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Sample records for micromechanical failure analyses

  1. Micromechanical Failure Analyses for Finite Element Polymer Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHAMBERS,ROBERT S.; REEDY JR.,EARL DAVID; LO,CHI S.; ADOLF,DOUGLAS B.; GUESS,TOMMY R.

    2000-11-01

    Polymer stresses around sharp corners and in constrained geometries of encapsulated components can generate cracks leading to system failures. Often, analysts use maximum stresses as a qualitative indicator for evaluating the strength of encapsulated component designs. Although this approach has been useful for making relative comparisons screening prospective design changes, it has not been tied quantitatively to failure. Accurate failure models are needed for analyses to predict whether encapsulated components meet life cycle requirements. With Sandia's recently developed nonlinear viscoelastic polymer models, it has been possible to examine more accurately the local stress-strain distributions in zones of likely failure initiation looking for physically based failure mechanisms and continuum metrics that correlate with the cohesive failure event. This study has identified significant differences between rubbery and glassy failure mechanisms that suggest reasonable alternatives for cohesive failure criteria and metrics. Rubbery failure seems best characterized by the mechanisms of finite extensibility and appears to correlate with maximum strain predictions. Glassy failure, however, seems driven by cavitation and correlates with the maximum hydrostatic tension. Using these metrics, two three-point bending geometries were tested and analyzed under variable loading rates, different temperatures and comparable mesh resolution (i.e., accuracy) to make quantitative failure predictions. The resulting predictions and observations agreed well suggesting the need for additional research. In a separate, additional study, the asymptotically singular stress state found at the tip of a rigid, square inclusion embedded within a thin, linear elastic disk was determined for uniform cooling. The singular stress field is characterized by a single stress intensity factor K{sub a} and the applicable K{sub a} calibration relationship has been determined for both fully bonded and

  2. Micromechanical Analyses of Sturzstroms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imre, Bernd; Laue, Jan; Springman, Sarah M.

    2010-05-01

    have been made observable and reproducible within a physical and a distinct element numerical modelling environment (DEM). As link between field evidence gained from the deposits of natural sturzstroms, the physical model within the ETH Geotechnical Drum Centrifuge (Springman et al., 2001) and the numerical model PFC-3D (Cundall and Strack, 1979; Itasca, 2005), serves a deterministic fractal analytical comminution model (Sammis et al., 1987; Steacy and Sammis, 1991). This approach allowed studying the effects of dynamic fragmentation within sturzstroms at true (macro) scale within the distinct element model, by allowing for a micro-mechanical, distinct particle based, and cyclic description of fragmentation at the same time, without losing significant computational efficiency. Theses experiments indicate rock mass and boundary conditions, which allow an alternating fragmenting and dilating dispersive regime to evolve and to be sustained long enough to replicate the spreading and run out of sturzstroms. The fragmenting spreading model supported here is able to explain the run out of a dry granular flow, beyond the travel distance predicted by a Coulomb frictional sliding model, without resorting to explanations by mechanics that can only be valid for certain, specific of the boundary conditions. The implications derived suggest that a sturzstrom, because of its strong relation to internal fractal fragmentation and other inertial effects, constitutes a landslide category of its own. Its mechanics differ significantly from all other gravity driven mass flows. This proposition does not exclude the possible appearance of frictionites, Toma hills or suspension flows etc., but it considers them as secondary features. The application of a fractal comminution model to describe natural and experimental sturzstrom deposits turned out to be a useful tool for sturzstrom research. Implemented within the DEM, it allows simulating the key features of sturzstrom successfully and

  3. Micromechanics Based Failure Analysis of Heterogeneous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sertse, Hamsasew M.

    In recent decades, heterogeneous materials are extensively used in various industries such as aerospace, defense, automotive and others due to their desirable specific properties and excellent capability of accumulating damage. Despite their wide use, there are numerous challenges associated with the application of these materials. One of the main challenges is lack of accurate tools to predict the initiation, progression and final failure of these materials under various thermomechanical loading conditions. Although failure is usually treated at the macro and meso-scale level, the initiation and growth of failure is a complex phenomena across multiple scales. The objective of this work is to enable the mechanics of structure genome (MSG) and its companion code SwiftComp to analyze the initial failure (also called static failure), progressive failure, and fatigue failure of heterogeneous materials using micromechanics approach. The initial failure is evaluated at each numerical integration point using pointwise and nonlocal approach for each constituent of the heterogeneous materials. The effects of imperfect interfaces among constituents of heterogeneous materials are also investigated using a linear traction-displacement model. Moreover, the progressive and fatigue damage analyses are conducted using continuum damage mechanics (CDM) approach. The various failure criteria are also applied at a material point to analyze progressive damage in each constituent. The constitutive equation of a damaged material is formulated based on a consistent irreversible thermodynamics approach. The overall tangent modulus of uncoupled elastoplastic damage for negligible back stress effect is derived. The initiation of plasticity and damage in each constituent is evaluated at each numerical integration point using a nonlocal approach. The accumulated plastic strain and anisotropic damage evolution variables are iteratively solved using an incremental algorithm. The damage analyses

  4. Micromechanical photothermal analyser of microfluidic samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a micromechanical photothermal analyser of microfluidic samples comprising an oblong micro-channel extending longitudinally from a support element, the micro-channel is made from at least two materials with different thermal expansion coefficients, wherein...

  5. The micro-mechanisms of failure of nodular cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Vaško

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The contribution deals with a comparison of the micro-mechanisms of failure of nodular cast irons at static, impact and fatigue stress. Several specimens of ferrite-pearlitic nodular cast irons with different content of ferrite in a matrix were used for metallographic analysis, mechanical tests and micro-fractographic analysis. Mechanical properties were found by static tensile test, impact bending test and fatigue tests. The micro-fractographic analysis was made with use of scanning electron microscope VEGA II LMU on fracture surfaces of the specimens fractured by these mechanical and fatigue tests. Fracture surfaces of analysed specimens are characteristic of mixed mode of fracture. Micro-mechanism of failure of nodular cast irons is dependent on the method of stress.

  6. Micromechanical failure in fiber-reinforced composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashouri Vajari, Danial

    Micromechanical failure mechanisms occurring in unidirectional fiber-reinforced composites are studied by means of the finite element method as well as experimental testing. This study highlights the effect of micro-scale features such as fiber/matrix interfacial debonding, matrix cracking...... and microvoids on the microscopic and macroscopic mechanical response of composite materials. To this end, first a numerical study is carried out to explore ways to stabilize interfacial crack growth under dominant Mode-I fracture using the cohesive zone model. Consequently, this study suggests a method...... composites. In the first approach, the J2 plasticity model is implemented to model the elasto-plastic behavior of the matrix while in the second strategy the modified Drucker-Prager plasticity model is utilized to account for brittle-like and pressure dependent behavior of an epoxy matrix. In addition...

  7. Failure Criterion for Brick Masonry: A Micro-Mechanics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawa Marek

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the formulation of failure criterion for an in-plane loaded masonry. Using micro-mechanics approach the strength estimation for masonry microstructure with constituents obeying the Drucker-Prager criterion is determined numerically. The procedure invokes lower bound analysis: for assumed stress fields constructed within masonry periodic cell critical load is obtained as a solution of constrained optimization problem. The analysis is carried out for many different loading conditions at different orientations of bed joints. The performance of the approach is verified against solutions obtained for corresponding layered and block microstructures, which provides the upper and lower strength bounds for masonry microstructure, respectively. Subsequently, a phenomenological anisotropic strength criterion for masonry microstructure is proposed. The criterion has a form of conjunction of Jaeger critical plane condition and Tsai-Wu criterion. The model proposed is identified based on the fitting of numerical results obtained from the microstructural analysis. Identified criterion is then verified against results obtained for different loading orientations. It appears that strength of masonry microstructure can be satisfactorily described by the criterion proposed.

  8. Experimental and numerical study of the micro-mechanical failure in composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashouri Vajari, Danial; Martyniuk, Karolina; Sørensen, Bent F.

    2013-01-01

    The fibre/matrix interfacial debonding is found to be the first microscale failure mechanism leading to subsequent macroscale transverse cracks in composite materials under tensile load. In this paper, the micromechanical interface failure in fiber-reinforced composites is studied experimentally ...

  9. Initiation of Failure for Masonry Subject to In-Plane Loads through Micromechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Berardi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A micromechanical procedure is used in order to evaluate the initiation of damage and failure of masonry with in-plane loads. Masonry material is viewed as a composite with periodic microstructure and, therefore, a unit cell with suitable boundary conditions is assumed as a representative volume element of the masonry. The finite element method is used to determine the average stress on the unit cell corresponding to a given average strain prescribed on the unit cell. Finally, critical curves representing the initiation of damage and failure in both clay brick masonry and adobe masonry are provided.

  10. Micromechanics of intergranular creep failure under cyclic loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Giessen, Erik; Tvergaard, Viggo

    1996-01-01

    boundaries are modelled individually. The model incorporates power-law creep of the grains, viscous grain boundary sliding between grains as well as the nucleation and growth of grain boundary cavities until they coalesce and form microcracks. Study of a limiting case with a facet-size microcrack reveals....... The analyses provide some new understanding that helps to explain the sometimes peculiar behaviour under balanced cyclic creep. Copyright (C) 1996 Acta Metallurgica Inc....

  11. Micromechanics-based damage model for failure prediction in cold forming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, X.Z.; Chan, L.C., E-mail: lc.chan@polyu.edu.hk

    2017-04-06

    The purpose of this study was to develop a micromechanics-based damage (micro-damage) model that was concerned with the evolution of micro-voids for failure prediction in cold forming. Typical stainless steel SS316L was selected as the specimen material, and the nonlinear isotropic hardening rule was extended to describe the large deformation of the specimen undergoing cold forming. A micro-focus high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT) system was employed to trace and measure the micro-voids inside the specimen directly. Three-dimensional (3D) representative volume element (RVE) models with different sizes and spatial locations were reconstructed from the processed CT images of the specimen, and the average size and volume fraction of micro-voids (VFMV) for the specimen were determined via statistical analysis. Subsequently, the micro-damage model was compiled as a user-defined material subroutine into the finite element (FE) package ABAQUS. The stress-strain responses and damage evolutions of SS316L specimens under tensile and compressive deformations at different strain rates were predicted and further verified experimentally. It was concluded that the proposed micro-damage model is convincing for failure prediction in cold forming of the SS316L material.

  12. Micromechanical local approach to brittle failure in bainite high resolution polycrystals: A short presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N'Guyen, C.N.; Osipov, N.; Cailletaud, G.; Barbe, F.; Marini, B.; Petry, C.

    2012-01-01

    The problem of determining the probability of failure in a brittle material from a micromechanical local approach has recently been addressed in few works, all related to bainite polycrystals at different temperatures and states of irradiation. They have separately paved the ground for a full-field modelling with high realism in terms of constitutive modelling and microstructural morphology. This work first contributes to enhance this realism by assembling the most pertinent/valuable characteristics (dislocation density based model, large deformation framework, fully controlled triaxiality conditions, explicit microstructure representation of grains and sub-grains,... ) and by accounting for a statistically representative Volume Element; this condition indeed must be fulfilled in order to capture rare events like brittle micro-fractures which, in the stress analysis, correspond to the tails of distribution curves. The second original contribution of this work concerns the methodology for determining fracture probabilities: rather than classically - and abruptly - considering a polycrystal as broken as soon as an elementary link (grain or sub-grain) has failed, the possibility of microcrack arrest at microstructural barriers is introduced, which enables to determine the probability of polycrystal failure according to different scenarios of multiple micro-fractures. (authors)

  13. A micromechanical four-phase model to predict the compressive failure surface of cement concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Caporale,

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a micromechanical model is used in order to predict the failure surface of cement concrete subject to multi-axial compression. In the adopted model, the concrete material is schematised as a composite with the following constituents: coarse aggregate (gravel, fine aggregate (sand and cement paste. The cement paste contains some voids which grow during the loading process. In fact, the non-linear behavior of the concrete is attributed to the creation of cracks in the cement paste; the effect of the cracks is taken into account by introducing equivalent voids (inclusions with zero stiffness in the cement paste. The three types of inclusions (namely gravel, sand and voids have different scales, so that the overall behavior of the concrete is obtained by the composition of three different homogenizations; in the sense that the concrete is regarded as the homogenized material of the two-phase composite constituted of the gravel and the mortar; in turn, the mortar is the homogenized material of the two-phase composite constituted of the sand inclusions and a (porous cement paste matrix; finally, the (porous cement paste is the homogenized material of the two-phase composite constituted of voids and the pure paste. The pure paste represents the cement paste before the loading process, so that it does not contain voids or other defects due to the loading process. The abovementioned three homogenizations are realized with the predictive scheme of Mori-Tanaka in conjunction with the Eshelby method. The adopted model can be considered an attempt to find micromechanical tools able to capture peculiar aspects of the cement concrete in load cases of uni-axial and multi-axial compression. Attributing the non-linear behavior of concrete to the creation of equivalent voids in the cement paste provides correspondence with many phenomenological aspects of concrete behavior. Trying to improve this correspondence, the influence of the parameters of the

  14. Micromechanics of failure in brittle geomaterials. Final technical report (for 7/1/1994 - 8/31/2000)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Teng-fong

    2000-01-01

    The overall objective was to provide a fundamental understanding of brittle failure processes in porous and compact geomaterials. This information is central to energy-related programs such as oil and gas exploration/production, reservoir engineering, drilling technology, geothermal energy recovery, nuclear waste isolation, and environmental remediation. The effects of key parameters such as grain boundary structure and cementation, damage state, and load path on the deformation and failure model of brittle geomaterials are still largely unknown. The research methodology emphasized the integration of experimental rock mechanical testing, quantitative microscopy, and detailed analysis using fracture mechanics, continuum plasticity theory, and numerical methods. Significant progress was made in elucidating the micromechanics of brittle failure in compact crystalline rocks, as well as high-porosity siliciclastic and carbonate rocks. Substantial effort was expended toward applying a new quantitative three-dimensional imaging technique to geomaterials and for developing enhanced image analysis capabilities. The research is presented under the following topics: technique for imaging the 3-D pore structure of geomaterials; mechanics of compressive failure in sandstone; effect of water on compressive failure of sandstone; micromechanics of compressive failure: observation and model; and the brittle-ductile transition in porous carbonate rocks

  15. Relations between a micro-mechanical model and a damage model for ductile failure in shear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Nielsen, Kim Lau

    2010-01-01

    Gurson type constitutive models that account for void growth to coalescence are not able to describe ductile fracture in simple shear, where there is no hydrostatic tension in the material. But recent micro-mechanical studies have shown that in shear the voids are flattened out to micro-cracks, w......Gurson type constitutive models that account for void growth to coalescence are not able to describe ductile fracture in simple shear, where there is no hydrostatic tension in the material. But recent micro-mechanical studies have shown that in shear the voids are flattened out to micro...

  16. Analysis of metal-matrix composite structures. I - Micromechanics constitutive theory. II - Laminate analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenburg, R. T.; Reddy, J. N.

    1991-01-01

    The micromechanical constitutive theory is used to examine the nonlinear behavior of continuous-fiber-reinforced metal-matrix composite structures. Effective lamina constitutive relations based on the Abouli micromechanics theory are presented. The inelastic matrix behavior is modeled by the unified viscoplasticity theory of Bodner and Partom. The laminate constitutive relations are incorporated into a first-order deformation plate theory. The resulting boundary value problem is solved by utilizing the finite element method. Attention is also given to computational aspects of the numerical solution, including the temporal integration of the inelastic strains and the spatial integration of bending moments. Numerical results the nonlinear response of metal matrix composites subjected to extensional and bending loads are presented.

  17. Micromechanical Analyses of Debonding and Matrix Cracking in Dual-Phase Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legarth, Brian Nyvang; Yang, Qingda

    2016-01-01

    Failure in elastic dual-phase materials under transverse tension is studied numerically. Cohesive zones represent failure along the interface and the augmented finite element method (A-FEM) is used for matrix cracking. Matrix cracks are formed at an angle of 55 deg - 60 deg relative to the loading...... direction, which is in good agreement with experiments. Matrix cracks initiate at the tip of the debond, and for equi-biaxial loading cracks are formed at both tips. For elliptical reinforcement the matrix cracks initiate at the narrow end of the ellipse. The load carrying capacity is highest for ligaments...

  18. The Micromechanics of Deformation and Failure in Metal-Matrix Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Needleman, Alan

    1997-01-01

    .... However, metal-matrix composites often have low ductility and low fracture toughness. An improved understanding of the basic deformation and failure mechanisms is needed to overcome these problems...

  19. Effect of Strength Coefficient of Bainite on Micromechanical Deformation and Failure Behaviors of Hot-Rolled 590FB Steel during Uniaxial Tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun-Young; Choi, Shi-Hoon [Sunchon National University, Suncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Il [POSCO Technical Research Laboratories, Gwangyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    The effect of the strength coefficient (K{sub B}) of bainite on micromechanical deformation and failure behaviors of a hot-rolled 590MPa steel (590FB) during uniaxial tension was simulated using the elasto-plastic finite element method (FEM). The spatial distribution of the constituent phases was obtained using a phase identification technique based on optical microstructure. Empirical equations which depend on chemical composition were used to determine the stress-strain relationship of the constituent phases of the 590FB steel. The stress-strain partitioning and failure behavior were analyzed by increasing the K{sub B} of bainite. The elasto-plastic FEM results revealed that effective strain in the ferrite-bainite boundaries, and maximum principal stress in fibrous bainite, were enhanced as the K{sub B} increased. The elasto-plastic FEM results also demonstrated that the K{sub B} significantly affects the micromechanical deformation and failure behaviors of the hot-rolled 590FB steel during uniaxial tension.

  20. Methodical treatment of dependent failures in risk analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennings, W.; Mertens, J.

    1987-06-01

    In this report the state-of-the-art regarding dependent failures is compiled and commented on. Among others the following recommendations are infered: The term 'common mode failures' should be restricted to failures of redundant, similar components; the generic term is 'dependent failures' with the subsets 'causal failures' and 'common cause failures'. In risk studies, dependent failures should be covered as far as possible by 'explicit methods'. Nevertheless an uncovered rest remains, which should be accounted for by sensitivity analyses using 'implicit methods'. For this the homogeneous Marshall-Olkin model is recommended. Because the available reports on operating experiences only record 'common mode failures' systematically, it is recommended to additionally apply other methods, e.g. carry out a 'precursor study'. (orig.) [de

  1. Micromechanical thermogravimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, R.; Lang, H. P.; Gerber, Ch.; Gimzewski, J. K.; Fabian, J. H.; Scandella, L.; Meyer, E.; Güntherodt, H.-J.

    1998-09-01

    We demonstrate a new method for thermal analysis of nanogram quantities of material using a micromechanical thermogravimetric technique. The cantilever-type device uses an integrated piezoresistor to sense bending and simultaneously to ramp the temperature and control temperature cycles. It has a mass resolution in the picogram range. A quantitative analysis of the dehydration of copper-sulfate-pentahydrate (CuSO 4·5H 2O) is presented. The technique outperforms current thermogravimetric approaches by five orders of magnitude.

  2. A Large-scale Finite Element Model on Micromechanical Damage and Failure of Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composites Including Thermal Residual Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, P. F.; Li, X. K.

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study micromechanical progressive failure properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composites with thermal residual stress by finite element analysis (FEA). Composite microstructures with hexagonal fiber distribution are used for the representative volume element (RVE), where an initial fiber breakage is assumed. Fiber breakage with random fiber strength is predicted using Monte Carlo simulation, progressive matrix damage is predicted by proposing a continuum damage mechanics model and interface failure is simulated using Xu and Needleman's cohesive model. Temperature dependent thermal expansion coefficients for epoxy matrix are used. FEA by developing numerical codes using ANSYS finite element software is divided into two steps: 1. Thermal residual stresses due to mismatch between fiber and matrix are calculated; 2. Longitudinal tensile load is further exerted on the RVE to perform progressive failure analysis of carbon fiber/epoxy composites. Numerical convergence is solved by introducing the viscous damping effect properly. The extended Mori-Tanaka method that considers interface debonding is used to get homogenized mechanical responses of composites. Three main results by FEA are obtained: 1. the real-time matrix cracking, fiber breakage and interface debonding with increasing tensile strain is simulated. 2. the stress concentration coefficients on neighbouring fibers near the initial broken fiber and the axial fiber stress distribution along the broken fiber are predicted, compared with the results using the global and local load-sharing models based on the shear-lag theory. 3. the tensile strength of composite by FEA is compared with those by the shear-lag theory and experiments. Finally, the tensile stress-strain curve of composites by FEA is applied to the progressive failure analysis of composite pressure vessel.

  3. Applying micromechanic failure models for description of failure modes in the ductile-brittle transition region; Einsatz mikromechanischer Schaedigungsmodelle im sproed-duktilen Uebergangsbereich

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernauer, G.

    1997-07-01

    The work reported was to examine whether the modified Gurson model and the Beremin model can be applied to the brittle-ductile transition region of a ferritic steel, and whether the material`s behaviour can be characterized with a failure model integrating the two models mentioned above into one. Any possible improvements of this approach were to be found. The report at first gives a brief list of terminology and formulas used. Chapter 3 explains the microscopic processes typically observed in the transition region in connection with the failure modes of ductile fracture and cleavage fracture, and shows possible approaches for modelling. Chapter 4 defines the specimens and materials, and chapter 5 explains the experiments as well as the microscopic analyses of the fracture surfaces. Chapter 6 presents subsequent calculations representing the processes observed. Based on the stress distributions thus derived, the Beremin model is re-examined for further development. Chapter 7 summarizes the results obtained. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Ziel der Arbeit ist, zu untersuchen, ob das modifizierte Gurson-Modell und das Beremin-Modell im sproed-duktilen Uebergangsbereich eines ferritischen Stahls einsetzbar sind und ob das Werkstoffverhalten mit einem aus beiden Modellen kombinierten Schaedigungsmodell berechnet werden kann. Gegebenenfalls sind Verbesserungen herbeizufuehren. Die vorliegende Arbeit beginnt mit einer kurzen Einfuehrung der verwendeten Begriffe und Formalismen. In Kap. 3 werden die mikroskopischen Vorgaenge bei den im Uebergangsbereich typischerweise auftretenden Versagensarten duktiler Bruch und Spaltbruch vorgestellt und verschiedene Moeglichkeiten ihrer Modellierung aufgezeigt. Nach der Vorstellung des Probenwerkstoffs werden in Kap. 4 die Experimente beschrieben und die mikroskopischen Untersuchungen der Bruchflaechen in Kap. 5 dargestellt. Die Nachrechnungen der Experimente werden in Kap. 6 vorgestellt. Auf der Grundlage der dadurch bereitgestellten

  4. Spacecraft electrical power subsystem: Failure behavior, reliability, and multi-state failure analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, So Young; Castet, Jean-Francois; Saleh, Joseph H.

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates the degradation and failure behavior of spacecraft electrical power subsystem (EPS) on orbit. First, this work provides updated statistical reliability and multi-state failure analyses of spacecraft EPS and its different constituents, namely the batteries, the power distribution, and the solar arrays. The EPS is shown to suffer from infant mortality and to be a major driver of spacecraft unreliability. Over 25% of all spacecraft failures are the result of EPS failures. As a result, satellite manufacturers may wish to pursue targeted improvement to this subsystem, either through better testing or burn-in procedures, better design or parts selection, or additional redundancy. Second, this work investigates potential differences in the EPS degradation and failure behavior for spacecraft in low earth orbits (LEO) and geosynchronous orbits (GEO). This analysis was motivated by the recognition that the power/load cycles and the space environment are significantly different in LEO and GEO, and as such, they may result in different failure behavior for the EPS in these two types of orbits. The results indicate, and quantify the extent to which, the EPS fails differently in LEO and GEO, both in terms of frequency and severity of failure events. A casual summary of the findings can be stated as follows: the EPS fails less frequently but harder (with fatal consequences to the spacecraft) in LEO than in GEO.

  5. A Microstructure-Based Model to Characterize Micromechanical Parameters Controlling Compressive and Tensile Failure in Crystallized Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazerani, T.; Zhao, J.

    2014-03-01

    A discrete element model is proposed to examine rock strength and failure. The model is implemented by UDEC which is developed for this purpose. The material is represented as a collection of irregular-sized deformable particles interacting at their cohesive boundaries. The interface between two adjacent particles is viewed as a flexible contact whose stress-displacement law is assumed to control the material fracture and fragmentation process. To reproduce rock anisotropy, an innovative orthotropic cohesive law is developed for contact which allows the interfacial shear and tensile behaviours to be different from each other. The model is applied to a crystallized igneous rock and the individual and interactional effects of the microstructural parameters on the material compressive and tensile failure response are examined. A new methodical calibration process is also established. It is shown that the model successfully reproduces the rock mechanical behaviour quantitatively and qualitatively. Ultimately, the model is used to understand how and under what circumstances micro-tensile and micro-shear cracking mechanisms control the material failure at different loading paths.

  6. Probabilistic analyses of failure in reactor coolant piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, G.S.

    1984-01-01

    LLNL is performing probabilistic reliability analyses of PWR and BWR reactor coolant piping for the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Specifically, LLNL is estimating the probability of a double-ended guillotine break (DEGB) in the reactor coolant loop piping in PWR plants, and in the main stream, feedwater, and recirculation piping of BWR plants. In estimating the probability of DEGB, LLNL considers two causes of pipe break: pipe fracture due to the growth of cracks at welded joints (direct DEGB), and pipe rupture indirectly caused by the seismically-induced failure of critical supports or equipment (indirect DEGB)

  7. Failure analyses and weld repair of boiler feed water pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vulpen, R. van [KemaPower Generation, Arnhem (Netherlands)

    1998-12-31

    During a regular inspection of the Boiler Auxiliaries at one of the Dutch Electricity Production Companies serious cracks were found in the cover and casings of the feed water circulation pumps in two units after 108.000 and 122.000 hours of boiler operation. Kema Laboratories carried out Failure analyses on boat samples at the cracked areas. Corrosion fatigue cracking was found on the inner side of the GS-24CrNiMo325 casing. Shop Weld repairs were carried out using a newly developed mechanized Plasma Welding Technique. The repaired feed water circulation pumps showed no problems alter several years of operation. The costs of repair were substantially lower than the costs of replacement. (orig.) 3 refs.

  8. Failure analyses and weld repair of boiler feed water pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vulpen, R van [KemaPower Generation, Arnhem (Netherlands)

    1999-12-31

    During a regular inspection of the Boiler Auxiliaries at one of the Dutch Electricity Production Companies serious cracks were found in the cover and casings of the feed water circulation pumps in two units after 108.000 and 122.000 hours of boiler operation. Kema Laboratories carried out Failure analyses on boat samples at the cracked areas. Corrosion fatigue cracking was found on the inner side of the GS-24CrNiMo325 casing. Shop Weld repairs were carried out using a newly developed mechanized Plasma Welding Technique. The repaired feed water circulation pumps showed no problems alter several years of operation. The costs of repair were substantially lower than the costs of replacement. (orig.) 3 refs.

  9. Compound floating pivot micromechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Ernest J.

    2001-04-24

    A new class of tilting micromechanical mechanisms have been developed. These new mechanisms use compound floating pivot structures to attain far greater tilt angles than are practical using other micromechanical techniques. The new mechanisms are also capable of bi-directional tilt about multiple axes.

  10. Micromechanisms with floating pivot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Ernest J.

    2001-03-06

    A new class of tilting micromechanical mechanisms have been developed. These new mechanisms use floating pivot structures to relieve some of the problems encountered in the use of solid flexible pivots.

  11. Analyses Of Techniques On Structural Fatigue Failure Detection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Machines and structures are subjected to variable loading conditions where the stress cycle does not remain the same during the operation of the machine. Fatigue is undoubtedly one of the most serious of all causes of breakdowns of machines and structures which results in sudden failures. The use of the time domain ...

  12. Fracture mechanics. With an introduction to micromechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, D.

    2006-01-01

    Concerned with the fundamental concepts and methods of fracture mechanics and micromechanics, Fracture Mechanics primarily focuses on the mechanical description of the fracture process; however, material specific aspects are also discussed. The presentation of continuum mechanical and phenomenological foundations is followed by an introduction into classical failure hypotheses. A major part of the book is devoted to linear elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics. Further subjects are creep fracture, dynamic fracture mechanics, damage mechanics, probabilistic fracture mechanics, failure of thin films and fracture of piezoelectric materials. The book also contains an extensive introduction into micromechanics. Self-contained and well-illustrated, this text serves as a graduate-level text and reference

  13. Broadening failure rate distributions in PRA uncertainty analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martz, H.F.

    1984-01-01

    Several recent nuclear power plant probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) have utilized broadened Reactor Safety Study (RSS) component failure rate population variability curves to compensate for such things as expert overvaluation bias in the estimates upon which the curves are based. A simple two-components of variation empirical Bayes model is proposed for use in estimating the between-expert variability curve in the presence of such biases. Under certain conditions this curve is a population variability curve. Comparisons are made with the existing method. The popular procedure appears to be generally much more conservative than the empirical Bayes method in removing such biases. In one case the broadened curve based on the popular method is more than two orders of magnitude broader than the empirical Bayes curve. In another case it is found that the maximum justifiable degree of broadening of the RSS curve is to increase α from 5% to 12%, which is significantly less than 20% value recommended in the popular approach. 15 references, 1 figure, 5 tables

  14. A failure at a licensed Atomic Energy Corporation facility, analysed thematically

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wet, J.R. De

    1995-01-01

    A containment accident, which resulted in the release of uranium hexafluoride, is analysed in terms of risk engineering, failure minimisation, and economy and safety. The importance of South African statutory obligations in the management of nuclear risk is illustrated. (author)

  15. Some failure analyses of South African Air Force aircraft engine and airframe components

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Benson, JM

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Failure analyses of various engine and airframe components from South African Air Force aircraft have been performed by the Division of Materials Science and Technology over several years and these have ranged from crash investigations to minor...

  16. Safety and deterministic failure analyses in high-beta D-D tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selcow, E.C.

    1984-01-01

    Safety and deterministic failure analyses were performed to compare major component failure characteristics for different high-beta D-D tokamak reactors. The primary focus was on evaluating damage to the reactor facility. The analyses also considered potential hazards to the general public and operational personnel. Parametric designs of high-beta D-D tokamak reactors were developed, using WILDCAT as the reference. The size, and toroidal field strength were reduced, and the fusion power increased in an independent manner. These changes were expected to improve the economics of D-D tokamaks. Issues examined using these designs were radiation induced failurs, radiation safety, first wall failure from plasma disruptions, and toroidal field magnet coil failure

  17. Micromechanics of hierarchical materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    A short overview of micromechanical models of hierarchical materials (hybrid composites, biomaterials, fractal materials, etc.) is given. Several examples of the modeling of strength and damage in hierarchical materials are summarized, among them, 3D FE model of hybrid composites...... with nanoengineered matrix, fiber bundle model of UD composites with hierarchically clustered fibers and 3D multilevel model of wood considered as a gradient, cellular material with layered composite cell walls. The main areas of research in micromechanics of hierarchical materials are identified, among them......, the investigations of the effects of load redistribution between reinforcing elements at different scale levels, of the possibilities to control different material properties and to ensure synergy of strengthening effects at different scale levels and using the nanoreinforcement effects. The main future directions...

  18. Micromechanics of heterogeneous materials

    CERN Document Server

    Buryachenko, Valeriy

    2007-01-01

    Here is an accurate and timely account of micromechanics, which spans materials science, mechanical engineering, applied mathematics, technical physics, geophysics, and biology. The book features rigorous and unified theoretical methods of applied mathematics and statistical physics in the material science of microheterogeneous media. Uniquely, it offers a useful demonstration of the systematic and fundamental research of the microstructure of the wide class of heterogeneous materials of natural and synthetic nature.

  19. Neural Networks and Micromechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kussul, Ernst; Baidyk, Tatiana; Wunsch, Donald C.

    The title of the book, "Neural Networks and Micromechanics," seems artificial. However, the scientific and technological developments in recent decades demonstrate a very close connection between the two different areas of neural networks and micromechanics. The purpose of this book is to demonstrate this connection. Some artificial intelligence (AI) methods, including neural networks, could be used to improve automation system performance in manufacturing processes. However, the implementation of these AI methods within industry is rather slow because of the high cost of conducting experiments using conventional manufacturing and AI systems. To lower the cost, we have developed special micromechanical equipment that is similar to conventional mechanical equipment but of much smaller size and therefore of lower cost. This equipment could be used to evaluate different AI methods in an easy and inexpensive way. The proved methods could be transferred to industry through appropriate scaling. In this book, we describe the prototypes of low cost microequipment for manufacturing processes and the implementation of some AI methods to increase precision, such as computer vision systems based on neural networks for microdevice assembly and genetic algorithms for microequipment characterization and the increase of microequipment precision.

  20. Micromechanical analysis of porous SMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sepe, V; Marfia, S; Sacco, E; Auricchio, F

    2015-01-01

    The present paper deals with computational micromechanical analyses of porous shape memory alloy (SMA). Porous SMAs are considered composite materials made of a dense SMA matrix including voids. A three-dimensional constitutive law is presented for the dense SMA able to reproduce the pseudo-elastic as well as the shape memory effects and, moreover, to account for the different elastic properties of the austenite and martensite phases. Furthermore, a numerical procedure is developed and the overall behavior of the porous SMA is recovered studying a representative volume element. Comparisons between the numerical results, recovered using the proposed modeling, and experimental data available in the literature are presented. The case of closed and open porosity is investigated. Parametric studies have been conducted in order to investigate the influence of the porosity, the shape and orientation of the pores on the overall mechanical response and, mainly, on the energy absorption dissipation capability. (paper)

  1. A Micromechanical RF Channelizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgul, Mehmet

    The power consumption of a radio generally goes as the number and strength of the RF signals it must process. In particular, a radio receiver would consume much less power if the signal presented to its electronics contained only the desired signal in a tiny percent bandwidth frequency channel, rather than the typical mix of signals containing unwanted energy outside the desired channel. Unfortunately, a lack of filters capable of selecting single channel bandwidths at RF forces the front-ends of contemporary receivers to accept unwanted signals, and thus, to operate with sub-optimal efficiency. This dissertation focuses on the degree to which capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators can achieve the aforementioned RF channel-selecting filters. It aims to first show theoretically that with appropriate scaling capacitive-gap transducers are strong enough to meet the needed coupling requirements; and second, to fully detail an architecture and design procedure needed to realize said filters. Finally, this dissertation provides an actual experimentally demonstrated RF channel-select filter designed using the developed procedures and confirming theoretical predictions. Specifically, this dissertation introduces four methods that make possible the design and fabrication of RF channel-select filters. The first of these introduces a small-signal equivalent circuit for parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators that employs negative capacitance to model the dependence of resonance frequency on electrical stiffness in a way that facilitates the analysis of micromechanical circuits loaded with arbitrary electrical impedances. The new circuit model not only correctly predicts the dependence of electrical stiffness on the impedances loading the input and output electrodes of parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical device, but does so in a visually intuitive way that identifies current drive as most appropriate for

  2. Collections and Analyses of Common Cause Failure Data for the Korea Standard and Westinghouse Type NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Dae Il; Han, S. H.

    2007-04-01

    The analyses of the CCF events for domestic NPPs were performed to establish the domestic database for the CCF events and to deliver supply them to the operation office of the international common cause failure data exchange (ICDE) project. We collected and analyzed the CCF events of emergency diesel generators, centrifugal pumps, motor-operated valves, check valves, circuit breakers for the Korean Standard Type nuclear power plants (NPPs), Yonggwang Units 3 and 4 and Ulchin Units 3 and 4, and the Westinghouse type NPPs, Kori Unit 3 and 4 and Yonggwang Units 1 and 2. First, the components to be collected and analyzed were classified into the common cause component groups (CCCGs) according to the ICDE coding guidelines. Next, the CCF events were identified based on reviews of the component database for the PSA and its related documents, and consultations with NPP staff. Fourteen CCF events were identified. The ratio of the number of CCF events to that of individual failure events was identified as approximately 10 percentages. However, an in depth review of the CCF events showed that most failure severities of them were identified as partial CCF events, which can be interpreted as some component failures within the CCCGs. Root causes of the CCF events were identified as 9 internal part failures, 2 human errors, 2 design deficiencies, 1 procedure inadequacy. It could be concluded that the major root causes of the CCF events were internal piece part failures

  3. A Micromechanics-Based Elastoplastic Damage Model for Rocks with a Brittle-Ductile Transition in Mechanical Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kun; Zhu, Qi-zhi; Chen, Liang; Shao, Jian-fu; Liu, Jian

    2018-06-01

    As confining pressure increases, crystalline rocks of moderate porosity usually undergo a transition in failure mode from localized brittle fracture to diffused damage and ductile failure. This transition has been widely reported experimentally for several decades; however, satisfactory modeling is still lacking. The present paper aims at modeling the brittle-ductile transition process of rocks under conventional triaxial compression. Based on quantitative analyses of experimental results, it is found that there is a quite satisfactory linearity between the axial inelastic strain at failure and the confining pressure prescribed. A micromechanics-based frictional damage model is then formulated using an associated plastic flow rule and a strain energy release rate-based damage criterion. The analytical solution to the strong plasticity-damage coupling problem is provided and applied to simulate the nonlinear mechanical behaviors of Tennessee marble, Indiana limestone and Jinping marble, each presenting a brittle-ductile transition in stress-strain curves.

  4. A novel micromechanical flow regulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Toor, M.W.; van Toor, M.W.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt; Monsma, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    A new concept for a micromechanical flow regulator is presented. Regulation of the flow is achieved using variation of channel length instead of channel diameter. Several design concepts together with their application in fluidic systems are presented. A regulator for biomedical use, as a part of a

  5. A novel micromechanical flow controller

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Toor, M.W.; van Toor, M.W.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt; Monsma, D.J.

    A new concept for a micromechanical flow regulator is presented. Regulation of the flow is achieved using variation of channel length instead of channel diameter. Several design concepts together with their application in fluidic systems are presented. A regulator for biomedical use, as a part of a

  6. KOH concentration effect on the cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells. Part 4: Results of failure analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1989-01-01

    KOH concentration effects on cycle life of a Ni/H2 cell have been studied by carrying out a cycle life test of ten Ni/H2 boiler plate cells which contain electrolytes of various KOH concentrations. Failure analyses of these cells were carried out after completion of the life test which accumulated up to 40,000 cycles at an 80 percent depth of discharge over a period of 3.7 years. These failure analyses included studies on changes of electrical characteristics of test cells and component analyses after disassembly of the cell. The component analyses included visual inspections, dimensional changes, capacity measurements of nickel electrodes, scanning electron microscopy, BET surface area measurements, and chemical analyses. Results have indicated that failure mode and change in the nickel electrode varied as the concentration was varied, especially, when the concentration was changed from 31 percent or higher to 26 percent or lower.

  7. Interfacial Micromechanics in Fibrous Composites: Design, Evaluation, and Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Zhenkun; Li, Xuan; Qin, Fuyong; Qiu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances of interfacial micromechanics in fiber reinforced composites using micro-Raman spectroscopy are given. The faced mechanical problems for interface design in fibrous composites are elaborated from three optimization ways: material, interface, and computation. Some reasons are depicted that the interfacial evaluation methods are difficult to guarantee the integrity, repeatability, and consistency. Micro-Raman study on the fiber interface failure behavior and the main interface mechanical problems in fibrous composites are summarized, including interfacial stress transfer, strength criterion of interface debonding and failure, fiber bridging, frictional slip, slip transition, and friction reloading. The theoretical models of above interface mechanical problems are given. PMID:24977189

  8. Micromechanics modelling of ductile fracture

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Zengtao

    2013-01-01

    This book summarizes research advances in micromechanics modelling of ductile fractures made in the past two decades. The ultimate goal of this book is to reach manufacturing frontline designers and materials engineers by providing a user-oriented, theoretical background of micromechanics modeling. Accordingly, the book is organized in a unique way and presents a vigorous damage percolation model developed by the authors over the last ten years. This model overcomes almost all difficulties of the existing models and can be used to completely accommodate ductile damage development within a single, measured microstructure frame. Related void damage criteria including nucleation, growth and coalescence are then discussed in detail: how they are improved, when and where they are used in the model, and how the model performs in comparison with the existing models. Sample forming simulations are provided to illustrate the model’s performance.

  9. Micro-Mechanical Temperature Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tom

    Temperature is the most frequently measured physical quantity in the world. The field of thermometry is therefore constantly evolving towards better temperature sensors and better temperature measurements. The aim of this Ph.D. project was to improve an existing type of micro-mechanical temperature...... sensor or to develop a new one. Two types of micro-mechanical temperature sensors have been studied: Bilayer cantilevers and string-like beam resonators. Both sensor types utilize thermally generated stress. Bilayer cantilevers are frequently used as temperature sensors at the micro-scale, and the goal....... The reduced sensitivity was due to initial bending of the cantilevers and poor adhesion between the two cantilever materials. No further attempts were made to improve the sensitivity of bilayer cantilevers. The concept of using string-like resonators as temperature sensors has, for the first time, been...

  10. An introduction to computational micromechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Zohdi, Tarek I; Zohdi, Tarek I

    2004-01-01

    In this, its second corrected printing, Zohdi and Wriggers' illuminating text presents a comprehensive introduction to the subject. The authors include in their scope basic homogenization theory, microstructural optimization and multifield analysis of heterogeneous materials. This volume is ideal for researchers and engineers, and can be used in a first-year course for graduate students with an interest in the computational micromechanical analysis of new materials.

  11. Micromechanics of fracture in WC-Co hardmetals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dusza, J.; Parilak, L.

    1986-01-01

    A study has been made in WC-Co cemented carbides with grain sizes of 2.1 - 3.6 μm and 13 - 32 vol% Co, of the relationship between the fracture toughness and microstructural parameters and micromechanisms of fracture. Regression analyses have been used to derive empirical relationships between fracture toughness, and the binder spacing, the contiguity and the relative proportions of fracture in the binder phase and between contiguous WC grains

  12. Micromechanics and Piezo Enhancements of HyperSizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Yarrington, Phillip; Collier, Craig S.

    2006-01-01

    The commercial HyperSizer aerospace-composite-material-structure-sizing software has been enhanced by incorporating capabilities for representing coupled thermal, piezoelectric, and piezomagnetic effects on the levels of plies, laminates, and stiffened panels. This enhancement is based on a formulation similar to that of the pre-existing HyperSizer capability for representing thermal effects. As a result of this enhancement, the electric and/or magnetic response of a material or structure to a mechanical or thermal load, or its mechanical response to an applied electric or magnetic field can be predicted. In another major enhancement, a capability for representing micromechanical effects has been added by establishment of a linkage between HyperSizer and Glenn Research Center s Micromechanics Analysis Code With Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC) computer program, which was described in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles. The linkage enables Hyper- Sizer to localize to the fiber and matrix level rather than only to the ply level, making it possible to predict local failures and to predict properties of plies from those of the component fiber and matrix materials. Advanced graphical user interfaces and database structures have been developed to support the new HyperSizer micromechanics capabilities.

  13. Mechanics of composite materials: Unified micromechanical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aboundi, J.

    1991-01-01

    Although many books have been written on the mechanics of composite materials, only a vew few have been devoted almost exclusively to the micromechanics aspects. The present monograph is devoted primarily to the micromechanics of fiber and particle reinforced composites with some additional treatment of laminates as well. Thus, this book would probably be more suitable as a reference book than a textbook

  14. Method for preventing micromechanical structures from adhering to another object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.H.; Ricco, A.J.

    1998-06-16

    A method for preventing micromechanical structures from adhering to another object includes the step of immersing a micromechanical structure and its associated substrate in a chemical species that does not stick to itself. The method can be employed during the manufacture of micromechanical structures to prevent micromechanical parts from sticking or adhering to one another and their associated substrate surface. 3 figs.

  15. Analysing a Chinese Regional Integrated Healthcare Organisation Reform Failure using a Complex Adaptive System Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxi Tang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: China’s organised health system has remained outdated for decades. Current health systems in many less market-oriented countries still adhere to traditional administrative-based directives and linear planning. Furthermore, they neglect the responsiveness and feedback of institutions and professionals, which often results in reform failure in integrated care. Complex adaptive system theory (CAS provides a new perspective and methodology for analysing the health system and policy implementation.  Methods: We observed the typical case of Qianjiang’s Integrated Health Organization Reform (IHO for 2 years to analyse integrated care reforms using CAS theory. Via questionnaires and interviews, we observed 32 medical institutions and 344 professionals. We compared their cooperative behaviours from both organisational and inter-professional levels between 2013 and 2015, and further investigated potential reasons for why medical institutions and professionals did not form an effective IHO. We discovered how interested parties in the policy implementation process influenced reform outcome, and by theoretical induction, proposed a new semi-organised system and corresponding policy analysis flowchart that potentially suits the actual realisation of CAS.  Results: The reform did not achieve its desired effect. The Qianjiang IHO was loosely integrated rather than closely integrated, and the cooperation levels between organisations and professionals were low. This disappointing result was due to low mutual trust among IHO members, with the main contributing factors being insufficient financial incentives and the lack of a common vision.  Discussion and Conclusions: The traditional 'organised health system' is old-fashioned. Rather than being completely organised or adaptive, the health system is currently more similar to a s'emi-organised system'. Medical institutions and professionals operate in a middle ground between complete adherence

  16. Concepts for measuring maintenance performance and methods for analysing competing failure modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, R.; Paulsen, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    competing failure modes. This article examines ways to assess maintenance performance without introducing statistical assumptions, then introduces a plausible statistical model for describing the interaction of preventive and corrective maintenance, and finally illustrates these with examples from...

  17. Computational micromechanics of bioabsorbable magnesium stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, J A; Leen, S B; McHugh, P E

    2014-06-01

    Magnesium alloys are a promising candidate material for an emerging generation of absorbable metal stents. Due to its hexagonal-close-packed lattice structure and tendency to undergo twinning, the deformation behaviour of magnesium is quite different to that of conventional stent materials, such as stainless steel 316L and cobalt chromium L605. In particular, magnesium exhibits asymmetric plastic behaviour (i.e. different yield behaviours in tension and compression) and has lower ductility than these conventional alloys. In the on-going development of absorbable metal stents it is important to assess how the unique behaviour of magnesium affects device performance. The mechanical behaviour of magnesium stent struts is investigated in this study using computational micromechanics, based on finite element analysis and crystal plasticity theory. The plastic deformation in tension and bending of textured and non-textured magnesium stent struts with different numbers of grains through the strut dimension is investigated. It is predicted that, unlike 316L and L605, the failure risk and load bearing capacity of magnesium stent struts during expansion is not strongly affected by the number of grains across the strut dimensions; however texturing, which may be introduced and controlled in the manufacturing process, is predicted to have a significant influence on these measures of strut performance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Micromechanics of soil responses in cyclic simple shear tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Liang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Offshore wind turbine (OWT foundations are subjected to a combination of cyclic and dynamic loading arising from wind, wave, rotor and blade shadowing. Under cyclic loading, most soils change their characteristics including stiffness, which may cause the system natural frequency to approach the loading frequency and lead to unplanned resonance and system damage or even collapse. To investigate such changes and the underlying micromechanics, a series of cyclic simple shear tests were performed on the RedHill 110 sand with different shear strain amplitudes, vertical stresses and initial relative densities of soil. The test results showed that: (a Vertical accumulated strain is proportional to the shear strain amplitude but inversely proportional to relative density of soil; (b Shear modulus increases rapidly in the initial loading cycles and then the rate of increase diminishes and the shear modulus remains below an asymptote; (c Shear modulus increases with increasing vertical stress and relative density, but decreasing with increasing strain amplitude. Coupled DEM simulations were performed using PFC2D to analyse the micromechanics underlying the cyclic behaviour of soils. Micromechanical parameters (e.g. fabric tensor, coordination number were examined to explore the reasons for the various cyclic responses to different shear strain amplitudes or vertical stresses. Both coordination number and magnitude of fabric anisotropy contribute to the increasing shear modulus.

  19. Microstructures, Forming Limit and Failure Analyses of Inconel 718 Sheets for Fabrication of Aerospace Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajun Prasad, K.; Panda, Sushanta Kumar; Kar, Sujoy Kumar; Sen, Mainak; Murty, S. V. S. Naryana; Sharma, Sharad Chandra

    2017-04-01

    Recently, aerospace industries have shown increasing interest in forming limits of Inconel 718 sheet metals, which can be utilised in designing tools and selection of process parameters for successful fabrication of components. In the present work, stress-strain response with failure strains was evaluated by uniaxial tensile tests in different orientations, and two-stage work-hardening behavior was observed. In spite of highly preferred texture, tensile properties showed minor variations in different orientations due to the random distribution of nanoprecipitates. The forming limit strains were evaluated by deforming specimens in seven different strain paths using limiting dome height (LDH) test facility. Mostly, the specimens failed without prior indication of localized necking. Thus, fracture forming limit diagram (FFLD) was evaluated, and bending correction was imposed due to the use of sub-size hemispherical punch. The failure strains of FFLD were converted into major-minor stress space ( σ-FFLD) and effective plastic strain-stress triaxiality space ( ηEPS-FFLD) as failure criteria to avoid the strain path dependence. Moreover, FE model was developed, and the LDH, strain distribution and failure location were predicted successfully using above-mentioned failure criteria with two stages of work hardening. Fractographs were correlated with the fracture behavior and formability of sheet metal.

  20. Uncertainties and quantification of common cause failure rates and probabilities for system analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaurio, Jussi K.

    2005-01-01

    Simultaneous failures of multiple components due to common causes at random times are modelled by constant multiple-failure rates. A procedure is described for quantification of common cause failure (CCF) basic event probabilities for system models using plant-specific and multiple-plant failure-event data. Methodology is presented for estimating CCF-rates from event data contaminated with assessment uncertainties. Generalised impact vectors determine the moments for the rates of individual systems or plants. These moments determine the effective numbers of events and observation times to be input to a Bayesian formalism to obtain plant-specific posterior CCF-rates. The rates are used to determine plant-specific common cause event probabilities for the basic events of explicit fault tree models depending on test intervals, test schedules and repair policies. Three methods are presented to determine these probabilities such that the correct time-average system unavailability can be obtained with single fault tree quantification. Recommended numerical values are given and examples illustrate different aspects of the methodology

  1. 3rd Conference on Microactuators and Micromechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Ananthasuresh, Gondi; Corves, Burkhard; Petuya, Victor

    2015-01-01

    This book contains applications of micromechanisms and microactuators in several very modern technical fields such as mechatronics, biomechanics, machines, micromachines, robotics and apparatuses. In connection with its topic, the work combines the theoretical results with experimental tests on micromechanisms and microactuators. The book presents the most recent research advances in Machine and Mechanisms Science. It includes the accepted reviewed papers of researchers specialized in the topics of the conference: microactuators and micro-assembly, micro sensors involving movable solids, micro-opto-mechanical devices, mechanical tools for cell and tissue studies, micromanipulation and micro-stages, micro-scale flight and swimming, micro-robotics and surgical tools, micron-scale power generation, miniature manufacturing machines, micromechatronics and micro-mechanisms, biomechanics micro and nano scales and control issues in microsystems.  The presented applications of micromechanisms and microactuators i...

  2. Cantilever-like micromechanical sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Anja; Dohn, Søren; Keller, Stephan Sylvest

    2011-01-01

    The field of cantilever-based sensing emerged in the mid-1990s and is today a well-known technology for label-free sensing which holds promise as a technique for cheap, portable, sensitive and highly parallel analysis systems. The research in sensor realization as well as sensor applications has...... increased significantly over the past 10 years. In this review we will present the basic modes of operation in cantilever-like micromechanical sensors and discuss optical and electrical means for signal transduction. The fundamental processes for realizing miniaturized cantilevers are described with focus...... on silicon-and polymer-based technologies. Examples of recent sensor applications are given covering such diverse fields as drug discovery, food diagnostics, material characterizations and explosives detection....

  3. Concepts for measuring maintenance performance and methods for analysing competing failure modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooke, Roger; Paulsen, Jette

    1997-01-01

    Measurement of maintenance performance is done on the basis of component history data in which service sojourns are distinguished according to whether they terminate in corrective or preventive maintenance. From the viewpoint of data analysis, corrective and preventive maintenance constitute competing failure nudes. This article examines ways to assess maintenance performance without introducing statistical assumptions, then introduces a plausible statistical model for describing the interaction of preventive and corrective maintenance, and finally illustrates these with examples from the Nordic TUD data system

  4. Failure probability analyses for PWSCC in Ni-based alloy welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udagawa, Makoto; Katsuyama, Jinya; Onizawa, Kunio; Li, Yinsheng

    2015-01-01

    A number of cracks due to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in pressurized water reactors and Ni-based alloy stress corrosion cracking (NiSCC) in boiling water reactors have been detected around Ni-based alloy welds. The causes of crack initiation and growth due to stress corrosion cracking include weld residual stress, operating stress, the materials, and the environment. We have developed the analysis code PASCAL-NP for calculating the failure probability and assessment of the structural integrity of cracked components on the basis of probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) considering PWSCC and NiSCC. This PFM analysis code has functions for calculating the incubation time of PWSCC and NiSCC crack initiation, evaluation of crack growth behavior considering certain crack location and orientation patterns, and evaluation of failure behavior near Ni-based alloy welds due to PWSCC and NiSCC in a probabilistic manner. Herein, actual plants affected by PWSCC have been analyzed using PASCAL-NP. Failure probabilities calculated by PASCAL-NP are in reasonable agreement with the detection data. Furthermore, useful knowledge related to leakage due to PWSCC was obtained through parametric studies using this code

  5. Failure assessments of corroded pipelines with axial defects using stress-based criteria: Numerical studies and verification analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiodo, Mario S.G.; Ruggieri, Claudio

    2009-01-01

    Conventional procedures used to assess the integrity of corroded piping systems with axial defects generally employ simplified failure criteria based upon a plastic collapse failure mechanism incorporating the tensile properties of the pipe material. These methods establish acceptance criteria for defects based on limited experimental data for low strength structural steels which do not necessarily address specific requirements for the high grade steels currently used. For these cases, failure assessments may be overly conservative or provide significant scatter in their predictions, which lead to unnecessary repair or replacement of in-service pipelines. Motivated by these observations, this study examines the applicability of a stress-based criterion based upon plastic instability analysis to predict the failure pressure of corroded pipelines with axial defects. A central focus is to gain additional insight into effects of defect geometry and material properties on the attainment of a local limit load to support the development of stress-based burst strength criteria. The work provides an extensive body of results which lend further support to adopt failure criteria for corroded pipelines based upon ligament instability analyses. A verification study conducted on burst testing of large-diameter pipe specimens with different defect length shows the effectiveness of a stress-based criterion using local ligament instability in burst pressure predictions, even though the adopted burst criterion exhibits a potential dependence on defect geometry and possibly on material's strain hardening capacity. Overall, the results presented here suggests that use of stress-based criteria based upon plastic instability analysis of the defect ligament is a valid engineering tool for integrity assessments of pipelines with axial corroded defects

  6. Failure assessments of corroded pipelines with axial defects using stress-based criteria: Numerical studies and verification analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiodo, Mario S.G. [Department of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2231 (PNV-EPUSP), Sao Paulo, SP 05508-030 (Brazil); Ruggieri, Claudio [Department of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2231 (PNV-EPUSP), Sao Paulo, SP 05508-030 (Brazil)], E-mail: claudio.ruggieri@poli.usp.br

    2009-02-15

    Conventional procedures used to assess the integrity of corroded piping systems with axial defects generally employ simplified failure criteria based upon a plastic collapse failure mechanism incorporating the tensile properties of the pipe material. These methods establish acceptance criteria for defects based on limited experimental data for low strength structural steels which do not necessarily address specific requirements for the high grade steels currently used. For these cases, failure assessments may be overly conservative or provide significant scatter in their predictions, which lead to unnecessary repair or replacement of in-service pipelines. Motivated by these observations, this study examines the applicability of a stress-based criterion based upon plastic instability analysis to predict the failure pressure of corroded pipelines with axial defects. A central focus is to gain additional insight into effects of defect geometry and material properties on the attainment of a local limit load to support the development of stress-based burst strength criteria. The work provides an extensive body of results which lend further support to adopt failure criteria for corroded pipelines based upon ligament instability analyses. A verification study conducted on burst testing of large-diameter pipe specimens with different defect length shows the effectiveness of a stress-based criterion using local ligament instability in burst pressure predictions, even though the adopted burst criterion exhibits a potential dependence on defect geometry and possibly on material's strain hardening capacity. Overall, the results presented here suggests that use of stress-based criteria based upon plastic instability analysis of the defect ligament is a valid engineering tool for integrity assessments of pipelines with axial corroded defects.

  7. Experimental POD measurement using ultrasonic phased arrays for incorporating nondestructive testes in probabilistic failure analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurz, Jochen H.; Dobmann, Gerd; Juengert, Anne; Dugan, Sandra; Roos, Eberhard

    2011-01-01

    In nuclear facilities, nondestructive tests are carried out during construction and during inspections. The type and extent of the tests are specified in the KTA rules. All tests must be qualified. In the past, the qualifications were made by extensive performance demonstrations of the test teams and equipment, which were judged by experts. This provided primarily pragmatic information on fault detection performance. In the USA, qualification of EPRI test teams also includes testing of test pieces with hidden (unknown) defects, of which a certain percentage must be detected. There is still a lack of information on the probability of detection (POD), in the form of POD curves, of specific defects in given test situations, using specifically selected testing techniques. Quantification of POD and the integration of relevant data in the probabilistic evaluation chain is one of the key goals of a research project whose first results are presented here. The concept of the project and first results of ultrasonic tests are presented. Defect distributions in the test pieces, experiment planning, and test specifications are gone into more closely. One of the most important goals is the specification of the residual uncertainty of components failure on the basis of the investigations. An outlook is presented for this.

  8. Sensitivity improvement techniques for micromechanical vibrating accelerometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vtorushin Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the problems of detecting a desired signal generated by micromechanical vibrating accelerometer. Three detection methods, namely frequency, amplitude and phase are considered in this paper. These methods are used in micromechanical vibrating accelerometers that incorporate a force sensitive element which transforms measured acceleration into the output signal. Investigations are carried out using the ANSYS finite element program and MATLAB/Simulink support package. Investigation results include the comparative analysis of the output signal characteristics obtained by the different detection methods.

  9. Determination of crack morphology parameters from service failures for leak-rate analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkowski, G.; Ghadiali, N.; Paul, D. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    In leak-rate analyses described in the literature, the crack morphology parameters are typically not well agreed upon by different investigators. This paper presents results on a review of crack morphology parameters determined from examination of service induced cracks. Service induced cracks were found to have a much more tortuous flow path than laboratory induced cracks due to crack branching associated with the service induced cracks. Several new parameters such as local and global surface roughnesses, as well as local and global number of turns were identified. The effect of each of these parameters are dependent on the crack-opening displacement. Additionally, the crack path is typically assumed to be straight through the pipe thickness, but the service data show that the flow path can be longer due to the crack following a fusion line, and/or the number of turns, where the number of turns in the past were included as a pressure drop term due to the turns, but not the longer flow path length. These parameters were statistically evaluated for fatigue cracks in air, corrosion-fatigue, IGSCC, and thermal fatigue cracks. A refined version of the SQUIRT leak-rate code was developed to account for these variables. Sample calculations are provided in this paper that show how the crack size can vary for a given leak rate and the statistical variation of the crack morphology parameters.

  10. KOH concentration effect on the cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells. 4: Results of failure analyse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1989-01-01

    Effects of KOH concentrations on failure modes and mechanisms of nickel-hydrogen cells were studied using long cycled boiler plate cells containing electrolytes of various KOH concentrations ranging 21 to 36 percent. Life of these cells were up to 40,000 cycles in an accelerated low earth orbit (LEO) cycle regime at 80 percent depth of discharge. An interim life test results were reported earlier in J. Power Sources, 22, 213-220, 1988. The results of final life test, end-of-life cell performance, and teardown analyses are discussed. These teardown analyses included visual observations, measurements of nickel electrode capacity in an electrolyte-flooded cell, dimensional changes of cell components, SEM studies on cell cross section, BET surface area and pore volume distribution in cycled nickel electrodes, and chemical analyses. Cycle life of a nickel-hydrogen cell was improved tremendously as KOH concentration was decreased from 36 to 31 percent and from 31 to 26 percent while effect of further concentration decrease was complicated as described in our earlier report. Failure mode of high concentration (31 to 36 percent) cells was gradual capacity decrease, while that of low concentration (21 to 26 percent) cells was mainly formation of a soft short. Long cycled (25,000 to 40,000 cycles) nickel electrodes were expanded more than 50 percent of the initial value, but no correlation was found between this expansion and measured capacity. All electrodes cycled in low concentration (21 to 26 percent) cells had higher capacity than those cycled in high concentration (31 to 36 percent) cells.

  11. Development of a micro-mechanical valve in a novel glaucoma implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewert, Stefan; Schultze, Christine; Schmidt, Wolfram; Hinze, Ulf; Chichkov, Boris; Wree, Andreas; Sternberg, Katrin; Allemann, Reto; Guthoff, Rudolf; Schmitz, Klaus-Peter

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes methods for design, manufacturing and characterization of a micro-mechanical valve for a novel glaucoma implant. The implant is designed to drain aqueous humour from the anterior chamber of the eye into the suprachoroidal space in case of an elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). In contrast to any existing glaucoma drainage device (GDD), the valve mechanism is located in the anterior chamber and there, surrounded by aqueous humour, immune to fibrosis induced failure. For the prevention of hypotony the micro-mechanical valve is designed to open if the physiological pressure difference between the anterior chamber and the suprachoroidal space in the range of 0.8 mmHg to 3.7 mmHg is exceeded. In particular the work includes: (i) manufacturing and morphological characterization of polymer tubing, (ii) mechanical material testing as basis for (iii) the design of micro-mechanical valves using finite element analysis (FEA), (iv) manufacturing of microstent prototypes including micro-mechanical valves by femtosecond laser micromachining and (v) the experimental fluid-mechanical characterization of the manufactured microstent prototypes with regard to valve opening pressure. The considered materials polyurethane (PUR) and silicone (SIL) exhibit low elastic modulus and high extensibility. The unique valve design enables a low opening pressure of micro-mechanical valves. An ideal valve design for PUR and SIL with an experimentally determined opening pressure of 2 mmHg and 3.7 mmHg is identified. The presented valve approach is suitable for the inhibition of hypotony as a major limitation of today's GDD and will potentially improve the minimally invasive treatment of glaucoma.

  12. Micromechanics based simulation of ductile fracture in structural steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellavajjala, Ravi Kiran

    The broader aim of this research is to develop fundamental understanding of ductile fracture process in structural steels, propose robust computational models to quantify the associated damage, and provide numerical tools to simplify the implementation of these computational models into general finite element framework. Mechanical testing on different geometries of test specimens made of ASTM A992 steels is conducted to experimentally characterize the ductile fracture at different stress states under monotonic and ultra-low cycle fatigue (ULCF) loading. Scanning electron microscopy studies of the fractured surfaces is conducted to decipher the underlying microscopic damage mechanisms that cause fracture in ASTM A992 steels. Detailed micromechanical analyses for monotonic and cyclic loading are conducted to understand the influence of stress triaxiality and Lode parameter on the void growth phase of ductile fracture. Based on monotonic analyses, an uncoupled micromechanical void growth model is proposed to predict ductile fracture. This model is then incorporated in to finite element program as a weakly coupled model to simulate the loss of load carrying capacity in the post microvoid coalescence regime for high triaxialities. Based on the cyclic analyses, an uncoupled micromechanics based cyclic void growth model is developed to predict the ULCF life of ASTM A992 steels subjected to high stress triaxialities. Furthermore, a computational fracture locus for ASTM A992 steels is developed and incorporated in to finite element program as an uncoupled ductile fracture model. This model can be used to predict the ductile fracture initiation under monotonic loading in a wide range of triaxiality and Lode parameters. Finally, a coupled microvoid elongation and dilation based continuum damage model is proposed, implemented, calibrated and validated. This model is capable of simulating the local softening caused by the various phases of ductile fracture process under

  13. Potential constitutive models for salt: Survey of phenomenology, micromechanisms, and equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senseny, P.E.; Hansen, F.D.

    1987-12-01

    Results are given of a literature survey performed to document the thermomechanical phenomena and micromechanical processes observed for salt over the ranges of stress and temperature of interest for a high-level nuclear repository. The elastic and thermal expansion behavior of salt can be readily modeled by the generalized Duhamel Neumann form of Hooke's law with temperature-dependent elastic constants and coefficient of thermal expansion. Inelastic deformation is primarily viscoplastic, but also has a brittle component. The observed phenomenological behavior of salt occurs because of micromechanical processes. To the extent that these processes have been studied, a summary of deformation mechanisms in natural salt is included in this report. Eight constitutive models that appear to be capable of modeling the viscoplastic deformation have been selected from the literature. Two models have been selected to model brittle deformation. Insufficient data are available to develop a model for failure. 92 refs., 39 figs., 6 tabs

  14. 4th Conference on Microactuators and Micromechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Corves, Burkhard; Jensen, Brian; Lovasz, Erwin-Christian

    2017-01-01

    This book brings together investigations which combine theoretical and experimental results related to such systems as capsule micromechanisms, active micro catheters, nanotube vascular stents, mechanisms for micromilling, different compliant mechanisms including grippers and compliant systems with actuators and sensors, microrobots based on vibrations, tactile sensors, tooth brackets, compliant valves, and space reflectors. This volume contains twenty-two contributions from researchers from ten countries, represented at the 4th Conference on Microactuators and Micromechanisms, which was held in 2016 in Ilmenau, Germany. The aim of the conference was to provide a special opportunity for a know-how exchange and collaboration in various disciplines concerning systems pertaining to micro-technology. This Conference was organized under the patronage of IFToMM (International Federation for the Promotion of Mechanism and Machine Science). .

  15. Micromechanical Resonator Driven by Radiation Pressure Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boales, Joseph A; Mateen, Farrukh; Mohanty, Pritiraj

    2017-11-22

    Radiation pressure exerted by light on any surface is the pressure generated by the momentum of impinging photons. The associated force - fundamentally, a quantum mechanical aspect of light - is usually too small to be useful, except in large-scale problems in astronomy and astrodynamics. In atomic and molecular optics, radiation pressure can be used to trap or cool atoms and ions. Use of radiation pressure on larger objects such as micromechanical resonators has been so far limited to its coupling to an acoustic mode, sideband cooling, or levitation of microscopic objects. In this Letter, we demonstrate direct actuation of a radio-frequency micromechanical plate-type resonator by the radiation pressure force generated by a standard laser diode at room temperature. Using two independent methods, the magnitude of the resonator's response to forcing by radiation pressure is found to be proportional to the intensity of the incident light.

  16. Parametric and Wavelet Analyses of Acoustic Emission Signals for the Identification of Failure Modes in CFRP Composites Using PZT and PVDF Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasopchaichana, Kritsada; Kwon, Oh Yang [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    Combination of the parametric and the wavelet analyses of acoustic emission (AE) signals was applied to identify the failure modes in carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite laminates during tensile testing. AE signals detected by surface mounted lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) sensors were analyzed by parametric analysis based on the time of occurrence which classifies AE signals corresponding to failure modes. The frequency band level-energy analysis can distinguish the dominant frequency band for each failure mode. It was observed that the same type of failure mechanism produced signals with different characteristics depending on the stacking sequences and the type of sensors. This indicates that the proposed method can identify the failure modes of the signals if the stacking sequences and the sensors used are known

  17. Micromechanics and Microactuators : Proceedings of MAMM 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Corves, Burkhard; Petuya, Victor

    2012-01-01

    This book contains selected papers presented at MAMM 2010, the First Workshop on Microactuators and Micromechanisms. This workshop has brought together scientists, industry experts and students and has provided a special opportunity for know-how exchange and collaboration in various disciplines referring to microsystems technology. The conference was organized by the Technical Committees of Mechanical Transmissions and Micromachines under the patronage of IFToMM, the International Federation for the Promotion of Mechanism and Machine Science.

  18. Micromechanics of Size Effect in Failure Due to Distributed Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-02-26

    U0 = ub+ us U9Ub 3 (s WE 4bd E where L is the span of the specimen, and ub and us are the contributions of bending and shear, respectively. The weight...0r- r- C ’= 0 "t M = ’- cr; Ej= -- * -r C + .0-~ - - - :3~~~~. C5r r-C -s t 1L C E 7S Iu.Cf~ ejr0C.C..~0~3J ~ ~c- 0 11 tD r =- -11 (10 21 mC CC c lC...w cc 77- -. 1 Z ~ - aCIOC0 aL -, v . ~ v: : . 4J 0 ftU L-< a ~ a - - - ~ -> u1 A *aJ 5U -. ; 0 C 0 -052 U CLUJ 2. =- =z U Z < CY es td .- -- . U 73

  19. Micromechanical Aspects of Transgranular and Intergranular Failure Competition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Tarafder, M.; Hadraba, Hynek

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 465, - (2011), s. 399-402 ISSN 1013-9826 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP107/10/0361 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : intergranular fracture * cleavage * fracture toughness Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  20. Modelling software failures of digital I and C in probabilistic safety analyses based on the TELEPERM registered XS operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jockenhoevel-Barttfeld, Mariana; Taurines Andre; Baeckstroem, Ola; Holmberg, Jan-Erik; Porthin, Markus; Tyrvaeinen, Tero

    2015-01-01

    Digital instrumentation and control (I and C) systems appear as upgrades in existing nuclear power plants (NPPs) and in new plant designs. In order to assess the impact of digital system failures, quantifiable reliability models are needed along with data for digital systems that are compatible with existing probabilistic safety assessments (PSA). The paper focuses on the modelling of software failures of digital I and C systems in probabilistic assessments. An analysis of software faults, failures and effects is presented to derive relevant failure modes of system and application software for the PSA. The estimations of software failure probabilities are based on an analysis of the operating experience of TELEPERM registered XS (TXS). For the assessment of application software failures the analysis combines the use of the TXS operating experience at an application function level combined with conservative engineering judgments. Failure probabilities to actuate on demand and of spurious actuation of typical reactor protection application are estimated. Moreover, the paper gives guidelines for the modelling of software failures in the PSA. The strategy presented in this paper is generic and can be applied to different software platforms and their applications.

  1. Micromechanical modelling of mechanical behaviour and strength of wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon; Qing, Hai

    2008-01-01

    An overview of the micromechanical theoretical and numerical models of wood is presented. Different methods of analysis of the effects of wood microstructures at different scale levels on the mechanical behaviour, deformation and strength of wood are discussed and compared. Micromechanical models...

  2. Micromechanical validation of a mesomodel for plasticity in composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, F.P.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the performance of a recent homogenized orthotropic plasticity model for fiber reinforced composites (Vogler et al. (2013)) is investigated by comparing the model response against a micromechanical model. It is assumed that the micromechanical model which contains a recent

  3. Reducing support loss in micromechanical ring resonators using phononic band-gap structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Feng-Chia; Huang, Tsun-Che; Wang, Chin-Hung; Chang, Pin [Industrial Technology Research Institute-South, Tainan 709, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Jin-Chen, E-mail: fengchiahsu@itri.org.t, E-mail: hsujc@yuntech.edu.t [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Douliou, Yunlin 64002, Taiwan (China)

    2011-09-21

    In micromechanical resonators, energy loss via supports into the substrates may lead to a low quality factor. To eliminate the support loss, in this paper a phononic band-gap structure is employed. We demonstrate a design of phononic-crystal (PC) strips used to support extensional wine-glass mode ring resonators to increase the quality factor. The PC strips are introduced to stop elastic-wave propagation by the band-gap and deaf-band effects. Analyses of resonant characteristics of the ring resonators and the dispersion relations, eigenmodes, and transmission properties of the PC strips are presented. With the proposed resonator architecture, the finite-element simulations show that the leaky power is effectively reduced and the stored energy inside the resonators is enhanced simultaneously as the operating frequencies of the resonators are within the band gap or deaf bands. Realization of a high quality factor micromechanical ring resonator with minimized support loss is expected.

  4. Reducing support loss in micromechanical ring resonators using phononic band-gap structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Feng-Chia; Huang, Tsun-Che; Wang, Chin-Hung; Chang, Pin; Hsu, Jin-Chen

    2011-01-01

    In micromechanical resonators, energy loss via supports into the substrates may lead to a low quality factor. To eliminate the support loss, in this paper a phononic band-gap structure is employed. We demonstrate a design of phononic-crystal (PC) strips used to support extensional wine-glass mode ring resonators to increase the quality factor. The PC strips are introduced to stop elastic-wave propagation by the band-gap and deaf-band effects. Analyses of resonant characteristics of the ring resonators and the dispersion relations, eigenmodes, and transmission properties of the PC strips are presented. With the proposed resonator architecture, the finite-element simulations show that the leaky power is effectively reduced and the stored energy inside the resonators is enhanced simultaneously as the operating frequencies of the resonators are within the band gap or deaf bands. Realization of a high quality factor micromechanical ring resonator with minimized support loss is expected.

  5. Cryogenic transimpedance amplifier for micromechanical capacitive sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonio, D; Pastoriza, H; Julián, P; Mandolesi, P

    2008-08-01

    We developed a cryogenic transimpedance amplifier that works at a broad range of temperatures, from room temperature down to 4 K. The device was realized with a standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor 1.5 mum process. Measurements of current-voltage characteristics, open-loop gain, input referred noise current, and power consumption are presented as a function of temperature. The transimpedance amplifier has been successfully applied to sense the motion of a polysilicon micromechanical oscillator at low temperatures. The whole device is intended to serve as a magnetometer for microscopic superconducting samples.

  6. A micromechanical study of porous composites under longitudinal shear and transverse normal loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashouri Vajari, Danial

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical response of porous unidirectional composites under transverse normal and longitudinal shear loading is studied using the finite element analysis. The 3D model includes discrete and random distribution of fibers and voids. The micromechanical failure mechanisms are taken into account....... Finally, the computational prediction of the porous composite in the transverse normal-longitudinal shear stress space is obtained and compared with Puck's model. The results show that both interfaces with low fracture toughness and microvoids with even small void volume fraction can significantly reduce...

  7. Micromechanics of Sea Urchin spines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Tsafnat

    Full Text Available The endoskeletal structure of the Sea Urchin, Centrostephanus rodgersii, has numerous long spines whose known functions include locomotion, sensing, and protection against predators. These spines have a remarkable internal microstructure and are made of single-crystal calcite. A finite-element model of the spine's unique porous structure, based on micro-computed tomography (microCT and incorporating anisotropic material properties, was developed to study its response to mechanical loading. Simulations show that high stress concentrations occur at certain points in the spine's architecture; brittle cracking would likely initiate in these regions. These analyses demonstrate that the organization of single-crystal calcite in the unique, intricate morphology of the sea urchin spine results in a strong, stiff and lightweight structure that enhances its strength despite the brittleness of its constituent material.

  8. Effectiveness and adverse events of tolvaptan in octogenarians with heart failure. Interim analyses of Samsca Post-Marketing Surveillance In Heart faiLurE (SMILE study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinugawa, Koichiro; Inomata, Takayuki; Sato, Naoki; Yasuda, Moriyoshi; Shimakawa, Toshiyuki; Bando, Kosuke; Mizuguchi, Kazuki

    2015-01-01

    The vasopressin receptor 2 (V2) receptor antagonist tolvaptan is an aquaretic agent that has been found to improve symptoms in patients with congestive heart failure. In this study (SMILE study), we administered tolvaptan to patients aged ≥ 80 years with heart failure accompanied by congestive symptoms and compared its effectiveness and safety profiles in this group with those in patients effectiveness of tolvaptan in the aged patients was similar to that in U-80 patients. In the safety profile, the incidence rate of thirst was lower in the aged patients than that in U-80 patients (9.6% versus 11.6%, P = 0.0023). Furthermore, the incidence of hypernatremia, defined as ≥ 150 mEq/L in aged patients, was comparable with that in U-80 patients (2.9% versus 3.6%, respectively, P = 0.3657). Based on these findings, tolvaptan has similar effectiveness and safety profiles in aged patients compared with U-80 patients. In addition, we found that a higher starting dose of tolvaptan was markedly associated with the occurrence of hypernatremia exclusively in the aged population; therefore, we recommend that tolvaptan should be started at lower doses in aged patients.

  9. Micromechanical modeling and inverse identification of damage using cohesive approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blal, Nawfal

    2013-01-01

    In this study a micromechanical model is proposed for a collection of cohesive zone models embedded between two each elements of a standard cohesive-volumetric finite element method. An equivalent 'matrix-inclusions' composite is proposed as a representation of the cohesive-volumetric discretization. The overall behaviour is obtained using homogenization approaches (Hashin Shtrikman scheme and the P. Ponte Castaneda approach). The derived model deals with elastic, brittle and ductile materials. It is available whatever the triaxiality loading rate and the shape of the cohesive law, and leads to direct relationships between the overall material properties and the local cohesive parameters and the mesh density. First, rigorous bounds on the normal and tangential cohesive stiffnesses are obtained leading to a suitable control of the inherent artificial elastic loss induced by intrinsic cohesive models. Second, theoretical criteria on damageable and ductile cohesive parameters are established (cohesive peak stress, critical separation, cohesive failure energy,... ). These criteria allow a practical calibration of the cohesive zone parameters as function of the overall material properties and the mesh length. The main interest of such calibration is its promising capacity to lead to a mesh-insensitive overall response in surface damage. (author) [fr

  10. Micro-mechanical analysis and modelling of the behavior and brittle fracture of a french 16MND5 steel: role of microstructural heterogeneities; Analyse et modelisation micromecanique du comportement et de la rupture fragile de l'acier 16MND5: prise en compte des heterogeneites microstructurales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathieu, J.Ph

    2006-10-15

    Reactor Pressure Vessel is the second containment barrier between nuclear fuel and the environment. Electricite de France's reactors are made with french 16MND5 low-alloyed steel (equ. ASTM A508 Cl.3). Various experimental techniques (scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction...) are set up in order to characterize mechanical heterogeneities inside material microstructure during tensile testing at different low temperatures [-150 C;-60 C]. Heterogeneities can be seen as the effect of both 'polycrystalline' and 'composite' microstructural features. Interphase (until 150 MPa in average between ferritic and bainitic macroscopic stress state) and intra-phase (until 100 MPa in average between ferritic orientations) stress variations are highlighted. Modelling involves micro-mechanical description of plastic glide, mean fields models and realistic three-dimensional aggregates, all put together inside a multi-scale approach. Calibration is done on macroscopic stress-strain curves at different low temperatures, and modelling reproduces experimental stress heterogeneities. This modelling allows to apply a local micro-mechanical fracture criterion for crystallographic cleavage. Deterministic computations of time to fracture for different carbides random selection provide a way to express probability of fracture for the elementary volume. Results are in good agreement with hypothesis made by local approach to fracture. Hence, the main difference is that no dependence to loading nor microstructure features is supposed for probability of fracture on the representative volume: this dependence is naturally introduced by modelling. (author)

  11. Micromechanical model of lung parenchyma hyperelasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concha, Felipe; Sarabia-Vallejos, Mauricio; Hurtado, Daniel E.

    2018-03-01

    Mechanics plays a key role in respiratory physiology, as lung tissue cyclically deforms to bring air in and out the lung, a life-long process necessary for respiration. The study of regional mechanisms of deformation in lung parenchyma has received great attention to date due to its clinical relevance, as local overstretching and stress concentration in lung tissue is currently associated to pathological conditions such as lung injury during mechanical ventilation therapy. This mechanical approach to lung physiology has motivated the development of constitutive models to better understand the relation between stress and deformation in the lung. While material models proposed to date have been key in the development of whole-lung simulations, either they do not directly relate microstructural properties of alveolar tissue with coarse-scale behavior, or they require a high computational effort when based on real alveolar geometries. Furthermore, most models proposed to date have not been thoroughly validated for anisotropic deformation states, which are commonly found in normal lungs in-vivo. In this work, we develop a novel micromechanical model of lung parenchyma hyperelasticity using the framework of finite-deformation homogenization. To this end, we consider a tetrakaidecahedron unit cell with incompressible Neo-Hookean structural elements that account for the alveolar wall tissue responsible for the elastic response, and derive expressions for its effective coarse-scale behavior that directly depend on the alveolar wall elasticity, reference porosity, and two other geometrical coefficients. To validate the proposed model, we simulate the non-linear elastic response of twelve representative volume elements (RVEs) of lung parenchyma with micrometric dimensions, whose geometry is obtained from micrometric computed-tomography reconstructions of murine lungs. We show that the proposed micromechanical model accurately captures the RVEs response not only for isotropic

  12. Experimental and Numerical Analyses of Dynamic Deformation and Failure in Marine Structures Subjected to Underwater Impulsive Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    fraction of glass fibers and directionality of fibers with respect to external loads. E-glass fibers are the most widely used reinforcement for...Imacon 200D high-speed camera. Gas ReservoirValveGun BarrelWater-chamberFlash Gun Chronograph Support BeamHigh-Speed Camera Breech 61...Explicit User’s Manual, Version 6.9. 2009. 102. Hooputra, H., et al., A comprehensive failure model for crashworthiness simulation of aluminium

  13. Micromechanical modelling of fuel viscoplastic behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masson, R.; Blanc, V.; Gatt, J.M.; Julien, J.; Michel, B.; Largenton, R.

    2015-01-01

    To identify the effect of microstructural parameters on the viscoplastic behaviour of nuclear fuels, micromechanical (also called homogenisation) approaches are used. These approaches aim at deriving effective properties of heterogeneous material from the properties of their constituents. They stand on full-field computations of representative volume elements of microstructures as well as on mean-field semi-analytical models. For light water reactor fuels, these approaches have been applied to the modelling of the effect of two microstructural parameters: the porosity effects on the thermal creep of dioxide uranium fuels (transient conditions of irradiation) as well as the plutonium content effect on the viscoplastic behaviour (nominal conditions of irradiations) of mixed oxide fuels (MOX). (authors)

  14. Designing H-shaped micromechanical filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arhaug, O P; Soeraasen, O

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the design constraints and possibilities given when designing a micromechanical band pass filter for intermediate frequencies (e.g. 10 MHz). The class of filters are based on coupled clamped-clamped beams constituting an H-shaped structure. A primary beam can electrostatically be activated in one of its different harmonic modes, setting the filter center frequency. The motion is transferred to an accompanying beam of equal dimensions by a mechanical coupling beam. The placement or coupling points of the quarterwavelength coupling beam which connects the vertically resonating beams is critical with respect to the bandwidth of the filters. Of special concern has been to investigate realistic dimensions allowing the filters to be processed by an actual foundry process and to find out how the choice of materials and actual dimensions would affect the performance

  15. Micromechanical modeling of strength and damage of fiber reinforced composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishnaevsky, L. Jr.; Broendsted, P.

    2007-03-15

    The report for the first year of the EU UpWind project includes three parts: overview of concepts and methods of modelling of mechanical behavior, deformation and damage of unidirectional fiber reinforced composites, development of computational tools for the automatic generation of 3D micromechanical models of fiber reinforced composites, and micromechanical modelling of damage in FRC, and phenomenological analysis of the effect of frequency of cyclic loading on the lifetime and damage evolution in materials. (au)

  16. Heat Transfer and Failure Mode Analyses of Ultrahigh-Temperature Ceramic Thermal Protection System of Hypersonic Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianbao Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The transient temperature distribution of the ultrahigh-temperature ceramic (UHTC thermal protection system (TPS of hypersonic vehicles is calculated using finite volume method. Convective cooling enables a balance of heat increment and loss to be achieved. The temperature in the UHTC plate at the balance is approximately proportional to the surface heat flux and is approximately inversely proportional to the convective heat transfer coefficient. The failure modes of the UHTCs are presented by investigating the thermal stress field of the UHTC TPS under different thermal environments. The UHTCs which act as the thermal protection materials of hypersonic vehicles can fail because of the tensile stress at the lower surface, an area above the middle plane, and the upper surface as well as because of the compressive stress at the upper surface. However, the area between the lower surface and the middle plane and a small area near the upper surface are relatively safe. Neither the compressive stress nor the tensile stress will cause failure of these areas.

  17. An integrated micromechanical large particle in flow sorter (MILPIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuad, Nurul M.; Skommer, Joanna; Friedrich, Timo; Kaslin, Jan; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2015-06-01

    At present, the major hurdle to widespread deployment of zebrafish embryo and larvae in large-scale drug development projects is lack of enabling high-throughput analytical platforms. In order to spearhead drug discovery with the use of zebrafish as a model, platforms need to integrate automated pre-test sorting of organisms (to ensure quality control and standardization) and their in-test positioning (suitable for high-content imaging) with modules for flexible drug delivery. The major obstacle hampering sorting of millimetre sized particles such as zebrafish embryos on chip-based devices is their substantial diameter (above one millimetre), mass (above one milligram), which both lead to rapid gravitational-induced sedimentation and high inertial forces. Manual procedures associated with sorting hundreds of embryos are very monotonous and as such prone to significant analytical errors due to operator's fatigue. In this work, we present an innovative design of a micromechanical large particle in-flow sorter (MILPIS) capable of analysing, sorting and dispensing living zebrafish embryos for drug discovery applications. The system consisted of a microfluidic network, revolving micromechanical receptacle actuated by robotic servomotor and opto-electronic sensing module. The prototypes were fabricated in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) transparent thermoplastic using infrared laser micromachining. Elements of MILPIS were also fabricated in an optically transparent VisiJet resin using 3D stereolithography (SLA) processes (ProJet 7000HD, 3D Systems). The device operation was based on a rapidly revolving miniaturized mechanical receptacle. The latter function was to hold and position individual fish embryos for (i) interrogation, (ii) sorting decision-making and (iii) physical sorting..The system was designed to separate between fertilized (LIVE) and non-fertilized (DEAD) eggs, based on optical transparency using infrared (IR) emitters and receivers embedded in the system

  18. Micromechanics Based Inelastic and Damage Modeling of Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. P. Procházka

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Micromechanics based models are considered for application to viscoelasticity and damage in metal matrix composites. The method proposes a continuation and development of Dvooák’s transformation field analysis, considering the piecewise uniform eigenstrains in each material phase. Standard applications of the method to a two-phase are considered in this study model, i.e., only one sub-volume per phase is considered. A continuous model is used, employing transformation field analysis with softening in order to prevent the tensile stress overstepping the tensile strength. At the same time shear cracking occurs in the tangential direction of the possible crack. This is considered in the principal shear stresses and they make disconnections in displacements. In this case, discontinuous models are more promising. Because discrete models, that can describe the situation more realistically have not been worked out in detail, we retain a continuous model and substitute the slip caused by overstepping the damage law by introducing eigenparameters from TFA. The various aspects of the proposed methods are systematically checked by comparing with finite element unit cell analyses, made through periodic homogenization assumptions, for SiC/Ti unidirectional lay-ups. 

  19. Studies and analyses of the space shuttle main engine. Failure information propagation model data base and software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischer, A. E.

    1987-01-01

    The failure information propagation model (FIPM) data base was developed to store and manipulate the large amount of information anticipated for the various Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) FIPMs. The organization and structure of the FIPM data base is described, including a summary of the data fields and key attributes associated with each FIPM data file. The menu-driven software developed to facilitate and control the entry, modification, and listing of data base records is also discussed. The transfer of the FIPM data base and software to the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is described. Complete listings of all of the data base definition commands and software procedures are included in the appendixes.

  20. Micromechanical Modeling of Grain Boundaries Damage in a Copper Alloy Under Creep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voese, Markus

    2015-01-01

    -grained copper-antimony specimens, on the other hand, have been used for the adjustment of the interface model. The calibrated model has finally been used in combination with artificially generated grain structures to investigate influences resulting from numerical and modelling issues. It was found that the mesh size has only a relatively small influence on the macroscopic creep behaviour. But because of the nearly incompressible deformation behaviour of the single crystal model, the use of special purpose continuum element types was necessary to avoid the occurrence of volumetric locking. Also the creep behaviour of polycrystalline materials, which includes the damage development leading to failure, has been analysed for different material and loading parameters. Especially for the copper-antimony alloy under consideration, it becomes evident that the creep behaviour was affected by grain boundary sliding. In particular, stress redistributions at the grain boundaries were comparable to the behaviour of free grain boundary sliding. Furthermore, simulations for multiaxial loading conditions indicated that the damage development is significantly influenced by the maximum principal stress and the von Mises stress.

  1. Nonlinear analyses and failure patterns of typical masonry school buildings in the epicentral zone of the 2016 Italian earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, Cristhian; Clementi, Francesco; Lenci, Stefano

    2017-11-01

    The paper discusses the behavior of typical masonry school buildings in the center of Italy built at the end of 1950s without any seismic guidelines. These structures have faced the recent Italian earthquakes in 2016 without diffuse damages. Global numerical models of the building have been built and masonry material has been simulated as nonlinear. Sensitivity analyses are done to evaluate the reliability of the structural models.

  2. Contact damage failure analyses of fretting wear behavior of the metal stem titanium alloy-bone cement interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lanfeng; Ge, Shirong; Liu, Hongtao; Wang, Qingliang; Wang, Liping; Xian, Cory J

    2015-11-01

    Although cemented titanium alloy is not favored currently in the Western world for its poor clinical and radiography outcomes, its lower modulus of elasticity and good biocompatibility are instrumental for its ability supporting and transforming physical load, and it is more suitable for usage in Chinese and Japanese populations due to their lower body weights and unique femoral characteristics. Through various friction tests of different cycles, loads and conditions and by examining fretting hysteresis loops, fatigue process curves and wear surfaces, the current study investigated fretting wear characteristics and wear mechanism of titanium alloy stem-bone cement interface. It was found that the combination of loads and displacement affected the wear quantity. Friction coefficient, which was in an inverse relationship to load under the same amplitude, was proportional to amplitudes under the same load. Additionally, calf serum was found to both lubricate and erode the wear interface. Moreover, cement fatigue contact areas appeared black/oxidative in dry and gruel in 25% calf serum. Fatigue scratches were detected within contact areas, and wear scars were found on cement and titanium surfaces, which were concave-shaped and ring concave/ convex-shaped, respectively. The coupling of thermoplastic effect and minimal torque damage has been proposed to be the major reason of contact damage. These data will be important for further studies analyzing metal-cement interface failure performance and solving interface friction and wear debris production issues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Failure database and tools for wind turbine availability and reliability analyses. The application of reliability data for selected wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozine, Igor; Christensen, P.; Winther-Jensen, M.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this project was to develop and establish a database for collecting reliability and reliability-related data, for assessing the reliability of wind turbine components and subsystems and wind turbines as a whole, as well as for assessingwind turbine availability while ranking the ...... similar safety systems. The database was established with Microsoft Access DatabaseManagement System, the software for reliability and availability assessments was created with Visual Basic....... the contributions at both the component and system levels. The project resulted in a software package combining a failure database with programs for predicting WTB availability and the reliability of all thecomponents and systems, especially the safety system. The report consists of a description of the theoretical......The objective of this project was to develop and establish a database for collecting reliability and reliability-related data, for assessing the reliability of wind turbine components and subsystems and wind turbines as a whole, as well as for assessingwind turbine availability while ranking...

  4. Analysis of events with common cause failures (CCF) from the international common cause failure date exchange (ICDE); Analyse von Ereignissen mit gemeinsam verursachten Ausfaellen (GVA) aus dem internationalen GVA-Datenaustauschprojekt ICDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueck, Benjamin; Kreuser, Albert; Simon, Julia; Stiller, Jan

    2014-08-15

    Common-cause-failure (CCF) events can significantly impact the availability of safety systems of nuclear power plants. In recognition of this, CCF data are systematically being collected and analyzed in several countries. A comprehensive evaluation of CCF events derived only from the operating experience in German nuclear power plants is not sufficient due to the low probability of occurrence of such events. Therefore it is necessary to make use of the operating experience of other countries using similar technology. In order to be able to use the CCF operating experience from other countries in the aim to carry on the development of the bases for evaluation of CCF GRS decisively co-initiated the setting up of an international common-cause failure working group. This working group has elaborated the project ''International Common-Cause Failure Data Exchange'' (ICDE). The project's objective is to organize a broad exchange of information concerning observed events with relevance to common-cause failures. The tasks for preparation and evaluation of information of the ICDE working group serve for confirmation and extension of the common-cause failure knowledge with regards to probabilistic safety analyses, the better understanding of causes and mechanisms of common-cause failures and the evaluation of preventive measures against the occurrence of common-cause failures. The objectives of the exchange on a long term basis are to - improve the comprehension of CCF events and their causes and their prevention, - generate qualitative insights into the root causes of CCF events which can then be used to derive and assess preventive measures against the occurrence of such events or their consequences, - establish an efficient feedback of experience gained in connection with observed common-cause failure phenomena which could be used e.g. for the development of indicators for risk based inspections, - provide quantitative information regarding the

  5. Dependency Defence and Dependency Analysis Guidance. Volume 2: Appendix 3-8. How to analyse and protect against dependent failures. Summary report of the Nordic Working Group on Common Cause Failure Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johanson, Gunnar; Hellstroem, Per; Makamo, Tuomas; Bento, Jean-Pierre; Knochenhauer, Michael; Poern, Kurt

    2003-10-01

    best possible and realistic CCF parameter estimates, if possible, plant specific. This second volume contains the following appendices: How to protect against dependent failures, How to model and analyse dependent failures, Data for dependent failures, Literature survey, Terms and definitions, Nordic Working group on CCF Studies - Project Programme

  6. Bio-Inspired Micromechanical Directional Acoustic Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, William; Alves, Fabio; Karunasiri, Gamani

    Conventional directional sound sensors employ an array of spatially separated microphones and the direction is determined using arrival times and amplitudes. In nature, insects such as the Ormia ochracea fly can determine the direction of sound using a hearing organ much smaller than the wavelength of sound it detects. The fly's eardrums are mechanically coupled, only separated by about 1 mm, and have remarkable directional sensitivity. A micromechanical sensor based on the fly's hearing system was designed and fabricated on a silicon on insulator (SOI) substrate using MEMS technology. The sensor consists of two 1 mm2 wings connected using a bridge and to the substrate using two torsional legs. The dimensions of the sensor and material stiffness determine the frequency response of the sensor. The vibration of the wings in response to incident sound at the bending resonance was measured using a laser vibrometer and found to be about 1 μm/Pa. The electronic response of the sensor to sound was measured using integrated comb finger capacitors and found to be about 25 V/Pa. The fabricated sensors showed good directional sensitivity. In this talk, the design, fabrication and characteristics of the directional sound sensor will be described. Supported by ONR and TDSI.

  7. Remote quantum entanglement between two micromechanical oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedinger, Ralf; Wallucks, Andreas; Marinković, Igor; Löschnauer, Clemens; Aspelmeyer, Markus; Hong, Sungkun; Gröblacher, Simon

    2018-04-01

    Entanglement, an essential feature of quantum theory that allows for inseparable quantum correlations to be shared between distant parties, is a crucial resource for quantum networks 1 . Of particular importance is the ability to distribute entanglement between remote objects that can also serve as quantum memories. This has been previously realized using systems such as warm 2,3 and cold atomic vapours 4,5 , individual atoms 6 and ions 7,8 , and defects in solid-state systems 9-11 . Practical communication applications require a combination of several advantageous features, such as a particular operating wavelength, high bandwidth and long memory lifetimes. Here we introduce a purely micromachined solid-state platform in the form of chip-based optomechanical resonators made of nanostructured silicon beams. We create and demonstrate entanglement between two micromechanical oscillators across two chips that are separated by 20 centimetres . The entangled quantum state is distributed by an optical field at a designed wavelength near 1,550 nanometres. Therefore, our system can be directly incorporated in a realistic fibre-optic quantum network operating in the conventional optical telecommunication band. Our results are an important step towards the development of large-area quantum networks based on silicon photonics.

  8. Frequency division using a micromechanical resonance cascade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qalandar, K. R., E-mail: kamala@engineering.ucsb.edu; Gibson, B.; Sharma, M.; Ma, A.; Turner, K. L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Strachan, B. S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48823 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48823 (United States); Shaw, S. W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48823 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48823 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    A coupled micromechanical resonator array demonstrates a mechanical realization of multi-stage frequency division. The mechanical structure consists of a set of N sequentially perpendicular microbeams that are connected by relatively weak elastic elements such that the system vibration modes are localized to individual microbeams and have natural frequencies with ratios close to 1:2:⋯:2{sup N}. Conservative (passive) nonlinear inter-modal coupling provides the required energy transfer between modes and is achieved by finite deformation kinematics. When the highest frequency beam is excited, this arrangement promotes a cascade of subharmonic resonances that achieve frequency division of 2{sup j} at microbeam j for j = 1, …, N. Results are shown for a capacitively driven three-stage divider in which an input signal of 824 kHz is passively divided through three modal stages, producing signals at 412 kHz, 206 kHz, and 103 kHz. The system modes are characterized and used to delineate the range of AC input voltages and frequencies over which the cascade occurs. This narrow band frequency divider has simple design rules that are scalable to higher frequencies and can be extended to a larger number of modal stages.

  9. Single coil bistable, bidirectional micromechanical actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabat, Ned; Guckel, Henry

    1998-09-15

    Micromechanical actuators capable of bidirectional and bistable operation can be formed on substrates using lithographic processing techniques. Bistable operation of the microactuator is obtained using a single coil and a magnetic core with a gap. A plunger having two magnetic heads is supported for back and forth linear movement with respect to the gap in the magnetic core, and is spring biased to a neutral position in which the two heads are on each side of the gap in the core. The single electrical coil is coupled to the core and is provided with electrical current to attract one of the heads toward the core by reluctance action to drive the plunger to a limit of travel in one direction. The current is then cut off and the plunger returns by spring action toward the gap, whereafter the current is reapplied to the coil to attract the other head of the plunger by reluctance action to drive the plunger to its other limit of travel. This process can be repeated at a time when switching of the actuator is required.

  10. Effect of Thermal Stresses on the Failure Criteria of Fiber Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leong, Martin Klitgaard; Sankar, Bhavani V.

    2010-01-01

    , the latter, called micro-thermal stresses, has not been given much attention. In this paper the Direct Micromechanics Method is used to investigate the effects of micro-thermal stresses on the failure envelope of composites. Using FEA the unit-cell of the composite is analyzed. Assuming the failure criteria...... for the fiber and matrix are known, the exact failure envelope is developed. Using the micromechanics results, the Tsai-Wu failure envelope is modified to account for the micro-thermal stresses. The approach is demonstrated using two example structures at cryogenic temperature....

  11. Versatile Micromechanics Model for Multiscale Analysis of Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Y. W.; Park, M. S.

    2013-08-01

    A general-purpose micromechanics model was developed so that the model could be applied to various composite materials such as reinforced by particles, long fibers and short fibers as well as those containing micro voids. Additionally, the model can be used with hierarchical composite materials. The micromechanics model can be used to compute effective material properties like elastic moduli, shear moduli, Poisson's ratios, and coefficients of thermal expansion for the various composite materials. The model can also calculate the strains and stresses at the constituent material level such as fibers, particles, and whiskers from the composite level stresses and strains. The model was implemented into ABAQUS using the UMAT option for multiscale analysis. An extensive set of examples are presented to demonstrate the reliability and accuracy of the developed micromechanics model for different kinds of composite materials. Another set of examples is provided to study the multiscale analysis of composite structures.

  12. Non-driven micromechanical gyroscopes and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Fuxue; Wang, Guosheng

    2018-01-01

    This book comprehensively and systematically introduces readers to the theories, structures, performance and applications of non-driven mechanical and non-driven micromechanical gyroscopes. The book is divided into three parts, the first of which mainly addresses mathematic models, precision, performance and operating error in non-driven mechanical gyroscopes. The second part focuses on the operating theory, error, phase shift and performance experiments involving non-driven micromechanical gyroscopes in rotating flight carriers, while the third part shares insights into the application of non-driven micromechanical gyroscopes in control systems for rotating flight carriers. The book offers a unique resource for all researchers and engineers who are interested in the use of inertial devices and automatic control systems for rotating flight carriers.  It can also serve as a reference book for undergraduates, graduates and instructors in related fields at colleges and universities.

  13. Micromechanical sensors for the measurement of biopolymer degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Gammelgaard, Lene; Jensen, M P

    2011-01-01

    We present microcantilever-based sensors for the characterization of biopolymer degradation by enzymes. Thin films of Poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) were spray-coated onto SU-8 cantilevers with well-known material properties and dimensions. The micromechanical sensors were immersed in solutions of protei......We present microcantilever-based sensors for the characterization of biopolymer degradation by enzymes. Thin films of Poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) were spray-coated onto SU-8 cantilevers with well-known material properties and dimensions. The micromechanical sensors were immersed in solutions...

  14. An Extension of Holographic Moiré to Micromechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciammarella, C. A.; Sciammarella, F. M.

    The electronic Holographic Moiré is an ideal tool for micromechanics studies. It does not require a modification of the surface by the introduction of a reference grating. This is of particular advantage when dealing with materials such as solid propellant grains whose chemical nature and surface finish makes the application of a reference grating very difficult. Traditional electronic Holographic Moiré presents some difficult problems when large magnifications are needed and large rigid body motion takes place. This paper presents developments that solves these problems and extends the application of the technique to micromechanics.

  15. Analyses of patterns-of-failure and prognostic factors according to radiation fields in early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krebs, Lorraine; Guillerm, Sophie; Menard, Jean; Hennequin, Christophe; Quero, Laurent; Amorin, Sandy; Brice, Pauline

    2017-01-01

    Doses and volumes of radiation therapy (RT) for early stages of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) have been reduced over the last 30 years. Combined modality therapy (CMT) is currently the standard treatment for most patients with early-stage HL. The aim of this study was to analyze the site of relapse after RT according to the extent of radiation fields. Between 1987 and 2011, 427 patients were treated at our institution with RT ± chemotherapy for stage-I/II HL. Among these, 65 patients who experienced a relapse were retrospectively analyzed. Most patients had nodular sclerosis histology (86 %) and stage-II disease (75.9 %). Bulky disease was present in 21 % and 56 % of patients belonged to the unfavorable risk group according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC)/The Lymphoma Study Association (LYSA) definitions. CMT was delivered to 91 % of patients. All patients received RT with doses ranging from 20 to 45 Gy (mean = 34 ± 5.3 Gy). The involved-field RT technique was used in 59 % of patients. The mean time between diagnosis and relapse was 4.2 years (range 0.3-24.5). Out-of-field relapses were suffered by 53 % of patients. Relapses occurred more frequently at out-of-field sites in patients with a favorable disease status, whereas in-field relapses were associated with bulky mediastinal disease. Relapses occurred later for favorable compared with the unfavorable risk group (3.5 vs. 2.9 years, p = 0.5). From multivariate analyses, neither RT dose nor RT field size were predictive for an in-field relapse (p = 0.25 and p = 0.8, respectively), only bulky disease was predictive (p = 0.018). In patients with bulky disease, RT dose and RT field size were not predictive for an in-field relapse. In this subgroup of patients, chemotherapy should be intensified. We confirmed the bad prognosis of early relapses. (orig.) [de

  16. Analyses of patterns-of-failure and prognostic factors according to radiation fields in early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krebs, Lorraine; Guillerm, Sophie; Menard, Jean; Hennequin, Christophe; Quero, Laurent [Saint Louis Hospital, Radiation Oncology Department, Paris (France); Amorin, Sandy; Brice, Pauline [Saint Louis Hospital, AP-HP, Hematooncology Department, Paris (France)

    2017-02-15

    Doses and volumes of radiation therapy (RT) for early stages of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) have been reduced over the last 30 years. Combined modality therapy (CMT) is currently the standard treatment for most patients with early-stage HL. The aim of this study was to analyze the site of relapse after RT according to the extent of radiation fields. Between 1987 and 2011, 427 patients were treated at our institution with RT ± chemotherapy for stage-I/II HL. Among these, 65 patients who experienced a relapse were retrospectively analyzed. Most patients had nodular sclerosis histology (86 %) and stage-II disease (75.9 %). Bulky disease was present in 21 % and 56 % of patients belonged to the unfavorable risk group according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC)/The Lymphoma Study Association (LYSA) definitions. CMT was delivered to 91 % of patients. All patients received RT with doses ranging from 20 to 45 Gy (mean = 34 ± 5.3 Gy). The involved-field RT technique was used in 59 % of patients. The mean time between diagnosis and relapse was 4.2 years (range 0.3-24.5). Out-of-field relapses were suffered by 53 % of patients. Relapses occurred more frequently at out-of-field sites in patients with a favorable disease status, whereas in-field relapses were associated with bulky mediastinal disease. Relapses occurred later for favorable compared with the unfavorable risk group (3.5 vs. 2.9 years, p = 0.5). From multivariate analyses, neither RT dose nor RT field size were predictive for an in-field relapse (p = 0.25 and p = 0.8, respectively), only bulky disease was predictive (p = 0.018). In patients with bulky disease, RT dose and RT field size were not predictive for an in-field relapse. In this subgroup of patients, chemotherapy should be intensified. We confirmed the bad prognosis of early relapses. (orig.) [German] Waehrend der letzten 30 Jahre wurden die Strahlentherapie-(RT-)Dosis und die RT-Volumina fuer die Behandlung der Fruehstadien

  17. Radiofrequency cold plasma nitrided carbon steel: Microstructural and micromechanical characterizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouanis, F.Z.; Bentiss, F.; Bellayer, S.; Vogt, J.B.; Jama, C.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → C38 carbon steel samples were plasma nitrided using a radiofrequency (rf) nitrogen plasma discharge. → RF plasma treatment enables nitriding for non-heated substrates. → The morphological and chemical analyses show the formation of a uniform thickness on the surface of the nitrided C38 steel. → Nitrogen plasma active species diffuse into the samples and lead to the formation of Fe x N. → The increase in microhardness values for nitrided samples with plasma processing time is interpreted by the formation of a thicker nitrided layer on the steel surface. - Abstract: In this work, C38 carbon steel was plasma nitrided using a radiofrequency (rf) nitrogen plasma discharge on non-heated substrates. General characterizations were performed to compare the chemical compositions, the microstructures and hardness of the untreated and plasma treated surfaces. The plasma nitriding was carried out on non-heated substrates at a pressure of 16.8 Pa, using N 2 gas. Surface characterizations before and after N 2 plasma treatment were performed by means of the electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Vickers microhardness measurements. The morphological and chemical analysis showed the formation of a uniform structure on the surface of the nitrided sample with enrichment in nitrogen when compared to untreated sample. The thickness of the nitride layer formed depends on the treatment time duration and is approximately 14 μm for 10 h of plasma treatment. XPS was employed to obtain chemical-state information of the plasma nitrided steel surfaces. The micromechanical results show that the surface microhardness increases as the plasma-processing time increases to reach, 1487 HV 0.005 at a plasma processing time of 8 h.

  18. Radiofrequency cold plasma nitrided carbon steel: Microstructural and micromechanical characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouanis, F.Z. [Universite Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Unite Materiaux et Transformations (UMET), Ingenierie des Systemes Polymeres, CNRS UMR 8207, ENSCL, BP 90108, F-59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Bentiss, F. [Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination et d' Analytique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Chouaib Doukkali, B.P. 20, M-24000 El Jadida (Morocco); Bellayer, S.; Vogt, J.B. [Universite Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Unite Materiaux et Transformations (UMET), Ingenierie des Systemes Polymeres, CNRS UMR 8207, ENSCL, BP 90108, F-59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Jama, C., E-mail: charafeddine.jama@ensc-lille.fr [Universite Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Unite Materiaux et Transformations (UMET), Ingenierie des Systemes Polymeres, CNRS UMR 8207, ENSCL, BP 90108, F-59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2011-05-16

    Highlights: {yields} C38 carbon steel samples were plasma nitrided using a radiofrequency (rf) nitrogen plasma discharge. {yields} RF plasma treatment enables nitriding for non-heated substrates. {yields} The morphological and chemical analyses show the formation of a uniform thickness on the surface of the nitrided C38 steel. {yields} Nitrogen plasma active species diffuse into the samples and lead to the formation of Fe{sub x}N. {yields} The increase in microhardness values for nitrided samples with plasma processing time is interpreted by the formation of a thicker nitrided layer on the steel surface. - Abstract: In this work, C38 carbon steel was plasma nitrided using a radiofrequency (rf) nitrogen plasma discharge on non-heated substrates. General characterizations were performed to compare the chemical compositions, the microstructures and hardness of the untreated and plasma treated surfaces. The plasma nitriding was carried out on non-heated substrates at a pressure of 16.8 Pa, using N{sub 2} gas. Surface characterizations before and after N{sub 2} plasma treatment were performed by means of the electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Vickers microhardness measurements. The morphological and chemical analysis showed the formation of a uniform structure on the surface of the nitrided sample with enrichment in nitrogen when compared to untreated sample. The thickness of the nitride layer formed depends on the treatment time duration and is approximately 14 {mu}m for 10 h of plasma treatment. XPS was employed to obtain chemical-state information of the plasma nitrided steel surfaces. The micromechanical results show that the surface microhardness increases as the plasma-processing time increases to reach, 1487 HV{sub 0.005} at a plasma processing time of 8 h.

  19. Cosserat moduli of anisotropic cancellous bone : A micromechanical analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fatemi, J.; Onck, P.R.; Poort, G.; Van Keulen, F.

    A micromechanical-based approach is proposed to quantify the effective (in the macroscopic sense) elastic constants of Cosserat materials. The material under investigation (cancellous bone) is cellular and classically elastic at the microscopic level and assumed to be dense Cosserat elastic at the

  20. Micromechanical models to guide the development of synthetic ‘brick and mortar’ composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begley, Matthew R.; Philips, Noah R.; Compton, Brett G.; Wilbrink, David V.; Ritchie, Robert O.; Utz, Marcel

    2012-08-01

    This paper describes a micromechanical analysis of the uniaxial response of composites comprising elastic platelets (bricks) bonded together with thin elastic perfectly plastic layers (mortar). The model yields closed-form results for the spatial variation of displacements in the bricks as a function of constituent properties, which can be used to calculate the effective properties of the composite, including elastic modulus, strength and work-to-failure. Regime maps are presented which indicate critical stresses for failure of the bricks and mortar as a function of constituent properties and brick architecture. The solution illustrates trade-offs between elastic modulus, strength and dissipated work that are a result of transitions between various failure mechanisms associated with brick rupture and rupture of the interfaces. Detailed scaling relationships are presented with the goal of providing material developers with a straightforward means to identify synthesis targets that balance competing mechanical behaviors and optimize material response. Ashby maps are presented to compare potential brick and mortar composites with existing materials, and identify future directions for material development.

  1. Electromagnetic and nuclear radiation detector using micromechanical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Warmack, Robert J.; Wachter, Eric A.

    2000-01-01

    Electromagnetic and nuclear radiation is detected by micromechanical sensors that can be coated with various interactive materials. As the micromechanical sensors absorb radiation, the sensors bend and/or undergo a shift in resonance characteristics. The bending and resonance changes are detected with high sensitivity by any of several detection methods including optical, capacitive, and piezoresistive methods. Wide bands of the electromagnetic spectrum can be imaged with picoJoule sensitivity, and specific absorptive coatings can be used for selective sensitivity in specific wavelength bands. Microcantilevers coated with optical cross-linking polymers are useful as integrating optical radiation dosimeters. Nuclear radiation dosimetry is possible by fabricating cantilevers from materials that are sensitive to various nuclear particles or radiation. Upon exposure to radiation, the cantilever bends due to stress and its resonance frequency shifts due to changes in elastic properties, based on cantilever shape and properties of the coating.

  2. Computational methods for coupling microstructural and micromechanical materials response simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOLM,ELIZABETH A.; BATTAILE,CORBETT C.; BUCHHEIT,THOMAS E.; FANG,HUEI ELIOT; RINTOUL,MARK DANIEL; VEDULA,VENKATA R.; GLASS,S. JILL; KNOROVSKY,GERALD A.; NEILSEN,MICHAEL K.; WELLMAN,GERALD W.; SULSKY,DEBORAH; SHEN,YU-LIN; SCHREYER,H. BUCK

    2000-04-01

    Computational materials simulations have traditionally focused on individual phenomena: grain growth, crack propagation, plastic flow, etc. However, real materials behavior results from a complex interplay between phenomena. In this project, the authors explored methods for coupling mesoscale simulations of microstructural evolution and micromechanical response. In one case, massively parallel (MP) simulations for grain evolution and microcracking in alumina stronglink materials were dynamically coupled. In the other, codes for domain coarsening and plastic deformation in CuSi braze alloys were iteratively linked. this program provided the first comparison of two promising ways to integrate mesoscale computer codes. Coupled microstructural/micromechanical codes were applied to experimentally observed microstructures for the first time. In addition to the coupled codes, this project developed a suite of new computational capabilities (PARGRAIN, GLAD, OOF, MPM, polycrystal plasticity, front tracking). The problem of plasticity length scale in continuum calculations was recognized and a solution strategy was developed. The simulations were experimentally validated on stockpile materials.

  3. Micromechanisms of damage in unidirectional fiber reinforced composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon; Brøndsted, Povl

    2009-01-01

    strength of a composite at the pre-critical load, while the fibers with randomly distributed strengths lead to the higher strength of the composite at post-critical loads. In the case of randomly distributed fiber strengths, the damage growth in fibers seems to be almost independent from the crack length...... in the numerical experiments. The effect of the statistical variability of fiber strengths, viscosity of the polymer matrix as well as the interaction between the damage processes in matrix, fibers and interface are investigated numerically. It is demonstrated that fibers with constant strength ensure higher......Numerical micromechanical investigations of the mechanical behavior and damage evolution of glass fiber reinforced composites are presented. A program code for the automatic generation of 3D micromechanical unit cell models of composites with damageable elements is developed, and used...

  4. Analysis of cement-treated clay behavior by micromechanical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang , Dong-Mei; Yin , Zhenyu; Hicher , Pierre Yves; Huang , Hong-Wei

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Experimental results show the significant influence of cement content on the mechanical properties of cement-treated clays. Cementation is produced by mixing a certain amount of cement with the saturated clay. The purpose of this paper is to model the cementation effect on the mechanical behavior of cement-treated clay. A micromechanical stress-strain model is developed considering explicitly the cementation at inter-cluster contacts. The inter-cluster bonding and debo...

  5. Micromechanics of Composite Materials Governed by Vector Constitutive Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Arnold, Steven M.

    2017-01-01

    The high-fidelity generalized method of cells micromechanics theory has been extended for the prediction of the effective property tensor and the corresponding local field distributions for composites whose constituents are governed by vector constitutive laws. As shown, the shear analogy, which can predict effective transverse properties, is not valid in the general three-dimensional case. Consequently, a general derivation is presented that is applicable to both continuously and discontinuously reinforced composites with arbitrary vector constitutive laws and periodic microstructures. Results are given for thermal and electric problems, effective properties and local field distributions, ordered and random microstructures, as well as complex geometries including woven composites. Comparisons of the theory's predictions are made to test data, numerical analysis, and classical expressions from the literature. Further, classical methods cannot provide the local field distributions in the composite, and it is demonstrated that, as the percolation threshold is approached, their predictions are increasingly unreliable. XXXX It has been observed that the bonding between the fibers and matrix in composite materials can be imperfect. In the context of thermal conductivity, such imperfect interfaces have been investigated in micromechanical models by Dunn and Taya (1993), Duan and Karihaloo (2007), Nan et al. (1997) and Hashin (2001). The present HFGMC micromechanical method, derived for perfectly bonded composite materials governed by vector constitutive laws, can be easily generalized to include the effects of weak bonding between the constituents. Such generalizations, in the context of the mechanical micromechanics problem, involve introduction of a traction-separation law at the fiber/matrix interface and have been presented by Aboudi (1987), Bednarcyk and Arnold (2002), Bednarcyk et al. (2004) and Aboudi et al. (2013) and will be addressed in the future.

  6. The micro-mechanics of strength, durability and damage tolerance in composites: new insights from high resolution computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spearing, S. Mark; Sinclair, Ian

    2016-07-01

    Recent work, led by the authors, on impact damage resistance, particle toughening and tensile fibre failure is reviewed in order to illustrate the use of high-resolution X-ray tomography to observe and quantify damage mechanisms in carbon fibre composite laminates. Using synchrotron and micro-focus X-ray sources resolutions of less than 1 μm have been routinely achieved. This enables individual broken fibres and the micromechanisms of particle toughening to be observed and quantified. The data for fibre failure, cluster formation and overall tensile strength are compared with model predictions. This allows strategies for future model development to be identified. The overall implications for using such high-resolution 3-D measurements to inform a “data-rich mechanics” approach to materials evaluation and modeling is discussed.

  7. Optical anisotropy in micromechanically rolled carbon nanotube forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razib, Mohd Asyraf bin Mohd; Rana, Masud; Saleh, Tanveer; Fan, Harrison; Koch, Andrew; Nojeh, Alireza; Takahata, Kenichi; Muthalif, Asan Gani Bin Abdul

    2017-09-01

    The bulk appearance of arrays of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNT arrays or CNT forests) is dark as they absorb most of the incident light. In this paper, two postprocessing techniques have been described where the CNT forest can be patterned by selective bending of the tips of the nanotubes using a rigid cylindrical tool. A tungsten tool was used to bend the vertical structure of CNTs with predefined parameters in two different ways as stated above: bending using the bottom surface of the tool (micromechanical bending (M2B)) and rolling using the side of the tool (micromechanical rolling (M2R)). The processed zone was investigated using a Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) and optical setup to reveal the surface morphology and optical characteristics of the patterned CNTs on the substrate. Interestingly, the polarized optical reflection from the micromechanical rolled (M2R) sample was found to be significantly influenced by the rotation of the sample. It was observed that, if the polarization of the light is parallel to the alignment of the CNTs, the reflectance is at least 2 x higher than for the perpendicular direction. Furthermore, the reflectance varied almost linearly with good repeatability ( 10%) as the processed CNT forest sample was rotated from 0° to 90°. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Micromechanical modeling of the cement-bone interface: the effect of friction, morphology and material properties on the micromechanical response

    OpenAIRE

    Janssen, Dennis; Mann, Kenneth A.; Verdonschot, Nico

    2008-01-01

    In order to gain insight into the micro-mechanical behavior of the cement-bone interface, the effect of parametric variations of frictional, morphological and material properties on the mechanical response of the cement-bone interface were analyzed using a finite element approach. Finite element models of a cement-bone interface specimen were created from micro-computed tomography data of a physical specimen that was sectioned from an in vitro cemented total hip arthroplasty. In five models t...

  9. Ductile sliding between mineral crystals followed by rupture of collagen crosslinks: experimentally supported micromechanical explanation of bone strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Andreas; Hellmich, Christian; Dormieux, Luc

    2009-09-21

    There is an ongoing discussion on how bone strength could be explained from its internal structure and composition. Reviewing recent experimental and molecular dynamics studies, we here propose a new vision on bone material failure: mutual ductile sliding of hydroxyapatite mineral crystals along layered water films is followed by rupture of collagen crosslinks. In order to cast this vision into a mathematical form, a multiscale continuum micromechanics theory for upscaling of elastoplastic properties is developed, based on the concept of concentration and influence tensors for eigenstressed microheterogeneous materials. The model reflects bone's hierarchical organization, in terms of representative volume elements for cortical bone, for extravascular and extracellular bone material, for mineralized fibrils and the extrafibrillar space, and for wet collagen. In order to get access to the stress states at the interfaces between crystals, the extrafibrillar mineral is resolved into an infinite amount of cylindrical material phases oriented in all directions in space. The multiscale micromechanics model is shown to be able to satisfactorily predict the strength characteristics of different bones from different species, on the basis of their mineral/collagen content, their intercrystalline, intermolecular, lacunar, and vascular porosities, and the elastic and strength properties of hydroxyapatite and (molecular) collagen.

  10. Effect of High-Irradiance Light-Curing on Micromechanical Properties of Resin Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Peutzfeldt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the influence of light-curing at high irradiances on micromechanical properties of resin cements. Three dual-curing resin cements and a light-curing flowable resin composite were light-cured with an LED curing unit in Standard mode (SM, High Power mode (HPM, or Xtra Power mode (XPM. Maximum irradiances were determined using a MARC PS radiometer, and exposure duration was varied to obtain two or three levels of radiant exposure (SM: 13.2 and 27.2 J/cm2; HPM: 15.0 and 30.4 J/cm2; XPM: 9.5, 19.3, and 29.7 J/cm2 (n=17. Vickers hardness (HV and indentation modulus (EIT were measured at 15 min and 1 week. Data were analyzed with nonparametric ANOVA, Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney tests, and Spearman correlation analyses (α=0.05. Irradiation protocol, resin-based material, and storage time and all interactions influenced HV and EIT significantly (p≤0.0001. Statistically significant correlations between radiant exposure and HV or EIT were found, indicating that high-irradiance light-curing has no detrimental effect on the polymerization of resin-based materials (p≤0.0021. However, one resin cement was sensitive to the combination of irradiance and exposure duration, with high-irradiance light-curing resulting in a 20% drop in micromechanical properties. The results highlight the importance of manufacturers issuing specific recommendations for the light-curing procedure of each resin cement.

  11. Overview and statistical failure analyses of the electrical insulation system for the SSC long dipole magnets from an industrialization point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roach, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    The electrical insulation system of the SSC long dipole magnets is reviewed and potential dielectric failure modes discussed. Electrical insulation fabrication and assembly issues with respect to rate production manufacturability are addressed. The automation required for rate assembly of electrical insulation components will require critical online visual and dielectric screening tests to insure production quality. Storage and assembly areas must bc designed to prevent foreign particles from becoming entrapped in the insulation during critical coil winding, molding, and collaring operations. All hand assembly procedures involving dielectrics must be performed with rigorous attention to their impact on insulation integrity. Individual dipole magnets must have a sufficiently low probability of electrical insulation failure under all normal and fault mode voltage conditions such that the series of magnets in the SSC rings have acceptable Mean Time Between Failure (MTBF) with respect to dielectric mode failure events. Statistical models appropriate for large electrical system breakdown failure analysis are applied to the SSC magnet rings. The MTBF of the SSC system is related to failure data base for individual dipole magnet samples

  12. A micromechanical study of the damage mechanics of acrylic particulate composites under thermomechanical loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Shihua

    The main aim of this dissertation was to characterize the damage mechanism and fatigue behavior of the acrylic particulate composite. This dissertation also investigated how the failure mechanism is influenced by changes in certain parameters including the volume fraction of particle, the interfacial bonding strength, the stiffness and thickness of the interphase, and the CTE mismatch between the particle and the matrix. Monotonic uniaxial tensile and compressive testing under various temperatures and strain rates, isothermal low-cycle mechanical testing and thermal cycling of a plate with a cutout were performed. The influence of the interfacial bonding strength between the particle and the matrix on the failure mechanism of the ATH filled PMMA was investigated using in situ observations under uniaxial loading conditions. For composites with weak interfacial bonding, the debonding is the major damage mode. For composites with strong interfacial bonding, the breakage of the agglomerate of particles is the major damage mode. Experimental studies also demonstrated the significant influence of interfacial bonding strength on the fatigue life of the ATH filled PMMA. The damage was characterized in terms of the elastic modulus degradation, the load-drop parameter, the plastic strain range and the hysteresis dissipation. Identifying the internal state variables that quantify material degradation under thermomechanical loading is an active research field. In this dissertation, the entropy production, which is a measure of the irreversibility of the thermodynamic system, is used as the metric for damage. The close correlation between the damage measured in terms of elastic modulus degradation and that obtained from the finite element simulation results validates the entropy based damage evolution function. A micromechanical model for acrylic particulate composites with imperfect interfacial bonds was proposed. Acrylic particulate composites are treated as three

  13. Detection of electromagnetic radiation using micromechanical multiple quantum wells structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datskos, Panagiotis G [Knoxville, TN; Rajic, Slobodan [Knoxville, TN; Datskou, Irene [Knoxville, TN

    2007-07-17

    An apparatus and method for detecting electromagnetic radiation employs a deflectable micromechanical apparatus incorporating multiple quantum wells structures. When photons strike the quantum-well structure, physical stresses are created within the sensor, similar to a "bimetallic effect." The stresses cause the sensor to bend. The extent of deflection of the sensor can be measured through any of a variety of conventional means to provide a measurement of the photons striking the sensor. A large number of such sensors can be arranged in a two-dimensional array to provide imaging capability.

  14. PREFACE: 14th Micromechanics Europe Workshop (MME'03)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolffenbuttel, R. F.

    2004-09-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering is devoted to the 14th Micromechanics Europe Workshop (MME'03), which was held at Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands on 2-4 November 2003. Papers have been selected from this workshop for presentation in this special issue. After a careful review by the MME'03 programme committee, 53 submissions were selected for poster presentation at the workshop in addition to 6 invited presentations. These covered the many aspects of our exciting field: technology, simulation, system design, fabrication and characterization in a wide range of applications. These contributions confirm a trend from technology-driven towards application-driven technological research. This trend has become possible because of the availability of mature fabrication technologies for micromechanical structures and is reflected by the presentations of some of the invited speakers. There were invited lectures about applications in the medical field, automotive and copiers, which provide evidence of the relevance of our work in society. Nevertheless, development of technologies rightfully remains a core activity of this workshop. This applies to both the introduction of new technologies, as was reflected by invited presentations on new trends in RIE and nanotechnology, and the addressing of manufacturing issues using available techniques, which will be demonstrated to be crucial in automotive applications. Out of these 59 papers 21 have been selected for presentation in this special issue. Since the scope of the workshop is somewhat wider than that of the journal, selection was based not only on the quality of the work, but also on suitability for presentation in the journal. Moreover, at the workshop, student presentation of research at an early stage was strongly encouraged, whereas publication of work in this journal requires a more advanced level. I would like to express my appreciation for the outstanding efforts

  15. Micromechanical studies of cyclic creep fracture under stress controlled loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Giessen, Erik; Tvergaard, Viggo

    1996-01-01

    is based on numerical unit cell analyses for a planar polycrystal model with the grains and grain boundaries modeled individually, in order to investigate the interactions between the mechanisms involved and to account for the build-up of residual stress fields during cycling. The behaviour of a limiting......This paper deals with a study of intergranular failure by creep cavitation under stress-controlled cyclic loading conditions. Loading is assumed to be slow enough that diffusion and creep mechanisms (including grain boundary sliding) dominate, leading to intergranular creep fracture. This study...

  16. Micromechanical models for graded composite materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiter, T; Dvorak, G.J.; Tvergaard, Viggo

    1997-01-01

    of piecewise homogeneous layers with equivalent elastic properties estimated by Mori-Tanaka and self-consistent methods are also analysed under similar boundary conditions. Comparisons of the overall and local fields predicted by the discrete and homogenized models are made using a C/SiC composite system...... fields are predicted by Mori-Tanaka estimates. On the other hand, the response of graded materials with a skeletal microstructure in a wide transition zone between clearly defined matrix phases is better approximated by the self-consistent estimates. Certain exceptions are noted for loading by overall...... transverse shear stress; The results suggest that the averaging methods originally developed for statistically homogeneous aggregates may be selectively applied, with a reasonable degree of confidence, to aggregates dth composition gradients, subjected to both uniform and nonuniform overall loads. (C) 1997...

  17. Continuum and micro-mechanics treatment of constraint in fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodds, R.H. Jr.; Shih, C.F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper explores the fundamental concepts of the J-Q description of crack-tip fields, the fracture toughness locus and micromechanics approaches to predict the variability of macroscopic fracture toughness with constraint under elastic-plastic conditions. While these concepts derived from plane-strain considerations, initial applications in fully 3-D geometries are very promising. Computational results are presented for a surface cracked plate containing a 6:1 semi-elliptical, a=t/4 flaw subjected to remote uniaxial and biaxial tension. Crack-tip stress fields consistent with the J-Q theory are demonstrated to exist at each location along the crack front. The micromechanics model employs the J-Q description of crack-front stresses to interpret fracture toughness values measured on laboratory specimens for fracture assessment of the surface cracked plate. The computational results suggest only a minor effect of the biaxial loading on the crack tip stress fields and, consequently, on the propensity for fracture relative to the uniaxial loading. 45 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Micromechanics and constitutive modeling of connective soft tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah, A; Ahmadian, M T; Firozbakhsh, K; Aghdam, M M

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a micromechanical model for connective soft tissues based on the available histological evidences is developed. The proposed model constituents i.e. collagen fibers and ground matrix are considered as hyperelastic materials. The matrix material is assumed to be isotropic Neo-Hookean while the collagen fibers are considered to be transversely isotropic hyperelastic. In order to take into account the effects of tissue structure in lower scales on the macroscopic behavior of tissue, a strain energy density function (SEDF) is developed for collagen fibers based on tissue hierarchical structure. Macroscopic response and properties of tissue are obtained using the numerical homogenization method with the help of ABAQUS software. The periodic boundary conditions and the proposed constitutive models are implemented into ABAQUS using the DISP and the UMAT subroutines, respectively. The existence of the solution and stable material behavior of proposed constitutive model for collagen fibers are investigated based on the poly-convexity condition. Results of the presented micromechanics model for connective tissues are compared and validated with available experimental data. Effects of geometrical and material parameters variation at microscale on macroscopic mechanical behavior of tissues are investigated. The results show that decrease in collagen content of the connective tissues like the tendon due to diseases leads 20% more stretch than healthy tissue under the same load which can results in connective tissue malfunction and hypermobility in joints. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Some micromechanical models of elastoplastic behaviors of porous geomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.Q. Shen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Some micromechanics-based constitutive models are presented in this study for porous geomaterials. These micro-macro mechanical models focus on the effect of porosity and the inclusions on the macroscopic elastoplastic behaviors of porous materials. In order to consider the effect of pores and the compressibility of the matrix, some macroscopic criteria are presented firstly for ductile porous medium having one population of pores with different types of matrix (von Mises, Green type, Mises–Schleicher and Drucker–Prager. Based on different homogenization techniques, these models are extended to the double porous materials with two populations of pores at different scales and a Drucker–Prager solid phase at the microscale. Based on these macroscopic criteria, complete constitutive models are formulated and implemented to describe the overall responses of typical porous geomaterials (sandstone, porous chalk and argillite. Comparisons between the numerical predictions and experimental data with different confining pressures or different mineralogical composites show the capabilities of these micromechanics-based models, which take into account the effects of microstructure on the macroscopic behavior and significantly improve the phenomenological ones.

  20. Heterogeneous Rock Simulation Using DIP-Micromechanics-Statistical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Molladavoodi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Rock as a natural material is heterogeneous. Rock material consists of minerals, crystals, cement, grains, and microcracks. Each component of rock has a different mechanical behavior under applied loading condition. Therefore, rock component distribution has an important effect on rock mechanical behavior, especially in the postpeak region. In this paper, the rock sample was studied by digital image processing (DIP, micromechanics, and statistical methods. Using image processing, volume fractions of the rock minerals composing the rock sample were evaluated precisely. The mechanical properties of the rock matrix were determined based on upscaling micromechanics. In order to consider the rock heterogeneities effect on mechanical behavior, the heterogeneity index was calculated in a framework of statistical method. A Weibull distribution function was fitted to the Young modulus distribution of minerals. Finally, statistical and Mohr–Coulomb strain-softening models were used simultaneously as a constitutive model in DEM code. The acoustic emission, strain energy release, and the effect of rock heterogeneities on the postpeak behavior process were investigated. The numerical results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  1. Pearlitic ductile cast iron: damaging micromechanisms at crack tip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Iacoviello

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ductile cast irons (DCIs are characterized by a wide range of mechanical properties, mainly depending on microstructural factors, as matrix microstructure (characterized by phases volume fraction, grains size and grain distribution, graphite nodules (characterized by size, shape, density and distribution and defects presence (e.g., porosity, inclusions, etc.. Versatility and higher performances at lower cost if compared to steels with analogous performances are the main DCIs advantages. In the last years, the role played by graphite nodules was deeply investigated by means of tensile and fatigue tests, performing scanning electron microscope (SEM observations of specimens lateral surfaces during the tests (“in situ” tests and identifying different damaging micromechanisms.In this work, a pearlitic DCIs fatigue resistance is investigated considering both fatigue crack propagation (by means of Compact Type specimens and according to ASTM E399 standard and overload effects, focusing the interaction between the crack and the investigated DCI microstructure (pearlitic matrix and graphite nodules. On the basis of experimental results, and considering loading conditions and damaging micromechanisms, the applicability of ASTM E399 standard on the characterization of fatigue crack propagation resistance in ferritic DCIs is critically analyzed, mainly focusing the stress intensity factor amplitude role.

  2. Micromechanical simulation of frictional behaviour in metal forming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.; Hodgson, P.D.; Cardew-Hall, M.J.; Kalyanasundaram, S.

    2000-01-01

    Friction is a critical factor for Sheet Metal Forming (SMF). The Coulomb friction model is usually used in most Finite Element (FE) simulation for SMF. However, friction is a function of the local contact deformation conditions, such as local pressure, roughness and relative velocity. This paper will present a micromechanical model that accounts for the local frictional behaviour through finite element simulations performed at the micromechanical level. Frictional behaviour between contact surfaces can be based on three cases: boundary, hydrodynamic and mixed lubrication. In our microscopic friction model based on FEM, the case of boundary lubrication contact between sheet and tool has been considered. In the view of microscopic geometry, roughness depends upon amplitude and wavelength of surface asperities of sheet and tool. The mean pressure applied on the surface differs from the pressure over the actual contact area. The effect of roughness (microscopic geometric condition) and relative speed of contact surfaces on friction coefficient was examined in the FE model for the microscopic friction behaviour. The analysis was performed using an explicit finite element formulation. In this study, it was found that the roughness of deformable sheet decreases during sliding and the coefficient of friction increases with increasing roughness of contact surfaces. The coefficient of friction increases with the increase of relative velocity and adhesive friction coefficient between contact surfaces. (author)

  3. Micro-mechanics based damage mechanics for 3D Orthogonal Woven Composites: Experiment and Numerical Modelling

    KAUST Repository

    Saleh, Mohamed Nasr

    2016-01-08

    Damage initiation and evolution of three-dimensional (3D) orthogonal woven carbon fibre composite (3DOWC) is investigated experimentally and numerically. Meso-scale homogenisation of the representative volume element (RVE) is utilised to predict the elastic properties, simulate damage initiation and evolution when loaded in tension. The effect of intra-yarns transverse cracking and shear diffused damage on the in-plane transverse modulus and shear modulus is investigated while one failure criterion is introduced to simulate the matrix damage. The proposed model is based on two major assumptions. First, the effect of the binder yarns, on the in-plane properties, is neglected, so the 3DOWC unit cell can be approximated as a (0o/90o) cross-ply laminate. Second, a micro-mechanics based damage approach is used at the meso-scale, so damage indicators can be correlated, explicitly, to the density of cracks within the material. Results from the simulated RVE are validated against experimental results along the warp (0o direction) and weft (90o direction). This approach paves the road for more predictive models as damage evolution laws are obtained from micro mechanical considerations and rely on few well-defined material parameters. This largely differs from classical damage mechanics approaches in which the evolution law is obtained by retrofitting experimental observations.

  4. Micro-mechanics based damage mechanics for 3D Orthogonal Woven Composites: Experiment and Numerical Modelling

    KAUST Repository

    Saleh, Mohamed Nasr; Lubineau, Gilles; Potluri, Prasad; Withers, Philip; Soutis, Constantinos

    2016-01-01

    Damage initiation and evolution of three-dimensional (3D) orthogonal woven carbon fibre composite (3DOWC) is investigated experimentally and numerically. Meso-scale homogenisation of the representative volume element (RVE) is utilised to predict the elastic properties, simulate damage initiation and evolution when loaded in tension. The effect of intra-yarns transverse cracking and shear diffused damage on the in-plane transverse modulus and shear modulus is investigated while one failure criterion is introduced to simulate the matrix damage. The proposed model is based on two major assumptions. First, the effect of the binder yarns, on the in-plane properties, is neglected, so the 3DOWC unit cell can be approximated as a (0o/90o) cross-ply laminate. Second, a micro-mechanics based damage approach is used at the meso-scale, so damage indicators can be correlated, explicitly, to the density of cracks within the material. Results from the simulated RVE are validated against experimental results along the warp (0o direction) and weft (90o direction). This approach paves the road for more predictive models as damage evolution laws are obtained from micro mechanical considerations and rely on few well-defined material parameters. This largely differs from classical damage mechanics approaches in which the evolution law is obtained by retrofitting experimental observations.

  5. Micromechanical modeling of short glass-fiber reinforced thermoplastics-Isotropic damage of pseudograins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kammoun, S.; Brassart, L.; Doghri, I.; Delannay, L.; Robert, G.

    2011-01-01

    A micromechanical damage modeling approach is presented to predict the overall elasto-plastic behavior and damage evolution in short fiber reinforced composite materials. The practical use of the approach is for injection molded thermoplastic parts reinforced with short glass fibers. The modeling is proceeded as follows. The representative volume element is decomposed into a set of pseudograins, the damage of which affects progressively the overall stiffness and strength up to total failure. Each pseudograin is a two-phase composite with aligned inclusions having same aspect ratio. A two-step mean-field homogenization procedure is adopted. In the first step, the pseudograins are homogenized individually according to the Mori-Tanaka scheme. The second step consists in a self-consistent homogenization of homogenized pseudograins. An isotropic damage model is applied at the pseudograin level. The model is implemented as a UMAT in the finite element code ABAQUS. Model is shown to reproduce the strength and the anisotropy (Lankford coefficient) during uniaxial tensile tests on samples cut under different directions relative to the injection flow direction.

  6. Dependency Defence and Dependency Analysis Guidance. Volume 1: Summary and Guidance (Appendix 1-2). How to analyse and protect against dependent failures. Summary report of the Nordic Working group on Common Cause Failure Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johanson, Gunnar; Hellstroem, Per; Makamo, Tuomas; Bento, Jean-Pierre; Knochenhauer, Michael; Poern, Kurt

    2003-10-01

    The safety systems in Nordic nuclear power plants are characterised by substantial redundancy and/or diversification in safety critical functions, as well as by physical separation of critical safety systems, including their support functions. Viewed together with the evident additional fact, that the single failure criterion has been systematically applied in the design of safety systems, this means that the plant risk profile as calculated in existing PSA:s is usually strongly dominated by failures caused by dependencies resulting in the loss of more than one system sub. The overall objective with the working group is to support safety by studying potential and real CCF events, process statistical data and report conclusions and recommendations that can improve the understanding of these events eventually resulting in increased safety. The result is intended for application in NPP operation, maintenance, inspection and risk assessments. The NAFCS project is part of the activities of the Nordic PSA Group (NPSAG), and is financed jointly by the Nordic utilities and authorities. The work is divided into one quantitative and one qualitative part with the following specific objectives: Qualitative objectives-The goal with the qualitative analysis is to compile experience data and generate insights in terms of relevant failure mechanisms and effective CCF protection measures. The results shall be presented as a guide with checklists and recommendations on how to identify current CCF protection standard and improvement possibilities regarding CCF defences decreasing the CCF vulnerability. Quantitative objectives-The goal with the quantitative analysis is to prepare a Nordic C-book where quantitative insights as Impact Vectors and CCF parameters for different redundancy levels are presented. Uncertainties in CCF data shall be reduced as much as possible. The high redundancy systems sensitivity to CCF events demand a well structured quantitative analysis in support of

  7. Micromechanical investigation of sand migration in gas hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, S.; Klar, A.; Cohen, E.

    2017-12-01

    Past field gas production tests from hydrate bearing sediments have indicated that sand migration is an important phenomenon that needs to be considered for successful long-term gas production. The authors previously developed the continuum based analytical thermo-hydro-mechanical sand migration model that can be applied to predict wellbore responses during gas production. However, the model parameters involved in the model still needs to be calibrated and studied thoroughly and it still remains a challenge to conduct well-defined laboratory experiments of sand migration, especially in hydrate-bearing sediments. Taking the advantage of capability of micromechanical modelling approach through discrete element method (DEM), this work presents a first step towards quantifying one of the model parameters that governs stresses reduction due to grain detachment. Grains represented by DEM particles are randomly removed from an isotropically loaded DEM specimen and statistical analyses reveal that linear proportionality exists between the normalized volume of detached solids and normalized reduced stresses. The DEM specimen with different porosities (different packing densities) are also considered and statistical analyses show that there is a clear transition between loose sand behavior and dense sand behavior, characterized by the relative density.

  8. Folded fabric tunes rock deformation and failure mode in the upper crust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agliardi, F; Dobbs, M R; Zanchetta, S; Vinciguerra, S

    2017-11-10

    The micro-mechanisms of brittle failure affect the bulk mechanical behaviour and permeability of crustal rocks. In low-porosity crystalline rocks, these mechanisms are related to mineralogy and fabric anisotropy, while confining pressure, temperature and strain rates regulate the transition from brittle to ductile behaviour. However, the effects of folded anisotropic fabrics, widespread in orogenic settings, on the mechanical behaviour of crustal rocks are largely unknown. Here we explore the deformation and failure behaviour of a representative folded gneiss, by combining the results of triaxial deformation experiments carried out while monitoring microseismicity with microstructural and damage proxies analyses. We show that folded crystalline rocks in upper crustal conditions exhibit dramatic strength heterogeneity and contrasting failure modes at identical confining pressure and room temperature, depending on the geometrical relationships between stress and two different anisotropies associated to the folded rock fabric. These anisotropies modulate the competition among quartz- and mica-dominated microscopic damage processes, resulting in transitional brittle to semi-brittle modes under P and T much lower than expected. This has significant implications on scales relevant to seismicity, energy resources, engineering applications and geohazards.

  9. Nanostructured interfaces for enhancing mechanical properties of composites: Computational micromechanical studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2015-01-01

    Computational micromechanical studies of the effect of nanostructuring and nanoengineering of interfaces, phase and grain boundaries of materials on the mechanical properties and strength of materials and the potential of interface nanostructuring to enhance the materials properties are reviewed....

  10. Analysis of failure modes in multislice computed tomography during primary trauma survey; Analyse von Verzoegerungen der Schockraumdiagnostik bei Einsatz der Mehrschicht-Spiral-Computertomografie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebers, C.; Stegmaier, J.; Kirchhoff, C.; Kanz, K.G. [Chirurgische Klinik, Klinikum der Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Wirth, S.; Koerner, M.; Pfeifer, K.J. [Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie, Klinikum der Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Kay, M.V. [Plansafe GmbH, Muenchen (Germany)

    2008-08-15

    Purpose: in the case of major trauma, immediate recognition and treatment of life-threatening conditions are essential. An increasing number of European trauma centers use MSCT during the primary trauma survey due to its high diagnostic precision and speed. However, there is currently little empirical data about failures in this process to practice quality assurance. The aim of this study was to evaluate this process under operating resuscitation conditions and to identify failure modes that caused delays in completion. Materials and methods: an independent study monitor documented the course of trauma room treatment during a 10-month period. The inclusion criteria were patients who were admitted directly from the accident scene and the study monitor was present at the time of admission. Results: according to our ATLS-based trauma algorithm whole-body CT (WBCT) consists of non-contrast head CT (CCT) and contrast-enhanced trunk CT (TCT). 57 trauma patients receiving 45 WBCT. 5 single CCT and 4 single TCT studies were evaluated. After initial resuscitation, CCT was obtained within 17 min of trauma room admission (IQR 13.0 - 20.0). In 20% (95%CI 9 - 31%) of the cases, a CCT delay of median 5.0 min (IQR 3.8 - 8.0) was observed caused by e.g. earings, piercings and ECG cables in the scan field or intoxicated patients. Contrast-enhanced TCT was performed after 23.0 min (IQR 19.0 - 27.0). Due to preventable errors 12 of the 49 TCT studies were delayed (25%95%CI 12 - 37%) for 5 min (IQR 3.0 - 8.0). Conclusion: under ''front line'' conditions every fifth CCT and every fourth TCT study was completed with a median delay of 5 min. An independent process analysis revealed that unpreventable delays were due to uncooperative patients or system failure. Preventable delays were due to errors such as short intravenous lines or deviation from trauma room algorithms. Preventable delays could be avoided by addressing human and technical aspects such as revising

  11. Micromechanics based framework with second-order damage tensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmorat, R.; Desmorat, B.; Olive, M.; Kolev, B.

    2018-05-01

    The harmonic product of tensors---leading to the concept of harmonic factorization---has been defined in a previous work (Olive et al, 2017). In the practical case of 3D crack density measurements on thin or thick walled structures, this mathematical tool allows us to factorize the harmonic (irreducible) part of the fourth-order damage tensor as an harmonic square: an exact harmonic square in 2D, an harmonic square over the set of so-called mechanically accessible directions for measurements in the 3D case. The corresponding micro-mechanics framework based on second---instead of fourth---order damage tensors is derived. An illustrating example is provided showing how the proposed framework allows for the modeling of the so-called hydrostatic sensitivity up to high damage levels.

  12. Micromechanical modelling of quasi-brittle materials behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, V.C.

    1992-01-01

    This special issues on Micromechanical modelling of quasi-brittle materials behavior represents an outgrowth of presentations given at a symposium of the same title held at the 1991 ASME Applied Mechanics and Biomechanics Summer Conference at the Ohio State University. The symposium was organized to promote communication between researchers in three materials groups: rock, cementitious materials, ceramics and related composites. The enthusiastic response of both speakers and attendants at the ASME symposium convinced the organizer that it would be useful to put together a coherent volume which can reach a larger audience. It was decided that the papers individually and as a volume ought to provide a broader view, so that as much as possible, the work contained in each paper would be accessible to readers working in any of the three materials groups. Applied Mechanics Reviews presents an appropriate platform for achieving these objectives

  13. Linear micromechanical stepping drive for pinhole array positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endrödy, Csaba; Mehner, Hannes; Hoffmann, Martin; Grewe, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    A compact linear micromechanical stepping drive for positioning a 7 × 5.5 mm 2 optical pinhole array is presented. The system features a step size of 13.2 µm and a full displacement range of 200 µm. The electrostatic inch-worm stepping mechanism shows a compact design capable of positioning a payload 50% of its own weight. The stepping drive movement, step sizes and position accuracy are characterized. The actuated pinhole array is integrated in a confocal chromatic hyperspectral imaging system, where coverage of the object plane, and therefore the useful picture data, can be multiplied by 14 in contrast to a non-actuated array. (paper)

  14. Micromechanical modeling of rate-dependent behavior of Connective tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah, A; Ahmadian, M T; Firozbakhsh, K; Aghdam, M M

    2017-03-07

    In this paper, a constitutive and micromechanical model for prediction of rate-dependent behavior of connective tissues (CTs) is presented. Connective tissues are considered as nonlinear viscoelastic material. The rate-dependent behavior of CTs is incorporated into model using the well-known quasi-linear viscoelasticity (QLV) theory. A planar wavy representative volume element (RVE) is considered based on the tissue microstructure histological evidences. The presented model parameters are identified based on the available experiments in the literature. The presented constitutive model introduced to ABAQUS by means of UMAT subroutine. Results show that, monotonic uniaxial test predictions of the presented model at different strain rates for rat tail tendon (RTT) and human patellar tendon (HPT) are in good agreement with experimental data. Results of incremental stress-relaxation test are also presented to investigate both instantaneous and viscoelastic behavior of connective tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. EDITORIAL: 15th European Workshop on Micromechanics (MME)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puers, Bob

    2005-07-01

    This special issue of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering is entirely devoted to the fifteenth European Workshop on Micromechanics (MME), which was held in Leuven, at the Faculty Club, 5-7 September 2004. In this issue you will find a selection of papers presented at this workshop. The MME Workshop is organized every year to gather mostly European scientists and people from industry to discuss topics related to micromachining and microengineering in an informal manner. The first workshop was held at Twente University, the Netherlands, in 1989. The success of that event inaugurated a series of workshops traveling all over Europe. Looking back on the fifteen years of micromachining it is evident that the field has become more mature. More application driven research is now replacing the basic pure technology driven research we once got so excited about. Yet, half of the contributions still cover problems related to fabrication, production and reliability. Traditionally, the workshop aims to bring together young scientists in the field, with emphasis on discussions and communications in a friendly and informal atmosphere. The goal is to stimulate and to improve knowledge in the field, as well as to promote friendships between researchers. This edition of the workshop was no different. More than 70 papers were contributed, and it was decided to widen the scope with contributions also covering non-silicon technologies. This trend had already been informally introduced some years ago. After the third edition, it was decided to open up a selection of the contributed papers to a broader public by publishing them in a special issue of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, and this has continued to the present day. Since the purpose of the workshop clearly is to stimulate younger scientists to enter the field, even immature research is presented there. The selection in this issue, however, aims to bring to you the more advanced level research work. Even

  16. Mechanical properties of Composite Engineering Structures by Multivolume Micromechanical Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Novotný

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineering structures often consist of elements having the character of a periodically repeated composite structure. A multivolume micromechanical model based on a representative cell division into r1 × r2 × r3 subcells with different elastic material properties has been used in this paper to derive macromechanical characteristics of the composite construction response to applied load and temperature changes. The multivolume method is based on ensuring the equilibrium of the considered volume on an average basis. In the same (average way, the continuity conditions of displacements and tractions at the interfaces between subcells and between neighboring representative elements are imposed, resulting in a homogenization procedure that eliminates the discrete nature of the composite model. The details of the method are shown for the case of a concrete block pavement. A parametric study is presented illustrating the influence of joint thickness, joint filling material properties and the quality of bonding between block and filler elements.

  17. Technical report on micro-mechanical versus conventional modelling in non-linear fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-07-01

    While conventional fracture mechanics is capable of predicting crack growth behaviour if sufficient experimental observations are available, micro-mechanical modelling can both increase the accuracy of these predictions and model phenomena that are inaccessible by the conventional theory such as the ductile-cleavage temperature transition. A common argument against micro-mechanical modelling is that it is too complicated for use in routine engineering applications. This is both a computational and an educational problem. That micro-mechanical modelling is unnecessarily complicated is certainly true in many situations. The on-going development of micro-mechanical models, computational algorithms and computer speed will however most probably diminish the computational problem rather rapidly. Compare for instance the rate of development of computational methods for structural analysis. Meanwhile micro-mechanical modelling may serve as a tool by which more simplified engineering methods can be validated. The process of receiving a wide acceptance of the new methods is probably much slower. This involves many steps. First the research community must be in reasonable agreement on the methods and their use. Then the methods have to be implemented into computer software and into code procedures. The development and acceptance of conventional fracture mechanics may serve as an historical example of the time required before a new methodology has received a wide usage. The CSNI Working Group on Integrity and Ageing (IAGE) decided to carry out a report on micro-mechanical modeling to promote this promising and valuable technique. The report presents a comparison with non-linear fracture mechanics and highlights key aspects that could lead to a better knowledge and accurate predictions. Content: - 1. Introduction; - 2. Concepts of non-linear fracture mechanics with point crack tip modelling; - 3. Micro-mechanical models for cleavage fracture; - 4, Micro-mechanical modelling of

  18. Micromechanical simulation of Uranium dioxide polycrystalline aggregate behaviour under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacull, J.

    2011-02-01

    In pressurized water nuclear power reactor (PWR), the fuel rod is made of dioxide of uranium (UO 2 ) pellet stacked in a metallic cladding. A multi scale and multi-physic approaches are needed for the simulation of fuel behavior under irradiation. The main phenomena to take into account are thermomechanical behavior of the fuel rod and chemical-physic behavior of the fission products. These last years one of the scientific issue to improve the simulation is to take into account the multi-physic coupling problem at the microscopic scale. The objective of this ph-D study is to contribute to this multi-scale approach. The present work concerns the micro-mechanical behavior of a polycrystalline aggregate of UO 2 . Mean field and full field approaches are considered. For the former and the later a self consistent homogenization technique and a periodic Finite Element model base on the 3D Voronoi pattern are respectively used. Fuel visco-plasticity is introduced in the model at the scale of a single grain by taking into account specific dislocation slip systems of UO 2 . A cohesive zone model has also been developed and implemented to simulate grain boundary sliding and intergranular crack opening. The effective homogenous behaviour of a Representative Volume Element (RVE) is fitted with experimental data coming from mechanical tests on a single pellet. Local behavior is also analyzed in order to evaluate the model capacity to assess micro-mechanical state. In particular, intra and inter granular stress gradient are discussed. A first validation of the local behavior assessment is proposed through the simulation of intergranular crack opening measured in a compressive creep test of a single fuel pellet. Concerning the impact of the microstructure on the fuel behavior under irradiation, a RVE simulation with a representative transient loading of a fuel rod during a power ramp test is achieved. The impact of local stress and strain heterogeneities on the multi

  19. Sideband cooling of micromechanical motion to the quantum ground state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teufel, J D; Donner, T; Li, Dale; Harlow, J W; Allman, M S; Cicak, K; Sirois, A J; Whittaker, J D; Lehnert, K W; Simmonds, R W

    2011-07-06

    The advent of laser cooling techniques revolutionized the study of many atomic-scale systems, fuelling progress towards quantum computing with trapped ions and generating new states of matter with Bose-Einstein condensates. Analogous cooling techniques can provide a general and flexible method of preparing macroscopic objects in their motional ground state. Cavity optomechanical or electromechanical systems achieve sideband cooling through the strong interaction between light and motion. However, entering the quantum regime--in which a system has less than a single quantum of motion--has been difficult because sideband cooling has not sufficiently overwhelmed the coupling of low-frequency mechanical systems to their hot environments. Here we demonstrate sideband cooling of an approximately 10-MHz micromechanical oscillator to the quantum ground state. This achievement required a large electromechanical interaction, which was obtained by embedding a micromechanical membrane into a superconducting microwave resonant circuit. To verify the cooling of the membrane motion to a phonon occupation of 0.34 ± 0.05 phonons, we perform a near-Heisenberg-limited position measurement within (5.1 ± 0.4)h/2π, where h is Planck's constant. Furthermore, our device exhibits strong coupling, allowing coherent exchange of microwave photons and mechanical phonons. Simultaneously achieving strong coupling, ground state preparation and efficient measurement sets the stage for rapid advances in the control and detection of non-classical states of motion, possibly even testing quantum theory itself in the unexplored region of larger size and mass. Because mechanical oscillators can couple to light of any frequency, they could also serve as a unique intermediary for transferring quantum information between microwave and optical domains.

  20. Concentration independent modulation of local micromechanics in a fibrin gel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell A Kotlarchyk

    Full Text Available Methods for tuning extracellular matrix (ECM mechanics in 3D cell culture that rely on increasing the concentration of either protein or cross-linking molecules fail to control important parameters such as pore size, ligand density, and molecular diffusivity. Alternatively, ECM stiffness can be modulated independently from protein concentration by mechanically loading the ECM. We have developed a novel device for generating stiffness gradients in naturally derived ECMs, where stiffness is tuned by inducing strain, while local mechanical properties are directly determined by laser tweezers based active microrheology (AMR. Hydrogel substrates polymerized within 35 mm diameter Petri dishes are strained non-uniformly by the precise rotation of an embedded cylindrical post, and exhibit a position-dependent stiffness with little to no modulation of local mesh geometry. Here we present the device in the context of fibrin hydrogels. First AMR is used to directly measure local micromechanics in unstrained hydrogels of increasing fibrin concentration. Changes in stiffness are then mapped within our device, where fibrin concentration is held constant. Fluorescence confocal imaging and orbital particle tracking are used to quantify structural changes in fibrin on the micro and nano levels respectively. The micromechanical strain stiffening measured by microrheology is not accompanied by ECM microstructural changes under our applied loads, as measured by confocal microscopy. However, super-resolution orbital tracking reveals nanostructural straightening, lengthening, and reduced movement of fibrin fibers. Furthermore, we show that aortic smooth muscle cells cultured within our device are morphologically sensitive to the induced mechanical gradient. Our results demonstrate a powerful cell culture tool that can be used in the study of mechanical effects on cellular physiology in naturally derived 3D ECM tissues.

  1. Micromechanical anisotropy and heterogeneity of the meniscus extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Qu, Feini; Han, Biao; Wang, Chao; Li, Hao; Mauck, Robert L; Han, Lin

    2017-05-01

    To understand how the complex biomechanical functions of the meniscus are endowed by the nanostructure of its extracellular matrix (ECM), we studied the anisotropy and heterogeneity in the micromechanical properties of the meniscus ECM. We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to quantify the time-dependent mechanical properties of juvenile bovine meniscus at deformation length scales corresponding to the diameters of collagen fibrils. At this scale, anisotropy in the elastic modulus of the circumferential fibers, the major ECM structural unit, can be attributed to differences in fibril deformation modes: uncrimping when normal to the fiber axis, and laterally constrained compression when parallel to the fiber axis. Heterogeneity among different structural units is mainly associated with their variations in microscale fiber orientation, while heterogeneity across anatomical zones is due to alterations in collagen fibril diameter and alignment at the nanoscale. Unlike the elastic modulus, the time-dependent properties are more homogeneous and isotropic throughout the ECM. These results enable a detailed understanding of the meniscus structure-mechanics at the nanoscale, and can serve as a benchmark for understanding meniscus biomechanical functions, documenting disease progression and designing tissue repair strategies. Meniscal damage is a common cause of joint injury, which can lead to the development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis among young adults. Restoration of meniscus function requires repairing its highly heterogeneous and complex extracellular matrix. Employing AFM, this study quantifies the anisotropic and heterogeneous features of the meniscus ECM structure and mechanics. The micromechanical properties are interpreted within the context of the collagen fibril nanostructure and its variation with tissue anatomical locations. These results provide a fundamental structure-mechanics knowledge benchmark, against which, repair and regeneration strategies can

  2. Time dependent micromechanics in continuous graphite fiber/epoxy composites with fiber breaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chao Hui

    Time dependent micromechanics in graphite fiber/epoxy composites around fiber breaks was investigated with micro Raman spectroscopy (MRS) and two shear-lag based composite models, a multi-fiber model (VBI) and a single fiber model (SFM), which aim at predicting the strain/stress evolutions in the composite from the matrix creep behavior and fiber strength statistics. This work is motivated by the need to understand the micromechanics and predict the creep-rupture of the composites. Creep of the unfilled epoxy was characterized under different stress levels and at temperatures up to 80°C, with two power law functions, which provided the modeling parameters used as input for the composite models. Both the VBI and the SFM models showed good agreement with the experimental data obtained with MRS, when inelasticity (interfacial debonding and/or matrix yielding) was not significant. The maximum shear stress near a fiber break relaxed at t-alpha/2 (or as (1+ talpha)-1/2) and the load recovery length increased at talpha/2(or (1+ talpha)1/2) following the model predictions. When the inelastic zone became non-negligible, the viscoelastic VBI model lost its competence, while the SFM with inelasticity showed good agreement with the MRS measurements. Instead of using the real fiber spacing, an effective fiber spacing was used in model predictions, taking into account of the radial decay of the interfacial shear stress from the fiber surface. The comparisons between MRS data and the SFM showed that inelastic zone would initiate when the shear strain at the fiber end exceeds a critical value gammac which was determined to be 5% for this composite system at room temperature and possibly a smaller value at elevated temperatures. The stress concentrations in neighboring intact fibers played important roles in the subsequent fiber failure and damage growth. The VBI model predicts a constant stress concentration factor, 1.33, for the 1st nearest intact fiber, which is in good

  3. Micromechanisms of ductile stable crack growth in nuclear pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belcher, W.P.A.; Druce, S.G.

    1981-10-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the relationship between the micromechanisms of ductile crack growth, the microstructural constituent phases present in nuclear pressure vessel steel, and the observed fracture behavior as determined by impact and fracture mechanics tests. Results from a microstructural and mechanical property comparison of an A508 Class 3 pressurized water reactor nozzle forging cutout and a 150-mm-thick A533B Class 1 plate are reported. The variation of upper-shelf toughness between the two steels and its orientation sensitivity are discussed on the basis of inclusion and precipitate distributions. Inclusion clusters in A533B, deformed to elongated disks in the rolling plane, have a profound effect on short transverse fracture properties. Data derived using the multi-specimen J-integral method to characterize the initiation of ductile crack extension and resistance to stable crack growth are compared with equivalent Charpy results. Results of the J /SUB R/ -curve analyses indicate (1) that the A533B short transverse crack growth resistance is approximately half that observed from transverse and longitudinal specimen orientations, and (2) that the A508 initiation toughness and resistance to stable crack growth are insensitive to position through the forging wall, and are higher than exhibited by A533B at any orientation in the midthickness position.

  4. MEMS resonant load cells for micro-mechanical test frames: feasibility study and optimal design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrents, A.; Azgin, K.; Godfrey, S. W.; Topalli, E. S.; Akin, T.; Valdevit, L.

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents the design, optimization and manufacturing of a novel micro-fabricated load cell based on a double-ended tuning fork. The device geometry and operating voltages are optimized for maximum force resolution and range, subject to a number of manufacturing and electromechanical constraints. All optimizations are enabled by analytical modeling (verified by selected finite elements analyses) coupled with an efficient C++ code based on the particle swarm optimization algorithm. This assessment indicates that force resolutions of ~0.5-10 nN are feasible in vacuum (~1-50 mTorr), with force ranges as large as 1 N. Importantly, the optimal design for vacuum operation is independent of the desired range, ensuring versatility. Experimental verifications on a sub-optimal device fabricated using silicon-on-glass technology demonstrate a resolution of ~23 nN at a vacuum level of ~50 mTorr. The device demonstrated in this article will be integrated in a hybrid micro-mechanical test frame for unprecedented combinations of force resolution and range, displacement resolution and range, optical (or SEM) access to the sample, versatility and cost.

  5. 2D micromechanical analysis of SiC/Al metal matrix composites under tensile, shear and combined tensile/shear loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qing, Hai

    2013-01-01

    The influence of interface strength and loading conditions on the mechanical behavior of the metal-matrix composites is investigated in this paper. A program is developed to generate automatically 2D micromechanical Finite element (FE) models including interface, in which both the locations...... and dimensions of Silicon-Carbide (SiC) particles are randomly distributed. Finite element simulations of the deformation and damage evolution of SiC particle reinforced Aluminum (Al) alloy composite are carried out for different microstructures and interphase strengths under tensile, shear and combined tensile....../shear loads. 2D cohesive element is applied to describe the fracture and failure process of interphase, while the damage models based on maximum principal stress criterion and the stress triaxial indicator are developed within Abaqus/Standard Subroutine USDFLD to simulate the failure process of SiC particles...

  6. A Compilation of MATLAB Scripts and Functions for MACGMC Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Mital, Subodh K.

    2017-01-01

    The primary aim of the current effort is to provide scripts that automate many of the repetitive pre- and post-processing tasks associated with composite materials analyses using the Micromechanics Analysis Code with the Generalized Method of Cells. This document consists of a compilation of hundreds of scripts that were developed in MATLAB (The Mathworks, Inc., Natick, MA) programming language and consolidated into 16 MATLAB functions. (MACGMC). MACGMC is a composite material and laminate analysis software code developed at NASA Glenn Research Center. The software package has been built around the generalized method of cells (GMC) family of micromechanics theories. The computer code is developed with a user-friendly framework, along with a library of local inelastic, damage, and failure models. Further, application of simulated thermo-mechanical loading, generation of output results, and selection of architectures to represent the composite material have been automated to increase the user friendliness, as well as to make it more robust in terms of input preparation and code execution. Finally, classical lamination theory has been implemented within the software, wherein GMC is used to model the composite material response of each ply. Thus, the full range of GMC composite material capabilities is available for analysis of arbitrary laminate configurations as well. The pre-processing tasks include generation of a multitude of different repeating unit cells (RUCs) for CMCs and PMCs, visualization of RUCs from MACGMC input and output files and generation of the RUC section of a MACGMC input file. The post-processing tasks include visualization of the predicted composite response, such as local stress and strain contours, damage initiation and progression, stress-strain behavior, and fatigue response. In addition to the above, several miscellaneous scripts have been developed that can be used to perform repeated Monte-Carlo simulations to enable probabilistic

  7. Micro-mechanical modeling of the cement-bone interface: the effect of friction, morphology and material properties on the micromechanical response.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, D.; Mann, K.A.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2008-01-01

    In order to gain insight into the micro-mechanical behavior of the cement-bone interface, the effect of parametric variations of frictional, morphological and material properties on the mechanical response of the cement-bone interface were analyzed using a finite element approach. Finite element

  8. Micro-mechanical modeling of the cement-bone interface: the effect of friction morphology and material properties on the micromechanical response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dennis; Mann, Kenneth A.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph

    2008-01-01

    In order to gain insight into the micro-mechanical behavior of the cement–bone interface, the effect of parametric variations of frictional, morphological and material properties on the mechanical response of the cement–bone interface were analyzed using a finite element approach. Finite element

  9. Radiation effects and micromechanics of SiC/SiC composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghoniem, N.M.

    1992-01-01

    The basic displacement damage process in SiC has been fully explored, and the mechanisms identified. Major modifications have been made to the theory of damage dosimetry in Fusion, Fission and Ion Simulation studies of Sic. For the first time, calculations of displacements per atoms in SiC can be made in any irradiation environment. Applications to irradiations in fusion first wall neutron spectra (ARIES and PROMETHEUS) as well as in fission spectra (HIFIR and FFTF) are given. Nucleation of helium-filled cavities in SiC was studied, using concepts of stability theory to determine the size of the critical nucleus under continuous generation of helium and displacement damage. It is predicted that a bimodal distribution of cavity sizes is likely to occur in heavily irradiated SiC. A study of the chemical compatibility of SiC composite structures with fusion reactor coolants at high-temperatures was undertaken. It was shown that SiC itself is chemically very stable in helium coolants in the temperature range 500--1000 degree C. However, current fiber/matrix interfaces, such as C and BN are not. The fracture mechanics of high-temperature matrix cracks with bridging fibers is now in progress. A fundamentally unique approach to study the propagation and interaction of cracks in a composite was initiated. The main focus of our research during the following period will be : (1) Theory and experiments for the micro-mechanics of high-temperature failure; and (2) Analysis of radiation damage and microstructure evolution

  10. Ductile failure analysis of high strength steel in hot forming based on micromechanical damage model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The damage evolution of high strength steel at elevated temperature is investigated by using the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN model. A hybrid method integrated thermal tensile test and numerical technique is employed to identify the damage parameters. The analysis results show that the damage parameters are different at different temperature as the variation of tested material microstructure. Furthermore, the calibrated damage parameters are implemented to simulate a bugling forming at elevated temperature. The experimental results show the availability of GTN damage model in analyzing sheet formability in hot forming.

  11. Ductile failure analysis of high strength steel in hot forming based on micromechanical damage model

    OpenAIRE

    Ying Liang; Liu Wenquan; Wang Dantong; Hu Ping

    2016-01-01

    The damage evolution of high strength steel at elevated temperature is investigated by using the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) model. A hybrid method integrated thermal tensile test and numerical technique is employed to identify the damage parameters. The analysis results show that the damage parameters are different at different temperature as the variation of tested material microstructure. Furthermore, the calibrated damage parameters are implemented to simulate a bugling forming at el...

  12. Micromechanical study of the effect of inclusions on fatigue failure in a roller bearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerullo, Michele; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2015-01-01

    model containing a single inclusion, using the approximation of a 2D plane strain numerical analysis. The Dang Van multiaxial fatigue criterion is used for the local stresses in the matrix material, to ensure that the stresses remain within the fatigue limit. The matrix material is taken to be one...... of the most commonly used bearing steels, AISI 52100, and two different types of inclusions are considered. The macroscopic stress histories applied correspond to either a Hertzian or an elastohydrodynamic (EHL) contact pressure distribution under the rollers. Findings - The paper shows that sub...

  13. Characterization of Bitumen Micro-Mechanical Behaviors Using AFM, Phase Dynamics Theory and MD Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Hou

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental understanding of micro-mechanical behaviors in bitumen, including phase separation, micro-friction, micro-abrasion, etc., can help the pavement engineers better understand the bitumen mechanical performances at macroscale. Recent researches show that the microstructure evolution in bitumen will directly affect its surface structure and micro-mechanical performance. In this study, the bitumen microstructure and micro-mechanical behaviors are studied using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM experiments, Phase Dynamics Theory and Molecular Dynamics (MD Simulation. The AFM experiment results show that different phase-structure will occur at the surface of the bitumen samples under certain thermodynamic conditions at microscale. The phenomenon can be explained using the phase dynamics theory, where the effects of stability parameter and temperature on bitumen microstructure and micro-mechanical behavior are studied combined with MD Simulation. Simulation results show that the saturates phase, in contrast to the naphthene aromatics phase, plays a major role in bitumen micro-mechanical behavior. A high stress zone occurs at the interface between the saturates phase and the naphthene aromatics phase, which may form discontinuities that further affect the bitumen frictional performance.

  14. Characterization of Bitumen Micro-Mechanical Behaviors Using AFM, Phase Dynamics Theory and MD Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yue; Wang, Linbing; Wang, Dawei; Guo, Meng; Liu, Pengfei; Yu, Jianxin

    2017-02-21

    Fundamental understanding of micro-mechanical behaviors in bitumen, including phase separation, micro-friction, micro-abrasion, etc., can help the pavement engineers better understand the bitumen mechanical performances at macroscale. Recent researches show that the microstructure evolution in bitumen will directly affect its surface structure and micro-mechanical performance. In this study, the bitumen microstructure and micro-mechanical behaviors are studied using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) experiments, Phase Dynamics Theory and Molecular Dynamics (MD) Simulation. The AFM experiment results show that different phase-structure will occur at the surface of the bitumen samples under certain thermodynamic conditions at microscale. The phenomenon can be explained using the phase dynamics theory, where the effects of stability parameter and temperature on bitumen microstructure and micro-mechanical behavior are studied combined with MD Simulation. Simulation results show that the saturates phase, in contrast to the naphthene aromatics phase, plays a major role in bitumen micro-mechanical behavior. A high stress zone occurs at the interface between the saturates phase and the naphthene aromatics phase, which may form discontinuities that further affect the bitumen frictional performance.

  15. Micromechanics of transformation-induced plasticity and variant coalescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marketz, F.; Fischer, F.D.; University for Mining and Metallurgy, Leoben; Tanaka, K.

    1996-01-01

    Quantitative micromechanics descriptions of both transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) associated with the martensitic transformation in an Fe-Ni alloy and of variant coalescence in a Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy are presented. The macroscopic deformation behavior of a polycrystalline aggregate as a result of the rearrangements within the crystallites is modelled with the help of a finite element based periodic microfield approach. In the case of TRIP the parent→martensite transformation is described by microscale thermodynamic and kinetic equations taking into account internal stress states. The simulation of a classical experiment on TRIP allows to quantify the Magee-effect and the Greenwood-Johnson effect. Furthermore, the development of the martensitic microstructure is studied with respect to the stress-assisted transformation of preferred variants. In the case of variant coalescence the strain energy due to internal stress states has an important influence on the mechanical behavior. Formulating the reorientation process on the size scale of self-accommodating plate groups in terms of the mobility of the boundaries between martensitic variants the macroscopic behavior in uniaxial tension is predicted by an incremental modelling procedure. Furthermore, influence of energy dissipation on the overall behavior is quantified. (orig.)

  16. Micro-mechanical properties of different sites on woodpecker's skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yikun; Wang, Lizhen; Liu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Hongquan; Lin, Chia-Ying; Fan, Yubo

    2017-11-01

    The uneven distributed microstructure featured with plate-like spongy bone in woodpecker's skull has been found to further help reduce the impact during woodpecker's pecking behavior. Therefore, this work was to investigate the micro-mechanical properties and composition on different sites of Great Spotted woodpecker's (GSW) skull. Different sites were selected on forehead, tempus and occiput, which were also compared with those of Eurasian Hoopoe (EH) and Lark birds (LB). Micro structural parameters assessed from micro computed tomography (μCT) occurred significantly difference between GSW, EH and LB. The micro finite element (micro-FE) models were developed and the simulation was performed as a compression process. The maximal stresses of GSW's micro-FE models were all lower than those of EH and LB respectively and few concentrated stresses were noticed on GSW's trabecular bone. Fourier transform infrared mapping suggesting a greater organic content in the occiput of GSW's cranial bone compared with others. The nano-hardness of the GSW's occiput was decreasing from forehead to occiput. The mechanical properties, site-dependent hardness distribution and special material composition of GSW's skull bone are newly found in this study. These factors may lead to a new design of bulk material mimicking these characteristics.

  17. Micro-mechanics of ionic electroactive polymer actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punning, Andres; Põldsalu, Inga; Kaasik, Friedrich; Vunder, Veiko; Aabloo, Alvo

    2015-04-01

    Commonly, modeling of the bending behavior of the ionic electroactive polymer (IEAP) actuators is based on the classical mechanics of cantilever beam. It is acknowledged, that the actuation of the ionic electroactive polymer (IEAP) actuators is symmetric about the centroid - the convex side of the actuator is expanding and the concave side is contracting for exactly the same amount, while the thickness of the actuator remains invariant. Actuating the IEAP actuators and sensors under scanning electron microscope (SEM), in situ, reveals that for some types of them this approach is incorrect. Comparison of the SEM micrographs using the Digital Image Correction (DIC) method results with the precise strain distribution of the IEAP actuators in two directions: in the axial direction, and in the direction of thickness. This information, in turn, points to the physical processes taking place within the electrodes as well as membrane of the trilayer laminate of sub-millimeter thickness. Comparison of the EAP materials, engaged as an actuator as well as a sensor, reveals considerable differences between the micro-mechanics of the two modes.

  18. Micromechanics of the human vertebral body for forward flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haisheng; Nawathe, Shashank; Fields, Aaron J; Keaveny, Tony M

    2012-08-09

    To provide mechanistic insight into the etiology of osteoporotic wedge fractures, we investigated the spatial distribution of tissue at the highest risk of initial failure within the human vertebral body for both forward flexion and uniform compression loading conditions. Micro-CT-based linear elastic finite element analysis was used to virtually load 22 human T9 vertebral bodies in either 5° of forward flexion or uniform compression; we also ran analyses replacing the simulated compliant disc (E=8 MPa) with stiff polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA, E=2500 MPa). As expected, we found that, compared to uniform compression, forward flexion increased the overall endplate axial load on the anterior half of the vertebra and shifted the spatial distribution of high-risk tissue within the vertebra towards the anterior aspect of the vertebral body. However, despite that shift, the high-risk tissue remained primarily within the central regions of the trabecular bone and endplates, and forward flexion only slightly altered the ratio of cortical-to-trabecular load sharing at the mid-vertebral level (mean±SD for n=22: 41.3±7.4% compression; 44.1±8.2% forward flexion). When the compliant disc was replaced with PMMA, the anterior shift of high-risk tissue was much more severe. We conclude that, for a compliant disc, a moderate degree of forward flexion does not appreciably alter the spatial distribution of stress within the vertebral body. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Micromechanical Models of Mechanical Response of High Performance Fibre Reinforced Cement Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, V. C.; Mihashi, H.; Alwan, J.

    1996-01-01

    generation of FRC with high performance and economical viability, is in sight. However, utilization of micromechanical models for a more comprehensive set of important HPFRCC properties awaits further investigations into fundamental mechanisms governing composite properties, as well as intergrative efforts......The state-of-the-art in micromechanical modeling of the mechanical response of HPFRCC is reviewed. Much advances in modeling has been made over the last decade to the point that certain properties of composites can be carefully designed using the models as analytic tools. As a result, a new...... across responses to different load types. Further, micromechanical models for HPFRCC behavior under complex loading histories, including those in fracture, fatigue and multuaxial loading are urgently needed in order to optimize HPFRCC microstrcuctures and enable predictions of such material in structures...

  20. Using Micromechanical Resonators to Measure Rheological Properties and Alcohol Content of Model Solutions and Commercial Beverages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart W. Hoogenboom

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Micromechanic resonators provide a small-volume and potentially high-throughput method to determine rheological properties of fluids. Here we explore the accuracy in measuring mass density and viscosity of ethanol-water and glycerol-water model solutions, using a simple and easily implemented model to deduce the hydrodynamic effects on resonating cantilevers of various length-to-width aspect ratios. We next show that these measurements can be extended to determine the alcohol percentage of both model solutions and commercial beverages such as beer, wine and liquor. This demonstrates how micromechanical resonators can be used for quality control of every-day drinks.

  1. Micromechanical Modeling of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anode Supports based on Three-dimensional Reconstructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwok, Kawai; Jørgensen, Peter Stanley; Frandsen, Henrik Lund

    2014-01-01

    Ni-3YSZ in the operating temperature through numerical micromechanical modeling. Three-dimensional microstructures of Ni-3YSZ anode supports are reconstructed from a two-dimensional image stack obtained via focused ion beam tomography. Time-dependent stress distributions in the microscopic scale...... are computed by the finite element method. The macroscopic creep response of the porous anode support is determined based on homogenization theory. It is shown that micromechanical modeling provides an effective tool to study the effect of microstructures on the macroscopic properties....

  2. Fuel micro-mechanics: homogenization, cracking, granular media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monerie, Yann

    2010-01-01

    This work summarizes about fifteen years of research in the field of micro-mechanics of materials. Emphasis is placed on the most recent work carried out in the context of nuclear safety. Micro-mechanics finds a natural place there, aiming to predict the behavior of heterogeneous materials with an evolving microstructure. The applications concerned mainly involve the nuclear fuel and its tubular cladding. The uranium dioxide fuel is modeled, according to the scales under consideration, as a porous ceramic or a granular medium. The strongly irradiated Zircaloy claddings are identified with a composite medium with a metal matrix and a gradient of properties. The analysis of these classes of material is rich in problems of a more fundamental nature. Three main themes are discussed: 1/ Homogenization, 2/ cracking, rupture and fragmentation, 3/ discrete media and fluid-grain couplings. Homogenization: The analytical scale change methods proposed aim to estimate or limit the linear and equivalent nonlinear behaviors of isotropic porous media and anisotropic composites with a metal matrix. The porous media under consideration are saturated or drained, with a compressible or incompressible matrix, and have one or two scales of spherical or ellipsoid pores, or cracks. The composites studied have a macroscopic anisotropy related to that of the matrix, and to the shape and spatial distribution of the inclusions. Thermoelastic, elastoplastic, and viscoplastic behaviors and ductile damage of these media are examined using different techniques: extensions of classic approaches, linear in particular, variational approaches and approaches using elliptical potentials with thermally activated elementary mechanisms. The models developed are validated on numerical finite element simulations, and their functional relevance is illustrated in comparison to experimental data obtained from the literature. The significant results obtained include a plasticity criterion for Gurson matrix

  3. Deep x-ray lithography for micromechanics and precision engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckel, H.

    1996-01-01

    Micromechanics, an emerging technology for sensor and actuator fabrication, has already been exploited in the sensor area. Progress in actuators, devices that modify their environment and are fundamentally three dimensional, has been much more modest and is suffering from the availability of a fabrication tool with the necessary attributes. If the tool is based on photoresist technology, requirements include very large structure heights: in the millimeter range, for mask-defined prismatic photoresist shapes with flanks that differ from 90 degrees by less than 15 arc-seconds. Photoresist procedures that lead to these results are very different from their counterparts in the microelectronic industry. Thus, application is based on precast sheets of polymethyl methacrylate, PMMA, and solvent bonding followed by precision fly-cutting. Exposure is based on well-collimated x-ray sources, synchrotrons, with flux densities that can deposit 1,600 Joules per cubic centimeter in a finite time at the correct photoresist depth. Since PMMA has an absorption length that varies with photon energy, it is 100 micrometer at 3000 eV and increases to 1 cm at 20,000 eV, beamline and exposure designs center on transmission filters that control the low energy portion of the synchrotron spectrum. Since exposure latitude is large, overexposure by a factor of 15 is allowed, beamline and exposure design are relatively simple. Experiments via the Wisconsin machine, Aladdin, and the Brookhaven 2.6-GeV ring are being used to study the effectiveness issue of manufacturing with synchrotron radiation. Actuator test vehicles are linear and rotational magnetic micromotors with force outputs in the milli-Newton range. High energy exposures have produced large parts with submicron precision that are finding applications in ink jet printing and precision injection molding procedures. Both device types are unique to x-ray assisted processing. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  4. Micromechanics of pressure-induced grain crushing in porous rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaxiang; Wong, Teng-Fong; Davis, Daniel M.

    1990-01-01

    The hydrostatic compaction behavior of a suite of porous sandstones was investigated at confining pressures up to 600 MPa and constant pore pressures ranging up to 50 MPa. These five sandstones (Boise, Kayenta, St. Peter, Berea, and Weber) were selected because of their wide range of porosity (5-35%) and grain size (60-460 μm). We tested the law of effective stress for the porosity change as a function of pressure. Except for Weber sandstone (which has the lowest porosity and smallest grain size), the hydrostat of each sandstone shows an inflection point corresponding to a critical effective pressure beyond which an accelerated, irrecoverable compaction occurs. Our microstructural observations show that brittle grain crushing initiates at this critical pressure. We also observed distributed cleavage cracking in calcite and intensive kinking in mica. The critical pressures for grain crushing in our sandstones range from 75 to 380 MPa. In general, a sandstone with higher porosity and larger grain size has a critical pressure which is lower than that of a sandstone with lower porosity and smaller grain size. We formulate a Hertzian fracture model to analyze the micromechanics of grain crushing. Assuming that the solid grains have preexisting microcracks with dimensions which scale with grain size, we derive an expression for the critical pressure which depends on the porosity, grain size, and fracture toughness of the solid matrix. The theoretical prediction is in reasonable agreement with our experimental data as well as other data from soil and rock mechanics studies for which the critical pressures range over 3 orders of magnitude.

  5. Micromechanical combined stress analysis: MICSTRAN, a user manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    Composite materials are currently being used in aerospace and other applications. The ability to tailor the composite properties by the appropriate selection of its constituents, the fiber and matrix, is a major advantage of composite materials. The Micromechanical Combined Stress Analysis (MICSTRAN) code provides the materials engineer with a user-friendly personal computer (PC) based tool to calculate overall composite properties given the constituent fiber and matrix properties. To assess the ability of the composite to carry structural loads, the materials engineer also needs to calculate the internal stresses in the composite material. MICSTRAN is a simple tool to calculate such internal stresses with a composite ply under combined thermomechanical loading. It assumes that the fibers have a circular cross-section and are arranged either in a repeating square or diamond array pattern within a ply. It uses a classical elasticity solution technique that has been demonstrated to calculate accurate stress results. Input to the program consists of transversely isotropic fiber properties and isotropic matrix properties such as moduli, Poisson's ratios, coefficients of thermal expansion, and volume fraction. Output consists of overall thermoelastic constants and stresses. Stresses can be computed under the combined action of thermal, transverse, longitudinal, transverse shear, and longitudinal shear loadings. Stress output can be requested along the fiber-matrix interface, the model boundaries, circular arcs, or at user-specified points located anywhere in the model. The MICSTRAN program is Windows compatible and takes advantage of the Microsoft Windows graphical user interface which facilitates multitasking and extends memory access far beyond the limits imposed by the DOS operating system.

  6. An analytical model for interactive failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yong; Ma Lin; Mathew, Joseph; Zhang Sheng

    2006-01-01

    In some systems, failures of certain components can interact with each other, and accelerate the failure rates of these components. These failures are defined as interactive failure. Interactive failure is a prevalent cause of failure associated with complex systems, particularly in mechanical systems. The failure risk of an asset will be underestimated if the interactive effect is ignored. When failure risk is assessed, interactive failures of an asset need to be considered. However, the literature is silent on previous research work in this field. This paper introduces the concepts of interactive failure, develops an analytical model to analyse this type of failure quantitatively, and verifies the model using case studies and experiments

  7. Fibre failure assessment in carbon fibre reinforced polymers under fatigue loading by synchrotron X-ray computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Garcea, Serafina; Sinclair, Ian; Spearing, Simon

    2016-01-01

    In situ fatigue experiments using synchrotron X-ray computed tomography (SRCT) are used to assess the underpinning micromechanisms of fibre failure in double notch carbon/epoxy coupons. Observations showed fibre breaks along the 0º ply splits, associated with the presence and failure of bridging fibres, as well as fibres failed in the bulk composite within the 0º plies. A tendency for cluster formation, with multiple adjacent breaks in the bulk composite was observed when higher peak loads we...

  8. Experimental approach and micro-mechanical modeling of the creep behavior of irradiated zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribis, J.

    2007-12-01

    The fuel rod cladding, strongly affected by microstructural changes due to irradiation such as high density of dislocation loops, is strained by the end-of-life fuel rod internal pressure and the potential release of fission gases and helium during dry storage. Within the temperature range that is expected during dry interim storage, cladding undergoes long term creep under over-pressure. So, in order to have a predictive approach of the behavior of zirconium alloys cladding in dry storage conditions it is essential to take into account: initial dislocation loops, thermal annealing of loops and creep straining due to over pressure. Specific experiments and modelling for irradiated samples have been developed to improve our knowledge in that field. A Zr-1%Nb-O alloy was studied using fine microstructural investigations and mechanical testing. The observations conducted by transmission electron microscopy show that the high density of loops disappears during a heat treatment. The loop size becomes higher and higher while their density falls. The microhardness tests reveal that the fall of loop density leads to the softening of the irradiated material. During a creep test, both temperature and applied stress are responsible of the disappearance of loops. The loops could be swept by the activation of the basal slip system while the prism slip system is inhibited. Once deprived of loops, the creep properties of the irradiated materials are closed to the non irradiated state, a result whose consequence is a sudden acceleration of the creep rate. Finally, a micro-mechanical modeling based on microscopic deformation mechanisms taking into account experimental dislocation loop analyses and creep test, was used for a predictive approach by constructing a deformation mechanism map of the creep behavior of the irradiated material. (author)

  9. Interface effects on the micromechanical response of a transversely loaded single fiber SCS-6/Ti-6Al-4V composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warrier, S.G.; Majumdar, B.S.; Gundel, D.B.; Miracle, D.B.

    1996-01-01

    The ability of a fiber-matrix interface to support a transverse load is typically evaluated in straight-sided composite specimens where a stress singularity exists at the free surface of the interface. This stress singularity is often the cause of crack initiation and debonding during transverse loading. In order to develop a fundamental understanding of the transverse behavior of the fiber-matrix interface, it is necessary to alter the crack initiation site from the free surface to an internal location. To achieve this objective, a cross-shaped specimen has been recently developed. In this study, based on the experimentally observed onset of nonlinearity in the stress-strain curve of these specimens and finite element analysis, the bond strength of the SCS-6/Ti-6Al-4V interface was determined to be 115 MPa. The micromechanical behavior of these specimens under transverse loading was examined by finite element analysis using this interface bond strength value and compared with experimental observations. Results demonstrate that the proposed geometry was successful in suppressing debonding at the surface and altering it to an internal event. The results from numerical analysis correlated well with the experimental stress-strain curve and several simple analytical models. In an attempt to identify the true bond strength and the interface failure criterion, the present study suggests that if failure initiates under tensile radial stresses, then the normal bond strength of the SCS-6/Ti-6Al-4V composites is about 115 MPa; under shear failure, the tangential shear strength of the interface is about 180 MPa

  10. Ultrasensitive thermometer for atmospheric pressure operation based on a micromechanical resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cagliani, Alberto; Pini, V.; Tamayo, J.

    2014-01-01

    For highly integrated systems for bio and chemical analysis a precise and integrated measurement of temperature is of fundamental importance. We have developed an ultrasensitive thermometer based on a micromechanical resonator for operation in air. The high quality factor and the strong temperatu...

  11. Micromechanical definition of an entropy for quasi-static deformation of granular materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rothenburg, L.; Kruyt, Nicolaas P.

    2009-01-01

    A micromechanical theory is formulated for quasi-static deformation of granular materials, which is based on information theory. A reasoning is presented that leads to the definition of an information entropy that is appropriate for quasi-static deformation of granular materials. This definition is

  12. A micromechanical device that monitors arterial pressure during general anesthesia and in intensive care units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, A. V.; Luchinin, V. V.; Kuzmina, K. A.; Klyavinek, A. S.; Karelov, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    A vibroacoustic fiber optic system that consists of micromechanical components designated for use in medicine and biology is reviewed. A theoretical analysis of a fiber optic microphone is done and its optimal construction parameters are determined. The possibility of using the developed system with magnetic resonance tomography to noninvasively measure man's arterial pressure is specified.

  13. Experiment feedbacks in micromechanics modeling of thermomechanical behaviors of SMA polycrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sittner, P.; Novak, V.

    2004-01-01

    Simulations of pseudoelastic deformation of NiTi and CuAlZnMn polycrystals using an earlier developed micromechanics model are presented. Advantages of having multiple feedbacks established between the model and in situ neutron diffraction experiment as well as doing modeling and experimentation simultaneously are discussed

  14. Composite materials for wind energy applications: micromechanical modeling and future directions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2012-01-01

    The strength and reliability of wind turbine blades depend on the properties, mechanical behavior and strengths of the material components (glass or carbon fibers and polymer matrix), and the interaction between them under loading. In this paper, ideas, methods and concepts of micromechanical...

  15. Effect of the primary particle morphology on the micromechanical properties of nanostructured alumina agglomerates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilde, Carsten; Westphal, Bastian; Kwade, Arno

    2012-01-01

    Depending on the application of nanoparticles, certain characteristics of the product quality such as size, morphology, abrasion resistance, specific surface, dispersibility and tendency to agglomeration are important. These characteristics are a function of the physicochemical properties, i.e. the micromechanical properties of the nanostructured material. The micromechanical properties of these nanostructured agglomerates such as the maximum indentation force, the plastic and elastic deformation energy and the strength give information on the product properties, e.g. the efficiency of a dispersion process of the agglomerates, and can be measured by nanoindentation. In this study a Berkovich indenter tip was used for the characterisation of model aggregates out of sol–gel produced silica and precipitated alumina agglomerates with different primary particle morphologies (dimension of 15–40 nm). In general, the effect of the primary particle morphology and the presence or absence of solid bonds can be characterised by the measurement of the micromechanical properties via nanoindentation. The micromechanical behaviour of aggregates containing solid bonds is strongly affected by the elastic–plastic deformation behaviour of the solid bonds and the breakage of solid bonds. Moreover, varying the primary particle morphology for similar particle material and approximately isotropic agglomerate behaviour the particle–particle interactions within the agglomerates can be described by the elementar breaking stress according to the formula of Rumpf.

  16. Micromechanical modeling of the elasto-viscoplastic bahavior of semi-crystalline polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dommelen, van J.A.W.; Parks, D.M.; Boyce, M.C.; Brekelmans, W.A.M.; Baaijens, F.P.T.

    2003-01-01

    A micromechanically-based constitutive model for the elasto-viscoplastic deformationand texture evolution of semi-crystalline polymers is developed. The modelidealizes the microstructure to consist of an aggregate of two-phase layered compositeinclusions. A new framework for the composite inclusion

  17. Micromechanical models to guide the development of synthetic 'brick and mortar' composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Begley, M.R.; Philips, N.R.; Compton, B.G.; Wilbrink, D.V.; Ritchie, R.O.; Utz, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a micromechanical analysis of the uniaxial response of composites comprising elastic platelets (bricks) bonded together with thin elastic perfectly plastic layers (mortar). The model yields closed-form results for the spatial variation of displacements in the bricks as a

  18. Application of micromechanical models of ductile fracture initiation to reactor pressure vessel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaouadi, R.; Walle, E. van; Fabry, A.; Velde, J. van de; Meester, P. de

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the current study is the application of local micromechanical models to predict crack initiation in ductile materials. Two reactor pressure vessel materials have been selected for this study: JRQ IAEA monitor base metal (A533B Cl.1) and Doel-IV weld material. Charpy impact tests have been performed in both un-irradiated and irradiated conditions. In addition to standard tensile tests, notched tensile specimens have been tested. The upper shelf energy of the weld material remains almost un-affected by irradiation, whereas a decrease of 20% is detected for the base metal. Accordingly, the tensile properties of the weld material do not reveal a clear irradiation effect on the yield and ultimate stresses, this in contrast to the base material flow properties. The tensile tests have been analyzed in terms of micromechanical models. A good correlation is found between the standard tests and the micromechanical models, that are able to predict the ductile damage evolution in these materials. Additional information on the ductility behavior of these materials is revealed by this micromechanical analysis

  19. 3D multiscale micromechanical model of wood: From annual rings to microfibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qing, Hai; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2010-01-01

    A 3D micromechanical analytical-computational model of softwood, which takes into account the wood microstructures at four scale levels, from microfibrils to annual rings, is developed. For the analysis of the effect of the annual rings structure on the properties of softwood, an improved rule-of...

  20. A micromechanical approach to elastic and viscoelastic properties of fiber reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasa Dutra, V.F.; Maghous, S.; Campos Filho, A.; Pacheco, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    Some aspects of the constitutive behavior of fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) are investigated within a micromechanical framework. Special emphasis is put on the prediction of creep of such materials. The linear elastic behavior is first examined by implementation of a Mori-Tanaka homogenization scheme. The micromechanical predictions for the overall stiffness prove to be very close to finite element solutions obtained from the numerical analysis of a representative elementary volume of FRC modeled as a randomly heterogeneous medium. The validation of the micromechanical concepts based on comparison with a set of experiments, shows remarkable predictive capabilities of the micromechanical representation. The second part of the paper is devoted to non-ageing viscoelasticity of FRC. Adopting a Zener model for the behavior of the concrete matrix and making use of the correspondence principle, the homogenized relaxation moduli are derived analytically. The validity of the model is established by mean of comparison with available experiment measurements of creep strain of steel fiber reinforced concrete under compressive load. Finally, the model predictions are compared to those derived from analytical models formulated within a one-dimensional setting.

  1. Mini-Symposium on Micromechanics at the CSME Mechanical Engineering Forum

    CERN Document Server

    Muschik, W

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains the lectures presented at the mini-symposium on "Micromechanics" held in conjunction with the CSME Mechanical Engineer­ ing Forum 1990 between the 3rd and 8th June, 1990 at the University of Toronto, Canada. The expressed purpose of this symposium was to discuss some recent developments in the Micromechanics of Materials and how ad­ vances in this field now relate to the solution of practical engineer­ ing problems. Due to the time limit set for this section of the Engineer­ ing Forum as well as the restriction on the number of papers to be pre­ sented, it was not possible to cover a much wider range of topics. How­ ever, an attempt was made to include the most important advances asso­ ciated with the progress made in micromechanics in its application to material science and engineering over the past decade. Thus, the topics are concerned with: the fundamental aspects of the thermodynamics of structured solids (part I), - the micromechanical behaviour of alloys (part II), - the mod...

  2. Micromechanical experimental analysis and modelling of elastic and damageable behaviour of unidirectional SiC/SiC composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chateau, C.

    2011-01-01

    Because of their potential use as a cladding material in future nuclear reactors, the complex mechanical behavior of SiC/SiC composites, which combines damage and anisotropy, must be understood and predictable. As part of a multi-scale approach, this work focuses on the first scale change: from the elementary constituents to the tow. Micromechanical approaches are implemented to describe the macroscopic behavior of the tow taking into account its microstructure heterogeneity and damage mechanisms occurring at the local scale. A representative virtual microstructure is generated based on a detailed microstructural investigation of the tow and its elastic response is studied by numerical homogenization. In addition to addressing the mechanical RVE issue, this study highlights the significant effects of residual porosity on the transverse behavior of the tow, due to the matrix infiltration process. The longitudinal damage is being studied through mini-composites, for which the evolution of microscopic damage mechanisms (matrix cracks and fiber breaks) is experimentally analyzed (in-situ SEM and tomography tensile tests). The identification of interfacial parameters of a 1D statistical damage model is based on the experimental characterization. Conventional assumptions of such models can adequately describe matrix cracking at macro and micro scale. However it is necessary to change them to get a proper prediction of ultimate failure. (author) [fr

  3. Identifying design parameters controlling damage behaviors of continuous fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites using micromechanics as a virtual testing tool

    KAUST Repository

    Pulungan, Ditho Ardiansyah; Lubineau, Gilles; Yudhanto, Arief; Yaldiz, Recep; Schijve, Warden

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a micromechanical approach to predict damage mechanisms and their interactions in glass fibers/polypropylene thermoplastic composites. First, a representative volume element (RVE) of such materials was rigorously determined using a geometrical two-point probability function and the eigenvalue stabilization of homogenized elastic tensor obtained by Hill-Mandel kinematic homogenization. Next, the 3D finite element models of the RVE were developed accordingly. The fibers were modeled with an isotropic linear elastic material. The matrix was modeled with an isotropic linear elastic, rate-independent hyperbolic Drucker-Prager plasticity coupled with a ductile damage model that is able to show pressure dependency of the yield and damage behavior often found in a thermoplastic material. In addition, cohesive elements were inserted into the fiber-matrix interfaces to simulate debonding. The RVE faces are imposed with periodical boundary conditions to minimize the edge effect. The RVE was then subjected to transverse tensile loading in accordance with experimental tensile tests on [90]8 laminates. The model prediction was found to be in very good agreement with the experimental results in terms of the global stress-strain curves, including the linear and nonlinear portion of the response and also the failure point, making it a useful virtual testing tool for composite material design. Furthermore, the effect of tailoring the main parameters of thermoplastic composites is investigated to provide guidelines for future improvements of these materials.

  4. Identifying design parameters controlling damage behaviors of continuous fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites using micromechanics as a virtual testing tool

    KAUST Repository

    Pulungan, Ditho Ardiansyah

    2017-03-31

    In this paper, we propose a micromechanical approach to predict damage mechanisms and their interactions in glass fibers/polypropylene thermoplastic composites. First, a representative volume element (RVE) of such materials was rigorously determined using a geometrical two-point probability function and the eigenvalue stabilization of homogenized elastic tensor obtained by Hill-Mandel kinematic homogenization. Next, the 3D finite element models of the RVE were developed accordingly. The fibers were modeled with an isotropic linear elastic material. The matrix was modeled with an isotropic linear elastic, rate-independent hyperbolic Drucker-Prager plasticity coupled with a ductile damage model that is able to show pressure dependency of the yield and damage behavior often found in a thermoplastic material. In addition, cohesive elements were inserted into the fiber-matrix interfaces to simulate debonding. The RVE faces are imposed with periodical boundary conditions to minimize the edge effect. The RVE was then subjected to transverse tensile loading in accordance with experimental tensile tests on [90]8 laminates. The model prediction was found to be in very good agreement with the experimental results in terms of the global stress-strain curves, including the linear and nonlinear portion of the response and also the failure point, making it a useful virtual testing tool for composite material design. Furthermore, the effect of tailoring the main parameters of thermoplastic composites is investigated to provide guidelines for future improvements of these materials.

  5. Nonlinear dynamics in micromechanical and nanomechanical resonators and oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Tyler

    dynamics in passive resonators, self-sustained MEMS are becoming increasingly prevalent in both research and technology for crucial objectives, such as measurement of time. Despite some effort, much work remains in order to understand phase noise and stability for an oscillator based upon a nonlinear resonator. With the eventual goal of making comprehensive measurements of such a nonlinear oscillator with controlled amplitude and phase, this work describes the realization of a micromechanical phase feedback oscillator.

  6. Intrinsic Energy Dissipation Limits in Nano and Micromechanical Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Srikanth Subramanian

    Resonant microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) have enabled miniaturization of high-performance inertial sensors, radio-frequency filters, timing references and mass-based chemical sensors. Despite the increasing prevalence of MEMS resonators for these applications, the energy dissipation in these structures is not well-understood. Accurate prediction of the energy loss and the resulting quality factor (Q) has significant design implications because it is directly related to device performance metrics including sensitivity for resonant sensors, bandwidth for radio-frequency filters and phase-noise for timing references. In order to assess the future potential for MEMS resonators it is critically important to evaluate the energy dissipation limits, which will dictate the ultimate performance resonant MEMS devices can achieve. This work focuses on the derivation and evaluation of the intrinsic mechanical energy dissipation limit for single-crystal nano and micromechanical resonators due to anharmonic phonon-phonon scattering in the Akhiezer regime. The energy loss is derived using perturbation theory and the linearized Boltzmann transport equation for phonons, and includes the direction and polarization dependent mode-Gruneisen parameters in order to capture the strain-induced anharmonicity among phonon branches. Evaluation of the quality factor limit reveals that Akhiezer damping, previously thought to depend only on material properties, has a strong dependence on crystal orientation and resonant mode shape. The robust model provides a dissipation limit for all resonant modes including shear-mode vibrations, which have significantly reduced energy loss because dissipative phonon-phonon scattering is restricted to volume-preserving phonon branches, indicating that Lame or wine-glass mode resonators will have the highest upper limit on mechanical efficiency. Finally, the analytical dissipation model is integrated with commercial finite element software in order to

  7. A Hybrid Approach to Composite Damage and Failure Analysis Combining Synergistic Damage Mechanics and Peridynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-30

    manufacturing defects in the intermediately -homogenized model of fiber-reinforced composites. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Computational micromechanics; Cavitation...defects in the intermediately -homogenized model of fiber-reinforced composites. Task 1.1 Micro-level crack initiation Background and motivation In...new Intermediate Homogenization Peridynamic approach (IH-PD model) for failure in multiphase materials. We plan to apply this IH-PD model for the

  8. Respiratory Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, ... brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can' ...

  9. Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can't pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. Heart failure does not mean that your heart has stopped ... and shortness of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and ...

  10. Micro-mechanical modeling of the cement-bone interface: the effect of friction, morphology and material properties on the micromechanical response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Dennis; Mann, Kenneth A; Verdonschot, Nico

    2008-11-14

    In order to gain insight into the micro-mechanical behavior of the cement-bone interface, the effect of parametric variations of frictional, morphological and material properties on the mechanical response of the cement-bone interface were analyzed using a finite element approach. Finite element models of a cement-bone interface specimen were created from micro-computed tomography data of a physical specimen that was sectioned from an in vitro cemented total hip arthroplasty. In five models the friction coefficient was varied (mu=0.0; 0.3; 0.7; 1.0 and 3.0), while in one model an ideally bonded interface was assumed. In two models cement interface gaps and an optimal cement penetration were simulated. Finally, the effect of bone cement stiffness variations was simulated (2.0 and 2.5 GPa, relative to the default 3.0 GPa). All models were loaded for a cycle of fully reversible tension-compression. From the simulated stress-displacement curves the interface deformation, stiffness and hysteresis were calculated. The results indicate that in the current model the mechanical properties of the cement-bone interface were caused by frictional phenomena at the shape-closed interlock rather than by adhesive properties of the cement. Our findings furthermore show that in our model maximizing cement penetration improved the micromechanical response of the cement-bone interface stiffness, while interface gaps had a detrimental effect. Relative to the frictional and morphological variations, variations in the cement stiffness had only a modest effect on the micro-mechanical behavior of the cement-bone interface. The current study provides information that may help to better understand the load-transfer mechanisms taking place at the cement-bone interface.

  11. EDITORIAL: The 19th MicroMechanics Europe Workshop (MME 2008) The 19th MicroMechanics Europe Workshop (MME 2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnakenberg, Uwe

    2009-07-01

    This special issue of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering is devoted to the 19th MicroMechanics Europe Workshop (MME 08), which took place at the RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany, from 28-30 September, 2008. The workshop is a well recognized and established European event in the field of micro system technology using thin-film technologies for creating micro components, micro sensors, micro actuators, and micro systems. The first MME Workshop was held 1989 in Enschede (The Netherlands) and continued 1990 in Berlin (Germany), 1992 in Leuven (Belgium), and then was held annually in Neuchâtel (Switzerland), Pisa (Italy), Copenhagen (Denmark), Barcelona (Spain), Southampton (UK), Ulvik in Hardanger (Norway), Gif-sur-Yvette (France), Uppsala (Sweden), Cork (Ireland), Sinaia (Romania), Delft (The Netherlands), Leuven (Belgium), Göteborg (Sweden), Southampton (UK), and in Guimarães (Portugal). The two day workshop was attended by 180 delegates from 26 countries all over Europe and from Armenia, Austria, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Cuba, Iran, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Taiwan, Turkey, and the United States of America. A total of 97 papers were accepted for presentation and there were a further five keynote presentations. I am proud to present 22 high-quality papers from MME 2008 selected for their novelty and relevance to Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering. All the papers went through the regular reviewing procedure of IOP Publishing. I am eternally grateful to all the referees for their excellent work. I would also like to extend my thanks to the members of the Programme Committee of MME 2008, Dr Reinoud Wolffenbuttel, Professor José Higino Correia, and Dr Patrick Pons for pre-selection of the papers as well as to Professor Robert Puers for advice on the final selection of papers. My thanks also go to Dr Ian Forbes of IOP Publishing for managing the entire process and to the editorial staff of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering. I

  12. Associations between ambient air pollution and daily mortality in a cohort of congestive heart failure: Case-crossover and nested case-control analyses using a distributed lag nonlinear model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buteau, Stephane; Goldberg, Mark S; Burnett, Richard T; Gasparrini, Antonio; Valois, Marie-France; Brophy, James M; Crouse, Dan L; Hatzopoulou, Marianne

    2018-04-01

    Persons with congestive heart failure may be at higher risk of the acute effects related to daily fluctuations in ambient air pollution. To meet some of the limitations of previous studies using grouped-analysis, we developed a cohort study of persons with congestive heart failure to estimate whether daily non-accidental mortality were associated with spatially-resolved, daily exposures to ambient nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) and ozone (O 3 ), and whether these associations were modified according to a series of indicators potentially reflecting complications or worsening of health. We constructed the cohort from the linkage of administrative health databases. Daily exposure was assigned from different methods we developed previously to predict spatially-resolved, time-dependent concentrations of ambient NO 2 (all year) and O 3 (warm season) at participants' residences. We performed two distinct types of analyses: a case-crossover that contrasts the same person at different times, and a nested case-control that contrasts different persons at similar times. We modelled the effects of air pollution and weather (case-crossover only) on mortality using distributed lag nonlinear models over lags 0 to 3 days. We developed from administrative health data a series of indicators that may reflect the underlying construct of "declining health", and used interactions between these indicators and the cross-basis function for air pollutant to assess potential effect modification. The magnitude of the cumulative as well as the lag-specific estimates of association differed in many instances according to the metric of exposure. Using the back-extrapolation method, which is our preferred exposure model, we found for the case-crossover design a cumulative mean percentage changes (MPC) in daily mortality per interquartile increment in NO 2 (8.8 ppb) of 3.0% (95% CI: -0.9, 6.9%) and for O 3 (16.5 ppb) 3.5% (95% CI: -4.5, 12.1). For O 3 there was strong confounding by weather

  13. Readout of micromechanical cantilever sensor arrays by Fabry-Perot interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehrmeister, Jana; Fuss, Achim; Saurenbach, Frank; Berger, Ruediger; Helm, Mark

    2007-01-01

    The increasing use of micromechanical cantilevers in sensing applications causes a need for reliable readout techniques of micromechanical cantilever sensor (MCS) bending. Current optical beam deflection techniques suffer from drawbacks such as artifacts due to changes in the refraction index upon exchange of media. Here, an adaptation of the Fabry-Perot interferometer is presented that allows simultaneous determination of MCS bending and changes in the refraction index of media. Calibration of the instrument with liquids of known refraction index provides an avenue to direct measurement of bending with nanometer precision. Versatile construction of flow cells in combination with alignment features for substrate chips allows simultaneous measurement of two MCS situated either on the same, or on two different support chips. The performance of the instrument is demonstrate in several sensing applications, including adsorption experiments of alkanethioles on MCS gold surfaces, and measurement of humidity changes in air

  14. Fatigue crack tip damaging micromechanisms in a ferritic-pearlitic ductile cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Iacoviello

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the peculiar graphite elements shape, obtained by means of a chemical composition control (mainly small addition of elements like Mg, Ca or Ce, Ductile Cast Irons (DCIs are able to offer the good castability of gray irons with the high mechanical properties of irons (first of all, toughness. This interesting properties combination can be improved both by means of the chemical composition control and by means of different heat treatments(e.g. annealing, normalizing, quenching, austempering etc. In this work, fatigue crack tip damaging micromechanisms in a ferritic-pearlitic DCI were investigated by means of scanning electron microscope observations performed on a lateral surface of Compact Type (CT specimens during the fatigue crack propagation test (step by step procedure, performed according to the “load shedding procedure”. On the basis of the experimental results, different fatigue damaging micromechanisms were identified, both in the graphite nodules and in the ferritic – pearlitic matrix.

  15. Micromechanical modelling of nanocrystalline and ultrafine grained metals: A short overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon; Levashov, Evgeny

    2015-01-01

    An overview of micromechanical models of strength and deformation behaviour of nanostructured and ultrafine grained metallic materials is presented. Composite models of nanomaterials, polycrystal plasticity based models, grain boundary sliding, the effect of non-equilibrium grain boundaries...... and nanoscale properties are discussed and compared. The examples of incorporation of peculiar nanocrystalline effects (like large content of amorphous or semi-amorphous grain boundary phase, partial dislocation GB emission/glide/GB absorption based deformation mechanism, diffusion deformation, etc.......) into the continuum mechanical approach are given. The possibilities of using micromechanical models to explore the ways of the improving the properties of nanocrystalline materials by modifying their structures (e.g., dispersion strengthening, creating non-equilibrium grain boundaries, varying the grain size...

  16. Micromechanical exfoliation of two-dimensional materials by a polymeric stamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, M C Ferraz da; Ribeiro, H B; Kessler, F; Souza, E A T de; Fechine, G J M

    2016-01-01

    In this work, an alternative technique to the traditional micromechanical exfoliation of two-dimensional materials is proposed, consisting of isolated flakes of graphite and molybdenum disulphide onto polymeric surfaces films. The set made up of polymer and flakes is fabricated by using a hot-press machine called polymeric stamp. The polymeric stamp was used to allocate flakes and also to allow the exfoliation process to take place just in one face of isolated flake. Optical microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy results showed that multilayers, bilayers and single layers of graphene and MoS 2 were obtained by using a polymeric stamp as tool for micromechanical exfoliation. These crystals were more easily found because the exfoliation process concentrates them in well-defined locations. The results prove the effectiveness of the method by embedding two-dimensional materials into polymers to fabricate fewer layers crystals in a fast, economic and clean way. (paper)

  17. Micromechanical exfoliation of two-dimensional materials by a polymeric stamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz da Costa, M. C.; Ribeiro, H. B.; Kessler, F.; de Souza, E. A. T.; Fechine, G. J. M.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, an alternative technique to the traditional micromechanical exfoliation of two-dimensional materials is proposed, consisting of isolated flakes of graphite and molybdenum disulphide onto polymeric surfaces films. The set made up of polymer and flakes is fabricated by using a hot-press machine called polymeric stamp. The polymeric stamp was used to allocate flakes and also to allow the exfoliation process to take place just in one face of isolated flake. Optical microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy results showed that multilayers, bilayers and single layers of graphene and MoS2 were obtained by using a polymeric stamp as tool for micromechanical exfoliation. These crystals were more easily found because the exfoliation process concentrates them in well-defined locations. The results prove the effectiveness of the method by embedding two-dimensional materials into polymers to fabricate fewer layers crystals in a fast, economic and clean way.

  18. Experiment feedbacks in micromechanics modeling of thermomechanical behaviour of SMA polycrystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šittner, Petr; Novák, Václav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 51, - (2004), s. 321-326 ISSN 1359-6462 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1048107; GA ČR GA202/04/2016 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : shape memory alloys (SMA) * martensitic phase transformation * micromechanical modeling * neutron diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.112, year: 2004

  19. Materials selection in micromechanical design: an application of the Ashby approach

    OpenAIRE

    Srikar, V.T.; Spearing, S.M.

    2003-01-01

    The set of materials available to microsystems designers is rapidly expanding. Techniques now exist to introduce and integrate a large number of metals, alloys, ceramics, glasses, polymers, and elastomers into microsystems, motivating the need for a rational approach for materials selection in microsystems design. As a step toward such an approach, we focus on the initial stages of materials selection for micromechanical structures with minimum feature sizes greater than 1 /spl mu/m. The vari...

  20. Micromechanisms of fracture and fatigue in Ti3Al based and TiAl based intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, A.W.; Chave, R.A.; Hippsley, C.A.; Bowen, P.

    1993-01-01

    Micromechanisms of fracture and fatigue crack growth resistance in specific Ti 3 Al based and TiAl based intermetallics are reviewed. Effects of test temperature, environment and microstructure on crack growth resistance are considered in detail for several Ti 3 Al and Ti'Al based intermetallic systems under development. The implications of these studies for the structural reliability of these materials is also addressed briefly. (orig.)

  1. Micromechanics model for predicting anisotropic electrical conductivity of carbon fiber composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Mohammad Faisal; Haider, Md. Mushfique; Yasmeen, Farzana

    2016-07-01

    Heterogeneous materials, such as composites consist of clearly distinguishable constituents (or phases) that show different electrical properties. Multifunctional composites have anisotropic electrical properties that can be tailored for a particular application. The effective anisotropic electrical conductivity of composites is strongly affected by many parameters including volume fractions, distributions, and orientations of constituents. Given the electrical properties of the constituents, one important goal of micromechanics of materials consists of predicting electrical response of the heterogeneous material on the basis of the geometries and properties of the individual phases, a task known as homogenization. The benefit of homogenization is that the behavior of a heterogeneous material can be determined without resorting or testing it. Furthermore, continuum micromechanics can predict the full multi-axial properties and responses of inhomogeneous materials, which are anisotropic in nature. Effective electrical conductivity estimation is performed by using classical micromechanics techniques (composite cylinder assemblage method) that investigates the effect of the fiber/matrix electrical properties and their volume fractions on the micro scale composite response. The composite cylinder assemblage method (CCM) is an analytical theory that is based on the assumption that composites are in a state of periodic structure. The CCM was developed to extend capabilities variable fiber shape/array availability with same volume fraction, interphase analysis, etc. The CCM is a continuum-based micromechanics model that provides closed form expressions for upper level length scales such as macro-scale composite responses in terms of the properties, shapes, orientations and constituent distributions at lower length levels such as the micro-scale.

  2. Activation barrier scaling and crossover for noise-induced switching in micromechanical parametric oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, H B; Stambaugh, C

    2007-08-10

    We explore fluctuation-induced switching in parametrically driven micromechanical torsional oscillators. The oscillators possess one, two, or three stable attractors depending on the modulation frequency. Noise induces transitions between the coexisting attractors. Near the bifurcation points, the activation barriers are found to have a power law dependence on frequency detuning with critical exponents that are in agreement with predicted universal scaling relationships. At large detuning, we observe a crossover to a different power law dependence with an exponent that is device specific.

  3. Influence of ceramic thickness and type on micromechanical properties of light-cured adhesive bonding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Elif; Bolay, Sükran; Hickel, Reinhard; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the micromechanical properties of different adhesive bonding agents when polymerized through ceramics. Sixty sound extracted human third molars were selected and the crowns were sectioned perpendicular to the long axis in order to obtain dentin slices to be bonded with one of the following adhesives: Syntac/Heliobond (Ivoclar-Vivadent) or Adper-Scotchbond-1XT (3M-ESPE). The adhesives were cured by using a LED-unit (Bluephase®, Ivoclar Vivadent) with three different curing times (10 s, 20 s and 30 s) under two ceramics (IPS-e.max-Press, Ivoclar-Vivadent; IPS-Empress®CAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent) of different thicknesses (0 mm, 0.75 mm, 2 mm). Thirty groups were included, each containing 60 measurements. Micromechanical properties (Hardness, HV; indentation modulus, E; and creep, Cr) of the adhesives were measured with an automatic microhardness indenter (Fisherscope H100C, Germany). Data were statistically analyzed by using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test, as well as a multivariate analysis to test the influence of the study parameters (SPSS 18.0). Significant differences were observed between the micromechanical properties of the adhesives (p ceramic type showed the highest effect on HV (Partial-eta squared (η(2)) = 0.109) of the tested adhesives, while E (η(2) = 0.275) and Cr (η(2) = 0.194) were stronger influenced by the adhesive type. Ceramic thickness showed no effect on the E and Cr of the adhesives. The adhesive bonding agents used in this study performed well by curing through different thicknesses of ceramics. The micromechanical properties of the adhesives were determined by the adhesive type and were less influenced by ceramic type and curing time.

  4. Ultrafast Hydro-Micromechanical Synthesis of Calcium Zincate: Structural and Morphological Characterizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Caldeira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium zincate is a compound with a large panel of application: mainly known as an advantageous replacement of zinc oxide in negative electrodes for air-zinc or nickel-zinc batteries, it is also used as precursor catalyst in biodiesel synthesis and as antifungal compound for the protection of limestone monuments. However, its synthesis is not optimized yet. In this study, it was elaborated using an ultrafast synthesis protocol: Hydro-Micromechanical Synthesis. Two other synthesis methods, Hydrochemical Synthesis and Hydrothermal Synthesis, were used for comparison. In all cases, the as-synthesized samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and LASER diffraction particle size analysis. Rietveld method was used to refine various structural parameters and obtain an average crystallite size, on a Hydro-Micromechanical submicronic sample. X-ray single crystal structure determination was performed on a crystal obtained by Hydrochemical Synthesis. It has been shown that regardless of the synthesis protocol, the prepared samples always crystallize in the same crystal lattice, with P21/c space group and only differ from their macroscopic textural parameters. Nevertheless, only the Hydro-Micromechanical method is industrially scalable and enables a precise control of the textural parameters of the obtained calcium zincate.

  5. Micromechanics-Based Structural Analysis (FEAMAC) and Multiscale Visualization within Abaqus/CAE Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Hussain, Aquila; Katiyar, Vivek

    2010-01-01

    A unified framework is presented that enables coupled multiscale analysis of composite structures and associated graphical pre- and postprocessing within the Abaqus/CAE environment. The recently developed, free, Finite Element Analysis--Micromechanics Analysis Code (FEAMAC) software couples NASA's Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC) with Abaqus/Standard and Abaqus/Explicit to perform micromechanics based FEA such that the nonlinear composite material response at each integration point is modeled at each increment by MAC/GMC. The Graphical User Interfaces (FEAMAC-Pre and FEAMAC-Post), developed through collaboration between SIMULIA Erie and the NASA Glenn Research Center, enable users to employ a new FEAMAC module within Abaqus/CAE that provides access to the composite microscale. FEA IAC-Pre is used to define and store constituent material properties, set-up and store composite repeating unit cells, and assign composite materials as sections with all data being stored within the CAE database. Likewise FEAMAC-Post enables multiscale field quantity visualization (contour plots, X-Y plots), with point and click access to the microscale i.e., fiber and matrix fields).

  6. Contraceptive failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, Vibeke

    2002-01-01

    Most studies focusing on contraceptive failure in relation to pregnancy have focused on contraceptive failure among women having induced abortions, thereby neglecting those women who, despite contraceptive failure, accept the pregnancy and intend to carry the fetus to term. To get a more complete...... picture of the problem of contraceptive failure, this study focuses on contraceptive failure among women with diverse pregnancy outcomes. In all, 3520 pregnant women attending Odense University Hospital were included: 373 had induced abortions, 435 had spontaneous abortions, 97 had ectopic pregnancies......, and 2614 received antenatal care. The variables studied comprise age, partner relationship, number of births, occupational and economical situation, and contraceptive use.Contraceptive failure, defined as contraceptive use (condom, diaphragm, IUD, oral contraception, or another modern method...

  7. Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    McMurray, John; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Heart failure occurs in 3% to 4% of adults aged over 65 years, usually as a consequence of coronary artery disease or hypertension, and causes breathlessness, effort intolerance, fluid retention, and increased mortality. The 5-year mortality in people with systolic heart failure ranges from 25% to 75%, often owing to sudden death following ventricular arrhythmia. Risks of cardiovascular events are increased in people with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) or heart failure.

  8. Deformation, Failure, and Fatigue Life of SiC/Ti-15-3 Laminates Accurately Predicted by MAC/GMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center's Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC) (ref.1) has been extended to enable fully coupled macro-micro deformation, failure, and fatigue life predictions for advanced metal matrix, ceramic matrix, and polymer matrix composites. Because of the multiaxial nature of the code's underlying micromechanics model, GMC--which allows the incorporation of complex local inelastic constitutive models--MAC/GMC finds its most important application in metal matrix composites, like the SiC/Ti-15-3 composite examined here. Furthermore, since GMC predicts the microscale fields within each constituent of the composite material, submodels for local effects such as fiber breakage, interfacial debonding, and matrix fatigue damage can and have been built into MAC/GMC. The present application of MAC/GMC highlights the combination of these features, which has enabled the accurate modeling of the deformation, failure, and life of titanium matrix composites.

  9. A Simplified Micromechanical Modeling Approach to Predict the Tensile Flow Curve Behavior of Dual-Phase Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Tarun; Kumar, B. Ravi; Singh, Vishal

    2017-11-01

    Micromechanical modeling is used to predict material's tensile flow curve behavior based on microstructural characteristics. This research develops a simplified micromechanical modeling approach for predicting flow curve behavior of dual-phase steels. The existing literature reports on two broad approaches for determining tensile flow curve of these steels. The modeling approach developed in this work attempts to overcome specific limitations of the existing two approaches. This approach combines dislocation-based strain-hardening method with rule of mixtures. In the first step of modeling, `dislocation-based strain-hardening method' was employed to predict tensile behavior of individual phases of ferrite and martensite. In the second step, the individual flow curves were combined using `rule of mixtures,' to obtain the composite dual-phase flow behavior. To check accuracy of proposed model, four distinct dual-phase microstructures comprising of different ferrite grain size, martensite fraction, and carbon content in martensite were processed by annealing experiments. The true stress-strain curves for various microstructures were predicted with the newly developed micromechanical model. The results of micromechanical model matched closely with those of actual tensile tests. Thus, this micromechanical modeling approach can be used to predict and optimize the tensile flow behavior of dual-phase steels.

  10. Corrosion failure analysis as related to prevention of corrosion failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suss, H.

    1977-10-01

    The factors and conditions which have contributed to many of the corrosion related service failures are discussed based on a review of actual case histories. The anti-corrosion devices which developed as a result of these failure analyses are reviewed, and the method which must be adopted and used to take advantage of the available corrosion prevention techniques is discussed

  11. Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other diseases. Chronic diseases — such as diabetes, HIV, hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, or a buildup of iron (hemochromatosis) or ... transplantation or support with a ventricular assist device. Prevention The key to preventing heart failure is to ...

  12. Failure analysis of buried tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, R.K.

    1994-01-01

    Failure of a buried tank can be hazardous. Failure may be a leak through which product is lost from the tank; but also through which contamination can occur. Failures are epidemic -- because buried tanks are out of sight, but also because designers of buried tanks have adopted analyses developed for pressure tanks. So why do pressure tanks fail when they are buried? Most failures of buried tanks are really soil failures. Soil compresses, or slips, or liquefies. Soil is not only a load, it is a support without which the tank deforms. A high water table adds to the load on the tank. It also reduces the strength of the soil. Based on tests, structural analyses are proposed for empty tanks buried in soils of various quality, with the water table at various levels, and with internal vacuum. Failure may be collapse tank. Such collapse is a sudden, audible inversion of the cylinder when the sidefill soil slips. Failure may be flotation. Failure may be a leak. Most leaks are fractures in the welds in overlap seams at flat spots. Flat spots are caused by a hard bedding or a heavy surface wheel load. Because the tank wall is double thick at the overlap, shearing stress in the weld is increased. Other weld failures occur when an end plate shears down past a cylinder; or when the tank is supported only at its ends like a beam. These, and other, failures can be analyzed with justifiable accuracy using basic principles of mechanics of materials. 10 figs

  13. Relations between morphology and micromechanical properties of alpha, beta and gamma phases of iPP

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šlouf, Miroslav; Pavlova, Ewa; Krejčíková, Sabina; Ostafinska, Aleksandra; Zhigunov, Alexander; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Sowinski, P.; Piorkowska, E.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 67, May (2018), s. 522-532 ISSN 0142-9418 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV15-31269A; GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) PAN-17-18 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:68081731 Keywords : polypropylene * gamma-phase * micromechanical properties Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry; JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering (UPT-D) OBOR OECD: Polymer science; Electrical and electronic engineering (UPT-D) Impact factor: 2.464, year: 2016

  14. Blu-Ray-based micromechanical characterization platform for biopolymer degradation assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casci Ceccacci, Andrea; Chen, Ching-Hsiu; Hwu, En-Te

    2017-01-01

    Degradable biopolymers are used as carrier materials in drug delivery devices. A complete understanding of their degradation behaviour is thus crucial in the design of new delivery systems. Here we combine a reliable method, based on spray coated micromechanical resonators and a disposable...... microfluidic chip, to characterize biopolymer degradation under the action of enzymes in controlled flow condition. The sensing platform is based on the mechanics and optics from a Blu-Ray player, which automatically localize individual sensors within the array, and sequentially measure and record...

  15. Testing the permeability and corrosion resistance of micro-mechanically interlocked joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byskov-Nielsen, Jeppe; Holm, Allan Hjarbæk; Højsholt, Rune

    2011-01-01

    Micro-mechanical interlocking (MMI) can be applied to create new and interesting composite materials. We have employed laser structuring to achieve MMI between stainless steel and plastic with extremely high joint strength. However, the water permeability and corrosion resistance of the joint must...... is conducted. The permeability seems to be consistent with the Hagen–Poiseuille equation independent of the laser structuring technique and is orders of magnitudes larger than the diffusion rate through the plastic. Two different types of corrosion tests have been undertaken, and we show that care must...... be taken in order not to degrade the corrosion resistance of the sample to an unacceptable level....

  16. Micromechanical Characterization of Complex Polypropylene Morphologies by HarmoniX AFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Liparoti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the capability of the HarmoniX Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM technique to draw accurate and reliable micromechanical characterization of complex polymer morphologies generally found in conventional thermoplastic polymers. To that purpose, injection molded polypropylene samples, containing representative morphologies, have been characterized by HarmoniX AFM. Mapping and distributions of mechanical properties of the samples surface are determined and analyzed. Effects of sample preparation and test conditions are also analyzed. Finally, the AFM determination of surface elastic moduli has been compared with that obtained by indentation tests, finding good agreement among the results.

  17. Temperature effect on crack resistance and fracture micromechanisms in tungsten-copper pseudoalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babak, A.V.; Gopkalo, E.E.; Krasovskij, A.Ya.; Nadezhdin, G.N.; Uskov, E.I.

    1988-01-01

    Results of the mechanical- and-physical study of peculiarities of the tungsten-copper pseudoalloy fracture in the temperature range of 293-2273 K are presented. It is shown that the studied material possesses maximum crack resistance in the vicinity of the upper temperature range boundary of the ductile-brittle transition and minimum resistance to cracks propagation when it contains melted copper. It is established that the peculiarities of changes in crack-resistance correspond to peculiarities of fracture micromechanisms for tungsten-copper pseudoalloy in the studied tempearture range

  18. Quantifying the Micromechanical Effects of Variable Cement in Granular Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, Laurel B.; Boutt David F.

    2010-02-18

    The mechanical and hydrologic behavior of clastic rocks and sediments is fundamentally controlled by variables such as grain size and shape, sorting, grain and cement mineralogy, porosity, and %cement - parameters that are not used directly in field-scale models of coupled flow and deformation. To improve our understanding of the relationship between these micromechanical properties and bulk behavior we focused on (1) relating detailed, quantitative characterization of the grain-pore systems to both hydrologic and mechanical properties of a suite of variably quartz-cemented quartz arenite samples and (2) the use of a combination of discrete element method (DEM) and poroelastic models parameterized by data from the natural samples to isolate and compare the influence of changes in the mechanical and hydrologic properties of granular porous media due to changes in degree of cementation. Quartz overgrowths, the most common form of authigenic cements in sandstones, are responsible for significant porosity and permeability reduction. The distribution of quartz overgrowths is controlled by available pore space and the crystallographic orientations of individual quartz grains. Study of the St. Peter Sandstone allowed evaluation of the relative effects of quartz cementation and compaction on final grain and pore morphology, showing that progressive quartz cementation modifies the grain framework in consistent, predictable ways. Detailed microstructural characterization and multiple regression analyses show that with progressive diagenesis, the number and length of grain contacts increases as the number of pores increases, the number of large, well-connected pores decreases, and pores become rounder. These changes cause a decrease in pore size variability that leads to a decrease in bulk permeability and both stiffening and strengthening of the grain framework. The consistent nature of these changes allows us to predict variations in hydrologic and mechanical properties

  19. Micromechanical analysis on anisotropy of structured magneto-rheological elastomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, R; Zhang, Z; Wang, X J; Chen, S W

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the equivalent elastic modulus of structured magneto-rheological elastomer (MRE) in the absence of magnetic field. We assume that both matrix and ferromagnetic particles are linear elastic materials, and ferromagnetic particles are embedded in matrix with layer-like structure. The structured composite could be divided into matrix layer and reinforced layer, in which the reinforced layer is composed of matrix and the homogenously distributed ferromagnetic particles in matrix. The equivalent elastic modulus of reinforced layer is analysed by the Mori-Tanaka method. Finite Element Method (FEM) is also carried out to illustrate the relationship between the elastic modulus and the volume fraction of ferromagnetic particles. The results show that the anisotropy of elastic modulus becomes noticeable, as the volume fraction of particles increases. (paper)

  20. Mechanical design and force calibration of dual-axis micromechanical probe for friction force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuzawa, Kenji; Terada, Satoshi; Shikida, Mitsuhiro; Amakawa, Hiroaki; Zhang, Hedong; Mitsuya, Yasunaga

    2007-01-01

    A dual-axis micromechanical probe that combines a double cantilever and torsion beams is presented. This probe can reduce the mechanical cross-talk between the lateral and vertical force detections. In addition, dual-axis forces can be detected by measuring the dual-axis displacement of the probe end using the optical lever-based method used in conventional friction force microscopes (FFMs). In this paper, the mechanical design of the probe, the details of the fabrication method, FFM performance, and calibration of the friction force are discussed. The mechanical design and the microfabrication method for probes that can provide a force resolution of the order of 1 nN without mechanical cross-talk are presented. Calibration of the lateral force signal is possible by using the relationship between the lateral force and the piezodisplacement at the onset of the probe scanning. The micromechanical probe enables simultaneous and independent detection of atomic and friction forces. This leads to accurate investigation of nanotribological phenomena and visualization of the distribution of the friction properties, which helps the identification of the material properties

  1. A micromechanical interpretation of the temperature dependence of Beremin model parameters for French RPV steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathieu, Jean-Philippe; Inal, Karim; Berveiller, Sophie; Diard, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Local approach to brittle fracture for low-alloyed steels is discussed in this paper. A bibliographical introduction intends to highlight general trends and consensual points of the topic and evokes debatable aspects. French RPV steel 16MND5 (equ. ASTM A508 Cl.3), is then used as a model material to study the influence of temperature on brittle fracture. A micromechanical modelling of brittle fracture at the elementary volume scale already used in previous work is then recalled. It involves a multiscale modelling of microstructural plasticity which has been tuned on experimental inter-phase and inter-granular stresses heterogeneities measurements. Fracture probability of the elementary volume can then be computed using a randomly attributed defect size distribution based on realistic carbides repartition. This defect distribution is then deterministically correlated to stress heterogeneities simulated within the microstructure using a weakest-link hypothesis on the elementary volume, which results in a deterministic stress to fracture. Repeating the process allows to compute Weibull parameters on the elementary volume. This tool is then used to investigate the physical mechanisms that could explain the already experimentally observed temperature dependence of Beremin's parameter for 16MND5 steel. It is showed that, assuming that the hypothesis made in this work about cleavage micro-mechanisms are correct, effective equivalent surface energy (i.e. surface energy plus plastically dissipated energy when blunting the crack tip) for propagating a crack has to be temperature dependent to explain Beremin's parameters temperature evolution.

  2. Micromechanical Behavior of Single-Crystal Superalloy with Different Crystal Orientations by Microindentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinghui Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the anisotropic micromechanical properties of single-crystal nickel-based superalloy DD99 of four crystallographic orientations, (001, (215, (405, and (605, microindentation test (MIT was conducted with different loads and loading velocities by a sharp Berkovich indenter. Some material parameters reflecting the micromechanical behavior of DD99, such as microhardness H, Young’s modulus E, yield stress σy, strain hardening component n, and tensile strength σb, can be obtained from load-displacement relations. H and E of four different crystal planes evidently decrease with the increase of h. The reduction of H is due to dislocation hardening while E is related to interplanar spacing and crystal variable. σy of (215 is the largest among four crystal planes, followed by (605, and (001 has the lowest value. n of (215 is the lowest, followed by (605, and that of (001 is the largest. Subsequently, a simplified elastic-plastic material model was employed for 3D microindentation simulation of DD99 with various crystal orientations. The simulation results agreed well with experimental, which confirmed the accuracy of the simplified material model.

  3. Role of discrete intragranular slip on lattice rotations in polycrystalline Ni: Experimental and micromechanical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrin, C.; Berbenni, S.; Vehoff, H.; Berveiller, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a new micromechanical approach accounting for the discreteness of intragranular slip is used to derive the local misorientations in the case of plastically deformed polycrystalline nickel in uniaxial tension. This intragranular microstructure is characterized in particular single slip grains by atomic force microscopy measurements in the early stage of plastic deformation. The micromechanical modelling accounts for the individual grain size, the spatial distances between active slip bands and the magnitude of slip in bands. The slip bands are modelled using discrete distributions of circular super glide dislocation loops constrained at grain boundaries for a spherical grain boundary embedded in an infinite matrix. In contrast with classic mean field approaches based on Eshelby's plastic inclusion concept, the present model is able to capture different intragranular behaviours between near grain boundary regions and grain interiors. These theoretical results are quantitatively confirmed by local electron backscatter diffraction measurements regarding intragranular misorientation mapping with respect to a reference point in the centre of the grain.

  4. Micromechanics and statistics of slipping events in a granular seismic fault model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcangelis, L de [Department of Information Engineering and CNISM, Second University of Naples, Aversa (Italy); Ciamarra, M Pica [CNR-SPIN, Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II (Italy); Lippiello, E; Godano, C, E-mail: dearcangelis@na.infn.it [Department of Environmental Sciences and CNISM, Second University of Naples, Caserta (Italy)

    2011-09-15

    The stick-slip is investigated in a seismic fault model made of a confined granular system under shear stress via three dimensional Molecular Dynamics simulations. We study the statistics of slipping events and, in particular, the dependence of the distribution on model parameters. The distribution consistently exhibits two regimes: an initial power law and a bump at large slips. The initial power law decay is in agreement with the the Gutenberg-Richter law characterizing real seismic occurrence. The exponent of the initial regime is quite independent of model parameters and its value is in agreement with experimental results. Conversely, the position of the bump is solely controlled by the ratio of the drive elastic constant and the system size. Large slips also become less probable in absence of fault gouge and tend to disappear for stiff drives. A two-time force-force correlation function, and a susceptibility related to the system response to pressure changes, characterize the micromechanics of slipping events. The correlation function unveils the micromechanical changes occurring both during microslips and slips. The mechanical susceptibility encodes the magnitude of the incoming microslip. Numerical results for the cellular-automaton version of the spring block model confirm the parameter dependence observed for size distribution in the granular model.

  5. Radiation effects in concrete for nuclear power plants, Part II: Perspective from micromechanical modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Pape, Y., E-mail: lepapeym@ornl.gov; Field, K.G.; Remec, I.

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • A micromechanical model for irradiated concrete is proposed. • Confrontation with literature data is successful. • Neutron radiation-induced volumetric expansion is a predominant degradation mode. • The nature of the aggregate alters the severity of damage to irradiated concrete. - Abstract: The need to understand and characterize the effects of neutron irradiation on concrete has become urgent because of the possible extension of service life of many nuclear power generating stations. Current knowledge is primarily based on a collection of data obtained in test reactors. These data are inherently difficult to interpret because materials and testing conditions are inconsistent. A micromechanical approach based on the Hashin composite sphere model is presented to derive a first-order separation of the effects of radiation on cement paste and aggregate, and, also, on their interaction. Although the scarcity of available data limits the validation of the model, it appears that, without negating a possible gamma-ray induced effect, the neutron-induced damage and swelling of aggregate plays a predominant role on the overall concrete expansion and the damage of the cement paste. The radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE) effects can also be aided by temperature elevation and shrinkage in the cement paste.

  6. Radiation effects in concrete for nuclear power plants, Part II: Perspective from micromechanical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Pape, Y.; Field, K.G.; Remec, I.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A micromechanical model for irradiated concrete is proposed. • Confrontation with literature data is successful. • Neutron radiation-induced volumetric expansion is a predominant degradation mode. • The nature of the aggregate alters the severity of damage to irradiated concrete. - Abstract: The need to understand and characterize the effects of neutron irradiation on concrete has become urgent because of the possible extension of service life of many nuclear power generating stations. Current knowledge is primarily based on a collection of data obtained in test reactors. These data are inherently difficult to interpret because materials and testing conditions are inconsistent. A micromechanical approach based on the Hashin composite sphere model is presented to derive a first-order separation of the effects of radiation on cement paste and aggregate, and, also, on their interaction. Although the scarcity of available data limits the validation of the model, it appears that, without negating a possible gamma-ray induced effect, the neutron-induced damage and swelling of aggregate plays a predominant role on the overall concrete expansion and the damage of the cement paste. The radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE) effects can also be aided by temperature elevation and shrinkage in the cement paste

  7. Fiber Temperature Sensor Based on Micro-mechanical Membranes and Optical Interference Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yueming; Tian Weijian; Hua Jing

    2011-01-01

    A novel fiber temperature sensor is presented theoretically and experimentally in this paper. Its working principle is based on Optical Fabry-Perot interference structure that is formed between a polished optical fiber end and micro-mechanical Bi-layered membranes. When ambient temperature is varying, Bi-layered membranes will be deflected and the length of Fabry-Perot cavity will be changed correspondingly. By detecting the reflecting optical intensity from the Fabry-Perot cavity, the ambient temperature can be measured. Using finite element software ANSYS, the sensor structure was optimized based on optical Interference theory and Bi-layered membranes thermal expansion theory, and theoretical characteristics was simulated by computer software. In the end, using optical fiber 2x2 coupler and photo-electrical detector, the fabricated sample sensor was tested successfully by experiment that demonstrating above theoretical analysis and simulation results. This sensor has some favorable features, such as: micro size owing to its micro-mechanical structure, high sensitivity owing to its working Fabry-Perot interference cavity structure, and optical integration character by using optical fiber techniques.

  8. Micromechanical modeling of stress-induced strain in polycrystalline Ni–Mn–Ga by directional solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Yuping; Shi, Tao; Teng, Yao

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A micromechanical model of directional solidification Ni–Mn–Ga is developed. • The stress–strain curves in different directions are tested. • The martensite Young’s moduli in different directions are predicted. • The macro reorientation strains in different directions are investigated. - Abstract: Polycrystalline ferromagnetic shape memory alloy Ni–Mn–Ga produced by directional solidification possess unique properties. Its compressive stress–strain behaviors in loading–unloading cycle show nonlinear and anisotropic. Based on the self-consistent theory and thermodynamics principle, a micromechanical constitutive model of polycrystalline Ni–Mn–Ga by directional solidification is developed considering the generating mechanism of the macroscopic strain and anisotropy. Then, the stress induced strains at different angles to solidification direction are calculated, and the results agree well with the experimental data. The predictive curves of martensite Young’s modulus and macro reorientation strain in different directions are investigated. It may provide theoretical guidance for the design and use of ferromagnetic shape memory alloy

  9. Three-dimensional microstructure-based micromechanical modeling for TC6 titanium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guoju; Shi, Ran [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Materials Under Shock and Impact, Beijing 100081 (China); Fan, Qunbo, E-mail: fanqunbo@bit.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Materials Under Shock and Impact, Beijing 100081 (China); Xia, Yumeng; Zhang, Hongmei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Materials Under Shock and Impact, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2017-02-08

    A new in-depth evaluation of the micromechanical response of TC6 (Ti–6Al–1.5Cr–2.5Mo–0.5Fe–0.3Si) titanium alloy subjected to uniaxial tensile loading is performed based on micromechanical modeling. This evaluation includes reconstruction of the three-dimensional annealed microstructure (annealing at 800 °C for 2 h, then air cooled) of the alloy via dual-energy micro-computed tomography. In addition, constitutive relations of the constituent phases were determined via synchrotron-based in-situ high-energy X-ray diffraction and a self-consistent model as well as nanoindentation tests combined with finite element modeling. The results revealed that the stress concentration was translated from the primary α phase to the secondary α phase, then to the β phase. Moreover, the stress generated was re-transferred to the primary α phase when the strain was increased from 0.00 to 0.05. This transfer is indicative of crack initiation in the primary α grains.

  10. Analysis of Fiber Clustering in Composite Materials Using High-Fidelity Multiscale Micromechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Arnold, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    A new multiscale micromechanical approach is developed for the prediction of the behavior of fiber reinforced composites in presence of fiber clustering. The developed method is based on a coupled two-scale implementation of the High-Fidelity Generalized Method of Cells theory, wherein both the local and global scales are represented using this micromechanical method. Concentration tensors and effective constitutive equations are established on both scales and linked to establish the required coupling, thus providing the local fields throughout the composite as well as the global properties and effective nonlinear response. Two nondimensional parameters, in conjunction with actual composite micrographs, are used to characterize the clustering of fibers in the composite. Based on the predicted local fields, initial yield and damage envelopes are generated for various clustering parameters for a polymer matrix composite with both carbon and glass fibers. Nonlinear epoxy matrix behavior is also considered, with results in the form of effective nonlinear response curves, with varying fiber clustering and for two sets of nonlinear matrix parameters.

  11. Failure Modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, K. P.; Burcharth, H. F.; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    1999-01-01

    The present appendix contains the derivation of ten different limit state equations divided on three different failure modes. Five of the limit state equations can be used independently of the characteristics of the subsoil, whereas the remaining five can be used for either drained or undrained s...

  12. Contact damage and fracture micromechanisms of multilayered TiN/CrN coatings at micro- and nano-length scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roa, J.J.; Jiménez-Piqué, E.; Martínez, R.; Ramírez, G.; Tarragó, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, systematic nanomechanical and micromechanical studies have been conducted in three multilayer TiN/CrN systems with different bilayer periods (8, 19 and 25 nm). Additionally, experimental work has been performed on corresponding TiN and CrN single layers, for comparison purposes. The investigation includes the use of different indenter tip geometries as well as contact loading conditions (i.e. indentation/scratch) such to induce different stress field and damage scenarios within the films. The surface and subsurface damage under the different indentation imprints and scratch tracks have been observed by atomic force microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and focused ion beam. Multilayer TiN/CrN coated systems are found to exhibit higher adhesion strength (under sliding contact load) and cracking resistance (under spherical indentation) than those coated with reference TiN and CrN monolayers. The main reason behind these findings is the effective development of microstructurally-driven deformation and cracking resistant micromechanisms: rotation of columnar grains (and associated distortion of bilayer period) and crack deflection of interlayer thickness length scale, respectively. - Highlights: • Nanomechanical and micromechanical study in TiN/CrN systems • TiN/CrN coated systems exhibit higher adhesion strength and cracking resistance. • Main deformation and cracking micromechanisms: columnar grain rotation and crack deflection

  13. Contact damage and fracture micromechanisms of multilayered TiN/CrN coatings at micro- and nano-length scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roa, J.J., E-mail: joan.josep.roa@upc.edu [CIEFMA — Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Eng. Metallúrgica, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); CRnE, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, C. Pasqual i Vila 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Jiménez-Piqué, E. [CIEFMA — Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Eng. Metallúrgica, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); CRnE, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, C. Pasqual i Vila 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Martínez, R. [Centro de Ingeniería Avanzada de Superfícies, Asociación de la Industria Navarra — AIN, Crta. Pamplona, 1, Edificio AIN, 31191 Cordovilla (Spain); Ramírez, G. [CIEFMA — Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Eng. Metallúrgica, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fundació CTM Centre Tecnològic, Avda. Bases de Manresa 1, 08243 Manresa (Spain); Tarragó, J.M. [CIEFMA — Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Eng. Metallúrgica, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); CRnE, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, C. Pasqual i Vila 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); and others

    2014-11-28

    In this study, systematic nanomechanical and micromechanical studies have been conducted in three multilayer TiN/CrN systems with different bilayer periods (8, 19 and 25 nm). Additionally, experimental work has been performed on corresponding TiN and CrN single layers, for comparison purposes. The investigation includes the use of different indenter tip geometries as well as contact loading conditions (i.e. indentation/scratch) such to induce different stress field and damage scenarios within the films. The surface and subsurface damage under the different indentation imprints and scratch tracks have been observed by atomic force microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and focused ion beam. Multilayer TiN/CrN coated systems are found to exhibit higher adhesion strength (under sliding contact load) and cracking resistance (under spherical indentation) than those coated with reference TiN and CrN monolayers. The main reason behind these findings is the effective development of microstructurally-driven deformation and cracking resistant micromechanisms: rotation of columnar grains (and associated distortion of bilayer period) and crack deflection of interlayer thickness length scale, respectively. - Highlights: • Nanomechanical and micromechanical study in TiN/CrN systems • TiN/CrN coated systems exhibit higher adhesion strength and cracking resistance. • Main deformation and cracking micromechanisms: columnar grain rotation and crack deflection.

  14. Micromechanical Time-Lapse X-ray CT Study of Fatigue Damage in Uni-Directional Fibre Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Kristine Munk; Lowe, Tristan; Withers, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    . The geometry of the cut-out is similar to that which will be used in the time-lapse study. As the micro-mechanical damage mechanisms are small features, it is necessary to obtain a high scan resolution which sets a limit to how large the field of view can be. Therefore, it is necessary to perform several scans...

  15. Skin friction under pressure. The role of micromechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva-Mendivil, Maria F.; Lengiewicz, Jakub; Limbert, Georges

    2018-03-01

    The role of contact pressure on skin friction has been documented in multiple experimental studies. Skin friction significantly raises in the low-pressure regime as load increases while, after a critical pressure value is reached, the coefficient of friction of skin against an external surface becomes mostly insensitive to contact pressure. However, up to now, no study has elucidated the qualitative and quantitative nature of the interplay between contact pressure, the material and microstructural properties of the skin, the size of an indenting slider and the resulting measured macroscopic coefficient of friction. A mechanistic understanding of these aspects is essential for guiding the rational design of products intended to interact with the skin through optimally-tuned surface and/or microstructural properties. Here, an anatomically-realistic 2D multi-layer finite element model of the skin was embedded within a computational contact homogenisation procedure. The main objective was to investigate the sensitivity of macroscopic skin friction to the parameters discussed above, in addition to the local (i.e. microscopic) coefficient of friction defined at skin asperity level. This was accomplished via the design of a large-scale computational experiment featuring 312 analyses. Results confirmed the potentially major role of finite deformations of skin asperities on the resulting macroscopic friction. This effect was shown to be modulated by the level of contact pressure and relative size of skin surface asperities compared to those of a rigid slider. The numerical study also corroborated experimental observations concerning the existence of two contact pressure regimes where macroscopic friction steeply and non-linearly increases up to a critical value, and then remains approximately constant as pressure increases further. The proposed computational modelling platform offers attractive features which are beyond the reach of current analytical models of skin

  16. Improvement of interfacial adhesion and nondestructive damage evaluation for plasma-treated PBO and Kevlar fibers/epoxy composites using micromechanical techniques and surface wettability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joung-Man; Kim, Dae-Sik; Kim, Sung-Ryong

    2003-08-15

    Comparison of interfacial properties and microfailure mechanisms of oxygen-plasma treated poly(p-phenylene-2,6-benzobisoxazole (PBO, Zylon) and poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide) (PPTA, Kevlar) fibers/epoxy composites were investigated using a micromechanical technique and nondestructive acoustic emission (AE). The interfacial shear strength (IFSS) and work of adhesion, Wa, of PBO or Kevlar fiber/epoxy composites increased with oxygen-plasma treatment, due to induced hydrogen and covalent bondings at their interface. Plasma-treated Kevlar fiber showed the maximum critical surface tension and polar term, whereas the untreated PBO fiber showed the minimum values. The work of adhesion and the polar term were proportional to the IFSS directly for both PBO and Kevlar fibers. The microfibril fracture pattern of two plasma-treated fibers appeared obviously. Unlike in slow cooling, in rapid cooling, case kink band and kicking in PBO fiber appeared, whereas buckling in the Kevlar fiber was observed mainly due to compressive and residual stresses. Based on the propagation of microfibril failure toward the core region, the number of AE events for plasma-treated PBO and Kevlar fibers increased significantly compared to the untreated case. The results of nondestructive AE were consistent with microfailure modes.

  17. Self-Sensing of Single Carbon Fiber/Carbon Nanotube-Epoxy Composites Using Electro-Micromechanical Techniques and Acoustic Emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Joung Man; Jang, Jung Hoon; Wang, Zuo Jia; Kwon, Dong Jun; Park, Jong Kyu; Lee, Woo Il

    2010-01-01

    Self-sensing on micro-failure, dispersion degree and relating properties, of carbon nanotube(CNT)/epoxy composites, were investigated using wettability, electro-micromechanical technique with acoustic emission(AE). Specimens were prepared from neat epoxy as well as composites with untreated and acid-treated CNT. Degree of dispersion was evaluated comparatively by measuring volumetric electrical resistivity and its standard deviation. Apparent modulus containing the stress transfer was higher for acid-treated CNT composite than for the untreated case. Applied cyclic loading responded well for a single carbon fiber/CNT-epoxy composite by the change in contact resistivity. The interfacial shear strength between a single carbon fiber and CNT-epoxy, determined in a fiber pullout test, was lower than that between a single carbon fiber and neat epoxy. Regarding on micro-damage sensing using electrical resistivity measurement with AE, the stepwise increment in electrical resistivity was observed for a single carbon fiber/CNT-epoxy composite. On the other hand, electrical resistivity increased infinitely right after the first carbon fiber breaks for a single carbon fiber/neat epoxy composite. The occurrence of AE events of added CNT composites was much higher than the neat epoxy case, due to microfailure at the interfaces by added CNTs

  18. Lower head failure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempe, J.L.; Thinnes, G.L.; Allison, C.M.; Cronenberg, A.W.

    1991-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is sponsoring a lower vessel head research program to investigate plausible modes of reactor vessel failure in order to determine (a) which modes have the greatest likelihood of occurrence during a severe accident and (b) the range of core debris and accident conditions that lead to these failures. This paper presents the methodology and preliminary results of an investigation of reactor designs and thermodynamic conditions using analytic closed-form approximations to assess the important governing parameters in non-dimensional form. Preliminary results illustrate the importance of vessel and tube geometrical parameters, material properties, and external boundary conditions on predicting vessel failure. Thermal analyses indicate that steady-state temperature distributions will occur in the vessel within several hours, although the exact time is dependent upon vessel thickness. In-vessel tube failure is governed by the tube-to-debris mass ratio within the lower head, where most penetrations are predicted to fail if surrounded by molten debris. Melt penetration distance is dependent upon the effective flow diameter of the tube. Molten debris is predicted to penetrate through tubes with a larger effective flow diameter, such as a boiling water reactor (BWR) drain nozzle. Ex-vessel tube failure for depressurized reactor vessels is predicted to be more likely for a BWR drain nozzle penetration because of its larger effective diameter. At high pressures (between ∼0.1 MPa and ∼12 MPa) ex-vessel tube rupture becomes a dominant failure mechanism, although tube ejection dominates control rod guide tube failure at lower temperatures. However, tube ejection and tube rupture predictions are sensitive to the vessel and tube radial gap size and material coefficients of thermal expansion

  19. Types of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Introduction Types of Heart Failure Classes of Heart Failure Heart Failure in Children Advanced Heart Failure • Causes and ... and procedures related to heart disease and stroke. Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor Use these questions ...

  20. Classes of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Introduction Types of Heart Failure Classes of Heart Failure Heart Failure in Children Advanced Heart Failure • Causes and ... and Advanced HF • Tools and Resources • Personal Stories Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor Use these questions ...

  1. Seismic fragility analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostov, Marin

    2000-01-01

    In the last two decades there is increasing number of probabilistic seismic risk assessments performed. The basic ideas of the procedure for performing a Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) of critical structures (NUREG/CR-2300, 1983) could be used also for normal industrial and residential buildings, dams or other structures. The general formulation of the risk assessment procedure applied in this investigation is presented in Franzini, et al., 1984. The probability of failure of a structure for an expected lifetime (for example 50 years) can be obtained from the annual frequency of failure, β E determined by the relation: β E ∫[d[β(x)]/dx]P(flx)dx. β(x) is the annual frequency of exceedance of load level x (for example, the variable x may be peak ground acceleration), P(fI x) is the conditional probability of structure failure at a given seismic load level x. The problem leads to the assessment of the seismic hazard β(x) and the fragility P(fl x). The seismic hazard curves are obtained by the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis. The fragility curves are obtained after the response of the structure is defined as probabilistic and its capacity and the associated uncertainties are assessed. Finally the fragility curves are combined with the seismic loading to estimate the frequency of failure for each critical scenario. The frequency of failure due to seismic event is presented by the scenario with the highest frequency. The tools usually applied for probabilistic safety analyses of critical structures could relatively easily be adopted to ordinary structures. The key problems are the seismic hazard definitions and the fragility analyses. The fragility could be derived either based on scaling procedures or on the base of generation. Both approaches have been presented in the paper. After the seismic risk (in terms of failure probability) is assessed there are several approaches for risk reduction. Generally the methods could be classified in two groups. The

  2. Failure Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iorio, A.F.; Crespi, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    After ten years of operation at the Atucha I Nuclear Power Station a gear belonging to a pressurized heavy water reactor refuelling machine, failed. The gear box was used to operate the inlet-outlet heavy-water valve of the machine. Visual examination of the gear device showed an absence of lubricant and that several gear teeth were broken at the root. Motion was transmitted with a speed-reducing device with controlled adjustable times in order to produce a proper fitness of the valve closure. The aim of this paper is to discuss the results of the gear failure analysis in order to recommend the proper solution to prevent further failures. (Author)

  3. Fully coupled heat conduction and deformation analyses of nonlinear viscoelastic composites

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Kamran

    2012-05-01

    This study presents an integrated micromechanical model-finite element framework for analyzing coupled heat conduction and deformations of particle-reinforced composite structures. A simplified micromechanical model consisting of four sub-cells, i.e., one particle and three matrix sub-cells is formulated to obtain the effective thermomechanical properties and micro-macro field variables due to coupled heat conduction and nonlinear thermoviscoelastic deformation of a particulate composite that takes into account the dissipation of energy from the viscoelastic constituents. A time integration algorithm for simultaneously solving the equations that govern heat conduction and thermoviscoelastic deformations of isotropic homogeneous materials is developed. The algorithm is then integrated to the proposed micromechanical model. A significant temperature generation due to the dissipation effect in the viscoelastic matrix was observed when the composite body is subjected to cyclic mechanical loadings. Heat conduction due to the dissipation of the energy cannot be ignored in predicting the factual temperature and deformation fields within the composite structure, subjected to cyclic loading for a long period. A higher creep resistant matrix material or adding elastic particles can lower the temperature generation. Our analyses suggest that using particulate composites and functionally graded materials can reduce the heat generation due to energy dissipation. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Study of failure criterion applicable to elastic-plastic finite element analyses of wall-thinned pipes subjected to multi-axial loading. Case for groove type flaw under combined internal pressure and bending loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Kosuke; Meshii, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a failure criterion applicable to large-strain finite element analysis (FEA) results was studied to predict the limit bending load M_c of the groove shaped wall-thinned pipes, under combined internal pressure and bending load, that experienced cracking. In our previous studies, Meshii and Ito (2012) considered cracking of pipes with groove shaped flaw (small axial length δ_z in Fig. 1) was due to the plastic instability at the wall-thinned section and proposed the Domain Collapse Criterion (DCC). The DCC could predict M_c of cracking for small δ_z by comparing the von Mises stress σ_M_i_s_e_s with the true tensile strength σ_B. Because the discrepancy in prediction of the M_c in the case of cracking was within 15%, it was considered that the predictability was could be improved further. Thus, in this work, attempt was made to improve the accuracy of M_c prediction with a perspective that multi-axial stress state might affect this plastic instability at the wall-thinned section. As a result of examination of the various failure criteria based on multi-axial stress, it was confirmed that the limit bending load of the groove flawed pipe that experienced cracking in experiment (Hereafter, it was expressed 'flawed pipe that experienced cracking') could be predicted within 5% accuracy by applying Hill's plastic instability onset criterion (Hill, 1952) to the outer surface of the crack penetration section. The accuracy of the predicted limit bending load was improved from DCC's within 15% to within 5%. (author)

  5. Micromechanics of non-active clays in saturated state and DEM modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pagano Arianna Gea

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a conceptual micromechanical model for 1-D compression behaviour of non-active clays in saturated state. An experimental investigation was carried out on kaolin clay samples saturated with fluids of different pH and dielectric permittivity. The effect of pore fluid characteristics on one-dimensional compressibility behaviour of kaolin was investigated. A three dimensional Discrete Element Method (DEM was implemented in order to simulate the response of saturated kaolin observed during the experiments. A complex contact model was introduced, considering both the mechanical and physico-chemical microscopic interactions between clay particles. A simple analysis with spherical particles only was performed as a preliminary step in the DEM study in the elastic regime.

  6. Finite deformation of incompressible fiber-reinforced elastomers: A computational micromechanics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraleda, Joaquín; Segurado, Javier; LLorca, Javier

    2009-09-01

    The in-plane finite deformation of incompressible fiber-reinforced elastomers was studied using computational micromechanics. Composite microstructure was made up of a random and homogeneous dispersion of aligned rigid fibers within a hyperelastic matrix. Different matrices (Neo-Hookean and Gent), fibers (monodisperse or polydisperse, circular or elliptical section) and reinforcement volume fractions (10-40%) were analyzed through the finite element simulation of a representative volume element of the microstructure. A successive remeshing strategy was employed when necessary to reach the large deformation regime in which the evolution of the microstructure influences the effective properties. The simulations provided for the first time "quasi-exact" results of the in-plane finite deformation for this class of composites, which were used to assess the accuracy of the available homogenization estimates for incompressible hyperelastic composites.

  7. Multiscale mechanics of TRIP-assisted multiphase steels: II. Micromechanical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lani, F.; Furnemont, Q.; Van Rompaey, T.; Delannay, F.; Jacques, P.J.; Pardoen, T.

    2007-01-01

    The stress and strain partitioning between the different phases of transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP)-aided multiphase steels is evaluated using a mean field homogenization approach. The change of the austenite volume fraction under straining is predicted using a micromechanics-based criterion for the martensitic transformation adapted to the case of small, isolated, transforming austenite grains. The parameters of the model are identified from the mechanical response and transformation kinetics measured under uniaxial tension for two steels differing essentially by the austenite stability. The model is validated by comparing the predictions with tests performed under different loading conditions: pure shear, intermediate biaxial and equibiaxial. An analysis of the effect of the austenite stability on strength and ductility provides guidelines for optimizing properties according to the stress state

  8. Micromechanics approach to the magnetoelectric properties of laminate and fibrous piezoelectric/magnetostrictive composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Haitao; Zhou, L.M.

    2004-01-01

    We use a micromechanics approach to study the magnetoelectric (ME) properties of the piezoelectric/magnetostrictive composite with a 2-2 laminate structure and a 3-1 fibrous structure. It is found that the 3-1 composite has a higher ME coefficient than the 2-2 one, if the volume ratio of piezoelectric material is the same. The reason is that the 3-1 fibrous composite makes use of the longitudinal piezoelectric response and the piezoelectric voltage constant g 33 is 2-3 times that of g 31 . Generally, a smaller volume ratio of the piezoelectric material will generate a higher ME response. The tensile stress at the piezoelectric/magnetostrictive interface of the 3-1 fibrous composite, however, could be high enough to induce plastic deformation or microcracks, which leads to a ME coefficient lower than the theoretically predicted one

  9. Micromechanical performance of interfacial transition zone in fiber-reinforced cement matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharda, V.; Němeček, J.; Štemberk, P.

    2017-09-01

    The paper investigates microstructure, chemical composition and micromechanical behavior of an interfacial transition zone (ITZ) in steel fiber reinforced cement matrix. For this goal, a combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nanoindentation and elastic homogenization theory are used. The investigated sample of cement paste with dispersed reinforcement consists of cement CEM I 42,5R and a steel fiber TriTreg 50 mm. The microscopy revealed smaller portion of clinkers and larger porosity in the ITZ. Nanoindentation delivered decreased elastic modulus in comparison with cement bulk (67%) and the width of ITZ (∼ 40 μm). The measured properties served as input parameters for a simple two-scale model for elastic properties of the composite. Although, no major influence of ITZ properties on the composite elastic behavior was found, the findings about the ITZ reduced properties and its size can serve as input to other microstructural fracture based models.

  10. Simulation of micromechanical behavior of polycrystals: finite elements versus fast Fourier transforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, A; Lebensohn, R A

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we compare finite element and fast Fourier transform approaches for the prediction of the micromechanical behavior of polycrystals. Both approaches are full-field approaches and use the same visco-plastic single crystal constitutive law. We investigate the texture and the heterogeneity of the inter- and intragranular stress and strain fields obtained from the two models. Additionally, we also look into their computational performance. Two cases—rolling of aluminum and wire drawing of tungsten—are used to evaluate the predictions of the two models. Results from both the models are similar, when large grain distortions do not occur in the polycrystal. The finite element simulations were found to be highly computationally intensive, in comparison with the fast Fourier transform simulations. Figure 9 was corrected in this article on the 25 August 2009. The corrected electronic version is identical to the print version

  11. Characterization of metal additive manufacturing surfaces using synchrotron X-ray CT and micromechanical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantzos, C. A.; Cunningham, R. W.; Tari, V.; Rollett, A. D.

    2018-05-01

    Characterizing complex surface topologies is necessary to understand stress concentrations created by rough surfaces, particularly those made via laser power-bed additive manufacturing (AM). Synchrotron-based X-ray microtomography (μ XCT) of AM surfaces was shown to provide high resolution detail of surface features and near-surface porosity. Using the CT reconstructions to instantiate a micromechanical model indicated that surface notches and near-surface porosity both act as stress concentrators, while adhered powder carried little to no load. Differences in powder size distribution had no direct effect on the relevant surface features, nor on stress concentrations. Conventional measurements of surface roughness, which are highly influenced by adhered powder, are therefore unlikely to contain the information relevant to damage accumulation and crack initiation.

  12. Development of a micromechanical pitch-tunable grating with reflective/transmissive dual working modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Yi-Ting; Yuan, Wei-Zheng; Li, Tai-Ping; Yan, Bin

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a micromechanical pitch-tunable grating with the capability of working in both reflective and transmissive modes is developed by using the silicon-on-glass (SOG) process. At a voltage of 65 V, the grating period is measured to increase by 4.62%. A simple optical experiment is performed to demonstrate how the proposed grating works in both modes. Then, experiments to measure the change of the diffraction angle versus driving voltage in both reflective and transmissive modes are designed and carried out utilizing an area-arrayed charge-coupled device (CCD), and the results are in good agreement with the theoretical calculation. Discussions on the structural configuration and diffraction efficiency of the proposed grating are presented. The grating presented provides better flexibility in the design and development of application systems.

  13. A new micromechanical approach of micropolar continuum modeling for 2-D periodic cellular material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Niu; Jun Yan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new united approach to formulate the equivalent micropolar constitutive relation of two-dimensional (2-D) periodic cellular material to capture its non-local properties and to explain the size effects in its structural analysis. The new united approach takes both the displacement compatibility and the equilibrium of forces and moments into consideration, where Taylor series expansion of the displacement and rotation fields and the extended aver-aging procedure with an explicit enforcement of equilibrium are adopted in the micromechanical analysis of a unit cell. In numerical examples, the effective micropolar constants obtained in this paper and others derived in the literature are used for the equivalent micropolar continuum simulation of cellular solids. The solutions from the equivalent analysis are compared with the discrete simulation solutions of the cellu-lar solids. It is found that the micropolar constants developed in this paper give satisfying results of equivalent analysis for the periodic cellular material.

  14. Micromechanics of transformation fields in ageing linear viscoelastic composites: effects of phase dissolution or precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honorio, Tulio

    2017-11-01

    Transformation fields, in an affine formulation characterizing mechanical behavior, describe a variety of physical phenomena regardless their origin. Different composites, notably geomaterials, present a viscoelastic behavior, which is, in some cases of industrial interest, ageing, i.e. it evolves independently with respect to time and loading time. Here, a general formulation of the micromechanics of prestressed or prestrained composites in Ageing Linear Viscoelasticity (ALV) is presented. Emphasis is put on the estimation of effective transformation fields in ALV. The result generalizes Ageing Linear Thermo- and Poro-Viscoelasticity and it can be used in approaches coping with a phase transformation. Additionally, the results are extended to the case of locally transforming materials due to non-coupled dissolution and/or precipitation of a given (elastic or viscoelastic) phase. The estimations of locally transforming composites can be made with respect to different morphologies. As an application, estimations of the coefficient of thermal expansion of a hydrating alite paste are presented.

  15. Microstructural Heterogeneity in Native and Engineered Fibrocartilage Directs Micromechanics and Mechanobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Woojin M; Heo, Su-Jin; Driscoll, Tristan P; Delucca, John F; McLeod, Claire M; Smith, Lachlan J; Duncan, Randall L; Mauck, Robert L; Elliott, Dawn M

    2015-01-01

    Treatment strategies to address pathologies of fibrocartilaginous tissue are in part limited by an incomplete understanding of structure-function relationships in these load-bearing tissues. There is therefore a pressing need to develop microengineered tissue platforms that can recreate the highly inhomogeneous tissue microstructures that are known to influence mechanotransductive processes in normal and diseased tissue. Here, we report the quantification of proteoglycan-rich microdomains in developing, aging, and diseased fibrocartilaginous tissues, and the impact of these microdomains on endogenous cell responses to physiologic deformation within a native-tissue context. We also developed a method to generate heterogeneous tissue engineered constructs (hetTECs) with microscale non-fibrous proteoglycan-rich microdomains engineered into the fibrous structure, and show that these hetTECs match the microstructural, micromechanical, and mechanobiological benchmarks of native tissue. Our tissue engineered platform should facilitate the study of the mechanobiology of developing, homeostatic, degenerating, and regenerating fibrous tissues. PMID:26726994

  16. Microstructural heterogeneity directs micromechanics and mechanobiology in native and engineered fibrocartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Woojin M.; Heo, Su-Jin; Driscoll, Tristan P.; Delucca, John F.; McLeod, Claire M.; Smith, Lachlan J.; Duncan, Randall L.; Mauck, Robert L.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2016-04-01

    Treatment strategies to address pathologies of fibrocartilaginous tissue are in part limited by an incomplete understanding of structure-function relationships in these load-bearing tissues. There is therefore a pressing need to develop micro-engineered tissue platforms that can recreate the highly inhomogeneous tissue microstructures that are known to influence mechanotransductive processes in normal and diseased tissue. Here, we report the quantification of proteoglycan-rich microdomains in developing, ageing and diseased fibrocartilaginous tissues, and the impact of these microdomains on endogenous cell responses to physiologic deformation within a native-tissue context. We also developed a method to generate heterogeneous tissue-engineered constructs (hetTECs) with non-fibrous proteoglycan-rich microdomains engineered into the fibrous structure, and show that these hetTECs match the microstructural, micromechanical and mechanobiological benchmarks of native tissue. Our tissue-engineered platform should facilitate the study of the mechanobiology of developing, homeostatic, degenerating and regenerating fibrous tissues.

  17. Moisture-related mechanical properties of softwood: 3D micromechanical modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qing, Hai; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2009-01-01

    Computational micromechanical analysis of the influence of moisture, density and microstructure of latewood on its hydroelastic and shrinkage properties is carried out. The elastic properties of cell sublayers have been determined using the unit cell models as for fiber reinforced composites (two....... The results for elastic properties of cell sublayers obtained from the unit cell models, from the self-consistent method and Halpin-Tsai equations are compared, and good agreement between these methods was observed. A computational technique, based on the representation of moisture effect as equivalent...... temperature-caused effects, has been developed and employed to the modeling of the moisture-related changes of the elastic properties of cell layers. A series of computational experiments have been carried out. In the simulations, it was observed that the shrinkage coefficients of longitudinal direction...

  18. Investigation of Mechanical Properties of Unidirectional Steel Fiber/Polyester Composites: Experiments and Micromechanical Predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raghavalu Thirumalai, Durai Prabhakaran; Løgstrup Andersen, Tom; Bech, Jakob Ilsted

    2016-01-01

    the role of material and process parameters on material properties. Two types of SFRP were studied: polyester resin reinforced by both steel fabric containing unidirectional fibers and steel fibers wound on a metal frame with 0° orientations. The effects of the fiber volume fraction and the role of polymer......The article introduces steel fiber reinforced polymer composites, which is considered new for composite product developments. These composites consist of steel fibers or filaments of 0.21 mm diameter embedded in a polyester resin. The goal of this investigation is to characterize the mechanical...... performance of steel fiber reinforced polyester composites at room temperature. The mechanical properties of unidirectional steel fiber reinforced polyester composites (SFRP) are evaluated experimentally and compared with the predicted values by micro-mechanical models. These predictions help to understand...

  19. Multiscale Modeling of PEEK Using Reactive Molecular Dynamics Modeling and Micromechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, William A.; Radue, Matthew; Chinkanjanarot, Sorayot; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Pineda, Evan J.; King, Julia A.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2018-01-01

    Polyether ether ketone (PEEK) is a high-performance, semi-crystalline thermoplastic that is used in a wide range of engineering applications, including some structural components of aircraft. The design of new PEEK-based materials requires a precise understanding of the multiscale structure and behavior of semi-crystalline PEEK. Molecular Dynamics (MD) modeling can efficiently predict bulk-level properties of single phase polymers, and micromechanics can be used to homogenize those phases based on the overall polymer microstructure. In this study, MD modeling was used to predict the mechanical properties of the amorphous and crystalline phases of PEEK. The hierarchical microstructure of PEEK, which combines the aforementioned phases, was modeled using a multiscale modeling approach facilitated by NASA's MSGMC. The bulk mechanical properties of semi-crystalline PEEK predicted using MD modeling and MSGMC agree well with vendor data, thus validating the multiscale modeling approach.

  20. Micromechanical modeling of tungsten-based bulk metallic glass matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Hao [Department of Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States); Li Ke [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A and M University, TAMU 3123, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)]. E-mail: keli@tamu.edu; Subhash, Ghatu [Department of Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States); Kecskes, Laszlo J. [Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 (United States); Dowding, Robert J. [Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 (United States)

    2006-08-15

    Micromechanics models are developed for tungsten (W)-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) matrix composites employing the Voronoi tessellation technique and the finite element (FE) method. The simulation results indicate that the computed elastic moduli are close to those measured in the experiments. The predicted stress-strain curves agree well with their experimentally obtained counterparts in the early stage of the plastic deformation. An increase in the W volume fraction leads to a decrease in the yield stress and an increase in the Young's modulus of the composite. In addition, contours of equivalent plastic strain for increasing applied strains provide an explanation why shear bands were observed in the glassy phase, along the W/BMG interface, and in the W phase of failed W/BMG composite specimens.

  1. Diuretics for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, Rajaa F; Flather, Marcus; Purcell, Henry; Poole-Wilson, Philip A; Coats, Andrew J S

    2012-02-15

    Chronic heart failure is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diuretics are regarded as the first-line treatment for patients with congestive heart failure since they provide symptomatic relief. The effects of diuretics on disease progression and survival remain unclear. To assess the harms and benefits of diuretics for chronic heart failure Updated searches were run in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials in The Cochrane Library (CENTRAL Issue 1 of 4, 2011), MEDLINE (1966 to 22 February 2011), EMBASE (1980 to 2011 Week 07) and HERDIN database (1990 to February 2011). We hand searched pertinent journals and reference lists of papers were inspected. We also contacted manufacturers and researchers in the field. No language restrictions were applied. Double-blinded randomised controlled trials of diuretic therapy comparing one diuretic with placebo, or one diuretic with another active agent (e.g. ACE inhibitors, digoxin) in patients with chronic heart failure. Two authors independently abstracted the data and assessed the eligibility and methodological quality of each trial. Extracted data were analysed by determining the odds ratio for dichotomous data, and difference in means for continuous data, of the treated group compared with controls. The likelihood of heterogeneity of the study population was assessed by the Chi-square test. If there was no evidence of statistical heterogeneity and pooling of results was clinically appropriate, a combined estimate was obtained using the fixed-effects model. This update has not identified any new studies for inclusion. The review includes 14 trials (525 participants), 7 were placebo-controlled, and 7 compared diuretics against other agents such as ACE inhibitors or digoxin. We analysed the data for mortality and for worsening heart failure. Mortality data were available in 3 of the placebo-controlled trials (202 participants). Mortality was lower for participants treated with diuretics than for

  2. Microstructural and micromechanical tests of titanium biomaterials intended for prosthetic reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryniewicz, Anna M; Bojko, Łukasz; Ryniewicz, Wojciech I

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present paper was a question of structural identification and evaluation of strength parameters of Titanium (Ticp - grade 2) and its alloy (Ti6Al4V) which are used to serve as a base for those permanent prosthetic supplements which are later manufactured employing CAD/CAM systems. Microstructural tests of Ticp and Ti6Al4V were conducted using an optical microscope as well as a scanning microscope. Hardness was measured with the Vickers method. Micromechanical properties of samples: microhardness and Young's modulus value, were measured with the Oliver and Pharr method. Based on studies using optical microscopy it was observed that the Ticp from the milling technology had a single phase, granular microstructure. The Ti64 alloy had a two-phase, fine-grained microstructure with an acicular-lamellar character. The results of scanning tests show that titanium Ticp had a single phase structure. On its grain there was visible acicular martensite. The structure of the two phase Ti64 alloy consists of a β matrix as well as released α phase deposits in the shape of extended needles. Micromechanical tests demonstrated that the alloy of Ti64 in both methods showed twice as high the microhardness as Ticp. In studies of Young's modulus of Ti64 alloy DMLS technology have lower value than titanium milling technology. According to the results obtained, the following conclusion has been drawn: when strength aspect is discussed, the DMLS method is a preferred one in manufacturing load structures in dentistry and may be an alternate way for the CAD/CAM system used in decrement processing.

  3. Multilevel modeling of micromechanics and phase formation for microstructural evolution of magnetic zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwa, Yoshihiro; Aizawa, Tatsuhiko; Takaya, Shigeru; Nagae, Yuji; Aoto, Kazumi

    2005-03-01

    The present research aims at a proposal of theoretical treatise to describe the local phase transformation from austenite to ferrite in the stainless steels under hot cyclic fatigue conditions. In experiments, this local phase transformation is detected as a magnetized region in the non-magnetic matrix after low-cycle fatigue test at the elevated temperature. The theoretical frame proposed here is composed of two methodologies. In the first approach, microstructure evolution with γ → α transformation is described by the phase field method. In the second approach, micromechanical method on the basis of the unit cell modeling is proposed to develop a new micromechanical analysis. The details of two approached are summarized in the following. (1) Phase formation simulation by the phase field method. Most of reports have started that γ-α phase transformation as a creep damage is induced by dechromization, which comes from carbide precipitation around grain boundaries. A new theoretical treatise is proposed for simulating this γ → α transformation in Fe-Cr-Ni system. Stabilities of both phases are investigated for various chemical compositions. Furthermore, in order to investigate dechromization phenomena in Fe-Cr-Ni-C system, a new theoretical frame is also proposed to handle an interstitial element in phase field method. (2) Low cycle fatigue elasto-plastic analysis by the unit-cell modeling. In experiments, the magnetized zones are generated to distribute at the vicinity of the hard, delta-phase inclusion in the austenitic matrix. The cumulative plastic region advances in the surroundings of this hard inclusion with increasing the number of cycles in the controlled strain range. This predicted profile of cumulative plastic regions corresponds to the experimentally measured, magnetized zones. In addition, the effect of geometric configuration of this inclusion on the plastic region evolution has close relationship of creep damage advancement in experiments

  4. EDITORIAL: Selected papers from the 22nd MicroMechanics and Microsystems Europe Workshop (MME 2011) Selected papers from the 22nd MicroMechanics and Microsystems Europe Workshop (MME 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlckers, Per

    2012-07-01

    This special section of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering is a selection of 13 of the best papers presented at the 22nd Micromechanics and Microsystems Europe Workshop, which was arranged in Toensberg, Norway, 19-22 June, 2011. 110 participants attended the 3 day workshop that had 5 invited keynote speakers and 80 submitted poster presentations. The MME Workshop is organized every year to gather mostly European scientists and people from industry to discuss topics related to research in micromechanics and microsystems in an informal manner. A distinct feature of this specialized workshop is to be an excellent venue for young scientists in the field, such as PhD students, to present their latest work. This workshop series was inaugurated in Enschede, the Netherlands in 1989, followed by: Berlin, Germany (1990), Leuven, Belgium (1992), Neuchatel, Switzerland (1993), Pisa, Italy (1994), Copenhagen, Denmark (1995), Barcelona, Spain (1996) [1], Southampton, UK (1997) [2], Ulvik, Norway (1998) [3], Gif-sur-Yvette, France (1999) [4], Uppsala, Sweden (2000), Cork, Ireland (2001) [5], Sinaia, Romania (2002) [6], Delft, The Netherlands (2003) [7], Leuven, Belgium (2004) [8], Goteborg, Sweden (2005) [9], Southampton, UK (2006) [10], Guimaraes, Portugal (2007) [11], Aachen, Germany (2008) [12], Toulouse, France (2009) [13] and Enschede, the Netherlands (2010) [14]. The workshop series has remained remarkably true to its original concept such as still having micromechanics as a priority topic while, at the same time, adapting to recent research topics such as microsystems integration. It is nice to observe that an earlier fragmented and mostly academic research field now has matured into a very strong industrial field being one of the fastest growing industries in the world, with successful applications on all levels from high end to low end, from space to consumer applications, with the inclusion of microsystems in smartphones such as three-axis accelerometers and

  5. Heart failure - tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - tests; Congestive heart failure - tests; Cardiomyopathy - tests; HF - tests ... the best test to: Identify which type of heart failure (systolic, diastolic, valvular) Monitor your heart failure and ...

  6. MICROMECHANICAL MICROPHONE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    and dirt, which partly or totally will be able to destroy its characteristics, a sealing acoustic membrane (6, 7) is placed on each side of the transducer element. The transducer element can for example be a capacitive transducer with external bias or an electret based transducer. The microphone, which can...

  7. Mechanisms of dynamic deformation and dynamic failure in aluminum nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Guangli; Chen, C.Q.; Ramesh, K.T.; McCauley, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    Uniaxial quasi-static, uniaxial dynamic and confined dynamic compression experiments have been performed to characterize the failure and deformation mechanisms of a sintered polycrystalline aluminum nitride using a servohydraulic machine and a modified Kolsky bar. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are used to identify the fracture and deformation mechanisms under high rate and high pressure loading conditions. These results show that the fracture mechanisms are strong functions of confining stress and strain rate, with transgranular fracture becoming more common at high strain rates. Dynamic fracture mechanics and micromechanical models are used to analyze the observed fracture mechanisms. TEM characterization of fragments from the confined dynamic experiments shows that at higher pressures dislocation motion becomes a common dominant deformation mechanism in AlN. Prismatic slip is dominant, and pronounced microcrack–dislocation interactions are observed, suggesting that the dislocation plasticity affects the macroscopic fracture behavior in this material under high confining stresses.

  8. Development of an approach for the analysis of network technologies in safety related instrumentation and control systems with respect to the propagation and effect of postulated failures; Entwicklung eines Ansatzes zur Analyse der Netzwerktechnologien in sicherheitsrelevanten Leittechniksystemen hinsichtlich Verbreitung und Auswirkung postulierter Fehler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herb, Joachim; Jopen, Manuela; Lindner, Falk; Piljugin, Ewgenij; Vogt, Pascal

    2015-06-15

    So far, safety related instrumentation and control (I and C) functions in nuclear power plants, such as controlling of safety systems, were mostly performed by conventional (analog) I and C equipment. For some years now, I and C systems and equipment in nuclear power plants worldwide, but also in Germany, are modernized by computer-based I and C systems. In signal processing of the computer-based I and C systems, modern network technologies are used both for internal and external communication, whereas the reliability and safety for information transfer and processing plays an important role. National and interna-tional operational experience shows a significant influence of communication in a net-worked I and C system on its reliability. The aim of the GRS within the project 361R01351 ''Development of an approach for an analysis of network technologies in safety related I and C systems in view of distribution and effect of postulated failures'' was to improve the expertise in the field of network communication, to investigate phenomenologically potential sources of failures and fault propagation paths (Network failures) in a generic I and C system as well as to develop methodic approaches for analyses of propagation and effect of postulated failures in typical networks. The GRS conducted extensive research in the field of ''Data communication in digital I and C systems''. In this report, the basic principles of data communication of computer-based I and C systems are presented. This includes, among other things, network topolo-gies, communication protocols and standards as well as generic failures. Additionally, the properties of different analysis methods and its applicability for reliability analyses of network communication in computer-based I and C systems are discussed. Based on state of the art evaluation, an analysis approach was developed, which takes into account the specific properties of network communication and

  9. Heart failure - home monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000113.htm Heart failure - home monitoring To use the sharing features on ... your high blood pressure Fast food tips Heart failure - discharge Heart failure - fluids and diuretics Heart failure - what to ...

  10. Light curing through glass ceramics: effect of curing mode on micromechanical properties of dual-curing resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flury, Simon; Lussi, Adrian; Hickel, Reinhard; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate micromechanical properties of five dual-curing resin cements after different curing modes including light curing through glass ceramic materials. Vickers hardness (VH) and indentation modulus (Y HU) of Panavia F2.0, RelyX Unicem 2 Automix, SpeedCEM, BisCem, and BeautiCem SA were measured after 1 week of storage (37 °C, 100 % humidity). The resin cements were tested following self-curing or light curing with the second-generation light-emitting diode (LED) curing unit Elipar FreeLight 2 in Standard Mode (1,545 mW/cm(2)) or with the third-generation LED curing unit VALO in High Power Mode (1,869 mW/cm(2)) or in XtraPower Mode (3,505 mW/cm(2)). Light curing was performed directly or through glass ceramic discs of 1.5 or 3 mm thickness of IPS Empress CAD or IPS e.max CAD. VH and Y HU were analysed with Kruskal-Wallis tests followed by pairwise Wilcoxon rank sum tests (α = 0.05). RelyX Unicem 2 Automix resulted in the highest VH and Y HU followed by BeautiCem SA, BisCem, SpeedCEM, and finally Panavia F2.0. Self-curing of RelyX Unicem 2 Automix and SpeedCEM lowered VH and Y HU compared to light curing whereas self-curing of Panavia F2.0, BisCem, and BeautiCem SA led to similar or significantly higher VH and Y HU compared to light curing. Generally, direct light curing resulted in similar or lower VH and Y HU compared to light curing through 1.5-mm-thick ceramic discs. Light curing through 3-mm-thick discs of IPS e.max CAD generally reduced VH and Y HU for all resin cements except SpeedCEM, which was the least affected by light curing through ceramic discs. The resin cements responded heterogeneously to changes in curing mode. The applied irradiances and light curing times adequately cured the resin cements even through 1.5-mm-thick ceramic discs. When light curing resin cements through thick glass ceramic restorations, clinicians should consider to prolong the light curing times even with LED curing units providing high

  11. Investigation of Macroscopic Brittle Creep Failure Caused by Microcrack Growth Under Step Loading and Unloading in Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaozhao; Shao, Zhushan

    2016-07-01

    The growth of subcritical cracks plays an important role in the creep of brittle rock. The stress path has a great influence on creep properties. A micromechanics-based model is presented to study the effect of the stress path on creep properties. The microcrack model of Ashby and Sammis, Charles' Law, and a new micro-macro relation are employed in our model. This new micro-macro relation is proposed by using the correlation between the micromechanical and macroscopic definition of damage. A stress path function is also introduced by the relationship between stress and time. Theoretical expressions of the stress-strain relationship and creep behavior are derived. The effects of confining pressure on the stress-strain relationship are studied. Crack initiation stress and peak stress are achieved under different confining pressures. The applied constant stress that could cause creep behavior is predicted. Creep properties are studied under the step loading of axial stress or the unloading of confining pressure. Rationality of the micromechanics-based model is verified by the experimental results of Jinping marble. Furthermore, the effects of model parameters and the unloading rate of confining pressure on creep behavior are analyzed. The coupling effect of step axial stress and confining pressure on creep failure is also discussed. The results provide implications on the deformation behavior and time-delayed rockburst mechanism caused by microcrack growth on surrounding rocks during deep underground excavations.

  12. A micromechanical approach of suffusion based on a length scale analysis of the grain detachment and grain transport processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wautier, Antoine; Bonelli, Stéphane; Nicot, François

    2017-06-01

    Suffusion is the selective erosion of the finest particles of a soil subjected to an internal flow. Among the four types of internal erosion and piping identified today, suffusion is the least understood. Indeed, there is a lack of micromechanical approaches for identifying the critical microstructural parameters responsible for this process. Based on a discrete element modeling of non cohesive granular assemblies, specific micromechanical tools are developed in a unified framework to account for the two first steps of suffusion, namely the grain detachment and the grain transport processes. Thanks to the use of an enhanced force chain definition and autocorrelation functions the typical lengths scales associated with grain detachment are characterized. From the definition of transport paths based on a graph description of the pore space the typical lengths scales associated with grain transport are recovered. For a uniform grain size distribution, a separation of scales between these two processes exists for the finest particles of a soil

  13. Mechanical Performance of Natural / Natural Fiber Reinforced Hybrid Composite Materials Using Finite Element Method Based Micromechanics and Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, Muhammad Ziaur

    2017-01-01

    A micromechanical analysis of the representative volume element (RVE) of a unidirectional flax/jute fiber reinforced epoxy composite is performed using finite element analysis (FEA). To do so, first effective mechanical properties of flax fiber and jute fiber are evaluated numerically and then used in evaluating the effective properties of ax/jute/epoxy hybrid composite. Mechanics of Structure Genome (MSG), a new homogenization tool developed in Purdue University, is used to calculate the hom...

  14. Micro-mechanical investigation of the effect of fine content on mechanical behavior of gap graded granular materials using DEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Habib

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a micro-mechanical study of the effect of fine content on the behavior of gap graded granular samples by using numerical simulations performed with the Discrete Element Method. Different samples with fine content varied from 0% to 30% are simulated. The role of fine content in reinforcing the granular skeleton and in supporting the external deviatoric stress is then brought into the light.

  15. Micromechanical Model for Deformation in Solids with Universal Predictions for Stress-Strain Curves and Slip Avalanches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahmen, Karin A.; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Uhl, Jonathan T.

    2009-01-01

    A basic micromechanical model for deformation of solids with only one tuning parameter (weakening ε) is introduced. The model can reproduce observed stress-strain curves, acoustic emissions and related power spectra, event statistics, and geometrical properties of slip, with a continuous phase transition from brittle to ductile behavior. Exact universal predictions are extracted using mean field theory and renormalization group tools. The results agree with recent experimental observations and simulations of related models for dislocation dynamics, material damage, and earthquake statistics.

  16. Bottom head failure program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.O.

    1989-01-01

    Earlier this year the NRC staff presented a Revised Severe Accident Research Program Plan (SECY-89-123) to the Commission and initiated work on that plan. Two of the near-term issues in that plan involve failure of the bottom head of the reactor pressure vessel. These two issues are (1) depressurization and DCH and (2) BWR Mark I Containment Shell Meltthrough. ORNL has developed models for several competing failure mechanisms for BWRs. INEL has performed analytical and experimental work directly related to bottom head failure in connection with several programs. SNL has conducted a number of analyses and experimental activities to examine the failure of LWR vessels. In addition to the government-sponsored work mentioned above, EPRI and FAI performed studies on vessel failure for the Industry Degraded Core Rulemaking Program (IDCOR). EPRI examined the failure of a PWR vessel bottom head without penetrations, as found in some Combustion Engineering reactors. To give more attention to this subject as called for by the revised Severe Accident Research Plan, two things are being done. First, work previously done is being reviewed carefully to develop an overall picture and to determine the reliability of assumptions used in those studies. Second, new work is being planned for FY90 to try to complete a reasonable understanding of the failure process. The review and planning are being done in close cooperation with the ACRS. Results of this exercise will be presented in this paper

  17. Raman Spectroscopy Study of Annealing-Induced Effects on Graphene Prepared by Micromechanical Exfoliation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Ji Eun; Ko, Taeg Yeoung; Ryu, Sun Min

    2010-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy was combined with AFM to investigate the effects of thermal annealing on the graphene samples prepared by the widely used micromechanical exfoliation method. Following annealing cycles, adhesive residues were shown to contaminate graphene sheets with thin molecular layers in their close vicinity causing several new intense Raman bands. Detailed investigation shows that the Raman scattering is very strong and may be enhanced by the interaction with graphene. Although the current study does not pinpoint detailed origins for the new Raman bands, the presented results stress that graphene prepared by the above method may require extra cautions when treated with heat or possibly solvents. Since its isolation from graphite, graphene has drawn a lot of experimental and theoretical research. These efforts have been mostly in pursuit of various applications such as electronics, sensors, stretchable transparent electrodes, and various composite materials. To accomplish such graphene-based applications, understanding chemical interactions of this new material with environments during various processing treatments will become more important. Since thermal annealing is widely used in various research of graphene for varying purposes such as cleaning, nanostructuring, reactions, etc., understanding annealing-induced effects is prerequisite to many fundamental studies of graphene. In this regard, it is to be noted that there has been a controversy on the cause of the annealing-induced hole doping in graphene

  18. Effect of gamma radiation on micromechanical hardness of lead-free solder joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulus, Wilfred [Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, 43600 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Rahman, Irman Abdul; Jalar, Azman; Kamil, Insan; Bakar, Maria Abu [Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, 43600 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Yusoff, Wan Yusmawati Wan [Universiti Pertahanan Nasional Malaysia, Kem Sg. Besi, 57000 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    Lead-free solders are important material in nano and microelectronic surface mounting technology for various applications in bio medicine, environmental monitoring, spacecraft and satellite instrumentation. Nevertheless solder joint in radiation environment needs higher reliability and resistance to any damage caused by ionizing radiations. In this study a lead-free 99.0Sn0.3Ag0.7Cu wt.% (SAC) solder joint was developed and subjected to various doses of gamma radiation to investigate the effects of the ionizing radiation to micromechanical hardness of the solder. Averaged hardness of the SAC joint was obtained from nanoindentation test. The results show a relationship between hardness values of indentations and the increment of radiation dose. Highest mean hardness, 0.2290 ± 0.0270 GPa was calculated on solder joint which was exposed to 5 Gray dose of gamma radiation. This value indicates possible radiation hardening effect on irradiated solder. The hardness gradually decreased to 0.1933 ± 0.0210 GPa and 0.1631 ± 0.0173 GPa when exposed to doses 50 and 500 gray respectively. These values are also lower than the hardness of non irradiated sample which was calculated as 0.2084 ± 0.0.3633 GPa indicating possible radiation damage and needs further related atomic dislocation study.

  19. Micromechanical Properties of a New Polymeric Microcapsule for Self-Healing Cementitious Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyang Lv

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Self-healing cementitious materials containing a microencapsulated healing agent are appealing due to their great application potential in improving the serviceability and durability of concrete structures. In this study, poly(phenol–formaldehyde (PF microcapsules that aim to provide a self-healing function for cementitious materials were prepared by an in situ polymerization reaction. Size gradation of the synthesized microcapsules was achieved through a series of sieving processes. The shell thickness and the diameter of single microcapsules was accurately measured under environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM. The relationship between the physical properties of the synthesized microcapsules and their micromechanical properties were investigated using nanoindentation. The results of the mechanical tests show that, with the increase of the mean size of microcapsules and the decrease of shell thickness, the mechanical force required to trigger the self-healing function of microcapsules increased correspondingly from 68.5 ± 41.6 mN to 198.5 ± 31.6 mN, featuring a multi-sensitive trigger function. Finally, the rupture behavior and crack surface of cement paste with embedded microcapsules were observed and analyzed using X-ray computed tomography (XCT. The synthesized PF microcapsules may find potential application in self-healing cementitious materials.

  20. Dynamic Evolution Of Off-Fault Medium During An Earthquake: A Micromechanics Based Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Marion Y.; Bhat, Harsha S.

    2018-05-01

    Geophysical observations show a dramatic drop of seismic wave speeds in the shallow off-fault medium following earthquake ruptures. Seismic ruptures generate, or reactivate, damage around faults that alter the constitutive response of the surrounding medium, which in turn modifies the earthquake itself, the seismic radiation, and the near-fault ground motion. We present a micromechanics based constitutive model that accounts for dynamic evolution of elastic moduli at high-strain rates. We consider 2D in-plane models, with a 1D right lateral fault featuring slip-weakening friction law. The two scenarios studied here assume uniform initial off-fault damage and an observationally motivated exponential decay of initial damage with fault normal distance. Both scenarios produce dynamic damage that is consistent with geological observations. A small difference in initial damage actively impacts the final damage pattern. The second numerical experiment, in particular, highlights the complex feedback that exists between the evolving medium and the seismic event. We show that there is a unique off-fault damage pattern associated with supershear transition of an earthquake rupture that could be potentially seen as a geological signature of this transition. These scenarios presented here underline the importance of incorporating the complex structure of fault zone systems in dynamic models of earthquakes.

  1. Investigation of shape memory alloy honeycombs by means of a micromechanical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freed, Yuval; Aboudi, Jacob; Gilat, Rivka

    2008-01-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) honeycombs are promising new smart materials which may be used for light-weight structures, biomedical implants, actuators and active structures. In this study, the behavior of several SMA honeycomb structures is investigated by means of a continuum-based thermomechanically coupled micromechanical analysis. To this end, macroscopic inelastic stress–strain responses of several topologies are investigated, both for pseudoelasticity and for shape memory effect. It was found that the triangular topology exhibits the best performance. In addition, the initial transformation surfaces are presented for all possible combinations of applied in-plane stresses. A special two-phase microstructure that is capable of producing an overall negative coefficient of thermal expansion is suggested and studied. In this configuration, in which one of the phases is a SMA, residual strains are being generated upon recovery. Here, the negative coefficient of thermal expansion appears to be associated with a larger amount of residual strain upon recovery. Furthermore, a two-dimensional SMA re-entrant topology that generates a negative in-plane Poisson's ratio is analyzed, and the effect of the full thermomechanical coupling is examined. Finally, the response of a particular three-dimensional microstructure is studied

  2. Tensile and fracture behavior of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloys: micro-mechanical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Y.

    2012-01-01

    The AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy was chosen as the material for the core vessel of the future Jules Horowitz testing reactor (JHR). The objective of this thesis is to understand and model the tensile and fracture behavior of the material, as well as the origin of damage anisotropy. A micro-mechanical approach was used to link the microstructure and mechanical behavior. The microstructure of the alloy was characterized on the surface via Scanning Electron Microscopy and in the 3D volume via synchrotron X-ray tomography and laminography. The damage mechanism was identified by in-situ SEM tensile testing, ex-situ X-ray tomography and in-situ laminography on different levels of triaxiality. The observations have shown that damage nucleated at lower strains on Mg 2 Si coarse precipitates than on iron rich intermetallics. The identified scenario and the in-situ measurements were then used to develop a coupled GTN damage model incorporating nucleation, growth and coalescence of cavities formed by coarse precipitates. The relationship between the damage and the microstructure anisotropies was explained and simulated. (author)

  3. Low-frequency sound affects active micromechanics in the human inner ear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugler, Kathrin; Wiegrebe, Lutz; Grothe, Benedikt; Kössl, Manfred; Gürkov, Robert; Krause, Eike; Drexl, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss is one of the most common auditory pathologies, resulting from overstimulation of the human cochlea, an exquisitely sensitive micromechanical device. At very low frequencies (less than 250 Hz), however, the sensitivity of human hearing, and therefore the perceived loudness is poor. The perceived loudness is mediated by the inner hair cells of the cochlea which are driven very inadequately at low frequencies. To assess the impact of low-frequency (LF) sound, we exploited a by-product of the active amplification of sound outer hair cells (OHCs) perform, so-called spontaneous otoacoustic emissions. These are faint sounds produced by the inner ear that can be used to detect changes of cochlear physiology. We show that a short exposure to perceptually unobtrusive, LF sounds significantly affects OHCs: a 90 s, 80 dB(A) LF sound induced slow, concordant and positively correlated frequency and level oscillations of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions that lasted for about 2 min after LF sound offset. LF sounds, contrary to their unobtrusive perception, strongly stimulate the human cochlea and affect amplification processes in the most sensitive and important frequency range of human hearing. PMID:26064536

  4. Preparation of polystyrene brush film by radical chain-transfer polymerization and micromechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Jing [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Chen Miao [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)], E-mail: miaochen99@yahoo.com; An Yanqing [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Liu Jianxi [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Yan Fengyuan [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)], E-mail: fyyan@lzb.ac.cn

    2008-12-30

    A radical chain-transfer polymerization technique has been applied to graft-polymerize brushes of polystyrene (PSt) on single-crystal silicon substrates. 3-Mercapto-propyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS), as a chain-transfer agent for grafting, was immobilized on the silicon surface by a self-assembling process. The structure and morphology of the graft-functionalized silicon surfaces were characterized by the means of contact-angle measurement, ellipsometric thickness measurement, Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The nanotribological and micromechanical properties of the as-prepared polymer brush films were investigated by frictional force microscopy (FFM), force-volume analysis and scratch test. The results indicate that the friction properties of the grafted polymer films can be improved significantly by the treatment of toluene, and the chemically bonded polystyrene film exhibits superior scratch resistance behavior compared with the spin-coated polystyrene film. The resultant polystyrene brush film is expected to develop as a potential lubrication coating for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS)

  5. Low Cycle Fatigue Behaviour of DP Steels: Micromechanical Modelling vs. Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazal Moeini

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to simulate the stabilised stress-strain hysteresis loop of dual phase (DP steel using micromechanical modelling. For this purpose, the investigation was conducted both experimentally and numerically. In the experimental part, the microstructure characterisation, monotonic tensile tests and low cycle fatigue tests were performed. In the numerical part, the representative volume element (RVE was employed to study the effect of the DP steel microstructure of the low cycle fatigue behavior of DP steel. A dislocation-density based model was utilised to identify the tensile behavior of ferrite and martensite. Then, by establishing a correlation between the monotonic and cyclic behavior of ferrite and martensite phases, the cyclic deformation properties of single phases were estimated. Accordingly, Chaboche kinematic hardening parameters were identified from the predicted cyclic curve of individual phases in DP steel. Finally, the predicted hysteresis loop from low cycle fatigue modelling was in very good agreement with the experimental one. The stabilised hysteresis loop of DP steel can be successfully predicted using the developed approach.

  6. Testing and Micromechanical Modelling of Rockfill Materials Considering the Effect of Stress Path

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have extended the micromechanics-based analytical (M-A model to make it capable of simulating Nuozhadu rockfill material (NRFM under different stress paths. Two types of drained triaxial tests on NRFM were conducted, namely, the stress paths of constant stress ratio (CSR and the complex stress paths with transitional features. The model was improved by considering the interparticle parameter variation with the unloading-reloading cycles and the effect of the stress transition path. The evolution of local dilatancy at interparticle planes due to an externally applied load is also discussed. Compared with Duncan-Chang’s E-u and E-B models, the improved model could not only better describe the deformation properties of NRFM under the stress path loading, but also present the volumetric strain changing from dilatancy to contractancy with increasing transitional confining pressures. All simulations have demonstrated that the proposed M-A model is capable of modelling the mechanical behaviour of NRFM in the dam.

  7. Dynamic Evolution Of Off-Fault Medium During An Earthquake: A Micromechanics Based Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, M. Y.; Bhat, H. S.

    2017-12-01

    Geophysical observations show a dramatic drop of seismic wave speeds in the shallow off-fault medium following earthquake ruptures. Seismic ruptures generate, or reactivate, damage around faults that alter the constitutive response of the surrounding medium, which in turn modifies the earthquake itself, the seismic radiation, and the near-fault ground motion. We present a micromechanics based constitutive model that accounts for dynamic evolution of elastic moduli at high-strain rates. We consider 2D in-plane models, with a 1D right lateral fault featuring slip-weakening friction law. The two scenarios studied here assume uniform initial off-fault damage and an observationally motivated exponential decay of initial damage with fault normal distance. Both scenarios produce dynamic damage that is consistent with geological observations. A small difference in initial damage actively impacts the final damage pattern. The second numerical experiment, in particular, highlights the complex feedback that exists between the evolving medium and the seismic event. We show that there is a unique off-fault damage pattern associated with supershear transition of an earthquake rupture that could be potentially seen as a geological signature of this transition. These scenarios presented here underline the importance of incorporating the complex structure of fault zone systems in dynamic models of earthquakes.

  8. Computational micromechanics of wind blade materials: recent activities at the Materials Research Division, Risoe DTU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishnaevsky Jr., L.; Broendsted, P.; Qing, H.; Wang, H.; Soerensen, Bent F. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Riso National Lab. for Sustainable Energy. Materials Research Div., Roskilde (Denmark)); OEstergaard, R.C. (LM Wind Power Blades, Composite Mechanics, Roskilde (Denmark))

    2010-10-22

    Recent research works in the area of 3D computational microstructural modelling, virtual testing and numerical optimization of wind blade materials, carried out at the Materials Research Division, Rise DTU (Programme Composites and Materials Mechanics) are summarized. The works presented here have been carried out in the framework of several research projects: EU FP6 Upwind, Danida project 'Development of wind energy technologies in Nepal' and SinoDanish project '3D Virtual Testing of composites for wind energy applications' as well as the Framework Program 'Interface design of composite materials' and recently established Danish Centre for Composite Structures and Materials for Wind Turbines. Different groups of materials, which are used or have a potential for use for the wind turbine blades, are modelled with the use of the methods of the computational micromechanics, in particular: (1) glass and carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites used in the large wind turbine blades, (2) different sorts of timber, used in small wind turbines (first of all, in developing countries) and (3) nanoparticle reinforced polymer matrix composites (which have a potential to be used as components for future high strength wind blades). On the basis of the developed 3D microstructural finite element models of these materials, we analyzed the effect of their microstructures on damage resistance, strength and stiffness. The methods of the 3D model design and results of the simulations are discussed in this paper. (Author)

  9. Analogy between electrochemical behaviour of thick silicon granular electrodes for lithium batteries and fine soils micromechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, B.P.N.; Gaubicher, J.; Lestriez, B.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we study the influence of the distribution and the shape of the carbon conductive additives on the cyclability of thick silicon based composite electrodes. Results pinpoint the influence of carbon additives is not only to play on the electronic conductivity but also to play on the micromechanics (stress distribution) of the composite films. The lack of correlation between electrochemical performance and the macroscopic electronic conductivity of the pristine electrodes and the observation of repeated drops and jumps in capacity during cycling brought us to make an analogy between the silicon composite electrodes and cohesive granular materials such as fine soils media. Considering the collective mechanical behavior of a stack of silicon particles upon repeated volume variations shed a novel understanding to the electrochemical behavior of composite electrodes based on silicon and alloying materials and tells us how critically important is the design at the different scales (the particle, a few particles, the composite electrode, the cell) to engineer the mechanical stress and strain and improve cycle life

  10. Micro-mechanical model for the tension-stabilized enzymatic degradation of collagen tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thao; Ruberti, Jeffery

    We present a study of how the collagen fiber structure influences the enzymatic degradation of collagen tissues. Experiments of collagen fibrils and tissues show that mechanical tension can slow and halt enzymatic degradation. Tissue-level experiments also show that degradation rate is minimum at a stretch level coincident with the onset of strain-stiffening in the stress response. To understand these phenomena, we developed a micro-mechanical model of a fibrous collagen tissue undergoing enzymatic degradation. Collagen fibers are described as sinusoidal elastica beams, and the tissue is described as a distribution of fibers. We assumed that the degradation reaction is inhibited by the axial strain energy of the crimped collagen fibers. The degradation rate law was calibrated to experiments on isolated single fibrils from bovine sclera. The fiber crimp and properties were fit to uniaxial tension tests of tissue strips. The fibril-level kinetic and tissue-level structural parameters were used to predict tissue-level degradation-induced creep rate under a constant applied force. We showed that we could accurately predict the degradation-induce creep rate of the pericardium and cornea once we accounted for differences in the fiber crimp structure and properties.

  11. High-Q micromechanical resonators for mass sensing in dissipative media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tappura, Kirsi; Pekko, Panu; Seppä, Heikki

    2011-01-01

    Single crystal silicon-based micromechanical resonators are developed for mass sensing in dissipative media. The design aspects and preliminary characterization of the resonators are presented. For the suggested designs, quality factors of about 20 000 are typically measured in air at atmospheric pressure and 1000–2000 in contact with liquid. The performance is based on a wine-glass-type lateral bulk acoustic mode excited in a rectangular resonator plate. The mode essentially eliminates the radiation of acoustic energy into the sample media leaving viscous drag as the dominant fluid-based dissipation mechanism in the system. For a mass loading distributed over the central areas of the resonator a sensitivity of 27 ppm ng −1 is measured exhibiting good agreement with the results of the finite element method-based simulations. It is also shown that the mass sensitivity can be somewhat enhanced, not only by the proper distribution of the loaded mass, but also by introducing shallow barrier structures on the resonator

  12. Experimental approach and micro-mechanical modeling of the mechanical behavior of irradiated zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onimus, F.

    2003-12-01

    Zirconium alloys cladding tubes containing nuclear fuel of the Pressurized Water Reactors constitute the first safety barrier against the dissemination of radioactive elements. Thus, it is essential to predict the mechanical behavior of the material in-reactor conditions. This study aims, on the one hand, to identify and characterize the mechanisms of the plastic deformation of irradiated zirconium alloys and, on the other hand, to propose a micro-mechanical modeling based on these mechanisms. The experimental analysis shows that, for the irradiated material, the plastic deformation occurs by dislocation channeling. For transverse tensile test and internal pressure test this channeling occurs in the basal planes. However, for axial tensile test, the study revealed that the plastic deformation also occurs by channeling but in the prismatic and pyramidal planes. In addition, the study of the macroscopic mechanical behavior, compared to the deformation mechanisms observed by TEM, suggested that the internal stress is higher in the case of irradiated material than in the case of non-irradiated material, because of the very heterogeneous character of the plastic deformation. This analysis led to a coherent interpretation of the mechanical behavior of irradiated materials, in terms of deformation mechanisms. The mechanical behavior of irradiated materials was finally modeled by applying homogenization methods for heterogeneous materials. This model is able to reproduce adequately the mechanical behavior of the irradiated material, in agreement with the TEM observations. (author)

  13. Self-induced parametric amplification arising from nonlinear elastic coupling in a micromechanical resonating disk gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzan, Sarah H; Zega, Valentina; Li, Mo; Ahn, Chae H; Corigliano, Alberto; Kenny, Thomas W; Horsley, David A

    2015-03-12

    Parametric amplification, resulting from intentionally varying a parameter in a resonator at twice its resonant frequency, has been successfully employed to increase the sensitivity of many micro- and nano-scale sensors. Here, we introduce the concept of self-induced parametric amplification, which arises naturally from nonlinear elastic coupling between the degenerate vibration modes in a micromechanical disk-resonator, and is not externally applied. The device functions as a gyroscope wherein angular rotation is detected from Coriolis coupling of elastic vibration energy from a driven vibration mode into a second degenerate sensing mode. While nonlinear elasticity in silicon resonators is extremely weak, in this high quality-factor device, ppm-level nonlinear elastic effects result in an order-of-magnitude increase in the observed sensitivity to Coriolis force relative to linear theory. Perfect degeneracy of the primary and secondary vibration modes is achieved through electrostatic frequency tuning, which also enables the phase and frequency of the parametric coupling to be varied, and we show that the resulting phase and frequency dependence of the amplification follow the theory of parametric resonance. We expect that this phenomenon will be useful for both fundamental studies of dynamic systems with low dissipation and for increasing signal-to-noise ratio in practical applications such as gyroscopes.

  14. Micromechanical contact stiffness devices and application for calibrating contact resonance atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Matthew R.; Chen, Sihan; Prater, Craig B.; King, William P.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the design, fabrication, and characterization of micromechanical devices that can present an engineered contact stiffness to an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever tip. These devices allow the contact stiffness between the AFM tip and a substrate to be easily and accurately measured, and can be used to calibrate the cantilever for subsequent mechanical property measurements. The contact stiffness devices are rigid copper disks of diameters 2-18 μm integrated onto a soft silicone substrate. Analytical modeling and finite element simulations predict the elastic response of the devices. Measurements of tip-sample interactions during quasi-static force measurements compare well with modeling simulation, confirming the expected elastic response of the devices, which are shown to have contact stiffness 32-156 N m-1. To demonstrate one application, we use the disk sample to calibrate three resonant modes of a U-shaped AFM cantilever actuated via Lorentz force, at approximately 220, 450, and 1200 kHz. We then use the calibrated cantilever to determine the contact stiffness and elastic modulus of three polymer samples at these modes. The overall approach allows cantilever calibration without prior knowledge of the cantilever geometry or its resonance modes, and could be broadly applied to both static and dynamic measurements that require AFM calibration against a known contact stiffness.

  15. Prediction of Elastic Constants of the Fuzzy Fibre Reinforced Polymer Using Computational Micromechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlik, Marzena; Lu, Yiling

    2018-05-01

    Computational micromechanics is a useful tool to predict properties of carbon fibre reinforced polymers. In this paper, a representative volume element (RVE) is used to investigate a fuzzy fibre reinforced polymer. The fuzzy fibre results from the introduction of nanofillers in the fibre surface. The composite being studied contains three phases, namely: the T650 carbon fibre, the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) reinforced interphase and the epoxy resin EPIKOTE 862. CNTs are radially grown on the surface of the carbon fibre, and thus resultant interphase composed of nanotubes and matrix is transversely isotropic. Transversely isotropic properties of the interphase are numerically implemented in the ANSYS FEM software using element orientation command. Obtained numerical predictions are compared with the available analytical models. It is found that the CNTs interphase significantly increased the transverse mechanical properties of the fuzzy fibre reinforced polymer. This extent of enhancement changes monotonically with the carbon fibre volume fraction. This RVE model enables to investigate different orientation of CNTs in the fuzzy fibre model.

  16. Mineral and water content of A. gigas scales determine local micromechanical properties and energy dissipation mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troncoso, Omar P.; Gigos, Florian; Torres, Fernando G.

    2017-11-01

    Arapaima gigas scales are natural laminated composite materials made of individual layers with different degrees of mineralization, accompanied of varying mechanical properties. This natural design provides scales with hardness and flexibility, and can serve as a source of inspiration for the development of new layered composites with a hard surface and flexible base. In this paper, we have carried out cyclic micro-indentation tests on both; the internal and the highly mineralized external surface of air dried and wet scales, in order to assess the variation of their local micromechanical properties with regard to the mineral and water content. The load-penetration (P-h) curves showed that creep takes place throughout the application of a constant force during the micro-indentation tests, confirming the time dependent response of A. gigas scales. A model that accounted for the elastic, plastic and viscous responses of the samples was used to fit the experimental results. The penetration depth during loading and creep, as well as the energy dissipated are dependent on the water content. The used model suggests that the viscous response of the internal layer increases with the water content.

  17. Finite-strain micromechanical model of stress-induced martensitic transformations in shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stupkiewicz, S.; Petryk, H.

    2006-01-01

    A micromechanical model of stress-induced martensitic transformation in single crystals of shape memory alloys is developed. This model is a finite-strain counterpart to the approach presented recently in the small-strain setting [S. Stupkiewicz, H. Petryk, J. Mech. Phys. Solids 50 (2002) 2303-2331]. The stress-induced transformation is assumed to proceed by the formation and growth of parallel martensite plates within the austenite matrix. Propagation of phase transformation fronts is governed by a rate-independent thermodynamic criterion with a threshold value for the thermodynamic driving force, including in this way the intrinsic dissipation due to phase transition. This criterion selects the initial microstructure at the onset of transformation and governs the evolution of the laminated microstructure at the macroscopic level. A multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into elastic and transformation parts is assumed, with full account for the elastic anisotropy of the phases. The pseudoelastic behavior of Cu-Zn-Al single crystal in tension and compression is studied as an application of the model

  18. Micromechanical Analysis of Crack Closure Mechanism for Intelligent Material Containing TiNi Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Shigetoshi; Ono, Hiroyuki; Saito, Kenji

    In our previous study, the micromechanical modeling of an intelligent material containing TiNi fibers was performed and the stress intensity factor KI at the tip of the crack in the material was expressed in terms of the magnitude of the shape memory shrinkage of the fibers and the thermal expansion strain in the material. In this study, the value of KI at the tip of the crack in the TiNi/epoxy material is calculated numerically by using analytical expressions obtained in our first report. As a result, we find that the KI value decreases with increasing shrink strain of the fibers, and this tendency agrees with that of the experimental result obtained by Shimamoto etal.(Trans. Jpn. Soc. Mech. Eng., Vol. 65, No. 634 (1999), pp. 1282-1286). Moreover, there exists an optimal value of the shrink strain of the fibers to make the KI value zero. The change in KI with temperature during the heating process from the reference temperature to the inverse austenitic finishing temperature of TiNi fiber is also consistent with the experimental result. These results can be explained by the changes in the shrink strain, the thermal expansion strain, and the elastic moduli of TiNi fiber with temperature. These results may be useful in designing intelligent materials containing TiNi fibers from the viewpoint of crack closure.

  19. Characterizing the lung tissue mechanical properties using a micromechanical model of alveolar sac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karami, Elham; Seify, Behzad; Moghadas, Hadi; Sabsalinejad, Masoomeh; Lee, Ting-Yim; Samani, Abbas

    2017-03-01

    According to statistics, lung disease is among the leading causes of death worldwide. As such, many research groups are developing powerful tools for understanding, diagnosis and treatment of various lung diseases. Recently, biomechanical modeling has emerged as an effective tool for better understanding of human physiology, disease diagnosis and computer assisted medical intervention. Mechanical properties of lung tissue are important requirements for methods developed for lung disease diagnosis and medical intervention. As such, the main objective of this study is to develop an effective tool for estimating the mechanical properties of normal and pathological lung parenchyma tissue based on its microstructure. For this purpose, a micromechanical model of the lung tissue was developed using finite element (FE) method, and the model was demonstrated to have application in estimating the mechanical properties of lung alveolar wall. The proposed model was developed by assembling truncated octahedron tissue units resembling the alveoli. A compression test was simulated using finite element method on the created geometry and the hyper-elastic parameters of the alveoli wall were calculated using reported alveolar wall stress-strain data and an inverse optimization framework. Preliminary results indicate that the proposed model can be potentially used to reconstruct microstructural images of lung tissue using macro-scale tissue response for normal and different pathological conditions. Such images can be used for effective diagnosis of lung diseases such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).

  20. Contributions to micromechanical model of the non linear behavior of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou-Chakra Guery, A.

    2007-12-01

    This work is performed in the general context of the project of underground disposal of radioactive waste, undertaken by the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (ANDRA). Due to its strong density and weak permeability, the formation of Callovo-Oxfordian argillite is chosen as one of possible geological barriers to radionuclides. The objective of the study to develop and validate a non linear homogenization approach of the mechanical behavior of Callovo-Oxfordian argillites. The material is modelled as a composite constituted of an elasto(visco)plastic clay matrix and of linear elastic or elastic damage inclusions. The macroscopic constitutive law is obtained by adapting the incremental method proposed by Hill. The derived model is first compared to Finite Element calculations on unit cell. It is then validated and applied for the prediction of the macroscopic stress-strain responses of the argillite at different geological depths. Finally, the micromechanical model is implemented in a commercial finite element code (Abaqus) for the simulation of a vertical shaft of the underground laboratory. This allows predicting the distribution of damage state and plastic strains and characterizing the excavation damage zone (EDZ). (author)

  1. Multi-scale modeling of ductile failure in metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardoen, Th.; Scheyvaerts, F.; Simar, A.; Tekoglu, C.; Onck, P.R.

    2010-01-01

    Micro-mechanical models for ductile failure have been developed in the seventies and eighties essentially to address cracking in structural applications and complement the fracture mechanics approach. Later, this approach has become attractive for physical metallurgists interested by the prediction of failure during forming operations and as a guide for the design of more ductile and/or high-toughness microstructures. Nowadays, a realistic treatment of damage evolution in complex metallic microstructures is becoming feasible when sufficiently sophisticated constitutive laws are used within the context of a multilevel modelling strategy. The current understanding and the state of the art models for the nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids are reviewed with a focus on the underlying physics. Considerations are made about the introduction of the different length scales associated with the microstructure and damage process. Two applications of the methodology are then described to illustrate the potential of the current models. The first application concerns the competition between intergranular and transgranular ductile fracture in aluminum alloys involving soft precipitate free zones along the grain boundaries. The second application concerns the modeling of ductile failure in friction stir welded joints, a problem which also involves soft and hard zones, albeit at a larger scale. (authors)

  2. Multiscale modeling of ductile failure in metallic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardoen, Thomas; Scheyvaerts, Florence; Simar, Aude; Tekoğlu, Cihan; Onck, Patrick R.

    2010-04-01

    Micromechanical models for ductile failure have been developed in the 1970s and 1980s essentially to address cracking in structural applications and complement the fracture mechanics approach. Later, this approach has become attractive for physical metallurgists interested by the prediction of failure during forming operations and as a guide for the design of more ductile and/or high-toughness microstructures. Nowadays, a realistic treatment of damage evolution in complex metallic microstructures is becoming feasible when sufficiently sophisticated constitutive laws are used within the context of a multilevel modelling strategy. The current understanding and the state of the art models for the nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids are reviewed with a focus on the underlying physics. Considerations are made about the introduction of the different length scales associated with the microstructure and damage process. Two applications of the methodology are then described to illustrate the potential of the current models. The first application concerns the competition between intergranular and transgranular ductile fracture in aluminum alloys involving soft precipitate free zones along the grain boundaries. The second application concerns the modeling of ductile failure in friction stir welded joints, a problem which also involves soft and hard zones, albeit at a larger scale.

  3. Fully coupled heat conduction and deformation analyses of nonlinear viscoelastic composites

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Kamran; Muliana, Anastasia Hanifah

    2012-01-01

    This study presents an integrated micromechanical model-finite element framework for analyzing coupled heat conduction and deformations of particle-reinforced composite structures. A simplified micromechanical model consisting of four sub-cells, i

  4. A materials perspective of Martyniaceae fruits: Exploring structural and micromechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horbens, Melanie; Eder, Michaela; Neinhuis, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    Several species of the plant family Martyniaceae are characterised by unique lignified capsules with hook-shaped extensions that interlock with hooves and ankles of large mammals to disperse the seeds. The arrangement of fruit endocarp fibre tissues is exceptional and intriguing among plants. Structure-function-relationships of these slender, curved, but mechanically highly stressed fruit extensions are of particular interest that may inspire advanced biomimetic composite materials. In the present study, we analyse mechanical properties and fracture behaviour of the hook-shaped fruit extensions under different load conditions. The results are correlated with calculated stress distributions, the specific cell wall structure, and chemical composition, providing a detailed interpretation of the complex fruit tissue microstructure. At the cell wall level, both a large microfibril angle and greater strain rates resulted in Young's moduli of 4-9 GPa, leading to structural plasticity. Longitudinally arranged fibre bundles contribute to a great tensile strength. At the tissue level, transversely oriented fibres absorb radial stresses upon bending, whereas cells encompass and pervade longitudinal fibre bundles, thus, stabilise them against buckling. During bending and torsion, microcracks between axial fibre bundles are probably spanned analogous to a circular anchor. Our study fathoms a highly specialized plant structure, substantiating former assumptions about epizoochory as dispersal mode. While the increased flexibility allows for proper attachment of fruits during dynamical locomotion, the high strength and stability prevent a premature failure due to heavy loads exerted by the animal. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Failures and Defects in the Building Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kirsten

    2009-01-01

    Function failures, defects, mistakes and poor communication are major problems for the construction sector. As the empirical element in the research, a large construction site was observed from the very start to the very end and all failures and defects of a certain size were recorded and analysed...

  6. Heart failure - medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... You will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken ...

  7. Computational micromechanics analysis of electron hopping and interfacial damage induced piezoresistive response in carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaurasia, A K; Seidel, G D; Ren, X

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-polymer nanocomposites have been observed to exhibit an effective macroscale piezoresistive response, i.e., change in macroscale resistivity when subjected to applied deformation. The macroscale piezoresistive response of CNT-polymer nanocomposites leads to deformation/strain sensing capabilities. It is believed that the nanoscale phenomenon of electron hopping is the major driving force behind the observed macroscale piezoresistivity of such nanocomposites. Additionally, CNT-polymer nanocomposites provide damage sensing capabilities because of local changes in electron hopping pathways at the nanoscale because of initiation/evolution of damage. The primary focus of the current work is to explore the effect of interfacial separation and damage at the nanoscale CNT-polymer interface on the effective macroscale piezoresistive response. Interfacial separation and damage are allowed to evolve at the CNT-polymer interface through coupled electromechanical cohesive zones, within a finite element based computational micromechanics framework, resulting in electron hopping based current density across the separated CNT-polymer interface. The macroscale effective material properties and gauge factors are evaluated using micromechanics techniques based on electrostatic energy equivalence. The impact of the electron hopping mechanism, nanoscale interface separation and damage evolution on the effective nanocomposite electrostatic and piezoresistive response is studied in comparison with the perfectly bonded interface. The effective electrostatic/piezoresistive response for the perfectly bonded interface is obtained based on a computational micromechanics model developed in the authors’ earlier work. It is observed that the macroscale effective gauge factors are highly sensitive to strain induced formation/disruption of electron hopping pathways, interface separation and the initiation/evolution of interfacial damage. (paper)

  8. Micro-Mechanical Voltage Tunable Fabry-Perot Filters Formed in (111) Silicon. Degree awarded by Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, James D.

    1997-01-01

    The MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems) technology is quickly evolving as a viable means to combine micro-mechanical and micro-optical elements on the same chip. One MEMS technology that has recently gained attention by the research community is the micro-mechanical Fabry-Perot optical filter. A MEMS based Fabry-Perot consists of a vertically integrated structure composed of two mirrors separated by an air gap. Wavelength tuning is achieved by applying a bias between the two mirrors resulting in an attractive electrostatic force which pulls the mirrors closer. In this work, we present a new micro-mechanical Fabry-Perot structure which is simple to fabricate and is integratable with low cost silicon photodetectors and transistors. The structure consists of a movable gold coated oxide cantilever for the top mirror and a stationary Au/Ni plated silicon bottom mirror. The fabrication process is single mask level, self aligned, and requires only one grown or deposited layer. Undercutting of the oxide cantilever is carried out by a combination of RIE and anisotropic KOH etching of the (111) silicon substrate. Metallization of the mirrors is provided by thermal evaporation and electroplating. The optical and electrical characteristics of the fabricated devices were studied and show promissing results. A wavelength shift of 120nm with 53V applied bias was demonstrated by one device geometry using 6.27 micrometer air gap. The finesse of the structure was 2.4. Modulation bandwidths ranging from 91KHz to greater than 920KHz were also observed. Theoretical calculations show that if mirror reflectivity, smoothness, and parallelism are improved, a finesse of 30 is attainable. The predictions also suggest that a reduction of the air gap to 1 micrometer results in an increased wavelength tuning range of 175 nm with a CMOS compatible 4.75V.

  9. Micromechanical characteristics of an Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-TiNi ceramic produced in a high-pressure chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barashkov, G.A.; Neshpor, V.S.; Berdikov, V.F.; Pushkarev, O.I.; Lavrenova, E. A.

    1987-03-01

    The micromechanical characteristics of an Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-TiNi ceramic produced in high-pressure chambers under conditions of forced mass transfer are investigated experimentally using the microindentation method. The objective of the study is to use micromechanical characteristics to determine the time required for producing an Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-TiNi ceramic with a fully formed structure. It is found that the process of forced mass transfer and crystallization is completed within 60-120 s.

  10. A microcontroller-based interface circuit for data acquisition and control of a micromechanical thermal flow sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asimakopoulos, P; Kaltsas, G; Nassiopoulou, A G

    2005-01-01

    In the present work, a special microcontroller-based data acquisition and control system was designed and fabricated, for fast and accurate flow measurements with programmable modes of operation. The system can apply predetermined power to the heater and simultaneously is able of monitoring both the thermopile signal and the heater current. An RS232 connection was also implemented for the communication with the outside world. The interface circuit was adapted to the micromechanical flow sensor for evaluation. Various sensor parameters were extracted in both laminar and turbulent flow conditions. The sensor responses with three operation modes (constant voltage, power and temperature) were also obtained

  11. A microcontroller-based interface circuit for data acquisition and control of a micromechanical thermal flow sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asimakopoulos, P.; Kaltsas, G.; Nassiopoulou, A. G.

    2005-01-01

    In the present work, a special microcontroller-based data acquisition and control system was designed and fabricated, for fast and accurate flow measurements with programmable modes of operation. The system can apply predetermined power to the heater and simultaneously is able of monitoring both the thermopile signal and the heater current. An RS232 connection was also implemented for the communication with the outside world. The interface circuit was adapted to the micromechanical flow sensor for evaluation. Various sensor parameters were extracted in both laminar and turbulent flow conditions. The sensor responses with three operation modes (constant voltage, power and temperature) were also obtained.

  12. Passive micromechanical tags. An investigation into writing information at nanometer resolution on micrometer size objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmieder, R.W.; Bastasz, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    The authors have completed a 3-year study of the technology related to the development of micron-sized passive micromechanical tags. The project was motivated by the discovery in 1990 by the present authors that low energy, high charge state ions (e.g., Xe +44 ) can produce nanometer-size damage sites on solid surfaces, and the realization that a pattern of these sites represents information. It was envisioned that extremely small, chemically inert, mechanical tags carrying a large label could be fabricated for a variety of applications, including tracking of controlled substances, document verification, process control, research, and engineering. Potential applications exist in the data storage, chemical, food, security, and other industries. The goals of this project were fully accomplished, and they are fully documented here. The work was both experimental and developmental. Most of the experimental effort was a search for appropriate tag materials. Several good materials were found, and the upper limits of information density were determined (ca. 10 12 bit/cm 2 ). Most of the developmental work involved inventing systems and strategies for using these tags, and compiling available technologies for implementing them. The technology provided herein is application-specific: first, the application must be specified, then the tag can be developed for it. The project was not intended to develop a single tag for a single application or for all possible applications. Rather, it was meant to provide the enabling technology for fabricating tags for a range of applications. The results of this project provide sufficient information to proceed directly with such development

  13. Passive micromechanical tags. An investigation into writing information at nanometer resolution on micrometer size objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmieder, R.W.; Bastasz, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    The authors have completed a 3-year study of the technology related to the development of micron-sized passive micromechanical tags. The project was motivated by the discovery in 1990 by the present authors that low energy, high charge state ions (e.g., Xe{sup +44}) can produce nanometer-size damage sites on solid surfaces, and the realization that a pattern of these sites represents information. It was envisioned that extremely small, chemically inert, mechanical tags carrying a large label could be fabricated for a variety of applications, including tracking of controlled substances, document verification, process control, research, and engineering. Potential applications exist in the data storage, chemical, food, security, and other industries. The goals of this project were fully accomplished, and they are fully documented here. The work was both experimental and developmental. Most of the experimental effort was a search for appropriate tag materials. Several good materials were found, and the upper limits of information density were determined (ca. 10{sup 12} bit/cm{sup 2}). Most of the developmental work involved inventing systems and strategies for using these tags, and compiling available technologies for implementing them. The technology provided herein is application-specific: first, the application must be specified, then the tag can be developed for it. The project was not intended to develop a single tag for a single application or for all possible applications. Rather, it was meant to provide the enabling technology for fabricating tags for a range of applications. The results of this project provide sufficient information to proceed directly with such development.

  14. Introduction to porous media micro-mechanics; Introduction a la micromecanique des milieux poreux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dormieux, L.; Bourgeois, E.

    2002-07-01

    The study of porous materials can be considered at two different scales: the microscopic scale characterized by the size of the pores and by the domains occupied by the solid and the fluids, and the macroscopic scale which is controlled by the size of the structures under study (backfilling, foundations, dams, oil reservoirs or sedimentary basins). An alternative way, explored since about 30 years, consists in searching the formulation of macroscopic laws in the framework of a scale change approach. This is the point of view considered in this book which proposes a micro-mechanical approach of the modeling of porous environments based on various techniques of homogenization of the heterogenous materials with a random or periodical microstructure: 1 - macroscopic description of porous environments (space scales, skeleton deformation and kinematics, kinematics of fluid components, conservation laws, internal stresses); 2 - scale change techniques (representative elementary volume, averaging operation, application to conservation laws); 3 - Darcy transport (phenomenological approach of the Darcy law, Darcy law interpretation at the microscopic scale, fluid and solid phases interaction, flows inside a rigid porous environment, application); 4 - diffusive transport of a fluid component (solute transport equation, modeling of the macroscopic diffusive flux by scale change, application to pollutant diffusion); 5 - linear poro-elastic behaviour (first approach: empty sphere model, generalisation, estimation of poro-elastic characteristics); 6 - evolution problems in poro-elasticity (problem formulation, resolution, study of poro-elastic consolidation, tide response of an underwater massif, modeling of the formation of a syncline, study of the folding back of a sheet, numerical resolution of coupled problems, realization of a Scilab script); 7 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  15. Comparative Laboratory and Numerical Simulations of Shearing Granular Fault Gouge: Micromechanical Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, J. K.; Marone, C. J.; Guo, Y.; Anthony, J. L.; Knuth, M. W.

    2004-12-01

    Laboratory studies of granular shear zones have provided significant insight into fault zone processes and the mechanics of earthquakes. The micromechanisms of granular deformation are more difficult to ascertain, but have been hypothesized based on known variations in boundary conditions, particle properties and geometries, and mechanical behavior. Numerical simulations using particle dynamics methods (PDM) can offer unique views into deforming granular shear zones, revealing the precise details of granular microstructures, particle interactions, and packings, which can be correlated with macroscopic mechanical behavior. Here, we describe a collaborative program of comparative laboratory and numerical experiments of granular shear using idealized materials, i.e., glass beads, glass rods or pasta, and angular sand. Both sets of experiments are carried out under similar initial and boundary conditions in a non-fracturing stress regime. Phenomenologically, the results of the two sets of experiments are very similar. Peak friction values vary as a function of particle dimensionality (1-D vs. 2-D vs. 3-D), particle angularity, particle size and size distributions, boundary roughness, and shear zone thickness. Fluctuations in shear strength during an experiment, i.e., stick-slip events, can be correlated with distinct changes in the nature, geometries, and durability of grain bridges that support the shear zone walls. Inclined grain bridges are observed to form, and to support increasing loads, during gradual increases in assemblage strength. Collapse of an individual grain bridge leads to distinct localization of strain, generating a rapidly propagating shear surface that cuts across multiple grain bridges, accounting for the sudden drop in strength. The distribution of particle sizes within an assemblage, along with boundary roughness and its periodicity, influence the rate of formation and dissipation of grain bridges, thereby controlling friction variations during

  16. Effect of fibre arrangement on the multiaxial fatigue of fibrous composites: a micromechanical computational model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Brighenti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Structural components made of fibre-reinforced materials are frequently used in engineering applications. Fibre-reinforced composites are multiphase materials, and complex mechanical phenomena take place at limit conditions but also during normal service situations, especially under fatigue loading, causing a progressive deterioration and damage. Under repeated loading, the degradation mainly occurs in the matrix material and at the fibre-matrix interface, and such a degradation has to be quantified for design structural assessment purposes. To this end, damage mechanics and fracture mechanics theories can be suitably applied to examine such a problem. Damage concepts can be applied to the matrix mechanical characteristics and, by adopting a 3-D mixed mode fracture description of the fibre-matrix detachment, fatigue fracture mechanics concepts can be used to determine the progressive fibre debonding responsible for the loss of load bearing capacity of the reinforcing phase. In the present paper, a micromechanical model is used to evaluate the unixial or multiaxial fatigue behaviour of structures with equi-oriented or randomly distributed fibres. The spatial fibre arrangement is taken into account through a statistical description of their orientation angles for which a Gaussian-like distribution is assumed, whereas the mechanical effect of the fibres on the composite is accounted for by a homogenization approach aimed at obtaining the macroscopic elastic constants of the material. The composite material behaves as an isotropic one for randomly distributed fibres, while it is transversally isotropic for unidirectional fibres. The fibre arrangement in the structural component influences the fatigue life with respect to the biaxiality ratio for multiaxial constant amplitude fatigue loading. One representative parametric example is discussed.

  17. Consequences of Location-Dependent Organ of Corti Micro-Mechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanju Liu

    Full Text Available The cochlea performs frequency analysis and amplification of sounds. The graded stiffness of the basilar membrane along the cochlear length underlies the frequency-location relationship of the mammalian cochlea. The somatic motility of outer hair cell is central for cochlear amplification. Despite two to three orders of magnitude change in the basilar membrane stiffness, the force capacity of the outer hair cell's somatic motility, is nearly invariant over the cochlear length. It is puzzling how actuators with a constant force capacity can operate under such a wide stiffness range. We hypothesize that the organ of Corti sets the mechanical conditions so that the outer hair cell's somatic motility effectively interacts with the media of traveling waves-the basilar membrane and the tectorial membrane. To test this hypothesis, a computational model of the gerbil cochlea was developed that incorporates organ of Corti structural mechanics, cochlear fluid dynamics, and hair cell electro-physiology. The model simulations showed that the micro-mechanical responses of the organ of Corti are different along the cochlear length. For example, the top surface of the organ of Corti vibrated more than the bottom surface at the basal (high frequency location, but the amplitude ratio was reversed at the apical (low frequency location. Unlike the basilar membrane stiffness varying by a factor of 1700 along the cochlear length, the stiffness of the organ of Corti complex felt by the outer hair cell remained between 1.5 and 0.4 times the outer hair cell stiffness. The Y-shaped structure in the organ of Corti formed by outer hair cell, Deiters cell and its phalange was the primary determinant of the elastic reactance imposed on the outer hair cells. The stiffness and geometry of the Deiters cell and its phalange affected cochlear amplification differently depending on the location.

  18. Preparing for Failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, L.T.; Manson, A.W.

    2006-01-01

    Risk management is one of the most complex project management processes, requiring rigorous management and discipline. Unfortunately, for many organizations, the risk management process has become contaminated by poor management practices, an absence of meaningful risk assessments, meaningless risk event descriptions, incomplete and vague risk impact analyses, poor follow through on risk mitigation activities and a general lack of attention to accuracy, completeness and quality. At this point, the risk register, instead of being a key tool used by the organization to systematically identify and eliminate risk, while exploiting opportunities, has become a list of pre-prepared excuses based on the repeat of failures encountered on past projects. However, organizations are not condemned to repeat past failures. By returning to the basics of risk management, and through the application of some basic management guidelines, the risk register-instead of being an 'Excuse Register' - can become the cornerstone of a comprehensive risk management program to promote a systematic, pro-active approach within an organization that will result in accomplishing mitigation activities, reducing risk and gaining advantage through opportunities. (authors)

  19. Failure analysis for WWER-fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehmert, J.; Huettig, W.

    1986-10-01

    If the fuel defect rate proves significantly high, failure analysis has to be performed in order to trace down the defect causes, to implement corrective actions, and to take measures of failure prevention. Such analyses are work-consuming and very skill-demanding technical tasks, which require examination methods and devices excellently developed and a rich stock of experience in evaluation of features of damage. For that this work specifies the procedure of failure analyses in detail. Moreover prerequisites and experimental equipment for the investigation of WWER-type fuel elements are described. (author)

  20. Advanced Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Advanced Heart Failure Updated:May 9,2017 When heart failure (HF) ... Making This content was last reviewed May 2017. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  1. Immune mediated liver failure

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaojing; Ning, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Liver failure is a clinical syndrome of various etiologies, manifesting as jaundice, encephalopathy, coagulopathy and circulatory dysfunction, which result in subsequent multiorgan failure. Clinically, liver failure is classified into four categories: acute, subacute, acute-on-chronic and chronic liver failure. Massive hepatocyte death is considered to be the core event in the development of liver failure, which occurs when the extent of hepatocyte death is beyond the liver regenerative capac...

  2. Chronic heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Hopper, Ingrid; Easton, Kellie

    2017-01-01

    1. The common symptoms and signs of chronic heart failure are dyspnoea, ankle swelling, raised jugular venous pressure and basal crepitations. Other conditions may be confused with chronic heart failure, including dependent oedema or oedema due to renal or hepatic disease. Shortness of breath may be due to respiratory disease or severe anaemia. Heart failure secondary to lung disease (cor pulmonale) should be distinguished from congestive cardiac failure. Heart failure may also present with l...

  3. Nonlinear micromechanics-based finite element analysis of the interfacial behaviour of FRP-strengthened reinforced concrete beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El Baky, Hussien

    This research work is devoted to theoretical and numerical studies on the flexural behaviour of FRP-strengthened concrete beams. The objectives of this research are to extend and generalize the results of simple experiments, to recommend new design guidelines based on accurate numerical tools, and to enhance our comprehension of the bond performance of such beams. These numerical tools can be exploited to bridge the existing gaps in the development of analysis and modelling approaches that can predict the behaviour of FRP-strengthened concrete beams. The research effort here begins with the formulation of a concrete model and development of FRP/concrete interface constitutive laws, followed by finite element simulations for beams strengthened in flexure. Finally, a statistical analysis is carried out taking the advantage of the aforesaid numerical tools to propose design guidelines. In this dissertation, an alternative incremental formulation of the M4 microplane model is proposed to overcome the computational complexities associated with the original formulation. Through a number of numerical applications, this incremental formulation is shown to be equivalent to the original M4 model. To assess the computational efficiency of the incremental formulation, the "arc-length" numerical technique is also considered and implemented in the original Bazant et al. [2000] M4 formulation. Finally, the M4 microplane concrete model is coded in FORTRAN and implemented as a user-defined subroutine into the commercial software package ADINA, Version 8.4. Then this subroutine is used with the finite element package to analyze various applications involving FRP strengthening. In the first application a nonlinear micromechanics-based finite element analysis is performed to investigate the interfacial behaviour of FRP/concrete joints subjected to direct shear loadings. The intention of this part is to develop a reliable bond--slip model for the FRP/concrete interface. The bond

  4. Failure analysis and failure prevention in electric power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, C.A. Jr.; Becker, D.G.; Besuner, P.M.; Cipolla, R.C.; Egan, G.R.; Gupta, P.; Johnson, D.P.; Omry, U.; Tetelman, A.S.; Rettig, T.W.; Peters, D.C.

    1977-01-01

    New methods have been developed and applied to better quantify and increase the reliability, safety, and availability of electric power plants. Present and potential problem areas have been identified both by development of an improved computerized data base of malfunctions in nuclear power plants and by detailed metallurgical and mechanical failure analyses of selected problems. Significant advances in the accuracy and speed of structural analyses have been made through development and application of the boundary integral equation and influence function methods of stress and fracture mechanics analyses. The currently specified flaw evaluation procedures of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code have been computerized. Results obtained from these procedures for evaluation of specific in-service inspection indications have been compared with results obtained utilizing the improved analytical methods. Mathematical methods have also been developed to describe and analyze the statistical variations in materials properties and in component loading, and uncertainties in the flaw size that might be passed by quality assurance systems. These new methods have been combined to develop accurate failure rate predictions based upon probabilistic fracture mechanics. Improved failure prevention strategies have been formulated by combining probabilistic fracture mechanics and cost optimization techniques. The approach has been demonstrated by optimizing the nondestructive inspection level with regard to both reliability and cost. (Auth.)

  5. Effects of fabrication on the mechanics, microstructure and micromechanical environment of small intestinal submucosa scaffolds for vascular tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Palencia, Diana M; D'Amore, Antonio; González-Mancera, Andrés; Wagner, William R; Briceño, Juan C

    2014-08-22

    In small intestinal submucosa scaffolds for functional tissue engineering, the impact of scaffold fabrication parameters on success rate may be related to the mechanotransductory properties of the final microstructural organization of collagen fibers. We hypothesized that two fabrication parameters, 1) preservation (P) or removal (R) of a dense collagen layer present in SIS and 2) SIS in a final dehydrated (D) or hydrated (H) state, have an effect on scaffold void area, microstructural anisotropy (fiber alignment) and mechanical anisotropy (global mechanical compliance). We further integrated our experimental measurements in a constitutive model to explore final effects on the micromechanical environment inside the scaffold volume. Our results indicated that PH scaffolds might exhibit recurrent and large force fluctuations between layers (up to 195 pN), while fluctuations in RH scaffolds might be larger (up to 256 pN) but not as recurrent. In contrast, both PD and RD groups were estimated to produce scarcer and smaller fluctuations (not larger than 50 pN). We concluded that the hydration parameter strongly affects the micromechanics of SIS and that an adequate choice of fabrication parameters, assisted by the herein developed method, might leverage the use of SIS for functional tissue engineering applications, where forces at the cellular level are of concern in the guidance of new tissue formation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Devices for measuring the capacitance of micromechanical sensors of mobile robots navigation systems and its deviation from the nominal value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudyk A.V.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article describes methods of constructing devices for measuring the capacitance of micromechanical sensors (accelerometers and gyros mobile robots navigation systems and its deviation from the nominal value. A modified diagram of a sigma-delta modulator is offered. It realizes a direct connection capacitive sensor connection to the sigma-delta converter, as a result increased resolution, accuracy and linearity of the conversion. This interface is insensitive to the value of capacitance between the sensor leads and common wire or leakage current to a common wire. Variants of expansion as the nominal of the test capacity and the range of conversion of the relative deviation of the nominal capacity using two integrators are offered. The versions of circuit implementation devices for measuring the capacitance deviation of a micromechanical sensor from the nominal value are designed on the basis of the completed integrated circuit AD7745 / AD7746 and AD7747 of Analog Devices, CAV414 / 424 firm Analog Microelectronics and precision analog microcontroller ADuCM360 / CM361 company ARM Limited.

  7. Heart failure - surgeries and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery; HF - surgery; Intra-aortic balloon pumps - heart failure; IABP - heart failure; Catheter based assist devices - heart failure ... problem may cause heart failure or make heart failure worse. Heart valve surgery may be needed to repair or ...

  8. Micromechanisms of Crack Growth in Ceramics and Glasses in Corrosive Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    Resistance Mecanique du Verre et les Moyens de l’Amelioree, Union Scientifique Continentale du Verre , Charleroix, Belgium, (1962). 8. B. A. Proctor, I...exhibit similar types of delayed failure curves. Failure occurs most rapidly at high loads. Below a critical value of the load known as the stress...fracture for the three types of materials differ greatly. Polymers and metals have plastic zones at their crack tips, so that stress corrosion

  9. Acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Fin Stolze; Bjerring, Peter Nissen

    2011-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) results in a multitude of serious complications that often lead to multi-organ failure. This brief review focuses on the pathophysiological processes in ALF and how to manage these.......Acute liver failure (ALF) results in a multitude of serious complications that often lead to multi-organ failure. This brief review focuses on the pathophysiological processes in ALF and how to manage these....

  10. In Support of Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Allison

    2013-01-01

    In this essay, I propose a concerted effort to begin devising a theory and pedagogy of failure. I review the discourse of failure in Western culture as well as in composition pedagogy, ultimately suggesting that failure is not simply a judgement or indication of rank but is a relational, affect-bearing concept with tremendous relevance to…

  11. [Coupled Analysis of Fluid-Structure Interaction of a Micro-Mechanical Valve for Glaucoma Drainage Devices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewert, S; Sämann, M; Schmidt, W; Stiehm, M; Falke, K; Grabow, N; Guthoff, R; Schmitz, K-P

    2015-12-01

    Glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. In therapeutically refractory cases, alloplastic glaucoma drainage devices (GDD) are being increasingly used to decrease intraocular pressure. Current devices are mainly limited by fibrotic encapsulation and postoperative hypotension. Preliminary studies have described the development of a glaucoma microstent to control aqueous humour drainage from the anterior chamber into the suprachoroidal space. One focus of these studies was on the design of a micro-mechanical valve placed in the anterior chamber to inhibit postoperative hypotension. The present report describes the coupled analysis of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) as basis for future improvements in the design micro-mechanical valves. FSI analysis was carried out with ANSYS 14.5 software. Solid and fluid geometry were combined in a model, and the corresponding material properties of silicone (Silastic Rx-50) and water at room temperature were assigned. The meshing of the solid and fluid domains was carried out in accordance with the results of a convergence study with tetrahedron elements. Structural and fluid mechanical boundary conditions completed the model. The FSI analysis takes into account geometric non-linearity and adaptive remeshing to consider changing geometry. A valve opening pressure of 3.26 mmHg was derived from the FSI analysis and correlates well with the results of preliminary experimental fluid mechanical studies. Flow resistance was calculated from non-linear pressure-flow characteristics as 8.5 × 10(-3) mmHg/µl  · min(-1) and 2.7 × 10(-3) mmHg/µl  · min(-1), respectively before and after valve opening pressure is exceeded. FSI analysis indicated leakage flow before valve opening, which is due to the simplified model geometry. The presented bidirectional coupled FSI analysis is a powerful tool for the development of new designs of micro-mechanical valves for GDD and may help to minimise the time and cost

  12. The failure of earthquake failure models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, J.

    2001-01-01

    In this study I show that simple heuristic models and numerical calculations suggest that an entire class of commonly invoked models of earthquake failure processes cannot explain triggering of seismicity by transient or "dynamic" stress changes, such as stress changes associated with passing seismic waves. The models of this class have the common feature that the physical property characterizing failure increases at an accelerating rate when a fault is loaded (stressed) at a constant rate. Examples include models that invoke rate state friction or subcritical crack growth, in which the properties characterizing failure are slip or crack length, respectively. Failure occurs when the rate at which these grow accelerates to values exceeding some critical threshold. These accelerating failure models do not predict the finite durations of dynamically triggered earthquake sequences (e.g., at aftershock or remote distances). Some of the failure models belonging to this class have been used to explain static stress triggering of aftershocks. This may imply that the physical processes underlying dynamic triggering differs or that currently applied models of static triggering require modification. If the former is the case, we might appeal to physical mechanisms relying on oscillatory deformations such as compaction of saturated fault gouge leading to pore pressure increase, or cyclic fatigue. However, if dynamic and static triggering mechanisms differ, one still needs to ask why static triggering models that neglect these dynamic mechanisms appear to explain many observations. If the static and dynamic triggering mechanisms are the same, perhaps assumptions about accelerating failure and/or that triggering advances the failure times of a population of inevitable earthquakes are incorrect.

  13. Biomarker Guided Therapy in Chronic Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bektas, Sema

    2015-01-01

    This review article addresses the question of whether biomarker-guided therapy is ready for clinical implementation in chronic heart failure. The most well-known biomarkers in heart failure are natriuretic peptides, namely B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal pro-BNP. They are well-established in the diagnostic process of acute heart failure and prediction of disease prognosis. They may also be helpful in screening patients at risk of developing heart failure. Although studied by 11 small- to medium-scale trials resulting in several positive meta-analyses, it is less well-established whether natriuretic peptides are also helpful for guiding chronic heart failure therapy. This uncertainty is expressed by differences in European and American guideline recommendations. In addition to reviewing the evidence surrounding the use of natriuretic peptides to guide chronic heart failure therapy, this article gives an overview of the shortcomings of the trials, how the results may be interpreted and the future directions necessary to fill the current gaps in knowledge. Therapy guidance in chronic heart failure using other biomarkers has not been prospectively tested to date. Emerging biomarkers, such as galectin-3 and soluble ST2, might be useful in this regard, as suggested by several post-hoc analyses. PMID:28785440

  14. Development of Circular Disk Model for Polymeric Nanocomposites and Micromechanical Analysis of Residual Stresses in Reinforced Fibers with Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Ghasemi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Circular Disk Model (CDM has been developed to determine the residual stresses in twophase and three- phase unit cell. The two-phase unit cell is consisting of carbon fiber and matrix. The three-phase unit cell is consisting of carbon fiber, carbon nanotubes and matrix in which the carbon fiber is reinforced with the carbon nanotube using electrophoresis method. For different volume fractions of carbon nanotubes, thermal properties of the carbon fiber and carbon nanotube in different linear and lateral directions and also different placement conditions of carbon nanotubes have been considered. Also, residual stresses distribution in two and three phases has been studied, separately. Results of micromechanical analysis of residual stresses obtained from Finite Element Method and CDM, confirms the evaluation and development of three dimensional CDM.

  15. Understanding the mechanisms that change the conductivity of damaged ITO-coated polymeric films: A micro-mechanical investigation

    KAUST Repository

    Nasr Saleh, Mohamed

    2014-11-01

    Degradation from mechanical loading of transparent electrodes made of indium tin oxide (ITO) endangers the integrity of any material based on these electrodes, including flexible organic solar cells. However, how different schemes of degradation change the conductivity of ITO devices remains unclear. We propose a systematic micro-mechanics-based approach to clarify the relationship between degradation and changes in electrical resistance. By comparing experimentally measured channel crack densities to changes in electrical resistance returned by the different micro-mechanical schemes, we highlight the key role played by the residual conductivity in the interface between the ITO electrode and its substrate after delamination. We demonstrate that channel cracking alone does not explain the experimental observations. Our results indicate that delamination has to take place between the ITO electrode and the substrate layers and that the residual conductivity of this delaminated interface plays a major role in changes in electrical resistance of the degraded device. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Welcome to the 2014 volume of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Weileun

    2014-01-01

    It is my great honor to serve as the Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering (JMM) starting from 2014, the 24th year of the journal. I would also like to take this opportunity to convey my sincere appreciation to (i) the past editors for their vision to bring this journal to be such a significant publication and research platform in MEMS and microsystems technology; (ii) the reviewers for their precious time and valuable comments that enhance the publication quality of this journal; and (iii) the authors for their choice to publish their best work in this journal and their contribution to our community; (iv) the readers who extend the journal's impact not only to their research fields but to industry and all human society; and finally (v) the publication team at IOP Publishing. As the sixth Editor-in-Chief, I will aim to continue my predecessors' leadership and guidance, and further extend the distinguished reputation of JMM. In the past year, the number of submissions to this journal neared 900, an increase on last year, with the acceptance number of 401 (an acceptance rate lower than 50%). I would also like to point out the articles published in 2013 has jumped up to 383, showing a healthy growth compared to 365 in year 2012. To achieve this progress, the average times of the receipt-first decision and the receipt-accept confirmations are 39 days and 104 days, respectively. Furthermore, the average time of the accept-web publication is within 26 days, which is a considerable improvement in this journal. All abovementioned numbers together become a very attractive feature of this journal. To deal with the rapid expansion of the incoming papers and associated reviewing process we have tremendous help from the members of the journal's Editorial Board and referees worldwide, whom I would like to acknowledge since their well-constructed evaluation is of great importance to continuously enhancing the quality of the journal. Of course it would

  17. Behaviour and damage of aged austenitic-ferritic steels: a micro-mechanical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugat, St.

    2000-12-01

    The austenitic-ferritic steels are used in the PWR primary cooling system. At the running temperature (320 C), they are submitted to a slow aging, which leads to the embrittlement of the ferritic phase. This embrittlement leads to a decrease of the mechanical properties, in particular of the crack resistance of the austenitic-ferritic steels. The damage and rupture of the austenitic-ferritic steels have been approached at the ENSMP by the works of P. Joly (1992) and of L. Devilliers-Guerville (1998). These works have allowed to reveal a damage heterogeneity which induces a strong dispersion on the ductilities and the toughnesses as well as on the scale effects. Modeling including the damage growth kinetics measured experimentally, have allowed to verify these effects. Nevertheless, they do not consider the two-phase character of the material and do not include a physical model of the cleavage cracks growth which appear in the embrittled ferrite. In this study, is proposed a description of the material allowing to treat these aspects while authorizing the structure calculation. In a first part, the material is studied. The use of the ESBD allows to specify the complex morphology of these steels and crystal orientation relations between the two phases. Moreover, it is shown that the two phases keep the same crystal orientation in the zones, called bicrystals, whose size varies between 500 μm and 1 mm. The study of the sliding lines, coupled to the ESBD, allows to specify too the deformation modes of the two phases. At last, tensile and tensile-compression tests at various deformation range are carried out to characterize the macroscopic mechanical behaviour of these materials. Then, a micro-mechanical modeling of the material behaviour is proposed. This one takes into account the three scales identified at the preceding chapter. The first scale, corresponding to the laths is described as a monocrystal whose behaviour includes both an isotropic and a kinematic strain

  18. Micro-mechanisms of Surface Defects Induced on Aluminum Alloys during Plastic Deformation at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gali, Olufisayo A.

    Near-surface deformed layers developed on aluminum alloys significantly influence the corrosion and tribological behavior as well as reduce the surface quality of the rolled aluminum. The evolution of the near-surface microstructures induced on magnesium containing aluminum alloys during thermomechanical processing has been investigated with the aim generating an understanding of the influence of individual forming parameters on its evolution and examine the microstructure of the roll coating induced on the mating steel roll through material transfer during rolling. The micro-mechanisms related to the various features of near-surface microstructure developed during tribological conditions of the simulated hot rolling process were identified. Thermomechanical processing experiments were performed with the aid of hot rolling (operating temperature: 550 to 460 °C, 4, 10 and 20 rolling pass schedules) and hot forming (operating temperature: 350 to 545 °C, strain rate: 4 x 10-2 s-1) tribo-simulators. The surface, near-surface features and material transfer induced during the elevated temperature plastic deformation were examined and characterized employing optical interferometry, SEM/EDS, FIB and TEM. Near-surface features characterized on the rolled aluminum alloys included; cracks, fractured intermetallic particles, aluminum nano-particles, oxide decorated grain boundaries, rolled-in oxides, shingles and blisters. These features were related to various individual rolling parameters which included, the work roll roughness, which induced the formation of shingles, rolling marks and were responsible for the redistribution of surface oxide and the enhancements of the depth of the near-surface damage. The enhanced stresses and strains experienced during rolling were related to the formation and propagation of cracks, the nanocrystalline structure of the near-surface layers and aluminum nano-particles. The mechanism of the evolution of the near-surface microstructure were

  19. micro-mechanical experimental investigation and modelling of strain and damage of argillaceous rocks under combined hydric and mechanical loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.

    2012-01-01

    The hydro-mechanical behavior of argillaceous rocks, which are possible host rocks for underground radioactive nuclear waste storage, is investigated by means of micro-mechanical experimental investigations and modellings. Strain fields at the micrometric scale of the composite structure of this rock, are measured by the combination of environmental scanning electron microscopy, in situ testing and digital image correlation technique. The evolution of argillaceous rocks under pure hydric loading is first investigated. The strain field is strongly heterogeneous and manifests anisotropy. The observed nonlinear deformation at high relative humidity (RH) is related not only to damage, but also to the nonlinear swelling of the clay mineral itself, controlled by different local mechanisms depending on RH. Irreversible deformations are observed during hydric cycles, as well as a network of microcracks located in the bulk of the clay matrix and/or at the inclusion-matrix interface. Second, the local deformation field of the material under combined hydric and mechanical loadings is quantified. Three types of deformation bands are evidenced under mechanical loading, either normal to stress direction (compaction), parallel (microcracking) or inclined (shear). Moreover, they are strongly controlled by the water content of the material: shear bands are in particular prone to appear at high RH states. In view of understanding the mechanical interactions a local scale, the material is modeled as a composite made of non-swelling elastic inclusions embedded in an elastic swelling clay matrix. The internal stress field induced by swelling strain incompatibilities between inclusions and matrix, as well as the overall deformation, is numerically computed at equilibrium but also during the transient stage associated with a moisture gradient. An analytical micro-mechanical model based on Eshelby's solution is proposed. In addition, 2D finite element computations are performed. Results

  20. Managing Feelings about Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Heart Failure Module 6: Managing Feelings About Heart Failure Download Module Order Hardcopy Heart failure can cause ... professional help for emotional problems. Common Feelings About Heart Failure It is common for people to feel depressed ...

  1. Probabilistic analysis of ''common mode failures''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easterling, R.G.

    1978-01-01

    Common mode failure is a topic of considerable interest in reliability and safety analyses of nuclear reactors. Common mode failures are often discussed in terms of examples: two systems fail simultaneously due to an external event such as an earthquake; two components in redundant channels fail because of a common manufacturing defect; two systems fail because a component common to both fails; the failure of one system increases the stress on other systems and they fail. The common thread running through these is a dependence of some sort--statistical or physical--among multiple failure events. However, the nature of the dependence is not the same in all these examples. An attempt is made to model situations, such as the above examples, which have been termed ''common mode failures.'' In doing so, it is found that standard probability concepts and terms, such as statistically dependent and independent events, and conditional and unconditional probabilities, suffice. Thus, it is proposed that the term ''common mode failures'' be dropped, at least from technical discussions of these problems. A corollary is that the complementary term, ''random failures,'' should also be dropped. The mathematical model presented may not cover all situations which have been termed ''common mode failures,'' but provides insight into the difficulty of obtaining estimates of the probabilities of these events

  2. BILAM: a composite laminate failure-analysis code using bilinear stress-strain approximations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaughlin, P.V. Jr.; Dasgupta, A.; Chun, Y.W.

    1980-10-01

    The BILAM code which uses constant strain laminate analysis to generate in-plane load/deformation or stress/strain history of composite laminates to the point of laminate failure is described. The program uses bilinear stress-strain curves to model layer stress-strain behavior. Composite laminates are used for flywheels. The use of this computer code will help to develop data on the behavior of fiber composite materials which can be used by flywheel designers. In this program the stress-strain curves are modelled by assuming linear response in axial tension while using bilinear approximations (2 linear segments) for stress-strain response to axial compressive, transverse tensile, transverse compressive and axial shear loadings. It should be noted that the program attempts to empirically simulate the effects of the phenomena which cause nonlinear stress-strain behavior, instead of mathematically modelling the micromechanics involved. This code, therefore, performs a bilinear laminate analysis, and, in conjunction with several user-defined failure interaction criteria, is designed to provide sequential information on all layer failures up to and including the first fiber failure. The modus operandi is described. Code BILAM can be used to: predict the load-deformation/stress-strain behavior of a composite laminate subjected to a given combination of in-plane loads, and make analytical predictions of laminate strength.

  3. 10 CFR 61.13 - Technical analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... air, soil, groundwater, surface water, plant uptake, and exhumation by burrowing animals. The analyses... processes such as erosion, mass wasting, slope failure, settlement of wastes and backfill, infiltration through covers over disposal areas and adjacent soils, and surface drainage of the disposal site. The...

  4. Automated multiple failure FMEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, C.J.; Taylor, N.S.

    2002-01-01

    Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is typically performed by a team of engineers working together. In general, they will only consider single point failures in a system. Consideration of all possible combinations of failures is impractical for all but the simplest example systems. Even if the task of producing the FMEA report for the full multiple failure scenario were automated, it would still be impractical for the engineers to read, understand and act on all of the results. This paper shows how approximate failure rates for components can be used to select the most likely combinations of failures for automated investigation using simulation. The important information can be automatically identified from the resulting report, making it practical for engineers to study and act on the results. The strategy described in the paper has been applied to a range of electrical subsystems, and the results have confirmed that the strategy described here works well for realistically complex systems

  5. Heart Failure in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Biykem; Khalaf, Shaden

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in women, and they tend to develop it at an older age compared to men. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction is more common in women than in men and accounts for at least half the cases of heart failure in women. When comparing men and women who have heart failure and a low left ventricular ejection fraction, the women are more symptomatic and have a similarly poor outcome. Overall recommendations for guideline-directed medical therapies show no differences in treatment approaches between men and women. Overall, women are generally underrepresented in clinical trials for heart failure. Further studies are needed to shed light into different mechanisms, causes, and targeted therapies of heart failure in women. PMID:29744014

  6. Definition of containment failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cybulskis, P.

    1982-01-01

    Core meltdown accidents of the types considered in probabilistic risk assessments (PRA's) have been predicted to lead to pressures that will challenge the integrity of containment structures. Review of a number of PRA's indicates considerable variation in the predicted probability of containment failure as a function of pressure. Since the results of PRA's are sensitive to the prediction of the occurrence and the timing of containment failure, better understanding of realistic containment capabilities and a more consistent approach to the definition of containment failure pressures are required. Additionally, since the size and location of the failure can also significantly influence the prediction of reactor accident risk, further understanding of likely failure modes is required. The thresholds and modes of containment failure may not be independent

  7. On the micromechanics of slip events in sheared, fluid-saturated fault gouge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorostkar, Omid; Guyer, Robert A.; Johnson, Paul A.; Marone, Chris; Carmeliet, Jan

    2017-06-01

    We used a three-dimensional discrete element method coupled with computational fluid dynamics to study the poromechanical properties of dry and fluid-saturated granular fault gouge. The granular layer was sheared under dry conditions to establish a steady state condition of stick-slip dynamic failure, and then fluid was introduced to study its effect on subsequent failure events. The fluid-saturated case showed increased stick-slip recurrence time and larger slip events compared to the dry case. Particle motion induces fluid flow with local pressure variation, which in turn leads to high particle kinetic energy during slip due to increased drag forces from fluid on particles. The presence of fluid during the stick phase of loading promotes a more stable configuration evidenced by higher particle coordination number. Our coupled fluid-particle simulations provide grain-scale information that improves understanding of slip instabilities and illuminates details of phenomenological, macroscale observations.

  8. On the relevance of the micromechanics approach for predicting the linear viscoelastic behavior of semi-crystalline poly(ethylene)terephtalates (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diani, J.; Bedoui, F.; Regnier, G.

    2008-01-01

    The relevance of micromechanics modeling to the linear viscoelastic behavior of semi-crystalline polymers is studied. For this purpose, the linear viscoelastic behaviors of amorphous and semi-crystalline PETs are characterized. Then, two micromechanics modeling methods, which have been proven in a previous work to apply to the PET elastic behavior, are used to predict the viscoelastic behavior of three semi-crystalline PETs. The microstructures of the crystalline PETs are clearly defined using WAXS techniques. Since microstructures and mechanical properties of both constitutive phases (the crystalline and the amorphous) are defined, the simulations are run without adjustable parameters. Results show that the models are unable to reproduce the substantial decrease of viscosity induced by the increase of crystallinity. Unlike the real materials, for moderate crystallinity, both models show materials of viscosity nearly identical to the amorphous material

  9. Immune mediated liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojing; Ning, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Liver failure is a clinical syndrome of various etiologies, manifesting as jaundice, encephalopathy, coagulopathy and circulatory dysfunction, which result in subsequent multiorgan failure. Clinically, liver failure is classified into four categories: acute, subacute, acute-on-chronic and chronic liver failure. Massive hepatocyte death is considered to be the core event in the development of liver failure, which occurs when the extent of hepatocyte death is beyond the liver regenerative capacity. Direct damage and immune-mediated liver injury are two major factors involved in this process. Increasing evidence has suggested the essential role of immune-mediated liver injury in the pathogenesis of liver failure. Here, we review the evolved concepts concerning the mechanisms of immune-mediated liver injury in liver failure from human and animal studies. Both innate and adaptive immunity, especially the interaction of various immune cells and molecules as well as death receptor signaling system are discussed. In addition, we highlight the concept of "immune coagulation", which has been shown to be related to the disease progression and liver injury exacerbation in HBV related acute-on-chronic liver failure.

  10. The Reconstruction of Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Ralph H.

    1972-01-01

    Seeks to explain the use of ideologies concerning the failure or non-failure in American education in terms of the struggle of sponsoring and professional groups to establish or maintain position on the social scene and, correspondingly, to gain control over those clienteles which are relevant to drives for social or professional mobility. (RJ)

  11. Success by Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Benjamin D.

    2017-01-01

    By taking the step to talk openly about his failure, the author stumbled upon one of several important lessons that he learned from this experience. The author recognized that he did not have to pretend anymore. In this article, the author shares his story of developing a "growth mindset" to overcome his own failure and support his…

  12. Central oxygen pipeline failure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    surgical intensive care unit (ICU), with two patients on full ventilation and ... uncertainty around the cause of the failure and the restoration, .... soon as its level also falls below three tons. Should ... (properly checked and closed prior to each anaesthetic). ... in use at the time of the central oxygen pipeline failure at Tygerberg.

  13. Nonlinearities and noise in micromechanical resonators: From understanding to characterization and design tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polunin, Pavel M.

    singular peaks in the probability distribution. The theoretical results are successfully compared experimental results obtained from collaborators at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Second, we discuss a time-domain technique for characterizing parameters for models that describe the response of a single vibrational mode of micromechanical resonators with symmetric restoring and damping forces. These parameters include coefficients of conservative and dissipative linear and nonlinear terms, as well as the strengths of various noise sources acting on the mode of interest. The method relies on measurements taken during a ringdown response, that is, free vibration, in which the nonlinearities result in an amplitude-dependent frequency and a non-exponential decay of the amplitude, while noise sources cause fluctuations in the resonator amplitude and phase. Analysis of the amplitude of the ringdown response allows one to estimate the quality factor and the dissipative nonlinearity, and the zero-crossing points in the ringdown measurement can be used to characterize the linear natural frequency and the cubic and quintic nonlinearities of the vibrational mode, which typically arise from a combination of mechanical and electrostatic effects. Additionally, we develop and demonstrate a statistical analysis of the zero-crossing points in the resonator response that allows one to separate the effects of additive, multiplicative, and measurement noises and estimate their corresponding intensities. These characterization methods are demonstrated using experimental measurements obtained from collaborators at Stanford University. Finally, we examine the problem of self-induced parametric amplification in ring/disk resonating gyroscopes. We model the dynamics of these gyroscopes by considering flexural (elliptical) vibrations of a thin elastic ring subjected to electrostatic transduction and show that the parametric amplification arises naturally from nonlinear

  14. Radiology of renal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    This book covers most aspects of imaging studies in patients with renal failure. The initial chapter provides basic information on contrast agents, intravenous urography, and imaging findings in the urinary tract disorders responsible for renal failure and in patients who have undergone transplantation. It illustrates common gastro-intestinal abnormalities seen on barium studies in patients with renal failure. It illustrates the cardiopulmonary complications of renal failure and offers advice for radiologic differentiation. It details different aspects of skeletal changes in renal failure, including a basic description of the pathophysiology of the changes; many excellent illustrations of classic bone changes, arthritis, avascular necrosis, and soft-tissue calcifications; and details of bone mineral analysis

  15. SOR-ring failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Hideo

    1981-01-01

    It was in the autumn of 1976 that the SOR-ring (synchrotron radiation storage ring) has commenced the regular operation. Since then, the period when the operation was interrupted due to the failures of SOR-ring itself is in total about 8 weeks. Failures and accidents have occurred most in the vacuum system. Those failure experiences are described on the vacuum, electromagnet, radio-frequency acceleration and beam transport systems with their interrupted periods. The eleven failures in the vacuum system have been reported, such as bellows breakage in a heating-evacuating period, leakage from the bellows of straight-through valves (made in U.S.A. and Japan), and leakage from the joint flange of the vacuum system. The longest interruption was 5 weeks due to the failure of a domestically manufactured straight-through valve. The failures of the electromagnet system involve the breakage in a cooling water system, short circuit of a winding in the Q magnet power transformer, blow of a fuse protecting the deflection magnet power source by the current less than the rating, and others. The failures of the RF acceleration system include the breakage of an output electronic tube the breakage of a cavity ceramic, RF voltage fluctuation due to the contact deterioration at a cavity electrode, and the failure of grid bias power source. It is necessary to select the highly reliable components for the vacuum system because the vacuum system failures require longer time for recovery, and very likely to induce secondary and tertiary failures. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  16. Micro-mechanical modelling of ductile failure in 6005A aluminium using a physics based strain hardening larw including stage IV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simar, Aude; Nielsen, Kim Lau; de Meester, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    The strain hardening and damage behaviour of isothermally heat treated 6005A aluminium is investigated in order to link the thermal treatment conditions, microstructure and fracture strain. The need for a plastic flow rule involving a stage IV hardening at large strain was found essential to gene...

  17. Relationship of acoustic emission to the kinetics and micromechanism of fatigue failure of high-strength steel with a martensitic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romaniv, O.N.; Kirillov, K.I.; Zima, Yu.V.; Nikiforchin, G.N.

    1987-01-01

    Techniques and results are presented for the rules of change in acoustic emission in fatigue crack propagation in hardened and low-temperature tempered 40Kh steel intended, in this study, for use as a reactor material. The results of the acoustic measurements are compared with data of quantitative aimed microfractography conducted during mechanical fracture tests

  18. Study and analysis of failure modes of the electrolytic capacitors and thyristors, applied to the protection system of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider); Etude et analyse des modes de defaillances des condensateurs electrolytiques a l'aluminium et des thyristors: appliquees au systeme de protection du LHC (Large Hadron Collider)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perisse, F

    2003-07-15

    The study presented in this thesis is a contribution about the analysis of failures modes of electrolytic capacitors and thyristors. The studied components are main elements of the protection system of the superconductive magnets of the LHC. The study of the ageing of the electrolytic capacitors has shown that their reliability is strongly related to their technological characteristic. Evolution of their principal indicator of ageing (ESR) can be modeled according to different laws chosen according to their running mode. It appears that the prediction of failure of these components other than that due to wear can be only statistical taking into account the many causes of failure involving various modes of failure. In order to be able to evaluate influence of the ageing of the electrolytic capacitors on a system, simple models taking into account this parameters as well as the effective temperature of the component are proposed. An acceptable precision taking into account the simplicity of the models is obtained. The study of the thyristors has shown that these components have little drift of parameters in static ageing, on the other hand of many failures by short-circuit were observed. These failures always have a local origin, and are due to defects of the components. The breakdown voltage strongly depends on the quality of the thyristor as well as the technology employed. (author)

  19. Study and analysis of failure modes of the electrolytic capacitors and thyristors, applied to the protection system of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider); Etude et analyse des modes de defaillances des condensateurs electrolytiques a l'aluminium et des thyristors: appliquees au systeme de protection du LHC (Large Hadron Collider)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perisse, F

    2003-07-15

    The study presented in this thesis is a contribution about the analysis of failures modes of electrolytic capacitors and thyristors. The studied components are main elements of the protection system of the superconductive magnets of the LHC. The study of the ageing of the electrolytic capacitors has shown that their reliability is strongly related to their technological characteristic. Evolution of their principal indicator of ageing (ESR) can be modeled according to different laws chosen according to their running mode. It appears that the prediction of failure of these components other than that due to wear can be only statistical taking into account the many causes of failure involving various modes of failure. In order to be able to evaluate influence of the ageing of the electrolytic capacitors on a system, simple models taking into account this parameters as well as the effective temperature of the component are proposed. An acceptable precision taking into account the simplicity of the models is obtained. The study of the thyristors has shown that these components have little drift of parameters in static ageing, on the other hand of many failures by short-circuit were observed. These failures always have a local origin, and are due to defects of the components. The breakdown voltage strongly depends on the quality of the thyristor as well as the technology employed. (author)

  20. Micromachined sensor for stress measurement and micromechanical study of free-standing thin films for MEMS applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have a wide range of applications. In the field of wireless and microwave technology, considerable attention has been given to the development and integration of MEMS-based RF (radio frequency) components. An RF MEMS switch requires low insertion loss, high isolation, and low actuation voltage - electrical aspects that have been extensively studied. The mechanical requirements of the switch, such as low sensitivity to built-in stress and high reliability, greatly depend on the micromechanical properties of the switch materials, and have not been thoroughly explored. RF MEMS switches are typically in the form of a free-standing thin film structure. Large stress gradients and across-wafer stress variations developed during fabrication severely degrade their electrical performance. A micromachined stress measurement sensor has been developed that can potentially be employed for in-situ monitoring of stress evolution and stress variation. The sensors were micromachined using five masks on two wafer levels, each measuring 5x3x1 mm. They function by means of an electron tunneling mechanism, where a 2x2 mm silicon nitride membrane elastically deflects under an applied deflection voltage via an external feedback circuitry. For the current design, the sensors are capable of measuring tensile stresses up to the GPa range under deflection voltages of 50--100 V. Sensor functionality was studied by finite element modeling and a theoretical analysis of square membrane deflection. While the mechanical properties of thin films on substrates have been extensively studied, studies of free-standing thin films have been limited due to the practical difficulties in sample handling and testing. Free-standing Al and Al-Ti thin films specimens have been successfully fabricated and microtensile and stress relaxation tests have been performed using a custom-designed micromechanical testing apparatus. A dedicated TEM (transmission electron microscopy

  1. A New and General Formulation of the Parametric HFGMC Micromechanical Method for Three-Dimensional Multi-Phase Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Ali, Rami; Aboudi, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    The recent two-dimensional (2-D) parametric formulation of the high fidelity generalized method of cells (HFGMC) reported by the authors is generalized for the micromechanical analysis of three-dimensional (3-D) multiphase composites with periodic microstructure. Arbitrary hexahedral subcell geometry is developed to discretize a triply periodic repeating unit-cell (RUC). Linear parametric-geometric mapping is employed to transform the arbitrary hexahedral subcell shapes from the physical space to an auxiliary orthogonal shape, where a complete quadratic displacement expansion is performed. Previously in the 2-D case, additional three equations are needed in the form of average moments of equilibrium as a result of the inclusion of the bilinear terms. However, the present 3-D parametric HFGMC formulation eliminates the need for such additional equations. This is achieved by expressing the coefficients of the full quadratic polynomial expansion of the subcell in terms of the side or face average-displacement vectors. The 2-D parametric and orthogonal HFGMC are special cases of the present 3-D formulation. The continuity of displacements and tractions, as well as the equilibrium equations, are imposed in the average (integral) sense as in the original HFGMC formulation. Each of the six sides (faces) of a subcell has an independent average displacement micro-variable vector which forms an energy-conjugate pair with the transformed average-traction vector. This allows generating symmetric stiffness matrices along with internal resisting vectors for the subcells which enhances the computational efficiency. The established new parametric 3-D HFGMC equations are formulated and solution implementations are addressed. Several applications for triply periodic 3-D composites are presented to demonstrate the general capability and varsity of the present parametric HFGMC method for refined micromechanical analysis by generating the spatial distributions of local stress fields

  2. Magnet failure workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marston, P G [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (U.S.A.); Desportes, H [C.E.N.-Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Morpurgo, M [C.E.R.N., Geneva (Switzerland); Komarek, P [Kernforschungszentrum, Karlsruhe (Germany, FR); Van Hulst, K [University of Nijmegen (The Netherlands); Hackley, D [General Dynamics Convair, San Diego, CA (U.S.A.); Young, J L [Westinghouse Electric Corporation, East Pittsburgh, PE (U.S.A.); Kibbe, K [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (U.S.A.)

    1984-01-01

    The dictionary defines failure as nonperformance or an unacceptable want of success. (The definition implies that the results should have been avoided). In an emerging technology such as ours, the boundaries of expectations and ''unacceptable success'' are often ill defined. Failures are often touted as hugh successes (occasionally rightfully so) and exceptional technological achievement can become dismal failure (if expectations are too high). We all, however, have experienced problems of one sort or another and the basic purpose of the workshop was simply to communicate these so that new or future workers don't make the same mistakes.

  3. Failure Diameter Resolution Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-12-19

    Previously the SURFplus reactive burn model was calibrated for the TATB based explosive PBX 9502. The calibration was based on fitting Pop plot data, the failure diameter and the limiting detonation speed, and curvature effect data for small curvature. The model failure diameter is determined utilizing 2-D simulations of an unconfined rate stick to find the minimum diameter for which a detonation wave propagates. Here we examine the effect of mesh resolution on an unconfined rate stick with a diameter (10mm) slightly greater than the measured failure diameter (8 to 9 mm).

  4. Magnet failure workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marston, P.G.; Desportes, H.; Morpurgo, M.; Komarek, P.; Van Hulst, K.; Hackley, D.; Young, J.L.; Kibbe, K.

    1984-01-01

    The dictionary defines failure as nonperformance or an unacceptable want of success. (The definition implies that the results should have been avoided). In an emerging technology such as ours, the boundaries of expectations and ''unacceptable success'' are often ill defined. Failures are often touted as hugh successes (occasionally rightfully so) and exceptional technological achievement can become dismal failure (if expectations are too high). We all, however, have experienced problems of one sort or another and the basic purpose of the workshop was simply to communicate these so that new or future workers don't make the same mistakes

  5. Nutrition in Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Reci Meseri

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure is defined as decreased ability of heart due to various reasons. It%u2019s seen 2-3% but the prevalence increases sharply after the age of seventy. The objectives of nutrition therapy in heart failure are to prevent from water retention and edema, to avoid from hard digestion and to offer a balanced diet. In order to avoid fluid retention and edema, daily sodium and fluid intake must be monitored carefully. Main dilemma of the heart failure patients is the obesity-cachexia dilem...

  6. Neurological Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Rudrappa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus infection in humans is mostly asymptomatic. Less than 1% of neuro-invasive cases show a fatality rate of around 10%. Acute flaccid paralysis of respiratory muscles leading to respiratory failure is the most common cause of death. Although the peripheral nervous system can be involved, isolated phrenic nerve palsy leading to respiratory failure is rare and described in only two cases in the English literature. We present another case of neurological respiratory failure due to West Nile virus-induced phrenic nerve palsy. Our case reiterates the rare, but lethal, consequences of West Nile virus infection, and the increase of its awareness among physicians.

  7. Acute heart failure syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and the classical syndrome of chronic persistent heart failure develops. The vast ... Flash pulmonary oedema: This is a severely elevated blood pressure with an .... (CPAP or bilevelNPPV) for cardiogenic pulmonary edema (review). Cochrane.

  8. Acute Liver Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can cause acute liver failure. It is an industrial chemical found in refrigerants and solvents for waxes, varnishes ... measures when spraying insecticides, fungicides, paint and other toxic chemicals. Follow product instructions carefully. Watch what gets on ...

  9. Failure to Fail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Vriezen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Between pessimism and optimism, Samuel Vriezen attempts to intuit a third way through an assessment of failure and negativity in the consonances and tensions between the prosody of Irish playwright Samuel Becekett and American poet Gertrude Stein.

  10. Inverter ratio failure detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, A. P.; Ebersole, T. J.; Andrews, R. E. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A failure detector which detects the failure of a dc to ac inverter is disclosed. The inverter under failureless conditions is characterized by a known linear relationship of its input and output voltages and by a known linear relationship of its input and output currents. The detector includes circuitry which is responsive to the detector's input and output voltages and which provides a failure-indicating signal only when the monitored output voltage is less by a selected factor, than the expected output voltage for the monitored input voltage, based on the known voltages' relationship. Similarly, the detector includes circuitry which is responsive to the input and output currents and provides a failure-indicating signal only when the input current exceeds by a selected factor the expected input current for the monitored output current based on the known currents' relationship.

  11. Acute kidney failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Renal failure - acute; ARF; Kidney injury - acute Images Kidney anatomy References Devarajan P. Biomarkers for assessment of renal function during acute kidney injury. In: Alpern RJ, Moe OW, Caplan M, ...

  12. A quantitative method for Failure Mode and Effects Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braaksma, Anne Johannes Jan; Meesters, A.J.; Klingenberg, W.; Hicks, C.

    2012-01-01

    Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is commonly used for designing maintenance routines by analysing potential failures, predicting their effect and facilitating preventive action. It is used to make decisions on operational and capital expenditure. The literature has reported that despite its

  13. Acute heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Sénior Sánchez, Juan Manuel; Gándara Ricardo, Jairo Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    We describe the clinical case of a 26 year-old woman who came to Hospital Universitario San Vicente Fundación (Medellín, Colombia) with symptoms and signs of acute heart failure. She had been previously diagnosed with chronic heart failure with reduced ejection fraction without clear origin, pulmonary thromboembolism and ischemic stroke, without optimal neurohormonal modulation. She was admitted with clinical findings of fluid overload and low tissue perfusion, with inotropic support requirem...

  14. Losartan Attenuates Degradation of Aorta and Lung Tissue Micromechanics in a Mouse Model of Severe Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jia-Jye; Galatioto, Josephine; Rao, Satish; Ramirez, Francesco; Costa, Kevin D

    2016-10-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an autosomal dominant disease of the connective tissue due to mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1). This study aimed at characterizing microelastic properties of the ascending aortic wall and lung parenchyma tissues from wild type (WT) and age-matched Fbn1 hypomorphic mice (Fbn1(mgR/mgR) mice) to identify tissue-specific biomechanical effects of aging and disease in MFS. Atomic force microscopy was used to indent lung parenchyma and aortic wall tissues, using Hybrid Eshelby Decomposition analysis to extract layer-specific properties of the intima and media. The intima stiffened with age and was not different between WT and Fbn1(mgR/mgR) tissues, whereas the media layer of MFS aortas showed progressive structural and mechanical degradation with a modulus that was 50% softer than WT by 3.5 months of age. Similarly, MFS mice displayed progressive structural and mechanical deterioration of lung tissue, which was over 85% softer than WT by 3.5 months of age. Chronic treatment with the angiotensin type I receptor antagonist, losartan, attenuated the aorta and lung tissue degradation, resulting in structural and mechanical properties not significantly different from age-matched WT controls. By revealing micromechanical softening of elastin-rich aorta and lung tissues with disease progression in fibrillin-1 deficient mice, our findings support the use of losartan as a prophylactic treatment that may abrogate the life-threatening symptoms of MFS.

  15. A micromechanical constitutive model for anisotropic cyclic deformation of super-elastic NiTi shape memory alloy single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chao; Kang, Guozheng; Kan, Qianhua

    2015-09-01

    Based on the experimental observations on the anisotropic cyclic deformation of super-elastic NiTi shape memory alloy single crystals done by Gall and Maier (2002), a crystal plasticity based micromechanical constitutive model is constructed to describe such anisotropic cyclic deformation. To model the internal stress caused by the unmatched inelastic deformation between the austenite and martensite phases on the plastic deformation of austenite phase, 24 induced martensite variants are assumed to be ellipsoidal inclusions with anisotropic elasticity and embedded in the austenite matrix. The homogeneous stress fields in the austenite matrix and each induced martensite variant are obtained by using the Mori-Tanaka homogenization method. Two different inelastic mechanisms, i.e., martensite transformation and transformation-induced plasticity, and their interactions are considered in the proposed model. Following the assumption of instantaneous domain growth (Cherkaoui et al., 1998), the Helmholtz free energy of a representative volume element of a NiTi shape memory single crystal is established and the thermodynamic driving forces of the internal variables are obtained from the dissipative inequalities. The capability of the proposed model to describe the anisotropic cyclic deformation of super-elastic NiTi single crystals is first verified by comparing the predicted results with the experimental ones. It is concluded that the proposed model can capture the main quantitative features observed in the experiments. And then, the proposed model is further used to predict the uniaxial and multiaxial transformation ratchetting of a NiTi single crystal.

  16. Automatically produced FRP beams with embedded FOS in complex geometry: process, material compatibility, micromechanical analysis, and performance tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabler, Markus; Tkachenko, Viktoriya; Küppers, Simon; Kuka, Georg G.; Habel, Wolfgang R.; Milwich, Markus; Knippers, Jan

    2012-04-01

    The main goal of the presented work was to evolve a multifunctional beam composed out of fiber reinforced plastics (FRP) and an embedded optical fiber with various fiber Bragg grating sensors (FBG). These beams are developed for the use as structural member for bridges or industrial applications. It is now possible to realize large scale cross sections, the embedding is part of a fully automated process and jumpers can be omitted in order to not negatively influence the laminate. The development includes the smart placement and layout of the optical fibers in the cross section, reliable strain transfer, and finally the coupling of the embedded fibers after production. Micromechanical tests and analysis were carried out to evaluate the performance of the sensor. The work was funded by the German ministry of economics and technology (funding scheme ZIM). Next to the authors of this contribution, Melanie Book with Röchling Engineering Plastics KG (Haren/Germany; Katharina Frey with SAERTEX GmbH & Co. KG (Saerbeck/Germany) were part of the research group.

  17. A high-quality factor of 267 000 micromechanical silicon resonator utilizing TED-free torsional vibration mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K.; Naito, Y.; Onishi, K.; Kawakatsu, H.

    2012-12-01

    In industrial applications of a micromechanical silicon resonator as a physical sensor, a high-quality factor Q and a low-temperature coefficient of Q (TCQ) are required for high sensitivity in a wide temperature range. Although the newly developed thin film encapsulation technique enables a beam to operate with low viscous damping in a vacuum cavity, the Q of a flexural vibration mode is limited by thermo-elastic damping (TED). We proposed a torsional beam resonator which features both a high Q and a low TCQ because theoretically the torsional vibration mode does not suffer from TED. From experiments, Q of 267 000 and TCQ of 1.4 for the 20 MHz torsional vibration mode were observed which were superior to those of the flexural mode. The pressure of the residual gas in the cavity of only 20 pl volume, which is one of the energy loss factors limiting the Q, was successfully estimated to be 1-14 Pa. Finally, the possibilities of improving the Q and the difference of the measured TCQ from a theoretical value were discussed.

  18. Micromechanics of deformation of metallic-glass-matrix composites from in situ synchrotron strain measurements and finite element modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, R.T.; Sansoz, F.; Molinari, J.F.; Almer, J.; Ramesh, K.T.; Hufunagel, T.C.

    2005-01-01

    In situ X-ray scattering and finite element modeling (FEM) were used to examine the micromechanics of deformation of in situ formed metallic-glass-matrix composites consisting of Ta-rich particles dispersed in an amorphous matrix. The strain measurements show that under uniaxial compression the second-phase particles yield at an applied stress of approx. 325 MPa. After yielding, the particles do not strain harden significantly; we show that this is due to an increasingly hydrostatic stress state arising from the lateral constraint on deformation of the particles imposed by the elastic matrix. Shear band initiation in the matrix is not due to the difference in elastic properties between the matrix and the particles. Rather, the development of a plastic misfit strain causes stress concentrations around the particles, resulting in localized yielding of the matrix by shear band formation at an applied stress of approx. 1450 MPa, considerably lower than the macroscopic yield stress of the composite (approx. 1725 MPa). Shear bands do not propagate at the lower stress because the yield criterion of the matrix is only satisfied in the region immediately around the particles. At the higher stresses, the yield criterion is satisfied in large regions of the matrix, allowing extensive shear band propagation and significant macroscopic plastic deformation. However, the presence of the particles makes the stress state highly inhomogeneous, which may partially explain why fracture is suppressed in the composite, allowing the development of large plastic strains

  19. Development of Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) micro-mechanical simulations of concrete specimens characterized by micro-X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giorla, Alain B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Concrete in Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) can be exposed to a wide range of degradation phenomena. In the past years, the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program has investigated Radiation-Induced Volumetric Expansion (RIVE) as a potential degradation mechanism for concrete biological shields [Graves et al., 2014, Rosseel et al., 2016]. RIVE causes swelling and micro-mechanical damage in concrete due to the amorphization of mineral phases contained in the aggregates under neutron irradiation [Hilsdorf et al., 1978, Rosseel et al., 2016]. For long-term operations, it is critical to assess the durability of concrete after 60 or 80 years of exposure to NPP operating conditions against this phenomenon. RIVE is dependent on the composition of the aggregates used in concrete. Quartz-bearing aggregates are more sensitive to RIVE than calcite-bearing aggregates, for example. However, the aggregate composition of a specific plant is generally not explicitly given in the concrete formulation, which makes it nearly impossible to predict the resistance of that concrete to RIVE. Additional characterization is needed to identify the radiation-sensitive mineral phases contained in the aggregates.

  20. Fatigue crack micromechanisms in a Cu-Zn-Al shape memory alloy with pseudo-elastic behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Di Cocco

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Shape memory property characterizes the behavior of many Ti based and Cu based alloys (SMAs. In Cu-Zn-Al SMAs, the original shape recovering is due to a bcc phase that is stable at high temperature. After an appropriate cooling process, this phase (β-phase or austenitic phase transforms reversibly into a B2 structure (transition phase and, after a further cooling process or a plastic deformation, it transforms into a DO3 phase (martensitic phase. In β-Cu-Zn-Al SMAs, the martensitic transformation due to plastic deformation is not stable at room temperature: a high temperature “austenitization” process followed by a high speed cooling process allow to obtain a martensitic phase with a higher stability. In this work, a Cu-Zn-Al SMA in “as cast” conditions has been microstructurally and metallographically characterized by means of X-Ray diffraction and Light Optical Microscope (LOM observations. Fatigue crack propagation resistance and damaging micromechanisms have been investigated corresponding to three different load ratios (R=0.10, 0.50 and 0.75

  1. Micromechanics-Based Damage Analysis of Fracture in Ti5553 Alloy with Application to Bolted Sectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettaieb, Mohamed Ben; Van Hoof, Thibaut; Minnebo, Hans; Pardoen, Thomas; Dufour, Philippe; Jacques, Pascal J.; Habraken, Anne Marie

    2015-03-01

    A physics-based, uncoupled damage model is calibrated using cylindrical notched round tensile specimens made of Ti5553 and Ti-6Al-4V alloys. The fracture strain of Ti5553 is lower than for Ti-6Al-4V in the full range of stress triaxiality. This lower ductility originates from a higher volume fraction of damage sites. By proper heat treatment, the fracture strain of Ti5553 increases by almost a factor of two, as a result of a larger damage nucleation stress. This result proves the potential for further optimization of the damage resistance of the Ti5553 alloy. The damage model is combined with an elastoviscoplastic law in order to predict failure in a wide range of loading conditions. In particular, a specific application involving bolted sectors is addressed in order to determine the potential of replacing the Ti-6Al-4V by the Ti5553 alloy.

  2. Micromechanical analysis of nanocomposites using 3D voxel based material model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2012-01-01

    A computational study on the effect of nanocomposite structures on the elastic properties is carried out with the use of the 3D voxel based model of materials and the combined Voigt–Reuss method. A hierarchical voxel based model of a material reinforced by an array of exfoliated and intercalated...... nanoclay platelets surrounded by interphase layers is developed. With this model, the elastic properties of the interphase layer are estimated using the inverse analysis. The effects of aspect ratio, intercalation and orientation of nanoparticles on the elastic properties of the nanocomposites are analyzed....... For modeling the damage in nanocomposites with intercalated structures, “four phase” model is suggested, in which the strength of “intrastack interphase” is lower than that of “outer” interphase around the nanoplatelets. Analyzing the effect of nanoreinforcement in the matrix on the failure probability...

  3. On experiments to detect possible failures on relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues Junior, W.A.; Tiomno, J.

    1982-01-01

    Conditions under which is expected the failure of Einstein's Relativity are analysed. A complete analysis of a recently proposed experiment by Kolen-Torr is also given showing that it must give a negative result. (Author) [pt

  4. A Failure Locus for Hydrogen Assisted Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuentes-Alonso, Sandra; Harris, Zach D.; Burns, James T.

    2017-01-01

    of a hydrogen-dependent traction separation law. A special control algorithm is employed to overcome numerical instabilities intrinsically associated with cohesive zone formulations. The fracture energy is degraded by means of an experimentally-motivated hydrogen degradation relation. Numerical results provide...... important insight into the failure process, enabling to identify critical values of hydrogen concentration and remote stresses that trigger cracking. The work builds upon previous works by the authors and brings important insight into the technologically important problem of hydrogen assisted cracking....

  5. CFD analyses in regulatory practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloemeling, F.; Pandazis, P.; Schaffrath, A.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical software is used in nuclear regulatory procedures for many problems in the fields of neutron physics, structural mechanics, thermal hydraulics etc. Among other things, the software is employed in dimensioning and designing systems and components and in simulating transients and accidents. In nuclear technology, analyses of this kind must meet strict requirements. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes were developed for computing multidimensional flow processes of the type occurring in reactor cooling systems or in containments. Extensive experience has been accumulated by now in selected single-phase flow phenomena. At the present time, there is a need for development and validation with respect to the simulation of multi-phase and multi-component flows. As insufficient input by the user can lead to faulty results, the validity of the results and an assessment of uncertainties are guaranteed only through consistent application of so-called Best Practice Guidelines. The authors present the possibilities now available to CFD analyses in nuclear regulatory practice. This includes a discussion of the fundamental requirements to be met by numerical software, especially the demands upon computational analysis made by nuclear rules and regulations. In conclusion, 2 examples are presented of applications of CFD analysis to nuclear problems: Determining deboration in the condenser reflux mode of operation, and protection of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) against brittle failure. (orig.)

  6. Metallic materials for the hydrogen energy industry and main gas pipelines: complex physical problems of aging, embrittlement, and failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nechaev, Yu S

    2008-01-01

    The possibilities of effective solutions of relevant technological problems are considered based on the analysis of fundamental physical aspects, elucidation of the micromechanisms and interrelations of aging and hydrogen embrittlement of materials in the hydrogen industry and gas-main industries. The adverse effects these mechanisms and processes have on the service properties and technological lifetime of materials are analyzed. The concomitant fundamental process of formation of carbohydride-like and other nanosegregation structures at dislocations (with the segregation capacity 1 to 1.5 orders of magnitude greater than in the widely used Cottrell 'atmosphere' model) and grain boundaries is discussed, as is the way in which these structures affect technological processes (aging, hydrogen embrittlement, stress corrosion damage, and failure) and the physicomechanical properties of the metallic materials (including the technological lifetimes of pipeline steels). (reviews of topical problems)

  7. Dependent failures of diesel generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mankamo, T.; Pulkkinen, U.

    1982-01-01

    This survey of dependent failures (common-cause failures) is based on the data of diesel generator failures in U. S. nuclear power plants as reported in Licensee Event Reports. Failures were classified into random and potentially dependent failures. All failures due to design errors, manufacturing or installation errors, maintenance errors, or deviations in the operational environment were classified as potentially dependent failures.The statistical dependence between failures was estimated from the relative portion of multiple failures. Results confirm the earlier view of the significance of statistical dependence, a strong dependence on the age of the diesel generator was found in each failure class excluding random failures and maintenance errors, which had a nearly constant frequency independent of diesel generator age

  8. Nutrition in Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reci Meseri

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure is defined as decreased ability of heart due to various reasons. It%u2019s seen 2-3% but the prevalence increases sharply after the age of seventy. The objectives of nutrition therapy in heart failure are to prevent from water retention and edema, to avoid from hard digestion and to offer a balanced diet. In order to avoid fluid retention and edema, daily sodium and fluid intake must be monitored carefully. Main dilemma of the heart failure patients is the obesity-cachexia dilemma. Since one of the main reasons of heart failure is cardiovascular diseases, in first phase, the patient may be obese. In the later phases, cachexia may show up. It was shown that cachexia is associated with mortality. Within this period, patients should not be over-fed and the patient should pass from catabolic state to anabolic state slowly. If the gastrointestinal track is functional oral/enteral feeding must be preferred. Multi vitamin and mineral supportsmay be beneficial, which may replace the increased loss, increase anti-inflammatory response and be anti-oxidants. Large, controlled and well-designed studies must be conducted in order to evaluate the benefits of nutritional practices such as nutritional assessment, enteral feeding and nutrient supports in heart failure patients.

  9. The strength and failure of silica optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, C; Bai, R X; Yu, H; Canning, J; Law, S

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical strength and failure behavior of conventional and microstructured silica optical fibers was investigated using a tensile test and fracture mechanics and numerical analyses. The effect of polymer coating on failure behavior was also studied. The results indicate that all these fibers fail in a brittle manner and failure normally starts from fiber surfaces. The failure loads observed in coated fibers are higher than those in bare fibers. The introduction of air holes reduces fiber strength and their geometrical arrangements have a remarkable effect on stress distribution in the longitudinal direction. These results are potentially useful for the design, fabrication and evaluation of optical fibers for a wide range of applications.

  10. The Effect of Fiber Strength Stochastics and Local Fiber Volume Fraction on Multiscale Progressive Failure of Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricks, Trenton M.; Lacy, Jr., Thomas E.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Continuous fiber unidirectional polymer matrix composites (PMCs) can exhibit significant local variations in fiber volume fraction as a result of processing conditions that can lead to further local differences in material properties and failure behavior. In this work, the coupled effects of both local variations in fiber volume fraction and the empirically-based statistical distribution of fiber strengths on the predicted longitudinal modulus and local tensile strength of a unidirectional AS4 carbon fiber/ Hercules 3502 epoxy composite were investigated using the special purpose NASA Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC); local effective composite properties were obtained by homogenizing the material behavior over repeating units cells (RUCs). The predicted effective longitudinal modulus was relatively insensitive to small (8%) variations in local fiber volume fraction. The composite tensile strength, however, was highly dependent on the local distribution in fiber strengths. The RUC-averaged constitutive response can be used to characterize lower length scale material behavior within a multiscale analysis framework that couples the NASA code FEAMAC and the ABAQUS finite element solver. Such an approach can be effectively used to analyze the progressive failure of PMC structures whose failure initiates at the RUC level. Consideration of the effect of local variations in constituent properties and morphologies on progressive failure of PMCs is a central aspect of the application of Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) principles for composite materials.

  11. Micromechanisms of deformation and fracture in a Ti3Al-Nb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akkurt, A.S.; Liu, G.; Bond, G.M.

    1991-01-01

    The object of this paper is to gain a greater understanding of deformation and fracture processes in a Ti-24Al-11Nb (at.%) alloy. The in-situ TEM deformation technique has been used to observe these processes as they occur. Material characterization studies revealed the existence of three different crystal structures in the material (α 2 , B2 and orthorhombic (O)). Slip is first initiated in the B2 and O phases. Although dislocations are observed in the α 2 phase in the deformed material, they are seen only in high-stress regions and only in some laths. While numerous dislocations may be injected into the corresponding grain and phase boundaries, slip does not easily propagate into the α 2 phase. Cracks are seen to originate most frequently in the regions transformed fully to α 2 laths, and sometimes in the regions that contain α 2 laths at prior β grain boundaries. Failure of grain or phase boundaries in the B2 or O phases where no α 2 is present is not observed

  12. Micro-Mechanical Analysis About Kink Band in Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composites Under Longitudinal Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mi; Guan, Zhidong; Wang, Xiaodong; Du, Shanyi

    2017-10-01

    Kink band is a typical phenomenon for composites under longitudinal compression. In this paper, theoretical analysis and finite element simulation were conducted to analyze kink angle as well as compressive strength of composites. Kink angle was considered to be an important character throughout longitudinal compression process. Three factors including plastic matrix, initial fiber misalignment and rotation due to loading were considered for theoretical analysis. Besides, the relationship between kink angle and fiber volume fraction was improved and optimized by theoretical derivation. In addition, finite element models considering fiber stochastic strength and Drucker-Prager constitutive model for matrix were conducted in ABAQUS to analyze kink band formation process, which corresponded with the experimental results. Through simulation, the loading and failure procedure can be evidently divided into three stages: elastic stage, softening stage, and fiber break stage. It also shows that kink band is a result of fiber misalignment and plastic matrix. Different values of initial fiber misalignment angle, wavelength and fiber volume fraction were considered to explore the effects on compressive strength and kink angle. Results show that compressive strength increases with the decreasing of initial fiber misalignment angle, the decreasing of initial fiber misalignment wavelength and the increasing of fiber volume fraction, while kink angle decreases in these situations. Orthogonal array in statistics was also built to distinguish the effect degree of these factors. It indicates that initial fiber misalignment angle has the largest impact on compressive strength and kink angle.

  13. Micromechanisms of fatigue crack growth in polycarbonate polyurethane: Time dependent and hydration effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Audrey C; Gramling, Hannah; Li, Samuel C; Sov, Jessica V; Srinivasan, Amrita; Pruitt, Lisa A

    2018-03-01

    Polycarbonate polyurethane has cartilage-like, hygroscopic, and elastomeric properties that make it an attractive material for orthopedic joint replacement application. However, little data exists on the cyclic loading and fracture behavior of polycarbonate polyurethane. This study investigates the mechanisms of fatigue crack growth in polycarbonate polyurethane with respect to time dependent effects and conditioning. We studied two commercially available polycarbonate polyurethanes, Bionate® 75D and 80A. Tension testing was performed on specimens at variable time points after being removed from hydration and variable strain rates. Fatigue crack propagation characterized three aspects of loading. Study 1 investigated the impact of continuous loading (24h/day) versus intermittent loading (8-10h/day) allowing for relaxation overnight. Study 2 evaluated the effect of frequency and study 3 examined the impact of hydration on the fatigue crack propagation in polycarbonate polyurethane. Samples loaded intermittently failed instantaneously and prematurely upon reloading while samples loaded continuously sustained longer stable cracks. Crack growth for samples tested at 2 and 5Hz was largely planar with little crack deflection. However, samples tested at 10Hz showed high degrees of crack tip deflection and multiple crack fronts. Crack growth in hydrated samples proceeded with much greater ductile crack mouth opening displacement than dry samples. An understanding of the failure mechanisms of this polymer is important to assess the long-term structural integrity of this material for use in load-bearing orthopedic implant applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. In-Situ NDE Characterization of Kevlar and Carbon Composite Micromechanics for Improved COPV Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Jess M.; Saulsberry, Regor L.

    2009-01-01

    This project is a subtask of a multi-center project to advance the state-of-the-art by developing NDE techniques that are capable of evaluating stress rupture (SR) degradation in Kevlar/epoxy (K/Ep) composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs), and damage progression in carbon/epoxy (C/Ep) COPVs. In this subtask, acoustic emission (AE) data acquired during intermittent load hold tensile testing of K/Ep and C/Ep composite tow materials-of-construction used in COPV fabrication were analyzed to monitor progressive damage during the approach to tensile failure. Insight into the progressive damage of composite tow was gained by monitoring AE event rate, energy, source location, and frequency. Source location based on arrival time data was used to discern between significant AE attributable to microstructural damage and spurious AE attributable to background and grip noise. One of the significant findings was the observation of increasing violation of the Kaiser effect (Felicity ratio < 1.0) with damage accumulation.

  15. Dynamic rock tensile strengths of Laurentian granite: Experimental observation and micromechanical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiwen Xia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Tensile strength is an important material property for rocks. In applications where rocks are subjected to dynamic loads, the dynamic tensile strength is the controlling parameter. Similar to the study of static tensile strength, there are various methods proposed to measure the dynamic tensile strength of rocks. Here we examine dynamic tensile strength values of Laurentian granite (LG measured from three methods: dynamic direct tension, dynamic Brazilian disc (BD test, and dynamic semi-circular bending (SCB. We found that the dynamic tensile strength from direct tension has the lowest value, and the dynamic SCB gives the highest strength at a given loading rate. Because the dynamic direct tension measures the intrinsic rock tensile strength, it is thus necessary to reconcile the differences in strength values between the direct tension and the other two methods. We attribute the difference between the dynamic BD results and the direct tension results to the overload and internal friction in BD tests. The difference between the dynamic SCB results and the direct tension results can be understood by invoking the non-local failure theory. It is shown that, after appropriate corrections, the dynamic tensile strengths from the two other tests can be reduced to those from direct tension.

  16. Micromechanical Modeling of Fiber-Reinforced Composites with Statistically Equivalent Random Fiber Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzhi Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Modeling the random fiber distribution of a fiber-reinforced composite is of great importance for studying the progressive failure behavior of the material on the micro scale. In this paper, we develop a new algorithm for generating random representative volume elements (RVEs with statistical equivalent fiber distribution against the actual material microstructure. The realistic statistical data is utilized as inputs of the new method, which is archived through implementation of the probability equations. Extensive statistical analysis is conducted to examine the capability of the proposed method and to compare it with existing methods. It is found that the proposed method presents a good match with experimental results in all aspects including the nearest neighbor distance, nearest neighbor orientation, Ripley’s K function, and the radial distribution function. Finite element analysis is presented to predict the effective elastic properties of a carbon/epoxy composite, to validate the generated random representative volume elements, and to provide insights of the effect of fiber distribution on the elastic properties. The present algorithm is shown to be highly accurate and can be used to generate statistically equivalent RVEs for not only fiber-reinforced composites but also other materials such as foam materials and particle-reinforced composites.

  17. Ductile failure modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benzerga, Ahmed Amine; Leblond, Jean Baptiste; Needleman, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Ductile fracture of structural metals occurs mainly by the nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids. Here an overview of continuum models for this type of failure is given. The most widely used current framework is described and its limitations discussed. Much work has focused on extending void...... growth models to account for non-spherical initial void shapes and for shape changes during growth. This includes cases of very low stress triaxiality, where the voids can close up to micro-cracks during the failure process. The void growth models have also been extended to consider the effect of plastic...... anisotropy, or the influence of nonlocal effects that bring a material size scale into the models. Often the voids are not present in the material from the beginning, and realistic nucleation models are important. The final failure process by coalescence of neighboring voids is an issue that has been given...

  18. Integrated failure probability estimation based on structural integrity analysis and failure data: Natural gas pipeline case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dundulis, Gintautas; Žutautaitė, Inga; Janulionis, Remigijus; Ušpuras, Eugenijus; Rimkevičius, Sigitas; Eid, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the authors present an approach as an overall framework for the estimation of the failure probability of pipelines based on: the results of the deterministic-probabilistic structural integrity analysis (taking into account loads, material properties, geometry, boundary conditions, crack size, and defected zone thickness), the corrosion rate, the number of defects and failure data (involved into the model via application of Bayesian method). The proposed approach is applied to estimate the failure probability of a selected part of the Lithuanian natural gas transmission network. The presented approach for the estimation of integrated failure probability is a combination of several different analyses allowing us to obtain: the critical crack's length and depth, the failure probability of the defected zone thickness, dependency of the failure probability on the age of the natural gas transmission pipeline. A model's uncertainty analysis and uncertainty propagation analysis are performed, as well. - Highlights: • Degradation mechanisms of natural gas transmission pipelines. • Fracture mechanic analysis of the pipe with crack. • Stress evaluation of the pipe with critical crack. • Deterministic-probabilistic structural integrity analysis of gas pipeline. • Integrated estimation of pipeline failure probability by Bayesian method.

  19. micro-mechanical modeling and numerical simulation of creep in concrete taking into account the effects of micro-cracking and hygro-thermal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thai, M.Q.

    2012-01-01

    Concrete is a complex heterogeneous material whose deformations include a delayed part that is affected by a number of factors such as temperature, relative humidity and microstructure evolution. Taking into account differed deformations and in particular creep is essential in the computation of concrete structures such as those dedicated to radioactive waste storage. The present work aims: (1) at elaborating a simple and robust model of creep for concrete by using micro-mechanics and accounting for the effects of damage, temperature and relative humidity; (2) at numerically implementing the creep model developed in a finite element code so as to simulate the behavior of simple structural elements in concrete. To achieve this twofold objective, the present work is partitioned into three parts. In the first part the cement-based material at the microscopic scale is taken to consist of a linear viscoelastic matrix characterized by a generalized Maxwell model and of particulate phases representing elastic aggregates and pores. The Mori-Tanaka micro-mechanical scheme, the Laplace-Carson transform and its inversion are then used to obtain analytical or numerical estimates for the mechanical and hydro-mechanical parameters of the material. Next, the original micromechanical model of creep is coupled to the damage model of Mazars through the concept of pseudo-deformations introduced by Schapery. The parameters involved in the creep-damage model thus established are systematically identified using available experimental data. Finally, the effects of temperature and relative humidity are accounted for in the creep-damage model by using the equivalent time method; the efficiency of this approach is demonstrated and discussed in the case of simple creep tests. (author) [fr

  20. Modeling Epidemic Network Failures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruepp, Sarah Renée; Fagertun, Anna Manolova

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the implementation of a failure propagation model for transport networks when multiple failures occur resulting in an epidemic. We model the Susceptible Infected Disabled (SID) epidemic model and validate it by comparing it to analytical solutions. Furthermore, we evaluate...... the SID model’s behavior and impact on the network performance, as well as the severity of the infection spreading. The simulations are carried out in OPNET Modeler. The model provides an important input to epidemic connection recovery mechanisms, and can due to its flexibility and versatility be used...... to evaluate multiple epidemic scenarios in various network types....

  1. Echo and heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modin, Daniel; Andersen, Ditte Madsen; Biering-Sørensen, Tor

    2018-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a threat to public health. Heterogeneities in aetiology and phenotype complicate the diagnosis and management of HF. This is especially true when considering HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), which makes up 50% of HF cases. Natriuretic peptides may aid in establis......Heart failure (HF) is a threat to public health. Heterogeneities in aetiology and phenotype complicate the diagnosis and management of HF. This is especially true when considering HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), which makes up 50% of HF cases. Natriuretic peptides may aid...

  2. Generalized Block Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    Block tearing is considered in several codes as a pure block tension or a pure block shear failure mechanism. However in many situations the load acts eccentrically and involves the transfer of a substantial moment in combination with the shear force and perhaps a normal force. A literature study...... shows that no readily available tests with a well-defined substantial eccentricity have been performed. This paper presents theoretical and experimental work leading towards generalized block failure capacity methods. Simple combination of normal force, shear force and moment stress distributions along...... yield lines around the block leads to simple interaction formulas similar to other interaction formulas in the codes....

  3. Root cause of failure analysis and the system engineer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppock, M.S.; Hartwig, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    In an industry where ever-increasing emphasis is being placed on root cause of failure determination, it is imperative that a successful nuclear utility have an effective means of identifying failures and performing the necessary analyses. The current Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) good practice, OE-907, root-cause analysis, gives references to methodology that will help determine breakdowns in procedures, programs, or design but gives very little guidance on how or when to perform component root cause of failure analyses. The system engineers of nuclear utilities are considered the focal point for their respective systems and are required by most programs to investigate component failures. The problem that the system engineer faces in determining a component root cause of failures lies in acquisition of the necessary data to identify the need to perform the analysis and in having the techniques and equipment available to perform it. The system engineers at the Palo Verde nuclear generating station routinely perform detailed component root cause of failure analyses. The Palo Verde program provides the system engineers with the information necessary to identify when a component root cause of failure is required. Palo Verde also has the necessary equipment on-site to perform the analyses

  4. Failure analysis of real-time systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalashgar, A.; Stoelen, K.

    1998-01-01

    This paper highlights essential aspects of real-time software systems that are strongly related to the failures and their course of propagation. The significant influence of means-oriented and goal-oriented system views in the description, understanding and analysing of those aspects is elaborated. The importance of performing failure analysis prior to reliability analysis of real-time systems is equally addressed. Problems of software reliability growth models taking the properties of such systems into account are discussed. Finally, the paper presents a preliminary study of a goal-oriented approach to model the static and dynamic characteristics of real-time systems, so that the corresponding analysis can be based on a more descriptive and informative picture of failures, their effects and the possibility of their occurrence. (author)

  5. Selected papers from the 23rd MicroMechanics and Microsystems Europe Workshop (MME 2012) (Ilmenau, Germany, September 9-12, 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Martin

    2013-07-01

    In September 2012, the 23rd MicroMechanics Europe Workshop (MME) took place in Ilmenau, Germany. With about 120 participants from 20 countries and 76 accepted presentations, the workshop series turned out to be a successful platform for young scientists to present their work to our scientific community. Traditionally, the interaction is an important aspect of this workshop: while short presentations introduce the posters, an extended poster session allows intensive discussion which is quite useful to the participants. The discussion very often extends into the breaks and the evening events. It is also encouraging for them that the best presentations are selected and invited to submit a full paper to this journal. Thanks to the support of IOP Publishing, this next logical step to present work to the scientific world is made possible. In this issue, you can find the best papers that have been selected by a committee during the workshop taking the written workshop contribution, the poster and the presentation into account. Again, all areas of micromechanics from new technology developments up to systems integration were presented at the workshop at different levels of completion. The selected papers present those results which are almost complete. Nevertheless, it is nice to see that in some cases topics grow over the years from 'nice ideas' to realized system concepts. And although this is the 23rd workshop, it is clear that micromechanics is a topic that is not running short of new ideas. First, I would like to thank the authors of the selected papers for each of their individual excellent contributions. My gratitude also goes to my fellow members in the programme committee (Per Ohlckers, Martin Hill and Sami Franssila) for their cooperation in the selection of invited speakers and submitted papers, as well as the anonymous Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering (JMM) reviewers for their careful selection of the final papers presented here. Last, but not

  6. Micromechanical analysis of volumetric growth in the context of open systems thermodynamics and configurational mechanics. Application to tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganghoffer, J. F.; Boubaker, M. B.

    2017-03-01

    We adopt in this paper the physically and micromechanically motivated point of view that growth (resp. resorption) occurs as the expansion (resp. contraction) of initially small tissue elements distributed within a host surrounding matrix, due to the interfacial motion of their boundary. The interface motion is controlled by the availability of nutrients and mechanical driving forces resulting from the internal stresses that built in during the growth. A general extremum principle of the zero potential for open systems witnessing a change of their mass due to the diffusion of nutrients is constructed, considering the framework of open systems thermodynamics. We postulate that the shape of the tissue element evolves in such a way as to minimize the zero potential among all possible admissible shapes of the growing tissue elements. The resulting driving force for the motion of the interface sets a surface growth models at the scale of the growing tissue elements, and is conjugated to a driving force identified as the interfacial jump of the normal component of an energy momentum tensor, in line with Hadamard's structure theorem. The balance laws associated with volumetric growth at the mesoscopic level result as the averaging of surface growth mechanisms occurring at the microscopic scale of the growing tissue elements. The average kinematics has been formulated in terms of the effective growth velocity gradient and elastic rate of deformation tensor, both functions of time. This formalism is exemplified by the simulation of the avascular growth of multicell spheroids in the presence of diffusion of nutrients, showing the respective influence of mechanical and chemical driving forces in relation to generation of internal stresses.

  7. A particle-based model to simulate the micromechanics of single-plant parenchyma cells and aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Liedekerke, P; Tijskens, E; Smeedts, B; Ramon, H; Ghysels, P; Samaey, G; Roose, D

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with addressing how plant tissue mechanics is related to the micromechanics of cells. To this end, we propose a mesh-free particle method to simulate the mechanics of both individual plant cells (parenchyma) and cell aggregates in response to external stresses. The model considers two important features in the plant cell: (1) the cell protoplasm, the interior liquid phase inducing hydrodynamic phenomena, and (2) the cell wall material, a viscoelastic solid material that contains the protoplasm. In this particle framework, the cell fluid is modeled by smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), a mesh-free method typically used to address problems with gas and fluid dynamics. In the solid phase (cell wall) on the other hand, the particles are connected by pairwise interactions holding them together and preventing the fluid to penetrate the cell wall. The cell wall hydraulic conductivity (permeability) is built in as well through the SPH formulation. Although this model is also meant to be able to deal with dynamic and even violent situations (leading to cell wall rupture or cell–cell debonding), we have concentrated on quasi-static conditions. The results of single-cell compression simulations show that the conclusions found by analytical models and experiments can be reproduced at least qualitatively. Relaxation tests revealed that plant cells have short relaxation times (1 µs–10 µs) compared to mammalian cells. Simulations performed on cell aggregates indicated an influence of the cellular organization to the tissue response, as was also observed in experiments done on tissues with a similar structure

  8. Structure and micro-mechanical properties of helium-implanted layer on Ti by plasma-based ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xinxin; Li Jinlong; Sun Mingren

    2008-01-01

    The present paper concentrates on structure and micro-mechanical properties of the helium-implanted layer on titanium treated by plasma-based ion implantation with a pulsed voltage of -30 kV and doses of 3, 6, 9 and 12 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 , respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy are employed to characterize the structure of the implanted layer. The hardnesses at different depths of the layer were measured by nano-indentation. We found that helium ion implantation into titanium leads to the formation of bubbles with a diameter from a few to more than 10 nm and the bubble size increases with the increase of dose. The primary existing form of Ti is amorphous in the implanted layer. Helium implantation also enhances the ingress of O, C and N and stimulates the formations of TiO 2 , Ti 2 O 3 , TiO, TiC and TiN in the near surface layer. And the amount of the ingressed oxygen is obviously higher than those of nitrogen and carbon due to its higher activity. At the near surface layer, the hardnesses of all implanted samples increases remarkably comparing with untreated one and the maximum hardness has an increase by a factor of up to 3.7. For the samples implanted with higher doses of 6, 9 and 12 x 10 17 He/cm 2 , the local displacement bursts are clearly found in the load-displacement curves. For the samples implanted with a lower dose of 3 x 10 17 He/cm 2 , there is no obvious displacement burst found. Furthermore, the burst width increases with the increase of the dose

  9. A bivariate model for analyzing recurrent multi-type automobile failures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunethra, A. A.; Sooriyarachchi, M. R.

    2017-09-01

    The failure mechanism in an automobile can be defined as a system of multi-type recurrent failures where failures can occur due to various multi-type failure modes and these failures are repetitive such that more than one failure can occur from each failure mode. In analysing such automobile failures, both the time and type of the failure serve as response variables. However, these two response variables are highly correlated with each other since the timing of failures has an association with the mode of the failure. When there are more than one correlated response variables, the fitting of a multivariate model is more preferable than separate univariate models. Therefore, a bivariate model of time and type of failure becomes appealing for such automobile failure data. When there are multiple failure observations pertaining to a single automobile, such data cannot be treated as independent data because failure instances of a single automobile are correlated with each other while failures among different automobiles can be treated as independent. Therefore, this study proposes a bivariate model consisting time and type of failure as responses adjusted for correlated data. The proposed model was formulated following the approaches of shared parameter models and random effects models for joining the responses and for representing the correlated data respectively. The proposed model is applied to a sample of automobile failures with three types of failure modes and up to five failure recurrences. The parametric distributions that were suitable for the two responses of time to failure and type of failure were Weibull distribution and multinomial distribution respectively. The proposed bivariate model was programmed in SAS Procedure Proc NLMIXED by user programming appropriate likelihood functions. The performance of the bivariate model was compared with separate univariate models fitted for the two responses and it was identified that better performance is secured by

  10. Isogeometric failure analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoosel, C.V.; Scott, M.A.; Borden, M.J.; Borst, de R.; Hughes, T.J.R.; Mueller-Hoeppe, D.; Loehnert, S.; Reese, S.

    2011-01-01

    Isogeometric analysis is a versatile tool for failure analysis. On the one hand, the excellent control over the inter-element continuity conditions enables a natural incorporation of continuum constitutive relations that incorporate higher-order strain gradients, as in gradient plasticity or damage.

  11. Beyond Success and Failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etalle, Sandro; Jaffar, Joxan; van Raamsdonk, Femke

    We study a new programming framework based on logic programming where success and failure are replaced by predicates for adequacy and inadequacy. Adequacy allows to extract a result from a partial computation, and inadequacy allows to flexibly constrain the search space. In this parameterized

  12. Poverty and Aspirations Failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalton, P.S.; Ghosal, S.; Mani, A.

    2011-01-01

    We develop a theoretical framework to study the psychology of poverty and 'aspirations failure'. In our framework, the rich and the poor share the same preferences - and also a behavioral bias in setting aspirations. Greater downside risks imposed by poverty exacerbates the effects of this

  13. Poverty and aspirations failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalton, P.S.; Ghosal, S.; Mani, A.

    We develop a theoretical framework to study the psychology of poverty and ‘aspirations failure’, defined as the failure to aspire to one’s own potential. In our framework, rich and the poor persons share the same preferences and same behavioral bias in setting aspirations. We show that poverty can

  14. Copeptin in Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balling, Louise; Gustafsson, Finn

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is one of the most common causes of hospitalization and mortality in the modern Western world and an increasing proportion of the population will be affected by HF in the future. Although HF management has improved quality of life and prognosis, mortality remains very high...

  15. Acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernal, William; Lee, William M; Wendon, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Over the last three decades acute liver failure (ALF) has been transformed from a rare and poorly understood condition with a near universally fatal outcome, to one with a well characterized phenotype and disease course. Complex critical care protocols are now applied and emergency liver...

  16. Premature ovarian failure

    OpenAIRE

    Pacheco, José

    2011-01-01

    Premature ovarian failure is characterized by secondary amenorrhea affecting a woman before the age of 40, leading to hypoestrogenism, infertility, and consequences of premature menopause, such as osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, neurovegetative alterations, and others. Follicular exhaustion is due to either follicles shortage or oocytes accelerated destruction. Main causes are genetic, autoimmune and iatrogenic. Among genetic causes Xq and Xp deletions, translocations, numeric aberratio...

  17. CMR in Heart Failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Sado, D. M.; Hasleton, J. M.; Herrey, A. S.; Moon, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Heart Failure (HF) is a common syndrome with multiple causes. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is a medical imaging technique with significant advantages, allowing the understanding of aetiology and pathophysiology of HF in the individual patient, permitting specific therapy to be administered and predicting prognosis. This paper discusses the diverse role of CMR in HF.

  18. Perioperative acute renal failure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mahon, Padraig

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Recent biochemical evidence increasingly implicates inflammatory mechanisms as precipitants of acute renal failure. In this review, we detail some of these pathways together with potential new therapeutic targets. RECENT FINDINGS: Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin appears to be a sensitive, specific and reliable biomarker of renal injury, which may be predictive of renal outcome in the perioperative setting. For estimation of glomerular filtration rate, cystatin C is superior to creatinine. No drug is definitively effective at preventing postoperative renal failure. Clinical trials of fenoldopam and atrial natriuretic peptide are, at best, equivocal. As with pharmacological preconditioning of the heart, volatile anaesthetic agents appear to offer a protective effect to the subsequently ischaemic kidney. SUMMARY: Although a greatly improved understanding of the pathophysiology of acute renal failure has offered even more therapeutic targets, the maintenance of intravascular euvolaemia and perfusion pressure is most effective at preventing new postoperative acute renal failure. In the future, strategies targeting renal regeneration after injury will use bone marrow-derived stem cells and growth factors such as insulin-like growth factor-1.

  19. An Experimental Investigation into Failure and Localization Phenomena in the Extension to Shear Fracture Transition in Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choens, R. C., II; Chester, F. M.; Bauer, S. J.; Flint, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    Fluid-pressure assisted fracturing can produce mesh and other large, interconnected and complex networks consisting of both extension and shear fractures in various metamorphic, magmatic and tectonic systems. Presently, rock failure criteria for tensile and low-mean compressive stress conditions is poorly defined, although there is accumulating evidence that the transition from extension to shear fracture with increasing mean stress is continuous. We report on the results of experiments designed to document failure criteria, fracture mode, and localization phenomena for several rock types (sandstone, limestone, chalk and marble). Experiments were conducted in triaxial extension using a necked (dogbone) geometry to achieve mixed tension and compression stress states with local component-strain measurements in the failure region. The failure envelope for all rock types is similar, but are poorly described using Griffith or modified Griffith (Coulomb or other) failure criteria. Notably, the mode of fracture changes systematically from pure extension to shear with increase in compressive mean stress and display a continuous change in fracture orientation with respect to principal stress axes. Differential stress and inelastic strain show a systematic increase with increasing mean stress, whereas the axial stress decreases before increasing with increasing mean stress. The stress and strain data are used to analyze elastic and plastic strains leading to failure and compare the experimental results to predictions for localization using constitutive models incorporating on bifurcation theory. Although models are able to describe the stability behavior and onset of localization qualitatively, the models are unable to predict fracture type or orientation. Constitutive models using single or multiple yield surfaces are unable to predict the experimental results, reflecting the difficulty in capturing the changing micromechanisms from extension to shear failure. Sandia

  20. Compressive failure model for fiber composites by kink band initiation from obliquely aligned, shear-dislocated fiber breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, J.; Phoenix, S.L. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics

    2005-04-01

    Predicting compressive failure of a unidirectional fibrous composite is a longstanding and challenging problem that we study from a new perspective. Motivated by previous modelling of tensile failure as well as experimental observations on compressive failures in single carbon fibers, we develop a new micromechanical model for the compressive failure process in unidirectional, planar composites. As the compressive load is increased, random fiber failures are assumed to occur due to statistically distributed flaws, analogous to what occurs in tension. These breaks are often shear-mode failures with slanted surfaces that induce shear dislocations, especially when they occur in small groups aligned obliquely. Our model includes interactions of dislocated and neighboring intact fibers through a system of fourth-order, differential equations governing transverse deformation, and also allows for local matrix plastic yielding and debonding from the fiber near and within the dislocation arrays. Using the Discrete Fourier Transform method, we find a 'building-block' analytical solution form, which naturally embodies local length scales of fiber microbuckling and instability. Based on the influence function, superposition approach, a computationally efficient scheme is developed to model the evolution of fiber and matrix stresses. Under increasing compressive strain the simulations show that matrix yielding and debonding crucially lead to large increases in bending strains in fibers next to small groups of obliquely aligned, dislocated breaks. From the paired locations of maximum fiber bending in flanking fibers, the triggering of an unstable kink band becomes realistic. The geometric features of the kink band, such as the fragment lengths and orientation angles, will depend on the fiber and matrix mechanical and geometric properties. In carbon fiber-polymer matrix systems our model predicts a much lower compressive failure stress than obtained from Rosen

  1. Geographic differences in heart failure trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, João Pedro; Girerd, Nicolas; Rossignol, Patrick; Zannad, Faiez

    2015-09-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are essential to develop advances in heart failure (HF). The need for increasing numbers of patients (without substantial cost increase) and generalization of results led to the disappearance of international boundaries in large RCTs. The significant geographic differences in patients' characteristics, outcomes, and, most importantly, treatment effect observed in HF trials have recently been highlighted. Whether the observed regional discrepancies in HF trials are due to trial-specific issues, patient heterogeneity, structural differences in countries, or a complex interaction between factors are the questions we propose to debate in this review. To do so, we will analyse and review data from HF trials conducted in different world regions, from heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HF-PEF), heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HF-REF), and acute heart failure (AHF). Finally, we will suggest objective and actionable measures in order to mitigate regional discrepancies in future trials, particularly in HF-PEF where prognostic modifying treatments are urgently needed and in which trials are more prone to selection bias, due to a larger patient heterogeneity. © 2015 The Authors European Journal of Heart Failure © 2015 European Society of Cardiology.

  2. Effect of Discontinuities and Uncertainties on the Response and Failure of Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Perry, Ferman W.; Poteat, Marcia M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The overall goal of this research was to assess the effect of discontinuities and uncertainties on the nonlinear response and failure of composite structures subjected to combined mechanical and thermal loads. The four key elements of the study were: (1) development of simple and efficient procedures for the accurate determination of transverse shear and transverse normal stresses in structural sandwiches as well as in unstiffened and stiffened composite panels and shells; (2) study the effects of transverse stresses on the response, damage initiation and propagation in composite and sandwich structures; (3) use of hierarchical sensitivity coefficients to identify the major parameters that affect the response and damage in each of the different levels in the hierarchy (micro-mechanical, layer, panel, subcomponent and component levels); and (4) application of fuzzy set techniques to identify the range and variation of possible responses. The computational models developed were used in conjunction with experiments, to understand the physical phenomena associated with the nonlinear response and failure of composite and sandwich structures. A toolkit was developed for use in conjunction with deterministic analysis programs to help the designer in assessing the effect of uncertainties in the different computational model parameters on the variability of the response quantities.

  3. A Critical Review of Landslide Failure Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stead, D.; Wolter, A.; Clague, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    During the last ten years several comprehensive geotechnical studies have been completed on major historic landslides including Randa in Switzerland, Frank in Canada, Aknes in Norway, La Clapiere in France and Vaiont in Italy. In addition, numerous researchers have documented deep-seated gravitational deformations and a wide variety of large prehistoric rock slope failures. The information provided by these studies is evidence of the significant advances made in our ability to map, monitor and model landslides. Over the same period, the mining industry has developed large open pits with slope heights exceeding 1000 m that provide important analogues to high mountain slopes. In this paper we analyse data from the literature to illustrate the importance of brittle fracture, 3D controls, anisotropy, overburden stress, geomorphic processes, groundwater and temperature in major landslides and provide some indicators as to the research required to further understand the complexity of rock slope failure mechanisms. The nature of the landslide failure surface has received inadequate attention in the past, with failure surfaces typically considered in 2D and simulated as discrete, smooth and often planar features. Current work shows that failure surfaces are inherently three-dimensional and have much structural variability across the area of the landslide scarp, reflecting complex structural histories. Such anisotropy and variations may result in multiple events or distinct blocks that move at different rates. Just as most failure surfaces vary spatially, they may also change with depth and thus should more realistically be considered failure zones rather than discrete surfaces. The increasing recognition of the importance of step-path failures, internal dilation and brittle fracture are indicative of the complexity in slope failure surfaces. Related to the variation in failure surface characteristics is the importance of 3D rotational displacements and both the

  4. Experimental approach and micro-mechanical modeling of the creep behavior of irradiated zirconium alloys; Approche experimentale et modelisation micromecanique du comportement en fluage des alliages de zircomium irradies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribis, J

    2007-12-15

    The fuel rod cladding, strongly affected by microstructural changes due to irradiation such as high density of dislocation loops, is strained by the end-of-life fuel rod internal pressure and the potential release of fission gases and helium during dry storage. Within the temperature range that is expected during dry interim storage, cladding undergoes long term creep under over-pressure. So, in order to have a predictive approach of the behavior of zirconium alloys cladding in dry storage conditions it is essential to take into account: initial dislocation loops, thermal annealing of loops and creep straining due to over pressure. Specific experiments and modelling for irradiated samples have been developed to improve our knowledge in that field. A Zr-1%Nb-O alloy was studied using fine microstructural investigations and mechanical testing. The observations conducted by transmission electron microscopy show that the high density of loops disappears during a heat treatment. The loop size becomes higher and higher while their density falls. The microhardness tests reveal that the fall of loop density leads to the softening of the irradiated material. During a creep test, both temperature and applied stress are responsible of the disappearance of loops. The loops could be swept by the activation of the basal slip system while the prism slip system is inhibited. Once deprived of loops, the creep properties of the irradiated materials are closed to the non irradiated state, a result whose consequence is a sudden acceleration of the creep rate. Finally, a micro-mechanical modeling based on microscopic deformation mechanisms taking into account experimental dislocation loop analyses and creep test, was used for a predictive approach by constructing a deformation mechanism map of the creep behavior of the irradiated material. (author)

  5. Compressive Failure of Fibre Reinforced Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik Myhre

    2003-01-01

    Compressive failure of uni-directional fibre composites by the kink band mechanism is analysed taking into account effects of residual stresses. Two criteria for determining the strength of the composite material have been investigated: Kink band formation at a bifurcation stress in a composite...... with perfectly aligned fibres, and kink band formation at a peak stress in a composite with a band of imperfect material....

  6. Common mode failures in redundancy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, I.A.; Edwards, G.T.

    1978-01-01

    Difficulties are experienced in assessing the impact of common mode failures on the reliability of safety systems. The paper first covers the investigation, definition and classification of CMF based on an extensive study of the nature of CMF. This is used as a basis for analysing data from nuclear reactor safety systems and aircraft systems. Design and maintenance errors are shown to be the prdominant cause of CMF. The analysis has laid the grounds for work on relating CMF modelling and defences. (author)

  7. Laser Beam Focus Analyser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Carøe; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2007-01-01

    the obtainable features in direct laser machining as well as heat affected zones in welding processes. This paper describes the development of a measuring unit capable of analysing beam shape and diameter of lasers to be used in manufacturing processes. The analyser is based on the principle of a rotating......The quantitative and qualitative description of laser beam characteristics is important for process implementation and optimisation. In particular, a need for quantitative characterisation of beam diameter was identified when using fibre lasers for micro manufacturing. Here the beam diameter limits...... mechanical wire being swept through the laser beam at varying Z-heights. The reflected signal is analysed and the resulting beam profile determined. The development comprised the design of a flexible fixture capable of providing both rotation and Z-axis movement, control software including data capture...

  8. OBSTETRIC RENAL FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeshwari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Renal failure in obstetrics is rare but important complication, associated with significant mortality and long term morbidity.1,2 It includes acute renal failure due to obstetrical complications or due to deterioration of existing renal disease. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the etiology and outcome of renal failure in obstetric patients. METHODS: We prospectively analyzed 30 pregnant and puerperal women with acute renal failure or pre-existing renal disease developing renal failure during pregnancy between November 2007 to sep-2009. Patients who presented/developed ARF during the hospital stay were included in this study. RESULTS: Among 30 patients, mean age was 23 years and 33 years age group. 12 cases (40% patients were primigravidae and 9(30% patients were multigravidae and 9 cases (30% presented in post-partum period. Eighteen cases (60% with ARF were seen in third trimester, followed by in postpartum period 9 cases (30%. Most common contributing factors to ARF were Pre-eclampsia, eclampsia and HELLP syndrome 60%, sepsis 56.6%, post abortal ARF 10%. DIC 40%. Haemorrhage as the aetiology for ARF was present 46%, APH in 20% and PPH in 26.6%. The type of ARF was renal in (63% and prerenal (36%; Oliguric seen in 10 patients (33% and high mortality (30%. Among the 20 pregnant patients with ARF, The average period of gestation was 33±2 weeks (30 -36 weeks, 5 cases (25% presented with intrauterine fetal demise and 18 cases (66% had preterm vaginal delivery and 2 cases (10% had induced abortion. And the average birth weight was 2±0.5 kg (1.5 kg. Eight cases (26% required dialysis. 80% of patients recovered completely of renal functions. 63% patients recovered without renal replacement therapy whereas 17% required dialysis. the maternal mortality was 20%, the main reason for mortality was septic shock and multi organ dysfunction (66%. CONCLUSION: ARF related pregnancy was seen commonly in the primigravidae and in the third trimester, the most

  9. Contesting Citizenship: Comparative Analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siim, Birte; Squires, Judith

    2007-01-01

    importance of particularized experiences and multiple ineequality agendas). These developments shape the way citizenship is both practiced and analysed. Mapping neat citizenship modles onto distinct nation-states and evaluating these in relation to formal equality is no longer an adequate approach....... Comparative citizenship analyses need to be considered in relation to multipleinequalities and their intersections and to multiple governance and trans-national organisinf. This, in turn, suggests that comparative citizenship analysis needs to consider new spaces in which struggles for equal citizenship occur...

  10. Micro-mechanical analysis and modelling of the behavior and brittle fracture of a french 16MND5 steel: role of microstructural heterogeneities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathieu, J.Ph.

    2006-10-01

    Reactor Pressure Vessel is the second containment barrier between nuclear fuel and the environment. Electricite de France's reactors are made with french 16MND5 low-alloyed steel (equ. ASTM A508 Cl.3). Various experimental techniques (scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction...) are set up in order to characterize mechanical heterogeneities inside material microstructure during tensile testing at different low temperatures [-150 C;-60 C]. Heterogeneities can be seen as the effect of both 'polycrystalline' and 'composite' microstructural features. Interphase (until 150 MPa in average between ferritic and bainitic macroscopic stress state) and intra-phase (until 100 MPa in average between ferritic orientations) stress variations are highlighted. Modelling involves micro-mechanical description of plastic glide, mean fields models and realistic three-dimensional aggregates, all put together inside a multi-scale approach. Calibration is done on macroscopic stress-strain curves at different low temperatures, and modelling reproduces experimental stress heterogeneities. This modelling allows to apply a local micro-mechanical fracture criterion for crystallographic cleavage. Deterministic computations of time to fracture for different carbides random selection provide a way to express probability of fracture for the elementary volume. Results are in good agreement with hypothesis made by local approach to fracture. Hence, the main difference is that no dependence to loading nor microstructure features is supposed for probability of fracture on the representative volume: this dependence is naturally introduced by modelling. (author)

  11. Autoimmune premature ovarian failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Komorowska

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Premature ovarian failure (POF, also termed as primary ovarian insufficiency (POI, is a highly heterogenous condition affecting 0.5-3.0% of women in childbearing age. These young women comprise quite a formidable group with unique physical and psychological needs that require special attention. Premature ovarian senescence (POS in all of its forms evolves insidiously as a basically asymptomatic process, leading to complete loss of ovarian function, and POI/POF diagnoses are currently made at relatively late stages. Well-known and well-documented risk factors exist, and the presence or suspicion of autoimmune disorder should be regarded as an important one. Premature ovarian failure is to some degree predictable in its occurrence and should be considered while encountering young women with loss of menstrual regularity, especially when there is a concomitant dysfunction in the immune system.

  12. Scarred by Failure?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahieu, Jeroen; Melillo, Francesca; Reichstein, Toke

    Are failed entrepreneurs penalized in the labour market? The answer is yes under certain conditions. Using a novel dataset of matched entrepreneurs and employees in Belgium, we show that: on average, entrepreneurs returning to the labour market after a business failure are penalized, but this eff......Are failed entrepreneurs penalized in the labour market? The answer is yes under certain conditions. Using a novel dataset of matched entrepreneurs and employees in Belgium, we show that: on average, entrepreneurs returning to the labour market after a business failure are penalized...... years do not get penalized. Entrepreneurs who fail fast and move to a new employer limit the wage penalty by changing industry compared to the industry they were venturing in. These results are consistent with theories of adverse selection in the labour market....

  13. Satellite failures revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-12-01

    In January 1994, the two geostationary satellites known as Anik-E1 and Anik-E2, operated by Telesat Canada, failed one after the other within 9 hours, leaving many northern Canadian communities without television and data services. The outage, which shut down much of the country's broadcast television for hours and cost Telesat Canada more than $15 million, generated significant media attention. Lam et al. used publicly available records to revisit the event; they looked at failure details, media coverage, recovery effort, and cost. They also used satellite and ground data to determine the precise causes of those satellite failures. The researchers traced the entire space weather event from conditions on the Sun through the interplanetary medium to the particle environment in geostationary orbit.

  14. Rate based failure detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brett Emery Trabun; Gamage, Thoshitha Thanushka; Bakken, David Edward

    2018-01-02

    This disclosure describes, in part, a system management component and failure detection component for use in a power grid data network to identify anomalies within the network and systematically adjust the quality of service of data published by publishers and subscribed to by subscribers within the network. In one implementation, subscribers may identify a desired data rate, a minimum acceptable data rate, desired latency, minimum acceptable latency and a priority for each subscription. The failure detection component may identify an anomaly within the network and a source of the anomaly. Based on the identified anomaly, data rates and or data paths may be adjusted in real-time to ensure that the power grid data network does not become overloaded and/or fail.

  15. Tritium Waste Treatment System component failure data analysis from June 18, 1984--December 31, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.; Stolpe Gavett, M.A.

    1990-09-01

    This document gives the failure rates for the major tritium-bearing components in the Tritium Waste Treatment System at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly, which is a fusion research and technology facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The failure reports, component populations, and operating demands/hours are given in this report, and sample calculations for binomial demand failure rates and poisson hourly failure rates are given in the appendices. The failure rates for tritium-bearing components were on the order of the screening failure rate values suggested for fusion reliability and risk analyses. More effort should be directed toward collecting and analyzing fusion component failure data, since accurate failure rates are necessary to refine reliability and risk analyses. 15 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  16. LHC Magnet test failure

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "On Tueday, March 22, a Fermilab-built quadrupole magnet, one of an "inner triplet" of three focusing magnets, failed a high-pressure test at Point 5 in the tunnel of the LHC accelerator at CERN. Since Tuesday, teams at CERN and Fermilab have worked closely together to address the problem and have identified the cause of the failure. Now they are at work on a solution.:" (1 page)

  17. Failures of chain systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    James, A

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available ?C and intermittent exposure at 400--450 ?C. Unlike structural steels, which become softer and more ductile when reheated in service, manga- nese steels become brittle when reheated sufficiently to induce carbide... to form a roughly oval shaped crack until the link section could no longer withstand the applied loading experienced during normal dragline operations, and this resulted in final fast brittle failure. The general...

  18. Rethinking Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    F?rstenwerth, Hauke

    2012-01-01

    An increasing body of clinical observations and experimental evidence suggests that cardiac dysfunction results from autonomic dysregulation of the contractile output of the heart. Excessive activation of the sympathetic nervous system and a decrease in parasympathetic tone are associated with increased mortality. Elevated levels of circulating catecholamines closely correlate with the severity and poor prognosis in heart failure. Sympathetic over-stimulation causes increased levels of catech...

  19. Diastolic Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Wake, Ryotaro; Yoshikawa, Junichi; Yoshiyama, Minoru

    2012-01-01

    Primary diastolic failure is typically seen in patients with hypertensive or valvular heart disease as well as in hypertrophic or restrictive cardiomyopathy but can also occur in a variety of clinical disorders, especially tachycardia and ischemia. Diastolic dysfunction has a particularly high prevalence in elderly patients and is generally associated, with low mortality but high morbidity. The pathophysiology of diastolic dysfunction includes delayed relaxation, impaired LV filling and/or in...

  20. Risico-analyse brandstofpontons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijt de Haag P; Post J; LSO

    2001-01-01

    Voor het bepalen van de risico's van brandstofpontons in een jachthaven is een generieke risico-analyse uitgevoerd. Er is een referentiesysteem gedefinieerd, bestaande uit een betonnen brandstofponton met een relatief grote inhoud en doorzet. Aangenomen is dat de ponton gelegen is in een

  1. Fast multichannel analyser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, A; Przybylski, M M; Sumner, I [Science Research Council, Daresbury (UK). Daresbury Lab.

    1982-10-01

    A fast multichannel analyser (MCA) capable of sampling at a rate of 10/sup 7/ s/sup -1/ has been developed. The instrument is based on an 8 bit parallel encoding analogue to digital converter (ADC) reading into a fast histogramming random access memory (RAM) system, giving 256 channels of 64 k count capacity. The prototype unit is in CAMAC format.

  2. A fast multichannel analyser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, A.; Przybylski, M.M.; Sumner, I.

    1982-01-01

    A fast multichannel analyser (MCA) capable of sampling at a rate of 10 7 s -1 has been developed. The instrument is based on an 8 bit parallel encoding analogue to digital converter (ADC) reading into a fast histogramming random access memory (RAM) system, giving 256 channels of 64 k count capacity. The prototype unit is in CAMAC format. (orig.)

  3. Effect of artificial toothbrushing and water storage on the surface roughness and micromechanical properties of tooth-colored CAD-CAM materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flury, Simon; Diebold, Elisabeth; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian

    2017-06-01

    Because of the different composition of resin-ceramic computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) materials, their polishability and their micromechanical properties vary. Moreover, depending on the composition of the materials, their surface roughness and micromechanical properties are likely to change with time. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of artificial toothbrushing and water storage on the surface roughness (Ra and Rz) and the micromechanical properties, surface hardness (Vickers [VHN]) and indentation modulus (E IT ), of 5 different tooth-colored CAD-CAM materials when polished with 2 different polishing systems. Specimens (n=40 per material) were cut from a composite resin (Paradigm MZ100; 3M ESPE), a feldspathic ceramic (Vitablocs Mark II; Vita Zahnfabrik), a resin nanoceramic (Lava Ultimate; 3M ESPE), a hybrid dental ceramic (Vita Enamic; Vita Zahnfabrik), and a nanocomposite resin (Ambarino High-Class; Creamed). All specimens were roughened in a standardized manner and polished either with Sof-Lex XT discs or the Vita Polishing Set Clinical. Surface roughness, VHN, and E IT were measured after polishing and after storage for 6 months (tap water, 37°C) with periodic, artificial toothbrushing. The surface roughness, VHN, and E IT results were analyzed with a nonparametric ANOVA followed by Kruskal-Wallis and exact Wilcoxon rank sum tests (α=.05). Irrespective of polishing system and of artificial toothbrushing and storage, Lava Ultimate generally showed the lowest surface roughness and Vitablocs Mark II the highest. As regards micromechanical properties, the following ranking of the CAD-CAM materials was found (from highest VHN/E IT to lowest VHN/E IT ): Vitablocs Mark II > Vita Enamic > Paradigm MZ100 > Lava Ultimate > Ambarino High-Class. Irrespective of material and of artificial toothbrushing and storage, polishing with Sof-Lex XT discs resulted in lower surface roughness than the Vita Polishing

  4. Heart Failure Society of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MACRA Resource Portal The Heart Failure Society of America, Inc. (HFSA) represents the first organized effort by heart failure experts from the Americas to provide a forum for all those interested ...

  5. Heart Failure in the Elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Cost (Bernard)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractHeart failure is a clinical syndrome with various causes for which no universally accepted definition exists. Packer's definition of heart failure "representing a complex clinical syndrome characterised by abnonnalities of left ventricular function and neurohumoral regulation. which are

  6. Heart failure - fluids and diuretics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000112.htm Heart failure - fluids and diuretics To use the sharing features ... to Expect at Home When you have heart failure, your heart does not pump out enough blood. This causes ...

  7. Molecular Epidemiology of Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gustav Smith, MD, PhD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is the end-stage of all heart disease and arguably constitutes the greatest unmet therapeutic need in cardiovascular medicine today. Classic epidemiological studies have established clinical risk factors for HF, but the cause remains poorly understood in many cases. Biochemical analyses of small case-control series and animal models have described a plethora of molecular characteristics of HF, but a single unifying pathogenic theory is lacking. Heart failure appears to result not only from cardiac overload or injury but also from a complex interplay among genetic, neurohormonal, metabolic, inflammatory, and other biochemical factors acting on the heart. Recent development of robust, high-throughput tools in molecular biology provides opportunity for deep molecular characterization of population-representative cohorts and HF cases (molecular epidemiology, including genome sequencing, profiling of myocardial gene expression and chromatin modifications, plasma composition of proteins and metabolites, and microbiomes. The integration of such detailed information holds promise for improving understanding of HF pathophysiology in humans, identification of therapeutic targets, and definition of disease subgroups beyond the current classification based on ejection fraction which may benefit from improved individual tailoring of therapy. Challenges include: 1 the need for large cohorts with deep, uniform phenotyping; 2 access to the relevant tissues, ideally with repeated sampling to capture dynamic processes; and 3 analytical issues related to integration and analysis of complex datasets. International research consortia have formed to address these challenges and combine datasets, and cohorts with up to 1 million participants are being collected. This paper describes the molecular epidemiology of HF and provides an overview of methods and tissue types and examples of published and ongoing efforts to systematically evaluate molecular

  8. Stochastic failure modelling of unidirectional composite ply failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whiteside, M.B.; Pinho, S.T.; Robinson, P.

    2012-01-01

    Stochastic failure envelopes are generated through parallelised Monte Carlo Simulation of a physically based failure criteria for unidirectional carbon fibre/epoxy matrix composite plies. Two examples are presented to demonstrate the consequence on failure prediction of both statistical interaction of failure modes and uncertainty in global misalignment. Global variance-based Sobol sensitivity indices are computed to decompose the observed variance within the stochastic failure envelopes into contributions from physical input parameters. The paper highlights a selection of the potential advantages stochastic methodologies offer over the traditional deterministic approach.

  9. Effects of fiber/matrix interactions on the interfacial deformation micromechanics of cellulose-fiber/polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tze, William Tai-Yin

    The overall objective of this dissertation was to gain an understanding of the relationship between interfacial chemistry and the micromechanics of the cellulose-fiber/polymer composites. Regenerated cellulose (lyocell) fibers were treated with amine-, phenylamine-, phenyl-, and octadecyl-silanes, and also styrene-maleic anhydride copolymer. Inverse gas chromatography was conducted to evaluate the modified surfaces and to examine the adsorption behavior of ethylbenzene, a model compound for polystyrene, onto the fibers. Micro-composites were formed by depositing micro-droplets of polystyrene onto single fibers. The fiber was subjected to a tensile strain, and Raman spectroscopy was employed to determine the point-to-point variation of the strain- and stress-sensitive 895 cm-1 band of cellulose along the embedded region. Inverse gas chromatography studies reveal that the Ia-b values, calculated by matching the Lewis acid parameter ( KA) and basic parameter (KB) between polystyrene and different fibers, were closely correlated to the acid-base adsorption enthalpies of ethylbenzene onto the corresponding fibers. Hence, Ia-b was subsequently used as a convenient indicator for fiber/matrix acid-base interaction. The Raman micro-spectroscopic studies demonstrate that the interfacial tensile strain and stress are highest at the edge of the droplet, and these values decline from the edge region to the middle region of the embedment. The maximum of these local strains corresponds to a strain-control fracture of the matrix polymer. The minimum of the local tensile stress corresponds to the extent of fiber-to-matrix load transfer. The slope of the tensile stress profile allows for an estimation of the maximum interfacial shear stress, which is indicative of fiber/polymer (practical) adhesion. As such, a novel micro-Raman tensile technique was established for evaluating the ductile-fiber/brittle-polymer system in this study. The micro-Raman tensile technique provided maximum

  10. Generic component failure data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eide, S.A.; Calley, M.B.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses comprehensive component generic failure data base which has been developed for light water reactor probabilistic risk assessments. The Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR) was used to generate component failure rates. Using this approach, most of the failure rates are based on actual plant data rather then existing estimates

  11. Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team Updated:May 9,2017 Patients with ... to the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  12. Planning Ahead: Advanced Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Planning Ahead: Advanced Heart Failure Updated:May 9,2017 An important part of ... Care This content was last reviewed May 2017. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  13. Possible future HERA analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geiser, Achim

    2015-12-01

    A variety of possible future analyses of HERA data in the context of the HERA data preservation programme is collected, motivated, and commented. The focus is placed on possible future analyses of the existing ep collider data and their physics scope. Comparisons to the original scope of the HERA pro- gramme are made, and cross references to topics also covered by other participants of the workshop are given. This includes topics on QCD, proton structure, diffraction, jets, hadronic final states, heavy flavours, electroweak physics, and the application of related theory and phenomenology topics like NNLO QCD calculations, low-x related models, nonperturbative QCD aspects, and electroweak radiative corrections. Synergies with other collider programmes are also addressed. In summary, the range of physics topics which can still be uniquely covered using the existing data is very broad and of considerable physics interest, often matching the interest of results from colliders currently in operation. Due to well-established data and MC sets, calibrations, and analysis procedures the manpower and expertise needed for a particular analysis is often very much smaller than that needed for an ongoing experiment. Since centrally funded manpower to carry out such analyses is not available any longer, this contribution not only targets experienced self-funded experimentalists, but also theorists and master-level students who might wish to carry out such an analysis.

  14. Biomass feedstock analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilen, C.; Moilanen, A.; Kurkela, E. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1996-12-31

    The overall objectives of the project `Feasibility of electricity production from biomass by pressurized gasification systems` within the EC Research Programme JOULE II were to evaluate the potential of advanced power production systems based on biomass gasification and to study the technical and economic feasibility of these new processes with different type of biomass feed stocks. This report was prepared as part of this R and D project. The objectives of this task were to perform fuel analyses of potential woody and herbaceous biomasses with specific regard to the gasification properties of the selected feed stocks. The analyses of 15 Scandinavian and European biomass feed stock included density, proximate and ultimate analyses, trace compounds, ash composition and fusion behaviour in oxidizing and reducing atmospheres. The wood-derived fuels, such as whole-tree chips, forest residues, bark and to some extent willow, can be expected to have good gasification properties. Difficulties caused by ash fusion and sintering in straw combustion and gasification are generally known. The ash and alkali metal contents of the European biomasses harvested in Italy resembled those of the Nordic straws, and it is expected that they behave to a great extent as straw in gasification. Any direct relation between the ash fusion behavior (determined according to the standard method) and, for instance, the alkali metal content was not found in the laboratory determinations. A more profound characterisation of the fuels would require gasification experiments in a thermobalance and a PDU (Process development Unit) rig. (orig.) (10 refs.)

  15. Teton Dam failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snorteland, N. [United States Dept. of the Interior, Washington, DC (United States). Bureau of Reclamation

    2009-07-01

    This case summary discussed an internal erosion failure that occurred at the embankment foundation of Teton Dam. The project was designed as a run-of-the-river power generation facility and to provide irrigation, flood protection, and power generation to the lower Teton region of southern Idaho. The dam site was located next to the eastern Snake River plain, a volcanic filled depression. The foundation's cutoff trench was excavated into the bedrock along the length of the dam. The dam was designed as a zoned earthfill with a height of 305 feet. A trench made of low plasticity windblown silt was designed to connect the embankment core to the rock foundation. Seeps were noted in 1976, and a leak was observed near the toe of the dam. A wet spot appeared on the downstream face of the dam at elevation 5200. A sinkhole then developed. The embankment crest collapsed, and the dam breached. Peak outflow was estimated at 1,000,000 cfs. The failure was attributed to a lack of communication between designers, a failure to understand geologic information about the region, and an insufficient review of designs and specifications by designers and field personnel. No monitoring instrumentation was installed in the embankment. Approximately 300 square miles were inundated, and 25,000 people were displaced. Eleven people were killed. A review group noted that the rock surface was not adequately sealed, and that the dam failed as a result of inadequate protection of the impervious core material from internal erosion. 42 figs.

  16. Steam generator tube failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, P.E.; Shah, V.N.; Ward, L.W.; Ellison, P.G.

    1996-04-01

    A review and summary of the available information on steam generator tubing failures and the impact of these failures on plant safety is presented. The following topics are covered: pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and Russian water moderated, water cooled energy reactor (VVER) steam generator degradation, PWR steam generator tube ruptures, the thermal-hydraulic response of a PWR plant with a faulted steam generator, the risk significance of steam generator tube rupture accidents, tubing inspection requirements and fitness-for-service criteria in various countries, and defect detection reliability and sizing accuracy. A significant number of steam generator tubes are defective and are removed from service or repaired each year. This wide spread damage has been caused by many diverse degradation mechanisms, some of which are difficult to detect and predict. In addition, spontaneous tube ruptures have occurred at the rate of about one every 2 years over the last 20 years, and incipient tube ruptures (tube failures usually identified with leak detection monitors just before rupture) have been occurring at the rate of about one per year. These ruptures have caused complex plant transients which have not always been easy for the reactor operators to control. Our analysis shows that if more than 15 tubes rupture during a main steam line break, the system response could lead to core melting. Although spontaneous and induced steam generator tube ruptures are small contributors to the total core damage frequency calculated in probabilistic risk assessments, they are risk significant because the radionuclides are likely to bypass the reactor containment building. The frequency of steam generator tube ruptures can be significantly reduced through appropriate and timely inspections and repairs or removal from service

  17. FRELIB, Failure Reliability Index Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson, D.B.; Oestergaard, C.

    1984-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: Calculation of the reliability index given the failure boundary. A linearization point (design point) is found on the failure boundary for a stationary reliability index (min) and a stationary failure probability density function along the failure boundary, provided that the basic variables are normally distributed. 2 - Method of solution: Iteration along the failure boundary which must be specified - together with its partial derivatives with respect to the basic variables - by the user in a subroutine FSUR. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: No distribution information included (first-order-second-moment-method). 20 basic variables (could be extended)

  18. Automotive component failures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Heyes, AM

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available in service for approximately 19\\999 km[ 1[1[ Visual examination Upon stripping the engine it was found that one of the combustion chambers showed heavy carbonaceous deposits indicative of the burning of oil "Fig[ 2# Circumferential black marks were found... whether failures in other vehicles could be expected[ 2[1[ Visual and stereo microscope examination The section of torsion bar submitted for examination was coated with a black paint coating which had ~aked o} at localised spots\\ where light rusting had...

  19. Triggers of State Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    à 1990) à l’aide de données collatérales additionnelles. Les auteurs du document n’ont pas essayé de suivre les événements qui étaient en cours...défaillance étatique, et les auteurs du document ont reconnu qu’il ne serait pas très utile de reproduire toutes ces informations. Le document s’appuie le...30 Carment, David. Assessing state failure: implications for theory and policy. in Third World Quarterly. Vol 24, no 3. pp 407-427. 30 DRDC

  20. New product failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dijksterhuis, Garmt Bernard

    2016-01-01

    When new consumer products are developed and later launched, 50 to 75 percent of them are removed from the market far short of meeting their projected financial targets. In short: they fail. We conclude that this failure is due to institutionalized insufficiencies in the use of the sciences...... that are best geared to understand and predict consumer behaviour, viz. the behavioural sciences. These are not necessarily the same as the marketing science that is performed by marketing departments. A scientific approach to understanding consumer behaviour appears to be lacking in many corporate research...

  1. Premature ovarian failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persani Luca

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Premature ovarian failure (POF is a primary ovarian defect characterized by absent menarche (primary amenorrhea or premature depletion of ovarian follicles before the age of 40 years (secondary amenorrhea. It is a heterogeneous disorder affecting approximately 1% of women e.g. Turner syndrome represent the major cause of primary amenorrhea associated with ovarian dysgenesis. Despite the description of several candidate genes, the cause of POF remains undetermined in the vast majority of the cases. Management includes substitution of the hormone defect by estrogen/progestin preparations. The only solution presently available for the fertility defect in women with absent follicular reserve is ovum donation.

  2. Failure analysis of a Francis turbine runner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frunzaverde, D; Campian, V [Research Center in Hydraulics, Automation and Heat Transfer, ' Eftimie Murgu' University of Resita P-ta Traian Vuia 1-4, RO-320085, Resita (Romania); Muntean, S [Centre of Advanced Research in Engineering Sciences, Romanian Academy - Timisoara Branch Bv. Mihai Viteazu 24, RO-300223, Timisoara (Romania); Marginean, G [University of Applied Sciences Gelsenkirchen, Neidenburger Str. 10, 45877 Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Marsavina, L [Department of Strength, ' Politehnica' University of Timisoara, Bv. Mihai Viteazu 1, RO-300222, Timisoara (Romania); Terzi, R; Serban, V, E-mail: gabriela.marginean@fh-gelsenkirchen.d, E-mail: d.frunzaverde@uem.r [Ramnicu Valcea Subsidiary, S.C. Hidroelectrica S.A., Str. Decebal 11, RO-240255, Ramnicu Valcea (Romania)

    2010-08-15

    The variable demand on the energy market requires great flexibility in operating hydraulic turbines. Therefore, turbines are frequently operated over an extended range of regimes. Francis turbines operating at partial load present pressure fluctuations due to the vortex rope in the draft tube cone. This phenomenon generates strong vibrations and noise that may produce failures on the mechanical elements of the machine. This paper presents the failure analysis of a broken Francis turbine runner blade. The failure appeared some months after the welding repair work realized in situ on fatigue cracks initiated near to the trailing edge at the junction with the crown, where stress concentration occurs. In order to determine the causes that led to the fracture of the runner blade, the metallographic investigations on a sample obtained from the blade is carried out. The metallographic investigations included macroscopic and microscopic examinations, both performed with light and scanning electron microscopy, as well as EDX - analyses. These investigations led to the conclusion, that the cracking of the blade was caused by fatigue, initiated by the surface unevenness of the welding seam. The failure was accelerated by the hydrogen embrittlement of the filling material, which appeared as a consequence of improper welding conditions. In addition to the metallographic investigations, numerical computations with finite element analysis are performed in order to evaluate the deformation and stress distribution on blade.

  3. Failure analysis of a Francis turbine runner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frunzaverde, D; Campian, V; Muntean, S; Marginean, G; Marsavina, L; Terzi, R; Serban, V

    2010-01-01

    The variable demand on the energy market requires great flexibility in operating hydraulic turbines. Therefore, turbines are frequently operated over an extended range of regimes. Francis turbines operating at partial load present pressure fluctuations due to the vortex rope in the draft tube cone. This phenomenon generates strong vibrations and noise that may produce failures on the mechanical elements of the machine. This paper presents the failure analysis of a broken Francis turbine runner blade. The failure appeared some months after the welding repair work realized in situ on fatigue cracks initiated near to the trailing edge at the junction with the crown, where stress concentration occurs. In order to determine the causes that led to the fracture of the runner blade, the metallographic investigations on a sample obtained from the blade is carried out. The metallographic investigations included macroscopic and microscopic examinations, both performed with light and scanning electron microscopy, as well as EDX - analyses. These investigations led to the conclusion, that the cracking of the blade was caused by fatigue, initiated by the surface unevenness of the welding seam. The failure was accelerated by the hydrogen embrittlement of the filling material, which appeared as a consequence of improper welding conditions. In addition to the metallographic investigations, numerical computations with finite element analysis are performed in order to evaluate the deformation and stress distribution on blade.

  4. System reliability analysis using dominant failure modes identified by selective searching technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Seok; Ok, Seung-Yong; Song, Junho; Koh, Hyun-Moo

    2013-01-01

    The failure of a redundant structural system is often described by innumerable system failure modes such as combinations or sequences of local failures. An efficient approach is proposed to identify dominant failure modes in the space of random variables, and then perform system reliability analysis to compute the system failure probability. To identify dominant failure modes in the decreasing order of their contributions to the system failure probability, a new simulation-based selective searching technique is developed using a genetic algorithm. The system failure probability is computed by a multi-scale matrix-based system reliability (MSR) method. Lower-scale MSR analyses evaluate the probabilities of the identified failure modes and their statistical dependence. A higher-scale MSR analysis evaluates the system failure probability based on the results of the lower-scale analyses. Three illustrative examples demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the approach through comparison with existing methods and Monte Carlo simulations. The results show that the proposed method skillfully identifies the dominant failure modes, including those neglected by existing approaches. The multi-scale MSR method accurately evaluates the system failure probability with statistical dependence fully considered. The decoupling between the failure mode identification and the system reliability evaluation allows for effective applications to larger structural systems

  5. Reactor Materials Program process water piping indirect failure frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daugherty, W.L.

    1989-01-01

    Following completion of the probabilistic analyses, the LOCA Definition Project has been subject to various external reviews, and as a result the need for several revisions has arisen. This report updates and summarizes the indirect failure frequency analysis for the process water piping. In this report, a conservatism of the earlier analysis is removed, supporting lower failure frequency estimates. The analysis results are also reinterpreted in light of subsequent review comments

  6. Severe Accident Recriticality Analyses (SARA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frid, W. [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden); Hoejerup, F. [Risoe National Lab. (Denmark); Lindholm, I.; Miettinen, J.; Puska, E.K. [VTT Energy, Helsinki (Finland); Nilsson, Lars [Studsvik Eco and Safety AB, Nykoeping (Sweden); Sjoevall, H. [Teoliisuuden Voima Oy (Finland)

    1999-11-01

    Recriticality in a BWR has been studied for a total loss of electric power accident scenario. In a BWR, the B{sub 4}C control rods would melt and relocate from the core before the fuel during core uncovery and heat-up. If electric power returns during this time-window unborated water from ECCS systems will start to reflood the partly control rod free core. Recriticality might take place for which the only mitigating mechanisms are the Doppler effect and void formation. In order to assess the impact of recriticality on reactor safety, including accident management measures, the following issues have been investigated in the SARA project: 1. the energy deposition in the fuel during super-prompt power burst, 2. the quasi steady-state reactor power following the initial power burst and 3. containment response to elevated quasi steady-state reactor power. The approach was to use three computer codes and to further develop and adapt them for the task. The codes were SIMULATE-3K, APROS and RECRIT. Recriticality analyses were carried out for a number of selected reflooding transients for the Oskarshamn 3 plant in Sweden with SIMULATE-3K and for the Olkiluoto 1 plant in Finland with all three codes. The core state initial and boundary conditions prior to recriticality have been studied with the severe accident codes SCDAP/RELAP5, MELCOR and MAAP4. The results of the analyses show that all three codes predict recriticality - both superprompt power bursts and quasi steady-state power generation - for the studied range of parameters, i. e. with core uncovery and heat-up to maximum core temperatures around 1800 K and water flow rates of 45 kg/s to 2000 kg/s injected into the downcomer. Since the recriticality takes place in a small fraction of the core the power densities are high which results in large energy deposition in the fuel during power burst in some accident scenarios. The highest value, 418 cal/g, was obtained with SIMULATE-3K for an Oskarshamn 3 case with reflooding

  7. Severe accident recriticality analyses (SARA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frid, W. E-mail: wiktor.frid@ski.se; Hoejerup, F.; Lindholm, I.; Miettinen, J.; Nilsson, L.; Puska, E.K.; Sjoevall, H

    2001-11-01

    Recriticality in a BWR during reflooding of an overheated partly degraded core, i.e. with relocated control rods, has been studied for a total loss of electric power accident scenario. In order to assess the impact of recriticality on reactor safety, including accident management strategies, the following issues have been investigated in the SARA project: (1) the energy deposition in the fuel during super-prompt power burst; (2) the quasi steady-state reactor power following the initial power burst; and (3) containment response to elevated quasi steady-state reactor power. The approach was to use three computer codes and to further develop and adapt them for the task. The codes were SIMULATE-3K, APROS and RECRIT. Recriticality analyses were carried out for a number of selected reflooding transients for the Oskarshamn 3 plant in Sweden with SIMULATE-3K and for the Olkiluoto 1 plant in Finland with all three codes. The core initial and boundary conditions prior to recriticality have been studied with the severe accident codes SCDAP/RELAP5, MELCOR and MAAP4. The results of the analyses show that all three codes predict recriticality--both super-prompt power bursts and quasi steady-state power generation--for the range of parameters studied, i.e. with core uncovering and heat-up to maximum core temperatures of approximately 1800 K, and water flow rates of 45-2000 kg s{sup -1} injected into the downcomer. Since recriticality takes place in a small fraction of the core, the power densities are high, which results in large energy deposition in the fuel during power burst in some accident scenarios. The highest value, 418 cal g{sup -1}, was obtained with SIMULATE-3K for an Oskarshamn 3 case with reflooding rate of 2000 kg s{sup -1}. In most cases, however, the predicted energy deposition was smaller, below the regulatory limits for fuel failure, but close to or above recently observed thresholds for fragmentation and dispersion of high burn-up fuel. The highest calculated

  8. Severe accident recriticality analyses (SARA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frid, W.; Hoejerup, F.; Lindholm, I.; Miettinen, J.; Nilsson, L.; Puska, E.K.; Sjoevall, H.

    2001-01-01

    Recriticality in a BWR during reflooding of an overheated partly degraded core, i.e. with relocated control rods, has been studied for a total loss of electric power accident scenario. In order to assess the impact of recriticality on reactor safety, including accident management strategies, the following issues have been investigated in the SARA project: (1) the energy deposition in the fuel during super-prompt power burst; (2) the quasi steady-state reactor power following the initial power burst; and (3) containment response to elevated quasi steady-state reactor power. The approach was to use three computer codes and to further develop and adapt them for the task. The codes were SIMULATE-3K, APROS and RECRIT. Recriticality analyses were carried out for a number of selected reflooding transients for the Oskarshamn 3 plant in Sweden with SIMULATE-3K and for the Olkiluoto 1 plant in Finland with all three codes. The core initial and boundary conditions prior to recriticality have been studied with the severe accident codes SCDAP/RELAP5, MELCOR and MAAP4. The results of the analyses show that all three codes predict recriticality--both super-prompt power bursts and quasi steady-state power generation--for the range of parameters studied, i.e. with core uncovering and heat-up to maximum core temperatures of approximately 1800 K, and water flow rates of 45-2000 kg s -1 injected into the downcomer. Since recriticality takes place in a small fraction of the core, the power densities are high, which results in large energy deposition in the fuel during power burst in some accident scenarios. The highest value, 418 cal g -1 , was obtained with SIMULATE-3K for an Oskarshamn 3 case with reflooding rate of 2000 kg s -1 . In most cases, however, the predicted energy deposition was smaller, below the regulatory limits for fuel failure, but close to or above recently observed thresholds for fragmentation and dispersion of high burn-up fuel. The highest calculated quasi steady

  9. Severe Accident Recriticality Analyses (SARA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frid, W.; Hoejerup, F.; Lindholm, I.; Miettinen, J.; Puska, E.K.; Nilsson, Lars; Sjoevall, H.

    1999-11-01

    Recriticality in a BWR has been studied for a total loss of electric power accident scenario. In a BWR, the B 4 C control rods would melt and relocate from the core before the fuel during core uncovery and heat-up. If electric power returns during this time-window unborated water from ECCS systems will start to reflood the partly control rod free core. Recriticality might take place for which the only mitigating mechanisms are the Doppler effect and void formation. In order to assess the impact of recriticality on reactor safety, including accident management measures, the following issues have been investigated in the SARA project: 1. the energy deposition in the fuel during super-prompt power burst, 2. the quasi steady-state reactor power following the initial power burst and 3. containment response to elevated quasi steady-state reactor power. The approach was to use three computer codes and to further develop and adapt them for the task. The codes were SIMULATE-3K, APROS and RECRIT. Recriticality analyses were carried out for a number of selected reflooding transients for the Oskarshamn 3 plant in Sweden with SIMULATE-3K and for the Olkiluoto 1 plant in Finland with all three codes. The core state initial and boundary conditions prior to recriticality have been studied with the severe accident codes SCDAP/RELAP5, MELCOR and MAAP4. The results of the analyses show that all three codes predict recriticality - both superprompt power bursts and quasi steady-state power generation - for the studied range of parameters, i. e. with core uncovery and heat-up to maximum core temperatures around 1800 K and water flow rates of 45 kg/s to 2000 kg/s injected into the downcomer. Since the recriticality takes place in a small fraction of the core the power densities are high which results in large energy deposition in the fuel during power burst in some accident scenarios. The highest value, 418 cal/g, was obtained with SIMULATE-3K for an Oskarshamn 3 case with reflooding

  10. AMS analyses at ANSTO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, E.M. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia). Physics Division

    1998-03-01

    The major use of ANTARES is Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) with {sup 14}C being the most commonly analysed radioisotope - presently about 35 % of the available beam time on ANTARES is used for {sup 14}C measurements. The accelerator measurements are supported by, and dependent on, a strong sample preparation section. The ANTARES AMS facility supports a wide range of investigations into fields such as global climate change, ice cores, oceanography, dendrochronology, anthropology, and classical and Australian archaeology. Described here are some examples of the ways in which AMS has been applied to support research into the archaeology, prehistory and culture of this continent`s indigenous Aboriginal peoples. (author)

  11. AMS analyses at ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, E.M.

    1998-01-01

    The major use of ANTARES is Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) with 14 C being the most commonly analysed radioisotope - presently about 35 % of the available beam time on ANTARES is used for 14 C measurements. The accelerator measurements are supported by, and dependent on, a strong sample preparation section. The ANTARES AMS facility supports a wide range of investigations into fields such as global climate change, ice cores, oceanography, dendrochronology, anthropology, and classical and Australian archaeology. Described here are some examples of the ways in which AMS has been applied to support research into the archaeology, prehistory and culture of this continent's indigenous Aboriginal peoples. (author)

  12. Characterising mechanical transmission wire ropes’ typical failure modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Espejo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The National University of Colombia’s Engineering School’s AFIS research group has helped several public and private institutions during the last five years in analysing the causes of failures presented in elevation and trans- port machinery leading to expensive consequences and even the loss of life. A group of typical wire rope failure modes have been identified, along with their common causes. These are presented in this work to offer help to our industry’s engineers and technicians, allowing them to identify possible risk situations in their routine work regarding the wire ropes which they use and approaches for carrying out wire rope failure analysis.

  13. Scaling of structural failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazant, Z.P. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Chen, Er-Ping [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This article attempts to review the progress achieved in the understanding of scaling and size effect in the failure of structures. Particular emphasis is placed on quasibrittle materials for which the size effect is complicated. Attention is focused on three main types of size effects, namely the statistical size effect due to randomness of strength, the energy release size effect, and the possible size effect due to fractality of fracture or microcracks. Definitive conclusions on the applicability of these theories are drawn. Subsequently, the article discusses the application of the known size effect law for the measurement of material fracture properties, and the modeling of the size effect by the cohesive crack model, nonlocal finite element models and discrete element models. Extensions to compression failure and to the rate-dependent material behavior are also outlined. The damage constitutive law needed for describing a microcracked material in the fracture process zone is discussed. Various applications to quasibrittle materials, including concrete, sea ice, fiber composites, rocks and ceramics are presented.

  14. Delusions as performance failures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrans, P

    2001-08-01

    Delusions are explanations of anomalous experiences. A theory of delusion requires an explanation of both the anomalous experience and the apparently irrational explanation generated by the delusional subject. Hence, we require a model of rational belief formation against which the belief formation of delusional subjects can be evaluated. I first describe such a model, distinguishing procedural from pragmatic rationality. Procedural rationality is the use of rules or procedures, deductive or inductive, that produce an inferentially coherent set of propositions. Pragmatic rationality is the use of procedural rationality in context. I then apply the distinction to the explanation of the Capgras and the Cotard delusions. I then argue that delusions are failures of pragmatic rationality. I examine the nature of these failures employing the distinction between performance and competence familiar from Chomskian linguistics. This approach to the irrationality of delusions reconciles accounts in which the explanation of the anomalous experience exhausts the explanation of delusion, accounts that appeal to further deficits within the reasoning processes of delusional subjects, and accounts that argue that delusions are not beliefs at all. (Respectively, one-stage, two-stage, and expressive accounts.) In paradigm cases that concern cognitive neuropsychiatry the irrationality of delusional subjects should be thought of as a performance deficit in pragmatic rationality.

  15. Analyses of MHD instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Tatsuoki

    1985-01-01

    In this article analyses of the MHD stabilities which govern the global behavior of a fusion plasma are described from the viewpoint of the numerical computation. First, we describe the high accuracy calculation of the MHD equilibrium and then the analysis of the linear MHD instability. The former is the basis of the stability analysis and the latter is closely related to the limiting beta value which is a very important theoretical issue of the tokamak research. To attain a stable tokamak plasma with good confinement property it is necessary to control or suppress disruptive instabilities. We, next, describe the nonlinear MHD instabilities which relate with the disruption phenomena. Lastly, we describe vectorization of the MHD codes. The above MHD codes for fusion plasma analyses are relatively simple though very time-consuming and parts of the codes which need a lot of CPU time concentrate on a small portion of the codes, moreover, the codes are usually used by the developers of the codes themselves, which make it comparatively easy to attain a high performance ratio on the vector processor. (author)

  16. Uncertainty Analyses and Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kevin Coppersmith

    2001-01-01

    The DOE identified a variety of uncertainties, arising from different sources, during its assessment of the performance of a potential geologic repository at the Yucca Mountain site. In general, the number and detail of process models developed for the Yucca Mountain site, and the complex coupling among those models, make the direct incorporation of all uncertainties difficult. The DOE has addressed these issues in a number of ways using an approach to uncertainties that is focused on producing a defensible evaluation of the performance of a potential repository. The treatment of uncertainties oriented toward defensible assessments has led to analyses and models with so-called ''conservative'' assumptions and parameter bounds, where conservative implies lower performance than might be demonstrated with a more realistic representation. The varying maturity of the analyses and models, and uneven level of data availability, result in total system level analyses with a mix of realistic and conservative estimates (for both probabilistic representations and single values). That is, some inputs have realistically represented uncertainties, and others are conservatively estimated or bounded. However, this approach is consistent with the ''reasonable assurance'' approach to compliance demonstration, which was called for in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) proposed 10 CFR Part 63 regulation (64 FR 8640 [DIRS 101680]). A risk analysis that includes conservatism in the inputs will result in conservative risk estimates. Therefore, the approach taken for the Total System Performance Assessment for the Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) provides a reasonable representation of processes and conservatism for purposes of site recommendation. However, mixing unknown degrees of conservatism in models and parameter representations reduces the transparency of the analysis and makes the development of coherent and consistent probability statements about projected repository

  17. Computational Models of Rock Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Dave A.; Spiegelman, Marc

    2017-04-01

    Practitioners in computational geodynamics, as per many other branches of applied science, typically do not analyse the underlying PDE's being solved in order to establish the existence or uniqueness of solutions. Rather, such proofs are left to the mathematicians, and all too frequently these results lag far behind (in time) the applied research being conducted, are often unintelligible to the non-specialist, are buried in journals applied scientists simply do not read, or simply have not been proven. As practitioners, we are by definition pragmatic. Thus, rather than first analysing our PDE's, we first attempt to find approximate solutions by throwing all our computational methods and machinery at the given problem and hoping for the best. Typically this approach leads to a satisfactory outcome. Usually it is only if the numerical solutions "look odd" that we start delving deeper into the math. In this presentation I summarise our findings in relation to using pressure dependent (Drucker-Prager type) flow laws in a simplified model of continental extension in which the material is assumed to be an incompressible, highly viscous fluid. Such assumptions represent the current mainstream adopted in computational studies of mantle and lithosphere deformation within our community. In short, we conclude that for the parameter range of cohesion and friction angle relevant to studying rocks, the incompressibility constraint combined with a Drucker-Prager flow law can result in problems which have no solution. This is proven by a 1D analytic model and convincingly demonstrated by 2D numerical simulations. To date, we do not have a robust "fix" for this fundamental problem. The intent of this submission is to highlight the importance of simple analytic models, highlight some of the dangers / risks of interpreting numerical solutions without understanding the properties of the PDE we solved, and lastly to stimulate discussions to develop an improved computational model of

  18. ORCID @ CMU: Successes and Failures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Troll Covey

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Setting and Objectives: Carnegie Mellon University (CMU recently planned and implemented a project to help CMU researchers get an Open Researcher and Contributor Identifier (ORCID and to enable administrators to integrate the ORCIDs into university systems. This article describes and assesses the planning, performance, and outcome of this initiative, branded ORCID @ CMU. Design and Methods: The article chronicles why and how ORCID was integrated at CMU, including the rationale for changes in strategic plans. It assesses researcher participation in the project using transaction log and content analyses, and the performance of the ORCID project team using recommendations in the Jisc ORCID project report, frankly reporting the team’s successes and failures. The article concludes with lessons learned that should inform ORCID integration projects and expectations at other institutions. Results: The ORCID @ CMU web application was a great success. However, the project team did not allow enough time to prepare or devote enough attention to advocacy. The marketing message was not sufficiently persuasive and the marketing channels were not particularly effective. The overall participation rate in ORCID @ CMU was far below the target of 40%, though participation in many demographics exceeded the goal. Conclusions: Strategic planning does not guarantee success. Secure more than lip service from senior administrators. Recruit champions from across the institution. Develop a message that resonates with researchers. Allow sufficient time to prepare. Empower the project manager. Start with the low hanging fruit. Develop special outreach to doctoral students and postdocs.

  19. Mesoscale simulation of concrete spall failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knell, S.; Sauer, M.; Millon, O.; Riedel, W.

    2012-05-01

    Although intensively studied, it is still being debated which physical mechanisms are responsible for the increase of dynamic strength and fracture energy of concrete observed at high loading rates, and to what extent structural inertia forces on different scales contribute to the observation. We present a new approach for the three dimensional mesoscale modelling of dynamic damage and cracking in concrete. Concrete is approximated as a composite of spherical elastic aggregates of mm to cm size embedded in an elastic cement stone matrix. Cracking within the matrix and at aggregate interfaces in the μm range are modelled with adaptively inserted—initially rigid—cohesive interface elements. The model is applied to analyse the dynamic tensile failure observed in Hopkinson-Bar spallation experiments with strain rates up to 100/s. The influence of the key mesoscale failure parameters of strength, fracture energy and relative weakening of the ITZ on macromechanic strength, momentum and energy conservation is numerically investigated.

  20. A simple beam analyser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemarchand, G.

    1977-01-01

    (ee'p) experiments allow to measure the missing energy distribution as well as the momentum distribution of the extracted proton in the nucleus versus the missing energy. Such experiments are presently conducted on SACLAY's A.L.S. 300 Linac. Electrons and protons are respectively analysed by two spectrometers and detected in their focal planes. Counting rates are usually low and include time coincidences and accidentals. Signal-to-noise ratio is dependent on the physics of the experiment and the resolution of the coincidence, therefore it is mandatory to get a beam current distribution as flat as possible. Using new technologies has allowed to monitor in real time the behavior of the beam pulse and determine when the duty cycle can be considered as being good with respect to a numerical basis