement statistic through the corresponding NMR ensemble measurement. This analytical approach is applicable to many kinds of magnetic materials and therefore may prove very versatile in the future research of particulate magnetic nanomaterials.

  17. Gold-decorated highly ordered self-organized grating-like nanostructures on Ge surface: Kelvin probe force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam Mollick, Safiul; Kumar, Mohit; Singh, Ranveer; Satpati, Biswarup; Ghose, Debabrata; Som, Tapobrata

    2016-10-01

    Nanoarchitecture by atomic manipulation is considered to be one of the emerging trends in advanced functional materials. It has a gamut of applications to offer in nanoelectronics, chemical sensing, and nanobiological science. In particular, highly ordered one-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures fabricated by self-organization methods are in high demand for their high aspect ratios and large number of applications. An efficient way of fabricating semiconductor nanostructures is by molecular beam epitaxy, where atoms are added to a crystalline surface at an elevated temperature during growth, yielding the desired structures in a self-assembled manner. In this article, we offer a room temperature process, in which atoms are sputtered away by ion impacts. Using gold ion implantation, the present study reports on the formation of highly ordered self-organized long grating-like nanostructures, with grooves between them, on a germanium surface. The ridges of the patterns are shown to have flower-like protruding nanostructures, which are mostly decorated by gold atoms. By employing local probe microscopic techniques like Kelvin probe force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy, we observe a spatial variation in the work function and different nanoscale electrical conductivity on the ridges of the patterns and the grooves between them, which can be attributed to gold atom decorated ridges. Thus, the architecture presented offers the advantage of using the patterned germanium substrates as periodic arrays of conducting ridges and poorly conducting grooves between them.

  18. Cross Kelvin force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy studies of organic bulk heterojunction blends for local morphology and electrical behavior analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villeneuve-Faure, C., E-mail: Christina.villeneuve@laplace.unvi-tlse.fr [LAPLACE, Université Paul Sabatier, 118 Route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse (France); UPS, INPT, Université de Toulouse, LCC 31077 Toulouse (France); Le Borgne, D. [LAPLACE, Université Paul Sabatier, 118 Route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse (France); UPS, INPT, Université de Toulouse, LCC 31077 Toulouse (France); LCC-CNRS, 205 route de Narbonne, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Bedel-Pereira, E.; Séguy, I. [UPS, INPT, Université de Toulouse, LCC 31077 Toulouse (France); LAAS-CNRS, 7 Avenue du Colonel Roche, 31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Moineau Chane-Ching, K. I.; Hernandez-Maldonado, D. [UPS, INPT, Université de Toulouse, LCC 31077 Toulouse (France); LCC-CNRS, 205 route de Narbonne, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

    2015-02-07

    Bulk Heterojunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaic devices performances depend on the relative organization and physical properties of the electron-donor and -acceptor materials. In this paper, BHJs of poly(3-hexyl-thiophene) (P3HT) associated with an electron acceptor material, 1-(3-methoxycarbonyl)-propyl-1-phenyl[6,6]C6 (PCBM) or [Ni(4dodpedt){sub 2}], are studied in terms of morphology, ordering, and electrical properties. First, comparison between the two BHJs performed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Raman characterizations shows that P3HT structuration is improved by blending with [Ni(4dodpedt){sub 2}]. Then, the relationship between charges trapping, electrical properties, and film morphology is investigated using conductive AFM and Kelvin Force Microscopy. Measurements in dark condition and under solar cell simulator provide complementary information on electrical phenomena in these organic nanostructures. Finally, time dependent measurement highlights the influence of charges stacking on conduction. Specifically, we demonstrate that charge accumulation initiated by illumination remains valid after switching off the light, and induces the modification in current versus voltage characteristic of P3HT: PCBM blend. Finally, we observe a current increasing which can be attributed to the energy barrier decreasing due to charges trapping in PCBM.

  19. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy evaluation of efficacy of scaling and root planing using magnification: A randomized controlled clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjana Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: A randomized controlled clinical study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of scaling and root planing (SRP by using Magnifying Loupes (ML and dental operating microscope (DOM. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 human teeth scheduled for extraction from 18 patients aged between 25 and 65 years suffering from generalized chronic severe periodontitis were randomly assigned to three treatment groups. Group 1 consisted SRP performed without using magnification (unaided, Group 2-SRP with ML and Group 3-SRP with DOM. Following extractions, samples were prepared for (i evaluation of surface topography by atomic force microscopy, (ii presence of smear layer, debris by scanning electron microscopy (iii elemental analysis by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Data was subjected to statistical analysis using analysis of variance, post-hoc (Tukey-HSD and Chi-square test. Results: Statistically significant (P < 0.001 difference was found among the different treatment groups. Group 3 was the best while Group 1 was the least effective technique for SRP. Order of efficacy in terms of the surface was found to be - Palatal < Lingual < Distal ≅ Mesial < Buccal. Efficiency in mandibular to maxillary teeth was found to be significant (P < 0.05, also anterior to posterior teeth (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Magnification tools significantly enhance the efficacy of supragingival and subgingival SRP.

  20. Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Michael

    1980-01-01

    Reviews technical aspects of structure determination in biological electron microscopy (EM). Discusses low dose EM, low temperature microscopy, electron energy loss spectra, determination of mass or molecular weight, and EM of labeled systems. Cites 34 references. (CS)

  1. Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Michael

    1980-01-01

    Reviews technical aspects of structure determination in biological electron microscopy (EM). Discusses low dose EM, low temperature microscopy, electron energy loss spectra, determination of mass or molecular weight, and EM of labeled systems. Cites 34 references. (CS)

  2. Solubilization of oils or addition of monoglycerides drives the formation of wormlike micelles with an elliptical cross-section in cholesterol-based surfactants: a study by rheology, SANS, and cryo-TEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Hala; Karlsson, Göran; Heenan, Richard K; Dreiss, Cécile A

    2011-06-21

    We report the formation of wormlike micelles (WLM) in poly(oxyethylene) cholesteryl ether (ChEO(10)) aqueous solutions by the addition of lipophilic monoglycerides at room temperature (monolaurin (ML), monocaprin (MC), and monocaprylin (MCL)) bearing 12-, 10-, and 8-carbon alkyl chains, respectively. A combination of rheology, small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), and cryo-TEM was used to study their viscoelastic properties and structure. With the successive addition of cosurfactant, a significant increase in viscosity and a clear solidlike behavior is obtained, suggesting the formation of a viscoelastic network of wormlike micelles. Only for MCL is typical Maxwellian behavior obtained. The onset of micellar growth, as detected by the occurrence of solidlike behavior and a significant increase in viscosity, is obtained for 0.30 (1 wt%), 0.34 (1 wt%), and 0.60 (1.5 wt%) cosurfactant/ChEO(10) molar ratios with ML, MC, and MCL, respectively. With ML and MC, extremely long relaxation times (exceeding 20 s) compared to those of MCL are obtained, and zero-shear viscosity values are more than 1 order of magnitude higher than with MCL. These results show that cosurfactants with longer alkyl chain lengths (ML and MC) induce the formation of longer wormlike micelles and do so at lower concentrations. SANS measurements on dilute solutions confirm that the viscoelastic behavior correlates with an increase in contour length and reveals an elliptical cross-section with an axial ratio of around 2. Cryo-TEM images provide visual evidence of the wormlike micelles and confirm the elliptical shape of the cross-section. The addition of small amounts of aliphatic oils (ethyl butyrate, EB, and ethyl caprylate, EC) and cyclic oils (peppermint, PP, and tea tree, TT, oils) to ChEO(10) solutions induces wormlike micelle formation at a lower cosurfactant concentration or even in its absence (for PP, TT, and EC) because of their probable localization in the palisade layer. The viscosity peak

  3. Local elasticity and adhesion of nanostructures on Drosophila melanogaster wing membrane studied using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Ryan, E-mail: rbwagner@purdue.edu [School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette (United States); Brick Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette (United States); Pittendrigh, Barry R. [Department of Entomology, University of Illinois, Champaign (United States); Raman, Arvind, E-mail: raman@purdue.edu [School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette (United States); Brick Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied the wing membrane of Drosophila melanogaster with atomic force microscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report the structure, elasticity, and adhesion on the wing membrane in air and nitrogen environments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results provide insight into the nature of the wing membrane enabling the development of biomimetic surface and micro air vehicles. - Abstract: Insect wings have a naturally occurring, complex, functional, hierarchical microstructure and nanostructure, which enable a remarkably water-resistant and self-cleaning surface. Insect wings are used as a basis for engineering biomimetic materials; however, the material properties of these nanostructures such as local elastic modulus and adhesion are poorly understood. We studied the wings of the Canton-S strain of Drosophila melanogaster (hereafter referred to as Drosophila) with atomic force microscopy (AFM) to quantify the local material properties of Drosophila wing surface nanostructures. The wings are found to have a hierarchical structure of 10-20 {mu}m long, 0.5-1 {mu}m diameter hair, and at a much smaller scale, 100 nm diameter and 30-60 nm high bumps. The local properties of these nanoscale bumps were studied under ambient and dry conditions with force-volume AFM. The wing membrane was found to have a elastic modulus on the order of 1000 MPa and the work of adhesion between the probe and wing membrane surface was found to be on the order of 100 mJ/m{sup 2}, these properties are the same order of magnitude as common thermoplastic polymers such as polyethylene. The difference in work of adhesion between the nanoscale bump and membrane does not change significantly between ambient (relative humidity of 30%) or dry conditions. This suggests that the nanoscale bumps and the surrounding membrane are chemically similar and only work to increase hydrophobicity though surface roughening or the geometric lotus effect.

  4. The development and advantages of helium ion microscopy for the study of block copolymer nanopatterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Alan P.; Senthamaraikannan, Ramsankar; Ghoshal, Tandra; Chaudhari, Atul; Leeson, Michael; Morris, Mick A.

    2015-03-01

    Helium ion microscopy (HIM) has been used to study nanopatterns formed in block copolymer (BCP) thin films. Owing to its' small spot size, minimal forward scattering of the incident ion and reduced velocity compared to electrons of comparable energy, HIM has considerable advantages and provides pattern information and resolution not attainable with other commercial microscopic techniques. In order to realize the full potential of BCP nanolithography in producing high density ultra-small features, the dimensions and geometry of these BCP materials will need to be accurately characterized through pattern formation, development and pattern transfer processes. The preferred BCP pattern inspection techniques (to date) are principally atomic force microscopy (AFM) and secondary electron microscopy (SEM) but suffer disadvantages in poor lateral resolution (AFM) and the ability to discriminate individual polymer domains (SEM). SEM suffers from reduced resolution when a more surface sensitive low accelerating voltage is used and low surface signal when a high accelerating voltage is used. In addition to these drawbacks, SEM can require the use of a conductive coating on these insulating materials and this reduces surface detail as well as increasing the dimensions of coated features. AFM is limited by the dimensions of the probe tip and a skewing of lateral dimension results. This can be eliminated through basic geometry for large sparse features, but when dense small features need to be characterized AFM lacks reliability. With this in mind, BCP inspection by HIM can offer greater insight into block ordering, critical dimensions and, critically, line edge roughness (LER) a critical parameter whose measurement is well suited to HIM because of its' enhanced edge contrast. In this work we demonstrate the resolution capabilities of HIM using various BCP systems (lamellar and cylinder structures). Imaging of BCP patterns of low molecular weight (MW)/low feature size which

  5. [Studies on Effect of Alkali Pretreatment on Anaerobic Digestion of Rice Straw with Confocal Raman Microscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yi-hua; Luo, Liu-bin; Li, Xiao-li; He, Yong; Sheng, Kui-chuan

    2015-03-01

    NaOH pretreatment is a convenient and effective method which is widely used in rice straw anaerobic digestion. But the mechanism of the alkaline (NaOH) hydrolysis of biopolymers compositions and polymeric cross-linked network structures of rice straw cell wall need further study. This paper firstly studied the effect and mechanism of alkali pretreatment on anaerobic digestion and biogas production of rice straw by using a combination of confocal Raman microscopy and transmission electron microscope. First, the original rice straw and the rice straw pretreated by NaOH were taken for mapping scanning by confocal Raman microscopy with micron-scale spatial resolution. Then principal component analysis was adopted to extract main information of Raman spectra, it could be found that the two types of samples were respectively presented with ray-like distribution in the first two principal component space, which were with cumulative contribution of 99%. And there was a clear boundary between the two types of samples without any overlapping, indicating that there was a significant difference of Raman spectral characteristic between original rice leaf and rice leaf pretreated by NaOH. Further analysis of the loading weights of the first two principal components showed that the Raman peaks at 1 739, 1 508 and 1 094 cm(-1) were the important bands, and these three Raman peaks were attributed to the scattering of hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin respectively. Following, chemical imaging analysis of hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin were achieved by combining these Raman peaks and microscopic image information. It could be found that the NaOH pretreatment resulted in a loss of dense spatial uniformity structure of tissue and great decreases of the contents of these three ingredients, particularly lignin. It can be concluded that it is feasible to non-destructively measure hemicellulose, lignin and cellulose in rice straw tissue by confocal Raman microscopy, and to achieve

  6. Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy (ETEM) Studies of Single Iron Nanoparticle Carburization in Synthesis Gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xi; Zhang, Chenghua; Li, Yongwang

    2017-01-01

    Structuralevolution of iron nanoparticles involving the formationand growth of iron carbide nuclei in the iron nanoparticle was directlyvisualized at the atomic level, using environmental transmission electronmicroscopy (TEM) under reactive conditions mimicking Fischer–Tropschsynthesis. Formation...... and electronenergy-loss spectra provides a detailed picture from initial activationto final degradation of iron under synthesis gas....

  7. Macroscopic Ensembles of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes in Bubble Imprints Studied by Polarized Raman Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shota Ushiba

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the alignment of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs in bubble imprints through polarized Raman microscopy. A hemispherical bubble containing SWCNTs is pressed against a glass substrate, resulting in an imprint of the bubble membrane with a coffee ring on the substrate. We find that macroscopic ensembles of aligned SWCNTs are obtained in the imprints, in which there are three patterns of orientations: (i azimuthal alignment on the coffee ring, (ii radial alignment at the edge of the membrane, and (iii random orientation at the center of the membrane. We also find that the alignment of SWCNTs in the imprints can be manipulated by spinning bubbles. The orientation of SWCNTs on the coffee ring is directed radially, which is orthogonal to the case of unspun bubbles. This approach enables one to align SWCNTs in large quantities and in a short time, potentially opening up a wide range of CNT-based electronic and optical applications.

  8. Devolatilization Studies of Oil Palm Biomass for Torrefaction Process through Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, D.; Abd. Rahman, A.; Shamsuddin, A. H.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, palm oil biomass consisting of empty fruit bunch (EFB), mesocarp fibre and palm kernel shell (PKS) were chosen as raw material for torrefaction process. Torrefaction process was conducted at various temperatures of 240 °C, 270 °C and 300 °C with a residence time of 60 minutes. The morphology of the raw and torrefied biomass was then observed through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images. Also, through this experiment the correlation between the torrefaction temperatures with the volatile gases released were studied. From the observation, the morphology structure of the biomass exhibited inter-particle gaps due to the release of volatile gases and it is obviously seen more at higher temperatures. Moreover, the change of the biomass structure is influenced by the alteration of the lignocellulose biomass.

  9. RSC remodeling of oligo-nucleosomes: an atomic force microscopy study

    CERN Document Server

    Montel, Fabien; Menoni, Hervé; Angelov, Dimitar; Dimitrov, Stéfan; Faivre-Moskalenko, Cendrine

    2010-01-01

    RSC is an essential chromatin remodeling factor that is required for the control of several processes including transcription, repair and replication. The ability of RSC to relocate centrally positioned mononucleosomes at the end of nucleosomal DNA is firmly established, but the data on RSC action on oligo-nucleosomal templates remains still scarce. By using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging, we have quantitatively studied the RSC- induced mobilization of positioned di- and trinucleosomes as well as the directionality of mobilization on mononucleosomal template labeled at one end with streptavidin. AFM imaging showed only a limited set of distinct configurational states for the remodeling products. No stepwise or preferred directionality of the nucleosome motion was observed. Analysis of the corresponding reaction pathways allows deciphering the mechanistic features of RSC-induced nucleosome relocation. The final outcome of RSC remodeling of oligosome templates is the packing of the nucleosomes at the edg...

  10. Fossilization in Geopark Araripe studied through X-ray diffraction, scanning microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Lima, Ricardo J C; Macedo, Zélia S; Sasaki, José M; Saraiva, Antônio A F

    2008-01-01

    The Geopark Araripe, located in Northeastern Brazil, is the first UNESCO Natural Park in the South hemisphere and a world-famous fossil deposit of the Early Cretaceous period (approximately 120 million years). Fossilized fish fauna in Geopark Araripe is found inside of sedimentary rocks in three-dimensional forms. In the present study sedimentary rocks and fossil fish Rhacolepis bucalis have been carefully analysed by means of X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and termogravimetric analysis. Mineralogical composition of the fossil fish was explained in terms of facts occurred at the initial stages of the opening of the South Atlantic and the oceanic hydrothermal phenomena (``black smoker'', ``white smoker'' and warm-water events). The occurrence of organic substance was, for the first time, evaluated in collapsed internal elements (intestinal and muscles) by termogravimetric analysis.

  11. In situ high temperature microscopy study of the surface oxidation and phase transformations in titanium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinov, S; Sha, W; Voon, C S

    2002-09-01

    Two popular commercial titanium alloys, Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-0.08Si, were used for in situ high temperature microscopy study. The experiments were performed on an optical microscope equipped with high temperature stage using both normal and florescence lights. Two kinds of experiments were performed, at continuous heating/cooling with different rates and in isothermal conditions at different temperatures. The changes taking place on the sample surface during the experiments were monitored. The morphology of the alpha ==> beta ==> alpha phase transformation was recorded at different heat treatment conditions using the effect of thermal etching. An effect of sample surface oxidation and deoxidation was observed during continuous heating. The appearance and disappearance of ordered titanium oxides Ti3O and Ti2O are discussed based on the phase equilibrium diagram. The kinetics of the surface oxidation was monitored in both isothermal and continuous cooling conditions.

  12. Surface kinetic roughening caused by dental erosion: An atomic force microscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartarone, Eliana; Mustarelli, Piercarlo; Poggio, Claudio; Lombardini, Marco

    2008-05-01

    Surface kinetic roughening takes place both in case of growth and erosion processes. Teeth surfaces are eroded by contact with acid drinks, such as those used to supplement mineral salts during sporting activities. Calcium-phosphate based (CPP-ACP) pastes are known to reduce the erosion process, and to favour the enamel remineralization. In this study we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the surface roughening during dental erosion, and the mechanisms at the basis of the protection role exerted by a commercial CPP-ACP paste. We found a statistically significant difference (proughness of surfaces exposed and not exposed to the acid solutions. The treatment with the CPP-ACP paste determined a statistically significant reduction of the roughness values. By interpreting the AFM results in terms of fractal scaling concepts and continuum stochastic equations, we showed that the protection mechanism of the paste depends on the chemical properties of the acid solution.

  13. Advanced fluorescence microscopy methods for the real-time study of transcription and chromatin dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annibale, Paolo; Gratton, Enrico

    2014-03-12

    In this contribution we provide an overview of the recent advances allowed by the use of fluorescence microscopy methods in the study of transcriptional processes and their interplay with the chromatin architecture in living cells. Although the use of fluorophores to label nucleic acids dates back at least to about half a century ago, (1) two recent breakthroughs have effectively opened the way to use fluorescence routinely for specific and quantitative probing of chromatin organization and transcriptional activity in living cells: namely, the possibility of labeling first the chromatin loci and then the mRNA synthesized from a gene using fluorescent proteins. In this contribution we focus on methods that can probe rapid dynamic processes by analyzing fast fluorescence fluctuations.

  14. Interaction of light and surface plasmon polaritons in Ag islands studied by nonlinear photoemission microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckanie, N M; Kirschbaum, P; Sindermann, S; Meyer zu Heringdorf, F-J

    2013-07-01

    Two photon photoemission microscopy was used to study the interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with Ag islands prepared using different strategies on Si(111) and SiO₂. The femtosecond laser pulses initiate surface plasmon polariton (SPP) waves at the edges of the island. The superposition of the electrical fields of the femtosecond laser pulses with the electrical fields of the SPP results in a moiré pattern that is comparable despite the rather different methods of preparation and that gives access to the wavelength and direction of the SPP waves. If the SPPs reach edges of the Ag islands, they can be converted back into light waves. The incident and refracted light waves result in an interference pattern that can again be described with a moiré pattern, demonstrating that Ag islands can be used as plasmonic beam deflectors for light.

  15. [Study of an oral protozoan Trichomonas tenax using scanning and transmission electron microscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribaux, C L

    1979-06-01

    The study with scanning and transmission electron microscopy of Trichomonas tenax gave morphological information on this protozoon. The oval-shaped cell body showed at the anterior pole four free flagella and a trailing flagellum which had an undulating membrane. The axostyle which consisted of microtubules and produced the cellular rigidity emerged at the posterior pole. An ovoid nucleus and a well-developed Golgi apparatus were located at the anterior pole. At the latter, a pelta consisting of horizontal microtubulus surrounding the kinetoplats from which started the flagella was also found. No mitochondria were observed: they were replaced by chromatin granules or hydrogenosomes. Numerous vacuoles and developing vesicles were found in the cytoplasm. Phagocytized bacteria were in an advanced stage of lysis. Others seemed intact showing even division phases.

  16. Atomic force microscopy study of anion intercalation into highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alliata, D.; Haering, P.; Haas, O.; Koetz, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Siegenthaler, H. [University of Berne (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    In the context of ion transfer batteries, we studied highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) in perchloric acid, as a model to elucidate the mechanism of electrochemical intercalation in graphite. Aim of the work is the local and time dependent investigation of dimensional changes of the host material during electrochemical intercalation processes on the nanometer scale. We used atomic force microscopy (AFM), combined with cyclic voltammetry, as in-situ tool of analysis during intercalation and expulsion of perchloric anions into the HOPG electrodes. According to the AFM measurements, the HOPG interlayer spacing increases by 32% when perchloric anions intercalate, in agreement with the formation of stage IV of graphite intercalation compounds. (author) 3 figs., 3 refs.

  17. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of niobium carbide (100) and (110) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsong, R. M.; Schmid, M.; Nagl, C.; Varga, P.; Davis, R. F.; Tsong, I. S. T.

    1996-10-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies were conducted on the surfaces of NbC 0.75(100) and NbC 0.865(110) single crystals after in situ cleaning treatments of sputtering and annealing cycles. STM images show atom-resolved structures of both surfaces. On NbC 0.75(100), localized areas of a square (1 × 1) structure were observed, together with regions of hexagonal structure, indicative of a coexisting surface phase, possibly that of Nb 4C 3- x. On the NbC 0.865(110) surface, a ridge-and-valley grating structure consisting of both (4 × 1) and (5 × 1) geometries was observed over large areas. The nanometer-scale faceting phenomenon may be common to the (110) surfaces of most transition-metal carbides.

  18. Characterization of the polycaprolactone melt crystallization: complementary optical microscopy, DSC, and AFM studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speranza, V; Sorrentino, A; De Santis, F; Pantani, R

    2014-01-01

    The first stages of the crystallization of polycaprolactone (PCL) were studied using several techniques. The crystallization exotherms measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were analyzed and compared with results obtained by polarized optical microscopy (POM), rheology, and atomic force microscope (AFM). The experimental results suggest a strong influence of the observation scale. In particular, the AFM, even if limited on time scale, appears to be the most sensitive technique to detect the first stages of crystallization. On the contrary, at least in the case analysed in this work, rheology appears to be the least sensitive technique. DSC and POM provide closer results. This suggests that the definition of induction time in the polymer crystallization is a vague concept that, in any case, requires the definition of the technique used for its characterization.

  19. Adsorption of L-Alanine on Cu(111) Studied by Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Si-Ping; L(U) Chao; ZHAO Ru-Guang

    2006-01-01

    The adsorption of L-alanine on Cu(111)surface is studied by means of scanning tunnelling microscopy under ultra-high Vacuum conditions.The results show that the adsorbates are chemisorbed on the surface,and can form a two-dimensional gas phase,chain phase and solid phase,depending on deposition rate and amount.The adsorbed molecules can be imaged as individual protrusions and parallel chains in gas and chain phases respectively.It is also found that alanine can form(2×2)superstructure on Cu(111)and copper step facet to directions in solid phase.On the basis of our scanning tunnelling microscopic images,a model js proposed for the Cu(111)(2×2)-alanine superstructure.In the model,we point out the close link between -direction hydrogen bond chains with the same direction copper step faceting.

  20. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of thin foil x-ray mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Besenbacher, Flemming; Garnaes, Jorgen;

    1990-01-01

    In this paper scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements of x-ray mirrors are presented. The x-ray mirrors are 0.3 mm thick dip-lacquered aluminum foils coated with gold by evaporation, as well as state-of-the-art polished surfaces coated with gold, platinum, or iridium. The measurements....... The results can be used as a guide when selecting the best coating process in the production of x-ray mirrors....... that the microroughness depends on the thickness of the gold layer. The roughness is smallest (~7 to 9 Å) for gold layers between ~100 and ~250Å, and it becomes significantly greater (~10 to 15Å) for gold layers thicker than ~350 Å. With a few exceptions the STM measurements agree well with recent x-ray studies...

  1. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of organic monolayers adsorbed on the rhodium(111) crystal surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cernota, Paul D.

    1999-08-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy studies were carried out on ordered overlayers on the (111) surface of rhodium. These adsorbates include carbon monoxide (CO), cyclohexane, cyclohexene, 1,4-cyclohexadiene, para-xylene, and meta-xylene. Coadsorbate systems included: CO with ethylidyne, CO with para- and meta-xylene, and para-xylene with meta-xylene. In the case of CO, the structure of the low coverage (2x2) overlayer has been observed. The symmetry of the unit cell in this layer suggests that the CO is adsorbed in the 3-fold hollow sites. There were also two higher coverage surface structures with ({radical}7x{radical}7) unit cells. One of these is composed of trimers of CO and has three CO molecules in each unit cell. The other structure has an additional CO molecule, making a total of four. This extra CO sits on a top site.

  2. Difference of operation mechanisms in SWNTs network FETs studied via scanning gate microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Xiaojun; Matsunaga, Masahiro; Yahagi, Tatsurou; Maeda, Kenji; Ochiai, Yuichi; Aoki, Nobuyuki [Graduate School of Advanced Integration Science, Chiba University, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Bird, Jonathan P. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University at Buffalo, the State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14260-1920 (United States); Ishibashi, Koji [Advanced Device Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2013-12-04

    Field effect transistors (FETs) whose channel is composed of a network of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been studied to investigate the mechanism of the device operation via scanning gate microscopy (SGM) at room temperature. We observed different SGM response in networks of SWNTs either synthesized by CoMoCAT process or semiconducting enriched by density gradient ultracentrifuge process. In the former case, SGM response was observed at specific inter-tube junctions suggesting a Schottky junction formed with semiconducting and metallic SWNTs in the network. In contrast, multiple concentric rings in the SGM response are observed within the tubes in a network of the latter SWNTs suggesting a possibility of quantum mechanical transport at room-temperature. Different type of SGM responses are confirmed in the two kinds of SWNTs networks, nevertheless such active positions would likely have an important role in the FET operation mechanism in each network.

  3. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of organic monolayers adsorbed on the rhodium(111) crystal surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cernota, Paul Davis [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-08-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy studies were carried out on ordered overlayers on the (111) surface of rhodium. These adsorbates include carbon monoxide (CO), cyclohexane, cyclohexene, 1,4-cyclohexadiene, para-xylene, and meta-xylene. Coadsorbate systems included: CO with ethylidyne, CO with para- and meta-xylene, and para-xylene with meta-xylene. In the case of CO, the structure of the low coverage (2x2) overlayer has been observed. The symmetry of the unit cell in this layer suggests that the CO is adsorbed in the 3-fold hollow sites. There were also two higher coverage surface structures with (√7x√7) unit cells. One of these is composed of trimers of CO and has three CO molecules in each unit cell. The other structure has an additional CO molecule, making a total of four. This extra CO sits on a top site.

  4. Nanogoniometry with scanning force microscopy: a model study of CdTe thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Lidón, Elisa; Guanter, Luis; Zúñiga-Pérez, Jesús; Muñoz-Sanjosé, Vicente; Colchero, Jaime

    2007-03-01

    In this paper scanning force microscopy is combined with simple but powerful data processing to determine quantitatively, on a sub-micrometer scale, the orientation of surface facets present on crystalline materials. A high-quality scanning force topography image is used to determine an angular histogram of the surface normal at each image point. In addition to the known method for the assignment of Miller indices to the facets appearing on the surface, a quantitative analysis is presented that allows the characterization of the relative population and morphological quality of each of these facets. Two different CdTe thin films are used as model systems to probe the capabilities of this method, which enables further information to be obtained about the thermodynamic stability of particular crystallographic facets. The method, which is referred to as nanogoniometry, will be a powerful tool to study in detail the surface of crystalline materials, particularly thin films, with sub-micrometer resolution.

  5. SiO{sub 2}-supported Pt particles studied by electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, D.; Penner, S.; Su, D.S.; Rupprechter, G.; Hayek, K.; Schloegl, R

    2003-08-28

    Regularly grown Pt particles supported by amorphous SiO{sub 2} were heated in hydrogen at 873 K after an oxidising treatment. The morphological and structural changes were studied by electron microscopy. Platinum silicides Pt{sub 3}Si with L1{sub 2} (Cu{sub 3}Au) structure, monoclinic Pt{sub 3}Si and tetragonal Pt{sub 12}Si{sub 5} were identified after the treatment. The mechanisms of coalescence of the particles and the formation of irregular large particles are suggested. A topotactic structural transformation accompanied with the migration of Si from the substrate to the particles are suggested to take place during Pt{sub 3}Si formation.

  6. PTCDA growth on Ge(111)-c(2\\times 8) surfaces: a scanning tunneling microscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Galera, A. J.; Wei, Z.; Nicoara, N.; Brihuega, I.; Gómez-Rodríguez, J. M.

    2017-03-01

    The initial stages of growth of PTCDA (3,4,9,10 perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride) at room temperature (RT) on Ge(111)-c(2× 8) surfaces have been studied by means of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. The results show that PTCDA molecules have a high mobility at RT on the well ordered areas of the semiconductor substrate, since nucleation is only observed in domain walls, steps and surface defects. However, no molecular ordering has been detected at submonolayer coverage. For higher coverages, the formation of three-dimensional (3D) molecular islands has been observed. These 3D islands present a crystalline nature as demostrated by molecularly resolved STM images. According to these STM measurements, PTCDA molecules are ordered in a herringbone structure, similar to the one observed in PTCDA bulk crystals. Moreover, the 3D crystallites are grown on top of a disordered molecular layer, which acts as a passivating layer.

  7. Electron Correlation Microscopy: A New Technique for Studying Local Atom Dynamics Applied to a Supercooled Liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Li; Zhang, Pei; Besser, Matthew F; Kramer, Matthew Joseph; Voyles, Paul M

    2015-08-01

    Electron correlation microscopy (ECM) is a new technique that utilizes time-resolved coherent electron nanodiffraction to study dynamic atomic rearrangements in materials. It is the electron scattering equivalent of photon correlation spectroscopy with the added advantage of nanometer-scale spatial resolution. We have applied ECM to a Pd40Ni40P20 metallic glass, heated inside a scanning transmission electron microscope into a supercooled liquid to measure the structural relaxation time τ between the glass transition temperature T g and the crystallization temperature, T x . τ determined from the mean diffraction intensity autocorrelation function g 2(t) decreases with temperature following an Arrhenius relationship between T g and T g +25 K, and then increases as temperature approaches T x . The distribution of τ determined from the g 2(t) of single speckles is broad and changes significantly with temperature.

  8. Boundary slip study on hydrophilic, hydrophobic, and superhydrophobic surfaces with dynamic atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhushan, Bharat; Wang, Yuliang; Maali, Abdelhamid

    2009-07-21

    Slip length has been measured using the dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) method. Unlike the contact AFM method, the sample surface approaches an oscillating sphere with a very low velocity in the dynamic AFM method. During this process, the amplitude and phase shift data are recorded to calculate the hydrodynamic damping coefficient, which is then used to obtain slip length. In this study, a glass sphere with a large radius was glued to the end of an AFM cantilever to measure the slip length on rough surfaces. Experimental results for hydrophilic, hydrophobic, and superhydrophobic surfaces show that the hydrodynamic damping coefficient decreases from the hydrophilic surface to the hydrophobic surface and from the hydrophobic one to the superhydrophobic one. The slip lengths obtained on the hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces are 43 and 236 nm, respectively, which indicates increasing boundary slip from the hydrophobic surface to the superhydrophobic one.

  9. Effects of acetylcysteine on rabbit conjunctival and corneal surfaces. A scanning electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thermes, F; Molon-Noblot, S; Grove, J

    1991-10-01

    Conjunctival and corneal epithelial surfaces of normal rabbit eyes with their associated mucus were studied by scanning electron microscopy before and after treatment with the mucolytic agent N-acetylcysteine (AC). Four groups received topically one 50-microliters drop of either (Group A) 0.1 MAC, (Group B) 0.1 M AC every 5 min for 1 hr, (Group C) 0.1 M AC every 5 min for 2 hr, or (Group D) three drops of 20% AC over 15 min. The effects of the instillation of AC on mucus removal and cellular lesions increased in the order (A) less than (B) less than (C) less than (D). Treatment A had no effect on cornea and conjunctiva. Treatment B cleaned away mucosal debris without alteration of either conjunctival or corneal epithelium. Treatment C had a similar effect on the mucus but was associated with focal necrosis, and treatment D produced widespread necrosis, desquamation of epithelial cells, and inflammation.

  10. Edge-melting: nanoscale key-mechanism to explain nanoparticle formation from heated TEM grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesaria, Maura, E-mail: maura.cesaria@le.infn.it [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Taurino, Antonietta; Catalano, Massimo [Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems, IMM-CNR, Via Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Caricato, Anna Paola; Martino, Maurizio [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2016-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Nanoparticle formation from metal grids explained by edge melting as key mechanism. • The inconsistency of bulk phenomenology invoking the vapor pressure is discussed. • Surface-melting and size-dependent evaporation are questioned as unsatisfactory. • Edge-melting: edges, corners, facets invoked as highly thermally unstable surfaces. • The polycrystalline nature of the really occurring metal grids is accounted for. - Abstract: In this study, we examine at both experimental and fundamental levels, the experimental evidence of nanoparticle formation in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) metal grids annealed at temperatures lower than the melting point of the corresponding metal bulk material. Our experimental investigation considers the most thermally unstable TEM grids (i.e. Cu-grids) and inspects the possible sources and mechanisms of contamination of thin films, conventionally deposited on carbon-coated Cu-grids. The investigations are supported by morphological–compositional analyses performed in different regions of the TEM sample. Then, a general model is formulated and discussed in order to explain the grid thermal instability, based on the critical role of edge-melting (i.e. melting initiated at edges and corners of the grid bars), the enhanced rate of evaporation from a liquid surface and the polycristallinity of the grid bars. Hence, we totally disregard conventional arguments such as bulk evaporation and metal vapor pressure and, in order to emphasize and clarify the alternative point of view of our model, we also overview the nano-scale melting phenomenology relevant to our discussion and survey the discrepancies reported in the literature.

  11. Lipid asymmetry in DLPC/DSPC supported lipid bilayers, a combined AFM and fluorescence microscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, W; Blanchette, C D; Ratto, T V; Longo, M L

    2005-06-20

    A fundamental attribute of cell membranes is transmembrane asymmetry, specifically the formation of ordered phase domains in one leaflet that are compositionally different from the opposing leaflet of the bilayer. Using model membrane systems, many previous studies have demonstrated the formation of ordered phase domains that display complete transmembrane symmetry but there have been few reports on the more biologically relevant asymmetric membrane structures. Here we report on a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence microscopy study whereby we observe three different states of transmembrane symmetry in phase-separated supported bilayers formed by vesicle fusion. We find that if the leaflets differ in gel-phase area fraction, then the smaller domains in one leaflet are in registry with the larger domains in the other leaflet and the system is dynamic. In a presumed lipid flip-flop process similar to Ostwald Ripening, the smaller domains in one leaflet erode away while the large domains in the other leaflet grow until complete compositional asymmetry is reached and remains stable. We have quantified this evolution and determined that the lipid flip-flop event happens most frequently at the interface between symmetric and asymmetric DSPC domains. If both leaflets have nearly identical area fraction of gel-phase, gel-phase domains are in registry and are static in comparison to the first state. The stability of these three DSPC domain distributions, the degree of registry observed, and the domain immobility have direct biological significance with regards to maintenance of lipid asymmetry in living cell membranes, communication between inner leaflet and outer leaflet, membrane adhesion, and raft mobility.

  12. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF RDTS v/s MICROSCOPY FOR THE DIAGNOSIS OF MALARIA IN CHILDREN

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    Rajesh Kumar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Malaria presents a diagnostic challenge in most tropical countries. Rapid detection of the malaria parasite and early treatment of infection still remain the most important goals of disease management. Therefore, performance characteristics of the indigenous RDTs was determined among children with suspected malaria fever attending pediatrics OPD or admitted in indoor of UP RIMS n R Saifai central India, to assess whether this rapid diagnostic test (RDT could be used for diagnosis of malaria and results were compared with Gold Standard microscopy test. We also assessed the logical utilization of RDTs to monitor treatment outcome. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 03 months to 12 years old children who were presented with acute fever without any focus to the OPD or IPD of our department from May 2011 to April 2013 were selected for the study. A finger prick blood sample was collected from each clinically suspected case of malaria to prepare blood smear and for testing with the RDT after taking informed consent. The blood smears were read by an experienced microscopist blinded to the RDT results and clinical status of the subjects. The figures for specificity, sensitivity, accuracy and predictive values were calculated using microscopy as gold standard. RESULTS: Analysis revealed that overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the RDT were approx. 90%, while RDT is useful to confirm the diagnosis of new symptomatic cases of suspected malaria infection, the persistence of parasite antigen leading to false positives even after clearance of asexual Parasitaemia has limited its utility as a prognostic tool. The study showed that RDTs was easy to use, reliable and cheap for diagnosing new malaria cases, and is an appropriate test for the use in the fields and remote areas.

  13. Confocal microscopy and electrophysiological study of single patient corneal endothelium cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatini, Francesca; Rossi, Francesca; Coppi, Elisabetta; Magni, Giada; Fusco, Irene; Menabuoni, Luca; Pedata, Felicita; Pugliese, Anna Maria; Pini, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The characterization of the ion channels in corneal endothelial cells and the elucidation of their involvement in corneal pathologies would lead to the identification of new molecular target for pharmacological treatments and to the clarification of corneal physiology. The corneal endothelium is an amitotic cell monolayer with a major role in preserving corneal transparency and in regulating the water and solute flux across the posterior surface of the cornea. Although endothelial cells are non-excitable, they express a range of ion channels, such as voltage-dependent Na+ channels and K+ channels, L-type Ca2 channels and many others. Interestingly, purinergic receptors have been linked to a variety of conditions within the eye but their presence in the endothelium and their role in its pathophysiology is still uncertain. In this study, we were able to extract endothelial cells from single human corneas, thus obtaining primary cultures that represent the peculiarity of each donor. Corneas were from tissues not suitable for transplant in patients. We characterized the endothelial cells by confocal microscopy, both within the intact cornea and in the primary endothelial cells cultures. We also studied the functional role of the purinergic system (adenosine, ATP and their receptors) by means of electrophysiological recordings. The experiments were performed by patch clamp recordings and confocal time-lapse microscopy and our results indicate that the application of purinergic compounds modulates the amplitude of outward currents in the isolated endothelial cells. These findings may lead to the proposal of new therapies for endothelium-related corneal diseases.

  14. A pilot study of short-duration sputum pretreatment procedures for optimizing smear microscopy for tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Daley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Direct sputum smear microscopy for tuberculosis (TB lacks sensitivity for the detection of acid fast bacilli. Sputum pretreatment procedures may enhance sensitivity. We did a pilot study to compare the diagnostic accuracy and incremental yield of two short-duration (<1 hour sputum pretreatment procedures to optimize direct smears among patients with suspected TB at a referral hospital in India. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: Blinded laboratory comparison of bleach and universal sediment processing (USP pretreated centrifuged auramine smears to direct Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN and direct auramine smears and to solid (Loweinstein-Jensen (LJ and liquid (BACTEC 460 culture. 178 pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB suspects were prospectively recruited during a one year period. Thirty six (20.2% were positive by either solid or liquid culture. Direct ZN smear detected 22 of 36 cases and direct auramine smears detected 26 of 36 cases. Bleach and USP centrifugation detected 24 cases each, providing no incremental yield beyond direct smears. When compared to combined culture, pretreated smears were not more sensitive than direct smears (66.6% vs 61.1 (ZN or 72.2 (auramine, and were not more specific (92.3% vs 93.0 (ZN or 97.2 (auramine. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Short duration sputum pretreatment with bleach and USP centrifugation did not increase yield as compared to direct sputum smears. Further work is needed to confirm this in a larger study and also determine if longer duration pre-treatment might be effective in optimizing smear microscopy for TB.

  15. Applications of nonlinear microscopy for studying the structure and dynamics in biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prent, Nicole; Cisek, Richard; Greenhalgh, Catherine; Sparrow, Raymond; Rohitlall, Neeresh; Milkereit, Maike-Svenja; Green, Chantal; Barzda, Virginijus

    2005-09-01

    Laser scanning nonlinear optical microscopy is used to study structure and dynamics of cellular and sub-cellular structures in vivo. Under tight focusing conditions with a high numerical aperture objective, nonlinear optical signals such as third harmonic generation (THG), second harmonic generation (SHG), and multiphoton excitation fluorescence (MPF) are simultaneously produced. MPF is extensively used in biological imaging. Unfortunately, fluorescence is accompanied by heat dissipation in the sample and photobleaching effects. On the other hand, parametric processes such as SHG and THG are free of photobleaching since they involve only virtual electronic states where there is no transfer of energy into the medium. There are many naturally occurring structures that exhibit harmonic generation effects, and hence, do not require dyes that can potentially disrupt the normal functionality of the system. SHG is efficiently generated in non-centrosymmetric media, such as chiral structures and interfaces. The THG signal is generated due to a break in symmetry at interfaces and can be enhanced by the presence of multilamellar structures, as in the mitochondria or chloroplasts. Many interesting biological processes, such as signal transduction in neurons or ATP synthesis in mitochondria, involve the movement of ions across membranes. THG and SHG are sensitive to changing electric potential gradients, and hence are ideally suited for dynamical investigations of these biological processes. The present work will expose the structural factors and conditions that influence THG and SHG generation efficiencies in biological samples. Examples of visualizing chloroplasts and mitochondria will illustrate the advantages of harmonic generation microscopy for studying structural and functional properties of the in vivo systems.

  16. Direct evidence of transformation from smectite to palygorskite: TEM investigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Tianhu; XU; Huifang; LU; Anhuai; XU; Xiaochun; PENG

    2004-01-01

    Palygorskite clays sampled from palygorskite clay deposits in Jiangsu and Anhui provinces were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Many intergrowth phenomena of special ultra-microstructure between smectite and palygorskite were found. The ultra-microstructure indicates that palygorsite fiberrous crystals grow along (001) of primary smectite through structural transformation and decomposition of the primary smectite. According to field investigation and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses, the transformation mechanism and process can be described as: formation of smectite from basalt weathering deposited in localization basin; evaporation of lake water in aridity environment causing pH increase and concentration of magnesium ion in interstice water of sediment smectite in the lake basin. Under alkaline conditions, magnesium ion occupied interlayer positions of the smectite. Because of the misfit between magnesium octahedral sheet and smectite layer, magnesium ion interaction with smectire layers caused the 'smectite to transform into palygorskite, and resulted in the formation of smectite and palygorskite complex particulates, and even smaller secondary smectite crystal plates. The transformation of smectite structure resulted in the formation of nanometer minerals with large specific surface area and excellent property of physics and chemistry in smectite-palygorskite mixing clay. The results from TEM investigation are important for understanding properties of palygorskite clay and application.

  17. Microstructure and properties of laser clad coatings studied by orientation imaging microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelik, V.; Furar, I.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this work orientation imaging microscopy (OIM), based on electron backscatter diffraction in scanning electron microscopy, was employed to examine in detail the relationship between laser cladding processing parameters and he properties and the microstructure of single and overlapping laser track

  18. Application of multiphoton microscopy in dermatological studies: A mini-review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah Yew

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the historical and more recent developments of multiphoton microscopy, as applied to dermatology. Multiphoton microscopy offers several advantages over competing microscopy techniques: there is an inherent axial sectioning, penetration depths that compete well with confocal microscopy on account of the use of near-infrared light, and many two-photon contrast mechanisms, such as second-harmonic generation, have no analogue in one-photon microscopy. While the penetration depths of photons into tissue are typically limited on the order of hundreds of microns, this is of less concern in dermatology, as the skin is thin and readily accessible. As a result, multiphoton microscopy in dermatology has generated a great deal of interest, much of which is summarized here. The review covers the interaction of light and tissue, as well as the various considerations that must be made when designing an instrument. The state of multiphoton microscopy in imaging skin cancer and various other diseases is also discussed, along with the investigation of aging and regeneration phenomena, and finally, the use of multiphoton microscopy to analyze the transdermal transport of drugs, cosmetics and other agents is summarized. The review concludes with a look at potential future research directions, especially those that are necessary to push these techniques into widespread clinical acceptance.

  19. Tem Observation Of Age-Hardening Precipitation In Mg-Gd-Y Alloys As Different Gd/Y Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsuoka Y.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the early stage of aging in Mg-Gd-Y alloys has been observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, high angle annular dark field – scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM and calculations of images and electron density and bond overlap population (BOP by first principal to understand the origin of precipitation in this alloy. The small hexagon of 0.37 nm is the first precipitate in this alloy, and this is the evidence of short range ordering of D019 structure. This is referred as the pre β”-phase. In the peak aged condition, β’ phase with bco structure was mainly observed.

  20. Semiclassical TEM image formation in phase space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubk, Axel; Röder, Falk

    2015-04-01

    Current developments in TEM such as high-resolution imaging at low acceleration voltages and large fields of view, the ever larger capabilities of hardware aberration correction and the systematic shaping of electron beams require accurate descriptions of TEM imaging in terms of wave optics. Since full quantum mechanic solutions have not yet been established for, e.g., the theory of aberrations, we are exploring semiclassical image formation in the TEM from the perspective of quantum mechanical phase space, here. Firstly, we use two well-known semiclassical approximations, Miller's semiclassical algebra and the frozen Gaussian method, for describing the wave optical generalization of arbitrary geometric aberrations, including nonisoplanatic and slope aberrations. Secondly, we demonstrate that the Wigner function representation of phase space is well suited to also describe incoherent aberrations as well as the ramifications of partial coherence due to the emission process at the electron source. We identify a close relationship between classical phase space and Wigner function distortions due to aberrations as well as classical brightness and quantum mechanical purity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. In situ transmission electron microscopy of light-induced photocatalytic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalca, F; Laursen, A B; Kardynal, B E; Dunin-Borkowski, R E; Dahl, S; Wagner, J B; Hansen, T W

    2012-02-24

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) makes it possible to obtain insight into the structure, composition and reactivity of photocatalysts, which are of fundamental interest for sustainable energy research. Such insight can be used for further material optimization. Here, we combine conventional TEM analysis of photocatalysts with environmental TEM (ETEM) and photoactivation using light. Two novel types of TEM specimen holder that enable in situ illumination are developed to study light-induced phenomena in photoactive materials, systems and photocatalysts at the nanoscale under working conditions. The technological development of the holders is described and two representative photo-induced phenomena are studied: the photodegradation of Cu₂O and the photodeposition of Pt onto a GaN:ZnO photocatalyst.

  2. THE STRUCTURE AND CONCENTRATION OF SOLIDS IN PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS STUDIED BY REFRACTOMETRY AND INTERFERENCE MICROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidman, Richard L.

    1957-01-01

    Fragments of freshly obtained retinas of several vertebrate species were studied by refractometry, with reference to the structure of the rods and cones. The findings allowed a reassessment of previous descriptions based mainly on fixed material. The refractometric method was used also to measure the refractice indices and to calculate the concentrations of solids and water in the various cell segments. The main quantitative data were confirmed by interference microscopy. When examined by the method of refractometry the outer segments of freshly prepared retinal rods appear homogeneous. Within a few minutes a single eccentric longitudinal fiber appears, and transverse striations may develop. These changes are attributed to imbibition of water and swelling in structures normally too small for detection by light microscopy. The central "core" of outer segments and the chromophobic disc between outer and inner segments appear to be artifacts resulting from shrinkage during dehydration. The fresh outer segments of cones, and the inner segments of rods and cones also are described and illustrated. The volumes, refractive indices, concentrations of solids, and wet and dry weights of various segments of the photoreceptor cells were tabulated. Rod outer segments of the different species vary more than 100-fold in volume and mass but all have concentrations of solids of 40 to 43 per cent. Cone outer segments contain only about 30 per cent solids. The myoids, paraboloids, and ellipsoids of the inner segments likewise have characteristic refractive indices and concentrations of solids. Some of the limitations and particular virtues of refractometry as a method for quantitative analysis of living cells are discussed in comparison with more conventional biochemical techniques. Also the shapes and refractive indices of the various segments of photoreceptor cells are considered in relation to the absorption and transmission of light. The Stiles-Crawford effect can be accounted

  3. Atomic force microscopy study of nano-physiological response of ladybird beetles to photostimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia V Guz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insects are of interest not only as the most numerous and diverse group of animals but also as highly efficient bio-machines varying greatly in size. They are the main human competitors for crop, can transmit various diseases, etc. However, little study of insects with modern nanotechnology tools has been done. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we applied an atomic force microscopy (AFM method to study stimulation of ladybird beetles with light. This method allows for measuring of the internal physiological responses of insects by recording surface oscillations in different parts of the insect at sub-nanometer amplitude level and sub-millisecond time. Specifically, we studied the sensitivity of ladybird beetles to light of different wavelengths. We demonstrated previously unknown blindness of ladybird beetles to emerald color (∼500nm light, while being able to see UV-blue and green light. Furthermore, we showed how one could study the speed of the beetle adaptation to repetitive flashing light and its relaxation back to the initial stage. CONCLUSIONS: The results show the potential of the method in studying insects. We see this research as a part of what might be a new emerging area of "nanophysiology" of insects.

  4. Atomic force microscopy study of nano-physiological response of ladybird beetles to photostimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guz, Natalia V; Dokukin, Maxim E; Sokolov, Igor

    2010-09-22

    Insects are of interest not only as the most numerous and diverse group of animals but also as highly efficient bio-machines varying greatly in size. They are the main human competitors for crop, can transmit various diseases, etc. However, little study of insects with modern nanotechnology tools has been done. Here we applied an atomic force microscopy (AFM) method to study stimulation of ladybird beetles with light. This method allows for measuring of the internal physiological responses of insects by recording surface oscillations in different parts of the insect at sub-nanometer amplitude level and sub-millisecond time. Specifically, we studied the sensitivity of ladybird beetles to light of different wavelengths. We demonstrated previously unknown blindness of ladybird beetles to emerald color (∼500nm) light, while being able to see UV-blue and green light. Furthermore, we showed how one could study the speed of the beetle adaptation to repetitive flashing light and its relaxation back to the initial stage. The results show the potential of the method in studying insects. We see this research as a part of what might be a new emerging area of "nanophysiology" of insects.

  5. In situ TEM imaging of defect dynamics under electrical bias in resistive switching rutile-TiO₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaladasa, Ranga J; Sharma, Abhishek A; Lai, Yu-Ting; Chen, Wenhao; Salvador, Paul A; Bain, James A; Skowronski, Marek; Picard, Yoosuf N

    2015-02-01

    In this study, in situ electrical biasing was combined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in order to study the formation and evolution of Wadsley defects and Magnéli phases during electrical biasing and resistive switching in titanium dioxide (TiO2). Resistive switching devices were fabricated from single-crystal rutile TiO2 substrates through focused ion beam milling and lift-out techniques. Defect evolution and phase transformations in rutile TiO2 were monitored by diffraction contrast imaging inside the TEM during electrical biasing. Reversible bipolar resistive switching behavior was observed in these single-crystal TiO2 devices. Biased induced reduction reactions created increased oxygen vacancy concentrations to such an extent that shear faults (Wadsley defects) and oxygen-deficient phases (Magnéli phases) formed over large volumes within the TiO2 TEM specimen. Nevertheless, the observed reversible formation/dissociation of Wadsley defects does not appear to correlate to resistive switching phenomena at these length scales. These defect zones were found to reversibly reconfigure in a manner consistent with charged oxygen vacancy migration responding to the applied bias polarity.

  6. Morphological Study of Adult Male Worms of Schistosoma mansoni Sambon, 1907 by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto Machado-Silva

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Tubercles, spines and sensory receptors are the most studied structures of adult male worms of Schistosoma mansoni isolated in other countries. The purpose of this investigation was to properly define these structures in Brazilian worms. Specimens 7-8 weeks after infection were recovered from albino SW mice and from a wild rodent (Nectomys squamipes and processed for scanning electron microscopy studies. Photomicrographs of the anterior region with the aspects related to the outer and inner regions of both suckers were considered. The ventral portion of the middle region was represented by the anterior of gynaecophoric canal while the dorsal surface was studied in its ventral and dorsal regions mainly focusing the aspect of the tubercles, spines and sensorial papillae. The outer surface of the oral sucker is spiny and spines are bigger, sharp with sensory receptors in their posterior edge. Tubercles with spines or receptors are more concentrated in the middle region and in one of the margins of the gynaecophoric canal. An excretory pore-like structure in the posterior portion was observed. The gynaecophoric canal has few sensory structures, spines broadned in their mid-region and are sharp pointed at the distal end. It was concluded that the presently studied characters are similar to those previously reported

  7. Self-emulsifying drug delivery system developed by the HLB-RSM approach: Characterization by transmission electron microscopy and pharmacokinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahloul, Badr; Lassoued, Mohamed Ali; Seguin, Johanne; Lai-Kuen, René; Dhotel, Hélène; Sfar, Souad; Mignet, Nathalie

    2015-06-20

    Recently, we developed a new approach to rationalize an optimized design for self-emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS) by introducing the HLB and the response surface as determinant factors in SEDDS development. The aim of this current paper is to assess the suitability of this HLB-RSM approach to enhance the oral bioavailability of BCS class II compounds using fenofibrate as drug model. Eight SEDDS formulations (I→VIII) were pre-selected regarding their self-emulsification capacity and their effect on increasing in vitro drug release. They were firstly evaluated for their thermodynamic stability and zeta potential. Unstable SEDDS were discarded meanwhile the structural morphology of the stable ones (I, VI and VIII) was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A pharmacokinetic study was then undertaken on male BALB/cJRj mices. The in vivo results showed a significant increase of fenofibrate absorption for all the three stable SEDDS formulations compared to the commercialized form, (LIPANTHYL micronized(®) (p<0.05)). The highest enhancement was recorded for SEDDS I, where AUC and Cmax values respectively increased by 2 and 4.4 folds. This justifies the fact that HLB-RSM approach could be considered as a promising method for the development of efficient and highly stable SEDDS aiming to increase the poor bioavailability of BCS class II molecules. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. The importance of transmission electron microscopy analysis of spermatozoa: Diagnostic applications and basic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Elena; Sutera, Gaetano; Collodel, Giulia

    2016-06-01

    This review is aimed at discussing the role of ultrastructural studies on human spermatozoa and evaluating transmission electron microscopy as a diagnostic tool that can complete andrology protocols. It is clear that morphological sperm defects may explain decreased fertilizing potential and acquire particular value in the field of male infertility. Electron microscopy is the best method to identify systematic or monomorphic and non-systematic or polymorphic sperm defects. The systematic defects are characterized by a particular anomaly that affects the vast majority of spermatozoa in a semen sample, whereas a heterogeneous combination of head and tail defects found in variable percentages are typically non-systematic or polymorphic sperm defects. A correct diagnosis of these specific sperm alterations is important for choosing the male infertility's therapy and for deciding to turn to assisted reproduction techniques. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) also represents a valuable method to explore the in vitro effects of different compounds (for example drugs with potential spermicidal activity) on the morphology of human spermatozoa. Finally, TEM used in combination with immunohistochemical techniques, integrates structural and functional aspects that provide a wide horizon in the understanding of sperm physiology and pathology. transmission electron microscopy: TEM; World Health Organization: WHO; light microscopy: LM; motile sperm organelle morphology examination: MSOME; intracytoplasmic morphologically selected sperm injection: IMSI; intracytoplasmic sperm injection: ICSI; dysplasia of fibrous sheath: DFS; primary ciliary dyskinesia: PCD; outer dense fibers: ODF; assisted reproduction technologies: ART; scanning electron microscopy: SEM; polyvinylpirrolidone: PVP; tert-butylhydroperoxide: TBHP.

  9. Ui, que nojo! Tem mais é que fechar esse valetão! Um estudo com o conceito deleuzeano de devir Ew, how disgusting! We must close this sewer channel: a study with the deleuzean becoming concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandamir Palmeiro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo relata o processo de investigação para a construção e aplicação de um conjunto de atividades relacionadas à temática água, em um Colégio de Curitiba. Os atores desta investigação são estudantes do Ensino Médio que moram e estudam perto de um curso d'água conhecido como Valetão da Rua Henry Ford. Discutimos, a partir do conceito deleuzeano de devir, o interesse/desinteresse instituídos sobre este valetão, com o objetivo de infectar, dissolver, desconstruir o que foi apagado nas vidas desses estudantes, moradores da comunidade e promover a mobilização para a revitalização do que é de fato, um rio, o rio Pinheirinho.This paper reports the investigation process to build and test a group of activities related to water in a Curitiba High School. The subjects of this study are High School Students who live and study close to a body of water known locally as Sewer channel of Henry Ford street. Based on the deleuzean concept of becoming we discussed the students' interests / disinterests in this body of water. The objective was to infect, dissolve, demolish what was removed from the lives of the students and inhabitants of the community and promote the mobilization to revitalize what is in fact a river, the Pinheirinho river.

  10. In situ TEM visualization of superior nanomechanical flexibility of shear-exfoliated phosphorene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Ma, Hongyu; Lei, Shuangying; Sun, Jun; Chen, Jing; Ge, Binghui; Zhu, Yimei; Sun, Litao

    2016-07-01

    Recently discovered atomically thin black phosphorus (called phosphorene) holds great promise for applications in flexible nanoelectronic devices. Experimentally identifying and characterizing nanomechanical properties of phosphorene are challenging, but also potentially rewarding. This work combines for the first time in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging and an in situ micro-manipulation system to directly visualize the nanomechanical behaviour of individual phosphorene nanoflakes. We demonstrate that the phosphorene nanoflakes can be easily bent, scrolled, and stretched, showing remarkable mechanical flexibility rather than fracturing. An out-of-plane plate-like bending mechanism and in-plane tensile strain of up to 34% were observed. Moreover, a facile liquid-phase shear exfoliation route has been developed to produce such mono-layer and few-layer phosphorene nanoflakes in organic solvents using only a household kitchen blender. The effects of surface tensions of the applied solvents on the ratio of average length and thickness (L/T) of the nanoflakes were studied systematically. The results reported here will pave the way for potential industrial-scale applications of flexible phosphorene nanoelectronic devices.Recently discovered atomically thin black phosphorus (called phosphorene) holds great promise for applications in flexible nanoelectronic devices. Experimentally identifying and characterizing nanomechanical properties of phosphorene are challenging, but also potentially rewarding. This work combines for the first time in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging and an in situ micro-manipulation system to directly visualize the nanomechanical behaviour of individual phosphorene nanoflakes. We demonstrate that the phosphorene nanoflakes can be easily bent, scrolled, and stretched, showing remarkable mechanical flexibility rather than fracturing. An out-of-plane plate-like bending mechanism and in-plane tensile strain of up to

  11. Active intracellular transport in metastatic cells studied by spatial light interference microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballos, Silvia; Kandel, Mikhail; Sridharan, Shamira; Majeed, Hassaan; Monroy, Freddy; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Spatiotemporal patterns of intracellular transport are very difficult to quantify and, consequently, continue to be insufficiently understood. While it is well documented that mass trafficking inside living cells consists of both random and deterministic motions, quantitative data over broad spatiotemporal scales are lacking. We studied the intracellular transport in live cells using spatial light interference microscopy, a high spatiotemporal resolution quantitative phase imaging tool. The results indicate that in the cytoplasm, the intracellular transport is mainly active (directed, deterministic), while inside the nucleus it is both active and passive (diffusive, random). Furthermore, we studied the behavior of the two-dimensional mass density over 30 h in HeLa cells and focused on the active component. We determined the standard deviation of the velocity distribution at the point of cell division for each cell and compared the standard deviation velocity inside the cytoplasm and the nucleus. We found that the velocity distribution in the cytoplasm is consistently broader than in the nucleus, suggesting mechanisms for faster transport in the cytosol versus the nucleus. Future studies will focus on improving phase measurements by applying a fluorescent tag to understand how particular proteins are transported inside the cell.

  12. Single-molecule studies of DNA transcription using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingsley, Daniel J.; Bonass, William A.; Crampton, Neal; Kirkham, Jennifer; Thomson, Neil H.

    2012-04-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can detect single biomacromolecules with a high signal-to-noise ratio on atomically flat biocompatible support surfaces, such as mica. Contrast arises from the innate forces and therefore AFM does not require imaging contrast agents, leading to sample preparation that is relatively straightforward. The ability of AFM to operate in hydrated environments, including humid air and aqueous buffers, allows structure and function of biological and biomolecular systems to be retained. These traits of the AFM are ensuring that it is being increasingly used to study deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) structure and DNA-protein interactions down to the secondary structure level. This report focuses in particular on reviewing the applications of AFM to the study of DNA transcription in reductionist single-molecule bottom-up approaches. The technique has allowed new insights into the interactions between ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymerase to be gained and enabled quantification of some aspects of the transcription process, such as promoter location, DNA wrapping and elongation. More recently, the trend is towards studying the interactions of more than one enzyme operating on a single DNA template. These methods begin to reveal the mechanics of gene expression at the single-molecule level and will enable us to gain greater understanding of how the genome is transcribed and translated into the proteome.

  13. Inflammation in dry eye associated with rheumatoid arthritis: cytokine and in vivo confocal microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, Edoardo; Galimberti, Daniela; Del Papa, Nicoletta; Nucci, Paolo; Ratiglia, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study ocular surface inflammation in relation to systemic disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with or without secondary Sjögren's syndrome (SSII and non-SSII respectively). The study was conducted in two phases. In phase I, 12 patients with active RA SSII and 12 with active RA non-SSII were consecutively enrolled. Each completed an Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) questionnaire and underwent a full eye exam and in vivo confocal microscopy examination of the cornea. Tear fluid samples were collected in sponges and analyzed for IL-1α, -6, and -8, and TNF-α. When RA activity was suppressed by systemic treatment the patients entered phase II of the study in which all of the phase I examinations were repeated. In RA SSII patients, OSDI, fluorescein staining dendritic cell density, and concentrations of IL-1α and IL-6 decreased significantly (P < 0.01) between phases I and II. Tear breakup time scores increased significantly. For RA non-SSII patients, there were no significant differences between phases I and II. Differences in the clinical, cellular and cytokine responsiveness to systemic RA treatments show that the ocular surface pathology is dissimilar for RA SSII and RA non-SSII patients.

  14. A scanning electron microscopy study of the embryonic development of Pycnogonum litorale (Arthropoda, Pycnogonida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machner, Jakob; Scholtz, Gerhard

    2010-11-01

    The phylogenetic position of the enigmatic Pycnogonida (sea spiders) is still controversial. This is in part due to a lack of detailed data about the morphology and ontogenesis of this, in many aspects, aberrant group. In particular, studies on the embryonic development of pycnogonids are rare and in part contradictory. Here, we present the first embryological study of a pycnogonid species using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We describe the late embryogenesis of Pycnogonum litorale from the first visible appendage anlagen to the hatchling in 11 embryonic stages. The three pairs of appendage anlagen gain in length by growth, as well as by extension of furrows into the embryo. The opening of the stomodaeum is located far in front of the anlagen of the chelifores and has a Y-shaped lumen from the onset. During further embryogenesis, the position of the mouth shifts ventrally, until it is located between the chelifores. The proboscis anlage grows out as a circumoral wall-like structure, which is initially more pronounced ventrally. Hypotheses about the evolution of the proboscis by fusion of originally separated components are critically discussed, because the proboscis anlage of P. litorale shows no indications of a composite nature. In particular, a participation of post-cheliforal elements in proboscis formation is rejected by our data. Further, no preoral structure and no stage in proboscis formation was found, which could plausibly be homologized with the labrum of othereuarthropods. Thus, our study supports the assumption of a complete lack of a labrum in Pycnogonida.

  15. Optimized Model Surfaces for Advanced Atomic Force Microscopy Studies of Surface Nanobubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bo; Zhou, Yi; Schönherr, Holger

    2016-11-01

    The formation of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of binary mixtures of 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid (MHDA) and 1-octadecanethiol (ODT) on ultraflat template-stripped gold (TSG) surfaces was systematically investigated to clarify the assembly behavior, composition, and degree of possible phase segregation in light of atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of surface nanobubbles on these substrates. The data for SAMs on TSG were compared to those obtained by adsorption on rough evaporated gold, as reported in a previous study. Quartz crystal microbalance and surface plasmon resonance data acquired in situ on TSG indicate that similar to SAM formation on conventional evaporated gold substrates ODT and MHDA form monolayers and bilayers, respectively. The second layer on MHDA, whose formation is attributed to hydrogen bonding, can be easily removed by adequate rinsing with water. The favorable agreement of the grazing incidence reflection Fourier transform infrared (GIR FTIR) spectroscopy and contact angle data analyzed with the Israelachvili-Gee model suggests that the binary SAMs do not segregate laterally. This conclusion is fully validated by high-resolution friction force AFM observations down to a length scale of 8-10 nm, which is much smaller than the typical observed surface nanobubble radii. Finally, correspondingly functionalized TSG substrates are shown to be valuable supports for studying surface nanobubbles by AFM in water and for addressing the relation between surface functionality and nanobubble formation and properties.

  16. X-ray photoemission electron microscopy for the study of semiconductor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, S.; Stammler, T.; Padmore, H.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Terminello, L.J.; Jankowski, A.F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Stoehr, J. [IBM Almaden Research Center, 650 Harry Road, San Jose, California 95120 (United States); Diaz, J. [Departamento de Fisic, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Oviedo, Avda. Calvo Sotelo s/n, Oviedo, 33007 (Spain); Cossy-Favre, A. [EMPA, Duebendorf, Ueberlandstrasse 129, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Singh, S. [Center for X-ray Lithography, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Stoughton, Wisconsin 53589 (United States)

    1998-11-01

    Photoemission Electron Microscopy using X-rays (X-PEEM) is a novel combination of two established materials analysis techniques{emdash}PEEM using UV light, and Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. This combination allows the study of elemental composition and bonding structure of the sample by NEXAFS spectroscopy with a high spatial resolution given by the microscope. A simple, two lens, 10 kV operation voltage PEEM has been used at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory and at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley to study various problems including materials of interest for the semiconductor industry. In the present paper we give a short overview over the method and the instrument which was used, and describe in detail a number of applications. These applications include the study of the different phases of titanium disilicide, various phases of boron nitride, and the analysis of small particles. A brief outlook is given on possible new fields of application of the PEEM technique, and the development of new PEEM instruments. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. X-ray photoemission electron microscopy for the study of semiconductor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, S.; Stammler, T.; Padmore, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Advanced Light Source Div.; Terminello, L.J.; Jankowski, A.F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Stohr, J. [IBM Almaden Research Center, San Jose, CA (United States); Diaz, J. [Univ. de Oviedo (Spain). Dept. de Fisica; Cossy-Gantner, A. [EMPA, Duebendorf (Germany)

    1998-03-01

    Photoemission Electron Microscopy (PEEM) using X-rays is a novel combination of two established materials analysis techniques--PEEM using UV light, and Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. This combination allows the study of elemental composition and bonding structure of the sample by NEXAFS spectroscopy with a high spatial resolution given by the microscope. A simple, two lens, 10 kV operation voltage PEEM has been used at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory and at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley to study various problems including materials of interest for the semiconductor industry. In the present paper the authors give a short overview over the method and the instrument which was used, and describe in detail a number of applications. These applications include the study of the different phases of titanium disilicide, various phases of boron nitride, and the analysis of small particles. A brief outlook is given on possible new fields of application of the PEEM technique, and the development of new PEEM instruments.

  18. A novel field emission microscopy method to study field emission characteristics of freestanding carbon nanotube arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunhan; Sun, Yonghai; Jaffray, David A.; Yeow, John T. W.

    2017-04-01

    Field emission (FE) uniformity and the mechanism of emitter failure of freestanding carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays have not been well studied due to the difficulty of observing and quantifying FE performance of each emitter in CNT arrays. Herein a field emission microscopy (FEM) method based on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) thin film is proposed to study the FE uniformity and CNT emitter failure of freestanding CNT arrays. FE uniformity of freestanding CNT arrays and different levels of FE current contributions from each emitter in the arrays are recorded and visualized. FEM patterns on the PMMA thin film contain the details of the CNT emitter tip shape and whether multiple CNT emitters occur at an emission site. Observation of real-time FE performance and the CNT emitter failure process in freestanding CNT arrays are successfully achieved using a microscopic camera. High emission currents through CNT emitters causes Joule heating and light emission followed by an explosion of the CNTs. The proposed approach is capable of resolving the major challenge of building the relationship between FE performance and CNT morphologies, which can significantly facilitate the study of FE non-uniformity, the emitter failure mechanism and the development of stable and reliable FE devices in practical applications.

  19. Fluoride varnish as root canal sealer: a scanning electron microscopy and bacterial penetration study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parirokh, Masoud; Talebizad, Mohammad; Forghani, Farshid Reza; Haghdoost, Ali Akabar; Asgary, Saeed; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Goddousi, Jamileh

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the bacterial leakage of root canal fillings when cavity varnish containing 5% fluoride (Duraflur) was used as root canal sealer. Root canals of 88 straight single-rooted teeth were prepared. Eighty teeth were randomly divided into 3 experimental groups (n=20) and two positive and negative control groups of ten each. The roots in group I and II were obturated with gutta-percha and AH-26 sealer using lateral condensation technique. The root canal walls in group II were coated with a layer of varnish before obturation. In group III the canals were obturated with gutta-percha and fluoride varnish as the sealer. Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) was used to determine the bacterial leakage during 90 days. The Kaplan Meier survival analysis was used for assessing the leakage and log rank test was used for pairwise comparison. The rest of eight single rooted teeth were selected for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) evaluation with 5000× magnification. Leakage occurred between 20 to 89 days. Group III showed significantly less bacterial penetration than groups I and II (P=0.001 and P=0.011, respectively). However, there was no significant difference between group I and II (P>0.05). SEM evaluation showed that the varnish had covered all dentinal tubules. The present study showed promising results for the use of fluoride varnish as root canal sealer but further in vitro and in vivo studies are needed.

  20. Determination of sex by exfoliative cytology using acridine orange confocal microscopy: A short study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, D Shyam Prasad; Sherlin, Herald J; Ramani, Pratibha; Prakash, P Ajay

    2012-07-01

    Establishing individuality is an imperative aspect in any investigation procedure. Sometimes, in identifying an individual, it becomes necessary to determine the sex of that particular individual. Combining rapidity with reliability, an innovative idea has been put forward using a confocal microscope in exfoliative cytology. In the present study, we have determined the sex of the individual from buccal mucosal scrapings. The exfoliative cells were observed for Barr bodies under a confocal microscope, and the percentage of Barr-body-positive cells was determined. The main objective of this study is to assess confocal microscopy for the determination of sex by observing Barr bodies in the exfoliative cells of both men and women. Samples of buccal mucosa smears were made followed by acridine orange staining. The stained slides were observed under a confocal microscope and the data obtained was subjected for statistical analysis, especially for mean and standard deviation. Samples of buccal mucosa smears from 20 men and 20 women were obtained by scraping with flat wooden sticks (exfoliative cytology). The smears were fixed in 100% alcohol for 15 min, followed by acridine orange (AO) staining as described by Von Bertalanffy et al. Smears stained with AO were examined under a confocal microscope and the percentage of Barr-body-positive cells was determined. Data obtained was subjected for statistical analysis, especially for mean and standard deviation. Two non-overlapping ranges for the percentage of Barr-body-positive cells have been obtained for men and women. It was observed that in the male samples, the percentage of Barr-body-positive cells ranged from 0-3%. In the female samples, the percentage of Barr-body-positive cells ranged from 18-72%, and all the females showed the presence of Barr bodies. The study showed that the presence of Barr body in buccal mucosal cells can be demonstrated with a fair degree of accuracy using acridine orange confocal microscopy. The

  1. Determination of sex by exfoliative cytology using acridine orange confocal microscopy: A short study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Shyam Prasad Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Establishing individuality is an imperative aspect in any investigation procedure. Sometimes, in identifying an individual, it becomes necessary to determine the sex of that particular individual. Combining rapidity with reliability, an innovative idea has been put forward using a confocal microscope in exfoliative cytology. In the present study, we have determined the sex of the individual from buccal mucosal scrapings. The exfoliative cells were observed for Barr bodies under a confocal microscope, and the percentage of Barr-body-positive cells was determined. Aims: The main objective of this study is to assess confocal microscopy for the determination of sex by observing Barr bodies in the exfoliative cells of both men and women. Settings and Design: Samples of buccal mucosa smears were made followed by acridine orange staining. The stained slides were observed under a confocal microscope and the data obtained was subjected for statistical analysis, especially for mean and standard deviation. Materials and Methods: Samples of buccal mucosa smears from 20 men and 20 women were obtained by scraping with flat wooden sticks (exfoliative cytology. The smears were fixed in 100% alcohol for 15 min, followed by acridine orange (AO staining as described by Von Bertalanffy et al. Smears stained with AO were examined under a confocal microscope and the percentage of Barr-body-positive cells was determined. Statistical Analysis Used: Data obtained was subjected for statistical analysis, especially for mean and standard deviation. Results: Two non-overlapping ranges for the percentage of Barr-body-positive cells have been obtained for men and women. It was observed that in the male samples, the percentage of Barr-body-positive cells ranged from 0-3%. In the female samples, the percentage of Barr-body-positive cells ranged from 18-72%, and all the females showed the presence of Barr bodies. Conclusion: The study showed that the presence of Barr

  2. Using magnetic resonance microscopy to study the growth dynamics of a glioma spheroid in collagen I: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Guangping

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly malignant gliomas are characterized by rapid growth, extensive local tissue infiltration and the resulting overall dismal clinical outcome. Gaining any additional insights into the complex interaction between this aggressive brain tumor and its microenvironment is therefore critical. Currently, the standard imaging modalities to investigate the crucial interface between tumor growth and invasion in vitro are light and confocal laser scanning microscopy. While immensely useful in cell culture, integrating these modalities with this cancer's clinical imaging method of choice, i.e. MRI, is a non-trivial endeavour. However, this integration is necessary, should advanced computational modeling be able to utilize these in vitro data to eventually predict growth behaviour in vivo. We therefore argue that employing the same imaging modality for both the experimental setting and the clinical situation it represents should have significant value from a data integration perspective. In this case study, we have investigated the feasibility of using a specific form of MRI, i.e. magnetic resonance microscopy or MRM, to study the expansion dynamics of a multicellular tumor spheroid in a collagen type I gel. Methods An U87mEGFR human giloblastoma multicellular spheroid (MTS containing approximately 4·103 cells was generated and pipetted into a collagen I gel. The sample was then imaged using a T2-weighted 3D spoiled gradient echo pulse sequence on a 14T MRI scanner over a period of 12 hours with a temporal resolution of 3 hours at room temperature. Standard histopathology was performed on the MRM sample, as well as on control samples. Results We were able to acquire three-dimensional MR images with a spatial resolution of 24 × 24 × 24 μm3. Our MRM data successfully documented the volumetric growth dynamics of an MTS in a collagen I gel over the 12-hour period. The histopathology results confirmed cell viability in the MRM sample

  3. Microvascular abnormalities in sickle cell disease: a computer-assisted intravital microscopy study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cheung, Anthony T W; Chen, Peter C Y; Larkin, Edward C; Duong, Patricia L; Ramanujam, Sahana; Tablin, Fern; Wun, Ted

    2002-01-01

    The conjunctival microcirculation of 18 homozygous sickle cell disease (SCD) patients during steady-state, painful crisis, and postcrisis conditions was recorded on high-resolution videotapes using intravital microscopy...

  4. Atomic force microscopy to study intermolecular forces and bonds associated with bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lower, Steven K

    2011-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) operates on a very different principle than other forms of microscopy, such as optical microscopy or electron microscopy. The key component of an AFM is a cantilever that bends in response to forces that it experiences as it touches another surface. Forces as small as a few picoNewtons can be detected and probed with AFM. AFM has become very useful in biological sciences because it can be used on living cells that are immersed in water. AFM is particularly useful when the cantilever is modified with chemical groups (e.g. amine or carboxylic groups), small beads (e.g. glass or latex), or even a bacterium. This chapter describes how AFM can be used to measure forces and bonds between a bacterium and another surface. This paper also provides an example of the use of AFM on Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterium that is often associated with biofilms in humans.

  5. A scanning electron microscopy study of the macro-crystalline structure of 2-(2,4-dinitrobenzyl) pyridine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Jacqueline; Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The compound, 2-(2,4-dinitrobenzyl) pyridine, was synthesized in the laboratory; an introductory level electron microscopy study of the macro-crystalline structure was conducted using the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The structure of these crystals was compared with the macrostructure of the crystal of 2-(2,4-dinitrobenzyl) pyridinium bromide, the hydrobromic salt of the compound which was also synthesized in the laboratory. A scanning electron microscopy crystal study was combined with a study of the principle of the electron microscope.

  6. Local elasticity and adhesion of nanostructures on Drosophila melanogaster wing membrane studied using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Ryan; Pittendrigh, Barry R.; Raman, Arvind

    2012-10-01

    Insect wings have a naturally occurring, complex, functional, hierarchical microstructure and nanostructure, which enable a remarkably water-resistant and self-cleaning surface. Insect wings are used as a basis for engineering biomimetic materials; however, the material properties of these nanostructures such as local elastic modulus and adhesion are poorly understood. We studied the wings of the Canton-S strain of Drosophila melanogaster (hereafter referred to as Drosophila) with atomic force microscopy (AFM) to quantify the local material properties of Drosophila wing surface nanostructures. The wings are found to have a hierarchical structure of 10-20 μm long, 0.5-1 μm diameter hair, and at a much smaller scale, 100 nm diameter and 30-60 nm high bumps. The local properties of these nanoscale bumps were studied under ambient and dry conditions with force-volume AFM. The wing membrane was found to have a elastic modulus on the order of 1000 MPa and the work of adhesion between the probe and wing membrane surface was found to be on the order of 100 mJ/m2, these properties are the same order of magnitude as common thermoplastic polymers such as polyethylene. The difference in work of adhesion between the nanoscale bump and membrane does not change significantly between ambient (relative humidity of 30%) or dry conditions. This suggests that the nanoscale bumps and the surrounding membrane are chemically similar and only work to increase hydrophobicity though surface roughening or the geometric lotus effect.

  7. Just Look! Intravital Microscopy as the Best Means to Study Kidney Cell Death Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schießl, Ina Maria; Hammer, Anna; Riquier-Brison, Anne; Peti-Peterdi, Janos

    2016-05-01

    Kidney cell death plays a key role in the progression of life-threatening renal diseases, such as acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease. Injured and dying epithelial and endothelial cells take part in complex communication with the innate immune system, which drives the progression of cell death and the decrease in renal function. To improve our understanding of kidney cell death dynamics and its impact on renal disease, a study approach is needed that facilitates the visualization of renal function and morphology in real time. Intravital multiphoton microscopy of the kidney has been used for more than a decade and made substantial contributions to our understanding of kidney physiology and pathophysiology. It is a unique tool that relates renal structure and function in a time- and spatial-dependent manner. Basic renal function, such as microvascular blood flow regulation and glomerular filtration, can be determined in real time and homeostatic alterations, which are linked inevitably to cell death and can be depicted down to the subcellular level. This review provides an overview of the available techniques to study kidney dysfunction and inflammation in terms of cell death in vivo, and addresses how this novel approach can be used to improve our understanding of cell death dynamics in renal disease.

  8. Combining confocal laser scanning microscopy with serial section reconstruction in the study of adult neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico eLuzzati

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Current advances in imaging techniques have extended the possibility of visualizing small structures within large volumes of both fixed and live specimens without sectioning. These techniques have contributed valuable information to study neuronal plasticity in the adult brain. However, technical limits still hamper the use of these approaches to investigate neurogenic regions located far from the ventricular surface such as parenchymal neurogenic niches, or the scattered neuroblasts induced by brain lesions. Here, we present a method to combine confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM and serial section reconstruction in order to reconstruct large volumes of brain tissue at cellular resolution. In this method a series of thick sections are imaged with CLSM and the resulting stacks of images are registered and 3D reconstructed. This approach is based on existing freeware software and can be performed on ordinary laboratory personal computers (PC. By using this technique we have investigated the morphology and spatial organization of a group of doublecortin (DCX+ neuroblasts located in the lateral striatum of the late post-natal guinea pig. The 3D study unravelled a complex network of long and poorly ramified cell processes, often fascicled and mostly oriented along the internal capsule fibre bundles. These data support CLSM serial section reconstruction as a reliable alternative to the whole mount approaches to analyze cyto-architectural features of adult germinative niches.

  9. A fluorescence microscopy study of quantum dots as fluorescent probes for brain tumor diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingjing; Vernier, P. Thomas; Sun, Yinghua; Gundersen, Martin A.; Marcu, Laura

    2005-03-01

    In vivo fluorescent spectroscopy and imaging using endogenous and exogenous sources of contrast can provide new approaches for enhanced demarcation of brain tumor margins and infiltration. Quantum dots (QDs), nanometer-size fluorescent probes, represent excellent contrast agents for biomedical imaging due to their broader excitation spectrum, narrower emission spectra, and higher sensitivity and stability. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is implicated in the development and progression of a number of human solid tumors including brain tumors and thus a potential target for brain tumor diagnosis. In this study, we investigate the up-take of ODs by brain tumor cells and the potential use of EGFR-targeted QDs for enhanced optical imaging of brain tumors. We conducted fluorescence microscopy studies of the up-take mechanism of the anti-EGFR-ODs complexes by Human U87, and SKMG-3 glioblastoma cells. Our preliminary results show that QDs can enter into glioma cells through anti-EGFR mediated endocytosis, suggesting that these nano-size particles can tag brain tumor cells.

  10. Atomic force microscopy and lamins: A review study towards future, combined investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecorari, Ilaria; Puzzi, Luca; Sbaizero, Orfeo

    2017-01-01

    In the last decades, atomic force microscopy (AFM) underwent a rapid and stunning development, especially for studying mechanical properties of biological samples. The numerous discoveries relying to this approach, have increased the credit of AFM as a versatile tool, and potentially eligible as a diagnostic equipment. Meanwhile, it has become strikingly evident that lamins are involved on the onset and development of certain diseases, including cancer, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, cardiovascular pathologies, and muscular dystrophy. A new category of pathologies has been defined, the laminopathies, which are caused by mutations in the gene encoding for A-type lamins. As the majority of medical issues, lamins, and all their related aspects can be considered as a quite complex problem. Indeed, there are many facets to explore, and this definitely requires a multidisciplinary approach. One of the most intriguing aspects concerning lamins is their remarkable contribute to cells mechanics. Over the years, this has led to the speculation of the so-called "structural hypothesis", which attempts to elucidate the etiology and some features of the laminopathies. Among the various techniques tried to figure out the role of lamins in the cells mechanics, the AFM has been already successfully applied, proving its versatility. Therefore, the present work aims both to highlight the qualities of AFM and to review the most relevant knowledge about lamins, in order to promote the study of the latter, taking advantage from the former. Microsc. Res. Tech. 80:97-108, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Fabrication of Gate-tunable Graphene Devices for Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies with Coulomb Impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Han Sae; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Wong, Dillon; Germany, Chad; Kahn, Salman; Kim, Youngkyou; Aikawa, Andrew S; Desai, Dhruv K; Rodgers, Griffin F; Bradley, Aaron J; Velasco, Jairo; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Wang, Feng; Zettl, Alex; Crommie, Michael F

    2015-07-24

    Owing to its relativistic low-energy charge carriers, the interaction between graphene and various impurities leads to a wealth of new physics and degrees of freedom to control electronic devices. In particular, the behavior of graphene's charge carriers in response to potentials from charged Coulomb impurities is predicted to differ significantly from that of most materials. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) can provide detailed information on both the spatial and energy dependence of graphene's electronic structure in the presence of a charged impurity. The design of a hybrid impurity-graphene device, fabricated using controlled deposition of impurities onto a back-gated graphene surface, has enabled several novel methods for controllably tuning graphene's electronic properties. Electrostatic gating enables control of the charge carrier density in graphene and the ability to reversibly tune the charge and/or molecular states of an impurity. This paper outlines the process of fabricating a gate-tunable graphene device decorated with individual Coulomb impurities for combined STM/STS studies. These studies provide valuable insights into the underlying physics, as well as signposts for designing hybrid graphene devices.

  12. Pattern of glomerular diseases in oman: A study based on light microscopy and immunofluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasar Yousuf Alwahaibi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Light microscopy and immunofluorescence play an important part in the final diagnosis of renal biopsy. The aim of this study was to analyze the pattern of various glomerular diseases in Oman. A total of 424 renal biopsies were retrospectively analyzed at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital between 1999 and 2010. Focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS, minimal change disease (MCD, membranous glomerulopathy (MGN and IgA nephropathy were the most common primary glomerular diseases encountered, accounting for 21.2%, 17%, 12.3% and 8.3%, respectively, of all cases. Lupus nephritis was the most common secondary glomerular disease and was the most prevalent among all biopsies, accounting for 30.4% of all biopsies. Amyloidosis was seen in only two cases. The presence of fluorescein isothiocyanatefibrin in all renal cases was low when compared with IgG, IgA, IgM, C3 and C1q markers. In conclusion, based on the findings of this study, lupus nephritis was the most common of all glomerular diseases and FSGS was the most common primary glomerular disease. The importance of fluorescein isothiocyanate-fibrin in the diagnosis of renal biopsy needs to be further investigated.

  13. High-Resolution Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Molecular Nanostructures on Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Xin

    The “bottom-up” fabrication by self-assembly has been proven to be a relatively facile way to construct well-defined nanostructures in a controlled manner. Although self-assembly technique has been widely used for design of different nanostructures, the further advanced fabrication of nanostructu......The “bottom-up” fabrication by self-assembly has been proven to be a relatively facile way to construct well-defined nanostructures in a controlled manner. Although self-assembly technique has been widely used for design of different nanostructures, the further advanced fabrication...... of nanostructures requires deeper insight into the adsorption sites, adsorption configurations, diffusion behaviour and driving forces for self-assembly of different molecules or atoms on different substrates. To study these fundamental issues, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has proven to be an ideal choice....... First, to study the role of hydrogen bonding in self-assembly, we investigate the monomolecular self-assembled system of pyrene-4,5,9,10-tetrone and phenanthrene- 9,10-dione molecules on Au(111) and HOPG surface respectively and the binary molecular self-assembled system of stearic acid and guanine...

  14. Calcium effect on membrane of an optically trapped erythrocyte studied by digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzam Rad, Vahideh; Tavakkoli, Rahim; Moradi, Ali-Reza; Anand, Arun; Javidi, Bahram

    2017-08-01

    The calcium level in blood affects the morphological and rheological properties of red blood cell (RBC) membranes. In this paper, we present an integrated optical system for a single cell study of hypercalcemia. The system consists of holographic optical tweezers and blinking optical tweezers, for photo-damage-free immobilization of the cells, combined with digital holographic microscopy, for quantitative analysis and live visualization of the cells. Digital holograms were recorded live, while the concentration of calcium ions in the buffer is gradually increased. Full morphometric data of RBCs were obtained by numerical reconstruction of the holograms. Morphological changes are expressed in terms of various parameters such as root mean square, skewness, and kurtosis of the cell membrane thickness distribution. We have observed dramatic changes of the cell morphology, which are attributed to the formation of calcium-induced hydrophobic aggregates of phospholipid molecules in the RBC membrane, resulting in a net change in membrane rigidity. Our experimental results are in agreement with previous biological studies of RBCs under the Ca2+ influence.

  15. Dental enamel roughness with different acid etching times: Atomic force microscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Bochnia Cerci

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: An important characteristic of human dental enamel not yet studied in detail is its surface roughness in mesoscopic scale. This study evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively the surface topography of acid etched enamel with different etching times. Materials and Methods: Ninety-six human maxillary bicuspids were randomly distributed into three groups (n=32: T0 (control, pumiced; T15, 35% phosphoric acid etched enamel for 15 s; T30, 35% phosphoric acid etched enamel for 30 s. Roughness measurements Ra, Rz and root mean square (RMS and 3D images of enamel′s topography were obtained with atomic force microscopy (AFM, which is a powerful technique to obtain direct measurements on microscale features. Results and Conclusions: Roughness variables Ra, Rz and RMS presented statistically significant differences to all groups (P<0.000, with values increasing with etching time. This increase was greater from T0 to T15 than from T15 to T30. Enamel surface alterations T15 to T30 occur mainly due to increase in height and deepening of prisms central region.

  16. TEM microstructure of mechanically alloyed Ti-12Mg powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T. S. KIM; B. T. LEE; J. P. AHN; J. K. PARK; J. C. BAE

    2006-01-01

    The microstructures of mechanical alloyed(MA) Ti-12%Mg alloy powders were examined using a high resolution TEM (HRTEM). The effect of MA atmospheres such as argon gas and liquid isopropyl alcohol on the resultant microstructure was investigated. Both the MA powders form a homogeneous Ti-Mg solid solution, but the oxidation behavior is distinguished. The phase change was studied as a function of milling conditions and annealing temperatures.

  17. Integrating two-photon microscopy and cryo-electron microscopy for studying the interaction of Cafeteria roenbergensis and CroV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghvami, Seyedmohammadali

    Cafeteria roenbergensis (Cro) is a marine zooplankton; its voracious appetite plays a significant role in regulating bacteria populations. The giant virus that lives within Cro, known as Cafeteria roenbergensis virus (CroV), has an important effect on the mortality of Cro populations. Although viral infections are extremely abundant in oceans, the complete procedure of the infection is still unknown. We study the infection process of Cro by CroV to find out whether the initial contact is through phagocytosis or CroV penetrating the host cell membrane directly. Cro is a moving at speed in the range of 10-100 um/s, therefore, there are many difficulties and challenges for traditional imaging techniques to study this viral-host interaction. We apply two-photon fluorescence microscopy to image this infection process. The image is taken at video rate (30 frame/s), which makes us able to catch the moment of interaction. We are able to image host and virus simultaneously where CroV is stained by SYBR gold dye and Cro is excited through NADH autofluorescence. For further structural biology study, we will obtain atomic level resolution information of infection. After catching the initial moment of infection, we will freeze the sample instantly and image it with cryo-electron microscope .

  18. Chitosan nanoparticles as non-viral gene delivery vehicles based on atomic force microscopy study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yujing Yuan; Jieyi Tan; Yifei Wang; Chuiwen Qian; Meiying Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Chitosan (CS), a biocompatible and biodegradable material, can act as a non-viral delivery vehicle with low toxicity. In this study, plasmid DNA (pDNA) and siRNA were encapsulated in CS nanoparticles (NPs) to prepare CS-DNA and CS-siRNA NPs using a complex coacervation process. The CS-DNA particle size was within the range of 180-370 nm with a surface charge ranging from 0 to 18 mV at pH 5.5. The stability of pDNA in CS-DNA was investigated by pDNA release study and DNase I protection assay. The release of pDNA from NPs was studied in pH 7.4 phosphatebuffered saline at 37℃ and the CS-DNA NPs could delay the DNA release. Results of DNase I protection assay showed that CS-DNA NPs could protect the encapsulated pDNA from nuclease degradation. In the transfection study, it was found that the transfection efficiency in vitro was dependent on the molecular weight, charge ratio, and DNA concentration of the CS-DNA NP as well as the type of cell transfected. Moreover, the morphology of HeLa cells transfected with CS-siRNA complexes was studied using atomic force microscopy. The results suggest that CS may be more capable than liposome in delivering siRNA to target cells. In summary,our analysis suggests that pDNA and siRNA can be encapsulated in CS NPs without being damaged.

  19. Recent Advances in Cryo-TEM Imaging of Soft Lipid Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Helvig

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cryo-transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM, and its technological variations thereof, have become a powerful tool for detailed morphological characterization and 3D tomography of soft lipid and polymeric nanoparticles as well as biological materials such as viruses and DNA without chemical fixation. Here, we review and discuss recent advances in Cryo-TEM analysis of lipid-based drug nanocarriers with particular emphasis on morphological and internal nanostructure characterization of lyotropic liquid crystalline nanoparticles such as cubosomes and hexosomes.

  20. Polymersomes, smaller than you think: ferrocene as a TEM probe to determine core structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, A. H., E-mail: ahj@soton.ac.u [University of Southampton, School of Biological Sciences (United Kingdom); Dalton, P. D. [Queensland University of Technology, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation (Australia); Newman, T. A. [University of Southampton, School of Medicine, Clinical Neurosciences (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-15

    By incorporating ferrocene into the hydrophobic membrane of PEG-b-PCL polymersome nanoparticles it is possible to selectively visualize their core using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Two different sizes of ferrocene-loaded polymersomes with mean hydrodynamic diameters of approximately 40 and 90 nm were prepared. Image analysis of TEM pictures of these polymersomes found that the mean diameter of the core was 4-5 times smaller than the mean hydrodynamic diameter. The values obtained also allow the surface diameter and internal volume of the core to be calculated.