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Sample records for microphthalmia transcription factor

  1. Design, construction, and analysis of specific zinc finger nucleases for microphthalmia - associate transcription factor

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    Wenwen Wang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This work studied the design, construction, and cleavage analysis of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs that could cut the specific sequences within microphthalmia - associate transcription factor (mitfa of zebra fish. The target site and ZFPs were selected and designed with zinc finger tools, while the ZFPs were synthesized using DNAWorks and two-step PCR. The ZFNs were constructed, expressed, purified, and analyzed in vitro. As expected, the designed ZFNs could create a double-stand break (DSB at the target site in vitro. The DNAWorks, two-step PCR, and an optimized process of protein expression were firstly induced in the construction of ZFNs successfully, which was an effective and simplified protocol. These results could be useful for further application of ZFNs - mediated gene targeting.

  2. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF – from Waardenburg syndrome genetics to melanoma therapy

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    Ivan Šamija

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF was first discovered as protein coded by gene whose mutations are associated with Waardenburg syndrome. Later, MITF was shown to be key transcription factor regulating melanogenesis. Further studies have shown that in addition to regulating melanogenesis MITF also plays central role in regulation of melanocyte development and survival. MITF gene is amplified in a proportion of melanomas and ectopic MITF expression can transform melanocytes so MITF can function as melanoma “lineage survival” oncogene. Different studies have further revealed MITF’s important but complex role in tumorigenesis and progression of melanoma. As expected from its important role in melanocytes and melanoma MITF is intricately regulated on all the levels from transcription to post-translational modifications. Although complex mechanisms of MITF functioning are still being revealed, MITF already has a valuable role in managing melanoma patients. Immunohistochemical analysis of MITF has shown both diagnostic and prognostic value in patients with melanoma. MITF is also a valuable specific marker for detection of circulating melanoma cells by reverse-transcription – polymerase chain reaction. MITF has recently been investigated as a potential target for melanoma therapy.

  3. Distinct and shared transcriptomes are regulated by microphthalmia-associated transcription factor isoforms in mast cells.

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    Shahlaee, Amir H; Brandal, Stephanie; Lee, Youl-Nam; Jie, Chunfa; Takemoto, Clifford M

    2007-01-01

    The Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (Mitf) is an essential basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper transcription factor for mast cell development. Mice deficient in Mitf harbor a severe mast cell deficiency, and Mitf-mutant mast cells cultured ex vivo display a number of functional defects. Therefore, an understanding of the genetic program regulated by Mitf may provide important insights into mast cell differentiation. Multiple, distinct isoforms of Mitf have been identified in a variety of cell types; we found that Mitf-a, Mitf-e, and Mitf-mc were the major isoforms expressed in mast cells. To determine the physiologic function of Mitf in mast cells, we restored expression of these isoforms in primary mast cells from Mitf(-/-) mice. We found that these isoforms restored granular morphology and integrin-mediated migration. By microarray analysis, proteases, signaling molecules, cell surface receptor, and transporters comprised the largest groups of genes up-regulated by all isoforms. Furthermore, we found that isoforms also regulated distinct genes sets, suggesting separable biological activities. This work defines the transcriptome regulated by Mitf in mast cells and supports its role as master regulator of mast cell differentiation. Expression of multiple isoforms of this transcription factor may provide for redundancy of biological activities while also allowing diversity of function.

  4. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor as the molecular target of cadmium toxicity in human melanocytes

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    Chantarawong, Wipa [Department of Molecular Biology and Applied Physiology, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Inter Departmental Multidisciplinary Graduate Program in Bioscience, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok (Thailand); Takeda, Kazuhisa; Sangartit, Weerapon; Yoshizawa, Miki [Department of Molecular Biology and Applied Physiology, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Pradermwong, Kantimanee [Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok (Thailand); Shibahara, Shigeki, E-mail: shibahar@med.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Biology and Applied Physiology, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • In human melanocytes, cadmium decreases the expression of MITF-M and tyrosinase and their mRNAs. • In human melanoma cells, cadmium decreases the expression of MITF-M protein and tyrosinase mRNA. • Expression of MITF-H is less sensitive to cadmium toxicity in melanocyte-linage cells. • Cadmium does not decrease the expression of MITF-H in retinal pigment epithelial cells. • MITF-M is the molecular target of cadmium toxicity in melanocytes. - Abstract: Dietary intake of cadmium is inevitable, causing age-related increase in cadmium accumulation in many organs, including hair, choroid and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Cadmium has been implicated in the pathogenesis of hearing loss and macular degeneration. The functions of cochlea and retina are maintained by melanocytes and RPE, respectively, and the differentiation of these pigment cells is regulated by microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF). In the present study, we explored the potential toxicity of cadmium in the cochlea and retina by using cultured human melanocytes and human RPE cell lines. MITF consists of multiple isoforms, including melanocyte-specific MITF-M and widely expressed MITF-H. Levels of MITF-M protein and its mRNA in human epidermal melanocytes and HMV-II melanoma cells were decreased significantly by cadmium. In parallel with the MITF reduction, mRNA levels of tyrosinase, the key enzyme of melanin biosynthesis that is regulated by MITF-M, were also decreased. In RPE cells, however, the levels of total MITF protein, constituting mainly MITF-H, were not decreased by cadmium. We thus identify MITF-M as the molecular target of cadmium toxicity in melanocytes, thereby accounting for the increased risk of disability from melanocyte malfunction, such as hearing and vision loss among people with elevated cadmium exposure.

  5. Regulatory and Functional Connection of Microphthalmia-Associated Transcription Factor and Anti-Metastatic Pigment Epithelium Derived Factor in Melanoma

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    Asunción Fernández-Barral

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF, a member of the serine protease inhibitor superfamily, has potent anti-metastatic effects in cutaneous melanoma through its direct actions on endothelial and melanoma cells. Here we show that PEDF expression positively correlates with microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF in melanoma cell lines and human samples. High PEDF and MITF expression is characteristic of low aggressive melanomas classified according to molecular and pathological criteria, whereas both factors are decreased in senescent melanocytes and naevi. Importantly, MITF silencing down-regulates PEDF expression in melanoma cell lines and primary melanocytes, suggesting that the correlation in the expression reflects a causal relationship. In agreement, analysis of Chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to high throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq data sets revealed three MITF binding regions within the first intron of SERPINF1, and reporter assays demonstrated that the binding of MITF to these regions is sufficient to drive transcription. Finally, we demonstrate that exogenous PEDF expression efficiently halts in vitro migration and invasion, as well as in vivo dissemination of melanoma cells induced by MITF silencing. In summary, these results identify PEDF as a novel transcriptional target of MITF and support a relevant functional role for the MITF-PEDF axis in the biology of melanoma.

  6. SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex is critical for the expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor in melanoma cells

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    Vachtenheim, Jiri, E-mail: jivach@upn.anet.cz [Laboratory of Molecular Biology, University Hospital, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Ondrusova, Lubica [Laboratory of Molecular Biology, University Hospital, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Borovansky, Jan [Institute of Biochemistry and Experimental Oncology, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2010-02-12

    The microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) is required for melanocyte development, maintenance of the melanocyte-specific transcription, and survival of melanoma cells. MITF positively regulates expression of more than 25 genes in pigment cells. Recently, it has been demonstrated that expression of several MITF downstream targets requires the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex, which contains one of the two catalytic subunits, Brm or Brg1. Here we show that the expression of MITF itself critically requires active SWI/SNF. In several Brm/Brg1-expressing melanoma cell lines, knockdown of Brg1 severely compromised MITF expression with a concomitant dowregulation of MITF targets and decreased cell proliferation. Although Brm was able to substitute for Brg1 in maintaining MITF expression and melanoma cell proliferation, sequential knockdown of both Brm and Brg1 in 501mel cells abolished proliferation. In Brg1-null SK-MEL-5 melanoma cells, depletion of Brm alone was sufficient to abrogate MITF expression and cell proliferation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation confirmed the binding of Brg1 or Brm to the promoter of MITF. Together these results demonstrate the essential role of SWI/SNF for expression of MITF and suggest that SWI/SNF may be a promissing target in melanoma therapy.

  7. Sesamin induces melanogenesis by microphthalmia-associated transcription factor and tyrosinase up-regulation via cAMP signaling pathway.

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    Jiang, Zequn; Li, Shasha; Liu, Yunyi; Deng, Pengyi; Huang, Jianguo; He, Guangyuan

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we confirmed that sesamin, an active lignan isolated from sesame seed and oil, is a novel skin-tanning compound. The melanin content and tyrosinase activity were increased by sesamin in a dose-dependent manner in B16 melanoma cells. The mRNA and protein levels of tyrosinase were also enhanced after the treatment with sesamin. Western blot analysis revealed that sesamin induced and sustained up-regulation of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF). Sesamin could activate cAMP response element (CRE) binding protein (CREB), but it had no effect on the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) or Akt. Moreover, sesamin activated protein kinase A (PKA) via a cAMP-dependent pathway. Consistent with these results, sesamin-mediated increase of melanin synthesis was reduced significantly by H-89, a PKA inhibitor, but not by SB203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor or by LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor. Sesamin-mediated phosphorylation of CREB and induction of MITF and tyrosinase expression were also inhibited by H-89. These findings indicated that sesamin could stimulate melanogenesis in B16 cells via the up-regulation of MITF and tyrosinase, which was, in turn, due to the activation of cAMP signaling.

  8. Expression of microphthalmia transcription factor, S100 protein, and HMB-45 in malignant melanoma and pigmented nevi

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    Xia, Jianxin; Wang, Yanlong; Li, Fuqiu; Wang, Jinfeng; Mu, Yan; Mei, Xianglin; Li, Xue; Zhu, Wenjing; Jin, Xianhua; Yu, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanoma (MM) is a type of malignant tumor, which originates from neural crest melanocytes. MM progresses rapidly and results in a high mortality rate. The present study aims to investigate the expression of microphthalmia transcription factor (MITF), the S100 protein, and HMB-45 in MM and pigmented nevi. A total of 32 MM samples (including three skin metastasis, three lymph node metastasis and two spindle cell MM samples), two Spitz nevus samples, four pigmented nevus samples and two blue nevus samples were collected. The expression levels of S100 protein, HMB-45, and MITF were observed via immunostaining. The S100 protein exhibited high positive rates in MM and pigment disorders (96.7 and 100%, respectively), but with low specificity. The S100 protein was also expressed in fibroblasts, myoepithelial cells, histocytes and Langerhans cells in normal skin samples. HMB-45 had high specificity. Its positive expression was only confined to MM cells and junctional nevus cells. Furthermore, HMB-45 was not expressed in melanocytes in the normal tissue samples around the tumor or in the benign intradermal nevus cells. MITF exhibited high specificity and high sensitivity. It was expressed in the nuclei of melanocytes, MM cells and nevus cells. It was observed to be strongly expressed in metastatic MM and spindle cell MMs. Thus, MITF may present as a specific immunomarker for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of MM. PMID:27602212

  9. Melanogenesis-Inducing Effect of Cirsimaritin through Increases in Microphthalmia-Associated Transcription Factor and Tyrosinase Expression

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    Hyo Jung Kim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The melanin-inducing properties of cirsimaritin were investigated in murine B16F10 cells. Cirsimaritin is an active flavone with methoxy groups, which is isolated from the branches of Lithocarpus dealbatus. Tyrosinase activity and melanin content in murine B16F10 melanoma cells were increased by cirsimaritin in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot analysis revealed that tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related protein (TRP 1, TRP2 protein levels were enhanced after treatment with cirsimaritin for 48 h. Cirsimaritin also upregulated the expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF after 24 h of treatment. Furthermore, cirsimaritin induced phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB in a dose-dependent manner after treatment for 15 min. The cirsimaritin-mediated increase of tyrosinase activity was significantly attenuated by H89, a cAMP-dependent protein kinase A inhibitor. These findings indicate that cirsimaritin stimulates melanogenesis in B16F10 cells by activation of CREB as well as upregulation of MITF and tyrosinase expression, which was activated by cAMP signaling. Finally, the melanogenic effect of cirsimaritin was confirmed in human epidermal melanocytes. These results support the putative application of cirsimaritin in ultraviolet photoprotection and hair coloration treatments.

  10. N-(4-bromophenethyl) Caffeamide Inhibits Melanogenesis by Regulating AKT/Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 Beta/Microphthalmia-associated Transcription Factor and Tyrosinase-related Protein 1/Tyrosinase.

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    Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Chen, Chien-Chia; Lin, Ping; You, Ya-Jhen; Chiang, Hsiu-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Skin color is primarily produced by melanin, which is a crucial pigment that protects the skin from UV-induced damage and prevents carcinogenesis. However, accumulated melanin in the skin may cause hyperpigmentation and related disorders. Melanin synthesis comprises consecutive oxidative reactions, and tyrosinase is the enzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting process of melanogenesis. In this study, tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TRP-1) and TRP-2 contributed to melanin formation. N-(4-bromophenethyl) caffeamide ((E)-N-(4-bromophenethyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)acrylamide; K36H), a caffeic acid phenyl amide derivative, inhibited α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH)-induced melanogenesis and tyrosinase activity in B16F0 cells. In addition, K36H reduced the protein expression of the phospho-cAMP response element binding protein (p-CREB), microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), tyrosinase, and TRP-1. Moreover, K36H promoted AKT and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) phosphorylation, thereby inhibiting MITF transcription activity. Thus, K36H attenuated α-MSH-induced cAMP pathways, contributing to hypopigmentation. The results of a safety assay revealed that K36H did not exhibit cytotoxicity or irritate the skin or eyes. According to these results, K36H may have the potential to be used as a whitening agent in the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries.

  11. Hair dyes resorcinol and lawsone reduce production of melanin in melanoma cells by tyrosinase activity inhibition and decreasing tyrosinase and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) expression.

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    Lee, Shu-Mei; Chen, Yi-Shyan; Lin, Chih-Chien; Chen, Kuan-Hung

    2015-01-09

    Hair coloring products are one of the most important cosmetics for modern people; there are three major types of hair dyes, including the temporary, semi-permanent and permanent hair dyes. The selected hair dyes (such as ammonium persulfate, sodium persulfate, resorcinol and lawsone) are the important components for hair coloring products. Therefore, we analyzed the effects of these compounds on melanogenesis in B16-F10 melanoma cells. The results proved that hair dyes resorcinol and lawsone can reduce the production of melanin. The results also confirmed that resorcinol and lawsone inhibit mushroom and cellular tyrosinase activities in vitro. Resorcinol and lawsone can also downregulate the protein levels of tyrosinase and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) in B16-F10 cells. Thus, we suggest that frequent use of hair dyes may have the risk of reducing natural melanin production in hair follicles. Moreover, resorcinol and lawsone may also be used as hypopigmenting agents to food, agricultural and cosmetic industry in the future.

  12. Hair Dyes Resorcinol and Lawsone Reduce Production of Melanin in Melanoma Cells by Tyrosinase Activity Inhibition and Decreasing Tyrosinase and Microphthalmia-Associated Transcription Factor (MITF Expression

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    Shu-Mei Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hair coloring products are one of the most important cosmetics for modern people; there are three major types of hair dyes, including the temporary, semi-permanent and permanent hair dyes. The selected hair dyes (such as ammonium persulfate, sodium persulfate, resorcinol and lawsone are the important components for hair coloring products. Therefore, we analyzed the effects of these compounds on melanogenesis in B16-F10 melanoma cells. The results proved that hair dyes resorcinol and lawsone can reduce the production of melanin. The results also confirmed that resorcinol and lawsone inhibit mushroom and cellular tyrosinase activities in vitro. Resorcinol and lawsone can also downregulate the protein levels of tyrosinase and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF in B16-F10 cells. Thus, we suggest that frequent use of hair dyes may have the risk of reducing natural melanin production in hair follicles. Moreover, resorcinol and lawsone may also be used as hypopigmenting agents to food, agricultural and cosmetic industry in the future.

  13. microRNA-155, induced by interleukin-1ß, represses the expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF-M in melanoma cells.

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    Nathalie Arts

    Full Text Available Loss of expression of surface antigens represents a significant problem for cancer immunotherapy. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF-M regulates melanocyte fate by driving expression of many differentiation genes, whose protein products can be recognized by cytolytic T lymphocytes. We previously reported that interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß can downregulate MITF-M levels. Here we show that downregulation of MITF-M expression by IL-1ß was paralleled by an upregulation of miR-155 expression in four melanoma lines. We confirmed that miR-155 was able to target endogenous MITF-M in melanoma cells and demonstrated a role for miR-155 in the IL-1ß-induced repression of MITF-M by using an antagomiR. Notably, we also observed a strong negative correlation between MITF-M and miR-155 levels in a mouse model of melanoma. Taken together, our results indicate that MITF-M downregulation by inflammatory stimuli might be partly due to miR-155 upregulation. This could represent a novel mechanism of melanoma immune escape in an inflammatory microenvironment.

  14. Evaluation of microphthalmia associated transcription factor (MITF expression in peripheral blood of a population with malign melanoma and control population and cell lines

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    Nelson Rangel

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of malign melanoma tumours has increased more rapidly than any other type of cancer; this has intensified the searching for tools that facilitate early detection of melanoma. Microphthalmia associated transcription factor (MITF is currently known as being a master melanocyte regulator. The article analyses MITF gene expression in peripheral blood of individuals suffering from melanoma, compared to people without any type of cancer and some cell lines.Materials and methods: Thirty one samples of peripheral blood were used: 19 from patients having melanoma and 12 from healthy people. Then RNA was extracted from these samples. MITF and housekeeping genes (b2M and GAPDH expression levels were then quantified by real-time PCR. Five cell lines were also used to determine the MITF expression.Results: MITF gene expression could be observed in all individuals, though no statistical significant differences were found among expression levels in the groups studied (p=0.09. Even so, MITF expression in the group of patients suffering from melanoma was much more variable than that observed in the group of cancer-free people. Expression was detected in the cell line AGS (gastric adenocarcinoma, not yet described.Conclusions: MITF gene expression levels were detected in the peripheral blood from both people suffering from melanoma and people without any type of cancer. However, variability in the number of molecules in MITF gene expression was observed in people with melanoma, this suggests the presence of tumour cells in circulation.

  15. Cooperative antiproliferative signaling by aspirin and indole-3-carbinol targets microphthalmia-associated transcription factor gene expression and promoter activity in human melanoma cells.

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    Poindexter, Kevin M; Matthew, Susanne; Aronchik, Ida; Firestone, Gary L

    2016-04-01

    Antiproliferative signaling of combinations of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a natural indolecarbinol compound derived from cruciferous vegetables, was investigated in human melanoma cells. Melanoma cell lines with distinct mutational profiles were sensitive to different extents to the antiproliferative response of aspirin, with oncogenic BRAF-expressing G361 cells and wild-type BRAF-expressing SK-MEL-30 cells being the most responsive. I3C triggered a strong proliferative arrest of G361 melanoma cells and caused only a modest decrease in the proliferation of SK-MEL-30 cells. In both cell lines, combinations of aspirin and I3C cooperatively arrested cell proliferation and induced a G1 cell cycle arrest, and nearly ablated protein and transcript levels of the melanocyte master regulator microphthalmia-associated transcription factor isoform M (MITF-M). In melanoma cells transfected with a -333/+120-bp MITF-M promoter-luciferase reporter plasmid, treatment with aspirin and I3C cooperatively disrupted MITF-M promoter activity, which accounted for the loss of MITF-M gene products. Mutational analysis revealed that the aspirin required the LEF1 binding site, whereas I3C required the BRN2 binding site to mediate their combined and individual effects on MITF-M promoter activity. Consistent with LEF1 being a downstream effector of Wnt signaling, aspirin, but not I3C, downregulated protein levels of the Wnt co-receptor LDL receptor-related protein-6 and β-catenin and upregulated the β-catenin destruction complex component Axin. Taken together, our results demonstrate that aspirin-regulated Wnt signaling and I3C-targeted signaling pathways converge at distinct DNA elements in the MITF-M promoter to cooperatively disrupt MITF-M expression and melanoma cell proliferation.

  16. Sesamin induces melanogenesis by microphthalmia-associated transcription factor and tyrosinase up-regulation via cAMP signaling pathway

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    Zequn Jiang; Shasha Li; Yunyi Liu; Pengyi Deng; Jianguo Huang; Guangyuan He

    2011-01-01

    In this study,we confirmed that sesamin,an active lignan isolated from sesame seed and oil,is a novel skin-tanning compound.The melanin content and tyrosinase activity were increased by sesamin in a dose-dependent manner in B16 melanoma cells.The mRNA and protein levels of tyrosinase were also enhanced after the treatment with sesamin.Western blot analysis revealed that sesamin induced and sustained up-regulation of microphthalmiaassociated transcription factor (MITF).Sesamin could activate cAMP response element (CRE) binding protein (CREB),but it had no effect on the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) or Akt.Moreover,sesamin activated protein kinase A (PKA) via a cAMP-dependent pathway.Consistent with these results,sesamin-mediated increase of melanin synthesis was reduced significantly by H-89,a PKA inhibitor,but not by SB203580,a p38 MAPK inhibitor or by LY294002,a phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor.Sesamin-mediated phosphorylation of CREB and induction of MITF and tyrosinase expression were also inhibited by H-89.These findings indicated that sesamin could stimulate melanogenesis in B16 cells via the up-regulation of MITF and tyrosinase,which was,in turn,due to the activation of cAMP signaling.

  17. Hispolon Decreases Melanin Production and Induces Apoptosis in Melanoma Cells through the Downregulation of Tyrosinase and Microphthalmia-Associated Transcription Factor (MITF Expressions and the Activation of Caspase-3, -8 and -9

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    Yi-Shyan Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hispolon is one of the most important functional compounds that forms Phellinus linteus (Berkeley & Curtis Teng. Hispolon has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative and anticancer effects. In this study, we analyzed the functions of hispolon on melanogenesis and apoptosis in B16-F10 melanoma cells. The results demonstrated that hispolon is not an enzymatic inhibitor for tyrosinase; rather, it represses the expression of tyrosinase and the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF to reduce the production of melanin in α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH-stimulated B16-F10 cells at lower concentrations (less than 2 μM. In contrast, at higher concentration (greater than 10 μM, hispolon can induce activity of caspase-3, -8 and -9 to trigger apoptosis of B16-F10 cells but not of Detroit 551 normal fibroblast cells. Therefore, we suggest that hispolon has the potential to treat hyperpigmentation diseases and melanoma skin cancer in the future.

  18. Research advance in tumors associated with microphthalmia-associated transcription factor gene family%小眼畸形转录因子基因家族相关肿瘤的分子病理研究进展

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    饶秋; 周晓军

    2011-01-01

    @@ 小眼畸形转录因子(microphthalmia-associated transcription factor,MiTF)位于3号染色体短臂(3p),是一种具有基本螺旋-环-螺旋-亮氨酸拉链(bHLHZip)结构的转录因子[1].研究表明MiTF在结构上与TFE3、TFEB和TFEC最接近.它们具有相似的DNA结合区域,即具有"CA[C/T]GTG"核心结构的DNA区域,并通过该结构与特异的DNA结构相结合,调控体内多种基因表达[1].

  19. Gene expression profiling identifies microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF and Dickkopf-1 (DKK1 as regulators of microenvironment-driven alterations in melanoma phenotype.

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    Mariusz L Hartman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The diversity of functional phenotypes observed within a tumor does not exclusively result from intratumoral genetic heterogeneity but also from the response of cancer cells to the microenvironment. We have previously demonstrated that the morphological and functional phenotypes of melanoma can be dynamically altered upon external stimuli. FINDINGS: In the present study, transcriptome profiles were generated to explore the molecules governing phenotypes of melanospheres grown in the bFGF(+EGF(+ serum-free cultures and monolayers maintained in the serum-containing medium. Higher expression levels of MITF-dependent genes that are responsible for differentiation, e.g., TYR and MLANA, and stemness-related genes, e.g., ALDH1A1, were detected in melanospheres. These results were supported by the observation that the melanospheres contained more pigmented cells and cells exerting the self-renewal capacity than the monolayers. In addition, the expression of the anti-apoptotic, MITF-dependent genes e.g., BCL2A1 was also higher in the melanospheres. The enhanced activity of MITF in melanospheres, as illustrated by the increased expression of 74 MITF-dependent genes, identified MITF as a central transcriptional regulator in melanospheres. Importantly, several genes including MITF-dependent ones were expressed in melanospheres and original tumors at similar levels. The reduced MITF level in monolayers might be partially explained by suppression of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, and DKK1, a secreted inhibitor of this pathway, was highly up-regulated in monolayers in comparison to melanospheres and original tumors. Furthermore, the silencing of DKK1 in monolayers increased the percentage of cells with self-renewing capacity. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates that melanospheres can be used to unravel the molecular pathways that sustain intratumoral phenotypic heterogeneity. Melanospheres directly derived from tumor specimens more accurately mirrored

  20. Experimental Studies on Pathogenesis of Waardenburg Syndrome Type Ⅱ Resulting from Microphthalmia-Associated Transcription Factor Gene Mutations%MITF基因突变致Ⅱ型Waardenburg综合征发病的实验研究

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    张华; 陈红胜; 李家大; 罗洪金; 梅凌云; 贺楚峰; 冯永

    2014-01-01

    目的 通过体外实验研究小眼球畸形相关转录因子(microphthalmia-associated transcription factor,MITF)突变基因功能,初步探讨其致Ⅱ型Waardenburg综合征(Waardenburg syndrome,WS)发病的分子机制.方法 以野生型MITF基因真核细胞表达质粒pCMV-MITF-Flag为模板分别构建二个致Ⅱ型WS的MITF基因新发突变R217I和T192fsX18的真核细胞表达质粒.野生MITF和突变R217I和T192fsX18表达质粒瞬时转染黑色素瘤细胞或小鼠胚胎成纤维细胞(NIH3T3细胞),应用Western blot和细胞免疫荧光分别检测其表达和亚细胞定位;应用荧光素酶活性检测系统通过对酪氨酸酶(tyrosinase,TYR)报告基因活性检测观察野生/突变MITF蛋白对其靶基因TYR转录活性的调控作用,以及二个突变蛋白对野生MITF蛋白功能的影响;应用生物素标记的含E box基序(CATGTG)的DNA寡核苷酸链探针分别沉淀MITF、R217I及T192fsX18蛋白,检测野生/突变MITF蛋白与靶基因TYR启动子的结合力.结果 成功构建了突变型R217I、T192fsX18真核细胞重组表达质粒pCMV-R217I-Flag和pCMV-T192fsX18-Flag,MITF蛋白与R217I、T192fsX18突变蛋白在黑色素瘤细胞中正确表达,进一步验证了重组质粒构建的正确性.突变R217I蛋白与野生MITF蛋白一样仅在细胞核中分布,而T192fsX18蛋白则出现异常亚细胞定位,仅在细胞质中分布.尽管R217I蛋白仍残余部分功能可增加TYR启动子转录活性,但与野生MITF蛋白相比,二者差异有显著统计学意义(P<0.01),而T192fsX18蛋白则完全失去调控TYR启动子转录活性作用(P<0.01);二者均未对野生MITF蛋白功能产生显性负效应(P>0.05).突变R217I蛋白与野生MITF蛋白均可与TYR启动子特异DNA序列E-box结合,而突变T192fs X18蛋白则不能与之结合.结论 R217I和T192fsX18突变蛋白通过影响靶基因TYR转录活性,使其表达下调、黑色素合成减少,以单倍体剂量不足效应致Ⅱ型WS.

  1. FOXE3 plays a significant role in autosomal recessive microphthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Linda M; Tyler, Rebecca C; Schneider, Adele; Bardakjian, Tanya; Stoler, Joan M; Melancon, Serge B; Semina, Elena V

    2010-03-01

    FOXE3 forkhead transcription factor is essential to lens development in vertebrates. The eyes of Foxe3/foxe3-deficient mice and zebrafish fail to develop normally. In humans, autosomal dominant and recessive mutations in FOXE3 have been associated with variable phenotypes including anterior segment anomalies, cataract, and microphthalmia. We undertook sequencing of FOXE3 in 116 probands with a spectrum of ocular defects ranging from anterior segment dysgenesis and cataract to anophthalmia/microphthalmia. Recessive mutations in FOXE3 were found in four of 26 probands affected with bilateral microphthalmia (15% of all bilateral microphthalmia and 100% of consanguineous families with this phenotype). FOXE3-positive microphthalmia was accompanied by aphakia and/or corneal defects; no other associated systemic anomalies were observed in FOXE3-positive families. The previously reported c.720C > A (p.C240X) nonsense mutation was identified in two additional families in our sample and therefore appears to be recurrent, now reported in three independent microphthalmia families of varied ethnic backgrounds. Several missense variants were identified at varying frequencies in patient and control groups with some apparently being race-specific, which underscores the importance of utilizing race/ethnicity-matched control populations in evaluating the relevance of genetic screening results. In conclusion, FOXE3 mutations represent an important cause of nonsyndromic autosomal recessive bilateral microphthalmia.

  2. 小眼畸形转录因子和c-Met及组织蛋白酶-K在黑色素病变中的表达及意义%Expressions and significances of microphthalmia transcription factor, c-Met and cathepsin-K in malignant melanoma and nevi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李良; 张正祥; 吴波; 缪国良; 饶秋

    2014-01-01

    目的 探讨小眼畸形转录因子(microphthalmia transcription factor,MITF)、e-Met和组织蛋白酶-K (cathepsin-K)在恶性黑色素瘤、痣和非典型性痣中的表达及意义.方法 32例恶性黑色素瘤(恶黑组)、13例普通痣患者(普通痣组)和6例非典型性痣患者(非典型痣组)的组织标本,采用免疫组织化学法检测3组组织中MITF、c-Met和cathepsin-K的表达情况.结果 MITF、c-Met表达于黑色素细胞的细胞核和细胞质,cathepsin-K表达于细胞质和细胞膜;MITF、c-Met和cathepsin-K阳性表达率恶黑组分别为93.8%、90.6%和93.8%,普通痣组分别为92.3%、92.3%和100.0%,非典型痣组分别为100.0%、100.0%和100.0%,3组间比较差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05);恶黑组MITF((卅))、c-Met((卅))及cathepsin-K((卅))阳性率高于普通痣组和非典型痣组(P<0.05);恶黑组转移者MITF、c-Met及cathepsin-K阳性率明显高于非转移者(P<0.05),结节性恶性黑色素瘤者MITF、c-Met及cathepsin-K阳性率高于表浅扩散性恶性黑色素瘤者(P<0.05);恶黑组转移者MITF、c-Met及cathepsin-K阳性率均为100%,高于HMB-45阳性率(75.0%)(P<0.05).结论 MITF、c-Met及cathepsin-K对恶性黑色素瘤的诊断及评估其进展和生物学行为有重要价值.

  3. Anophthalmia and microphthalmia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verma Amit S

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Anophthalmia and microphthalmia describe, respectively, the absence of an eye and the presence of a small eye within the orbit. The combined birth prevalence of these conditions is up to 30 per 100,000 population, with microphthalmia reported in up to 11% of blind children. High-resolution cranial imaging, post-mortem examination and genetic studies suggest that these conditions represent a phenotypic continuum. Both anophthalmia and microphthalmia may occur in isolation or as part of a syndrome, as in one-third of cases. Anophthalmia/microphthalmia have complex aetiology with chromosomal, monogenic and environmental causes identified. Chromosomal duplications, deletions and translocations are implicated. Of monogenic causes only SOX2 has been identified as a major causative gene. Other linked genes include PAX6, OTX2, CHX10 and RAX. SOX2 and PAX6 mutations may act through causing lens induction failure. FOXE3 mutations, associated with lens agenesis, have been observed in a few microphthalmic patients. OTX2, CHX10 and RAX have retinal expression and may result in anophthalmia/microphthalmia through failure of retinal differentiation. Environmental factors also play a contributory role. The strongest evidence appears to be with gestational-acquired infections, but may also include maternal vitamin A deficiency, exposure to X-rays, solvent misuse and thalidomide exposure. Diagnosis can be made pre- and post-natally using a combination of clinical features, imaging (ultrasonography and CT/MR scanning and genetic analysis. Genetic counselling can be challenging due to the extensive range of genes responsible and wide variation in phenotypic expression. Appropriate counselling is indicated if the mode of inheritance can be identified. Differential diagnoses include cryptophthalmos, cyclopia and synophthalmia, and congenital cystic eye. Patients are often managed within multi-disciplinary teams consisting of ophthalmologists, paediatricians

  4. Anophthalmia and microphthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Amit S; Fitzpatrick, David R

    2007-11-26

    Anophthalmia and microphthalmia describe, respectively, the absence of an eye and the presence of a small eye within the orbit. The combined birth prevalence of these conditions is up to 30 per 100,000 population, with microphthalmia reported in up to 11% of blind children. High-resolution cranial imaging, post-mortem examination and genetic studies suggest that these conditions represent a phenotypic continuum. Both anophthalmia and microphthalmia may occur in isolation or as part of a syndrome, as in one-third of cases. Anophthalmia/microphthalmia have complex aetiology with chromosomal, monogenic and environmental causes identified. Chromosomal duplications, deletions and translocations are implicated. Of monogenic causes only SOX2 has been identified as a major causative gene. Other linked genes include PAX6, OTX2, CHX10 and RAX. SOX2 and PAX6 mutations may act through causing lens induction failure. FOXE3 mutations, associated with lens agenesis, have been observed in a few microphthalmic patients. OTX2, CHX10 and RAX have retinal expression and may result in anophthalmia/microphthalmia through failure of retinal differentiation. Environmental factors also play a contributory role. The strongest evidence appears to be with gestational-acquired infections, but may also include maternal vitamin A deficiency, exposure to X-rays, solvent misuse and thalidomide exposure. Diagnosis can be made pre- and post-natally using a combination of clinical features, imaging (ultrasonography and CT/MR scanning) and genetic analysis. Genetic counselling can be challenging due to the extensive range of genes responsible and wide variation in phenotypic expression. Appropriate counselling is indicated if the mode of inheritance can be identified. Differential diagnoses include cryptophthalmos, cyclopia and synophthalmia, and congenital cystic eye. Patients are often managed within multi-disciplinary teams consisting of ophthalmologists, paediatricians and/or clinical geneticists

  5. 小眼畸形相关转录因子转录调控与白癜风临床类型的相关性研究%Correlation Between Microphthalmia-associated Transcription Factor and Clinical Pattern in Vitiligo Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪亚杰; 王平; 洪为松; 章莉; 郑俊惠

    2013-01-01

    目的 研究小眼畸形相关转录因子(MITF)及其转录调控的酪氨酸酶相关蛋白(TRPs)与白癜风临床类型的相关性.方法 选择非节段型白癜风(NSV)17例和节段型白癜风(SV) 13例,对所有病例均取白斑区、远离白斑正常肤色区的表皮片,首先应用免疫组织化学方法原位检测黑素细胞的MITF及其主要转录调控分子酪氨酸酶(TYR)、酪氨酸酶相关蛋白1(TYRPI)和酪氨酸酶相关蛋白2(TYRP2)的表达情况,并对所有30例远离白斑正常肤色区的表皮黑素细胞进行培养,应用免疫印迹方法检测培养的黑素细胞MITF及TYR、TYRP1和TYRP2的表达情况.结果 (1)原位表达结果:白斑区:所有病例MITF及TYR、TYRP1和TYRP2的表达均为阴性;正常肤色区:SV的MITF表达显著抑制,与NSV及正常人对比均具有统计学差异(P<0.05),NSV的MITF、NSV与SV的TYR、TYRP1和TYRP2表达与正常人对比均没有统计学差异(P>0.05).(2)培养黑素细胞的蛋白表达结果:NSV的TYRP2表达下调,与正常人对比具有统计学差异(P<0.05),而MITF、TYR和TYRP1表达正常;SV的MITF与NSV及正常人对比均具有统计学差异(P<0.05),而TYR、TYRP1和TYRP2正常表达.结论 NSV和SV可能存在不同的MITF转录调控机制.%Objective To analyze the expression of microphthalmia - associated transcription factor ( MITF) , tyrosinase - related proteins (TRPs) and the correlation with clinical pattern in patients with vitiligo. Methods Suction epidermal sheets were taken from le-sional and non - lesional skin from patients of 17 non - segmental vitiligo ( NSV) and 13 segmental vitiligo ( SV) respectively. MITF and its transcriptional molecules tyrosinase (TYR) , tyrosinase - related protein - 1 (TYRP1) , and tyrosinase - related protein - 2 (TYRP2) of melanocytes from lesional and non - lesional skin were detected by immunohistochemistry. MITF, TYR, TYRP1 and TYRP2 of cultured melanocytes from non -lesional vitiligo skin were detected

  6. Genetic Effect of Tyrosinase (TYR), Microphthalmia-associated Transcription Factor (MITF) and Agouti Signaling Protein (ASIP) Genes on Melanin Deposition of White Silky Fowl (Gallus gallus domesticus Brisson)%酪氨酸酶(TYR)、小眼畸形相关转录因子(MITF)和刺鼠信号蛋白(ASIP)基因对白绒乌骨鸡黑色素沉积的遗传效应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑嫩珠; 李丽; 辛清武; 缪中纬; 朱志明; 陈黎; 刘凤辉; 吴剑飞; 黄勤楼

    2015-01-01

    为研究白绒乌骨鸡(Gallus gallus domesticus Brisson)黑色素沉积分子机制,本研究采用实时荧光定量PCR(quantitative Real-time PCR,qRT-PCR)的2-△△Ct检测酪氨酸酶(tyrosinase,TYR)、刺鼠信号蛋白(agouti signaling protein,ASIP)和小眼畸形相关转录因子(microphthalmia-associated transcription factor,MITF)基因在乌骨鸡皮肤、肌肉、肝脏、肾脏和肌胃的表达情况,采用紫外分光光度法测定不同组织黑色素含量,探索3个基因在不同组织中mRNA表达量与黑色素沉积之间的关系.结果表明,TYR、MITF和ASIP在所有组织中均有表达,且各基因mRNA相对表达量在各组织间差异极显著(P<0.01),其中MITF和TYR mRNA表达量依次为皮肤>肾脏>肌胃>肝脏>肌肉,与乌骨鸡各组织黑色素沉积规律基本一致;ASIP基因表达量则与其相反,表现为肌肉>肝脏>肌胃>肾脏>皮肤.相关性分析表明,TYR和MITF基因在各个组织中的表达量与其黑色素含量呈显著正相关(P<0.05),ASIP基因表达量与其呈显著负相关(P<0.05).由此提示,TYR、MITF和ASIP与白绒乌骨鸡黑色素沉积均具有一定的相关性,其中TYR和MITF基因的高表达可能促进乌骨鸡黑色素沉积,ASIP则相反.本研究为进一步阐明黑色素沉积的遗传调控机制提供了理论基础.

  7. 藏羊刺鼠信号蛋白基因(Agouti)的多态性及不同颜色被毛皮肤组织中Agouti与小眼畸形相关转录因子基因(MITF)表达的定量分析%The Polymorphism of Agouti Signaling Protein Gene (Agouti) and the Expression of A gouti and Microphthalmia-associated Transcription Factor Gene MITF in Different Coat Color Skin Tissues of Tibetan Sheep (Ovis aries)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩吉龙; 岳耀敬; 裴杰; 郭婷婷; 刘建斌; 郭健; 孙晓萍; 冯瑞林; 杨博辉

    2013-01-01

    expression quantity of Agouti gene and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor gene (MITF), so as to analyze the discrepancy of relative expression quantity of the same gene in different skin tissue with different coat color and then had a correlation analysis of mRNA expression quantity of the two genes in the same parts of the same individual. The results showed that there was no correlation between Agouti gene exon's SNP polymorphism and coat color, so did the CNV of Agouti gene and coat color. Brown was significantly higher than that of other color skin tissue in mRNA expression of Agouti gene (P<0.05), mRNA expression quantity of MITF gene in black skin tissue had a great difference to other color skin tissue (F<0.05). Through correlation analysis, there was no significant correlation for mRNA's relative expression value of both genes in the same color of skin tissue of the same individual. The results presumed that the polymorphism of Agouti gene may have no evident correlation to the coat color of Tibetan sheep, the mRNA expression of MITF gene of the skin tissue around the eye socket plays a certain role in the formation of the black coat color of Tibetan sheep. mRNA expression of Agouti and MITF genes may have to do with the black brown hair; mRNA expression of Agouti and MITF genes has no evident correlation to the white hair, respectively.

  8. Microphthalmia in Texel sheep is associated with a missense mutation in the paired-like homeodomain 3 (PITX3) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Doreen; Tetens, Jens; Brunner, Adrian; Bürstel, Daniela; Ganter, Martin; Kijas, James; Drögemüller, Cord

    2010-01-13

    Microphthalmia in sheep is an autosomal recessive inherited congenital anomaly found within the Texel breed. It is characterized by extremely small or absent eyes and affected lambs are absolutely blind. For the first time, we use a genome-wide ovine SNP array for positional cloning of a Mendelian trait in sheep. Genotyping 23 cases and 23 controls using Illumina's OvineSNP50 BeadChip allowed us to localize the causative mutation for microphthalmia to a 2.4 Mb interval on sheep chromosome 22 by association and homozygosity mapping. The PITX3 gene is located within this interval and encodes a homeodomain-containing transcription factor involved in vertebrate lens formation. An abnormal development of the lens vesicle was shown to be the primary event in ovine microphthalmia. Therefore, we considered PITX3 a positional and functional candidate gene. An ovine BAC clone was sequenced, and after full-length cDNA cloning the PITX3 gene was annotated. Here we show that the ovine microphthalmia phenotype is perfectly associated with a missense mutation (c.338G>C, p.R113P) in the evolutionary conserved homeodomain of PITX3. Selection against this candidate causative mutation can now be used to eliminate microphthalmia from Texel sheep in production systems. Furthermore, the identification of a naturally occurring PITX3 mutation offers the opportunity to use the Texel as a genetically characterized large animal model for human microphthalmia.

  9. Microphthalmia in Texel sheep is associated with a missense mutation in the paired-like homeodomain 3 (PITX3 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doreen Becker

    Full Text Available Microphthalmia in sheep is an autosomal recessive inherited congenital anomaly found within the Texel breed. It is characterized by extremely small or absent eyes and affected lambs are absolutely blind. For the first time, we use a genome-wide ovine SNP array for positional cloning of a Mendelian trait in sheep. Genotyping 23 cases and 23 controls using Illumina's OvineSNP50 BeadChip allowed us to localize the causative mutation for microphthalmia to a 2.4 Mb interval on sheep chromosome 22 by association and homozygosity mapping. The PITX3 gene is located within this interval and encodes a homeodomain-containing transcription factor involved in vertebrate lens formation. An abnormal development of the lens vesicle was shown to be the primary event in ovine microphthalmia. Therefore, we considered PITX3 a positional and functional candidate gene. An ovine BAC clone was sequenced, and after full-length cDNA cloning the PITX3 gene was annotated. Here we show that the ovine microphthalmia phenotype is perfectly associated with a missense mutation (c.338G>C, p.R113P in the evolutionary conserved homeodomain of PITX3. Selection against this candidate causative mutation can now be used to eliminate microphthalmia from Texel sheep in production systems. Furthermore, the identification of a naturally occurring PITX3 mutation offers the opportunity to use the Texel as a genetically characterized large animal model for human microphthalmia.

  10. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130...

  11. The discovery of the microphthalmia locus and its gene, Mitf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnheiter, Heinz

    2010-12-01

    The history of the discovery of the microphthalmia locus and its gene, now called Mitf, is a testament to the triumph of serendipity. Although the first microphthalmia mutation was discovered among the descendants of a mouse that was irradiated for the purpose of mutagenesis, the mutation most likely was not radiation induced but occurred spontaneously in one of the parents of a later breeding. Although Mitf might eventually have been identified by other molecular genetic techniques, it was first cloned from a chance transgene insertion at the microphthalmia locus. And although Mitf was found to encode a member of a well-known transcription factor family, its analysis might still be in its infancy had Mitf not turned out to be of crucial importance for the physiology and pathology of many distinct organs, including eye, ear, immune system, bone, and skin, and in particular for melanoma. In fact, near seven decades of Mitf research have led to many insights about development, function, degeneration, and malignancies of a number of specific cell types, and it is hoped that these insights will one day lead to therapies benefitting those afflicted with diseases originating in these cell types.

  12. Dual roles of lineage restricted transcription factors: the case of MITF in melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Carmit; Fisher, David E

    2011-01-01

    Microphthalmia-associated Transcription Factor, MITF, is a master regulator of melanocyte development, differentiation, migration, and survival.(1) A broad collection of studies have indicated that MITF directly regulates the transcription of genes involved in pigmentation, which are selective to the melanocyte lineage. In addition, MITF controls expression of genes which are expressed in multiple cell lineages, and may also play differential roles in activating vs. maintaining gene expression patterns. In this Point of View article, we discuss lineage restricted transcription factor activation of both tissue-specific and ubiquitously expressed genes using melanocytes and MITF as a model system that may eventually provide insights into such processes in multiple cell lineages.

  13. The transcription factor encyclopedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I; Bolotin, Eugene; Ticoll, Amy; Cheung, Warren A; Zhang, Xiao Yu Cindy; Dickman, Christopher T D; Fulton, Debra L; Lim, Jonathan S; Schnabl, Jake M; Ramos, Oscar H P; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille; de Leeuw, Charles N; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Ryffel, Gerhart U; Lam, Eric W-F; Kist, Ralf; Wilson, Miranda S C; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Brosens, Jan J; Beccari, Leonardo L; Bovolenta, Paola; Benayoun, Bérénice A; Monteiro, Lara J; Schwenen, Helma D C; Grontved, Lars; Wederell, Elizabeth; Mandrup, Susanne; Veitia, Reiner A; Chakravarthy, Harini; Hoodless, Pamela A; Mancarelli, M Michela; Torbett, Bruce E; Banham, Alison H; Reddy, Sekhar P; Cullum, Rebecca L; Liedtke, Michaela; Tschan, Mario P; Vaz, Michelle; Rizzino, Angie; Zannini, Mariastella; Frietze, Seth; Farnham, Peggy J; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Brown, Philip J; Laperrière, David; Leprince, Dominique; de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Prince, Kelly L; Putker, Marrit; del Peso, Luis; Camenisch, Gieri; Wenger, Roland H; Mikula, Michal; Rozendaal, Marieke; Mader, Sylvie; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Rhodes, Simon J; Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Olechnowicz, Sam W Z; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S; Nanan, Kyster K; Wegner, Michael; Hou, Juan; Mullen, Rachel D; Colvin, Stephanie C; Noy, Peter John; Webb, Carol F; Witek, Matthew E; Ferrell, Scott; Daniel, Juliet M; Park, Jason; Waldman, Scott A; Peet, Daniel J; Taggart, Michael; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Karrich, Julien J; Blom, Bianca; Vesuna, Farhad; O'Geen, Henriette; Sun, Yunfu; Gronostajski, Richard M; Woodcroft, Mark W; Hough, Margaret R; Chen, Edwin; Europe-Finner, G Nicholas; Karolczak-Bayatti, Magdalena; Bailey, Jarrod; Hankinson, Oliver; Raman, Venu; LeBrun, David P; Biswal, Shyam; Harvey, Christopher J; DeBruyne, Jason P; Hogenesch, John B; Hevner, Robert F; Héligon, Christophe; Luo, Xin M; Blank, Marissa Cathleen; Millen, Kathleen Joyce; Sharlin, David S; Forrest, Douglas; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zhao, Chunyan; Mishima, Yuriko; Sinha, Satrajit; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Sladek, Frances M; Bradley, Philip H; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe.

  14. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I

    2012-01-01

    mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written......ABSTRACT: Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130...

  15. Smad transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massagué, Joan; Seoane, Joan; Wotton, David

    2005-12-01

    Smad transcription factors lie at the core of one of the most versatile cytokine signaling pathways in metazoan biology-the transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) pathway. Recent progress has shed light into the processes of Smad activation and deactivation, nucleocytoplasmic dynamics, and assembly of transcriptional complexes. A rich repertoire of regulatory devices exerts control over each step of the Smad pathway. This knowledge is enabling work on more complex questions about the organization, integration, and modulation of Smad-dependent transcriptional programs. We are beginning to uncover self-enabled gene response cascades, graded Smad response mechanisms, and Smad-dependent synexpression groups. Our growing understanding of TGFbeta signaling through the Smad pathway provides general principles for how animal cells translate complex inputs into concrete behavior.

  16. Eukaryotic transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staby, Lasse; O'Shea, Charlotte; Willemoës, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Gene-specific transcription factors (TFs) are key regulatory components of signaling pathways, controlling, for example, cell growth, development, and stress responses. Their biological functions are determined by their molecular structures, as exemplified by their structured DNA-binding domains...... targeting specific cis-acting elements in genes, and by the significant lack of fixed tertiary structure in their extensive intrinsically disordered regions. Recent research in protein intrinsic disorder (ID) has changed our understanding of transcriptional activation domains from 'negative noodles' to ID...... them to participate in large interactomes, how they use only a few hydrophobic residues, short sequence motifs, prestructured motifs, and coupled folding and binding for their interactions with co-activators, and how their accessibility to post-translational modification affects their interactions...

  17. Waardenburg syndrome type 2 caused by mutations in the human microphthalmia (MITF) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassabehji, M; Newton, V E; Read, A P

    1994-11-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type 2 (WS2) is a dominantly inherited syndrome of hearing loss and pigmentary disturbances. We recently mapped a WS2 gene to chromosome 3p12.3-p14.1 and proposed as a candidate gene MITF, the human homologue of the mouse microphthalmia (mi) gene. This encodes a putative basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper transcription factor expressed in adult skin and in embryonic retina, otic vesicle and hair follicles. Mice carrying mi mutations show reduced pigmentation of the eyes and coat, and with some alleles, microphthalmia, hearing loss, osteopetrosis and mast cell defects. Here we show that affected individuals in two WS2 families have mutations affecting splice sites in the MITF gene.

  18. [SOX2 defect and anophthalmia and microphthalmia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fu-xiang; Fan, Xian-qun

    2012-11-01

    As a severe congenital developmental disorder, anophthalmia and microphthalmia are usually accompanied with vision impairment and hypoevolutism of the orbit in the affected side. Many genes are involved in anophthalmia and microphthalmia, in which, SOX2 is an important one. The defect of SOX2 causes multiple system disorders, including anophthalmia and microphthalmia. We describe the relationship between the SOX2 defect and anophthalmia/microphthalmia, in order to offer some proposals for the differential diagnosis, treatment and research of anophthalmia and microphthalmia.

  19. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cartwright, P; Helin, K

    2000-01-01

    To elicit the transcriptional response following intra- or extracellular stimuli, the signals need to be transmitted to their site of action within the nucleus. The nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription factors is a mechanism mediating this process. The activation and inactivation...... of the transcriptional response is essential for cells to progress through the cell cycle in a normal manner. The involvement of cytoplasmic and nuclear accessory molecules, and the general nuclear membrane transport components, are essential for this process. Although nuclear import and export for different...... transcription factor families are regulated by similar mechanisms, there are several differences that allow for the specific activation of each transcription factor. This review discusses the general import and export pathways found to be common amongst many different transcription factors, and highlights...

  20. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cartwright, P; Helin, K

    2000-01-01

    To elicit the transcriptional response following intra- or extracellular stimuli, the signals need to be transmitted to their site of action within the nucleus. The nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription factors is a mechanism mediating this process. The activation and inactivation...... transcription factor families are regulated by similar mechanisms, there are several differences that allow for the specific activation of each transcription factor. This review discusses the general import and export pathways found to be common amongst many different transcription factors, and highlights...... of the transcriptional response is essential for cells to progress through the cell cycle in a normal manner. The involvement of cytoplasmic and nuclear accessory molecules, and the general nuclear membrane transport components, are essential for this process. Although nuclear import and export for different...

  1. Sigma Factors for Cyanobacterial Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousuke Imamura

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are photosynthesizing microorganisms that can be used as a model for analyzing gene expression. The expression of genes involves transcription and translation. Transcription is performed by the RNA polymerase (RNAP holoenzyme, comprising a core enzyme and a sigma (σ factor which confers promoter selectivity. The unique structure, expression, and function of cyanobacterial σ factors (and RNAP core subunits are summarized here based on studies, reported previously. The types of promoter recognized by the σ factors are also discussed with regard to transcriptional regulation.

  2. Transcription factors - Methods and protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CarloAlberto Redi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A hearty wellcome to prof. Higgins editorial toil: a necessary tool for those colleagues (young and older fighting each day with the transcription factor they are involved with. In fact, the book is a full coverage compendium of state of the art papers dealing with practical thecniques and theoretical concepts about transcription factors. Each of the chapters (twenty-four is written by colleagues already working with one of the many trascription factors we become acquainted with. For the sake of the reader the volume is divided in four parts: Part I is a brief (when compared to the others three ! introductory presentation of the shuttling (i.e., transcription factor nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking achieved by three reviews presentation of this biologically critical phenomenon. Part II (nine chapters is devoted to the necessary techniques to study nuclear translocation ...............

  3. Transcription factor-based biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Jeffrey A; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides for a system comprising a BmoR transcription factor, a .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase, and a pBMO promoter operatively linked to a reporter gene, wherein the pBMO promoter is capable of expression of the reporter gene with an activated form of the BmoR and the .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase.

  4. HDG1 transcription factor targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horstman, A.; Boutilier, K.A.; Sanchez Perez, Gabino

    2015-01-01

    The AIL transcription factor BABY BOOM (BBM) is required together with the related PLETHORA proteins for embryo and root meristem development and its expression is sufficient to confer pluripotency and totipotency to somatic tissues. We show that BBM and other AIL proteins interact with multiple

  5. Transcription factors in alkaloid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2013-01-01

    Higher plants produce a large variety of low-molecular weight secondary compounds. Among them, nitrogen-containing alkaloids are the most biologically active and are often used pharmaceutically. Whereas alkaloid chemistry has been intensively investigated, alkaloid biosynthesis, including the relevant biosynthetic enzymes, genes and their regulation, and especially transcription factors, is largely unknown, as only a limited number of plant species produce certain types of alkaloids and they are difficult to study. Recently, however, several groups have succeeded in isolating the transcription factors that are involved in the biosynthesis of several types of alkaloids, including bHLH, ERF, and WRKY. Most of them show Jasmonate (JA) responsiveness, which suggests that the JA signaling cascade plays an important role in alkaloid biosynthesis. Here, we summarize the types and functions of transcription factors that have been isolated in alkaloid biosynthesis, and characterize their similarities and differences compared to those in other secondary metabolite pathways, such as phenylpropanoid and terpenoid biosyntheses. The evolution of this biosynthetic pathway and regulatory network, as well as the application of these transcription factors to metabolic engineering, is discussed.

  6. Meis1 coordinates a network of genes implicated in eye development and microphthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Séverine; González-Lázaro, Monica; Beccari, Leonardo; Carramolino, Laura; Martin-Bermejo, Maria Jesus; Amarie, Oana; Mateos-San Martín, Daniel; Torroja, Carlos; Bogdanović, Ozren; Doohan, Roisin; Puk, Oliver; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Graw, Jochen; Gomez-Skarmeta, Jose Luis; Casares, Fernando; Torres, Miguel; Bovolenta, Paola

    2015-09-01

    Microphthalmos is a rare congenital anomaly characterized by reduced eye size and visual deficits of variable degree. Sporadic and hereditary microphthalmos have been associated with heterozygous mutations in genes fundamental for eye development. Yet, many cases are idiopathic or await the identification of molecular causes. Here we show that haploinsufficiency of Meis1, which encodes a transcription factor with evolutionarily conserved expression in the embryonic trunk, brain and sensory organs, including the eye, causes microphthalmic traits and visual impairment in adult mice. By combining analysis of Meis1 loss-of-function and conditional Meis1 functional rescue with ChIP-seq and RNA-seq approaches we show that, in contrast to its preferential association with Hox-Pbx BSs in the trunk, Meis1 binds to Hox/Pbx-independent sites during optic cup development. In the eye primordium, Meis1 coordinates, in a dose-dependent manner, retinal proliferation and differentiation by regulating genes responsible for human microphthalmia and components of the Notch signaling pathway. In addition, Meis1 is required for eye patterning by controlling a set of eye territory-specific transcription factors, so that in Meis1(-/-) embryos boundaries among the different eye territories are shifted or blurred. We propose that Meis1 is at the core of a genetic network implicated in eye patterning/microphthalmia, and represents an additional candidate for syndromic cases of these ocular malformations.

  7. NAC transcription factors in senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podzimska-Sroka, Dagmara; O'Shea, Charlotte; Gregersen, Per L.;

    2015-01-01

    Within the last decade, NAC transcription factors have been shown to play essential roles in senescence, which is the focus of this review. Transcriptome analyses associate approximately one third of Arabidopsis NAC genes and many crop NAC genes with senescence, thereby implicating NAC genes...... as important regulators of the senescence process. The consensus DNA binding site of the NAC domain is used to predict NAC target genes, and protein interaction sites can be predicted for the intrinsically disordered transcription regulatory domains of NAC proteins. The molecular characteristics...

  8. Identification of the RNAs for Transcription Factor Mitf as a Component of the Balbiani Body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingyou Li; Yongming Yuan; Yunhan Hong

    2013-01-01

    Balbiani body (BB) is a large distinctive organelle aggregate uniquely present in developing oocytes of diverse animal species.BB is thought as a stage-specific structure that resembles germ plasm,the cytoplasmic organelle of germ cells.The role and function of BB have remained speculative because of a highly dynamic structure and a lack of genetic and molocular data.BB has been found to contain proteins and RNAs,none of them-except the zebrafish foxH1 RNA,is or encodes a transcription factor.Here we report in the fish medaka (Oryzias latipes) that RNAs encoding microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (Mitf) are prominent components of the BB.By fluorescence in siru hybridization on ovarian section,we revealed that the transcripts of both mitfl and mitf2 genes concentrated in the BB,in which they co-localized with the dazl RNA,a definitive BB marker highly conserved in vertebrates.Therefore,the mitfproduct may play dual roles in germ gene transcription and BB formation and/or function in this organism.Our data provide the second evidence that the RNA of a transcription factor can be a prominent component of the BB in a vertebrate.

  9. A case of Lenz microphthalmia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkinay, F F; Ozkinay, C; Yüksel, H; Yenigun, A; Sapmaz, G; Aksu, O

    1997-07-01

    Lenz microphthalmia syndrome was first described by Lenz et al in 1955. The cardinal features of the syndrome are microphthalmia or anophthalmos, narrow shoulders, other skeletal anomalies, and dental and urogenital malformations. Here we present a case of Lenz microphthalmia syndrome who shows the typical characteristics and, additionally, dysgenesis of the corpus callosum associated with dilatation of the lateral ventricles. The patient, a 13 year old male, was referred to our hospital by a dental hospital for genetic counselling. On physical examination, height, weight, and head circumference were below the 3rd centile and he had brachymicrocephaly, a preauricular tag, microphthalmia, missing teeth, narrow shoulders, long, proximally placed thumbs, hypospadias, cryptorchidism, and a normal IQ. Ophthalmological examination showed microcornea, sclerocornea, absence of the pupil, no vision in the left eye and decreased vision and a small pupil in the right eye in addition to his bilateral microphthalmia. Cranial MRI showed dilatation of the lateral ventricles and dysgenesis of the corpus callosum.

  10. Oculofaciocardiodental and Lenz microphthalmia syndromes result from distinct classes of mutations in BCOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, David; Thakker, Nalin; Corcoran, Connie M; Donnai, Dian; Perveen, Rahat; Schneider, Adele; Hadley, Donald W; Tifft, Cynthia; Zhang, Liqun; Wilkie, Andrew O M; van der Smagt, Jasper J; Gorlin, Robert J; Burgess, Shawn M; Bardwell, Vivian J; Black, Graeme C M; Biesecker, Leslie G

    2004-04-01

    Lenz microphthalmia is inherited in an X-linked recessive pattern and comprises microphthalmia, mental retardation, and skeletal and other anomalies. Two loci associated with this syndrome, MAA (microphthalmia with associated anomalies) and MAA2, are situated respectively at Xq27-q28 (refs. 1,2) and Xp11.4-p21.2 (ref. 3). We identified a substitution, nt 254C-->T; P85L, in BCOR (encoding BCL-6-interacting corepressor, BCOR) in affected males from the family with Lenz syndrome previously used to identify the MAA2 locus. Oculofaciocardiodental syndrome (OFCD; OMIM 300166) is inherited in an X-linked dominant pattern with presumed male lethality and comprises microphthalmia, congenital cataracts, radiculomegaly, and cardiac and digital abnormalities. Given their phenotypic overlap, we proposed that OFCD and MAA2-associated Lenz microphthalmia were allelic, and we found different frameshift, deletion and nonsense mutations in BCOR in seven families affected with OFCD. Like wild-type BCOR, BCOR P85L and an OFCD-mutant form of BCOR can interact with BCL-6 and efficiently repress transcription. This indicates that these syndromes are likely to result from defects in alternative functions of BCOR, such as interactions with transcriptional partners other than BCL-6. We cloned the zebrafish (Danio rerio) ortholog of BCOR and found that knock-down of this ortholog caused developmental perturbations of the eye, skeleton and central nervous system consistent with the human syndromes, confirming that BCOR is a key transcriptional regulator during early embryogenesis.

  11. Expression of truncated PITX3 in the developing lens leads to microphthalmia and aphakia in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Wada

    Full Text Available Microphthalmia is a severe ocular disorder, and this condition is typically caused by mutations in transcription factors that are involved in eye development. Mice carrying mutations in these transcription factors would be useful tools for defining the mechanisms underlying developmental eye disorders. We discovered a new spontaneous recessive microphthalmos mouse mutant in the Japanese wild-derived inbred strain KOR1/Stm. The homozygous mutant mice were histologically characterized as microphthalmic by the absence of crystallin in the lens, a condition referred to as aphakia. By positional cloning, we identified the nonsense mutation c.444C>A outside the genomic region that encodes the homeodomain of the paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 3 gene (Pitx3 as the mutation responsible for the microphthalmia and aphakia. We examined Pitx3 mRNA expression of mutant mice during embryonic stages using RT-PCR and found that the expression levels are higher than in wild-type mice. Pitx3 over-expression in the lens during developmental stages was also confirmed at the protein level in the microphthalmos mutants via immunohistochemical analyses. Although lens fiber differentiation was not observed in the mutants, strong PITX3 protein signals were observed in the lens vesicles of the mutant lens. Thus, we speculated that abnormal PITX3, which lacks the C-terminus (including the OAR domain as a result of the nonsense mutation, is expressed in mutant lenses. We showed that the expression of the downstream genes Foxe3, Prox1, and Mip was altered because of the Pitx3 mutation, with large reductions in the lens vesicles in the mutants. Similar profiles were observed by immunohistochemical analysis of these proteins. The expression profiles of crystallins were also altered in the mutants. Therefore, we speculated that the microphthalmos/aphakia in this mutant is caused by the expression of truncated PITX3, resulting in the abnormal expression of

  12. Expression of truncated PITX3 in the developing lens leads to microphthalmia and aphakia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Kenta; Matsushima, Yoshibumi; Tada, Tomoki; Hasegawa, Sayaka; Obara, Yo; Yoshizawa, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Gou; Hiai, Hiroshi; Shimanuki, Midori; Suzuki, Sari; Saitou, Junichi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Ichikawa, Masumi; Watanabe, Kei; Kikkawa, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Microphthalmia is a severe ocular disorder, and this condition is typically caused by mutations in transcription factors that are involved in eye development. Mice carrying mutations in these transcription factors would be useful tools for defining the mechanisms underlying developmental eye disorders. We discovered a new spontaneous recessive microphthalmos mouse mutant in the Japanese wild-derived inbred strain KOR1/Stm. The homozygous mutant mice were histologically characterized as microphthalmic by the absence of crystallin in the lens, a condition referred to as aphakia. By positional cloning, we identified the nonsense mutation c.444C>A outside the genomic region that encodes the homeodomain of the paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 3 gene (Pitx3) as the mutation responsible for the microphthalmia and aphakia. We examined Pitx3 mRNA expression of mutant mice during embryonic stages using RT-PCR and found that the expression levels are higher than in wild-type mice. Pitx3 over-expression in the lens during developmental stages was also confirmed at the protein level in the microphthalmos mutants via immunohistochemical analyses. Although lens fiber differentiation was not observed in the mutants, strong PITX3 protein signals were observed in the lens vesicles of the mutant lens. Thus, we speculated that abnormal PITX3, which lacks the C-terminus (including the OAR domain) as a result of the nonsense mutation, is expressed in mutant lenses. We showed that the expression of the downstream genes Foxe3, Prox1, and Mip was altered because of the Pitx3 mutation, with large reductions in the lens vesicles in the mutants. Similar profiles were observed by immunohistochemical analysis of these proteins. The expression profiles of crystallins were also altered in the mutants. Therefore, we speculated that the microphthalmos/aphakia in this mutant is caused by the expression of truncated PITX3, resulting in the abnormal expression of downstream targets and

  13. MiT/TFE transcription factors are activated during mitophagy downstream of Parkin and Atg5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezich, Catherine L; Wang, Chunxin; Fogel, Adam I; Youle, Richard J

    2015-08-03

    The kinase PINK1 and ubiquitin ligase Parkin can regulate the selective elimination of damaged mitochondria through autophagy (mitophagy). Because of the demand on lysosomal function by mitophagy, we investigated a role for the transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis, in this process. We show that during mitophagy TFEB translocates to the nucleus and displays transcriptional activity in a PINK1- and Parkin-dependent manner. MITF and TFE3, homologues of TFEB belonging to the same microphthalmia/transcription factor E (MiT/TFE) family, are similarly regulated during mitophagy. Unlike TFEB translocation after starvation-induced mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibition, Parkin-mediated TFEB relocalization required Atg9A and Atg5 activity. However, constitutively active Rag guanosine triphosphatases prevented TFEB translocation during mitophagy, suggesting cross talk between these two MiT/TFE activation pathways. Analysis of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-generated TFEB/MITF/TFE3/TFEC single, double, and triple knockout cell lines revealed that these proteins partly facilitate Parkin-mediated mitochondrial clearance. These results illuminate a pathway leading to MiT/TFE transcription factor activation, distinct from starvation-induced autophagy, which occurs during mitophagy.

  14. Regulated assembly of transcription factors and control of transcription initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, D

    2001-11-30

    Proteins that function in regulation of transcription initiation are typically homo or hetero-oligomeric. Results of recent biophysical studies of transcription regulators indicate that the assembly of these proteins is often subject to regulation. This regulation of assembly dictates the frequency of transcription initiation via its influence on the affinity of a transcription regulator for DNA and its affect on target site selection. Factors that modulate transcription factor assembly include binding of small molecules, post-translational modification, DNA binding and interactions with other proteins. Here, the results of recent structural and/or thermodynamic studies of a number of transcription regulators that are subject to regulated assembly are reviewed. The accumulated data indicate that this phenomenon is ubiquitous and that mechanisms utilized in eukaryotes and prokaryotes share common features. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  15. Surgical and prosthetic treatment for microphthalmia syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wavreille, O; François Fiquet, C; Abdelwahab, O; Laumonier, E; Wolber, A; Guerreschi, P; Pellerin, P

    2013-03-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the long-term outcomes of prosthetic treatment and orbital expansion in the management of microphthalmia syndromes. We did a retrospective single-centre study of all cases of microphthalmia treated between 1989 and 2010. The patients were divided into three groups: isolated microphthalmia, microphthalmia associated with micro-orbitism, and complex microphthalmia syndrome. To evaluate the results a score was computed for each patient by assessing the length of the palpebral fissure, the depth of the conjunctival fornix, and local complications together with an evaluation of the satisfaction of patients and their families. Forty-four children were included (27 boys and 17 girls). Twenty-seven had unilateral microphthalmia (61%) and 17 bilateral microphthalmia (39%). Twelve patients were lost to follow up. The mean duration of follow-up was 12 years (range 4-21). Management involved an ocular conformer in only 31 patients (71%). The treatment was deemed satisfactory in all except 10 children. Surgical treatment with orbital expansion permitted good symmetry of the orbital cavities with a final mean difference of 9% (range 3-17) compared with the initial 16.8% (range 13.6-20.3). The prosthetic treatment gives satisfactory results. Despite limited indications and difficult follow-up, our experience emphasises the value of surgical treatment for severe micro-orbitism.

  16. DBD: a transcription factor prediction database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummerfeld, Sarah K; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2006-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression influences almost all biological processes in an organism; sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factors are critical to this control. For most genomes, the repertoire of transcription factors is only partially known. Hitherto transcription factor identification has been largely based on genome annotation pipelines that use pairwise sequence comparisons, which detect only those factors similar to known genes, or on functional classification schemes that amalgamate many types of proteins into the category of 'transcription factor'. Using a novel transcription factor identification method, the DBD transcription factor database fills this void, providing genome-wide transcription factor predictions for organisms from across the tree of life. The prediction method behind DBD identifies sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factors through homology using profile hidden Markov models (HMMs) of domains. Thus, it is limited to factors that are homologus to those HMMs. The collection of HMMs is taken from two existing databases (Pfam and SUPERFAMILY), and is limited to models that exclusively detect transcription factors that specifically recognize DNA sequences. It does not include basal transcription factors or chromatin-associated proteins, for instance. Based on comparison with experimentally verified annotation, the prediction procedure is between 95% and 99% accurate. Between one quarter and one-half of our genome-wide predicted transcription factors represent previously uncharacterized proteins. The DBD (www.transcriptionfactor.org) consists of predicted transcription factor repertoires for 150 completely sequenced genomes, their domain assignments and the hand curated list of DNA-binding domain HMMs. Users can browse, search or download the predictions by genome, domain family or sequence identifier, view families of transcription factors based on domain architecture and receive predictions for a protein sequence.

  17. Teratogenic factors affect transcription factor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Takuya; Asano, Shinya; Takahashi, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    Chemical compounds are produced every day, many with adverse effects on human health, and hence it is vital to predict the risks to humans simply, rapidly, and accurately. Teratogens have a serious impact on fetal development. This has been studied mainly by phenotypic analysis of experimental animals. However, since phenotypes can vary within different species, we established a new evaluation system based on our recent finding that teratogens influence Hox gene expression in mice. Similarly to the Hox gene expression changes, the expression patterns of several transcription factors involved in development, including the Dlx, Irx, Sall, and T-box families, were altered after 6 h of exposure to retinoic acid (RA) or 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). The expression changes in Dlx4, Dlx6, Irx5, Sall2, Sall3, Sall4, Tbx10, and Tbx22 were linked to teratogen-induced phenotypes, and our results indicate that expression changes in developmental transcription factors can help to predict teratogenic risk.

  18. The Journey of a Transcription Factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pireyre, Marie

    MYBs to activate transcription of GLS biosynthetic genes. A lot is known about transcriptional regulation of these nine GLS regulators. This thesis aimed at identifying regulatory mechanisms at the protein level, allowing rapid and specific regulation of transcription factors using GLS as a model....... The general introduction and the first chapter provide background on protein level regulation and underline the importance of these mechanisms in regulating transcription factors. The remaining chapters report the identification of multiple new regulators of MYB transcription factors, potentially involved...... in their regulation at multiple steps of their activation. Plant signaling in connection with transcription factor regulation is an exciting field, allowing research on multiple regulatory mechanisms. This thesis shed light on the importance of integrating all steps of transcription factor activation in a regulatory...

  19. Microphthalmia and anophthalmia in Chuuk State, Federated States of Micronesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yomai, A A; Pavlin, B I

    2010-04-01

    Microphthalmia ('small eye') and anophthalmia ('no eye') are rare congenital defects of eye development. Previous studies utilizing a variety of methodologies have estimated their combined incidence at anywhere from 4 to 30 cases per 100,000 live births. In Chuuk, Federated States of Micronesia, there have been 42 cases detected since 1988, yielding an estimated incidence of 140 cases per 100,000. A number of putative genetic and environmental causes have previously been associated with microphthalmia and anophthalmia, including vitamin A deficiency. To date, it is unclear which of these factors may play a role in the alarmingly high rates observed in Chuuk. The Chuuk Division of Public Health has proposed a study to explore these potential causes, which will hopefully shed light on the prevention of these rare but debilitating conditions.

  20. Transcription Factor Tfe3 Directly Regulates Pgc-1alpha in Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salma, Nunciada; Song, Jun S; Arany, Zoltan; Fisher, David E

    2015-10-01

    The microphthalmia (MiT) family of transcription factors is an important mediator of metabolism. Family members Mitf and Tfeb directly regulate the expression of the master regulator of metabolism, peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (Pgc-1alpha), in melanomas and in the liver, respectively. Pgc-1alpha is enriched in tissues with high oxidative capacity and plays an important role in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and cellular metabolism. In skeletal muscle, Pgc-1alpha affects many aspects of muscle functionally such as endurance, fiber-type switching, and insulin sensitivity. Tfe3 also regulates muscle metabolic genes that enhance insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle. Tfe3 has not yet been shown to regulate Pgc-1alpha expression. Our results reported here show that Tfe3 directly regulates Pgc-1alpha expression in myotubes. Tfe3 ectopic expression induces Pgc-1alpha, and Tfe3 silencing suppresses Pgc-1alpha expression. This regulation is direct, as shown by Tfe3's binding to E-boxes on the Pgc-1alpha proximal promoter. We conclude that Tfe3 is a critical transcription factor that regulates Pgc-1alpha gene expression in myotubes. Since Pgc-1alpha coactivates numerous biological programs in diverse tissues, the regulation of its expression by upstream transcription factors such Tfe3 implies potential opportunities for the treatment of diseases where modulation of Pgc-1alpha expression may have important clinical outcomes.

  1. Focal skin defect, limb anomalies and microphthalmia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jackson, K.E.; Andersson, H.C.

    2004-01-01

    We describe two unrelated female patients with congenital single focal skin defects, unilateral microphthalmia and limb anomalies. Growth and psychomotor development were normal and no brain malformation was detected. Although eye and limb anomalies are commonly associated, clinical anophthalmia and

  2. Prunus transcription factors: Breeding perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valmor João Bianchi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Many plant processes depend on differential gene expression, which is generally controlled by complex proteins called transcription factors (TFs. In peach, 1,533 TFs have been identified, accounting for about 5.5% of the 27,852 protein-coding genes. These TFs are the reference for the rest of the Prunus species. TF studies in Prunus have been performed on the gene expression analysis of different agronomic traits, including control of the flowering process, fruit quality, and biotic and abiotic stress resistance. These studies, using quantitative RT-PCR, have mainly been performed in peach, and to a lesser extent in other species, including almond, apricot, black cherry, Fuji cherry, Japanese apricot, plum, and sour and sweet cherry. Other tools have also been used in TF studies, including cDNA-AFLP, LC-ESI-MS, RNA and DNA blotting or mapping. More recently, new tools assayed include microarray and high-throughput DNA sequencing (DNA-Seq and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq. New functional genomics opportunities include genome resequencing and the well-known synteny among Prunus genomes and transcriptomes. These new functional studies should be applied in breeding programs in the development of molecular markers. With the genome sequences available, some strategies that have been used in model systems (such as SNP genotyping assays and genotyping-by-sequencing may be applicable in the functional analysis of Prunus TFs as well. In addition, the knowledge of the gene functions and position in the peach reference genome of the TFs represents an additional advantage. These facts could greatly facilitate the isolation of genes via QTL (quantitative trait loci map-based cloning in the different Prunus species, following the association of these TFs with the identified QTLs using the peach reference genome.

  3. Transcriptional factors, Mafs and their biological roles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mariko Tsuchiya; Ryoichi Misaka; Kosaku Nitta; Ken Tsuchiya

    2015-01-01

    The Maf family of transcription factors is characterizedby a typical bZip structure; these transcription factorsact as important regulators of the development anddifferentiation of many organs and tissues, includingthe kidney. The Maf family consists of two subgroupsthat are characterized according to their structure largeMaf transcription factors and small Maf transcriptionfactors. The large Maf subgroup consists of fourproteins, designated as MAFA, MAFB, c-MAF and neuralretina-specific leucine zipper. In particular, MAFA is adistinct molecule that has been attracting the attentionof researchers because it acts as a strong transactivatorof insulin, suggesting that Maf transcription factors arelikely to be involved in systemic energy homeostasis. Inthis review, we focused on the regulation of glucose/energy balance by Maf transcription factors in variousorgans.

  4. A New Vaccinia Virus Intermediate Transcription Factor

    OpenAIRE

    Sanz, Patrick; Moss, Bernard

    1998-01-01

    Transcription of the vaccinia virus genome is mediated by a virus-encoded multisubunit DNA-dependent RNA polymerase in conjunction with early-, intermediate-, and late-stage-specific factors. Previous studies indicated that two virus-encoded proteins (capping enzyme and VITF-1) and one unidentified cellular protein (VITF-2) are required for specific transcription of an intermediate promoter template in vitro. We have now extensively purified an additional virus-induced intermediate transcript...

  5. Apparent Lenz microphthalmia syndrome: a patient with unusual manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumus, N; Zenciroglu, A; Demirel, N; Bas, A Y; Ceylaner, S

    2008-01-01

    Lenz microphthalmia syndrome was first described by Lenz et al. in 1955 (9). The cardinal features of the syndrome are microphthalmia or anophthalmia, microcephaly, mental retardation, external ear, digital, cardiac, skeletal, dental and genitourinary anomalies. Here we present a case of Lenz microphthalmia syndrome that shows the typical characteristics and, additionally, macrophallus, a broad chest with widely spaced nipples, wide gap between first and second toes, which are unusual manifestations in Lenz Microphthalmia Syndrome.

  6. The Journey of a Transcription Factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pireyre, Marie

    Plants have developed astonishing networks regulating their metabolism to adapt to their environment. The complexity of these networks is illustrated by the expansion of families of regulators such as transcription factors in the plant kingdom. Transcription factors specifically impact...... transcriptional networks by integrating exogenous and endogenous stimuli and regulating gene expression accordingly. Regulation of transcription factors and their activation is thus highly important to modulate the transcriptional programs and increase fitness of the plant in a given environment. Plant metabolism...... is regulated to allocate resources to growth and/or defense at different time points. Among plant chemical defenses are the amino acid-derived glucosinolates (GLS). Their absolute and relative accumulation is tightly regulated at basal level, but also in response to e.g. pathogen attack and hormone stimuli...

  7. Transcription Factor Networks in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Y. Rhee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Specific cellular fates and functions depend on differential gene expression, which occurs primarily at the transcriptional level and is controlled by complex regulatory networks of transcription factors (TFs. TFs act through combinatorial interactions with other TFs, cofactors, and chromatin-remodeling proteins. Here, we define protein-protein interactions using a coaffinity purification/mass spectrometry method and study 459 Drosophila melanogaster transcription-related factors, representing approximately half of the established catalog of TFs. We probe this network in vivo, demonstrating functional interactions for many interacting proteins, and test the predictive value of our data set. Building on these analyses, we combine regulatory network inference models with physical interactions to define an integrated network that connects combinatorial TF protein interactions to the transcriptional regulatory network of the cell. We use this integrated network as a tool to connect the functional network of genetic modifiers related to mastermind, a transcriptional cofactor of the Notch pathway.

  8. Comparison of Transcription Factor Binding Site Models

    KAUST Repository

    Bhuyan, Sharifulislam

    2012-05-01

    Modeling of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) and TFBS prediction on genomic sequences are important steps to elucidate transcription regulatory mechanism. Dependency of transcription regulation on a great number of factors such as chemical specificity, molecular structure, genomic and epigenetic characteristics, long distance interaction, makes this a challenging problem. Different experimental procedures generate evidence that DNA-binding domains of transcription factors show considerable DNA sequence specificity. Probabilistic modeling of TFBSs has been moderately successful in identifying patterns from a family of sequences. In this study, we compare performances of different probabilistic models and try to estimate their efficacy over experimental TFBSs data. We build a pipeline to calculate sensitivity and specificity from aligned TFBS sequences for several probabilistic models, such as Markov chains, hidden Markov models, Bayesian networks. Our work, containing relevant statistics and evaluation for the models, can help researchers to choose the most appropriate model for the problem at hand.

  9. Microphthalmia with linear skin defects syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rabasco, Ana; De-Unamuno, Blanca; Martínez, Francisco; Febrer-Bosch, Isabel; Alegre-de-Miquel, Víctor

    2013-01-01

    Microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) or microcornea, dermal aplasia and sclerocornea (MIDAS) syndrome is a rare X-linked-dominant disorder. We present a patient with agenesis of corpus callosum, ocular abnormalities, and multiple skin defects. The cytogenetic studies of the MLS critical region (Xp22.2) were normal, but a skewed X-chromosome inactivation pattern (85:15) was observed.

  10. Interactions of transcription factors with chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bakel, Harm

    2011-01-01

    Sequence-specific transcription factors (TFs) play a central role in regulating transcription initiation by directing the recruitment and activity of the general transcription machinery and accessory factors. It is now well established that many of the effects exerted by TFs in eukaryotes are mediated through interactions with a host of coregulators that modify the chromatin state, resulting in a more open (in case of activation) or closed conformation (in case of repression). The relationship between TFs and chromatin is a two-way street, however, as chromatin can in turn influence the recognition and binding of target sequences by TFs. The aim of this chapter is to highlight how this dynamic interplay between TF-directed remodelling of chromatin and chromatin-adjusted targeting of TF binding determines where and how transcription is initiated, and to what degree it is productive.

  11. Transcription Factors in Xylem Development. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sederoff, Ronald; Whetten, Ross; O' Malley, David; Campbell, Malcolm

    1999-07-01

    Answers to the following questions are answered in this report. do the two pine Byb proteins previously identified as candidate transcription factors bind to DNA and activate transcription? In what cell types are tehse Myb proteins expressed? Are these proteins localized to the nucleus? Do other proteins in pine xylem interact with these Myb proteins? Does altered expression of these genes have an impact on xylogenesis, specifically the expression of monolignol biosynthetic genes?

  12. Transcription Factors in Xylem Development. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sederoff, Ronald; Whetten, Ross; O' Malley, David; Campbell, Malcolm

    1999-07-01

    Answers to the following questions are answered in this report. do the two pine Byb proteins previously identified as candidate transcription factors bind to DNA and activate transcription? In what cell types are tehse Myb proteins expressed? Are these proteins localized to the nucleus? Do other proteins in pine xylem interact with these Myb proteins? Does altered expression of these genes have an impact on xylogenesis, specifically the expression of monolignol biosynthetic genes?

  13. ETS transcription factors in embryonic vascular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Michael P; Sumanas, Saulius

    2016-07-01

    At least thirteen ETS-domain transcription factors are expressed during embryonic hematopoietic or vascular development and potentially function in the formation and maintenance of the embryonic vasculature or blood lineages. This review summarizes our current understanding of the specific roles played by ETS factors in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis and the implications of functional redundancies between them.

  14. Congenital anophthalmia and microphthalmia: epidemiology and orbitofacial rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Llorente-González S

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Sara Llorente-González1, J Peralta-Calvo2, JM Abelairas-Gómez21Ophthalmology Service of Hospital de Torrejón, Madrid, Spain; 2Ophthalmology Service of Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, SpainObjective: To describe the prevalence of congenital anophthalmia and microphthalmia in Hospital Universitario La Paz, and to identify associated risk factors and evaluate cosmetic results in treated and nontreated patients.Methods: A retrospective, descriptive, cross-sectional study of patients treated with orbital expanding techniques (cases and nontreated patients (controls was carried out as a comparative case series study. A total of 36 patients with unilateral or bilateral anophthalmia or microphthalmia as main diagnosis were included; 52 epidemiological and management variables for each patient were analyzed. The study evaluated orbital growth and facial symmetry.Results: The overall cosmetic result in the study’s group of patients was satisfactory: 66.7% showed good or very good orbital growth, and 75% showed good or very good facial symmetry. Controls had better cosmetic outcome but showed more cataracts (P = 0.05, inferior colobomas (P = 0.026, and family history (P = 0.056 than the cases. Controls also showed significantly better orbital growth (P = 0.042 and facial symmetry (P = 0.014 than the cases.Conclusion: This study suggests that the mere presence of a globe (controls still provides better orbitofacial development than the artificial stimulation (cases currently available for patients with congenital anophthalmia and microphthalmia, who receive internal and external orbital rehabilitation.Keywords: cosmetic outcome, orbital rehabilitation, ocular malformation, congenital cataract, persistent fetal vasculature

  15. Transcription factor CTCF and mammalian genome organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotova E. S.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The CTCF transcription factor is thought to be one of the main participants in various gene regulatory networks including transcription activation and repression, formation of independently functioning chromatin domains, regulation of imprinting etc. Sequencing of human and other genomes opened up a possibility to ascertain the genomic distribution of CTCF binding sites and to identify CTCF-dependent cis-regulatory elements, including insulators. In the review, we summarized recent data on CTCF functioning within a framework of the chromatin loop domain hypothesis of large-scale regulation of the genome activity. Its fundamental properties allow CTCF to serve as a transcription factor, an insulator protein and a dispersed genome-wide demarcation tool able to recruit various factors that emerge in response to diverse external and internal signals, and thus to exert its signal-specific function(s.

  16. Interaction of Restin with transcription factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU; Yousheng; LU; Fan; QI; Yinxin; WANG; Ruihua; ZHANG; Jia

    2005-01-01

    Restin, a member of melanoma-associated antigen superfamily gene, was first cloned from differentiated leukemia cell induced by all trans-retinoic acid, and was able to inhibit cell proliferation, but the molecular mechanism was not clear. Since Restin was localized in cell nucleus, and its homolog member, Necdin (neuronal growth suppressor factor), could interact with transcription factors p53 and E2F1, we proposed that Restin might also function as Necdin through interacting with some transcription factors. In this study, transcription factors p53, AP1,ATFs and E2Fs were cloned and used in the mammalian two-hybrid system to identify their interaction with Restin. The results showed that only ATF3 had a strong interaction with Restin. It is interesting to know that ATF3 was an important transcription factor for G1 cell cycle initiation in physiological stress response. It was possible that the inhibition of cell proliferation by Restin might be related with the inhibition of ATF3 activity.

  17. Overexpression of Pax6 results in microphthalmia, retinal dysplasia and defective retinal ganglion cell axon guidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffery Glen

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcription factor Pax6 is expressed by many cell types in the developing eye. Eyes do not form in homozygous loss-of-function mouse mutants (Pax6Sey/Sey and are abnormally small in Pax6Sey/+ mutants. Eyes are also abnormally small in PAX77 mice expressing multiple copies of human PAX6 in addition to endogenous Pax6; protein sequences are identical in the two species. The developmental events that lead to microphthalmia in PAX77 mice are not well-characterised, so it is not clear whether over- and under-expression of Pax6/PAX6 cause microphthalmia through similar mechanisms. Here, we examined the consequences of over-expression for the eye and its axonal connections. Results Eyes form in PAX77+/+ embryos but subsequently degenerate. At E12.5, we found no abnormalities in ocular morphology, retinal cell cycle parameters and the incidence of retinal cell death. From E14.5 on, we observed malformations of the optic disc. From E16.5 into postnatal life there is progressively more severe retinal dysplasia and microphthalmia. Analyses of patterns of gene expression indicated that PAX77+/+ retinae produce a normal range of cell types, including retinal ganglion cells (RGCs. At E14.5 and E16.5, quantitative RT-PCR with probes for a range of molecules associated with retinal development showed only one significant change: a slight reduction in levels of mRNA encoding the secreted morphogen Shh at E16.5. At E16.5, tract-tracing with carbocyanine dyes in PAX77+/+ embryos revealed errors in intraretinal navigation by RGC axons, a decrease in the number of RGC axons reaching the thalamus and an increase in the proportion of ipsilateral projections among those RGC axons that do reach the thalamus. A survey of embryos with different Pax6/PAX6 gene dosage (Pax6Sey/+, Pax6+/+, PAX77+ and PAX77+/+ showed that (1 the total number of RGC axons projected by the retina and (2 the proportions that are sorted into the ipsilateral and

  18. Runx transcription factors in neuronal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiga Takashi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Runt-related (Runx transcription factors control diverse aspects of embryonic development and are responsible for the pathogenesis of many human diseases. In recent years, the functions of this transcription factor family in the nervous system have just begun to be understood. In dorsal root ganglion neurons, Runx1 and Runx3 play pivotal roles in the development of nociceptive and proprioceptive sensory neurons, respectively. Runx appears to control the transcriptional regulation of neurotrophin receptors, numerous ion channels and neuropeptides. As a consequence, Runx contributes to diverse aspects of the sensory system in higher vertebrates. In this review, we summarize recent progress in determining the role of Runx in neuronal development.

  19. The LIM Homeodomain Transcription Factor LHX6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zichao; Gutierrez, Diana; Li, Xiao; Bidlack, Felicitas; Cao, Huojun; Wang, Jianbo; Andrade, Kelsey; Margolis, Henry C.; Amendt, Brad A.

    2013-01-01

    LHX6 is a LIM-homeobox transcription factor expressed during embryogenesis; however, the molecular mechanisms regulating LHX6 transcriptional activities are unknown. LHX6 and the PITX2 homeodomain transcription factor have overlapping expression patterns during tooth and craniofacial development, and in this report, we demonstrate new transcriptional mechanisms for these factors. PITX2 and LHX6 are co-expressed in the oral and dental epithelium and epithelial cell lines. Lhx6 expression is increased in Pitx2c transgenic mice and decreased in Pitx2 null mice. PITX2 activates endogenous Lhx6 expression and the Lhx6 promoter, whereas LHX6 represses its promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments reveal endogenous PITX2 binding to the Lhx6 promoter. LHX6 directly interacts with PITX2 to inhibit PITX2 transcriptional activities and activation of multiple promoters. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays reveal an LHX6·PITX2 nuclear interaction in living cells. LHX6 has a dominant repressive effect on the PITX2 synergistic activation with LEF-1 and β-catenin co-factors. Thus, LHX6 acts as a transcriptional repressor and represses the expression of several genes involved in odontogenesis. We have identified specific defects in incisor, molar, mandible, bone, and root development and late stage enamel formation in Lhx6 null mice. Amelogenin and ameloblastin expression is reduced and/or delayed in the Lhx6 null mice, potentially resulting from defects in dentin deposition and ameloblast differentiation. Our results demonstrate that LHX6 regulates cell proliferation in the cervical loop and promotes cell differentiation in the anterior region of the incisor. We demonstrate new molecular mechanisms for LHX6 and an interaction with PITX2 for normal craniofacial and tooth development. PMID:23229549

  20. Polyphenol Compound as a Transcription Factor Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyeon Park

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A target-based approach has been used to develop novel drugs in many therapeutic fields. In the final stage of intracellular signaling, transcription factor–DNA interactions are central to most biological processes and therefore represent a large and important class of targets for human therapeutics. Thus, we focused on the idea that the disruption of protein dimers and cognate DNA complexes could impair the transcriptional activation and cell transformation regulated by these proteins. Historically, natural products have been regarded as providing the primary leading compounds capable of modulating protein–protein or protein-DNA interactions. Although their mechanism of action is not fully defined, polyphenols including flavonoids were found to act mostly as site-directed small molecule inhibitors on signaling. There are many reports in the literature of screening initiatives suggesting improved drugs that can modulate the transcription factor interactions responsible for disease. In this review, we focus on polyphenol compound inhibitors against dimeric forms of transcription factor components of intracellular signaling pathways (for instance, c-jun/c-fos (Activator Protein-1; AP-1, c-myc/max, Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB and β-catenin/T cell factor (Tcf.

  1. NAC transcription factors: structurally distinct, functionally diverse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Addie Nina; Ernst, Heidi A; Leggio, Leila Lo;

    2005-01-01

    NAC proteins constitute one of the largest families of plant-specific transcription factors, and the family is present in a wide range of land plants. Here, we summarize the biological and molecular functions of the NAC family, paying particular attention to the intricate regulation of NAC protei...

  2. TCP transcription factors: architectures of plant form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manassero, Nora G Uberti; Viola, Ivana L; Welchen, Elina; Gonzalez, Daniel H

    2013-04-01

    After its initial definition in 1999, the TCP family of transcription factors has become the focus of a multiplicity of studies related with plant development at the cellular, organ, and tissue levels. Evidence has accumulated indicating that TCP transcription factors are the main regulators of plant form and architecture and constitute a tool through which evolution shapes plant diversity. The TCP transcription factors act in a multiplicity of pathways related with cell proliferation and hormone responses. In recent years, the molecular pathways of TCP protein action and biochemical studies on their mode of interaction with DNA have begun to shed light on their mechanism of action. However, the available information is fragmented and a unifying view of TCP protein action is lacking, as well as detailed structural studies of the TCP-DNA complex. Also important, the possible role of TCP proteins as integrators of plant developmental responses to the environment has deserved little attention. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the structure and functions of TCP transcription factors and analyze future perspectives for the study of the role of these proteins and their use to modify plant development.

  3. Cross-Family Transcription Factor Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemer, Marian; Dijk, van Aalt-Jan; Immink, Richard G.H.; Angenent, Gerco C.

    2017-01-01

    Specific and dynamic gene expression strongly depends on transcription factor (TF) activity and most plant TFs function in a combinatorial fashion. They can bind to DNA and control the expression of the corresponding gene in an additive fashion or cooperate by physical interactions, forming larger p

  4. Structure and regulatory function of plant transcription factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The expression of inducible genes in plants is regulated byspecific transcription factors at the transcriptional level. A typical transcription factor usually contains a DNA-binding domain, a transcription regulation domain, a dimerization site and a nuclear localization domain. These functional domains define the characteristic, localization and regulatory role of a transcription factor. Transcription factors recognize and bind to specific cis-acting elements or interact with other proteins, and then activate or repress the transcription of target genes by their functional domains. In recent years, elucidation on the structure and function of transcription factors has become an important subject in plant molecular biology.

  5. 细胞功能调控的重要转录因子TFEB%Function and regulation of the transcription factor TFEB

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈太琪; 姜丛; 王平; 刘宁

    2013-01-01

    TFEB is a member of the MiTF/TFE (microphthalmia-transcription factor E) subfamily of bHLH-LZ (basic-helix-loop-helix leucine-zipper) factors. And TFEB-related pathway is involved in some of cellular physiological processes and its regulating aberration has been known to contribute to the pathogenesis of several human diseases, such as placenta angiogenesis and renal cell carcinoma. Recent studies have shown that TFEB could regulate autophagy and lysosome function through regulating the expression of the related genes. Future study on the function and mechanism of TFEB will help better understand the pathological process and provide new theory basis and clues for the treatment of TFEB-related diseases.%转录因子TFEB (transcription factor EB)属于亮氨酸拉链bHLH-LZ (basic-helix-loop-helix leucine-zipper)类转录因子中的MiTF/TFE (microphthalmia-transcription factor E)家族成员,参与调控许多重要的细胞生理过程,例如胎盘血管新生、肾癌的发生等.最近研究表明,TFEB能通过调控细胞自噬和溶酶体相关的基因表达而调控细胞自噬以及溶酶体功能.因此,对于TFEB的生物学功能及其相关调控机制的研究,将为进一步阐释其生理病理发生过程及相关疾病的治疗提供重要的线索及理论依据.

  6. Adaptive evolution of transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berg Johannes

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The regulation of a gene depends on the binding of transcription factors to specific sites located in the regulatory region of the gene. The generation of these binding sites and of cooperativity between them are essential building blocks in the evolution of complex regulatory networks. We study a theoretical model for the sequence evolution of binding sites by point mutations. The approach is based on biophysical models for the binding of transcription factors to DNA. Hence we derive empirically grounded fitness landscapes, which enter a population genetics model including mutations, genetic drift, and selection. Results We show that the selection for factor binding generically leads to specific correlations between nucleotide frequencies at different positions of a binding site. We demonstrate the possibility of rapid adaptive evolution generating a new binding site for a given transcription factor by point mutations. The evolutionary time required is estimated in terms of the neutral (background mutation rate, the selection coefficient, and the effective population size. Conclusions The efficiency of binding site formation is seen to depend on two joint conditions: the binding site motif must be short enough and the promoter region must be long enough. These constraints on promoter architecture are indeed seen in eukaryotic systems. Furthermore, we analyse the adaptive evolution of genetic switches and of signal integration through binding cooperativity between different sites. Experimental tests of this picture involving the statistics of polymorphisms and phylogenies of sites are discussed.

  7. The world according to GARP transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safi, Alaeddine; Medici, Anna; Szponarski, Wojciech; Ruffel, Sandrine; Lacombe, Benoît; Krouk, Gabriel

    2017-10-01

    Plant specific GARP transcription factor family (made of ARR-B and G2-like) contains genes with very diverse in planta functions: nutrient sensing, root and shoot development, floral transition, chloroplast development, circadian clock oscillation maintenance, hormonal transport and signaling. In this work we review: first, their structural but distant relationships with MYB transcription factors, second, their role in planta, third, the diversity of their Cis-regulatory elements, fourth, their potential protein partners. We conclude that the GARP family may hold keys to understand the interactions between nutritional signaling pathways (nitrogen and phosphate at least) and development. Understanding how plant nutrition and development are coordinated is central to understand how to adapt plants to an ever-changing environment. Consequently GARPs are likely to attract increasing research attentions, as they are likely at the crossroads of these fundamental processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Systematic genetic analysis of transcription factors to map the fission yeast transcription-regulatory network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Gordon

    2013-12-01

    Mapping transcriptional-regulatory networks requires the identification of target genes, binding specificities and signalling pathways of transcription factors. However, the characterization of each transcription factor sufficiently for deciphering such networks remains laborious. The recent availability of overexpression and deletion strains for almost all of the transcription factor genes in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe provides a valuable resource to better investigate transcription factors using systematic genetics. In the present paper, I review and discuss the utility of these strain collections combined with transcriptome profiling and genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation to identify the target genes of transcription factors.

  9. Recessive and dominant mutations in retinoic acid receptor beta in cases with microphthalmia and diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srour, Myriam; Chitayat, David; Caron, Véronique; Chassaing, Nicolas; Bitoun, Pierre; Patry, Lysanne; Cordier, Marie-Pierre; Capo-Chichi, José-Mario; Francannet, Christine; Calvas, Patrick; Ragge, Nicola; Dobrzeniecka, Sylvia; Hamdan, Fadi F; Rouleau, Guy A; Tremblay, André; Michaud, Jacques L

    2013-10-01

    Anophthalmia and/or microphthalmia, pulmonary hypoplasia, diaphragmatic hernia, and cardiac defects are the main features of PDAC syndrome. Recessive mutations in STRA6, encoding a membrane receptor for the retinol-binding protein, have been identified in some cases with PDAC syndrome, although many cases have remained unexplained. Using whole-exome sequencing, we found that two PDAC-syndrome-affected siblings, but not their unaffected sibling, were compound heterozygous for nonsense (c.355C>T [p.Arg119(∗)]) and frameshift (c.1201_1202insCT [p.Ile403Serfs(∗)15]) mutations in retinoic acid receptor beta (RARB). Transfection studies showed that p.Arg119(∗) and p.Ile403Serfs(∗)15 altered RARB had no transcriptional activity in response to ligands, confirming that the mutations induced a loss of function. We then sequenced RARB in 15 subjects with anophthalmia and/or microphthalmia and at least one other feature of PDAC syndrome. Surprisingly, three unrelated subjects with microphthalmia and diaphragmatic hernia showed de novo missense mutations affecting the same codon; two of the subjects had the c.1159C>T (Arg387Cys) mutation, whereas the other one carried the c.1159C>A (p.Arg387Ser) mutation. We found that compared to the wild-type receptor, p.Arg387Ser and p.Arg387Cys altered RARB induced a 2- to 3-fold increase in transcriptional activity in response to retinoic acid ligands, suggesting a gain-of-function mechanism. Our study thus suggests that both recessive and dominant mutations in RARB cause anophthalmia and/or microphthalmia and diaphragmatic hernia, providing further evidence of the crucial role of the retinoic acid pathway during eye development and organogenesis.

  10. A Case with Microphthalmia and Multiple Congenital Anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayça Sarı

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a 7-month-old girl with bilateral microphthalmia, sclerocornea, iris and chorioretinal coloboma, blepharophimosis and dacryostenosis. Microphthalmia is one of the most common features in many syndromes as Micro syndrome, oculodentodigital dysplasia, oculofaciocardiodental syndrome, and Lenz microphthalmia syndrome. Our patient’s clinical features also involved microcephaly, cleft palate, developmental delay, digital and urogenital anomalies, cardiac septal defects and hearing loss, which diagnosis is mostly consistent with the Lenz microphthalmia syndrome. Lenz microphthalmia syndrome is a very rare conditions and their expressions are more often in countries with high rates of consanguineous marriages. Hence, recognizing such rare syndromes in patients with multiple congenital anomalies is essential. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2013; 43: 468-70

  11. Mutations in ALDH1A3 cause microphthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldahmesh, M A; Khan, A O; Hijazi, H; Alkuraya, F S

    2013-08-01

    Microphthalmia is an important inborn error of eye development that can be associated with multisystem involvement. Anophthalmia is more severe and rarer. Single mutations in an expanding list of genes are known to cause this spectrum of anomaly. In one branch of a multiplex family with microphthalmia and anophthalmia, autozygome analysis excluded all known microphthalmia genes at the time of doing this study. Exome sequencing and autozygome filtration identified a novel homozygous variant in ALDH1A3. Subsequently, we identified another homozygous variant in 2 of the 10 probands with microphthalmia we specifically screened for mutations in ALDH1A3. Interestingly, the other branch of the original family was found to segregate anophthalmia/syndactyly with a novel homozygous SMOC1 variant. Our data support the very recent and independent identification of ALDH1A3 as a disease gene in microphthalmia. Locus heterogeneity should be considered in consanguineous families even for extremely rare phenotypes.

  12. Conserved genetic pathways associated with microphthalmia, anophthalmia, and coloboma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Linda M; Semina, Elena V

    2015-06-01

    The human eye is a complex organ whose development requires extraordinary coordination of developmental processes. The conservation of ocular developmental steps in vertebrates suggests possible common genetic mechanisms. Genetic diseases involving the eye represent a leading cause of blindness in children and adults. During the last decades, there has been an exponential increase in genetic studies of ocular disorders. In this review, we summarize current success in identification of genes responsible for microphthalmia, anophthalmia, and coloboma (MAC) phenotypes, which are associated with early defects in embryonic eye development. Studies in animal models for the orthologous genes identified overlapping phenotypes for most factors, confirming the conservation of their function in vertebrate development. These animal models allow for further investigation of the mechanisms of MAC, integration of various identified genes into common developmental pathways and finally, provide an avenue for the development and testing of therapeutic interventions.

  13. Transcription factor regulation by mechanical stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Melissa G; Janmey, Paul A

    2012-05-01

    New technologies and interest in cell mechanics are generating exciting new discoveries about how material properties and forces affect biological structure and function. Mechanical forces are transduced via a variety of mechanisms, recently beginning to be revealed, into signals capable of altering cell function and structure. Responses to physical stimuli occur at multiple levels, from changes in the structures of single proteins to global cascades capable of altering cell proliferation and differentiation. This review describes recent findings in which physical stimuli were shown to modulate transcription factor activity, including that of armadillo/β-catenin, serum response factor (SRF), yes-associated protein (YAP) and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. HIF transcription factors, inflammation, and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazon, Asis; Goldrath, Ananda W; Nizet, Victor; Johnson, Randall S

    2014-10-16

    The hypoxic response in cells and tissues is mediated by the family of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) transcription factors; these play an integral role in the metabolic changes that drive cellular adaptation to low oxygen availability. HIF expression and stabilization in immune cells can be triggered by hypoxia, but also by other factors associated with pathological stress: e.g., inflammation, infectious microorganisms, and cancer. HIF induces a number of aspects of host immune function, from boosting phagocyte microbicidal capacity to driving T cell differentiation and cytotoxic activity. Cellular metabolism is emerging as a key regulator of immunity, and it constitutes another layer of fine-tuned immune control by HIF that can dictate myeloid cell and lymphocyte development, fate, and function. Here we discuss how oxygen sensing in the immune microenvironment shapes immunological response and examine how HIF and the hypoxia pathway control innate and adaptive immunity.

  15. Statistics for Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) play a key role in gene regulation. They interact with specific binding sites or motifs on the DNA sequence and regulate expression of genes downstream of these binding sites. In silico prediction of potential binding of a TF to a binding site is an important task in computational biology. From a statistical point of view, the DNA sequence is a long text consisting of four different letters ('A','C','G', and 'T'). The binding of a TF to the sequence corresponds to ...

  16. From tissue mechanics to transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janmey, Paul A; Wells, Rebecca G; Assoian, Richard K; McCulloch, Christopher A

    2013-10-01

    Changes in tissue stiffness are frequently associated with diseases such as cancer, fibrosis, and atherosclerosis. Several recent studies suggest that, in addition to resulting from pathology, mechanical changes may play a role akin to soluble factors in causing the progression of disease, and similar mechanical control might be essential for normal tissue development and homeostasis. Many cell types alter their structure and function in response to exogenous forces or as a function of the mechanical properties of the materials to which they adhere. This review summarizes recent progress in identifying intracellular signaling pathways, and especially transcriptional programs, that are differentially activated when cells adhere to materials with different mechanical properties or when they are subject to tension arising from external forces. Several cytoplasmic or cytoskeletal signaling pathways involving small GTPases, focal adhesion kinase and transforming growth factor beta as well as the transcriptional regulators MRTF-A, NFκB, and Yap/Taz have emerged as important mediators of mechanical signaling. © 2013 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Mitochondrial nucleoid and transcription factor A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanki, Tomotake; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Narie; Takio, Koji; Alam, Tanfis Istiaq; Hamasaki, Naotaka; Kang, Dongchon

    2004-04-01

    Nuclear DNA is tightly packed into nucleosomal structure. In contrast, human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) had long been believed to be rather naked because mitochondria lack histone. Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), a member of a high mobility group (HMG) protein family and a first-identified mitochondrial transcription factor, is essential for maintenance of mitochondrial DNA. Abf2, a yeast counterpart of human TFAM, is abundant enough to cover the whole region of mtDNA and to play a histone-like role in mitochondria. Human TFAM is indeed as abundant as Abf2, suggesting that TFAM also has a histone-like architectural role for maintenance of mtDNA. When human mitochondria are solubilized with non-ionic detergent Nonidet-P40 and then separated into soluble and particulate fractions, most TFAM is recovered from the particulate fraction together with mtDNA, suggesting that human mtDNA forms a nucleoid structure. TFAM is tightly associated with mtDNA as a main component of the nucleoid.

  18. Lens specific RLIP76 transgenic mice show a phenotype similar to microphthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Mukesh; Sharma, Rajendra; Yadav, Sushma; Wakamiya, Maki; Chaudhary, Pankaj; Awasthi, Sanjay; Awasthi, Yogesh C

    2014-01-01

    RALBP1/RLIP76 is a ubiquitously expressed protein, involved in promotion and regulation of functions initiated by Ral and R-Ras small GTPases. Presence of multiple domains in its structure enables RLIP76 to be involved in a number of physiological processes such as endocytosis, exocytosis, mitochondrial fission, actin cytoskeleton remodeling, and transport of exogenous and endogenous toxicants. Previously, we have established that RLIP76 provides protection to ocular tissues against oxidative stress by transporting the glutathione-conjugates of the toxic, electrophilic products of lipid peroxidation generated during oxidative stress. Therefore, we developed lens specific RLIP76 transgenic mice (lensRLIP76 Tg) to elucidate the role of RLIP76 in protection against oxidative stress, but these transgenic mice showed impaired lens development and a phenotype with small eyes similar to that observed in microphthalmia. These findings prompted us to investigate the mechanisms via which RLIP76 affects lens and eye development. In the present study, we report engineering of lensRLIP76 Tg mice, characterization of the associated phenotype, and the possible molecular mechanisms that lead to the impaired development of eye and lens in these mice. The results of microarray array analysis indicate that the genes involved in pathways for G-Protein signaling, actin cytoskeleton reorganization, endocytosis, and apoptosis are affected in these transgenic mice. The expression of transcription factors, Pax6, Hsf1, and Hsf4b known to be involved in lens development is down regulated in the lens of these Tg mice. However, the expression of heat shock proteins (Hsps), the downstream targets of Hsfs, is differentially affected in the lens showing down regulation of Hsp27, Hsp40, up regulation of Hsp60, and no effect on Hsp70 and Hsp90 expression. The disruption in the organization of actin cytoskeleton of these Tg mice was associated with the inhibition of the activation of Cdc42 and

  19. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of a NAC1 transcription factor in Medicago truncatula roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'haeseleer, Katrien; Den Herder, Griet; Laffont, Carole; Plet, Julie; Mortier, Virginie; Lelandais-Brière, Christine; De Bodt, Stefanie; De Keyser, Annick; Crespi, Martin; Holsters, Marcelle; Frugier, Florian; Goormachtig, Sofie

    2011-08-01

    • Legume roots develop two types of lateral organs, lateral roots and nodules. Nodules develop as a result of a symbiotic interaction with rhizobia and provide a niche for the bacteria to fix atmospheric nitrogen for the plant. • The Arabidopsis NAC1 transcription factor is involved in lateral root formation, and is regulated post-transcriptionally by miRNA164 and by SINAT5-dependent ubiquitination. We analyzed in Medicago truncatula the role of the closest NAC1 homolog in lateral root formation and in nodulation. • MtNAC1 shows a different expression pattern in response to auxin than its Arabidopsis homolog and no changes in lateral root number or nodulation were observed in plants affected in MtNAC1 expression. In addition, no interaction was found with SINA E3 ligases, suggesting that post-translational regulation of MtNAC1 does not occur in M. truncatula. Similar to what was found in Arabidopsis, a conserved miR164 target site was retrieved in MtNAC1, which reduced protein accumulation of a GFP-miR164 sensor. Furthermore, miR164 and MtNAC1 show an overlapping expression pattern in symbiotic nodules, and overexpression of this miRNA led to a reduction in nodule number. • This work suggests that regulatory pathways controlling a conserved transcription factor are complex and divergent between M. truncatula and Arabidopsis.

  20. Functional analysis of human mutations in homeodomain transcription factor PITX3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorokina Elena

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The homeodomain-containing transcription factor PITX3 was shown to be essential for normal eye development in vertebrates. Human patients with point mutations in PITX3 demonstrate congenital cataracts along with anterior segment defects in some cases when one allele is affected and microphthalmia with brain malformations when both copies are mutated. The functional consequences of these human mutations remain unknown. Results We studied the PITX3 mutant proteins S13N and G219fs to determine the type and severity of functional defects. Our results demonstrate alterations in DNA-binding profiles and/or transactivation activities and suggest a partial loss-of-function in both mutants with the G219fs form being more severely affected. No anomalies in cellular distribution and no dominant-negative effects were discovered for these mutants. Interestingly, the impairment of the G219fs activity varied between different ocular cell lines. Conclusion The G219fs mutation was found in multiple families affected with congenital cataracts along with anterior segment malformations in many members. Our data suggest that the presence/severity of anterior segment defects in families affected with G219fs may be determined by secondary factors that are expressed in the developing anterior segment structures and may modify the effect(s of this mutation. The S13N mutant showed only minor alteration of transactivation ability and DNA binding pattern and may represent a rare polymorphism in the PITX3 gene. A possible contribution of this mutation to human disease needs to be further investigated.

  1. Mapping functional regions of transcription factor TFIIIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrana, K E; Churchill, M E; Tullius, T D; Brown, D D

    1988-04-01

    Functional deletion mutants of the trans-acting factor TFIIIA, truncated at both ends of the molecule, have been expressed by in vitro transcription of a cDNA clone and subsequent cell-free translation of the synthetic mRNAs. A region of TFIIIA 19 amino acids or less, near the carboxyl terminus, is critical for maximal transcription and lies outside the DNA-binding domain. The elongated protein can be aligned over the internal control region (ICR) of the Xenopus 5S RNA gene with its carboxyl terminus oriented toward the 5' end of the gene and its amino terminus oriented toward the 3' end of the gene. The nine "zinc fingers" and the linkers that separate them comprise 80% of the protein mass and correspond to the DNA-binding domain of TFIIIA. The zinc fingers near the amino terminus of the protein contribute more to the overall binding energy of the protein to the ICR than do the zinc fingers near the carboxyl end. The most striking feature of TFIIIA is its modular structure. This is demonstrated by the fact that each zinc finger binds to just one of three short nucleotide sequences within the ICR.

  2. Transcription Factor Families Regulate the Anthocyanin Biosynthetic Pathway in Capsicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthocyanin structural gene transcription requires the expression of at least one member of each of three transcription factor families - MYC, MYB and WD40. These transcription factors form a complex that binds to structural gene promoters, thereby modulating gene expression. Capsicum annuum display...

  3. Human cytomegalovirus IE2 protein interacts with transcription activating factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Jinping(徐进平); YE; Linbai(叶林柏)

    2002-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) IE86 Cdna was cloned into Pgex-2T and fusion protein GST-IE86 was expressed in E. Coli. SDS-PAGE and Western blot assay indicated that fusion protein GST-IE86 with molecular weight of 92 ku is soluble in the supernatant of cell lysate. Protein GST and fusion protein GST-IE86 were purified by affinity chromatography. The technology of co-separation and specific affinity chromatography was used to study the interactions of HCMV IE86 protein with some transcriptional regulatory proteins and transcriptional factors. The results indicated that IE86 interacts separately with transcriptional factor TFIIB and promoter DNA binding transcription trans-activating factors SP1, AP1 and AP2 to form a heterogenous protein complex. These transcriptional trans-activating factors, transcriptional factor and IE86 protein were adsorbed and retained in the affinity chromatography simultaneously. But IE86 protein could not interact with NF-Кb, suggesting that the function of IE86 protein that can interact with transcriptional factor and transcriptional trans-activating factors has no relevance to protein glycosylation. IE86 protein probably has two domains responsible for binding transcriptional trans-activating regulatory proteins and transcriptional factors respectively, thus activating the transcription of many genes. The interactions accelerated the assembly of the transcriptional initiation complexes.

  4. Genetic heterogeneity of syndromic X-linked recessive microphthalmia-anophthalmia: is Lenz microphthalmia a single disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, David; Hadley, Donald W; Tifft, Cynthia J; Biesecker, Leslie G

    2002-07-15

    Nonsyndromic congenital microphthalmia or anophthalmia is a heterogeneous malformation with autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked modes of inheritance. Lenz microphthalmia syndrome comprises microphthalmia with mental retardation, malformed ears, skeletal anomalies, and is inherited in an X-linked recessive pattern. Prior studies have shown linkage of both isolated (or nonsyndromic) anophthalmos (ANOP1, [MIM 301590]) and Lenz syndrome [MIM 309800] to Xq27-q28. Nonsyndromic colobomatous microphthalmia [MIM 300345] has been linked to Xp11.4-Xq11.1. We describe a five-generation African-American family with microphthalmia or anophthalmia, mental retardation, and urogenital anomalies, in an X-linked recessive inheritance pattern, consistent with Lenz syndrome. Initial linkage analysis with microsatellite markers excluded the region in Xq27-q28 previously reported as a candidate region for ANOP1 [MIM 301590]. An X-chromosome scan revealed linkage to a 10-cM region between markers DXS228 and DXS992 in Xp11.4-p21.2. Multipoint analysis gave a maximum LOD score of 2.46 at marker DXS993. These data show that X-linked recessive syndromic microphthalmia exhibits genetic heterogeneity. In addition, it suggests that Lenz microphthalmia syndrome, previously thought to be a single disorder, may represent an amalgam of two distinct disorders.

  5. DNA residence time is a regulatory factor of transcription repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauß, Karen; Popp, Achim P; Schulze, Lena; Hettich, Johannes; Reisser, Matthias; Escoter Torres, Laura; Uhlenhaut, N Henriette; Gebhardt, J Christof M

    2017-08-21

    Transcription comprises a highly regulated sequence of intrinsically stochastic processes, resulting in bursts of transcription intermitted by quiescence. In transcription activation or repression, a transcription factor binds dynamically to DNA, with a residence time unique to each factor. Whether the DNA residence time is important in the transcription process is unclear. Here, we designed a series of transcription repressors differing in their DNA residence time by utilizing the modular DNA binding domain of transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) and varying the number of nucleotide-recognizing repeat domains. We characterized the DNA residence times of our repressors in living cells using single molecule tracking. The residence times depended non-linearly on the number of repeat domains and differed by more than a factor of six. The factors provoked a residence time-dependent decrease in transcript level of the glucocorticoid receptor-activated gene SGK1. Down regulation of transcription was due to a lower burst frequency in the presence of long binding repressors and is in accordance with a model of competitive inhibition of endogenous activator binding. Our single molecule experiments reveal transcription factor DNA residence time as a regulatory factor controlling transcription repression and establish TALE-DNA binding domains as tools for the temporal dissection of transcription regulation. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Transcriptional interference by RNA polymerase pausing and dislodgement of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Adam C; Egan, J Barry; Shearwin, Keith E

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptional interference is the in cis suppression of one transcriptional process by another. Mathematical modeling shows that promoter occlusion by elongating RNA polymerases cannot produce strong interference. Interference may instead be generated by (1) dislodgement of slow-to-assemble pre-initiation complexes and transcription factors and (2) prolonged occlusion by paused RNA polymerases.

  7. Lenz microphthalmia syndrome: three additional cases with rare associated anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temtamy, S A; Ismail, S I; Meguid, N A

    2000-01-01

    Lenz microphthalmia syndrome is an extremely rare inherited disorder, characterized by unilateral or bilateral microphthalmia. In rare cases affected patients exhibit complete absence of eye or blepharoptosis resulting in visual impairment. Additional physical abnormalities are often associated with this disorder, orofacial, digital, skeletal and urogenital abnormalities. Here we present three cases of Lenz microphthalmia with additional manifestations: two brothers of first cousin mating, the elder one has bilateral congenital cataract which is a rare ophthalmological finding in this syndrome and a third case who presented to us because of ambiguous genitalia. She was 12 years old, and reared as a female. Chromosomal analysis showed 46,XY karyotype, and hormonal studies indicated 5-alpha reductase deficiency. This is the first report of the association of 5-alpha reductase deficiency with Lenz microphthalmia syndrome.

  8. TOBFAC: the database of tobacco transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brannock Jennifer F

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulation of gene expression at the level of transcription is a major control point in many biological processes. Transcription factors (TFs can activate and/or repress the transcriptional rate of target genes and vascular plant genomes devote approximately 7% of their coding capacity to TFs. Global analysis of TFs has only been performed for three complete higher plant genomes – Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana, poplar (Populus trichocarpa and rice (Oryza sativa. Presently, no large-scale analysis of TFs has been made from a member of the Solanaceae, one of the most important families of vascular plants. To fill this void, we have analysed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum TFs using a dataset of 1,159,022 gene-space sequence reads (GSRs obtained by methylation filtering of the tobacco genome. An analytical pipeline was developed to isolate TF sequences from the GSR data set. This involved multiple (typically 10–15 independent searches with different versions of the TF family-defining domain(s (normally the DNA-binding domain followed by assembly into contigs and verification. Our analysis revealed that tobacco contains a minimum of 2,513 TFs representing all of the 64 well-characterised plant TF families. The number of TFs in tobacco is higher than previously reported for Arabidopsis and rice. Results TOBFAC: the database of tobacco transcription factors, is an integrative database that provides a portal to sequence and phylogeny data for the identified TFs, together with a large quantity of other data concerning TFs in tobacco. The database contains an individual page dedicated to each of the 64 TF families. These contain background information, domain architecture via Pfam links, a list of all sequences and an assessment of the minimum number of TFs in this family in tobacco. Downloadable phylogenetic trees of the major families are provided along with detailed information on the bioinformatic pipeline that was used to find

  9. Prenatal diagnosis of X-linked recessive Lenz microphthalmia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzumori, Nobuhiro; Kaname, Tadashi; Muramatsu, Yukako; Yanagi, Kumiko; Kumagai, Kyoko; Mizuno, Seiji; Naritomi, Kenji; Saitoh, Shinji; Sugiura-Ogasawara, Mayumi

    2013-11-01

    Lenz microphthalmia syndrome comprises microphthalmia-anophthalmia with mental retardation, malformed ears and skeletal anomalies, and is inherited in an X-linked recessive pattern. In 2004, it was reported that the missense mutation (BCL-6 co-repressor gene [BCOR] c.254C>T, p.P85L) in a single family with Lenz microphthalmia syndrome co-segregated with the disease phenotype. We report a case of prenatal diagnosis for X-linked recessive Lenz microphthalmia syndrome with the mutation. A 32-year-old gravida 5, para 2 Japanese woman was referred to Nagoya City University Hospital at 15 weeks of gestation. After genetic counseling and informed consent, amniocentesis was performed for fetal karyotyping, which was 46,XY. Using the extracted DNA from cultured amniotic cells, fetal search for BCOR c.254C>T mutation was undertaken. The couple requested medical termination of pregnancy, and the postabortion examination confirmed the diagnosis. This is the third report of a BCOR mutation, associated with X-linked syndromic microphthalmia, and most importantly, it is always the same mutation. The prenatal genetic diagnosis of the Lenz microphthalmia syndrome allowed time for parental counseling and delivery planning.

  10. Competitive inhibition of transcription factors by small interfering peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Pil Joon; Hong, Shin-Young; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Park, Chung-Mo

    2011-10-01

    Combinatorial assortment by dynamic dimer formation diversifies gene transcriptional specificities of transcription factors. A similar but biochemically distinct mechanism is competitive inhibition in which small proteins act as negative regulators by competitively forming nonfunctional heterodimers with specific transcription factors. The most extensively studied is the negative regulation of auxin response factors by AUXIN/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID repressors. Similarly, Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) little zipper and mini finger proteins act as competitive inhibitors of target transcription factors. Competitive inhibitors are also generated by alternative splicing and controlled proteolytic processing. Because they provide a way of attenuating transcription factors we propose to call them small interfering peptides (siPEPs). The siPEP-mediated strategy could be applied to deactivate specific transcription factors in crop plants.

  11. Expression analysis of OsbZIP transcription factors in resistance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    zino

    2013-08-21

    Aug 21, 2013 ... Plant basic leucine zipper (bZIP) proteins play an essential role in the genes ... Key words: OsbZIP transcription factors, rice blast, resistance ... quantitative reverse transcriptions polymerase chain reaction. ... eukaryotes, which shared two common structures: a .... RNA extration and reverse transcription.

  12. Nrf2 transcription factor gene regulates basal transcription of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... In contrast, there was no obvious effect on SOD2 in the Nrf2(+/+) mouse brain by any of the chemicals used . Key words: Nuclear ..... necrosis factor, selected anticancer drugs, and ionizing radiation. FASEB J. 7: 361-368.

  13. Genome-wide signatures of transcription factor activity: connecting transcription factors, disease, and small molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen

    Full Text Available Identifying transcription factors (TF involved in producing a genome-wide transcriptional profile is an essential step in building mechanistic model that can explain observed gene expression data. We developed a statistical framework for constructing genome-wide signatures of TF activity, and for using such signatures in the analysis of gene expression data produced by complex transcriptional regulatory programs. Our framework integrates ChIP-seq data and appropriately matched gene expression profiles to identify True REGulatory (TREG TF-gene interactions. It provides genome-wide quantification of the likelihood of regulatory TF-gene interaction that can be used to either identify regulated genes, or as genome-wide signature of TF activity. To effectively use ChIP-seq data, we introduce a novel statistical model that integrates information from all binding "peaks" within 2 Mb window around a gene's transcription start site (TSS, and provides gene-level binding scores and probabilities of regulatory interaction. In the second step we integrate these binding scores and regulatory probabilities with gene expression data to assess the likelihood of True REGulatory (TREG TF-gene interactions. We demonstrate the advantages of TREG framework in identifying genes regulated by two TFs with widely different distribution of functional binding events (ERα and E2f1. We also show that TREG signatures of TF activity vastly improve our ability to detect involvement of ERα in producing complex diseases-related transcriptional profiles. Through a large study of disease-related transcriptional signatures and transcriptional signatures of drug activity, we demonstrate that increase in statistical power associated with the use of TREG signatures makes the crucial difference in identifying key targets for treatment, and drugs to use for treatment. All methods are implemented in an open-source R package treg. The package also contains all data used in the analysis

  14. Differentiation of zebrafish melanophores depends on transcription factors AP2 alpha and AP2 epsilon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Van Otterloo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A model of the gene-regulatory-network (GRN, governing growth, survival, and differentiation of melanocytes, has emerged from studies of mouse coat color mutants and melanoma cell lines. In this model, Transcription Factor Activator Protein 2 alpha (TFAP2A contributes to melanocyte development by activating expression of the gene encoding the receptor tyrosine kinase Kit. Next, ligand-bound Kit stimulates a pathway activating transcription factor Microphthalmia (Mitf, which promotes differentiation and survival of melanocytes by activating expression of Tyrosinase family members, Bcl2, and other genes. The model predicts that in both Tfap2a and Kit null mutants there will be a phenotype of reduced melanocytes and that, because Tfap2a acts upstream of Kit, this phenotype will be more severe, or at least as severe as, in Tfap2a null mutants in comparison to Kit null mutants. Unexpectedly, this is not the case in zebrafish or mouse. Because many Tfap2 family members have identical DNA-binding specificity, we reasoned that another Tfap2 family member may work redundantly with Tfap2a in promoting Kit expression. We report that tfap2e is expressed in melanoblasts and melanophores in zebrafish embryos and that its orthologue, TFAP2E, is expressed in human melanocytes. We provide evidence that Tfap2e functions redundantly with Tfap2a to maintain kita expression in zebrafish embryonic melanophores. Further, we show that, in contrast to in kita mutants where embryonic melanophores appear to differentiate normally, in tfap2a/e doubly-deficient embryonic melanophores are small and under-melanized, although they retain expression of mitfa. Interestingly, forcing expression of mitfa in tfap2a/e doubly-deficient embryos partially restores melanophore differentiation. These findings reveal that Tfap2 activity, mediated redundantly by Tfap2a and Tfap2e, promotes melanophore differentiation in parallel with Mitf by an effector other than Kit. This work

  15. Failure to Target RANKL Signaling Through p38-MAPK Results in Defective Osteoclastogenesis in the Microphthalmia Cloudy-Eyed Mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Heather A; Bronisz, Agnieszka; Cabrera, Jennifer; Hildreth, Blake E; Cuitiño, Maria; Fu, Qi; Ahmad, Asrar; Toribio, Ramiro E; Ostrowski, Michael C; Sharma, Sudarshana M

    2016-03-01

    The Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) is a basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper family factor that is essential for terminal osteoclast differentiation. Previous work demonstrates that phosphorylation of MITF by p38 MAPK downstream of Receptor Activator of NFkB Ligand (RANKL) signaling is necessary for MITF activation in osteoclasts. The spontaneous Mitf cloudy eyed (ce) allele results in production of a truncated MITF protein that lacks the leucine zipper and C-terminal end. Here we show that the Mitf(ce) allele leads to a dense bone phenotype in neonatal mice due to defective osteoclast differentiation. In response to RANKL stimulation, in vitro osteoclast differentiation was impaired in myeloid precursors derived from neonatal or adult Mitf(ce/ce) mice. The loss of the leucine zipper domain in Mitf(ce/ce) mice does not interfere with the recruitment of MITF/PU.1 complexes to target promoters. Further, we have mapped the p38 MAPK docking site within the region deleted in Mitf(ce). This interaction is necessary for the phosphorylation of MITF by p38 MAPK. Site-directed mutations in the docking site interfered with the interaction between MITF and its co-factors FUS and BRG1. MITF-ce fails to recruit FUS and BRG1 to target genes, resulting in decreased expression of target genes and impaired osteoclast function. These results highlight the crucial role of signaling dependent MITF/p38 MAPK interactions in osteoclast differentiation.

  16. The WRKY transcription factor family in Brachypodium distachyon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathi Prateek

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A complete assembled genome sequence of wheat is not yet available. Therefore, model plant systems for wheat are very valuable. Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium is such a system. The WRKY family of transcription factors is one of the most important families of plant transcriptional regulators with members regulating important agronomic traits. Studies of WRKY transcription factors in Brachypodium and wheat therefore promise to lead to new strategies for wheat improvement. Results We have identified and manually curated the WRKY transcription factor family from Brachypodium using a pipeline designed to identify all potential WRKY genes. 86 WRKY transcription factors were found, a total higher than all other current databases. We therefore propose that our numbering system (BdWRKY1-BdWRKY86 becomes the standard nomenclature. In the JGI v1.0 assembly of Brachypodium with the MIPS/JGI v1.0 annotation, nine of the transcription factors have no gene model and eleven gene models are probably incorrectly predicted. In total, twenty WRKY transcription factors (23.3% do not appear to have accurate gene models. To facilitate use of our data, we have produced The Database of Brachypodium distachyon WRKY Transcription Factors. Each WRKY transcription factor has a gene page that includes predicted protein domains from MEME analyses. These conserved protein domains reflect possible input and output domains in signaling. The database also contains a BLAST search function where a large dataset of WRKY transcription factors, published genes, and an extensive set of wheat ESTs can be searched. We also produced a phylogram containing the WRKY transcription factor families from Brachypodium, rice, Arabidopsis, soybean, and Physcomitrella patens, together with published WRKY transcription factors from wheat. This phylogenetic tree provides evidence for orthologues, co-orthologues, and paralogues of Brachypodium WRKY transcription factors

  17. Activation of the Long Terminal Repeat of Human Endogenous Retrovirus K by Melanoma-Specific Transcription Factor MITF-M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyoko Katoh

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The human and Old World primate genomes possess conserved endogenous retrovirus sequences that have been implicated in evolution, reproduction, and carcinogenesis. Human endogenous retrovirus (HERV-K with 5′LTR-gag-pro-pol-env-rec/np9-3′LTR sequences represents the newest retrovirus family that integrated into the human genome 1 to 5 million years ago. Although a high-level expression of HERV-K in melanomas, breast cancers, and terato-carcinomas has been demonstrated, the mechanism of the lineage-specific activation of the long terminal repeat (LTR remains obscure. We studied chromosomal HERV-K expression in MeWo melanoma cells in comparison with the basal expression in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293 cells. Cloned LTR of HERV-K (HML-2.HOM was also characterized by mutation and transactivation experiments. We detected multiple transcriptional initiator (Inr sites in the LTR by rapid amplification of complementary DNA ends (5′ RACE. HEK293 and MeWo showed different Inr usage. The most potent Inr was associated with a TATA box and three binding motifs of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF. Both chromosomal HERV-K expression and the cloned LTR function were strongly activated in HEK293 by transfection with MITF-M, a melanocyte/melanoma–specific isoform of MITF. Coexpression of MITF and the HERV-K core antigen was detected in retinal pigmented epithelium by an immunofluorescence analysis. Although malignant melanoma lines MeWo, G361, and SK-MEL-28 showed enhanced HERV-K transcription compared with normal melanocytes, the level of MITF-M messenger RNA persisted from normal to transformed melanocytes. Thus, MITF-M may be a prerequisite for the pigmented cell lineage–specific function of HERV-K LTR, leading to the high-level expression in malignant melanomas.

  18. Genome Binding and Gene Regulation by Stem Cell Transcription Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Brandsma (Johan)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractNearly all cells of an individual organism contain the same genome. However, each cell type transcribes a different set of genes due to the presence of different sets of cell type-specific transcription factors. Such transcription factors bind to regulatory regions such as promoters

  19. Primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the orbit in a 5-year-old girl with microphthalmia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alyahya, Ghassan Ayish Jabur; Heegaard, Steffen; Fledelius, Hans C.;

    2000-01-01

    ophthalmology, primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET), Ewing's sarcoma, small round-cell tumors, retinoblastoma, medulloepithelioma, microphthalmia, orbitotomy......ophthalmology, primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET), Ewing's sarcoma, small round-cell tumors, retinoblastoma, medulloepithelioma, microphthalmia, orbitotomy...

  20. Exclusive gene mapping of congenital microphthalmia in a Chinese family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Yanan; LI Hui; YU Ping; ZHOU Qiang; ZHAO Luhang; ZHANG Ya-Ping

    2006-01-01

    Congenital microphthalmia is a developmental ocular disorder and might be caused by the mutations in the genes involved in eye development.To uncover the genetic cause in a six-generation Chinese pedigree with autosomal dominant congenital microphthalmia, we performed genescan and linkage analysis in this family. Fourteen microsatellite markers on chromosomes 3, 11, 14 and 15 were selected as genetic markers according to the five previously reported loci associated with microphthalmia (MITF, SOX2, PAX6, MCOP and NN02). The genomic DNA of each member in the pedigree was amplified with 14 pairs of fluorescence labeled primers. Genome screening and genotyping were conducted on ABI377 DNA sequencer and linkage analysis was performed with Linkage software package. All two-point LOD scores of linkage analysis between the suggested disease genes and microsatellite markers were <-2, which indicated that none of the five genes were responsible for microphthalmia in this Chinese family. Microphthalmia in this family may be caused by mutation in a new gene which is essential in eye development.

  1. Transcription-dependent degradation controls the stability of the SREBP family of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundqvist, Anders; Ericsson, Johan

    2003-11-25

    Cholesterol metabolism is tightly controlled by members of the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) family of transcription factors. Here we demonstrate that the ubiquitination and degradation of SREBPs depend on their transcriptional activity. Mutations in the transactivation or DNA-binding domains of SREBPs inhibit their transcriptional activity and stabilize the proteins. The transcriptional activity and degradation of these mutants are restored when fused to heterologous transactivation or DNA-binding domains. When SREBP1a was fused to the DBD of Gal4, the ubiquitination and degradation of the fusion protein depended on coexpression of a promoter-reporter gene containing Gal4-binding sites. In addition, disruption of the interaction between WT SREBP and endogenous p300/CBP resulted in inhibition of SREBP-dependent transcription and stabilization of SREBP. Chemical inhibitors of transcription reduced the degradation of transcriptionally active SREBP1a, whereas they had no effect on the stability of transcriptionally inactive mutants, demonstrating that transcriptional activation plays an important role in the degradation of SREBPs. Thus, transcription-dependent degradation of SREBP constitutes a feedback mechanism to regulate the expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism and may represent a general mechanism to regulate the duration of transcriptional responses.

  2. Arabidopsis transcription factors: genome-wide comparative analysis among eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechmann, J L; Heard, J; Martin, G; Reuber, L; Jiang, C; Keddie, J; Adam, L; Pineda, O; Ratcliffe, O J; Samaha, R R; Creelman, R; Pilgrim, M; Broun, P; Zhang, J Z; Ghandehari, D; Sherman, B K; Yu, G

    2000-12-15

    The completion of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence allows a comparative analysis of transcriptional regulators across the three eukaryotic kingdoms. Arabidopsis dedicates over 5% of its genome to code for more than 1500 transcription factors, about 45% of which are from families specific to plants. Arabidopsis transcription factors that belong to families common to all eukaryotes do not share significant similarity with those of the other kingdoms beyond the conserved DNA binding domains, many of which have been arranged in combinations specific to each lineage. The genome-wide comparison reveals the evolutionary generation of diversity in the regulation of transcription.

  3. Understanding variation in transcription factor binding by modeling transcription factor genome-epigenome interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieh-Chun Chen

    Full Text Available Despite explosive growth in genomic datasets, the methods for studying epigenomic mechanisms of gene regulation remain primitive. Here we present a model-based approach to systematically analyze the epigenomic functions in modulating transcription factor-DNA binding. Based on the first principles of statistical mechanics, this model considers the interactions between epigenomic modifications and a cis-regulatory module, which contains multiple binding sites arranged in any configurations. We compiled a comprehensive epigenomic dataset in mouse embryonic stem (mES cells, including DNA methylation (MeDIP-seq and MRE-seq, DNA hydroxymethylation (5-hmC-seq, and histone modifications (ChIP-seq. We discovered correlations of transcription factors (TFs for specific combinations of epigenomic modifications, which we term epigenomic motifs. Epigenomic motifs explained why some TFs appeared to have different DNA binding motifs derived from in vivo (ChIP-seq and in vitro experiments. Theoretical analyses suggested that the epigenome can modulate transcriptional noise and boost the cooperativity of weak TF binding sites. ChIP-seq data suggested that epigenomic boost of binding affinities in weak TF binding sites can function in mES cells. We showed in theory that the epigenome should suppress the TF binding differences on SNP-containing binding sites in two people. Using personal data, we identified strong associations between H3K4me2/H3K9ac and the degree of personal differences in NFκB binding in SNP-containing binding sites, which may explain why some SNPs introduce much smaller personal variations on TF binding than other SNPs. In summary, this model presents a powerful approach to analyze the functions of epigenomic modifications. This model was implemented into an open source program APEG (Affinity Prediction by Epigenome and Genome, http://systemsbio.ucsd.edu/apeg.

  4. Understanding variation in transcription factor binding by modeling transcription factor genome-epigenome interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chieh-Chun; Xiao, Shu; Xie, Dan; Cao, Xiaoyi; Song, Chun-Xiao; Wang, Ting; He, Chuan; Zhong, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Despite explosive growth in genomic datasets, the methods for studying epigenomic mechanisms of gene regulation remain primitive. Here we present a model-based approach to systematically analyze the epigenomic functions in modulating transcription factor-DNA binding. Based on the first principles of statistical mechanics, this model considers the interactions between epigenomic modifications and a cis-regulatory module, which contains multiple binding sites arranged in any configurations. We compiled a comprehensive epigenomic dataset in mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells, including DNA methylation (MeDIP-seq and MRE-seq), DNA hydroxymethylation (5-hmC-seq), and histone modifications (ChIP-seq). We discovered correlations of transcription factors (TFs) for specific combinations of epigenomic modifications, which we term epigenomic motifs. Epigenomic motifs explained why some TFs appeared to have different DNA binding motifs derived from in vivo (ChIP-seq) and in vitro experiments. Theoretical analyses suggested that the epigenome can modulate transcriptional noise and boost the cooperativity of weak TF binding sites. ChIP-seq data suggested that epigenomic boost of binding affinities in weak TF binding sites can function in mES cells. We showed in theory that the epigenome should suppress the TF binding differences on SNP-containing binding sites in two people. Using personal data, we identified strong associations between H3K4me2/H3K9ac and the degree of personal differences in NFκB binding in SNP-containing binding sites, which may explain why some SNPs introduce much smaller personal variations on TF binding than other SNPs. In summary, this model presents a powerful approach to analyze the functions of epigenomic modifications. This model was implemented into an open source program APEG (Affinity Prediction by Epigenome and Genome, http://systemsbio.ucsd.edu/apeg).

  5. Making a tooth: growth factors, transcription factors, and stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yah Ding ZHANG; Zhi CHEN; Yi Qiang SONG; Chao LIU; Yi Ping CHEN

    2005-01-01

    Mammalian tooth development is largely dependent on sequential and reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions.These processes involve a series of inductive and permissive interactions that result in the determination, differentiation,and organization of odontogenic tissues. Multiple signaling molecules, including BMPs, FGFs, Shh, and Wnt proteins,have been implicated in mediating these tissue interactions. Transcription factors participate in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions via linking the signaling loops between tissue layers by responding to inductive signals and regulating the expression of other signaling molecules. Adult stem cells are highly plastic and multipotent. These cells including dental pulp stem cells and bone marrow stromal cells could be reprogrammed into odontogenic fate and participated in tooth formation. Recent progress in the studies of molecular basis of tooth development, adult stem cell biology, and regeneration will provide fundamental knowledge for the realization of human tooth regeneration in the near future.

  6. Regulation of the Ets transcription factor Tel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roukens, Mark Guido

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis we report novel studies on the molecular regulation of the transcriptional repressor Tel (Translocation Ets Leukemia). The work in this thesis is presented as follows: Chapter 1 is an introduction which summarizes the literature about Tel and its Drosophila orthologue Yan as it was k

  7. TFinDit: transcription factor-DNA interaction data depository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Daniel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the crucial steps in regulation of gene expression is the binding of transcription factor(s to specific DNA sequences. Knowledge of the binding affinity and specificity at a structural level between transcription factors and their target sites has important implications in our understanding of the mechanism of gene regulation. Due to their unique functions and binding specificity, there is a need for a transcription factor-specific, structure-based database and corresponding web service to facilitate structural bioinformatics studies of transcription factor-DNA interactions, such as development of knowledge-based interaction potential, transcription factor-DNA docking, binding induced conformational changes, and the thermodynamics of protein-DNA interactions. Description TFinDit is a relational database and a web search tool for studying transcription factor-DNA interactions. The database contains annotated transcription factor-DNA complex structures and related data, such as unbound protein structures, thermodynamic data, and binding sequences for the corresponding transcription factors in the complex structures. TFinDit also provides a user-friendly interface and allows users to either query individual entries or generate datasets through culling the database based on one or more search criteria. Conclusions TFinDit is a specialized structural database with annotated transcription factor-DNA complex structures and other preprocessed data. We believe that this database/web service can facilitate the development and testing of TF-DNA interaction potentials and TF-DNA docking algorithms, and the study of protein-DNA recognition mechanisms.

  8. Transcriptional elongation factor ENL phosphorylated by ATM recruits polycomb and switches off transcription for DSB repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ui, Ayako; Nagaura, Yuko; Yasui, Akira

    2015-05-07

    Transcription is repressed if a DNA double-strand break (DSB) is introduced in close proximity to a transcriptional activation site at least in part by H2A-ubiquitination. While ATM signaling is involved, how it controls H2A-ubiquitination remains unclear. Here, we identify that, in response to DSBs, a transcriptional elongation factor, ENL (MLLT1), is phosphorylated by ATM at conserved SQ sites. This phosphorylation increases the interaction between ENL and the E3-ubiquitin-ligase complex of Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) via BMI1. This interaction promotes enrichment of PRC1 at transcription elongation sites near DSBs to ubiquitinate H2A leading to transcriptional repression. ENL SQ sites and BMI1 are necessary for KU70 accumulation at DSBs near active transcription sites and cellular resistance to DSBs. Our data suggest that ATM-dependent phosphorylation of ENL functions as switch from elongation to Polycomb-mediated repression to preserve genome integrity.

  9. The Arabidopsis thaliana Nuclear Factor Y Transcription Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hang; Wu, Di; Kong, Fanying; Lin, Ke; Zhang, Haishen; Li, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear factor Y (NF-Y) is an evolutionarily conserved trimeric transcription factor complex present in nearly all eukaryotes. The heterotrimeric NF-Y complex consists of three subunits, NF-YA, NF-YB, and NF-YC, and binds to the CCAAT box in the promoter regions of its target genes to regulate their expression. Yeast and mammal genomes generally have single genes with multiple splicing isoforms that encode each NF-Y subunit. By contrast, plant genomes generally have multi-gene families encoding each subunit and these genes are differentially expressed in various tissues or stages. Therefore, different subunit combinations can lead to a wide variety of NF-Y complexes in various tissues, stages, and growth conditions, indicating the potentially diverse functions of this complex in plants. Indeed, many recent studies have proved that the NF-Y complex plays multiple essential roles in plant growth, development, and stress responses. In this review, we highlight recent progress on NF-Y in Arabidopsis thaliana, including NF-Y protein structure, heterotrimeric complex formation, and the molecular mechanism by which NF-Y regulates downstream target gene expression. We then focus on its biological functions and underlying molecular mechanisms. Finally, possible directions for future research on NF-Y are also presented.

  10. Evolution of transcriptional networks in yeast: alternative teams of transcriptional factors for different species

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Muñoz; Daniella Santos Muñoz; Aleksey Zimin; Yorke, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The diversity in eukaryotic life reflects a diversity in regulatory pathways. Nocedal and Johnson argue that the rewiring of gene regulatory networks is a major force for the diversity of life, that changes in regulation can create new species. Results We have created a method (based on our new “ping-pong algorithm) for detecting more complicated rewirings, where several transcription factors can substitute for one or more transcription factors in the regulation of a family of co-r...

  11. Molecular architecture of transcription factor hotspots in early adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Baek, Songjoon; Rabiee, Atefeh;

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors have recently been shown to colocalize in hotspot regions of the genome, which are further clustered into super-enhancers. However, the detailed molecular organization of transcription factors at hotspot regions is poorly defined. Here, we have used digital genomic...... footprinting to precisely define factor localization at a genome-wide level during the early phase of 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation, which allows us to obtain detailed molecular insight into how transcription factors target hotspots. We demonstrate the formation of ATF-C/EBP heterodimers at a composite...... motif on chromatin, and we suggest that this may be a general mechanism for integrating external signals on chromatin. Furthermore, we find evidence of extensive recruitment of transcription factors to hotspots through alternative mechanisms not involving their known motifs and demonstrate...

  12. Molecular architecture of transcription factor hotspots in early adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Baek, Songjoon; Rabiee, Atefeh

    2014-01-01

    motif on chromatin, and we suggest that this may be a general mechanism for integrating external signals on chromatin. Furthermore, we find evidence of extensive recruitment of transcription factors to hotspots through alternative mechanisms not involving their known motifs and demonstrate......Transcription factors have recently been shown to colocalize in hotspot regions of the genome, which are further clustered into super-enhancers. However, the detailed molecular organization of transcription factors at hotspot regions is poorly defined. Here, we have used digital genomic...... footprinting to precisely define factor localization at a genome-wide level during the early phase of 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation, which allows us to obtain detailed molecular insight into how transcription factors target hotspots. We demonstrate the formation of ATF-C/EBP heterodimers at a composite...

  13. Experimental determination of the evolvability of a transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maerkl, Sebastian J; Quake, Stephen R

    2009-11-03

    Sequence-specific binding of a transcription factor to DNA is the central event in any transcriptional regulatory network. However, relatively little is known about the evolutionary plasticity of transcription factors. For example, the exact functional consequence of an amino acid substitution on the DNA-binding specificity of most transcription factors is currently not predictable. Furthermore, although the major structural families of transcription factors have been identified, the detailed DNA-binding repertoires within most families have not been characterized. We studied the sequence recognition code and evolvability of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor family by creating all possible 95 single-point mutations of five DNA-contacting residues of Max, a human helix-loop-helix transcription factor and measured the detailed DNA-binding repertoire of each mutant. Our results show that the sequence-specific repertoire of Max accessible through single-point mutations is extremely limited, and we are able to predict 92% of the naturally occurring diversity at these positions. All naturally occurring basic regions were also found to be accessible through functional intermediates. Finally, we observed a set of amino acids that are functional in vitro but are not found to be used naturally, indicating that functionality alone is not sufficient for selection.

  14. Lenz microphthalmia syndrome with dental anomalies: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersin, Nazan Kocatas; Tugsel, Zuhal; Gökce, Bülent; Ozpinar, Birgül; Eronat, Nesrin

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the dental management and 7-year follow-up of a 14-year-old boy who showed the typical characteristics of Lenz microphthalmia syndrome, a rare genetic disorder characterized by multiple abnormalities. The main features of the syndrome are microphthalmia, developmental retardation, ear abnormalities, microcephaly, skeletal, digital and urogenital anomalies. The dental anomalies include micrognathia, hypodontia, agenesis of permanent teeth, conic-shaped incisors, and taurodontic molars. The purpose of the report was to document specific oral manifestations and dental anomalies and their management associated with a previously reported case.

  15. Maintenance of Transcription-Translation Coupling by Elongation Factor P

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Elgamal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Under conditions of tight coupling between translation and transcription, the ribosome enables synthesis of full-length mRNAs by preventing both formation of intrinsic terminator hairpins and loading of the transcription termination factor Rho. While previous studies have focused on transcription factors, we investigated the role of Escherichia coli elongation factor P (EF-P, an elongation factor required for efficient translation of mRNAs containing consecutive proline codons, in maintaining coupled translation and transcription. In the absence of EF-P, the presence of Rho utilization (rut sites led to an ~30-fold decrease in translation of polyproline-encoding mRNAs. Coexpression of the Rho inhibitor Psu fully restored translation. EF-P was also shown to inhibit premature termination during synthesis and translation of mRNAs encoding intrinsic terminators. The effects of EF-P loss on expression of polyproline mRNAs were augmented by a substitution in RNA polymerase that accelerates transcription. Analyses of previously reported ribosome profiling and global proteomic data identified several candidate gene clusters where EF-P could act to prevent premature transcription termination. In vivo probing allowed detection of some predicted premature termination products in the absence of EF-P. Our findings support a model in which EF-P maintains coupling of translation and transcription by decreasing ribosome stalling at polyproline motifs. Other regulators that facilitate ribosome translocation through roadblocks to prevent premature transcription termination upon uncoupling remain to be identified.

  16. Yin Yang 1: a multifaceted protein beyond a transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhiyong; Cao, Paul; Wan, Mei Mei; Sui, Guangchao

    2010-01-01

    As a transcription factor, Yin Yang 1 (YY1) regulates the transcription of a dazzling list of genes and the number of its targets still mounts. Recent studies revealed that YY1 possesses functions independent of its DNA binding activity and its regulatory role in tumorigenesis has started to emerge.

  17. Maintenance of Transcription-Translation Coupling by Elongation Factor P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgamal, Sara

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Under conditions of tight coupling between translation and transcription, the ribosome enables synthesis of full-length mRNAs by preventing both formation of intrinsic terminator hairpins and loading of the transcription termination factor Rho. While previous studies have focused on transcription factors, we investigated the role of Escherichia coli elongation factor P (EF-P), an elongation factor required for efficient translation of mRNAs containing consecutive proline codons, in maintaining coupled translation and transcription. In the absence of EF-P, the presence of Rho utilization (rut) sites led to an ~30-fold decrease in translation of polyproline-encoding mRNAs. Coexpression of the Rho inhibitor Psu fully restored translation. EF-P was also shown to inhibit premature termination during synthesis and translation of mRNAs encoding intrinsic terminators. The effects of EF-P loss on expression of polyproline mRNAs were augmented by a substitution in RNA polymerase that accelerates transcription. Analyses of previously reported ribosome profiling and global proteomic data identified several candidate gene clusters where EF-P could act to prevent premature transcription termination. In vivo probing allowed detection of some predicted premature termination products in the absence of EF-P. Our findings support a model in which EF-P maintains coupling of translation and transcription by decreasing ribosome stalling at polyproline motifs. Other regulators that facilitate ribosome translocation through roadblocks to prevent premature transcription termination upon uncoupling remain to be identified. PMID:27624127

  18. PlnTFDB: an integrative plant transcription factor database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruzicic Slobodan

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factors (TFs are key regulatory proteins that enhance or repress the transcriptional rate of their target genes by binding to specific promoter regions (i.e. cis-acting elements upon activation or de-activation of upstream signaling cascades. TFs thus constitute master control elements of dynamic transcriptional networks. TFs have fundamental roles in almost all biological processes (development, growth and response to environmental factors and it is assumed that they play immensely important functions in the evolution of species. In plants, TFs have been employed to manipulate various types of metabolic, developmental and stress response pathways. Cross-species comparison and identification of regulatory modules and hence TFs is thought to become increasingly important for the rational design of new plant biomass. Up to now, however, no computational repository is available that provides access to the largely complete sets of transcription factors of sequenced plant genomes. Description PlnTFDB is an integrative plant transcription factor database that provides a web interface to access large (close to complete sets of transcription factors of several plant species, currently encompassing Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress, Populus trichocarpa (poplar, Oryza sativa (rice, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Ostreococcus tauri. It also provides an access point to its daughter databases of a species-centered representation of transcription factors (OstreoTFDB, ChlamyTFDB, ArabTFDB, PoplarTFDB and RiceTFDB. Information including protein sequences, coding regions, genomic sequences, expressed sequence tags (ESTs, domain architecture and scientific literature is provided for each family. Conclusion We have created lists of putatively complete sets of transcription factors and other transcriptional regulators for five plant genomes. They are publicly available through http://plntfdb.bio.uni-potsdam.de. Further data will be

  19. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma recruits the positive transcription elongation factor b complex to activate transcription and promote adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iankova, Irena; Petersen, Rasmus K; Annicotte, Jean-Sébastien

    2006-01-01

    Positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) phosphorylates the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, facilitating transcriptional elongation. In addition to its participation in general transcription, P-TEFb is recruited to specific promoters by some transcription factors such as c-Myc...

  20. ETS transcription factors in hematopoietic stem cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciau-Uitz, Aldo; Wang, Lu; Patient, Roger; Liu, Feng

    2013-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are essential for the maintenance of the hematopoietic system. However, these cells cannot be maintained or created in vitro, and very little is known about their generation during embryogenesis. Many transcription factors and signaling pathways play essential roles at various stages of HSC development. Members of the ETS ('E twenty-six') family of transcription factors are recognized as key regulators within the gene regulatory networks governing hematopoiesis, including the ontogeny of HSCs. Remarkably, although all ETS transcription factors bind the same DNA consensus sequence and overlapping tissue expression is observed, individual ETS transcription factors play unique roles in the development of HSCs. Also, these transcription factors are recurrently used throughout development and their functions are context-dependent, increasing the challenge of studying their mechanism of action. Critically, ETS factors also play roles under pathological conditions, such as leukemia and, therefore, deciphering their mechanism of action will not only enhance our knowledge of normal hematopoiesis, but also inform protocols for their creation in vitro from pluripotent stem cells and the design of new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of malignant blood cell diseases. In this review, we summarize the key findings on the roles of ETS transcription factors in HSC development and discuss novel mechanisms by which they could control hematopoiesis. © 2013.

  1. Leucine zipper transcription factor-like 1 expression in gastric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    gastric cancer and its relationship to relative adhesion molecule ... Keywords: Leucine zipper transcription factor-like1 expression, Gastric cancer, Relative adhesion molecule, Protein ..... cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and recurrence [17].

  2. Plant NAC-type transcription factor proteins contain a NARD domain for repression of transcriptional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yu-Jun; Song, Qing-Xin; Chen, Hao-Wei; Zou, Hong-Feng; Wei, Wei; Kang, Xu-Sheng; Ma, Biao; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Zhang, Jin-Song; Chen, Shou-Yi

    2010-10-01

    Plant-specific transcription factor NAC proteins play essential roles in many biological processes such as development, senescence, morphogenesis, and stress signal transduction pathways. In the NAC family, some members function as transcription activators while others act as repressors. In the present study we found that though the full-length GmNAC20 from soybean did not have transcriptional activation activity, the carboxy-terminal activation domain of GmNAC20 had high transcriptional activation activity in the yeast assay system. Deletion experiments revealed an active repression domain with 35 amino acids, named NARD (NAC Repression Domain), in the d subdomain of NAC DNA-binding domain. NARD can reduce the transcriptional activation ability of diverse transcription factors when fused to either the amino-terminal or the carboxy-terminal of the transcription factors. NARD-like sequences are also present in other NAC family members and they are functional repression domain when fused to VP16 in plant protoplast assay system. Mutation analysis of conserved amino acid residues in NARD showed that the hydrophobic LVFY motif may partially contribute to the repression function. It is hypothesized that the interactions between the repression domain NARD and the carboxy-terminal activation domain may finally determine the ability of NAC family proteins to regulate downstream gene expressions.

  3. Metastatic Bone Disease: Role of Transcription Factors and Future Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Pratap, Jitesh; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Gary S.

    2010-01-01

    Progression of cancer from the earliest event of cell transformation through stages of tumor growth and metastasis at a distal site involves many complex biological processes. Underlying the numerous responses of cancer cells to the tumor microenvironment which support their survival, migration and metastasis are transcription factors that regulate the expression of genes reflecting properties of the tumor cell. A number of transcription factors have been identified that play key roles in pro...

  4. SoyDB: a knowledge database of soybean transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valliyodan Babu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factors play the crucial rule of regulating gene expression and influence almost all biological processes. Systematically identifying and annotating transcription factors can greatly aid further understanding their functions and mechanisms. In this article, we present SoyDB, a user friendly database containing comprehensive knowledge of soybean transcription factors. Description The soybean genome was recently sequenced by the Department of Energy-Joint Genome Institute (DOE-JGI and is publicly available. Mining of this sequence identified 5,671 soybean genes as putative transcription factors. These genes were comprehensively annotated as an aid to the soybean research community. We developed SoyDB - a knowledge database for all the transcription factors in the soybean genome. The database contains protein sequences, predicted tertiary structures, putative DNA binding sites, domains, homologous templates in the Protein Data Bank (PDB, protein family classifications, multiple sequence alignments, consensus protein sequence motifs, web logo of each family, and web links to the soybean transcription factor database PlantTFDB, known EST sequences, and other general protein databases including Swiss-Prot, Gene Ontology, KEGG, EMBL, TAIR, InterPro, SMART, PROSITE, NCBI, and Pfam. The database can be accessed via an interactive and convenient web server, which supports full-text search, PSI-BLAST sequence search, database browsing by protein family, and automatic classification of a new protein sequence into one of 64 annotated transcription factor families by hidden Markov models. Conclusions A comprehensive soybean transcription factor database was constructed and made publicly accessible at http://casp.rnet.missouri.edu/soydb/.

  5. TrSDB: a proteome database of transcription factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermoso, Antoni; Aguilar, Daniel; Aviles, Francesc X.; Querol, Enrique

    2004-01-01

    TrSDB—TranScout Database—(http://ibb.uab.es/trsdb) is a proteome database of eukaryotic transcription factors based upon predicted motifs by TranScout and data sources such as InterPro and Gene Ontology Annotation. Nine eukaryotic proteomes are included in the current version. Extensive and diverse information for each database entry, different analyses considering TranScout classification and similarity relationships are offered for research on transcription factors or gene expression. PMID:14681387

  6. A bacteriophage transcription regulator inhibits bacterial transcription initiation by σ-factor displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing; Shadrin, Andrey; Sheppard, Carol; Mekler, Vladimir; Xu, Yingqi; Severinov, Konstantin; Matthews, Steve; Wigneshweraraj, Sivaramesh

    2014-04-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) appropriate essential processes of bacterial hosts to benefit their own development. The multisubunit bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAp) enzyme, which catalyses DNA transcription, is targeted by phage-encoded transcription regulators that selectively modulate its activity. Here, we describe the structural and mechanistic basis for the inhibition of bacterial RNAp by the transcription regulator P7 encoded by Xanthomonas oryzae phage Xp10. We reveal that P7 uses a two-step mechanism to simultaneously interact with the catalytic β and β' subunits of the bacterial RNAp and inhibits transcription initiation by inducing the displacement of the σ(70)-factor on initial engagement of RNAp with promoter DNA. The new mode of interaction with and inhibition mechanism of bacterial RNAp by P7 underscore the remarkable variety of mechanisms evolved by phages to interfere with host transcription.

  7. Controllability analysis of transcriptional regulatory networks reveals circular control patterns among transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Österlund, Tobias; Bordel, Sergio; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is the most committed type of regulation in living cells where transcription factors (TFs) control the expression of their target genes and TF expression is controlled by other TFs forming complex transcriptional regulatory networks that can be highly interconnected. Here...... we analyze the topology and organization of nine transcriptional regulatory networks for E. coli, yeast, mouse and human, and we evaluate how the structure of these networks influences two of their key properties, namely controllability and stability. We calculate the controllability for each network...... as a measure of the organization and interconnectivity of the network. We find that the number of driver nodes n(D) needed to control the whole network is 64% of the TFs in the E. coli transcriptional regulatory network in contrast to only 17% for the yeast network, 4% for the mouse network and 8...

  8. Potential Role of Activating Transcription Factor 5 during Osteogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Vicari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human adipose-derived stem cells are an abundant population of stem cells readily isolated from human adipose tissue that can differentiate into connective tissue lineages including bone, cartilage, fat, and muscle. Activating transcription factor 5 is a transcription factor of the ATF/cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB family. It is transcribed in two types of mRNAs (activating transcription factor 5 isoform 1 and activating transcription factor 5 isoform 2, encoding the same single 30-kDa protein. Although it is well demonstrated that it regulates the proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, little is known about its potential role in osteogenic differentiation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression levels of the two isoforms and protein during osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells. Our data indicate that activating transcription factor 5 is differentially expressed reaching a peak of expression at the stage of bone mineralization. These findings suggest that activating transcription factor 5 could play an interesting regulatory role during osteogenesis, which would provide a powerful tool to study bone physiology.

  9. Evolution of transcriptional networks in yeast: alternative teams of transcriptional factors for different species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Muñoz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diversity in eukaryotic life reflects a diversity in regulatory pathways. Nocedal and Johnson argue that the rewiring of gene regulatory networks is a major force for the diversity of life, that changes in regulation can create new species. Results We have created a method (based on our new “ping-pong algorithm for detecting more complicated rewirings, where several transcription factors can substitute for one or more transcription factors in the regulation of a family of co-regulated genes. An example is illustrative. A rewiring has been reported by Hogues et al. that RAP1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae substitutes for TBF1/CBF1 in Candida albicans for ribosomal RP genes. There one transcription factor substitutes for another on some collection of genes. Such a substitution is referred to as a “rewiring”. We agree with this finding of rewiring as far as it goes but the situation is more complicated. Many transcription factors can regulate a gene and our algorithm finds that in this example a “team” (or collection of three transcription factors including RAP1 substitutes for TBF1 for 19 genes. The switch occurs for a branch of the phylogenetic tree containing 10 species (including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, while the remaining 13 species (Candida albicans are regulated by TBF1. Conclusions To gain insight into more general evolutionary mechanisms, we have created a mathematical algorithm that finds such general switching events and we prove that it converges. Of course any such computational discovery should be validated in the biological tests. For each branch of the phylogenetic tree and each gene module, our algorithm finds a sub-group of co-regulated genes and a team of transcription factors that substitutes for another team of transcription factors. In most cases the signal will be small but in some cases we find a strong signal of switching. We report our findings for 23 Ascomycota fungi species.

  10. Congenital Microphthalmia, Anophthalmia and Coloboma among Live Births in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Laura; Jensen, Hanne; Grønskov, Karen;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study aims to quantify the occurrence of the congenital eye malformations anophthalmia (AO), microphthalmia (MO) and coloboma among liveborn infants in Denmark, and to estimate the rate of chromosomal abnormalities in this group of patients. METHODS: A cohort of patients born in 1995...

  11. Kabuki syndrome: expanding the phenotype to include microphthalmia and anophthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVeigh, Terri P; Banka, Siddharth; Reardon, William

    2015-10-01

    Kabuki syndrome is a rare genetic malformation syndrome that is characterized by distinct facies, structural defects and intellectual disability. Kabuki syndrome may be caused by mutations in one of two histone methyltransferase genes: KMT2D and KDM6A. We describe a male child of nonconsanguineous Irish parents presenting with multiple malformations, including bilateral extreme microphthalmia; cleft palate; congenital diaphragmatic hernia; duplex kidney; as well as facial features of Kabuki syndrome, including interrupted eyebrows and lower lid ectropion. A de-novo germline mutation in KMT2D was identified. Whole-exome sequencing failed to reveal mutations in any of the known microphthalmia/anopthalmia genes. We also identified four other patients with Kabuki syndrome and microphthalmia. We postulate that Kabuki syndrome may produce this type of ocular phenotype as a result of extensive interaction between KMT2D, WAR complex proteins and PAXIP1. Children presenting with microphthalmia/anophthalmia should be examined closely for other signs of Kabuki syndrome, especially at an age where the facial gestalt might be less readily appreciable.

  12. Modulation of DNA binding by gene-specific transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleif, Robert F

    2013-10-01

    The transcription of many genes, particularly in prokaryotes, is controlled by transcription factors whose activity can be modulated by controlling their DNA binding affinity. Understanding the molecular mechanisms by which DNA binding affinity is regulated is important, but because forming definitive conclusions usually requires detailed structural information in combination with data from extensive biophysical, biochemical, and sometimes genetic experiments, little is truly understood about this topic. This review describes the biological requirements placed upon DNA binding transcription factors and their consequent properties, particularly the ways that DNA binding affinity can be modulated and methods for its study. What is known and not known about the mechanisms modulating the DNA binding affinity of a number of prokaryotic transcription factors, including CAP and lac repressor, is provided.

  13. NAC Transcription Factors in Stress Responses and Senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Shea, Charlotte

    Plant-specific NAM/ATAF/CUC (NAC) transcription factors have recently received considerable attention due to their significant roles in plant development and stress signalling. This interest has resulted in a number of physiological, genetic and cell biological studies of their functions. Some......RF is a functional hotspot for both transcriptional activity and interaction with the cellular hub protein Radical Induced Cell Death1 (RCD1). Specific amino acid residues essential for the interaction were identified. These studies and structural analysis suggested that RCD1-ANAC046 complex formation does......-associated RCD1-transcription factor network represents a much-needed model for translation of in vitro obtained ID analysis, as presented here, to the in vivo organismal level. A systematic analysis was performed of the DNA-binding-site landscape and regulatory network of NAC transcription factors...

  14. Plastid sigma factors: Their individual functions and regulation in transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Wei; He, Baoye; Mao, Juan; Jiang, Jingjing; Zhang, Lixin

    2015-09-01

    Sigma factors are the predominant factors involved in transcription regulation in bacteria. These factors can recruit the core RNA polymerase to promoters with specific DNA sequences and initiate gene transcription. The plastids of higher plants originating from an ancestral cyanobacterial endosymbiont also contain sigma factors that are encoded by a small family of nuclear genes. Although all plastid sigma factors contain sequences conserved in bacterial sigma factors, a considerable number of distinct traits have been acquired during evolution. The present review summarises recent advances concerning the regulation of the structure, function and activity of plastid sigma factors since their discovery nearly 40 years ago. We highlight the specialised roles and overlapping redundant functions of plastid sigma factors according to their promoter selectivity. We also focus on the mechanisms that modulate the activity of sigma factors to optimise plastid function in response to developmental cues and environmental signals. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chloroplast Biogenesis.

  15. Involvement of Nurr-1/Nur77 in corticotropin-releasing factor/urocortin1-induced tyrosinase-related protein 1 gene transcription in human melanoma HMV-II cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanuki, Yutaka; Takayasu, Shinobu; Kageyama, Kazunori; Iwasaki, Yasumasa; Sakihara, Satoru; Terui, Ken; Nigawara, Takeshi; Suda, Toshihiro

    2013-05-06

    Recent molecular and biochemical analyses have revealed the presence of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and urocortin (Ucn), together with their corresponding receptors in mammalian skin. The melanosomal enzyme tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TRP1) is involved in modulation of pigment production in response to stressors. Although CRF and Ucn are thought to have potent effects on the skin system, their possible roles and regulation have yet to be fully determined. This study aimed to explore the effects of CRF and Ucn on TRP1 gene expression using human melanoma HMV-II cells. The mRNA of CRF, Ucn1, Ucn2, and CRF receptor type 1 (CRF1 receptor) was detected in HMV-II cells. CRF and Ucn1 stimulated TRP1 gene transcription via the CRF1 receptor, and increased both Nurr-1 and Nur77 mRNA expression levels. Both CRF- and Ucn1-induced Nurr-1/Nur77 acted via a NGFI-B response element on the TRP1 promoter. The combination of Nurr-1/Nur77 and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, a melanocyte-specific transcription factor gene induced by α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, had additive effects on activation of TRP1 gene transcription. The findings suggest that in human melanoma HMV-II cells both CRF and Ucn1 regulate TRP1 gene expression via Nurr-1/Nur77 production, independent of pro-opiomelanocortin or α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone stimulation.

  16. TcoF-DB: dragon database for human transcription co-factors and transcription factor interacting proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Schaefer, Ulf

    2010-10-21

    The initiation and regulation of transcription in eukaryotes is complex and involves a large number of transcription factors (TFs), which are known to bind to the regulatory regions of eukaryotic DNA. Apart from TF-DNA binding, protein-protein interaction involving TFs is an essential component of the machinery facilitating transcriptional regulation. Proteins that interact with TFs in the context of transcription regulation but do not bind to the DNA themselves, we consider transcription co-factors (TcoFs). The influence of TcoFs on transcriptional regulation and initiation, although indirect, has been shown to be significant with the functionality of TFs strongly influenced by the presence of TcoFs. While the role of TFs and their interaction with regulatory DNA regions has been well-studied, the association between TFs and TcoFs has so far been given less attention. Here, we present a resource that is comprised of a collection of human TFs and the TcoFs with which they interact. Other proteins that have a proven interaction with a TF, but are not considered TcoFs are also included. Our database contains 157 high-confidence TcoFs and additionally 379 hypothetical TcoFs. These have been identified and classified according to the type of available evidence for their involvement in transcriptional regulation and their presence in the cell nucleus. We have divided TcoFs into four groups, one of which contains high-confidence TcoFs and three others contain TcoFs which are hypothetical to different extents. We have developed the Dragon Database for Human Transcription Co-Factors and Transcription Factor Interacting Proteins (TcoF-DB). A web-based interface for this resource can be freely accessed at http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/tcof/ and http://apps.sanbi.ac.za/tcof/. © The Author(s) 2010.

  17. Transcription Factor Substitution during the Evolution of Fungal Ribosome Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Hogues, Hervé; Lavoie, Hugo; Sellam, Adnane; Mangos, Maria; Roemer, Terry; Purisima, Enrico; Nantel, André; Whiteway, Malcolm

    2008-01-01

    Coordinated ribosomal protein (RP) gene expression is crucial for cellular viability, but the transcriptional network controlling this regulon has only been well characterized in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have used whole-genome transcriptional and location profiling to establish that, in Candida albicans, the RP regulon is controlled by the Myb domain protein Tbf1 working in conjunction with Cbf1. These two factors bind both the promoters of RP genes and the rDNA locus; Tbf1 acti...

  18. Resetting the transcription factor network reverses terminal chronic hepatic failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Taichiro; Bell, Aaron; Brooks, Jenna M; Setoyama, Kentaro; Melis, Marta; Han, Bing; Fukumitsu, Ken; Handa, Kan; Tian, Jianmin; Kaestner, Klaus H; Vodovotz, Yoram; Locker, Joseph; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Fox, Ira J

    2015-04-01

    The cause of organ failure is enigmatic for many degenerative diseases, including end-stage liver disease. Here, using a CCl4-induced rat model of irreversible and fatal hepatic failure, which also exhibits terminal changes in the extracellular matrix, we demonstrated that chronic injury stably reprograms the critical balance of transcription factors and that diseased and dedifferentiated cells can be returned to normal function by re-expression of critical transcription factors, a process similar to the type of reprogramming that induces somatic cells to become pluripotent or to change their cell lineage. Forced re-expression of the transcription factor HNF4α induced expression of the other hepatocyte-expressed transcription factors; restored functionality in terminally diseased hepatocytes isolated from CCl4-treated rats; and rapidly reversed fatal liver failure in CCl4-treated animals by restoring diseased hepatocytes rather than replacing them with new hepatocytes or stem cells. Together, the results of our study indicate that disruption of the transcription factor network and cellular dedifferentiation likely mediate terminal liver failure and suggest reinstatement of this network has therapeutic potential for correcting organ failure without cell replacement.

  19. Emerging Functions of Transcription Factors in Malaria Parasite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu Tuteja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcription is a process by which the genetic information stored in DNA is converted into mRNA by enzymes known as RNA polymerase. Bacteria use only one RNA polymerase to transcribe all of its genes while eukaryotes contain three RNA polymerases to transcribe the variety of eukaryotic genes. RNA polymerase also requires other factors/proteins to produce the transcript. These factors generally termed as transcription factors (TFs are either associated directly with RNA polymerase or add in building the actual transcription apparatus. TFs are the most common tools that our cells use to control gene expression. Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for causing the most lethal form of malaria in humans. It shows most of its characteristics common to eukaryotic transcription but it is assumed that mechanisms of transcriptional control in P. falciparum somehow differ from those of other eukaryotes. In this article we describe the studies on the main TFs such as myb protein, high mobility group protein and ApiA2 family proteins from malaria parasite. These studies show that these TFs are slowly emerging to have defined roles in the regulation of gene expression in the parasite.

  20. Sumoylation delays the ATF7 transcription factor subcellular localization and inhibits its transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamard, Pierre-Jacques; Boyer-Guittaut, Michaël; Camuzeaux, Barbara; Dujardin, Denis; Hauss, Charlotte; Oelgeschläger, Thomas; Vigneron, Marc; Kedinger, Claude; Chatton, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    Over the past few years, small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) modification has emerged as an important regulator of diverse pathways and activities including protein localization and transcriptional regulation. We identified a consensus sumoylation motif (IKEE), located within the N-terminal activation domain of the ATF7 transcription factor and thus investigated the role of this modification. ATF7 is a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor, homologous to ATF2, that binds to CRE elements within specific promoters. This protein is able to heterodimerize with Jun or Fos proteins and its transcriptional activity is mediated by interaction with TAF12, a subunit of the general transcription factor TFIID. In the present article, we demonstrate that ATF7 is sumoylated in vitro (using RanBP2 as a E3-specific ligase) and in vivo. Moreover, we show that ATF7 sumoylation affects its intranuclear localization by delaying its entry into the nucleus. Furthermore, SUMO conjugation inhibits ATF7 transactivation activity by (i) impairing its association with TAF12 and (ii) blocking its binding-to-specific sequences within target promoters.

  1. Identifying genetic modulators of the connectivity between transcription factors and their transcriptional targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazlollahi, Mina; Muroff, Ivor; Lee, Eunjee; Causton, Helen C; Bussemaker, Harmen J

    2016-03-29

    Regulation of gene expression by transcription factors (TFs) is highly dependent on genetic background and interactions with cofactors. Identifying specific context factors is a major challenge that requires new approaches. Here we show that exploiting natural variation is a potent strategy for probing functional interactions within gene regulatory networks. We developed an algorithm to identify genetic polymorphisms that modulate the regulatory connectivity between specific transcription factors and their target genes in vivo. As a proof of principle, we mapped connectivity quantitative trait loci (cQTLs) using parallel genotype and gene expression data for segregants from a cross between two strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae We identified a nonsynonymous mutation in the DIG2 gene as a cQTL for the transcription factor Ste12p and confirmed this prediction empirically. We also identified three polymorphisms in TAF13 as putative modulators of regulation by Gcn4p. Our method has potential for revealing how genetic differences among individuals influence gene regulatory networks in any organism for which gene expression and genotype data are available along with information on binding preferences for transcription factors.

  2. NAC Transcription Factors in Stress Responses and Senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Shea, Charlotte

    in Arabidopsis as a prerequisite for a system-wide understanding of NAC transcription factors. This PhD thesis contributes to the work through the production and purification of NAC domain recombinant proteins. More importantly, the work presented here has created a platform for future verification of predicted......Plant-specific NAM/ATAF/CUC (NAC) transcription factors have recently received considerable attention due to their significant roles in plant development and stress signalling. This interest has resulted in a number of physiological, genetic and cell biological studies of their functions. Some...... not involve significant folding-upon-binding but fuzziness or an extended ANAC046 region. The ANAC046 regulatory domain functions as an entropic chain with a bait for interactions with for example RCD1. RCD1 interacts with transcription factors from several different families, and the large stress...

  3. CRTR-1, a developmentally regulated transcriptional repressor related to the CP2 family of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodda, S; Sharma, S; Scherer, M; Chapman, G; Rathjen, P

    2001-02-02

    CP2-related proteins comprise a family of DNA-binding transcription factors that are generally activators of transcription and expressed ubiquitously. We reported a differential display polymerase chain reaction fragment, Psc2, which was expressed in a regulated fashion in mouse pluripotent cells in vitro and in vivo. Here, we report further characterization of the Psc2 cDNA and function. The Psc2 cDNA contained an open reading frame homologous to CP2 family proteins. Regions implicated in DNA binding and oligomeric complex formation, but not transcription activation, were conserved. Psc2 expression in vivo during embryogenesis and in the adult mouse demonstrated tight spatial and temporal regulation, with the highest levels of expression in the epithelial lining of distal convoluted tubules in embryonic and adult kidneys. Functional analysis demonstrated that PSC2 repressed transcription 2.5-15-fold when bound to a heterologous promoter in ES, 293T, and COS-1 cells. The N-terminal 52 amino acids of PSC2 were shown to be necessary and sufficient for this activity and did not share obvious homology with reported repressor motifs. These results represent the first report of a CP2 family member that is expressed in a developmentally regulated fashion in vivo and that acts as a direct repressor of transcription. Accordingly, the protein has been named CP2-Related Transcriptional Repressor-1 (CRTR-1).

  4. Regulation of the Hippo Pathway Transcription Factor TEAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kimberly C; Park, Hyun Woo; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2017-09-27

    The TEAD transcription factor family is best known for transcriptional output of the Hippo signaling pathway and has been implicated in processes such as development, cell growth and proliferation, tissue homeostasis, and regeneration. Our understanding of the functional importance of TEADs has increased dramatically since its initial discovery three decades ago. The majority of our knowledge of TEADs is in the context of Hippo signaling as nuclear DNA-binding proteins passively activated by Yes-associated protein (YAP) and transcriptional activator with PDZ-binding domain (TAZ), transcription coactivators downstream of the Hippo pathway. However, recent studies suggest that TEAD itself is actively regulated. Here, we highlight evidence demonstrating Hippo-independent regulation of TEADs and the potential impacts these studies may have on new cancer therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Split personality of transcription factors inside and outside the nuclear border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, José R; Mellström, Britt

    2007-01-30

    Growing evidence indicates that transcription factors may have functions entirely distinct from the regulation of gene transcription. Here we describe three transcription factors that, when outside the nucleus, regulate calcium homeostasis by three independent but convergent mechanisms.

  6. Cooperative binding of transcription factors promotes bimodal gene expression response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo S Gutierrez

    Full Text Available In the present work we extend and analyze the scope of our recently proposed stochastic model for transcriptional regulation, which considers an arbitrarily complex cis-regulatory system using only elementary reactions. Previously, we determined the role of cooperativity on the intrinsic fluctuations of gene expression for activating transcriptional switches, by means of master equation formalism and computer simulation. This model allowed us to distinguish between two cooperative binding mechanisms and, even though the mean expression levels were not affected differently by the acting mechanism, we showed that the associated fluctuations were different. In the present generalized model we include other regulatory functions in addition to those associated to an activator switch. Namely, we introduce repressive regulatory functions and two theoretical mechanisms that account for the biphasic response that some cis-regulatory systems show to the transcription factor concentration. We have also extended our previous master equation formalism in order to include protein production by stochastic translation of mRNA. Furthermore, we examine the graded/binary scenarios in the context of the interaction energy between transcription factors. In this sense, this is the first report to show that the cooperative binding of transcription factors to DNA promotes the "all-or-none" phenomenon observed in eukaryotic systems. In addition, we confirm that gene expression fluctuation levels associated with one of two cooperative binding mechanism never exceed the fluctuation levels of the other.

  7. Cdk phosphorylation of the Ste11 transcription factor constrains differentiation-specific transcription to G1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerulff, Søren; Andersen, Nicoline Resen; Borup, Mia Trolle;

    2007-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells normally differentiate from G(1); here we investigate the mechanism preventing expression of differentiation-specific genes outside G(1). In fission yeast, induction of the transcription factor Ste11 triggers sexual differentiation. We find that Ste11 is only active in G(1) when...... S phase. When we mutated T82 to aspartic acid, mimicking constant phosphorylation, cells no longer underwent differentiation. Conversely, changing T82 to alanine rendered Ste11-controlled transcription constitutive through the cell cycle, and allowed mating from S phase with increased frequency...

  8. Uncovering Transcriptional Regulatory Networks by Sparse Bayesian Factor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jia; Zhang, Jianqiu(Michelle); Qi, Yuan(Alan); Chen, Yidong; Huang, Yufei

    2010-12-01

    The problem of uncovering transcriptional regulation by transcription factors (TFs) based on microarray data is considered. A novel Bayesian sparse correlated rectified factor model (BSCRFM) is proposed that models the unknown TF protein level activity, the correlated regulations between TFs, and the sparse nature of TF-regulated genes. The model admits prior knowledge from existing database regarding TF-regulated target genes based on a sparse prior and through a developed Gibbs sampling algorithm, a context-specific transcriptional regulatory network specific to the experimental condition of the microarray data can be obtained. The proposed model and the Gibbs sampling algorithm were evaluated on the simulated systems, and results demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed approach. The proposed model was then applied to the breast cancer microarray data of patients with Estrogen Receptor positive ([InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]) status and Estrogen Receptor negative ([InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]) status, respectively.

  9. Decoding the Pluripotency Network: The Emergence of New Transcription Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Chuen Lee

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the successful isolation of mouse and human embryonic stem cells (ESCs in the past decades, massive investigations have been conducted to dissect the pluripotency network that governs the ability of these cells to differentiate into all cell types. Beside the core Oct4-Sox2-Nanog circuitry, accumulating regulators, including transcription factors, epigenetic modifiers, microRNA and signaling molecules have also been found to play important roles in preserving pluripotency. Among the various regulations that orchestrate the cellular pluripotency program, transcriptional regulation is situated in the central position and appears to be dominant over other regulatory controls. In this review, we would like to summarize the recent advancements in the accumulating findings of new transcription factors that play a critical role in controlling both pluripotency network and ESC identity.

  10. Transcriptional profiling of intrinsic PNS factors in the postnatal mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robin P; Lerch-Haner, Jessica K; Pardinas, Jose R; Buchser, William J; Bixby, John L; Lemmon, Vance P

    2011-01-01

    Neurons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) display a higher capacity to regenerate after injury than those in the central nervous system, suggesting cell specific transcriptional modules underlying axon growth and inhibition. We report a systems biology based search for PNS specific transcription factors (TFs). Messenger RNAs enriched in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons compared to cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) were identified using subtractive hybridization and DNA microarray approaches. Network and transcription factor binding site enrichment analyses were used to further identify TFs that may be differentially active. Combining these techniques, we identified 32 TFs likely to be enriched and/or active in the PNS. Twenty-five of these TFs were then tested for an ability to promote CNS neurite outgrowth in an overexpression screen. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemical studies confirmed that one representative TF, STAT3, is intrinsic to PNS neurons, and that constitutively active STAT3 is sufficient to promote CGN neurite outgrowth.

  11. Uncovering Transcriptional Regulatory Networks by Sparse Bayesian Factor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Yuan(Alan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The problem of uncovering transcriptional regulation by transcription factors (TFs based on microarray data is considered. A novel Bayesian sparse correlated rectified factor model (BSCRFM is proposed that models the unknown TF protein level activity, the correlated regulations between TFs, and the sparse nature of TF-regulated genes. The model admits prior knowledge from existing database regarding TF-regulated target genes based on a sparse prior and through a developed Gibbs sampling algorithm, a context-specific transcriptional regulatory network specific to the experimental condition of the microarray data can be obtained. The proposed model and the Gibbs sampling algorithm were evaluated on the simulated systems, and results demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed approach. The proposed model was then applied to the breast cancer microarray data of patients with Estrogen Receptor positive ( status and Estrogen Receptor negative ( status, respectively.

  12. Regulation of neural gene transcription by optogenetic inhibition of the RE1-silencing transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paonessa, Francesco; Criscuolo, Stefania; Sacchetti, Silvio; Amoroso, Davide; Scarongella, Helena; Pecoraro Bisogni, Federico; Carminati, Emanuele; Pruzzo, Giacomo; Maragliano, Luca; Cesca, Fabrizia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics provides new ways to activate gene transcription; however, no attempts have been made as yet to modulate mammalian transcription factors. We report the light-mediated regulation of the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), a master regulator of neural genes. To tune REST activity, we selected two protein domains that impair REST-DNA binding or recruitment of the cofactor mSin3a. Computational modeling guided the fusion of the inhibitory domains to the light-sensitive Avena sativa light-oxygen-voltage-sensing (LOV) 2-phototrophin 1 (AsLOV2). By expressing AsLOV2 chimeras in Neuro2a cells, we achieved light-dependent modulation of REST target genes that was associated with an improved neural differentiation. In primary neurons, light-mediated REST inhibition increased Na(+)-channel 1.2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcription and boosted Na(+) currents and neuronal firing. This optogenetic approach allows the coordinated expression of a cluster of genes impinging on neuronal activity, providing a tool for studying neuronal physiology and correcting gene expression changes taking place in brain diseases.

  13. Resveratrol regulates gene transcription via activation of stimulus-responsive transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Gerald; Rössler, Oliver G

    2017-03-01

    Resveratrol (trans-3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene), a polyphenolic phytoalexin of grapes and other fruits and plants, is a common constituent of our diet and of dietary supplements. Many health-promoting benefits have been connected with resveratrol in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, inflammation, neurodegeneration, and diseases connected with aging. To explain the pleiotropic effects of resveratrol, the molecular targets of this compound have to be identified on the cellular level. Resveratrol induces intracellular signal transduction pathways which ultimately lead to changes in the gene expression pattern of the cells. Here, we review the effect of resveratrol on the activation of the stimulus-responsive transcription factors CREB, AP-1, Egr-1, Elk-1, and Nrf2. Following activation, these transcription factors induce transcription of delayed response genes. The gene products of these delayed response genes are ultimately responsible for the changes in the biochemistry and physiology of resveratrol-treated cells. The activation of stimulus-responsive transcription factors may explain many of the intracellular activities of resveratrol. However, results obtained in vitro may not easily be transferred to in vivo systems.

  14. Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Findings in Posterior Microphthalmia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Tınkır Kayıtmazbatır

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The retinal spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT findings of two posterior microphthalmia cases are presented in this case report. For this purpose, the findings of two siblings aged five and seven years who presented to our clinic with the complain of far-sightedness and high hypermetropia were evaluated. Both cases diagnosed to have posterior microphthalmia demonstrated normal biomicroscopic anterior segment examination and gonioscopy findings and the axial lengths were measured to be shorter than 17mm. The SD-OCT analysis of papillomacular folds detected in fundus examination revealed contribution of only neurosensorial retina. Beneath the retinal fold, we observed bilateral cysts in the intraretinal area in one of the cases and a triangle-shaped hyporeflective space with an apex corresponding to that of the retinal fold in the subretinal area in both cases. SD-OCT is an adjunctive imaging tool for diagnosis and follow-up of degenerative changes in posterior microphthalmia. These changes may be also important for visual prognosis. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 240-2

  15. Controllability analysis of transcriptional regulatory networks reveals circular control patterns among transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Österlund, Tobias; Bordel, Sergio; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-05-01

    Transcriptional regulation is the most committed type of regulation in living cells where transcription factors (TFs) control the expression of their target genes and TF expression is controlled by other TFs forming complex transcriptional regulatory networks that can be highly interconnected. Here we analyze the topology and organization of nine transcriptional regulatory networks for E. coli, yeast, mouse and human, and we evaluate how the structure of these networks influences two of their key properties, namely controllability and stability. We calculate the controllability for each network as a measure of the organization and interconnectivity of the network. We find that the number of driver nodes nD needed to control the whole network is 64% of the TFs in the E. coli transcriptional regulatory network in contrast to only 17% for the yeast network, 4% for the mouse network and 8% for the human network. The high controllability (low number of drivers needed to control the system) in yeast, mouse and human is due to the presence of internal loops in their regulatory networks where the TFs regulate each other in a circular fashion. We refer to these internal loops as circular control motifs (CCM). The E. coli transcriptional regulatory network, which does not have any CCMs, shows a hierarchical structure of the transcriptional regulatory network in contrast to the eukaryal networks. The presence of CCMs also has influence on the stability of these networks, as the presence of cycles can be associated with potential unstable steady-states where even small changes in binding affinities can cause dramatic rearrangements of the state of the network.

  16. Cloning and characterization of a putative transcription factor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... bZIP transcription factors have been reported to play important roles in ... ding to protein structural features, Arabidopsis bZIP ... reactions were set up using Ex Taq DNA polymerase (TaKaRa) and ... RNA was isolated from maize samples using the TRIzol reagent ... 2– t method (Livak and Schmittgrn, 2001).

  17. Transcription factor movement and tissue patterning in Arabidopsis root meristem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Long, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-cell communication is key to coordinated cellular functions in multicellular organisms. In addition to the signaling molecules found in animals, plants also frequently recruit mobile transcription factors to deliver positional information. The best studied example is SHORT-ROOT (SHR), a transcr

  18. Posttranslational modifications of Forkhead box O transcription factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horst, Aart Arno van der

    2006-01-01

    FOXO transcription factors play an important role in essential biological processes such as differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, DNA repair, metabolism and stress resistance. Phosphorylation is the modification that was first found on FOXOs and much of the subsequent studies focused on this ty

  19. Structural Fingerprints of Transcription Factor Binding Site Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Willett

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Fourier transforms are a powerful tool in the prediction of DNA sequence properties, such as the presence/absence of codons. We have previously compiled a database of the structural properties of all 32,896 unique DNA octamers. In this work we apply Fourier techniques to the analysis of the structural properties of human chromosomes 21 and 22 and also to three sets of transcription factor binding sites within these chromosomes. We find that, for a given structural property, the structural property power spectra of chromosomes 21 and 22 are strikingly similar. We find common peaks in their power spectra for both Sp1 and p53 transcription factor binding sites. We use the power spectra as a structural fingerprint and perform similarity searching in order to find transcription factor binding site regions. This approach provides a new strategy for searching the genome data for information. Although it is difficult to understand the relationship between specific functional properties and the set of structural parameters in our database, our structural fingerprints nevertheless provide a useful tool for searching for function information in sequence data. The power spectrum fingerprints provide a simple, fast method for comparing a set of functional sequences, in this case transcription factor binding site regions, with the sequences of whole chromosomes. On its own, the power spectrum fingerprint does not find all transcription factor binding sites in a chromosome, but the results presented here show that in combination with other approaches, this technique will improve the chances of identifying functional sequences hidden in genomic data.

  20. The EDLL motif: a potent plant transcriptional activation domain from AP2/ERF transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Shiv B; Belachew, Alemu; Ma, Siu Fong; Young, Melinda; Ade, Jules; Shen, Yu; Marion, Colleen M; Holtan, Hans E; Bailey, Adina; Stone, Jeffrey K; Edwards, Leslie; Wallace, Andreah D; Canales, Roger D; Adam, Luc; Ratcliffe, Oliver J; Repetti, Peter P

    2012-06-01

    In plants, the ERF/EREBP family of transcriptional regulators plays a key role in adaptation to various biotic and abiotic stresses. These proteins contain a conserved AP2 DNA-binding domain and several uncharacterized motifs. Here, we describe a short motif, termed 'EDLL', that is present in AtERF98/TDR1 and other clade members from the same AP2 sub-family. We show that the EDLL motif, which has a unique arrangement of acidic amino acids and hydrophobic leucines, functions as a strong activation domain. The motif is transferable to other proteins, and is active at both proximal and distal positions of target promoters. As such, the EDLL motif is able to partly overcome the repression conferred by the AtHB2 transcription factor, which contains an ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif. We further examined the activation potential of EDLL by analysis of the regulation of flowering time by NF-Y (nuclear factor Y) proteins. Genetic evidence indicates that NF-Y protein complexes potentiate the action of CONSTANS in regulation of flowering in Arabidopsis; we show that the transcriptional activation function of CONSTANS can be substituted by direct fusion of the EDLL activation motif to NF-YB subunits. The EDLL motif represents a potent plant activation domain that can be used as a tool to confer transcriptional activation potential to heterologous DNA-binding proteins.

  1. Hydrogen peroxide sensing, signaling and regulation of transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Susana Marinho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The regulatory mechanisms by which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 modulates the activity of transcription factors in bacteria (OxyR and PerR, lower eukaryotes (Yap1, Maf1, Hsf1 and Msn2/4 and mammalian cells (AP-1, NRF2, CREB, HSF1, HIF-1, TP53, NF-κB, NOTCH, SP1 and SCREB-1 are reviewed. The complexity of regulatory networks increases throughout the phylogenetic tree, reaching a high level of complexity in mammalians. Multiple H2O2 sensors and pathways are triggered converging in the regulation of transcription factors at several levels: (1 synthesis of the transcription factor by upregulating transcription or increasing both mRNA stability and translation; (ii stability of the transcription factor by decreasing its association with the ubiquitin E3 ligase complex or by inhibiting this complex; (iii cytoplasm–nuclear traffic by exposing/masking nuclear localization signals, or by releasing the transcription factor from partners or from membrane anchors; and (iv DNA binding and nuclear transactivation by modulating transcription factor affinity towards DNA, co-activators or repressors, and by targeting specific regions of chromatin to activate individual genes. We also discuss how H2O2 biological specificity results from diverse thiol protein sensors, with different reactivity of their sulfhydryl groups towards H2O2, being activated by different concentrations and times of exposure to H2O2. The specific regulation of local H2O2 concentrations is also crucial and results from H2O2 localized production and removal controlled by signals. Finally, we formulate equations to extract from typical experiments quantitative data concerning H2O2 reactivity with sensor molecules. Rate constants of 140 M−1 s−1 and ≥1.3 × 103 M−1 s−1 were estimated, respectively, for the reaction of H2O2 with KEAP1 and with an unknown target that mediates NRF2 protein synthesis. In conclusion, the multitude of H2O2 targets and mechanisms provides an opportunity for

  2. Transcription profile of Escherichia coli: genomic SELEX search for regulatory targets of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihama, Akira; Shimada, Tomohiro; Yamazaki, Yukiko

    2016-03-18

    Bacterial genomes are transcribed by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), which achieves gene selectivity through interaction with sigma factors that recognize promoters, and transcription factors (TFs) that control the activity and specificity of RNAP holoenzyme. To understand the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation, the identification of regulatory targets is needed for all these factors. We then performed genomic SELEX screenings of targets under the control of each sigma factor and each TF. Here we describe the assembly of 156 SELEX patterns of a total of 116 TFs performed in the presence and absence of effector ligands. The results reveal several novel concepts: (i) each TF regulates more targets than hitherto recognized; (ii) each promoter is regulated by more TFs than hitherto recognized; and (iii) the binding sites of some TFs are located within operons and even inside open reading frames. The binding sites of a set of global regulators, including cAMP receptor protein, LeuO and Lrp, overlap with those of the silencer H-NS, suggesting that certain global regulators play an anti-silencing role. To facilitate sharing of these accumulated SELEX datasets with the research community, we compiled a database, 'Transcription Profile of Escherichia coli' (www.shigen.nig.ac.jp/ecoli/tec/). © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Transcription factors mediate long-range enhancer-promoter interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolis, Ilias K; McKay, Daniel J; Mantouvalou, Eva; Lomvardas, Stavros; Merika, Menie; Thanos, Dimitris

    2009-12-01

    We examined how remote enhancers establish physical communication with target promoters to activate gene transcription in response to environmental signals. Although the natural IFN-beta enhancer is located immediately upstream of the core promoter, it also can function as a classical enhancer element conferring virus infection-dependent activation of heterologous promoters, even when it is placed several kilobases away from these promoters. We demonstrated that the remote IFN-beta enhancer "loops out" the intervening DNA to reach the target promoter. These chromatin loops depend on sequence-specific transcription factors bound to the enhancer and the promoter and thus can explain the specificity observed in enhancer-promoter interactions, especially in complex genetic loci. Transcription factor binding sites scattered between an enhancer and a promoter can work as decoys trapping the enhancer in nonproductive loops, thus resembling insulator elements. Finally, replacement of the transcription factor binding sites involved in DNA looping with those of a heterologous prokaryotic protein, the lambda repressor, which is capable of loop formation, rescues enhancer function from a distance by re-establishing enhancer-promoter loop formation.

  4. Transcription factor interplay in T helper cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Catherine M; Jenner, Richard G

    2013-11-01

    The differentiation of CD4 helper T cells into specialized effector lineages has provided a powerful model for understanding immune cell differentiation. Distinct lineages have been defined by differential expression of signature cytokines and the lineage-specifying transcription factors necessary and sufficient for their production. The traditional paradigm of differentiation towards Th1 and Th2 subtypes driven by T-bet and GATA3, respectively, has been extended to incorporate additional T cell lineages and transcriptional regulators. Technological advances have expanded our view of these lineage-specifying transcription factors to the whole genome and revealed unexpected interplay between them. From these data, it is becoming clear that lineage specification is more complex and plastic than previous models might have suggested. Here, we present an overview of the different forms of transcription factor interplay that have been identified and how T cell phenotypes arise as a product of this interplay within complex regulatory networks. We also suggest experimental strategies that will provide further insight into the mechanisms that underlie T cell lineage specification and plasticity.

  5. Determination and inference of eukaryotic transcription factor sequence specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weirauch, Matthew T; Yang, Ally; Albu, Mihai; Cote, Atina G; Montenegro-Montero, Alejandro; Drewe, Philipp; Najafabadi, Hamed S; Lambert, Samuel A; Mann, Ishminder; Cook, Kate; Zheng, Hong; Goity, Alejandra; van Bakel, Harm; Lozano, Jean-Claude; Galli, Mary; Lewsey, Mathew G; Huang, Eryong; Mukherjee, Tuhin; Chen, Xiaoting; Reece-Hoyes, John S; Govindarajan, Sridhar; Shaulsky, Gad; Walhout, Albertha J M; Bouget, François-Yves; Ratsch, Gunnar; Larrondo, Luis F; Ecker, Joseph R; Hughes, Timothy R

    2014-09-11

    Transcription factor (TF) DNA sequence preferences direct their regulatory activity, but are currently known for only ∼1% of eukaryotic TFs. Broadly sampling DNA-binding domain (DBD) types from multiple eukaryotic clades, we determined DNA sequence preferences for >1,000 TFs encompassing 54 different DBD classes from 131 diverse eukaryotes. We find that closely related DBDs almost always have very similar DNA sequence preferences, enabling inference of motifs for ∼34% of the ∼170,000 known or predicted eukaryotic TFs. Sequences matching both measured and inferred motifs are enriched in chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) peaks and upstream of transcription start sites in diverse eukaryotic lineages. SNPs defining expression quantitative trait loci in Arabidopsis promoters are also enriched for predicted TF binding sites. Importantly, our motif "library" can be used to identify specific TFs whose binding may be altered by human disease risk alleles. These data present a powerful resource for mapping transcriptional networks across eukaryotes.

  6. Molecular mechanisms of ETS transcription factor mediated tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Adwitiya; Gutierrez-Hartmann, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    The ETS family of transcription factors is critical for development, differentiation, proliferation and also has a role in apoptosis and tissue remodeling. Changes in expression of ETS proteins therefore have a significant impact on normal physiology of the cell. Transcriptional consequences of ETS protein deregulation by overexpression, gene fusion, and modulation by RAS/MAPK signaling are linked to alterations in normal cell functions, and lead to unlimited increased proliferation, sustained angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. Existing data show that ETS proteins control pathways in epithelial cells as well as stromal compartments, and the crosstalk between the two is essential for normal development and cancer. In this review we have focused on ETS factors with a known contribution in cancer development. Instead of focusing on a prototype, we address cancer associated ETS proteins and have highlighted the diverse mechanisms by which they affect carcinogenesis. Finally, we discuss strategies for ETS factor targeting as a potential means for cancer therapeutics. PMID:24066765

  7. Molecular mechanisms of ETS transcription factor-mediated tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Adwitiya; Gutierrez-Hartmann, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    The E26 transformation-specific (ETS) family of transcription factors is critical for development, differentiation, proliferation and also has a role in apoptosis and tissue remodeling. Changes in expression of ETS proteins therefore have a significant impact on normal physiology of the cell. Transcriptional consequences of ETS protein deregulation by overexpression, gene fusion, and modulation by RAS/MAPK signaling are linked to alterations in normal cell functions, and lead to unlimited increased proliferation, sustained angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. Existing data show that ETS proteins control pathways in epithelial cells as well as stromal compartments, and the crosstalk between the two is essential for normal development and cancer. In this review, we have focused on ETS factors with a known contribution in cancer development. Instead of focusing on a prototype, we address cancer associated ETS proteins and have highlighted the diverse mechanisms by which they affect carcinogenesis. Finally, we discuss strategies for ETS factor targeting as a potential means for cancer therapeutics.

  8. Effects of cytosine methylation on transcription factor binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Medvedeva, Yulia A

    2014-03-26

    Background: DNA methylation in promoters is closely linked to downstream gene repression. However, whether DNA methylation is a cause or a consequence of gene repression remains an open question. If it is a cause, then DNA methylation may affect the affinity of transcription factors (TFs) for their binding sites (TFBSs). If it is a consequence, then gene repression caused by chromatin modification may be stabilized by DNA methylation. Until now, these two possibilities have been supported only by non-systematic evidence and they have not been tested on a wide range of TFs. An average promoter methylation is usually used in studies, whereas recent results suggested that methylation of individual cytosines can also be important.Results: We found that the methylation profiles of 16.6% of cytosines and the expression profiles of neighboring transcriptional start sites (TSSs) were significantly negatively correlated. We called the CpGs corresponding to such cytosines " traffic lights" We observed a strong selection against CpG " traffic lights" within TFBSs. The negative selection was stronger for transcriptional repressors as compared with transcriptional activators or multifunctional TFs as well as for core TFBS positions as compared with flanking TFBS positions.Conclusions: Our results indicate that direct and selective methylation of certain TFBS that prevents TF binding is restricted to special cases and cannot be considered as a general regulatory mechanism of transcription. 2013 Medvedeva et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  9. Screening Driving Transcription Factors in the Processing of Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangzhong Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Construction of the transcriptional regulatory network can provide additional clues on the regulatory mechanisms and therapeutic applications in gastric cancer. Methods. Gene expression profiles of gastric cancer were downloaded from GEO database for integrated analysis. All of DEGs were analyzed by GO enrichment and KEGG pathway enrichment. Transcription factors were further identified and then a global transcriptional regulatory network was constructed. Results. By integrated analysis of the six eligible datasets (340 cases and 43 controls, a bunch of 2327 DEGs were identified, including 2100 upregulated and 227 downregulated DEGs. Functional enrichment analysis of DEGs showed that digestion was a significantly enriched GO term for biological process. Moreover, there were two important enriched KEGG pathways: cell cycle and homologous recombination. Furthermore, a total of 70 differentially expressed TFs were identified and the transcriptional regulatory network was constructed, which consisted of 566 TF-target interactions. The top ten TFs regulating most downstream target genes were BRCA1, ARID3A, EHF, SOX10, ZNF263, FOXL1, FEV, GATA3, FOXC1, and FOXD1. Most of them were involved in the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer. Conclusion. The transcriptional regulatory network can help researchers to further clarify the underlying regulatory mechanisms of gastric cancer tumorigenesis.

  10. Functionality of soybean CBF/DREB1 transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Yuji; Randall, Stephen K

    2016-05-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) is considered to be cold intolerant and is not able to significantly acclimate to cold/freezing stress. In most cold tolerant plants, the C-repeat/DRE Binding Factors (CBF/DREBs) are critical contributors to successful cold-responses; rapidly increasing following cold treatment and regulating the induction of many cold responsive genes. In soybean vegetative tissue, we found strong, transient accumulation of CBF transcripts in response to cold stress; however, the soybean transcripts of typical cold responsive genes (homologues to Arabidopsis genes such as dehydrins, ADH1, RAP2.1, and LEA14) were not significantly altered. Soybean CBFs were found to be functional, as when expressed constitutively in Arabidopsis they increased the levels of AtCOR47 and AtRD29a transcripts and increased freezing tolerance as measured by a decrease in leaf freezing damage and ion leakage. Furthermore the constitutive expression of GmDREB1A;2 and GmDREB1B;1 in Arabidopsis led to stronger up-regulation of downstream genes and more freezing tolerance than GmDREB1A;1, the gene whose transcript is the major contributor to total CBF/DREB1 transcripts in soybean. The inability for the soybean CBFs to significantly up regulate the soybean genes that contribute to cold tolerance is consistent with poor acclimation capability and the cold intolerance of soybean.

  11. Snapshots of a hybrid transcription factor in the Hippo pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xuelian

    2010-09-01

    The Hippo pathway plays key roles in animal development. It suppresses tumorigenesis by controlling the transcription of the target genes that are critical for cell proliferation and apoptosis. The transcriptional coactivator YAP is the major downstream effector of the Hippo signaling. Upon extracellular stimulation, a kinase cascade in the Hippo pathway phosphorylates YAP and promotes its cytoplasmic sequestration by 14-3-3 and ubiquitin-dependent degradation. When the Hippo pathway is turned off, YAP (which lacks a DNA-binding domain) is dephosphorylated and translocates to the nucleus, where it associates with the transcription factor TEAD to form a functional heterodimeric transcription factor and to promote the expression of the Hippo-responsive genes. Recently, structures of the YAP-binding domain of TEAD alone or in complex with YAP have revealed the atomic details of the TEAD-YAP interaction. Here, I review these exciting advances, propose a strategy for targeting the TEAD-YAP interaction using small molecules, and suggest potential mechanisms by which phosphorylation and 14-3-3 binding regulate the cytoplasmic retention of YAP.

  12. Functionally significant, rare transcription factor variants in tetralogy of Fallot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Töpf

    Full Text Available Rare variants in certain transcription factors involved in cardiac development cause Mendelian forms of congenital heart disease. The purpose of this study was to systematically assess the frequency of rare transcription factor variants in sporadic patients with the cardiac outflow tract malformation tetralogy of Fallot (TOF.We sequenced the coding, 5'UTR, and 3'UTR regions of twelve transcription factor genes implicated in cardiac outflow tract development (NKX2.5, GATA4, ISL1, TBX20, MEF2C, BOP/SMYD1, HAND2, FOXC1, FOXC2, FOXH, FOXA2 and TBX1 in 93 non-syndromic, non-Mendelian TOF cases. We also analysed Illumina Human 660W-Quad SNP Array data for copy number variants in these genes; none were detected. Four of the rare variants detected have previously been shown to affect transactivation in in vitro reporter assays: FOXC1 p.P297S, FOXC2 p.Q444R, FOXH1 p.S113T and TBX1 p.P43_G61del PPPPRYDPCAAAAPGAPGP. Two further rare variants, HAND2 p.A25_A26insAA and FOXC1 p.G378_G380delGGG, A488_491delAAAA, affected transactivation in in vitro reporter assays. Each of these six functionally significant variants was present in a single patient in the heterozygous state; each of the four for which parental samples were available were maternally inherited. Thus in the 93 TOF cases we identified six functionally significant mutations in the secondary heart field transcriptional network.This study indicates that rare genetic variants in the secondary heart field transcriptional network with functional effects on protein function occur in 3-13% of patients with TOF. This is the first report of a functionally significant HAND2 mutation in a patient with congenital heart disease.

  13. Functionally significant, rare transcription factor variants in tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töpf, Ana; Griffin, Helen R; Glen, Elise; Soemedi, Rachel; Brown, Danielle L; Hall, Darroch; Rahman, Thahira J; Eloranta, Jyrki J; Jüngst, Christoph; Stuart, A Graham; O'Sullivan, John; Keavney, Bernard D; Goodship, Judith A

    2014-01-01

    Rare variants in certain transcription factors involved in cardiac development cause Mendelian forms of congenital heart disease. The purpose of this study was to systematically assess the frequency of rare transcription factor variants in sporadic patients with the cardiac outflow tract malformation tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). We sequenced the coding, 5'UTR, and 3'UTR regions of twelve transcription factor genes implicated in cardiac outflow tract development (NKX2.5, GATA4, ISL1, TBX20, MEF2C, BOP/SMYD1, HAND2, FOXC1, FOXC2, FOXH, FOXA2 and TBX1) in 93 non-syndromic, non-Mendelian TOF cases. We also analysed Illumina Human 660W-Quad SNP Array data for copy number variants in these genes; none were detected. Four of the rare variants detected have previously been shown to affect transactivation in in vitro reporter assays: FOXC1 p.P297S, FOXC2 p.Q444R, FOXH1 p.S113T and TBX1 p.P43_G61del PPPPRYDPCAAAAPGAPGP. Two further rare variants, HAND2 p.A25_A26insAA and FOXC1 p.G378_G380delGGG, A488_491delAAAA, affected transactivation in in vitro reporter assays. Each of these six functionally significant variants was present in a single patient in the heterozygous state; each of the four for which parental samples were available were maternally inherited. Thus in the 93 TOF cases we identified six functionally significant mutations in the secondary heart field transcriptional network. This study indicates that rare genetic variants in the secondary heart field transcriptional network with functional effects on protein function occur in 3-13% of patients with TOF. This is the first report of a functionally significant HAND2 mutation in a patient with congenital heart disease.

  14. Targeted 'Next-Generation' sequencing in anophthalmia and microphthalmia patients confirms SOX2, OTX2 and FOXE3 mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez Jimenez Nelson

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anophthalmia/microphthalmia (A/M is caused by mutations in several different transcription factors, but mutations in each causative gene are relatively rare, emphasizing the need for a testing approach that screens multiple genes simultaneously. We used next-generation sequencing to screen 15 A/M patients for mutations in 9 pathogenic genes to evaluate this technology for screening in A/M. Methods We used a pooled sequencing design, together with custom single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP calling software. We verified predicted sequence alterations using Sanger sequencing. Results We verified three mutations - c.542delC in SOX2, resulting in p.Pro181Argfs*22, p.Glu105X in OTX2 and p.Cys240X in FOXE3. We found several novel sequence alterations and SNPs that were likely to be non-pathogenic - p.Glu42Lys in CRYBA4, p.Val201Met in FOXE3 and p.Asp291Asn in VSX2. Our analysis methodology gave one false positive result comprising a mutation in PAX6 (c.1268A > T, predicting p.X423LeuextX*15 that was not verified by Sanger sequencing. We also failed to detect one 20 base pair (bp deletion and one 3 bp duplication in SOX2. Conclusions Our results demonstrated the power of next-generation sequencing with pooled sample groups for the rapid screening of candidate genes for A/M as we were correctly able to identify disease-causing mutations. However, next-generation sequencing was less useful for small, intragenic deletions and duplications. We did not find mutations in 10/15 patients and conclude that there is a need for further gene discovery in A/M.

  15. FOXA and master transcription factors recruit Mediator and Cohesin to the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Michèle; Bourriquen, Gaëlle; Lamaze, Fabien C.; Côté, Maxime C.; Fournier, Éric; Joly-Beauparlant, Charles; Caron, Vicky; Gobeil, Stéphane; Droit, Arnaud; Bilodeau, Steve

    2016-10-01

    Controlling the transcriptional program is essential to maintain the identity and the biological functions of a cell. The Mediator and Cohesin complexes have been established as central cofactors controlling the transcriptional program in normal cells. However, the distribution, recruitment and importance of these complexes in cancer cells have not been fully investigated. Here we show that FOXA and master transcription factors are part of the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells and are essential to recruit M ediator and Cohesin. Indeed, Mediator and Cohesin occupied the enhancer and promoter regions of actively transcribed genes and maintained the proliferation and colony forming potential. Through integration of publically available ChIP-Seq datasets, we predicted the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of each cancer cell. Unexpectedly, for all cells investigated, the pioneer transcription factors FOXA1 and/or FOXA2 were identified in addition to cell-specific master transcription factors. Loss of both types of transcription factors phenocopied the loss of Mediator and Cohesin. Lastly, the master and pioneer transcription factors were essential to recruit Mediator and Cohesin to regulatory regions of actively transcribed genes. Our study proposes that maintenance of the cancer cell state is dependent on recruitment of Mediator and Cohesin through FOXA and master transcription factors.

  16. FOXA and master transcription factors recruit Mediator and Cohesin to the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Michèle; Bourriquen, Gaëlle; Lamaze, Fabien C; Côté, Maxime C; Fournier, Éric; Joly-Beauparlant, Charles; Caron, Vicky; Gobeil, Stéphane; Droit, Arnaud; Bilodeau, Steve

    2016-10-14

    Controlling the transcriptional program is essential to maintain the identity and the biological functions of a cell. The Mediator and Cohesin complexes have been established as central cofactors controlling the transcriptional program in normal cells. However, the distribution, recruitment and importance of these complexes in cancer cells have not been fully investigated. Here we show that FOXA and master transcription factors are part of the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells and are essential to recruit M ediator and Cohesin. Indeed, Mediator and Cohesin occupied the enhancer and promoter regions of actively transcribed genes and maintained the proliferation and colony forming potential. Through integration of publically available ChIP-Seq datasets, we predicted the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of each cancer cell. Unexpectedly, for all cells investigated, the pioneer transcription factors FOXA1 and/or FOXA2 were identified in addition to cell-specific master transcription factors. Loss of both types of transcription factors phenocopied the loss of Mediator and Cohesin. Lastly, the master and pioneer transcription factors were essential to recruit Mediator and Cohesin to regulatory regions of actively transcribed genes. Our study proposes that maintenance of the cancer cell state is dependent on recruitment of Mediator and Cohesin through FOXA and master transcription factors.

  17. FOXA and master transcription factors recruit Mediator and Cohesin to the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Michèle; Bourriquen, Gaëlle; Lamaze, Fabien C.; Côté, Maxime C.; Fournier, Éric; Joly-Beauparlant, Charles; Caron, Vicky; Gobeil, Stéphane; Droit, Arnaud; Bilodeau, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Controlling the transcriptional program is essential to maintain the identity and the biological functions of a cell. The Mediator and Cohesin complexes have been established as central cofactors controlling the transcriptional program in normal cells. However, the distribution, recruitment and importance of these complexes in cancer cells have not been fully investigated. Here we show that FOXA and master transcription factors are part of the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells and are essential to recruit M ediator and Cohesin. Indeed, Mediator and Cohesin occupied the enhancer and promoter regions of actively transcribed genes and maintained the proliferation and colony forming potential. Through integration of publically available ChIP-Seq datasets, we predicted the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of each cancer cell. Unexpectedly, for all cells investigated, the pioneer transcription factors FOXA1 and/or FOXA2 were identified in addition to cell-specific master transcription factors. Loss of both types of transcription factors phenocopied the loss of Mediator and Cohesin. Lastly, the master and pioneer transcription factors were essential to recruit Mediator and Cohesin to regulatory regions of actively transcribed genes. Our study proposes that maintenance of the cancer cell state is dependent on recruitment of Mediator and Cohesin through FOXA and master transcription factors. PMID:27739523

  18. An expansive human regulatory lexicon encoded in transcription factor footprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neph, Shane; Vierstra, Jeff; Stergachis, Andrew B; Reynolds, Alex P; Haugen, Eric; Vernot, Benjamin; Thurman, Robert E; John, Sam; Sandstrom, Richard; Johnson, Audra K; Maurano, Matthew T; Humbert, Richard; Rynes, Eric; Wang, Hao; Vong, Shinny; Lee, Kristen; Bates, Daniel; Diegel, Morgan; Roach, Vaughn; Dunn, Douglas; Neri, Jun; Schafer, Anthony; Hansen, R Scott; Kutyavin, Tanya; Giste, Erika; Weaver, Molly; Canfield, Theresa; Sabo, Peter; Zhang, Miaohua; Balasundaram, Gayathri; Byron, Rachel; MacCoss, Michael J; Akey, Joshua M; Bender, M A; Groudine, Mark; Kaul, Rajinder; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A

    2012-09-06

    Regulatory factor binding to genomic DNA protects the underlying sequence from cleavage by DNase I, leaving nucleotide-resolution footprints. Using genomic DNase I footprinting across 41 diverse cell and tissue types, we detected 45 million transcription factor occupancy events within regulatory regions, representing differential binding to 8.4 million distinct short sequence elements. Here we show that this small genomic sequence compartment, roughly twice the size of the exome, encodes an expansive repertoire of conserved recognition sequences for DNA-binding proteins that nearly doubles the size of the human cis-regulatory lexicon. We find that genetic variants affecting allelic chromatin states are concentrated in footprints, and that these elements are preferentially sheltered from DNA methylation. High-resolution DNase I cleavage patterns mirror nucleotide-level evolutionary conservation and track the crystallographic topography of protein-DNA interfaces, indicating that transcription factor structure has been evolutionarily imprinted on the human genome sequence. We identify a stereotyped 50-base-pair footprint that precisely defines the site of transcript origination within thousands of human promoters. Finally, we describe a large collection of novel regulatory factor recognition motifs that are highly conserved in both sequence and function, and exhibit cell-selective occupancy patterns that closely parallel major regulators of development, differentiation and pluripotency.

  19. Functional characterization of tomato membrane-bound NAC transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Payel; Das, Rohit; Mandal, Arunava; Kundu, Pallob

    2017-03-01

    Genome-wide analysis was carried out to identify and analyze differential expression pattern of tomato membrane bound NAC transcription factors (SlNACMTFs) during stresses. Two biotic-stress-related SlNACMTFs have been characterized to elucidate their regulatory function. NAC transcription factors are known regulators of stress-related gene expression. As Stresses are perceived and transmitted by membrane-bound proteins, functional characterization of membrane-associated NAC transcription factors in tomato can reveal valuable insight about membrane-mediated stress-signalling. Tomato genome encodes 13 NAC genes which have predicted transmembrane domain(s) (SlNACMTFs). mRNA of 12 SlNACMTFs were readily detected in multiple tissues, and also in polysome isolated from leaf, confirming active transcription and translation from these genes occur under normal physiological condition. Additionally, most of the SlNACMTFs were differentially regulated during stresses and stress-related transcription factor binding sites are prevalent in their promoters. SlNACMTF3 and 8 were majorly regulated in biotic and abiotic stresses. Like other MTFs, SlNACMTF3 was translocated to the plasma membrane, whereas the C-terminus truncated (ΔC) form localized in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Accordingly, the ΔC forms significantly influenced the activity of promoters harbouring NAC binding sites (NACbs). Furthermore, the NAC domain of these transcription factors could directly interact with an NACbs, and the proteins failed to regulate a promoter lacking a crucial NACbs. Interestingly, the type of influence to an NACbs containing promoter was dependent on the context of the NACbs, as the same SlNACMTF showed an alternative mode of regulation on different promoters, as well as the same promoter activity was oppositely regulated by two different SlNACMTF. Finally, both SlNACMTFs demonstrated the differential regulatory effect on the expression of several stress-related genes by interacting

  20. A role for the transcription factor HEY1 in glioblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulleman, Esther; Quarto, Micaela; Vernell, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the highest-grade glioma, is the most frequent tumour of the brain with a very poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. Although little is known about the molecular mechanisms that underlie glioblastoma formation, a number of signal transduction routes......, such as the Notch and Ras signalling pathways, seem to play an important role in the formation of GBM. In the present study, we show by in situ hybridization on primary tumour material that the transcription factor HEY1, a target of the Notch signalling pathway, is specifically upregulated in glioma...... and that expression of HEY1 in GBM correlates with tumour-grade and survival. In addition, we show by chromatin immunoprecipitations, luciferase assays and Northern blot experiments that HEY1 is a bona fide target of the E2F family of transcription factors, connecting the Ras and Notch signalling pathways. Finally...

  1. The AP2/EREBP family of plant transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechmann, J L; Meyerowitz, E M

    1998-06-01

    AP2 (APETALA2) and EREBPs (ethylene-responsive element binding proteins) are the prototypic members of a family of transcription factors unique to plants, whose distinguishing characteristic is that they contain the so-called AP2 DNA-binding domain. AP2/ REBP genes form a large multigene family, and they play a variety of roles throughout the plant life cycle: from being key regulators of several developmental processes, like floral organ identity determination or control of leaf epidermal cell identity, to forming part of the mechanisms used by plants to respond to various types of biotic and environmental stress. The molecular and biochemical characteristics of the AP2/EREBP transcription factors and their diverse functions are reviewed here, and this multigene family is analyzed within the context of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence project.

  2. Pathologically Relevant Prelamin A Interactions with Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, Arantza; Rodríguez, Clara I

    2016-01-01

    LMNA-linked laminopathies are a group of rare human diseases caused by mutations in LMNA or by disrupted posttranslational processing of its largest encoded isoform, prelamin A. The accumulation of mutated or immature forms of farnesylated prelamin A, named progerin or prelamin A, respectively, dominantly disrupts nuclear lamina structure with toxic effects in cells. One hypothesis is that aberrant lamin filament networks disrupt or "trap" proteins such as transcription factors, thereby interfering with their normal activity. Since laminopathies mainly affect tissues of mesenchymal origin, we tested this hypothesis by generating an experimental model of laminopathy by inducing prelamin A accumulation in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). We provide detailed protocols for inducing and detecting prelamin A accumulation in hMSCs, and describe the bioinformatic analysis and in vitro assays of transcription factors potentially affected by prelamin A accumulation.

  3. Transcription factors for modification of lignin content in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huanzhong; Chen, Fang; Dixon, Richard A.

    2015-06-02

    The invention provides methods for modifying lignin, cellulose, xylan, and hemicellulose content in plants, and for achieving ectopic lignification and, for instance, secondary cell wall synthesis in pith cells, by altered regulation of a WRKY transcription factor. Nucleic acid constructs for altered WRKY-TF expression are described. Transgenic plants are provided that comprise modified pith cell walls, and lignin, cellulose, and hemicellulose content. Plants described herein may be used, for example, as improved biofuel feedstock and as highly digestible forage crops.

  4. Transcription factors expressed in soybean roots under drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, S S; Guimarães, F C M; Carvalho, J F C; Stolf-Moreira, R; Oliveira, M C N; Rolla, A A P; Farias, J R B; Neumaier, N; Nepomuceno, A L

    2011-10-21

    To gain insight into stress-responsive gene regulation in soybean plants, we identified consensus sequences that could categorize the transcription factors MYBJ7, BZIP50, C2H2, and NAC2 as members of the gene families myb, bzip, c2h2, and nac, respectively. We also investigated the evolutionary relationship of these transcription factors and analyzed their expression levels under drought stress. The NCBI software was used to find the predicted amino acid sequences of the transcription factors, and the Clustal X software was used to align soybean and other plant species sequences. Phylogenetic trees were built using the Mega 4.1 software by neighbor joining and the degree of confidence test by Bootstrap. Expression level studies were carried out using hydroponic culture; the experiments were designed in completely randomized blocks with three repetitions. The blocks consisted of two genotypes, MG/BR46 Conquista (drought-tolerant) and BR16 (drought-sensitive) and the treatments consisted of increasingly long dehydration periods (0, 25, 50, 75, and 100 min). The transcription factors presented domains and/or conserved regions that characterized them as belonging to the bzip, c2h2, myb, and nac families. Based on the phylogenetic trees, it was found that the myb, bzip and nac genes are closely related to myb78, bzip48 and nac2 of soybean and that c2h2 is closely related to c2h2 of Brassica napus. Expression of all genes was in general increased under drought stress in both genotypes. Major differences between genotypes were due to the lowering of the expression of the mybj7 and c2h2 genes in the drought-tolerant variety at some times. Over-expression or silencing of some of these genes has the potential to increase stress tolerance.

  5. Transcription factors for modification of lignin content in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huanzhong; Chen, Fang; Dixon, Richard A.

    2015-06-02

    The invention provides methods for modifying lignin, cellulose, xylan, and hemicellulose content in plants, and for achieving ectopic lignification and, for instance, secondary cell wall synthesis in pith cells, by altered regulation of a WRKY transcription factor. Nucleic acid constructs for altered WRKY-TF expression are described. Transgenic plants are provided that comprise modified pith cell walls, and lignin, cellulose, and hemicellulose content. Plants described herein may be used, for example, as improved biofuel feedstock and as highly digestible forage crops.

  6. Transcription factors regulating B cell fate in the germinal centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recaldin, T; Fear, D J

    2016-01-01

    Diversification of the antibody repertoire is essential for the normal operation of the vertebrate adaptive immune system. Following antigen encounter, B cells are activated, proliferate rapidly and undergo two diversification events; somatic hypermutation (followed by selection), which enhances the affinity of the antibody for its cognate antigen, and class-switch recombination, which alters the effector functions of the antibody to adapt the response to the challenge faced. B cells must then differentiate into antibody-secreting plasma cells or long-lived memory B cells. These activities take place in specialized immunological environments called germinal centres, usually located in the secondary lymphoid organs. To complete the germinal centre activities successfully, a B cell adopts a transcriptional programme that allows it to migrate to specific sites within the germinal centre, proliferate, modify its DNA recombination and repair pathways, alter its apoptotic potential and finally undergo terminal differentiation. To co-ordinate these processes, B cells employ a number of 'master regulator' transcription factors which mediate wholesale transcriptomic changes. These master transcription factors are mutually antagonistic and form a complex regulatory network to maintain distinct gene expression programs. Within this network, multiple points of positive and negative feedback ensure the expression of the 'master regulators', augmented by a number of 'secondary' factors that reinforce these networks and sense the progress of the immune response. In this review we will discuss the different activities B cells must undertake to mount a successful T cell-dependent immune response and describe how a regulatory network of transcription factors controls these processes.

  7. Transcription Factor Zbtb20 Controls Regional Specification of Mammalian Archicortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenthal, Eva Helga

    2010-01-01

    Combinatorial expression of sets of transcription factors (TFs) along the mammalian cortex controls its subdivision into functional areas. Unlike neocortex, only few recent data suggest genetic mechanisms controlling the regionalization of the archicortex. TF Emx2 plays a crucial role in patterning...... later on becoming restricted exclusively to postmitotic neurons of hippocampus (Hi) proper, dentate gyrus (DG), and two transitory zones, subiculum (S) and retrosplenial cortex (Rsp). Analysis of Zbtb20-/- mice revealed altered cortical patterning at the border between neocortex and archicortex...

  8. Activating transcription factor 4 regulates osteoclast differentiation in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huiling; Yu, Shibing; Yao, Zhi; Galson, Deborah L.; Jiang, Yu; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Fan, Jie; Lu, Binfeng; Guan, Youfei; Luo, Min; Lai, Yumei; Zhu, Yibei; Kurihara, Noriyoshi; Patrene, Kenneth; Roodman, G. David; Xiao, Guozhi

    2010-01-01

    Activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) is a critical transcription factor for osteoblast (OBL) function and bone formation; however, a direct role in osteoclasts (OCLs) has not been established. Here, we targeted expression of ATF4 to the OCL lineage using the Trap promoter or through deletion of Atf4 in mice. OCL differentiation was drastically decreased in Atf4–/– bone marrow monocyte (BMM) cultures and bones. Coculture of Atf4–/– BMMs with WT OBLs or a high concentration of RANKL failed to restore the OCL differentiation defect. Conversely, Trap-Atf4-tg mice displayed severe osteopenia with dramatically increased osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. We further showed that ATF4 was an upstream activator of the critical transcription factor Nfatc1 and was critical for RANKL activation of multiple MAPK pathways in OCL progenitors. Furthermore, ATF4 was crucial for M-CSF induction of RANK expression on BMMs, and lack of ATF4 caused a shift in OCL precursors to macrophages. Finally, ATF4 was largely modulated by M-CSF signaling and the PI3K/AKT pathways in BMMs. These results demonstrate that ATF4 plays a direct role in regulating OCL differentiation and suggest that it may be a therapeutic target for treating bone diseases associated with increased OCL activity. PMID:20628199

  9. Plant MYB Transcription Factors: Their Role in Drought Response Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Baldoni

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Water scarcity is one of the major causes of poor plant performance and limited crop yields worldwide and it is the single most common cause of severe food shortage in developing countries. Several molecular networks involved in stress perception, signal transduction and stress responses in plants have been elucidated so far. Transcription factors are major players in water stress signaling. In recent years, different MYB transcription factors, mainly in Arabidopsis thaliana (L. Heynh. but also in some crops, have been characterized for their involvement in drought response. For some of them there is evidence supporting a specific role in response to water stress, such as the regulation of stomatal movement, the control of suberin and cuticular waxes synthesis and the regulation of flower development. Moreover, some of these genes have also been characterized for their involvement in other abiotic or biotic stresses, an important feature considering that in nature, plants are often simultaneously subjected to multiple rather than single environmental perturbations. This review summarizes recent studies highlighting the role of the MYB family of transcription factors in the adaptive responses to drought stress. The practical application value of MYBs in crop improvement, such as stress tolerance engineering, is also discussed.

  10. Plant MYB Transcription Factors: Their Role in Drought Response Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldoni, Elena; Genga, Annamaria; Cominelli, Eleonora

    2015-07-13

    Water scarcity is one of the major causes of poor plant performance and limited crop yields worldwide and it is the single most common cause of severe food shortage in developing countries. Several molecular networks involved in stress perception, signal transduction and stress responses in plants have been elucidated so far. Transcription factors are major players in water stress signaling. In recent years, different MYB transcription factors, mainly in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. but also in some crops, have been characterized for their involvement in drought response. For some of them there is evidence supporting a specific role in response to water stress, such as the regulation of stomatal movement, the control of suberin and cuticular waxes synthesis and the regulation of flower development. Moreover, some of these genes have also been characterized for their involvement in other abiotic or biotic stresses, an important feature considering that in nature, plants are often simultaneously subjected to multiple rather than single environmental perturbations. This review summarizes recent studies highlighting the role of the MYB family of transcription factors in the adaptive responses to drought stress. The practical application value of MYBs in crop improvement, such as stress tolerance engineering, is also discussed.

  11. Differential gene expression regulated by oscillatory transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Cerone

    Full Text Available Cells respond to changes in the internal and external environment by a complex regulatory system whose end-point is the activation of transcription factors controlling the expression of a pool of ad-hoc genes. Recent experiments have shown that certain stimuli may trigger oscillations in the concentration of transcription factors such as NF-κB and p53 influencing the final outcome of the genetic response. In this study we investigate the role of oscillations in the case of three different well known gene regulatory mechanisms using mathematical models based on ordinary differential equations and numerical simulations. We considered the cases of direct regulation, two-step regulation and feed-forward loops, and characterized their response to oscillatory input signals both analytically and numerically. We show that in the case of indirect two-step regulation the expression of genes can be turned on or off in a frequency dependent manner, and that feed-forward loops are also able to selectively respond to the temporal profile of oscillating transcription factors.

  12. Clever cancer strategies with FoxO transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiese, Kenneth; Chong, Zhao Zhong; Shang, Yan Chen; Hou, Jinling

    2008-12-15

    Given that cancer and related disorders affect a wide spectrum of the world's population, and in most cases are progressive in nature, it is essential that future care must overcome the present limitations of existing therapies in the absence of toxic side effects. Mammalian forkhead transcription factors of the O class (FoxOs) may fill this niche since these proteins are increasingly considered to represent unique cellular targets directed against human cancer in light of their pro-apoptotic effects and ability to lead to cell cycle arrest. Yet, FoxOs also can significantly affect normal cell survival and longevity, requiring new treatments for neoplastic growth to modulate novel pathways that integrate cell proliferation, metabolism, inflammation and survival. In this respect, members of the FoxO family are extremely compelling to consider since these transcription factors have emerged as versatile proteins that can control angiogenesis, stem cell proliferation, cell adhesion and autoimmune disease. Further elucidation of FoxO protein function during neoplastic growth should continue to lay the foundation for the successful translation of these transcription factors into novel and robust clinical therapies for cancer.

  13. Regeneration of the aged thymus by a single transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredenkamp, Nicholas; Nowell, Craig S; Blackburn, C Clare

    2014-04-01

    Thymic involution is central to the decline in immune system function that occurs with age. By regenerating the thymus, it may therefore be possible to improve the ability of the aged immune system to respond to novel antigens. Recently, diminished expression of the thymic epithelial cell (TEC)-specific transcription factor Forkhead box N1 (FOXN1) has been implicated as a component of the mechanism regulating age-related involution. The effects of upregulating FOXN1 function in the aged thymus are, however, unknown. Here, we show that forced, TEC-specific upregulation of FOXN1 in the fully involuted thymus of aged mice results in robust thymus regeneration characterized by increased thymopoiesis and increased naive T cell output. We demonstrate that the regenerated organ closely resembles the juvenile thymus in terms of architecture and gene expression profile, and further show that this FOXN1-mediated regeneration stems from an enlarged TEC compartment, rebuilt from progenitor TECs. Collectively, our data establish that upregulation of a single transcription factor can substantially reverse age-related thymic involution, identifying FOXN1 as a specific target for improving thymus function and, thus, immune competence in patients. More widely, they demonstrate that organ regeneration in an aged mammal can be directed by manipulation of a single transcription factor, providing a provocative paradigm that may be of broad impact for regenerative biology.

  14. Activating transcription factor 4 regulates osteoclast differentiation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huiling; Yu, Shibing; Yao, Zhi; Galson, Deborah L; Jiang, Yu; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Fan, Jie; Lu, Binfeng; Guan, Youfei; Luo, Min; Lai, Yumei; Zhu, Yibei; Kurihara, Noriyoshi; Patrene, Kenneth; Roodman, G David; Xiao, Guozhi

    2010-08-01

    Activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) is a critical transcription factor for osteoblast (OBL) function and bone formation; however, a direct role in osteoclasts (OCLs) has not been established. Here, we targeted expression of ATF4 to the OCL lineage using the Trap promoter or through deletion of Atf4 in mice. OCL differentiation was drastically decreased in Atf4-/- bone marrow monocyte (BMM) cultures and bones. Coculture of Atf4-/- BMMs with WT OBLs or a high concentration of RANKL failed to restore the OCL differentiation defect. Conversely, Trap-Atf4-tg mice displayed severe osteopenia with dramatically increased osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. We further showed that ATF4 was an upstream activator of the critical transcription factor Nfatc1 and was critical for RANKL activation of multiple MAPK pathways in OCL progenitors. Furthermore, ATF4 was crucial for M-CSF induction of RANK expression on BMMs, and lack of ATF4 caused a shift in OCL precursors to macrophages. Finally, ATF4 was largely modulated by M-CSF signaling and the PI3K/AKT pathways in BMMs. These results demonstrate that ATF4 plays a direct role in regulating OCL differentiation and suggest that it may be a therapeutic target for treating bone diseases associated with increased OCL activity.

  15. Identification and Transcript Analysis of the TCP Transcription Factors in the Diploid Woodland Strawberry Fragaria vesca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Hu, Yang; Cui, Meng-Yuan; Han, Yong-Tao; Gao, Kuan; Feng, Jia-Yue

    2016-01-01

    Plant-specific TEOSINTE BRANCHED 1, CYCLOIDEA, and PROLIFERATING CELL FACTORS (TCP) transcription factors play versatile functions in multiple processes of plant growth and development. However, no systematic study has been performed in strawberry. In this study, 19 FvTCP genes were identified in the diploid woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca) accession Heilongjiang-3. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the FvTCP genes were classified into two main classes, with the second class further divided into two subclasses, which was supported by the exon-intron organizations and the conserved motif structures. Promoter analysis revealed various cis-acting elements related to growth and development, hormone and/or stress responses. We analyzed FvTCP gene transcript accumulation patterns in different tissues and fruit developmental stages. Among them, 12 FvTCP genes exhibited distinct tissue-specific transcript accumulation patterns. Eleven FvTCP genes were down-regulated in different fruit developmental stages, while five FvTCP genes were up-regulated. Transcripts of FvTCP genes also varied with different subcultural propagation periods and were induced by hormone treatments and biotic and abiotic stresses. Subcellular localization analysis showed that six FvTCP-GFP fusion proteins showed distinct localizations in Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts. Notably, transient over-expression of FvTCP9 in strawberry fruits dramatically affected the expression of a series of genes implicated in fruit development and ripening. Taken together, the present study may provide the basis for functional studies to reveal the role of this gene family in strawberry growth and development. PMID:28066489

  16. Transcription Factors Exhibit Differential Conservation in Bacteria with Reduced Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán-Vásquez, Edgardo; Sánchez-Osorio, Ismael; Martínez-Antonio, Agustino

    2016-01-01

    The description of transcriptional regulatory networks has been pivotal in the understanding of operating principles under which organisms respond and adapt to varying conditions. While the study of the topology and dynamics of these networks has been the subject of considerable work, the investigation of the evolution of their topology, as a result of the adaptation of organisms to different environmental conditions, has received little attention. In this work, we study the evolution of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria from a genome reduction perspective, which manifests itself as the loss of genes at different degrees. We used the transcriptional regulatory network of Escherichia coli as a reference to compare 113 smaller, phylogenetically-related γ-proteobacteria, including 19 genomes of symbionts. We found that the type of regulatory action exerted by transcription factors, as genomes get progressively smaller, correlates well with their degree of conservation, with dual regulators being more conserved than repressors and activators in conditions of extreme reduction. In addition, we found that the preponderant conservation of dual regulators might be due to their role as both global regulators and nucleoid-associated proteins. We summarize our results in a conceptual model of how each TF type is gradually lost as genomes become smaller and give a rationale for the order in which this phenomenon occurs.

  17. Transcription Factors Exhibit Differential Conservation in Bacteria with Reduced Genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgardo Galán-Vásquez

    Full Text Available The description of transcriptional regulatory networks has been pivotal in the understanding of operating principles under which organisms respond and adapt to varying conditions. While the study of the topology and dynamics of these networks has been the subject of considerable work, the investigation of the evolution of their topology, as a result of the adaptation of organisms to different environmental conditions, has received little attention. In this work, we study the evolution of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria from a genome reduction perspective, which manifests itself as the loss of genes at different degrees. We used the transcriptional regulatory network of Escherichia coli as a reference to compare 113 smaller, phylogenetically-related γ-proteobacteria, including 19 genomes of symbionts. We found that the type of regulatory action exerted by transcription factors, as genomes get progressively smaller, correlates well with their degree of conservation, with dual regulators being more conserved than repressors and activators in conditions of extreme reduction. In addition, we found that the preponderant conservation of dual regulators might be due to their role as both global regulators and nucleoid-associated proteins. We summarize our results in a conceptual model of how each TF type is gradually lost as genomes become smaller and give a rationale for the order in which this phenomenon occurs.

  18. Novel mutations in PXDN cause microphthalmia and anterior segment dysgenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Alex; Lao, Richard; Ling-Fung Tang, Paul; Wan, Eunice; Mayer, Wasima; Bardakjian, Tanya; Shaw, Gary M; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Schneider, Adele; Slavotinek, Anne

    2015-03-01

    We used exome sequencing to study a non-consanguineous family with two children who had anterior segment dysgenesis, sclerocornea, microphthalmia, hypotonia and developmental delays. Sanger sequencing verified two Peroxidasin (PXDN) mutations in both sibs--a maternally inherited, nonsense mutation, c.1021C>T predicting p.(Arg341*), and a paternally inherited, 23-basepair deletion causing a frameshift and premature protein truncation, c.2375_2397del23, predicting p.(Leu792Hisfs*67). We re-examined exome data from 20 other patients with structural eye defects and identified two additional PXDN mutations in a sporadic male with bilateral microphthalmia, cataracts and anterior segment dysgenesis--a maternally inherited, frameshift mutation, c.1192delT, predicting p.(Tyr398Thrfs*40) and a paternally inherited, missense substitution that was predicted to be deleterious, c.947 A>C, predicting p.(Gln316Pro). Mutations in PXDN were previously reported in three families with congenital cataracts, microcornea, sclerocornea and developmental glaucoma. The gene is expressed in corneal epithelium and is secreted into the extracellular matrix. Defective peroxidasin has been shown to impair sulfilimine bond formation in collagen IV, a constituent of the basement membrane, implying that the eye defects result because of loss of basement membrane integrity in the developing eye. Our finding of a broader phenotype than previously appreciated for PXDN mutations is typical for exome-sequencing studies, which have proven to be highly effective for mutation detection in patients with atypical presentations. We conclude that PXDN sequencing should be considered in microphthalmia with anterior segment dysgenesis.

  19. A systems biology approach to transcription factor binding site prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The elucidation of mammalian transcriptional regulatory networks holds great promise for both basic and translational research and remains one the greatest challenges to systems biology. Recent reverse engineering methods deduce regulatory interactions from large-scale mRNA expression profiles and cross-species conserved regulatory regions in DNA. Technical challenges faced by these methods include distinguishing between direct and indirect interactions, associating transcription regulators with predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs, identifying non-linearly conserved binding sites across species, and providing realistic accuracy estimates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We address these challenges by closely integrating proven methods for regulatory network reverse engineering from mRNA expression data, linearly and non-linearly conserved regulatory region discovery, and TFBS evaluation and discovery. Using an extensive test set of high-likelihood interactions, which we collected in order to provide realistic prediction-accuracy estimates, we show that a careful integration of these methods leads to significant improvements in prediction accuracy. To verify our methods, we biochemically validated TFBS predictions made for both transcription factors (TFs and co-factors; we validated binding site predictions made using a known E2F1 DNA-binding motif on E2F1 predicted promoter targets, known E2F1 and JUND motifs on JUND predicted promoter targets, and a de novo discovered motif for BCL6 on BCL6 predicted promoter targets. Finally, to demonstrate accuracy of prediction using an external dataset, we showed that sites matching predicted motifs for ZNF263 are significantly enriched in recent ZNF263 ChIP-seq data. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using an integrative framework, we were able to address technical challenges faced by state of the art network reverse engineering methods, leading to significant improvement in direct

  20. Transcription of human respiratory syncytial virus genome RNA in vitro: requirement of cellular factor(s).

    OpenAIRE

    Barik, S

    1992-01-01

    Extracts made from human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-infected Hep-2 cells synthesized mRNAs encoded by all known viral genes. In contrast, RSV ribonucleoproteins purified from infected cells failed to transcribe in vitro; transcription was restored by addition of a cytoplasmic extract of uninfected Hep-2 cells, demonstrating that a cellular factor(s) has a role in RSV gene expression. Quantitation of the individual gene mRNAs transcribed in vitro revealed polarity of transcription of th...

  1. Congenital systematized basaloid follicular hamartoma with microphthalmia and hemimegalencephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccaletti, Valeria; Accorsi, Patrizia; Pinelli, Lorenzo; Ungari, Marco; Giordano, Lucio; Neri, Iria; De Panfilis, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    The lines of Blaschko are a cutaneous pattern of mosaicism present in a variety of skin disorders. Developmental abnormalities affecting other tissues derived from the embryonic ectoderm and mesoderm are sometimes associated. Here, we describe a 5-year-old boy with basaloid follicular hamartoma affecting the left side of the body in linear multiple bands, following Blaschko lines. Lesions were predominantly hypopigmented macules and streaks, but among these, we could observe brownish atrophic patches and brown papules. Furthermore, ipsilateral hemimegaloencephaly and microphthalmia were present. These findings suggest a neurocutaneous condition recently described by Happle and Tinschert. Its nosologic classification will be discussed. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The chloroplast transcription apparatus from mustard (Sinapis alba L.). Evidence for three different transcription factors which resemble bacterial sigma factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiller, K; Eisermann, A; Link, G

    1991-05-23

    A chloroplast protein fraction with sigma-like activity [Bülow, S. & Link, G. (1988) Plant Mol. Biol. 10, 349-357], was further purified and characterized. Chromatography on heparin-Sepharose, DEAE-Sepharose and Sephacryl S-300 led to the separation of three sigma-like factors (SLF) polypeptides with Mr 67,000 (SLF67), 52,000 (SLF52) and 29,000 (SLF29). None of these polypeptides bind to DNA itself, but each one confers enhanced binding and transcriptional activity when added to Escherichia coli RNA-polymerase core enzyme and DNA fragments carrying a chloroplast promoter. SLF67, SLF52, and SLF29 differ in their ionic-strength requirements for activity. They each mediate the binding to promoters of the chloroplast genes psbA, trnQ, and rps16, with different efficiencies. It is suggested that chloroplast transcription in vivo might be controlled at least in part by these functionally distinct factors.

  3. Pirfenidone exerts antifibrotic effects through inhibition of GLI transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didiasova, Miroslava; Singh, Rajeev; Wilhelm, Jochen; Kwapiszewska, Grazyna; Wujak, Lukasz; Zakrzewicz, Dariusz; Schaefer, Liliana; Markart, Philipp; Seeger, Werner; Lauth, Matthias; Wygrecka, Malgorzata

    2017-02-01

    Pirfenidone is an antifibrotic drug, recently approved for the treatment of patients suffering from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Although pirfenidone exhibits anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antifibrotic properties, the molecular mechanism underlying its protective effects remains unknown. Here, we link pirfenidone action with the regulation of the profibrotic hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway. We demonstrate that pirfenidone selectively destabilizes the glioma-associated oncogene homolog (GLI)2 protein, the primary activator of Hh-mediated gene transcription. Consequently, pirfenidone decreases overall Hh pathway activity in patients with IPF and in patient-derived primary lung fibroblasts and leads to diminished levels of Hh target genes such as GLI1, Hh receptor Patched-1, α-smooth muscle actin, and fibronectin and to reduced cell migration and proliferation. Interestingly, Hh-triggered TGF-β1 expression potentiated Hh responsiveness of primary lung fibroblasts by elevating the available pool of glioma-associated oncogene homolog (GLI)1/GLI2, thus creating a vicious cycle of amplifying fibrotic processes. Because GLI transcription factors are not only crucial for Hh-mediated changes but are also required as mediators of TGF-β signaling, our findings suggest that pirfenidone exerts its clinically beneficial effects through dual Hh/TGF-β inhibition by targeting the GLI2 protein.-Didiasova, M., Singh, R., Wilhelm, J., Kwapiszewska, G., Wujak, L., Zakrzewicz, D., Schaefer, L., Markart, P., Seeger, W., Lauth, M., Wygrecka, M. Pirfenidone exerts antifibrotic effects through inhibition of GLI transcription factors.

  4. Sequence dependence of transcription factor-mediated DNA looping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Stephanie; Lindén, Martin; Phillips, Rob

    2012-09-01

    DNA is subject to large deformations in a wide range of biological processes. Two key examples illustrate how such deformations influence the readout of the genetic information: the sequestering of eukaryotic genes by nucleosomes and DNA looping in transcriptional regulation in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. These kinds of regulatory problems are now becoming amenable to systematic quantitative dissection with a powerful dialogue between theory and experiment. Here, we use a single-molecule experiment in conjunction with a statistical mechanical model to test quantitative predictions for the behavior of DNA looping at short length scales and to determine how DNA sequence affects looping at these lengths. We calculate and measure how such looping depends upon four key biological parameters: the strength of the transcription factor binding sites, the concentration of the transcription factor, and the length and sequence of the DNA loop. Our studies lead to the surprising insight that sequences that are thought to be especially favorable for nucleosome formation because of high flexibility lead to no systematically detectable effect of sequence on looping, and begin to provide a picture of the distinctions between the short length scale mechanics of nucleosome formation and looping.

  5. Thioredoxin interacting protein inhibits hypoxia-inducible factor transcriptional activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Michael R; Rogers, Lynette K; Liu, Yusen; Welty, Stephen E; Tipple, Trent E

    2010-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is required for proper lung development and is transcriptionally regulated in alveolar epithelial cells by hypoxia inducible factor (HIF). Previous findings in a newborn mouse model of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) suggest that thioredoxin interacting protein (Txnip) is a novel regulator of VEGF expression. The present studies were designed to test the hypothesis that Txnip negatively regulates VEGF through effects on HIF-mediated gene expression. To test this hypothesis, we first examined the levels of VEGF and Txnip protein in the lungs of 1 day-old newborn and E19 embryos and detected a significant inverse correlation. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying this relationship, we studied the effects of Txnip overexpression on HIF-mediated transcription using murine lung epithelial (MLE-12) cells. Overexpression of Txnip inhibited HIF-mediated reporter activity in both hypoxia and room air. Suppression of HIF activity by Txnip appeared to be independent of the ability of Txnip to bind to thioredoxin. Thus, our studies support a model in which Txnip is a potentially critical regulator of HIF-mediated gene transcription in the murine lung. Alterations in Txnip expression could alter lung VEGF expression in prematurely born human infants and contribute to the development of BPD. PMID:20692333

  6. Isl1 is a direct transcriptional target of Forkhead transcription factors in second heart field-derived mesoderm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jione; Nathan, Elisha; Xu, Shan-Mei; Tzahor, Eldad; Black, Brian L.

    2009-01-01

    The cells of the second heart field (SHF) contribute to the outflow tract and right ventricle, as well as to parts of the left ventricle and atria. Isl1, a member of the LIM-homeodomain transcription factor family, is expressed early in this cardiac progenitor population and functions near the top of a transcriptional pathway essential for heart development. Isl1 is required for the survival and migration of SHF-derived cells into the early developing heart at the inflow and outflow poles. Despite this important role for Isl1 in early heart formation, the transcriptional regulation of Isl1 has remained largely undefined. Therefore, to identify transcription factors that regulate Isl1 expression in vivo, we screened the conserved noncoding sequences from the mouse Isl1 locus for enhancer activity in transgenic mouse embryos. Here, we report the identification of an enhancer from the mouse Isl1 gene that is sufficient to direct expression to the SHF and its derivatives. The Isl1 SHF enhancer contains three consensus Forkhead transcription factor binding sites that are efficiently and specifically bound by Forkhead transcription factors. Importantly, the activity of the enhancer is dependent on these three Forkhead binding sites in transgenic mouse embryos. Thus, these studies demonstrate that Isl1 is a direct transcriptional target of Forkhead transcription factors in the SHF and establish a transcriptional pathway upstream of Isl1 in the SHF. PMID:19580802

  7. Bidirectional Transcription Arises from Two Distinct Hubs of Transcription Factor Binding and Active Chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scruggs, Benjamin S; Gilchrist, Daniel A; Nechaev, Sergei; Muse, Ginger W; Burkholder, Adam; Fargo, David C; Adelman, Karen

    2015-06-18

    Anti-sense transcription originating upstream of mammalian protein-coding genes is a well-documented phenomenon, but remarkably little is known about the regulation or function of anti-sense promoters and the non-coding RNAs they generate. Here we define at nucleotide resolution the divergent transcription start sites (TSSs) near mouse mRNA genes. We find that coupled sense and anti-sense TSSs precisely define the boundaries of a nucleosome-depleted region (NDR) that is highly enriched in transcription factor (TF) motifs. Notably, as the distance between sense and anti-sense TSSs increases, so does the size of the NDR, the level of signal-dependent TF binding, and gene activation. We further discover a group of anti-sense TSSs in macrophages with an enhancer-like chromatin signature. Interestingly, this signature identifies divergent promoters that are activated during immune challenge. We propose that anti-sense promoters serve as platforms for TF binding and establishment of active chromatin to further regulate or enhance sense-strand mRNA expression.

  8. Statistical mechanical model of coupled transcription from multiple promoters due to transcription factor titration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydenfelt, Mattias; Cox, Robert Sidney, III; Garcia, Hernan; Phillips, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) with regulatory action at multiple promoter targets is the rule rather than the exception, with examples ranging from the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) in E. coli that regulates hundreds of different genes simultaneously to situations involving multiple copies of the same gene, such as plasmids, retrotransposons, or highly replicated viral DNA. When the number of TFs heavily exceeds the number of binding sites, TF binding to each promoter can be regarded as independent. However, when the number of TF molecules is comparable to the number of binding sites, TF titration will result in correlation (“promoter entanglement”) between transcription of different genes. We develop a statistical mechanical model which takes the TF titration effect into account and use it to predict both the level of gene expression for a general set of promoters and the resulting correlation in transcription rates of different genes. Our results show that the TF titration effect could be important for understanding gene expression in many regulatory settings.

  9. Isolation, classification and transcription profiles of the AP2/ERF transcription factor superfamily in citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiu-lan; Shen, Shu-ling; Yin, Xue-ren; Xu, Qian; Sun, Chong-de; Grierson, Donald; Ferguson, Ian; Chen, Kun-song

    2014-07-01

    The AP2/ERF gene family encodes plant-specific transcription factors. In model plants, AP2/ERF genes have been shown to be expressed in response to developmental and environmental stimuli, and many function downstream of the ethylene, biotic, and abiotic stress signaling pathways. In citrus, ethylene is effective in regulation citrus fruit quality, such as degreening and aroma. However, information about the citrus AP2/ERF family is limited, and would enhance our understanding of fruit responses to environmental stress, fruit development and quality. CitAP2/ERF genes were isolated using the citrus genome database, and their expression patterns analyzed by real-time PCR using various orange organs and samples from a fruit developmental series. 126 sequences with homologies to AP2/ERF proteins were identified from the citrus genome, and, on the basis of their structure and sequence, assigned to the ERF family (102), AP2 family (18), RAV family (4) and Soloist (2). MEME motif analysis predicted the defining AP2/ERF domain and EAR repressor domains. Analysis of transcript accumulation in Citrus sinensis cv. 'Newhall' indicated that CitAP2/ERF genes show organ-specific and temporal expression, and provided a framework for understanding the transcriptional regulatory roles of AP2/ERF gene family members in citrus. Hierarchical cluster analysis and t tests identified regulators that potentially function during orange fruit growth and development.

  10. Role of DNA Methylation in Modulating Transcription Factor Occupancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew T. Maurano

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Although DNA methylation is commonly invoked as a mechanism for transcriptional repression, the extent to which it actively silences transcription factor (TF occupancy sites in vivo is unknown. To study the role of DNA methylation in the active modulation of TF binding, we quantified the effect of DNA methylation depletion on the genomic occupancy patterns of CTCF, an abundant TF with known methylation sensitivity that is capable of autonomous binding to its target sites in chromatin. Here, we show that the vast majority (>98.5% of the tens of thousands of unoccupied, methylated CTCF recognition sequences remain unbound upon abrogation of DNA methylation. The small fraction of sites that show methylation-dependent binding in vivo are in turn characterized by highly variable CTCF occupancy across cell types. Our results suggest that DNA methylation is not a primary groundskeeper of genomic TF landscapes, but rather a specialized mechanism for stabilizing intrinsically labile sites.

  11. Transcription factor FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network in non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Sang-Min; An, Joo-Hee; Kim, Chul-Hong; Kim, Jung-Woong, E-mail: jungkim@cau.ac.kr; Choi, Kyung-Hee, E-mail: khchoi@cau.ac.kr

    2015-08-07

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-mediated death. Although various therapeutic approaches are used for lung cancer treatment, these mainly target the tumor suppressor p53 transcription factor, which is involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. However, p53-targeted therapies have limited application in lung cancer, since p53 is found to be mutated in more than half of lung cancers. In this study, we propose tumor suppressor FOXA2 as an alternative target protein for therapies against lung cancer and reveal a possible FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network by identifying new target genes and binding partners of FOXA2 by using various screening techniques. The genes encoding Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 2 (NR0B2), cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) were identified as putative target genes of FOXA2. Additionally, the proteins including highly similar to heat shock protein HSP 90-beta (HSP90A), heat shock 70 kDa protein 1A variant (HSPA1A), histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and HDAC3 were identified as novel interacting partners of FOXA2. Moreover, we showed that FOXA2-dependent promoter activation of BAX and p21 genes is significantly reduced via physical interactions between the identified binding partners and FOXA2. These results provide opportunities to understand the FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network and novel therapeutic targets to modulate this network in p53-deficient lung cancer. - Highlights: • Identification of new target genes of FOXA2. • Identifications of novel interaction proteins of FOXA2. • Construction of FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulatory network in non-small cell lung cancer.

  12. Engineering phenolics metabolism in the grasses using transcription factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grotewold, Erich [The Ohio State University

    2013-07-26

    The economical competitiveness of agriculture-derived biofuels can be significantly enhanced by increasing biomass/acre yields and by furnishing the desired carbon balance for facilitating liquid fuel production (e.g., ethanol) or for high-energy solid waste availability to be used as biopower (e.g., for electricity production). Biomass production and carbon balance are tightly linked to the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds, which are found in crops and in agricultural residues either as lignins, as part of the cell wall, or as soluble phenolics which play a variety of functions in the biology of plants. The grasses, in particular maize, provide the single major source of agricultural biomass, offering significant opportunities for increasing renewable fuel production. Our laboratory has pioneered the use of transcription factors for manipulating plant metabolic pathways, an approach that will be applied here towards altering the composition of phenolic compounds in maize. Previously, we identified a small group of ten maize R2R3-MYB transcription factors with all the characteristics of regulators of different aspects of phenolic biosynthesis. Here, we propose to investigate the participation of these R2R3-MYB factors in the regulation of soluble and insoluble maize phenolics, using a combination of over-expression and down-regulation of these transcription factors in transgenic maize cultured cells and in maize plants. Maize cells and plants altered in the activity of these regulatory proteins will be analyzed for phenolic composition by targeted metabolic profiling. Specifically, we will I) Investigate the effect of gain- and loss-of-function of a select group of R2R3-MYB transcription factors on the phenolic composition of maize plants and II) Identify the biosynthetic genes regulated by each of the selected R2R3-MYB factors. While a likely outcome of these studies are transgenic maize plants with altered phenolic composition, this research will significantly

  13. ALDH1A3 mutations cause recessive anophthalmia and microphthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares-Taie, Lucas; Gerber, Sylvie; Chassaing, Nicolas; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Hanein, Sylvain; Silva, Eduardo; Serey, Margaux; Serre, Valérie; Gérard, Xavier; Baumann, Clarisse; Plessis, Ghislaine; Demeer, Bénédicte; Brétillon, Lionel; Bole, Christine; Nitschke, Patrick; Munnich, Arnold; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Calvas, Patrick; Kaplan, Josseline; Ragge, Nicola; Rozet, Jean-Michel

    2013-02-01

    Anophthalmia and microphthalmia (A/M) are early-eye-development anomalies resulting in absent or small ocular globes, respectively. A/M anomalies occur in syndromic or nonsyndromic forms. They are genetically heterogeneous, some mutations in some genes being responsible for both anophthalmia and microphthalmia. Using a combination of homozygosity mapping, exome sequencing, and Sanger sequencing, we identified homozygosity for one splice-site and two missense mutations in the gene encoding the A3 isoform of the aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1A3) in three consanguineous families segregating A/M with occasional orbital cystic, neurological, and cardiac anomalies. ALDH1A3 is a key enzyme in the formation of a retinoic acid gradient along the dorso-ventral axis during early eye development. Transitory expression of mutant ALDH1A3 open reading frames showed that both missense mutations reduce the accumulation of the enzyme, potentially leading to altered retinoic acid synthesis. Although the role of retinoic acid signaling in eye development is well established, our findings provide genetic evidence of a direct link between retinoic-acid-synthesis dysfunction and early-eye-development anomalies in humans.

  14. The genetic architecture of microphthalmia, anophthalmia and coloboma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Kathleen A; FitzPatrick, David R

    2014-08-01

    Microphthalmia, anophthalmia and coloboma (MAC) are distinct phenotypes that represent a continuum of structural developmental eye defects. In severe bilateral cases (anophthalmia or severe microphthalmia) the genetic cause is now identifiable in approximately 80 percent of cases, with de novo heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in SOX2 or OTX2 being the most common. The genetic cause of other forms of MAC, in particular isolated coloboma, remains unknown in the majority of cases. This review will focus on MAC phenotypes that are associated with mutation of the genes SOX2, OTX2, PAX6, STRA6, ALDH1A3, RARB, VSX2, RAX, FOXE3, BMP4, BMP7, GDF3, GDF6, ABCB6, ATOH7, C12orf57, TENM3 (ODZ3), and VAX1. Recently reported mutation of the SALL2 and YAP1 genes are discussed in brief. Clinical and genetic features were reviewed in a total of 283 unrelated MAC cases or families that were mutation-positive from these 20 genes. Both the relative frequency of mutations in MAC cohort screens and the level of confidence in the assignment of disease-causing status were evaluated for each gene.

  15. Early retinoic acid deprivation in developing zebrafish results in microphthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Hong-Gam T; Dowling, John E; Cameron, D Joshua

    2012-09-01

    Vitamin A deficiency causes impaired vision and blindness in millions of children around the world. Previous studies in zebrafish have demonstrated that retinoic acid (RA), the acid form of vitamin A, plays a vital role in early eye development. The objective of this study was to describe the effects of early RA deficiency by treating zebrafish with diethylaminobenzaldehyde (DEAB), a potent inhibitor of the enzyme retinaldehyde dehydrogenase (RALDH) that converts retinal to RA. Zebrafish embryos were treated for 2 h beginning at 9 h postfertilization. Gross morphology and retinal development were examined at regular intervals for 5 days after treatment. The optokinetic reflex (OKR) test, visual background adaptation (VBA) test, and the electroretinogram (ERG) were performed to assess visual function and behavior. Early treatment of zebrafish embryos with 100 μM DEAB (9 h) resulted in reduced eye size, and this microphthalmia persisted through larval development. Retinal histology revealed that DEAB eyes had significant developmental abnormalities but had relatively normal retinal lamination by 5.5 days postfertilization. However, the fish showed neither an OKR nor a VBA response. Further, the retina did not respond to light as measured by the ERG. We conclude that early deficiency of RA during eye development causes microphthalmia as well as other visual defects, and that timing of the RA deficiency is critical to the developmental outcome.

  16. Glucagon and Insulin Cooperatively Stimulate Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Gene Transcription by Increasing the Expression of Activating Transcription Factor 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonge, Kimberly M; Meares, Gordon P; Hillgartner, F Bradley

    2017-03-31

    Previous studies have shown that glucagon cooperatively interacts with insulin to stimulate hepatic FGF21 gene expression. Here we investigated the mechanism by which glucagon and insulin increased FGF21 gene transcription in primary hepatocyte cultures. Transfection analyses demonstrated that glucagon plus insulin induction of FGF21 transcription was conferred by two activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) binding sites in the FGF21 gene. Glucagon plus insulin stimulated a 5-fold increase in ATF4 protein abundance, and knockdown of ATF4 expression suppressed the ability of glucagon plus insulin to increase FGF21 expression. In hepatocytes incubated in the presence of insulin, treatment with a PKA-selective agonist mimicked the ability of glucagon to stimulate ATF4 and FGF21 expression. Inhibition of PKA, PI3K, Akt, and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) suppressed the ability of glucagon plus insulin to stimulate ATF4 and FGF21 expression. Additional analyses demonstrated that chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) induced a 6-fold increase in ATF4 expression and that knockdown of ATF4 expression suppressed the ability of CDCA to increase FGF21 gene expression. CDCA increased the phosphorylation of eIF2α, and inhibition of eIF2α signaling activity suppressed CDCA regulation of ATF4 and FGF21 expression. These results demonstrate that glucagon plus insulin increases FGF21 transcription by stimulating ATF4 expression and that activation of cAMP/PKA and PI3K/Akt/mTORC1 mediates the effect of glucagon plus insulin on ATF4 expression. These results also demonstrate that CDCA regulation of FGF21 transcription is mediated at least partially by an eIF2α-dependent increase in ATF4 expression. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Negative transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) by nuclear TFAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Jin; Kang, Young Cheol; Park, Wook-Ha; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Pak, Youngmi Kim, E-mail: ykpak@khu.ac.kr

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • TFAM localizes in nuclei and mitochondria of neuronal cells. • Nuclear TFAM does not bind the Tfam promoter. • Nuclear TFAM reduced the Tfam promoter activity via suppressing NRF-1 activity. • A novel self-negative feedback regulation of Tfam gene expression is explored. • FAM may play different roles depending on its subcellular localizations. - Abstract: The nuclear DNA-encoded mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is synthesized in cytoplasm and transported into mitochondria. TFAM enhances both transcription and replication of mitochondrial DNA. It is unclear, however, whether TFAM plays a role in regulating nuclear gene expression. Here, we demonstrated that TFAM was localized to the nucleus and mitochondria by immunostaining, subcellular fractionation, and TFAM-green fluorescent protein hybrid protein studies. In HT22 hippocampal neuronal cells, human TFAM (hTFAM) overexpression suppressed human Tfam promoter-mediated luciferase activity in a dose-dependent manner. The mitochondria targeting sequence-deficient hTFAM also repressed Tfam promoter activity to the same degree as hTFAM. It indicated that nuclear hTFAM suppressed Tfam expression without modulating mitochondrial activity. The repression required for nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), but hTFAM did not bind to the NRF-1 binding site of its promoter. TFAM was co-immunoprecipitated with NRF-1. Taken together, we suggest that nuclear TFAM down-regulate its own gene expression as a NRF-1 repressor, showing that TFAM may play different roles depending on its subcellular localizations.

  18. The ETS family of oncogenic transcription factors in solid tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, Gina M; Pitarresi, Jason R; Balakrishnan, Subhasree; Ostrowski, Michael C

    2017-06-01

    Findings over the past decade have identified aberrant activation of the ETS transcription factor family throughout all stages of tumorigenesis. Specifically in solid tumours, gene rearrangement and amplification, feed-forward growth factor signalling loops, formation of gain-of-function co-regulatory complexes and novel cis-acting mutations in ETS target gene promoters can result in increased ETS activity. In turn, pro-oncogenic ETS signalling enhances tumorigenesis through a broad mechanistic toolbox that includes lineage specification and self-renewal, DNA damage and genome instability, epigenetics and metabolism. This Review discusses these different mechanisms of ETS activation and subsequent oncogenic implications, as well as the clinical utility of ETS factors.

  19. A transcriptional cofactor YAP regulates IFNT expression via transcription factor TEAD in bovine conceptuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusama, K; Bai, R; Sakurai, T; Bai, H; Ideta, A; Aoyagi, Y; Imakawa, K

    2016-10-01

    Interferon tau (IFNT) is the pregnancy recognition protein in all ruminants, and its expression is restricted to trophoblast cells. Interferon tau production increases as the conceptus elongates; however, its expression is downregulated soon after the initiation of conceptus attachment to the uterine epithelium. Our previous study identified that among 8 bovine IFNT genes, only 2 forms of IFNTs, IFNT2 and IFN-tau-c1, were expressed by the conceptuses during the periattachment period. To characterize whether Hippo signaling including a transcription cofactor yes-associated protein (YAP) was involved in the IFNT regulation, we examined the expression and effects of YAP and/or TEAD in human choriocarcinoma JEG3 and bovine trophoblast CT-1 cells, and in bovine conceptuses obtained from day 17, 20 or 22 pregnant animals (pregnant day 19.5 = day of conceptus attachment to the endometrium). YAP was expressed in bovine conceptuses and transfection of YAP or TEAD4, a transcription factor partner of YAP, expression plasmid increased the luciferase activity of IFNT2 and IFN-tau-c1 reporter plasmids in JEG3 cells. In the presence of YAP expression plasmid, TEAD2 or TEAD4 expression plasmid further upregulated transcriptional activity of IFNT2 or IFN-tau-c1 constructs, which were substantially reduced in the absence of the TEAD-binding site on IFNT2 or IFN-tau-c1 promoter region in JEG3 cells. In CT-1 cells, treatment with TEAD2, TEAD4, or YAP small-interfering RNA downregulated endogenous IFNT expression. It should be noted that TEAD2 and TEAD4 were predominantly localized in the nuclei of trophectoderm of Day 17 conceptuses, but nuclear localization appeared to be lower in those cells of conceptuses on days 20 and 22 of pregnancy. Moreover, the binding of TEAD4 to the TEAD-binding site of the IFN-tau-c1 promoter region in day 17 conceptuses was less in day 20 and 22 conceptuses. Furthermore, the level of YAP phosphorylation increased in day 20 and 22 conceptuses. These

  20. NAC transcription factor JUNGBRUNNEN1 enhances drought tolerance in tomato

    KAUST Repository

    Thirumalaikumar, Venkatesh P.

    2017-06-22

    Water deficit (drought stress) massively restricts plant growth and the yield of crops; reducing the deleterious effects of drought is therefore of high agricultural relevance. Drought triggers diverse cellular processes including the inhibition of photosynthesis, the accumulation of cell-damaging reactive oxygen species, and gene expression reprogramming, besides others. Transcription factors (TF) are central regulators of transcriptional reprogramming and expression of many TF genes is affected by drought, including members of the NAC family. Here, we identify the NAC factor JUNGBRUNNEN1 (JUB1) as a regulator of drought tolerance in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Expression of tomato JUB1 (SlJUB1) is enhanced by various abiotic stresses, including drought. Inhibiting SlJUB1 by virus-induced gene silencing drastically lowers drought tolerance concomitant with an increase in ion leakage, an elevation of hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) levels, and a decrease of the expression of various drought-responsive genes. In contrast, overexpression of AtJUB1 from Arabidopsis thaliana increases drought tolerance in tomato, alongside with a higher relative leaf water content during drought and reduced H2 O2 levels. AtJUB1 was previously shown to stimulate expression of DREB2A, a TF involved in drought responses, and of the DELLA genes GAI and RGL1. We show here that SlJUB1 similarly controls the expression of the tomato orthologs SlDREB1, SlDREB2, and SlDELLA. Furthermore, AtJUB1 directly binds to the promoters of SlDREB1, SlDREB2 and SlDELLA in tomato. Our study highlights JUB1 as a transcriptional regulator of drought tolerance and suggests considerable conservation of the abiotic stress-related gene regulatory networks controlled by this NAC factor between Arabidopsis and tomato. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Signatures of DNA target selectivity by ETS transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Gregory M K; Kim, Hye Mi

    2017-05-27

    The ETS family of transcription factors is a functionally heterogeneous group of gene regulators that share a structurally conserved, eponymous DNA-binding domain. DNA target specificity derives from combinatorial interactions with other proteins as well as intrinsic heterogeneity among ETS domains. Emerging evidence suggests molecular hydration as a fundamental feature that defines the intrinsic heterogeneity in DNA target selection and susceptibility to epigenetic DNA modification. This perspective invokes novel hypotheses in the regulation of ETS proteins in physiologic osmotic stress, their pioneering potential in heterochromatin, and the effects of passive and pharmacologic DNA demethylation on ETS regulation.

  2. Experimental strategies for studying transcription factor-DNA binding specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geertz, Marcel; Maerkl, Sebastian J

    2010-12-01

    Specific binding of transcription factors (TFs) determines in a large part the connectivity of gene regulatory networks as well as the quantitative level of gene expression. A multiplicity of both experimental and computational methods is currently used to discover and characterize the underlying TF-DNA interactions. Experimental methods can be further subdivided into in vitro- and in vivo-based approaches, each accenting different aspects of TF-binding events. In this review we summarize the flexibility and performance of a selection of both types of experimental methods. In conclusion, we argue that a serial combination of methods with different throughput and data type constitutes an optimal experimental strategy.

  3. Neuroprotective Transcription Factors in Animal Models of Parkinson Disease

    OpenAIRE

    François-Xavier Blaudin de Thé; Hocine Rekaik; Alain Prochiantz; Julia Fuchs; Joshi, Rajiv L.

    2015-01-01

    A number of transcription factors, including En1/2, Foxa1/2, Lmx1a/b, Nurr1, Otx2, and Pitx3, with key roles in midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neuron development, also regulate adult mDA neuron survival and physiology. Mouse models with targeted disruption of some of these genes display several features reminiscent of Parkinson disease (PD), in particular the selective and progressive loss of mDA neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). The characterization of these animal models ha...

  4. The molecular clock regulates circadian transcription of tissue factor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Katsutaka; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohkura, Naoki

    2013-02-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is involved in endotoxin-induced inflammation and mortality. We found that the circadian expression of TF mRNA, which peaked at the day to night transition (activity onset), was damped in the liver of Clock mutant mice. Luciferase reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses using embryonic fibroblasts derived from wild-type or Clock mutant mice showed that CLOCK is involved in transcription of the TF gene. Furthermore, the results of real-time luciferase reporter experiments revealed that the circadian expression of TF mRNA is regulated by clock molecules through a cell-autonomous mechanism via an E-box element located in the promoter region.

  5. Variable structure motifs for transcription factor binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, John E; Evans, Kenneth J; Dyer, Nigel; Wernisch, Lorenz; Ott, Sascha

    2010-01-14

    Classically, models of DNA-transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) have been based on relatively few known instances and have treated them as sites of fixed length using position weight matrices (PWMs). Various extensions to this model have been proposed, most of which take account of dependencies between the bases in the binding sites. However, some transcription factors are known to exhibit some flexibility and bind to DNA in more than one possible physical configuration. In some cases this variation is known to affect the function of binding sites. With the increasing volume of ChIP-seq data available it is now possible to investigate models that incorporate this flexibility. Previous work on variable length models has been constrained by: a focus on specific zinc finger proteins in yeast using restrictive models; a reliance on hand-crafted models for just one transcription factor at a time; and a lack of evaluation on realistically sized data sets. We re-analysed binding sites from the TRANSFAC database and found motivating examples where our new variable length model provides a better fit. We analysed several ChIP-seq data sets with a novel motif search algorithm and compared the results to one of the best standard PWM finders and a recently developed alternative method for finding motifs of variable structure. All the methods performed comparably in held-out cross validation tests. Known motifs of variable structure were recovered for p53, Stat5a and Stat5b. In addition our method recovered a novel generalised version of an existing PWM for Sp1 that allows for variable length binding. This motif improved classification performance. We have presented a new gapped PWM model for variable length DNA binding sites that is not too restrictive nor over-parameterised. Our comparison with existing tools shows that on average it does not have better predictive accuracy than existing methods. However, it does provide more interpretable models of motifs of variable

  6. Variable structure motifs for transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wernisch Lorenz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classically, models of DNA-transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs have been based on relatively few known instances and have treated them as sites of fixed length using position weight matrices (PWMs. Various extensions to this model have been proposed, most of which take account of dependencies between the bases in the binding sites. However, some transcription factors are known to exhibit some flexibility and bind to DNA in more than one possible physical configuration. In some cases this variation is known to affect the function of binding sites. With the increasing volume of ChIP-seq data available it is now possible to investigate models that incorporate this flexibility. Previous work on variable length models has been constrained by: a focus on specific zinc finger proteins in yeast using restrictive models; a reliance on hand-crafted models for just one transcription factor at a time; and a lack of evaluation on realistically sized data sets. Results We re-analysed binding sites from the TRANSFAC database and found motivating examples where our new variable length model provides a better fit. We analysed several ChIP-seq data sets with a novel motif search algorithm and compared the results to one of the best standard PWM finders and a recently developed alternative method for finding motifs of variable structure. All the methods performed comparably in held-out cross validation tests. Known motifs of variable structure were recovered for p53, Stat5a and Stat5b. In addition our method recovered a novel generalised version of an existing PWM for Sp1 that allows for variable length binding. This motif improved classification performance. Conclusions We have presented a new gapped PWM model for variable length DNA binding sites that is not too restrictive nor over-parameterised. Our comparison with existing tools shows that on average it does not have better predictive accuracy than existing methods. However, it does

  7. The Role of Multiple Transcription Factors In Archaeal Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles J. Daniels

    2008-09-23

    Since the inception of this research program, the project has focused on two central questions: What is the relationship between the 'eukaryal-like' transcription machinery of archaeal cells and its counterparts in eukaryal cells? And, how does the archaeal cell control gene expression using its mosaic of eukaryal core transcription machinery and its bacterial-like transcription regulatory proteins? During the grant period we have addressed these questions using a variety of in vivo approaches and have sought to specifically define the roles of the multiple TATA binding protein (TBP) and TFIIB-like (TFB) proteins in controlling gene expression in Haloferax volcanii. H. volcanii was initially chosen as a model for the Archaea based on the availability of suitable genetic tools; however, later studies showed that all haloarchaea possessed multiple tbp and tfb genes, which led to the proposal that multiple TBP and TFB proteins may function in a manner similar to alternative sigma factors in bacterial cells. In vivo transcription and promoter analysis established a clear relationship between the promoter requirements of haloarchaeal genes and those of the eukaryal RNA polymerase II promoter. Studies on heat shock gene promoters, and the demonstration that specific tfb genes were induced by heat shock, provided the first indication that TFB proteins may direct expression of specific gene families. The construction of strains lacking tbp or tfb genes, coupled with the finding that many of these genes are differentially expressed under varying growth conditions, provided further support for this model. Genetic tools were also developed that led to the construction of insertion and deletion mutants, and a novel gene expression scheme was designed that allowed the controlled expression of these genes in vivo. More recent studies have used a whole genome array to examine the expression of these genes and we have established a linkage between the expression of

  8. E2F1 and p53 Transcription Factors as Accessory Factors for Nucleotide Excision Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Johnson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Many of the biochemical details of nucleotide excision repair (NER have been established using purified proteins and DNA substrates. In cells however, DNA is tightly packaged around histones and other chromatin-associated proteins, which can be an obstacle to efficient repair. Several cooperating mechanisms enhance the efficiency of NER by altering chromatin structure. Interestingly, many of the players involved in modifying chromatin at sites of DNA damage were originally identified as regulators of transcription. These include ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, histone modifying enzymes and several transcription factors. The p53 and E2F1 transcription factors are well known for their abilities to regulate gene expression in response to DNA damage. This review will highlight the underappreciated, transcription-independent functions of p53 and E2F1 in modifying chromatin structure in response to DNA damage to promote global NER.

  9. Transcription factor NF-kB as a potential biomarker for oxidative stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, R. van den; Haenen, G.R.M.M.; Berg, H. van den; Bast, A.

    2001-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the involvement of transcription factors, such as of the transcription factor NF-κB (nuclear factor-κB), in the pathogenesis of various diseases. NF-κB is involved in the control of the transcription of a variety of cellular genes that regulate the inflammatory respon

  10. Mutation analysis of the genes associated with anterior segment dysgenesis, microcornea and microphthalmia in 257 patients with glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaobo; Xiao, Xueshan; Jia, Xiaoyun; Li, Shiqiang; Li, Miaoling; Guo, Xiangming; Liu, Xing; Zhang, Qingjiong

    2015-10-01

    Genetic factors have an important role in the development of glaucoma; however, the exact genetic defects remain to be identified in the majority of patients. Glaucoma is frequently observed in patients with anterior segment dysgenesis (ASD), microcornea or microphthalmia. The present study aimed to detect the potential mutations in the genes associated with ASD, microcornea and microphthalmia in 257 patients with glaucoma. Variants in 43 of the 46 genes, which are associated with ASD, microcornea or microphthalmia, were available in whole‑exome sequencing. Candidate variants in the 43 genes were selected following multi‑step bioinformatic analysis and were subsequently confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Confirmed variants were further validated by segregation analysis and analysis of controls. Overall, 70 candidate variants were selected from whole‑exome sequencing, of which 53 (75.7%) were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. In total, 27 of the 53 were considered potentially pathogenic based on bioinformatic analysis and analysis of controls. Of the 27, 6 were identified in BEST1, 4 in EYA1, 3 in GDF6, 2 in BMP4, 2 in CRYBA4, 2 in HCCS, and 1 in each of CRYAA, CRYGC, CRYGD, COL4A1, FOXC1, GJA8, PITX2 and SHH. The 27 variants were detected in 28 of 257 (10.9%) patients, including 11 of 125 patients with primary open‑angle glaucoma and 17 of 132 patients with primary angle‑closure glaucoma. Variants in these genes may be a potential risk factor for primary glaucoma. Careful clinical observation and analysis of additional patients in different populations are expected to further these findings.

  11. Transcription factor control of growth rate dependent genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A three factor design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazio, Alessandro; Jewett, Michael Christopher; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale;

    2008-01-01

    Background: Characterization of cellular growth is central to understanding living systems. Here, we applied a three-factor design to study the relationship between specific growth rate and genome-wide gene expression in 36 steady-state chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The three...... factors we considered were specific growth rate, nutrient limitation, and oxygen availability. Results: We identified 268 growth rate dependent genes, independent of nutrient limitation and oxygen availability. The transcriptional response was used to identify key areas in metabolism around which m...... transcription factor target sets, transcription factors that coordinate balanced growth were also identified. Our analysis shows that FhII, Rap1, and Sfp1, regulating protein biosynthesis, have significantly enriched target sets for genes up-regulated with increasing growth rate. Cell cycle regulators...

  12. Transcription factor FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sang-Min; An, Joo-Hee; Kim, Chul-Hong; Kim, Jung-Woong; Choi, Kyung-Hee

    2015-08-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-mediated death. Although various therapeutic approaches are used for lung cancer treatment, these mainly target the tumor suppressor p53 transcription factor, which is involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. However, p53-targeted therapies have limited application in lung cancer, since p53 is found to be mutated in more than half of lung cancers. In this study, we propose tumor suppressor FOXA2 as an alternative target protein for therapies against lung cancer and reveal a possible FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network by identifying new target genes and binding partners of FOXA2 by using various screening techniques. The genes encoding Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 2 (NR0B2), cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) were identified as putative target genes of FOXA2. Additionally, the proteins including highly similar to heat shock protein HSP 90-beta (HSP90A), heat shock 70 kDa protein 1A variant (HSPA1A), histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and HDAC3 were identified as novel interacting partners of FOXA2. Moreover, we showed that FOXA2-dependent promoter activation of BAX and p21 genes is significantly reduced via physical interactions between the identified binding partners and FOXA2. These results provide opportunities to understand the FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network and novel therapeutic targets to modulate this network in p53-deficient lung cancer.

  13. Classifying transcription factor targets and discovering relevant biological features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeLisi Charles

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important goal in post-genomic research is discovering the network of interactions between transcription factors (TFs and the genes they regulate. We have previously reported the development of a supervised-learning approach to TF target identification, and used it to predict targets of 104 transcription factors in yeast. We now include a new sequence conservation measure, expand our predictions to include 59 new TFs, introduce a web-server, and implement an improved ranking method to reveal the biological features contributing to regulation. The classifiers combine 8 genomic datasets covering a broad range of measurements including sequence conservation, sequence overrepresentation, gene expression, and DNA structural properties. Principal Findings (1 Application of the method yields an amplification of information about yeast regulators. The ratio of total targets to previously known targets is greater than 2 for 11 TFs, with several having larger gains: Ash1(4, Ino2(2.6, Yaf1(2.4, and Yap6(2.4. (2 Many predicted targets for TFs match well with the known biology of their regulators. As a case study we discuss the regulator Swi6, presenting evidence that it may be important in the DNA damage response, and that the previously uncharacterized gene YMR279C plays a role in DNA damage response and perhaps in cell-cycle progression. (3 A procedure based on recursive-feature-elimination is able to uncover from the large initial data sets those features that best distinguish targets for any TF, providing clues relevant to its biology. An analysis of Swi6 suggests a possible role in lipid metabolism, and more specifically in metabolism of ceramide, a bioactive lipid currently being investigated for anti-cancer properties. (4 An analysis of global network properties highlights the transcriptional network hubs; the factors which control the most genes and the genes which are bound by the largest set of regulators. Cell-cycle and

  14. Bayesian non-negative factor analysis for reconstructing transcription factor mediated regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yidong

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcriptional regulation by transcription factor (TF controls the time and abundance of mRNA transcription. Due to the limitation of current proteomics technologies, large scale measurements of protein level activities of TFs is usually infeasible, making computational reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory network a difficult task. Results We proposed here a novel Bayesian non-negative factor model for TF mediated regulatory networks. Particularly, the non-negative TF activities and sample clustering effect are modeled as the factors from a Dirichlet process mixture of rectified Gaussian distributions, and the sparse regulatory coefficients are modeled as the loadings from a sparse distribution that constrains its sparsity using knowledge from database; meantime, a Gibbs sampling solution was developed to infer the underlying network structure and the unknown TF activities simultaneously. The developed approach has been applied to simulated system and breast cancer gene expression data. Result shows that, the proposed method was able to systematically uncover TF mediated transcriptional regulatory network structure, the regulatory coefficients, the TF protein level activities and the sample clustering effect. The regulation target prediction result is highly coordinated with the prior knowledge, and sample clustering result shows superior performance over previous molecular based clustering method. Conclusions The results demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed approach in reconstructing transcriptional networks mediated by TFs through simulated systems and real data.

  15. Protein interactions of the transcription factor Hoxa1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lambert Barbara

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hox proteins are transcription factors involved in crucial processes during animal development. Their mode of action remains scantily documented. While other families of transcription factors, like Smad or Stat, are known cell signaling transducers, such a function has never been squarely addressed for Hox proteins. Results To investigate the mode of action of mammalian Hoxa1, we characterized its interactome by a systematic yeast two-hybrid screening against ~12,200 ORF-derived polypeptides. Fifty nine interactors were identified of which 45 could be confirmed by affinity co-purification in animal cell lines. Many Hoxa1 interactors are proteins involved in cell-signaling transduction, cell adhesion and vesicular trafficking. Forty-one interactions were detectable in live cells by Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation which revealed distinctive intracellular patterns for these interactions consistent with the selective recruitment of Hoxa1 by subgroups of partner proteins at vesicular, cytoplasmic or nuclear compartments. Conclusions The characterization of the Hoxa1 interactome presented here suggests unexplored roles for Hox proteins in cell-to-cell communication and cell physiology.

  16. Affinity purification strategies for proteomic analysis of transcription factor complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giambruno, Roberto; Grebien, Florian; Stukalov, Alexey; Knoll, Christian; Planyavsky, Melanie; Rudashevskaya, Elena L; Colinge, Jacques; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Bennett, Keiryn L

    2013-09-06

    Affinity purification (AP) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) has been successful in elucidating protein molecular networks of mammalian cells. These approaches have dramatically increased the knowledge of the interconnectivity present among proteins and highlighted biological functions within different protein complexes. Despite significant technical improvements reached in the past years, it is still challenging to identify the interaction networks and the subsequent associated functions of nuclear proteins such as transcription factors (TFs). A straightforward and robust methodology is therefore required to obtain unbiased and reproducible interaction data. Here we present a new approach for TF AP-MS, exemplified with the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPalpha). Utilizing the advantages of a double tag and three different MS strategies, we conducted a total of six independent AP-MS strategies to analyze the protein-protein interactions of C/EBPalpha. The resultant data were combined to produce a cohesive C/EBPalpha interactome. Our study describes a new methodology that robustly identifies specific molecular complexes associated with transcription factors. Moreover, it emphasizes the existence of TFs as protein complexes essential for cellular biological functions and not as single, static entities.

  17. Mutations and binding sites of human transcription factors

    KAUST Repository

    Kamanu, Frederick Kinyua

    2012-06-01

    Mutations in any genome may lead to phenotype characteristics that determine ability of an individual to cope with adaptation to environmental challenges. In studies of human biology, among the most interesting ones are phenotype characteristics that determine responses to drug treatments, response to infections, or predisposition to specific inherited diseases. Most of the research in this field has been focused on the studies of mutation effects on the final gene products, peptides, and their alterations. Considerably less attention was given to the mutations that may affect regulatory mechanism(s) of gene expression, although these may also affect the phenotype characteristics. In this study we make a pilot analysis of mutations observed in the regulatory regions of 24,667 human RefSeq genes. Our study reveals that out of eight studied mutation types, insertions are the only one that in a statistically significant manner alters predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). We also find that 25 families of TFBSs have been altered by mutations in a statistically significant manner in the promoter regions we considered. Moreover, we find that the related transcription factors are, for example, prominent in processes related to intracellular signaling; cell fate; morphogenesis of organs and epithelium; development of urogenital system, epithelium, and tube; neuron fate commitment. Our study highlights the significance of studying mutations within the genes regulatory regions and opens way for further detailed investigations on this topic, particularly on the downstream affected pathways. 2012 Kamanu, Medvedeva, Schaefer, Jankovic, Archer and Bajic.

  18. Imputation for transcription factor binding predictions based on deep learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the cell-specific binding patterns of transcription factors (TFs) is fundamental to studying gene regulatory networks in biological systems, for which ChIP-seq not only provides valuable data but is also considered as the gold standard. Despite tremendous efforts from the scientific community to conduct TF ChIP-seq experiments, the available data represent only a limited percentage of ChIP-seq experiments, considering all possible combinations of TFs and cell lines. In this study, we demonstrate a method for accurately predicting cell-specific TF binding for TF-cell line combinations based on only a small fraction (4%) of the combinations using available ChIP-seq data. The proposed model, termed TFImpute, is based on a deep neural network with a multi-task learning setting to borrow information across transcription factors and cell lines. Compared with existing methods, TFImpute achieves comparable accuracy on TF-cell line combinations with ChIP-seq data; moreover, TFImpute achieves better accuracy on TF-cell line combinations without ChIP-seq data. This approach can predict cell line specific enhancer activities in K562 and HepG2 cell lines, as measured by massively parallel reporter assays, and predicts the impact of SNPs on TF binding. PMID:28234893

  19. DAF-16/FOXO Transcription Factor in Aging and Longevity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojuan Sun

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with age-related diseases and an increase susceptibility of cancer. Dissecting the molecular mechanisms that underlie aging and longevity would contribute to implications for preventing and treating the age-dependent diseases or cancers. Multiple signaling pathways such as the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway, TOR signaling, AMPK pathway, JNK pathway and germline signaling have been found to be involved in aging and longevity. And DAF-16/FOXO, as a key transcription factor, could integrate different signals from these pathways to modulate aging, and longevity via shuttling from cytoplasm to nucleus. Hence, understanding how DAF-16/FOXO functions will be pivotal to illustrate the processes of aging and longevity. Here, we summarized how DAF-16/FOXO receives signals from these pathways to affect aging and longevity. We also briefly discussed the transcriptional regulation and posttranslational modifications of DAF-16/FOXO, its co-factors as well as its potential downstream targets participating in lifespan according to the published data in C. elegans and in mammals, and in most cases, we may focus on the studies in C. elegans which has been considered to be a very good animal model for longevity research.

  20. FOXO Transcription Factors: Their Clinical Significance and Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of the class O of forkhead box transcription factors (FOXO have important roles in metabolism, cellular proliferation, stress resistance, and apoptosis. The activity of FOXOs is tightly regulated by posttranslational modification, including phosphorylation, acetylation, and ubiquitylation. Activation of cell survival pathways such as phosphoinositide-3-kinase/AKT/IKK or RAS/mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylates FOXOs at different sites which regulate FOXOs nuclear localization or degradation. FOXO transcription factors are upregulated in a number of cell types including hepatocytes, fibroblasts, osteoblasts, keratinocytes, endothelial cells, pericytes, and cardiac myocytes. They are involved in a number of pathologic and physiologic processes that include proliferation, apoptosis, autophagy, metabolism, inflammation, cytokine expression, immunity, differentiation, and resistance to oxidative stress. These processes impact a number of clinical conditions such as carcinogenesis, diabetes, diabetic complications, cardiovascular disease, host response, and wound healing. In this paper, we focus on the potential role of FOXOs in different disease models and the regulation of FOXOs by various stimuli.

  1. Early evolution of the T-box transcription factor family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau; Ariza-Cosano, Ana; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Leininger, Sven; Yang, Ally; Torruella, Guifré; Adamski, Marcin; Adamska, Maja; Hughes, Timothy R.; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki

    2013-01-01

    Developmental transcription factors are key players in animal multicellularity, being members of the T-box family that are among the most important. Until recently, T-box transcription factors were thought to be exclusively present in metazoans. Here, we report the presence of T-box genes in several nonmetazoan lineages, including ichthyosporeans, filastereans, and fungi. Our data confirm that Brachyury is the most ancient member of the T-box family and establish that the T-box family diversified at the onset of Metazoa. Moreover, we demonstrate functional conservation of a homolog of Brachyury of the protist Capsaspora owczarzaki in Xenopus laevis. By comparing the molecular phenotype of C. owczarzaki Brachyury with that of homologs of early branching metazoans, we define a clear difference between unicellular holozoan and metazoan Brachyury homologs, suggesting that the specificity of Brachyury emerged at the origin of Metazoa. Experimental determination of the binding preferences of the C. owczarzaki Brachyury results in a similar motif to that of metazoan Brachyury and other T-box classes. This finding suggests that functional specificity between different T-box classes is likely achieved by interaction with alternative cofactors, as opposed to differences in binding specificity. PMID:24043797

  2. Fission yeast CSL proteins function as transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Oravcová

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcription factors of the CSL (CBF1/RBP-Jk/Suppressor of Hairless/LAG-1 family are key regulators of metazoan development and function as the effector components of the Notch receptor signalling pathway implicated in various cell fate decisions. CSL proteins recognize specifically the GTG[G/A]AA sequence motif and several mutants compromised in their ability to bind DNA have been reported. In our previous studies we have identified a number of novel putative CSL family members in fungi, organisms lacking the Notch pathway. It is not clear whether these represent genuine CSL family members. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches we characterized the DNA binding properties of Cbf11 and Cbf12, the antagonistic CSL paralogs from the fission yeast, important for the proper coordination of cell cycle events and the regulation of cell adhesion. We have shown that a mutation of a conserved arginine residue abolishes DNA binding in both CSL paralogs, similar to the situation in mouse. We have also demonstrated the ability of Cbf11 and Cbf12 to activate gene expression in an autologous fission yeast reporter system. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that the fission yeast CSL proteins are indeed genuine family members capable of functioning as transcription factors, and provide support for the ancient evolutionary origin of this important protein family.

  3. Activating transcription factor 6 derepression mediates neuroprotection in Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, José R; Zhang, Hongyu; Villar, Diego; González, Paz; Dopazo, Xose M; Morón-Oset, Javier; Higueras, Elena; Oliveros, Juan C; Arrabal, María D; Prieto, Angela; Cercós, Pilar; González, Teresa; De la Cruz, Alicia; Casado-Vela, Juan; Rábano, Alberto; Valenzuela, Carmen; Gutierrez-Rodriguez, Marta; Li, Jia-Yi; Mellström, Britt

    2016-02-01

    Deregulated protein and Ca2+ homeostasis underlie synaptic dysfunction and neurodegeneration in Huntington disease (HD); however, the factors that disrupt homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we determined that expression of downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein, is reduced in murine in vivo and in vitro HD models and in HD patients. DREAM downregulation was observed early after birth and was associated with endogenous neuroprotection. In the R6/2 mouse HD model, induced DREAM haplodeficiency or blockade of DREAM activity by chronic administration of the drug repaglinide delayed onset of motor dysfunction, reduced striatal atrophy, and prolonged life span. DREAM-related neuroprotection was linked to an interaction between DREAM and the unfolded protein response (UPR) sensor activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). Repaglinide blocked this interaction and enhanced ATF6 processing and nuclear accumulation of transcriptionally active ATF6, improving prosurvival UPR function in striatal neurons. Together, our results identify a role for DREAM silencing in the activation of ATF6 signaling, which promotes early neuroprotection in HD.

  4. Rule-based design of synthetic transcription factors in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Oliver; Peccoud, Jean; Lu, Timothy K

    2014-10-17

    To design and build living systems, synthetic biologists have at their disposal an increasingly large library of naturally derived and synthetic parts. These parts must be combined together in particular orders, orientations, and spacings to achieve desired functionalities. These structural constraints can be viewed as grammatical rules describing how to assemble parts together into larger functional units. Here, we develop a grammar for the design of synthetic transcription factors (sTFs) in eukaryotic cells and implement it within GenoCAD, a Computer-Aided Design (CAD) software for synthetic biology. Knowledge derived from experimental evidence was captured in this grammar to guide the user to create designer transcription factors that should operate as intended. The grammar can be easily updated and refined as our experience with using sTFs in different contexts increases. In combination with grammars that define other synthetic systems, we anticipate that this work will enable the more reliable, efficient, and automated design of synthetic cells with rich functionalities.

  5. Constrained transcription factor spacing is prevalent and important for transcriptional control of mouse blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Felicia S L; Schütte, Judith; Ruau, David; Diamanti, Evangelia; Hannah, Rebecca; Kinston, Sarah J; Göttgens, Berthold

    2014-12-16

    Combinatorial transcription factor (TF) binding is essential for cell-type-specific gene regulation. However, much remains to be learned about the mechanisms of TF interactions, including to what extent constrained spacing and orientation of interacting TFs are critical for regulatory element activity. To examine the relative prevalence of the 'enhanceosome' versus the 'TF collective' model of combinatorial TF binding, a comprehensive analysis of TF binding site sequences in large scale datasets is necessary. We developed a motif-pair discovery pipeline to identify motif co-occurrences with preferential distance(s) between motifs in TF-bound regions. Utilizing a compendium of 289 mouse haematopoietic TF ChIP-seq datasets, we demonstrate that haematopoietic-related motif-pairs commonly occur with highly conserved constrained spacing and orientation between motifs. Furthermore, motif clustering revealed specific associations for both heterotypic and homotypic motif-pairs with particular haematopoietic cell types. We also showed that disrupting the spacing between motif-pairs significantly affects transcriptional activity in a well-known motif-pair-E-box and GATA, and in two previously unknown motif-pairs with constrained spacing-Ets and Homeobox as well as Ets and E-box. In this study, we provide evidence for widespread sequence-specific TF pair interaction with DNA that conforms to the 'enhanceosome' model, and furthermore identify associations between specific haematopoietic cell-types and motif-pairs. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Bosma arrhinia microphthalmia syndrome in a Mexican patient with a molecular analysis of PAX6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra-Solano, Luis E; Chacón, Liliana; Morales-Mata, Dinorah; Zenteno, Juan C; Ramírez-Dueñas, Maria L; García-Ortiz, Jose E

    2016-01-01

    The association of anophthalmia, arrhinia, and hypogonadism constitutes the major clinical features for Bosma arrhinia microphthalmia syndrome. However, there is variability in the presentation of this disease; arrhinia is the most constant clinical feature, which is then combined with a spectrum of anophthalmia/microphthalmia and/or hypogonadism. This rare entity is not associated with any specific genes, but the genes that are related to arrhinia and anophthalmia have been studied in an attempt to explain this phenomenon. We analyzed the PAX6 gene in a Bosma arrhinia microphthalmia syndrome patient but found no variation or mutation that could constitute or establish a causal association in our patient.

  7. Leveraging cross-species transcription factor binding site patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claussnitzer, Melina; Dankel, Simon N; Klocke, Bernward

    2014-01-01

    to disease susceptibility. We show that integrative computational analysis of phylogenetic conservation with a complexity assessment of co-occurring transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) can identify cis-regulatory variants and elucidate their mechanistic role in disease. Analysis of established type 2...... diabetes risk loci revealed a striking clustering of distinct homeobox TFBS. We identified the PRRX1 homeobox factor as a repressor of PPARG2 expression in adipose cells and demonstrate its adverse effect on lipid metabolism and systemic insulin sensitivity, dependent on the rs4684847 risk allele...... that triggers PRRX1 binding. Thus, cross-species conservation analysis at the level of co-occurring TFBS provides a valuable contribution to the translation of genetic association signals to disease-related molecular mechanisms....

  8. DNA-binding specificities of human transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolma, Arttu; Yan, Jian; Whitington, Thomas; Toivonen, Jarkko; Nitta, Kazuhiro R; Rastas, Pasi; Morgunova, Ekaterina; Enge, Martin; Taipale, Mikko; Wei, Gonghong; Palin, Kimmo; Vaquerizas, Juan M; Vincentelli, Renaud; Luscombe, Nicholas M; Hughes, Timothy R; Lemaire, Patrick; Ukkonen, Esko; Kivioja, Teemu; Taipale, Jussi

    2013-01-17

    Although the proteins that read the gene regulatory code, transcription factors (TFs), have been largely identified, it is not well known which sequences TFs can recognize. We have analyzed the sequence-specific binding of human TFs using high-throughput SELEX and ChIP sequencing. A total of 830 binding profiles were obtained, describing 239 distinctly different binding specificities. The models represent the majority of human TFs, approximately doubling the coverage compared to existing systematic studies. Our results reveal additional specificity determinants for a large number of factors for which a partial specificity was known, including a commonly observed A- or T-rich stretch that flanks the core motifs. Global analysis of the data revealed that homodimer orientation and spacing preferences, and base-stacking interactions, have a larger role in TF-DNA binding than previously appreciated. We further describe a binding model incorporating these features that is required to understand binding of TFs to DNA.

  9. GATA transcription factors in adrenal development and tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parviainen, Helka; Kiiveri, Sanne; Bielinska, Malgorzata; Rahman, Nafis; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T; Wilson, David B; Heikinheimo, Markku

    2007-02-01

    Of the six GATA transcription factors, GATA-4 and GATA-6 are expressed in the mouse and human adrenal with distinct developmental profiles. GATA-4 is confined to the fetal cortex, i.e. to the less differentiated proliferating cells, while GATA-6 is expressed both in the fetal and adult adrenal. In vitro, GATA-4 regulates inhibin-alpha and steroidogenic factor-1 implicated in normal adrenal function. GATA-6 probably has roles in the development and differentiation of adrenocortical cells, and in the regulation of steroidogenesis. GATA-4 expression is dramatically upregulated and GATA-6 downregulated in gonadotropin dependent mouse adrenocortical tumors. This is accompanied by the appearance of luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR). In vitro, GATA-4 transactivates LHR promoter, and gonadotropins upregulate GATA-4 levels. Human adrenal tumors occasionally express GATA-4, whereas GATA-6 levels are usually lower than normal.

  10. Myocardin-related transcription factor regulates Nox4 protein expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rozycki, Matthew; Bialik, Janne Folke; Speight, Pam

    2016-01-01

    TGFβ-induced expression of the NADPH oxidase Nox4 is essential for fibroblast-myofibroblast transition. Rho has been implicated in Nox4 regulation, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF), a Rho/actin polymerization-controlled coactivator...... translocation of MRTF. Because the Nox4 promoter harbors a serum response factor/MRTF cis-element (CC(A/T)6GG box), we asked if MRTF (and thus cytoskeleton organization) could regulate Nox4 expression. We show that Nox4 protein is robustly induced in kidney tubular cells exclusively by combined application...... of contact uncoupling and TGFβ. Nox4 knockdown abrogates epithelial-myofibroblast transition-associated reactive oxygen species production. Laser capture microdissection reveals increased Nox4 expression in the tubular epithelium also during obstructive nephropathy. MRTF down-regulation/inhibition suppresses...

  11. Differential induction of HNF-3 transcription factors during neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, A; Budhiraja, S; Reichel, R R

    1997-08-01

    We have investigated the regulation of transcription factors HNF-3alpha and HNF-3beta during the retinoic acid-mediated differentiation of mouse P19 cells. Retinoic acid treatment converts P19 stem cells into neurons and astrocytes and we have clearly shown that gene expression of both HNF-3alpha and HNF-3beta is activated during this process. HNF-3alpha transcription was detected 2 h after addition of retinoic acid and took place in the absence of de novo protein synthesis. This suggests that HNF-3alpha is a primary target for retinoic acid action. HNF-3alpha induction displays a biphasic profile and HNF-3alpha mRNA reaches maximal levels at 2 and 6 days postdifferentiation. Additional experiments strongly suggest that the second peak is due to HNF-3alpha induction in postmitotic neurons. P19 stem cells, on the other hand, do not contain any detectable HNF-3alpha mRNA. According to our studies, the retinoic acid-mediated induction of HNF-3alpha occurs at the level of transcriptional initiation and is conferred by distal promoter sequences. In comparison to HNF-3alpha, HNF-3beta induction is a subsequent event and detectable levels of HNF-3beta mRNA materialize approximately 1 day after addition of retinoic acid to P19 stem cells. Time course studies firmly demonstrate that HNF-3beta mRNA peaks at about 2 days postdifferentiation and then declines to virtually unreadable levels. This temporal pattern is consistent with HNF-3beta being a secondary target for retinoic acid. In analogy to HNF-3alpha, HNF-3beta activation also takes place at the level of transcriptional initiation. Recent studies implicate HNF-3alpha and HNF-3beta in early mammalian neurogenesis. The detection of HNF-3alpha/beta activation during P19 cell differentiation provides us with a convenient cell culture system to elucidate the induction mechanism and the precise role of both transcriptional regulators in the formation of neuronal cells.

  12. Transcription factor EGR1 directs tendon differentiation and promotes tendon repair

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guerquin, Marie-Justine; Charvet, Benjamin; Nourissat, Geoffroy; Havis, Emmanuelle; Ronsin, Olivier; Bonnin, Marie-Ange; Ruggiu, Mathilde; Olivera-Martinez, Isabel; Robert, Nicolas; Lu, Yinhui; Kadler, Karl E; Baumberger, Tristan; Doursounian, Levon; Berenbaum, Francis; Duprez, Delphine

    2013-01-01

    Tendon formation and repair rely on specific combinations of transcription factors, growth factors, and mechanical parameters that regulate the production and spatial organization of type I collagen...

  13. Conserved and essential transcription factors for cellulase gene expression in ascomycete fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Coradetti, Samuel T.; Craig, James P.; Xiong, Yi; Shock, Teresa; Tian, Chaoguang; Glass, N. Louise

    2012-01-01

    Rational engineering of filamentous fungi for improved cellulase production is hampered by our incomplete knowledge of transcriptional regulatory networks. We therefore used the model filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa to search for uncharacterized transcription factors associated with cellulose deconstruction. A screen of a N. crassa transcription factor deletion collection identified two uncharacterized zinc binuclear cluster transcription factors (clr-1 and clr-2) that were required for ...

  14. Identification of Post-Transcriptional Modulators of Breast Cancer Transcription Factor Activity Using MINDy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Thomas M.; Castro, Mauro A. A.; Ponder, Bruce A. J.

    2016-01-01

    We have recently identified transcription factors (TFs) that are key drivers of breast cancer risk. To better understand the pathways or sub-networks in which these TFs mediate their function we sought to identify upstream modulators of their activity. We applied the MINDy (Modulator Inference by Network Dynamics) algorithm to four TFs (ESR1, FOXA1, GATA3 and SPDEF) that are key drivers of estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer risk, as well as cancer progression. Our computational analysis identified over 500 potential modulators. We assayed 189 of these and identified 55 genes with functional characteristics that were consistent with a role as TF modulators. In the future, the identified modulators may be tested as potential therapeutic targets, able to alter the activity of TFs that are critical in the development of breast cancer. PMID:27997592

  15. Prediction of nucleosome positioning based on transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianfu Yi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The DNA of all eukaryotic organisms is packaged into nucleosomes, the basic repeating units of chromatin. The nucleosome consists of a histone octamer around which a DNA core is wrapped and the linker histone H1, which is associated with linker DNA. By altering the accessibility of DNA sequences, the nucleosome has profound effects on all DNA-dependent processes. Understanding the factors that influence nucleosome positioning is of great importance for the study of genomic control mechanisms. Transcription factors (TFs have been suggested to play a role in nucleosome positioning in vivo. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, the minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR feature selection algorithm, the nearest neighbor algorithm (NNA, and the incremental feature selection (IFS method were used to identify the most important TFs that either favor or inhibit nucleosome positioning by analyzing the numbers of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs in 53,021 nucleosomal DNA sequences and 50,299 linker DNA sequences. A total of nine important families of TFs were extracted from 35 families, and the overall prediction accuracy was 87.4% as evaluated by the jackknife cross-validation test. CONCLUSIONS: Our results are consistent with the notion that TFs are more likely to bind linker DNA sequences than the sequences in the nucleosomes. In addition, our results imply that there may be some TFs that are important for nucleosome positioning but that play an insignificant role in discriminating nucleosome-forming DNA sequences from nucleosome-inhibiting DNA sequences. The hypothesis that TFs play a role in nucleosome positioning is, thus, confirmed by the results of this study.

  16. Activating Transcription Factor 3 (ATF3 and the Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Norval Anderson

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available It has been recognised for over a century that the ability of axons to regenerate in peripheral nerves is fundamentally greater than that of axons in the brain, spinal cord or optic nerves [early literature was reviewed in (Ramon y Cajal, 1928]. One factor that contributes to the successful regeneration of the axons in peripheral nerves is the complex cell body response the neurons show to axotomy. That transcription factors must play an important role in enabling neurons to regrow their axons is implicit to the observation that several hundred genes are regulated in neurons during axonal regeneration (Costigan et al., 2002; Boeshore et al., 2004. In addition, similarly large numbers of genes are regulated in the non-neuronal cells present in injured peripheral nerves [especially Schwann cells (Barrette et al., 2010] and CNS tissue. Of the transcription factors that regulate these changes in gene expression, the function of c-jun is best understood but ATF-3 (also known as LRF-1, LRG-21, CRG-5 and TI-241 is also upregulated in most of the neurons (Fig. 1 and Schwann cells that express c-jun. Indeed, ATF-3 has become a standard marker for neurons axotomised by peripheral nerve injury (Tsuzuki et al., 2001; Yamanaka et al., 2005; Yano et al., 2008; Linda et al., 2011 and its expression by injured neurons is closely correlated with a regenerative response. None the less, surprisingly little is known about the functions of ATF3 in neurons or glia within the injured nervous system, especially when compared with those of its potential binding partner, c-Jun.

  17. The ubiquitous transcription factor CTCF promotes lineage-specific epigenomic remodeling and establishment of transcriptional networks driving cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois-Chevalier, Julie; Staels, Bart; Lefebvre, Philippe; Eeckhoute, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Cell differentiation relies on tissue-specific transcription factors (TFs) that cooperate to establish unique transcriptomes and phenotypes. However, the role of ubiquitous TFs in these processes remains poorly defined. Recently, we have shown that the CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) is required for adipocyte differentiation through epigenomic remodelling of adipose tissue-specific enhancers and transcriptional activation of Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG), the main driver of the adipogenic program (PPARG), and its target genes. Here, we discuss how these findings, together with the recent literature, illuminate a functional role for ubiquitous TFs in lineage-determining transcriptional networks.

  18. The roles of mitochondrial transcription termination factors (MTERFs) in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada, Víctor

    2016-07-01

    Stress such as salinity, cold, heat or drought affect plant growth and development, and frequently result in diminished productivity. Unlike animals, plants are sedentary organisms that must withstand and cope with environmental stresses. During evolution, plants have developed strategies to successfully adapt to or tolerate such stresses, which might have led to the expansion and functional diversification of gene families. Some new genes may have acquired functions that could differ from those of their animal homologues, e.g. in response to abiotic stress. The mitochondrial transcription termination factor (MTERF) family could be a good example of this. Originally identified and characterized in metazoans, MTERFs regulate transcription, translation and DNA replication in vertebrate mitochondria. Plant genomes harbor a considerably larger number of MTERFs than animals. Nonetheless, only eight plant MTERFs have been characterized, which encode chloroplast or mitochondrial proteins. Mutations in MTERFs alter the expression of organelle genes and impair chloroplast or mitochondria development. This information is transmitted to the nucleus, probably through retrograde signaling, because mterf plants often exhibit changes in nuclear gene expression. This study summarizes the recent findings, mainly from the analysis of mterf mutants, which support an emerging role for plant MTERFs in response to abiotic stress.

  19. Role of DNA Methylation in Modulating Transcription Factor Occupancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurano, Matthew T; Wang, Hao; John, Sam; Shafer, Anthony; Canfield, Theresa; Lee, Kristen; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A

    2015-08-18

    Although DNA methylation is commonly invoked as a mechanism for transcriptional repression, the extent to which it actively silences transcription factor (TF) occupancy sites in vivo is unknown. To study the role of DNA methylation in the active modulation of TF binding, we quantified the effect of DNA methylation depletion on the genomic occupancy patterns of CTCF, an abundant TF with known methylation sensitivity that is capable of autonomous binding to its target sites in chromatin. Here, we show that the vast majority (>98.5%) of the tens of thousands of unoccupied, methylated CTCF recognition sequences remain unbound upon abrogation of DNA methylation. The small fraction of sites that show methylation-dependent binding in vivo are in turn characterized by highly variable CTCF occupancy across cell types. Our results suggest that DNA methylation is not a primary groundskeeper of genomic TF landscapes, but rather a specialized mechanism for stabilizing intrinsically labile sites. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Expression of Drosophila forkhead transcription factors during kidney development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jeong-In; Choi, Soo Young; Chacon-Heszele, Maria F; Zuo, Xiaofeng; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2014-03-28

    The Drosophila forkhead (Dfkh) family of transcription factors has over 40 family members. One Dfkh family member, BF2 (aka FoxD1), has been shown, by targeted disruption, to be essential for kidney development. In order to determine if other Dfkh family members were involved in kidney development and to search for new members of this family, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed using degenerate primers of the consensus sequence of the DNA binding domain of this family and developing rat kidney RNA. The RT-PCR product was used to probe RNA from a developing rat kidney (neonatal), from a 20-day old kidney, and from an adult kidney. The RT-PCR product hybridized only to a developing kidney RNA transcript of ∼2.3 kb (the size of BF2). A lambda gt10 mouse neonatal kidney library was then screened, using the above-described RT-PCR product as a probe. Three lambda phage clones were isolated that strongly hybridized to the RT-PCR probe. Sequencing of the RT-PCR product and the lambda phage clones isolated from the developing kidney library revealed Dfkh BF2. In summary, only Dfkh family member BF2, which has already been shown to be essential for nephrogenesis, was identified in our screen and no other candidate Dfkh family members were identified.

  1. The effects of cytosine methylation on general transcription factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jianshi; Lian, Tengfei; Gu, Chan; Yu, Kai; Gao, Yi Qin; Su, Xiao-Dong

    2016-07-01

    DNA methylation on CpG sites is the most common epigenetic modification. Recently, methylation in a non-CpG context was found to occur widely on genomic DNA. Moreover, methylation of non-CpG sites is a highly controlled process, and its level may vary during cellular development. To study non-CpG methylation effects on DNA/protein interactions, we have chosen three human transcription factors (TFs): glucocorticoid receptor (GR), brain and muscle ARNT-like 1 (BMAL1) - circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK) and estrogen receptor (ER) with methylated or unmethylated DNA binding sequences, using single-molecule and isothermal titration calorimetry assays. The results demonstrated that these TFs interact with methylated DNA with different effects compared with their cognate DNA sequences. The effects of non-CpG methylation on transcriptional regulation were validated by cell-based luciferase assay at protein level. The mechanisms of non-CpG methylation influencing DNA-protein interactions were investigated by crystallographic analyses and molecular dynamics simulation. With BisChIP-seq assays in HEK-293T cells, we found that GR can recognize highly methylated sites within chromatin in cells. Therefore, we conclude that non-CpG methylation of DNA can provide a mechanism for regulating gene expression through directly affecting the binding of TFs.

  2. Systematic identification of transcription factors associated with patient survival in cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves Pedro

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aberrant activation or expression of transcription factors has been implicated in the tumorigenesis of various types of cancer. In spite of the prevalent application of microarray experiments for profiling gene expression in cancer samples, they provide limited information regarding the activities of transcription factors. However, the association between transcription factors and cancers is largely dependent on the transcription regulatory activities rather than mRNA expression levels. Results In this paper, we propose a computational approach that integrates microarray expression data with the transcription factor binding site information to systematically identify transcription factors associated with patient survival given a specific cancer type. This approach was applied to two gene expression data sets for breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. We found that two transcription factor families, the steroid nuclear receptor family and the ATF/CREB family, are significantly correlated with the survival of patients with breast cancer; and that a transcription factor named T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia 1 is significantly correlated with acute myeloid leukemia patient survival. Conclusion Our analysis identifies transcription factors associating with patient survival and provides insight into the regulatory mechanism underlying the breast cancer and leukemia. The transcription factors identified by our method are biologically meaningful and consistent with prior knowledge. As an insightful tool, this approach can also be applied to other microarray cancer data sets to help researchers better understand the intricate relationship between transcription factors and diseases.

  3. Dermatoscopic aspects of the microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Hiram Larangeira de; Rossi, Gabriela; Abreu, Luciana Boff de; Bergamaschi, Cristina; Silva, Alessandra Banaszeski da; Kutsche, Kerstin

    2014-01-01

    The association of microphthalmia and linear skin defects was named microphthalmia with linear skin defects syndrome (MLS) or MIDAS syndrome (microphthalmia, dermal aplasia, and sclerocornea), an X-chromosomal disorder manifesting mainly in females. We examined a female newborn with facial linear skin defects following the Blaschko lines. Computer tomography and ophthalmological examination confirmed bilateral microphthalmia. An interstitial microdeletion at Xp22.2, encompassing the entire HCCS gene, was identified. Dermatoscopic examination showed erythematous linear areas with telangectasias and absence of sebaceous glands, which appear as brilliant white dots. Vellus hairs were also absent in the red areas. Dermatoscopy could help to establish the diagnosis of MLS/MIDAS syndrome by confirming the aplastic nature of the lesions.

  4. Global transcriptional profiling reveals Streptococcus agalactiae genes controlled by the MtaR transcription factor

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    Cvek Urska

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus; GBS is a significant bacterial pathogen of neonates and an emerging pathogen of adults. Though transcriptional regulators are abundantly encoded on the GBS genome, their role in GBS pathogenesis is poorly understood. The mtaR gene encodes a putative LysR-type transcriptional regulator that is critical for the full virulence of GBS. Previous studies have shown that an mtaR- mutant transports methionine at reduced rates and grows poorly in normal human plasma not supplemented with methionine. The decreased virulence of the mtaR mutant was correlated with a methionine transport defect; however, no MtaR-regulated genes were identified. Results Microarray analysis of wild-type GBS and an mtaR mutant revealed differential expression of 12 genes, including 1 upregulated and 11 downregulated genes in the mtaR mutant. Among the downregulated genes, we identified a cluster of cotranscribed genes encoding a putative methionine transporter (metQ1NP and peptidase (pdsM. The expression of four genes potentially involved in arginine transport (artPQ and arginine biosynthesis (argGH was downregulated and these genes localized to two transcriptional units. The virulence factor cspA, which encodes an extracellular protease, was downregulated. Additionally, the SAN_1255 locus, which putatively encodes a protein displaying similarity to plasminogen activators, was downregulated. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first study to describe the global influence of MtaR on GBS gene expression. This study implicates the metQ1NP genes as encoding the MtaR-regulated methionine transporter, which may provide a mechanistic explanation for the methionine-dependent growth defect of the mtaR mutant. In addition to modulating the expression of genes involved in metabolism and amino acid transport, inactivation of mtaR affected the expression of other GBS genes implicated in pathogenesis. These findings

  5. Object oriented Transcription Factors Database (ooTFD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, D

    1999-01-01

    ooTFD is an object-oriented database for the representation of information pertaining to transcription factors, the proteins and biochemical entities which play a central role in the regulation of gene expression. Given the recent explosion of genome sequence information, and that a large percentage of proteins encoded by fully sequenced genomes fall into this category, information pertaining to this class of molecules may become an essential aspect of biology and of genomics in the 21st century. In the past year, there was a small increase in the size of this database, and a number of new tools to facilitate data access and analysis have been added at the MIRAGE (Molecular Informatics Resource for the Analysis of Gene Expression) web site. ooTFD and associated tools and resources can be accessed at http://www.ifti.org/

  6. Dynamic regulation of transcription factors by nucleosome remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Hada, Arjan; Sen, Payel; Olufemi, Lola; Hall, Michael A; Smith, Benjamin Y; Forth, Scott; McKnight, Jeffrey N; Patel, Ashok; Bowman, Gregory D; Bartholomew, Blaine; Wang, Michelle D

    2015-06-05

    The chromatin landscape and promoter architecture are dominated by the interplay of nucleosome and transcription factor (TF) binding to crucial DNA sequence elements. However, it remains unclear whether nucleosomes mobilized by chromatin remodelers can influence TFs that are already present on the DNA template. In this study, we investigated the interplay between nucleosome remodeling, by either yeast ISW1a or SWI/SNF, and a bound TF. We found that a TF serves as a major barrier to ISW1a remodeling, and acts as a boundary for nucleosome repositioning. In contrast, SWI/SNF was able to slide a nucleosome past a TF, with concurrent eviction of the TF from the DNA, and the TF did not significantly impact the nucleosome positioning. Our results provide direct evidence for a novel mechanism for both nucleosome positioning regulation by bound TFs and TF regulation via dynamic repositioning of nucleosomes.

  7. Tunable signal processing through modular control of transcription factor translocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Nan; Budnik, Bogdan A.; Gunawardena, Jeremy; O’Shea, Erin K.

    2013-01-01

    Signaling pathways can induce different dynamics of transcription factor (TF) activation. We explored how TFs process signaling inputs to generate diverse dynamic responses. The budding yeast general stress responsive TF Msn2 acted as a tunable signal processor that could track, filter, or integrate signals in an input dependent manner. This tunable signal processing appears to originate from dual regulation of both nuclear import and export by phosphorylation, as mutants with one form of regulation sustained only one signal processing function. Versatile signal processing by Msn2 is crucial for generating distinct dynamic responses to different natural stresses. Our findings reveal how complex signal processing functions are integrated into a single molecule and provide a guide for the design of TFs with “programmable” signal processing functions. PMID:23349292

  8. Tunable signal processing through modular control of transcription factor translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Nan; Budnik, Bogdan A; Gunawardena, Jeremy; O'Shea, Erin K

    2013-01-25

    Signaling pathways can induce different dynamics of transcription factor (TF) activation. We explored how TFs process signaling inputs to generate diverse dynamic responses. The budding yeast general stress-responsive TF Msn2 acted as a tunable signal processor that could track, filter, or integrate signals in an input-dependent manner. This tunable signal processing appears to originate from dual regulation of both nuclear import and export by phosphorylation, as mutants with one form of regulation sustained only one signal-processing function. Versatile signal processing by Msn2 is crucial for generating distinct dynamic responses to different natural stresses. Our findings reveal how complex signal-processing functions are integrated into a single molecule and provide a guide for the design of TFs with "programmable" signal-processing functions.

  9. Evaluation of methods for modeling transcription-factor sequence specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weirauch, Matthew T.; Cote, Atina; Norel, Raquel; Annala, Matti; Zhao, Yue; Riley, Todd R.; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Cokelaer, Thomas; Vedenko, Anastasia; Talukder, Shaheynoor; Bussemaker, Harmen J.; Morris, Quaid D.; Bulyk, Martha L.; Stolovitzky, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    Genomic analyses often involve scanning for potential transcription-factor (TF) binding sites using models of the sequence specificity of DNA binding proteins. Many approaches have been developed to model and learn a protein’s binding specificity, but these methods have not been systematically compared. Here we applied 26 such approaches to in vitro protein binding microarray data for 66 mouse TFs belonging to various families. For 9 TFs, we also scored the resulting motif models on in vivo data, and found that the best in vitro–derived motifs performed similarly to motifs derived from in vivo data. Our results indicate that simple models based on mononucleotide position weight matrices learned by the best methods perform similarly to more complex models for most TFs examined, but fall short in specific cases (<10%). In addition, the best-performing motifs typically have relatively low information content, consistent with widespread degeneracy in eukaryotic TF sequence preferences. PMID:23354101

  10. Transcription factors and target genes of pre-TCR signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Rodríguez, Cristina; Aramburu, Jose; Berga-Bolaños, Rosa

    2015-06-01

    Almost 30 years ago pioneering work by the laboratories of Harald von Boehmer and Susumo Tonegawa provided the first indications that developing thymocytes could assemble a functional TCRβ chain-containing receptor complex, the pre-TCR, before TCRα expression. The discovery and study of the pre-TCR complex revealed paradigms of signaling pathways in control of cell survival and proliferation, and culminated in the recognition of the multifunctional nature of this receptor. As a receptor integrated in a dynamic developmental process, the pre-TCR must be viewed not only in the light of the biological outcomes it promotes, but also in context with those molecular processes that drive its expression in thymocytes. This review article focuses on transcription factors and target genes activated by the pre-TCR to drive its different outcomes.

  11. Expression analysis of TALE family transcription factors during avian development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coy, Sarah E; Borycki, Anne-Gaëlle

    2010-04-01

    The TALE family of homeodomain containing transcription factors consists of the Meis, Prep and Tgif, and the Pbx subfamily of proteins. Several TALE orthologues have been identified in amniotes, but no comprehensive analysis of their expression pattern during embryogenesis has been performed. Here, we report on TALE gene expression in the avian embryo. During embryonic development, Pbx genes are predominantly expressed in the neural ectoderm and paraxial mesoderm, although Pbx3 is restricted to the intermediate and lateral mesoderm, and anterior central nervous system. Members of the Meis, Prep, and Tgif subfamilies are expressed at high levels in the paraxial mesoderm, and display differential expression along the anterior-posterior and dorsoventral axes of the developing neural tube. Overall the expression patterns reported in this study are consistent with the known function of the TALE gene family in controlling early patterning of limb, neural tube and paraxial mesoderm tissues during embryogenesis.

  12. Water deficit-induced changes in transcription factor expression in maize seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plants tolerate water deficits by regulating gene networks controlling cellular and physiological traits to modify growth and development. Transcription factor (TFs) directed regulation of transcription within these gene networks is key to eliciting appropriate responses. In this study, reverse tran...

  13. Comprehensive Behavioral Analysis of Activating Transcription Factor 5-Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemura, Mariko; Ogura, Tae; Matsuzaki, Ayako; Nakano, Haruo; Takao, Keizo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Yuji

    2017-01-01

    Activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5) is a member of the CREB/ATF family of basic leucine zipper transcription factors. We previously reported that ATF5-deficient (ATF5(-/-)) mice demonstrated abnormal olfactory bulb development due to impaired interneuron supply. Furthermore, ATF5(-/-) mice were less aggressive than ATF5(+/+) mice. Although ATF5 is widely expressed in the brain, and involved in the regulation of proliferation and development of neurons, the physiological role of ATF5 in the higher brain remains unknown. Our objective was to investigate the physiological role of ATF5 in the higher brain. We performed a comprehensive behavioral analysis using ATF5(-/-) mice and wild type littermates. ATF5(-/-) mice exhibited abnormal locomotor activity in the open field test. They also exhibited abnormal anxiety-like behavior in the light/dark transition test and open field test. Furthermore, ATF5(-/-) mice displayed reduced social interaction in the Crawley's social interaction test and increased pain sensitivity in the hot plate test compared with wild type. Finally, behavioral flexibility was reduced in the T-maze test in ATF5(-/-) mice compared with wild type. In addition, we demonstrated that ATF5(-/-) mice display disturbances of monoamine neurotransmitter levels in several brain regions. These results indicate that ATF5 deficiency elicits abnormal behaviors and the disturbance of monoamine neurotransmitter levels in the brain. The behavioral abnormalities of ATF5(-/-) mice may be due to the disturbance of monoamine levels. Taken together, these findings suggest that ATF5(-/-) mice may be a unique animal model of some psychiatric disorders.

  14. Identifying differential transcription factor binding in ChIP-seq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai-Ying eWu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available ChIP seq is a widely used assay to measure genome-wide protein binding. The decrease in costs associated with sequencing has led to a rise in the number of studies that investigate protein binding across treatment conditions or cell lines. In addition to the identification of binding sites, new studies evaluate the variation in protein binding between conditions. A number of approaches to study differential transcription factor binding have recently been developed. Several of these methods build upon established methods from RNA-seq to quantify differences in read counts. We compare how these new approaches perform on different data sets from the ENCODE project to illustrate the impact of data processing pipelines under different study designs. The performance of normalization methods for differential ChIP-seq depends strongly on the variation in total amount of protein bound between conditions, with total read count outperforming effective library size, or variants thereof, when a large variation in binding was studied. Use of input subtraction to correct for non-specific binding showed a relatively modest impact on the number of differential peaks found and the fold change accuracy to biological validation, however a larger impact might be expected for samples with more extreme copy number variations between them. Still, it did identify a small subset of novel differential regions while excluding some differential peaks in regions with high background signal.These results highlight proper scaling for between-sample data normalization as critical for differential transcription factor binding analysis and suggest bioinformaticians need to know about the variation in level of total protein binding between conditions to select the best analysis method. At the same time, validation using fold-change estimates from qRT-PCR suggests there is still room for further method improvement.

  15. Inhibition of enterovirus 71 entry by transcription factor XBP1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jheng, Jia-Rong; Lin, Chiou-Yan [Department of Biochemistry and Research Center for Emerging Viral Infections, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa First Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Horng, Jim-Tong, E-mail: jimtong@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Biochemistry and Research Center for Emerging Viral Infections, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa First Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Lau, Kean Seng [Department of Biochemistry and Research Center for Emerging Viral Infections, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa First Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IRE1 was activated but no XBP1 splicing was detected during enterovirus 71 infection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XBP1 was subject to translational shutoff by enterovirus 71-induced eIF4G cleavage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The uptake of UV-irradiated virus was decreased in XBP1-overexpressing cells. -- Abstract: Inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) plays an important role in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), or unfolded protein, stress response by activating its downstream transcription factor X-box-binding protein 1 (XBP1). We demonstrated previously that enterovirus 71 (EV71) upregulated XBP1 mRNA levels but did not activate spliced XBP1 (XBP1s) mRNA or its downstream target genes, EDEM and chaperones. In this study, we investigated further this regulatory mechanism and found that IRE1 was phosphorylated and activated after EV71 infection, whereas its downstream XBP1s protein level decreased. We also found that XBP1s was not cleaved directly by 2A{sup pro}, but that cleavage of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G by the EV71 2A{sup pro} protein may contribute to the decrease in XBP1s expression. Knockdown of XBP1 increased viral protein expression, and the synthesis of EV71 viral protein and the production of EV71 viral particles were inhibited in XBP1-overexpressing RD cells. When incubated with replication-deficient and UV-irradiated EV71, XBP1-overexpressing RD cells exhibited reduced viral RNA levels, suggesting that the inhibition of XBP1s by viral infection may underlie viral entry, which is required for viral replication. Our findings are the first indication of the ability of XBP1 to inhibit viral entry, possibly via its transcriptional activity in regulating molecules in the endocytic machinery.

  16. Identifying differential transcription factor binding in ChIP-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dai-Ying; Bittencourt, Danielle; Stallcup, Michael R; Siegmund, Kimberly D

    2015-01-01

    ChIP seq is a widely used assay to measure genome-wide protein binding. The decrease in costs associated with sequencing has led to a rise in the number of studies that investigate protein binding across treatment conditions or cell lines. In addition to the identification of binding sites, new studies evaluate the variation in protein binding between conditions. A number of approaches to study differential transcription factor binding have recently been developed. Several of these methods build upon established methods from RNA-seq to quantify differences in read counts. We compare how these new approaches perform on different data sets from the ENCODE project to illustrate the impact of data processing pipelines under different study designs. The performance of normalization methods for differential ChIP-seq depends strongly on the variation in total amount of protein bound between conditions, with total read count outperforming effective library size, or variants thereof, when a large variation in binding was studied. Use of input subtraction to correct for non-specific binding showed a relatively modest impact on the number of differential peaks found and the fold change accuracy to biological validation, however a larger impact might be expected for samples with more extreme copy number variations between them. Still, it did identify a small subset of novel differential regions while excluding some differential peaks in regions with high background signal. These results highlight proper scaling for between-sample data normalization as critical for differential transcription factor binding analysis and suggest bioinformaticians need to know about the variation in level of total protein binding between conditions to select the best analysis method. At the same time, validation using fold-change estimates from qRT-PCR suggests there is still room for further method improvement.

  17. Mechanisms of transcriptional activation of the stimulator of interferon genes by transcription factors CREB and c-Myc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Yan; Jin, Rui; Zhou, Guo-Ping; Xu, Hua-Guo

    2016-12-20

    Stimulator of interferon genes (STING) plays an important role in host defense, autoimmune disease, osteoclast differentiation and anti-tumor response. Although many downstream targets have been studied in depth, the regulation of STING gene expression remains largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that transcription factors CREB and c-Myc maintain the transcriptional activity of STING. By 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends analysis, we identified the transcriptional start site (TSS) of STING. We illustrated that the region -124/+1 relative to TSS was sufficient for full promoter activity by a series of 5' deletion promoter constructs. Transcriptional activity of the STING minimal promoter was dependent on CREB and c-Myc binding motifs and was abolished after mutation of these two DNA elements. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that transcription factors CREB and c-Myc bind to STING promoter in vivo. Overexpression of CREB and c-Myc increased the STING promoter activity. Meanwhile, knocking-down of CREB and c-Myc by a small interfering RNA (siRNA) strategy markedly reduced endogenous STING expression. In summary, these results demonstrated that transcription factors CREB and c-Myc are involved in the regulation of STING transcription.

  18. Understanding Transcription Factor Regulation by Integrating Gene Expression and DNase I Hypersensitive Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors are proteins that bind to DNA sequences to regulate gene transcription. The transcription factor binding sites are short DNA sequences (5–20 bp long specifically bound by one or more transcription factors. The identification of transcription factor binding sites and prediction of their function continue to be challenging problems in computational biology. In this study, by integrating the DNase I hypersensitive sites with known position weight matrices in the TRANSFAC database, the transcription factor binding sites in gene regulatory region are identified. Based on the global gene expression patterns in cervical cancer HeLaS3 cell and HelaS3-ifnα4h cell (interferon treatment on HeLaS3 cell for 4 hours, we present a model-based computational approach to predict a set of transcription factors that potentially cause such differential gene expression. Significantly, 6 out 10 predicted functional factors, including IRF, IRF-2, IRF-9, IRF-1 and IRF-3, ICSBP, belong to interferon regulatory factor family and upregulate the gene expression levels responding to the interferon treatment. Another factor, ISGF-3, is also a transcriptional activator induced by interferon alpha. Using the different transcription factor binding sites selected criteria, the prediction result of our model is consistent. Our model demonstrated the potential to computationally identify the functional transcription factors in gene regulation.

  19. Regulation of Memory Formation by the Transcription Factor XBP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Gabriela; Vidal, René L; Mardones, Pablo; Serrano, Felipe G; Ardiles, Alvaro O; Wirth, Craig; Valdés, Pamela; Thielen, Peter; Schneider, Bernard L; Kerr, Bredford; Valdés, Jose L; Palacios, Adrian G; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Glimcher, Laurie H; Hetz, Claudio

    2016-02-16

    Contextual memory formation relies on the induction of new genes in the hippocampus. A polymorphism in the promoter of the transcription factor XBP1 was identified as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and bipolar disorders. XBP1 is a major regulator of the unfolded protein response (UPR), mediating adaptation to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Using a phenotypic screen, we uncovered an unexpected function of XBP1 in cognition and behavior. Mice lacking XBP1 in the nervous system showed specific impairment of contextual memory formation and long-term potentiation (LTP), whereas neuronal XBP1s overexpression improved performance in memory tasks. Gene expression analysis revealed that XBP1 regulates a group of memory-related genes, highlighting brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a key component in memory consolidation. Overexpression of BDNF in the hippocampus reversed the XBP1-deficient phenotype. Our study revealed an unanticipated function of XBP1 in cognitive processes that is apparently unrelated to its role in ER stress. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Regulation of Memory Formation by the Transcription Factor XBP1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Martínez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Contextual memory formation relies on the induction of new genes in the hippocampus. A polymorphism in the promoter of the transcription factor XBP1 was identified as a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease and bipolar disorders. XBP1 is a major regulator of the unfolded protein response (UPR, mediating adaptation to endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. Using a phenotypic screen, we uncovered an unexpected function of XBP1 in cognition and behavior. Mice lacking XBP1 in the nervous system showed specific impairment of contextual memory formation and long-term potentiation (LTP, whereas neuronal XBP1s overexpression improved performance in memory tasks. Gene expression analysis revealed that XBP1 regulates a group of memory-related genes, highlighting brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a key component in memory consolidation. Overexpression of BDNF in the hippocampus reversed the XBP1-deficient phenotype. Our study revealed an unanticipated function of XBP1 in cognitive processes that is apparently unrelated to its role in ER stress.

  1. Wild type p53 transcriptionally represses the SALL2 transcription factor under genotoxic stress.

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    Carlos Farkas

    Full Text Available SALL2- a member of the Spalt gene family- is a poorly characterized transcription factor found deregulated in various cancers, which suggests it plays a role in the disease. We previously identified SALL2 as a novel interacting protein of neurotrophin receptors and showed that it plays a role in neuronal function, which does not necessarily explain why or how SALL2 is deregulated in cancer. Previous evidences indicate that SALL2 gene is regulated by the WT1 and AP4 transcription factors. Here, we identified SALL2 as a novel downstream target of the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Bioinformatic analysis of the SALL2 gene revealed several putative p53 half sites along the promoter region. Either overexpression of wild-type p53 or induction of the endogenous p53 by the genotoxic agent doxorubicin repressed SALL2 promoter activity in various cell lines. However R175H, R249S, and R248W p53 mutants, frequently found in the tumors of cancer patients, were unable to repress SALL2 promoter activity, suggesting that p53 specific binding to DNA is important for the regulation of SALL2. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated binding of p53 to one of the identified p53 half sites in the Sall2 promoter, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed in vivo interaction of p53 with the promoter region of Sall2 containing this half site. Importantly, by using a p53ER (TAM knockin model expressing a variant of p53 that is completely dependent on 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen for its activity, we show that p53 activation diminished SALL2 RNA and protein levels during genotoxic cellular stress in primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs and radiosensitive tissues in vivo. Thus, our finding indicates that p53 represses SALL2 expression in a context-specific manner, adding knowledge to the understanding of SALL2 gene regulation, and to a potential mechanism for its deregulation in cancer.

  2. Two recently duplicated maize NAC transcription factor paralogs are induced in response to Colletotrichum graminicola infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitsik, Anna-Maria; Muench, Steffen; Deising, Holger B; Voll, Lars M

    2013-05-29

    NAC transcription factors belong to a large family of plant-specific transcription factors with more than 100 family members in monocot and dicot species. To date, the majority of the studied NAC proteins are involved in the response to abiotic stress, to biotic stress and in the regulation of developmental processes. Maize NAC transcription factors involved in the biotic stress response have not yet been identified. We have found that two NAC transcription factors, ZmNAC41 and ZmNAC100, are transcriptionally induced both during the initial biotrophic as well as the ensuing necrotrophic colonization of maize leaves by the hemibiotrophic ascomycete fungus C. graminicola. ZmNAC41 transcripts were also induced upon infection with C. graminicola mutants that are defective in host penetration, while the induction of ZmNAC100 did not occur in such interactions. While ZmNAC41 transcripts accumulated specifically in response to jasmonate (JA), ZmNAC100 transcripts were also induced by the salicylic acid analog 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid (INA).To assess the phylogenetic relation of ZmNAC41 and ZmNAC100, we studied the family of maize NAC transcription factors based on the recently annotated B73 genome information. We identified 116 maize NAC transcription factor genes that clustered into 12 clades. ZmNAC41 and ZmNAC100 both belong to clade G and appear to have arisen by a recent gene duplication event. Including four other defence-related NAC transcription factors of maize and functionally characterized Arabidopsis and rice NAC transcription factors, we observed an enrichment of NAC transcription factors involved in host defense regulation in clade G. In silico analyses identified putative binding elements for the defence-induced ERF, Myc2, TGA and WRKY transcription factors in the promoters of four out of the six defence-related maize NAC transcription factors, while one of the analysed maize NAC did not contain any of these potential binding sites. Our study provides a

  3. E2F1 transcription factor and its impact on growth factor and cytokine signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertosun, Mustafa Gokhan; Hapil, Fatma Zehra; Osman Nidai, Ozes

    2016-10-01

    E2F1 is a transcription factor involved in cell cycle regulation and apoptosis. The transactivation capacity of E2F1 is regulated by pRb. In its hypophosphorylated form, pRb binds and inactivates DNA binding and transactivating functions of E2F1. The growth factor stimulation of cells leads to activation of CDKs (cyclin dependent kinases), which in turn phosphorylate Rb and hyperphosphorylated Rb is released from E2F1 or E2F1/DP complex, and free E2F1 can induce transcription of several genes involved in cell cycle entry, induction or inhibition of apoptosis. Thus, growth factors and cytokines generally utilize E2F1 to direct cells to either fate. Furthermore, E2F1 regulates expressions of various cytokines and growth factor receptors, establishing positive or negative feedback mechanisms. This review focuses on the relationship between E2F1 transcription factor and cytokines (IL-1, IL-2, IL-3, IL-6, TGF-beta, G-CSF, LIF), growth factors (EGF, KGF, VEGF, IGF, FGF, PDGF, HGF, NGF), and interferons (IFN-α, IFN-β and IFN-γ).

  4. The transcription factor REST is lost in aggressive breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P Wagoner

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The function of the tumor suppressor RE1 silencing transcription factor (REST is lost in colon and small cell lung cancers and is known to induce anchorage-independent growth in human mammary epithelial cells. However, nothing is currently known about the role of this tumor suppressor in breast cancer. Here, we test the hypothesis that loss of REST function plays a role in breast cancer. To assay breast tumors for REST function, we developed a 24-gene signature composed of direct targets of the transcriptional repressor. Using the 24- gene signature, we identified a previously undefined RESTless breast tumor subtype. Using gene set enrichment analysis, we confirmed the aberrant expression of REST target genes in the REST-less tumors, including neuronal gene targets of REST that are normally not expressed outside the nervous system. Examination of REST mRNA identified a truncated splice variant of REST present in the REST-less tumor population, but not other tumors. Histological analysis of 182 outcome-associated breast tumor tissues also identified a subpopulation of tumors that lack full-length, functional REST and over-express the neuroendocrine marker and REST target gene Chromogranin A. Importantly, patients whose tumors were found to be REST-less using either the 24-gene signature or histology had significantly poorer prognosis and were more than twice as likely to undergo disease recurrence within the first 3 years after diagnosis. We show here that REST function is lost in breast cancer, at least in part via an alternative splicing mechanism. Patients with REST-less breast cancer undergo significantly more early disease recurrence than those with fully functional REST, regardless of estrogen receptor or HER2 status. Importantly, REST status may serve as a predictor of poor prognosis, helping to untangle the heterogeneity inherent in disease course and response to treatment. Additionally, the alternative splicing observed in REST

  5. The transcription factor SOX17 is involved in the transcriptional control of the uteroglobin gene in rabbit endometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Carlos; Calvo, Enrique; Nieto, Antonio

    2007-10-15

    The transcription of the uteroglobin gene (ug) is induced by progesterone in the rabbit endometrium, primarily through the binding of the progesterone receptor to the distal region of the ug promoter. However, other transcription factors participate in the progesterone action. The proximal ug promoter contains several putative consensus sequences for the binding of various progesterone-dependent endometrial nuclear factors (Perez Martinez et al. [1996] Arch Biochem Biophys 333: 12-18), suggesting that several transcription factors might be implicated in the hormonal induction of ug. We report here that one of these progesterone-dependent factors specifically binds to the sequence CACAATG (-183/-177) of the rabbit ug promoter. This sequence (hereafter called element G') is very similar to the consensus sequence for binding of the SOX family of transcription factors. Mutation of the element G' reduced transcription from the ug promoter in transient expression experiments. The endometrial factor was purified and analyzed by nano-liquid chromatography and ion trap coupled mass spectrometry yielding two partial amino acid sequences corresponding to a region of SOX17 that is highly conserved inter-species. This identification was confirmed by immunological techniques using a specific anti-SOX17 antibody. In agreement with the above findings, overexpression of SOX17 in transfected endometrial cells increased transcription from the ug promoter. SOX17 gradually accumulated in the nucleus in vivo concomitant with the induction of ug expression by progesterone in the endometrium. Thus, these findings implicate, for the first time, SOX17 in the transcriptional control of rabbit ug.

  6. [Association of schizophrenia with variations in genes encoding transcription factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyajyan, A S; Atshemyan, S A; Zakharyan, R V

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in neuronal plasticity and immune system play a key role in pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Identification of genetic factors contributing to these alterations will significantly encourage elucidation of molecular etiopathomechanisms of this disorder. Transcription factors c-Fos, c-Jun, and Ier5 are the important regulators of neuronal plasticity and immune response. In the present work we investigated a potential association of schizophrenia with a number of single nucleotide polymorphisms of c-Fos-,c-Jun and Ier5 encoding genes (FOS, JUN, and IER5 respectively). Genotyping of DNA samples of patients with schizophrenia and healthy individuals was performed using polymerase chain reaction with allele specific primers. The results obtained demonstrated association between schizophrenia and FOS rs1063169, FOS rs7101, JUN rs11688, and IER5 rs6425663 polymorphisms. Namely, it was found that the inheritance of FOS rs1063169*T, JUN rs11688*A, and IER5 rs6425663*T minor variants decreases risk for development of schizophrenia whereas the inheritance of FOS rs7101*T minor variant, especially its homozygous form, increases risk for development of this disorder.

  7. Regulation of archicortical arealization by the transcription factor Zbtb20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Eva H; Tonchev, Anton B; Stoykova, Anastassia; Chowdhury, Kamal

    2012-11-01

    The molecular mechanisms of regionalization of the medial pallium (MP), the anlage of the hippocampus, and transitional (cingulate and retrosplenial) cortices are largely unknown. Previous analyses have outlined an important role of the transcription factor (TF) Zbtb20 for hippocampal CA1 field specification (Nielsen et al. (2007) Development 134:1133-1140; Nielsen et al. (2010) Cereb Cortex 20:1904-1914; Xie et al. (2010) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 107:6510-6515). Here, we present novel data showing that Zbtb20 exhibits a ventral(high)-to-dorsal(low) gradient of expression in MP progenitors as well as an expression in postmitotic cells at the transitional cortex/neocortex border. Our detailed pattern analysis revealed that in Zbtb20 loss-of-function the molecular borders between neocortical, transitional, and hippocampal fields are progressively shifted ventrally, leading to an ectopic positioning of all dorsal fields into the neighboring ventrally located areas. Thus, in addition to its known importance for the specification of the hippocampal CA1 sector, the graded expression of TF Zbtb20 in ventricular zone of MP appears to translate early positional information for establishment of all developing MP fields. Our data also suggest that the signaling factor Wnt3a is a putative molecular partner of TF Zbtb20 in this patterning process. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Retinoic acid regulates the expression of photoreceptor transcription factor NRL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Hemant; Akimoto, Masayuki; Siffroi-Fernandez, Sandrine; Friedman, James S; Hicks, David; Swaroop, Anand

    2006-09-15

    NRL (neural retina leucine zipper) is a key basic motif-leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor, which orchestrates rod photoreceptor differentiation by activating the expression of rod-specific genes. The deletion of Nrl in mice results in functional cones that are derived from rod precursors. However, signaling pathways modulating the expression or activity of NRL have not been elucidated. Here, we show that retinoic acid (RA), a diffusible factor implicated in rod development, activates the expression of NRL in serum-deprived Y79 human retinoblastoma cells and in primary cultures of rat and porcine photoreceptors. The effect of RA is mimicked by TTNPB, a RA receptor agonist, and requires new protein synthesis. DNaseI footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) using bovine retinal nuclear extract demonstrate that RA response elements (RAREs) identified within the Nrl promoter bind to RA receptors. Furthermore, in transiently transfected Y79 and HEK293 cells the activity of Nrl-promoter driving a luciferase reporter gene is induced by RA, and this activation is mediated by RAREs. Our data suggest that signaling by RA via RA receptors regulates the expression of NRL, providing a framework for delineating early steps in photoreceptor cell fate determination.

  9. Transcription factor PIF4 controls the thermosensory activation of flowering

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, S. Vinod

    2012-03-21

    Plant growth and development are strongly affected by small differences in temperature. Current climate change has already altered global plant phenology and distribution, and projected increases in temperature pose a significant challenge to agriculture. Despite the important role of temperature on plant development, the underlying pathways are unknown. It has previously been shown that thermal acceleration of flowering is dependent on the florigen, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT). How this occurs is, however, not understood, because the major pathway known to upregulate FT, the photoperiod pathway, is not required for thermal acceleration of flowering. Here we demonstrate a direct mechanism by which increasing temperature causes the bHLH transcription factor PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4) to activate FT. Our findings provide a new understanding of how plants control their timing of reproduction in response to temperature. Flowering time is an important trait in crops as well as affecting the life cycles of pollinator species. A molecular understanding of how temperature affects flowering will be important for mitigating the effects of climate change. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  10. Inferring yeast cell cycle regulators and interactions using transcription factor activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galbraith Simon J

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since transcription factors are often regulated at the post-transcriptional level, their activities, rather than expression levels may provide valuable information for investigating functions and their interactions. The recently developed Network Component Analysis (NCA and its generalized form (gNCA provide a robust framework for deducing the transcription factor activities (TFAs from various types of DNA microarray data and transcription factor-gene connectivity. The goal of this work is to demonstrate the utility of TFAs in inferring transcription factor functions and interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cycle regulation. Results Using gNCA, we determined 74 TFAs from both wild type and fkh1 fkh2 deletion mutant microarray data encompassing 1529 ORFs. We hypothesized that transcription factors participating in the cell cycle regulation exhibit cyclic activity profiles. This hypothesis was supported by the TFA profiles of known cell cycle factors and was used as a basis to uncover other potential cell cycle factors. By combining the results from both cluster analysis and periodicity analysis, we recovered nearly 90% of the known cell cycle regulators, and identified 5 putative cell cycle-related transcription factors (Dal81, Hap2, Hir2, Mss11, and Rlm1. In addition, by analyzing expression data from transcription factor knockout strains, we determined 3 verified (Ace2, Ndd1, and Swi5 and 4 putative interaction partners (Cha4, Hap2, Fhl1, and Rts2 of the forkhead transcription factors. Sensitivity of TFAs to connectivity errors was determined to provide confidence level of these predictions. Conclusion By subjecting TFA profiles to analyses based upon physiological signatures we were able to identify cell cycle related transcription factors consistent with current literature, transcription factors with potential cell cycle dependent roles, and interactions between transcription factors.

  11. Transcription factor cooperativity in early adipogenic hotspots and super-enhancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Rabiee, Atefeh; Nielsen, Ronni;

    2014-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that transcription factors operate in complex networks through thousands of genomic binding sites, many of which bind several transcription factors. However, the extent and mechanisms of crosstalk between transcription factors at these hotspots remain unclear....... Using a combination of advanced proteomics and genomics approaches, we identify ∼12,000 transcription factor hotspots (∼400 bp) in the early phase of adipogenesis, and we find evidence of both simultaneous and sequential binding of transcription factors at these regions. We demonstrate that hotspots...... are highly enriched in large super-enhancer regions (several kilobases), which drive the early adipogenic reprogramming of gene expression. Our results indicate that cooperativity between transcription factors at the level of hotspots as well as super-enhancers is very important for enhancer activity...

  12. Microphthalmia, late onset keratitis, and iris coloboma/aniridia in a family with a novel PAX6 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xueshan; Li, Shiqiang; Zhang, Qingjiong

    2012-06-01

    Autosomal dominant microphthalmia with late-onset keratitis and iris coloboma/aniridia has not been reported before. Here we report a Chinese family with these phenotypes and a novel PAX6 mutation. Microphthalmia, late-onset keratitis, iris coloboma, and nystagmus were present in the proband. His son had microphthalmia, aniridia, foveal hypoplasia, and nystagmus. A novel c.649C>T (p.Arg217X) mutation in PAX6 was detected in the proband and his affected son. This study expands the phenotypic spectrum of PAX6 mutation and enriched our knowledge of the genetic cause for microphthalmia and late-onset keratitis.

  13. Physical interactions among plant MADS-box transcription factors and their biological relevance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nougalli Tonaco, I.A.

    2008-01-01

    The biological interpretation of the genome starts from transcription, and many different signaling pathways are integrated at this level. Transcription factors play a central role in the transcription process, because they select the down-stream genes and determine their spatial and temporal

  14. Problem-Solving Test: The Mechanism of Transcription Termination by the Rho Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2012-01-01

    Transcription termination comes in two forms in "E. coli" cells. Rho-dependent termination requires the binding of a termination protein called Rho factor to the transcriptional machinery at the terminator region, whereas Rho-independent termination is achieved by conformational changes in the transcript itself. This article presents a test…

  15. Characterization of the MADS domain transcription factor family in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folter, Stefan de

    2006-01-01

    Gene regulation at the level of transcription is crucial for almost all biological processes in a cell or organism. Transcription factors are sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins that are capable of activating and/or repressing transcription. The genome of Arabidopsis thaliana, for instance, consi

  16. Physical interactions among plant MADS-box transcription factors and their biological relevance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nougalli Tonaco, I.A.

    2008-01-01

    The biological interpretation of the genome starts from transcription, and many different signaling pathways are integrated at this level. Transcription factors play a central role in the transcription process, because they select the down-stream genes and determine their spatial and temporal expres

  17. DNA repair helicase: a component of BTF2 (TFIIH) basic transcription factor. (research article)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Schaeffer; R. Roy (Richard); S. Humbert; V. Moncollin; W. Vermeulen (Wim); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); P. Chambon; J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe human BTF2 basic transcription factor (also called TFIIH), which is similar to the delta factor in rat and factor b in yeast, is required for class II gene transcription. A strand displacement assay was used to show that highly purified preparation of BTF2 had an adenosine triphospha

  18. ATF2, a paradigm of the multifaceted regulation of transcription factors in biology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Gregory; Ronai, Ze'ev; Lau, Eric

    2017-02-15

    Stringent transcriptional regulation is crucial for normal cellular biology and organismal development. Perturbations in the proper regulation of transcription factors can result in numerous pathologies, including cancer. Thus, understanding how transcription factors are regulated and how they are dysregulated in disease states is key to the therapeutic targeting of these factors and/or the pathways that they regulate. Activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) has been studied in a number of developmental and pathological conditions. Recent findings have shed light on the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and post-translational regulatory mechanisms that influence ATF2 function, and thus, the transcriptional programs coordinated by ATF2. Given our current knowledge of its multiple levels of regulation and function, ATF2 represents a paradigm for the mechanistic complexity that can regulate transcription factor function. Thus, increasing our understanding of the regulation and function of ATF2 will provide insights into fundamental regulatory mechanisms that influence how cells integrate extracellular and intracellular signals into a genomic response through transcription factors. Characterization of ATF2 dysfunction in the context of pathological conditions, particularly in cancer biology and response to therapy, will be important in understanding how pathways controlled by ATF2 or other transcription factors might be therapeutically exploited. In this review, we provide an overview of the currently known upstream regulators and downstream targets of ATF2.

  19. Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are a framework for predicting quantitative relationships between molecular initiatin...

  20. [Transcription Factors in Developmental Genetics and the Evolution of Higher Plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutova, L A; Dodueva, I E; Lebedeva, M A; Tvorogova, V E

    2015-05-01

    Transcription factors play an essential role in controlling various developmental programs in plants, coordinating the action of any genetic network. Among the most important groups of plant transcription factors are the homeodomain-containing transcription factors, in particular, those belonging to the KNOX and WOX families, the functions of which are associated with regulation of the meristem activity, development of the aboveground and underground parts of plants, and control of embryogenesis. This review examines the role of KNOX and WOX transcription factors in various developmental programs, as well as in the evolutionary complication of the body plan in terrestrial plants.

  1. Characterization of the transcriptional activation domains of human TEF3-1 (transcription enhancer factor 3 isoform 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Cheng; Jiang, Yajie; Deng, Cuilan; Huang, Zebo; Teng, Kaixuan; Chen, Lan; Liu, Xin

    2015-03-01

    TEF3-1 (transcription enhancer factor 3 isoform 1) is a human transcriptional factor, which has a N-terminal TEA/ATTS domain supposedly for DNA binding and C-terminal PRD and STY domains for transcriptional activation. Taking advantage of the efficient reporter design of yeast two-hybrid system, we characterized the TEF3-1 domains in activating gene expression. Previously study usually mentioned that the C-terminal domain of TEF3-1 has the transcriptional activity, however, our data shows that the peptides TEF3-11-66 and TEF3-1197-434 functioned as two independent activation domains, suggesting that N-terminal domain of TEF3-1 also has transcriptional activation capacity. Additionally, more deletions of amino acids 197-434 showed that only the peptides TEF3-1197-265 contained the minimum sequences for the C-terminal transcriptional activation domain. The protein structure is predicted to contain a helix-turn-helix structure in TEF3-11-66 and four β sheets in TEF3-1197-265. Finally, after the truncated fragments of TEF3-1 were expressed in HUVEC cells, the whole TEF3-1 and the two activation domains could increase F-actin stress fiber, cell proliferation, migration and targeted gene expression. Further analysis and characterization of the activation domains in TEF3-1 may broaden our understanding of the gene involved in angiogenesis and other pathological processes.

  2. VEGF promotes the transcription of the human PRL-3 gene in HUVEC through transcription factor MEF2C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianliang Xu

    Full Text Available Phosphatase of regenerating liver 3 (PRL-3 is known to be overexpressed in many tumors, and its transcript level is high in the vasculature and endothelial cells of malignant tumor tissue. However, the mechanism(s underlying its enhanced expression and its function in endothelial cells remain unknown. Here, we report that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF can induce PRL-3 transcription in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC. An analysis of its 5'UTR revealed that PRL-3 transcription is initiated from two distinct sites, which results in the formation of the two transcripts, PRL-3-iso1 and PRL-3-iso2, but only the latter is up-regulated in HUVEC by VEGF. The PRL-3-iso2 promoter region includes two functional MEF2 (myocyte enhancer factor2 binding sites. The over-expression of the constitutively active form of MEF2C promotes the abundance of the PRL-3-iso2 transcript in a number of human cell lines. The siRNA-induced knockdown of MEF2C abolished the stimulative effect of VEGF on PRL-3 transcript in HUVEC, indicating that the VEGF-induced promotion of PRL-3 expression requires the presence of MEF2C. Finally, blocking PRL-3 activity or expression suppresses tube formation by HUVEC. We suggest that PRL-3 functions downstream of the VEGF/MEF2C pathway in endothelial cells and may play an important role in tumor angiogenesis.

  3. VEGF promotes the transcription of the human PRL-3 gene in HUVEC through transcription factor MEF2C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianliang; Cao, Shaoxian; Wang, Lu; Xu, Rui; Chen, Gong; Xu, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    Phosphatase of regenerating liver 3 (PRL-3) is known to be overexpressed in many tumors, and its transcript level is high in the vasculature and endothelial cells of malignant tumor tissue. However, the mechanism(s) underlying its enhanced expression and its function in endothelial cells remain unknown. Here, we report that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) can induce PRL-3 transcription in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). An analysis of its 5'UTR revealed that PRL-3 transcription is initiated from two distinct sites, which results in the formation of the two transcripts, PRL-3-iso1 and PRL-3-iso2, but only the latter is up-regulated in HUVEC by VEGF. The PRL-3-iso2 promoter region includes two functional MEF2 (myocyte enhancer factor2) binding sites. The over-expression of the constitutively active form of MEF2C promotes the abundance of the PRL-3-iso2 transcript in a number of human cell lines. The siRNA-induced knockdown of MEF2C abolished the stimulative effect of VEGF on PRL-3 transcript in HUVEC, indicating that the VEGF-induced promotion of PRL-3 expression requires the presence of MEF2C. Finally, blocking PRL-3 activity or expression suppresses tube formation by HUVEC. We suggest that PRL-3 functions downstream of the VEGF/MEF2C pathway in endothelial cells and may play an important role in tumor angiogenesis.

  4. Transcription factor-based biosensors enlightened by the analyte.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul eFernandez-Lopez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Whole cell biosensors (WCBs have multiple applications for environmental monitoring, detecting a wide range of pollutants. WCBs depend critically on the sensitivity and specificity of the transcription factor (TF used to detect the analyte. We describe the mechanism of regulation and the structural and biochemical properties of TF families that are used, or could be used, for the development of environmental WCBs. Focusing on the chemical nature of the analyte, we review TFs that respond to aromatic compounds (XylS-AraC, XylR-NtrC and LysR, metal ions (MerR, ArsR, DtxR, Fur and NikR or antibiotics (TetR and MarR. Analyzing the structural domains involved in DNA recognition, we highlight the similitudes in the DNA binding domains (DBDs of these TF families. Opposite to DBDs, the wide range of analytes detected by TFs results in a diversity of structures at the effector binding domain (EBD. The modular architecture of TFs opens the possibility of engineering TFs with hybrid DNA and effector specificities. Yet, the lack of a crisp correlation between structural domains and specific functions makes this a challenging task.

  5. Nanopore sensing of individual transcription factors bound to DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, Allison; Atas, Evrim; Meller, Amit

    2015-06-01

    Transcription factor (TF)-DNA interactions are the primary control point in regulation of gene expression. Characterization of these interactions is essential for understanding genetic regulation of biological systems and developing novel therapies to treat cellular malfunctions. Solid-state nanopores are a highly versatile class of single-molecule sensors that can provide rich information about local properties of long charged biopolymers using the current blockage patterns generated during analyte translocation, and provide a novel platform for characterization of TF-DNA interactions. The DNA-binding domain of the TF Early Growth Response Protein 1 (EGR1), a prototypical zinc finger protein known as zif268, is used as a model system for this study. zif268 adopts two distinct bound conformations corresponding to specific and nonspecific binding, according to the local DNA sequence. Here we implement a solid-state nanopore platform for direct, label- and tether-free single-molecule detection of zif268 bound to DNA. We demonstrate detection of single zif268 TFs bound to DNA according to current blockage sublevels and duration of translocation through the nanopore. We further show that the nanopore can detect and discriminate both specific and nonspecific binding conformations of zif268 on DNA via the distinct current blockage patterns corresponding to each of these two known binding modes.

  6. Characterization of Binding Sites of Eukaryotic Transcription Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Qian; Jimmy Lin; Donald J. Zack

    2006-01-01

    To explore the nature of eukaryotic transcription factor (TF) binding sites and determine how they differ from surrounding DNA sequences, we examined four features associated with DNA binding sites: G+C content, pattern complexity,palindromic structure, and Markov sequence ordering. Our analysis of the regulatory motifs obtained from the TRANSFAC database, using yeast intergenic sequences as background, revealed that these four features show variable enrichment in motif sequences. For example, motif sequences were more likely to have palindromic structure than were background sequences. In addition, these features were tightly localized to the regulatory motifs, indicating that they are a property of the motif sequences themselves and are not shared by the general promoter "environment" in which the regulatory motifs reside. By breaking down the motif sequences according to the TF classes to which they bind, more specific associations were identified. Finally, we found that some correlations, such as G+C content enrichment, were species-specific, while others, such as complexity enrichment, were universal across the species examined. The quantitative analysis provided here should increase our understanding of protein-DNA interactions and also help facilitate the discovery of regulatory motifs through bioinformatics.

  7. Modeling microRNA-transcription factor networks in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguda, Baltazar D

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of transcription factors (TFs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) is known to form feedback loops (FBLs) of interactions where a TF positively or negatively regulates the expression of a miRNA, and the miRNA suppresses the translation of the TF messenger RNA. FBLs are potential sources of instability in a gene regulatory network. Positive FBLs can give rise to switching behaviors while negative FBLs can generate periodic oscillations. This chapter presents documented examples of FBLs and their relevance to stem cell renewal and differentiation in gliomas. Feed-forward loops (FFLs) are only discussed briefly because they do not affect network stability unless they are members of cycles. A primer on qualitative network stability analysis is given and then used to demonstrate the network destabilizing role of FBLs. Steps in model formulation and computer simulations are illustrated using the miR-17-92/Myc/E2F network as an example. This example possesses both negative and positive FBLs.

  8. WRKY transcription factor genes in wild rice Oryza nivara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hengjian; Watanabe, Kenneth A; Zhang, Liyuan; Shen, Qingxi J

    2016-08-01

    The WRKY transcription factor family is one of the largest gene families involved in plant development and stress response. Although many WRKY genes have been studied in cultivated rice (Oryza sativa), the WRKY genes in the wild rice species Oryza nivara, the direct progenitor of O. sativa, have not been studied. O. nivara shows abundant genetic diversity and elite drought and disease resistance features. Herein, a total of 97 O. nivara WRKY (OnWRKY) genes were identified. RNA-sequencing demonstrates that OnWRKY genes were generally expressed at higher levels in the roots of 30-day-old plants. Bioinformatic analyses suggest that most of OnWRKY genes could be induced by salicylic acid, abscisic acid, and drought. Abundant potential MAPK phosphorylation sites in OnWRKYs suggest that activities of most OnWRKYs can be regulated by phosphorylation. Phylogenetic analyses of OnWRKYs support a novel hypothesis that ancient group IIc OnWRKYs were the original ancestors of only some group IIc and group III WRKYs. The analyses also offer strong support that group IIc OnWRKYs containing the HVE sequence in their zinc finger motifs were derived from group Ia WRKYs. This study provides a solid foundation for the study of the evolution and functions of WRKY genes in O. nivara.

  9. Spatial expression of transcription factors in Drosophila embryonic organ development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammonds, Ann S; Bristow, Christopher A; Fisher, William W; Weiszmann, Richard; Wu, Siqi; Hartenstein, Volker; Kellis, Manolis; Yu, Bin; Frise, Erwin; Celniker, Susan E

    2013-12-20

    Site-specific transcription factors (TFs) bind DNA regulatory elements to control expression of target genes, forming the core of gene regulatory networks. Despite decades of research, most studies focus on only a small number of TFs and the roles of many remain unknown. We present a systematic characterization of spatiotemporal gene expression patterns for all known or predicted Drosophila TFs throughout embryogenesis, the first such comprehensive study for any metazoan animal. We generated RNA expression patterns for all 708 TFs by in situ hybridization, annotated the patterns using an anatomical controlled vocabulary, and analyzed TF expression in the context of organ system development. Nearly all TFs are expressed during embryogenesis and more than half are specifically expressed in the central nervous system. Compared to other genes, TFs are enriched early in the development of most organ systems, and throughout the development of the nervous system. Of the 535 TFs with spatially restricted expression, 79% are dynamically expressed in multiple organ systems while 21% show single-organ specificity. Of those expressed in multiple organ systems, 77 TFs are restricted to a single organ system either early or late in development. Expression patterns for 354 TFs are characterized for the first time in this study. We produced a reference TF dataset for the investigation of gene regulatory networks in embryogenesis, and gained insight into the expression dynamics of the full complement of TFs controlling the development of each organ system.

  10. Stem cell pluripotency and transcription factor Oct4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Mammalian cell totipotency is a subject that has fascinated scientists for generations. A long lastingquestion whether some of the somatic cells retains totipotency was answered by the cloning of Dolly atthe end of the 20th century. The dawn of the 21st has brought forward great expectations in harnessingthe power of totipotentcy in medicine. Through stem cell biology, it is possible to generate any parts ofthe human body by stem cell engineering. Considerable resources will be devoted to harness the untappedpotentials of stem cells in the foreseeable future which may transform medicine as we know today. At themolecular level, totipotency has been linked to a singular transcription factor and its expression appearsto define whether a cell should be totipotent. Named Oct4, it can activate or repress the expression ofvarious genes. Curiously, very little is known about Oct4 beyond its ability to regulate gene expression. Themechanism by which Oct4 specifies totipotency remains entirely unresolved. In this review, we summarizethe structure and function of Oct4 and address issues related to Oct4 function in maintaining totipotencyor pluripotency of embryonic stem cells.

  11. Molecular evolution of the transcription factor LEAFY in Brassicaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, David A; Yoon, Ho-Sung; Oldham, Rebecca L

    2005-10-01

    LEAFY (LFY) is a DNA-binding transcription factor that regulates floral meristem identity. LFY is unusual among angiosperm developmental regulators because it is not part of an extended gene family. Recent expression studies and transgenic experiments have suggested that changes at the LFY locus might have played a role in the evolution of rosette flowering, a modified plant architecture that has evolved at least three times in Brassicaceae. Here we examined the sequences of LFY genes from 16 species of Brassicaceae to evaluate whether gene duplication and/or the shift to rosette flowering correlate with changes in the molecular evolution of LFY. We found evidence of gene duplication in four taxa, but phylogenetic analysis suggested that duplicate genes have generally not persisted through multiple speciation events. This result can be explained if LFY is prone to be lost by drift due to a low probability of subfunctionalization or neofunctionalization. Despite great heterogeneity in dN/dS ratios, duplicate genes show a significant tendency to have elevated dN/dS ratios. Rosette-flowering lineages also show elevated dN/dS ratios and two of the rosette-flowering taxa, Idahoa and Leavenworthia, have some radical amino acid substitutions that are candidates for having played a causal role in the evolution of rosette flowering.

  12. Identification of Transcription Factors for Lineage-Specific ESC Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamizu, Kohei; Piao, Yulan; Sharov, Alexei A.; Zsiros, Veronika; Yu, Hong; Nakazawa, Kazu; Schlessinger, David; Ko, Minoru S.H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A network of transcription factors (TFs) determines cell identity, but identity can be altered by overexpressing a combination of TFs. However, choosing and verifying combinations of TFs for specific cell differentiation have been daunting due to the large number of possible combinations of ∼2,000 TFs. Here, we report the identification of individual TFs for lineage-specific cell differentiation based on the correlation matrix of global gene expression profiles. The overexpression of identified TFs—Myod1, Mef2c, Esx1, Foxa1, Hnf4a, Gata2, Gata3, Myc, Elf5, Irf2, Elf1, Sfpi1, Ets1, Smad7, Nr2f1, Sox11, Dmrt1, Sox9, Foxg1, Sox2, or Ascl1—can direct efficient, specific, and rapid differentiation into myocytes, hepatocytes, blood cells, and neurons. Furthermore, transfection of synthetic mRNAs of TFs generates their appropriate target cells. These results demonstrate both the utility of this approach to identify potent TFs for cell differentiation, and the unanticipated capacity of single TFs directly guides differentiation to specific lineage fates. PMID:24371809

  13. SoxC transcription factors in retinal development and regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-Che Chang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma and other optic neuropathies result in optic nerve degeneration and the loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs through complex signaling pathways. Although the mechanisms that regulate RGC development remain unclear, uncovering novel developmental pathways may support new strategies to regenerate the optic nerve or replace RGCs. Here we review recent studies that provide strong evidence that the Sry-related high-mobility-group C (SoxC subfamily of transcription factors (TFs are necessary and sufficient for axon guidance and RGC fate specification. These findings also uncover novel SoxC-dependent mechanisms that serve as master regulators during important steps of RGC development. For example, we review work showing that SoxC TFs regulate RGC axon guidance and direction through the optic chiasm towards their appropriate targets in the brain. We also review work demonstrating that Sox11 subcellular localization is, in part, controlled through small ubiquitin-like post-translational modifier (SUMO and suggest compensatory cross-talk between Sox4 and Sox11. Furthermore, Sox4 overexpression is shown to positively drive RGC differentiation in human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs. Finally, we discuss how these findings may contribute to the advancement of regenerative and cell-based therapies to treat glaucoma and other optic nerve neuropathies.

  14. Reprogramming with Small Molecules instead of Exogenous Transcription Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongxiang Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs could be employed in the creation of patient-specific stem cells, which could subsequently be used in various basic and clinical applications. However, current iPSC methodologies present significant hidden risks with respect to genetic mutations and abnormal expression which are a barrier in realizing the full potential of iPSCs. A chemical approach is thought to be a promising strategy for safety and efficiency of iPSC generation. Many small molecules have been identified that can be used in place of exogenous transcription factors and significantly improve iPSC reprogramming efficiency and quality. Recent studies have shown that the use of small molecules results in the generation of chemically induced pluripotent stem cells from mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. These studies might lead to new areas of stem cell research and medical applications, not only human iPSC by chemicals alone, but also safe generation of somatic stem cells for cell based clinical trials and other researches. In this paper, we have reviewed the recent advances in small molecule approaches for the generation of iPSCs.

  15. Pluripotent stem cell transcription factors during human odontogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Juliana Malta; da Costa-Neves, Adriana; Kerkis, Irina; da Silva, Marcelo Cavenaghi Pereira

    2013-09-01

    Stem cells are capable of generating various cell lines and can be obtained from adult or embryonic tissues for clinical therapies. Stem cells from deciduous dental pulp are among those that are easily obtainable from adult tissues and have been widely studied because of their ability to differentiate into a variety of cell lines in the presence of various chemical mediators. We have analyze the expression of several proteins related to the differentiation and proliferative potential of cell populations that compose the tooth germ of human fetuses. We evaluate 20 human fetuses of both genders. After being paraffin-embedded, cap and bell stages of tooth germ development were subjected to immunohistochemistry for the following markers: Oct-4, Nanog, Stat-3 and Sox-2. The studied antibodies showed nuclear or cytoplasmic immunnostaining within various anatomical structures and with various degrees of expression, indicating the action of these proteins during tooth development. We conclude that the interrelationship between these transcription factors is complex and associated with self-renewal and cell differentiation. Our results suggest that the expression of Oct-4, Nanog, Sox-2 and Stat-3 are related to differentiation in ameloblasts and odontoblasts.

  16. Frequent gain and loss of functional transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott W Doniger

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Cis-regulatory sequences are not always conserved across species. Divergence within cis-regulatory sequences may result from the evolution of species-specific patterns of gene expression or the flexible nature of the cis-regulatory code. The identification of functional divergence in cis-regulatory sequences is therefore important for both understanding the role of gene regulation in evolution and annotating regulatory elements. We have developed an evolutionary model to detect the loss of constraint on individual transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs. We find that a significant fraction of functionally constrained binding sites have been lost in a lineage-specific manner among three closely related yeast species. Binding site loss has previously been explained by turnover, where the concurrent gain and loss of a binding site maintains gene regulation. We estimate that nearly half of all loss events cannot be explained by binding site turnover. Recreating the mutations that led to binding site loss confirms that these sequence changes affect gene expression in some cases. We also estimate that there is a high rate of binding site gain, as more than half of experimentally identified S. cerevisiae binding sites are not conserved across species. The frequent gain and loss of TFBSs implies that cis-regulatory sequences are labile and, in the absence of turnover, may contribute to species-specific patterns of gene expression.

  17. A male with unilateral microphthalmia reveals a role for TMX3 in eye development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Chao

    Full Text Available Anophthalmia and microphthalmia are important birth defects, but their pathogenesis remains incompletely understood. We studied a patient with severe unilateral microphthalmia who had a 2.7 Mb deletion at chromosome 18q22.1 that was inherited from his mother. In-situ hybridization showed that one of the deleted genes, TMX3, was expressed in the retinal neuroepithelium and lens epithelium in the developing murine eye. We re-sequenced TMX3 in 162 patients with anophthalmia or microphthalmia, and found two missense substitutions in unrelated patients: c.116G>A, predicting p.Arg39Gln, in a male with unilateral microphthalmia and retinal coloboma, and c.322G>A, predicting p.Asp108Asn, in a female with unilateral microphthalmia and severe micrognathia. We used two antisense morpholinos targeted against the zebrafish TMX3 orthologue, zgc:110025, to examine the effects of reduced gene expression in eye development. We noted that the morphant larvae resulting from both morpholinos had significantly smaller eye sizes and reduced labeling with islet-1 antibody directed against retinal ganglion cells at 2 days post fertilization. Co-injection of human wild type TMX3 mRNA rescued the small eye phenotype obtained with both morpholinos, whereas co-injection of human TMX3(p.Arg39Gln mutant mRNA, analogous to the mutation in the patient with microphthalmia and coloboma, did not rescue the small eye phenotype. Our results show that haploinsufficiency for TMX3 results in a small eye phenotype and represents a novel genetic cause of microphthalmia and coloboma. Future experiments to determine if other thioredoxins are important in eye morphogenesis and to clarify the mechanism of function of TMX3 in eye development are warranted.

  18. A male with unilateral microphthalmia reveals a role for TMX3 in eye development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ryan; Nevin, Linda; Agarwal, Pooja; Riemer, Jan; Bai, Xiaoyang; Delaney, Allen; Akana, Matthew; JimenezLopez, Nelson; Bardakjian, Tanya; Schneider, Adele; Chassaing, Nicolas; Schorderet, Daniel F; FitzPatrick, David; Kwok, Pui-yan; Ellgaard, Lars; Gould, Douglas B; Zhang, Yan; Malicki, Jarema; Baier, Herwig; Slavotinek, Anne

    2010-05-11

    Anophthalmia and microphthalmia are important birth defects, but their pathogenesis remains incompletely understood. We studied a patient with severe unilateral microphthalmia who had a 2.7 Mb deletion at chromosome 18q22.1 that was inherited from his mother. In-situ hybridization showed that one of the deleted genes, TMX3, was expressed in the retinal neuroepithelium and lens epithelium in the developing murine eye. We re-sequenced TMX3 in 162 patients with anophthalmia or microphthalmia, and found two missense substitutions in unrelated patients: c.116G>A, predicting p.Arg39Gln, in a male with unilateral microphthalmia and retinal coloboma, and c.322G>A, predicting p.Asp108Asn, in a female with unilateral microphthalmia and severe micrognathia. We used two antisense morpholinos targeted against the zebrafish TMX3 orthologue, zgc:110025, to examine the effects of reduced gene expression in eye development. We noted that the morphant larvae resulting from both morpholinos had significantly smaller eye sizes and reduced labeling with islet-1 antibody directed against retinal ganglion cells at 2 days post fertilization. Co-injection of human wild type TMX3 mRNA rescued the small eye phenotype obtained with both morpholinos, whereas co-injection of human TMX3(p.Arg39Gln) mutant mRNA, analogous to the mutation in the patient with microphthalmia and coloboma, did not rescue the small eye phenotype. Our results show that haploinsufficiency for TMX3 results in a small eye phenotype and represents a novel genetic cause of microphthalmia and coloboma. Future experiments to determine if other thioredoxins are important in eye morphogenesis and to clarify the mechanism of function of TMX3 in eye development are warranted.

  19. A systematic survey in Arabidopsis thaliana of transcription factors that modulate circadian parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merkle Thomas

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant circadian systems regulate various biological processes in harmony with daily environmental changes. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the underlying clock mechanism is comprised of multiple integrated transcriptional feedbacks, which collectively lead to global patterns of rhythmic gene expression. The transcriptional networks are essential within the clock itself and in its output pathway. Results Here, to expand understanding of transcriptional networks within and associated to the clock, we performed both an in silico analysis of transcript rhythmicity of transcription factor genes, and a pilot assessment of functional phenomics on the MYB, bHLH, and bZIP families. In our in silico analysis, we defined which members of these families express a circadian waveform of transcript abundance. Up to 20% of these families were over-represented as clock-controlled genes. To detect members that contribute to proper oscillator function, we systematically measured rhythmic growth via an imaging system in hundreds of misexpression lines targeting members of the transcription-factor families. Three transcription factors were found that conferred aberrant circadian rhythms when misexpressed: MYB3R2, bHLH69, and bHLH92. Conclusion Transcript abundance of many transcription factors in Arabidopsis oscillates in a circadian manner. Further, a developed pipeline assessed phenotypic contribution of a panel of transcriptional regulators in the circadian system.

  20. Analyses of in vivo interactions between transcription factors and the archaeal RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Julie E; Santangelo, Thomas J

    2015-09-15

    Transcription factors regulate the activities of RNA polymerase (RNAP) at each stage of the transcription cycle. Many basal transcription factors with common ancestry are employed in eukaryotic and archaeal systems that directly bind to RNAP and influence intramolecular movements of RNAP and modulate DNA or RNA interactions. We describe and employ a flexible methodology to directly probe and quantify the binding of transcription factors to RNAP in vivo. We demonstrate that binding of the conserved and essential archaeal transcription factor TFE to the archaeal RNAP is directed, in part, by interactions with the RpoE subunit of RNAP. As the surfaces involved are conserved in many eukaryotic and archaeal systems, the identified TFE-RNAP interactions are likely conserved in archaeal-eukaryal systems and represent an important point of contact that can influence the efficiency of transcription initiation.

  1. A transcriptional network underlies susceptibility to kidney disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laouari, Denise; Burtin, Martine; Phelep, Aurélie; Bienaime, Frank; Noel, Laure-Hélène; Lee, David C; Legendre, Christophe; Friedlander, Gérard; Pontoglio, Marco; Terzi, Fabiola

    2012-08-01

    The molecular networks that control the progression of chronic kidney diseases (CKD) are poorly defined. We have recently shown that the susceptibility to development of renal lesions after nephron reduction is controlled by a locus on mouse chromosome 6 and requires epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation. Here, we identified microphthalmia-associated transcription factor A (MITF-A), a bHLH-Zip transcription factor, as a modifier of CKD progression. Sequence analysis revealed a strain-specific mutation in the 5' UTR that decreases MITF-A protein synthesis in lesion-prone friend virus B NIH (FVB/N) mice. More importantly, we dissected the molecular pathway by which MITF-A modulates CKD progression. MITF-A interacts with histone deacetylases to repress the transcription of TGF-α, a ligand of EGFR, and antagonizes transactivation by its related partner, transcription factor E3 (TFE3). Consistent with the key role of this network in CKD, Tgfa gene inactivation protected FVB/N mice from renal deterioration after nephron reduction. These data are relevant to human CKD, as we found that the TFE3/MITF-A ratio was increased in patients with damaged kidneys. Our study uncovers a novel transcriptional network and unveils novel potential prognostic and therapeutic targets for preventing human CKD progression.

  2. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation in planta via synthetic dCas9-based transcription factors

    KAUST Repository

    Piatek, Agnieszka Anna

    2014-11-14

    Targeted genomic regulation is a powerful approach to accelerate trait discovery and development in agricultural biotechnology. Bacteria and archaea use clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) regulatory systems for adaptive molecular immunity against foreign nucleic acids introduced by invading phages and conjugative plasmids. The type II CRISPR/Cas system has been adapted for genome editing in many cell types and organisms. A recent study used the catalytically inactive Cas9 (dCas9) protein combined with guide-RNAs (gRNAs) as a DNA-targeting platform to modulate gene expression in bacterial, yeast, and human cells. Here, we modified this DNA-targeting platform for targeted transcriptional regulation in planta by developing chimeric dCas9-based transcriptional activators and repressors. To generate transcriptional activators, we fused the dCas9 C-terminus with the activation domains of EDLL and TAL effectors. To generate a transcriptional repressor, we fused the dCas9 C-terminus with the SRDX repression domain. Our data demonstrate that dCas9 fusion with the EDLL activation domain (dCas9:EDLL) and the TAL activation domain (dCas9:TAD), guided by gRNAs complementary to selected promoter elements, induce strong transcriptional activation on Bs3

  3. Using TESS to predict transcription factor binding sites in DNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schug, Jonathan

    2008-03-01

    This unit describes how to use the Transcription Element Search System (TESS). This Web site predicts transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in DNA sequence using two different kinds of models of sites, strings and positional weight matrices. The binding of transcription factors to DNA is a major part of the control of gene expression. Transcription factors exhibit sequence-specific binding; they form stronger bonds to some DNA sequences than to others. Identification of a good binding site in the promoter for a gene suggests the possibility that the corresponding factor may play a role in the regulation of that gene. However, the sequences transcription factors recognize are typically short and allow for some amount of mismatch. Because of this, binding sites for a factor can typically be found at random every few hundred to a thousand base pairs. TESS has features to help sort through and evaluate the significance of predicted sites.

  4. AKNA: Another AT-hook transcription factor"hooking-up"with inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alison R Moliterno; Linda MS Resar

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies highlight a key role for AT-hook transcription factors as master regulators of fundamental cellular processes involved in development,immune function,cancer,diabetes and other human diseases [1,2].The high mobility group A (HMGA) proteins are an important family of AT-hook chromatin remodeling proteins that orchestrate transcriptional complexes to regulate gene expression [ 1 ].Recent studies have uncovered links between HMG AT-hook transcription factors and inflammation [1-8].

  5. Pharmacological manipulation of transcription factor protein-protein interactions: opportunities and obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Fontaine

    2015-01-01

    As more attempts at modulating transcription factor activity are undertaken, valuable knowledge will be accumulated on the modality of action required to modulate transcription and how these findings can be applied to developing transcription factor drugs. Key discoveries will spawn into new therapeutic approaches not only as anticancer targets but also for other indications, such as those with an inflammatory component including neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, and chronic liver and kidney diseases.

  6. LASAGNA: A novel algorithm for transcription factor binding site alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Scientists routinely scan DNA sequences for transcription factor (TF) binding sites (TFBSs). Most of the available tools rely on position-specific scoring matrices (PSSMs) constructed from aligned binding sites. Because of the resolutions of assays used to obtain TFBSs, databases such as TRANSFAC, ORegAnno and PAZAR store unaligned variable-length DNA segments containing binding sites of a TF. These DNA segments need to be aligned to build a PSSM. While the TRANSFAC database provides scoring matrices for TFs, nearly 78% of the TFs in the public release do not have matrices available. As work on TFBS alignment algorithms has been limited, it is highly desirable to have an alignment algorithm tailored to TFBSs. Results We designed a novel algorithm named LASAGNA, which is aware of the lengths of input TFBSs and utilizes position dependence. Results on 189 TFs of 5 species in the TRANSFAC database showed that our method significantly outperformed ClustalW2 and MEME. We further compared a PSSM method dependent on LASAGNA to an alignment-free TFBS search method. Results on 89 TFs whose binding sites can be located in genomes showed that our method is significantly more precise at fixed recall rates. Finally, we described LASAGNA-ChIP, a more sophisticated version for ChIP (Chromatin immunoprecipitation) experiments. Under the one-per-sequence model, it showed comparable performance with MEME in discovering motifs in ChIP-seq peak sequences. Conclusions We conclude that the LASAGNA algorithm is simple and effective in aligning variable-length binding sites. It has been integrated into a user-friendly webtool for TFBS search and visualization called LASAGNA-Search. The tool currently stores precomputed PSSM models for 189 TFs and 133 TFs built from TFBSs in the TRANSFAC Public database (release 7.0) and the ORegAnno database (08Nov10 dump), respectively. The webtool is available at http://biogrid.engr.uconn.edu/lasagna_search/. PMID:23522376

  7. Characterization of the Far Transcription Factor Family in Aspergillus flavus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xingyu; Affeldt, Katharyn J.; Keller, Nancy P.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolism of fatty acids is a critical requirement for the pathogenesis of oil seed pathogens including the fungus Aspergillus flavus. Previous studies have correlated decreased ability to grow on fatty acids with reduced virulence of this fungus on host seed. Two fatty acid metabolism regulatory transcription factors, FarA and FarB, have been described in other filamentous fungi. Unexpectedly, we find A. flavus possesses three Far homologs, FarA, FarB, and FarC, with FarA and FarC showing a greater protein similarity to each other than FarB. farA and farB are located in regions of colinearity in all Aspergillus spp. sequenced to date, whereas farC is limited to a subset of species where it is inserted in an otherwise colinear region in Aspergillus genomes. Deletion and overexpression (OE) of farA and farB, but not farC, yielded mutants with aberrant growth patterns on specific fatty acids as well as altered expression of genes involved in fatty acid metabolism. Marked differences included significant growth defects of both ∆farA and ∆farB on medium-chain fatty acids and decreased growth of OE::farA on unsaturated fatty acids. Loss of farA diminished expression of mitochondrial β-oxidation genes whereas OE::farA inhibited expression of genes involved in unsaturated fatty acid catabolism. FarA also positively regulated the desaturase genes required to generate polyunsaturated fatty acids. Aflatoxin production on toxin-inducing media was significantly decreased in the ∆farB mutant and increased in the OE::farB mutant, with gene expression data supporting a role for FarB in tying β-oxidation processes with aflatoxin accumulation. PMID:27534569

  8. Forkhead transcription factor foxe1 regulates chondrogenesis in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Chisako; Iida, Atsumi; Tabata, Yoko; Watanabe, Sumiko

    2009-12-15

    Forkhead transcription factor (Fox) e1 is a causative gene for Bamforth-Lazarus syndrome, which is characterized by hypothyroidism and cleft palate. Applying degenerate polymerase chain reaction using primers specific for the conserved forkhead domain, we identified zebrafish foxe1 (foxe1). Foxe1 is expressed in the thyroid, pharynx, and pharyngeal skeleton during development; strongly expressed in the gill and weakly expressed in the brain, eye, and heart in adult zebrafish. A loss of function of foxe1 by morpholino antisense oligo (MO) exhibited abnormal craniofacial development, shortening of Meckel's cartilage and the ceratohyals, and suppressed chondrycytic proliferation. However, at 27 hr post fertilization, the foxe1 MO-injected embryos showed normal dlx2, hoxa2, and hoxb2 expression, suggesting that the initial steps of pharyngeal skeletal development, including neural crest migration and specification of the pharyngeal arch occurred normally. In contrast, at 2 dpf, a severe reduction in the expression of sox9a, colIIaI, and runx2b, which play roles in chondrocytic proliferation and differentiation, was observed. Interestingly, fgfr2 was strongly upregulated in the branchial arches of the foxe1 MO-injected embryos. Unlike Foxe1-null mice, normal thyroid development in terms of morphology and thyroid-specific marker expression was observed in foxe1 MO-injected zebrafish embryos. Taken together, our results indicate that Foxe1 plays an important role in chondrogenesis during development of the pharyngeal skeleton in zebrafish, probably through regulation of fgfr2 expression. Furthermore, the roles reported for FOXE1 in mammalian thyroid development may have been acquired during evolution.

  9. Identification of HTF (HER2 transcription factor) as an AP-2 (activator protein-2) transcription factor and contribution of the HTF binding site to ERBB2 gene overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernimmen, Douglas; Begon, Dominique; Salvador, Christophe; Gofflot, Stéphanie; Grooteclaes, Madeleine; Winkler, Rosita

    2003-02-15

    The ERBB2 gene is overexpressed in 30% of human breast cancers and this is correlated with poor prognosis. Overexpression of the ERBB2 gene is due to increased transcription and gene amplification. Our previous studies have identified a new cis element in the ERBB2 promoter which is involved in the gene's overexpression. This cis element, located 501 bp upstream from the main ERBB2 transcription initiation site, binds a transcription factor called HTF (HER2 transcription factor). We report here the identification of HTF as an AP-2 (activator protein-2) transcription factor. The new cis element is bound by AP-2 with high affinity, compared with a previously described AP-2 binding site located 284 bp downstream. Co-transfection of an AP-2alpha expression vector with a reporter vector containing the newly identified AP-2 binding site in front of a minimal ERBB2 promoter induced a dose-dependent increase in transcriptional activity. We examined the contribution of the new AP-2 binding site to ERBB2 overexpression. For this purpose we abolished the new and/or the previously described AP-2 binding sequence by site-directed mutagenesis. The results show that the two functional AP-2 sites in the first 700 bp of the ERBB2 promoter co-operate to achieve maximal transcriptional activity.

  10. The bZip transcription factor vitellogenin-binding protein is post transcriptional down regulated in chicken liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smidt, MP; Snippe, L; Van Keulen, G; Ab, G

    1998-01-01

    The vitellogenin-binding protein (VBP) is a member of the proline and acidic-region rich (PAR) family of bZip transcription factors. PAR is located N-terminally to the DNA-binding domain. VBP binds to specific sites within the 300-bp 5'-flanking region of the chicken-liver-specific estrogen-dependen

  11. The sequence-specific transcription factor c-Jun targets Cockayne syndrome protein B to regulate transcription and chromatin structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Lake

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cockayne syndrome is an inherited premature aging disease associated with numerous developmental and neurological defects, and mutations in the gene encoding the CSB protein account for the majority of Cockayne syndrome cases. Accumulating evidence suggests that CSB functions in transcription regulation, in addition to its roles in DNA repair, and those defects in this transcriptional activity might contribute to the clinical features of Cockayne syndrome. Transcription profiling studies have so far uncovered CSB-dependent effects on gene expression; however, the direct targets of CSB's transcriptional activity remain largely unknown. In this paper, we report the first comprehensive analysis of CSB genomic occupancy during replicative cell growth. We found that CSB occupancy sites display a high correlation to regions with epigenetic features of promoters and enhancers. Furthermore, we found that CSB occupancy is enriched at sites containing the TPA-response element. Consistent with this binding site preference, we show that CSB and the transcription factor c-Jun can be found in the same protein-DNA complex, suggesting that c-Jun can target CSB to specific genomic regions. In support of this notion, we observed decreased CSB occupancy of TPA-response elements when c-Jun levels were diminished. By modulating CSB abundance, we found that CSB can influence the expression of nearby genes and impact nucleosome positioning in the vicinity of its binding site. These results indicate that CSB can be targeted to specific genomic loci by sequence-specific transcription factors to regulate transcription and local chromatin structure. Additionally, comparison of CSB occupancy sites with the MSigDB Pathways database suggests that CSB might function in peroxisome proliferation, EGF receptor transactivation, G protein signaling and NF-κB activation, shedding new light on the possible causes and mechanisms of Cockayne syndrome.

  12. B-lineage transcription factors and cooperating gene lesions required for leukemia development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijchon, E.J.H.; Havinga, J.; Leeuwen, F.N. van; Scheijen, B.

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells into B lymphocytes requires the concerted action of specific transcription factors, such as RUNX1, IKZF1, E2A, EBF1 and PAX5. As key determinants of normal B-cell development, B-lineage transcription factors are frequently deregulated in hematological

  13. TF Target Mapper: a BLAST search tool for the identification of Transcription Factor target genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsman, S.; Moorhouse, M.J.; Jager, V.C.L. de; Spek, P. van der; Grosveld, F.; Strouboulis, J.; Katsantoni, E.Z.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the current era of high throughput genomics a major challenge is the genome-wide identification of target genes for specific transcription factors. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) allows the isolation of in vivo binding sites of transcription factors and provides a powerful tool

  14. Proteopedia: 3D Visualization and Annotation of Transcription Factor-DNA Readout Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas Machado, Ana Carolina; Saleebyan, Skyler B.; Holmes, Bailey T.; Karelina, Maria; Tam, Julia; Kim, Sharon Y.; Kim, Keziah H.; Dror, Iris; Hodis, Eran; Martz, Eric; Compeau, Patricia A.; Rohs, Remo

    2012-01-01

    3D visualization assists in identifying diverse mechanisms of protein-DNA recognition that can be observed for transcription factors and other DNA binding proteins. We used Proteopedia to illustrate transcription factor-DNA readout modes with a focus on DNA shape, which can be a function of either nucleotide sequence (Hox proteins) or base pairing…

  15. Biochemical analysis of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Olig2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, D.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors oligodendrocyte transcription factor 1 (Olig1) and Olig2 are structurally similar and, to a first approximation, coordinately expressed in the developing CNS and postnatal brain. Notwithstanding these similarities, it was apparent from early on

  16. MADS interactomics : towards understanding the molecular mechanisms of plant MADS-domain transcription factor function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smaczniak, C.D.

    2013-01-01

    Protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions are essential for the molecular action of transcription factors. By combinatorial binding to target gene promoters, transcription factors are able to up- or down-regulate the expression of these genes. MADS-domain proteins comprise a large family of trans

  17. MADS interactomics : towards understanding the molecular mechanisms of plant MADS-domain transcription factor function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smaczniak, C.D.

    2013-01-01

    Protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions are essential for the molecular action of transcription factors. By combinatorial binding to target gene promoters, transcription factors are able to up- or down-regulate the expression of these genes. MADS-domain proteins comprise a large family of trans

  18. Unexpected complexity of the Reef-Building Coral Acropora millepora transcription factor network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravasi Timothy

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coral reefs are disturbed on a global scale by environmental changes including rising sea surface temperatures and ocean acidification. Little is known about how corals respond or adapt to these environmental changes especially at the molecular level. This is mostly because of the paucity of genome-wide studies on corals and the application of systems approaches that incorporate the latter. Like in any other organism, the response of corals to stress is tightly controlled by the coordinated interplay of many transcription factors. Results Here, we develop and apply a new system-wide approach in order to infer combinatorial transcription factor networks of the reef-building coral Acropora millepora. By integrating sequencing-derived transcriptome measurements, a network of physically interacting transcription factors, and phylogenetic network footprinting we were able to infer such a network. Analysis of the network across a phylogenetically broad sample of five species, including human, reveals that despite the apparent simplicity of corals, their transcription factors repertoire and interaction networks seem to be largely conserved. In addition, we were able to identify interactions among transcription factors that appear to be species-specific lending strength to the novel concept of "Taxonomically Restricted Interactions". Conclusions This study provides the first look at transcription factor networks in corals. We identified a transcription factor repertoire encoded by the coral genome and found consistencies of the domain architectures of transcription factors and conserved regulatory subnetworks across eumetazoan species, providing insight into how regulatory networks have evolved.

  19. Network based transcription factor analysis of regenerating axolotl limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Jo Ann

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies on amphibian limb regeneration began in the early 1700's but we still do not completely understand the cellular and molecular events of this unique process. Understanding a complex biological process such as limb regeneration is more complicated than the knowledge of the individual genes or proteins involved. Here we followed a systems biology approach in an effort to construct the networks and pathways of protein interactions involved in formation of the accumulation blastema in regenerating axolotl limbs. Results We used the human orthologs of proteins previously identified by our research team as bait to identify the transcription factor (TF pathways and networks that regulate blastema formation in amputated axolotl limbs. The five most connected factors, c-Myc, SP1, HNF4A, ESR1 and p53 regulate ~50% of the proteins in our data. Among these, c-Myc and SP1 regulate 36.2% of the proteins. c-Myc was the most highly connected TF (71 targets. Network analysis showed that TGF-β1 and fibronectin (FN lead to the activation of these TFs. We found that other TFs known to be involved in epigenetic reprogramming, such as Klf4, Oct4, and Lin28 are also connected to c-Myc and SP1. Conclusions Our study provides a systems biology approach to how different molecular entities inter-connect with each other during the formation of an accumulation blastema in regenerating axolotl limbs. This approach provides an in silico methodology to identify proteins that are not detected by experimental methods such as proteomics but are potentially important to blastema formation. We found that the TFs, c-Myc and SP1 and their target genes could potentially play a central role in limb regeneration. Systems biology has the potential to map out numerous other pathways that are crucial to blastema formation in regeneration-competent limbs, to compare these to the pathways that characterize regeneration-deficient limbs and finally, to identify stem

  20. The transcription factor Nfix is essential for normal brain development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Litwack E David

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Nuclear Factor I (NFI multi-gene family encodes site-specific transcription factors essential for the development of a number of organ systems. We showed previously that Nfia-deficient mice exhibit agenesis of the corpus callosum and other forebrain defects; Nfib-deficient mice have defects in lung maturation and show callosal agenesis and forebrain defects resembling those seen in Nfia-deficient animals, while Nfic-deficient mice have defects in tooth root formation. Recently the Nfix gene has been disrupted and these studies indicated that there were largely uncharacterized defects in brain and skeletal development in Nfix-deficient mice. Results Here we show that disruption of Nfix by Cre-recombinase mediated excision of the 2nd exon results in defects in brain development that differ from those seen in Nfia and Nfib KO mice. In particular, complete callosal agenesis is not seen in Nfix-/- mice but rather there appears to be an overabundance of aberrant Pax6- and doublecortin-positive cells in the lateral ventricles of Nfix-/- mice, increased brain weight, expansion of the cingulate cortex and entire brain along the dorsal ventral axis, and aberrant formation of the hippocampus. On standard lab chow Nfix-/- animals show a decreased growth rate from ~P8 to P14, lose weight from ~P14 to P22 and die at ~P22. If their food is supplemented with a soft dough chow from P10, Nfix-/- animals show a lag in weight gain from P8 to P20 but then increase their growth rate. A fraction of the animals survive to adulthood and are fertile. The weight loss correlates with delayed eye and ear canal opening and suggests a delay in the development of several epithelial structures in Nfix-/- animals. Conclusion These data show that Nfix is essential for normal brain development and may be required for neural stem cell homeostasis. The delays seen in eye and ear opening and the brain morphology defects appear independent of the nutritional

  1. Incorporating evolution of transcription factor binding sites into annotated alignments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abha S Bais; Steffen Grossmann; Martin Vingron

    2007-08-01

    Identifying transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) is essential to elucidate putative regulatory mechanisms. A common strategy is to combine cross-species conservation with single sequence TFBS annotation to yield ``conserved TFBSs”. Most current methods in this field adopt a multi-step approach that segregates the two aspects. Again, it is widely accepted that the evolutionary dynamics of binding sites differ from those of the surrounding sequence. Hence, it is desirable to have an approach that explicitly takes this factor into account. Although a plethora of approaches have been proposed for the prediction of conserved TFBSs, very few explicitly model TFBS evolutionary properties, while additionally being multi-step. Recently, we introduced a novel approach to simultaneously align and annotate conserved TFBSs in a pair of sequences. Building upon the standard Smith-Waterman algorithm for local alignments, SimAnn introduces additional states for profiles to output extended alignments or annotated alignments. That is, alignments with parts annotated as gaplessly aligned TFBSs (pair-profile hits) are generated. Moreover, the pair-profile related parameters are derived in a sound statistical framework. In this article, we extend this approach to explicitly incorporate evolution of binding sites in the SimAnn framework. We demonstrate the extension in the theoretical derivations through two position-specific evolutionary models, previously used for modelling TFBS evolution. In a simulated setting, we provide a proof of concept that the approach works given the underlying assumptions, as compared to the original work. Finally, using a real dataset of experimentally verified binding sites in human-mouse sequence pairs, we compare the new approach (eSimAnn) to an existing multi-step tool that also considers TFBS evolution. Although it is widely accepted that binding sites evolve differently from the surrounding sequences, most comparative TFBS identification

  2. Microbiota regulate intestinal epithelial gene expression by suppressing the transcription factor Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, James M.; Lickwar, Colin R.; Song, Lingyun; Breton, Ghislain; Crawford, Gregory E.; Rawls, John F.

    2017-01-01

    Microbiota influence diverse aspects of intestinal physiology and disease in part by controlling tissue-specific transcription of host genes. However, host genomic mechanisms mediating microbial control of intestinal gene expression are poorly understood. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF4) is the most ancient family of nuclear receptor transcription factors with important roles in human metabolic and inflammatory bowel diseases, but a role in host response to microbes is unknown. Using an unbiased screening strategy, we found that zebrafish Hnf4a specifically binds and activates a microbiota-suppressed intestinal epithelial transcriptional enhancer. Genetic analysis revealed that zebrafish hnf4a activates nearly half of the genes that are suppressed by microbiota, suggesting microbiota negatively regulate Hnf4a. In support, analysis of genomic architecture in mouse intestinal epithelial cells disclosed that microbiota colonization leads to activation or inactivation of hundreds of enhancers along with drastic genome-wide reduction of HNF4A and HNF4G occupancy. Interspecies meta-analysis suggested interactions between HNF4A and microbiota promote gene expression patterns associated with human inflammatory bowel diseases. These results indicate a critical and conserved role for HNF4A in maintaining intestinal homeostasis in response to microbiota. PMID:28385711

  3. Molecular findings and clinical data in a cohort of 150 patients with anophthalmia/microphthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassaing, N; Causse, A; Vigouroux, A; Delahaye, A; Alessandri, J-L; Boespflug-Tanguy, O; Boute-Benejean, O; Dollfus, H; Duban-Bedu, B; Gilbert-Dussardier, B; Giuliano, F; Gonzales, M; Holder-Espinasse, M; Isidor, B; Jacquemont, M-L; Lacombe, D; Martin-Coignard, D; Mathieu-Dramard, M; Odent, S; Picone, O; Pinson, L; Quelin, C; Sigaudy, S; Toutain, A; Thauvin-Robinet, C; Kaplan, Josseline; Calvas, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    Anophthalmia and microphthalmia (AM) are the most severe malformations of the eye, corresponding respectively to reduced size or absent ocular globe. Wide genetic heterogeneity has been reported and different genes have been demonstrated to be causative of syndromic and non-syndromic forms of AM. We screened seven AM genes [GDF6 (growth differentiation factor 6), FOXE3 (forkhead box E3), OTX2 (orthodenticle protein homolog 2), PAX6 (paired box 6), RAX (retina and anterior neural fold homeobox), SOX2 (SRY sex determining region Y-box 2), and VSX2 (visual system homeobox 2 gene)] in a cohort of 150 patients with isolated or syndromic AM. The causative genetic defect was identified in 21% of the patients (32/150). Point mutations were identified by direct sequencing of these genes in 25 patients (13 in SOX2, 4 in RAX, 3 in OTX2, 2 in FOXE3, 1 in VSX2, 1 in PAX6, and 1 in GDF6). In addition eight gene deletions (five SOX2, two OTX2 and one RAX) were identified using a semi-quantitative multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) [quantitative multiplex PCR amplification of short fluorescent fragments (QMPSF)]. The causative genetic defect was identified in 21% of the patients. This result contributes to our knowledge of the molecular basis of AM, and will facilitate accurate genetic counselling.

  4. Bilateral microphthalmia and aphakia associated with multiple eye abnormalities in a free-living European red deer calf (Cervus elaphus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutinelli, Franco; Vercelli, Antonella; Carminato, Antonio; Luchesa, Lucio; Pasolli, Claudio; Cova, Mariapia; Marchioro, Wendy; Melchiotti, Erica; Vascellari, Marta

    2012-04-01

    A free-living European red deer calf (Cervus elaphus) was euthanized due to bilateral microphthalmia. Lens was missing, replaced by proliferating squamous epithelial cells; hyperplastic squamous cells, sebaceous and mucinous glands were observed within the cornea with the characteristics of inclusion cyst. Findings were consistent with congenital microphthalmia/aphakia, with multiple eye abnormalities.

  5. Transcription factor binding site positioning in yeast: proximal promoter motifs characterize TATA-less promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb, Ionas; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The availability of sequence specificities for a substantial fraction of yeast's transcription factors and comparative genomic algorithms for binding site prediction has made it possible to comprehensively annotate transcription factor binding sites genome-wide. Here we use such a genome-wide annotation for comprehensively studying promoter architecture in yeast, focusing on the distribution of transcription factor binding sites relative to transcription start sites, and the architecture of TATA and TATA-less promoters. For most transcription factors, binding sites are positioned further upstream and vary over a wider range in TATA promoters than in TATA-less promoters. In contrast, a group of 6 'proximal promoter motifs' (GAT1/GLN3/DAL80, FKH1/2, PBF1/2, RPN4, NDT80, and ROX1) occur preferentially in TATA-less promoters and show a strong preference for binding close to the transcription start site in these promoters. We provide evidence that suggests that pre-initiation complexes are recruited at TATA sites in TATA promoters and at the sites of the other proximal promoter motifs in TATA-less promoters. TATA-less promoters can generally be classified by the proximal promoter motif they contain, with different classes of TATA-less promoters showing different patterns of transcription factor binding site positioning and nucleosome coverage. These observations suggest that different modes of regulation of transcription initiation may be operating in the different promoter classes. In addition we show that, across all promoter classes, there is a close match between nucleosome free regions and regions of highest transcription factor binding site density. This close agreement between transcription factor binding site density and nucleosome depletion suggests a direct and general competition between transcription factors and nucleosomes for binding to promoters.

  6. Transcription factor binding site positioning in yeast: proximal promoter motifs characterize TATA-less promoters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionas Erb

    Full Text Available The availability of sequence specificities for a substantial fraction of yeast's transcription factors and comparative genomic algorithms for binding site prediction has made it possible to comprehensively annotate transcription factor binding sites genome-wide. Here we use such a genome-wide annotation for comprehensively studying promoter architecture in yeast, focusing on the distribution of transcription factor binding sites relative to transcription start sites, and the architecture of TATA and TATA-less promoters. For most transcription factors, binding sites are positioned further upstream and vary over a wider range in TATA promoters than in TATA-less promoters. In contrast, a group of 6 'proximal promoter motifs' (GAT1/GLN3/DAL80, FKH1/2, PBF1/2, RPN4, NDT80, and ROX1 occur preferentially in TATA-less promoters and show a strong preference for binding close to the transcription start site in these promoters. We provide evidence that suggests that pre-initiation complexes are recruited at TATA sites in TATA promoters and at the sites of the other proximal promoter motifs in TATA-less promoters. TATA-less promoters can generally be classified by the proximal promoter motif they contain, with different classes of TATA-less promoters showing different patterns of transcription factor binding site positioning and nucleosome coverage. These observations suggest that different modes of regulation of transcription initiation may be operating in the different promoter classes. In addition we show that, across all promoter classes, there is a close match between nucleosome free regions and regions of highest transcription factor binding site density. This close agreement between transcription factor binding site density and nucleosome depletion suggests a direct and general competition between transcription factors and nucleosomes for binding to promoters.

  7. Protein-Protein Interactions in the Regulation of WRKY Transcription Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingjun Chi; Yan Yang; Yuan Zhou; Jie Zhou; Baofang Fan; Jing-Quan Yu; Zhixiang Chen

    2013-01-01

    It has been almost 20 years since the first report of a WRKY transcription factor,SPF1,from sweet potato.Great progress has been made since then in establishing the diverse biological roles of WRKY transcription factors in plant growth,development,and responses to biotic and abiotic stress.Despite the functional diversity,almost all analyzed WRKY proteins recognize the TrGACC/T W-box sequences and,therefore,mechanisms other than mere recognition of the core W-box promoter elements are necessary to achieve the regulatory specificity of WRKY transcription factors.Research over the past several years has revealed that WRKY transcription factors physically interact with a wide range of proteins with roles in signaling,transcription,and chromatin remodeling.Studies of WRKY-interacting proteins have provided important insights into the regulation and mode of action of members of the important family of transcription factors.It has also emerged that the slightly varied WRKY domains and other protein motifs conserved within each of the seven WRKY subfamilies participate in protein-protein interactions and mediate complex functional interactions between WRKY proteins and between WRKY and other regulatory proteins in the modulation of important biological processes.In this review,we summarize studies of protein-protein interactions for WRKY transcription factors and discuss how the interacting partners contribute,at different levels,to the establishment of the complex regulatory and functional network of WRKY transcription factors.

  8. O-GlcNAc modification of Sp3 and Sp4 transcription factors negatively regulates their transcriptional activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Changhoon; Lim, Kihong

    2015-11-13

    The addition of O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) on serine or threonine modifies a myriad of proteins and regulates their function, stability and localization. O-GlcNAc modification is common among chromosome-associated proteins, such as transcription factors, suggesting its extensive involvement in gene expression regulation. In this study, we demonstrate the O-GlcNAc status of the Sp family members of transcription factors and the functional impact on their transcriptional activities. We highlight the presence of O-GlcNAc residues in Sp3 and Sp4, but not Sp2, as demonstrated by their enrichment in GlcNAc positive protein fractions and by detection of O-GlcNAc residues on Sp3 and Sp4 co-expressed in Escherichia coli together with O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) using an O-GlcNAc-specific antibody. Deletion mutants of Sp3 and Sp4 indicate that the majority of O-GlcNAc sites reside in their N-terminal transactivation domain. Overall, using reporter gene assays and co-immunoprecipitations, we demonstrate a functional inhibitory role of O-GlcNAc modifications in Sp3 and Sp4 transcription factors. Thereby, our study strengthens the current notion that O-GlcNAc modification is an important regulator of protein interactome.

  9. A male with unilateral microphthalmia reveals a role for TMX3 in eye development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chao, Ryan; Nevin, Linda; Agarwal, Pooja;

    2010-01-01

    of the deleted genes, TMX3, was expressed in the retinal neuroepithelium and lens epithelium in the developing murine eye. We re-sequenced TMX3 in 162 patients with anophthalmia or microphthalmia, and found two missense substitutions in unrelated patients: c.116G>A, predicting p.Arg39Gln, in a male...... with unilateral microphthalmia and retinal coloboma, and c.322G>A, predicting p.Asp108Asn, in a female with unilateral microphthalmia and severe micrognathia. We used two antisense morpholinos targeted against the zebrafish TMX3 orthologue, zgc:110025, to examine the effects of reduced gene expression in eye...... development. We noted that the morphant larvae resulting from both morpholinos had significantly smaller eye sizes and reduced labeling with islet-1 antibody directed against retinal ganglion cells at 2 days post fertilization. Co-injection of human wild type TMX3 mRNA rescued the small eye phenotype obtained...

  10. Mutations in c12orf57 cause a syndromic form of colobomatous microphthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahrani, Fatema; Aldahmesh, Mohammed A; Alshammari, Muneera J; Al-Hazzaa, Selwa A F; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2013-03-01

    Microphthalmia is an important developmental eye disorder. Although mutations in several genes have been linked to this condition, they only account for a minority of cases. We performed autozygome analysis and exome sequencing on a multiplex consanguineous family in which colobomatous microphthalmia is associated with profound global developmental delay, intractable seizures, and corpus callosum abnormalities, and we identified a homozygous truncating mutation in C12orf57 [c.1A>G; p.Met1?]. In a simplex case with a similar phenotype, we identified compound heterozygosity for the same mutation and another missense mutation [c.152T>A; p.Leu51Gln]. Little is known about C12orf57 but we show that it is expressed in several mouse tissues, including the eye and brain. Our data strongly implicate mutations in C12orf57 in the pathogenesis of a clinically distinct autosomal-recessive syndromic form of colobomatous microphthalmia.

  11. The interaction between bacterial transcription factors and RNA polymerase during the transition from initiation to elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Lewis, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    There are three stages of transcription: initiation, elongation and termination, and traditionally there has been a clear distinction between the stages. The specificity factor sigma is completely released from bacterial RNA polymerase after initiation, and then recycled for another round of transcription. Elongation factors then associate with the polymerase followed by termination factors (where necessary). These factors dissociate prior to initiation of a new round of transcription. However, there is growing evidence suggesting that sigma factors can be retained in the elongation complex. The structure of bacterial RNAP in complex with an essential elongation factor NusA has recently been published, which suggested rather than competing for the major σ binding site, NusA binds to a discrete region on RNAP. A model was proposed to help explain the way in which both factors could be associated with RNAP during the transition from transcription initiation to elongation.

  12. Retention of transcription initiation factor sigma(70) in transcription elongation: Single-molecule analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kapanidis, A. N.; Margeat, E; Laurence, T A; Doose, S.; Ho, S O; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Kortkhonjia, E; Mekler, V; Ebright, R H; S. Weiss

    2005-01-01

    We report a single-molecule assay that defines, simultaneously, the translocational position of a protein complex relative to DNA and the subunit stoichiometry of the complex. We applied the assay to define translocational positions and sigma(70) contents of bacterial transcription elongation complexes in vitro. The results confirm ensemble results indicating that a large fraction, similar to 70%-90%, of early elongation complexes retain sigma(70) and that a determinant for sigma(70) recognit...

  13. The Hv NAC6 transcription factor: a positive regulator of penetration resistance in barley and Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Krogh; Rung, Jesper Henrik; Gregersen, Per Langkjaer

    2007-01-01

    Pathogens induce the expression of many genes encoding plant transcription factors, though specific knowledge of the biological function of individual transcription factors remains scarce. NAC transcription factors are encoded in plants by a gene family with proposed functions in both abiotic...... and biotic stress adaptation, as well as in developmental processes. In this paper, we provide convincing evidence that a barley NAC transcription factor has a direct role in regulating basal defence. The gene transcript was isolated by differential display from barley leaves infected with the biotrophic...... powdery mildew fungus, Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei (Bgh). The full-length cDNA clone was obtained using 5'-RACE and termed HvNAC6, due to its high similarity to the rice homologue, OsNAC6. Gene silencing of HvNAC6 during Bgh inoculation compromises penetration resistance in barley epidermal cells...

  14. Altered activities of transcription factors and their related gene expression in cardiac tissues of diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Y; Kashiwagi, A; Taki, H; Shinozaki, K; Maeno, Y; Kojima, H; Maegawa, H; Haneda, M; Hidaka, H; Yasuda, H; Horiike, K; Kikkawa, R

    1998-08-01

    Gene regulation in the cardiovascular tissues of diabetic subjects has been reported to be altered. To examine abnormal activities in transcription factors as a possible cause of this altered gene regulation, we studied the activity of two redox-sensitive transcription factors--nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and activating protein-1 (AP-1)--and the change in the mRNA content of heme oxygenase-1, which is regulated by these transcription factors in the cardiac tissues of rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Increased activity of NF-kappaB and AP-1 but not nuclear transcription-activating factor, as determined by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay, was found in the hearts of 4-week diabetic rats. Glycemic control by a subcutaneous injection of insulin prevented these diabetes-induced changes in transcription factor activity. In accordance with these changes, the mRNA content of heme oxygenase-1 was increased fourfold in 4-week diabetic rats and threefold in 24-week diabetic rats as compared with control rats (P oxidative stress is involved in the activation of the transcription factors NF-kappaB and AP-1 in the cardiac tissues of diabetic rats, and that these abnormal activities of transcription factors could be associated with the altered gene regulation observed in the cardiovascular tissues of diabetic rats.

  15. The human enhancer blocker CTC-binding factor interacts with the transcription factor Kaiso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defossez, Pierre-Antoine; Kelly, Kevin F; Filion, Guillaume J P; Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Magdinier, Frédérique; Menoni, Hervé; Nordgaard, Curtis L; Daniel, Juliet M; Gilson, Eric

    2005-12-30

    CTC-binding factor (CTCF) is a DNA-binding protein of vertebrates that plays essential roles in regulating genome activity through its capacity to act as an enhancer blocker. We performed a yeast two-hybrid screen to identify protein partners of CTCF that could regulate its activity. Using full-length CTCF as bait we recovered Kaiso, a POZ-zinc finger transcription factor, as a specific binding partner. The interaction occurs through a C-terminal region of CTCF and the POZ domain of Kaiso. CTCF and Kaiso are co-expressed in many tissues, and CTCF was specifically co-immunoprecipitated by several Kaiso monoclonal antibodies from nuclear lysates. Kaiso is a bimodal transcription factor that recognizes methylated CpG dinucleotides or a conserved unmethylated sequence (TNGCAGGA, the Kaiso binding site). We identified one consensus unmethylated Kaiso binding site in close proximity to the CTCF binding site in the human 5' beta-globin insulator. We found, in an insulation assay, that the presence of this Kaiso binding site reduced the enhancer-blocking activity of CTCF. These data suggest that the Kaiso-CTCF interaction negatively regulates CTCF insulator activity.

  16. Functional characterization of tobacco transcription factor TGA2.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kegler, C.; Lenk, I.; Krawczyk, S.

    2004-01-01

    Activation sequence-1 (as-1)-like regulatory cis elements mediate transcriptional activation in response to increased levels of plant signalling molecules auxin and salicylic acid (SA). Our earlier work has shown that tobacco cellular as-1-binding complex SARP (salicylic acid responsive protein...

  17. Reverse Transcriptase and Cellular Factors: Regulators of HIV-1 Reverse Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Harrich

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available There is ample evidence that synthesis of HIV-1 proviral DNA from the viral RNA genome during reverse transcription requires host factors. However, only a few cellular proteins have been described in detail that affect reverse transcription and interact with reverse transcriptase (RT. HIV-1 integrase is an RT binding protein and a number of IN-binding proteins including INI1, components of the Sin3a complex, and Gemin2 affect reverse transcription. In addition, recent studies implicate the cellular proteins HuR, AKAP149, and DNA topoisomerase I in reverse transcription through an interaction with RT. In this review we will consider interactions of reverse transcription complex with viral and cellular factors and how they affect the reverse transcription process.

  18. A deeper look into transcription regulatory code by preferred pair distance templates for transcription factor binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.

    2011-08-18

    Motivation: Modern experimental methods provide substantial information on protein-DNA recognition. Studying arrangements of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) of interacting transcription factors (TFs) advances understanding of the transcription regulatory code. Results: We constructed binding motifs for TFs forming a complex with HIF-1α at the erythropoietin 3\\'-enhancer. Corresponding TFBSs were predicted in the segments around transcription start sites (TSSs) of all human genes. Using the genome-wide set of regulatory regions, we observed several strongly preferred distances between hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) and binding sites of a particular cofactor protein. The set of preferred distances was called as a preferred pair distance template (PPDT). PPDT dramatically depended on the TF and orientation of its binding sites relative to HRE. PPDT evaluated from the genome-wide set of regulatory sequences was used to detect significant PPDT-consistent binding site pairs in regulatory regions of hypoxia-responsive genes. We believe PPDT can help to reveal the layout of eukaryotic regulatory segments. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  19. Genome-Wide Association between Transcription Factor Expression and Chromatin Accessibility Reveals Regulators of Chromatin Accessibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueedi, Rico

    2017-01-01

    To better understand genome regulation, it is important to uncover the role of transcription factors in the process of chromatin structure establishment and maintenance. Here we present a data-driven approach to systematically characterise transcription factors that are relevant for this process. Our method uses a linear mixed modelling approach to combine datasets of transcription factor binding motif enrichments in open chromatin and gene expression across the same set of cell lines. Applying this approach to the ENCODE dataset, we confirm already known and imply numerous novel transcription factors that play a role in the establishment or maintenance of open chromatin. In particular, our approach rediscovers many factors that have been annotated as pioneer factors. PMID:28118358

  20. Interplay between transcription factors and the epigenome: Insight from the role of RUNX1 in leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Helen Brettingham-Moore

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The genome has the ability to respond in a precise and co-ordinated manner to cellular signals. It achieves this through the concerted actions of transcription factors and the chromatin platform, which are targets of the signalling pathways. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms through which transcription factors and the chromatin landscape each control gene activity has expanded dramatically over recent years, and attention has now turned to understanding the complex, multifaceted interplay between these regulatory layers in normal and disease states. It has become apparent that transcription factors as well as the components and modifiers of the epigenetic machinery are frequent targets of genomic alterations in cancer cells. Through the study of these factors, we can gain unique insight into the dynamic interplay between transcription factors and the epigenome, and how their dysregulation leads to aberrant gene expression programs in cancer. Here we will highlight how these factors normally co-operate to establish and maintain the transcriptional and epigenetic landscape of cells, and how this is reprogrammed in cancer, focusing on the RUNX1 transcription factor and oncogenic derivative RUNX1-ETO in leukemia as paradigms of transcriptional and epigenetic reprogramming.

  1. DNA methylation profiling of transcription factor genes in normal lymphocyte development and lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivascu, Claudia; Wasserkort, Reinhold; Lesche, Ralf; Dong, Jun; Stein, Harald; Thiel, Andreas; Eckhardt, Florian

    2007-01-01

    Transcription factors play a crucial role during hematopoiesis by orchestrating lineage commitment and determining cellular fate. Although tight regulation of transcription factor expression appears to be essential, little is known about the epigenetic mechanisms involved in transcription factor gene regulation. We have analyzed DNA methylation profiles of 13 key transcription factor genes in primary cells of the hematopoietic cascade, lymphoma cell lines and lymph node biopsies of diffuse large B-cell- and T-cell-non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients. Several of the transcription factor genes (SPI1, GATA3, TCF-7, Etv5, c-maf and TBX21) are differentially methylated in specific cell lineages and stages of the hematopoietic cascade. For some genes, such as SPI1, Etv5 and Eomes, we found an inverse correlation between the methylation of the 5' untranslated region and expression of the associated gene suggesting that these genes are regulated by DNA methylation. Differential methylation is not limited to cells of the healthy hematopoietic cascade, as we observed aberrant methylation of c-maf, TCF7, Eomes and SPI1 in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. Our results suggest that epigenetic remodelling of transcription factor genes is a frequent mechanism during hematopoietic development. Aberrant methylation of transcription factor genes is frequently observed in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas and might have a functional role during tumorigenesis.

  2. Technical Advance: Transcription factor, promoter, and enhancer utilization in human myeloid cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Anagha; Pooley, Christopher; Freeman, Tom C.; Lennartsson, Andreas; Babina, Magda; Schmidl, Christian; Geijtenbeek, Teunis; Michoel, Tom; Severin, Jessica; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Kawaji, Hideya; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Rehli, Michael; Hume, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The generation of myeloid cells from their progenitors is regulated at the level of transcription by combinatorial control of key transcription factors influencing cell-fate choice. To unravel the global dynamics of this process at the transcript level, we generated transcription profiles for 91 human cell types of myeloid origin by use of CAGE profiling. The CAGE sequencing of these samples has allowed us to investigate diverse aspects of transcription control during myelopoiesis, such as identification of novel transcription factors, miRNAs, and noncoding RNAs specific to the myeloid lineage. We further reconstructed a transcription regulatory network by clustering coexpressed transcripts and associating them with enriched cis-regulatory motifs. With the use of the bidirectional expression as a proxy for enhancers, we predicted over 2000 novel enhancers, including an enhancer 38 kb downstream of IRF8 and an intronic enhancer in the KIT gene locus. Finally, we highlighted relevance of these data to dissect transcription dynamics during progressive maturation of granulocyte precursors. A multifaceted analysis of the myeloid transcriptome is made available (www.myeloidome.roslin.ed.ac.uk). This high-quality dataset provides a powerful resource to study transcriptional regulation during myelopoiesis and to infer the likely functions of unannotated genes in human innate immunity. PMID:25717144

  3. Technical Advance: Transcription factor, promoter, and enhancer utilization in human myeloid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Anagha; Pooley, Christopher; Freeman, Tom C; Lennartsson, Andreas; Babina, Magda; Schmidl, Christian; Geijtenbeek, Teunis; Michoel, Tom; Severin, Jessica; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Kawaji, Hideya; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R R; Rehli, Michael; Hume, David A

    2015-05-01

    The generation of myeloid cells from their progenitors is regulated at the level of transcription by combinatorial control of key transcription factors influencing cell-fate choice. To unravel the global dynamics of this process at the transcript level, we generated transcription profiles for 91 human cell types of myeloid origin by use of CAGE profiling. The CAGE sequencing of these samples has allowed us to investigate diverse aspects of transcription control during myelopoiesis, such as identification of novel transcription factors, miRNAs, and noncoding RNAs specific to the myeloid lineage. We further reconstructed a transcription regulatory network by clustering coexpressed transcripts and associating them with enriched cis-regulatory motifs. With the use of the bidirectional expression as a proxy for enhancers, we predicted over 2000 novel enhancers, including an enhancer 38 kb downstream of IRF8 and an intronic enhancer in the KIT gene locus. Finally, we highlighted relevance of these data to dissect transcription dynamics during progressive maturation of granulocyte precursors. A multifaceted analysis of the myeloid transcriptome is made available (www.myeloidome.roslin.ed.ac.uk). This high-quality dataset provides a powerful resource to study transcriptional regulation during myelopoiesis and to infer the likely functions of unannotated genes in human innate immunity.

  4. Breaking the mold: transcription factors in the anucleate platelet and platelet-derived microparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie L Lannan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Platelets are small anucleate blood cells derived from megakaryocytes. In addition to their pivotal roles in hemostasis, platelets are the smallest, yet most abundant, immune cell and regulate inflammation, immunity, and disease progression. Although platelets lack DNA, and thus no functional transcriptional activities, they are nonetheless rich sources of RNAs, possess an intact spliceosome, and are thus capable of synthesizing proteins. Previously, it was thought that platelet RNAs and translational machinery were remnants from the megakaryocyte. We now know that the initial description of platelets as cellular fragments is an antiquated notion, as mounting evidence suggests otherwise. Therefore, it is reasonable to hypothesize that platelet transcription factors are not vestigial remnants from megakaryoctes, but have important, if only partly understood functions. Proteins play multiple cellular roles to minimize energy expenditure for maximum cellular function; thus, the same can be expected for transcription factors. In fact, numerous transcription factors have non-genomic roles, both in platelets and in nucleated cells. Our lab and others have discovered the presence and nongenomic roles of transcription factors in platelets, such as the nuclear factor kappa β (NFκB family of proteins and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ. In addition to numerous roles in regulating platelet activation, functional transcription factors can be transferred to vascular and immune cells through platelet microparticles. This method of transcellular delivery of key immune molecules may be a vital mechanism by which platelet transcription factors regulate inflammation and immunity. At the very least, platelets are an ideal model cell to dissect out the nongenomic roles of transcription factors in nucleated cells. There is abundant evidence to suggest that transcription factors in platelets play key roles in regulating inflammatory and

  5. TcoF-DB v2: update of the database of human and mouse transcription co-factors and transcription factor interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Schmeier, Sebastian

    2016-10-17

    Transcription factors (TFs) play a pivotal role in transcriptional regulation, making them crucial for cell survival and important biological functions. For the regulation of transcription, interactions of different regulatory proteins known as transcription co-factors (TcoFs) and TFs are essential in forming necessary protein complexes. Although TcoFs themselves do not bind DNA directly, their influence on transcriptional regulation and initiation, although indirect, has been shown to be significant, with the functionality of TFs strongly influenced by the presence of TcoFs. In the TcoF-DB v2 database, we collect information on TcoFs. In this article, we describe updates and improvements implemented in TcoF-DB v2. TcoF-DB v2 provides several new features that enables exploration of the roles of TcoFs. The content of the database has significantly expanded, and is enriched with information from Gene Ontology, biological pathways, diseases and molecular signatures. TcoF-DB v2 now includes many more TFs; has substantially increased the number of human TcoFs to 958, and now includes information on mouse (418 new TcoFs). TcoF-DB v2 enables the exploration of information on TcoFs and allows investigations into their influence on transcriptional regulation in humans and mice. TcoF-DB v2 can be accessed at http://tcofdb.org/.

  6. iTAK: A program for genome-wide prediction and classification of plant transcription factors, transcriptional regulators and protein kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transcription factors (TFs) are proteins that regulate the expression of target genes by binding to specific elements in their regulatory regions. Transcriptional regulators (TRs) also regulate the expression of target genes; however, they operate indirectly via interaction with the basal transcript...

  7. Structural motifs and potential sigma homologies in the large subunit of human general transcription factor TFIIE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkuma, Y; Sumimoto, H; Hoffmann, A; Shimasaki, S; Horikoshi, M; Roeder, R G

    1991-12-05

    The general transcription factor TFIIE has an essential role in eukaryotic transcription initiation together with RNA polymerase II and other general factors. Human TFIIE consists of two subunits of relative molecular mass 57,000 (TFIIE-alpha) and 34,000 (TFIIE-beta) and joins the preinitiation complex after RNA polymerase II and TFIIF. Here we report the cloning and structure of a complementary DNA encoding a functional human TFIIE-alpha. TFIIE-alpha is necessary for transcription initiation together with TFIIE-beta, and recombinant TFIIE-alpha can fully replace the natural subunit in an in vitro transcription assay. The sequence contains several interesting structural motifs (leucine repeat, zinc finger and helix-turn-helix) and sequence similarities to bacterial sigma factors that suggest direct involvement in the regulation of transcription initiation.

  8. New Insights into the Functions of Transcription Factors that Bind the RNA Polymerase Secondary Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenkin, Nikolay; Yuzenkova, Yulia

    2015-06-25

    Transcription elongation is regulated at several different levels, including control by various accessory transcription elongation factors. A distinct group of these factors interacts with the RNA polymerase secondary channel, an opening at the enzyme surface that leads to its active center. Despite investigation for several years, the activities and in vivo roles of some of these factors remain obscure. Here, we review the recent progress in understanding the functions of the secondary channel binding factors in bacteria. In particular, we highlight the surprising role of global regulator DksA in fidelity of RNA synthesis and the resolution of RNA polymerase traffic jams by the Gre factor. These findings indicate a potential link between transcription fidelity and collisions of the transcription and replication machineries.

  9. New Insights into the Functions of Transcription Factors that Bind the RNA Polymerase Secondary Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Zenkin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Transcription elongation is regulated at several different levels, including control by various accessory transcription elongation factors. A distinct group of these factors interacts with the RNA polymerase secondary channel, an opening at the enzyme surface that leads to its active center. Despite investigation for several years, the activities and in vivo roles of some of these factors remain obscure. Here, we review the recent progress in understanding the functions of the secondary channel binding factors in bacteria. In particular, we highlight the surprising role of global regulator DksA in fidelity of RNA synthesis and the resolution of RNA polymerase traffic jams by the Gre factor. These findings indicate a potential link between transcription fidelity and collisions of the transcription and replication machineries.

  10. Transcription factor co-repressors in cancer biology: roles and targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Sebastiano; Maguire, Orla; Campbell, Moray J

    2010-06-01

    Normal transcription displays a high degree of flexibility over the choice, timing and magnitude of mRNA expression levels that tend to oscillate and cycle. These processes allow for combinatorial actions, feedback control and fine-tuning. A central role has emerged for the transcriptional co-repressor proteins such as NCOR1, NCOR2/SMRT, CoREST and CTBPs, to control the actions of many transcriptional factors, in large part, by recruitment and activation of a range of chromatin remodeling enzymes. Thus, co-repressors and chromatin remodeling factors are recruited to transcription factors at specific promoter/enhancer regions and execute changes in the chromatin structure. The specificity of this recruitment is controlled in a spatial-temporal manner. By playing a central role in transcriptional control, as they move and target transcription factors, co-repressors act as a key driver in the epigenetic economy of the nucleus. Co-repressor functions are selectively distorted in malignancy, by both loss and gain of function and contribute to the generation of transcriptional rigidity. Features of transcriptional rigidity apparent in cancer cells include the distorted signaling of nuclear receptors and the WNTs/beta-catenin axis. Understanding and predicting the consequences of altered co-repressor expression patterns in cancer cells has diagnostic and prognostic significance, and also have the capacity to be targeted through selective epigenetic therapies.

  11. Challenges in Targeting a Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor with Hydrocarbon-Stapled Peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edwards, Amanda L; Meijer, Dimphna H; Guerra, Rachel M; Molenaar, Remco J; Alberta, John A; Bernal, Federico; Bird, Gregory H; Stiles, Charles D; Walensky, Loren D

    2016-01-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors play critical roles in organism development and disease by regulating cell proliferation and differentiation. Transcriptional activity, whether by bHLH homo- or heterodimerization, is dependent on protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions mediat

  12. Sucrose-induced translational repression of plant bZIP-type transcription factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiese, A.; Elzinga, N.; Wobbes, B.; Smeekens, S.

    2005-01-01

    Sugars as signalling molecules exert control on the transcription of many plant genes. Sugar signals also alter mRNA and protein stability. Increased sucrose concentrations specifically repress translation of the S-class basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) type transcription factor AtbZIP11/ATB2. Thi

  13. Step out of the groove : Epigenetic gene control systems and engineered transcription factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschure, Pernette J.; Visser, Astrid E.; Rots, Marianne G.; Hall, JC; Dunlap, JC; Friedmann, T; VanHeyningen,

    2006-01-01

    At the linear DNA level, gene activity is believed to be driven by binding of transcription factors, which subsequently recruit the RNA polymerase to the gene promoter region. However, it has become clear that transcriptional activation involves large complexes of many different proteins, which not

  14. Step out of the groove : epigenetic gene control systems and engineered transcription factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschure, P.J.; Visser, A.E.; Rots, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    At the linear DNA level, gene activity is believed to be driven by binding of transcription factors, which subsequently recruit the RNA polymerase to the gene promoter region. However, it has become clear that transcriptional activation involves large complexes of many different proteins, which not

  15. The mitochondrial transcription factor A functions in mitochondrial base excision repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canugovi, Chandrika; Maynard, Scott; Bayne, Anne-Cécile V

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is an essential component of mitochondrial nucleoids. TFAM plays an important role in mitochondrial transcription and replication. TFAM has been previously reported to inhibit nucleotide excision repair (NER) in vitro but NER has not yet been detected i...

  16. Step out of the groove : Epigenetic gene control systems and engineered transcription factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschure, Pernette J.; Visser, Astrid E.; Rots, Marianne G.; Hall, JC; Dunlap, JC; Friedmann, T; VanHeyningen,

    2006-01-01

    At the linear DNA level, gene activity is believed to be driven by binding of transcription factors, which subsequently recruit the RNA polymerase to the gene promoter region. However, it has become clear that transcriptional activation involves large complexes of many different proteins, which not

  17. Insight into transcription factor gene duplication from Caenorhabditis elegans Promoterome-driven expression patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidal Marc

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The C. elegans Promoterome is a powerful resource for revealing the regulatory mechanisms by which transcription is controlled pan-genomically. Transcription factors will form the core of any systems biology model of genome control and therefore the promoter activity of Promoterome inserts for C. elegans transcription factor genes was examined, in vivo, with a reporter gene approach. Results Transgenic C. elegans strains were generated for 366 transcription factor promoter/gfp reporter gene fusions. GFP distributions were determined, and then summarized with reference to developmental stage and cell type. Reliability of these data was demonstrated by comparison to previously described gene product distributions. A detailed consideration of the results for one C. elegans transcription factor gene family, the Six family, comprising ceh-32, ceh-33, ceh-34 and unc-39 illustrates the value of these analyses. The high proportion of Promoterome reporter fusions that drove GFP expression, compared to previous studies, led to the hypothesis that transcription factor genes might be involved in local gene duplication events less frequently than other genes. Comparison of transcription factor genes of C. elegans and Caenorhabditis briggsae was therefore carried out and revealed very few examples of functional gene duplication since the divergence of these species for most, but not all, transcription factor gene families. Conclusion Examining reporter expression patterns for hundreds of promoters informs, and thereby improves, interpretation of this data type. Genes encoding transcription factors involved in intrinsic developmental control processes appear acutely sensitive to changes in gene dosage through local gene duplication, on an evolutionary time scale.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation study of conformational changes of transcription factor TFIIS during RNA polymerase II transcriptional arrest and reactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changsun Eun

    Full Text Available Transcription factor IIS (TFIIS is a protein known for catalyzing the cleavage reaction of the 3'-end of backtracked RNA transcript, allowing RNA polymerase II (Pol II to reactivate the transcription process from the arrested state. Recent structural studies have provided a molecular basis of protein-protein interaction between TFIIS and Pol II. However, the detailed dynamic conformational changes of TFIIS upon binding to Pol II and the related thermodynamic information are largely unknown. Here we use computational approaches to investigate the conformational space of TFIIS in the Pol II-bound and Pol II-free (unbound states. Our results reveal two distinct conformations of TFIIS: the closed and the open forms. The closed form is dominant in the Pol II-free (unbound state of TFIIS, whereas the open form is favorable in the Pol II-bound state. Furthermore, we discuss the free energy difference involved in the conformational changes between the two forms in the presence or absence of Pol II. Additionally, our analysis indicates that hydrophobic interactions and the protein-protein interactions between TFIIS and Pol II are crucial for inducing the conformational changes of TFIIS. Our results provide novel insights into the functional interplay between Pol II and TFIIS as well as mechanism of reactivation of Pol II transcription by TFIIS.

  19. Large-scale screening of transcription factor-promoter interactions in spruce reveals a transcriptional network involved in vascular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Isabelle; Lachance, Denis; Giguère, Isabelle; Bomal, Claude; Morency, Marie-Josée; Pelletier, Gervais; Boyle, Brian; MacKay, John J; Séguin, Armand

    2014-06-01

    This research aimed to investigate the role of diverse transcription factors (TFs) and to delineate gene regulatory networks directly in conifers at a relatively high-throughput level. The approach integrated sequence analyses, transcript profiling, and development of a conifer-specific activation assay. Transcript accumulation profiles of 102 TFs and potential target genes were clustered to identify groups of coordinately expressed genes. Several different patterns of transcript accumulation were observed by profiling in nine different organs and tissues: 27 genes were preferential to secondary xylem both in stems and roots, and other genes were preferential to phelloderm and periderm or were more ubiquitous. A robust system has been established as a screening approach to define which TFs have the ability to regulate a given promoter in planta. Trans-activation or repression effects were observed in 30% of TF-candidate gene promoter combinations. As a proof of concept, phylogenetic analysis and expression and trans-activation data were used to demonstrate that two spruce NAC-domain proteins most likely play key roles in secondary vascular growth as observed in other plant species. This study tested many TFs from diverse families in a conifer tree species, which broadens the knowledge of promoter-TF interactions in wood development and enables comparisons of gene regulatory networks found in angiosperms and gymnosperms.

  20. The thumb subdomain of yeast mitochondrial RNA polymerase is involved in processivity, transcript fidelity and mitochondrial transcription factor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Gilberto; Sousa, Rui; Brieba, Luis G

    2015-01-01

    Single subunit RNA polymerases have evolved 2 mechanisms to synthesize long transcripts without falling off a DNA template: binding of nascent RNA and interactions with an RNA:DNA hybrid. Mitochondrial RNA polymerases share a common ancestor with T-odd bacteriophage single subunit RNA polymerases. Herein we characterized the role of the thumb subdomain of the yeast mtRNA polymerase gene (RPO41) in complex stability, processivity, and fidelity. We found that deletion and point mutants of the thumb subdomain of yeast mtRNA polymerase increase the synthesis of abortive transcripts and the probability that the polymerase will disengage from the template during the formation of the late initial transcription and elongation complexes. Mutations in the thumb subdomain increase the amount of slippage products from a homopolymeric template and, unexpectedly, thumb subdomain deletions decrease the binding affinity for mitochondrial transcription factor (Mtf1). The latter suggests that the thumb subdomain is part of an extended binding surface area involved in binding Mtf1.

  1. RNA interference against transcription elongation factor SII does not support its role in transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackinnon-Roy, Christine; Stubbert, Lawton J; McKay, Bruce C

    2011-01-10

    RNA polymerase II is unable to bypass bulky DNA lesions induced by agents like ultraviolet light (UV light) and cisplatin that are located in the template strand of active genes. Arrested polymerases form a stable ternary complex at the site of DNA damage that is thought to pose an impediment to the repair of these lesions. Transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) preferentially repairs these DNA lesions through an incompletely defined mechanism. Based on elegant in vitro experiments, it was hypothesized that the transcription elongation factor IIS (TFIIS) may be required to couple transcription to repair by catalyzing the reverse translocation of the arrested polymerase, allowing access of repair proteins to the site of DNA damage. However the role of TFIIS in this repair process has not been tested in vivo. Here, silencing TFIIS using an RNA interference strategy did not affect the ability of cells to recover nascent RNA synthesis following UV exposure or the ability of cells to repair a UV-damaged reporter gene while a similar strategy to decrease the expression Cockayne syndrome group B protein (CSB) resulted in the expected repair defect. Furthermore, RNA interference against TFIIS did not increase the sensitivity of cells to UV light or cisplatin while decreased expression of CSB did. Taken together, these results indicate that TFIIS is not limiting for the repair of transcription-blocking DNA lesions and thus the present work does not support a role for TFIIS in TC-NER.

  2. Homozygous FOXE3 mutations cause non-syndromic, bilateral, total sclerocornea, aphakia, microphthalmia and optic disc coloboma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Manir; Buentello-Volante, Beatriz; McKibbin, Martin; Rocha-Medina, J Alberto; Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis; Koga-Nakamura, Wilson; Ashiq, Aruna; Khan, Kamron; Booth, Adam P; Williams, Grange; Raashid, Yasmin; Jafri, Hussain; Rice, Aine; Inglehearn, Chris F; Zenteno, Juan Carlos

    2010-06-23

    To investigate the genetic basis of recessively-inherited congenital, non syndromic, bilateral, total sclerocornea in two consanguineous pedigrees, one from the Punjab province of Pakistan and the other from the Tlaxcala province of Mexico. Ophthalmic examinations were conducted on each family member to confirm their diagnosis and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or ultrasonography of the eyes was performed on some family members. Genomic DNA was analyzed by homozygosity mapping using the Affymetrix 6.0 SNP array and linkage was confirmed with polymorphic microsatellite markers. Candidate genes were sequenced. A diagnosis of autosomal recessive sclerocornea was established for 7 members of the Pakistani and 8 members of the Mexican pedigrees. In the Pakistani family we established linkage to a region on chromosome 1p that contained Forkhead Box E3 (FOXE3), a strong candidate gene since FOXE3 mutations had previously been associated with various anterior segment abnormalities. Sequencing FOXE3 identified the previously reported nonsense mutation, c.720C>A, p.C240X, in the Pakistani pedigree and a novel missense mutation which disrupts an evolutionarily conserved residue in the forkhead domain, c.292T>C, p.Y98H, in the Mexican pedigree. Individuals with heterozygous mutations had no ocular abnormalities. MRI or ultrasonography confirmed that the patients with sclerocornea were also aphakic, had microphthalmia and some had optic disc coloboma. This is the fourth report detailing homozygous FOXE3 mutations causing anterior segment abnormalities in human patients. Previous papers have emphasized aphakia and microphthalmia as the primary phenotype, but we find that the initial diagnosis - and perhaps the only one possible in a rural setting - is one of non-syndromic, bilateral, total sclerocornea. Dominantly inherited anterior segment defects have also been noted in association with heterozygous FOXE3 mutations. However the absence of any abnormalities in the FOXE3

  3. A semi-supervised method for predicting transcription factor-gene interactions in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Ernst

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available While Escherichia coli has one of the most comprehensive datasets of experimentally verified transcriptional regulatory interactions of any organism, it is still far from complete. This presents a problem when trying to combine gene expression and regulatory interactions to model transcriptional regulatory networks. Using the available regulatory interactions to predict new interactions may lead to better coverage and more accurate models. Here, we develop SEREND (SEmi-supervised REgulatory Network Discoverer, a semi-supervised learning method that uses a curated database of verified transcriptional factor-gene interactions, DNA sequence binding motifs, and a compendium of gene expression data in order to make thousands of new predictions about transcription factor-gene interactions, including whether the transcription factor activates or represses the gene. Using genome-wide binding datasets for several transcription factors, we demonstrate that our semi-supervised classification strategy improves the prediction of targets for a given transcription factor. To further demonstrate the utility of our inferred interactions, we generated a new microarray gene expression dataset for the aerobic to anaerobic shift response in E. coli. We used our inferred interactions with the verified interactions to reconstruct a dynamic regulatory network for this response. The network reconstructed when using our inferred interactions was better able to correctly identify known regulators and suggested additional activators and repressors as having important roles during the aerobic-anaerobic shift interface.

  4. Novel mutations in BCOR in three patients with oculo-facio-cardio-dental syndrome, but none in Lenz microphthalmia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Denise; Chyrek, Magdalena; Kleier, Saskia; Lüttgen, Sabine; Bolz, Hanno; Hinkel, Georg-Klaus; Korenke, Georg Christoph; Riess, Angelika; Schell-Apacik, Can; Tinschert, Sigrid; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Kutsche, Kerstin

    2005-05-01

    Oculo-facio-cardio-dental (OFCD) syndrome is a rare X-linked dominant condition with male lethality characterized by microphthalmia, congenital cataracts, facial dysmorphic features, congenital heart defects, and dental anomalies. Mutations in BCOR (BCL6 co-repressor) located in Xp11.4 have been described to cause OFCD syndrome. Lenz microphthalmia syndrome is inherited in an X-linked recessive pattern comprising microphthalmia/anophthalmia, mental retardation, malformed ears, digital, skeletal, and urogenital anomalies (synonym: microphthalmia with associated anomalies (MAA)). One locus for MAA has been mapped to Xq27-q28. Nonetheless, linkage and subsequent mutation analysis revealed a single missense mutation (p.P85L) in BCOR in a large family with presumed Lenz microphthalmia syndrome (MAA2). We describe novel mutations in BCOR in three patients with OFCD syndrome, two small deletions (c.2488_2489delAG and c.3286delG) and a submicroscopic deletion of about 60 kb encompassing at least BCOR exons 2-15. No BCOR mutation was detected in eight patients with Lenz microphthalmia syndrome. Our data confirm that BCOR is the causative gene for OFCD syndrome; however, the failure to identify any mutation in patients with Lenz microphthalmia syndrome together with the oligosymptomatic phenotype in the reported MAA2 patients suggest that BCOR is not the major gene for this syndrome.

  5. Localization of a novel gene for congenital nonsyndromic simple microphthalmia to chromosome 2q11-14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Wang, Jia-Xin; Wang, Cheng-Ye; Yu, Ping; Zhou, Qiang; Chen, Yong-Gang; Zhao, Lu-Hang; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2008-01-01

    Microphthalmia is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder of eye development. The genetic basis of nonsyndromic microphthalmia is not yet fully understood. Previous studies indicated that disease pedigrees from different genetic backgrounds could be attributed to completely different gene loci. To investigate the etiology in a large autosomal-dominant inherited simple microphthalmia (nanophthalmia) pedigree, which is the first genetically analyzed Chinese microphthalmia pedigree, we performed a whole-genome scan using 382 micro-satellite DNA markers after the exclusion of reported candidates associated with microphthalmia. Strong evidence indicated that microphthalmia in this family was mapped to an unreported new locus on chromosome 2q. A significantly positive two-point LOD score was obtained with a maximum 3.290 at a recombination fraction of 0.00 for marker D2S2265. Subsequent haplotype analysis and recombination data further confined the disease-causing gene to a 15-cM interval between D2S1890 and D2S347 on 2q11-14. Our results further underlined the degree of heterogeneity in microphthalmia from Chinese background and localized a novel gene which regulates eye embryogenesis.

  6. Whole-genome copy number variation analysis in anophthalmia and microphthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilter, K F; Reis, L M; Schneider, A; Bardakjian, T M; Abdul-Rahman, O; Kozel, B A; Zimmerman, H H; Broeckel, U; Semina, E V

    2013-11-01

    Anophthalmia/microphthalmia (A/M) represent severe developmental ocular malformations. Currently, mutations in known genes explain less than 40% of A/M cases. We performed whole-genome copy number variation analysis in 60 patients affected with isolated or syndromic A/M. Pathogenic deletions of 3q26 (SOX2) were identified in four independent patients with syndromic microphthalmia. Other variants of interest included regions with a known role in human disease (likely pathogenic) as well as novel rearrangements (uncertain significance). A 2.2-Mb duplication of 3q29 in a patient with non-syndromic anophthalmia and an 877-kb duplication of 11p13 (PAX6) and a 1.4-Mb deletion of 17q11.2 (NF1) in two independent probands with syndromic microphthalmia and other ocular defects were identified; while ocular anomalies have been previously associated with 3q29 duplications, PAX6 duplications, and NF1 mutations in some cases, the ocular phenotypes observed here are more severe than previously reported. Three novel regions of possible interest included a 2q14.2 duplication which cosegregated with microphthalmia/microcornea and congenital cataracts in one family, and 2q21 and 15q26 duplications in two additional cases; each of these regions contains genes that are active during vertebrate ocular development. Overall, this study identified causative copy number mutations and regions with a possible role in ocular disease in 17% of A/M cases.

  7. Signaling Proteins and Transcription Factors in Normal and Malignant Early B Cell Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Pérez-Vera

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available B cell development starts in bone marrow with the commitment of hematopoietic progenitors to the B cell lineage. In murine models, the IL-7 and preBCR receptors, and the signaling pathways and transcription factors that they regulate, control commitment and maintenance along the B cell pathway. E2A, EBF1, PAX5, and Ikaros are among the most important transcription factors controlling early development and thereby conditioning mice homeostatic B cell lymphopoiesis. Importantly, their gain or loss of function often results in malignant development in humans, supporting conserved roles for these transcription factors. B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common cause of pediatric cancer, and it is characterized by unpaired early B cell development resulting from genetic lesions in these critical signaling pathways and transcription factors. Fine mapping of these genetic abnormalities is allowing more specific treatments, more accurately predicting risk profiles for this disease, and improving survival rates.

  8. Large-scale identification of sequence variants influencing human transcription factor occupancy in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurano, Matthew T; Haugen, Eric; Sandstrom, Richard; Vierstra, Jeff; Shafer, Anthony; Kaul, Rajinder; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A

    2015-12-01

    The function of human regulatory regions depends exquisitely on their local genomic environment and on cellular context, complicating experimental analysis of common disease- and trait-associated variants that localize within regulatory DNA. We use allelically resolved genomic DNase I footprinting data encompassing 166 individuals and 114 cell types to identify >60,000 common variants that directly influence transcription factor occupancy and regulatory DNA accessibility in vivo. The unprecedented scale of these data enables systematic analysis of the impact of sequence variation on transcription factor occupancy in vivo. We leverage this analysis to develop accurate models of variation affecting the recognition sites for diverse transcription factors and apply these models to discriminate nearly 500,000 common regulatory variants likely to affect transcription factor occupancy across the human genome. The approach and results provide a new foundation for the analysis and interpretation of noncoding variation in complete human genomes and for systems-level investigation of disease-associated variants.

  9. Building predictive gene signatures through simultaneous assessment of transcription factor activation and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Building predictive gene signatures through simultaneous assessment of transcription factor activation and gene expression Exposure to many drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals can cause adverse outcomes. These adverse outcomes, such as cancer, have been linked to mol...

  10. Regulation of cell proliferation by the E2F transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, K

    1998-01-01

    demonstrated that individual members of the E2F transcription factor family are likely to have distinct roles in mammalian development and homeostasis. Additional mechanisms regulating the activity of the E2F transcription factors have been reported, including subcellular localization and proteolysis of the E2......Experimental data generated in the past year have further emphasized the essential role for the E2F transcription factors in the regulation of cell proliferation. Genetic studies have shown that E2F activity is required for normal development in fruitflies, and the generation of E2F-1(-/-) mice has......Fs in the proteasomes. Novel target genes for the E2F transcription factors have been identified that link the E2Fs directly to the initiation of DNA replication....

  11. GATA transcription factors associate with a novel class of nuclear bodies in erythroblasts and megakaryocytes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.G. Elefanty (Andrew); M. Antoniou (Michael); N. Custodio; M. Carmo-Fonseca; F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe nuclear distribution of GATA transcription factors in murine haemopoietic cells was examined by indirect immunofluorescence. Specific bright foci of GATA-1 fluorescence were observed in erythroleukaemia cells and primary murine erythroblasts and megakaryocytes, in addition to diffuse

  12. Analysis of a transcription factor using transient assay in Arabidopsis protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Yuji; Lee, Mi-Hyun; Koizumi, Nozomu

    2011-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression by transcription factors is a fundamental mechanism in essentially all aspects of cellular processes. Transient expression assay of a reporter plasmid containing a reporter gene driven by a promoter of interest and an effector plasmid expressing a transcription factor has been a powerful tool for analyzing transcription factors. Here we present a protocol for polyethylene glycol (PEG)-mediated transformation of Arabidopsis protoplasts. It details preparation of protoplasts from Arabidopsis suspension cultured cells or leaves of soil-grown Arabidopsis plants and subsequent PEG-mediated transformation with reporter and effector plasmids. This protocol can be completed within 24 h from protoplast preparation to reporter assay. As an example, analysis of the membrane-bound transcription factor AtbZIP60 and its target BiP3 promoter is shown.

  13. Divergence of the yeast transcription factor FZF1 affects sulfite resistance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Engle, Elizabeth K; Fay, Justin C

    2012-01-01

    .... Here, we use a genome-wide screen for promoters that are likely to have diverged in function and identify a yeast transcription factor, FZF1, that has evolved substantial differences in its ability...

  14. Bacterial sigma factors as targets for engineered or synthetic transcriptional control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Lakshmi; Zhang, Yan; Lin, Zhanglin

    2014-01-01

    Sigma (σ) factors are the predominant constituents of transcription regulation in bacteria. σ Factors recruit the core RNA polymerase to recognize promoters with specific DNA sequences. Recently, engineering of transcriptional regulators has become a significant tool for strain engineering. The present review summarizes the recent advances in σ factor based engineering or synthetic design. The manipulation of σ factors presents insights into the bacterial stress tolerance and metabolite productivity. We envision more synthetic design based on σ factors that can be used to tune the regulatory network of bacteria.

  15. Bacterial sigma factors as targets for engineered or synthetic transcriptional control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi eTripathi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sigma (σ factors are the predominant constituents of transcription regulation in bacteria. σ factors recruit the core RNA polymerase (RNAP to recognize promoters with specific DNA sequences. Recently engineering of transcriptional regulators has become a significant tool for strain engineering. The present review summarizes the recent advances in σ factor based engineering or synthetic design. The manipulation of σ factors presents insights into the bacterial stress tolerance and metabolite productivity. We envision more synthetic design based on σ factors that can be used to tune the regulatory network of bacteria.

  16. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 3 Is an Oxygen-Dependent Transcription Activator and Regulates a Distinct Transcriptional Response to Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs play key roles in the cellular response to hypoxia. It is widely accepted that whereas HIF-1 and HIF-2 function as transcriptional activators, HIF-3 inhibits HIF-1/2α action. Contrary to this idea, we show that zebrafish Hif-3α has strong transactivation activity. Hif-3α is degraded under normoxia. Mutation of P393, P493, and L503 inhibits this oxygen-dependent degradation. Transcriptomics and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses identify genes that are regulated by Hif-3α, Hif-1α, or both. Under hypoxia or when overexpressed, Hif-3α binds to its target gene promoters and upregulates their expression. Dominant-negative inhibition and knockdown of Hif-3α abolish hypoxia-induced Hif-3α-promoter binding and gene expression. Hif-3α not only mediates hypoxia-induced growth and developmental retardation but also possesses hypoxia-independent activities. Importantly, transactivation activity is conserved and human HIF-3α upregulates similar genes in human cells. These findings suggest that Hif-3 is an oxygen-dependent transcription factor and activates a distinct transcriptional response to hypoxia.

  17. The role for runt related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) as a transcriptional repressor in luteinizing granulosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Sil; Park, Jiyeon; Franceschi, Renny T; Jo, Misung

    2012-10-15

    Transcription factors induced by the LH surge play a vital role in reprogramming the gene expression in periovulatory follicles. The present study investigated the role of RUNX2 transcription factor in regulating the expression of Runx1, Ptgs2, and Tnfaip6 using cultured granulosa cells isolated from PMSG-primed immature rats. hCG or forskolin+PMA induced the transient increase in Runx1, Ptgs2, and Tnfaip6 expression, while the expression of Runx2 continued to increase until 48 h. The knockdown of the agonist-stimulated Runx2 expression increased Runx1, Ptgs2, and Tnfaip6 expression and PGE(2) levels in luteinizing granulosa cells. Conversely, the over-expression of RUNX2 inhibited the expression of these genes and PGE(2) levels. The mutation of RUNX binding motifs in the Runx1 promoter enhanced transcriptional activity of the Runx1 promoter. The knockdown and overexpression of Runx2 increased and decreased Runx1 promoter activity, respectively. ChIP assays revealed the binding of RUNX2 in the Runx1 and Ptgs2 promoters. Together, these novel findings provide support for the role of RUNX2 in down-regulation of Runx1, Ptgs2, and Tnfaip6 during the late ovulatory period to support proper ovulation and/or luteinization.

  18. Transcription factor binding sites are highly enriched within microRNA precursor sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piriyapongsa Jittima

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factors are thought to regulate the transcription of microRNA genes in a manner similar to that of protein-coding genes; that is, by binding to conventional transcription factor binding site DNA sequences located in or near promoter regions that lie upstream of the microRNA genes. However, in the course of analyzing the genomics of human microRNA genes, we noticed that annotated transcription factor binding sites commonly lie within 70- to 110-nt long microRNA small hairpin precursor sequences. Results We report that about 45% of all human small hairpin microRNA (pre-miR sequences contain at least one predicted transcription factor binding site motif that is conserved across human, mouse and rat, and this rises to over 75% if one excludes primate-specific pre-miRs. The association is robust and has extremely strong statistical significance; it affects both intergenic and intronic pre-miRs and both isolated and clustered microRNA genes. We also confirmed and extended this finding using a separate analysis that examined all human pre-miR sequences regardless of conservation across species. Conclusions The transcription factor binding sites localized within small hairpin microRNA precursor sequences may possibly regulate their transcription. Transcription factors may also possibly bind directly to nascent primary microRNA gene transcripts or small hairpin microRNA precursors and regulate their processing. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Guillaume Bourque (nominated by Jerzy Jurka, Dmitri Pervouchine (nominated by Mikhail Gelfand, and Yuriy Gusev.

  19. The XPB subunit of repair/transcription factor TFIIH directly interacts with SUG1, a subunit of the 26S proteasome and putative transcription factor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Weeda (Geert); M. Rossignol; R.A. Fraser; G.S. Winkler (Sebastiaan); W. Vermeulen (Wim); L.J. van 't Veer (Laura); L. Ma (Libin); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractMutations in the basal transcription initiation/DNA repair factor TFIIH are responsible for three human disorders: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), cockayne syndrome (CS) and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). The non-repair features of CS and TTD are thought to be due to a partial inactivation of th

  20. Sulindac sulfide inhibits colon cancer cell growth and downregulates specificity protein transcription factors

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xi; Pathi, Satya S.; Safe, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Background Specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors play pivotal roles in maintaining the phenotypes of many cancers. We hypothesized that the antineoplastic effects of sulindac and its metabolites were due, in part, to targeting downregulation of Sp transcription factors. Methods The functional effects of sulindac, sulindac sulfone and sulindac sulfide on colon cancer cell proliferation were determined by cell counting. Effects of these compounds on expression of Sp1, Sp3, Sp4 and pro-...

  1. A membrane-tethered transcription factor ANAC089 negatively regulates floral initiation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The plant-specific NAC (NAM, ATAF1/2,and CUC2) transcription factors have a regulatory function in developmental processes and stress responses. Notably a group of NAC members named NTLs (NTM1-Like) are membrane-tethered, ensuring plants rapidly respond to developmental changes and environmental stimuli. Our results indicated that ANAC089 was a membrane-tethered transcription factor and its truncated form was responsible for the physiological function in flowering time control.

  2. Transcription factors, sucrose, and sucrose metabolic genes interact to regulate potato phenylpropanoid metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Much remains unknown about how transcription factors and sugars regulate phenylpropanoid metabolism in tuber crops like potato (Solanum tuberosum). Based on phylogeny and protein similarity to known regulators of phenylpropanoid metabolism, 15 transcription factors were selected and their expression was compared in white, yellow, red, and purple genotypes with contrasting phenolic and anthocyanin profiles. Red and purple genotypes had increased phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) enzyme activit...

  3. PEA3/ETV4-related transcription factors coupled with active ERK signalling are associated with poor prognosis in gastric adenocarcinoma

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keld, R

    2011-06-28

    Background: Transcription factors often play important roles in tumourigenesis. Members of the PEA3 subfamily of ETS-domain transcription factors fulfil such a role and have been associated with tumour metastasis in several different cancers. Moreover, the activity of the PEA3 subfamily transcription factors is potentiated by Ras-ERK pathway signalling, which is itself often deregulated in tumour cells.\\r\

  4. Role of unphosphorylated transcription factor STAT3 in late cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samraj, Ajoy K; Müller, Anne H; Grell, Anne-Sofie

    2014-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms behind increased cerebral vasospasm and local inflammation in late cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are poorly elucidated. Using system biology tools and experimental SAH models, we have identified signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3......) transcription factor as a possible major regulatory molecule. On the basis of the presence of transcription factor binding sequence in the promoters of differentially regulated genes (significant enrichment PE: 6 × 10(5)) and the consistent expression of STAT3 (mRNA, P=0.0159 and Protein, P=0.0467), we...

  5. Transcription factor ZNF25 is associated with osteoblast differentiation of human skeletal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twine, Natalie A.; Harkness, Linda; Kassem, Moustapha;

    2016-01-01

    Background The differentiation of human bone marrow derived skeletal stem cells (known as human bone marrow stromal or mesenchymal stem cells, hMSCs) into osteoblasts involves the activation of a small number of well-described transcription factors. To identify additional osteoblastic transcription...... containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 and RAN-binding protein 3-like. We also observed enrichment in extracellular matrix organization, skeletal system development and regulation of ossification in the entire upregulated set of genes. Consistent with its function as a transcription factor during osteoblast...

  6. RAD21 cooperates with pluripotency transcription factors in the maintenance of embryonic stem cell identity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Nitzsche

    Full Text Available For self-renewal, embryonic stem cells (ESCs require the expression of specific transcription factors accompanied by a particular chromosome organization to maintain a balance between pluripotency and the capacity for rapid differentiation. However, how transcriptional regulation is linked to chromosome organization in ESCs is not well understood. Here we show that the cohesin component RAD21 exhibits a functional role in maintaining ESC identity through association with the pluripotency transcriptional network. ChIP-seq analyses of RAD21 reveal an ESC specific cohesin binding pattern that is characterized by CTCF independent co-localization of cohesin with pluripotency related transcription factors Oct4, Nanog, Sox2, Esrrb and Klf4. Upon ESC differentiation, most of these binding sites disappear and instead new CTCF independent RAD21 binding sites emerge, which are enriched for binding sites of transcription factors implicated in early differentiation. Furthermore, knock-down of RAD21 causes expression changes that are similar to expression changes after Nanog depletion, demonstrating the functional relevance of the RAD21--pluripotency transcriptional network association. Finally, we show that Nanog physically interacts with the cohesin or cohesin interacting proteins STAG1 and WAPL further substantiating this association. Based on these findings we propose that a dynamic placement of cohesin by pluripotency transcription factors contributes to a chromosome organization supporting the ESC expression program.

  7. Acute myeloid leukemia induced by graded reduction of a lineage-specific transcription factor, PU.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbauer, Frank; Wagner, Katharina; Kutok, Jeffery L; Iwasaki, Hiromi; Le Beau, Michelle M; Okuno, Yutaka; Akashi, Koichi; Fiering, Steven; Tenen, Daniel G

    2004-06-01

    Transcription factors are believed to have a dominant role in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). This idea is supported by analysis of gene-knockout mice, which uncovered crucial roles of several transcription factors in normal hematopoiesis, and of individuals with leukemia, in whom transcription factors are frequently downregulated or mutated. However, analysis of knockout animals has not shown a direct link between abrogated transcription factors and the pathogenesis of AML. Sfpi1, encoding the lineage-specific transcription factor PU.1, is indispensable for normal myeloid and lymphoid development. We found that mice carrying hypomorphic Sfpi1 alleles that reduce PU.1 expression to 20% of normal levels, unlike mice carrying homo- or heterozygous deletions of Sfpi1, developed AML. Unlike complete or 50% loss, 80% loss of PU.1 induced a precancerous state characterized by accumulation of an abnormal precursor pool retaining responsiveness to G-CSF with disruption of M- and GM-CSF pathways. Malignant transformation was associated with a high frequency of clonal chromosomal changes. Retroviral restoration of PU.1 expression rescued myeloid differentiation of mutant progenitors and AML blasts. These results suggest that tightly graded reduction, rather than complete loss, of a lineage-indispensable transcription factor can induce AML.

  8. Genome-wide identification of transcription start sites, promoters and transcription factor binding sites in E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Mendoza-Vargas

    Full Text Available Despite almost 40 years of molecular genetics research in Escherichia coli a major fraction of its Transcription Start Sites (TSSs are still unknown, limiting therefore our understanding of the regulatory circuits that control gene expression in this model organism. RegulonDB (http://regulondb.ccg.unam.mx/ is aimed at integrating the genetic regulatory network of E. coli K12 as an entirely bioinformatic project up till now. In this work, we extended its aims by generating experimental data at a genome scale on TSSs, promoters and regulatory regions. We implemented a modified 5' RACE protocol and an unbiased High Throughput Pyrosequencing Strategy (HTPS that allowed us to map more than 1700 TSSs with high precision. From this collection, about 230 corresponded to previously reported TSSs, which helped us to benchmark both our methodologies and the accuracy of the previous mapping experiments. The other ca 1500 TSSs mapped belong to about 1000 different genes, many of them with no assigned function. We identified promoter sequences and type of sigma factors that control the expression of about 80% of these genes. As expected, the housekeeping sigma(70 was the most common type of promoter, followed by sigma(38. The majority of the putative TSSs were located between 20 to 40 nucleotides from the translational start site. Putative regulatory binding sites for transcription factors were detected upstream of many TSSs. For a few transcripts, riboswitches and small RNAs were found. Several genes also had additional TSSs within the coding region. Unexpectedly, the HTPS experiments revealed extensive antisense transcription, probably for regulatory functions. The new information in RegulonDB, now with more than 2400 experimentally determined TSSs, strengthens the accuracy of promoter prediction, operon structure, and regulatory networks and provides valuable new information that will facilitate the understanding from a global perspective the complex and

  9. Inferring the role of transcription factors in regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Borgne Michel

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression profiles obtained from multiple perturbation experiments are increasingly used to reconstruct transcriptional regulatory networks, from well studied, simple organisms up to higher eukaryotes. Admittedly, a key ingredient in developing a reconstruction method is its ability to integrate heterogeneous sources of information, as well as to comply with practical observability issues: measurements can be scarce or noisy. In this work, we show how to combine a network of genetic regulations with a set of expression profiles, in order to infer the functional effect of the regulations, as inducer or repressor. Our approach is based on a consistency rule between a network and the signs of variation given by expression arrays. Results We evaluate our approach in several settings of increasing complexity. First, we generate artificial expression data on a transcriptional network of E. coli extracted from the literature (1529 nodes and 3802 edges, and we estimate that 30% of the regulations can be annotated with about 30 profiles. We additionally prove that at most 40.8% of the network can be inferred using our approach. Second, we use this network in order to validate the predictions obtained with a compendium of real expression profiles. We describe a filtering algorithm that generates particularly reliable predictions. Finally, we apply our inference approach to S. cerevisiae transcriptional network (2419 nodes and 4344 interactions, by combining ChIP-chip data and 15 expression profiles. We are able to detect and isolate inconsistencies between the expression profiles and a significant portion of the model (15% of all the interactions. In addition, we report predictions for 14.5% of all interactions. Conclusion Our approach does not require accurate expression levels nor times series. Nevertheless, we show on both data, real and artificial, that a relatively small number of perturbation experiments are enough to determine

  10. A binding site for the transcription factor Grainyhead/Nuclear transcription factor-1 contributes to regulation of the Drosophila proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Y; Yamagishi, M; Nishimoto, Y; Taguchi, O; Matsukage, A; Yamaguchi, M

    1999-12-03

    The Drosophila proliferating cell nuclear antigen promoter contains multiple transcriptional regulatory elements, including upstream regulatory element (URE), DNA replication-related element, E2F recognition sites, and three common regulatory factor for DNA replication and DNA replication-related element-binding factor genes recognition sites. In nuclear extracts of Drosophila embryos, we detected a protein factor, the URE-binding factor (UREF), that recognizes the nucleotide sequence 5'-AAACCAGTTGGCA located within URE. Analyses in Drosophila Kc cells and transgenic flies revealed that the UREF-binding site plays an important role in promoter activity both in cultured cells and in living flies. A yeast one-hybrid screen using URE as a bait allowed isolation of a cDNA encoding a transcription factor, Grainyhead/nuclear transcription factor-1 (GRH/NTF-1). The nucleotide sequence required for binding to GRH was indistinguishable from that for UREF detected in embryo nuclear extracts. Furthermore, a specific antibody to GRH reacted with UREF in embryo nuclear extracts. From these results we conclude that GRH is identical to UREF. Although GRH has been thought to be involved in regulation of differentiation-related genes, this study demonstrates, for the first time, involvement of a GRH-binding site in regulation of the DNA replication-related proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene.

  11. Ligand-specific sequential regulation of transcription factors for differentiation of MCF-7 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyoda Tetsuro

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sharing a common ErbB/HER receptor signaling pathway, heregulin (HRG induces differentiation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells while epidermal growth factor (EGF elicits proliferation. Although cell fates resulting from action of the aforementioned ligands completely different, the respective gene expression profiles in early transcription are qualitatively similar, suggesting that gene expression during late transcription, but not early transcription, may reflect ligand specificity. In this study, based on both the data from time-course quantitative real-time PCR on over 2,000 human transcription factors and microarray of all human genes, we identified a series of transcription factors which may control HRG-specific late transcription in MCF-7 cells. Results We predicted that four transcription factors including EGR4, FRA-1, FHL2, and DIPA should have responsibility of regulation in MCF-7 cell differentiation. Validation analysis suggested that one member of the activator protein 1 (AP-1 family, FOSL-1 (FRA-1 gene, appeared immediately following c-FOS expression, might be responsible for expression of transcription factor FHL2 through activation of the AP-1 complex. Furthermore, RNAi gene silencing of FOSL-1 and FHL2 resulted in increase of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK phosphorylation of which duration was sustained by HRG stimulation. Conclusion Our analysis indicated that a time-dependent transcriptional regulatory network including c-FOS, FRA-1, and FHL2 is vital in controlling the ERK signaling pathway through a negative feedback loop for MCF-7 cell differentiation.

  12. Diversity and Complexity in DNA Recognition by Transcription Factors**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badis, Gwenael; Berger, Michael F.; Philippakis, Anthony A.; Talukder, Shaheynoor; Gehrke, Andrew R.; Jaeger, Savina A.; Chan, Esther T.; Metzler, Genita; Vedenko, Anastasia; Chen, Xiaoyu; Kuznetsov, Hanna; Wang, Chi-Fong; Coburn, David; Newburger, Daniel E.; Morris, Quaid; Hughes, Timothy R.; Bulyk, Martha L.

    2010-01-01

    Sequence preferences of DNA-binding proteins are a primary mechanism by which cells interpret the genome. Despite these proteins’ central importance in physiology, development, and evolution, comprehensive DNA-binding specificities have been determined experimentally for few proteins. Here, we used microarrays containing all 10-base-pair sequences to examine the binding specificities of 104 distinct mouse DNA-binding proteins representing 22 structural classes. Our results reveal a complex landscape of binding, with virtually every protein analyzed possessing unique preferences. Roughly half of the proteins each recognized multiple distinctly different sequence motifs, challenging our molecular understanding of how proteins interact with their DNA binding sites. This complexity in DNA recognition may be important in gene regulation and in evolution of transcriptional regulatory networks. PMID:19443739

  13. WRKY Transcription Factors Involved in Activation of SA Biosynthesis Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bol John F

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased defense against a variety of pathogens in plants is achieved through activation of a mechanism known as systemic acquired resistance (SAR. The broad-spectrum resistance brought about by SAR is mediated through salicylic acid (SA. An important step in SA biosynthesis in Arabidopsis is the conversion of chorismate to isochorismate through the action of isochorismate synthase, encoded by the ICS1 gene. Also AVRPPHB SUSCEPTIBLE 3 (PBS3 plays an important role in SA metabolism, as pbs3 mutants accumulate drastically reduced levels of SA-glucoside, a putative storage form of SA. Bioinformatics analysis previously performed by us identified WRKY28 and WRKY46 as possible regulators of ICS1 and PBS3. Results Expression studies with ICS1 promoter::β-glucuronidase (GUS genes in Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts cotransfected with 35S::WRKY28 showed that over expression of WRKY28 resulted in a strong increase in GUS expression. Moreover, qRT-PCR analyses indicated that the endogenous ICS1 and PBS3 genes were highly expressed in protoplasts overexpressing WRKY28 or WRKY46, respectively. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays indentified potential WRKY28 binding sites in the ICS1 promoter, positioned -445 and -460 base pairs upstream of the transcription start site. Mutation of these sites in protoplast transactivation assays showed that these binding sites are functionally important for activation of the ICS1 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays with haemagglutinin-epitope-tagged WRKY28 showed that the region of the ICS1 promoter containing the binding sites at -445 and -460 was highly enriched in the immunoprecipitated DNA. Conclusions The results obtained here confirm results from our multiple microarray co-expression analyses indicating that WRKY28 and WRKY46 are transcriptional activators of ICS1 and PBS3, respectively, and support this in silico screening as a powerful tool for identifying new components of stress

  14. Probabilistic inference of transcription factor binding from multiple data sources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harri Lähdesmäki

    Full Text Available An important problem in molecular biology is to build a complete understanding of transcriptional regulatory processes in the cell. We have developed a flexible, probabilistic framework to predict TF binding from multiple data sources that differs from the standard hypothesis testing (scanning methods in several ways. Our probabilistic modeling framework estimates the probability of binding and, thus, naturally reflects our degree of belief in binding. Probabilistic modeling also allows for easy and systematic integration of our binding predictions into other probabilistic modeling methods, such as expression-based gene network inference. The method answers the question of whether the whole analyzed promoter has a binding site, but can also be extended to estimate the binding probability at each nucleotide position. Further, we introduce an extension to model combinatorial regulation by several TFs. Most importantly, the proposed methods can make principled probabilistic inference from multiple evidence sources, such as, multiple statistical models (motifs of the TFs, evolutionary conservation, regulatory potential, CpG islands, nucleosome positioning, DNase hypersensitive sites, ChIP-chip binding segments and other (prior sequence-based biological knowledge. We developed both a likelihood and a Bayesian method, where the latter is implemented with a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. Results on a carefully constructed test set from the mouse genome demonstrate that principled data fusion can significantly improve the performance of TF binding prediction methods. We also applied the probabilistic modeling framework to all promoters in the mouse genome and the results indicate a sparse connectivity between transcriptional regulators and their target promoters. To facilitate analysis of other sequences and additional data, we have developed an on-line web tool, ProbTF, which implements our probabilistic TF binding prediction method using multiple

  15. Allelic mutations in noncoding genomic sequences construct novel transcription factor binding sites that promote gene overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Erming; Børset, Magne; Sawyer, Jeffrey R; Brede, Gaute; Våtsveen, Thea K; Hov, Håkon; Waage, Anders; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John D; Epstein, Joshua; Sundan, Anders

    2015-11-01

    The growth and survival factor hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is expressed at high levels in multiple myeloma (MM) cells. We report here that elevated HGF transcription in MM was traced to DNA mutations in the promoter alleles of HGF. Sequence analysis revealed a previously undiscovered single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and crucial single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the promoters of myeloma cells that produce large amounts of HGF. The allele-specific mutations functionally reassembled wild-type sequences into the motifs that affiliate with endogenous transcription factors NFKB (nuclear factor kappa-B), MZF1 (myeloid zinc finger 1), and NRF-2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2). In vitro, a mutant allele that gained novel NFKB-binding sites directly responded to transcriptional signaling induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) to promote high levels of luciferase reporter. Given the recent discovery by genome-wide sequencing (GWS) of numerous non-coding mutations in myeloma genomes, our data provide evidence that heterogeneous SNVs in the gene regulatory regions may frequently transform wild-type alleles into novel transcription factor binding properties to aberrantly interact with dysregulated transcriptional signals in MM and other cancer cells.

  16. 14q13.1-21.1 deletion encompassing the HPE8 locus in an adolescent with intellectual disability and bilateral microphthalmia, but without holoprosencephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccione, Maria; Serra, Gregorio; Consiglio, Valeria; Di Fiore, Antonella; Cavani, Simona; Grasso, Marina; Malacarne, Michela; Pierluigi, Mauro; Viaggi, Chiara; Corsello, Giovanni

    2012-06-01

    Interstitial deletions involving 14q13.1q21.1 are rare. In the literature at least 10 cases involving this region have been described and all patients showed a phenotype within the holoprosencephaly (HPE) spectrum. Previous studies suggested the HPE8 region as a candidate locus for HPE at 14q13. We report an adolescent with a 14q13.1q21.1 deletion encompassing the HPE8 region associated with intellectual disability (ID), bilateral microphthalmia, and coloboma, without cerebral anomalies typical of HPE. Except for ocular defects (i.e., microphthalmia, coloboma) consistent with HPE-type anomalies, the minor facial dysmorphia was not suggestive for HPE and the absence of cerebral anomalies should rule out this diagnosis. The deletion of the potential HPE candidate genes NPAS3, EAPP, SNX6, and TULIP1, raises doubts about their pathologic role in determining HPE. It is likely that deletions of HPE genes are not sufficient to cause HPE, and that multiple genetic, chromosomal, and environmental factors interact to determine the variable clinical expression of HPE. This is the first case of a 14q deletion encompassing the HPE8 locus with the only features consistent with HPE-type anomalies affecting the ocular system (i.e., microphthalmia, coloboma), and without cerebral anomalies specific for HPE. The inclusion of potential HPE candidate genes in the deletion raises the question whether this patient is affected by a less severe form of HPE (HPE microform), or whether he has a new ID/MCA deletion syndrome.

  17. A New Microsphere-Based Immunoassay for Measuring the Activity of Transcription Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Chueh-Jen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There are several traditional and well-developed methods for analyzing the activity of transcription factors, such as EMSA, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and reporter gene activity assays. All of these methods have their own distinct disadvantages, but none can analyze the changes in transcription factors in the few cells that are cultured in the wells of 96-well titer plates. Thus, a new microsphere-based immunoassay to measure the activity of transcription factors (MIA-TF was developed. In MIA-TF, NeutrAvidin-labeled microspheres were used as the solid phase to capture biotin-labeled double-strand DNA fragments which contain certain transcription factor binding elements. The activity of transcription factors was detected by immunoassay using a transcription factor-specific antibody to monitor the binding with the DNA probe. Next, analysis was performed by flow cytometry. The targets hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB were applied and detected in this MIA-TF method; the results that we obtained demonstrated that this method could be used to monitor the changes of NF-κB or HIF within 50 or 100 ng of nuclear extract. Furthermore, MIA-TF could detect the changes in NF-κB or HIF in cells that were cultured in wells of a 96-well plate without purification of the nuclear protein, an important consideration for applying this method to high-throughput assays in the future. The development of MIA-TF would support further progress in clinical analysis and drug screening systems. Overall, MIA-TF is a method with high potential to detect the activity of transcription factors.

  18. Arabidopsis sigma factor binding proteins are activators of the WRKY33 transcription factor in plant defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhibing; Li, Ying; Wang, Fei; Cheng, Yuan; Fan, Baofang; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2011-10-01

    Necrotrophic pathogens are important plant pathogens that cause many devastating plant diseases. Despite their impact, our understanding of the plant defense response to necrotrophic pathogens is limited. The WRKY33 transcription factor is important for plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens; therefore, elucidation of its functions will enhance our understanding of plant immunity to necrotrophic pathogens. Here, we report the identification of two WRKY33-interacting proteins, nuclear-encoded SIGMA FACTOR BINDING PROTEIN1 (SIB1) and SIB2, which also interact with plastid-encoded plastid RNA polymerase SIGMA FACTOR1. Both SIB1 and SIB2 contain an N-terminal chloroplast targeting signal and a putative nuclear localization signal, suggesting that they are dual targeted. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation indicates that WRKY33 interacts with SIBs in the nucleus of plant cells. Both SIB1 and SIB2 contain a short VQ motif that is important for interaction with WRKY33. The two VQ motif-containing proteins recognize the C-terminal WRKY domain and stimulate the DNA binding activity of WRKY33. Like WRKY33, both SIB1 and SIB2 are rapidly and strongly induced by the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Resistance to B. cinerea is compromised in the sib1 and sib2 mutants but enhanced in SIB1-overexpressing transgenic plants. These results suggest that dual-targeted SIB1 and SIB2 function as activators of WRKY33 in plant defense against necrotrophic pathogens.

  19. The Role of the TEF Transcription Factors in Cardiogenesis and Other Developmental Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquemin, P; Davidson, I

    1997-08-01

    The development of complex tissues and organs during embryogenesis is accompanied by precise spatial and temporal gene regulation, which usually takes place at the level of transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II. Differential patterns of gene expression are controlled by the binding of combinatorial arrays of transcription factors to their cognate regulatory elements in the promoters and enhancers of target genes. Generally, these transcription factors belong to families that have arisen through gene duplication. Members of a given family can be identified by the fact that they possess a common DNA-binding domain. In this review, we present the current data arguing for the possible involvement of the TEF family of transcription factors, which contain the TEA DNA-binding domain, in cardiogenesis and in other developmental processes. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:192-197). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  20. Differential expression of transcription factors Snail, Slug, SIP1, and Twist in ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siar, Chong Huat; Ng, Kok Han

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) via the mechanism of transcription repression is a crucial process for the induction of invasiveness in many human tumors. Ameloblastoma is a benign odontogenic epithelial neoplasm with a locally infiltrative behavior. Twist, an EMT promoter, has been implicated in its invasiveness. The roles of the other transcription factors remain unclarified. Four transcription factors, namely Snail, Slug, SIP1, and Twist, were examined immunohistochemically in 64 ameloblastoma [18 unicystic (UA), 20 solid/multicystic (SA), 4 desmoplastic (DA), and 22 recurrent (RA)]. All four transcription factors were differentially expressed in ameloblastoma [Snail: n = 60/64 (94%); Slug: n = 21/64 (33%); SIP: n = 18/64 (28%); Twist: n = 26/64 (41%)] (P 0.05). Intracellular protein localization was predominantly nuclear for Snail, cytoplasmic>nuclear for Slug and SIP1, and cytoplasmic/nuclear for Twist. Overexpression of Snail in most subsets (UA = 18/18; SMA = 19/20; DA = 4/4; RA = 19/22) compared with the other transcription factors (P ameloblastoma. Overexpression of Snail in most subsets suggests that this molecule is most likely the prototype transcription factor involved in inducing EMT in the ameloblastoma. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Identification of transcription-factor genes expressed in the Arabidopsis female gametophyte

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    Kang Il-Ho

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In flowering plants, the female gametophyte is typically a seven-celled structure with four cell types: the egg cell, the central cell, the synergid cells, and the antipodal cells. These cells perform essential functions required for double fertilization and early seed development. Differentiation of these distinct cell types likely involves coordinated changes in gene expression regulated by transcription factors. Therefore, understanding female gametophyte cell differentiation and function will require dissection of the gene regulatory networks operating in each of the cell types. These efforts have been hampered because few transcription factor genes expressed in the female gametophyte have been identified. To identify such genes, we undertook a large-scale differential expression screen followed by promoter-fusion analysis to detect transcription-factor genes transcribed in the Arabidopsis female gametophyte. Results Using quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR, we analyzed 1,482 Arabidopsis transcription-factor genes and identified 26 genes exhibiting reduced mRNA levels in determinate infertile 1 mutant ovaries, which lack female gametophytes, relative to ovaries containing female gametophytes. Spatial patterns of gene transcription within the mature female gametophyte were identified for 17 transcription-factor genes using promoter-fusion analysis. Of these, ten genes were predominantly expressed in a single cell type of the female gametophyte including the egg cell, central cell and the antipodal cells whereas the remaining seven genes were expressed in two or more cell types. After fertilization, 12 genes were transcriptionally active in the developing embryo and/or endosperm. Conclusions We have shown that our quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR differential-expression screen is sufficiently sensitive to detect transcription-factor genes transcribed in the female gametophyte. Most of the genes identified in this

  2. c-Fos as a transcription factor: a stressful (re)view from a functional map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, K J

    1998-10-01

    This article summarizes the achievements that have been accumulated about the role of c-Fos as a transcription factor and as a functional marker of activated neurons. Since its discovery, more than a decade ago, as an inducible immediate-early gene encoding a transcription factor, or third messenger, involved in stimulus-transcription coupling and mediation of extracellular signals to long-term changes in cellular phenotype, c-fos became the most widely used powerful tool to delineate individual neurons as well as extended circuitries that are responsive to wide variety of external stimuli. There still remain uncertainties as to how general is the c-fos induction in the central neurons, and whether the threshold of c-fos induction is comparable along a certain neuronal circuit. The major limitation of this technology is that c-fos does not mark cells with a net inhibitory synaptic or transcriptional drive, and c-fos induction, as a generic marker of trans-synaptic activation, does not provide evidence for transcriptional activation of specific target genes in a certain cell type of interest. The first part of the review focuses on recent functional data on c-fos as transcription factor, while the second part discusses c-fos as a cellular marker of transcriptional activity in the stress-related circuitry.

  3. R7 Photoreceptor Specification in the Developing Drosophila Eye: The Role of the Transcription Factor Deadpan.

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    Yannis Emmanuel Mavromatakis

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available As cells proceed along their developmental pathways they make a series of sequential cell fate decisions. Each of those decisions needs to be made in a robust manner so there is no ambiguity in the state of the cell as it proceeds to the next stage. Here we examine the decision made by the Drosophila R7 precursor cell to become a photoreceptor and ask how the robustness of that decision is achieved. The transcription factor Tramtrack (Ttk inhibits photoreceptor assignment, and previous studies found that the RTK-induced degradation of Ttk was critically required for R7 specification. Here we find that the transcription factor Deadpan (Dpn is also required; it is needed to silence ttk transcription, and only when Ttk protein degradation and transcriptional silencing occur together is the photoreceptor fate robustly achieved. Dpn expression needs to be tightly restricted to R7 precursors, and we describe the role played by Ttk in repressing dpn transcription. Thus, Dpn and Ttk act as mutually repressive transcription factors, with Dpn acting to ensure that Ttk is effectively removed from R7, and Ttk acting to prevent Dpn expression in other cells. Furthermore, we find that N activity is required to promote dpn transcription, and only in R7 precursors does the removal of Ttk coincide with high N activity, and only in this cell does Dpn expression result.

  4. Extracellular Matrix-Regulated Gene Expression RequiresCooperation of SWI/SNF and Transcription Factors

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    Xu, Ren; Spencer, Virginia A.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2006-05-25

    Extracellular cues play crucial roles in the transcriptional regulation of tissue-specific genes, but whether and how these signals lead to chromatin remodeling is not understood and subject to debate. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays and mammary-specific genes as models, we show here that extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules and prolactin cooperate to induce histone acetylation and binding of transcription factors and the SWI/SNF complex to the {beta}- and ?-casein promoters. Introduction of a dominant negative Brg1, an ATPase subunit of SWI/SNF complex, significantly reduced both {beta}- and ?-casein expression, suggesting that SWI/SNF-dependent chromatin remodeling is required for transcription of mammary-specific genes. ChIP analyses demonstrated that the ATPase activity of SWI/SNF is necessary for recruitment of RNA transcriptional machinery, but not for binding of transcription factors or for histone acetylation. Coimmunoprecipitation analyses showed that the SWI/SNF complex is associated with STAT5, C/EBP{beta}, and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Thus, ECM- and prolactin-regulated transcription of the mammary-specific casein genes requires the concerted action of chromatin remodeling enzymes and transcription factors.

  5. The WRKY57 Transcription Factor Affects the Expression of Jasmonate ZIM-Domain Genes Transcriptionally to Compromise Botrytis cinerea Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanjuan; Yu, Diqiu

    2016-08-01

    Although necrotrophic pathogens cause many devastating plant diseases, our understanding of the plant defense response to them is limited. Here, we found that loss of function of WRKY57 enhanced the resistance of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) against Botrytis cinerea infection. Further investigation suggested that the negative regulation of WRKY57 against B cinerea depends on the jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that WRKY57 directly binds to the promoters of JASMONATE ZIM-DOMAIN1 (JAZ1) and JAZ5, encoding two important repressors of the JA signaling pathway, and activates their transcription. In vivo and in vitro experiments demonstrated that WRKY57 interacts with nuclear-encoded SIGMA FACTOR BINDING PROTEIN1 (SIB1) and SIB2. Further experiments display that the same domain, the VQ motif, of SIB1 and SIB2 interact with WRKY33 and WRKY57. Moreover, transient transcriptional activity assays confirmed that WRKY57 and WRKY33 competitively regulate JAZ1 and JAZ5, SIB1 and SIB2 further enhance these competitions of WRKY57 to WRKY33. Therefore, coordinated regulation of Arabidopsis against B cinerea by transcription activators and repressors would benefit plants by allowing fine regulation of defense.

  6. High resolution genome wide binding event finding and motif discovery reveals transcription factor spatial binding constraints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuchun Guo

    Full Text Available An essential component of genome function is the syntax of genomic regulatory elements that determine how diverse transcription factors interact to orchestrate a program of regulatory control. A precise characterization of in vivo spacing constraints between key transcription factors would reveal key aspects of this genomic regulatory language. To discover novel transcription factor spatial binding constraints in vivo, we developed a new integrative computational method, genome wide event finding and motif discovery (GEM. GEM resolves ChIP data into explanatory motifs and binding events at high spatial resolution by linking binding event discovery and motif discovery with positional priors in the context of a generative probabilistic model of ChIP data and genome sequence. GEM analysis of 63 transcription factors in 214 ENCODE human ChIP-Seq experiments recovers more known factor motifs than other contemporary methods, and discovers six new motifs for factors with unknown binding specificity. GEM's adaptive learning of binding-event read distributions allows it to further improve upon previous methods for processing ChIP-Seq and ChIP-exo data to yield unsurpassed spatial resolution and discovery of closely spaced binding events of the same factor. In a systematic analysis of in vivo sequence-specific transcription factor binding using GEM, we have found hundreds of spatial binding constraints between factors. GEM found 37 examples of factor binding constraints in mouse ES cells, including strong distance-specific constraints between Klf4 and other key regulatory factors. In human ENCODE data, GEM found 390 examples of spatially constrained pair-wise binding, including such novel pairs as c-Fos:c-Jun/USF1, CTCF/Egr1, and HNF4A/FOXA1. The discovery of new factor-factor spatial constraints in ChIP data is significant because it proposes testable models for regulatory factor interactions that will help elucidate genome function and the

  7. High resolution genome wide binding event finding and motif discovery reveals transcription factor spatial binding constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuchun; Mahony, Shaun; Gifford, David K

    2012-01-01

    An essential component of genome function is the syntax of genomic regulatory elements that determine how diverse transcription factors interact to orchestrate a program of regulatory control. A precise characterization of in vivo spacing constraints between key transcription factors would reveal key aspects of this genomic regulatory language. To discover novel transcription factor spatial binding constraints in vivo, we developed a new integrative computational method, genome wide event finding and motif discovery (GEM). GEM resolves ChIP data into explanatory motifs and binding events at high spatial resolution by linking binding event discovery and motif discovery with positional priors in the context of a generative probabilistic model of ChIP data and genome sequence. GEM analysis of 63 transcription factors in 214 ENCODE human ChIP-Seq experiments recovers more known factor motifs than other contemporary methods, and discovers six new motifs for factors with unknown binding specificity. GEM's adaptive learning of binding-event read distributions allows it to further improve upon previous methods for processing ChIP-Seq and ChIP-exo data to yield unsurpassed spatial resolution and discovery of closely spaced binding events of the same factor. In a systematic analysis of in vivo sequence-specific transcription factor binding using GEM, we have found hundreds of spatial binding constraints between factors. GEM found 37 examples of factor binding constraints in mouse ES cells, including strong distance-specific constraints between Klf4 and other key regulatory factors. In human ENCODE data, GEM found 390 examples of spatially constrained pair-wise binding, including such novel pairs as c-Fos:c-Jun/USF1, CTCF/Egr1, and HNF4A/FOXA1. The discovery of new factor-factor spatial constraints in ChIP data is significant because it proposes testable models for regulatory factor interactions that will help elucidate genome function and the implementation of combinatorial

  8. Binding site turnover produces pervasive quantitative changes in transcription factor binding between closely related Drosophila species.

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    Robert K Bradley

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Changes in gene expression play an important role in evolution, yet the molecular mechanisms underlying regulatory evolution are poorly understood. Here we compare genome-wide binding of the six transcription factors that initiate segmentation along the anterior-posterior axis in embryos of two closely related species: Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila yakuba. Where we observe binding by a factor in one species, we almost always observe binding by that factor to the orthologous sequence in the other species. Levels of binding, however, vary considerably. The magnitude and direction of the interspecies differences in binding levels of all six factors are strongly correlated, suggesting a role for chromatin or other factor-independent forces in mediating the divergence of transcription factor binding. Nonetheless, factor-specific quantitative variation in binding is common, and we show that it is driven to a large extent by the gain and loss of cognate recognition sequences for the given factor. We find only a weak correlation between binding variation and regulatory function. These data provide the first genome-wide picture of how modest levels of sequence divergence between highly morphologically similar species affect a system of coordinately acting transcription factors during animal development, and highlight the dominant role of quantitative variation in transcription factor binding over short evolutionary distances.

  9. Wide-scale analysis of human functional transcription factor binding reveals a strong bias towards the transcription start site.

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    Yuval Tabach

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcription factors (TF regulate expression by binding to specific DNA sequences. A binding event is functional when it affects gene expression. Functionality of a binding site is reflected in conservation of the binding sequence during evolution and in over represented binding in gene groups with coherent biological functions. Functionality is governed by several parameters such as the TF-DNA binding strength, distance of the binding site from the transcription start site (TSS, DNA packing, and more. Understanding how these parameters control functionality of different TFs in different biological contexts is a must for identifying functional TF binding sites and for understanding regulation of transcription. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We introduce a novel method to screen the promoters of a set of genes with shared biological function (obtained from the functional Gene Ontology (GO classification against a precompiled library of motifs, and find those motifs which are statistically over-represented in the gene set. More than 8,000 human (and 23,000 mouse genes, were assigned to one of 134 GO sets. Their promoters were searched (from 200 bp downstream to 1,000 bp upstream the TSS for 414 known DNA motifs. We optimized the sequence similarity score threshold, independently for every location window, taking into account nucleotide heterogeneity along the promoters of the target genes. The method, combined with binding sequence and location conservation between human and mouse, identifies with high probability functional binding sites for groups of functionally-related genes. We found many location-sensitive functional binding events and showed that they clustered close to the TSS. Our method and findings were tested experimentally. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We identified reliably functional TF binding sites. This is an essential step towards constructing regulatory networks. The promoter region proximal to the TSS is of central

  10. A Genome-Scale Resource for the Functional Characterization of Arabidopsis Transcription Factors

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    Jose L. Pruneda-Paz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Extensive transcriptional networks play major roles in cellular and organismal functions. Transcript levels are in part determined by the combinatorial and overlapping functions of multiple transcription factors (TFs bound to gene promoters. Thus, TF-promoter interactions provide the basic molecular wiring of transcriptional regulatory networks. In plants, discovery of the functional roles of TFs is limited by an increased complexity of network circuitry due to a significant expansion of TF families. Here, we present the construction of a comprehensive collection of Arabidopsis TFs clones created to provide a versatile resource for uncovering TF biological functions. We leveraged this collection by implementing a high-throughput DNA binding assay and identified direct regulators of a key clock gene (CCA1 that provide molecular links between different signaling modules and the circadian clock. The resources introduced in this work will significantly contribute to a better understanding of the transcriptional regulatory landscape of plant genomes.

  11. Association of transcription factor gene LMX1B with autism.

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    Ismail Thanseem

    Full Text Available Multiple lines of evidence suggest a serotoninergic dysfunction in autism. The role of LMX1B in the development and maintenance of serotoninergic neurons is well known. In order to examine the role, if any, of LMX1B with autism pathophysiology, a trio-based SNP association study using 252 family samples from the AGRE was performed. Using pair-wise tagging method, 24 SNPs were selected from the HapMap data, based on their location and minor allele frequency. Two SNPs (rs10732392 and rs12336217 showed moderate association with autism with p values 0.018 and 0.022 respectively in transmission disequilibrium test. The haplotype AGCGTG also showed significant association (p = 0.008. Further, LMX1B mRNA expressions were studied in the postmortem brain tissues of autism subjects and healthy controls samples. LMX1B transcripts was found to be significantly lower in the anterior cingulate gyrus region of autism patients compared with controls (p = 0.049. Our study suggests a possible role of LMX1B in the pathophysiology of autism. Based on previous reports, it is likely to be mediated through a seretoninergic mechanism. This is the first report on the association of LMX1B with autism, though it should be viewed with some caution considering the modest associations we report.

  12. Association of transcription factor gene LMX1B with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanseem, Ismail; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Anitha, Ayyappan; Suda, Shiro; Yamada, Kazuo; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Toyota, Tomoko; Tsujii, Masatsugu; Iwata, Yasuhide; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Matsuzaki, Hideo; Iwata, Keiko; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Mori, Norio

    2011-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence suggest a serotoninergic dysfunction in autism. The role of LMX1B in the development and maintenance of serotoninergic neurons is well known. In order to examine the role, if any, of LMX1B with autism pathophysiology, a trio-based SNP association study using 252 family samples from the AGRE was performed. Using pair-wise tagging method, 24 SNPs were selected from the HapMap data, based on their location and minor allele frequency. Two SNPs (rs10732392 and rs12336217) showed moderate association with autism with p values 0.018 and 0.022 respectively in transmission disequilibrium test. The haplotype AGCGTG also showed significant association (p = 0.008). Further, LMX1B mRNA expressions were studied in the postmortem brain tissues of autism subjects and healthy controls samples. LMX1B transcripts was found to be significantly lower in the anterior cingulate gyrus region of autism patients compared with controls (p = 0.049). Our study suggests a possible role of LMX1B in the pathophysiology of autism. Based on previous reports, it is likely to be mediated through a seretoninergic mechanism. This is the first report on the association of LMX1B with autism, though it should be viewed with some caution considering the modest associations we report.

  13. [Inhibiting the pro-tumor and transcription factor FACT: Mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluchenko, N V; Chang, H W; Kozinova, M T; Valieva, M E; Gerasimova, N S; Kitashov, A V; Kirpichnikov, M P; Georgiev, P G; Studitsky, V M

    2016-01-01

    Conventional antitumor therapy is often complicated by the emergence of the so-called cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are characterized by low metabolic rates and high resistance to almost all existing therapies. Many problems of clinical oncology and a poor efficacy of current treatments in particular are ascribed to CSCs. Therefore, it is important to develop new compounds capable of eliminating both rapidly proliferating tumor cells and standard treatment-resistant CSCs. Curaxins have been demonstrated to manifest various types of antitumor activity. Curaxins simultaneously affect at least three key molecular cascades involved in tumor development, including the p53, NF-κB, and HSF1 metabolic pathways. In addition, studies of some curaxins indicate that they can inhibit the transcriptional induction of the genes for matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 8 (MMP1 and MMP8); the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling cascades; cIAP-1 (apoptosis protein 1) inhibitor activity; topoisomerase II; and a number of oncogenes, such as c-MYC and others. In vivo experiments have shown that the CSC population increases on gemcitabine monotherapy and is reduced on treatment with curaxin CBL0137. The data support the prospective use of FACT inhibitors as new anticancer drugs with multiple effects on cell metabolism.

  14. Mapping Transcription Factors on Extended DNA: A Single Molecule Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebenstein, Yuval; Gassman, Natalie; Weiss, Shimon

    The ability to determine the precise loci and distribution of nucleic acid binding proteins is instrumental to our detailed understanding of cellular processes such as transcription, replication, and chromatin reorganization. Traditional molecular biology approaches and above all Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) based methods have provided a wealth of information regarding protein-DNA interactions. Nevertheless, existing techniques can only provide average properties of these interactions, since they are based on the accumulation of data from numerous protein-DNA complexes analyzed at the ensemble level. We propose a single molecule approach for direct visualization of DNA binding proteins bound specifically to their recognition sites along a long stretch of DNA such as genomic DNA. Fluorescent Quantum dots are used to tag proteins bound to DNA, and the complex is deposited on a glass substrate by extending the DNA to a linear form. The sample is then imaged optically to determine the precise location of the protein binding site. The method is demonstrated by detecting individual, Quantum dot tagged T7-RNA polymerase enzymes on the bacteriophage T7 genomic DNA and assessing the relative occupancy of the different promoters.

  15. Structural, functional, and genetic analyses of the actinobacterial transcription factor RbpA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubin, Elizabeth A; Tabib-Salazar, Aline; Humphrey, Laurence J; Flack, Joshua E; Olinares, Paul Dominic B; Darst, Seth A; Campbell, Elizabeth A; Paget, Mark S

    2015-06-01

    Gene expression is highly regulated at the step of transcription initiation, and transcription activators play a critical role in this process. RbpA, an actinobacterial transcription activator that is essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), binds selectively to group 1 and certain group 2 σ-factors. To delineate the molecular mechanism of RbpA, we show that the Mtb RbpA σ-interacting domain (SID) and basic linker are sufficient for transcription activation. We also present the crystal structure of the Mtb RbpA-SID in complex with domain 2 of the housekeeping σ-factor, σ(A). The structure explains the basis of σ-selectivity by RbpA, showing that RbpA interacts with conserved regions of σ(A) as well as the nonconserved region (NCR), which is present only in housekeeping σ-factors. Thus, the structure is the first, to our knowledge, to show a protein interacting with the NCR of a σ-factor. We confirm the basis of selectivity and the observed interactions using mutagenesis and functional studies. In addition, the structure allows for a model of the RbpA-SID in the context of a transcription initiation complex. Unexpectedly, the structural modeling suggests that RbpA contacts the promoter DNA, and we present in vivo and in vitro studies supporting this finding. Our combined data lead to a better understanding of the mechanism of RbpA function as a transcription activator.

  16. Ikaros family transcription factors expression in rat thymus: detection of impaired development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradzik, M; Novak, S; Mokrovic, G; Bordukalo Niksic, T; Heckel, D; Stipic, J; Pavicic Baldani, D; Cicin-Sain, L; Antica, M

    2012-01-01

    The expression of Ikaros family transcription factors and consequently their signalling pathway is limiting for hematopoietic and lymphocyte development in mice and human. Due to their importance, these transcription factors are highly homologous between species. As an initial approach to examining the possible involvement of Ikaros transcription factors in pathogenesis of rat lymphoid development, we analyzed the expression of all known Ikaros family members, Ikaros, Aiolos, Helios, Eos and Pegasus in the rat thymus. We established a semi-quantitative RT-PCR to detect mRNA of each transcription factor. For the first time we give evidence of the expression of Ikaros family transcription factors in the rat thymus. Further, we evaluated whether their mRNA expression was succumbed to changes when the rats were exposed to ethanol, as a known debilitating agent during development. Therefore we analyzed the thymus of adult rats whose mothers were forced to drink ethanol during gestation, to detect possible changes in thymus mRNA expression levels of Ikaros, Aiolos, Helios, Eos and Pegasus. We found that rats prenatally exposed to ethanol show a slightly higher expression of Ikaros family transcription factors in the adult thymus when compared to control rats, but these differences were not statistically significant. We further studied the distribution of the major lymphocyte subpopulations in the rat thymus according to CD3, CD4 and CD8 expression by four color flow cytometry. We found a higher incidence of CD3 positive cells in the double positive, CD4+CD8+ thymic subpopulation of rats prenatally exposed to ethanol when compared to non-exposed animals. Our findings indicate that ethanol exposure of pregnant rats might influence the development of CD3 positive cells in the thymus of the offspring but this result should be further tackled at the level of transcription factor expression.

  17. Auxiliary splice factor U2AF26 and transcription factor Gfi1 cooperate directly in regulating CD45 alternative splicing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heyd, F.; Dam, G.B. ten; Moroy, T.

    2006-01-01

    By alternative splicing, different isoforms of the transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase CD45 are generated that either enhance or limit T cell receptor signaling. We report here that CD45 alternative splicing is regulated by cooperative action of the splice factor U2AF26 and the transcription factor G

  18. ER stress and cancer: The FOXO forkhead transcription factor link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alasiri, Glowi; Fan, Lavender Yuen-Nam; Zona, Stefania; Goldsbrough, Isabella Galeno; Ke, Hui-Ling; Auner, Holger Werner; Lam, Eric Wing-Fai

    2017-05-29

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a cellular organelle with central roles in maintaining proteostasis due to its involvement in protein synthesis, folding, quality control, distribution and degradation. The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the ER lumen causes 'ER stress' and threatens overall cellular proteostasis. To restore ER homeostasis, cells evoke an evolutionarily conserved adaptive signalling and gene expression network collectively called the 'unfolded protein response (UPR)', a complex biological process which aims to restore proteostasis. When ER stress is overwhelming and beyond rectification, the normally pro-survival UPR can shift to induce cell termination. Emerging evidence from mammalian, fly and nematode worm systems reveals that the FOXO Forkhead proteins integrate upstream ER stress and UPR signals with the transcriptional machinery to decrease translation, promote cell survival/termination and increase the levels of ER-resident chaperones and of ER-associated degradation (ERAD) components to restore ER homeostasis. The high rates of protein synthesis/translation associated with cancer cell proliferation and metabolism, as well as mutations resulting in aberrant proteins, also induce ER stress and the UPR. While the pro-survival side of the UPR underlies its ability to sustain and promote cancers, its apoptotic functions can be exploited for cancer therapies by offering the chance to 'flick the proteostatic switch'. To this end, further studies are required to fully reevaluate the roles and regulation of these UPR signalling molecules, including FOXO proteins and their targets, in cancer initiation and progression as well as the effects on inhibiting their functions in cancer cells. This information will help to establish these UPR signalling molecules as possible therapeutic targets and putative biomarkers in cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Drosophila Transcription Factors Tinman and Pannier Activate and Collaborate with Myocyte Enhancer Factor-2 to Promote Heart Cell Fate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TyAnna L Lovato

    Full Text Available Expression of the MADS domain transcription factor Myocyte Enhancer Factor 2 (MEF2 is regulated by numerous and overlapping enhancers which tightly control its transcription in the mesoderm. To understand how Mef2 expression is controlled in the heart, we identified a late stage Mef2 cardiac enhancer that is active in all heart cells beginning at stage 14 of embryonic development. This enhancer is regulated by the NK-homeodomain transcription factor Tinman, and the GATA transcription factor Pannier through both direct and indirect interactions with the enhancer. Since Tinman, Pannier and MEF2 are evolutionarily conserved from Drosophila to vertebrates, and since their vertebrate homologs can convert mouse fibroblast cells to cardiomyocytes in different activator cocktails, we tested whether over-expression of these three factors in vivo could ectopically activate known cardiac marker genes. We found that mesodermal over-expression of Tinman and Pannier resulted in approximately 20% of embryos with ectopic Hand and Sulphonylurea receptor (Sur expression. By adding MEF2 alongside Tinman and Pannier, a dramatic expansion in the expression of Hand and Sur was observed in almost all embryos analyzed. Two additional cardiac markers were also expanded in their expression. Our results demonstrate the ability to initiate ectopic cardiac fate in vivo by the combination of only three members of the conserved Drosophila cardiac transcription network, and provide an opportunity for this genetic model system to be used to dissect the mechanisms of cardiac specification.

  20. The TEAD/TEF family of transcription factor Scalloped mediates Hippo signaling in organ size control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Ren, Fangfang; Zhang, Qing; Chen, Yongbin; Wang, Bing; Jiang, Jin

    2008-03-01

    The Hippo (Hpo) signaling pathway governs cell growth, proliferation, and apoptosis by controlling key regulatory genes that execute these processes; however, the transcription factor of the pathway has remained elusive. Here we provide evidence that the TEAD/TEF family transcription factor Scalloped (Sd) acts together with the coactivator Yorkie (Yki) to regulate Hpo pathway-responsive genes. Sd and Yki form a transcriptional complex whose activity is inhibited by Hpo signaling. Sd overexpression enhances, whereas its inactivation suppresses, tissue overgrowth caused by Yki overexpression or tumor suppressor mutations in the Hpo pathway. Inactivation of Sd diminishes Hpo target gene expression and reduces organ size, whereas a constitutively active Sd promotes tissue overgrowth. Sd promotes Yki nuclear localization, whereas Hpo signaling retains Yki in the cytoplasm by phosphorylating Yki at S168. Finally, Sd recruits Yki to the enhancer of the pathway-responsive gene diap1, suggesting that diap1 is a direct transcriptional target of the Hpo pathway.

  1. Keeping up to speed with the transcription termination factor Rho motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudvillain, Marc; Nollmann, Marcello; Margeat, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    In bacteria, a subset of transcription termination events requires the participation of the transcription termination factor Rho. Rho is a homo-hexameric, ring-shaped, motor protein that uses the energy derived from its RNA-dependent ATPase activity to directionally unwind RNA and RNA-DNA helices and to dissociate transcription elongation complexes. Despite a wealth of structural, biochemical and genetic data, the molecular mechanisms used by Rho to carry out its biological functions remain poorly understood. Here, we briefly discuss the most recent findings on Rho mechanisms and function and highlight important questions that remain to be addressed.

  2. Pleiohomeotic interacts with the core transcription elongation factor Spt5 to regulate gene expression in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Harvey

    Full Text Available The early elongation checkpoint regulated by Positive Transcription Elongation Factor b (P-TEFb is a critical control point for the expression of many genes. Spt5 interacts directly with RNA polymerase II and has an essential role in establishing this checkpoint, and also for further transcript elongation. Here we demonstrate that Drosophila Spt5 interacts both physically and genetically with the Polycomb Group (PcG protein Pleiohomeotic (Pho, and the majority of Pho binding sites overlap with Spt5 binding sites across the genome in S2 cells. Our results indicate that Pho can interact with Spt5 to regulate transcription elongation in a gene specific manner.

  3. Identification of a novel and unique transcription factor in the intraerythrocytic stage of Plasmodium falciparum.

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    Kanako Komaki-Yasuda

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of stage-specific gene regulation in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum are largely unclear, with only a small number of specific regulatory transcription factors (AP2 family having been identified. In particular, the transcription factors that function in the intraerythrocytic stage remain to be elucidated. Previously, as a model case for stage-specific transcription in the P. falciparum intraerythrocytic stage, we analyzed the transcriptional regulation of pf1-cys-prx, a trophozoite/schizont-specific gene, and suggested that some nuclear factors bind specifically to the cis-element of pf1-cys-prx and enhance transcription. In the present study, we purified nuclear factors from parasite nuclear extract by 5 steps of chromatography, and identified a factor termed PREBP. PREBP is not included in the AP2 family, and is a novel protein with four K-homology (KH domains. The KH domain is known to be found in RNA-binding or single-stranded DNA-binding proteins. PREBP is well conserved in Plasmodium species and partially conserved in phylum Apicomplexa. To evaluate the effects of PREBP overexpression, we used a transient overexpression and luciferase assay combined approach. Overexpression of PREBP markedly enhanced luciferase expression under the control of the pf1-cys-prx cis-element. These results provide the first evidence of a novel transcription factor that activates the gene expression in the malaria parasite intraerythrocytic stage. These findings enhance our understanding of the evolution of specific transcription machinery in Plasmodium and other eukaryotes.

  4. C. elegans BED domain transcription factor BED-3 controls lineage-specific cell proliferation during organogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Inoue, Takao; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    The control of cell division is critical to organogenesis, but how this control is achieved is not fully understood. We found that mutations in bed-3, encoding a BED Zn-finger domain transcription factor, confer a phenotype where a specific set of cell divisions during vulval organogenesis is lost. Unlike general cell cycle regulators in Caenorhabditis elegans, the function of bed-3 is restricted to specific lineages. Transcriptional reporters suggest that bed-3 is expressed in a limited numb...

  5. Comparative Analysis of Transcription Factors Families across Fungal Tree of Life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamov, Asaf; Grigoriev, Igor

    2015-03-19

    Transcription factors (TFs) are proteins that regulate the transcription of genes, by binding to specific DNA sequences. Based on literature (Shelest, 2008; Weirauch and Hughes,2011) collected and manually curated list of DBD Pfam domains (in total 62 DBD domains) We looked for distribution of TFs in 395 fungal genomes plus additionally in plant genomes (Phytozome), prokaryotes(IMG), some animals/metazoans and protists genomes

  6. Assembly of transcription factor IIB at a promoter in vivo requires contact with RNA polymerase II

    OpenAIRE

    Elsby, Laura M.; O'Donnell, Amanda J M; Green, Laura M.; Sharrocks, Andrew D.; Roberts, Stefan G. E.

    2006-01-01

    The general transcription factor TFIIB has a central role in the assembly of the preinitiation complex at the promoter, providing a platform for the entry of RNA polymerase II/TFIIF. We used an RNA interference (RNAi)-based system in which TFIIB expression is ablated in vivo and replaced with a TFIIB derivative that contains a silent mutation and is refractory to the RNAi. Using this approach, we found that transcriptionally defective TFIIB amino-terminal mutants showed distinct effects on th...

  7. The HMG box transcription factor Sox4 contributes to the development of the endocrine pancreas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, M.E.; Yang, K.Y.; Kalousova, A.; Janet, L.; Kosaka, Y.; Lynn, F.C.; Wang, J.; Mrejen, C.; Episkopou, V.; Clevers, J.C.; German, M.S.

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the role of the Sry/hydroxymethylglutaryl box (Sox) transcription factors in the development of the pancreas, we determined the expression pattern of Sox factors in the developing mouse pancreas. By RT-PCR, we detected the presence of multiple Sox family members in both the developing

  8. E2F Transcription Factors Control the Roller Coaster Ride of Cell Cycle Gene Expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thurlings, Ingrid; de Bruin, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Initially, the E2F transcription factor was discovered as a factor able to bind the adenovirus E2 promoter and activate viral genes. Afterwards it was shown that E2F also binds to promoters of nonviral genes such as C-MYC and DHFR, which were already known at that time to be important for cell growt

  9. An Overview of the Importance of Conformational Flexibility in Gene Regulation by the Transcription Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shagufta H. Khan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of proteins with intrinsically disordered (ID regions/domains are reported to be found disproportionately higher in transcription factors. Available evidences suggest that presence of ID region/domain within a transcription factor plays an important role in its biological functions. These ID sequences provide large flexible surfaces that can allow them to make more efficient physical and functional interactions with their target partners. Since transcription factors regulate expression of target genes by interacting with specific coregulatory proteins, these ID regions/domains can be used as a platform for such large macromolecular interactions, and may represent a mechanism for regulation of cellular processes. The precise structural basis for the function of these ID regions/domains of the transcription factors remains to be determined. In the recent years there has been growing evidence suggesting that an induced fit-like process leads to imposition of folded functional structure in these ID domains on which large multiprotein complexes are built. These multiprotein complexes may eventually dictate the final outcome of the gene regulation by the transcription factors.

  10. GATA transcription factors as tissue-specific master regulators for induced responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Dena Hs; Shapira, Michael

    2015-01-01

    GATA transcription factors play important roles in directing developmental genetic programs and cell differentiation, and are conserved in animals, plants and fungi. C. elegans has 11 GATA-type transcription factors that orchestrate development of the gut, epidermis and vulva. However, the expression of certain GATA proteins persists into adulthood, where their function is less understood. Accumulating evidence demonstrates contributions of 2 terminal differentiation GATA transcription factors, ELT-2 and ELT-3, to epithelial immune responses in the adult intestine and epidermis (hypodermis), respectively. Involvement in other stress responses has also been documented. We recently showed that ELT-2 acted as a tissue-specific master regulator, cooperating with 2 transcription factors activated by the p38 pathway, ATF-7 and SKN-1, to control immune responses in the adult C. elegans intestine. Here, we discuss the broader implications of these findings for understanding the involvement of GATA transcription factors in adult stress responses, and draw parallels between ELT-2 and ELT-3 to speculate that the latter may fulfill similar tissue-specific functions in the epidermis.

  11. Inhibition of the TEF/TEAD transcription factor activity by nuclear calcium and distinct kinase pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M; Andrade, V A; Andrade, S J; Pusl, T; Ortega, J M; Goes, A M; Leite, M F

    2003-02-07

    Transcription enhancer factor (TEF/TEAD) is a family of four transcription factors that share a common TEA-DNA binding domain and are involved in similar cellular functions, such as cell differentiation and proliferation. All adult tissues express at least one of the four TEAD genes, so this family of transcription factors may be of widespread importance, yet little is known about their regulation. Here we examine the factors that regulate TEAD activity in CHO cells. RT-PCR indicated the presence of TEAD-1, TEAD-3, and both isoforms of TEAD-4, but not TEAD-2. Quantitative measurements showed that TEAD-4 is most abundant, followed by TEAD-3, then TEAD-1. We examined the relative effects of nuclear and cytosolic Ca(2+) on TEAD activity, since TEAD proteins are localized to the nucleus and since free Ca(2+) within the nucleus selectively regulates transcription in some systems. Chelation of nuclear but not cytosolic Ca(2+) increased TEAD activity two times above control. Inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) also increased TEAD activity, while cAMP decreased TEAD activity, and protein kinase C had no effect. Together, these results show that nuclear Ca(2+), MAPK, and cAMP each negatively regulate the activity of the TEAD transcription factor.

  12. An information transmission model for transcription factor binding at regulatory DNA sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Mingfeng; Yu, Dong; Jin, Yuan; Dou, Lei; Li, Beiping; Wang, Yuelan; Yue, Junjie; Liang, Long

    2012-06-06

    Computational identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) is a rapid, cost-efficient way to locate unknown regulatory elements. With increased potential for high-throughput genome sequencing, the availability of accurate computational methods for TFBS prediction has never been as important as it currently is. To date, identifying TFBSs with high sensitivity and specificity is still an open challenge, necessitating the development of novel models for predicting transcription factor-binding regulatory DNA elements. Based on the information theory, we propose a model for transcription factor binding of regulatory DNA sites. Our model incorporates position interdependencies in effective ways. The model computes the information transferred (TI) between the transcription factor and the TFBS during the binding process and uses TI as the criterion to determine whether the sequence motif is a possible TFBS. Based on this model, we developed a computational method to identify TFBSs. By theoretically proving and testing our model using both real and artificial data, we found that our model provides highly accurate predictive results. In this study, we present a novel model for transcription factor binding regulatory DNA sites. The model can provide an increased ability to detect TFBSs.

  13. A transcript cleavage factor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis important for its survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnab China

    Full Text Available After initiation of transcription, a number of proteins participate during elongation and termination modifying the properties of the RNA polymerase (RNAP. Gre factors are one such group conserved across bacteria. They regulate transcription by projecting their N-terminal coiled-coil domain into the active center of RNAP through the secondary channel and stimulating hydrolysis of the newly synthesized RNA in backtracked elongation complexes. Rv1080c is a putative gre factor (MtbGre in the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The protein enhanced the efficiency of promoter clearance by lowering abortive transcription and also rescued arrested and paused elongation complexes on the GC rich mycobacterial template. Although MtbGre is similar in domain organization and shares key residues for catalysis and RNAP interaction with the Gre factors of Escherichia coli, it could not complement an E. coli gre deficient strain. Moreover, MtbGre failed to rescue E. coli RNAP stalled elongation complexes, indicating the importance of specific protein-protein interactions for transcript cleavage. Decrease in the level of MtbGre reduced the bacterial survival by several fold indicating its essential role in mycobacteria. Another Gre homolog, Rv3788 was not functional in transcript cleavage activity indicating that a single Gre is sufficient for efficient transcription of the M. tuberculosis genome.

  14. An NAC transcription factor controls ethylene-regulated cell expansion in flower petals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Haixia; Ma, Nan; Tian, Ji; Luo, Jing; Chen, Jiwei; Li, Jing; Zheng, Yi; Chen, Xiang; Fei, Zhangjun; Gao, Junping

    2013-10-01

    Cell expansion is crucial for plant growth. It is well known that the phytohormone ethylene functions in plant development as a key modulator of cell expansion. However, the role of ethylene in the regulation of this process remains unclear. In this study, 2,189 ethylene-responsive transcripts were identified in rose (Rosa hybrida) petals using transcriptome sequencing and microarray analysis. Among these transcripts, an NAC (for no apical meristem [NAM], Arabidopsis transcription activation factor [ATAF], and cup-shaped cotyledon [CUC])-domain transcription factor gene, RhNAC100, was rapidly and dramatically induced by ethylene in the petals. Interestingly, accumulation of the RhNAC100 transcript was modulated by ethylene via microRNA164-dependent posttranscriptional regulation. Overexpression of RhNAC100 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) substantially reduced the petal size by repressing petal cell expansion. By contrast, silencing of RhNAC100 in rose petals using virus-induced gene silencing significantly increased petal size and promoted cell expansion in the petal abaxial subepidermis (P cellulose synthase and two aquaporin genes (Rosa hybrida Cellulose Synthase2 and R. hybrida Plasma Membrane Intrinsic Protein1;1/2;1) were identified as targets of RhNAC100. Our results suggest that ethylene regulates cell expansion by fine-tuning the microRNA164/RhNAC100 module and also provide new insights into the function of NAC transcription factors.

  15. Reactivation of Latent HIV-1 Expression by Engineered TALE Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigão, Pedro; Gaj, Thomas; Santa-Marta, Mariana; Barbas, Carlos F; Goncalves, Joao

    2016-01-01

    The presence of replication-competent HIV-1 -which resides mainly in resting CD4+ T cells--is a major hurdle to its eradication. While pharmacological approaches have been useful for inducing the expression of this latent population of virus, they have been unable to purge HIV-1 from all its reservoirs. Additionally, many of these strategies have been associated with adverse effects, underscoring the need for alternative approaches capable of reactivating viral expression. Here we show that engineered transcriptional modulators based on customizable transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins can induce gene expression from the HIV-1 long terminal repeat promoter, and that combinations of TALE transcription factors can synergistically reactivate latent viral expression in cell line models of HIV-1 latency. We further show that complementing TALE transcription factors with Vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, enhances HIV-1 expression in latency models. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that TALE transcription factors are a potentially effective alternative to current pharmacological routes for reactivating latent virus and that combining synthetic transcriptional activators with histone deacetylase inhibitors could lead to the development of improved therapies for latent HIV-1 infection.

  16. Cellular Levels of Signaling Factors Are Sensed by β-actin Alleles to Modulate Transcriptional Pulse Intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alon Kalo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The transcriptional response of β-actin to extra-cellular stimuli is a paradigm for transcription factor complex assembly and regulation. Serum induction leads to a precisely timed pulse of β-actin transcription in the cell population. Actin protein is proposed to be involved in this response, but it is not known whether cellular actin levels affect nuclear β-actin transcription. We perturbed the levels of key signaling factors and examined the effect on the induced transcriptional pulse by following endogenous β-actin alleles in single living cells. Lowering serum response factor (SRF protein levels leads to loss of pulse integrity, whereas reducing actin protein levels reveals positive feedback regulation, resulting in elevated gene activation and a prolonged transcriptional response. Thus, transcriptional pulse fidelity requires regulated amounts of signaling proteins, and perturbations in factor levels eliminate the physiological response, resulting in either tuning down or exaggeration of the transcriptional pulse.

  17. Termination factor Rho: From the control of pervasive transcription to cell fate determination in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidnenko, Vladimir; Nicolas, Pierre; Grylak-Mielnicka, Aleksandra; Delumeau, Olivier; Auger, Sandrine; Aucouturier, Anne; Guerin, Cyprien; Repoila, Francis; Bardowski, Jacek; Aymerich, Stéphane; Bidnenko, Elena

    2017-07-01

    In eukaryotes, RNA species originating from pervasive transcription are regulators of various cellular processes, from the expression of individual genes to the control of cellular development and oncogenesis. In prokaryotes, the function of pervasive transcription and its output on cell physiology is still unknown. Most bacteria possess termination factor Rho, which represses pervasive, mostly antisense, transcription. Here, we investigate the biological significance of Rho-controlled transcription in the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Rho inactivation strongly affected gene expression in B. subtilis, as assessed by transcriptome and proteome analysis of a rho-null mutant during exponential growth in rich medium. Subsequent physiological analyses demonstrated that a considerable part of Rho-controlled transcription is connected to balanced regulation of three mutually exclusive differentiation programs: cell motility, biofilm formation, and sporulation. In the absence of Rho, several up-regulated sense and antisense transcripts affect key structural and regulatory elements of these differentiation programs, thereby suppressing motility and biofilm formation and stimulating sporulation. We dissected how Rho is involved in the activity of the cell fate decision-making network, centered on the master regulator Spo0A. We also revealed a novel regulatory mechanism of Spo0A activation through Rho-dependent intragenic transcription termination of the protein kinase kinB gene. Altogether, our findings indicate that distinct Rho-controlled transcripts are functional and constitute a previously unknown built-in module for the control of cell differentiation in B. subtilis. In a broader context, our results highlight the recruitment of the termination factor Rho, for which the conserved biological role is probably to repress pervasive transcription, in highly integrated, bacterium-specific, regulatory networks.

  18. Termination factor Rho: From the control of pervasive transcription to cell fate determination in Bacillus subtilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Bidnenko

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, RNA species originating from pervasive transcription are regulators of various cellular processes, from the expression of individual genes to the control of cellular development and oncogenesis. In prokaryotes, the function of pervasive transcription and its output on cell physiology is still unknown. Most bacteria possess termination factor Rho, which represses pervasive, mostly antisense, transcription. Here, we investigate the biological significance of Rho-controlled transcription in the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Rho inactivation strongly affected gene expression in B. subtilis, as assessed by transcriptome and proteome analysis of a rho-null mutant during exponential growth in rich medium. Subsequent physiological analyses demonstrated that a considerable part of Rho-controlled transcription is connected to balanced regulation of three mutually exclusive differentiation programs: cell motility, biofilm formation, and sporulation. In the absence of Rho, several up-regulated sense and antisense transcripts affect key structural and regulatory elements of these differentiation programs, thereby suppressing motility and biofilm formation and stimulating sporulation. We dissected how Rho is involved in the activity of the cell fate decision-making network, centered on the master regulator Spo0A. We also revealed a novel regulatory mechanism of Spo0A activation through Rho-dependent intragenic transcription termination of the protein kinase kinB gene. Altogether, our findings indicate that distinct Rho-controlled transcripts are functional and constitute a previously unknown built-in module for the control of cell differentiation in B. subtilis. In a broader context, our results highlight the recruitment of the termination factor Rho, for which the conserved biological role is probably to repress pervasive transcription, in highly integrated, bacterium-specific, regulatory networks.

  19. The "O" class: crafting clinical care with FoxO transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiese, Kenneth; Chong, Zhao Zhong; Hou, Jinling; Shang, Yan Chen

    2009-01-01

    Forkhead Transcription Factors: Vital Elements in Biology and Medicine provides a unique platform for the presentation of novel work and new insights into the vital role that forkhead transcription factors play in both cellular physiology as well as clinical medicine. Internationally recognized investigators provide their insights and perspectives for a number of forkhead genes and proteins that may have the greatest impact for the development of new strategies for a broad array of disorders that can involve aging, cancer, cardiac function, neurovascular integrity, fertility, stem cell differentiation, cellular metabolism, and immune system regulation. Yet, the work clearly sets a precedent for the necessity to understand the cellular and molecular function of forkhead proteins since this family of transcription factors can limit as well as foster disease progression depending upon the cellular environment. With this in mind, our concluding chapter for Forkhead Transcription Factors: Vital Elements in Biology andMedicine offers to highlight both the diversity and complexity of the forkhead transcription family by focusing upon the mammalian forkhead transcription factors of the O class (FoxOs) that include FoxO1, FoxO3, FoxO4, and FoxO6. FoxO proteins are increasingly considered to represent unique cellular targets that can control numerous processes such as angiogenesis, cardiovascular development, vascular tone, oxidative stress, stem cell proliferation, fertility, and immune surveillance. Furthermore, FoxO transcription factors are exciting considerations for disorders such as cancer in light of their pro-apoptotic and inhibitory cell cycle effects as well as diabetes mellitus given the close association FoxOs hold with cellular metabolism. In addition, these transcription factors are closely integrated with several novel signal transduction pathways, such as erythropoietin and Wnt proteins, that may influence the ability of FoxOs to lead to cell survival or

  20. Cloning and characterization of a putative human holocytochrome c-type synthetase gene (HCCS) isolated from the critical region for microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, L.; Ballabio, A.; Zoghbi, H.Y. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Microphthalmia with linear skin defects syndrome (MLS) is an X-linked male-lethal disorder associated with X chromosomal rearrangements resulting in monosomy from Xpter to Xp22. Features include microphthalmia, sclerocornea, linear skin defects, and agenesis of the corpus callosum. Using a cross-species conservation strategy, an expressed sequence from the 450- to the 550-kb MLS critical region on Xp22 was identified by screening a human embryo cDNA library. Northern analysis revealed a transcript of {approx}2.6 kb in all tissues examined, with weaker expression of {approx}1.2- and {approx}5.2-kb transcripts. The strongest expression was observed in heart and skeletal muscle. Sequence analysis of a 3-kb cDNA contig revealed an 807-bp open reading frame encoding a putative 268-amino-acid-protein. Comparison of the sequence with sequences in the databases revealed homology with holocytochrome c-type synthetases, which catalyze the covalent addition of a heme group onto c-type cytochromes in the mitochondria. The c-type cytochromes are required for proper functioning of the electron transport pathway. The human gene (HGMW-approved symbol HCCS) and the corresponding murine gene characterized in this paper are the first mammalian holocytochrome c-type synthetases to be described in the literature. Because of the lack of a neuromuscular phenotype in MLS, it is uncertain whether the deletion of a mitochondrial holocytochrome synthetase would contribute to the phenotype seen in MLS. The expression pattern of this gene and knowledge about the function of holocytochrome synthetases, however, suggest that it is a good candidate for X-linked encephalomyopathies typically associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. 25 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Posterior microphthalmia and nanophthalmia in Tunisia caused by a founder c.1059_1066insC mutation of the PRSS56 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Mariem Ben; Chouchène, Ebtissem; Salem, Salma Ben; Daoud, Kods; Largueche, Leila; Bouassida, Walid; Benzina, Zeineb; Ayadi, Hammadi; Söderkvist, Peter; Matri, Leila; Hmani-Aifa, Mounira

    2013-10-10

    Congenital microphthalmia (CMIC) is a common developmental ocular disorder characterized by a small, and sometimes malformed, eye. Posterior microphthalmia (PM) and nanophthalmia are two rare subtypes of isolated CMIC characterized by extreme hyperopia due to short axial length and elevated lens/eye volume ratio. While nanophthalmia is associated with a reduced size in both anterior and posterior segments, PM involves a normal-size anterior chamber but a small posterior segment. Several genes encoding transcription and non-transcription regulators have been identified in different forms of CMIC. MFRP gene mutations have, for instance, been associated with nanophthalmia, and mutations in the recently identified PRSS56 gene have been linked to PM. So far, these two forms of CMIC have been associated with 9 mutations in PRSS56. Of particular interest, a c.1059_1066insC mutation has recently been reported in four Tunisian families with isolated PM and one Tunisian family with nanophthalmia. Here, we performed a genome-wide scan using a high density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array 50 K in a large consanguineous Tunisian family (PM7) affected with PM and identified the same causative disease mutation. A total of 24 polymorphic markers spanning the PRSS56 gene in 6 families originating from different regions of Tunisia were analyzed to investigate the origin of the c.1059_1066insC mutation and to determine whether it arose in a common ancestor. A highly significant disease-associated haplotype, spanning across the 146 kb of the 2q37.1 chromosome, was conserved in those families, suggesting that c.1059_1066insC arose from a common founder. The age of the mutation in this haplotype was estimated to be around 1,850 years. The identification of such 'founder effects' may greatly simplify diagnostic genetic screening and lead to better prognostic counseling.

  2. Insights into mRNP biogenesis provided by new genetic interactions among export and transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estruch Francisco

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The various steps of mRNP biogenesis (transcription, processing and export are interconnected. It has been shown that the transcription machinery plays a pivotal role in mRNP assembly, since several mRNA export factors are recruited during transcription and physically interact with components of the transcription machinery. Although the shuttling DEAD-box protein Dbp5p is concentrated on the cytoplasmic fibrils of the NPC, previous studies demonstrated that it interacts physically and genetically with factors involved in transcription initiation. Results We investigated the effect of mutations affecting various components of the transcription initiation apparatus on the phenotypes of mRNA export mutant strains. Our results show that growth and mRNA export defects of dbp5 and mex67 mutant strains can be suppressed by mutation of specific transcription initiation components, but suppression was not observed for mutants acting in the very first steps of the pre-initiation complex (PIC formation. Conclusions Our results indicate that mere reduction in the amount of mRNP produced is not sufficient to suppress the defects caused by a defective mRNA export factor. Suppression occurs only with mutants affecting events within a narrow window of the mRNP biogenesis process. We propose that reducing the speed with which transcription converts from initiation and promoter clearance to elongation may have a positive effect on mRNP formation by permitting more effective recruitment of partially-functional mRNP proteins to the nascent mRNP.

  3. Yeast genetic analysis reveals the involvement of chromatin reassembly factors in repressing HIV-1 basal transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Vanti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Rebound of HIV viremia after interruption of anti-retroviral therapy is due to the small population of CD4+ T cells that remain latently infected. HIV-1 transcription is the main process controlling post-integration latency. Regulation of HIV-1 transcription takes place at both initiation and elongation levels. Pausing of RNA polymerase II at the 5' end of HIV-1 transcribed region (5'HIV-TR, which is immediately downstream of the transcription start site, plays an important role in the regulation of viral expression. The activation of HIV-1 transcription correlates with the rearrangement of a positioned nucleosome located at this region. These two facts suggest that the 5'HIV-TR contributes to inhibit basal transcription of those HIV-1 proviruses that remain latently inactive. However, little is known about the cell elements mediating the repressive role of the 5'HIV-TR. We performed a genetic analysis of this phenomenon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae after reconstructing a minimal HIV-1 transcriptio