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Sample records for microfluidic architectures enabled

  1. Liquid metal enabled microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Tang, Shi-Yang; Zhu, Jiu Yang; Schaefer, Samira; Mitchell, Arnan; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh; Dickey, Michael D

    2017-03-14

    Several gallium-based liquid metal alloys are liquid at room temperature. As 'liquid', such alloys have a low viscosity and a high surface tension while as 'metal', they have high thermal and electrical conductivities, similar to mercury. However, unlike mercury, these liquid metal alloys have low toxicity and a negligible vapor pressure, rendering them much safer. In comparison to mercury, the distinguishing feature of these alloys is the rapid formation of a self-limiting atomically thin layer of gallium oxide over their surface when exposed to oxygen. This oxide layer changes many physical and chemical properties of gallium alloys, including their interfacial and rheological properties, which can be employed and modulated for various applications in microfluidics. Injecting liquid metal into microfluidic structures has been extensively used to pattern and encapsulate highly deformable and reconfigurable electronic devices including electrodes, sensors, antennas, and interconnects. Likewise, the unique features of liquid metals have been employed for fabricating miniaturized microfluidic components including pumps, valves, heaters, and electrodes. In this review, we discuss liquid metal enabled microfluidic components, and highlight their desirable attributes including simple fabrication, facile integration, stretchability, reconfigurability, and low power consumption, with promising applications for highly integrated microfluidic systems.

  2. Temperature Sensing in Modular Microfluidic Architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisna C. Bhargava

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A discrete microfluidic element with integrated thermal sensor was fabricated and demonstrated as an effective probe for process monitoring and prototyping. Elements were constructed using stereolithography and market-available glass-bodied thermistors within the modular, standardized framework of previous discrete microfluidic elements demonstrated in the literature. Flow rate-dependent response due to sensor self-heating and microchannel heating and cooling was characterized and shown to be linear in typical laboratory conditions. An acid-base neutralization reaction was performed in a continuous flow setting to demonstrate applicability in process management: the ratio of solution flow rates was varied to locate the equivalence point in a titration, closely matching expected results. This element potentially enables complex, three-dimensional microfluidic architectures with real-time temperature feedback and flow rate sensing, without application specificity or restriction to planar channel routing formats.

  3. Enabling Microfluidics: From Clean Rooms to Makerspaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-30

    e.g. detection , electric manipulation, inlets/outlets) 129 [31]. For example, Lafluer et al. used 3D-printed and paper substrates to develop an...preparation, sample analysis, and optical detection methods can be 272 designed synonymously in the same space for a potentially instrument-free sample-to...287 drug screening, sepsis diagnostics, and ultra-rare cell types), new innovations in microfluidics 288 have obviated some of the need for the

  4. Droplet-based microfluidics: enabling impact on drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, Oliver J; Maceiczyk, Richard M; Chang, Soo-Ik; deMello, Andrew J

    2014-04-01

    Over the past two decades, the application of microengineered systems in the chemical and biological sciences has transformed the way in which high-throughput experimentation is performed. The ability to fabricate complex microfluidic architectures has allowed scientists to create new experimental formats for processing ultra-small analytical volumes in short periods and with high efficiency. The development of such microfluidic systems has been driven by a range of fundamental features that accompany miniaturization. These include the ability to handle small sample volumes, ultra-low fabrication costs, reduced analysis times, enhanced operational flexibility, facile automation, and the ability to integrate functional components within complex analytical schemes. Herein we discuss the impact of microfluidics in the area of high-throughput screening and drug discovery and highlight some of the most pertinent studies in the recent literature.

  5. Microvalve Enabled Digital Microfluidic Systems for High Performance Biochemical and Genetic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Erik C; Zeng, Yong; Kim, Jungkyu; Mathies, Richard A

    2010-12-01

    Microfluidic devices offer unparalleled capability for digital microfluidic automation of sample processing and complex assay protocols in medical diagnostic and research applications. In our own work, monolithic membrane valves have enabled the creation of two platforms that precisely manipulate discrete, nanoliter-scale volumes of sample. The digital microfluidic Automaton uses two-dimensional microvalve arrays to combinatorially process nanoliter-scale sample volumes. This programmable system enables rapid integration of diverse assay protocols using a universal processing architecture. Microfabricated emulsion generator array (MEGA) devices integrate actively controlled 3-microvalve pumps to enable on-demand generation of uniform droplets for statistical encapsulation of microbeads and cells. A MEGA device containing 96 channels confers the capability of generating up to 3.4 × 10(6) nanoliter-volume droplets per hour for ultrahigh-throughput detection of rare mutations in a vast background of normal genotypes. These novel digital microfluidic platforms offer significant enhancements in throughput, sensitivity, and programmability for automated sample processing and analysis.

  6. Development of Droplet Microfluidics Enabling High-Throughput Single-Cell Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Wen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews recent developments in droplet microfluidics enabling high-throughput single-cell analysis. Five key aspects in this field are included in this review: (1 prototype demonstration of single-cell encapsulation in microfluidic droplets; (2 technical improvements of single-cell encapsulation in microfluidic droplets; (3 microfluidic droplets enabling single-cell proteomic analysis; (4 microfluidic droplets enabling single-cell genomic analysis; and (5 integrated microfluidic droplet systems enabling single-cell screening. We examine the advantages and limitations of each technique and discuss future research opportunities by focusing on key performances of throughput, multifunctionality, and absolute quantification.

  7. Microfluidics: an enabling technology for the life sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Zengerle, Roland; Koltay, P.; Ducrée, Jens

    2004-01-01

    During the last year we have investigated existing and future markets, products and technologies for microfluidics in the life sciences. Within this paper we present some of the findings and discuss a major trend identified within this project: the development of microfluidic platforms for flexible design of application specific integrated microfluidic systems. We discuss two platforms in detail which are currently under development in our lab: microfluidics on a rotating CD ("Lab-CD") as wel...

  8. Microfluidic vias enable nested bioarrays and autoregulatory devices in Newtonian fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartalov, Emil P; Walker, Christopher; Taylor, Clive R; Anderson, W French; Scherer, Axel

    2006-08-15

    We report on a fundamental technological advance for multilayer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidics. Vertical passages (vias), connecting channels located in different layers, are fabricated monolithically, in parallel, by simple and easy means. The resulting 3D connectivity greatly expands the potential complexity of microfluidic architecture. We apply the vias to printing nested bioarrays and building autoregulatory devices. A current source is demonstrated, while a diode and a rectifier are derived; all are building blocks for analog circuitry in Newtonian fluids. We also describe microfluidic septa and their applications. Vias lay the foundation for a new generation of microfluidic devices.

  9. Development of Microfluidic Systems Enabling High-Throughput Single-Cell Protein Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Beiyuan; Li, Xiufeng; Chen, Deyong; Peng, Hongshang; Wang, Junbo; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in microfluidic systems enabling high-throughput characterization of single-cell proteins. Four key perspectives of microfluidic platforms are included in this review: (1) microfluidic fluorescent flow cytometry; (2) droplet based microfluidic flow cytometry; (3) large-array micro wells (microengraving); and (4) large-array micro chambers (barcode microchips). We examine the advantages and limitations of each technique and discuss future research opportunities by focusing on three key performance parameters (absolute quantification, sensitivity, and throughput). PMID:26891303

  10. Development of Microfluidic Systems Enabling High-Throughput Single-Cell Protein Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beiyuan Fan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews recent developments in microfluidic systems enabling high-throughput characterization of single-cell proteins. Four key perspectives of microfluidic platforms are included in this review: (1 microfluidic fluorescent flow cytometry; (2 droplet based microfluidic flow cytometry; (3 large-array micro wells (microengraving; and (4 large-array micro chambers (barcode microchips. We examine the advantages and limitations of each technique and discuss future research opportunities by focusing on three key performance parameters (absolute quantification, sensitivity, and throughput.

  11. Microfluidics: an enabling screening technology for enhanced oil recovery (EOR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifton, Victor A

    2016-05-21

    Oil production is a critical industrial process that affects the entire world population and any improvements in its efficiency while reducing its environmental impact are of utmost societal importance. The paper reviews recent applications of microfluidics and microtechnology to study processes of oil extraction and recovery. It shows that microfluidic devices can be useful tools in investigation and visualization of such processes used in the oil & gas industry as fluid propagation, flooding, fracturing, emulsification and many others. Critical macro-scale processes that define oil extraction and recovery are controlled by the micro-scale processes based on wetting, adhesion, surface tension, colloids and other concepts of microfluidics. A growing number of research efforts demonstrates that microfluidics is becoming, albeit slowly, an accepted methodology in this area. We propose several areas of development where implementation of microfluidics may bring about deeper understanding and hence better control over the processes of oil recovery based on fluid propagation, droplet generation, wettability control. Studies of processes such as hydraulic fracturing, sand particle propagation in porous networks, high throughput screening of chemicals (for example, emulsifiers and surfactants) in microfluidic devices that simulate oil reservoirs are proposed to improve our understanding of these complicated physico-chemical systems. We also discuss why methods of additive manufacturing (3D printing) should be evaluated for quick prototyping and modification of the three-dimensional structures replicating natural oil-bearing rock formations for studies accessible to a wider audience of researchers.

  12. In-air microfluidics: Drop and jet coalescence enables rapid multi-phase 3D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Claas Willem; Kamperman, Tom; Lohse, Detlef; Karperien, Marcel; University of Twente Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    For the first time, we connect and integrate the fields of microfluidics and additive manufacturing, by presenting a unifying technology that we call In-air microfluidics (IAMF). We impact two liquid jets or a jet and a droplet train while flying in-air, and control their coalescence and solidification. This approach enables producing monodisperse emulsions, particles, and fibers with controlled shape and size (10 to 300 µm) and production rates 100x higher than droplet microfluidics. A single device is sufficient to process a variety of materials, and to produce different particle or fiber shapes, in marked contrast to current microfluidic devices or printers. In-air microfluidics also enables rapid deposition onto substrates, for example to form 3D printed (bio)materials which are partly-liquid but still shape-stable.

  13. Reconfigurable microfluidic pump enabled by opto-electrical-thermal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Masaru; Hagiwara, Masaya; Haulot, Gauvain; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2013-10-01

    Flexible integration of a microfluidic system comprising pumps, valves, and microchannels was realized by an optoelectronic reconfigurable microchannels (OERM) technique. Projecting a low light fluidic device pattern—e.g., pumps, valves, and channels—onto an OERM platform generates Joule heating and melts the substrate in the bright area on the platform; thus, the fluidic system can be reconfigured by changing the projected light pattern. Hexadecane was used as the substrate of the microfluidic system. The volume change of hexadecane during the liquid-solid phase transition was utilized to generate pumping pressure. The system can pump nanoliters of water within several seconds.

  14. Microfluidic solutions enabling continuous processing and monitoring of biological samples: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karle, Marc; Vashist, Sandeep Kumar; Zengerle, Roland; von Stetten, Felix

    2016-07-27

    The last decade has witnessed tremendous advances in employing microfluidic solutions enabling Continuous Processing and Monitoring of Biological Samples (CPMBS), which is an essential requirement for the control of bio-processes. The microfluidic systems are superior to the traditional inline sensors due to their ability to implement complex analytical procedures, such as multi-step sample preparation, and enabling the online measurement of parameters. This manuscript provides a backgound review of microfluidic approaches employing laminar flow, hydrodynamic separation, acoustophoresis, electrophoresis, dielectrophoresis, magnetophoresis and segmented flow for the continuous processing and monitoring of biological samples. The principles, advantages and limitations of each microfluidic approach are described along with its potential applications. The challenges in the field and the future directions are also provided.

  15. K-Channel: A Multifunctional Architecture for Dynamically Reconfigurable Sample Processing in Droplet Microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doonan, Steven R; Bailey, Ryan C

    2017-03-13

    By rapidly creating libraries of thousands of unique, miniaturized reactors, droplet microfluidics provides a powerful method for automating high-throughput chemical analysis. In order to engineer in-droplet assays, microfluidic devices must add reagents into droplets, remove fluid from droplets, and perform other necessary operations, each typically provided by a unique, specialized geometry. Unfortunately, modifying device performance or changing operations usually requires re-engineering the device among these specialized geometries, a time-consuming and costly process when optimizing in-droplet assays. To address this challenge in implementing droplet chemistry, we have developed the "K-channel," which couples a cross-channel flow to the segmented droplet flow to enable a range of operations on passing droplets. K-channels perform reagent injection (0-100% of droplet volume), fluid extraction (0-50% of droplet volume), and droplet splitting (1:1-1:5 daughter droplet ratio). Instead of modifying device dimensions or channel configuration, adjusting external conditions, such as applied pressure and electric field, selects the K-channel process and tunes its magnitude. Finally, interfacing a device-embedded magnet allows selective capture of 96% of droplet-encapsulated superparamagnetic beads during 1:1 droplet splitting events at ∼400 Hz. Addition of a second K-channel for injection (after the droplet splitting K-channel) enables integrated washing of magnetic beads within rapidly moving droplets. Ultimately, the K-channel provides an exciting opportunity to perform many useful droplet operations across a range of magnitudes without requiring architectural modifications. Therefore, we envision the K-channel as a versatile, easy to use microfluidic component enabling diverse, in-droplet (bio)chemical manipulations.

  16. Open Architecture as an Enabler for FORCEnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    Functional Area Manager FCP Fire Control Picture FCS Fire Control Solution FCQ Fire Control Quality FFBD Functional Flow Block Diagram Fn/OA FORCEnet...a) Firing Unit (FRU) receive Fire Control Quality ( FCQ ) data on threat from Remote Unit(s) (RUs). b) Validate FCQ data, enable FRU to act. c...Maintain Common Operational Picture (COP) of local tracks. d) Develop Fire Control Solution (FCS) based on FCQ data. e) Correlate FRU FCS with RU

  17. A Reversibly Sealed, Easy Access, Modular (SEAM Microfluidic Architecture to Establish In Vitro Tissue Interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay V Abhyankar

    Full Text Available Microfluidic barrier tissue models have emerged as advanced in vitro tools to explore interactions with external stimuli such as drug candidates, pathogens, or toxins. However, the procedures required to establish and maintain these systems can be challenging to implement for end users, particularly those without significant in-house engineering expertise. Here we present a module-based approach that provides an easy-to-use workflow to establish, maintain, and analyze microscale tissue constructs. Our approach begins with a removable culture insert that is magnetically coupled, decoupled, and transferred between standalone, prefabricated microfluidic modules for simplified cell seeding, culture, and downstream analysis. The modular approach allows several options for perfusion including standard syringe pumps or integration with a self-contained gravity-fed module for simple cell maintenance. As proof of concept, we establish a culture of primary human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC and report combined surface protein imaging and gene expression after controlled apical stimulation with the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS. We also demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating hydrated biomaterial interfaces into the microfluidic architecture by integrating an ultra-thin (< 1 μm, self-assembled hyaluronic acid/peptide amphiphile culture membrane with brain-specific Young's modulus (~ 1kPa. To highlight the importance of including biomimetic interfaces into microscale models we report multi-tiered readouts from primary rat cortical cells cultured on the self-assembled membrane and compare a panel of mRNA targets with primary brain tissue signatures. We anticipate that the modular approach and simplified operational workflows presented here will enable a wide range of research groups to incorporate microfluidic barrier tissue models into their work.

  18. Enabling Rapid Naval Architecture Design Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Michael A.; Dufresne, Stephane; Balestrini-Robinson, Santiago; Mavris, Dimitri

    2011-01-01

    Well accepted conceptual ship design tools can be used to explore a design space, but more precise results can be found using detailed models in full-feature computer aided design programs. However, defining a detailed model can be a time intensive task and hence there is an incentive for time sensitive projects to use conceptual design tools to explore the design space. In this project, the combination of advanced aerospace systems design methods and an accepted conceptual design tool facilitates the creation of a tool that enables the user to not only visualize ship geometry but also determine design feasibility and estimate the performance of a design.

  19. Microfluidic-enabled liposomes elucidate size-dependent transdermal transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renee R Hood

    Full Text Available Microfluidic synthesis of small and nearly-monodisperse liposomes is used to investigate the size-dependent passive transdermal transport of nanoscale lipid vesicles. While large liposomes with diameters above 105 nm are found to be excluded from deeper skin layers past the stratum corneum, the primary barrier to nanoparticle transport, liposomes with mean diameters between 31-41 nm exhibit significantly enhanced penetration. Furthermore, multicolor fluorescence imaging reveals that the smaller liposomes pass rapidly through the stratum corneum without vesicle rupture. These findings reveal that nanoscale liposomes with well-controlled size and minimal size variance are excellent vehicles for transdermal delivery of functional nanoparticle drugs.

  20. An integrated photocatalytic microfluidic platform enabling total phosphorus digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Jianhua; Dong, Tian; Bian, Chao; Wang, Minrui; Wang, Fangfang; Bai, Yin; Xia, Shanhong

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents an integrated thermally assisted photocatalytic microfluidic chip and its application to the digestion of total phosphorus (TP) in freshwater. A micro heater, a micro temperature sensor, thermal-isolation channels and a polymethylsiloxane (PDMS) reaction chamber were fabricated on the microfluidic chip. Nano-TiO2 film sputtered on the surface of silicon in the reaction area was used as the photocatalyst, and a micro ultraviolet A-ray-light-emitting diode (UVA-LED) array fabricated by MEMS technology were attached to the top of reaction chamber for TP degradation. In this study, sodium tripolyphosphate (Na5P3O10) and sodium glycerophosphate (C3H7Na2O6P) were chosen as the typical components of TP, and these water samples were digested under UVA light irradiation and heating at the same time. Compared with the conventional high-temperature TP digestion which works at 120 °C for 30 min, the thermally assisted UVA digestion method could work at relatively low temperature, and the power consumption is decreased to less than 2 W. Since this digestion method could work without an oxidizing reagent, it is compatible with the electrochemical detection process, which makes it possible to achieve a fully functional detection chip by integrating the digestion unit and electrochemical microelectrode, to realize the on-chip detection of TP, and other water quality parameters such as total nitrogen and chemical oxygen demand.

  1. Raexplore: Enabling Rapid, Automated Architecture Exploration for Full Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yao [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Balaprakash, Prasanna [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Meng, Jiayuan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Morozov, Vitali [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Parker, Scott [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kumaran, Kalyan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-12-01

    We present Raexplore, a performance modeling framework for architecture exploration. Raexplore enables rapid, automated, and systematic search of architecture design space by combining hardware counter-based performance characterization and analytical performance modeling. We demonstrate Raexplore for two recent manycore processors IBM Blue- Gene/Q compute chip and Intel Xeon Phi, targeting a set of scientific applications. Our framework is able to capture complex interactions between architectural components including instruction pipeline, cache, and memory, and to achieve a 3–22% error for same-architecture and cross-architecture performance predictions. Furthermore, we apply our framework to assess the two processors, and discover and evaluate a list of architectural scaling options for future processor designs.

  2. Research highlights: microfluidic-enabled single-cell epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Manjima; Khojah, Reem; Tay, Andy; Di Carlo, Dino

    2015-11-07

    Individual cells are the fundamental unit of life with diverse functions from metabolism to motility. In multicellular organisms, a single genome can give rise to tremendous variability across tissues at the single-cell level due to epigenetic differences in the genes that are expressed. Signals from the local environment or a history of signals can drive these variations, and tissues have many cell types that play separate roles. This epigenetic heterogeneity is of biological importance in normal functions such as tissue morphogenesis and can contribute to development or resistance of cancer, or other disease states. Therefore, an improved understanding of variations at the single cell level are fundamental to understanding biology and developing new approaches to combating disease. Traditional approaches to characterize epigenetic modifications of chromatin or the transcriptome of cells have often focused on blended responses of many cells in a tissue; however, such bulk measures lose spatial and temporal differences that occur from cell to cell, and cannot uncover novel or rare populations of cells. Here we highlight a flurry of recent activity to identify the mRNA profiles from thousands of single-cells as well as chromatin accessibility and histone marks on single to few hundreds of cells. Microfluidics and microfabrication have played a central role in the range of new techniques, and will likely continue to impact their further development towards routine single-cell epigenetic analysis.

  3. Real-time tunability of chip-based light source enabled by microfluidic mixing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Brian Bilenberg; Rasmussen, Torben; Balslev, Søren

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate real-time tunability of a chip-based liquid light source enabled by microfluidic mixing. The mixer and light source are fabricated in SU-8 which is suitable for integration in SU-8-based laboratory-on-a-chip microsystems. The tunability of the light source is achieved by changing...

  4. Architectural Synthesis of Flow-Based Microfluidic Large-Scale Integration Biochips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minhass, Wajid Hassan; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Microfluidic biochips are replacing the conventional biochemical analyzers and are able to integrate the necessary functions for biochemical analysis on-chip. In this paper we are interested in flow-based biochips, in which the flow of liquid is manipulated using integrated microvalves......,we propose a top-down architectural synthesis methodology for the flow-based biochips. Starting from a given biochemical application and a microfluidic component library, we are interested in synthesizing a biochip architecture, i.e., performing component allocation from the library based on the biochemical...... application, generating the biochip schematic (netlist) and then performing physical synthesis (deciding the placement of the microfluidic components on the chip and performing routing of the microfluidic channels), such that the application completion time is minimized. We evaluate our proposed approach...

  5. A Web-based Architecture Enabling Multichannel Telemedicine Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Lamberti

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Telemedicine scenarios include today in-hospital care management, remote teleconsulting, collaborative diagnosis and emergency situations handling. Different types of information need to be accessed by means of etherogeneous client devices in different communication environments in order to enable high quality continuous sanitary assistance delivery wherever and whenever needed. In this paper, a Web-based telemedicine architecture based on Java, XML and XSL technologies is presented. By providing dynamic content delivery services and Java based client applications for medical data consultation and modification, the system enables effective access to an Electronic Patient Record based standard database by means of any device equipped with a Web browser, such as traditional Personal Computers and workstation as well as modern Personal Digital Assistants. The effectiveness of the proposed architecture has been evaluated in different scenarios, experiencing fixed and mobile clinical data transmissions over Local Area Networks, wireless LANs and wide coverage telecommunication network including GSM and GPRS.

  6. Fabrication of microfluidic architectures for optimal flow rate and concentration measurement for lab on chip application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Tijjani; Hashim, U.

    2017-03-01

    Optimum flow in micro channel for sensing purpose is challenging. In this study, The optimizations of the fluid sample flows are made through the design and characterization of the novel microfluidics' architectures to achieve the optimal flow rate in the micro channels. The biocompatibility of the Polydimetylsiloxane (Sylgard 184 silicon elastomer) polymer used to fabricate the device offers avenue for the device to be implemented as the universal fluidic delivery system for bio-molecules sensing in various bio-medical applications. The study uses the following methodological approaches, designing a novel microfluidics' architectures by integrating the devices on a single 4 inches silicon substrate, fabricating the designed microfluidic devices using low-cost solution soft lithography technique, characterizing and validating the flow throughput of urine samples in the micro channels by generating pressure gradients through the devices' inlets. The characterization on the urine samples flow in the micro channels have witnessed the constant flow throughout the devices.

  7. Quantitative full-colour transmitted light microscopy and dyes for concentration mapping and measurement of diffusion coefficients in microfluidic architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werts, Martinus H V; Raimbault, Vincent; Texier-Picard, Rozenn; Poizat, Rémi; Français, Olivier; Griscom, Laurent; Navarro, Julien R G

    2012-02-21

    A simple and versatile methodology has been developed for the simultaneous measurement of multiple concentration profiles of colourants in transparent microfluidic systems, using a conventional transmitted light microscope, a digital colour (RGB) camera and numerical image processing combined with multicomponent analysis. Rigorous application of the Beer-Lambert law would require monochromatic probe conditions, but in spite of the broad spectral bandwidths of the three colour channels of the camera, a linear relation between the measured optical density and dye concentration is established under certain conditions. An optimised collection of dye solutions for the quantitative optical microscopic characterisation of microfluidic devices is proposed. Using the methodology for optical concentration measurement we then implement and validate a simplified and robust method for the microfluidic measurement of diffusion coefficients using an H-filter architecture. It consists of measuring the ratio of the concentrations of the two output channels of the H-filter. It enables facile determination of the diffusion coefficient, even for non-fluorescent molecules and nanoparticles, and is compatible with non-optical detection of the analyte.

  8. ARINC 818 specification revisions enable new avionics architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunwald, Paul

    2014-06-01

    The ARINC 818 Avionics Digital Video Bus is the standard for cockpit video that has gained wide acceptance in both the commercial and military cockpits. The Boeing 787, A350XWB, A400M, KC-46A, and many other aircraft use it. The ARINC 818 specification, which was initially release in 2006, has recently undergone a major update to address new avionics architectures and capabilities. Over the seven years since its release, projects have gone beyond the specification due to the complexity of new architectures and desired capabilities, such as video switching, bi-directional communication, data-only paths, and camera and sensor control provisions. The ARINC 818 specification was revised in 2013, and ARINC 818-2 was approved in November 2013. The revisions to the ARINC 818-2 specification enable switching, stereo and 3-D provisions, color sequential implementations, regions of interest, bi-directional communication, higher link rates, data-only transmission, and synchronization signals. This paper discusses each of the new capabilities and the impact on avionics and display architectures, especially when integrating large area displays, stereoscopic displays, multiple displays, and systems that include a large number of sensors.

  9. A Laminar Flow-Based Microfluidic Tesla Pump via Lithography Enabled 3D Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habhab, Mohammed-Baker; Ismail, Tania; Lo, Joe Fujiou

    2016-11-23

    Tesla turbine and its applications in power generation and fluid flow were demonstrated by Nicholas Tesla in 1913. However, its real-world implementations were limited by the difficulty to maintain laminar flow between rotor disks, transient efficiencies during rotor acceleration, and the lack of other applications that fully utilize the continuous flow outputs. All of the aforementioned limits of Tesla turbines can be addressed by scaling to the microfluidic flow regime. Demonstrated here is a microscale Tesla pump designed and fabricated using a Digital Light Processing (DLP) based 3D printer with 43 µm lateral and 30 µm thickness resolutions. The miniaturized pump is characterized by low Reynolds number of 1000 and a flow rate of up to 12.6 mL/min at 1200 rpm, unloaded. It is capable of driving a mixer network to generate microfluidic gradient. The continuous, laminar flow from Tesla turbines is well-suited to the needs of flow-sensitive microfluidics, where the integrated pump will enable numerous compact lab-on-a-chip applications.

  10. A Laminar Flow-Based Microfluidic Tesla Pump via Lithography Enabled 3D Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed-Baker Habhab

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Tesla turbine and its applications in power generation and fluid flow were demonstrated by Nicholas Tesla in 1913. However, its real-world implementations were limited by the difficulty to maintain laminar flow between rotor disks, transient efficiencies during rotor acceleration, and the lack of other applications that fully utilize the continuous flow outputs. All of the aforementioned limits of Tesla turbines can be addressed by scaling to the microfluidic flow regime. Demonstrated here is a microscale Tesla pump designed and fabricated using a Digital Light Processing (DLP based 3D printer with 43 µm lateral and 30 µm thickness resolutions. The miniaturized pump is characterized by low Reynolds number of 1000 and a flow rate of up to 12.6 mL/min at 1200 rpm, unloaded. It is capable of driving a mixer network to generate microfluidic gradient. The continuous, laminar flow from Tesla turbines is well-suited to the needs of flow-sensitive microfluidics, where the integrated pump will enable numerous compact lab-on-a-chip applications.

  11. A Laminar Flow-Based Microfluidic Tesla Pump via Lithography Enabled 3D Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habhab, Mohammed-Baker; Ismail, Tania; Lo, Joe Fujiou

    2016-01-01

    Tesla turbine and its applications in power generation and fluid flow were demonstrated by Nicholas Tesla in 1913. However, its real-world implementations were limited by the difficulty to maintain laminar flow between rotor disks, transient efficiencies during rotor acceleration, and the lack of other applications that fully utilize the continuous flow outputs. All of the aforementioned limits of Tesla turbines can be addressed by scaling to the microfluidic flow regime. Demonstrated here is a microscale Tesla pump designed and fabricated using a Digital Light Processing (DLP) based 3D printer with 43 µm lateral and 30 µm thickness resolutions. The miniaturized pump is characterized by low Reynolds number of 1000 and a flow rate of up to 12.6 mL/min at 1200 rpm, unloaded. It is capable of driving a mixer network to generate microfluidic gradient. The continuous, laminar flow from Tesla turbines is well-suited to the needs of flow-sensitive microfluidics, where the integrated pump will enable numerous compact lab-on-a-chip applications. PMID:27886051

  12. Mesh Network Architecture for Enabling Inter-Spacecraft Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Christopher; Merrill, Garrick

    2017-01-01

    To enable communication between spacecraft operating in a formation or small constellation, a mesh network architecture was developed and tested using a time division multiple access (TDMA) communication scheme. The network is designed to allow for the exchange of telemetry and other data between spacecraft to enable collaboration between small spacecraft. The system uses a peer-to-peer topology with no central router, so that it does not have a single point of failure. The mesh network is dynamically configurable to allow for addition and subtraction of new spacecraft into the communication network. Flight testing was performed using an unmanned aerial system (UAS) formation acting as a spacecraft analogue and providing a stressing environment to prove mesh network performance. The mesh network was primarily devised to provide low latency, high frequency communication but is flexible and can also be configured to provide higher bandwidth for applications desiring high data throughput. The network includes a relay functionality that extends the maximum range between spacecraft in the network by relaying data from node to node. The mesh network control is implemented completely in software making it hardware agnostic, thereby allowing it to function with a wide variety of existing radios and computing platforms..

  13. Microfluidic Impedance Flow Cytometry Enabling High-Throughput Single-Cell Electrical Property Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Chen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews recent developments in microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for high-throughput electrical property characterization of single cells. Four major perspectives of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell characterization are included in this review: (1 early developments of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell electrical property characterization; (2 microfluidic impedance flow cytometry with enhanced sensitivity; (3 microfluidic impedance and optical flow cytometry for single-cell analysis and (4 integrated point of care system based on microfluidic impedance flow cytometry. We examine the advantages and limitations of each technique and discuss future research opportunities from the perspectives of both technical innovation and clinical applications.

  14. Microfluidic impedance flow cytometry enabling high-throughput single-cell electrical property characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Xue, Chengcheng; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Deyong; Wu, Min-Hsien; Wang, Junbo

    2015-04-29

    This article reviews recent developments in microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for high-throughput electrical property characterization of single cells. Four major perspectives of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell characterization are included in this review: (1) early developments of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell electrical property characterization; (2) microfluidic impedance flow cytometry with enhanced sensitivity; (3) microfluidic impedance and optical flow cytometry for single-cell analysis and (4) integrated point of care system based on microfluidic impedance flow cytometry. We examine the advantages and limitations of each technique and discuss future research opportunities from the perspectives of both technical innovation and clinical applications.

  15. Self-powered integrated microfluidic point-of-care low-cost enabling (SIMPLE) chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Erh-Chia; Fu, Chi-Cheng; Hu, Lucy; Thakur, Rohan; Feng, Jeffrey; Lee, Luke P.

    2017-01-01

    Portable, low-cost, and quantitative nucleic acid detection is desirable for point-of-care diagnostics; however, current polymerase chain reaction testing often requires time-consuming multiple steps and costly equipment. We report an integrated microfluidic diagnostic device capable of on-site quantitative nucleic acid detection directly from the blood without separate sample preparation steps. First, we prepatterned the amplification initiator [magnesium acetate (MgOAc)] on the chip to enable digital nucleic acid amplification. Second, a simplified sample preparation step is demonstrated, where the plasma is separated autonomously into 224 microwells (100 nl per well) without any hemolysis. Furthermore, self-powered microfluidic pumping without any external pumps, controllers, or power sources is accomplished by an integrated vacuum battery on the chip. This simple chip allows rapid quantitative digital nucleic acid detection directly from human blood samples (10 to 105 copies of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus DNA per microliter, ~30 min, via isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification). These autonomous, portable, lab-on-chip technologies provide promising foundations for future low-cost molecular diagnostic assays. PMID:28345028

  16. An integrated microfluidic chip enabling control and spatially resolved monitoring of temperature in micro flow reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoera, Christian; Ohla, Stefan; Shu, Zhe; Beckert, Erik; Nagl, Stefan; Belder, Detlev

    2015-01-01

    A strength of microfluidic chip laboratories is the rapid heat transfer that, in principle, enables a very homogeneous temperature distribution in chemical processes. In order to exploit this potential, we present an integrated chip system where the temperature is precisely controlled and monitored at the microfluidic channel level. This is realized by integration of a luminescent temperature sensor layer into the fluidic structure together with inkjet-printed micro heating elements. This allows steering of the temperature at the microchannel level and monitoring of the reaction progress simultaneously. A fabrication procedure is presented that allows for straightforward integration of thin polymer layers with optical sensing functionality in microchannels of glass-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) chips of only 150 μm width and 29 μm height. Sensor layers consisting of polyacrylonitrile and a temperature-sensitive ruthenium tris-phenanthroline probe with film thicknesses of about 0.5 to 6 μm were generated by combining blade coating and abrasion techniques. Optimal coating procedures were developed and evaluated. The chip-integrated sensor layers were calibrated and investigated with respect to stability, reproducibility, and response times. These microchips allowed observation of temperature in a wide range with a signal change of around 1.6 % per K and a maximum resolution of around 0.07 K. The device is employed to study temperature-controlled continuous micro flow reactions. This is demonstrated exemplarily for the tryptic cleavage of coumarin-modified peptides via fluorescence detection.

  17. Final report: An enabling architecture for information driven manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griesmeyer, J.M.

    1997-08-01

    This document is the final report for the LDRD: An Enabling Architecture for Information Driven Manufacturing. The project was motivated by the need to bring quality products to market quickly and to remain efficient and profitable with small lot sizes, intermittent production and short product life cycles. The emphasis is on integration of the product realization process and the information required to drive it. Enterprise level information was not addressed except in so far as the enterprise must provide appropriate information to the production equipment to specify what to produce, and the equipment must return enough information to record what was produced. A production script approach was developed in which the production script specifies all of the information required to produce a quality product. A task sequencer that decomposes the script into process steps which are dispatched to capable Standard Manufacturing Modules. The plug and play interface to these modules allows rapid introduction of new modules into the production system and speeds up the product realization cycle. The results of applying this approach to the Agile Manufacturing Prototyping System are described.

  18. A distributed architecture for enabling autonomous underwater intervention missions

    OpenAIRE

    Palomeras N.; Garcia J.C.; Prats M.; Fernandez J.J.; Sanz P.J.; Ridao P.

    2010-01-01

    This work introduces the main aspects related with a new architecture defined for an ongoing research project named RAUVI (i.e. Reconfigurable AUV for Intervention Missions). Two initially independent architectures for the underwater vehicle and the robotic arm have been combined into a new schema that allows for reactive and deliberative behaviours on both subsystems. Reactive actions are performed through a low-level control layer in communication with the robot hardwar...

  19. Direct Electrospinning of Ultrafine Fibers with Interconnected Macropores Enabled by in Situ Mixing Microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wanjun; Zhu, Lei; Huang, Chen; Jin, Xiangyu

    2016-12-21

    Porous ultrafine fibers are of great importance to various applications. Herein, we report a method to directly fabricate macro-porous ultrafine fibers by an in situ mixing microfluidics which allows for the simultaneous electrospinning of solution immediately after mixing. The formation mechanism of macro-pores should be attributed to the incomplete mixing coupled with nonsolvent-induced phase separation, which was elucidated by systematical investigation of various solvent systems and mixing solvents. The diameter of the macro-porous fibers can be tuned from 1.80 ± 0.40 to 6.75 ± 0.48 μm by adjusting the solution concentration and the feeding rate of mixing solvent. The results indicated that macro-porous fibers exhibited higher specific surface area (48.66 ± 8.30 m(2) g(-1)), larger pore size (116.73 nm) and pore volume (0.169 ± 0.007 cm(3) g(-1)) than conventional electrospun porous fibers, enabling the high oil absorption capacities of 95.68, 57.98, and 34.82 g g(-1) for silicon oil, motor oil, and peanut oil, respectively. Our method has greatly expanded the solution scope for electrospinning from stable solution systems to unstable or substable solution systems, thus providing intriguing opportunities for the investigation and fabrication of heterogeneous fibers by in situ mixing of various immiscible solvents/solutions. Our findings can serve as guidelines for the electrospinning of ultrafine fibers with interconnected macro-pores (>50 nm).

  20. Cloud-enabled microscopy and droplet microfluidic platform for specific detection of Escherichia coli in water.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Golberg

    Full Text Available We report an all-in-one platform - ScanDrop - for the rapid and specific capture, detection, and identification of bacteria in drinking water. The ScanDrop platform integrates droplet microfluidics, a portable imaging system, and cloud-based control software and data storage. The cloud-based control software and data storage enables robotic image acquisition, remote image processing, and rapid data sharing. These features form a "cloud" network for water quality monitoring. We have demonstrated the capability of ScanDrop to perform water quality monitoring via the detection of an indicator coliform bacterium, Escherichia coli, in drinking water contaminated with feces. Magnetic beads conjugated with antibodies to E. coli antigen were used to selectively capture and isolate specific bacteria from water samples. The bead-captured bacteria were co-encapsulated in pico-liter droplets with fluorescently-labeled anti-E. coli antibodies, and imaged with an automated custom designed fluorescence microscope. The entire water quality diagnostic process required 8 hours from sample collection to online-accessible results compared with 2-4 days for other currently available standard detection methods.

  1. Towards reference architectures as an enabler for software ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knodel, Jens; Manikas, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Software ecosystems - a topic with increasingly growing interest in academia and industry in the past decade - arguably revolutionized many aspects of industrial software engineering (business models, architectures, platforms, project executions, collaboration models, distribution of assets...... health. In this work, we identify a set of challenges and propose a research agenda for the further development of the field towards efficiently improving the existing means of ecosystem orchestration....

  2. Towards ultrathick battery electrodes: aligned carbon nanotube-enabled architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evanoff, Kara; Khan, Javed; Balandin, Alexander A; Magasinski, Alexandre; Ready, W Jud; Fuller, Thomas F; Yushin, Gleb

    2012-01-24

    Vapor deposition techniques were utilized to synthesize very thick (∼1 mm) Li-ion battery anodes consisting of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes coated with silicon and carbon. The produced anode demonstrated ultrahigh thermal (>400 W·m(-1) ·K(-1)) and high electrical (>20 S·m(-1)) conductivities, high cycle stability, and high average capacity (>3000 mAh·g(Si) (-1)). The processes utilized allow for the conformal deposition of other materials, thus making it a promising architecture for the development of Li-ion anodes and cathodes with greatly enhanced electrical and thermal conductivities.

  3. How Enterprise Architecture Maturity Enables Post-merger IT Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Törmer, Robert Lorenz; Henningsson, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    While world-wide Mergers and Acquisitions (M&As) activity continues to accelerate, a substantial proportion of deals fails to yield the expected value. The inability to plan and implement post-merger integration of information technology contributes substantially to these failure rates. This paper...... advances the argument that a company’s pre-existing Enterprise Architecture decisively shapes the capability to implement post-merger IT integration and subsequently realize benefits from M&A. Our multiple-case study investigates three acquisition cases and develops an explanatory theory of how Enterprise...

  4. Distributed, Modular, Network Enabled Architecture For Process Control Military Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Kamble*,

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In process control world, use of distributed modular embedded controller architecture drastically reduces the number and complexity of cabling; at the same time increases the system computing performance and response for real time application as compared to centralized control system. We propose a design based on ARM Cortex M4 hardware architecture and Cortex Microcontroller Software Interface Standard (CMSIS based software development. The ARM Cortex-M series ensures a compatible target processor and provides common core peripherals whereas CMSIS abstraction layer reduces development time, helps design software reusability and provides seamless application software interface for controllers. Being a custom design, we can built features like Built-In Test Equipment (BITE, single point fault tolerance, redundancy, 2/3 logic, etc. which are more desirable for a military applications. This paper describes the design of a generic embedded hardware module that can be configured as local I/O controller or application controller or Man Machine Interface (MMI. This paper also proposes a philosophy for step by step hardware and software development.

  5. An Architecture to Enable Autonomous Control of Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Ryan D.; Dever, Timothy P.; Soeder, James F.; George, Patrick J.; Morris, Paul H.; Colombano, Silvano P.; Frank, Jeremy D.; Schwabacher, Mark A.; Wang, Liu; LawLer, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Autonomy is required for manned spacecraft missions distant enough that light-time communication delays make ground-based mission control infeasible. Presently, ground controllers develop a complete schedule of power modes for all spacecraft components based on a large number of factors. The proposed architecture is an early attempt to formalize and automate this process using on-vehicle computation resources. In order to demonstrate this architecture, an autonomous electrical power system controller and vehicle Mission Manager are constructed. These two components are designed to work together in order to plan upcoming load use as well as respond to unanticipated deviations from the plan. The communication protocol was developed using "paper" simulations prior to formally encoding the messages and developing software to implement the required functionality. These software routines exchange data via TCP/IP sockets with the Mission Manager operating at NASA Ames Research Center and the autonomous power controller running at NASA Glenn Research Center. The interconnected systems are tested and shown to be effective at planning the operation of a simulated quasi-steady state spacecraft power system and responding to unexpected disturbances.

  6. A Microfluidic Immunostaining System Enables Quality Assured and Standardized Immunohistochemical Biomarker Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Seyong; Cho, Chang Hyun; Kwon, Youngmee; Lee, Eun Sook; Park, Je-Kyun

    2017-04-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) plays an important role in biomarker-driven cancer therapy. Although there has been a high demand for standardized and quality assured IHC, it has rarely been achieved due to the complexity of IHC testing and the subjective validation-based process flow of IHC quality control. We present here a microfluidic immunostaining system for the standardization of IHC by creating a microfluidic linearly graded antibody (Ab)-staining device and a reference cell microarray. Unlike conventional efforts, our system deals primarily with the screening of biomarker staining conditions for quantitative quality assurance testing in IHC. We characterized the microfluidic matching of Ab staining intensity using three HER2 Abs produced by different manufacturers. The quality of HER2 Ab was also validated using tissues of breast cancer patients, demonstrating that our system is an efficient and powerful tool for the standardization and quality assurance of IHC.

  7. A Microfluidic Immunostaining System Enables Quality Assured and Standardized Immunohistochemical Biomarker Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Seyong; Cho, Chang Hyun; Kwon, Youngmee; Lee, Eun Sook; Park, Je-Kyun

    2017-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) plays an important role in biomarker-driven cancer therapy. Although there has been a high demand for standardized and quality assured IHC, it has rarely been achieved due to the complexity of IHC testing and the subjective validation-based process flow of IHC quality control. We present here a microfluidic immunostaining system for the standardization of IHC by creating a microfluidic linearly graded antibody (Ab)-staining device and a reference cell microarray. Unlike conventional efforts, our system deals primarily with the screening of biomarker staining conditions for quantitative quality assurance testing in IHC. We characterized the microfluidic matching of Ab staining intensity using three HER2 Abs produced by different manufacturers. The quality of HER2 Ab was also validated using tissues of breast cancer patients, demonstrating that our system is an efficient and powerful tool for the standardization and quality assurance of IHC. PMID:28378835

  8. Microfluidic-Enabled Print-to-Screen Platform for High-Throughput Screening of Combinatorial Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yuzhe; Li, Jiannan; Xiao, Wenwu; Xiao, Kai; Lee, Joyce; Bhardwaj, Urvashi; Zhu, Zijie; Digiglio, Philip; Yang, Gaomai; Lam, Kit S; Pan, Tingrui

    2015-10-20

    Since the 1960s, combination chemotherapy has been widely utilized as a standard method to treat cancer. However, because of the potentially enormous number of drug candidates and combinations, conventional identification methods of the effective drug combinations are usually associated with significantly high operational costs, low throughput screening, laborious and time-consuming procedures, and ethical concerns. In this paper, we present a low-cost, high-efficiency microfluidic print-to-screen (P2S) platform, which integrates combinatorial screening with biomolecular printing for high-throughput screening of anticancer drug combinations. This P2S platform provides several distinct advantages and features, including automatic combinatorial printing, high-throughput parallel drug screening, modular disposable cartridge, and biocompatibility, which can potentially speed up the entire discovery cycle of potent drug combinations. Microfluidic impact printing utilizing plug-and-play microfluidic cartridges is experimentally characterized with controllable droplet volume and accurate positioning. Furthermore, the combinatorial print-to-screen assay is demonstrated in a proof-of-concept biological experiment which can identify the positive hits among the entire drug combination library in a parallel and rapid manner. Overall, this microfluidic print-to-screen platform offers a simple, low-cost, high-efficiency solution for high-throughput large-scale combinatorial screening and can be applicable for various emerging applications in drug cocktail discovery.

  9. Synthesis of Application-Specific Fault-Tolerant Digital Microfluidic Biochip Architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alistar, Mirela; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Digital microfluidic biochips (DMBs) are microfluidic devices that manipulate droplets on an array of electrodes. Microfluidic operations, such as transport, mixing, and split, are performed on the electrode array to perform a biochemical application. All previous work assumes that the DMB...

  10. Flexible opto-electronics enabled microfluidics systems with cloud connectivity for point-of-care micronutrient analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stephen; Aranyosi, A J; Wong, Michelle D; Hong, Ji Hyung; Lowe, Jared; Chan, Carol; Garlock, David; Shaw, Scott; Beattie, Patrick D; Kratochvil, Zachary; Kubasti, Nick; Seagers, Kirsten; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Swanson, Christina D

    2016-04-15

    In developing countries, the deployment of medical diagnostic technologies remains a challenge because of infrastructural limitations (e.g. refrigeration, electricity), and paucity of health professionals, distribution centers and transportation systems. Here we demonstrate the technical development and clinical testing of a novel electronics enabled microfluidic paper-based analytical device (EE-μPAD) for quantitative measurement of micronutrient concentrations in decentralized, resource-limited settings. The system performs immune-detection using paper-based microfluidics, instrumented with flexible electronics and optoelectronic sensors in a mechanically robust, ultrathin format comparable in size to a credit card. Autonomous self-calibration, plasma separation, flow monitoring, timing and data storage enable multiple devices to be run simultaneously. Measurements are wirelessly transferred to a mobile phone application that geo-tags the data and transmits it to a remote server for real time tracking of micronutrient deficiencies. Clinical tests of micronutrient levels from whole blood samples (n=95) show comparable sensitivity and specificity to ELISA-based tests. These results demonstrate instantaneous acquisition and global aggregation of diagnostics data using a fully integrated point of care system that will enable rapid and distributed surveillance of disease prevalence and geographical progression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Application-specific fault-tolerant architecture synthesis for digital microfluidic biochips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alistar, Mirela; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan

    2013-01-01

    , but as discrete droplets on an array of electrodes. Microfluidic operations, such as transport, mixing, split, are performed on this array by routing the corresponding droplets on a series of electrodes. Researchers have proposed several approaches for the synthesis of digital microfluidic biochips. All previous......Microfluidic-based biochips are replacing the conventional biochemical analyzers, and are able to integrate onchip all the necessary functions for biochemical analysis using microfluidics. The digital microfluidic biochips are based on the manipulation of liquids not as a continuous flow...

  12. Long-Term Growth of Moss in Microfluidic Devices Enables Subcellular Studies in Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bascom, Carlisle S; Wu, Shu-Zon; Nelson, Katherine; Oakey, John; Bezanilla, Magdalena

    2016-09-01

    Key developmental processes that occur on the subcellular and cellular level or occur in occluded tissues are difficult to access, let alone image and analyze. Recently, culturing living samples within polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices has facilitated the study of hard-to-reach developmental events. Here, we show that an early diverging land plant, Physcomitrella patens, can be continuously cultured within PDMS microfluidic chambers. Because the PDMS chambers are bonded to a coverslip, it is possible to image P. patens development at high resolution over long time periods. Using PDMS chambers, we report that wild-type protonemal tissue grows at the same rate as previously reported for growth on solid medium. Using long-term imaging, we highlight key developmental events, demonstrate compatibility with high-resolution confocal microscopy, and obtain growth rates for a slow-growing mutant. By coupling the powerful genetic tools available to P. patens with long-term growth and imaging provided by PDMS microfluidic chambers, we demonstrate the capability to study cellular and subcellular developmental events in plants directly and in real time.

  13. A Tokenization-Based Communication Architecture for HCE-Enabled NFC Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busra Ozdenizci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Following the announcement of Host Card Emulation (HCE technology, card emulation mode based Near Field Communication (NFC services have gained further appreciation as an enabler of the Cloud-based Secure Element (SE concept. A comprehensive and complete architecture with a centralized and feasible business model for diverse HCE-based NFC services will be highly appreciated, particularly by Service Providers and users. To satisfy the need in this new emerging research area, a Tokenization-based communication architecture for HCE-based NFC services is presented in this paper. Our architecture proposes Two-Phased Tokenization to enable the identity management of both user and Service Provider. NFC Smartphone users can store, manage, and make use of their sensitive data on the Cloud for NFC services; Service Providers can also provide diverse card emulation NFC services easily through the proposed architecture. In this paper, we initially present the Two-Phased Tokenization model and then validate the proposed architecture by providing a case study on access control. We further evaluate the usability aspect in terms of an authentication scheme. We then discuss the ecosystem and business model comprised of the proposed architecture and emphasize the contributions to ecosystem actors. Finally, suggestions are provided for data protection in transit and at rest.

  14. Rule-based graph theory to enable exploration of the space system architecture design space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arney, Dale Curtis

    The primary goal of this research is to improve upon system architecture modeling in order to enable the exploration of design space options. A system architecture is the description of the functional and physical allocation of elements and the relationships, interactions, and interfaces between those elements necessary to satisfy a set of constraints and requirements. The functional allocation defines the functions that each system (element) performs, and the physical allocation defines the systems required to meet those functions. Trading the functionality between systems leads to the architecture-level design space that is available to the system architect. The research presents a methodology that enables the modeling of complex space system architectures using a mathematical framework. To accomplish the goal of improved architecture modeling, the framework meets five goals: technical credibility, adaptability, flexibility, intuitiveness, and exhaustiveness. The framework is technically credible, in that it produces an accurate and complete representation of the system architecture under consideration. The framework is adaptable, in that it provides the ability to create user-specified locations, steady states, and functions. The framework is flexible, in that it allows the user to model system architectures to multiple destinations without changing the underlying framework. The framework is intuitive for user input while still creating a comprehensive mathematical representation that maintains the necessary information to completely model complex system architectures. Finally, the framework is exhaustive, in that it provides the ability to explore the entire system architecture design space. After an extensive search of the literature, graph theory presents a valuable mechanism for representing the flow of information or vehicles within a simple mathematical framework. Graph theory has been used in developing mathematical models of many transportation and

  15. A microfluidic device with multi-valves system to enable several simultaneous exposure tests on Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jaehoon; Nakajima, Masahiro; Masaru, Takeuchi; Huang, Qiang; Fukuda, Toshio

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we report on a microfluidic device with a multi-valve system to conduct several exposure tests on Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) simultaneously. It has pneumatic valves and no-moving-parts (NMP) valves. An NMP valve is incorporated with a chamber and enables the unidirectional movement of C. elegans in the chamber; once worms are loaded into the chamber, they cannot exit, regardless of the flow direction. To demonstrate the ability of the NMP valve to handle worms, we made a microfluidic device with three chambers. Each chamber was used to expose worms to Cd and Cu solutions, and K-medium. A pair of electrodes was installed in the device and the capacitance in-between the electrode was measured. When a C. elegans passed through the electrodes, the capacitance was changed. The capacitance change was proportional to the body volume of the worm, thus the body volume change by the heavy metal exposure was measured in the device. Thirty worms were divided into three groups and exposed to each solution. We confirmed that the different solutions induced differences in the capacitance changes for each group. These results indicate that our device is a viable method for simultaneously analyzing the effect of multiple stimuli on C. elegans.

  16. Rapid discovery of potent siRNA-containing lipid nanoparticles enabled by controlled microfluidic formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Delai; Love, Kevin T; Chen, Yi; Eltoukhy, Ahmed A; Kastrup, Christian; Sahay, Gaurav; Jeon, Alvin; Dong, Yizhou; Whitehead, Kathryn A; Anderson, Daniel G

    2012-04-25

    The discovery of potent new materials for in vivo delivery of nucleic acids depends upon successful formulation of the active molecules into a dosage form suitable for the physiological environment. Because of the inefficiencies of current formulation methods, materials are usually first evaluated for in vitro delivery efficacy as simple ionic complexes with the nucleic acids (lipoplexes). The predictive value of such assays, however, has never been systematically studied. Here, for the first time, by developing a microfluidic method that allowed the rapid preparation of high-quality siRNA-containing lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) for a large number of materials, we have shown that gene silencing assays employing lipoplexes result in a high rate of false negatives (~90%) that can largely be avoided through formulation. Seven novel materials with in vivo gene silencing potencies of >90% at a dose of 1.0 mg/kg in mice were discovered. This method will facilitate the discovery of next-generation reagents for LNP-mediated nucleic acid delivery.

  17. A simple method for the evaluation of microfluidic architecture using flow quantitation via a multiplexed fluidic resistance measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Daniel C; Melnikoff, Brett A; Marchiarullo, Daniel J; Cash, Devin R; Ferrance, Jerome P; Landers, James P

    2010-08-07

    Quality control of microdevices adds significant costs, in time and money, to any fabrication process. A simple, rapid quantitative method for the post-fabrication characterization of microchannel architecture using the measurement of flow with volumes relevant to microfluidics is presented. By measuring the mass of a dye solution passed through the device, it circumvents traditional gravimetric and interface-tracking methods that suffer from variable evaporation rates and the increased error associated with smaller volumes. The multiplexed fluidic resistance (MFR) measurement method measures flow via stable visible-wavelength dyes, a standard spectrophotometer and common laboratory glassware. Individual dyes are used as molecular markers of flow for individual channels, and in channel architectures where multiple channels terminate at a common reservoir, spectral deconvolution reveals the individual flow contributions. On-chip, this method was found to maintain accurate flow measurement at lower flow rates than the gravimetric approach. Multiple dyes are shown to allow for independent measurement of multiple flows on the same device simultaneously. We demonstrate that this technique is applicable for measuring the fluidic resistance, which is dependent on channel dimensions, in four fluidically connected channels simultaneously, ultimately determining that one chip was partially collapsed and, therefore, unusable for its intended purpose. This method is thus shown to be widely useful in troubleshooting microfluidic flow characteristics.

  18. Workflow-enabled distributed component-based information architecture for digital medical imaging enterprises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Stephen T C; Tjandra, Donny; Wang, Huili; Shen, Weimin

    2003-09-01

    Few information systems today offer a flexible means to define and manage the automated part of radiology processes, which provide clinical imaging services for the entire healthcare organization. Even fewer of them provide a coherent architecture that can easily cope with heterogeneity and inevitable local adaptation of applications and can integrate clinical and administrative information to aid better clinical, operational, and business decisions. We describe an innovative enterprise architecture of image information management systems to fill the needs. Such a system is based on the interplay of production workflow management, distributed object computing, Java and Web techniques, and in-depth domain knowledge in radiology operations. Our design adapts the approach of "4+1" architectural view. In this new architecture, PACS and RIS become one while the user interaction can be automated by customized workflow process. Clinical service applications are implemented as active components. They can be reasonably substituted by applications of local adaptations and can be multiplied for fault tolerance and load balancing. Furthermore, the workflow-enabled digital radiology system would provide powerful query and statistical functions for managing resources and improving productivity. This paper will potentially lead to a new direction of image information management. We illustrate the innovative design with examples taken from an implemented system.

  19. HistoFlex--a microfluidic device providing uniform flow conditions enabling highly sensitive, reproducible and quantitative in situ hybridizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søe, Martin Jensen; Okkels, Fridolin; Sabourin, David; Alberti, Massimo; Holmstrøm, Kim; Dufva, Martin

    2011-11-21

    A microfluidic device (the HistoFlex) designed to perform and monitor molecular biological assays under dynamic flow conditions on microscope slide-substrates, with special emphasis on analyzing histological tissue sections, is presented. Microscope slides were reversibly sealed onto a cast polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) insert, patterned with distribution channels and reaction chambers. Topology optimization was used to design reaction chambers with uniform flow conditions. The HistoFlex provided uniform hybridization conditions, across the reaction chamber, as determined by hybridization to microscope slides of spotted DNA microarrays when applying probe concentrations generally used in in situ hybridization (ISH) assays. The HistoFlex's novel ability in online monitoring of an in situ hybridization assay was demonstrated using direct fluorescent detection of hybridization to 18S rRNA. Tissue sections were not visually damaged during assaying, which enabled adapting a complete ISH assay for detection of microRNAs (miRNA). The effects of flow based incubations on hybridization, antibody incubation and Tyramide Signal Amplification (TSA) steps were investigated upon adapting the ISH assay for performing in the HistoFlex. The hybridization step was significantly enhanced using flow based incubations due to improved hybridization efficiency. The HistoFlex device enabled a fast miRNA ISH assay (3 hours) which provided higher hybridization signal intensity compared to using conventional techniques (5 h 40 min). We further demonstrate that the improved hybridization efficiency using the HistoFlex permits more complex assays e.g. those comprising sequential hybridization and detection of two miRNAs to be performed with significantly increased sensitivity. The HistoFlex provides a new histological analysis platform that will allow multiple and sequential assays to be performed under their individual optimum assay conditions. Images can subsequently be recorded either in

  20. Enabling Co-Design of Multi-Layer Exascale Storage Architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carothers, Christopher [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    2015-08-31

    Growing demands for computing power in applications such as energy production, climate analysis, computational chemistry, and bioinformatics have propelled computing systems toward the exascale: systems with 1018 floating-point operations per second. These systems, to be designed and constructed over the next decade, will create unprecedented challenges in component counts, power consumption, resource limitations, and system complexity. Data storage and access are an increasingly important and complex component in extreme-scale computing systems, and significant design work is needed to develop successful storage hardware and software architectures at exascale. Co-design of these systems will be necessary to find the best possible design points for exascale systems. The goal of this work has been to enable the exploration and co-design of exascale storage systems by providing a detailed, accurate, and highly parallel simulation of exascale storage and the surrounding environment. Specifically, this simulation has (1) portrayed realistic application checkpointing and analysis workloads, (2) captured the complexity, scale, and multilayer nature of exascale storage hardware and software, and (3) executed in a timeframe that enables “what if'” exploration of design concepts. We developed models of the major hardware and software components in an exascale storage system, as well as the application I/O workloads that drive them. We used our simulation system to investigate critical questions in reliability and concurrency at exascale, helping guide the design of future exascale hardware and software architectures. Additionally, we provided this system to interested vendors and researchers so that others can explore the design space. We validated the capabilities of our simulation environment by configuring the simulation to represent the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Blue Gene/Q system and comparing simulation results for application I

  1. Architectural Modeling for the Future Internet-enabled Enterprise (AMFInE) Workshop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinderen, van Marten; Zelm, Martin; Sanchis, Raquel; Poler, Raul; Doumeingts, Guy

    2012-01-01

    In order for future enterprises to make effective use of the Future Internet, it is necessary that their Enterprise Architecture aligns with the Future Internet Architecture. An Enterprise Architecture is a comprehensive architecture description that spans enterprise and technology aspects, to allow

  2. Architectural Modeling for the Future Internet-enabled Enterprise (AMFInE) Workshop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sinderen, Marten J.; Zelm, Martin; Sanchis, Raquel; Poler, Raul; Doumeingts, Guy

    2012-01-01

    In order for future enterprises to make effective use of the Future Internet, it is necessary that their Enterprise Architecture aligns with the Future Internet Architecture. An Enterprise Architecture is a comprehensive architecture description that spans enterprise and technology aspects, to allow

  3. Integrated microfluidic system enabling (bio)chemical reactions with on-line MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brivio, Monica; Fokkens, Roel H.; Verboom, Willem; Reinhoudt, David N.; Tas, Niels R.; Goedbloed, Martijn; Berg, van den Albert

    2002-01-01

    A continuous flow micro total analysis system (μ-TAS) consisting of an on-chip microfluidic device connected to a matrix assisted laser desorption ionization [MALDI] time-of-flight [TOF] mass spectrometer (MS) as an analytical screening system is presented. Reaction microchannels and inlet/outlet re

  4. Evolvable Mars Campaign Long Duration Habitation Strategies: Architectural Approaches to Enable Human Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Matthew A.; Toups, Larry; Howe, A. Scott; Wald, Samuel I.

    2015-01-01

    The Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC) is the current NASA Mars mission planning effort which seeks to establish sustainable, realistic strategies to enable crewed Mars missions in the mid-2030s timeframe. The primary outcome of the Evolvable Mars Campaign is not to produce "The Plan" for sending humans to Mars, but instead its intent is to inform the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate near-term key decisions and investment priorities to prepare for those types of missions. The FY'15 EMC effort focused upon analysis of integrated mission architectures to identify technically appealing transportation strategies, logistics build-up strategies, and vehicle designs for reaching and exploring Mars moons and Mars surface. As part of the development of this campaign, long duration habitats are required which are capable of supporting crew with limited resupply and crew abort during the Mars transit, Mars moons, and Mars surface segments of EMC missions. In particular, the EMC design team sought to design a single, affordable habitation system whose manufactured units could be outfitted uniquely for each of these missions and reused for multiple crewed missions. This habitat system must provide all of the functionality to safely support 4 crew for long durations while meeting mass and volume constraints for each of the mission segments set by the chosen transportation architecture and propulsion technologies. This paper describes several proposed long-duration habitation strategies to enable the Evolvable Mars Campaign through improvements in mass, cost, and reusability, and presents results of analysis to compare the options and identify promising solutions. The concepts investigated include several monolithic concepts: monolithic clean sheet designs, and concepts which leverage the co-manifested payload capability of NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) to deliver habitable elements within the Universal Payload Adaptor between the SLS upper stage and the Orion

  5. Fast architecture-level synthesis of fault-tolerant flow-based microfluidic biochips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Wei Lun; Gupta, Ankur; Roy, Sudip

    2017-01-01

    in turn results in wastage of expensive reagent fluids. In order to make the chip fault-tolerant, the state-of-the-art technique adopts simulated annealing (SA) based approach to synthesize a fault-tolerant architecture. However, the SA method is time consuming and non-deterministic with over...

  6. Ubiquitous Learning Architecture to Enable Learning Path Design across the Cumulative Learning Continuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Karoudis

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The past twelve years have seen ubiquitous learning (u-learning emerging as a new learning paradigm based on ubiquitous technology. By integrating a high level of mobility into the learning environment, u-learning enables learning not only through formal but also through informal and social learning modalities. This makes it suitable for lifelong learners that want to explore, identify and seize such learning opportunities, and to fully build upon these experiences. This paper presents a theoretical framework for designing personalized learning paths for lifelong learners, which supports contemporary pedagogical approaches that can promote the idea of a cumulative learning continuum from pedagogy through andragogy to heutagogy where lifelong learners progress in maturity and autonomy. The framework design builds on existing conceptual and process models for pedagogy-driven design of learning ecosystems. Based on this framework, we propose a system architecture that aims to provide personalized learning pathways using selected pedagogical strategies, and to integrate formal, informal and social training offerings using two well-known learning and development reference models; the 70:20:10 framework and the 3–33 model.

  7. A coral-on-a-chip microfluidic platform enabling live-imaging microscopy of reef-building corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Orr H; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Gavish, Assaf R; Stocker, Roman; Vardi, Assaf

    2016-03-04

    Coral reefs, and the unique ecosystems they support, are facing severe threats by human activities and climate change. Our understanding of these threats is hampered by the lack of robust approaches for studying the micro-scale interactions between corals and their environment. Here we present an experimental platform, coral-on-a-chip, combining micropropagation and microfluidics to allow direct microscopic study of live coral polyps. The small and transparent coral micropropagates are ideally suited for live-imaging microscopy, while the microfluidic platform facilitates long-term visualization under controlled environmental conditions. We demonstrate the usefulness of this approach by imaging coral micropropagates at previously unattainable spatio-temporal resolutions, providing new insights into several micro-scale processes including coral calcification, coral-pathogen interaction and the loss of algal symbionts (coral bleaching). Coral-on-a-chip thus provides a powerful method for studying coral physiology in vivo at the micro-scale, opening new vistas in coral biology.

  8. Cucurbit[n]uril-Based Microcapsules Self-Assembled within Microfluidic Droplets: A Versatile Approach for Supramolecular Architectures and Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ji; Lan, Yang; Yu, Ziyi; Tan, Cindy S Y; Parker, Richard M; Abell, Chris; Scherman, Oren A

    2017-02-21

    Microencapsulation is a fundamental concept behind a wide range of daily applications ranging from paints, adhesives, and pesticides to targeted drug delivery, transport of vaccines, and self-healing concretes. The beauty of microfluidics to generate microcapsules arises from the capability of fabricating monodisperse and micrometer-scale droplets, which can lead to microcapsules/particles with fine-tuned control over size, shape, and hierarchical structure, as well as high reproducibility, efficient material usage, and high-throughput manipulation. The introduction of supramolecular chemistry, such as host-guest interactions, endows the resultant microcapsules with stimuli-responsiveness and self-adjusting capabilities, and facilitates hierarchical microstructures with tunable stability and porosity, leading to the maturity of current microencapsulation industry. Supramolecular architectures and materials have attracted immense attention over the past decade, as they open the possibility to obtain a large variety of aesthetically pleasing structures, with myriad applications in biomedicine, energy, sensing, catalysis, and biomimicry, on account of the inherent reversible and adaptive nature of supramolecular interactions. As a subset of supramolecular interactions, host-guest molecular recognition involves the formation of inclusion complexes between two or more moieties, with specific three-dimensional structures and spatial arrangements, in a highly controllable and cooperative manner. Such highly selective, strong yet dynamic interactions could be exploited as an alternative methodology for programmable and controllable engineering of supramolecular architectures and materials, exploiting reversible interactions between complementary components. Through the engineering of molecular structures, assemblies can be readily functionalized based on host-guest interactions, with desirable physicochemical characteristics. In this Account, we summarize the current state

  9. Functional Performance of an Enabling Atmosphere Revitalization Subsystem Architecture for Deep Space Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jay L.; Abney, Morgan B.; Frederick, Kenneth R.; Greenwood, Zachary W.; Kayatin, Matthew J.; Newton, Robert L.; Parrish, Keith J.; Roman, Monsi C.; Takada, Kevin C.; Miller, Lee A.; Scott, Joseph P.; Stanley, Christine M.

    2013-01-01

    A subsystem architecture derived from the International Space Station's (ISS) Atmosphere Revitalization Subsystem (ARS) has been functionally demonstrated. This ISS-derived architecture features re-arranged unit operations for trace contaminant control and carbon dioxide removal functions, a methane purification component as a precursor to enhance resource recovery over ISS capability, operational modifications to a water electrolysis-based oxygen generation assembly, and an alternative major atmospheric constituent monitoring concept. Results from this functional demonstration are summarized and compared to the performance observed during ground-based testing conducted on an ISS-like subsystem architecture. Considerations for further subsystem architecture and process technology development are discussed.

  10. Digital microfluidics-enabled single-molecule detection by printing and sealing single magnetic beads in femtoliter droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witters, Daan; Knez, Karel; Ceyssens, Frederik; Puers, Robert; Lammertyn, Jeroen

    2013-06-07

    Digital microfluidics is introduced as a novel platform with unique advantages for performing single-molecule detection. We demonstrate how superparamagnetic beads, used for capturing single protein molecules, can be printed with unprecedentedly high loading efficiency and single bead resolution on an electrowetting-on-dielectric-based digital microfluidic chip by micropatterning the Teflon-AF surface of the device. By transporting droplets containing suspended superparamagnetic beads over a hydrophilic-in-hydrophobic micropatterned Teflon-AF surface, single beads are trapped inside the hydrophilic microwells due to their selective wettability and tailored dimensions. Digital microfluidics presents the following advantages for printing and sealing magnetic beads for single-molecule detection: (i) droplets containing suspended beads can be transported back and forth over the array of hydrophilic microwells to obtain high loading efficiencies of microwells with single beads, (ii) the use of hydrophilic-in-hydrophobic patterns permits the use of a magnet to speed up the bead transfer process to the wells, while the receding droplet meniscus removes excess beads off the chip surface and thereby shortens the bead patterning time, and (iii) reagents can be transported over the printed beads multiple times, while capillary forces and a magnet hold the printed beads in place. High loading efficiencies (98% with a CV of 0.9%) of single beads in microwells were obtained by transporting droplets of suspended beads over the array 10 times in less than 1 min, which is much higher than previously reported methods (40-60%), while the total surface area needed for performing single-molecule detection can be decreased. The performance of the device was demonstrated by fluorescent detection of the presence of the biotinylated enzyme β-galactosidase on streptavidin-coated beads with a linear dynamic range of 4 orders of magnitude ranging from 10 aM to 90 fM.

  11. The Instrumentation of a Microfluidic Analyzer Enabling the Characterization of the Specific Membrane Capacitance, Cytoplasm Conductivity, and Instantaneous Young's Modulus of Single Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Deyong; Huang, Chengjun; Fan, Beiyuan; Long, Rong; Hsieh, Chia-Hsun; Wang, Junbo; Wu, Min-Hsien; Chen, Jian

    2017-06-19

    This paper presents the instrumentation of a microfluidic analyzer enabling the characterization of single-cell biophysical properties, which includes seven key components: a microfluidic module, a pressure module, an imaging module, an impedance module, two LabVIEW platforms for instrument operation and raw data processing, respectively, and a Python code for data translation. Under the control of the LabVIEW platform for instrument operation, the pressure module flushes single cells into the microfluidic module with raw biophysical parameters sampled by the imaging and impedance modules and processed by the LabVIEW platform for raw data processing, which were further translated into intrinsic cellular biophysical parameters using the code developed in Python. Based on this system, specific membrane capacitance, cytoplasm conductivity, and instantaneous Young's modulus of three cell types were quantified as 2.76 ± 0.57 μF/cm², 1.00 ± 0.14 S/m, and 3.79 ± 1.11 kPa for A549 cells (ncell = 202); 1.88 ± 0.31 μF/cm², 1.05 ± 0.16 S/m, and 3.74 ± 0.75 kPa for 95D cells (ncell = 257); 2.11 ± 0.38 μF/cm², 0.87 ± 0.11 S/m, and 5.39 ± 0.89 kPa for H460 cells (ncell = 246). As a semi-automatic instrument with a throughput of roughly 1 cell per second, this prototype instrument can be potentially used for the characterization of cellular biophysical properties.

  12. The Instrumentation of a Microfluidic Analyzer Enabling the Characterization of the Specific Membrane Capacitance, Cytoplasm Conductivity, and Instantaneous Young’s Modulus of Single Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Deyong; Huang, Chengjun; Fan, Beiyuan; Long, Rong; Hsieh, Chia-Hsun; Wang, Junbo; Wu, Min-Hsien; Chen, Jian

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the instrumentation of a microfluidic analyzer enabling the characterization of single-cell biophysical properties, which includes seven key components: a microfluidic module, a pressure module, an imaging module, an impedance module, two LabVIEW platforms for instrument operation and raw data processing, respectively, and a Python code for data translation. Under the control of the LabVIEW platform for instrument operation, the pressure module flushes single cells into the microfluidic module with raw biophysical parameters sampled by the imaging and impedance modules and processed by the LabVIEW platform for raw data processing, which were further translated into intrinsic cellular biophysical parameters using the code developed in Python. Based on this system, specific membrane capacitance, cytoplasm conductivity, and instantaneous Young’s modulus of three cell types were quantified as 2.76 ± 0.57 μF/cm2, 1.00 ± 0.14 S/m, and 3.79 ± 1.11 kPa for A549 cells (ncell = 202); 1.88 ± 0.31 μF/cm2, 1.05 ± 0.16 S/m, and 3.74 ± 0.75 kPa for 95D cells (ncell = 257); 2.11 ± 0.38 μF/cm2, 0.87 ± 0.11 S/m, and 5.39 ± 0.89 kPa for H460 cells (ncell = 246). As a semi-automatic instrument with a throughput of roughly 1 cell per second, this prototype instrument can be potentially used for the characterization of cellular biophysical properties. PMID:28629175

  13. A coral-on-a-chip microfluidic platform enabling live-imaging microscopy of reef-building corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Orr H.; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Gavish, Assaf R.; Stocker, Roman; Vardi, Assaf

    2016-01-01

    Coral reefs, and the unique ecosystems they support, are facing severe threats by human activities and climate change. Our understanding of these threats is hampered by the lack of robust approaches for studying the micro-scale interactions between corals and their environment. Here we present an experimental platform, coral-on-a-chip, combining micropropagation and microfluidics to allow direct microscopic study of live coral polyps. The small and transparent coral micropropagates are ideally suited for live-imaging microscopy, while the microfluidic platform facilitates long-term visualization under controlled environmental conditions. We demonstrate the usefulness of this approach by imaging coral micropropagates at previously unattainable spatio-temporal resolutions, providing new insights into several micro-scale processes including coral calcification, coral–pathogen interaction and the loss of algal symbionts (coral bleaching). Coral-on-a-chip thus provides a powerful method for studying coral physiology in vivo at the micro-scale, opening new vistas in coral biology. PMID:26940983

  14. Rapid, low-cost prototyping of centrifugal microfluidic devices for effective implementation of various microfluidic operations

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hugo, S

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The work presented here details the implementation of a centrifugal microfluidic platform – the first of its kind in South Africa – as a foundation for the development of various microfluidic operations. Microfluidic systems enable the precise...

  15. Trends and Potentials of the Smart Grid Infrastructure: From ICT Sub-System to SDN-Enabled Smart Grid Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaebeom Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Context and situational awareness are key features and trends of the smart grid and enable adaptable, flexible and extendable smart grid services. However, the traditional hardware-dependent communication infrastructure is not designed to identify the flow and context of data, and it focuses only on packet forwarding using a pre-defined network configuration profile. Thus, the current network infrastructure may not dynamically adapt the various business models and services of the smart grid system. To solve this problem, software-defined networking (SDN is being considered in the smart grid, but the design, architecture and system model need to be optimized for the smart grid environment. In this paper, we investigate the state-of-the-art smart grid information subsystem, communication infrastructure and its emerging trends and potentials, called an SDN-enabled smart grid. We present an abstract business model, candidate SDN applications and common architecture of the SDN-enabled smart grid. Further, we compare recent studies into the SDN-enabled smart grid depending on its service functionalities, and we describe further challenges of the SDN-enabled smart grid network infrastructure.

  16. Techniques for Enabling Highly Efficient Message Passing on Many-Core Architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Si, Min; Balaji, Pavan; Ishikawa, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Many-core architecture provides a massively parallel environment with dozens of cores and hundreds of hardware threads. Scientific application programmers are increasingly looking at ways to utilize such large numbers of lightweight cores for various programming models. Efficiently executing these models on massively parallel many-core environments is not easy, however and performance may be degraded in various ways. The first author's doctoral research focuses on exploiting the capabilities of many-core architectures on widely used MPI implementations. While application programmers have studied several approaches to achieve better parallelism and resource sharing, many of those approaches still face communication problems that degrade performance. In the thesis, we investigate the characteristics of MPI on such massively threaded architectures and propose two efficient strategies -- a multi-threaded MPI approach and a process-based asynchronous model -- to optimize MPI communication for modern scientific applications.

  17. Measuring dynamics in weakly structured regions of proteins using microfluidics-enabled subsecond H/D exchange mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rob, Tamanna; Liuni, Peter; Gill, Preet Kamal; Zhu, Shaolong; Balachandran, Naresh; Berti, Paul J; Wilson, Derek J

    2012-04-17

    This work introduces an integrated microfluidic device for measuring rapid H/D exchange (HDX) in proteins. By monitoring backbone amide HDX on the millisecond to low second time scale, we are able to characterize conformational dynamics in weakly structured regions, such as loops and molten globule-like domains that are inaccessible in conventional HDX experiments. The device accommodates the entire MS-based HDX workflow on a single chip with residence times sufficiently small (ca. 8 s) that back-exchange is negligible (≤5%), even without cooling. Components include an adjustable position capillary mixer providing a variable-time labeling pulse, a static mixer for HDX quenching, a proteolytic microreactor for rapid protein digestion, and on-chip electrospray ionization (ESI). In the present work, we characterize device performance using three model systems, each illustrating a different application of 'time-resolved' HDX. Ubiquitin is used to illustrate a crude, high throughput structural analysis based on a single subsecond HDX time-point. In experiments using cytochrome c, we distinguish dynamic behavior in loops, establishing a link between flexibility and interactions with the heme prosthetic group. Finally, we localize an unusually high 'burst-phase' of HDX in the large tetrameric enzyme DAHP synthase to a 'molten globule-like' region surrounding the active site.

  18. A microfluidic system enabling Raman measurements of the oxygenation cycle in single optically trapped red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramser, Kerstin; Enger, Jonas; Goksör, Mattias; Hanstorp, Dag; Logg, Katarina; Käll, Mikael

    2005-04-01

    Using a lab-on-a-chip approach we demonstrate the possibility of selecting a single cell with certain properties and following its dynamics after an environmental stimulation in real time using Raman spectroscopy. This is accomplished by combining a micro Raman set-up with optical tweezers and a microfluidic system. The latter gives full control over the media surrounding the cell, and it consists of a pattern of channels and reservoirs defined by electron beam lithography that is moulded into rubber silicon (PDMS). Different buffers can be transported through the channels using electro-osmotic flow, while the resonance Raman response of an optically trapped red blood cell (RBC) is simultaneously registered. This makes it possible to monitor the oxygenation cycle of the cell in real time and to investigate effects like photo-induced chemistry caused by the illumination. The experimental set-up has high potential for in vivo monitoring of cellular drug response using a variety of spectroscopic probes.

  19. A new electro-optic waveguide architecture and the unprecedented devices it enables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Scott R.; Rommel, Scott D.; Farca, George; Anderson, Michael H.

    2008-04-01

    A new electro-optic waveguide platform, which provides unprecedented electro-optical phase delays (> 1mm), with very low loss (integrated photonic architecture has applications in a wide array of commercial and defense markets including: remote sensing, micro-LADAR, OCT, laser illumination, phased array radar, optical communications, etc. Performance attributes of several example devices are presented.

  20. Commercialization of microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpatti, Lisa R; Yetisen, Ali K

    2014-07-01

    Microfluidic devices offer automation and high-throughput screening, and operate at low volumes of consumables. Although microfluidics has the potential to reduce turnaround times and costs for analytical devices, particularly in medical, veterinary, and environmental sciences, this enabling technology has had limited diffusion into consumer products. This article analyzes the microfluidics market, identifies issues, and highlights successful commercialization strategies. Addressing niche markets and establishing compatibility with existing workflows will accelerate market penetration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Enabling Future Science and Human Exploration with NASA's Next Generation near Earth and Deep Space Communications and Navigation Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Schier, James S.; Israel, David J.; Tai, Wallace; Liebrecht, Philip E.; Townes, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is studying alternatives for the United States space communications architecture through the 2040 timeframe. This architecture provides communication and navigation services to both human exploration and science missions throughout the solar system. Several of NASA's key space assets are approaching their end of design life and major systems are in need of replacement. The changes envisioned in the relay satellite architecture and capabilities around both Earth and Mars are significant undertakings and occur only once or twice each generation, and therefore is referred to as NASA's next generation space communications architecture. NASA's next generation architecture will benefit from technology and services developed over recent years. These innovations will provide missions with new operations concepts, increased performance, and new business and operating models. Advancements in optical communications will enable high-speed data channels and the use of new and more complex science instruments. Modern multiple beam/multiple access technologies such as those employed on commercial high throughput satellites will enable enhanced capabilities for on-demand service, and with new protocols will help provide Internet-like connectivity for cooperative spacecraft to improve data return and coordinate joint mission objectives. On-board processing with autonomous and cognitive networking will play larger roles to help manage system complexity. Spacecraft and ground systems will coordinate among themselves to establish communications, negotiate link connectivity, and learn to share spectrum to optimize resource allocation. Spacecraft will autonomously navigate, plan trajectories, and handle off-nominal events. NASA intends to leverage the ever-expanding capabilities of the satellite communications industry and foster its continued growth. NASA's technology development will complement and extend commercial capabilities

  2. Enabling two-phase microfluidic thermal transport systems using a novel thermal-flux degassing and fluid charging approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh Dhillon, Navdeep; Pisano, Albert P.

    2014-03-01

    A novel two-port thermal-flux method has been proposed and demonstrated for degassing and charging two-phase microfluidic thermal transport systems with a degassed working fluid. In microscale heat pipes and loop heat pipes (mLHPs), small device volumes and large capillary forces associated with smaller feature sizes render conventional vacuum pump-based degassing methods quite impractical. Instead, we employ a thermally generated pressure differential to purge non-condensable gases from these devices before charging them with a degassed working fluid in a two-step process. Based on the results of preliminary experiments studying the effectiveness and reliability of three different high temperature-compatible device packaging approaches, an optimized compression packaging technique was developed to degas and charge a mLHP device using the thermal-flux method. An induction heating-based noninvasive hermetic sealing approach for permanently sealing the degassed and charged mLHP devices has also been proposed. To demonstrate the efficacy of this approach, induction heating experiments were performed to noninvasively seal 1 mm square silicon fill-hole samples with donut-shaped solder preforms. The results show that the minimum hole sealing induction heating time is heat flux limited and can be estimated using a lumped capacitance thermal model. However, further continued heating of the solder uncovers the hole due to surface tension-induced contact line dynamics of the molten solder. It was found that an optimum mass of the solder preform is required to ensure a wide enough induction-heating time window for successful sealing of a fill-hole.

  3. Framework Architecture Enabling an Agent-Based Inter-Company Integration with XML

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klement Fellner

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available More and more cooperating companies utilize the World Wide Web (WWW to federate and further integrate their heterogeneous business application systems. At the same time, innovative business strategies, like virtual organizations, supply chain management or one-to-one marketing as well as trendsetting competitive strategies, like mass customisation are realisable. Both, the necessary integration and the innovative concepts are demanding software supporting automation of communication as well as coordination across system boundaries. In this paper, we describe a framework architecture for intercompany integration of business processes based on commonly accepted and (partially standardized concepts and techniques. Further on, it is shown how the framework architecture helps to automate procurement processes and how a cost-saving black-box re-use is achieved following a component oriented implementation paradigm.

  4. Close-range photogrammetry enables documentation of environment-induced deformation of architectural heritage

    OpenAIRE

    Suziedelyte-Visockiene, J; Bagdziunaite, R; Malys, N.; Maliene, V

    2015-01-01

    Deformation, damage and permanent loss of heritage assets due to various physical and environmental factors has always been a major problem. As the availability of funds for conservation and restoration is limited, the digital documentation of heritage objects and monitoring of environment-induced deformations are increasingly important for cultural heritage preservation. Our study elucidates developments in the digital image capturing and processing for recording architectural heritage objec...

  5. A Secure NEC-enabling Architecture : Disentangling Infrastructure, Information and Security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, D.; Hartog, T.; Schotanus, H.A.; Verkoelen, C.A.A.

    2011-01-01

    The NATO Network-Enabled Capability (NNEC) study envisions effective and efficient cooperation among the coalition partners in missions. This requires information sharing and efficient deployment of IT assets. Current military communication infrastructures are mostly deployed as stand-alone

  6. Tunable Microfluidic Dye Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Brian Bilenberg; Helbo, Bjarne; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2003-01-01

    We present a tunable microfluidic dye laser fabricated in SU-8. The tunability is enabled by integrating a microfluidic diffusion mixer with an existing microfluidic dye laser design by Helbo et al. By controlling the relative flows in the mixer between a dye solution and a solvent......, the concentration of dye in the laser cavity can be adjusted, allowing the wavelength to be tuned. Wavelength tuning controlled by the dye concentration was demonstrated with macroscopic dye lasers already in 1971, but this principle only becomes practically applicable by the use of microfluidic mixing...

  7. Enabling Future Large Searches for Exoplanet Auroral Emission with the EPIC Correlator Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Beardsley, Adam P.; Bowman, Judd D.; Morales, Miguel F.

    2017-05-01

    Extrasolar planets are expected to emit strong ``auroral'' emission at radio frequencies generated by the interaction of the host star's stellar winds with the planet's magnetosphere through electron-cyclotron maser emission. This transient emission lasts a few seconds to days and is almost fully circularly polarized. Detecting this emission in exoplanets is a critical probe of their magnetospheres and thus their interior compositions and habitability. The intensity and detectability of the emission depends on the suitability of many factors to the observing parameters such as the strength of the stellar wind power, the planetary magnetosphere cross-section, the highly beamed and coherent nature of electron-cyclotron emission, and narrow ranges of the planet's orbital phase. Large areas of sky must be surveyed continuously to high sensitivity to detect auroral emission. Next-generation radio telescopes with wide fields of view, large collecting areas and high efficiency are needed for these searches. This poses challenges to traditional correlator architectures whose computational cost scales as the square of the number of antennas. I will present a novel radio aperture synthesis imaging architecture - E-field Parallel Imaging Correlator (EPIC) - whose all-sky and full Stokes imaging capabilities will not only address the aforementioned factors preventing detection but also solve the computational challenges posed by large arrays. Compared to traditional imaging, EPIC is inherently fast and thus presents the unique advantage of probing transient timescales ranging orders of magnitude from tens of microseconds to days at no additional cost.

  8. Integrated Microfluidic Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Yu; Wang, Yanju; Wang, Shutao; Tseng, Hsian-Rong

    2009-12-01

    Microfluidic reactors exhibit intrinsic advantages of reduced chemical consumption, safety, high surface-area-to-volume ratios, and improved control over mass and heat transfer superior to the macroscopic reaction setting. In contract to a continuous-flow microfluidic system composed of only a microchannel network, an integrated microfluidic system represents a scalable integration of a microchannel network with functional microfluidic modules, thus enabling the execution and automation of complicated chemical reactions in a single device. In this review, we summarize recent progresses on the development of integrated microfluidics-based chemical reactors for (i) parallel screening of in situ click chemistry libraries, (ii) multistep synthesis of radiolabeled imaging probes for positron emission tomography (PET), (iii) sequential preparation of individually addressable conducting polymer nanowire (CPNW), and (iv) solid-phase synthesis of DNA oligonucleotides. These proof-of-principle demonstrations validate the feasibility and set a solid foundation for exploring a broad application of the integrated microfluidic system.

  9. Architecture-driven Migration of Legacy Systems to Cloud-enabled Software

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Aakash; Babar, Muhammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    With the widespread adoption of cloud computing, an increasing number of organizations view it as an important business strategy to evolve their legacy applications to cloud-enabled infrastructures. We present a framework, named Legacy-to-Cloud Migration Horseshoe, for supporting the migration of...

  10. A Secure NEC-enabling Architecture : Disentangling Infrastructure, Information and Security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, D.; Hartog, T.; Schotanus, H.A.; Verkoelen, C.A.A.

    2011-01-01

    The NATO Network-Enabled Capability (NNEC) study envisions effective and efficient cooperation among the coalition partners in missions. This requires information sharing and efficient deployment of IT assets. Current military communication infrastructures are mostly deployed as stand-alone networke

  11. HistoFlex-a microfluidic device providing uniform flow conditions enabling highly sensitive, reproducible and quantitative in situ hybridizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søe, Martin Jensen; Okkels, Fridolin; Sabourin, David;

    2011-01-01

    slides of spotted DNA microarrays when applying probe concentrations generally used in in situ hybridization (ISH) assays. The HistoFlex's novel ability in online monitoring of an in situ hybridization assay was demonstrated using direct fluorescent detection of hybridization to 18S rRNA. Tissue sections...... were not visually damaged during assaying, which enabled adapting a complete ISH assay for detection of microRNAs (miRNA). The effects of flow based incubations on hybridization, antibody incubation and Tyramide Signal Amplification (TSA) steps were investigated upon adapting the ISH assay...

  12. The Montage architecture for grid-enabled science processing of large, distributed datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Joseph C.; Katz, Daniel S .; Prince, Thomas; Berriman, Bruce G.; Good, John C.; Laity, Anastasia C.; Deelman, Ewa; Singh, Gurmeet; Su, Mei-Hui

    2004-01-01

    Montage is an Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Computational Technologies (CT) Round III Grand Challenge investigation to deploy a portable, compute-intensive, custom astronomical image mosaicking service for the National Virtual Observatory (NVO). Although Montage is developing a compute- and data-intensive service for the astronomy community, we are also helping to address a problem that spans both Earth and Space science, namely how to efficiently access and process multi-terabyte, distributed datasets. In both communities, the datasets are massive, and are stored in distributed archives that are, in most cases, remote from the available Computational resources. Therefore, state of the art computational grid technologies are a key element of the Montage portal architecture. This paper describes the aspects of the Montage design that are applicable to both the Earth and Space science communities.

  13. A Conceptual Architecture for National Biosurveillance: Moving Beyond Situational Awareness to Enable Digital Detection of Emerging Threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velsko, Stephan; Bates, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Despite numerous calls for improvement, the US biosurveillance enterprise remains a patchwork of uncoordinated systems that fail to take advantage of the rapid progress in information processing, communication, and analytics made in the past decade. By synthesizing components from the extensive biosurveillance literature, we propose a conceptual framework for a national biosurveillance architecture and provide suggestions for implementation. The framework differs from the current federal biosurveillance development pathway in that it is not focused on systems useful for "situational awareness" but is instead focused on the long-term goal of having true warning capabilities. Therefore, a guiding design objective is the ability to digitally detect emerging threats that span jurisdictional boundaries, because attempting to solve the most challenging biosurveillance problem first provides the strongest foundation to meet simpler surveillance objectives. Core components of the vision are: (1) a whole-of-government approach to support currently disparate federal surveillance efforts that have a common data need, including those for food safety, vaccine and medical product safety, and infectious disease surveillance; (2) an information architecture that enables secure national access to electronic health records, yet does not require that data be sent to a centralized location for surveillance analysis; (3) an inference architecture that leverages advances in "big data" analytics and learning inference engines-a significant departure from the statistical process control paradigm that underpins nearly all current syndromic surveillance systems; and (4) an organizational architecture with a governance model aimed at establishing national biosurveillance as a critical part of the US national infrastructure. Although it will take many years to implement, and a national campaign of education and debate to acquire public buy-in for such a comprehensive system, the potential

  14. Optimized Architectural Approaches in Hardware and Software Enabling Very High Performance Shared Storage Systems

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    There are issues encountered in high performance storage systems that normally lead to compromises in architecture. Compute clusters tend to have compute phases followed by an I/O phase that must move data from the entire cluster in one operation. That data may then be shared by a large number of clients creating unpredictable read and write patterns. In some cases the aggregate performance of a server cluster must exceed 100 GB/s to minimize the time required for the I/O cycle thus maximizing compute availability. Accessing the same content from multiple points in a shared file system leads to the classical problems of data "hot spots" on the disk drive side and access collisions on the data connectivity side. The traditional method for increasing apparent bandwidth usually includes data replication which is costly in both storage and management. Scaling a model that includes replicated data presents additional management challenges as capacity and bandwidth expand asymmetrically while the system is scaled. ...

  15. Structured nucleosome fingerprints enable high-resolution mapping of chromatin architecture within regulatory regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schep, Alicia N; Buenrostro, Jason D; Denny, Sarah K; Schwartz, Katja; Sherlock, Gavin; Greenleaf, William J

    2015-11-01

    Transcription factors canonically bind nucleosome-free DNA, making the positioning of nucleosomes within regulatory regions crucial to the regulation of gene expression. Using the assay of transposase accessible chromatin (ATAC-seq), we observe a highly structured pattern of DNA fragment lengths and positions around nucleosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and use this distinctive two-dimensional nucleosomal "fingerprint" as the basis for a new nucleosome-positioning algorithm called NucleoATAC. We show that NucleoATAC can identify the rotational and translational positions of nucleosomes with up to base-pair resolution and provide quantitative measures of nucleosome occupancy in S. cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and human cells. We demonstrate the application of NucleoATAC to a number of outstanding problems in chromatin biology, including analysis of sequence features underlying nucleosome positioning, promoter chromatin architecture across species, identification of transient changes in nucleosome occupancy and positioning during a dynamic cellular response, and integrated analysis of nucleosome occupancy and transcription factor binding.

  16. Quantitative full-colour transmitted light microscopy and dyes for concentration mapping and measurement of diffusion coefficients in microfluidic architectures

    OpenAIRE

    Werts, Martinus H. V.; Raimbault, Vincent; Texier-Picard, Rozenn; Poizat, Rémi; Français, Olivier; Griscom, Laurent; Navarro, Julien R. G.

    2012-01-01

    International audience; A simple and versatile methodology has been developed for the simultaneous measurement of multiple concentration profiles of colourants in transparent microfluidic systems, using a conventional transmitted light microscope, a digital colour (RGB) camera and numerical image processing combined with multicomponent analysis. Rigorous application of the Beer-Lambert law would require monochromatic probe conditions, but in spite of the broad spectral bandwidths of the three...

  17. Topology of ON and OFF inputs in visual cortex enables an invariant columnar architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kuo-Sheng; Huang, Xiaoying; Fitzpatrick, David

    2016-05-05

    Circuits in the visual cortex integrate the information derived from separate ON (light-responsive) and OFF (dark-responsive) pathways to construct orderly columnar representations of stimulus orientation and visual space. How this transformation is achieved to meet the specific topographic constraints of each representation remains unclear. Here we report several novel features of ON-OFF convergence visualized by mapping the receptive fields of layer 2/3 neurons in the tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri) visual cortex using two-photon imaging of GCaMP6 calcium signals. We show that the spatially separate ON and OFF subfields of simple cells in layer 2/3 exhibit topologically distinct relationships with the maps of visual space and orientation preference. The centres of OFF subfields for neurons in a given region of cortex are confined to a compact region of visual space and display a smooth visuotopic progression. By contrast, the centres of the ON subfields are distributed over a wider region of visual space, display substantial visuotopic scatter, and have an orientation-specific displacement consistent with orientation preference map structure. As a result, cortical columns exhibit an invariant aggregate receptive field structure: an OFF-dominated central region flanked by ON-dominated subfields. This distinct arrangement of ON and OFF inputs enables continuity in the mapping of both orientation and visual space and the generation of a columnar map of absolute spatial phase.

  18. Architecture of a service-enabled sensing platform for the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsev, Alexander; Pantisano, Francesco; Schade, Sven; Jirka, Simon

    2015-02-13

    Recent technological advancements have led to the production of arrays of miniaturized sensors, often embedded in existing multitasking devices (e.g., smartphones, tablets) and using a wide range of radio standards (e.g., Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, 4G cellular networks). Altogether, these technological evolutions coupled with the diffusion of ubiquitous Internet connectivity provide the base-line technology for the Internet of Things (IoT). The rapid increase of IoT devices is enabling the definition of new paradigms of data collection and introduces the concept of mobile crowd-sensing. In this respect, new sensing methodologies promise to extend the current understanding of the environment and social behaviors by leveraging citizen-contributed data for a wide range of applications. Environmental sensing can however only be successful if all the heterogeneous technologies and infrastructures work smoothly together. As a result, the interconnection and orchestration of devices is one of the central issues of the IoT paradigm. With this in mind, we propose an approach for improving the accessibility of observation data, based on interoperable standards and on-device web services.

  19. Architecture of a Service-Enabled Sensing Platform for the Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Kotsev

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent technological advancements have led to the production of arrays of miniaturized sensors, often embedded in existing multitasking devices (e.g., smartphones, tablets and using a wide range of radio standards (e.g., Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, 4G cellular networks. Altogether, these technological evolutions coupled with the diffusion of ubiquitous Internet connectivity provide the base-line technology for the Internet of Things (IoT. The rapid increase of IoT devices is enabling the definition of new paradigms of data collection and introduces the concept of mobile crowd-sensing. In this respect, new sensing methodologies promise to extend the current understanding of the environment and social behaviors by leveraging citizen-contributed data for a wide range of applications. Environmental sensing can however only be successful if all the heterogeneous technologies and infrastructures work smoothly together. As a result, the interconnection and orchestration of devices is one of the central issues of the IoT paradigm. With this in mind, we propose an approach for improving the accessibility of observation data, based on interoperable standards and on-device web services.

  20. Stellar Imager (SI): Enhancements to the Mission Enabled by the Constellation Architecture (Ares I/Ares V)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Lyon, Richard G.; Karovska, Margarita; Mozurkwich, D.; Schrijver, Carolus

    2009-01-01

    Stellar Imager (SI) is a space-based, UV/Optical Interferometer (UVOI) with over 200x the resolution of HST. It will enable 0.1 milli-aresec spectral imaging of stellar surfaces and the Universe in general and open an enormous new "discovery space" for astrophysics with its combination of high angular resolution, dynamic imaging , and spectral energy resolution. SI's goal is to study the role of magnetism in the Universe and revolutionize our understanding of 1) Solar/Stellar Magnetic Activity and their impact on Space Weather, Planetary Climates, and Life, 2) Magnetic and Accretion Processes and their roles in the Origin & Evolution of Structure and in the Transport of Matter throughout the Universe, 3) the close-in structure of Active Galactic Nuclei and their winds, and 4) Exo-Solar Planet Transits and Disks. SI is a "Landmark-Discovery Mission" in 2005 Heliophysics Roadmap and a candidate UVOI in the 2006 Astrophysics Strategic Plan and is targeted for launch in the mid-2020's. It is a NASA Vision Mission and has been recommended for further study in a 2008 NRC report on missions potentially enabled/enhanced by an Ares V launch. In this paper, we discuss the science goals and required capabilities of SI, the baseline architecture of the mission assuming launch on one or more Delta rockets, and then the potential significant enhancements to the SI science and mission architecture that would be made possible by a launch in the larger volume Ares V payload fairing, and by servicing options under consideration in the Constellation program.

  1. Genetic Architecture of Phenomic-Enabled Canopy Coverage in Glycine max.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Alencar; Hall, Benjamin; Hearst, Anthony A; Cherkauer, Keith A; Rainey, Katy M

    2017-06-01

    Digital imagery can help to quantify seasonal changes in desirable crop phenotypes that can be treated as quantitative traits. Because limitations in precise and functional phenotyping restrain genetic improvement in the postgenomic era, imagery-based phenomics could become the next breakthrough to accelerate genetic gains in field crops. Whereas many phenomic studies focus on exploratory analysis of spectral data without obvious interpretative value, we used field images to directly measure soybean canopy development from phenological stage V2 to R5. Over 3 years, we collected imagery using ground and aerial platforms of a large and diverse nested association panel comprising 5555 lines. Genome-wide association analysis of canopy coverage across sampling dates detected a large quantitative trait locus (QTL) on soybean (Glycine max, L. Merr.) chromosome 19. This QTL provided an increase in yield of 47.3 kg ha(-1) Variance component analysis indicated that a parameter, described as average canopy coverage, is a highly heritable trait (h(2) = 0.77) with a promising genetic correlation with grain yield (0.87), enabling indirect selection of yield via canopy development parameters. Our findings indicate that fast canopy coverage is an early season trait that is inexpensive to measure and has great potential for application in breeding programs focused on yield improvement. We recommend using the average canopy coverage in multiple trait schemes, especially for the early stages of the breeding pipeline (including progeny rows and preliminary yield trials), in which the large number of field plots makes collection of grain yield data challenging. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  2. MEMS in microfluidic channels.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, Carol Iris Hill; Okandan, Murat; Michalske, Terry A.; Sounart, Thomas L.; Matzke, Carolyn M.

    2004-03-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) comprise a new class of devices that include various forms of sensors and actuators. Recent studies have shown that microscale cantilever structures are able to detect a wide range of chemicals, biomolecules or even single bacterial cells. In this approach, cantilever deflection replaces optical fluorescence detection thereby eliminating complex chemical tagging steps that are difficult to achieve with chip-based architectures. A key challenge to utilizing this new detection scheme is the incorporation of functionalized MEMS structures within complex microfluidic channel architectures. The ability to accomplish this integration is currently limited by the processing approaches used to seal lids on pre-etched microfluidic channels. This report describes Sandia's first construction of MEMS instrumented microfluidic chips, which were fabricated by combining our leading capabilities in MEMS processing with our low-temperature photolithographic method for fabricating microfluidic channels. We have explored in-situ cantilevers and other similar passive MEMS devices as a new approach to directly sense fluid transport, and have successfully monitored local flow rates and viscosities within microfluidic channels. Actuated MEMS structures have also been incorporated into microfluidic channels, and the electrical requirements for actuation in liquids have been quantified with an elegant theory. Electrostatic actuation in water has been accomplished, and a novel technique for monitoring local electrical conductivities has been invented.

  3. A Web 2.0 and OGC Standards Enabled Sensor Web Architecture for Global Earth Observing System of Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandl, Daniel; Unger, Stephen; Ames, Troy; Frye, Stuart; Chien, Steve; Cappelaere, Pat; Tran, Danny; Derezinski, Linda; Paules, Granville

    2007-01-01

    This paper will describe the progress of a 3 year research award from the NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) that began October 1, 2006, in response to a NASA Announcement of Research Opportunity on the topic of sensor webs. The key goal of this research is to prototype an interoperable sensor architecture that will enable interoperability between a heterogeneous set of space-based, Unmanned Aerial System (UAS)-based and ground based sensors. Among the key capabilities being pursued is the ability to automatically discover and task the sensors via the Internet and to automatically discover and assemble the necessary science processing algorithms into workflows in order to transform the sensor data into valuable science products. Our first set of sensor web demonstrations will prototype science products useful in managing wildfires and will use such assets as the Earth Observing 1 spacecraft, managed out of NASA/GSFC, a UASbased instrument, managed out of Ames and some automated ground weather stations, managed by the Forest Service. Also, we are collaborating with some of the other ESTO awardees to expand this demonstration and create synergy between our research efforts. Finally, we are making use of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) suite of standards and some Web 2.0 capabilities to Beverage emerging technologies and standards. This research will demonstrate and validate a path for rapid, low cost sensor integration, which is not tied to a particular system, and thus be able to absorb new assets in an easily evolvable, coordinated manner. This in turn will help to facilitate the United States contribution to the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), as agreed by the U.S. and 60 other countries at the third Earth Observation Summit held in February of 2005.

  4. Three-Dimensional Printing Based Hybrid Manufacturing of Microfluidic Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alapan, Yunus; Hasan, Muhammad Noman; Shen, Richang; Gurkan, Umut A

    2015-05-01

    Microfluidic platforms offer revolutionary and practical solutions to challenging problems in biology and medicine. Even though traditional micro/nanofabrication technologies expedited the emergence of the microfluidics field, recent advances in advanced additive manufacturing hold significant potential for single-step, stand-alone microfluidic device fabrication. One such technology, which holds a significant promise for next generation microsystem fabrication is three-dimensional (3D) printing. Presently, building 3D printed stand-alone microfluidic devices with fully embedded microchannels for applications in biology and medicine has the following challenges: (i) limitations in achievable design complexity, (ii) need for a wider variety of transparent materials, (iii) limited z-resolution, (iv) absence of extremely smooth surface finish, and (v) limitations in precision fabrication of hollow and void sections with extremely high surface area to volume ratio. We developed a new way to fabricate stand-alone microfluidic devices with integrated manifolds and embedded microchannels by utilizing a 3D printing and laser micromachined lamination based hybrid manufacturing approach. In this new fabrication method, we exploit the minimized fabrication steps enabled by 3D printing, and reduced assembly complexities facilitated by laser micromachined lamination method. The new hybrid fabrication method enables key features for advanced microfluidic system architecture: (i) increased design complexity in 3D, (ii) improved control over microflow behavior in all three directions and in multiple layers, (iii) transverse multilayer flow and precisely integrated flow distribution, and (iv) enhanced transparency for high resolution imaging and analysis. Hybrid manufacturing approaches hold great potential in advancing microfluidic device fabrication in terms of standardization, fast production, and user-independent manufacturing.

  5. Surface acoustic wave microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Li, Peng; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Stratton, Zackary S; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Slotcavage, Daniel; Mao, Xiaole; Shi, Jinjie; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-09-21

    The recent introduction of surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology onto lab-on-a-chip platforms has opened a new frontier in microfluidics. The advantages provided by such SAW microfluidics are numerous: simple fabrication, high biocompatibility, fast fluid actuation, versatility, compact and inexpensive devices and accessories, contact-free particle manipulation, and compatibility with other microfluidic components. We believe that these advantages enable SAW microfluidics to play a significant role in a variety of applications in biology, chemistry, engineering and medicine. In this review article, we discuss the theory underpinning SAWs and their interactions with particles and the contacting fluids in which they are suspended. We then review the SAW-enabled microfluidic devices demonstrated to date, starting with devices that accomplish fluid mixing and transport through the use of travelling SAW; we follow that by reviewing the more recent innovations achieved with standing SAW that enable such actions as particle/cell focusing, sorting and patterning. Finally, we look forward and appraise where the discipline of SAW microfluidics could go next.

  6. Punch Card Programmable Microfluidics

    CERN Document Server

    Korir, George

    2014-01-01

    Small volume fluid handling in single and multiphase microfluidics provides a promising strategy for efficient bio-chemical assays, low-cost point-of-care diagnostics and new approaches to scientific discoveries. However multiple barriers exist towards low-cost field deployment of programmable microfluidics. Incorporating multiple pumps, mixers and discrete valve based control of nanoliter fluids and droplets in an integrated, programmable manner without additional required external components has remained elusive. Combining the idea of punch card programming with arbitrary fluid control, here we describe a self-contained, hand-crank powered, multiplex and robust programmable microfluidic platform. A paper tape encodes information as a series of punched holes. A mechanical reader/actuator reads these paper tapes and correspondingly executes a series of operations onto a microfluidic chip coupled to the platform in a plug-and-play fashion. Enabled by the complexity of codes that can be represented by a series ...

  7. Cell manipulation in microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hoyoung; Kim, Kisoo; Lee, Won Gu

    2013-06-01

    Recent advances in the lab-on-a-chip field in association with nano/microfluidics have been made for new applications and functionalities to the fields of molecular biology, genetic analysis and proteomics, enabling the expansion of the cell biology field. Specifically, microfluidics has provided promising tools for enhancing cell biological research, since it has the ability to precisely control the cellular environment, to easily mimic heterogeneous cellular environment by multiplexing, and to analyze sub-cellular information by high-contents screening assays at the single-cell level. Various cell manipulation techniques in microfluidics have been developed in accordance with specific objectives and applications. In this review, we examine the latest achievements of cell manipulation techniques in microfluidics by categorizing externally applied forces for manipulation: (i) optical, (ii) magnetic, (iii) electrical, (iv) mechanical and (v) other manipulations. We furthermore focus on history where the manipulation techniques originate and also discuss future perspectives with key examples where available.

  8. Magnetic digital microfluidics - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2017-03-14

    A digital microfluidic platform manipulates droplets on an open surface. Magnetic digital microfluidics utilizes magnetic forces for actuation and offers unique advantages compared to other digital microfluidic platforms. First, the magnetic particles used in magnetic digital microfluidics have multiple functions. In addition to serving as actuators, they also provide a functional solid substrate for molecule binding, which enables a wide range of applications in molecular diagnostics and immunodiagnostics. Second, magnetic digital microfluidics can be manually operated in a "power-free" manner, which allows for operation in low-resource environments for point-of-care diagnostics where even batteries are considered a luxury item. This review covers research areas related to magnetic digital microfluidics. This paper first summarizes the current development of magnetic digital microfluidics. Various methods of droplet manipulation using magnetic forces are discussed, ranging from conventional magnetic particle-based actuation to the recent development of ferrofluids and magnetic liquid marbles. This paper also discusses several new approaches that use magnetically controlled flexible substrates for droplet manipulation. In addition, we emphasize applications of magnetic digital microfluidics in biosensing and medical diagnostics, and identify the current limitations of magnetic digital microfluidics. We provide a perspective on possible solutions to close these gaps. Finally, the paper discusses the future improvement of magnetic digital microfluidics to explore potential new research directions.

  9. Microfluidic liquid chromatography system for proteomic applications and biomarker screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Iulia M; Trisiripisal, Phichet; Sarvaiya, Hetal A

    2006-08-01

    A microfluidic liquid chromatography (LC) system for proteomic investigations that integrates all the necessary components for stand-alone operation, i.e., pump, valve, separation column, and electrospray interface, is described in this paper. The overall size of the LC device is small enough to enable the integration of two fully functional separation systems on a 3 in. x 1 in. glass microchip. A multichannel architecture that uses electroosmotic pumping principles provides the necessary functionality for eluent propulsion and sample valving. The flow rates generated within these chips are fully consistent with the requirements of nano-LC platforms that are routinely used in proteomic applications. The microfluidic device was evaluated for the analysis of a protein digest obtained from the MCF7 breast cancer cell line. The cytosolic protein extract was processed according to a shotgun protocol, and after tryptic digestion and prefractionation using strong cation exchange chromatography (SCX), selected sample subfractions were analyzed with conventional and microfluidic LC platforms. Using similar experimental conditions, the performance of the microchip LC was comparable to that obtained with benchtop instrumentation, providing an overlap of 75% in proteins that were identified by more than two unique peptides. The microfluidic LC analysis of a protein-rich SCX fraction enabled the confident identification of 77 proteins by using conventional data filtering parameters, of 39 proteins with p screening applications.

  10. Microfluidic electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2012-08-21

    Microfluidics, a field that has been well-established for several decades, has seen extensive applications in the areas of biology, chemistry, and medicine. However, it might be very hard to imagine how such soft microfluidic devices would be used in other areas, such as electronics, in which stiff, solid metals, insulators, and semiconductors have previously dominated. Very recently, things have radically changed. Taking advantage of native properties of microfluidics, advances in microfluidics-based electronics have shown great potential in numerous new appealing applications, e.g. bio-inspired devices, body-worn healthcare and medical sensing systems, and ergonomic units, in which conventional rigid, bulky electronics are facing insurmountable obstacles to fulfil the demand on comfortable user experience. Not only would the birth of microfluidic electronics contribute to both the microfluidics and electronics fields, but it may also shape the future of our daily life. Nevertheless, microfluidic electronics are still at a very early stage, and significant efforts in research and development are needed to advance this emerging field. The intention of this article is to review recent research outcomes in the field of microfluidic electronics, and address current technical challenges and issues. The outlook of future development in microfluidic electronic devices and systems, as well as new fabrication techniques, is also discussed. Moreover, the authors would like to inspire both the microfluidics and electronics communities to further exploit this newly-established field.

  11. Surfactants in microfluidics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michler, D.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid development of microfluidic techniques in the last two decades has revolutionized chemical and biological research. This technology has enabled scientists in a manifold of research fields to analyze and synthesize specimens with hither to unreached speed and precision. The number of applic

  12. Basic Microfluidics Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2015-01-01

    ,000 m−1, which is a huge difference and has a large impact on flow behavior. In this chapter the basic microfluidic theory will be presented, enabling the reader to gain a comprehensive understanding of how liquids behave at the microscale, enough to be able to engage in design of micro systems...

  13. Context predictor based sparse sensing technique and smart transmission architecture for IoT enabled remote health monitoring applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai Kiran, M P R; Rajalakshmi, P; Acharyya, Amit

    2014-01-01

    In hyperconnectivity scenario, managing the amount of data acquired from sensors in the Body Area Networks (BANs) is one of the major issues. In this paper we propose an on-chip context predictor based sparse sensing technology with smart transmission architecture which makes use of confidence interval calculation from the features that present in the data, thereby achieving statistical guarantee. The proposed architecture uses intelligent sparse sensing, which eradicates the collection of redundant data, thereby reducing the amount of data generated. For the performance analysis, we considered ECG data acquisition and transmission system. The proposed architecture when applied on the data collected from 10 patients reduces the duty cycle of the sensing unit to 27.99%, by achieving an energy saving of 72% and the mean deviation of sampled data from the original data is 2%.

  14. A new generation of previously unrealizable photonic devices as enabled by a unique electro-optic waveguide architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Scott R.; Rommel, Scott D.; Farca, George; Anderson, Michael H.

    2008-08-01

    A new electro-optic waveguide platform, which provides unprecedented electro-optical phase delays (> 1mm), with very low loss (integrated photonic architecture has applications in a wide array of commercial and defense markets including: remote sensing, micro-LADAR, OCT, laser illumination, phased array radar, optical communications, etc. Performance attributes of several example devices are presented.

  15. Punch card programmable microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korir, George; Prakash, Manu

    2015-01-01

    Small volume fluid handling in single and multiphase microfluidics provides a promising strategy for efficient bio-chemical assays, low-cost point-of-care diagnostics and new approaches to scientific discoveries. However multiple barriers exist towards low-cost field deployment of programmable microfluidics. Incorporating multiple pumps, mixers and discrete valve based control of nanoliter fluids and droplets in an integrated, programmable manner without additional required external components has remained elusive. Combining the idea of punch card programming with arbitrary fluid control, here we describe a self-contained, hand-crank powered, multiplex and robust programmable microfluidic platform. A paper tape encodes information as a series of punched holes. A mechanical reader/actuator reads these paper tapes and correspondingly executes operations onto a microfluidic chip coupled to the platform in a plug-and-play fashion. Enabled by the complexity of codes that can be represented by a series of holes in punched paper tapes, we demonstrate independent control of 15 on-chip pumps with enhanced mixing, normally-closed valves and a novel on-demand impact-based droplet generator. We demonstrate robustness of operation by encoding a string of characters representing the word "PUNCHCARD MICROFLUIDICS" using the droplet generator. Multiplexing is demonstrated by implementing an example colorimetric water quality assays for pH, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate content in different water samples. With its portable and robust design, low cost and ease-of-use, we envision punch card programmable microfluidics will bring complex control of microfluidic chips into field-based applications in low-resource settings and in the hands of children around the world.

  16. Punch card programmable microfluidics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Korir

    Full Text Available Small volume fluid handling in single and multiphase microfluidics provides a promising strategy for efficient bio-chemical assays, low-cost point-of-care diagnostics and new approaches to scientific discoveries. However multiple barriers exist towards low-cost field deployment of programmable microfluidics. Incorporating multiple pumps, mixers and discrete valve based control of nanoliter fluids and droplets in an integrated, programmable manner without additional required external components has remained elusive. Combining the idea of punch card programming with arbitrary fluid control, here we describe a self-contained, hand-crank powered, multiplex and robust programmable microfluidic platform. A paper tape encodes information as a series of punched holes. A mechanical reader/actuator reads these paper tapes and correspondingly executes operations onto a microfluidic chip coupled to the platform in a plug-and-play fashion. Enabled by the complexity of codes that can be represented by a series of holes in punched paper tapes, we demonstrate independent control of 15 on-chip pumps with enhanced mixing, normally-closed valves and a novel on-demand impact-based droplet generator. We demonstrate robustness of operation by encoding a string of characters representing the word "PUNCHCARD MICROFLUIDICS" using the droplet generator. Multiplexing is demonstrated by implementing an example colorimetric water quality assays for pH, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate content in different water samples. With its portable and robust design, low cost and ease-of-use, we envision punch card programmable microfluidics will bring complex control of microfluidic chips into field-based applications in low-resource settings and in the hands of children around the world.

  17. An AmI-Based Software Architecture Enabling Evolutionary Computation in Blended Commerce: The Shopping Plan Application

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppe D’Aniello; Matteo Gaeta; Vincenzo Loia; Francesco Orciuoli

    2015-01-01

    This work describes an approach to synergistically exploit ambient intelligence technologies, mobile devices, and evolutionary computation in order to support blended commerce or ubiquitous commerce scenarios. The work proposes a software architecture consisting of three main components: linked data for e-commerce, cloud-based services, and mobile apps. The three components implement a scenario where a shopping mall is presented as an intelligent environment in which customers use NFC capabil...

  18. High Efficiency, Digitally Calibrated TR Modules Enabling Lightweight SweepSAR Architectures for DESDynI-Class Radar Instruments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop and demonstrate a next-generation digitally calibrated, highly scalable, L-band Transmit/Receive (TR) module to enable a precision beamforming SweepSAR...

  19. GITEWS, an extensible and open integration platform for manifold sensor systems and processing components based on Sensor Web Enablement and the principles of Service Oriented Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haener, Rainer; Waechter, Joachim; Fleischer, Jens; Herrnkind, Stefan; Schwarting, Herrmann

    2010-05-01

    The German Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS) is a multifaceted system consisting of various sensor types like seismometers, sea level sensors or GPS stations, and processing components, all with their own system behavior and proprietary data structure. To operate a warning chain, beginning from measurements scaling up to warning products, all components have to interact in a correct way, both syntactically and semantically. Designing the system great emphasis was laid on conformity to the Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) specification by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). The technical infrastructure, the so called Tsunami Service Bus (TSB) follows the blueprint of Service Oriented Architectures (SOA). The TSB is an integration concept (SWE) where functionality (observe, task, notify, alert, and process) is grouped around business processes (Monitoring, Decision Support, Sensor Management) and packaged as interoperable services (SAS, SOS, SPS, WNS). The benefits of using a flexible architecture together with SWE lead to an open integration platform: • accessing and controlling heterogeneous sensors in a uniform way (Functional Integration) • assigns functionality to distinct services (Separation of Concerns) • allows resilient relationship between systems (Loose Coupling) • integrates services so that they can be accessed from everywhere (Location Transparency) • enables infrastructures which integrate heterogeneous applications (Encapsulation) • allows combination of services (Orchestration) and data exchange within business processes Warning systems will evolve over time: New sensor types might be added, old sensors will be replaced and processing components will be improved. From a collection of few basic services it shall be possible to compose more complex functionality essential for specific warning systems. Given these requirements a flexible infrastructure is a prerequisite for sustainable systems and their architecture must be

  20. Perspectives on the Role and Synergies of Architecture and Social and Built Environment in Enabling Active Healthy Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Evangelia Chrysikou; Richard Rabnett; Chariklia Tziraki

    2016-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that enabling societal and physical infrastructure and personal accommodations enhance healthy and active aging throughout the lifespan. Yet, there is a paucity of research on how to bring together the various disciplines involved in a multidomain synergistic collaboration to create new living environments for aging. This paper aims to explore the key domains of skills and knowledge that need to be considered for a conceptual prototype of an enabling educational proc...

  1. Microfluidic Synthesis Enables Dense and Uniform Loading of Surfactant-Free PtSn Nanocrystals on Carbon Supports for Enhanced Ethanol Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fuxiang; Zhang, Dongtang; Peng, Manhua; Yu, Zhihui; Wang, Xiayan; Guo, Guangsheng; Sun, Yugang

    2016-04-11

    Developing new synthetic methods for carbon supported catalysts with improved performance is of fundamental importance in advancing proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology. Continuous-flow, microfluidic reactions in capillary tube reactors are described, which are capable of synthesizing surfactant-free, ultrafine PtSn alloyed nanoparticles (NPs) on various carbon supports (for example, commercial carbon black particles, carbon nanotubes, and graphene sheets). The PtSn NPs are highly crystalline with sizes smaller than 2 nm, and they are highly dispersed on the carbon supports with high loadings up to 33 wt%. These characteristics make the as-synthesized carbon-supported PtSn NPs more efficient than state of the art commercial Pt/C catalysts applied to the ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR). Significantly enhanced mass catalytic activity (two-times that of Pt/C) and improved stability are obtained. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Nano-porous architecture of N-doped carbon nanorods grown on graphene to enable synergetic effects of supercapacitance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, H. S.; Wang, H.; Zhao, N.; Xu, J.; Pan, F.

    2014-01-01

    A novel nano-porous 3D architecture of N-doped carbon nanorods arrays grown on the surface of graphene has been prepared by carbonizing polyaniline/graphene oxide (PANI-GO) composite with PANI nanorod arrays on both sides of GO nanosheets. The obtained carbon materials are entirely composed of regularly grown carbon nanorods on graphene with height of about 100 nm and width about 30 nm, showing porous property due to the decomposition of PANI chains. The morphology of PANI grown on GO at the different growth stages was investigated to demonstrate the mechanism of the finally hierarchical architecture formation. Due to its large specific surface area and incorporation of the nitrogen groups into the carbon matrix, the obtained 3D carbon material enhances the ionic transport and the super-capacitance by synergetic effect of both double-layer and faradaic capacitances. This study provides a controllable approach to fabricate hierarchical carbon material based on conducting polymers and graphene oxide with promising applications in the high-rate electrode material of supercapacitors. PMID:25519206

  3. Nano-porous architecture of N-doped carbon nanorods grown on graphene to enable synergetic effects of supercapacitance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, H S; Wang, H; Zhao, N; Xu, J; Pan, F

    2014-12-18

    A novel nano-porous 3D architecture of N-doped carbon nanorods arrays grown on the surface of graphene has been prepared by carbonizing polyaniline/graphene oxide (PANI-GO) composite with PANI nanorod arrays on both sides of GO nanosheets. The obtained carbon materials are entirely composed of regularly grown carbon nanorods on graphene with height of about 100 nm and width about 30 nm, showing porous property due to the decomposition of PANI chains. The morphology of PANI grown on GO at the different growth stages was investigated to demonstrate the mechanism of the finally hierarchical architecture formation. Due to its large specific surface area and incorporation of the nitrogen groups into the carbon matrix, the obtained 3D carbon material enhances the ionic transport and the super-capacitance by synergetic effect of both double-layer and faradaic capacitances. This study provides a controllable approach to fabricate hierarchical carbon material based on conducting polymers and graphene oxide with promising applications in the high-rate electrode material of supercapacitors.

  4. Incentive and Architecture of Multi-Band Enabled Small Cell and UE for Up-/Down-Link and Control-/User-Plane Splitting for 5G Mobile Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Rony Kumer; Aswakul, Chaodit

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a multi-band enabled femtocell base station (FCBS) and user equipment (UE) architecture is proposed in a multi-tier network that consists of small cells, including femtocells and picocells deployed over the coverage of a macrocell for splitting uplink and downlink (UL/DL) as well as control-plane and user-plane (C-/U-plane) for 5G mobile networks. Since splitting is performed at the same FCBS, we define this architecture as the same base station based split architecture (SBSA). For multiple bands, we consider co-channel (CC) microwave and different frequency (DF) 60 GHz millimeter wave (mmWave) bands for FCBSs and UEs with respect to the microwave band used by their over-laid macrocell base station. All femtocells are assumed to be deployed in a 3-dimensional multi-storage building. For CC microwave band, cross-tier CC interference of femtocells with macrocell is avoided using almost blank subframe based enhanced inter-cell interference coordination techniques. The co-existence of CC microwave and DF mmWave bands for SBSA on the same FCBS and UE is first studied to show their performance disparities in terms of system capacity and spectral efficiency in order to provide incentives for employing multiple bands at the same FCBS and UE and identify a suitable band for routing decoupled UL/DL or C-/U-plane traffic. We then present a number of disruptive architectural design alternatives of multi-band enabled SBSA for 5G mobile networks for UL/DL and C-/U-plane splitting, including a disruptive and complete splitting of UL/DL and C-/U-plane as well as a combined UL/DL and C-/U-plane splitting, by exploiting dual connectivity on CC microwave and DF mmWave bands. The outperformances of SBSA in terms of system level capacity, average spectral efficiency, energy efficiency, and control-plane overhead traffic capacity in comparison with different base stations based split architecture (DBSA) are shown. Finally, a number of technical and business perspectives

  5. A Neural Dynamic Architecture for Reaching and Grasping Integrates Perception and Movement Generation and Enables On-Line Updating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knips, Guido; Zibner, Stephan K. U.; Reimann, Hendrik; Schöner, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    Reaching for objects and grasping them is a fundamental skill for any autonomous robot that interacts with its environment. Although this skill seems trivial to adults, who effortlessly pick up even objects they have never seen before, it is hard for other animals, for human infants, and for most autonomous robots. Any time during movement preparation and execution, human reaching movement are updated if the visual scene changes (with a delay of about 100 ms). The capability for online updating highlights how tightly perception, movement planning, and movement generation are integrated in humans. Here, we report on an effort to reproduce this tight integration in a neural dynamic process model of reaching and grasping that covers the complete path from visual perception to movement generation within a unified modeling framework, Dynamic Field Theory. All requisite processes are realized as time-continuous dynamical systems that model the evolution in time of neural population activation. Population level neural processes bring about the attentional selection of objects, the estimation of object shape and pose, and the mapping of pose parameters to suitable movement parameters. Once a target object has been selected, its pose parameters couple into the neural dynamics of movement generation so that changes of pose are propagated through the architecture to update the performed movement online. Implementing the neural architecture on an anthropomorphic robot arm equipped with a Kinect sensor, we evaluate the model by grasping wooden objects. Their size, shape, and pose are estimated from a neural model of scene perception that is based on feature fields. The sequential organization of a reach and grasp act emerges from a sequence of dynamic instabilities within a neural dynamics of behavioral organization, that effectively switches the neural controllers from one phase of the action to the next. Trajectory formation itself is driven by a dynamical systems version of

  6. A Neural Dynamic Architecture for Reaching and Grasping Integrates Perception and Movement Generation and Enables On-Line Updating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knips, Guido; Zibner, Stephan K U; Reimann, Hendrik; Schöner, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    Reaching for objects and grasping them is a fundamental skill for any autonomous robot that interacts with its environment. Although this skill seems trivial to adults, who effortlessly pick up even objects they have never seen before, it is hard for other animals, for human infants, and for most autonomous robots. Any time during movement preparation and execution, human reaching movement are updated if the visual scene changes (with a delay of about 100 ms). The capability for online updating highlights how tightly perception, movement planning, and movement generation are integrated in humans. Here, we report on an effort to reproduce this tight integration in a neural dynamic process model of reaching and grasping that covers the complete path from visual perception to movement generation within a unified modeling framework, Dynamic Field Theory. All requisite processes are realized as time-continuous dynamical systems that model the evolution in time of neural population activation. Population level neural processes bring about the attentional selection of objects, the estimation of object shape and pose, and the mapping of pose parameters to suitable movement parameters. Once a target object has been selected, its pose parameters couple into the neural dynamics of movement generation so that changes of pose are propagated through the architecture to update the performed movement online. Implementing the neural architecture on an anthropomorphic robot arm equipped with a Kinect sensor, we evaluate the model by grasping wooden objects. Their size, shape, and pose are estimated from a neural model of scene perception that is based on feature fields. The sequential organization of a reach and grasp act emerges from a sequence of dynamic instabilities within a neural dynamics of behavioral organization, that effectively switches the neural controllers from one phase of the action to the next. Trajectory formation itself is driven by a dynamical systems version of

  7. Design concepts for a virtualizable embedded MPSoC architecture enabling virtualization in embedded multi-processor systems

    CERN Document Server

    Biedermann, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Alexander Biedermann presents a generic hardware-based virtualization approach, which may transform an array of any off-the-shelf embedded processors into a multi-processor system with high execution dynamism. Based on this approach, he highlights concepts for the design of energy aware systems, self-healing systems as well as parallelized systems. For the latter, the novel so-called Agile Processing scheme is introduced by the author, which enables a seamless transition between sequential and parallel execution schemes. The design of such virtualizable systems is further aided by introduction

  8. Protein viscosity, mineral fraction and staggered architecture cooperatively enable the fastest stress wave decay in load-bearing biological materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qwamizadeh, Mahan; Zhang, Zuoqi; Zhou, Kun; Zhang, Yong Wei

    2016-07-01

    One of the key functions of load-bearing biological materials, such as bone, dentin and sea shell, is to protect their inside fragile organs by effectively damping dynamic impact. How those materials achieve this remarkable function remains largely unknown. Using systematic finite element analyses, we study the stress wave propagation and attenuation in cortical bone at the nanoscale as a model material to examine the effects of protein viscosity, mineral fraction and staggered architecture on the elastic wave decay. It is found that the staggered arrangement, protein viscosity and mineral fraction work cooperatively to effectively attenuate the stress wave. For a typical mineral volume fraction and protein viscosity, an optimal staggered nanostructure with specific feature sizes and layouts is able to give rise to the fastest stress wave decay, and the optimal aspect ratio and thickness of mineral platelets are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements. In contrary, as the mineral volume fraction or the protein viscosity goes much higher, the structural arrangement is seen having trivial effect on the stress wave decay, suggesting that the damping properties of the composites go into the structure-insensitive regime from the structure-sensitive regime. These findings not only significantly add to our understanding of the structure-function relationship of load-bearing biological materials, and but also provide useful guidelines for the design of bio-inspired materials with superior resistance to impact loading.

  9. An AmI-Based Software Architecture Enabling Evolutionary Computation in Blended Commerce: The Shopping Plan Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe D’Aniello

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes an approach to synergistically exploit ambient intelligence technologies, mobile devices, and evolutionary computation in order to support blended commerce or ubiquitous commerce scenarios. The work proposes a software architecture consisting of three main components: linked data for e-commerce, cloud-based services, and mobile apps. The three components implement a scenario where a shopping mall is presented as an intelligent environment in which customers use NFC capabilities of their smartphones in order to handle e-coupons produced, suggested, and consumed by the abovesaid environment. The main function of the intelligent environment is to help customers define shopping plans, which minimize the overall shopping cost by looking for best prices, discounts, and coupons. The paper proposes a genetic algorithm to find suboptimal solutions for the shopping plan problem in a highly dynamic context, where the final cost of a product for an individual customer is dependent on his previous purchases. In particular, the work provides details on the Shopping Plan software prototype and some experimentation results showing the overall performance of the genetic algorithm.

  10. Perspectives on the Role and Synergies of Architecture and Social and Built Environment in Enabling Active Healthy Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Chrysikou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Research has demonstrated that enabling societal and physical infrastructure and personal accommodations enhance healthy and active aging throughout the lifespan. Yet, there is a paucity of research on how to bring together the various disciplines involved in a multidomain synergistic collaboration to create new living environments for aging. This paper aims to explore the key domains of skills and knowledge that need to be considered for a conceptual prototype of an enabling educational process and environments where healthcare professionals, architects, planners, and entrepreneurs may establish a shared theoretical and experiential knowledge base, vocabulary, and implementation strategies, for the creation of the next generation of living communities of active healthy adults, for persons with disabilities and chronic disease conditions. We focus on synergistic, paradigmatic, simple, and practical issues that can be easily upscaled through market mechanisms. This practical and physically concrete approach may also become linked with more elaborate neuroscientific and technologically sophisticated interventions. We examine the domains of knowledge to be included in establishing a learning model that focuses on the still-understudied impact of the benefits toward active and healthy aging, where architects, urban planners, clinicians, and healthcare facility managers are educated toward a synergistic approach at the operational level.

  11. Perspectives on the Role and Synergies of Architecture and Social and Built Environment in Enabling Active Healthy Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysikou, Evangelia; Rabnett, Richard; Tziraki, Chariklia

    2016-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that enabling societal and physical infrastructure and personal accommodations enhance healthy and active aging throughout the lifespan. Yet, there is a paucity of research on how to bring together the various disciplines involved in a multidomain synergistic collaboration to create new living environments for aging. This paper aims to explore the key domains of skills and knowledge that need to be considered for a conceptual prototype of an enabling educational process and environments where healthcare professionals, architects, planners, and entrepreneurs may establish a shared theoretical and experiential knowledge base, vocabulary, and implementation strategies, for the creation of the next generation of living communities of active healthy adults, for persons with disabilities and chronic disease conditions. We focus on synergistic, paradigmatic, simple, and practical issues that can be easily upscaled through market mechanisms. This practical and physically concrete approach may also become linked with more elaborate neuroscientific and technologically sophisticated interventions. We examine the domains of knowledge to be included in establishing a learning model that focuses on the still-understudied impact of the benefits toward active and healthy aging, where architects, urban planners, clinicians, and healthcare facility managers are educated toward a synergistic approach at the operational level.

  12. Open-source Peer-to-Peer Environment to Enable Sensor Web Architecture: Application to Geomagnetic Observations and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, M.; Pulkkinen, A.

    2007-12-01

    A flexible, dynamic, and reliable secure peer-to-peer (P2P) communication environment is under development at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Popular open-source P2P software technology provides a self- organizing, self-healing ad hoc "virtual network overlay" protocol-suite. The current effort builds a proof-of-concept geomagnetic Sensor Web upon this foundation. Our long-term objective is to enable an evolution of many types of distributed Earth system sensors and related processing/storage components into elements of an operational Sensor Web via integration into this P2P Environment. In general, the Environment distributes data communication tasks among the sensors (viewed as peers, each assigned a peer-role) and controls the flow of data. This work encompasses dynamic discovery, monitoring, control, and configuration as well as autonomous operations, real-time modeling and data processing, and secure ubiquitous communications. We currently restrict our communications to be within the secure GSFC network environment, and have integrated "simulated" (via historical data) geomagnetic sensors. Each remote sensor has operating modes to manage (from remote interfaces) and is designed to have features nearly indistinguishable from a live magnetometer. We have implemented basic identity management features (organized around GSFC identity-management practices); providing mechanisms which restrict data-serving privileges to authorized users, and which allow improved trust and accountability among users of the Environment. Data-serving peers digitally "sign" their services, and their data-browsing counterparts will only accept the products of services whose signature (and hence identity) can be verified. The current usage scenario involves modeling-peers, which operate within the same Environment as the sensors and also have operating modes to remotely manage, portraying a near-real- time global representation of geomagnetic activity from dynamic sensor

  13. Second Annual Transformative Vertical Flight Concepts Workshop: Enabling New Flight Concepts Through Novel Propulsion and Energy Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Michael R. (Editor); Duffy, Michael; Hirschberg, Michael; Moore, Mark; German, Brian; Goodrich, Ken; Gunnarson, Tom; Petermaier,Korbinian; Stoll, Alex; Fredericks, Bill; Gibson, Andy; Newman, Aron; Ouellette, Richard; Antcliff, Kevin; Sinkula, Michael; Buettner-Garrett, Josh; Ricci, Mike; Keogh, Rory; Moser, Tim; Borer, Nick; Rizzi, Steve; Lighter, Gwen

    2015-01-01

    On August 3rd and 4th, 2015, a workshop was held at the NASA Ames Research Center, located at the Moffett Federal Airfield in California to explore the aviation communities interest in Transformative Vertical Flight (TVF) Concepts. The Workshop was sponsored by the AHS International (AHS), the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and hosted by the NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI). This second annual workshop built on the success and enthusiasm generated by the first TVF Workshop held in Washington, DC in August of 2014. The previous Workshop identified the existence of a multi-disciplinary community interested in this topic and established a consensus among the participants that opportunities to establish further collaborations in this area are warranted. The desire to conduct a series of annual workshops augmented by online virtual technical seminars to strengthen the TVF community and continue planning for advocacy and collaboration was a direct outcome of the first Workshop. The second Workshop organizers focused on four desired action-oriented outcomes. The first was to establish and document common stakeholder needs and areas of potential collaborations. This includes advocacy strategies to encourage the future success of unconventional vertiport capable flight concept solutions that are enabled by emerging technologies. The second was to assemble a community that can collaborate on new conceptual design and analysis tools to permit novel configuration paths with far greater multi-disciplinary coupling (i.e., aero-propulsive-control) to be investigated. The third was to establish a community to develop and deploy regulatory guidelines. This community would have the potential to initiate formation of an American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) F44 Committee Subgroup for the development of consensus-based certification standards for General Aviation scale vertiport

  14. Microfluidics for food, agriculture and biosystems industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neethirajan, Suresh; Kobayashi, Isao; Nakajima, Mitsutoshi; Wu, Dan; Nandagopal, Saravanan; Lin, Francis

    2011-05-07

    Microfluidics, a rapidly emerging enabling technology has the potential to revolutionize food, agriculture and biosystems industries. Examples of potential applications of microfluidics in food industry include nano-particle encapsulation of fish oil, monitoring pathogens and toxins in food and water supplies, micro-nano-filtration for improving food quality, detection of antibiotics in dairy food products, and generation of novel food structures. In addition, microfluidics enables applications in agriculture and animal sciences such as nutrients monitoring and plant cells sorting for improving crop quality and production, effective delivery of biopesticides, simplified in vitro fertilization for animal breeding, animal health monitoring, vaccination and therapeutics. Lastly, microfluidics provides new approaches for bioenergy research. This paper synthesizes information of selected microfluidics-based applications for food, agriculture and biosystems industries. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  15. Microfluidic colloid filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkhorst, John; Beckmann, Torsten; Go, Dennis; Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Wessling, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    Filtration of natural and colloidal matter is an essential process in today’s water treatment processes. The colloidal matter is retained with the help of micro- and nanoporous synthetic membranes. Colloids are retained in a “cake layer” – often coined fouling layer. Membrane fouling is the most substantial problem in membrane filtration: colloidal and natural matter build-up leads to an increasing resistance and thus decreasing water transport rate through the membrane. Theoretical models exist to describe macroscopically the hydrodynamic resistance of such transport and rejection phenomena; however, visualization of the various phenomena occurring during colloid retention is extremely demanding. Here we present a microfluidics based methodology to follow filter cake build up as well as transport phenomena occuring inside of the fouling layer. The microfluidic colloidal filtration methodology enables the study of complex colloidal jamming, crystallization and melting processes as well as translocation at the single particle level.

  16. Interplay between materials and microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xu; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Santiago, Grissel Trujillo-De; Alvarez, Mario Moisés; Ribas, João; Jonas, Steven J.; Weiss, Paul S.; Andrews, Anne M.; Aizenberg, Joanna; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2017-04-01

    Developments in the field of microfluidics have triggered technological revolutions in many disciplines, including chemical synthesis, electronics, diagnostics, single-cell analysis, micro- and nanofabrication, and pharmaceutics. In many of these areas, rapid growth is driven by the increasing synergy between fundamental materials development and new microfluidic capabilities. In this Review, we critically evaluate both how recent advances in materials fabrication have expanded the frontiers of microfluidic platforms and how the improved microfluidic capabilities are, in turn, furthering materials design. We discuss how various inorganic and organic materials enable the fabrication of systems with advanced mechanical, optical, chemical, electrical and biointerfacial properties — in particular, when these materials are combined into new hybrids and modular configurations. The increasing sophistication of microfluidic techniques has also expanded the range of resources available for the fabrication of new materials, including particles and fibres with specific functionalities, 3D (bio)printed composites and organoids. Together, these advances lead to complex, multifunctional systems, which have many interesting potential applications, especially in the biomedical and bioengineering domains. Future exploration of the interactions between materials science and microfluidics will continue to enrich the diversity of applications across engineering as well as the physical and biomedical sciences.

  17. Redundancy Optimization for Error Recovery in Digital Microfluidic Biochips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alistar, Mirela; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic-based biochips are replacing the conventional biochemical analyzers, and are able to integrate all the necessary functions for biochemical analysis. The digital microfluidic biochips are based on the manipulation of liquids not as a continuous flow, but as discrete droplets....... Researchers have proposed approaches for the synthesis of digital microfluidic biochips, which, starting from a biochemical application and a given biochip architecture, determine the allocation, resource binding, scheduling, placement and routing of the operations in the application. During the execution...

  18. Theoretical microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruus, Henrik

    in complexity, a proper theoretical understanding becomes increasingly important. The basic idea of the book is to provide a self-contained formulation of the theoretical framework of microfluidics, and at the same time give physical motivation and examples from lab-on-a-chip technology. After three chapters...

  19. Theoretical microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruus, Henrik

    , complex flow patterns and acousto-fluidics, as well as the new fields of opto- and nano-fluidics. Throughout the book simple models with analytical solutions are presented to provide the student with a thorough physical understanding of order of magnitudes and various selected microfluidic phenomena...

  20. Principles, Techniques, and Applications of Tissue Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Lawrence A.; Kartalov, Emil P.; Shibata, Darryl; Taylor, Clive

    2011-01-01

    The principle of tissue microfluidics and its resultant techniques has been applied to cell analysis. Building microfluidics to suit a particular tissue sample would allow the rapid, reliable, inexpensive, highly parallelized, selective extraction of chosen regions of tissue for purposes of further biochemical analysis. Furthermore, the applicability of the techniques ranges beyond the described pathology application. For example, they would also allow the posing and successful answering of new sets of questions in many areas of fundamental research. The proposed integration of microfluidic techniques and tissue slice samples is called tissue microfluidics because it molds the microfluidic architectures in accordance with each particular structure of each specific tissue sample. Thus, microfluidics can be built around the tissues, following the tissue structure, or alternatively, the microfluidics can be adapted to the specific geometry of particular tissues. By contrast, the traditional approach is that microfluidic devices are structured in accordance with engineering considerations, while the biological components in applied devices are forced to comply with these engineering presets. The proposed principles represent a paradigm shift in microfluidic technology in three important ways: Microfluidic devices are to be directly integrated with, onto, or around tissue samples, in contrast to the conventional method of off-chip sample extraction followed by sample insertion in microfluidic devices. Architectural and operational principles of microfluidic devices are to be subordinated to suit specific tissue structure and needs, in contrast to the conventional method of building devices according to fluidic function alone and without regard to tissue structure. Sample acquisition from tissue is to be performed on-chip and is to be integrated with the diagnostic measurement within the same device, in contrast to the conventional method of off-chip sample prep and

  1. Principles, Techniques, and Applications of Tissue Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Lawrence A.; Kartalov, Emil P.; Shibata, Darryl; Taylor, Clive

    2011-01-01

    The principle of tissue microfluidics and its resultant techniques has been applied to cell analysis. Building microfluidics to suit a particular tissue sample would allow the rapid, reliable, inexpensive, highly parallelized, selective extraction of chosen regions of tissue for purposes of further biochemical analysis. Furthermore, the applicability of the techniques ranges beyond the described pathology application. For example, they would also allow the posing and successful answering of new sets of questions in many areas of fundamental research. The proposed integration of microfluidic techniques and tissue slice samples is called "tissue microfluidics" because it molds the microfluidic architectures in accordance with each particular structure of each specific tissue sample. Thus, microfluidics can be built around the tissues, following the tissue structure, or alternatively, the microfluidics can be adapted to the specific geometry of particular tissues. By contrast, the traditional approach is that microfluidic devices are structured in accordance with engineering considerations, while the biological components in applied devices are forced to comply with these engineering presets.

  2. Bio-microfluidics: biomaterials and biomimetic designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domachuk, Peter; Tsioris, Konstantinos; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G; Kaplan, David L

    2010-01-12

    Bio-microfluidics applies biomaterials and biologically inspired structural designs (biomimetics) to microfluidic devices. Microfluidics, the techniques for constraining fluids on the micrometer and sub-micrometer scale, offer applications ranging from lab-on-a-chip to optofluidics. Despite this wealth of applications, the design of typical microfluidic devices imparts relatively simple, laminar behavior on fluids and is realized using materials and techniques from silicon planar fabrication. On the other hand, highly complex microfluidic behavior is commonplace in nature, where fluids with nonlinear rheology flow through chaotic vasculature composed from a range of biopolymers. In this Review, the current state of bio-microfluidic materials, designs and applications are examined. Biopolymers enable bio-microfluidic devices with versatile functionalization chemistries, flexibility in fabrication, and biocompatibility in vitro and in vivo. Polymeric materials such as alginate, collagen, chitosan, and silk are being explored as bulk and film materials for bio-microfluidics. Hydrogels offer options for mechanically functional devices for microfluidic systems such as self-regulating valves, microlens arrays and drug release systems, vital for integrated bio-microfluidic devices. These devices including growth factor gradients to study cell responses, blood analysis, biomimetic capillary designs, and blood vessel tissue culture systems, as some recent examples of inroads in the field that should lead the way in a new generation of microfluidic devices for bio-related needs and applications. Perhaps one of the most intriguing directions for the future will be fully implantable microfluidic devices that will also integrate with existing vasculature and slowly degrade to fully recapitulate native tissue structure and function, yet serve critical interim functions, such as tissue maintenance, drug release, mechanical support, and cell delivery.

  3. Multi-layer microfluidic glass chips for microanalytical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daridon, Antoine; Fascio, Valia; Lichtenberg, Jan; Wütrich, Rolf; Langen, Hans; Verpoorte, Elisabeth; De Rooij, Nico F.

    2001-01-01

    A new, versatile architecture is presented for microfluidic devices made entirely from glass, for use with reagents which would prove highly corrosive for silicon. Chips consist of three layers of glass wafers bonded together by fusion bonding. On the inside wafer faces a network of microfluidic cha

  4. Using compute unified device architecture-enabled graphic processing unit to accelerate fast Fourier transform-based regression Kriging interpolation on a MODIS land surface temperature image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hongda; Shu, Hong; Hu, Zhiyong; Xu, Jianhui

    2016-04-01

    Kriging interpolation provides the best linear unbiased estimation for unobserved locations, but its heavy computation limits the manageable problem size in practice. To address this issue, an efficient interpolation procedure incorporating the fast Fourier transform (FFT) was developed. Extending this efficient approach, we propose an FFT-based parallel algorithm to accelerate regression Kriging interpolation on an NVIDIA® compute unified device architecture (CUDA)-enabled graphic processing unit (GPU). A high-performance cuFFT library in the CUDA toolkit was introduced to execute computation-intensive FFTs on the GPU, and three time-consuming processes were redesigned as kernel functions and executed on the CUDA cores. A MODIS land surface temperature 8-day image tile at a resolution of 1 km was resampled to create experimental datasets at eight different output resolutions. These datasets were used as the interpolation grids with different sizes in a comparative experiment. Experimental results show that speedup of the FFT-based regression Kriging interpolation accelerated by GPU can exceed 1000 when processing datasets with large grid sizes, as compared to the traditional Kriging interpolation running on the CPU. These results demonstrate that the combination of FFT methods and GPU-based parallel computing techniques greatly improves the computational performance without loss of precision.

  5. Femtosecond laser fabrication for the integration of optical sensors in microfluidic lab-on-chip devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osellame, R.; Martinez-Vazquez, R.; Dongre, C.; Dekker, R.; Hoekstra, H.J.W.M.; Ramponi, R.; Pollnau, M.; Cerullo, G.; Corkum, P.; Silvestri, de S.; Nelson, K.A.; Riedle, E.; Schoenlein, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    Femtosecond lasers enable the fabrication of both optical waveguides and buried microfluidic channels on a glass substrate. The waveguides are used to integrate optical detection in a commercial microfluidic lab-on-chip for capillary electrophoresis.

  6. Femtosecond laser fabrication for the integration of optical sensors in microfluidic lab-on-chip devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osellame, R.; Martinez Vazquez, R.; Dongre, C.; Dekker, R.; Hoekstra, H.J.W.M.; Pollnau, M.; Ramponi, R.; Cerullo, G.

    2008-01-01

    Femtosecond lasers enable the fabrication of both optical waveguides and buried microfluidic channels on a glass substrate. The waveguides are used to integrate optical detection in a commercial microfluidic lab-on-chip for capillary electrophoresis

  7. Microfluidic devices for droplet injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrecht, Donald; Akartuna, Ilke; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    As picoliter-scale reaction vessels, microfluidic water-in-oil emulsions have found application for high-throughput, large-sample number analyses. Often, the biological or chemical system under investigation needs to be encapsulated into droplets to prevent cross contamination prior to the introduction of reaction reagents. Previous techniques of picoinjection or droplet synchronization and merging enable the addition of reagents to individual droplets, but present limitations on what can be added to each droplet. We present microfluidic devices that couple the strengths of picoinjection and droplet merging, allowing us to selectively add precise volume to our droplet reactions.

  8. Microfluidic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey L. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  9. Performance and scaling effects in a multilayer microfluidic extracorporeal lung oxygenation device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniazeva, Tatiana; Epshteyn, Alla A; Hsiao, James C; Kim, Ernest S; Kolachalama, Vijaya B; Charest, Joseph L; Borenstein, Jeffrey T

    2012-05-07

    Microfluidic fabrication technologies are emerging as viable platforms for extracorporeal lung assist devices and oxygenators for cardiac surgical support and critical care medicine, based in part on their ability to more closely mimic the architecture of the human vasculature than existing technologies. In comparison with current hollow fiber oxygenator technologies, microfluidic systems have more physiologically-representative blood flow paths, smaller cross section blood conduits and thinner gas transfer membranes. These features can enable smaller device sizes and a reduced blood volume in the oxygenator, enhanced gas transfer efficiencies, and may also reduce the tendency for clotting in the system. Several critical issues need to be addressed in order to advance this technology from its current state and implement it in an organ-scale device for clinical use. Here we report on the design, fabrication and characterization of multilayer microfluidic oxygenators, investigating scaling effects associated with fluid mechanical resistance, oxygen transfer efficiencies, and other parameters in multilayer devices. Important parameters such as the fluidic resistance of interconnects are shown to become more predominant as devices are scaled towards many layers, while other effects such as membrane distensibility become less significant. The present study also probes the relationship between blood channel depth and membrane thickness on oxygen transfer, as well as the rate of oxygen transfer on the number of layers in the device. These results contribute to our understanding of the complexity involved in designing three-dimensional microfluidic oxygenators for clinical applications.

  10. Simplified prototyping of perfusable polystyrene microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Reginald; Ahn, Byungwook; R. Myers, David; Qiu, Yongzhi; Sakurai, Yumiko; Moot, Robert; Mihevc, Emma; Trent Spencer, H.; Doering, Christopher; A. Lam, Wilbur

    2014-01-01

    Cell culture in microfluidic systems has primarily been conducted in devices comprised of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) or other elastomers. As polystyrene (PS) is the most characterized and commonly used substrate material for cell culture, microfluidic cell culture would ideally be conducted in PS-based microsystems that also enable tight control of perfusion and hydrodynamic conditions, which are especially important for culture of vascular cell types. Here, we report a simple method to prototype perfusable PS microfluidics for endothelial cell culture under flow that can be fabricated using standard lithography and wet laboratory equipment to enable stable perfusion at shear stresses up to 300 dyn/cm2 and pumping pressures up to 26 kPa for at least 100 h. This technique can also be extended to fabricate perfusable hybrid PS-PDMS microfluidics of which one application is for increased efficiency of viral transduction in non-adherent suspension cells by leveraging the high surface area to volume ratio of microfluidics and adhesion molecules that are optimized for PS substrates. These biologically compatible microfluidic devices can be made more accessible to biological-based laboratories through the outsourcing of lithography to various available microfluidic foundries. PMID:25379106

  11. 3D-printed microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Reza; Knowlton, Stephanie; Hart, Alexander; Yenilmez, Bekir; Ghaderinezhad, Fariba; Katebifar, Sara; Messina, Michael; Khademhosseini, Ali; Tasoglu, Savas

    2016-06-20

    Microfluidics is a flourishing field, enabling a wide range of biochemical and clinical applications such as cancer screening, micro-physiological system engineering, high-throughput drug testing, and point-of-care diagnostics. However, fabrication of microfluidic devices is often complicated, time consuming, and requires expensive equipment and sophisticated cleanroom facilities. Three-dimensional (3D) printing presents a promising alternative to traditional techniques such as lithography and PDMS-glass bonding, not only by enabling rapid design iterations in the development stage, but also by reducing the costs associated with institutional infrastructure, equipment installation, maintenance, and physical space. With the recent advancements in 3D printing technologies, highly complex microfluidic devices can be fabricated via single-step, rapid, and cost-effective protocols, making microfluidics more accessible to users. In this review, we discuss a broad range of approaches for the application of 3D printing technology to fabrication of micro-scale lab-on-a-chip devices.

  12. Analogy among microfluidics, micromechanics, and microelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng-Shian; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2013-10-07

    We wish to illuminate the analogous link between microfluidic-based devices, and the already established pairing of micromechanics and microelectronics to create a triangular/three-way scientific relationship as a means of interlinking familial disciplines and accomplishing two primary goals: (1) to facilitate the modeling of multidisciplinary domains; and, (2) to enable us to co-simulate the entire system within a compact circuit simulator (e.g., Cadence or SPICE). A microfluidic channel-like structure embedded in a micro-electro-mechanical resonator via our proposed CMOS-MEMS technology is used to illustrate the connections among microfluidics, micromechanics, and microelectronics.

  13. Fabrication, Metrology, and Transport Characteristics of Single Polymeric Nanopores in Three-Dimensional Hybrid Microfluidic/Nanofluidic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Travis L.

    2009-01-01

    The incorporation of nanofluidic elements between microfluidic channels to form hybrid microfluidic/nanofluidic architectures allows the extension of microfluidic systems into the third dimension, thus removing the constraints imposed by planarity. Measuring and understanding the behavior of these devices creates new analytical challenges due to…

  14. An easy-to-use microfluidic interconnection system to create quick and reversibly interfaced simple microfluidic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfreundt, Andrea; Andersen, Karsten Brandt; Dimaki, Maria;

    2015-01-01

    The presented microfluidic interconnection system provides an alternative for the individual interfacing of simple microfluidic devices fabricated in polymers such as polymethylmethacrylate, polycarbonate and cyclic olefin polymer. A modification of the device inlet enables the direct attachment...... pressures above 250 psi and therefore supports applications with high flow rates or highly viscous fluids. The ease of incorporation, configuration, fabrication and use make this interconnection system ideal for the rapid prototyping of simple microfluidic devices or other integrated systems that require...

  15. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzo, Ralph G [Champaign, IL; Mitrovski, Svetlana M [Urbana, IL

    2011-03-22

    A microfluidic electrochemical reactor includes an electrode and one or more microfluidic channels on the electrode, where the microfluidic channels are covered with a membrane containing a gas permeable polymer. The distance between the electrode and the membrane is less than 500 micrometers. The microfluidic electrochemical reactor can provide for increased reaction rates in electrochemical reactions using a gaseous reactant, as compared to conventional electrochemical cells. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors can be incorporated into devices for applications such as fuel cells, electrochemical analysis, microfluidic actuation, pH gradient formation.

  16. Integrated microfluidic systems for DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njoroge, Samuel K; Chen, Hui-Wen; Witek, Małgorzata A; Soper, Steven A

    2011-01-01

    The potential utility of genome-related research in terms of evolving basic discoveries in biology has generated widespread use of DNA diagnostics and DNA forensics and driven the accelerated development of fully integrated microfluidic systems for genome processing. To produce a microsystem with favorable performance characteristics for genetic-based analyses, several key operational elements must be strategically chosen, including device substrate material, temperature control, fluidic control, and reaction product readout. As a matter of definition, a microdevice is a chip that performs a single processing step, for example microchip electrophoresis. Several microdevices can be integrated to a single wafer, or combined on a control board as separate devices to form a microsystem. A microsystem is defined as a chip composed of at least two microdevices. Among the many documented analytical microdevices, those focused on the ability to perform the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) have been reported extensively due to the importance of this processing step in most genetic-based assays. Other microdevices that have been detailed in the literature include those for solid-phase extractions, microchip electrophoresis, and devices composed of DNA microarrays used for interrogating DNA primary structure. Great progress has also been made in the areas of chip fabrication, bonding and sealing to enclose fluidic networks, evaluation of different chip substrate materials, surface chemistries, and the architecture of reaction conduits for basic processing steps such as mixing. Other important elements that have been developed to realize functional systems include miniaturized readout formats comprising optical or electrochemical transduction and interconnect technologies. These discoveries have led to the development of fully autonomous and functional integrated systems for genome processing that can supply "sample in/answer out" capabilities. In this chapter, we focus on

  17. Architecture as Design Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppinen, Heta

    1989-01-01

    Explores the use of analogies in architectural design, the importance of Gestalt theory and aesthetic cannons in understanding and being sensitive to architecture. Emphasizes the variation between public and professional appreciation of architecture. Notes that an understanding of architectural process enables students to improve the aesthetic…

  18. A microfluidic AFM cantilever based dispensing and aspiration platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Oorschot, R.; Perez Garza, H.H.; Derks, R.J.S.; Staufer, U.; Ghatkesar, M.K.

    2015-01-01

    We present the development of a microfluidic AFM (atomic force microscope) cantilever-based platform to enable the local dispensing and aspiration of liquid with volumes in the pico-to-femtoliter range. The platform consists of a basic AFM measurement system, microfluidic AFM chip, fluidic interface

  19. Using microfluidics to study programmed cell death: A new approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Christina; Zor, Kinga; Heiskanen, Arto

    This project focuses on applying microfluidic tissue culture for electrochemical or optical measurements during programmed cell death (PCD) in barley aleurone layer to increase understanding of the underlying mechanisms of PCD in plants. Microfluidic tissue culture enables in vitro experiments to...

  20. Overview of the microfluidic diagnostics commercial landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Lily

    2013-01-01

    Since its birth in the late 1980s, the field of microfluidics has continued to mature, with a growing number of companies pursuing diagnostic applications. In 2009 the worldwide in vitro diagnostics market was estimated at >$40 billion USD, and microfluidic diagnostics are poised to reap a significant part of this market across a range of areas including laboratory diagnostics, point-of-care diagnostics, cancer diagnostics, and others. The potential economic advantages of microfluidics are numerous and compelling: lower reagent and/or sample volumes, lower equipment costs, improved portability, increased automation, and increased measurement speed. All of these factors may help put more information in the hands of doctors and patients sooner, enabling earlier disease detection and more tailored, effective treatments. This chapter reviews the microfluidic diagnostics commercial landscape and discusses potential commercialization challenges and opportunities.

  1. Microfluidic methods for non-viral gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wing-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidics is a compelling technology that shows considerable promise in applications ranging from gene expression profiling to cell-based assays. Owing to its capacity to enable generation of single droplets and multiple droplet arrays with precisely controlled composition and a narrow size distribution, recently microfluidics has been exploited for delivery of genes. This article provides an overview of recent advances in microfluidic gene delivery, and speculates the prospects for further research. The objectives of this article are to illustrate the potential roles played by microfluidics in gene delivery research, and to shed new light on strategies to enhance the efficiency of gene therapy.

  2. Optofluidic Waveguides in Teflon AF-Coated PDMS Microfluidic Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung Hwan; Godin, Jessica; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2009-08-01

    We report a new method for fabricating an optofluidic waveguide that is compatible with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The light path follows the microfluidic channels, an architecture that can maximize detection efficiency and make the most economic use of chip area in many lab-on-chip applications. The PDMS-based microfluidic channels are coated with Teflon amorphous fluoropolymers (Teflon AF) which has a lower refractive index (n = 1.31) than water (n = 1.33) to form a water/Teflon AF optical waveguide. Driven by a vacuum pump, the Teflon AF solution was flowed through the channels, leaving a thin (5-15 µm) layer of coating on the channel wall as the cladding layer of optical waveguides. This coating process resolves the limitations of spin-coating processes by reducing the elasticity mismatch between the Teflon AF cladding layer and the PDMS device body. We demonstrate that the resulting optofluidic waveguide confines and guides the laser light through the liquid core channel. Furthermore, the light in such a waveguide can be split when the fluid flow is split. This new method enables highly integrated biosensors such as lab-on-chip flow cytometers and micro-fabricated fluorescence-activated cell sorter with on-chip excitation.

  3. Spiral microfluidic nanoparticle separators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, Ali Asgar S.; Kuntaegowdanahalli, Sathyakumar S.; Dionysiou, Dionysios D.; Papautsky, Ian

    2008-02-01

    Nanoparticles have potential applications in many areas such as consumer products, health care, electronics, energy and other industries. As the use of nanoparticles in manufacturing increases, we anticipate a growing need to detect and measure particles of nanometer scale dimensions in fluids to control emissions of possible toxic nanoparticles. At present most particle separation techniques are based on membrane assisted filtering schemes. Unfortunately their efficiency is limited by the membrane pore size, making them inefficient for separating a wide range of sizes. In this paper, we propose a passive spiral microfluidic geometry for momentum-based particle separations. The proposed design is versatile and is capable of separating particulate mixtures over a wide dynamic range and we expect it will enable a variety of environmental, medical, or manufacturing applications that involve rapid separation of nanoparticles in real-world samples with a wide range of particle components.

  4. Microfluidic Dye Lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders; Balslev, Søren; Gersborg-Hansen, Morten

    2006-01-01

    A technology for miniaturized, polymer based lasers, suitable for integration with planar waveguides and microfluidic networks is presented. The microfluidic dye laser device consists of a microfluidic channel with an embedded optical resonator. The devices are fabricated in a thin polymer film...

  5. Microfluidic sieve valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quake, Stephen R; Marcus, Joshua S; Hansen, Carl L

    2015-01-13

    Sieve valves for use in microfluidic device are provided. The valves are useful for impeding the flow of particles, such as chromatography beads or cells, in a microfluidic channel while allowing liquid solution to pass through the valve. The valves find particular use in making microfluidic chromatography modules.

  6. Microfluidic single sperm analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, de Bjorn

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic technology has been occasionally used for in vitro analysis and separation of cells. The small dimensions of microfluidic chips are very suitable to study cells on the single cell level rather than in whole populations. Also sperm cells have been studied and manipulated using microfluid

  7. Development of a high-throughput microfluidic integrated microarray for the detection of chimeric bioweapons.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppod, Timothy; Satterfield, Brent; Hukari, Kyle W.; West, Jason A. A.; Hux, Gary A.

    2006-10-01

    The advancement of DNA cloning has significantly augmented the potential threat of a focused bioweapon assault, such as a terrorist attack. With current DNA cloning techniques, toxin genes from the most dangerous (but environmentally labile) bacterial or viral organism can now be selected and inserted into robust organism to produce an infinite number of deadly chimeric bioweapons. In order to neutralize such a threat, accurate detection of the expressed toxin genes, rather than classification on strain or genealogical decent of these organisms, is critical. The development of a high-throughput microarray approach will enable the detection of unknowns chimeric bioweapons. The development of a high-throughput microarray approach will enable the detection of unknown bioweapons. We have developed a unique microfluidic approach to capture and concentrate these threat genes (mRNA's) upto a 30 fold concentration. These captured oligonucleotides can then be used to synthesize in situ oligonucleotide copies (cDNA probes) of the captured genes. An integrated microfluidic architecture will enable us to control flows of reagents, perform clean-up steps and finally elute nanoliter volumes of synthesized oligonucleotides probes. The integrated approach has enabled a process where chimeric or conventional bioweapons can rapidly be identified based on their toxic function, rather than being restricted to information that may not identify the critical nature of the threat.

  8. Parallel imaging microfluidic cytometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Daniel J; McKenna, Brian K; Evans, James G; Belkina, Anna C; Denis, Gerald V; Sherr, David H; Cheung, Man Ching

    2011-01-01

    By adding an additional degree of freedom from multichannel flow, the parallel microfluidic cytometer (PMC) combines some of the best features of fluorescence-activated flow cytometry (FCM) and microscope-based high-content screening (HCS). The PMC (i) lends itself to fast processing of large numbers of samples, (ii) adds a 1D imaging capability for intracellular localization assays (HCS), (iii) has a high rare-cell sensitivity, and (iv) has an unusual capability for time-synchronized sampling. An inability to practically handle large sample numbers has restricted applications of conventional flow cytometers and microscopes in combinatorial cell assays, network biology, and drug discovery. The PMC promises to relieve a bottleneck in these previously constrained applications. The PMC may also be a powerful tool for finding rare primary cells in the clinic. The multichannel architecture of current PMC prototypes allows 384 unique samples for a cell-based screen to be read out in ∼6-10 min, about 30 times the speed of most current FCM systems. In 1D intracellular imaging, the PMC can obtain protein localization using HCS marker strategies at many times for the sample throughput of charge-coupled device (CCD)-based microscopes or CCD-based single-channel flow cytometers. The PMC also permits the signal integration time to be varied over a larger range than is practical in conventional flow cytometers. The signal-to-noise advantages are useful, for example, in counting rare positive cells in the most difficult early stages of genome-wide screening. We review the status of parallel microfluidic cytometry and discuss some of the directions the new technology may take.

  9. Multithreading architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Nemirovsky, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Multithreaded architectures now appear across the entire range of computing devices, from the highest-performing general purpose devices to low-end embedded processors. Multithreading enables a processor core to more effectively utilize its computational resources, as a stall in one thread need not cause execution resources to be idle. This enables the computer architect to maximize performance within area constraints, power constraints, or energy constraints. However, the architectural options for the processor designer or architect looking to implement multithreading are quite extensive and

  10. Microfluidic very large scale integration (VLSI) modeling, simulation, testing, compilation and physical synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the state-of-the-art techniques for the modeling, simulation, testing, compilation and physical synthesis of mVLSI biochips. The authors describe a top-down modeling and synthesis methodology for the mVLSI biochips, inspired by microelectronics VLSI methodologies. They introduce a modeling framework for the components and the biochip architecture, and a high-level microfluidic protocol language. Coverage includes a topology graph-based model for the biochip architecture, and a sequencing graph to model for biochemical application, showing how the application model can be obtained from the protocol language. The techniques described facilitate programmability and automation, enabling developers in the emerging, large biochip market. · Presents the current models used for the research on compilation and synthesis techniques of mVLSI biochips in a tutorial fashion; · Includes a set of "benchmarks", that are presented in great detail and includes the source code of several of the techniques p...

  11. Multi-layer microfluidic glass chips for microanalytical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Daridon, Antoine; Fascio, Valia; Lichtenberg, Jan; Wütrich, Rolf; Langen, Hans; Verpoorte, Elisabeth; De Rooij, Nicolaas F

    2010-01-01

    A new, versatile architecture is presented for microfluidic devices made entirely from glass, for use with reagents which would prove highly corrosive for silicon. Chips consist of three layers of glass wafers bonded together by fusion bonding. On the inside wafer faces a network of microfluidic channels is created by photolithography and wet chemical etching. Low dead-volume fluidic connections between the layers are fabricated by spark-assisted etching (SAE), a computer numerical controlled...

  12. Reconfigurable microfluidic nanoparticle trapping using dielectrophoresis for chemical detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salemmilani, Reza; Piorek, Brian; Moskovits, Martin; Meinhart, Carl

    2016-11-01

    We report a microfluidic particle manipulation platform based on dielectrophoresis (DEP) to capture and release nanoscale particles cyclically via reconfigurable traps. DEP is routinely used in microfluidic devices for capturing and trapping cells and particles of various sizes, however the trapping of small nanoparticles by DEP is challenging due to the inverse relationship of the DEP force with particle size. The architecture we describe uses electrically insulating silica beads of micron scale in conjunction with DEP electrodes configured to manipulate nanoscale particles for microfluidic applications such as filtration and chemical detection. Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106, United States.

  13. A Review of Biomedical Centrifugal Microfluidic Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghui Tang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Centrifugal microfluidic or lab-on-a-disc platforms have many advantages over other microfluidic systems. These advantages include a minimal amount of instrumentation, the efficient removal of any disturbing bubbles or residual volumes, and inherently available density-based sample transportation and separation. Centrifugal microfluidic devices applied to biomedical analysis and point-of-care diagnostics have been extensively promoted recently. This paper presents an up-to-date overview of these devices. The development of biomedical centrifugal microfluidic platforms essentially covers two categories: (i unit operations that perform specific functionalities, and (ii systems that aim to address certain biomedical applications. With the aim to provide a comprehensive representation of current development in this field, this review summarizes progress in both categories. The advanced unit operations implemented for biological processing include mixing, valving, switching, metering and sequential loading. Depending on the type of sample to be used in the system, biomedical applications are classified into four groups: nucleic acid analysis, blood analysis, immunoassays, and other biomedical applications. Our overview of advanced unit operations also includes the basic concepts and mechanisms involved in centrifugal microfluidics, while on the other hand an outline on reported applications clarifies how an assembly of unit operations enables efficient implementation of various types of complex assays. Lastly, challenges and potential for future development of biomedical centrifugal microfluidic devices are discussed.

  14. Microfluidic Devices in Advanced Caenorhabditis elegans Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muniesh Muthaiyan Shanmugam

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of model organisms is very important in view of their potential for application to human therapeutic uses. One such model organism is the nematode worm, Caenorhabditis elegans. As a nematode, C. elegans have ~65% similarity with human disease genes and, therefore, studies on C. elegans can be translated to human, as well as, C. elegans can be used in the study of different types of parasitic worms that infect other living organisms. In the past decade, many efforts have been undertaken to establish interdisciplinary research collaborations between biologists, physicists and engineers in order to develop microfluidic devices to study the biology of C. elegans. Microfluidic devices with the power to manipulate and detect bio-samples, regents or biomolecules in micro-scale environments can well fulfill the requirement to handle worms under proper laboratory conditions, thereby significantly increasing research productivity and knowledge. The recent development of different kinds of microfluidic devices with ultra-high throughput platforms has enabled researchers to carry out worm population studies. Microfluidic devices primarily comprises of chambers, channels and valves, wherein worms can be cultured, immobilized, imaged, etc. Microfluidic devices have been adapted to study various worm behaviors, including that deepen our understanding of neuromuscular connectivity and functions. This review will provide a clear account of the vital involvement of microfluidic devices in worm biology.

  15. Tabu Search-based Synthesis of Digital Microfluidic Biochips with Dynamically Reconfigurable Non-rectangular Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maftei, Elena; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Microfluidic biochips are replacing the conventional biochemical analyzers, and are able to integrate on-chip all the necessary functions for biochemical analysis. The "digital" microfluidic biochips are manipulating liquids not as a continuous flow, but as discrete droplets, and hence...... rectangular. In this paper, we present a Tabu Search metaheuristic for the synthesis of digital microfluidic biochips, which, starting from a biochemical application and a given biochip architecture, determines the allocation, resource binding, scheduling and placement of the operations in the application...

  16. Synthesis of Biochemical Applications on Digital Microfluidic Biochips with Operation Execution Time Variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alistar, Mirela; Pop, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic-based biochips are replacing the conventional biochemical analyzers, and are able to integrate all the necessary functions for biochemical analysis. The digital microfluidic biochips are based on the manipulation of liquids not as a continuous flow, but as discrete droplets. Several...... approaches have been proposed for the synthesis of digital microfluidic biochips, which, starting from a biochemical application and a given biochip architecture, determine the allocation, resource binding, scheduling, placement and routing of the operations in the application. Researchers have assumed...

  17. NG-PON2 Architecture Enabled by Heterogeneous Space Division Multiplexing with Distributed Light Source: A Proof-of-Concept Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asif, Rameez; Imran, Muhammad; Ye, Feihong

    2015-01-01

    We have numerically evaluated the next generation passive optical network stage-2 (NG-PON2) architecture based on heterogeneous space division multiplexing (SDM) and wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM). Error free transmission (BER of 10−9 ) is obtained for all the downstream (DS) and upstream...... (US) data tributaries, each carrying 40 Gbit/s data, over 20-km of 19-core multi-core fiber (MCF) and 6-spatial-mode fewmode fiber (FMF) without using multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) digital signal processing (DSP), respectively....

  18. Porous Microfluidic Devices - Fabrication adn Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, J.; Geerken, M.J.; Lammertink, Rob G.H.; Wessling, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    The major part of microfluidic devices nowadays consists of a dense material that defines the fluidic structure. A generic fabrication method enabling the production of completely porous micro devices with user-defined channel networks is developed. The channel walls can be used as a (selective) bar

  19. High content screening in microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Raymond; Paliwal, Saurabh; Levchenko, Andre

    2011-01-01

    Importance of the field Miniaturization is key to advancing the state-of-the-art in high content screening (HCS), in order to enable dramatic cost savings through reduced usage of expensive biochemical reagents and to enable large-scale screening on primary cells. Microfluidic technology offers the potential to enable HCS to be performed with an unprecedented degree of miniaturization. Areas covered in this review This perspective highlights a real-world example from the authors’ work of HCS assays implemented in a highly miniaturized microfluidic format. Advantages of this technology are discussed, including cost savings, high throughput screening on primary cells, improved accuracy, the ability to study complex time-varying stimuli, and ease of automation, integration, and scaling. What the reader will gain The reader will understand the capabilities of a new microfluidics-based platform for HCS, and the advantages it provides over conventional plate-based HCS. Take home message Microfluidics technology will drive significant advancements and broader usage and applicability of HCS in drug discovery. PMID:21852997

  20. Valve Concepts for Microfluidic Cell Handling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Grabowski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present various pneumatically actuated microfluidic valves to enable user-defined fluid management within a microfluidic chip. To identify a feasible valve design, certain valve concepts are simulated in ANSYS to investigate the pressure dependent opening and closing characteristics of each design. The results are verified in a series of tests. Both the microfluidic layer and the pneumatic layer are realized by means of soft-lithographic techniques. In this way, a network of channels is fabricated in photoresist as a molding master. By casting these masters with PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane we get polymeric replicas containing the channel network. After a plasma-enhanced bonding process, the two layers are irreversibly bonded to each other. The bonding is tight for pressures up to 2 bar. The valves are integrated into a microfluidic cell handling system that is designed to manipulate cells in the presence of a liquid reagent (e.g. PEG – polyethylene glycol, for cell fusion. For this purpose a user-defined fluid management system is developed. The first test series with human cell lines show that the microfluidic chip is suitable for accumulating cells within a reaction chamber, where they can be flushed by a liquid medium.

  1. Super-resolution imaging with Pontamine Fast Scarlet 4BS enables direct visualization of cellulose orientation and cell connection architecture in onion epidermis cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liesche, Johannes; Ziomkiewicz, Iwona; Schulz, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    of cellulose fibril orientation and growth. The fluorescent dye Pontamine Fast Scarlet 4BS (PFS) was shown to stain cellulose with high specificity and could be used to visualize cellulose bundles in cell walls of Arabidopsis root epidermal cells with confocal microscopy. The resolution limit of confocal...... as alternatives 3D-structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) and confocal microscopy, combined with image deconvolution. Both methods offer lower resolution than STORM, but enable 3D imaging. While 3D-SIM produced strong artifacts, deconvolution gave good results. The resolution was improved over conventional...... confocal microscopy and the approach could be used to demonstrate differences in fibril orientation in different layers of the cell wall as well as particular cellulose fortifications around plasmodesmata. Conclusions Super-resolution light microscopy of PFS-stained cellulose fibrils is possible...

  2. Unconventional microfluidics: expanding the discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Mao, Xiaole; Stratton, Zackary S; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-04-21

    Since its inception, the discipline of microfluidics has been harnessed for innovations in the biomedicine/chemistry fields-and to great effect. This success has had the natural side-effect of stereotyping microfluidics as a platform for medical diagnostics and miniaturized lab processes. But microfluidics has more to offer. And very recently, some researchers have successfully applied microfluidics to fields outside its traditional domains. In this Focus article, we highlight notable examples of such "unconventional" microfluidics applications (e.g., robotics, electronics). It is our hope that these early successes in unconventional microfluidics prompt further creativity, and inspire readers to expand the microfluidics discipline.

  3. Final Scientific/Technical Report (DOE F 241.3) Next-Generation LED Package Architectures Enabled by Thermally Conductive Transparent Encapsulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murugaiah, Anand [Momentive Performance Materials Quartz, Inc., Strongsville, OH (United States)

    2016-12-30

    The objective of this program is to generate novel LED package designs that would provide 30% improvement in lumen/$ output. This was to be achieved by improving thermal management in encapsulants/ phosphors to reduce their temperatures. Currently, the heat that is generated during down conversion of blue light to longer wavelengths by the phosphors dispersed in the encapsulant does not have optimum thermal pathways for dissipation due to poor thermal conductivity of the encapsulant material. Additionally, high temperature in the encapsulant during operation is one of the primary failure modes in LED luminaires resulting in much shorter than expected life. The thermal issues manifest in color instability (yellowing, browning), cracking and hot spots in the encapsulant leading to failures. This work explored boron nitride (hBN) as thermal fillers in encapsulants to improve thermal conductivity while minimally impacting optical properties. Various approaches to Boron Nitride (BN) were evaluated and over 380 samples were generated to down select appropriate BN morphologies. We developed a range or BN materials for enabling thermal properties while attempting to minimally impact to optical properties.

  4. "Microcanals" for micropipette access to single cells in microfluidic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chia-Hsien; Chen, Chihchen; Folch, Albert

    2004-10-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication and operation of "microcanals"(i.e. open-air microfluidic channels without a roof), which enable micropipette manipulation and probing of cells within a microfluidic environment. The microcanal devices are fabricated in PDMS on glass substrates using a PDMS membrane transferring technique. Here we show patch-clamp electrophysiological recording and intracellular dye injection performed on cells seeded in microcanals.

  5. Semantic Sensor Web Enablement for COAST Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) is an Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standard Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) that facilitates discovery and integration of...

  6. Microfluidics and microbial engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Songzi; Cheng, Danhui; Sun, Fei; Hsing, I-Ming

    2016-02-01

    The combination of microbial engineering and microfluidics is synergistic in nature. For example, microfluidics is benefiting from the outcome of microbial engineering and many reported point-of-care microfluidic devices employ engineered microbes as functional parts for the microsystems. In addition, microbial engineering is facilitated by various microfluidic techniques, due to their inherent strength in high-throughput screening and miniaturization. In this review article, we firstly examine the applications of engineered microbes for toxicity detection, biosensing, and motion generation in microfluidic platforms. Secondly, we look into how microfluidic technologies facilitate the upstream and downstream processes of microbial engineering, including DNA recombination, transformation, target microbe selection, mutant characterization, and microbial function analysis. Thirdly, we highlight an emerging concept in microbial engineering, namely, microbial consortium engineering, where the behavior of a multicultural microbial community rather than that of a single cell/species is delineated. Integrating the disciplines of microfluidics and microbial engineering opens up many new opportunities, for example in diagnostics, engineering of microbial motors, development of portable devices for genetics, high throughput characterization of genetic mutants, isolation and identification of rare/unculturable microbial species, single-cell analysis with high spatio-temporal resolution, and exploration of natural microbial communities.

  7. Microbridge structures for uniform interval control of flowing droplets in microfluidic networks

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Do-Hyun; Lee, Wonhye; Um, Eujin; Park, Je-Kyun

    2011-01-01

    Precise temporal control of microfluidic droplets such as synchronization and combinatorial pairing of droplets is required to achieve a variety range of chemical and biochemical reactions inside microfluidic networks. Here, we present a facile and robust microfluidic platform enabling uniform interval control of flowing droplets for the precise temporal synchronization and pairing of picoliter droplets with a reagent. By incorporating microbridge structures interconnecting the droplet-carryi...

  8. Microfluidics and cancer analysis: cell separation, cell/tissue culture, cell mechanics, and integrated analysis systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Dimitri

    2016-01-21

    Among the growing number of tools available for cancer studies, microfluidic systems have emerged as a promising analytical tool to elucidate cancer cell and tumor function. Microfluidic methods to culture cells have created approaches to provide a range of environments from single-cell analysis to complex three-dimensional devices. In this review we discuss recent advances in tumor cell culture, cancer cell analysis, and advanced studies enabled by microfluidic systems.

  9. Nanomaterials meet microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumera, Martin

    2011-05-28

    Nanomaterials and lab-on-a-chip platforms have undergone enormous development during the past decade. Here, we present an overview of how microfluidics benefited from the use of nanomaterials for the enhanced separation and detection of analytes. We also discuss how nanomaterials benefit from microfluidics in terms of synthesis and in terms of the simulation of environments for nanomotors and nanorobots. In our opinion, the "marriage" of nanomaterials and microfluidics is highly beneficial and is expected to solve vital challenges in related fields.

  10. Materials for microfluidic chip fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Kangning; Zhou, Jianhua; Wu, Hongkai

    2013-11-19

    Through manipulating fluids using microfabricated channel and chamber structures, microfluidics is a powerful tool to realize high sensitive, high speed, high throughput, and low cost analysis. In addition, the method can establish a well-controlled microenivroment for manipulating fluids and particles. It also has rapid growing implementations in both sophisticated chemical/biological analysis and low-cost point-of-care assays. Some unique phenomena emerge at the micrometer scale. For example, reactions are completed in a shorter amount of time as the travel distances of mass and heat are relatively small; the flows are usually laminar; and the capillary effect becomes dominant owing to large surface-to-volume ratios. In the meantime, the surface properties of the device material are greatly amplified, which can lead to either unique functions or problems that we would not encounter at the macroscale. Also, each material inherently corresponds with specific microfabrication strategies and certain native properties of the device. Therefore, the material for making the device plays a dominating role in microfluidic technologies. In this Account, we address the evolution of materials used for fabricating microfluidic chips, and discuss the application-oriented pros and cons of different materials. This Account generally follows the order of the materials introduced to microfluidics. Glass and silicon, the first generation microfluidic device materials, are perfect for capillary electrophoresis and solvent-involved applications but expensive for microfabriaction. Elastomers enable low-cost rapid prototyping and high density integration of valves on chip, allowing complicated and parallel fluid manipulation and in-channel cell culture. Plastics, as competitive alternatives to elastomers, are also rapid and inexpensive to microfabricate. Their broad variety provides flexible choices for different needs. For example, some thermosets support in-situ fabrication of

  11. Centrifugal microfluidic platforms: advanced unit operations and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmeier, O; Keller, M; Schwemmer, F; Zehnle, S; Mark, D; von Stetten, F; Zengerle, R; Paust, N

    2015-10-01

    Centrifugal microfluidics has evolved into a mature technology. Several major diagnostic companies either have products on the market or are currently evaluating centrifugal microfluidics for product development. The fields of application are widespread and include clinical chemistry, immunodiagnostics and protein analysis, cell handling, molecular diagnostics, as well as food, water, and soil analysis. Nevertheless, new fluidic functions and applications that expand the possibilities of centrifugal microfluidics are being introduced at a high pace. In this review, we first present an up-to-date comprehensive overview of centrifugal microfluidic unit operations. Then, we introduce the term "process chain" to review how these unit operations can be combined for the automation of laboratory workflows. Such aggregation of basic functionalities enables efficient fluidic design at a higher level of integration. Furthermore, we analyze how novel, ground-breaking unit operations may foster the integration of more complex applications. Among these are the storage of pneumatic energy to realize complex switching sequences or to pump liquids radially inward, as well as the complete pre-storage and release of reagents. In this context, centrifugal microfluidics provides major advantages over other microfluidic actuation principles: the pulse-free inertial liquid propulsion provided by centrifugal microfluidics allows for closed fluidic systems that are free of any interfaces to external pumps. Processed volumes are easily scalable from nanoliters to milliliters. Volume forces can be adjusted by rotation and thus, even for very small volumes, surface forces may easily be overcome in the centrifugal gravity field which enables the efficient separation of nanoliter volumes from channels, chambers or sensor matrixes as well as the removal of any disturbing bubbles. In summary, centrifugal microfluidics takes advantage of a comprehensive set of fluidic unit operations such as

  12. Plasmonic nanoshell synthesis in microfluidic composite foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duraiswamy, Suhanya; Khan, Saif A

    2010-09-01

    The availability of robust, scalable, and automated nanoparticle manufacturing processes is crucial for the viability of emerging nanotechnologies. Metallic nanoparticles of diverse shape and composition are commonly manufactured by solution-phase colloidal chemistry methods, where rapid reaction kinetics and physical processes such as mixing are inextricably coupled, and scale-up often poses insurmountable problems. Here we present the first continuous flow process to synthesize thin gold "nanoshells" and "nanoislands" on colloidal silica surfaces, which are nanoparticle motifs of considerable interest in plasmonics-based applications. We assemble an ordered, flowing composite foam lattice in a simple microfluidic device, where the lattice cells are alternately aqueous drops containing reagents for nanoparticle synthesis or gas bubbles. Microfluidic foam generation enables precisely controlled reagent dispensing and mixing, and the ordered foam structure facilitates compartmentalized nanoparticle growth. This is a general method for aqueous colloidal synthesis, enabling continuous, inherently digital, scalable, and automated production processes for plasmonic nanomaterials.

  13. 3D Printed Multimaterial Microfluidic Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, William G.; Sharma, Sunanda; Kong, David S.; Oxman, Neri

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel 3D printed multimaterial microfluidic proportional valve. The microfluidic valve is a fundamental primitive that enables the development of programmable, automated devices for controlling fluids in a precise manner. We discuss valve characterization results, as well as exploratory design variations in channel width, membrane thickness, and membrane stiffness. Compared to previous single material 3D printed valves that are stiff, these printed valves constrain fluidic deformation spatially, through combinations of stiff and flexible materials, to enable intricate geometries in an actuated, functionally graded device. Research presented marks a shift towards 3D printing multi-property programmable fluidic devices in a single step, in which integrated multimaterial valves can be used to control complex fluidic reactions for a variety of applications, including DNA assembly and analysis, continuous sampling and sensing, and soft robotics. PMID:27525809

  14. Electrodes for Microfluidic Integrated Optoelectronic Tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Wei Huang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on two types of electrodes that enable the integration of optoelectronic tweezers (OETs with multilayer poly(dimethylsilane- (PDMS- based microfluidic devices. Both types of electrodes, Au-mesh and single-walled carbon nanotube- (SWNT- embedded PDMS thin film, are optically transparent, electrically conductive, and can be mechanically deformed and provide interfaces to form strong covalent bonding between an OET device and PDMS through standard oxygen plasma treatment. Au-mesh electrodes provide high electrical conductivity and high transparency but are lack of flexibility and allow only small deformation. On the other hand, SWNT-embedded PDMS thin film electrodes provide not only electrical conductivity but also optical transparency and can undergo large mechanical deformation repeatedly without failure. This enables, for the first time, microfluidic integrated OET with on-chip valve and pump functions, which is a critical step for OET-based platforms to conduct more complex and multistep biological and biochemical analyses.

  15. Microfluidics in inorganic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Hassan, Ali; Sandre, Olivier; Cabuil, Valérie

    2010-08-23

    The application of microfluidics in chemistry has gained significant importance in the recent years. Miniaturized chemistry platforms provide controlled fluid transport, rapid chemical reactions, and cost-saving advantages over conventional reactors. The advantages of microfluidics have been clearly established in the field of analytical and bioanalytical sciences and in the field of organic synthesis. It is less true in the field of inorganic chemistry and materials science; however in inorganic chemistry it has mostly been used for the separation and selective extraction of metal ions. Microfluidics has been used in materials science mainly for the improvement of nanoparticle synthesis, namely metal, metal oxide, and semiconductor nanoparticles. Microfluidic devices can also be used for the formulation of more advanced and sophisticated inorganic materials or hybrids.

  16. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-cheng; Sui, Guodong; Elizarov, Arkadij; Kolb, Hartmuth C.; Huang, Jiang; Heath, James R.; Phelps, Michael E.; Quake, Stephen R.; Tseng, Hsian-rong; Wyatt, Paul; Daridon, Antoine

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  17. Microfluidic Bead Suspension Hopper

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Alexander K.; MacConnell, Andrew B.; Paegel, Brian M.

    2014-01-01

    Many high-throughput analytical platforms, from next-generation DNA sequencing to drug discovery, rely on beads as carriers of molecular diversity. Microfluidic systems are ideally suited to handle and analyze such bead libraries with high precision and at minute volume scales; however, the challenge of introducing bead suspensions into devices before they sediment usually confounds microfluidic handling and analysis. We developed a bead suspension hopper that exploits sedimentation to load b...

  18. Punch Card Programmable Microfluidics

    OpenAIRE

    George Korir; Manu Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Small volume fluid handling in single and multiphase microfluidics provides a promising strategy for efficient bio-chemical assays, low-cost point-of-care diagnostics and new approaches to scientific discoveries. However multiple barriers exist towards low-cost field deployment of programmable microfluidics. Incorporating multiple pumps, mixers and discrete valve based control of nanoliter fluids and droplets in an integrated, programmable manner without additional required external component...

  19. Architecture on Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Karen

    2016-01-01

    This paper will discuss the challenges faced by architectural education today. It takes as its starting point the double commitment of any school of architecture: on the one hand the task of preserving the particular knowledge that belongs to the discipline of architecture, and on the other hand...... that is not scientific or academic but is more like a latent body of data that we find embedded in existing works of architecture. This information, it is argued, is not limited by the historical context of the work. It can be thought of as a virtual capacity – a reservoir of spatial configurations that can...... the autonomy of architecture, not as an esoteric concept but as a valid source of information in a pragmatic design practice, may help us overcome the often-proclaimed dichotomy between formal autonomy and a societally committed architecture. It follows that in architectural education there can be a close...

  20. Microfluidic devices for in vitro studies on liver drug metabolism and toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Midwoud, Paul M.; Verpoorte, Elisabeth; Groothuis, Geny M. M.

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidic technologies enable the fabrication of advanced in vitro systems incorporating liver tissue or cells to perform metabolism and toxicity studies for drugs and other xenobiotics. The use of microfluidics provides the possibility to utilize a flow of medium, thereby creating a

  1. Integrated on-chip mass spectrometry reaction monitoring in microfluidic devices containing porous polymer monolithic columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietze, C; Schulze, S; Ohla, S; Gilmore, K; Seeberger, P H; Belder, D

    2016-09-21

    Chip-based microfluidics enable the seamless integration of different functions into single devices. Here, we present microfluidic chips containing porous polymer monolithic columns as a means to facilitate chemical transformations as well as both downstream chromatographic separation and mass spectrometric analysis. Rapid liquid phase lithography prototyping creates the multifunctional device economically.

  2. Open-source, community-driven microfluidics with Metafluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, David S; Thorsen, Todd A; Babb, Jonathan; Wick, Scott T; Gam, Jeremy J; Weiss, Ron; Carr, Peter A

    2017-06-07

    Microfluidic devices have the potential to automate and miniaturize biological experiments, but open-source sharing of device designs has lagged behind sharing of other resources such as software. Synthetic biologists have used microfluidics for DNA assembly, cell-free expression, and cell culture, but a combination of expense, device complexity, and reliance on custom set-ups hampers their widespread adoption. We present Metafluidics, an open-source, community-driven repository that hosts digital design files, assembly specifications, and open-source software to enable users to build, configure, and operate a microfluidic device. We use Metafluidics to share designs and fabrication instructions for both a microfluidic ring-mixer device and a 32-channel tabletop microfluidic controller. This device and controller are applied to build genetic circuits using standard DNA assembly methods including ligation, Gateway, Gibson, and Golden Gate. Metafluidics is intended to enable a broad community of engineers, DIY enthusiasts, and other nontraditional participants with limited fabrication skills to contribute to microfluidic research.

  3. A gradient-generating microfluidic device for cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Bong Geun; Manbachi, Amir; Saadi, Wajeeh; Lin, Francis; Jeon, Noo Li; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2007-01-01

    The fabrication and operation of a gradient-generating microfluidic device for studying cellular behavior is described. A microfluidic platform is an enabling experimental tool, because it can precisely manipulate fluid flows, enable high-throughput experiments, and generate stable soluble concentration gradients. Compared to conventional gradient generators, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-based microfluidic devices can generate stable concentration gradients of growth factors with well-defined profiles. Here, we developed simple gradient-generating microfluidic devices with three separate inlets. Three microchannels combined into one microchannel to generate concentration gradients. The stability and shape of growth factor gradients were confirmed by fluorescein isothyiocyanate (FITC)-dextran with a molecular weight similar to epidermal growth factor (EGF). Using this microfluidic device, we demonstrated that fibroblasts exposed to concentration gradients of EGF migrated toward higher concentrations. The directional orientation of cell migration and motility of migrating cells were quantitatively assessed by cell tracking analysis. Thus, this gradient-generating microfluidic device might be useful for studying and analyzing the behavior of migrating cells.

  4. Microfluidics for Antibiotic Susceptibility and Toxicity Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Dai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The recent emergence of antimicrobial resistance has become a major concern for worldwide policy makers as very few new antibiotics have been developed in the last twenty-five years. To prevent the death of millions of people worldwide, there is an urgent need for a cheap, fast and accurate set of tools and techniques that can help to discover and develop new antimicrobial drugs. In the past decade, microfluidic platforms have emerged as potential systems for conducting pharmacological studies. Recent studies have demonstrated that microfluidic platforms can perform rapid antibiotic susceptibility tests to evaluate antimicrobial drugs’ efficacy. In addition, the development of cell-on-a-chip and organ-on-a-chip platforms have enabled the early drug testing, providing more accurate insights into conventional cell cultures on the drug pharmacokinetics and toxicity, at the early and cheaper stage of drug development, i.e., prior to animal and human testing. In this review, we focus on the recent developments of microfluidic platforms for rapid antibiotics susceptibility testing, investigating bacterial persistence and non-growing but metabolically active (NGMA bacteria, evaluating antibiotic effectiveness on biofilms and combinatorial effect of antibiotics, as well as microfluidic platforms that can be used for in vitro antibiotic toxicity testing.

  5. Opto-Microfluidic Immunosensors: From Colorimetric to Plasmonic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie-Long He

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Optical detection has long been the most popular technique in immunosensing. Recent developments in the synthesis of luminescent probes and the fabrication of novel nanostructures enable more sensitive and efficient optical detection, which can be miniaturized and integrated with microfluidics to realize compact lab-on-a-chip immunosensors. These immunosensors are portable, economical and automated, but their sensitivity is not compromised. This review focuses on the incorporation and implementation of optical detection and microfluidics in immunosensors; it introduces the working principles of each optical detection technique and how it can be exploited in immunosensing. The recent progress in various opto-microfluidic immunosensor designs is described. Instead of being comprehensive to include all opto-microfluidic platforms, the report centers on the designs that are promising for point-of-care immunosensing diagnostics, in which ease of use, stability and cost-effective fabrication are emphasized.

  6. Single-molecule emulsion PCR in microfluidic droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhi; Jenkins, Gareth; Zhang, Wenhua; Zhang, Mingxia; Guan, Zhichao; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2012-06-01

    The application of microfluidic droplet PCR for single-molecule amplification and analysis has recently been extensively studied. Microfluidic droplet technology has the advantages of compartmentalizing reactions into discrete volumes, performing highly parallel reactions in monodisperse droplets, reducing cross-contamination between droplets, eliminating PCR bias and nonspecific amplification, as well as enabling fast amplification with rapid thermocycling. Here, we have reviewed the important technical breakthroughs of microfluidic droplet PCR in the past five years and their applications to single-molecule amplification and analysis, such as high-throughput screening, next generation DNA sequencing, and quantitative detection of rare mutations. Although the utilization of microfluidic droplet single-molecule PCR is still in the early stages, its great potential has already been demonstrated and will provide novel solutions to today's biomedical engineering challenges in single-molecule amplification and analysis.

  7. Compact and controlled microfluidic mixing and biological particle capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Matthew; Owen, Drew; Mills, Zachary Grant; Hesketh, Peter J.; Alexeev, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    We use three-dimensional simulations and experiments to develop a multifunctional microfluidic device that performs rapid and controllable microfluidic mixing and specific particle capture. Our device uses a compact microfluidic channel decorated with magnetic features. A rotating magnetic field precisely controls individual magnetic microbeads orbiting around the features, enabling effective continuous-flow mixing of fluid streams over a compact mixing region. We use computer simulations to elucidate the underlying physical mechanisms that lead to effective mixing and compare them with experimental mixing results. We study the effect of various system parameters on microfluidic mixing to design an efficient micromixer. We also experimentally and numerically demonstrate that orbiting microbeads can effectively capture particles transported by the fluid, which has major implications in pre-concentration and detection of biological particles including various cells and bacteria, with applications in areas such as point-of-care diagnostics, biohazard detection, and food safety. Support from NSF and USDA is gratefully acknowledged.

  8. Superhydrophobic Surface Coatings for Microfluidics and MEMs.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branson, Eric D.; Singh, Seema [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA; Houston, Jack E.; van Swol, Frank B.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2006-11-01

    Low solid interfacial energy and fractally rough surface topography confer to Lotus plants superhydrophobic (SH) properties like high contact angles, rolling and bouncing of liquid droplets, and self-cleaning of particle contaminants. This project exploits the porous fractal structure of a novel, synthetic SH surface for aerosol collection, its self-cleaning properties for particle concentration, and its slippery nature 3 to enhance the performance of fluidic and MEMS devices. We propose to understand fundamentally the conditions needed to cause liquid droplets to roll rather than flow/slide on a surface and how this %22rolling transition%22 influences the boundary condition describing fluid flow in a pipe or micro-channel. Rolling of droplets is important for aerosol collection strategies because it allows trapped particles to be concentrated and transported in liquid droplets with no need for a pre-defined/micromachined fluidic architecture. The fluid/solid boundary condition is important because it governs flow resistance and rheology and establishes the fluid velocity profile. Although many research groups are exploring SH surfaces, our team is the first to unambiguously determine their effects on fluid flow and rheology. SH surfaces could impact all future SNL designs of collectors, fluidic devices, MEMS, and NEMS. Interfaced with inertial focusing aerosol collectors, SH surfaces would allow size-specific particle populations to be collected, concentrated, and transported to a fluidic interface without loss. In microfluidic systems, we expect to reduce the energy/power required to pump fluids and actuate MEMS. Plug-like (rather than parabolic) velocity profiles can greatly improve resolution of chip-based separations and enable unprecedented control of concentration profiles and residence times in fluidic-based micro-reactors. Patterned SH/hydrophilic channels could induce mixing in microchannels and enable development of microflow control elements

  9. Microfluidic lab-on-a-chip platforms: requirements, characteristics and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Daniel; Haeberle, Stefan; Roth, Günter; von Stetten, Felix; Zengerle, Roland

    2010-03-01

    This critical review summarizes developments in microfluidic platforms that enable the miniaturization, integration, automation and parallelization of (bio-)chemical assays (see S. Haeberle and R. Zengerle, Lab Chip, 2007, 7, 1094-1110, for an earlier review). In contrast to isolated application-specific solutions, a microfluidic platform provides a set of fluidic unit operations, which are designed for easy combination within a well-defined fabrication technology. This allows the easy, fast, and cost-efficient implementation of different application-specific (bio-)chemical processes. In our review we focus on recent developments from the last decade (2000s). We start with a brief introduction into technical advances, major market segments and promising applications. We continue with a detailed characterization of different microfluidic platforms, comprising a short definition, the functional principle, microfluidic unit operations, application examples as well as strengths and limitations of every platform. The microfluidic platforms in focus are lateral flow tests, linear actuated devices, pressure driven laminar flow, microfluidic large scale integration, segmented flow microfluidics, centrifugal microfluidics, electrokinetics, electrowetting, surface acoustic waves, and dedicated systems for massively parallel analysis. This review concludes with the attempt to provide a selection scheme for microfluidic platforms which is based on their characteristics according to key requirements of different applications and market segments. Applied selection criteria comprise portability, costs of instrument and disposability, sample throughput, number of parameters per sample, reagent consumption, precision, diversity of microfluidic unit operations and the flexibility in programming different liquid handling protocols (295 references).

  10. Droplet microfluidics for high-throughput biological assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mira T; Rotem, Assaf; Heyman, John A; Weitz, David A

    2012-06-21

    Droplet microfluidics offers significant advantages for performing high-throughput screens and sensitive assays. Droplets allow sample volumes to be significantly reduced, leading to concomitant reductions in cost. Manipulation and measurement at kilohertz speeds enable up to 10(8) samples to be screened in one day. Compartmentalization in droplets increases assay sensitivity by increasing the effective concentration of rare species and decreasing the time required to reach detection thresholds. Droplet microfluidics combines these powerful features to enable currently inaccessible high-throughput screening applications, including single-cell and single-molecule assays.

  11. In-line microfluidic integration of photonic crystal fibres as a highly sensitive refractometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chuang; Tse, Ming-Leung Vincent; Liu, Zhengyong; Guan, Bai-Ou; Zhang, A Ping; Lu, Chao; Tam, Hwa-Yaw

    2014-11-07

    Photonic crystal fibres appear to be an ideal platform for the realisation of novel optofluidic devices and sensors due to their waveguide nature and microstructured architecture. In this paper, we present the fabrication and characterisation of an in-line photonic crystal fibre microfluidic refractometer enabled by a C-shaped fibre. The C-shaped fibre spliced in-between the photonic crystal fibre and the single-mode fibre allows simultaneous in-line optical signal delivery and analyte fluid feeding. Through an arc discharge pre-treatment technique, we successfully achieve selective exploitation of only the central two channels of the photonic crystal fibre for microfluidic sensing. After constructing a Sagnac interferometer, a highly sensitive refractometer with a sensitivity of 8699 nm per RIU was achieved experimentally; this agrees very well with the theoretical value of 8675 nm per RIU. As a demonstration for label-free optical sensing application, the refractometer was used to measure the concentration of NaCl solution with a sensitivity of 15.08 nm/(1 wt%) and a detection limit of 2.3 × 10(-3) wt% (23 ppm).

  12. Pressure-driven microfluidic perfusion culture device for integrated dose-response assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Koji; Sugiura, Shinji; Kanamori, Toshiyuki

    2013-12-01

    Cell-based assays are widely used in the various stages of drug discovery. Advances in microfluidic systems over the past two decades have enabled them to become a powerful tool for cell-based assays to achieve both reliability and high throughput. The interface between the micro-world and macro-world is important in industrial assay processes. Therefore, microfluidic cell-based assays using pressure-driven liquid handling are an ideal platform for integrated assays. The aim of this article is to review recent advancements in microfluidic cell-based assays focusing on a pressure-driven perfusion culture device. Here, we review the development of microfluidic cell-based assay devices and discuss the techniques involved in designing a microfluidic network, device fabrication, liquid and cell manipulation, and detection schemes for pressure-driven perfusion culture devices. Finally, we describe recent progress in semiautomatic and reliable pressure-driven microfluidic cell-based assays.

  13. Microfluidic microwell and microcapillary biochips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minot, Michael J.; Stowe, David W.; Detarando, Michael A.; Krans, Joseph A.; Kass, Jason L.

    2006-02-01

    Utilizing nanotechnology, proprietary chemistry, and microfluidics, innovative firms are developing biochips and instrument systems that enable high-speed automated biomedical sequencing. Incom Inc. presents development results on five novel biochip technologies based on FiberOptic MicroSlide and microcapillary technology. FiberOptic MicroSlides are fiber optic interrogated (FOI) biochips made up of millions of fused optical fibers, and are uniquely suited as a platform for microarray applications. FiberOptic MicroSlides (henceforth referred to as "MicroSlides" or "slides" in this paper) act as a 'zero thickness substrate' transmitting optical signals from top to bottom without spreading, so that fluorescent or luminescent activity on the surface or within a well can be directly coupled to a CCD device without additional optics. In contrast to bulk optics, the slides are compact and have excellent light-gathering power. They are an alternative to conventional microscope slides for applications involving moderate-resolution bottom viewing (inverted microscopy). The surface of the MicroSlides can be etched or patterned with a permanent polymer to form microwell arrays, or microfluidic structures suitable for genomic and proteomic analysis, cell migration studies and other applications. Low-cost microcapillary array plates have also been developed. These plates act as microscopic test tubes, which enable picoliter reactions to be detected, counted and analyzed. Progress in developing large area (300 mm X 300 mm) arrays with up to 100 million capillaries, and diameter / length aspect ratios up to 10,000: 1 is presented. Results demonstrate negligible optical cross talk between capillaries, resulting in improved signal-to-noise ratios while minimizing false hits.

  14. Direct integration of MEMS, dielectric pumping and cell manipulation with reversibly bonded gecko adhesive microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnat, S.; King, H.; Wasay, A.; Sameoto, D.; Hubbard, T.

    2016-09-01

    We present an approach to form a microfluidic environment on top of MEMS dies using reversibly bonded microfluidics. The reversible polymeric microfluidics moulds bond to the MEMS die using a gecko-inspired gasket architecture. In this study the formed microchannels are demonstrated in conjunction with a MEMS mechanical single cell testing environment for BioMEMS applications. A reversible microfluidics placement technique with an x-y and rotational accuracy of  ±2 µm and 1° respectively on a MEMS die was developed. No leaks were observed during pneumatic pumping of common cell media (PBS, sorbitol, water, seawater) through the fluidic channels. Thermal chevron actuators were successful operated inside this fluidic environment and a performance deviation of ~15% was measured compared to an open MEMS configuration. Latex micro-spheres were pumped using traveling wave di-electrophoresis and compared to an open (no-microfluidics) configuration with velocities of 24 µm s-1 and 20 µm s-1.

  15. Microfluidics for Positron Emission Tomography Probe Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Wei Wang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Owing to increased needs for positron emission tomography (PET, high demands for a wide variety of radiolabeled compounds will have to be met by exploiting novel radiochemistry and engineering technologies to improve the production and development of PET probes. The application of microfluidic reactors to perform radiosyntheses is currently attracting a great deal of interest because of their potential to deliver many advantages over conventional labeling systems. Microfluidics-based radiochemistry can lead to the use of smaller quantities of precursors, accelerated reaction rates, and easier purification processes with greater yield and higher specific activity of desired probes. Several proof-of-principle examples along with the basics of device architecture and operation and the potential limitations of each design are discussed. Along with the concept of radioisotope distribution from centralized cyclotron facilities to individual imaging centers and laboratories (“decentralized model”, an easy-to-use, stand-alone, flexible, fully automated, radiochemical microfluidic platform can provide simpler and more cost-effective procedures for molecular imaging using PET.

  16. Architectural Prototyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob; Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2004-01-01

    ' concerns with respect to a system under development. An architectural prototype is primarily a learning and communication vehicle used to explore and experiment with alternative architectural styles, features, and patterns in order to balance different architectural qualities. The use of architectural......A major part of software architecture design is learning how specific architectural designs balance the concerns of stakeholders. We explore the notion of "architectural prototypes", correspondingly architectural prototyping, as a means of using executable prototypes to investigate stakeholders...

  17. Analysis system for characterisation of simple, low-cost microfluidic components

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smith, S

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available for performing blood cell counting, enabling the balance between function and cost to be established quantitatively. Microfluidic components for sample and reagent introduction, mixing and dispensing of fluids were investigated. A simple inlet port plugging...

  18. Enhancing single molecule imaging in optofluidics and microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasdekis, Andreas E; Laporte, Gregoire P J

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidics and optofluidics have revolutionized high-throughput analysis and chemical synthesis over the past decade. Single molecule imaging has witnessed similar growth, due to its capacity to reveal heterogeneities at high spatial and temporal resolutions. However, both resolution types are dependent on the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the image. In this paper, we review how the SNR can be enhanced in optofluidics and microfluidics. Starting with optofluidics, we outline integrated photonic structures that increase the signal emitted by single chromophores and minimize the excitation volume. Turning then to microfluidics, we review the compatible functionalization strategies that reduce noise stemming from non-specific interactions and architectures that minimize bleaching and blinking.

  19. Enhancing Single Molecule Imaging in Optofluidics and Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas E. Vasdekis

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidics and optofluidics have revolutionized high-throughput analysis and chemical synthesis over the past decade. Single molecule imaging has witnessed similar growth, due to its capacity to reveal heterogeneities at high spatial and temporal resolutions. However, both resolution types are dependent on the signal to noise ratio (SNR of the image. In this paper, we review how the SNR can be enhanced in optofluidics and microfluidics. Starting with optofluidics, we outline integrated photonic structures that increase the signal emitted by single chromophores and minimize the excitation volume. Turning then to microfluidics, we review the compatible functionalization strategies that reduce noise stemming from non-specific interactions and architectures that minimize bleaching and blinking.

  20. Centrifugal microfluidic platform for ultrasensitive detection of botulinum toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Chung-Yan; Schaff, Ulrich Y; Piccini, Matthew E; Stanker, Larry H; Cheng, Luisa W; Ravichandran, Easwaran; Singh, Bal-Ram; Sommer, Greg J; Singh, Anup K

    2015-01-20

    We present an innovative centrifugal microfluidic immunoassay platform (SpinDx) to address the urgent biodefense and public health need for ultrasensitive point-of-care/incident detection of botulinum toxin. The simple, sample-to-answer centrifugal microfluidic immunoassay approach is based on binding of toxins to antibody-laden capture particles followed by sedimentation of the particles through a density-media in a microfluidic disk and quantification by laser-induced fluorescence. A blind, head-to-head comparison study of SpinDx versus the gold-standard mouse bioassay demonstrates 100-fold improvement in sensitivity (limit of detection = 0.09 pg/mL), while achieving total sample-to-answer time of capture beads and detection antibodies) are disconnected from the disk architecture and the reader, facilitating rapid development of new assays. SpinDx can also serve as a general-purpose immunoassay platform applicable to diagnosis of other conditions and diseases.

  1. Architecture on Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Karen

    2016-01-01

    This paper will discuss the challenges faced by architectural education today. It takes as its starting point the double commitment of any school of architecture: on the one hand the task of preserving the particular knowledge that belongs to the discipline of architecture, and on the other hand...... the obligation to prepare students to perform in a profession that is largely defined by forces outside that discipline. It will be proposed that the autonomy of architecture can be understood as a unique kind of information: as architecture’s self-reliance or knowledge-about itself. A knowledge...... that is not scientific or academic but is more like a latent body of data that we find embedded in existing works of architecture. This information, it is argued, is not limited by the historical context of the work. It can be thought of as a virtual capacity – a reservoir of spatial configurations that can...

  2. Microfluidic Flame Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungas, Gregory S. (Inventor); Fisher, David J. (Inventor); Mungas, Christopher (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Propellants flow through specialized mechanical hardware that is designed for effective and safe ignition and sustained combustion of the propellants. By integrating a micro-fluidic porous media element between a propellant feed source and the combustion chamber, an effective and reliable propellant injector head may be implemented that is capable of withstanding transient combustion and detonation waves that commonly occur during an ignition event. The micro-fluidic porous media element is of specified porosity or porosity gradient selected to be appropriate for a given propellant. Additionally the propellant injector head design integrates a spark ignition mechanism that withstands extremely hot running conditions without noticeable spark mechanism degradation.

  3. Grid Architecture 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taft, Jeffrey D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The report describes work done on Grid Architecture under the auspices of the Department of Electricity Office of Electricity Delivery and Reliability in 2015. As described in the first Grid Architecture report, the primary purpose of this work is to provide stakeholder insight about grid issues so as to enable superior decision making on their part. Doing this requires the creation of various work products, including oft-times complex diagrams, analyses, and explanations. This report provides architectural insights into several important grid topics and also describes work done to advance the science of Grid Architecture as well.

  4. A robust and scalable microfluidic metering method that allows protein crystal growth by free interface diffusion

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Carl L.; Skordalakes, Emmanuel; Berger, James M.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2002-01-01

    Producing robust and scalable fluid metering in a microfluidic device is a challenging problem. We developed a scheme for metering fluids on the picoliter scale that is scalable to highly integrated parallel architectures and is independent of the properties of the working fluid. We demonstrated the power of this method by fabricating and testing a microfluidic chip for rapid screening of protein crystallization conditions, a major hurdle in structural biology efforts. The chip has 480 active...

  5. Femtolitre chemistry assisted by microfluidic pen lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, Carlos; Stylianou, Kyriakos C; Hernando, Jordi; Evangelio, Emi; Barnett, Sarah A; Nettikadan, Saju; Imaz, Inhar; Maspoch, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Chemical reactions at ultrasmall volumes are becoming increasingly necessary to study biological processes, to synthesize homogenous nanostructures and to perform high-throughput assays and combinatorial screening. Here we show that a femtolitre reaction can be realized on a surface by handling and mixing femtolitre volumes of reagents using a microfluidic stylus. This method, named microfluidic pen lithography, allows mixing reagents in isolated femtolitre droplets that can be used as reactors to conduct independent reactions and crystallization processes. This strategy overcomes the high-throughput limitations of vesicles and micelles and obviates the usually costly step of fabricating microdevices and wells. We anticipate that this process enables performing distinct reactions (acid-base, enzymatic recognition and metal-organic framework synthesis), creating multiplexed nanoscale metal-organic framework arrays, and screening combinatorial reactions to evaluate the crystallization of novel peptide-based materials.

  6. Cavity optomechanics on a microfluidic resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kyu Hyun; Lee, Wonsuk; Liu, Jing; Tomes, Matthew; Fan, Xudong; Carmon, Tal

    2012-01-01

    Light pressure is known to excite or cool vibrations in microresonators for sensing quantum-optomechanical effects and we now show that it can be explored for investigations with liquids. Currently, optical resonances are utilized to detect analytes in liquids. However, optomechanical oscillations have never been excited when devices were immersed in liquid. This is because replacing the surrounding air with water inherently increases the acoustical impedance and the associated acoustical-radiation losses. Here we fabricate a hollow optomechanical bubble resonator with water inside, and use light pressure to excite 8 MHz - 140 MHz vibrations with 1 mW optical-threshold power and >2000 mechanical Q, constituting the first time that any microfluidic system is optomechanically actuated. Bridging between optomechanics and microfluidics will enable recently developed capillaries and on-chip bubbles to vibrate via optical excitation; and allow optomechanics with non-solid material phases including bio-analytes, sup...

  7. Femtolitre chemistry assisted by microfluidic pen lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, Carlos; Stylianou, Kyriakos C.; Hernando, Jordi; Evangelio, Emi; Barnett, Sarah A.; Nettikadan, Saju; Imaz, Inhar; Maspoch, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Chemical reactions at ultrasmall volumes are becoming increasingly necessary to study biological processes, to synthesize homogenous nanostructures and to perform high-throughput assays and combinatorial screening. Here we show that a femtolitre reaction can be realized on a surface by handling and mixing femtolitre volumes of reagents using a microfluidic stylus. This method, named microfluidic pen lithography, allows mixing reagents in isolated femtolitre droplets that can be used as reactors to conduct independent reactions and crystallization processes. This strategy overcomes the high-throughput limitations of vesicles and micelles and obviates the usually costly step of fabricating microdevices and wells. We anticipate that this process enables performing distinct reactions (acid-base, enzymatic recognition and metal-organic framework synthesis), creating multiplexed nanoscale metal-organic framework arrays, and screening combinatorial reactions to evaluate the crystallization of novel peptide-based materials. PMID:23863998

  8. Three-dimensional deconvolution microfluidic microscopy using a tilted channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pégard, Nicolas C.; Fleischer, Jason W.

    2013-04-01

    We have developed a microfluidic device that enables the computation of three-dimensional (3-D) images of flowing samples. Using a microfluidic channel that is tilted along the optical axis, we record several progressively defocused images of the flowing sample as it passes across the focal plane. The resulting focal stack is then deconvolved to generate 3-D images. Experimental results on flowing yeast cells reveal both volume and surface profile information. The microfluidic channel eliminates the need for a precise translation stage to control defocusing and enables high sample throughput in an insulated, nontoxic, liquid environment. The experimental device can be implemented in all existing microscopes as a modified slide stage and is ideally suited for 3-D profiling in flow cytometers.

  9. A microfluidic platform with a free-standing perforated polymer membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Junseo; Roychowdhury, Anish; Kim, Namwon; Nikitopoulos, Dimitris E.; Lee, Wonbong; Han, Haksoo; Park, Sunggook

    2010-08-01

    A membrane architecture that facilitates access from both sides in microfluidic environments provides a flexible platform for the study of biosystems. Here, we report for the first time on a simple and low cost fabrication process via nanoimprint lithography (NIL) for a thin, fully released SU-8 membrane with perforated micro- and sub-micron pores and a modular microfluidic system integrated with the membrane. A modified NIL process which combines thermal and UV NIL was employed to define the pore structures in an SU-8 layer coated on a sacrificial layer. We have demonstrated the production of large area SU-8 membranes of as large as 4 inch diameter that are fully covered with perforated micropores. The released SU-8 membrane was easily integrated as a modular component into a microfluidic system by sandwiching the membrane between two microfluidic chips. Important aspects to reliably produce the membrane architecture such as materials selection and process conditions for fabrication are discussed. After demonstrating selective adsorption of lipid vesicles at the micropore sites of the SU-8 membrane, we have reconstituted lipid bilayers at the micropores within the microfluidic system following the method developed by Suzuki et al (2004 Lab Chip 4 502-5). This implies that the membrane architecture can potentially be used as a microfluidic platform with lipid bilayers that can sustain external mechanical stress for biophysical studies of membrane proteins.

  10. Microfluidics as a functional tool for cell mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanapalli, Siva A; Duits, Michel H G; Mugele, Frieder

    2009-01-05

    Living cells are a fascinating demonstration of nature's most intricate and well-coordinated micromechanical objects. They crawl, spread, contract, and relax-thus performing a multitude of complex mechanical functions. Alternatively, they also respond to physical and chemical cues that lead to remodeling of the cytoskeleton. To understand this intricate coupling between mechanical properties, mechanical function and force-induced biochemical signaling requires tools that are capable of both controlling and manipulating the cell microenvironment and measuring the resulting mechanical response. In this review, the power of microfluidics as a functional tool for research in cell mechanics is highlighted. In particular, current literature is discussed to show that microfluidics powered by soft lithographic techniques offers the following capabilities that are of significance for understanding the mechanical behavior of cells: (i) Microfluidics enables the creation of in vitro models of physiological environments in which cell mechanics can be probed. (ii) Microfluidics is an excellent means to deliver physical cues that affect cell mechanics, such as cell shape, fluid flow, substrate topography, and stiffness. (iii) Microfluidics can also expose cells to chemical cues, such as growth factors and drugs, which alter their mechanical behavior. Moreover, these chemical cues can be delivered either at the whole cell or subcellular level. (iv) Microfluidic devices offer the possibility of measuring the intrinsic mechanical properties of cells in a high throughput fashion. (v) Finally, microfluidic methods provide exquisite control over drop size, generation, and manipulation. As a result, droplets are being increasingly used to control the physicochemical environment of cells and as biomimetic analogs of living cells. These powerful attributes of microfluidics should further stimulate novel means of investigating the link between physicochemical cues and the biomechanical

  11. Microfluidics for medical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Albert; van den Berg, A.; Segerink, L.I.; Segerink, Loes Irene; Unknown, [Unknown

    2015-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip devices for point of care diagnostics have been present in clinics for several years now. Alongside their continual development, research is underway to bring the organs and tissue on-a-chip to the patient, amongst other medical applications of microfluidics. This book provides the

  12. Enzyme detection by microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic-implemented methods of detecting an enzyme, in particular a DNA-modifying enzyme, are provided, as well as methods for detecting a cell, or a microorganism expressing said enzyme. The enzyme is detected by providing a nucleic acid substrate, which is specifically targeted...

  13. Chemistry in Microfluidic Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Matthew C.; Sweeney, Christina M.; Odom, Teri W.

    2011-01-01

    General chemistry introduces principles such as acid-base chemistry, mixing, and precipitation that are usually demonstrated in bulk solutions. In this laboratory experiment, we describe how chemical reactions can be performed in a microfluidic channel to show advanced concepts such as laminar fluid flow and controlled precipitation. Three sets of…

  14. Enzyme detection by microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic-implemented methods of detecting an enzyme, in particular a DNA-modifying enzyme, are provided, as well as methods for detecting a cell, or a microorganism expressing said enzyme. The enzyme is detected by providing a nucleic acid substrate, which is specifically targeted...... by that enzyme...

  15. Architecture on Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Karen

    2016-01-01

    that is not scientific or academic but is more like a latent body of data that we find embedded in existing works of architecture. This information, it is argued, is not limited by the historical context of the work. It can be thought of as a virtual capacity – a reservoir of spatial configurations that can...... the obligation to prepare students to perform in a profession that is largely defined by forces outside that discipline. It will be proposed that the autonomy of architecture can be understood as a unique kind of information: as architecture’s self-reliance or knowledge-about itself. A knowledge...... be transformed and reapplied endlessly through its confrontation with shifting information from outside the realms of architecture. A selection of architects’ statements on their own work will be used to demonstrate how in quite diverse contemporary practices the re-use of existing architectures is applied...

  16. Microfluidic production of multiple emulsions and functional microcapsules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Tae Yong; Choi, Tae Min; Shim, Tae Soup; Frijns, Raoul A.M.; Kim, Shin Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in microfluidics have enabled the controlled production of multiple-emulsion drops with onion-like topology. The multiple-emulsion drops possess an intrinsic core–shell geometry, which makes them useful as templates to create microcapsules with a solid membrane. High flexibility in t

  17. PREFACE: Nano- and microfluidics Nano- and microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Karin

    2011-05-01

    The field of nano- and microfluidics emerged at the end of the 1990s parallel to the demand for smaller and smaller containers and channels for chemical, biochemical and medical applications such as blood and DNS analysis [1], gene sequencing or proteomics [2, 3]. Since then, new journals and conferences have been launched and meanwhile, about two decades later, a variety of microfluidic applications are on the market. Briefly, 'the small flow becomes mainstream' [4]. Nevertheless, research in nano- and microfluidics is more than downsizing the spatial dimensions. For liquids on the nanoscale, surface and interface phenomena grow in importance and may even dominate the behavior in some systems. The studies collected in this special issue all concentrate on these type of systems and were part ot the priority programme SPP1164 'Nano- and Microfluidics' of the German Science Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG). The priority programme was initiated in 2002 by Hendrik Kuhlmann and myself and was launched in 2004. Friction between a moving liquid and a solid wall may, for instance, play an important role so that the usual assumption of a no-slip boundary condition is no longer valid. Likewise, the dynamic deformations of soft objects like polymers, vesicles or capsules in flow arise from the subtle interplay between the (visco-)elasticity of the object and the viscous stresses in the surrounding fluid and, potentially, the presence of structures confining the flow like channels. Consequently, new theories were developed ( see articles in this issue by Münch and Wagner, Falk and Mecke, Bonthuis et al, Finken et al, Almenar and Rauscher, Straube) and experiments were set up to unambiguously demonstrate deviations from bulk, or 'macro', behavior (see articles in this issue by Wolff et al, Vinogradova and Belyaev, Hahn et al, Seemann et al, Grüner and Huber, Müller-Buschbaum et al, Gutsche et al, Braunmüller et al, Laube et al, Brücker, Nottebrock et al

  18. Droplet microfluidics based microseparation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhiliang; Niu, Menglei; Zhang, Bo

    2012-06-01

    Lab on a chip (LOC) technology is a promising miniaturization approach. The feature that it significantly reduced sample consumption makes great sense in analytical and bioanalytical chemistry. Since the start of LOC technology, much attention has been focused on continuous flow microfluidic systems. At the turn of the century, droplet microfluidics, which was also termed segmented flow microfluidics, was introduced. Droplet microfluidics employs two immiscible phases to form discrete droplets, which are ideal vessels with confined volume, restricted dispersion, limited cross-contamination, and high surface area. Due to these unique features, droplet microfluidics proves to be a versatile tool in microscale sample handling. This article reviews the utility of droplet microfluidics in microanalytical systems with an emphasize on separation science, including sample encapsulation at ultra-small volume, compartmentalization of separation bands, isolation of droplet contents, and related detection techniques.

  19. Microfluidic Biosensing Systems Using Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz Keplinger

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been rapidly growing interest in developing hand held, sensitive and cost-effective on-chip biosensing systems that directly translate the presence of certain bioanalytes (e.g., biomolecules, cells and viruses into an electronic signal. The impressive and rapid progress in micro- and nanotechnology as well as in biotechnology enables the integration of a variety of analytical functions in a single chip. All necessary sample handling and analysis steps are then performed within the chip. Microfluidic systems for biomedical analysis usually consist of a set of units, which guarantees the manipulation, detection and recognition of bioanalytes in a reliable and flexible manner. Additionally, the use of magnetic fields for performing the aforementioned tasks has been steadily gaining interest. This is because magnetic fields can be well tuned and applied either externally or from a directly integrated solution in the biosensing system. In combination with these applied magnetic fields, magnetic nanoparticles are utilized. Some of the merits of magnetic nanoparticles are the possibility of manipulating them inside microfluidic channels by utilizing high gradient magnetic fields, their detection by integrated magnetic microsensors, and their flexibility due to functionalization by means of surface modification and specific binding. Their multi-functionality is what makes them ideal candidates as the active component in miniaturized on-chip biosensing systems. In this review, focus will be given to the type of biosening systems that use microfluidics in combination with magnetoresistive sensors and detect the presence of bioanalyte tagged with magnetic nanoparticles.

  20. Microfluidic biosensing systems using magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giouroudi, Ioanna; Keplinger, Franz

    2013-09-09

    In recent years, there has been rapidly growing interest in developing hand held, sensitive and cost-effective on-chip biosensing systems that directly translate the presence of certain bioanalytes (e.g., biomolecules, cells and viruses) into an electronic signal. The impressive and rapid progress in micro- and nanotechnology as well as in biotechnology enables the integration of a variety of analytical functions in a single chip. All necessary sample handling and analysis steps are then performed within the chip. Microfluidic systems for biomedical analysis usually consist of a set of units, which guarantees the manipulation, detection and recognition of bioanalytes in a reliable and flexible manner. Additionally, the use of magnetic fields for performing the aforementioned tasks has been steadily gaining interest. This is because magnetic fields can be well tuned and applied either externally or from a directly integrated solution in the biosensing system. In combination with these applied magnetic fields, magnetic nanoparticles are utilized. Some of the merits of magnetic nanoparticles are the possibility of manipulating them inside microfluidic channels by utilizing high gradient magnetic fields, their detection by integrated magnetic microsensors, and their flexibility due to functionalization by means of surface modification and specific binding. Their multi-functionality is what makes them ideal candidates as the active component in miniaturized on-chip biosensing systems. In this review, focus will be given to the type of biosening systems that use microfluidics in combination with magnetoresistive sensors and detect the presence of bioanalyte tagged with magnetic nanoparticles.

  1. Micromagnetic-microfluidic blood cleansing device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Chong Wing; Fiering, Jason; Mueller, Andrew J; Ingber, Donald E

    2009-05-07

    Sepsis is a lethal disease caused by a systemic microbial infection that spreads via the bloodstream to overwhelm the body's defenses. Current therapeutic approaches are often suboptimal, in part, because they do not fully eliminate the pathogen, and hence the source of deadly toxins. Here we describe an extracorporeal blood cleansing device to selectively remove pathogens from contaminated blood and thereby enhance the patient's response to antibiotic therapy. Immunomagnetic microbeads were modified to create magnetic opsonins that were used to cleanse flowing human whole blood of Candida albicans fungi, a leading cause of sepsis-related deaths. The micromagnetic-microfluidic blood cleansing device generates magnetic field gradients across vertically stacked channels to enable continuous and high throughput separation of fungi from flowing whole blood. A multiplexed version of the device containing four parallel channels achieved over 80% clearance of fungi from contaminated blood at a flow rate of 20 mL/h in a single pass, a rate 1000 times faster than a previously described prototype micromagnetic-microfluidic cell separation system. These results provide the first proof-of-principle that a multiplexed micromagnetic-microfluidic separation system can be used to cleanse pathogens from flowing human blood at a rate and separation efficiency that is relevant for clinical applications.

  2. Efficient microfluidic photocatalysis in a symmetrical metal-cladding waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shu; Dai, Hailang; Jiang, Bei; Shen, Zhenhua; Chen, Xianfeng

    2016-02-14

    In this paper, a symmetrical metal-cladding optical waveguide based microfluidic chip with a self-organized and free-standing TiO2 nanotube membrane was utilized to perform efficient photocatalysis. The chip has a microchannel bonded with TiO2 nanotube coated glass. The employment of microfluidic chip for hydrolysis reaction can enable the transfer of mass and photons. Moreover, the incorporation of the double metal-cladding waveguide enhances the light-matter interaction and effectively improves the efficiency of photocatalysis.

  3. Microfluidic Production of Multiple Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran T. Vladisavljević

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidic devices are promising tools for the production of monodispersed tuneable complex emulsions. This review highlights the advantages of microfluidics for the fabrication of emulsions and presents an overview of the microfluidic emulsification methods including two-step and single-step methods for the fabrication of high-order multiple emulsions (double, triple, quadruple and quintuple and emulsions with multiple and/or multi-distinct inner cores. The microfluidic methods for the formation of multiple emulsion drops with ultra-thin middle phase, multi-compartment jets, and Janus and ternary drops composed of two or three distinct surface regions are also presented. Different configurations of microfluidic drop makers are covered, such as co-flow, T-junctions and flow focusing (both planar and three-dimensional (3D. Furthermore, surface modifications of microfluidic channels and different modes of droplet generation are summarized. Non-confined microfluidic geometries used for buoyancy-driven drop generation and membrane integrated microfluidics are also discussed. The review includes parallelization and drop splitting strategies for scaling up microfluidic emulsification. The productivity of a single drop maker is typically <1 mL/h; thus, more than 1000 drop makers are needed to achieve commercially relevant droplet throughputs of >1 L/h, which requires combining drop makers into twodimensional (2D and 3D assemblies fed from a single set of inlet ports through a network of distribution and collection channels.

  4. Methods of making microfluidic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Buttner, Ulrich

    2017-06-01

    Microfluidics has advanced in terms of designs and structures, however, fabrication methods are either time consuming or expensive to produce, in terms of the facilities and equipment needed. A fast and economically viable method is provided to allow, for example, research groups to have access to microfluidic fabrication. Unlike most fabrication methods, a method is provided to fabricate a microfluidic device in one step. In an embodiment, a resolution of 50 micrometers was achieved by using maskless high-resolution digital light projection (MDLP). Bonding and channel fabrication of complex or simple structures can be rapidly incorporated to fabricate the microfluidic devices.

  5. Microfluidic bubble logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Manu; Gershenfeld, Neil

    2007-02-09

    We demonstrate universal computation in an all-fluidic two-phase microfluidic system. Nonlinearity is introduced into an otherwise linear, reversible, low-Reynolds number flow via bubble-to-bubble hydrodynamic interactions. A bubble traveling in a channel represents a bit, providing us with the capability to simultaneously transport materials and perform logical control operations. We demonstrate bubble logic AND/OR/NOT gates, a toggle flip-flop, a ripple counter, timing restoration, a ring oscillator, and an electro-bubble modulator. These show the nonlinearity, gain, bistability, synchronization, cascadability, feedback, and programmability required for scalable universal computation. With increasing complexity in large-scale microfluidic processors, bubble logic provides an on-chip process control mechanism integrating chemistry and computation.

  6. The Microfluidic Jukebox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Say Hwa; Maes, Florine; Semin, Benoît; Vrignon, Jérémy; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2014-04-01

    Music is a form of art interweaving people of all walks of life. Through subtle changes in frequencies, a succession of musical notes forms a melody which is capable of mesmerizing the minds of people. With the advances in technology, we are now able to generate music electronically without relying solely on physical instruments. Here, we demonstrate a musical interpretation of droplet-based microfluidics as a form of novel electronic musical instruments. Using the interplay of electric field and hydrodynamics in microfluidic devices, well controlled frequency patterns corresponding to musical tracks are generated in real time. This high-speed modulation of droplet frequency (and therefore of droplet sizes) may also provide solutions that reconciles high-throughput droplet production and the control of individual droplet at production which is needed for many biochemical or material synthesis applications.

  7. Microfluidic redox battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Wook; Goulet, Marc-Antoni; Kjeang, Erik

    2013-07-01

    A miniaturized microfluidic battery is proposed, which is the first membraneless redox battery demonstrated to date. This unique concept capitalizes on dual-pass flow-through porous electrodes combined with stratified, co-laminar flow to generate electrical power on-chip. The fluidic design is symmetric to allow for both charging and discharging operations in forward, reverse, and recirculation modes. The proof-of-concept device fabricated using low-cost materials integrated in a microfluidic chip is shown to produce competitive power levels when operated on a vanadium redox electrolyte. A complete charge/discharge cycle is performed to demonstrate its operation as a rechargeable battery, which is an important step towards providing sustainable power to lab-on-a-chip and microelectronic applications.

  8. Robot Electronics Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Michael; Magnone, Lee; Aghazarian, Hrand; Baumgartner, Eric; Kennedy, Brett

    2008-01-01

    An electronics architecture has been developed to enable the rapid construction and testing of prototypes of robotic systems. This architecture is designed to be a research vehicle of great stability, reliability, and versatility. A system according to this architecture can easily be reconfigured (including expanded or contracted) to satisfy a variety of needs with respect to input, output, processing of data, sensing, actuation, and power. The architecture affords a variety of expandable input/output options that enable ready integration of instruments, actuators, sensors, and other devices as independent modular units. The separation of different electrical functions onto independent circuit boards facilitates the development of corresponding simple and modular software interfaces. As a result, both hardware and software can be made to expand or contract in modular fashion while expending a minimum of time and effort.

  9. Flexible packaging of solid-state integrated circuit chips with elastomeric microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bowei; Dong, Quan; Korman, Can E.; Li, Zhenyu; Zaghloul, Mona E.

    2013-01-01

    A flexible technology is proposed to integrate smart electronics and microfluidics all embedded in an elastomer package. The microfluidic channels are used to deliver both liquid samples and liquid metals to the integrated circuits (ICs). The liquid metals are used to realize electrical interconnects to the IC chip. This avoids the traditional IC packaging challenges, such as wire-bonding and flip-chip bonding, which are not compatible with current microfluidic technologies. As a demonstration we integrated a CMOS magnetic sensor chip and associate microfluidic channels on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate that allows precise delivery of small liquid samples to the sensor. Furthermore, the packaged system is fully functional under bending curvature radius of one centimetre and uniaxial strain of 15%. The flexible integration of solid-state ICs with microfluidics enables compact flexible electronic and lab-on-a-chip systems, which hold great potential for wearable health monitoring, point-of-care diagnostics and environmental sensing among many other applications.

  10. Flexible packaging of solid-state integrated circuit chips with elastomeric microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bowei; Dong, Quan; Korman, Can E.; Li, Zhenyu; Zaghloul, Mona E.

    2013-01-01

    A flexible technology is proposed to integrate smart electronics and microfluidics all embedded in an elastomer package. The microfluidic channels are used to deliver both liquid samples and liquid metals to the integrated circuits (ICs). The liquid metals are used to realize electrical interconnects to the IC chip. This avoids the traditional IC packaging challenges, such as wire-bonding and flip-chip bonding, which are not compatible with current microfluidic technologies. As a demonstration we integrated a CMOS magnetic sensor chip and associate microfluidic channels on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate that allows precise delivery of small liquid samples to the sensor. Furthermore, the packaged system is fully functional under bending curvature radius of one centimetre and uniaxial strain of 15%. The flexible integration of solid-state ICs with microfluidics enables compact flexible electronic and lab-on-a-chip systems, which hold great potential for wearable health monitoring, point-of-care diagnostics and environmental sensing among many other applications.

  11. A review on continuous-flow microfluidic PCR in droplets: Advances, challenges and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yonghao; Jiang, Hui-Rong

    2016-03-31

    Significant advances have been made in developing microfluidic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) devices in the last two decades. More recently, microfluidic microdroplet technology has been exploited to perform PCR in droplets because of its unique features. For example, it can prevent crossover contamination and PCR inhibition, is suitable for single-cell and single-molecule analyses, and has the potential for system integration and automation. This review will therefore focus on recent developments on droplet-based continuous-flow microfluidic PCR, and the major research challenges. This paper will also discuss a new way of on-chip flow control and a rational design simulation tool, which are required to underpin fully integrated and automated droplet-based microfluidic systems. We will conclude with a scientific speculation of future autonomous scientific discoveries enabled by microfluidic microdroplet technologies.

  12. Droplet based microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, Ralf; Brinkmann, Martin; Pfohl, Thomas; Herminghaus, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Droplet based microfluidics is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary field of research combining soft matter physics, biochemistry and microsystems engineering. Its applications range from fast analytical systems or the synthesis of advanced materials to protein crystallization and biological assays for living cells. Precise control of droplet volumes and reliable manipulation of individual droplets such as coalescence, mixing of their contents, and sorting in combination with fast analysis tools allow us to perform chemical reactions inside the droplets under defined conditions. In this paper, we will review available drop generation and manipulation techniques. The main focus of this review is not to be comprehensive and explain all techniques in great detail but to identify and shed light on similarities and underlying physical principles. Since geometry and wetting properties of the microfluidic channels are crucial factors for droplet generation, we also briefly describe typical device fabrication methods in droplet based microfluidics. Examples of applications and reaction schemes which rely on the discussed manipulation techniques are also presented, such as the fabrication of special materials and biophysical experiments.

  13. Droplet based microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, Ralf; Brinkmann, Martin; Pfohl, Thomas; Herminghaus, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Droplet based microfluidics is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary field of research combining soft matter physics, biochemistry and microsystems engineering. Its applications range from fast analytical systems or the synthesis of advanced materials to protein crystallization and biological assays for living cells. Precise control of droplet volumes and reliable manipulation of individual droplets such as coalescence, mixing of their contents, and sorting in combination with fast analysis tools allow us to perform chemical reactions inside the droplets under defined conditions. In this paper, we will review available drop generation and manipulation techniques. The main focus of this review is not to be comprehensive and explain all techniques in great detail but to identify and shed light on similarities and underlying physical principles. Since geometry and wetting properties of the microfluidic channels are crucial factors for droplet generation, we also briefly describe typical device fabrication methods in droplet based microfluidics. Examples of applications and reaction schemes which rely on the discussed manipulation techniques are also presented, such as the fabrication of special materials and biophysical experiments.

  14. Microfluidic desalination. Capacitive deionization on chip for microfluidic sample preparation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, Susan Helena

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of the work described in this thesis is to implement the desalination technique capacitive deionization (CDI) on a microfluidic chip to improve the reproducibility in the analysis of biological samples for drug development. Secondly, microfluidic CDI allows for the in situ study of ion

  15. Architectural slicing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2013-01-01

    a system and a slicing criterion, architectural slicing produces an architectural prototype that contain the elements in the architecture that are dependent on the ele- ments in the slicing criterion. Furthermore, we present an initial design and implementation of an architectural slicer for Java.......Architectural prototyping is a widely used practice, con- cerned with taking architectural decisions through experiments with light- weight implementations. However, many architectural decisions are only taken when systems are already (partially) implemented. This is prob- lematic in the context...... of architectural prototyping since experiments with full systems are complex and expensive and thus architectural learn- ing is hindered. In this paper, we propose a novel technique for harvest- ing architectural prototypes from existing systems, \\architectural slic- ing", based on dynamic program slicing. Given...

  16. Architectural Slicing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2013-01-01

    a system and a slicing criterion, architectural slicing produces an architectural prototype that contain the elements in the architecture that are dependent on the ele- ments in the slicing criterion. Furthermore, we present an initial design and implementation of an architectural slicer for Java.......Architectural prototyping is a widely used practice, con- cerned with taking architectural decisions through experiments with light- weight implementations. However, many architectural decisions are only taken when systems are already (partially) implemented. This is prob- lematic in the context...... of architectural prototyping since experiments with full systems are complex and expensive and thus architectural learn- ing is hindered. In this paper, we propose a novel technique for harvest- ing architectural prototypes from existing systems, \\architectural slic- ing", based on dynamic program slicing. Given...

  17. An architecture for integration of multidisciplinary models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belete, Getachew F.; Voinov, Alexey; Holst, Niels

    2014-01-01

    , Enterprise Application Integration, and Integration Design Patterns. We developed an architecture of a multidisciplinary model integration framework that brings these three aspects of integration together. Service-oriented-based platform independent architecture that enables to establish loosely coupled...

  18. Micro-scale and microfluidic devices for neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Anne M; Jeon, Noo Li

    2010-10-01

    The precise spatial and temporal control afforded by microfluidic devices make them uniquely suited as experimental tools for cellular neuroscience. Micro-structures have been developed to direct the placement of cells and small organisms within a device. Microfluidics can precisely define pharmacological microenvironments, mimicking conditions found in vivo with the advantage of defined parameters which are usually difficult to control and manipulate in vivo. These devices are compatible with high-resolution microscopy, are simple to assemble, and are reproducible. In this review we will focus on microfluidic devices that have recently been developed for small, whole organisms such as C. elegans and dissociated cultured neurons. These devices have improved control over the placement of cells or organisms and allowed unprecedented experimental access, enabling novel investigations in neurobiology.

  19. Evaluation of microfluidic channels with optical coherence tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Czajkowski, J.

    2010-06-25

    Application of time domain, ultra high resolution optical coherence tomography (UHR-OCT) in evaluation of microfluidic channels is demonstrated. Presented study was done using experimental UHR-OCT device based on a Kerr-lens mode locked Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser, a photonic crystal fibre and modified, free-space Michelson interferometer. To show potential of the technique, microfluidic chip fabricated by VTT Center for Printed Intelligence (Oulu, Finland) was measured. Ability for full volumetric reconstruction in non-contact manner enabled complete characterization of closed entity of a microfluidic channel without contamination and harm for the sample. Measurement, occurring problems, and methods of postprocessing for raw data are described. Results present completely resolved physical structure of the channel, its spatial dimensions, draft angles and evaluation of lamination quality.

  20. Droplet microfluidics--a tool for single-cell analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joensson, Haakan N; Andersson Svahn, Helene

    2012-12-03

    Droplet microfluidics allows the isolation of single cells and reagents in monodisperse picoliter liquid capsules and manipulations at a throughput of thousands of droplets per second. These qualities allow many of the challenges in single-cell analysis to be overcome. Monodispersity enables quantitative control of solute concentrations, while encapsulation in droplets provides an isolated compartment for the single cell and its immediate environment. The high throughput allows the processing and analysis of the tens of thousands to millions of cells that must be analyzed to accurately describe a heterogeneous cell population so as to find rare cell types or access sufficient biological space to find hits in a directed evolution experiment. The low volumes of the droplets make very large screens economically viable. This Review gives an overview of the current state of single-cell analysis involving droplet microfluidics and offers examples where droplet microfluidics can further biological understanding.

  1. Using Microfluidics for Droplet and Particle Characterization of Environmental Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Andrew; Hogan, Chris; Dutcher, Cari

    2016-11-01

    Two-phase flows in microfluidic platforms enable high-throughput experiments for measurement of rheological, thermodynamic, and kinetic interfacial properties. In this talk, I will highlight biphasic microfluidic studies with environmental applications, including atmospheric aerosol properties and water contamination. For example, the fate of atmospheric aerosol particles can be profoundly affected by the presence of surface-active species within the aerosol liquid. In this work, the presence of these species is detected with microfluidic interfacial tensiometry, in which the behavior of the droplet interface under extensional shear is measured. Both secondary organic aerosol chemical mimics and aerosol filter extracts are used in droplet generation. In addition, preliminary work for use of the platform for water treatment applications will be highlighted. Particulate contamination in water can be detected by freezing contaminated droplets at different temperatures to study the perturbed thermodynamic state.

  2. On-chip Microfluidic Multimodal Swimmer toward 3D Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbot, Antoine; Decanini, Dominique; Hwang, Gilgueng

    2016-01-01

    Mobile microrobots have a promising future in various applications. These include targeted drug delivery, local measurement, biopsy or microassembly. Studying mobile microrobots inside microfluidics is an essential step towards such applications. But in this environment that was not designed for the robot, integration process and propulsion robustness still pose technological challenges. In this paper, we present a helical microrobot with three different motions, designed to achieve these goals. These motions are rolling, spintop motion and swimming. Through these multiple motions, microrobots are able to selectively integrate a chip through a microfluidic channel. This enables them to perform propulsion characterizations, 3D (Three Dimensional) maneuverability, particle cargo transport manipulation and exit from the chip. The microrobot selective integration inside microfluidics could lead to various in-vitro biologic or in-vivo biomedical applications.

  3. Architecture as liminal Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilly Harag

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The point of departure of the architectural project has to stem from the combination of inner and outer journeys in between the real or imagined limits. The pressing challenge is to destabilize the neat division of architecture into separate bodies of knowledge and pose the architect’s mode of action on the threshold between the concrete and the universal. Architecture is a lens, an instrument one looks through to bring new perspectives into focus, enabling the transformation of experience from a magnified self-concentrated space to a wide horizon. Architecture narrates relations between spaces and examines its validity through signifying practices of design. Design for itself becomes the language of the current, of the immediate fashion. Architecture can fulfill peoples’ dreams and miraculously can provide them tools to invent new ones: Curiosity is the first motive to act.

  4. Path to Low Cost Microfluidics

    CERN Document Server

    Govyadinov, Alexander N; Kornilovitch, Pavel; Markel, David

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes a novel concept for a low cost microfluidic platform utilizing materials and processes used in low cost thermal inkjet printing. The concept re-purposes the jetting elements to create pumps, mixers, and valves all necessary components for the transport of fluids in a broad range of microfluidic applications.

  5. Microfluidic devices for biological applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Potgieter, S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available , faster reaction times and process-specific designs. A microfluidic system typically consists of a series of channels with components like pumps, valves and actuators to control the flow of fluids. One of the applications being worked on is a microfluidic...

  6. Centrifugal microfluidics for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorkin, Robert; Park, Jiwoon; Siegrist, Jonathan; Amasia, Mary; Lee, Beom Seok; Park, Jong-Myeon; Kim, Jintae; Kim, Hanshin; Madou, Marc; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung

    2010-07-21

    The centrifugal microfluidic platform has been a focus of academic and industrial research efforts for almost 40 years. Primarily targeting biomedical applications, a range of assays have been adapted on the system; however, the platform has found limited commercial success as a research or clinical tool. Nonetheless, new developments in centrifugal microfluidic technologies have the potential to establish wide-spread utilization of the platform. This paper presents an in-depth review of the centrifugal microfluidic platform, while highlighting recent progress in the field and outlining the potential for future applications. An overview of centrifugal microfluidic technologies is presented, including descriptions of advantages of the platform as a microfluidic handling system and the principles behind centrifugal fluidic manipulation. The paper also discusses a history of significant centrifugal microfluidic platform developments with an explanation of the evolution of the platform as it pertains to academia and industry. Lastly, we review the few centrifugal microfluidic-based sample-to-answer analysis systems shown to date and examine the challenges to be tackled before the centrifugal platform can be more broadly accepted as a new diagnostic platform. In particular, fully integrated, easy to operate, inexpensive and accurate microfluidic tools in the area of in vitro nucleic acid diagnostics are discussed.

  7. Acoustofluidics 1: Governing equations in microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruus, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Governing equations for microfluidics and basic flow solutions are presented. Equivalent circuit modeling for determining flow rates in microfluidic networks is introduced.......Governing equations for microfluidics and basic flow solutions are presented. Equivalent circuit modeling for determining flow rates in microfluidic networks is introduced....

  8. A robust and scalable microfluidic metering method that allows protein crystal growth by free interface diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Carl L.; Skordalakes, Emmanuel; Berger, James M.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2002-12-01

    Producing robust and scalable fluid metering in a microfluidic device is a challenging problem. We developed a scheme for metering fluids on the picoliter scale that is scalable to highly integrated parallel architectures and is independent of the properties of the working fluid. We demonstrated the power of this method by fabricating and testing a microfluidic chip for rapid screening of protein crystallization conditions, a major hurdle in structural biology efforts. The chip has 480 active valves and performs 144 parallel reactions, each of which uses only 10 nl of protein sample. The properties of microfluidic mixing allow an efficient kinetic trajectory for crystallization, and the microfluidic device outperforms conventional techniques by detecting more crystallization conditions while using 2 orders of magnitude less protein sample. We demonstrate that diffraction-quality crystals may be grown and harvested from such nanoliter-volume reactions.

  9. A robust and scalable microfluidic metering method that allows protein crystal growth by free interface diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Carl L.; Skordalakes, Emmanuel; Berger, James M.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2002-01-01

    Producing robust and scalable fluid metering in a microfluidic device is a challenging problem. We developed a scheme for metering fluids on the picoliter scale that is scalable to highly integrated parallel architectures and is independent of the properties of the working fluid. We demonstrated the power of this method by fabricating and testing a microfluidic chip for rapid screening of protein crystallization conditions, a major hurdle in structural biology efforts. The chip has 480 active valves and performs 144 parallel reactions, each of which uses only 10 nl of protein sample. The properties of microfluidic mixing allow an efficient kinetic trajectory for crystallization, and the microfluidic device outperforms conventional techniques by detecting more crystallization conditions while using 2 orders of magnitude less protein sample. We demonstrate that diffraction-quality crystals may be grown and harvested from such nanoliter-volume reactions. PMID:12486223

  10. Online Synthesis for Error Recovery in Digital Microfluidic Biochips with Operation Variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alistar, Mirela; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan

    2012-01-01

    , but as discrete droplets. Researchers have presented approaches for the synthesis of digital microfluidic biochips, which, starting from a biochemical application and a given biochip architecture, determine the allocation, resource binding, scheduling, placement and routing of the operations in the application......Microfluidic-based biochips are replacing the conventional biochemical analyzers, and are able to integrate on-chip all the necessary functions for biochemical analysis using microfluidics. The digital microfluidic biochips are based on the manipulation of liquids not as a continuous flow....... The droplet volumes can vary erroneously due to parametric faults, thus impacting negatively the correctness of the application. Researchers have proposed approaches that synthesize offline predetermined recovery subroutines, which are activated online when errors occur. In this paper, we propose an online...

  11. Synthesis of biochemical applications on digital microfluidic biochips with operation variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alistar, Mirela; Maftei, Elena; Pop, Paul

    2010-01-01

    , but as discrete droplets. Researchers have presented approaches for the synthesis of digital microfluidic biochips, which, starting from a biochemical application and a given biochip architecture, determine the allocation, resource binding, scheduling and placement of the operations in the application. Existing......Microfluidic-based biochips are replacing the conventional biochemical analyzers, and are able to integrate on-chip all the necessary functions for biochemical analysis using microfluidics. The digital microfluidic biochips are based on the manipulation of liquids not as a continuous flow...... approaches consider that on-chip operations, such as splitting a droplet of liquid, are perfect. However, these operations have variability margins, which can impact the correctness of the biochemical application.We consider that a split operation, which goes beyond specified variability bounds, is faulty...

  12. Architectural Prototyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob; Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2004-01-01

    A major part of software architecture design is learning how specific architectural designs balance the concerns of stakeholders. We explore the notion of "architectural prototypes", correspondingly architectural prototyping, as a means of using executable prototypes to investigate stakeholders......' concerns with respect to a system under development. An architectural prototype is primarily a learning and communication vehicle used to explore and experiment with alternative architectural styles, features, and patterns in order to balance different architectural qualities. The use of architectural...... prototypes in the development process is discussed, and we argue that such prototypes can play a role throughout the entire process. The use of architectural prototypes is illustrated by three distinct cases of creating software systems. We argue that architectural prototyping can provide key insights...

  13. Architectural prototyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2004-01-01

    A major part of software architecture design is learning how specific architectural designs balance the concerns of stakeholders. We explore the notion of "architectural prototypes", correspondingly architectural prototyping, as a means of using executable prototypes to investigate stakeholders......' concerns with respect to a system under development. An architectural prototype is primarily a learning and communication vehicle used to explore and experiment with alternative architectural styles, features, and patterns in order to balance different architectural qualities. The use of architectural...... prototypes in the development process is discussed, and we argue that such prototypes can play a role throughout the entire process. The use of architectural prototypes is illustrated by three distinct cases of creating software systems. We argue that architectural prototyping can provide key insights...

  14. A disposable and multifunctional capsule for easy operation of microfluidic elastomer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorslund, Sara; Nguyen, Hugo; Läräng, Thomas; Barkefors, Irmeli; Kreuger, Johan

    2011-12-01

    The global lab-on-chip and microfluidic markets for cell-based assays have been predicted to grow considerably, as novel microfluidic systems enable cell biologists to perform in vitro experiments at an unprecedented level of experimental control. Nevertheless, microfluidic assays must, in order to compete with conventional assays, be made available at easily affordable costs, and in addition be made simple to operate for users having no previous experience with microfluidics. We have to this end developed a multifunctional microfluidic capsule that can be mass-produced at low cost in thermoplastic material. The capsule enables straightforward operation of elastomer inserts of optional design, here exemplified with insert designs for molecular gradient formation in microfluidic cell culture systems. The integrated macro-micro interface of the capsule ensures reliable connection of the elastomer fluidic structures to an external perfusion system. A separate compartment in the capsule filled with superabsorbent material is used for internal waste absorption. The capsule assembly process is made easy by integrated snap-fits, and samples within the closed capsule can be analyzed using both inverted and upright microscopes. Taken together, the capsule concept presented here could help accelerate the use of microfluidic-based biological assays in the life science sector.

  15. MICROFLUIDIC COMPONENT CAPABLE OF SELF-SEALING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    A microfluidic component (100) for building a microfluidic system is provided. The microfluidic component (100) can be mounted on a microf luidic breadboard (202) in a manner that allows it to be connected to other microfluidic components (204, 206) without the requirement of additional devices....... The microfluidic component (100) comprises at least one flexible tube piece (102) for transporting a fluid. The microfluidic component (100) also comprises means for applying and maintaining pressure (104) between the flexible tube piece (102) and a tube piece (208, 210) housed in another microfluidic component...

  16. Digitally-Driven Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henriette Bier

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The shift from mechanical to digital forces architects to reposition themselves: Architects generate digital information, which can be used not only in designing and fabricating building components but also in embedding behaviours into buildings. This implies that, similar to the way that industrial design and fabrication with its concepts of standardisation and serial production influenced modernist architecture, digital design and fabrication influences contemporary architecture. While standardisation focused on processes of rationalisation of form, mass-customisation as a new paradigm that replaces mass-production, addresses non-standard, complex, and flexible designs. Furthermore, knowledge about the designed object can be encoded in digital data pertaining not just to the geometry of a design but also to its physical or other behaviours within an environment. Digitally-driven architecture implies, therefore, not only digitally-designed and fabricated architecture, it also implies architecture – built form – that can be controlled, actuated, and animated by digital means.In this context, this sixth Footprint issue examines the influence of digital means as pragmatic and conceptual instruments for actuating architecture. The focus is not so much on computer-based systems for the development of architectural designs, but on architecture incorporating digital control, sens­ing, actuating, or other mechanisms that enable buildings to inter­act with their users and surroundings in real time in the real world through physical or sensory change and variation.

  17. Hybrid integrated PDMS microfluidics with a silica capillary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimov, Ivan K; Riaz, Asif; Ducrée, Jens; Lee, Luke P

    2010-06-07

    To harness the properties of both PDMS and silica, we have demonstrated hybrid integrated PDMS microfluidic systems with fused silica capillaries. The hybrid integrated PDMS microfluidics and silica capillary (iPSC) modules exhibit a novel architecture and method for leakage free CE sample injection merely requiring a single high voltage source and one pair of electrodes. The use of the iPSC device is based on a modular approach which allows the capillary to be reused extensively whilst replacing the attached fluidic module for different experiments. Integrating fused silica capillaries with PDMS microfluidic modules allows the direct application of a wide variety of well established conventional CE protocols for separations of complex analytes. Furthermore it bears the potential for facile coupling to standard electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), letting users focus on the sample analysis rather than the development of new separation protocols. The fabrication of the iPSC module consists of a simple and quick three-step method that submerges a fused silica capillary in PDMS prepolymer. After cross linking the prepolymer and punching the inlets, the iPSC module layer can be mounted onto a microfluidic device for CE separation.

  18. A Microfluidic DNA Sensor Based on Three-Dimensional (3D Hierarchical MoS2/Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahou Yang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present a novel microfluidic biosensor for sensitive fluorescence detection of DNA based on 3D architectural MoS2/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT nanocomposites. The proposed platform exhibits a high sensitivity, selectivity, and stability with a visible manner and operation simplicity. The excellent fluorescence quenching stability of a MoS2/MWCNT aqueous solution coupled with microfluidics will greatly simplify experimental steps and reduce time for large-scale DNA detection.

  19. Using a microfluidic device for high-content analysis of cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Raymond; Wang, Chiaochun Joanne; Levchenko, Andre

    2009-06-16

    Quantitative analysis and understanding of signaling networks require measurements of the location and activities of key proteins over time, at the level of single cells, in response to various perturbations. Microfluidic devices enable such analyses to be conducted in a high-throughput and in a highly controlled manner. We describe in detail how to design and use a microfluidic device to perform such information-rich experiments.

  20. Microfluidic Scintillation Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Microfluidic scintillation detectors are devices of recent introduction for the detection of high energy particles, developed within the EP-DT group at CERN. Most of the interest for such technology comes from the use of liquid scintillators, which entails the possibility of changing the active material in the detector, leading to an increased radiation resistance. This feature, together with the high spatial resolution and low thickness deriving from the microfabrication techniques used to manufacture such devices, is desirable not only in instrumentation for high energy physics experiments but also in medical detectors such as beam monitors for hadron therapy.

  1. Rapid manufacturing for microfluidics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Land, K

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available . Microfluidics is at the forefront of developing solutions for drug discovery, diagnostics (from glucose tests to malaria and TB testing) and environmental diagnostics (E-coli monitoring of drinking water). In order to quickly implement new designs, a rapid... stream_source_info Land_2012.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 2089 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Land_2012.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Rapid manufacturing...

  2. Microfluidic Cell Culture Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Shuichi (Inventor); Cabrera, Lourdes Marcella (Inventor); Heo, Yun Seok (Inventor); Smith, Gary Daniel (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic devices for cell culturing and methods for using the same are disclosed. One device includes a substrate and membrane. The substrate includes a reservoir in fluid communication with a passage. A bio-compatible fluid may be added to the reservoir and passage. The reservoir is configured to receive and retain at least a portion of a cell mass. The membrane acts as a barrier to evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid from the passage. A cover fluid may be added to cover the bio-compatible fluid to prevent evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid.

  3. Spatial manipulation with microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eLin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical gradients convey information through space, time, and concentration, and are ultimately capable of spatially resolving distinct cellular phenotypes, such as differentiation, proliferation, and migration. How these gradients develop, evolve, and function during development, homeostasis, and various disease states is a subject of intense interest across a variety of disciplines. Microfluidic technologies have become essential tools for investigating gradient sensing in vitro due to their ability to precisely manipulate fluids on demand in well controlled environments at cellular length scales. This minireview will highlight their utility for studying gradient sensing along with relevant applications to biology.

  4. Digital Microfluidics for Nucleic Acid Amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Coelho

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Digital Microfluidics (DMF has emerged as a disruptive methodology for the control and manipulation of low volume droplets. In DMF, each droplet acts as a single reactor, which allows for extensive multiparallelization of biological and chemical reactions at a much smaller scale. DMF devices open entirely new and promising pathways for multiplex analysis and reaction occurring in a miniaturized format, thus allowing for healthcare decentralization from major laboratories to point-of-care with accurate, robust and inexpensive molecular diagnostics. Here, we shall focus on DMF platforms specifically designed for nucleic acid amplification, which is key for molecular diagnostics of several diseases and conditions, from pathogen identification to cancer mutations detection. Particular attention will be given to the device architecture, materials and nucleic acid amplification applications in validated settings.

  5. Microfluidic structures for LOC devices designed by laser lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figurova, M.; Pudis, D.; Gaso, P.

    2016-12-01

    Nowadays, lab on a chip (LOC) applications are very popular in the field of biomedicine. LOC device works with biological materials and enables to arrange conventional laboratory operations on a small chip. Philosophy of LOC applications stands on quick and precise diagnostics process and technology, which uses cheap materials with possibility of rapid prototyping. LOC, as a time saving application, works with small volume of samples and reagents and enables better control over the sample. We present fabrication method of functional LOC chip for different biomedical microfluidic applications based on direct laser writing (DLW) lithography. We present fabrication of few types of microfluidic and micro-optic structures with different capabilities created by DLW system. The combination of DLW lithography in photoresist layer deposited on glass substrate and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) replica molding process were used for patterning of designed microstructures. Prepared microfluidic and micro-optic structures were observed by confocal microscope and microfluidic flow observations were investigated by conventional optical microscope and CCD camera.

  6. Comparison of roll-to-roll replication approaches for microfluidic and optical functions in lab-on-a-chip diagnostic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecher, Christian; Baum, Christoph; Bastuck, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Economically advantageous microfabrication technologies for lab-on-a-chip diagnostic devices substituting commonly used glass etching or injection molding processes are one of the key enablers for the emerging market of microfluidic devices. On-site detection in fields of life sciences, point of care diagnostics and environmental analysis requires compact, disposable and highly functionalized systems. Roll-to-roll production as a high volume process has become the emerging fabrication technology for integrated, complex high technology products within recent years (e.g. fuel cells). Differently functionalized polymer films enable researchers to create a new generation of lab-on-a-chip devices by combining electronic, microfluidic and optical functions in multilayer architecture. For replication of microfluidic and optical functions via roll-to-roll production process competitive approaches are available. One of them is to imprint fluidic channels and optical structures of micro- or nanometer scale from embossing rollers into ultraviolet (UV) curable lacquers on polymer substrates. Depending on dimension, shape and quantity of those structures there are alternative manufacturing technologies for the embossing roller. Ultra-precise diamond turning, electroforming or casting polymer materials are used either for direct structuring or manufacturing of roller sleeves. Mastering methods are selected for application considering replication quality required and structure complexity. Criteria for the replication quality are surface roughness and contour accuracy. Structure complexity is evaluated by shapes producible (e.g. linear, circular) and aspect ratio. Costs for the mastering process and structure lifetime are major cost factors. The alternative replication approaches are introduced and analyzed corresponding to the criteria presented. Advantages and drawbacks of each technology are discussed and exemplary applications are presented.

  7. A light writable microfluidic "flash memory": optically addressed actuator array with latched operation for microfluidic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Zhishan; Pal, Rohit; Srivannavit, Onnop; Burns, Mark A; Gulari, Erdogan

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents a novel optically addressed microactuator array (microfluidic "flash memory") with latched operation. Analogous to the address-data bus mediated memory address protocol in electronics, the microactuator array consists of individual phase-change based actuators addressed by localized heating through focused light patterns (address bus), which can be provided by a modified projector or high power laser pointer. A common pressure manifold (data bus) for the entire array is used to generate large deflections of the phase change actuators in the molten phase. The use of phase change material as the working media enables latched operation of the actuator array. After the initial light "writing" during which the phase is temporarily changed to molten, the actuated status is self-maintained by the solid phase of the actuator without power and pressure inputs. The microfluidic flash memory can be re-configured by a new light illumination pattern and common pressure signal. The proposed approach can achieve actuation of arbitrary units in a large-scale array without the need for complex external equipment such as solenoid valves and electrical modules, which leads to significantly simplified system implementation and compact system size. The proposed work therefore provides a flexible, energy-efficient, and low cost multiplexing solution for microfluidic applications based on physical displacements. As an example, the use of the latched microactuator array as "normally closed" or "normally open" microvalves is demonstrated. The phase-change wax is fully encapsulated and thus immune from contamination issues in fluidic environments.

  8. Electro-Microfluidic Packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, G. L.; Galambos, P. C.

    2002-06-01

    There are many examples of electro-microfluidic products that require cost effective packaging solutions. Industry has responded to a demand for products such as drop ejectors, chemical sensors, and biological sensors. Drop ejectors have consumer applications such as ink jet printing and scientific applications such as patterning self-assembled monolayers or ejecting picoliters of expensive analytes/reagents for chemical analysis. Drop ejectors can be used to perform chemical analysis, combinatorial chemistry, drug manufacture, drug discovery, drug delivery, and DNA sequencing. Chemical and biological micro-sensors can sniff the ambient environment for traces of dangerous materials such as explosives, toxins, or pathogens. Other biological sensors can be used to improve world health by providing timely diagnostics and applying corrective measures to the human body. Electro-microfluidic packaging can easily represent over fifty percent of the product cost and, as with Integrated Circuits (IC), the industry should evolve to standard packaging solutions. Standard packaging schemes will minimize cost and bring products to market sooner.

  9. An automated microfluidic multiplexer for fast delivery of C. elegans populations from multiwells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Ghorashian

    Full Text Available Automated biosorter platforms, including recently developed microfluidic devices, enable and accelerate high-throughput and/or high-resolution bioassays on small animal models. However, time-consuming delivery of different organism populations to these systems introduces a major bottleneck to executing large-scale screens. Current population delivery strategies rely on suction from conventional well plates through tubing periodically exposed to air, leading to certain disadvantages: 1 bubble introduction to the sample, interfering with analysis in the downstream system, 2 substantial time drain from added bubble-cleaning steps, and 3 the need for complex mechanical systems to manipulate well plate position. To address these concerns, we developed a multiwell-format microfluidic platform that can deliver multiple distinct animal populations from on-chip wells using multiplexed valve control. This Population Delivery Chip could operate autonomously as part of a relatively simple setup that did not require any of the major mechanical moving parts typical of plate-handling systems to address a given well. We demonstrated automatic serial delivery of 16 distinct C. elegans worm populations to a single outlet without introducing any bubbles to the samples, causing cross-contamination, or damaging the animals. The device achieved delivery of more than 90% of the population preloaded into a given well in 4.7 seconds; an order of magnitude faster than delivery modalities in current use. This platform could potentially handle other similarly sized model organisms, such as zebrafish and drosophila larvae or cellular micro-colonies. The device's architecture and microchannel dimensions allow simple expansion for processing larger numbers of populations.

  10. Microfluidic fuel cells and batteries

    CERN Document Server

    Kjeang, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic fuel cells and batteries represent a special type of electrochemical power generators that can be miniaturized and integrated in a microfluidic chip. Summarizing the initial ten years of research and development in this emerging field, this SpringerBrief is the first book dedicated to microfluidic fuel cell and battery technology for electrochemical energy conversion and storage. Written at a critical juncture, where strategically applied research is urgently required to seize impending technology opportunities for commercial, analytical, and educational utility, the intention is

  11. Inhibitory effect of common microfluidic materials on PCR outcome

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2012-02-20

    Microfluidic chips have a variety of applications in the biological sciences and medicine. In contrast with traditional experimental approaches, microfluidics entails lower sample and reagent consumption, allows faster reactions and enables efficient separation. Additionally microfluidics offers other advantages accruing from the fluids’ various distinct behaviors, such as energy dissipation, fluidic resistance, laminar flow, and surface tension. Biological molecules suspended in fluid and transported through microfluidics channels interact with the channel-wall material. This interaction is even stronger in high surface-area-to-volume ratio (SAVR) microfluidic channels. Adsorption and inhibition of biomolecules occur when these materials come in contact with biomolecular reaction components. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a thermal cycling procedure for amplifying target DNA. The PCR compatibility of silicon, silicon dioxide (SiO2) and other surfaces have been studied; however the results are inconclusive. Usually for protein-surface interaction measurements, bulky and expensive equipment is used, such as Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Scanning or Transmission Electron Microscopy (SEM, TEM), spectrophotometric protein concentration measurement, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) or X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). \\tThe PCR reaction components include the DNA template, primers, DNA polymerase (the main component), dNTPs, a buffer, divalent ions (MgCl2), and KCl. \\tWe designed a simple, relatively quick measurement that only requires a PCR cycler; thus it mimics actual conditions in PCR cycling. In our study, we evaluated the inhibitory affect of different materials on PCR, which is one of the most frequently used enzymatic reactions in microfluidics. PCR reaction optimization through choice of surface materials is of the upmost importance, as it enables and improves enzymatic reaction in microfluidics. Our assessment of the PCR

  12. Robustness via Diffractal Architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Moocarme, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    When plane waves diffract through fractal-patterned apertures, the resulting far-field profiles or diffractals also exhibit iterated, self-similar features. Here we show that this specific architecture enables robust signal processing and spatial multiplexing: arbitrary parts of a diffractal contain sufficient information to recreate the entire original sparse signal.

  13. Control and automation of multilayered integrated microfluidic device fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipper, Sarit; Frolov, Ludmila; Guy, Ortal; Pellach, Michal; Glick, Yair; Malichi, Asaf; Knisbacher, Binyamin A; Barbiro-Michaely, Efrat; Avrahami, Dorit; Yavets-Chen, Yehuda; Levanon, Erez Y; Gerber, Doron

    2017-01-31

    Integrated microfluidics is a sophisticated three-dimensional (multi layer) solution for high complexity serial or parallel processes. Fabrication of integrated microfluidic devices requires soft lithography and the stacking of thin-patterned PDMS layers. Precise layer alignment and bonding is crucial. There are no previously reported standards for alignment of the layers, which is mostly performed using uncontrolled processes with very low alignment success. As a result, integrated microfluidics is mostly used in academia rather than in the many potential industrial applications. We have designed and manufactured a semiautomatic Microfluidic Device Assembly System (μDAS) for full device production. μDAS comprises an electrooptic mechanical system consisting of four main parts: optical system, smart media holder (for PDMS), a micropositioning xyzθ system and a macropositioning XY mechanism. The use of the μDAS yielded valuable information regarding PDMS as the material for device fabrication, revealed previously unidentified errors, and enabled optimization of a robust fabrication process. In addition, we have demonstrated the utilization of the μDAS technology for fabrication of a complex 3 layered device with over 12 000 micromechanical valves and an array of 64 × 64 DNA spots on a glass substrate with high yield and high accuracy. We increased fabrication yield from 25% to about 85% with an average layer alignment error of just ∼4 μm. It also increased our protein expression yields from 80% to over 90%, allowing us to investigate more proteins per experiment. The μDAS has great potential to become a valuable tool for both advancing integrated microfluidics in academia and producing and applying microfluidic devices in the industry.

  14. Robotic architectures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mtshali, M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the development of mobile robotic systems, a robotic architecture plays a crucial role in interconnecting all the sub-systems and controlling the system. The design of robotic architectures for mobile autonomous robots is a challenging...

  15. Robotic Architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mbali Mtshali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the development of mobile robotic systems, a robotic architecture plays a crucial role in interconnecting all the sub-systems and controlling the system. The design of robotic architectures for mobile autonomous robots is a challenging and complex task. With a number of existing architectures and tools to choose from, a review of the existing robotic architecture is essential. This paper surveys the different paradigms in robotic architectures. A classification of the existing robotic architectures and comparison of different proposals attributes and properties have been carried out. The paper also provides a view on the current state of designing robot architectures. It also proposes a conceptual model of a generalised robotic architecture for mobile autonomous robots.Defence Science Journal, 2010, 60(1, pp.15-22, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.60.96

  16. Architecture & Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Mary; Delahunt, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Most art teachers would agree that architecture is an important form of visual art, but they do not always include it in their curriculums. In this article, the authors share core ideas from "Architecture and Environment," a teaching resource that they developed out of a long-term interest in teaching architecture and their fascination with the…

  17. Architecture & Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Mary; Delahunt, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Most art teachers would agree that architecture is an important form of visual art, but they do not always include it in their curriculums. In this article, the authors share core ideas from "Architecture and Environment," a teaching resource that they developed out of a long-term interest in teaching architecture and their fascination with the…

  18. Interfacial microfluidic transport on micropatterned superhydrophobic textile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Siyuan; Jiang, Jia; Pan, Tingrui

    2013-05-21

    Textile-enabled interfacial microfluidics, utilizing fibrous hydrophilic yarns (e.g., cotton) to guide biological reagent flows, has been extended to various biochemical analyses recently. The restricted capillary-driving mechanism, however, persists as a major challenge for continuous and facilitated biofluidic transport. In this paper, we have first introduced a novel interfacial microfluidic transport principle to drive three-dimensional liquid flows on a micropatterned superhydrophobic textile (MST) platform in a more autonomous and controllable manner. Specifically, the MST system utilizes the surface tension-induced Laplace pressure to facilitate the liquid motion along the hydrophilic yarn, in addition to the capillarity present in the fibrous structure. The fabrication of MST is simply accomplished by stitching hydrophilic cotton yarn into a superhydrophobic fabric substrate (contact angle 140 ± 3°), from which well-controlled wetting patterns are established for interfacial microfluidic operations. The geometric configurations of the stitched micropatterns, e.g., the lengths and diameters of the yarn and bundled arrangement, can all influence the transport process, which is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Two operation modes, discrete and continuous transport, are also presented in detail. In addition, the gravitational effect as well as the droplet removal process have been also considered and quantitatively analysed during the transport process. As a demonstration, an MST design has been implemented on an artificial skin surface to collect and remove sweat in a highly efficient and facilitated means. The results have illustrated that the novel interfacial transport on the textile platform can be potentially extended to a variety of biofluidic collection and removal applications.

  19. Synchronous Droplet Microfluidics: One "Clock" to rule them all

    CERN Document Server

    Katsikis, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    Controlling fluid droplets efficiently in the microscale is of great interest both from a basic science and a technology perspective. We have designed and developed a general-purpose, highly scalable microfluidic control strategy through a single global clock signal that enables synchronous control of arbitrary number of droplets in a planar geometry. A rotating precessive magnetic field provides a global clock signal, enabling simultaneous control of droplet position, velocity and trajectories. Here, in this fluid dynamics video, we explain the main physics of this new microfluidic concept. Video data from droplets moving in sync in different fluidic circuits are included. The experimental setup is described and video data is analyzed to provide a detailed view of the time-dynamics of propagating droplets. Finally, we explore the operational limits of this concept, scaling and phase diagram with physical regime diagram.

  20. Detection and classification of ebola on microfluidic chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xue; Jin, Xiangyu; Fan, Yunqian; Huang, Qin; Kou, Yue; Zu, Guo; Huang, Shiguang; Liu, Xiaosheng; Huang, Guoliang

    2016-10-01

    Point-of-care testing (POCT) for an infectious diseases is the prerequisite to control of the disease and limitation of its spread. A microfluidic chip for detection and classification of four strains of Ebola virus was developed and evaluated. This assay was based on reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) and specific primers for Ebola Zaire virus, Ebola Sudan virus, Ebola Tai Forest virus and Ebola Bundibugyo virus were designed. The sensitivity of the microfluidic chip was under 103 copies per milliliter, as determined by ten repeated tests. This assay is unique in its ability to enable diagnosis of the Ebola infections and simultaneous typing of Ebola virus on a single chip. It offers short reaction time, ease of use and high specificity. These features should enable POCT in remote area during outbreaks of Ebola virus.

  1. Microfluidic Multichannel Flow Cytometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a "Microfluidic Multichannel Flow Cytometer." Several novel concepts are integrated to produce the final design, which is compatible with...

  2. Whole-Teflon microfluidic chips

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kangning Ren; Wen Dai; Jianhua Zhou; Jing Su; Hongkai Wu

    2011-01-01

    .... In this work, we present a convenient strategy for fabricating whole-Teflon microfluidic chips with integrated valves that show outstanding inertness to various chemicals and extreme resistance against all solvents...

  3. Perspective: microfluidic applications in microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh-Lakha, Saleema; Trevors, Jack T

    2010-07-01

    The application of microfluidics technology to microbiology research is an excellent platform for the analysis of microorganisms and their nucleic acids. This technology combines engineering, physics, chemistry, biology and computing to control the devices. In this perspective we discuss how microfluidics can be applied to microbiological research and used in diagnostic applications. We also summarize advantages and limitations of this technology, as well as highlight some recent microbiological applications.

  4. Microfluidics - Sorting particles with light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, J.

    2004-01-01

    Microfluidic systems have great potential to perform complex chemical and biological processing and analysis on a single disposable chip. That goal is now a step closer with the demonstration of an efficient all-optical particle sorter.......Microfluidic systems have great potential to perform complex chemical and biological processing and analysis on a single disposable chip. That goal is now a step closer with the demonstration of an efficient all-optical particle sorter....

  5. Passive microfluidic array card and reader

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, Lawrence Christopher [Modesto, CA; Coleman, Matthew A [Oakland, CA

    2011-08-09

    A microfluidic array card and reader system for analyzing a sample. The microfluidic array card includes a sample loading section for loading the sample onto the microfluidic array card, a multiplicity of array windows, and a transport section or sections for transporting the sample from the sample loading section to the array windows. The microfluidic array card reader includes a housing, a receiving section for receiving the microfluidic array card, a viewing section, and a light source that directs light to the array window of the microfluidic array card and to the viewing section.

  6. Microfluidic Mechanics and Applications: a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Arya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidics involves the transportation, splitting and mixing of minute fluids to perform several chemical and biological reactions including drug screening, heating, cooling or dissolution of reagents. Efforts have been made to develop different microfluidic devices, droplets and valves that can stop and resume flow of liquids inside a microchannel. This paper provides the review related to the theory and mechanics of microfluidic devices and fluid flow. Different materials and techniques for fabricating microfluidic devices are discussed. Subsequently, the microfluidic components that are responsible for successful micrfluidic device formation are presented. Finally, recent applications related to the microfluidics are highlighted.

  7. A hybrid microfluidic-vacuum device for direct interfacing with conventional cell culture methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Bong Geun; Park, Jeong Won; Hu, Jia Sheng; Huang, Carlos; Monuki, Edwin S; Jeon, Noo Li

    2007-09-20

    Microfluidics is an enabling technology with a number of advantages over traditional tissue culture methods when precise control of cellular microenvironment is required. However, there are a number of practical and technical limitations that impede wider implementation in routine biomedical research. Specialized equipment and protocols required for fabrication and setting up microfluidic experiments present hurdles for routine use by most biology laboratories. We have developed and validated a novel microfluidic device that can directly interface with conventional tissue culture methods to generate and maintain controlled soluble environments in a Petri dish. It incorporates separate sets of fluidic channels and vacuum networks on a single device that allows reversible application of microfluidic gradients onto wet cell culture surfaces. Stable, precise concentration gradients of soluble factors were generated using simple microfluidic channels that were attached to a perfusion system. We successfully demonstrated real-time optical live/dead cell imaging of neural stem cells exposed to a hydrogen peroxide gradient and chemotaxis of metastatic breast cancer cells in a growth factor gradient. This paper describes the design and application of a versatile microfluidic device that can directly interface with conventional cell culture methods. This platform provides a simple yet versatile tool for incorporating the advantages of a microfluidic approach to biological assays without changing established tissue culture protocols.

  8. Universal microfluidic automaton for autonomous sample processing: application to the Mars Organic Analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungkyu; Jensen, Erik C; Stockton, Amanda M; Mathies, Richard A

    2013-08-20

    A fully integrated multilayer microfluidic chemical analyzer for automated sample processing and labeling, as well as analysis using capillary zone electrophoresis is developed and characterized. Using lifting gate microfluidic control valve technology, a microfluidic automaton consisting of a two-dimensional microvalve cellular array is fabricated with soft lithography in a format that enables facile integration with a microfluidic capillary electrophoresis device. The programmable sample processor performs precise mixing, metering, and routing operations that can be combined to achieve automation of complex and diverse assay protocols. Sample labeling protocols for amino acid, aldehyde/ketone and carboxylic acid analysis are performed automatically followed by automated transfer and analysis by the integrated microfluidic capillary electrophoresis chip. Equivalent performance to off-chip sample processing is demonstrated for each compound class; the automated analysis resulted in a limit of detection of ~16 nM for amino acids. Our microfluidic automaton provides a fully automated, portable microfluidic analysis system capable of autonomous analysis of diverse compound classes in challenging environments.

  9. Design of pressure-driven microfluidic networks using electric circuit analogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Kwang W; Lee, Kangsun; Ahn, Byungwook; Furlani, Edward P

    2012-02-07

    This article reviews the application of electric circuit methods for the analysis of pressure-driven microfluidic networks with an emphasis on concentration- and flow-dependent systems. The application of circuit methods to microfluidics is based on the analogous behaviour of hydraulic and electric circuits with correlations of pressure to voltage, volumetric flow rate to current, and hydraulic to electric resistance. Circuit analysis enables rapid predictions of pressure-driven laminar flow in microchannels and is very useful for designing complex microfluidic networks in advance of fabrication. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the physics of pressure-driven laminar flow, the formal analogy between electric and hydraulic circuits, applications of circuit theory to microfluidic network-based devices, recent development and applications of concentration- and flow-dependent microfluidic networks, and promising future applications. The lab-on-a-chip (LOC) and microfluidics community will gain insightful ideas and practical design strategies for developing unique microfluidic network-based devices to address a broad range of biological, chemical, pharmaceutical, and other scientific and technical challenges.

  10. A hybrid microfluidic-vacuum device for direct interfacing with conventional cell culture methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monuki Edwin S

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microfluidics is an enabling technology with a number of advantages over traditional tissue culture methods when precise control of cellular microenvironment is required. However, there are a number of practical and technical limitations that impede wider implementation in routine biomedical research. Specialized equipment and protocols required for fabrication and setting up microfluidic experiments present hurdles for routine use by most biology laboratories. Results We have developed and validated a novel microfluidic device that can directly interface with conventional tissue culture methods to generate and maintain controlled soluble environments in a Petri dish. It incorporates separate sets of fluidic channels and vacuum networks on a single device that allows reversible application of microfluidic gradients onto wet cell culture surfaces. Stable, precise concentration gradients of soluble factors were generated using simple microfluidic channels that were attached to a perfusion system. We successfully demonstrated real-time optical live/dead cell imaging of neural stem cells exposed to a hydrogen peroxide gradient and chemotaxis of metastatic breast cancer cells in a growth factor gradient. Conclusion This paper describes the design and application of a versatile microfluidic device that can directly interface with conventional cell culture methods. This platform provides a simple yet versatile tool for incorporating the advantages of a microfluidic approach to biological assays without changing established tissue culture protocols.

  11. Smart Pipette and Microfluidic Pipette Tip for Blood Plasma Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byeongyeon; Choi, Sungyoung

    2016-01-13

    An integrated method for blood plasma separation is presented by combining a pneumatic device, which is referred to as a "smart pipette," and a hydrophoretic microchannel as a microfluidic pipette tip for whole-blood sample preparation. This method enables hemolysis-free, high-purity plasma separation through smart pipetting of whole blood, potentially providing the means for rapid, inexpensive blood sample preparation for point-of-care testing.

  12. Development of Droplet-Based Microfluidics for Synthetic Biology Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Janiesch, Jan-Willi

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidics combines principles of science and technology, and enables the user to handle, process and manipulate fluids of very small volumes. This technology permits the integration of multiple laboratory applications into one single microfabricated chip, requires minimal manual user intervention and sample consumption, and allows enhanced data analysis speed and precision. Due to these numerous advantages, the potential for this technology to be applied in fundamental biop...

  13. Microfluidic Screening of Electrophoretic Mobility Shifts Elucidates Riboswitch Binding Function

    OpenAIRE

    Karns, Kelly; Vogan, Jacob M.; Qin, Qian; Hickey, Scott F.; Wilson, Stephen C.; Hammond, Ming C.; Herr, Amy E.

    2013-01-01

    Riboswitches are RNA sensors that change conformation upon binding small molecule metabolites, in turn modulating gene expression. Our understanding of riboswitch regulatory function would be accelerated by a high throughput, quantitative screening tool capable of measuring riboswitch-ligand binding. We introduce a microfluidic mobility shift assay that enables precise and rapid quantitation of ligand binding and subsequent riboswitch conformational change. In 0.3% of the time required for be...

  14. Hydrogel-coated microfluidic channels for cardiomyocyte culture

    OpenAIRE

    Annabi, Nasim; Selimović, Šeila; Cox, Juan Pablo Acevedo; Ribas, João; Bakooshli, Mohsen Afshar; Heintze, Déborah; Weiss, Anthony S.; Cropek, Donald; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The research areas of tissue engineering and drug development have displayed increased interest in organ-on-a-chip studies, in which physiologically or pathologically relevant tissues can be engineered to test pharmaceutical candidates. Microfluidic technologies enable the control of the cellular microenvironment for these applications through the topography, size, and elastic properties of the microscale cell culture environment, while delivering nutrients and chemical cues to the cells thro...

  15. Digital Microfluidics Sample Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Michael G.; Srinivasan, Vijay; Eckhardt, Allen; Paik, Philip Y.; Sudarsan, Arjun; Shenderov, Alex; Hua, Zhishan; Pamula, Vamsee K.

    2010-01-01

    Three innovations address the needs of the medical world with regard to microfluidic manipulation and testing of physiological samples in ways that can benefit point-of-care needs for patients such as premature infants, for which drawing of blood for continuous tests can be life-threatening in their own right, and for expedited results. A chip with sample injection elements, reservoirs (and waste), droplet formation structures, fluidic pathways, mixing areas, and optical detection sites, was fabricated to test the various components of the microfluidic platform, both individually and in integrated fashion. The droplet control system permits a user to control droplet microactuator system functions, such as droplet operations and detector operations. Also, the programming system allows a user to develop software routines for controlling droplet microactuator system functions, such as droplet operations and detector operations. A chip is incorporated into the system with a controller, a detector, input and output devices, and software. A novel filler fluid formulation is used for the transport of droplets with high protein concentrations. Novel assemblies for detection of photons from an on-chip droplet are present, as well as novel systems for conducting various assays, such as immunoassays and PCR (polymerase chain reaction). The lab-on-a-chip (a.k.a., lab-on-a-printed-circuit board) processes physiological samples and comprises a system for automated, multi-analyte measurements using sub-microliter samples of human serum. The invention also relates to a diagnostic chip and system including the chip that performs many of the routine operations of a central labbased chemistry analyzer, integrating, for example, colorimetric assays (e.g., for proteins), chemiluminescence/fluorescence assays (e.g., for enzymes, electrolytes, and gases), and/or conductometric assays (e.g., for hematocrit on plasma and whole blood) on a single chip platform.

  16. Accelerating Yeast Prion Biology using Droplet Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Lloyd; Rotem, Assaf; Jarosz, Daniel; Datta, Manoshi; Lindquist, Susan; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    Prions are infectious proteins in a misfolded form, that can induce normal proteins to take the misfolded state. Yeast prions are relevant, as a model of human prion diseases, and interesting from an evolutionary standpoint. Prions may also be a form of epigenetic inheritance, which allow yeast to adapt to stressful conditions at rates exceeding those of random mutations and propagate that adaptation to their offspring. Encapsulation of yeast in droplet microfluidic devices enables high-throughput measurements with single cell resolution, which would not be feasible using bulk methods. Millions of populations of yeast can be screened to obtain reliable measurements of prion induction and loss rates. The population dynamics of clonal yeast, when a fraction of the cells are prion expressing, can be elucidated. Furthermore, the mechanism by which certain strains of bacteria induce yeast to express prions in the wild can be deduced. Integrating the disparate fields of prion biology and droplet microfluidics reveals a more complete picture of how prions may be more than just diseases and play a functional role in yeast.

  17. Microfluidic Screening of Electric Fields for Electroporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Paulo A.; Ge, Zhifei; Moran, Jeffrey L.; Buie, Cullen R.

    2016-02-01

    Electroporation is commonly used to deliver molecules such as drugs, proteins, and/or DNA into cells, but the mechanism remains poorly understood. In this work a rapid microfluidic assay was developed to determine the critical electric field threshold required for inducing bacterial electroporation. The microfluidic device was designed to have a bilaterally converging channel to amplify the electric field to magnitudes sufficient to induce electroporation. The bacterial cells are introduced into the channel in the presence of SYTOX®, which fluorescently labels cells with compromised membranes. Upon delivery of an electric pulse, the cells fluoresce due to transmembrane influx of SYTOX® after disruption of the cell membranes. We calculate the critical electric field by capturing the location within the channel of the increase in fluorescence intensity after electroporation. Bacterial strains with industrial and therapeutic relevance such as Escherichia coli BL21 (3.65 ± 0.09 kV/cm), Corynebacterium glutamicum (5.20 ± 0.20 kV/cm), and Mycobacterium smegmatis (5.56 ± 0.08 kV/cm) have been successfully characterized. Determining the critical electric field for electroporation facilitates the development of electroporation protocols that minimize Joule heating and maximize cell viability. This assay will ultimately enable the genetic transformation of bacteria and archaea considered intractable and difficult-to-transfect, while facilitating fundamental genetic studies on numerous diverse microbes.

  18. Microfluidic chips for protein differential expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenta, Jenny M; Dawoud, Abdulilah A; Lazar, Iulia M

    2009-04-01

    Biomarker discovery and screening using novel proteomic technologies is an area that is attracting increased attention in the biomedical community. Early detection of abnormal physiological conditions will be highly beneficial for diagnosing various diseases and increasing survivability rates. Clearly, progress in this area will depend on the development of fast, reliable, and highly sensitive and specific sample bioanalysis methods. Microfluidics has emerged as a technology that could become essential in proteomics research as it enables the integration of all sample preparation, separation, and detection steps, with the added benefit of enhanced sample throughput. The combination of these advantages with the sensitivity and capability of MS detection to deliver precise structural information makes microfluidics-MS a very competitive technology for biomarker discovery. The integration of LC microchip devices with MS detection, and specifically their applicability to biomarker screening applications in MCF-7 breast cancer cellular extracts is reported in this manuscript. Loading approximately 0.1-1 microg of crude protein extract tryptic digest on the chip has typically resulted in the reliable identification of approximately 40-100 proteins. The potential of an LC-ESI-MS chip for comparative proteomic analysis of isotopically labeled MCF-7 breast cancer cell extracts is explored for the first time.

  19. Microfluidics, Chromatography, and Atomic-Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark

    2008-01-01

    A Raman-and-atomic-force microscope (RAFM) has been shown to be capable of performing several liquid-transfer and sensory functions essential for the operation of a microfluidic laboratory on a chip that would be used to perform rapid, sensitive chromatographic and spectro-chemical analyses of unprecedentedly small quantities of liquids. The most novel aspect of this development lies in the exploitation of capillary and shear effects at the atomic-force-microscope (AFM) tip to produce shear-driven flow of liquids along open microchannels of a microfluidic device. The RAFM can also be used to perform such functions as imaging liquids in microchannels; removing liquid samples from channels for very sensitive, tip-localized spectrochemical analyses; measuring a quantity of liquid adhering to the tip; and dip-pen deposition from a chromatographic device. A commercial Raman-spectroscopy system and a commercial AFM were integrated to make the RAFM so as to be able to perform simultaneous topographical AFM imaging and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) at the AFM tip. The Raman-spectroscopy system includes a Raman microprobe attached to an optical microscope, the translation stage of which is modified to accommodate the AFM head. The Raman laser excitation beam, which is aimed at the AFM tip, has a wavelength of 785 nm and a diameter of about 5 m, and its power is adjustable up to 10 mW. The AFM is coated with gold to enable tip-localized SERS.

  20. Microfluidic culture models to study the hydrodynamics of tumor progression and therapeutic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Cara; Rylander, Marissa Nichole

    2013-08-01

    The integration of tissue engineering strategies with microfluidic technologies has enabled the design of in vitro microfluidic culture models that better adapt to morphological changes in tissue structure and function over time. These biomimetic microfluidic scaffolds accurately mimic native 3D microenvironments, as well as permit precise and simultaneous control of chemical gradients, hydrodynamic stresses, and cellular niches within the system. The recent application of microfluidic in vitro culture models to cancer research offers enormous potential to aid in the development of improved therapeutic strategies by supporting the investigation of tumor angiogenesis and metastasis under physiologically relevant flow conditions. The intrinsic material properties and fluid mechanics of microfluidic culture models enable high-throughput anti-cancer drug screening, permit well-defined and controllable input parameters to monitor tumor cell response to various hydrodynamic conditions or treatment modalities, as well as provide a platform for elucidating fundamental mechanisms of tumor physiology. This review highlights recent developments and future applications of microfluidic culture models to study tumor progression and therapeutic targeting under conditions of hydrodynamic stress relevant to the complex tumor microenvironment.

  1. Digital microfluidics for automated hanging drop cell spheroid culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aijian, Andrew P; Garrell, Robin L

    2015-06-01

    Cell spheroids are multicellular aggregates, grown in vitro, that mimic the three-dimensional morphology of physiological tissues. Although there are numerous benefits to using spheroids in cell-based assays, the adoption of spheroids in routine biomedical research has been limited, in part, by the tedious workflow associated with spheroid formation and analysis. Here we describe a digital microfluidic platform that has been developed to automate liquid-handling protocols for the formation, maintenance, and analysis of multicellular spheroids in hanging drop culture. We show that droplets of liquid can be added to and extracted from through-holes, or "wells," and fabricated in the bottom plate of a digital microfluidic device, enabling the formation and assaying of hanging drops. Using this digital microfluidic platform, spheroids of mouse mesenchymal stem cells were formed and maintained in situ for 72 h, exhibiting good viability (>90%) and size uniformity (% coefficient of variation screen was performed on human colorectal adenocarcinoma spheroids to demonstrate the ability to recapitulate physiologically relevant phenomena such as insulin-induced drug resistance. With automatable and flexible liquid handling, and a wide range of in situ sample preparation and analysis capabilities, the digital microfluidic platform provides a viable tool for automating cell spheroid culture and analysis.

  2. A Smartphone Controlled Handheld Microfluidic Liquid Handling System

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Baichen; Guan, Allan; Dong, Quan; Ruan, Kangcheng; Hu, Ronggui; Li, Zhenyu

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip technologies have made it possible to manipulate small volume liquids with unprecedented resolution, automation and integration. However, most current microfluidic systems still rely on bulky off-chip infrastructures such as compressed pressure sources, syringe pumps and computers to achieve complex liquid manipulation functions. Here, we present a handheld automated microfluidic liquid handling system controlled by a smartphone, which is enabled by combining elastomeric on-chip valves and a compact pneumatic system. As a demonstration, we show that the system can automatically perform all the liquid handling steps of a bead-based sandwich immunoassay on a multi-layer PDMS chip without any human intervention. The footprint of the system is 6 by 10.5 by 16.5cm, and the total weight is 829g including battery. Powered by a 12.8V 1500mAh Li battery, the system consumed 2.2W on average during the immunoassay and lasted for 8.7 hrs. This handheld microfluidic liquid handling platform...

  3. A Versatile Microfluidic Device for Automating Synthetic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Steve C C; Goyal, Garima; Kim, Peter W; Koutsoubelis, Nicolas; Keasling, Jay D; Adams, Paul D; Hillson, Nathan J; Singh, Anup K

    2015-10-16

    New microbes are being engineered that contain the genetic circuitry, metabolic pathways, and other cellular functions required for a wide range of applications such as producing biofuels, biobased chemicals, and pharmaceuticals. Although currently available tools are useful in improving the synthetic biology process, further improvements in physical automation would help to lower the barrier of entry into this field. We present an innovative microfluidic platform for assembling DNA fragments with 10× lower volumes (compared to that of current microfluidic platforms) and with integrated region-specific temperature control and on-chip transformation. Integration of these steps minimizes the loss of reagents and products compared to that with conventional methods, which require multiple pipetting steps. For assembling DNA fragments, we implemented three commonly used DNA assembly protocols on our microfluidic device: Golden Gate assembly, Gibson assembly, and yeast assembly (i.e., TAR cloning, DNA Assembler). We demonstrate the utility of these methods by assembling two combinatorial libraries of 16 plasmids each. Each DNA plasmid is transformed into Escherichia coli or Saccharomyces cerevisiae using on-chip electroporation and further sequenced to verify the assembly. We anticipate that this platform will enable new research that can integrate this automated microfluidic platform to generate large combinatorial libraries of plasmids and will help to expedite the overall synthetic biology process.

  4. Electrofluidics fabricated by space-selective metallization in glass microfluidic structures using femtosecond laser direct writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Wu, Dong; Hanada, Yasutaka; Chen, Chi; Wu, Sizhu; Cheng, Ya; Sugioka, Koji; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2013-12-07

    Space-selective metallization of the inside of glass microfluidic structures using femtosecond laser direct-write ablation followed by electroless plating is demonstrated. Femtosecond laser direct writing followed by thermal treatment and successive chemical etching allows us to fabricate three-dimensional microfluidic structures inside photosensitive glass. Then, femtosecond laser ablation followed by electroless metal plating enables flexible deposition of patterned metal films on desired locations of not only the top and bottom walls but also the sidewalls of fabricated microfluidic structures. A volume writing scheme for femtosecond laser irradiation inducing homogeneous ablation on the sidewalls of microfluidic structures is proposed for sidewall metallization. The developed technique is used to fabricate electrofluidics in which microelectric components are integrated into glass microchannels. The fabricated electrofluidics are applied to control the temperature of liquid samples in the microchannels for the enhancement of chemical reactions and to manipulate the movement of biological samples in the microscale space.

  5. Architectural freedom and industrialised architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Inge

    2012-01-01

    compares "best practice" in Denmark and "best practice" in Austria. The modern architects accepted the fact that industrialized architecture told the storey of repetition and monotonous as basic condition. This article aims to explain that architecture can be thought as a complex and diverse design through......Architectural freedom and industrialized architecture. Inge Vestergaard, Associate Professor, Cand. Arch. Aarhus School of Architecture, Denmark Noerreport 20, 8000 Aarhus C Telephone +45 89 36 0000 E-mai l inge.vestergaard@aarch.dk Based on the repetitive architecture from the "building boom" 1960...... to 1973 it is discussed how architects can handle these Danish element and montage buildings through the transformation to upgraded aesthetical, functional and energy efficient architecture. The method used is analysis of cases, parallels to literature studies and producer interviews. This analysis...

  6. Electrorheological fluid-actuated microfluidic pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liyu; Chen, Xiaoqing; Niu, Xize; Wen, Weijia; Sheng, Ping

    2006-08-01

    The authors report the design and implementation of an electrorheological (ER) fluid-actuated microfluidic pump, with programmable digital control. Our microfluidic pump has a multilayered structure fabricated on polydimethylsiloxane by soft-lithographic technique. The ER microfluidic pump exhibits good performance at high pumping frequencies and uniform liquid flow characteristics. It can be easily integrated with other microfluidic components. The programmable control also gives the device flexibility in its operations.

  7. Mimosa Origami: A nanostructure-enabled directional self-organization regime of materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, William S Y; Li, Minfei; Nisbet, David R; Craig, Vincent S J; Wang, Zuankai; Tricoli, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    One of the innate fundamentals of living systems is their ability to respond toward distinct stimuli by various self-organization behaviors. Despite extensive progress, the engineering of spontaneous motion in man-made inorganic materials still lacks the directionality and scale observed in nature. We report the directional self-organization of soft materials into three-dimensional geometries by the rapid propagation of a folding stimulus along a predetermined path. We engineer a unique Janus bilayer architecture with superior chemical and mechanical properties that enables the efficient transformation of surface energy into directional kinetic and elastic energies. This Janus bilayer can respond to pinpoint water stimuli by a rapid, several-centimeters-long self-assembly that is reminiscent of the Mimosa pudica's leaflet folding. The Janus bilayers also shuttle water at flow rates up to two orders of magnitude higher than traditional wicking-based devices, reaching velocities of 8 cm/s and flow rates of 4.7 μl/s. This self-organization regime enables the ease of fabricating curved, bent, and split flexible channels with lengths greater than 10 cm, demonstrating immense potential for microfluidics, biosensors, and water purification applications.

  8. Mimosa Origami: A nanostructure-enabled directional self-organization regime of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, William S. Y.; Li, Minfei; Nisbet, David R.; Craig, Vincent S. J.; Wang, Zuankai; Tricoli, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    One of the innate fundamentals of living systems is their ability to respond toward distinct stimuli by various self-organization behaviors. Despite extensive progress, the engineering of spontaneous motion in man-made inorganic materials still lacks the directionality and scale observed in nature. We report the directional self-organization of soft materials into three-dimensional geometries by the rapid propagation of a folding stimulus along a predetermined path. We engineer a unique Janus bilayer architecture with superior chemical and mechanical properties that enables the efficient transformation of surface energy into directional kinetic and elastic energies. This Janus bilayer can respond to pinpoint water stimuli by a rapid, several-centimeters-long self-assembly that is reminiscent of the Mimosa pudica’s leaflet folding. The Janus bilayers also shuttle water at flow rates up to two orders of magnitude higher than traditional wicking-based devices, reaching velocities of 8 cm/s and flow rates of 4.7 μl/s. This self-organization regime enables the ease of fabricating curved, bent, and split flexible channels with lengths greater than 10 cm, demonstrating immense potential for microfluidics, biosensors, and water purification applications. PMID:28861471

  9. Modeling and Simulation Framework for Flow-Based Microfluidic Biochips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Morten Foged; Minhass, Wajid Hassan; Pop, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic biochips are replacing the conventional biochemical analyzers and are able to integrate the necessary functions for biochemical analysis on-chip. In this paper we are interested in flow-based biochips, in which the fluidic flow is manipulated using integrated microvalves. By combining...... and error prone. In this paper, we present an Integrated Development Environment (IDE), which addresses (i) schematic capture of the biochip architecture and biochemical application, (ii) logic simulation of an application running on a biochip, and is able to integrate the high level synthesis tasks we have...

  10. Droplet Microfluidics for Chip-Based Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karan V. I. S. Kaler

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Droplet microfluidics (DMF is a fluidic handling technology that enables precision control over dispensing and subsequent manipulation of droplets in the volume range of microliters to picoliters, on a micro-fabricated device. There are several different droplet actuation methods, all of which can generate external stimuli, to either actively or passively control the shape and positioning of fluidic droplets over patterned substrates. In this review article, we focus on the operation and utility of electro-actuation-based DMF devices, which utilize one or more micro-/nano-patterned substrates to facilitate electric field-based handling of chemical and/or biological samples. The underlying theory of DMF actuations, device fabrication methods and integration of optical and opto-electronic detectors is discussed in this review. Example applications of such electro-actuation-based DMF devices have also been included, illustrating the various actuation methods and their utility in conducting chip-based laboratory and clinical diagnostic assays.

  11. Engineering particle morphology with microfluidic droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Zhanxiao; Kong, Tiantian; Lei, Leyan; Zhu, Pingan; Tian, Xiaowei; Wang, Liqiu

    2016-07-01

    The controlled generation of microparticles with non-spherical features is of increasing importance. Such particles are useful for fundamental studies in areas such as self-assembly, as well as biomedical applications from drug carriers to photonic devices. We propose a simple model that captures the dominating factors controlling the size and morphology of non-spherical particles from phase separated droplets. The validity of our model is verified by comparing the generated non-spherical microparticles by droplet microfluidics. This simple relationship between the dominating factors and the final morphologies enables the production of non-spherical particles with well-defined shapes and tightly-controlled dimensions for a variety of applications from drug delivery vehicles to structural materials.

  12. Digital Microfluidics: A New Paradigm for Radiochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Yuin Keng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The emerging technology of digital microfluidics is opening up the possibility of performing radiochemistry at the microliter scale to produce tracers for positron emission tomography (PET labeled with fluorine-18 or other isotopes. Working at this volume scale not only reduces reagent costs but also improves specific activity (SA by reducing contamination by the stable isotope. This technology could provide a practical means to routinely prepare high-SA tracers for applications such as neuroimaging and could make it possible to routinely achieve high SA using synthesis strategies such as isotopic exchange. Reagent droplets are controlled electronically, providing high reliability, a compact control system, and flexibility for diverse syntheses with a single-chip design. The compact size may enable the development of a self-shielded synthesizer that does not require a hot cell. This article reviews the progress of this technology and its application to the synthesis of PET tracers.

  13. Microfluidic devices for cell cultivation and proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Tehranirokh, Masoomeh; Kouzani, Abbas Z.; Francis, Paul S.; Kanwar, Jagat R.

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic technology provides precise, controlled-environment, cost-effective, compact, integrated, and high-throughput microsystems that are promising substitutes for conventional biological laboratory methods. In recent years, microfluidic cell culture devices have been used for applications such as tissue engineering, diagnostics, drug screening, immunology, cancer studies, stem cell proliferation and differentiation, and neurite guidance. Microfluidic technology allows dynamic cell cul...

  14. Green Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Ho

    Today, the environment has become a main subject in lots of science disciplines and the industrial development due to the global warming. This paper presents the analysis of the tendency of Green Architecture in France on the threes axes: Regulations and Approach for the Sustainable Architecture (Certificate and Standard), Renewable Materials (Green Materials) and Strategies (Equipments) of Sustainable Technology. The definition of 'Green Architecture' will be cited in the introduction and the question of the interdisciplinary for the technological development in 'Green Architecture' will be raised up in the conclusion.

  15. Catalyst Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiib, Hans; Marling, Gitte; Hansen, Peter Mandal

    2014-01-01

    How can architecture promote the enriching experiences of the tolerant, the democratic, and the learning city - a city worth living in, worth supporting and worth investing in? Catalyst Architecture comprises architectural projects, which, by virtue of their location, context and their combination...... of programs, have a role in mediating positive social and/or cultural development. In this sense, we talk about architecture as a catalyst for: sustainable adaptation of the city’s infrastructure appropriate renovation of dilapidated urban districts strengthening of social cohesiveness in the city development...

  16. Software architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Oliver; Chughtai, Arif

    2011-01-01

    As a software architect you work in a wide-ranging and dynamic environment. You have to understand the needs of your customer, design architectures that satisfy both functional and non-functional requirements, and lead development teams in implementing the architecture. And it is an environment that is constantly changing: trends such as cloud computing, service orientation, and model-driven procedures open up new architectural possibilities. This book will help you to develop a holistic architectural awareness and knowledge base that extends beyond concrete methods, techniques, and technologi

  17. Microfluidic System for Solution Array Based Bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dougherty, G M; Tok, J B; Pannu, S S; Rose, K A

    2006-02-10

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate new enabling technology for multiplex biodetection systems that are flexible, miniaturizable, highly automated, low cost, and high performance. It builds on prior successes at LLNL with particle-based solution arrays, such as those used in the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) successfully field deployed to multiple locations nationwide. We report the development of a multiplex solution array immunoassay based upon engineered metallic nanorod particles. Nanobarcodes{reg_sign} particles are fabricated by sequential electrodeposition of dissimilar metals within porous alumina templates, yielding optically encoded striping patterns that can be read using standard laboratory microscope optics and PC-based image processing software. The addition of self-assembled monolayer (SAM) coatings and target-specific antibodies allows each encoded class of nanorod particles to be directed against a different antigen target. A prototype assay panel directed against bacterial, viral, and soluble protein targets demonstrates simultaneous detection at sensitivities comparable to state of the art immunoassays, with minimal cross-reactivity. Studies have been performed to characterize the colloidal properties (zeta potential) of the suspended nanorod particles as a function of pH, the ionic strength of the suspending solution, and surface functionalization state. Additional studies have produced means for the non-contact manipulation of the particles, including the insertion of magnetic nickel stripes within the encoding pattern, and control via externally applied electromagnetic fields. Using the results of these studies, the novel Nanobarcodes{reg_sign} based assay was implemented in a prototype automated system with the sample processing functions and optical readout performed on a microfluidic card. The unique physical properties of the nanorod particles enable the development of integrated microfluidic systems for

  18. Single cell microfluidics for systems oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Rong

    2012-02-01

    The singular term ``cancer'' is never one kind of disease, but deceivingly encompasses a large number of heterogeneous disease states, which makes it impossible to completely treat cancer using a generic approach. Rather systems approaches are urgently required to assess cancer heterogeneity, stratify patients and enable the most effective, individualized treatment. The heterogeneity of tumors at the single cell level is reflected by the hierarchical complexity of the tumor microenvironment. To identify all the cellular components, including both tumor and infiltrating immune cells, and to delineate the associated cell-to-cell signaling network that dictates tumor initiation, progression and metastasis, we developed a single cell microfluidics chip that can analyze a panel of proteins that are potentially associated inter-cellular signaling network in tumor microenvironment from hundreds of single cells in parallel. This platform integrates two advanced technologies -- microfluidic single cell handling and ultra-high density protein array. This device was first tested for highly multiplexed profiling of secreted proteins including tumor-immune signaling molecules from monocytic leukemia cells. We observed profound cellular heterogeneity with all functional phenotypes quantitatively identified. Correlation analysis further indicated the existence of an intercellular cytokine network in which TNFα-induced secondary signaling cascades further increased functional cellular diversity. It was also exploited to evaluate polyfunctionality of tumor antigen-specific T cells from melanoma patients being treated with adoptive T cell transfer immunotherapy. This platform could be further extended to analyze both solid tumor cells (e.g. human lung carcinoma cells) and infiltrating immune cells (e.g. macrophages) so as to enable systems analysis of the complex tumor microenvironment from small amounts of clinical specimens, e.g. skinny needle biopsies. Thus, it could potentially

  19. Probing cell mechanical properties with microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowat, Amy

    2012-02-01

    Exploiting flow on the micron-scale is emerging as a method to probe cell mechanical properties with 10-1000x advances in throughput over existing technologies. The mechanical properties of cells and the cell nucleus are implicated in a wide range of biological contexts: for example, the ability of white blood cells to deform is central to immune response; and malignant cells show decreased stiffness compared to benign cells. We recently developed a microfluidic device to probe cell and nucleus mechanical properties: cells are forced to deform through a narrow constrictions in response to an applied pressure; flowing cells through a series of constrictions enables us to probe the ability of hundreds of cells to deform and relax during flow. By tuning the constriction width so it is narrower than the width of the cell nucleus, we can specifically probe the effects of nuclear physical properties on whole cell deformability. We show that the nucleus is the rate-limiting step in cell passage: inducing a change in its shape to a multilobed structure results in cells that transit more quickly; increased levels of lamin A, a nuclear protein that is key for nuclear shape and mechanical stability, impairs the passage of cells through constrictions. We are currently developing a new class of microfluidic devices to simultaneously probe the deformability of hundreds of cell samples in parallel. Using the same soft lithography techniques, membranes are fabricated to have well-defined pore distribution, width, length, and tortuosity. We design the membranes to interface with a multiwell plate, enabling simultaneous measurement of hundreds of different samples. Given the wide spectrum of diseases where altered cell and nucleus mechanical properties are implicated, such a platform has great potential, for example, to screen cells based on their mechanical phenotype against a library of drugs.

  20. Architectural freedom and industrialised architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Inge

    2012-01-01

    Architectural freedom and industrialized architecture. Inge Vestergaard, Associate Professor, Cand. Arch. Aarhus School of Architecture, Denmark Noerreport 20, 8000 Aarhus C Telephone +45 89 36 0000 E-mai l inge.vestergaard@aarch.dk Based on the repetitive architecture from the "building boom" 1960...... compares "best practice" in Denmark and "best practice" in Austria. The modern architects accepted the fact that industrialized architecture told the storey of repetition and monotonous as basic condition. This article aims to explain that architecture can be thought as a complex and diverse design through...... to the building physic problems a new industrialized period has started based on light weight elements basically made of wooden structures, faced with different suitable materials meant for individual expression for the specific housing area. It is the purpose of this article to widen up the different design...

  1. Microfluidic stretchable RF electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2010-12-07

    Stretchable electronics is a revolutionary technology that will potentially create a world of radically different electronic devices and systems that open up an entirely new spectrum of possibilities. This article proposes a microfluidic based solution for stretchable radio frequency (RF) electronics, using hybrid integration of active circuits assembled on flex foils and liquid alloy passive structures embedded in elastic substrates, e.g. polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This concept was employed to implement a 900 MHz stretchable RF radiation sensor, consisting of a large area elastic antenna and a cluster of conventional rigid components for RF power detection. The integrated radiation sensor except the power supply was fully embedded in a thin elastomeric substrate. Good electrical performance of the standalone stretchable antenna as well as the RF power detection sub-module was verified by experiments. The sensor successfully detected the RF radiation over 5 m distance in the system demonstration. Experiments on two-dimensional (2D) stretching up to 15%, folding and twisting of the demonstrated sensor were also carried out. Despite the integrated device was severely deformed, no failure in RF radiation sensing was observed in the tests. This technique illuminates a promising route of realizing stretchable and foldable large area integrated RF electronics that are of great interest to a variety of applications like wearable computing, health monitoring, medical diagnostics, and curvilinear electronics.

  2. Vibration Induced Microfluidic Atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Leslie; Qi, Aisha; Friend, James

    2008-11-01

    We demonstrate rapid generation of micron aerosol droplets in a microfluidic device in which a fluid drop is exposed to surface vibration as it sits atop a piezoelectric substrate. Little, however, is understood about the processes by which these droplets form due to the complex hydrodynamic processes that occur across widely varying length and time scales. Through experiments, scaling theory and numerical modelling, we elucidate the interfacial destabilization mechanisms that lead to droplet formation. Droplets form due to the axisymmetric break-up of cylindrical liquid jets ejected as a consequence of interfacial destabilization. Their 10 μm size correlates with the jet radius and the instability wavelength, both determined from a viscous-capillary dominant force balance and confirmed through a numerical solution. With the exception of drops that spread into thin films with thicknesses on the order of the boundary layer dimension, the free surface is always observed to vibrate at the capillary-viscous resonance frequency despite the surface vibration frequency being several orders larger. This is contrary to common assumptions used in deriving subharmonic models resulting in a Mathieu equation, which has commonly led to spurious predictions in the droplet size.

  3. Hydrogel-coated microfluidic channels for cardiomyocyte culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annabi, Nasim; Selimović, Šeila; Cox, Juan Pablo Acevedo; Ribas, João; Bakooshli, Mohsen Afshar; Heintze, Déborah; Weiss, Anthony S.; Cropek, Donald; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The research areas of tissue engineering and drug development have displayed increased interest in organ-on-a-chip studies, in which physiologically or pathologically relevant tissues can be engineered to test pharmaceutical candidates. Microfluidic technologies enable the control of the cellular microenvironment for these applications through the topography, size, and elastic properties of the microscale cell culture environment, while delivering nutrients and chemical cues to the cells through continuous media perfusion. Traditional materials used in the fabrication of microfluidic devices, such as poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), offer high fidelity and high feature resolution, but do not facilitate cell attachment. To overcome this challenge, we have developed a method for coating microfluidic channels inside a closed PDMS device with a cell-compatible hydrogel layer. We have synthesized photocrosslinkable gelatin and tropoelastin-based hydrogel solutions that were used to coat the surfaces under continuous flow inside 50 μm wide, straight microfluidic channels to generate a hydrogel layer on the channel walls. Our observation of primary cardiomyocytes seeded on these hydrogel layers showed preferred attachment as well as higher spontaneous beating rates on tropoelastin coatings compared to gelatin. In addition, cellular attachment, alignment and beating were stronger on 5 % (w/v) hydrogel-coated devices than on 10 % (w/v) gel-coated channels. Our results demonstrate that cardiomyocytes respond favorably to the elastic, soft tropoelastin culture substrates, indicating that tropoelastin-based hydrogels may be a suitable coating choice for some organ-on-a-chip applications. We anticipate that the proposed hydrogel coating method and tropoelastin as a cell culture substrate may be useful for the generation of elastic tissues, e.g. blood vessels, using microfluidic approaches. PMID:23728018

  4. Dynamics of blood flow in a microfluidic ladder network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddala, Jeevan; Zilberman-Rudenko, Jevgenia; McCarty, Owen

    The dynamics of a complex mixture of cells and proteins, such as blood, in perturbed shear flow remains ill-defined. Microfluidics is a promising technology for improving the understanding of blood flow under complex conditions of shear; as found in stent implants and in tortuous blood vessels. We model the fluid dynamics of blood flow in a microfluidic ladder network with dimensions mimicking venules. Interaction of blood cells was modeled using multiagent framework, where cells of different diameters were treated as spheres. This model served as the basis for predicting transition regions, collision pathways, re-circulation zones and residence times of cells dependent on their diameters and device architecture. Based on these insights from the model, we were able to predict the clot formation configurations at various locations in the device. These predictions were supported by the experiments using whole blood. To facilitate platelet aggregation, the devices were coated with fibrillar collagen and tissue factor. Blood was perfused through the microfluidic device for 9 min at a physiologically relevant venous shear rate of 600 s-1. Using fluorescent microscopy, we observed flow transitions near the channel intersections and at the areas of blood flow obstruction, which promoted larger thrombus formation. This study of integrating model predictions with experimental design, aids in defining the dynamics of blood flow in microvasculature and in development of novel biomedical devices.

  5. Stack air-breathing membraneless glucose microfluidic biofuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-de-la-Rosa, J.; Moreno-Zuria, A.; Vallejo-Becerra, V.; Arjona, N.; Guerra-Balcázar, M.; Ledesma-García, J.; Arriaga, L. G.

    2016-11-01

    A novel stacked microfluidic fuel cell design comprising re-utilization of the anodic and cathodic solutions on the secondary cell is presented. This membraneless microfluidic fuel cell employs porous flow-through electrodes in a “V”-shape cell architecture. Enzymatic bioanodic arrays based on glucose oxidase were prepared by immobilizing the enzyme onto Toray carbon paper electrodes using tetrabutylammonium bromide, Nafion and glutaraldehyde. These electrodes were characterized through the scanning electrochemical microscope technique, evidencing a good electrochemical response due to the electronic transference observed with the presence of glucose over the entire of the electrode. Moreover, the evaluation of this microfluidic fuel cell with an air-breathing system in a double-cell mode showed a performance of 0.8951 mWcm-2 in a series connection (2.2822mAcm-2, 1.3607V), and 0.8427 mWcm-2 in a parallel connection (3.5786mAcm-2, 0.8164V).

  6. Architectural Engineering to Super-Light Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castberg, Niels Andreas

    with architectural engineering as a starting point. The thesis is based on a two stringed hypothesis: Architectural engineering gives rise to better architecture and Super-Light Structures support and enables a static, challenging architecture. The aim of the thesis is to clarify architectural engineering's impact...... on the work process between architects and engineers in the design development. Using architectural engineering, Super-Light Structures are examined in an architectural context, and it is explained how digital tools can support architectural engineering and design of Super-Light Structures. The experiences...... to be subjects of examination for this thesis. The research results show that architectural engineering has a significant impact on a design process. The projects illustrate that simple explanations, underpinned by visualisations of the challenges between shape versus structure, often creates a shared...

  7. Microfluidic tools toward industrial biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Aline F; Pessoa, Amanda C S N; Bastos, Reinaldo G; de la Torre, Lucimara G

    2016-11-01

    Microfluidics is a technology that operates with small amounts of fluids and makes possible the investigation of cells, enzymes, and biomolecules and encapsulation of biocatalysts in a greater variety of conditions than permitted using conventional methods. This review discusses technological possibilities that can be applied in the field of industrial biotechnology, presenting the principal definitions and fundamental aspects of microfluidic parameters to better understand advanced approaches. Specifically, concentration gradient generators, droplet-based microfluidics, and microbioreactors are explored as useful tools that can contribute to industrial biotechnology. These tools present potential applications, inclusive as commercial platforms to optimizing in bioprocesses development as screening cells, encapsulating biocatalysts, and determining critical kinetic parameters. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1372-1389, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  8. Magnetic separation in microfluidic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smistrup, Kristian

    2007-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis presents theory, modeling, design, fabrication, experiments and results for microfluidic magnetic separators. A model for magnetic bead movement in a microfluidic channel is presented, and the limits of the model are discussed. The effective magnetic field gradient is defined...... for fabrication of silicon based systems. This fabrication scheme is explained, and it is shown how, it is applied with variations for several designs of magnetic separators. An experimental setup for magnetic separation experiments has been developed. It has been coupled with an image analysis program....... It is shown conceptually how such a system can be applied for parallel biochemical processing in a microfluidic system. ’Passive’ magnetic separators are presented, where on-chip soft magnetic elements are magnetized by an external magnetic field and create strong magnetic fields and gradients inside...

  9. Microfluidic Technologies for Synthetic Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Kuk Lee

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidic technologies have shown powerful abilities for reducing cost, time, and labor, and at the same time, for increasing accuracy, throughput, and performance in the analysis of biological and biochemical samples compared with the conventional, macroscale instruments. Synthetic biology is an emerging field of biology and has drawn much attraction due to its potential to create novel, functional biological parts and systems for special purposes. Since it is believed that the development of synthetic biology can be accelerated through the use of microfluidic technology, in this review work we focus our discussion on the latest microfluidic technologies that can provide unprecedented means in synthetic biology for dynamic profiling of gene expression/regulation with high resolution, highly sensitive on-chip and off-chip detection of metabolites, and whole-cell analysis.

  10. Architectural Contestation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merle, J.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the reductive reading of Georges Bataille's work done within the field of architectural criticism and theory which tends to set aside the fundamental ‘broken’ totality of Bataille's oeuvre and also to narrowly interpret it as a mere critique of architectural form, consequ

  11. Local architecture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Local architecture refers to structures built in the countryside,such as temples,memorial halls,residences, stores,pavilions, bridges,decorated archways, and wells. Because these structures were all built by focal craftsmen and villagers in the traditional local style, they are generally called local architecture.

  12. Architecture Sustainability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avgeriou, Paris; Stal, Michael; Hilliard, Rich

    2013-01-01

    Software architecture is the foundation of software system development, encompassing a system's architects' and stakeholders' strategic decisions. A special issue of IEEE Software is intended to raise awareness of architecture sustainability issues and increase interest and work in the area. The fir

  13. Architectural geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pottmann, Helmut; Eigensatz, Michael; Vaxman, A.; Wallner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Around 2005 it became apparent in the geometry processing community that freeform architecture contains many problems of a geometric nature to be solved, and many opportunities for optimization which however require geometric understanding. This area of research, which has been called architectural

  14. Architectural Contestation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merle, J.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the reductive reading of Georges Bataille's work done within the field of architectural criticism and theory which tends to set aside the fundamental ‘broken’ totality of Bataille's oeuvre and also to narrowly interpret it as a mere critique of architectural form,

  15. Architectural geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pottmann, Helmut; Eigensatz, Michael; Vaxman, A.; Wallner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Around 2005 it became apparent in the geometry processing community that freeform architecture contains many problems of a geometric nature to be solved, and many opportunities for optimization which however require geometric understanding. This area of research, which has been called architectural

  16. Microfluidic partitioning of the extracellular space around single cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauke, Norbert; Smith, Godfrey L; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2007-02-01

    This paper describes the partitioning of the extracellular space around an electrically activated single cardiac myocyte, constrained within a microfluidic device. Central to this new method is the production of a hydrophobic gap-structure, which divides the extracellular space into two distinct microfluidic pools. The content of these pools was controlled using a pair of concentric automated pipets (subsequently called "dual superfusion pipet"), each providing the ability to dispense (i.e., the source, inner pipet) and aspirate (the sink, outer pipet) a buffer solution (perfusate) into each of the two pools. For rapid solution switching around the cell, additional dual superfusion pipets were inserted into the microchannel for defined time periods using a piezostepper, enabling us to add a test solution, such as a drug. Three distinct areas of the cell were manipulated, namely, the microfluidic environment, the cellular membrane, and the intracellular space. Planar integrated microelectrodes enabled the electrical stimulation of the cardiomyocyte and the recording of the evoked action potential. The device was mounted on an inverted microscope to allow simultaneous sarcomere length and epifluorescence measurements during evoked electrical activity, including, for example, the response of the stimulated end of the cardiac myocyte in comparison with the untreated cell end.

  17. Plasma treatments of wool fiber surface for microfluidic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, So-Hyoun; Hwang, Ki-Hwan; Lee, Jin Su [Department of Chemistry, Sungkyunkwan University, 440-746 Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Boo, Jin-Hyo, E-mail: jhboo@skku.edu [Department of Chemistry, Sungkyunkwan University, 440-746 Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Sang H., E-mail: shy@kth.se [Institute of Basic Science, Sungkyunkwan University, 440-746 Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • We used atmospheric plasma for tuning the wettability of wool fibers. • The wicking rates of the wool fibers increased with increasing treatment time. • The increasing of wettability results in removement of fatty acid on the wool surface. - Abstract: Recent progress in health diagnostics has led to the development of simple and inexpensive systems. Thread-based microfluidic devices allow for portable and inexpensive field-based technologies enabling medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, and food safety analysis. However, controlling the flow rate of wool thread, which is a very important part of thread-based microfluidic devices, is quite difficult. For this reason, we focused on thread-based microfluidics in the study. We developed a method of changing the wettability of hydrophobic thread, including wool thread. Thus, using natural wool thread as a channel, we demonstrate herein that the manipulation of the liquid flow, such as micro selecting and micro mixing, can be achieved by applying plasma treatment to wool thread. In addition to enabling the flow control of the treated wool channels consisting of all natural substances, this procedure will also be beneficial for biological sensing devices. We found that wools treated with various gases have different flow rates. We used an atmospheric plasma with O{sub 2}, N{sub 2} and Ar gases.

  18. Applications of microfluidics in quantitative biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yang; Gao, Meng; Wen, Lingling; He, Caiyun; Chen, Yuan; Liu, Chenli; Fu, Xiongfei; Huang, Shuqiang

    2017-10-04

    Quantitative biology is dedicated to taking advantage of quantitative reasoning and advanced engineering technologies to make biology more predictable. Microfluidics, as an emerging technique, provides new approaches to precisely control fluidic conditions on small scales and collect data in high-throughput and quantitative manners. In this review, we present the relevant applications of microfluidics to quantitative biology based on two major categories (channel-based microfluidics and droplet-based microfluidics), and their typical features. We also envision some other microfluidic techniques that may not be employed in quantitative biology right now, but have great potential in the near future. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Architectural Theatricality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Tenna Doktor Olsen

    This PhD thesis is motived by a personal interest in the theoretical, practical and creative qualities of architecture. But also a wonder and curiosity about the cultural and social relations architecture represents through its occupation with both the sciences and the arts. Inspired by present...... initiatives in Aalborg Hospital to overcome patient undernutrition by refurbishing eating environments, this thesis engages in an investigation of the interior architectural qualities of patient eating environments. The relevance for this holistic perspective, synthesizing health, food and architecture...... environments and a knowledge gap therefore exists in present hospital designs. Consequently, the purpose of this thesis has been to investigate if any research-based knowledge exist supporting the hypothesis that the interior architectural qualities of eating environments influence patient food intake, health...

  20. Systemic Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poletto, Marco; Pasquero, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    design protocols developed to describe the city as a territory of self-organization. Collecting together nearly a decade of design experiments by the authors and their practice, ecoLogicStudio, the book discusses key disciplinary definitions such as ecologic urbanism, algorithmic architecture, bottom......This is a manual investigating the subject of urban ecology and systemic development from the perspective of architectural design. It sets out to explore two main goals: to discuss the contemporary relevance of a systemic practice to architectural design, and to share a toolbox of informational......-up or tactical design, behavioural space and the boundary of the natural and the artificial realms within the city and architecture. A new kind of "real-time world-city" is illustrated in the form of an operational design manual for the assemblage of proto-architectures, the incubation of proto...

  1. Architectural Theatricality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Tenna Doktor Olsen

    and well-being, as well as outline a set of basic design principles ‘predicting’ the future interior architectural qualities of patient eating environments. Methodologically the thesis is based on an explorative study employing an abductive approach and hermeneutic-interpretative strategy utilizing tactics......This PhD thesis is motived by a personal interest in the theoretical, practical and creative qualities of architecture. But also a wonder and curiosity about the cultural and social relations architecture represents through its occupation with both the sciences and the arts. Inspired by present...... initiatives in Aalborg Hospital to overcome patient undernutrition by refurbishing eating environments, this thesis engages in an investigation of the interior architectural qualities of patient eating environments. The relevance for this holistic perspective, synthesizing health, food and architecture...

  2. Architectural Narratives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    and architectural heritage; another group tries to embed new performative technologies in expressive architectural representation. Finally, this essay provides a theoretical framework for the analysis of the political rationales of these projects and for the architectural representation bridges the gap between......In this essay, I focus on the combination of programs and the architecture of cultural projects that have emerged within the last few years. These projects are characterized as “hybrid cultural projects,” because they intend to combine experience with entertainment, play, and learning. This essay...... identifies new rationales related to this development, and it argues that “cultural planning” has increasingly shifted its focus from a cultural institutional approach to a more market-oriented strategy that integrates art and business. The role of architecture has changed, too. It not only provides...

  3. Architectural Theatricality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Tenna Doktor Olsen

    , is the current building of a series of Danish ‘super hospitals’ and an increased focus among architectural practices on research-based knowledge produced with the architectural sub-disciplines Healing Architecture and Evidence-Based Design. The problem is that this research does not focus on patient eating...... environments and a knowledge gap therefore exists in present hospital designs. Consequently, the purpose of this thesis has been to investigate if any research-based knowledge exist supporting the hypothesis that the interior architectural qualities of eating environments influence patient food intake, health...... and well-being, as well as outline a set of basic design principles ‘predicting’ the future interior architectural qualities of patient eating environments. Methodologically the thesis is based on an explorative study employing an abductive approach and hermeneutic-interpretative strategy utilizing tactics...

  4. Architectural Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Marie

    -anthropology. Within the field of architecture, however, there has not yet been quite the same eagerness to include anthropological approaches in design processes. This paper discusses why this is so and how and whether architectural anthropology has different conditions and objectives than other types of design...... and other spaces that architects are preoccupied with. On the other hand, the distinction between architecture and design is not merely one of scale. Design and architecture represent – at least in Denmark – also quite different disciplinary traditions and methods. Where designers develop prototypes......, and that this will restrict the creative design process. Also, the end user of architecture is not easily identified, as a new building should not just accommodate the needs of specific residents but also those of neighbours, future residents, other citizens and maybe society as such. The paper explores the challenges...

  5. Microfluidic 3D Helix Mixers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgette B. Salieb-Beugelaar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric microfluidic systems are well suited for miniaturized devices with complex functionality, and rapid prototyping methods for 3D microfluidic structures are increasingly used. Mixing at the microscale and performing chemical reactions at the microscale are important applications of such systems and we therefore explored feasibility, mixing characteristics and the ability to control a chemical reaction in helical 3D channels produced by the emerging thread template method. Mixing at the microscale is challenging because channel size reduction for improving solute diffusion comes at the price of a reduced Reynolds number that induces a strictly laminar flow regime and abolishes turbulence that would be desired for improved mixing. Microfluidic 3D helix mixers were rapidly prototyped in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS using low-surface energy polymeric threads, twisted to form 2-channel and 3-channel helices. Structure and flow characteristics were assessed experimentally by microscopy, hydraulic measurements and chromogenic reaction, and were modeled by computational fluid dynamics. We found that helical 3D microfluidic systems produced by thread templating allow rapid prototyping, can be used for mixing and for controlled chemical reaction with two or three reaction partners at the microscale. Compared to the conventional T-shaped microfluidic system used as a control device, enhanced mixing and faster chemical reaction was found to occur due to the combination of diffusive mixing in small channels and flow folding due to the 3D helix shape. Thus, microfluidic 3D helix mixers can be rapidly prototyped using the thread template method and are an attractive and competitive method for fluid mixing and chemical reactions at the microscale.

  6. Fluid control in microfluidic devices using a fluid conveyance extension and an absorbent microfluidic flow modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Po Ki

    2013-05-07

    This article presents a simple method for controlling fluid in microfluidic devices without the need for valves or pumps. A fluid conveyance extension is fluidly coupled to the enclosed outlet chamber of a microfluidic device. After a fluid is introduced into the microfluidic device and saturates the fluid conveyance extension, a fluid flow in the microfluidic device is generated by contacting an absorbent microfluidic flow modulator with the fluid conveyance extension to absorb the fluid from the fluid conveyance extension through capillary action. Since the fluid in the microfluidic device is fluidly coupled with the fluid conveyance extension and the fluid conveyance extension is fluidly coupled with the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator, the absorption rate of the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator, which is the rate at which the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator absorbs fluid, matches the fluid flow rate in the microfluidic device. Thus, the fluid flow rate in the microfluidic device is set by the absorption rate of the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator. Sheath flow and fluid switching applications are demonstrated using this simple fluid control method without the need for valves or pumps. Also, the ability to control the fluid flow rate in the microfluidic device is demonstrated using absorbent microfluidic flow modulators with various absorbent characteristics and dimensions.

  7. Microfluidic device for drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, David J. (Inventor); MacDonald, Michael J. (Inventor); Eddington, David T. (Inventor); Mensing, Glennys A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A microfluidic device is provided for delivering a drug to an individual. The microfluidic device includes a body that defines a reservoir for receiving the drug therein. A valve interconnects the reservoir to an output needle that is insertable into the skin of an individual. A pressure source urges the drug from the reservoir toward the needle. The valve is movable between a closed position preventing the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle and an open position allowing for the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle in response to a predetermined condition in the physiological fluids of the individual.

  8. Die-stacking architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The emerging three-dimensional (3D) chip architectures, with their intrinsic capability of reducing the wire length, promise attractive solutions to reduce the delay of interconnects in future microprocessors. 3D memory stacking enables much higher memory bandwidth for future chip-multiprocessor design, mitigating the ""memory wall"" problem. In addition, heterogenous integration enabled by 3D technology can also result in innovative designs for future microprocessors. This book first provides a brief introduction to this emerging technology, and then presents a variety of approaches to design

  9. Review of cell and particle trapping in microfluidic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, J.; Evander, M.; Hammarstroem, B. [Department of Measurement Technology and Industrial Electrical Engineering, Div. of Nanobiotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, Lund (Sweden); Laurell, T., E-mail: thomas.laurell@elmat.lth.se [Department of Measurement Technology and Industrial Electrical Engineering, Div. of Nanobiotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, Lund (Sweden)

    2009-09-07

    The ability to obtain ideal conditions for well-defined chemical microenvironments and controlled temporal chemical and/or thermal variations holds promise of high-resolution cell response studies, cell-cell interactions or e.g. proliferation conditions for stem cells. It is a major motivation for the rapid increase of lab-on-a-chip based cell biology research. In view of this, new chip-integrated technologies are at an increasing rate being presented to the research community as potential tools to offer spatial control and manipulation of cells in microfluidic systems. This is becoming a key area of interest in the emerging lab-on-a-chip based cell biology research field. This review focuses on the different technical approaches presented to enable trapping of particles and cells in microfluidic system.

  10. Continuous flow synthesis of nanoparticles using ceramic microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-de Pedro, S; Puyol, M; Alonso-Chamarro, J

    2010-10-15

    A microfluidic system based on the low-temperature co-fired ceramics technology (LTCC) is proposed to reproducibly carry out a simple one-phase synthesis and functionalization of monodispersed gold nanoparticles. It takes advantage of the LTCC technology, offering a fast prototyping without the need to use sophisticated facilities, reducing significantly the cost and production time of microfluidic systems. Some other interesting advantages of the ceramic materials compared to glass, silicon or polymers are their versatility and chemical resistivity. The technology enables the construction of multilayered systems, which can integrate other mechanical, electronic and fluidic components in a single substrate. This approach allows rapid, easy, low cost and automated synthesis of the gold colloidal, thus it becomes a useful approach in the progression from laboratory scale to pilot-line scale processes, which is currently demanded.

  11. Microwave Dielectric Heating of Drops in Microfluidic Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Issadore, David; Brown, Keith A; Sandberg, Lori; Weitz, David; Westervelt, Robert M

    2009-01-01

    We present a technique to locally and rapidly heat water drops in microfluidic devices with microwave dielectric heating. Water absorbs microwave power more efficiently than polymers, glass, and oils due to its permanent molecular dipole moment that has a large dielectric loss at GHz frequencies. The relevant heat capacity of the system is a single thermally isolated picoliter drop of water and this enables very fast thermal cycling. We demonstrate microwave dielectric heating in a microfluidic device that integrates a flow-focusing drop maker, drop splitters, and metal electrodes to locally deliver microwave power from an inexpensive, commercially available 3.0 GHz source and amplifier. The temperature of the drops is measured by observing the temperature dependent fluorescence intensity of cadmium selenide nanocrystals suspended in the water drops. We demonstrate characteristic heating times as short as 15 ms to steady-state temperatures as large as 30 degrees C above the base temperature of the microfluidi...

  12. Multimodal Microchannel and Nanowell-Based Microfluidic Platforms for Bioimaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Tao; Smallwood, Chuck R.; Zhu, Ying; Bredeweg, Erin L.; Baker, Scott E.; Evans, James E.; Kelly, Ryan T.

    2017-03-30

    Modern live-cell imaging approaches permit real-time visualization of biological processes. However, limitations for unicellular organism trapping, culturing and long-term imaging can preclude complete understanding of how such microorganisms respond to perturbations in their local environment or linking single-cell variability to whole population dynamics. We have developed microfluidic platforms to overcome prior technical bottlenecks to allow both chemostat and compartmentalized cellular growth conditions using the same device. Additionally, a nanowell-based platform enables a high throughput approach to scale up compartmentalized imaging optimized within the microfluidic device. These channel and nanowell platforms are complementary, and both provide fine control over the local environment as well as the ability to add/replace media components at any experimental time point.

  13. Electrostatic charging and control of droplets in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongbo; Yao, Shuhuai

    2013-03-07

    Precharged droplets can facilitate manipulation and control of low-volume liquids in droplet-based microfluidics. In this paper, we demonstrate non-contact electrostatic charging of droplets by polarizing a neutral droplet and splitting it into two oppositely charged daughter droplets in a T-junction microchannel. We performed numerical simulation to analyze the non-contact charging process and proposed a new design with a notch at the T-junction in aid of droplet splitting for more efficient charging. We experimentally characterized the induced charge in droplets in microfabricated devices. The experimental results agreed well with the simulation. Finally, we demonstrated highly effective droplet manipulation in a path selection unit appending to the droplet charging. We expect our work could enable precision manipulation of droplets for more complex liquid handling in microfluidics and promote electric-force based manipulation in 'lab-on-a-chip' systems.

  14. A frequency reconfigurable antenna based on digital microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damgaci, Yasin; Cetiner, Bedri A

    2013-08-07

    We present a novel antenna reconfiguration mechanism relying on electrowetting based digital microfluidics to implement a frequency reconfigurable antenna operating in the X-band. The antenna built on a quartz substrate (εr = 3.9, tan δ = 0.0002) is a coplanar waveguide fed annular slot antenna, which is monolithically integrated with a microfluidic chip. This chip establishes an electrowetting on dielectric platform with a mercury droplet placed in it. The base contact area of the mercury droplet can be spread out by electrostatic actuation resulting in a change of loading capacitance. This in turn changes the resonant frequency of the antenna enabling a reversible reconfigurable impedance property. This reconfigurable antenna has been designed, fabricated and measured. The frequency of operation is tuned from around 11 GHz to 13 GHz as demonstrated by simulations and measurements. The design methodology, fabrication processes and the experimental results are given and discussed.

  15. Catalyst Architecture for Stable Single Atom Dispersion Enables Site-Specific Spectroscopic and Reactivity Measurements of CO Adsorbed to Pt Atoms, Oxidized Pt Clusters, and Metallic Pt Clusters on TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRita, Leo; Dai, Sheng; Lopez-Zepeda, Kimberly; Pham, Nicholas; Graham, George W; Pan, Xiaoqing; Christopher, Phillip

    2017-10-11

    Oxide-supported precious metal nanoparticles are widely used industrial catalysts. Due to expense and rarity, developing synthetic protocols that reduce precious metal nanoparticle size and stabilize dispersed species is essential. Supported atomically dispersed, single precious metal atoms represent the most efficient metal utilization geometry, although debate regarding the catalytic activity of supported single precious atom species has arisen from difficulty in synthesizing homogeneous and stable single atom dispersions, and a lack of site-specific characterization approaches. We propose a catalyst architecture and characterization approach to overcome these limitations, by depositing ∼1 precious metal atom per support particle and characterizing structures by correlating scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging and CO probe molecule infrared spectroscopy. This is demonstrated for Pt supported on anatase TiO2. In these structures, isolated Pt atoms, Ptiso, remain stable through various conditions, and spectroscopic evidence suggests Ptiso species exist in homogeneous local environments. Comparing Ptiso to ∼1 nm preoxidized (Ptox) and prereduced (Ptmetal) Pt clusters on TiO2, we identify unique spectroscopic signatures of CO bound to each site and find CO adsorption energy is ordered: Ptiso ≪ Ptmetal atoms bonded to TiO2 and that Ptiso exhibits optimal reactivity because every atom is exposed for catalysis and forms an interfacial site with TiO2. This approach should be generally useful for studying the behavior of supported precious metal atoms.

  16. Zooming in to see the bigger picture: microfluidic and nanofabrication tools to study bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hol, Felix J H; Dekker, Cees

    2014-10-24

    The spatial structure of natural habitats strongly affects bacterial life, ranging from nanoscale structural features that individual cells exploit for surface attachment, to micro- and millimeter-scale chemical gradients that drive population-level processes. Nanofabrication and microfluidics are ideally suited to manipulate the environment at those scales and have emerged as powerful tools with which to study bacteria. Here, we review the new scientific insights gained by using a diverse set of nanofabrication and microfluidic techniques to study individual bacteria and multispecies communities. This toolbox is beginning to elucidate disparate bacterial phenomena-including aging, electron transport, and quorum sensing-and enables the dissection of environmental communities through single-cell genomics. A more intimate integration of microfluidics, nanofabrication, and microbiology will enable further exploration of bacterial life at the smallest scales. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. Flow Manipulation in Thread-Based Microfluidics by Tuning the Wettability of Wool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, So-Hyoun; Hwang, Ki-Hwan; Jung, Won Suk; Seo, Hyeon-Jin; Nam, Sung Woo; Boo, Jin-Hyo; Yun, Sang H

    2015-02-01

    Recent progress in thread-based microfluidic devices has provided portable and inexpensive field-based technologies enabling medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, and food safety analysis. However, capillary-driven liquid flow in a single thread, a crucial aspect of thread-based microfluidics, is difficult to control. Among potential materials, hydrophobic wool thread is an appropriate candidate for liquid flow control in thread-based microfluidics because its wettability can be readily tuned by the introduction of a natural color pigment, thereby manipulating flow. Thus, utilizing natural wool thread as a channel, we demonstrate here that liquid flow manipulations, such as microselecting and micromixing, can be achieved by coating the complex Al(III) (Alum) brazilein onto wool thread. In addition to enabling flow control, the coated wool channels consisting entirely of naturally occurring substances will be beneficial for biological sensing devices.

  18. Complex Microfluidic Systems Architectures and Applications to Micropower Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-07

    mass flow perturbation at high frequency causes stream in the main channel to laminate and mix. Reactor Development Figure 1: Design of the Synthetic...premix) air and incoming fuel across the width of the microchannel , when parameters of side channel oscillation are optimized. , , Figure 5: Smoke...repetitive extinction-ignition cycles appear (minimum value of the reaction rate is small). Combustion in single microchannel with no external heating phase

  19. 3D-printed microfluidic chips with patterned, cell-laden hydrogel constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Yu, Chu Hsiang; Ersoy, Fulya; Emadi, Sharareh; Khademhosseini, Ali; Tasoglu, Savas

    2016-06-20

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing offers potential to fabricate high-throughput and low-cost fabrication of microfluidic devices as a promising alternative to traditional techniques which enables efficient design iterations in the development stage. In this study, we demonstrate a single-step fabrication of a 3D transparent microfluidic chip using two alternative techniques: a stereolithography-based desktop 3D printer and a two-step fabrication using an industrial 3D printer based on polyjet technology. This method, compared to conventional fabrication using relatively expensive materials and labor-intensive processes, presents a low-cost, rapid prototyping technique to print functional 3D microfluidic chips. We enhance the capabilities of 3D-printed microfluidic devices by coupling 3D cell encapsulation and spatial patterning within photocrosslinkable gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA). The platform presented here serves as a 3D culture environment for long-term cell culture and growth. Furthermore, we have demonstrated the ability to print complex 3D microfluidic channels to create predictable and controllable fluid flow regimes. Here, we demonstrate the novel use of 3D-printed microfluidic chips as controllable 3D cell culture environments, advancing the applicability of 3D printing to engineering physiological systems for future applications in bioengineering.

  20. Multi-Dimensional Nanostructures for Microfluidic Screening of Biomarkers: From Molecular Separation to Cancer Cell Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Elaine; Chen, Kaina; Hang, Annie; Syed, Abeer; Zhang, John X J

    2016-04-01

    Rapid screening of biomarkers, with high specificity and accuracy, is critical for many point-of-care diagnostics. Microfluidics, the use of microscale channels to manipulate small liquid samples and carry reactions in parallel, offers tremendous opportunities to address fundamental questions in biology and provide a fast growing set of clinical tools for medicine. Emerging multi-dimensional nanostructures, when coupled with microfluidics, enable effective and efficient screening with high specificity and sensitivity, both of which are important aspects of biological detection systems. In this review, we provide an overview of current research and technologies that utilize nanostructures to facilitate biological separation in microfluidic channels. Various important physical parameters and theoretical equations that characterize and govern flow in nanostructure-integrated microfluidic channels will be introduced and discussed. The application of multi-dimensional nanostructures, including nanoparticles, nanopillars, and nanoporous layers, integrated with microfluidic channels in molecular and cellular separation will also be reviewed. Finally, we will close with insights on the future of nanostructure-integrated microfluidic platforms and their role in biological and biomedical applications.

  1. Study on Microchannel Design and Burst Frequency Detection for Centrifugal Microfluidic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaw-Jen Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A centrifugal microfluidic system has been developed in this study, enabling the control and measurement of the burst frequency in order to manipulate the liquid. The radial microfluid chips with different microchannel dimensions were designed for simulation analyses and experimental verifications. The microfluidic flow in the microchannel was analyzed using software CFDRC, providing an accurate result compared with that from experiment. The results show that the design of the overflow microchannel can correctly keep the liquid volume with error as low as 5%. For mercurochrome, the burst frequency has an inverse proportion to the channel width, and the simulation results agree with the experimental results. For oil, however, the experimental and simulation results indicate that the relationship between the burst frequency and channel width is not obvious due to oil properties. Since the simulation approach can provide an accurate prediction of flow behavior in the microchannel, the design of radial microfluid chip and the control of burst frequency can be achieved effectively. A practical application to design the centrifugal microfluidic disc for blood typing test was also carried out in this study. The centrifugal microfluidic system can successfully control the spinning speed to achieve the result of adding reagents in a specific sequence.

  2. Humanizing Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Tanya Søndergaard

    2015-01-01

    The article proposes the urban digital gallery as an opportunity to explore the relationship between ‘human’ and ‘technology,’ through the programming of media architecture. It takes a curatorial perspective when proposing an ontological shift from considering media facades as visual spectacles...... agency and a sense of being by way of dematerializing architecture. This is achieved by way of programming the symbolic to provide new emotional realizations and situations of enlightenment in the public audience. This reflects a greater potential to humanize the digital in media architecture....

  3. Healing Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folmer, Mette Blicher; Mullins, Michael; Frandsen, Anne Kathrine

    2012-01-01

    The project examines how architecture and design of space in the intensive unit promotes or hinders interaction between relatives and patients. The primary starting point is the relatives. Relatives’ support and interaction with their loved ones is important in order to promote the patients healing...... process. Therefore knowledge on how space can support interaction is fundamental for the architect, in order to make the best design solutions. Several scientific studies document that the hospital's architecture and design are important for human healing processes, including how the physical environment...... architectural and design solutions in order to improve quality of interaction between relative and patient in the hospital's intensive unit....

  4. Architectural technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    The booklet offers an overall introduction to the Institute of Architectural Technology and its projects and activities, and an invitation to the reader to contact the institute or the individual researcher for further information. The research, which takes place at the Institute of Architectural...... Technology at the Roayl Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture, reflects a spread between strategic, goal-oriented pilot projects, commissioned by a ministry, a fund or a private company, and on the other hand projects which originate from strong personal interests and enthusiasm of individual...

  5. Humanizing Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Tanya Søndergaard

    2015-01-01

    The article proposes the urban digital gallery as an opportunity to explore the relationship between ‘human’ and ‘technology,’ through the programming of media architecture. It takes a curatorial perspective when proposing an ontological shift from considering media facades as visual spectacles...... agency and a sense of being by way of dematerializing architecture. This is achieved by way of programming the symbolic to provide new emotional realizations and situations of enlightenment in the public audience. This reflects a greater potential to humanize the digital in media architecture....

  6. Going beyond 20 μm-sized channels for studying red blood cell phase separation in microfluidic bifurcations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Sophie; Merlo, Adlan; Duru, Paul; Risso, Frédéric; Lorthois, Sylvie

    2016-05-01

    Despite the development of microfluidics, experimental challenges are considerable for achieving a quantitative study of phase separation, i.e., the non-proportional distribution of Red Blood Cells (RBCs) and suspending fluid, in microfluidic bifurcations with channels smaller than 20 μm. Yet, a basic understanding of phase separation in such small vessels is needed for understanding the coupling between microvascular network architecture and dynamics at larger scale. Here, we present the experimental methodologies and measurement techniques developed for that purpose for RBC concentrations (tube hematocrits) ranging between 2% and 20%. The maximal RBC velocity profile is directly measured by a temporal cross-correlation technique which enables to capture the RBC slip velocity at walls with high resolution, highlighting two different regimes (flat and more blunted ones) as a function of RBC confinement. The tube hematocrit is independently measured by a photometric technique. The RBC and suspending fluid flow rates are then deduced assuming the velocity profile of a Newtonian fluid with no slip at walls for the latter. The accuracy of this combination of techniques is demonstrated by comparison with reference measurements and verification of RBC and suspending fluid mass conservation at individual bifurcations. The present methodologies are much more accurate, with less than 15% relative errors, than the ones used in previous in vivo experiments. Their potential for studying steady state phase separation is demonstrated, highlighting an unexpected decrease of phase separation with increasing hematocrit in symmetrical, but not asymmetrical, bifurcations and providing new reference data in regimes where in vitro results were previously lacking.

  7. Controlled Cavitation in Microfluidic Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, Ed; le Gac, Severine; Tsuji, Kinko; Ohl, C.D.

    2007-01-01

    We report on cavitation in confined microscopic environments which are commonly called microfluidic or lab-on-a-chip systems. The cavitation bubble is created by focusing a pulsed laser into these structures filled with a lght-absorbing liquid. At hte center of a 20 mu m thick and 1 mm wide channel,

  8. Membranes and microfluidics: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, J.; Lammertink, Rob G.H.; Wessling, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    The integration of mass transport control by means of membrane functionality into microfluidic devices has shown substantial growth over the last 10 years. Many different examples of mass transport control have been reported, demonstrating the versatile use of membranes. This review provides an

  9. Microfluidic fabrication of plasmonic microcapsules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Jin, M.L.; Eijkel, J.C.T.; Berg, van den A.; Zhou, G.F.; Shui, L.L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the plasmonic microcapsules with well-ordered nanoparticles embedded in polymer network fabricated by using a microfluidic device. The well-ordered nanoparticle arrays on the microcapsule form high-density uniform “hot-spots” with a deposited metal film, on which the localized su

  10. Microfluidic technology for PET radiochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillies, J.M. [Cancer Research-UK/University of Manchester Radiochemical Targeting and Imaging Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester, M20 4BX (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: jgillies@picr.man.ac.uk; Prenant, C. [Cancer Research-UK/University of Manchester Radiochemical Targeting and Imaging Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester, M20 4BX (United Kingdom); School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Sciences, University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester, M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Chimon, G.N. [Cancer Research-UK/University of Manchester Radiochemical Targeting and Imaging Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester, M20 4BX (United Kingdom); School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Sciences, University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester, M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Smethurst, G.J. [Cancer Research-UK/University of Manchester Radiochemical Targeting and Imaging Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester, M20 4BX (United Kingdom); Dekker, B.A. [Cancer Research-UK/University of Manchester Radiochemical Targeting and Imaging Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester, M20 4BX (United Kingdom); Zweit, J. [Cancer Research-UK/University of Manchester Radiochemical Targeting and Imaging Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester, M20 4BX (United Kingdom); School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Sciences, University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester, M60 1QD (United Kingdom)

    2006-03-15

    This paper describes the first application of a microfabricated reaction system to positron emission tomography (PET) radiochemistry. We have applied microfluidic technology to synthesise PET radiopharmaceuticals using {sup 18}F and {sup 124}I as labels for fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and Annexin-V, respectively. These reactions involved established methods of nucleophilic substitution on a mannose triflate precursor and direct iodination of the protein using iodogen as an oxidant. This has demonstrated a proof of principle of using microfluidic technology to radiochemical reactions involving low and high molecular weight compounds. Using microfluidic reactions, [{sup 18}F]FDG was synthesised with a 50% incorporation of the available F-18 radioactivity in a very short time of 4 s. The radiolabelling efficiency of {sup 124}I Annexin-V was 40% after 1 min reaction time. Chromatographic analysis showed that such reaction yields are comparable to conventional methods, but in a much shorter time. The yields can be further improved with more optimisation of the microfluidic device itself and its fluid mixing profiles. This demonstrates the potential for this technology to have an impact on rapid and simpler radiopharmaceutical synthesis using short and medium half-life radionuclides.

  11. Microfluidic Liquid-Liquid Contactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcculloch, Quinn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-25

    This report describes progress made on the microfluidic contactor. A model was developed to predict its failure, a surrogate chemical system was selected to demonstrate mass transfer, and an all-optical system has been invented and implemented to monitor carryover and flowrates.

  12. Mixing in a Microfluid Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Deryabin, Mikhail

    Mixing of fluids in microchannels cannot rely on turbulence since the flow takes place at extremly low Reynolds numbers. Various active and passive devices have been developed to induce mixing in microfluid flow devices. We describe here a model of an active mixer where a transverse periodic flow...

  13. Topology optimization of microfluidic mixers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Casper Schousboe; Gersborg, Allan Roulund; Sigmund, Ole

    2009-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the application of the topology optimization method as a general and systematic approach for microfluidic mixer design. The mixing process is modeled as convection dominated transport in low Reynolds number incompressible flow. The mixer performance is maximized by altering...

  14. A microfluidic microprocessor: controlling biomimetic containers and cells using hybrid integrated circuit/microfluidic chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issadore, David; Franke, Thomas; Brown, Keith A; Westervelt, Robert M

    2010-11-07

    We present an integrated platform for performing biological and chemical experiments on a chip based on standard CMOS technology. We have developed a hybrid integrated circuit (IC)/microfluidic chip that can simultaneously control thousands of living cells and pL volumes of fluid, enabling a wide variety of chemical and biological tasks. Taking inspiration from cellular biology, phospholipid bilayer vesicles are used as robust picolitre containers for reagents on the chip. The hybrid chip can be programmed to trap, move, and porate individual living cells and vesicles and fuse and deform vesicles using electric fields. The IC spatially patterns electric fields in a microfluidic chamber using 128 × 256 (32,768) 11 × 11 μm(2) metal pixels, each of which can be individually driven with a radio frequency (RF) voltage. The chip's basic functions can be combined in series to perform complex biological and chemical tasks and can be performed in parallel on the chip's many pixels for high-throughput operations. The hybrid chip operates in two distinct modes, defined by the frequency of the RF voltage applied to the pixels: Voltages at MHz frequencies are used to trap, move, and deform objects using dielectrophoresis and voltages at frequencies below 1 kHz are used for electroporation and electrofusion. This work represents an important step towards miniaturizing the complex chemical and biological experiments used for diagnostics and research onto automated and inexpensive chips.

  15. Successes and future outlook for microfluidics-based cardiovascular drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skommer, Joanna; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2015-03-01

    The greatest advantage of using microfluidics as a platform for the assessment of cardiovascular drug action is its ability to finely regulate fluid flow conditions, including flow rate, shear stress and pulsatile flow. At the same time, microfluidics provide means for modifying the vessel geometry (bifurcations, stenoses, complex networks), the type of surface of the vessel walls, and for patterning cells in 3D tissue-like architecture, including generation of lumen walls lined with cells and heart-on-a-chip structures for mimicking ventricular cardiomyocyte physiology. In addition, owing to the small volume of required specimens, microfluidics is ideally suited to clinical situations whereby monitoring of drug dosing or efficacy needs to be coupled with minimal phlebotomy-related drug loss. In this review, the authors highlight potential applications for the currently existing and emerging technologies and offer several suggestions on how to close the development cycle of microfluidic devices for cardiovascular drug discovery. The ultimate goal in microfluidics research for drug discovery is to develop 'human-on-a-chip' systems, whereby several organ cultures, including the vasculature and the heart, can mimic complex interactions between the organs and body systems. This would provide in vivo-like pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics for drug ADMET assessment. At present, however, the great variety of available designs does not go hand in hand with their use by the pharmaceutical community.

  16. Analysis of the Diffusion Process by pH Indicator in Microfluidic Chips for Liposome Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Bottaro

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the development of nano- and micro-particles has attracted considerable interest from researchers and enterprises, because of the potential utility of such particles as drug delivery vehicles. Amongst the different techniques employed for the production of nanoparticles, microfluidic-based methods have proven to be the most effective for controlling particle size and dispersity, and for achieving high encapsulation efficiency of bioactive compounds. In this study, we specifically focus on the production of liposomes, spherical vesicles formed by a lipid bilayer encapsulating an aqueous core. The formation of liposomes in microfluidic devices is often governed by diffusive mass transfer of chemical species at the liquid interface between a solvent (i.e., alcohol and a non-solvent (i.e., water. In this work, we developed a new approach for the analysis of mixing processes within microfluidic devices. The method relies on the use of a pH indicator, and we demonstrate its utility by characterizing the transfer of ethanol and water within two different microfluidic architectures. Our approach represents an effective route to experimentally characterize diffusion and advection processes governing the formation of vesicular/micellar systems in microfluidics, and can also be employed to validate the results of numerical modelling.

  17. Architectural Mealscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Tenna Doktor Olsen; Fisker, Anna Marie; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2012-01-01

    the German architect Gottfried Semper developed a theory on the “four elements of Architecture” tracing the origin of architecture back to the rise of the early human settlement and the creation of fire. With the notion ‘hearth’ as the first motive in architecture and the definition of three enclosing...... motives; mounding, enclosure and roof, Semper linked the cultural and social values of the primordial fireplace with the order and shape of architecture. He claimed that any building ever made was nothing but a variation of the first primitive shelters erected around the fireplace, and that the three...... enclosing motives existed only as defenders of the “sacred flame”. In that way Semper developed the idea that any architectural scenery can be described, analyzed and explained by understanding the contextual, symbolic and social values of how the four basic motives of hearth, mounding, enclosure, and roof...

  18. Architectural Theatricality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Tenna Doktor Olsen; Fisker, Anna Marie; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2013-01-01

    and recovery through the architecture framing eating experiences, this article examines, from a theoretical perspective, two less debated concepts relating to hospitality called food design and architectural theatricality. In architectural theory the nineteenth century German architect Gottfried Semper...... is known for his writings on theatricality, understood as a holistic design approach emphasizing the contextual, cultural, ritual and social meanings rooted in architecture. Relative hereto, the International Food Design Society recently argued, in a similar holistic manner, that the methodology used...... to provide an aesthetic eating experience includes knowledge on both food and design. Based on a hermeneutic reading of Semper’s theory, our thesis is that this holistic design approach is important when debating concepts of hospitality in hospitals. We use this approach to argue for how ‘food design...

  19. Architectural Engineers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rikke Premer

    The design professions have always been an amorphous phenomena difficult to merge under one label. New constellations continually emerge, questioning, stretching, and reconfiguring the understanding of design and the professional practices linked to it. In this paper the idea of architectural...... engineering is addresses from two perspectives – as an educational response and an occupational constellation. Architecture and engineering are two of the traditional design professions and they frequently meet in the occupational setting, but at educational institutions they remain largely estranged....... The paper builds on a multi-sited study of an architectural engineering program at the Technical University of Denmark and an architectural engineering team within an international engineering consultancy based on Denmark. They are both responding to new tendencies within the building industry where...

  20. Capture and X-ray diffraction studies of protein microcrystals in a microfluidic trap array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyubimov, Artem Y. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Murray, Thomas D. [University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Koehl, Antoine [Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Araci, Ismail Emre [Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; Baxter, Elizabeth L. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Brewster, Aaron S.; Sauter, Nicholas K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Brunger, Axel T., E-mail: brunger@stanford.edu [Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Berger, James M., E-mail: brunger@stanford.edu [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    A microfluidic platform has been developed for the capture and X-ray analysis of protein microcrystals, affording a means to improve the efficiency of XFEL and synchrotron experiments. X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) promise to enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from samples that are refractory to data collection at synchrotron sources. At present, however, more efficient sample-delivery methods that minimize the consumption of microcrystalline material are needed to allow the application of XFEL sources to a wide range of challenging structural targets of biological importance. Here, a microfluidic chip is presented in which microcrystals can be captured at fixed, addressable points in a trap array from a small volume (<10 µl) of a pre-existing slurry grown off-chip. The device can be mounted on a standard goniostat for conducting diffraction experiments at room temperature without the need for flash-cooling. Proof-of-principle tests with a model system (hen egg-white lysozyme) demonstrated the high efficiency of the microfluidic approach for crystal harvesting, permitting the collection of sufficient data from only 265 single-crystal still images to permit determination and refinement of the structure of the protein. This work shows that microfluidic capture devices can be readily used to facilitate data collection from protein microcrystals grown in traditional laboratory formats, enabling analysis when cryopreservation is problematic or when only small numbers of crystals are available. Such microfluidic capture devices may also be useful for data collection at synchrotron sources.

  1. Microfluidic interface technology based on stereolithography for glass-based lab-on-a-chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Song-I; Han, Ki-Ho

    2013-01-01

    As lab-on-a-chips are developed for on-chip integrated microfluidic systems with multiple functions, the development of microfluidic interface (MFI) technology to enable integration of complex microfluidic systems becomes increasingly important and faces many technical difficulties. Such difficulties include the need for more complex structures, the possibility of biological or chemical cross-contamination between functional compartments, and the possible need for individual compartments fabricated from different substrate materials. This chapter introduces MFI technology, based on rapid stereolithography, for a glass-based miniaturized genetic sample preparation system, as an example of a complex lab-on-a-chip that could include functional elements such as; solid-phase DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction, and capillary electrophoresis. To enable the integration of a complex lab-on-a-chip system in a single chip, MFI technology based on stereolithography provides a simple method for realizing complex arrangements of one-step plug-in microfluidic interconnects, integrated microvalves for microfluidic control, and optical windows for on-chip optical processes.

  2. Rapid prototyping of centrifugal microfluidic modules for point of care blood testing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Madzivhandila, Phophi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We present modular centrifugal microfluidic devices that enable a series of blood tests to be performed towards a full blood count. The modular approach allows for rapid prototyping of device components in a generic format to complete different...

  3. THE SCENE OF ARCHITECTURAL SPACE IN THE CONTEX PRESSIVE BEING OF ARCHITECTURAL SPACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena E. BIRYUKOVA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aesthetic aspects of the existence of architectural space is closely related to its scene. The scene of architectural objects and all the architectural space allow enables the existence and active external expression of its non-use component, abstract spiritual meanings, ideas and images. The purpose of this study is the aesthetic and philosophical analysis of the shape of architectural space. The research problem is the search for the relationship between the scene of the architectural space and its existence as the outer presentation of spiritual meanings. Under the scene of architectural space we mean to its expressive exterior shell that is available to the perception of the senses. Architectural space is a certain visibility. This space by which can act spiritual aspects of the human content of architecture. The architectural scene is not only the look of the architectural object or element of architectural space, but and architectural appearance (face of the people. The architectural scene is built in accordance with the needs of the inner world of man and contains the image of the person in the material form. It is also the external scene of the architectural environment for human been and appearance of the individual life. Therefore, the scene of architecture is concrete space. National, social, cultural identity finds expression through the scene of its architectural space. 

  4. Microfluidic PDMS on paper (POP) devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shangguan, Jin-Wen; Liu, Yu; Pan, Jian-Bin; Xu, Bi-Yi; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2016-12-20

    In this paper, we propose a generalized concept of microfluidic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) on paper (POP) devices, which combines well the merits of paper chips and PDMS chips. First, we optimized the conditions for accurate PDMS spatial patterning on paper, based on screen printing and a high temperature enabled superfast curing technique, which enables PDMS patterning to an accuracy of tens of microns in less than ten seconds. This, in turn, makes it available for seamless, reversible and reliable integration of the resulting paper layer with other PDMS channel structures. The integrated POP devices allow for both porous paper and smooth channels to be spatially defined on the devices, greatly extending the flexibility for designers to be able to construct powerful functional structures. To demonstrate the versatility of this design, a prototype POP device for the colorimetric analysis of liver function markers, serum protein, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), was constructed. On this POP device, quantitative sample loading, mixing and multiplex analysis have all been realized.

  5. Online Synthesis for Operation Execution Time Variability on Digital Microfluidic Biochips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alistar, Mirela; Pop, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Several approaches have been proposed for the synthesis of digital microfluidic biochips, which, starting from a biochemical application and a given biochip architecture, determine the allocation, resource binding, scheduling, placement and routing of the operations in the application. Researchers...... an online synthesis strategy that re-synthesizes the application at runtime when operations experience variability in their execution time, obtaining thus shorter application execution times. The proposed strategy has been evaluated using several benchmarks....

  6. Spintronic microfluidic platform for biomedical and environmental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, F. A.; Martins, V. C.; Fonseca, L. P.; Germano, J.; Sousa, L. A.; Piedade, M. S.; Freitas, P. P.

    2010-09-01

    Faster, more sensitive and easy to operate biosensing devices still are a need at important areas such as biomedical diagnostics, food control and environmental monitoring. Recently, spintronic-devices have emerged as a promising alternative to the existent technologies [1-3]. A number of advantages, namely high sensitivity, easy integration, miniaturization, scalability, robustness and low cost make these devices potentially capable of responding to the existent technological need. In parallel, the field of microfluidics has shown great advances [4]. Microfluidic systems allow the analysis of small sample volumes (from micro- down to pico-liters), often by automate sample processing with the ability to integrate several steps into a single device (analyte amplification, concentration, separation and/or labeling), all in a reduced assay time (minutes to hours) and affordable cost. The merging of these two technologies, magnetoresistive biochips and microfluidics, will enable the development of highly competitive devices. This work reports the integration of a magnetoresistive biochip with a microfluidic system inside a portable and autonomous electronic platform aiming for a fully integrated device. A microfluidic structure fabricated in polydimethylsiloxane with dimensions of W: 0.5mm, H: 0.1mm, L: 10mm, associated to a mechanical system to align and seal the channel by pressure is presented (Fig. 1) [5]. The goal is to perform sample loading and transportation over the chip and simultaneously control the stringency and uniformity of the wash-out process. The biochip output is acquired by an electronic microsystem incorporating the circuitry to control, address and read-out the 30 spin-valve sensors sequentially (Fig. 1) [2]. This platform is being applied to the detection of water-borne microbial pathogens (e.g. Salmonella and Escherichia coli) and genetic diseases diagnosis (e.g. cystic fibrosis) through DNA hybridization assays. Open chamber measurements were

  7. Functionalized electrospun nanofibers as bioseparators in microfluidic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlock-Colangelo, Lauren; Cho, Daehwan; Pitner, Christine L; Frey, Margaret W; Baeumner, Antje J

    2012-05-01

    Functionalized electrospun nanofibers were integrated into microfluidic channels to serve as on-chip bioseparators. Specifically, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanofiber mats were shown to successfully serve as bioseparators for negatively charged nanoparticles. Nanofibers were electrospun onto gold microelectrodes, which were incorporated into poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microfluidic devices using UV-assisted thermal bonding. PVA nanofibers functionalized with poly(hexadimethrine bromide) (polybrene) were positively charged and successfully filtered negatively charged liposomes out of a buffer solution, while negatively charged nanofibers functionalized with Poly(methyl vinyl ether-alt-maleic anhydride) (POLY(MVE/MA)) were shown to repel the liposomes. The effect of fiber mat thickness was studied using confocal fluorescence microscopy, determining a quite broad optimal range of thicknesses for specific liposome retention, which simplifies fiber mat production with respect to retention reliability. Finally, it was demonstrated that liposomes bound to positively charged nanofibers could be selectively released using a 4-(2-Hydroxyethyl)piperazine-1-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES)-sucrose-saline (HSS) solution of pH 9, which dramatically changes the nanofiber zeta potential and renders the positively charged nanofibers negatively charged. This is the first demonstration of functional electrospun nanofibers used to enable sample preparation procedures of isolation and concentration in lab-on-a-chip devices. This has far reaching impact on the ability to integrate functional surfaces and materials into microfluidic devices and to significantly expand their ability toward simple lab-on-a-chip devices.

  8. Dynamic self-assembly and control of microfluidic particle crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonhee; Amini, Hamed; Stone, Howard A.; Di Carlo, Dino

    2010-01-01

    Engineered two-phase microfluidic systems have recently shown promise for computation, encryption, and biological processing. For many of these systems, complex control of dispersed-phase frequency and switching is enabled by nonlinearities associated with interfacial stresses. Introducing nonlinearity associated with fluid inertia has recently been identified as an easy to implement strategy to control two-phase (solid-liquid) microscale flows. By taking advantage of inertial effects we demonstrate controllable self-assembling particle systems, uncover dynamics suggesting a unique mechanism of dynamic self-assembly, and establish a framework for engineering microfluidic structures with the possibility of spatial frequency filtering. Focusing on the dynamics of the particle–particle interactions reveals a mechanism for the dynamic self-assembly process; inertial lift forces and a parabolic flow field act together to stabilize interparticle spacings that otherwise would diverge to infinity due to viscous disturbance flows. The interplay of the repulsive viscous interaction and inertial lift also allow us to design and implement microfluidic structures that irreversibly change interparticle spacing, similar to a low-pass filter. Although often not considered at the microscale, nonlinearity due to inertia can provide a platform for high-throughput passive control of particle positions in all directions, which will be useful for applications in flow cytometry, tissue engineering, and metamaterial synthesis. PMID:21149674

  9. Analytical detection techniques for droplet microfluidics--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Fang, Qun

    2013-07-17

    In the last decade, droplet-based microfluidics has undergone rapid progress in the fields of single-cell analysis, digital PCR, protein crystallization and high throughput screening. It has been proved to be a promising platform for performing chemical and biological experiments with ultra-small volumes (picoliter to nanoliter) and ultra-high throughput. The ability to analyze the content in droplet qualitatively and quantitatively is playing an increasing role in the development and application of droplet-based microfluidic systems. In this review, we summarized the analytical detection techniques used in droplet systems and discussed the advantage and disadvantage of each technique through its application. The analytical techniques mentioned in this paper include bright-field microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, laser induced fluorescence, Raman spectroscopy, electrochemistry, capillary electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, absorption detection, chemiluminescence, and sample pretreatment techniques. The importance of analytical detection techniques in enabling new applications is highlighted. We also discuss the future development direction of analytical detection techniques for droplet-based microfluidic systems.

  10. Microfluidics for synthetic biology: from design to execution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, M S; Razinkov, I A; Hasty, J

    2011-01-01

    With the expanding interest in cellular responses to dynamic environments, microfluidic devices have become important experimental platforms for biological research. Microfluidic "microchemostat" devices enable precise environmental control while capturing high quality, single-cell gene expression data. For studies of population heterogeneity and gene expression noise, these abilities are crucial. Here, we describe the necessary steps for experimental microfluidics using devices created in our lab as examples. First, we discuss the rational design of microchemostats and the tools available to predict their performance. We carefully analyze the critical parts of an example device, focusing on the most important part of any microchemostat: the cell trap. Next, we present a method for generating on-chip dynamic environments using an integrated fluidic junction coupled to linear actuators. Our system relies on the simple modulation of hydrostatic pressure to alter the mixing ratio between two source reservoirs and we detail the software and hardware behind it. To expand the throughput of microchemostat experiments, we describe how to build larger, parallel versions of simpler devices. To analyze the large amounts of data, we discuss methods for automated cell tracking, focusing on the special problems presented by Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The manufacturing of microchemostats is described in complete detail: from the photolithographic processing of the wafer to the final bonding of the PDMS chip to glass coverslip. Finally, the procedures for conducting Escherichia coli and S. cerevisiae microchemostat experiments are addressed.

  11. Stop flow lithography in perfluoropolyether (PFPE) microfluidic channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bong, Ki Wan; Lee, Jiseok; Doyle, Patrick S

    2014-12-21

    Stop Flow Lithography (SFL) is a microfluidic-based particle synthesis method for creating anisotropic multifunctional particles with applications that range from MEMS to biomedical engineering. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has been typically used to construct SFL devices as the material enables rapid prototyping of channels with complex geometries, optical transparency, and oxygen permeability. However, PDMS is not compatible with most organic solvents which limit the current range of materials that can be synthesized with SFL. Here, we demonstrate that a fluorinated elastomer, called perfluoropolyether (PFPE), can be an alternative oxygen permeable elastomer for SFL microfluidic flow channels. We fabricate PFPE microfluidic devices with soft lithography and synthesize anisotropic multifunctional particles in the devices via the SFL process--this is the first demonstration of SFL with oxygen lubrication layers in a non-PDMS channel. We benchmark the SFL performance of the PFPE devices by comparing them to PDMS devices. We synthesized particles in both PFPE and PDMS devices under the same SFL conditions and found the difference of particle dimensions was less than a micron. PFPE devices can greatly expand the range of precursor materials that can be processed in SFL because the fluorinated devices are chemically resistant to most organic solvents, an inaccessible class of reagents in PDMS-based devices due to swelling.

  12. Using Adhesive Patterning to Construct 3D Paper Microfluidic Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalish, Brent; Tsutsui, Hideaki

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the use of patterned aerosol adhesives to construct both planar and nonplanar 3D paper microfluidic devices. By spraying an aerosol adhesive through a metal stencil, the overall amount of adhesive used in assembling paper microfluidic devices can be significantly reduced. We show on a simple 4-layer planar paper microfluidic device that the optimal adhesive application technique and device construction style depends heavily on desired performance characteristics. By moderately increasing the overall area of a device, it is possible to dramatically decrease the wicking time and increase device success rates while also reducing the amount of adhesive required to keep the device together. Such adhesive application also causes the adhesive to form semi-permanent bonds instead of permanent bonds between paper layers, enabling single-use devices to be non-destructively disassembled after use. Nonplanar 3D origami devices also benefit from the semi-permanent bonds during folding, as it reduces the likelihood that unrelated faces may accidently stick together. Like planar devices, nonplanar structures see reduced wicking times with patterned adhesive application vs uniformly applied adhesive.

  13. Thermally driven microfluidic pumping via reversible shape memory polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, J. M.; Rodriguez, R. X.; Holmes, L. R., Jr.; Mather, P. T.; Wetzel, E. D.

    2016-08-01

    The need exists for autonomous microfluidic pumping systems that utilize environmental cues to transport fluid within a network of channels for such purposes as heat distribution, self-healing, or optical reconfiguration. Here, we report on reversible thermally driven microfluidic pumping enabled by two-way shape memory polymers. After developing a suitable shape memory polymer (SMP) through variation in the crosslink density, thin and flexible microfluidic devices were constructed by lamination of plastic films with channels defined by laser-cutting of double-sided adhesive film. SMP blisters integrated into the devices provide thermally driven pumping, while opposing elastic blisters are used to generate backpressure for reversible operation. Thermal cycling of the device was found to drive reversible fluid flow: upon heating to 60 °C, the SMP rapidly contracted to fill the surface channels with a transparent fluid, and upon cooling to 8 °C the flow reversed and the channel re-filled with black ink. Combined with a metallized backing layer, this device results in refection of incident light at high temperatures and absorption of light (at the portions covered with channels) at low temperatures. We discuss power-free, autonomous applications ranging from thermal regulation of structures to thermal indication via color change.

  14. Integrated Microfluidic Flow-Through Microbial Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Huawei; Ali, Md. Azahar; Xu, Zhen; Halverson, Larry J.; Dong, Liang

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on a miniaturized microbial fuel cell with a microfluidic flow-through configuration: a porous anolyte chamber is formed by filling a microfluidic chamber with three-dimensional graphene foam as anode, allowing nutritional medium to flow through the chamber to intimately interact with the colonized microbes on the scaffolds of the anode. No nutritional media flow over the anode. This allows sustaining high levels of nutrient utilization, minimizing consumption of nutritional substrates, and reducing response time of electricity generation owing to fast mass transport through pressure-driven flow and rapid diffusion of nutrients within the anode. The device provides a volume power density of 745 μW/cm3 and a surface power density of 89.4 μW/cm2 using Shewanella oneidensis as a model biocatalyst without any optimization of bacterial culture. The medium consumption and the response time of the flow-through device are reduced by 16.4 times and 4.2 times, respectively, compared to the non-flow-through counterpart with its freeway space volume six times the volume of graphene foam anode. The graphene foam enabled microfluidic flow-through approach will allow efficient microbial conversion of carbon-containing bioconvertible substrates to electricity with smaller space, less medium consumption, and shorter start-up time. PMID:28120875

  15. Multi-Spectral Detection of Microfluidic Separation Products.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayden, Carl C.; Meagher, Robert

    2007-12-01

    The objectives of this project were to develop a new scientific tool for studies of chemical processes at the single molecule level, and to provide enhanced capabilities for multiplexed, ultrasensitive separations and immunoassays. We have combined microfluidic separation techniques with our newly developed technology for spectrally and temporally resolved detection of single molecules. The detection of individual molecules can reveal fluctuations in molecular conformations, which are obscured in ensemble measurements, and allows detailed studies of reaction kinetics such as ligand or antibody binding. Detection near the single molecule level also enables the use of correlation techniques to extract information, such as diffusion rates, from the fluorescence signal. The micro-fluidic technology offers unprecedented control of the chemical environment and flow conditions, and affords the unique opportunity to study biomolecules without immobilization. For analytical separations, the fluorescence lifetime and spectral resolution of the detection makes it possible to use multiple parameters for identification of separation products to improve the certainty of identification. We have successfully developed a system that can measure fluorescence spectra, lifetimes and diffusion constants of the components of mixtures separated in a microfluidic electrophoresis chip.

  16. Microfluidic networks embedded in a printed circuit board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Liangwei; Hu, Yueli

    2017-07-01

    In order to improve the robustness of microfluidic networks in printed circuit board (PCB)-based microfluidic platforms, a new method was presented. A pattern in a PCB was formed using hollowed-out technology. Polydimethylsiloxane was partly filled in the hollowed-out fields after mounting an adhesive tape on the bottom of the PCB, and solidified in an oven. Then, microfluidic networks were built using soft lithography technology. Microfluidic transportation and dilution operations were demonstrated using the fabricated microfluidic platform. Results show that this method can embed microfluidic networks into a PCB, and microfluidic operations can be implemented in the microfluidic networks embedded into the PCB.

  17. Microfluidic Technology: Uncovering the Mechanisms of Nanocrystal Nucleation and Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lignos, Ioannis; Maceiczyk, Richard; deMello, Andrew J

    2017-05-16

    -throughput parametric screening of metal chalcogenides (CdSe, PbS, PbSe, CdSeTe), ternary and core/shell heavy metal-free quantum dots (CuInS2, CuInS2/ZnS), and all-inorganic perovskite nanocrystals (CsPbX3, X = Cl, Br, I) syntheses. Critically, concurrent absorption and photoluminescence measurements on millisecond to second time scales allow the extraction of basic parameters governing nanocrystal formation. Moreover, experimental data obtained from such microfluidic platforms can be directly supported by theoretical models of nucleation and growth. To this end, we also describe the use of metamodeling algorithms able to accurately predict optimized conditions of CdSe synthesis using a minimal number of sample parameters. Importantly, we discuss future challenges that must be addressed before microfluidic technologies are in a position to be widely adopted for the on-demand formation of nanocrystals. From a technology perspective, these challenges include the development of novel engineering platforms for the formation of complex architectures, the integration of monitoring systems able to harvest photophysical and structural information, the incorporation of continuous purification systems, and the application of optimization algorithms to multicomponent quantum dot systems.

  18. Microfluidic Immuno-Biochip for Detection of Breast Cancer Biomarkers Using Hierarchical Composite of Porous Graphene and Titanium Dioxide Nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Md Azahar; Mondal, Kunal; Jiao, Yueyi; Oren, Seval; Xu, Zhen; Sharma, Ashutosh; Dong, Liang

    2016-08-17

    We report on a label-free microfluidic immunosensor with femtomolar sensitivity and high selectivity for early detection of epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (EGFR2 or ErbB2) proteins. This sensor utilizes a uniquely structured immunoelectrode made of porous hierarchical graphene foam (GF) modified with electrospun carbon-doped titanium dioxide nanofibers (nTiO2) as an electrochemical working electrode. Due to excellent biocompatibility, intrinsic surface defects, high reaction kinetics, and good stability for proteins, anatase nTiO2 are ideal for electrochemical sensor applications. The three-dimensional and porous features of GF allow nTiO2 to penetrate and attach to the surface of the GF by physical adsorption. Combining GF with functional nTiO2 yields high charge transfer resistance, large surface area, and porous access to the sensing surface by the analyte, resulting in new possibilities for the development of electrochemical immunosensors. Here, the enabling of EDC-NHS chemistry covalently immobilized the antibody of ErbB2 (anti-ErbB2) on the GF-nTiO2 composite. To obtain a compact sensor architecture, the composite working electrode was designed to hang above the gold counter electrode in a microfluidic channel. The sensor underwent differential pulse voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to quantify breast cancer biomarkers. The two methods had high sensitivities of 0.585 μA μM(-1) cm(-2) and 43.7 kΩ μM(-1) cm(-2) in a wide concentration range of target ErbB2 antigen from 1 × 10(-15) M (1.0 fM) to 0.1 × 10(-6) M (0.1 μM) and from 1 × 10(-13) M (0.1 pM) to 0.1 × 10(-6) M (0.1 μM), respectively. Utilization of the specific recognition element, i.e., anti-ErbB2, results in high specificity, even in the presence of identical members of the EGFR family of receptor tyrosine kinases, such as ErbB3 and ErbB4. Many promising applications in the field of electrochemical detection of chemical and biological species will derive from the

  19. Architectural geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Pottmann, Helmut

    2014-11-26

    Around 2005 it became apparent in the geometry processing community that freeform architecture contains many problems of a geometric nature to be solved, and many opportunities for optimization which however require geometric understanding. This area of research, which has been called architectural geometry, meanwhile contains a great wealth of individual contributions which are relevant in various fields. For mathematicians, the relation to discrete differential geometry is significant, in particular the integrable system viewpoint. Besides, new application contexts have become available for quite some old-established concepts. Regarding graphics and geometry processing, architectural geometry yields interesting new questions but also new objects, e.g. replacing meshes by other combinatorial arrangements. Numerical optimization plays a major role but in itself would be powerless without geometric understanding. Summing up, architectural geometry has become a rewarding field of study. We here survey the main directions which have been pursued, we show real projects where geometric considerations have played a role, and we outline open problems which we think are significant for the future development of both theory and practice of architectural geometry.

  20. A microfluidic D-subminiature connector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Adina; Au, Anthony K; Vinckenbosch, Elise; Folch, Albert

    2013-06-07

    Standardized, affordable, user-friendly world-to-chip interfaces represent one of the major barriers to the adoption of microfluidics. We present a connector system for plug-and-play interfacing of microfluidic devices to multiple input and output lines. The male connectors are based on existing standardized housings from electronics that are inexpensive and widely available. The female connectors are fabricated using familiar replica molding techniques that can easily be adopted by microfluidic developers.

  1. [Recent development of microfluidic diagnostic technologies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haifang; Zhang, Qianyun; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2011-04-01

    Microfluidic devices exhibit a great promising development in clinical diagnosis and disease screening due to their advantages of precise controlling of fluid flow, requirement of miniamount sample, rapid reaction speed and convenient integration. In this paper, the improvements of microfluidic diagnostic technologies in recent years are reviewed. The applications and developments of on-chip disease marker detection, microfluidic cell selection and cell drug metabolism, and diagnostic micro-devices are discussed.

  2. Dynamics of Microvalve Operations in Integrated Microfluidics

    OpenAIRE

    Alan T. H. Lau; Hon Ming Yip; Kathy C. C. Ng; Xin Cui; Lam, Raymond H. W.

    2014-01-01

    Pneumatic microvalves are widely used key components for automating liquid manipulation and flow control in microfluidics for more than one decade. Due to their robust operations and the ease of fabrication, tremendous microfluidic systems have been developed with the multiple microvalves for higher throughput and extended functionalities. Therefore, operation performance of the microvalves in the integrated microfluidic devices is crucial to the related applications, in fields such as micro-...

  3. Microfluidics for optics and quantitative cell biology

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, James Kyle

    2008-01-01

    Microfluidics is a quickly expanding field with numerous applications. The advent of rapid-prototyping and soft- lithography allow for easy and inexpensive fabrication of microfluidic devices. Fluid manipulation on the microscale allows for new functionalities of devices and components not available on the macroscale. Fluid flows on the microscale are laminar with chemical mixing defined strictly by diffusion allowing us to design microfluidic devices with precise control of fluid flow and ch...

  4. Protein crystallization using microfluidic technologies based on valves, droplets, and SlipChip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2010-01-01

    To obtain protein crystals, researchers must search for conditions in multidimensional chemical space. Empirically, thousands of crystallization experiments are carried out to screen various precipitants at multiple concentrations. Microfluidics can manipulate fluids on a nanoliter scale, and it affects crystallization twofold. First, it miniaturizes the experiments that can currently be done on a larger scale and enables crystallization of proteins that are available only in small amounts. Second, it offers unique experimental approaches that are difficult or impossible to implement on a larger scale. Ongoing development of microfluidic techniques and their integration with protein production, characterization, and in situ diffraction promises to accelerate the progress of structural biology.

  5. Microfluidic Device to Quantify the Behavior of Therapeutic Bacteria in Three-Dimensional Tumor Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackett, Emily L.; Swofford, Charles A.; Forbes, Neil S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Microfluidic devices enable precise quantification of the interactions between anticancer bacteria and tumor tissue. Direct observation of bacterial movement and gene expression in tissue is not possible with either monolayers of cells or tumor-bearing mice. Quantification of these interactions is necessary to understand the inherent mechanisms of bacterial targeting and to develop modified organisms with enhanced therapeutic properties. Here we describe the procedures for designing, printing and assembling microfluidic tumor-on-a-chip devices. We also describe the procedures for inserting three- dimensional tumor-cell masses, exposing to bacteria, and analyzing the resultant images. PMID:26846800

  6. Terra Harvest software architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humeniuk, Dave; Klawon, Kevin

    2012-06-01

    Under the Terra Harvest Program, the DIA has the objective of developing a universal Controller for the Unattended Ground Sensor (UGS) community. The mission is to define, implement, and thoroughly document an open architecture that universally supports UGS missions, integrating disparate systems, peripherals, etc. The Controller's inherent interoperability with numerous systems enables the integration of both legacy and future UGS System (UGSS) components, while the design's open architecture supports rapid third-party development to ensure operational readiness. The successful accomplishment of these objectives by the program's Phase 3b contractors is demonstrated via integration of the companies' respective plug-'n'-play contributions that include controllers, various peripherals, such as sensors, cameras, etc., and their associated software drivers. In order to independently validate the Terra Harvest architecture, L-3 Nova Engineering, along with its partner, the University of Dayton Research Institute, is developing the Terra Harvest Open Source Environment (THOSE), a Java Virtual Machine (JVM) running on an embedded Linux Operating System. The Use Cases on which the software is developed support the full range of UGS operational scenarios such as remote sensor triggering, image capture, and data exfiltration. The Team is additionally developing an ARM microprocessor-based evaluation platform that is both energy-efficient and operationally flexible. The paper describes the overall THOSE architecture, as well as the design decisions for some of the key software components. Development process for THOSE is discussed as well.

  7. Advances in microfluidics for environmental analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokerst, Jana C; Emory, Jason M; Henry, Charles S

    2012-01-07

    During the past few years, a growing number of groups have recognized the utility of microfluidic devices for environmental analysis. Microfluidic devices offer a number of advantages and in many respects are ideally suited to environmental analyses. Challenges faced in environmental monitoring, including the ability to handle complex and highly variable sample matrices, lead to continued growth and research. Additionally, the need to operate for days to months in the field requires further development of robust, integrated microfluidic systems. This review examines recently published literature on the applications of microfluidic systems for environmental analysis and provides insight in the future direction of the field.

  8. Integrated lenses in polystyrene microfluidic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Yiqiang

    2013-04-01

    This paper reports a new method for integrating microlenses into microfluidic devices for improved observation. Two demonstration microfluidic devices were provided which were fabricated using this new technique. The integrated microlenses were fabricated using a free-surface thermo-compression molding method on a polystyrene (PS) sheet which was then bonded on top of microfluidic channels as a cover plate, with the convex microlenses providing a magnified image of the channel for the easier observation of the flow in the microchannels. This approach for fabricating the integrated microlens in microfluidic devices is rapid, low cost and without the requirement of cleanroom facilities. © 2013 IEEE.

  9. Architectural Anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Marie

    , while recent material and spatial turns in anthropology have also brought an increasing interest in design, architecture and the built environment. Understanding the relationship between the social and the physical is at the heart of both disciplines, and they can obviously benefit from further......Architecture and anthropology have always had a common focus on dwelling, housing, urban life and spatial organisation. Current developments in both disciplines make it even more relevant to explore their boundaries and overlaps. Architects are inspired by anthropological insights and methods...... collaboration: How can qualitative anthropological approaches contribute to contemporary architecture? And just as importantly: What can anthropologists learn from architects’ understanding of spatial and material surroundings? Recent theoretical developments in anthropology stress the role of materials...

  10. Architectural Narratives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    In this essay, I focus on the combination of programs and the architecture of cultural projects that have emerged within the last few years. These projects are characterized as “hybrid cultural projects,” because they intend to combine experience with entertainment, play, and learning. This essay...... identifies new rationales related to this development, and it argues that “cultural planning” has increasingly shifted its focus from a cultural institutional approach to a more market-oriented strategy that integrates art and business. The role of architecture has changed, too. It not only provides...... a functional framework for these concepts, but tries increasingly to endow the main idea of the cultural project with a spatially aesthetic expression - a shift towards “experience architecture.” A great number of these projects typically recycle and reinterpret narratives related to historical buildings...

  11. A brief review on microfluidic platforms for hormones detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozhikandathil, Jayan; Badilescu, Simona; Packirisamy, Muthukumaran

    2017-01-01

    Lab-on-chip technology is attracting great interest due to its potential as miniaturized devices that can automate and integrate many sample-handling steps, minimize consumption of reagent and samples, have short processing time and enable multiplexed analysis. Microfluidic devices have demonstrated their potential for a broad range of applications in life sciences, including point-of-care diagnostics and personalized medicine, based on the routine diagnosis of levels of hormones, cancer markers, and various metabolic products in blood, serum, etc. Microfluidics offers an adaptable platform that can facilitate cell culture as well as monitor their activity and control the cellular environment. Signaling molecules released from cells such as neurotransmitters and hormones are important in assessing the health of cells and the effect of drugs on their functions. In this review, we provide an insight into the state-of-art applications of microfluidics for monitoring of hormones released by cells. In our works, we have demonstrated efficient detection methods for bovine growth hormones using nano and microphotonics integrated microfluidics devices. The bovine growth hormone can be used as a growth promoter in dairy farming to enhance the milk and meat production. In the recent years, a few attempts have been reported on developing very sensitive, fast and low-cost methods of detection of bovine growth hormone using micro devices. This paper reviews the current state-of-art of detection and analysis of hormone using integrated optical micro and nanofluidics systems. In addition, the paper also focuses on various lab-on-a-chip technologies reported recently, and their benefits for screening growth hormones in milk.

  12. The microfluidic Kelvin water dropper

    CERN Document Server

    Marin, Alvaro G; García-Sánchez, Pablo; Shui, Lingling; Xie, Yanbo; Fontelos, Marco A; Eijkel, Jan C T; Berg, Albert van den; Lohse, Detlef

    2013-01-01

    The so-called "Kelvin water dropper" is a simple experiment demonstrating the spontaneous appearance of induced free charge in droplets emitted through a tube. As Lord Kelvin explained, water droplets spontaneously acquire a net charge during detachment from a faucet due to the presence of electrical fields in their surrounding created by any metallic object. In his experiment, two streams of droplets are allowed to drip from separated nozzles into separated buckets, which are at the same time interconnected through the dripping needles. In this paper we build a microfluidic water dropper and demonstrate that the droplets get charged and break-up due to electrohydrodynamic instabilities. A comparison with recent simulations shows the dependence of the acquired charge in the droplets on different parameters of the system. The phenomenon opens a door to cheap and accessible transformation of pneumatic pressure into electrical energy and to an enhanced control in microfluidic and biophysical manipulation of caps...

  13. Fabrication and integration of microprism mirrors for high-speed three-dimensional measurement in inertial microfluidic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Joonyoung; Kim, Jihye; Shin, Jung H.; Lee, Wonhee

    2014-09-01

    Inertial microfluidics utilizes fluid inertia from high flow velocity to manipulate particles and fluids in 3D. Acquiring a 3D information of particle positions and complex flow patterns within microfluidic devices requires 3D imaging techniques such as confocal microscopy, which are often expensive and slow. Here, we report on a prism-mirror-embedded microfluidic device that allows simultaneous imaging of the top and side view of the microchannel for a high-speed, low-cost 3D imaging. The microprism mirrors are fabricated and integrated into a microfluidic system using conventional microfabrication techniques including wet etch and soft lithography. This inexpensive high quality prism mirror provides a highly reflective, smooth mirror surface with precise 45° reflection angle, enabling 3D measurement of inertial migration of microparticles in a rectangular channel at speeds in excess of 10 000 frame/s.

  14. Imaging diffusion in a microfluidic device by third harmonic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Uwe; Büchel, Andreas; Hardt, Steffen; Halfmann, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    We monitor and characterize near-surface diffusion of miscible, transparent liquids in a microfluidic device by third harmonic microscopy. The technique enables observations even of transparent or index-matched media without perturbation of the sample. In particular, we image concentrations of ethanol diffusing in water and estimate the diffusion coefficient from the third harmonic images. We obtain a diffusion coefficient D = (460 ± 30) μm2/s, which is consistent with theoretical predictions. The investigations clearly demonstrate the potential of harmonic microscopy also under the challenging conditions of transparent fluids.

  15. Electrokinetic Microfluidic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Juan

    2005-03-01

    Microfabrication technology has enabled the application of electrokinetics as a method of performing chemical analyses and achieving liquid pumping in electronically-controlled microchip systems with no moving parts. Electrokinetics involves the interaction of solid surfaces, ionic solutions, and electric fields. Electric fields can be used to generate bulk fluid motion (electroosmosis) and to separate charged species (electrophoresis). Microfabrication technology has enabled the application of electrokinetics as a method of performing chemical analyses and achieving liquid pumping in electronically-controlled microsystems with no moving parts. This seminar reviews progress at Stanford including methods for sample stacking in capillary electrophoresis assays and fundamental studies of electrokinetic flow instabilities. Field amplified sample stacking (FASS) leverages conductivity gradients as a robust method of increasing sample concentration prior to electrophoretic separation. A major challenge to achieving robust, high-efficiency FASS is the role of electrokinetic instabilities (EKI) generated by a coupling of electric fields and ionic conductivity gradients. This coupling results in electric body forces in the bulk liquid that can generate instabilities. Suppression and/or control of electrokinetic flow instabilities is critical as they dramatically increase dispersion rates and thereby limit stacking efficiency. We have identified the key physical mechanisms in EKI; developed generalized models for electrokinetic systems; and validated the models with experiments. We have applied this understanding to the development of chip systems that achieve signal increases of more than 20,000 fold using FASS. This stacking ratio is over 200 times larger than previous on-chip FASS devices.

  16. Acoustically-driven microfluidic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, A W; Benett, W J; Tarte, L R

    2000-06-23

    We have demonstrated a non-contact method of concentrating and mixing particles in a plastic microfluidic chamber employing acoustic radiation pressure. A flaw cell package has also been designed that integrates liquid sample interconnects, electrical contacts and a removable sample chamber. Experiments were performed on 1, 3, 6, and 10 {micro}m polystyrene beads. Increased antibody binding to a solid-phase substrate was observed in the presence of acoustic mixing due to improve mass transport.

  17. Optical detection in microfluidic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2009-01-01

    Optical detection schemes continue to be favoured for measurements in microfluidic systems. A selection of the latest progress mainly within the last two years is critically reviewed. Emphasis is on integrated solutions, such as planar waveguides, coupling schemes to the outside world, evanescent...... to ease commercialisation of the devices. This work will hopefully result in more commercial products that benefit from integrated optics, because the impact on commercial devices so far has been modest....

  18. Microfluidic fabrication of plasmonic microcapsules

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, J.; Jin, M. L.; Eijkel, J.C.T.; Berg, van den, A.E.; Zhou, G.F.; Shui, L.L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the plasmonic microcapsules with well-ordered nanoparticles embedded in polymer network fabricated by using a microfluidic device. The well-ordered nanoparticle arrays on the microcapsule form high-density uniform “hot-spots” with a deposited metal film, on which the localized surface plasmon resonance effect is obtained. These plasmonic microcapsules can be engineered and modified by nanoparticle size and the metal film thickness. Repeatable Surfaced-Enhanced Raman Scatte...

  19. DNA Bipedal Motor Achieves a Large Number of Steps Due to Operation Using Microfluidics-Based Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomov, Toma E; Tsukanov, Roman; Glick, Yair; Berger, Yaron; Liber, Miran; Avrahami, Dorit; Gerber, Doron; Nir, Eyal

    2017-04-25

    Realization of bioinspired molecular machines that can perform many and diverse operations in response to external chemical commands is a major goal in nanotechnology, but current molecular machines respond to only a few sequential commands. Lack of effective methods for introduction and removal of command compounds and low efficiencies of the reactions involved are major reasons for the limited performance. We introduce here a user interface based on a microfluidics device and single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy that allows efficient introduction and removal of chemical commands and enables detailed study of the reaction mechanisms involved in the operation of synthetic molecular machines. The microfluidics provided 64 consecutive DNA strand commands to a DNA-based motor system immobilized inside the microfluidics, driving a bipedal walker to perform 32 steps on a DNA origami track. The microfluidics enabled removal of redundant strands, resulting in a 6-fold increase in processivity relative to an identical motor operated without strand removal and significantly more operations than previously reported for user-controlled DNA nanomachines. In the motor operated without strand removal, redundant strands interfere with motor operation and reduce its performance. The microfluidics also enabled computer control of motor direction and speed. Furthermore, analysis of the reaction kinetics and motor performance in the absence of redundant strands, made possible by the microfluidics, enabled accurate modeling of the walker processivity. This enabled identification of dynamic boundaries and provided an explanation, based on the "trap state" mechanism, for why the motor did not perform an even larger number of steps. This understanding is very important for the development of future motors with significantly improved performance. Our universal interface enables two-way communication between user and molecular machine and, relying on concepts similar to that of solid

  20. Secure Service Oriented Architectures (SOA) Supporting NEC [Architecture orientée service (SOA) gérant la NEC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meiler, P.P.; Schmeing, M.

    2009-01-01

    Combined scenario ; Data management ; Data processing ; Demonstrator ; Information systems ; Integrated systems ; Interoperability ; Joint scenario ; Network Enabled Capability (NEC) ; Operational effectiveness ; Operations research ; Scenarios ; Secure communication ; Service Oriented Architecture

  1. Security Shift in Future Network Architectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, T.; Schotanus, H.A.; Verkoelen, C.A.A.

    2010-01-01

    In current practice military communication infrastructures are deployed as stand-alone networked information systems. Network-Enabled Capabilities (NEC) and combined military operations lead to new requirements which current communication architectures cannot deliver. This paper informs IT architect

  2. Consistent model driven architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niepostyn, Stanisław J.

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the MDA is to produce software systems from abstract models in a way where human interaction is restricted to a minimum. These abstract models are based on the UML language. However, the semantics of UML models is defined in a natural language. Subsequently the verification of consistency of these diagrams is needed in order to identify errors in requirements at the early stage of the development process. The verification of consistency is difficult due to a semi-formal nature of UML diagrams. We propose automatic verification of consistency of the series of UML diagrams originating from abstract models implemented with our consistency rules. This Consistent Model Driven Architecture approach enables us to generate automatically complete workflow applications from consistent and complete models developed from abstract models (e.g. Business Context Diagram). Therefore, our method can be used to check practicability (feasibility) of software architecture models.

  3. Whole-Teflon microfluidic chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Kangning; Dai, Wen; Zhou, Jianhua; Su, Jing; Wu, Hongkai

    2011-05-17

    Although microfluidics has shown exciting potential, its broad applications are significantly limited by drawbacks of the materials used to make them. In this work, we present a convenient strategy for fabricating whole-Teflon microfluidic chips with integrated valves that show outstanding inertness to various chemicals and extreme resistance against all solvents. Compared with other microfluidic materials [e.g., poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)] the whole-Teflon chip has a few more advantages, such as no absorption of small molecules, little adsorption of biomolecules onto channel walls, and no leaching of residue molecules from the material bulk into the solution in the channel. Various biological cells have been cultured in the whole-Teflon channel. Adherent cells can attach to the channel bottom, spread, and proliferate well in the channels (with similar proliferation rate to the cells in PDMS channels with the same dimensions). The moderately good gas permeability of the Teflon materials makes it suitable to culture cells inside the microchannels for a long time.

  4. Microfluidic Devices for Blood Fractionation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chwee Teck Lim

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Blood, a complex biological fluid, comprises 45% cellular components suspended in protein rich plasma. These different hematologic components perform distinct functions in vivo and thus the ability to efficiently fractionate blood into its individual components has innumerable applications in both clinical diagnosis and biological research. Yet, processing blood is not trivial. In the past decade, a flurry of new microfluidic based technologies has emerged to address this compelling problem. Microfluidics is an attractive solution for this application leveraging its numerous advantages to process clinical blood samples. This paper reviews the various microfluidic approaches realized to successfully fractionate one or more blood components. Techniques to separate plasma from hematologic cellular components as well as isolating blood cells of interest including certain rare cells are discussed. Comparisons based on common separation metrics including efficiency (sensitivity, purity (selectivity, and throughput will be presented. Finally, we will provide insights into the challenges associated with blood-based separation systems towards realizing true point-of-care (POC devices and provide future perspectives.

  5. Analysis system for characterisation of simple, low-cost microfluidic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Suzanne; Naidoo, Thegaran; Nxumalo, Zandile; Land, Kevin; Davies, Emlyn; Fourie, Louis; Marais, Philip; Roux, Pieter

    2014-06-01

    There is an inherent trade-off between cost and operational integrity of microfluidic components, especially when intended for use in point-of-care devices. We present an analysis system developed to characterise microfluidic components for performing blood cell counting, enabling the balance between function and cost to be established quantitatively. Microfluidic components for sample and reagent introduction, mixing and dispensing of fluids were investigated. A simple inlet port plugging mechanism is used to introduce and dispense a sample of blood, while a reagent is released into the microfluidic system through compression and bursting of a blister pack. Mixing and dispensing of the sample and reagent are facilitated via air actuation. For these microfluidic components to be implemented successfully, a number of aspects need to be characterised for development of an integrated point-of-care device design. The functional components were measured using a microfluidic component analysis system established in-house. Experiments were carried out to determine: 1. the force and speed requirements for sample inlet port plugging and blister pack compression and release using two linear actuators and load cells for plugging the inlet port, compressing the blister pack, and subsequently measuring the resulting forces exerted, 2. the accuracy and repeatability of total volumes of sample and reagent dispensed, and 3. the degree of mixing and dispensing uniformity of the sample and reagent for cell counting analysis. A programmable syringe pump was used for air actuation to facilitate mixing and dispensing of the sample and reagent. Two high speed cameras formed part of the analysis system and allowed for visualisation of the fluidic operations within the microfluidic device. Additional quantitative measures such as microscopy were also used to assess mixing and dilution accuracy, as well as uniformity of fluid dispensing - all of which are important requirements towards the

  6. Microfluidics-mediated assembly of functional nanoparticles for cancer-related pharmaceutical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qiang; Sun, Jiashu; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-06-01

    The controlled synthesis of functional nanoparticles with tunable structures and properties has been extensively investigated for cancer treatment and diagnosis. Among a variety of methods for fabrication of nanoparticles, microfluidics-based synthesis enables enhanced mixing and precise fluidic modulation inside microchannels, thus allowing for the flow-mediated production of nanoparticles in a controllable manner. This review focuses on recent advances of using microfluidic devices for the synthesis of drug-loaded nanoparticles with specific characteristics (such as size, composite, surface modification, structure and rigidity) for enhanced cancer treatment and diagnosis as well as to investigate the bio-nanoparticle interaction. The discussion on microfluidics-based synthesis may shed light on the rational design of functional nanoparticles for cancer-related pharmaceutical applications.

  7. On-chip cell analysis platform: Implementation of contact fluorescence microscopy in microfluidic chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, Hiroaki; Kazutaka, Osawa; Haruta, Makito; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2017-09-01

    Although fluorescence microscopy is the gold standard tool for biomedical research and clinical applications, their use beyond well-established laboratory infrastructures remains limited. The present study investigated a novel on-chip cell analysis platform based on contact fluorescence microscopy and microfluidics. Combined use of a contact fluorescence imager based on complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology and an ultra-thin glass bottom microfluidic chip enabled both to observe living cells with minimal image distortion and to ease controlling and handling of biological samples (e.g. cells and biological molecules) in the imaged area. A proof-of-concept experiment of on-chip detection of cellular response to endothelial growth factor demonstrated promising use for the recently developed on-chip cell analysis platform. Contact fluorescence microscopy has numerous desirable features including compatibility with plastic microfluidic chips and compatibility with the electrical control system, and thus will fulfill the requirements of a fully automated cell analysis system.

  8. Micromilling: a method for ultra-rapid prototyping of plastic microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guckenberger, David J; de Groot, Theodorus E; Wan, Alwin M D; Beebe, David J; Young, Edmond W K

    2015-06-07

    This tutorial review offers protocols, tips, insight, and considerations for practitioners interested in using micromilling to create microfluidic devices. The objective is to provide a potential user with information to guide them on whether micromilling would fill a specific need within their overall fabrication strategy. Comparisons are made between micromilling and other common fabrication methods for plastics in terms of technical capabilities and cost. The main discussion focuses on "how-to" aspects of micromilling, to enable a user to select proper equipment and tools, and obtain usable microfluidic parts with minimal start-up time and effort. The supplementary information provides more extensive discussion on CNC mill setup, alignment, and programming. We aim to reach an audience with minimal prior experience in milling, but with strong interests in fabrication of microfluidic devices.

  9. Optical hyperpolarization and NMR detection of $^{129}$Xe on a microfluidic chip

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez-Martinez, Ricardo; Rosenbluh, Michael; Donley, Elizabeth A; Knappe, Svenja; Seltzer, Scott J; Ring, Hattie L; Bajaj, Vikram S; Kitching, John

    2014-01-01

    Optically hyperpolarized $^{129}$Xe gas has become a powerful contrast agent in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging, with applications ranging from studies of the human lung to the targeted detection of biomolecules. Equally attractive is its potential use to enhance the sensitivity of microfluidic NMR experiments, in which small sample volumes yield poor sensitivity. Unfortunately, most $^{129}$Xe polarization systems are large and non-portable. Here we present a microfabricated chip that optically polarizes $^{129}$Xe gas. We have achieved $^{129}$Xe polarizations greater than 0.5$\\%$ at flow rates of several microliters per second, compatible with typical microfluidic applications. We employ in situ optical magnetometry to sensitively detect and characterize the $^{129}$Xe polarization at magnetic fields of 1 $\\mu$T. We construct the device using standard microfabrication techniques, which will facilitate its integration with existing microfluidic platforms. This device may enable the...

  10. Chip in a lab: Microfluidics for next generation life science research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streets, Aaron M; Huang, Yanyi

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic circuits are characterized by fluidic channels and chambers with a linear dimension on the order of tens to hundreds of micrometers. Components of this size enable lab-on-a-chip technology that has much promise, for example, in the development of point-of-care diagnostics. Micro-scale fluidic circuits also yield practical, physical, and technological advantages for studying biological systems, enhancing the ability of researchers to make more precise quantitative measurements. Microfluidic technology has thus become a powerful tool in the life science research laboratory over the past decade. Here we focus on chip-in-a-lab applications of microfluidics and survey some examples of how small fluidic components have provided researchers with new tools for life science research.

  11. A microfluidic platform to study the mechano sensational properties of ion channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratchi, Sara; Tovar-Lopez, Francisco J.; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Grace, Megan; Darby, William; McIntyre, Peter; Mitchell, Arnan

    2013-12-01

    Microfluidic platforms have been widely considered as an enabling technology for studying the ion transport phenomena of cells under precisely controlled shear stresses. Here, we report the application of a unique microfluidic platform to analyze the response of transgenic TRPV4-HEK293 cells in response to different shear stresses and in one field of view. Applying this system, we show the kinetics of calcium signalling at different shear stresses in TRPV4 positive cells and elucidate the threshold of their response. We show that there is direct correlation between the magnitude of shear stress and percentage of cells that are able to sense that level of shear. Further, we show that shear stress-induced elevation in intracellular calcium levels ([Ca2+]i) is through calcium influx from extracellular sources. The results demonstrate that the microfluidic system has unique capabilities for analysis of shear stress on adhesive cells and that it should be amenable to moderate throughput applications.

  12. Multichannel bipotentiostat integrated with a microfluidic platform for electrochemical real-time monitoring of cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergani, Marco; Carminati, Marco; Ferrari, Giorgio; Landini, Ettore; Caviglia, Claudia; Heiskanen, Arto; Comminges, Clément; Zór, Kinga; Sabourin, David; Dufva, Martin; Dimaki, Maria; Raiteri, Roberto; Wollenberger, Ulla; Emneus, Jenny; Sampietro, Marco

    2012-10-01

    An electrochemical detection system specifically designed for multi-parameter real-time monitoring of stem cell culturing/differentiation in a microfluidic system is presented. It is composed of a very compact 24-channel electronic board, compatible with arrays of microelectrodes and coupled to a microfluidic cell culture system. A versatile data acquisition software enables performing amperometry, cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy in each of the 12 independent chambers over a 100 kHz bandwidth with current resolution down to 5 pA for 100 ms measuring time. The design of the platform, its realization and experimental characterization are reported, with emphasis on the analysis of impact of input capacitance (i.e., microelectrode size) and microfluidic pump operation on current noise. Programmable sequences of successive injections of analytes (ferricyanide and dopamine) and rinsing buffer solution as well as the impedimetric continuous tracking for seven days of the proliferation of a colony of PC12 cells are successfully demonstrated.

  13. Textile Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heimdal, Elisabeth Jacobsen

    2010-01-01

    Textiles can be used as building skins, adding new aesthetic and functional qualities to architecture. Just like we as humans can put on a coat, buildings can also get dressed. Depending on our mood, or on the weather, we can change coat, and so can the building. But the idea of using textiles...

  14. Architectural Tops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    The development of the skyscraper is an American story that combines architectural history, economic power, and technological achievement. Each city in the United States can be identified by the profile of its buildings. The design of the tops of skyscrapers was the inspiration for the students in the author's high-school ceramic class to develop…

  15. Architectural Mealscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Tenna Doktor Olsen; Fisker, Anna Marie; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2012-01-01

    are jointed together. The purpose of this paper has therefore been to test the idea of a new paradigm for ‘Interior Design for Food’ taking into account the reflective perspective and critical thinking of architectural theory like for instance developed with Semper, when studying the eating environment...

  16. Architectural Illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doornek, Richard R.

    1990-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan developed around the work of architectural muralist Richard Haas. Discusses the significance of mural painting and gives key concepts for the lesson. Lists class activities for the elementary and secondary grades. Provides a photograph of the Haas mural on the Fountainbleau Hilton Hotel, 1986. (GG)

  17. Religious Architecture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The main religions of ancient China were Buddhism,Taoism and Islam, of which Buddhism was the most widespread. As a result, Buddhist temples and towers are found all over China, and have become important components of the country's ancient architecture.

  18. Textile Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heimdal, Elisabeth Jacobsen

    2010-01-01

    Textiles can be used as building skins, adding new aesthetic and functional qualities to architecture. Just like we as humans can put on a coat, buildings can also get dressed. Depending on our mood, or on the weather, we can change coat, and so can the building. But the idea of using textiles...

  19. Fuel cell-powered microfluidic platform for lab-on-a-chip applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel, Juan Pablo; Castellarnau, Marc; Senn, Tobias; Löchel, Bernd; Samitier, Josep; Sabaté, Neus

    2012-01-07

    The achievement of a higher degree of integration of components--especially micropumps and power sources--is a challenge currently being pursued to obtain portable and totally autonomous microfluidic devices. This paper presents the integration of a micro direct methanol fuel cell (μDMFC) in a microfluidic platform as a smart solution to provide both electrical and pumping power to a Lab-on-a-Chip system. In this system the electric power produced by the fuel cell is available to enable most of the functionalites required by the microfluidic chip, while the generated CO(2) from the electrochemical reaction produces a pressure capable of pumping a liquid volume through a microchannel. The control of the fuel cell operating conditions allows regulation of the flow rate of a liquid sample through a microfluidic network. The relation between sample flow rate and the current generated by the fuel cell is practically linear, achieving values in the range of 4-18 μL min(-1) while having an available power between 1-4 mW. This permits adjusting the desired flow rate for a given application by controlling the fuel cell output conditions and foresees a fully autonomous analytical Lab-on-a-Chip in which the same device would provide the electrical power to a detection module and at the same time use the CO(2) pumping action to flow the required analytes through a particular microfluidic design.

  20. Multilayer microfluidic systems with indium-tin-oxide microelectrodes for studying biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsiang-Chiu; Lyau, Jia-Bo; Lin, Min-Hsuan; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Chen, Hsin

    2017-07-01

    Contemporary semiconductor and micromachining technologies have been exploited to develop lab-on-a-chip microsystems, which enable parallel and efficient experiments in molecular and cellular biology. In these microlab systems, microfluidics play an important role for automatic transportation or immobilization of cells and bio-molecules, as well as for separation or mixing of different chemical reagents. However, seldom microlab systems allow both morphology and electrophysiology of biological cells to be studied in situ. This kind of study is important, for example, for understanding how neuronal networks grow in response to environmental stimuli. To fulfill this application need, this paper investigates the possibility of fabricating multi-layer photoresists as microfluidic systems directly above a glass substrate with indium-tin-oxide (ITO) electrodes. The microfluidic channels are designed to guide and trap biological cells on top of ITO electrodes, through which the electrical activities of cells can be recorded or elicited. As both the microfluidic system and ITO electrodes are transparent, the cellular morphology is observable easily during electrophysiological studies. Two fabrication processes are proposed and compared. One defines the structure and curing depth of each photoresist layer simply by controlling the exposure time in lithography, while the other further utilizes a sacrificial layer to defines the structure of the bottom layer. The fabricated microfluidic system is proved bio-compatible and able to trap blood cells or neurons. Therefore, the proposed microsystem will be useful for studying cultured cells efficiently in applications such as drug-screening.

  1. In situ molecular imaging of hydrated biofilm in a microfluidic reactor by ToF-SIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Xin; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Zhaoying; Yang, Li; Liu, Bingwen; Zhu, Zihua; Tucker, Abigail E.; Chrisler, William B.; Hill, Eric A.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Lin, Yuehe; Liu, Songqin; Marshall, Matthew J.

    2014-02-26

    The first results of using a novel single channel microfluidic reactor to enable Shewanella biofilm growth and in situ characterization using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) in the hydrated environment are presented. The new microfluidic interface allows direct probing of the liquid surface using ToF-SIMS, a vacuum surface technique. The detection window is an aperture of 2 m in diameter on a thin silicon nitride (SiN) membrane and it allows direct detection of the liquid surface. Surface tension of the liquid flowing inside the microchannel holds the liquid within the aperture. ToF-SIMS depth profiling was used to drill through the SiN membrane and the biofilm grown on the substrate. In situ 2D imaging of the biofilm in hydrated state was acquired, providing spatial distribution of the chemical compounds in the biofilm system. This data was compared with a medium filled microfluidic reactor devoid of biofilm and dried biofilm samples deposited on clean silicon wafers. Principle Component Analysis (PCA) was used to investigate these observations. Our results show that imaging biofilms in the hydrated environment using ToF-SIMS is possible using the unique microfluidic reactor. Moreover, characteristic biofilm fatty acids fragments were observed in the hydrated biofilm grown in the microfluidic channel, illustrating the advantage of imaging biofilm in its native environment.

  2. Microbridge structures for uniform interval control of flowing droplets in microfluidic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Do-Hyun; Lee, Wonhye; Um, Eujin; Park, Je-Kyun

    2011-09-01

    Precise temporal control of microfluidic droplets such as synchronization and combinatorial pairing of droplets is required to achieve a variety range of chemical and biochemical reactions inside microfluidic networks. Here, we present a facile and robust microfluidic platform enabling uniform interval control of flowing droplets for the precise temporal synchronization and pairing of picoliter droplets with a reagent. By incorporating microbridge structures interconnecting the droplet-carrying channel and the flow control channel, a fluidic pressure drop was derived between the two fluidic channels via the microbridge structures, reordering flowing droplets with a defined uniform interval. Through the adjustment of the control oil flow rate, the droplet intervals were flexibly and precisely adjustable. With this mechanism of droplet spacing, the gelation of the alginate droplets as well as control of the droplet interval was simultaneously achieved by additional control oil flow including calcified oleic acid. In addition, by parallel linking identical microfluidic modules with distinct sample inlet, controlled synchronization and pairing of two distinct droplets were demonstrated. This method is applicable to facilitate and develop many droplet-based microfluidic applications, including biological assay, combinatorial synthesis, and high-throughput screening.

  3. Real-time Functional Analysis of Inertial Microfluidic Devices via Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Biqin; Chen, Siyu; Zhou, Fan; Chan, Christina H. Y.; Yi, Ji; Zhang, Hao F.; Sun, Cheng

    2016-09-01

    We report the application of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) technology that enables real-time functional analysis of sorting microparticles and cells in an inertial microfluidic device. We demonstrated high-speed, high-resolution acquisition of cross-sectional images at a frame rate of 350 Hz, with a lateral resolution of 3 μm and an axial resolution of 1 μm within the microfluidic channel filled with water. We analyzed the temporal sequence of cross-sectional SD-OCT images to determine the position and diameter of microspheres in a spiral microfluidic channel under various flow rates. We used microspheres with known diameters to validate the sub-micrometer precision of the particle size analysis based on a scattering model of spherical microparticles. An additional investigation of sorting live HT-29 cells in the spiral microfluidic channel indicated that the distribution of cells within in the microchannel has a close correspondence with the cells’ size distribution. The label-free real-time imaging and analysis of microscale particles in flow offers robustness for practical applications with live cells and allows us to better understand the mechanisms of particle separations in microfluidic sorting systems.

  4. Merging microfluidics and sonochemistry: towards greener and more efficient micro-sono-reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez Rivas, David; Cintas, Pedro; Gardeniers, Han J G E

    2012-11-18

    Microfluidics enable the manipulation of chemical reactions using very small amounts of fluid, in channels with dimensions of tens to hundreds of micrometers; so-called microstructured devices, from which the iconic image of chips emerges. The immediate attraction of microfluidics lies in its greenness: use of small quantities of reagents and solvents, and hence less waste, a precise control of reaction conditions, integration of functionality for process intensification, safer and often faster protocols, reliable scale-up, and possibility of performing multiphase reactions. Among the limitations found in microfluidics the facile formation of precipitating products should be highlighted, and in this context, the search for efficient mass and energy transfers is a must. Such limitations have been partially overcome with the aid of ultrasound in conventional flow systems, and can now be successfully used in microreactors, which provide new capabilities. Novel applications and a better understanding of the physical and chemical aspects of sonochemistry can certainly be achieved by combining microfluidics and ultrasound. We will review this nascent area of research, paying attention to the latest developments and showing future directions, which benefit both from the existing microfluidic technology and sonochemistry itself.

  5. Magnetic optical sensor particles: a flexible analytical tool for microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungerböck, Birgit; Fellinger, Siegfried; Sulzer, Philipp; Abel, Tobias; Mayr, Torsten

    2014-05-21

    In this study we evaluate magnetic optical sensor particles (MOSePs) with incorporated sensing functionalities regarding their applicability in microfluidic devices. MOSePs can be separated from the surrounding solution to form in situ sensor spots within microfluidic channels, while read-out is accomplished outside the chip. These magnetic sensor spots exhibit benefits of sensor layers (high brightness and convenient usage) combined with the advantages of dispersed sensor particles (ease of integration). The accumulation characteristics of MOSePs with different diameters were investigated as well as the in situ sensor spot stability at varying flow rates. Magnetic sensor spots were stable at flow rates specific to microfluidic applications. Furthermore, MOSePs were optimized regarding fiber optic and imaging read-out systems, and different referencing schemes were critically discussed on the example of oxygen sensors. While the fiber optic sensing system delivered precise and accurate results for measurement in microfluidic channels, limitations due to analyte consumption were found for microscopic oxygen imaging. A compensation strategy is provided, which utilizes simple pre-conditioning by exposure to light. Finally, new application possibilities were addressed, being enabled by the use of MOSePs. They can be used for microscopic oxygen imaging in any chip with optically transparent covers, can serve as flexible sensor spots to monitor enzymatic activity or can be applied to form fixed sensor spots inside microfluidic structures, which would be inaccessible to integration of sensor layers.

  6. Impedimetric toxicity assay in microfluidics using free and liposome-encapsulated anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caviglia, Claudia; Zór, Kinga; Montini, Lucia; Tilli, Valeria; Canepa, Silvia; Melander, Fredrik; Muhammad, Haseena B; Carminati, Marco; Ferrari, Giorgio; Raiteri, Roberto; Heiskanen, Arto; Andresen, Thomas L; Emnéus, Jenny

    2015-02-17

    In this work, we have developed a microfluidic cytotoxicity assay for a cell culture and detection platform, which enables both fluid handling and electrochemical/optical detection. The cytotoxic effect of anticancer drugs doxorubicin (DOX), oxaliplatin (OX) as well as OX-loaded liposomes, developed for targeted drug delivery, was evaluated using real-time impedance monitoring. The time-dependent effect of DOX on HeLa cells was monitored and found to have a delayed onset of cytotoxicity in microfluidics compared with static culture conditions based on data obtained in our previous study. The result of a fluorescent microscopic annexin V/propidium iodide assay, performed in microfluidics, confirmed the outcome of the real-time impedance assay. In addition, the response of HeLa cells to OX-induced cytotoxicity proved to be slower than toxicity induced by DOX. A difference in the time-dependent cytotoxic response of fibrosarcoma cells (HT1080) to free OX and OX-loaded liposomes was observed and attributed to incomplete degradation of the liposomes, which results in lower drug availability. The matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-dependent release of OX from OX-loaded liposomes was also confirmed using laryngopharynx carcinoma cells (FaDu). The comparison and the observed differences between the cytotoxic effects under microfluidic and static conditions highlight the importance of comparative studies as basis for implementation of microfluidic cytotoxic assays.

  7. Entropy-based consistent model driven architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niepostyn, Stanisław Jerzy

    2016-09-01

    A description of software architecture is a plan of the IT system construction, therefore any architecture gaps affect the overall success of an entire project. The definitions mostly describe software architecture as a set of views which are mutually unrelated, hence potentially inconsistent. Software architecture completeness is also often described in an ambiguous way. As a result most methods of IT systems building comprise many gaps and ambiguities, thus presenting obstacles for software building automation. In this article the consistency and completeness of software architecture are mathematically defined based on calculation of entropy of the architecture description. Following this approach, in this paper we also propose our method of automatic verification of consistency and completeness of the software architecture development method presented in our previous article as Consistent Model Driven Architecture (CMDA). The proposed FBS (Functionality-Behaviour-Structure) entropy-based metric applied in our CMDA approach enables IT architects to decide whether the modelling process is complete and consistent. With this metric, software architects could assess the readiness of undergoing modelling work for the start of IT system building. It even allows them to assess objectively whether the designed software architecture of the IT system could be implemented at all. The overall benefit of such an approach is that it facilitates the preparation of complete and consistent software architecture more effectively as well as it enables assessing and monitoring of the ongoing modelling development status. We demonstrate this with a few industry examples of IT system designs.

  8. Integrating Electronics and Microfluidics on Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedi, Mahiar M; Ainla, Alar; Güder, Firat; Christodouleas, Dionysios C; Fernández-Abedul, M Teresa; Whitesides, George M

    2016-07-01

    Paper microfluidics and printed electronics have developed independently, and are incompatible in many aspects. Monolithic integration of microfluidics and electronics on paper is demonstrated. This integration makes it possible to print 2D and 3D fluidic, electrofluidic, and electrical components on paper, and to fabricate devices using them.

  9. Cell Culture Microfluidic Biochips: Experimental Throughput Maximization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minhass, Wajid Hassan; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidic biochips offer a promising alternative to a conventional biochemical laboratory, integrating all necessary functionalities on-chip in order to perform biochemical applications. Researchers have started to propose computer-aided design tools for the synthesis of such biochips. Our focus...... metaheuristic for experimental design generation for the cell culture microfluidic biochips, and we have evaluated our approach using multiple experimental setups....

  10. Modular microfluidic system for biological sample preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Klint A.; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.; Bailey, Christopher G.; Ness, Kevin Dean

    2015-09-29

    A reconfigurable modular microfluidic system for preparation of a biological sample including a series of reconfigurable modules for automated sample preparation adapted to selectively include a) a microfluidic acoustic focusing filter module, b) a dielectrophoresis bacteria filter module, c) a dielectrophoresis virus filter module, d) an isotachophoresis nucleic acid filter module, e) a lyses module, and f) an isotachophoresis-based nucleic acid filter.

  11. A microfluidic method to study demulsification kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krebs, T.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Boom, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of experiments studying droplet coalescence in a dense layer of emulsion droplets using microfluidic circuits. The microfluidic structure allows direct observation of collisions and coalescence events between oil droplets dispersed in water. The coalescence rate of a flowing h

  12. Spatially enabling the health sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Stephen Weeramanthri

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Spatial information describes the physical location of either people or objects, and the measured relationships between them. In this article we offer the view that greater utilisation of spatial information and its related technology, as part of a broader redesign of the architecture of health information at local and national levels, could assist and speed up the process of health reform, which is taking place across the globe in richer and poorer countries alike.In making this point, we describe the impetus for health sector reform, recent developments in spatial information and analytics, and current Australasian spatial health research. We highlight examples of uptake of spatial information by the health sector, as well as missed opportunities. Our recommendations to spatially enable the health sector are applicable to high and low-resource settings.

  13. Simulation Enabled Safeguards Assessment Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Bean; Trond Bjornard; Thomas Larson

    2007-09-01

    It is expected that nuclear energy will be a significant component of future supplies. New facilities, operating under a strengthened international nonproliferation regime will be needed. There is good reason to believe virtual engineering applied to the facility design, as well as to the safeguards system design will reduce total project cost and improve efficiency in the design cycle. Simulation Enabled Safeguards Assessment MEthodology (SESAME) has been developed as a software package to provide this capability for nuclear reprocessing facilities. The software architecture is specifically designed for distributed computing, collaborative design efforts, and modular construction to allow step improvements in functionality. Drag and drop wireframe construction allows the user to select the desired components from a component warehouse, render the system for 3D visualization, and, linked to a set of physics libraries and/or computational codes, conduct process evaluations of the system they have designed.

  14. Electrorheological fluid and its applications in microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Limu; Gong, Xiuqing; Wen, Weijia

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidics is a low-cost technique for fast-diagnosis and microsynthesis. Within a decade it might become the foundation of point-of-care and lab-on-a-chip applications. With microfluidic chips, high-throughput sample screening and information processing are made possible. The picoliter droplet runs in microfluidic chips are ideal miniaturized vessels for microdetection and microsynthesis. Meanwhile, individual manipulation of microdroplets remains a challenge: the shortcomings in automatic, reliable, and scalable methods for logic control prevent further integration of microfluidic applications. The giant electrorheological fluid (GERF), which is a kind of "smart" colloid, has tunable viscosity under the influence of external electric field. Therefore, GERF is introduced as the active controlling medium, with real-time response in on-chip fluid control. This review article introduces the working principles and fabrication methods of different types of electrorheological fluid, and extensively describes the strategies of GERF-assisted microfluidic controlling schemes.

  15. Manipulation of microfluidic droplets by electrorheological fluid

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Menying

    2009-09-01

    Microfluidics, especially droplet microfluidics, attracts more and more researchers from diverse fields, because it requires fewer materials and less time, produces less waste and has the potential of highly integrated and computer-controlled reaction processes for chemistry and biology. Electrorheological fluid, especially giant electrorheological fluid (GERF), which is considered as a kind of smart material, has been applied to the microfluidic systems to achieve active and precise control of fluid by electrical signal. In this review article, we will introduce recent results of microfluidic droplet manipulation, GERF and some pertinent achievements by introducing GERF into microfluidic system: digital generation, manipulation of "smart droplets" and droplet manipulation by GERF. Once it is combined with real-time detection, integrated chip with multiple functions can be realized. © 2009 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  16. Microfluidics: a new cosset for neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinyi; Ren, Li; Li, Li; Liu, Wenming; Zhou, Jing; Yu, Wenhao; Tong, Denwen; Chen, Shulin

    2009-03-07

    Recently, microfluidic systems have shown great potential in the study of molecular and cellular biology. With its excellent properties, such as miniaturization, integration and automation, to name just a few, microfluidics creates new opportunities for the spatial and temporal control of cell growth and environmental stimuli in vitro. In the field of neuroscience, microfluidic devices offer precise control of the microenvironment surrounding individual cells, and the delivery of biochemical or physical cues to neural networks or single neurons. The intent of this review is to outline recent advances in microfluidic-based applications in neurobiology, with emphasis on neuron culture, neuron manipulation, neural stem cell differentiation, neuropharmacology, neuroelectrophysiology, and neuron biosensors. It also aims to stimulate development of microfluidic-based applications in neurobiology by involving scientists from various disciplines, especially neurobiology and microtechnology.

  17. Microfluidic desalination techniques and their potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, S H; van den Berg, A; Odijk, M

    2015-09-07

    In this review we discuss recent developments in the emerging research field of miniaturized desalination. Traditionally desalination is performed to convert salt water into potable water and research is focused on improving performance of large-scale desalination plants. Microfluidic desalination offers several new opportunities in comparison to macro-scale desalination, such as providing a platform to increase fundamental knowledge of ion transport on the nano- and microfluidic scale and new microfluidic sample preparation methods. This approach has also lead to the development of new desalination techniques, based on micro/nanofluidic ion-transport phenomena, which are potential candidates for up-scaling to (portable) drinking water devices. This review assesses microfluidic desalination techniques on their applications and is meant to contribute to further implementation of microfluidic desalination techniques in the lab-on-chip community.

  18. Manipulation of microfluidic droplets by electrorheological fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Menying; Gong, Xiuqing; Wen, Weijia

    2009-09-01

    Microfluidics, especially droplet microfluidics, attracts more and more researchers from diverse fields, because it requires fewer materials and less time, produces less waste and has the potential of highly integrated and computer-controlled reaction processes for chemistry and biology. Electrorheological fluid, especially giant electrorheological fluid (GERF), which is considered as a kind of smart material, has been applied to the microfluidic systems to achieve active and precise control of fluid by electrical signal. In this review article, we will introduce recent results of microfluidic droplet manipulation, GERF and some pertinent achievements by introducing GERF into microfluidic system: digital generation, manipulation of "smart droplets" and droplet manipulation by GERF. Once it is combined with real-time detection, integrated chip with multiple functions can be realized.

  19. Research of Dielectric Breakdown Microfluidic Sampling Chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidic chip is mainly driven electrically by external electrode and array electrode, but there are certain disadvantages in both of ways, which affect the promotion and application of microfluidic technology. This paper discusses a scheme that uses the conductive solution in a microchannel made by PDMS, replacing electrodes and the way of dielectric breakdown to achieve microfluidic chip driver. It could reduce the driving voltage and simplify the chip production process. To prove the feasibility of this method, we produced a microfluidic chip used in PDMS material with the lithography technology and experimented it. The results showed that using the dielectric breakdown to achieve microfluidic chip driver is feasible, and it has certain application prospect.

  20. MUF architecture /art London

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen Kajita, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Om MUF architecture samt interview med Liza Fior og Katherine Clarke, partnere i muf architecture/art......Om MUF architecture samt interview med Liza Fior og Katherine Clarke, partnere i muf architecture/art...

  1. Catalyst Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    the projects as case studies, which contribute with strategic knowledge rather than generalizing from average considerations. These are ‘strategic projects’ where we have looked for the specific and the particular (Flyvbjerg 1991). According to the case studies, we use the case study method developed by Bent......’ interpretations and architectural strategies are included in the analyses. This implies that there is a large variation of empirical knowledge about the selected problems. That is the reason why we give a short introduction to the exact use of approaches and methods in the beginning of each case study. Based...... in experience? Which design qualities do the best examples of architecture as urban catalysts have, and how can we as citizens, politicians and professionals use knowledge about this in the development of our cities as good places to live? We wish to throw light on these key questions through case studies...

  2. Kosmos = architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tine Kurent

    1985-12-01

    Full Text Available The old Greek word "kosmos" means not only "cosmos", but also "the beautiful order", "the way of building", "building", "scenography", "mankind", and, in the time of the New Testament, also "pagans". The word "arhitekton", meaning first the "master of theatrical scenography", acquired the meaning of "builder", when the words "kosmos" and ~kosmetes" became pejorative. The fear that architecture was not considered one of the arts before Renaissance, since none of the Muses supervised the art of building, results from the misunderstanding of the word "kosmos". Urania was the Goddes of the activity implied in the verb "kosmein", meaning "to put in the beautiful order" - everything, from the universe to the man-made space, i. e. the architecture.

  3. Architectural Engineers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rikke Premer

    The design professions have always been an amorphous phenomena difficult to merge under one label. New constellations continually emerge, questioning, stretching, and reconfiguring the understanding of design and the professional practices linked to it. In this paper the idea of architectural eng...... with new types of competences and be able to manoeuvre in new types of constellations, but concurrently core competences must be preserved and the time of study kept at a minimum....

  4. Architectural Theatricality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Tenna Doktor Olsen

    putting an emphasis on architecture as unified scenery guided by the four motives hearth, enclosure, dressing and context. This theoretical framework draws on the Gastronomic Analogy put forth by James Fergusson in 1862 and an interpretation of the writings of the 19th century architect Gottfried Semper...... with the material appearance of objects, but also the imaginary world of dreams and memories which are concealed with the communicative significance of intentions when designing the future super hospitals....

  5. Architectures for enabling flexible business processes : A research agenda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overbeek, S.J.; Gong, Y.

    2010-01-01

    For decades, information systems have been designed for controlling and managing business processes. In the past, these systems were often monolithic in nature and not made for interacting and communicating with other systems. Today, departments and organizations must collaborate, which requires dis

  6. TRUSTWORTHY ENABLED RELIABLE COMMUNICATION ARCHITECTURE IN MOBILE AD HOC NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanan Dhavamani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ad hoc networks are widely used in military and other scientific area. There are various kind of routing protocols are available to establish the route, with the proper analyzation one can choose the routing protocol to form their own network with respect to number of nodes and security considerations. The mobility of nodes makes the environment infrastructure less. It also has a certain number of characteristics which makes the security difficult. A trust recommendation mechanism has designed to keep track of node’s behavior to establish the trustworthiness of the network. Meanwhile with this trustworthiness a node can make objective judgment among another node’s trustworthiness to maintain whole system at a certain security level. The motivation of the work is to understanding the behavior or routing protocol and the trustworthiness.

  7. Architectures for enabling flexible business processes : A research agenda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overbeek, S.J.; Gong, Y.

    2010-01-01

    For decades, information systems have been designed for controlling and managing business processes. In the past, these systems were often monolithic in nature and not made for interacting and communicating with other systems. Today, departments and organizations must collaborate, which requires

  8. Open Architecture as an Enabler for FORCEnet Cruise Missile Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    battlespace via the FORCEnet information network. Current capability gaps include a lack of common configuration and Fire Control Quality ( FCQ ...connectivity among platforms that is needed to achieve and maintain a robust cruise missile defense. FCQ is defined as data obtained with the sufficient...platform, or a combination of the two. With Fire Control Quality ( FCQ ) threat data from a remote sensor, the remote unit can initiate a launch

  9. Photonics in switching: Architectures, systems and enabling technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffaelli, C.; Vlachos, K.; Andriolli, N.;

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes recent research activities and results in the area of photonic switching carried out within the Virtual Department on Switching (VDS) of the European e-Photon/ONe Network of Excellence. Contributions from outstanding European research groups in this field are collected to offer...

  10. ARCHITECTURES AND ALGORITHMS FOR COGNITIVE NETWORKS ENABLED BY QUALITATIVE MODELS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balamuralidhar, P.

    2013-01-01

    the qualitative models in a cognitive engine. Further I use the methodology in multiple functional scenarios of cognitive networks including self- optimization and self- monitoring. In the case of self-optimization, I integrate principles from monotonicity analysis to evaluate and enhance qualitative models......Complexity of communication networks is ever increasing and getting complicated by their heterogeneity and dynamism. Traditional techniques are facing challenges in network performance management. Cognitive networking is an emerging paradigm to make networks more intelligent, thereby overcoming...... traditional limitations and potentially achieving better performance. The vision is that, networks should be able to monitor themselves, reason upon changes in self and environment, act towards the achievement of specific goals and learn from experience. The concept of a Cognitive Engine (CE) supporting...

  11. Microfluidics: Emerging prospects for anti-cancer drug screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodkowic, Donald; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2010-11-10

    Cancer constitutes a heterogenic cellular system with a high level of spatio-temporal complexity. Recent discoveries by systems biologists have provided emerging evidence that cellular responses to anti-cancer modalities are stochastic in nature. To uncover the intricacies of cell-to-cell variability and its relevance to cancer therapy, new analytical screening technologies are needed. The last decade has brought forth spectacular innovations in the field of cytometry and single cell cytomics, opening new avenues for systems oncology and high-throughput real-time drug screening routines. The up-and-coming microfluidic Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC) technology and micro-total analysis systems (μTAS) are arguably the most promising platforms to address the inherent complexity of cellular systems with massive experimental parallelization and 4D analysis on a single cell level. The vast miniaturization of LOC systems and multiplexing enables innovative strategies to reduce drug screening expenditures while increasing throughput and content of information from a given sample. Small cell numbers and operational reagent volumes are sufficient for microfluidic analyzers and, as such, they enable next generation high-throughput and high-content screening of anti-cancer drugs on patient-derived specimens. Herein we highlight the selected advancements in this emerging field of bioengineering, and provide a snapshot of developments with relevance to anti-cancer drug screening routines.

  12. Microfluidic single-cell analysis for systems immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junkin, Michael; Tay, Savaş

    2014-04-07

    The immune system constantly battles infection and tissue damage, but exaggerated immune responses lead to allergies, autoimmunity and cancer. Discrimination of self from foreign and the fine-tuning of immunity are achieved by information processing pathways, whose regulatory mechanisms are little understood. Cell-to-cell variability and stochastic molecular interactions result in diverse cellular responses to identical signaling inputs, casting doubt on the reliability of traditional population-averaged analyses. Furthermore, dynamic molecular and cellular interactions create emergent properties that change over multiple time scales. Understanding immunity in the face of complexity and noisy dynamics requires time-dependent analysis of single-cells in a proper context. Microfluidic systems create precisely defined microenvironments by controlling fluidic and surface chemistries, feature sizes, geometries and signal input timing, and thus enable quantitative multi-parameter analysis of single cells. Such qualities allow observable dynamic environments approaching in vivo levels of biological complexity. Seamless parallelization of functional units in microfluidic devices allows high-throughput measurements, an essential feature for statistically meaningful analysis of naturally variable biological systems. These abilities recapitulate diverse scenarios such as cell-cell signaling, migration, differentiation, antibody and cytokine production, clonal selection, and cell lysis, thereby enabling accurate and meaningful study of immune behaviors in vitro.

  13. Electrokinetic Properties of Lubricin Antiadhesive Coatings in Microfluidic Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, George W; Duffy, Emer; Shallan, Aliaa; Wuethrich, Alain; Paull, Brett

    2016-02-23

    Lubricin is a glycoprotein found in articular joints which has long been recognized as being an important biological boundary lubricant molecule and, more recently, an impressive antiadhesive that readily self-assembles into a well ordered, polymer brush layer on virtually any substrate. The lubricin molecule possesses an overabundance of anionic charge, a property that is atypical among antiadhesive molecules, that enables its use as a coating for applications involving electrokinetic processes such as electrophoresis and electroosmosis. Coating the surfaces of silica and polymeric microfluidic devices with self-assembled lubricin coatings affords a unique combination of excellent fouling resistance and high charge density that enables notoriously "sticky" biomolecules such as proteins to be used and controlled electrokinetically in the device without complications arising from nonspecific adsorption. Using capillary electrophoresis, we characterized the stability, uniformity, and electrokinetic properties of lubricin coatings applied to silica and PTFE capillaries over a range of run buffer pHs and when exposed to concentrated solutions of protein. In addition, we demonstrate the effectiveness of lubricin as a coating to minimize nonspecific protein adsorption in an electrokinetically controlled polydimethylsiloxane/silica microfluidic device.

  14. Electrowetting-based microfluidic operations on rapid-manufactured devices for heat pipe applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Renee S.; Bahadur, Vaibhav

    2017-07-01

    The heat transport capacity of traditional heat pipes is limited by the capillary pressure generated in the internal wick that pumps condensate to the evaporator. Recently, the authors conceptualized a novel heat pipe architecture, wherein wick-based pumping is replaced by electrowetting (EW)-based pumping of microliter droplets in the adiabatic section. An electrowetting heat pipe (EHP) can overcome the capillary limit to heat transport capacity and enable compact, planar, gravity-insensitive, and ultralow power consumption heat pipes that transport kiloWatt heat loads over extended distances. This work develops a novel technique for rapid, scalable fabrication of EW-based devices and studies critical microfluidic operations underlying the EHP, with the objective of predicting the key performance parameters of the EHP. Devices are fabricated on a printed circuit board (PCB) substrate with mechanically-milled electrodes, and a removable polyimide dielectric film. The first set of experiments uncovers the maximum channel gap (1 mm) for reliable EW-based pumping; this parameter determines the heat transport capacity of the EHP, which scales linearly with the channel gap. The second set of experiments uncovers the maximum channel gap (375 microns) at which EW voltages can successfully split droplets. This is an important consideration which ensures EHP operability in the event of unintentional droplet merging. The third set of experiments demonstrate and study EW-induced droplet generation from an open-to-air reservoir, which mimics the interface between the condenser and adiabatic sections of the EHP. The experimental findings predict that planar, water-based EHPs with a (10 cm by 4 mm) cross section can transport 1.6 kW over extended distances (>1 m), with a thermal resistance of 0.01 K W-1.

  15. Blood Perfusion in Microfluidic Models of Pulmonary Capillary Networks: Role of Geometry and Hematocrit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauber, Hagit; Waisman, Dan; Sznitman, Josue; Technion-IIT Team; Department of Neonatology Carmel Medical Center; Faculty of Medicine-Technion IIT Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Microfluidic platforms are increasingly used to study blood microflows at true physiological scale due to their ability to overcome manufacturing obstacle of complex anatomical morphologies, such as the organ-specific architectures of the microcirculation. In the present work, we utilize microfluidic platforms to devise in vitro models of the underlying pulmonary capillary networks (PCN), where capillary lengths and diameters are similar to the size of RBCs (~ 5-10 μm). To better understand flow characteristics and dispersion of red blood cells (RBCs) in PCNs, we have designed microfluidic models of alveolar capillary beds inspired by the seminal ``sheet flow'' model of Fung and Sobin (1969). Our microfluidic PCNs feature confined arrays of staggered pillars with diameters of ~ 5,7 and 10 μm, mimicking the dense structure of pulmonary capillary meshes. The devices are perfused with suspensions of RBCs at varying hematocrit levels under different flow rates. Whole-field velocity patterns using micro-PIV and single-cell tracking using PTV are obtained with fluorescently-labelled RBCs and discussed. Our experiments deliver a real-scale quantitative description of RBC perfusion characteristics across the pulmonary capillary microcirculation.

  16. Kinetic ELISA in Microfluidic Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debashis Dutta

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we describe the kinetic ELISA of Blue Tongue and Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease viral antibodies in microfluidic channels by monitoring the rate of generation of the enzyme reaction product under static conditions. It has been shown that this format of the immunoassay allows very reliable quantitation of the target species using inexpensive glass microchips and a standard epifluorescence microscope system coupled to a CCD camera. For the viral antibodies assayed here, the limit of detection (LOD for the analyte concentration in our microchips was established to be 3–5 times lower than that obtained on commercial microwell plates using a fiftieth of the sample volume and less than a third of the incubation time. Our analyses further show that when compared to the end-point ELISA format, the kinetic mode of this assay yields an improvement in the LOD by over an order of magnitude in microfluidic devices. This benefit is primarily realized as the observed variation in the background fluorescence (signal at the start of the enzyme reaction period was significantly larger than that in the rate of signal generation upon repeating these assays in different microchannels/microchips. Because the kinetic ELISA results depend only on the latter quantity, the noise level in them was substantially lower compared to that in its end-point counterpart in which the absolute fluorescence measurements are of greater significance. While a similar benefit was also recorded through implementation of kinetic ELISAs on the microwell platform, the improvement in LOD registered in that system was not as significant as was observed in the case of microfluidic assays.

  17. Paneling architectural freeform surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Eigensatz, Michael

    2010-07-26

    The emergence of large-scale freeform shapes in architecture poses big challenges to the fabrication of such structures. A key problem is the approximation of the design surface by a union of patches, socalled panels, that can be manufactured with a selected technology at reasonable cost, while meeting the design intent and achieving the desired aesthetic quality of panel layout and surface smoothness. The production of curved panels is mostly based on molds. Since the cost of mold fabrication often dominates the panel cost, there is strong incentive to use the same mold for multiple panels. We cast the major practical requirements for architectural surface paneling, including mold reuse, into a global optimization framework that interleaves discrete and continuous optimization steps to minimize production cost while meeting user-specified quality constraints. The search space for optimization is mainly generated through controlled deviation from the design surface and tolerances on positional and normal continuity between neighboring panels. A novel 6-dimensional metric space allows us to quickly compute approximate inter-panel distances, which dramatically improves the performance of the optimization and enables the handling of complex arrangements with thousands of panels. The practical relevance of our system is demonstrated by paneling solutions for real, cutting-edge architectural freeform design projects. © 2010 ACM.

  18. Paneling architectural freeform surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Eigensatz, Michael

    2010-07-25

    The emergence of large-scale freeform shapes in architecture poses big challenges to the fabrication of such structures. A key problem is the approximation of the design surface by a union of patches, so-called panels, that can be manufactured with a selected technology at reasonable cost, while meeting the design intent and achieving the desired aesthetic quality of panel layout and surface smoothness. The production of curved panels is mostly based on molds. Since the cost of mold fabrication often dominates the panel cost, there is strong incentive to use the same mold for multiple panels. We cast the major practical requirements for architectural surface paneling, including mold reuse, into a global optimization framework that interleaves discrete and continuous optimization steps to minimize production cost while meeting user-specified quality constraints. The search space for optimization is mainly generated through controlled deviation from the design surface and tolerances on positional and normal continuity between neighboring panels. A novel 6-dimensional metric space allows us to quickly compute approximate inter-panel distances, which dramatically improves the performance of the optimization and enables the handling of complex arrangements with thousands of panels. The practical relevance of our system is demonstrated by paneling solutions for real, cutting-edge architectural freeform design projects.

  19. Microfluidics and microscale transport processes

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Suman

    2012-01-01

    With an intense focus on micro- and nanotechnology from a fluidic perspective, this book details the research activities in key directions on both the theoretical and experimental fronts. As part of the IIT Kharagpur Research Monograph series, the text discusses topics such as capillary transport in microchannels, fluid friction and heat transfer in microchannels, electrokinetics, and interfacial transport in nanochannels. It also covers nanoparticle transport in colloidal suspensions, bubble generation in microfluidic channels, micro-heat pipe, the lattice Boltzmann method for phase changing

  20. Microfluidics and the life sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Holger; Gärtner, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    The field of microfluidics, often also referred to as "Lab-on-a-Chip" has made significant progress in the last 15 years and is an essential tool in the development of new products and protocols in the life sciences. This article provides a broad overview on the developments on the academic as well as the commercial side. Fabrication technologies for polymer-based devices are presented and a strategy for the development of complex integrated devices is discussed, together with an example on the use of these devices in pathogen detection.