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Sample records for microfabricated dna analysis

  1. Microfabricated DNA analysis system. Semi-annual report, August 1993--January 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Northrup, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    We are miniaturizing instrumentation for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) -- a bioanalytical technique that amplifies target sections of DNA through thermal cycling. This report focuses on delineating reaction chamber, design parameters through computer modeling and infrared imaging. We have also continued micro-chamber-based PCR experiments and have successfully amplified three different targets from two different biological sources. Specifically, we have amplified DNA from {beta}-globin (a subunit of hemoglobin), and two different-sized targets from the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). These experiments were performed in newly-designed chambers. Reaction chambers are also being designed with detection in mind, specifically for the detection of fluorescent DNA labels. Finally, some new developments in PCR technology are described as they represent potential biological diagnostics to be evaluated in microfabricated DNA analysis systems.

  2. Concentrating Genomic Length DNA in a Microfabricated Array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yu; Abrams, Ezra S.; Boles, T. Christian

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that a microfabricated bump array can concentrate genomic-length DNA molecules efficiently at continuous, high flow velocities, up to 40 μm=s, if the single-molecule DNA globule has a sufficiently large shear modulus. Increase in the shear modulus is accomplished by compacting the ...... for next-generation DNA-sequencing libraries will be an important application of this development.......We demonstrate that a microfabricated bump array can concentrate genomic-length DNA molecules efficiently at continuous, high flow velocities, up to 40 μm=s, if the single-molecule DNA globule has a sufficiently large shear modulus. Increase in the shear modulus is accomplished by compacting...... the DNA molecules to minimal coil size using polyethylene glycol (PEG) derived depletion forces. We map out the sweet spot, where concentration occurs, as a function of PEG concentration and flow speed using a combination of theoretical analysis and experiment. Purification of DNA from enzymatic reactions...

  3. Microfabricated Fountain Pens for High-Density DNA Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Matthew O.; van Dam, R. Michae; Scherer, Axel; Quake, Stephen R.

    2003-01-01

    We used photolithographic microfabrication techniques to create very small stainless steel fountain pens that were installed in place of conventional pens on a microarray spotter. Because of the small feature size produced by the microfabricated pens, we were able to print arrays with up to 25,000 spots/cm2, significantly higher than can be achieved by other deposition methods. This feature density is sufficiently large that a standard microscope slide can contain multiple replicates of every gene in a complex organism such as a mouse or human. We tested carryover during array printing with dye solution, labeled DNA, and hybridized DNA, and we found it to be indistinguishable from background. Hybridization also showed good sequence specificity to printed oligonucleotides. In addition to improved slide capacity, the microfabrication process offers the possibility of low-cost mass-produced pens and the flexibility to include novel pen features that cannot be machined with conventional techniques. PMID:12975313

  4. Microfabricated Fountain Pens for High-Density DNA Arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Reese, Matthew O.; van Dam, R. Michae; Scherer, Axel; Quake, Stephen R.

    2003-01-01

    We used photolithographic microfabrication techniques to create very small stainless steel fountain pens that were installed in place of conventional pens on a microarray spotter. Because of the small feature size produced by the microfabricated pens, we were able to print arrays with up to 25,000 spots/cm2, significantly higher than can be achieved by other deposition methods. This feature density is sufficiently large that a standard microscope slide can contain multiple replicates of every...

  5. Microfabricated tools for manipulation and analysis of magnetic microcarriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tondra, Mark [NVE Corporation, 11409 Valley View Road, Eden Prairie, MN 55344 (United States)]. E-mail: Markt@nve.com; Popple, Anthony [NVE Corporation, 11409 Valley View Road, Eden Prairie, MN 55344 (United States); Jander, Albrecht [Department of Electrical Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); Millen, Rachel L. [Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Pekas, Nikola [Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Porter, Marc D. [Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2005-05-15

    Tools for manipulating and detecting magnetic microcarriers are being developed with microscale features. Microfabricated giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors and wires are used for detection, and for creating high local field gradients. Microfluidic structures are added to control flow, and positioning of samples and microcarriers. These tools are designed for work in analytical chemistry and biology.

  6. High-performance genetic analysis on microfabricated capillary array electrophoresis plastic chips fabricated by injection molding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Fuquan; Tabata, Osamu; Kurokawa, Masaya; Ewis, Ashraf A; Zhang, Lihua; Yamaoka, Yoshihisa; Shinohara, Shouji; Shinohara, Yasuo; Ishikawa, Mitsuru; Baba, Yoshinobu

    2005-04-01

    We have developed a novel technique for mass production of microfabricated capillary array electrophoresis (mu-CAE) plastic chips for high-speed, high-throughput genetic analysis. The mu-CAE chips, containing 10 individual separation channels of 50-microm width, 50-microm depth, and a 100-microm lane-to-lane spacing at the detection region and a sacrificial channel network, were fabricated on a poly(methyl methacrylate) substrate by injection molding and then bonded manually using a pressure-sensitive sealing tape within several seconds at room temperature. The conditions for injection molding and bonding were carefully characterized to yield mu-CAE chips with well-defined channel and injection structures. A CCD camera equipped with an image intensifier was used to monitor simultaneously the separation in a 10-channel array with laser-induced fluorescence detection. High-performance electrophoretic separations of phiX174 HaeIII DNA restriction fragments and PCR products related to the human beta-globin gene and SP-B gene (the surfactant protein B) have been demonstrated on mu-CAE plastic chips using a methylcellulose sieving matrix in individual channels. The current work demonstrated greatly simplified the fabrication process as well as a detection scheme for mu-CAE chips and will bring the low-cost mass production and application of mu-CAE plastic chips for genetic analysis.

  7. A microfabricated silicon platform with 60 microfluidic chips for rapid mass spectrometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainiemi, Lauri; Nissilä, Teemu; Kostiainen, Risto; Ketola, Raimo A; Franssila, Sami

    2011-09-07

    This work presents a way of using silicon microfabrication to take advantage of the rim of a silicon wafer in a novel manner. Our circular multichip platform, which is fabricated using only standard microfabrication techniques, has 60 identical miniaturized micropillar array electrospray ionization (μPESI) chips at the periphery of a silicon wafer. The fabricated platform is fixed on a computer controlled rotating table, in front of a mass spectrometer (MS). After each MS measurement an unused μPESI chip is aligned towards the MS by the programmable rotating table. Our wafer-scale platform enabled measurement of 60 samples in 8 minutes. The samples can also be stored on the platform for later analysis.

  8. Microfabricated Electrochemical Cell-Based Biosensors for Analysis of Living Cells In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cellular biochemical parameters can be used to reveal the physiological and functional information of various cells. Due to demonstrated high accuracy and non-invasiveness, electrochemical detection methods have been used for cell-based investigation. When combined with improved biosensor design and advanced measurement systems, the on-line biochemical analysis of living cells in vitro has been applied for biological mechanism study, drug screening and even environmental monitoring. In recent decades, new types of miniaturized electrochemical biosensor are emerging with the development of microfabrication technology. This review aims to give an overview of the microfabricated electrochemical cell-based biosensors, such as microelectrode arrays (MEA, the electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS technique, and the light addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS. The details in their working principles, measurement systems, and applications in cell monitoring are covered. Driven by the need for high throughput and multi-parameter detection proposed by biomedicine, the development trends of electrochemical cell-based biosensors are also introduced, including newly developed integrated biosensors, and the application of nanotechnology and microfluidic technology.

  9. Improving Probe Immobilization for Label-Free Capacitive Detection of DNA Hybridization on Microfabricated Gold Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Carrara

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Alternative approaches to labeled optical detection for DNA arrays are actively investigated for low-cost point-of-care applications. In this domain, label-free capacitive detection is one of the most intensely studied techniques. It is based on the idea to detect the Helmholtz ion layer displacements when molecular recognition occurs at the electrodes/solution interface. The sensing layer is usually prepared by using thiols terminated DNA single-strength oligonucleotide probes on top of the sensor electrodes. However, published data shows evident time drift, which greatly complicates signal conditioning and processing and ultimately increases the uncertainty in DNA recognition sensing. The aim of this work is to show that newly developed ethylene-glycol functionalized alkanethiols greatly reduce time drift, thereby significantly improving capacitance based label-free detection of DNA.

  10. Introduction to microfabrication

    CERN Document Server

    Franssila, Sami

    2005-01-01

    Microfabrication is the key technology behind integrated circuits, microsensors, photonic crystals, ink jet printers, solar cells and flat panel displays. Microsystems can be complex, but the basic microstructures and processes of microfabrication are fairly simple. Introduction to Microfabrication shows how the common microfabrication concepts can be applied over and over again to create devices with a wide variety of structures and functions.Featuring:* A comprehensive presentation of basic fabrication processes* An emphasis on materials and microstructures, rather than devic

  11. Microfabricated fuel heating value monitoring device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Alex L [Albuquerque, NM; Manginell, Ronald P [Albuquerque, NM; Moorman, Matthew W [Albuquerque, NM

    2010-05-04

    A microfabricated fuel heating value monitoring device comprises a microfabricated gas chromatography column in combination with a catalytic microcalorimeter. The microcalorimeter can comprise a reference thermal conductivity sensor to provide diagnostics and surety. Using microfabrication techniques, the device can be manufactured in production quantities at a low per-unit cost. The microfabricated fuel heating value monitoring device enables continuous calorimetric determination of the heating value of natural gas with a 1 minute analysis time and 1.5 minute cycle time using air as a carrier gas. This device has applications in remote natural gas mining stations, pipeline switching and metering stations, turbine generators, and other industrial user sites. For gas pipelines, the device can improve gas quality during transfer and blending, and provide accurate financial accounting. For industrial end users, the device can provide continuous feedback of physical gas properties to improve combustion efficiency during use.

  12. Conventional and enantioselective gas chromatography with microfabricated planar columns for analysis of real-world samples of plant volatile fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagliero, C; Galli, S; Galli, M; Elmi, I; Belluce, M; Zampolli, S; Sgorbini, B; Rubiolo, P; Bicchi, C

    2016-01-15

    Within a project exploring the application of lab-on-chip GC to in-field analysis of the plant volatile fraction, this study evaluated the performance of a set of planar columns (also known as microchannels, MEMS columns, or microfabricated columns) of different dimensions installed in a conventional GC unit. Circular double-spiral-shaped-channel planar columns with different square/rectangular sections up to 2m long were applied to the analysis of both essential oils and headspace samples of a group of medicinal and aromatic plants (chamomile, peppermint, sage, rosemary, lavender and bergamot) and of standard mixtures of related compounds; the results were compared to those obtained with reference narrow-bore columns (l:5m, dc:0.1mm, df:0.1 μm). The above essential oils and headspaces were first analyzed quali-and quantitatively with planar columns statically coated with conventional stationary phases (5%-phenyl-polymethylsiloxane and auto-bondable nitroterephthalic-acid-modified polyethylene glycol), and then submitted to chiral recognition of their diagnostic markers, by enantioselective GC with a planar columns coated with a cyclodextrin derivative (30% 6(I-VII)-O-TBDMS-3(I-VII)-O-ethyl-2(I-VII)-O-ethyl-β-cyclodextrin in PS-086). Column characteristics and analysis conditions were first optimized to obtain suitable retention and efficiency for the samples investigated. The planar columns tested showed performances close to the reference conventional narrow-bore columns, with theoretical plate numbers per meter (N/m) ranging from 6100 to 7200 for those coated with the conventional stationary phases, and above 5600 for those with the chiral selector. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Microfabricated Waveguide Atom Traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    A nanoscale , microfabricated waveguide structure can in - principle be used to trap atoms in well - defined locations and enable strong photon-atom interactions . A neutral - atom platform based on this microfabrication technology will be prealigned , which is especially important for quantum - control applications. At present, there is still no reported demonstration of evanescent - field atom trapping using a microfabricated waveguide structure. We described the capabilities established by our team for future development of the waveguide atom - trapping technology at SNL and report our studies to overcome the technical challenges of loading cold atoms into the waveguide atom traps, efficient and broadband optical coupling to a waveguide, and the waveguide material for high - power optical transmission. From the atomic - physics and the waveguide modeling, w e have shown that a square nano-waveguide can be utilized t o achieve better atomic spin squeezing than using a nanofiber for first time.

  14. Microfabricated ion trap array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain, Matthew G [Albuquerque, NM; Fleming, James G [Albuquerque, NM

    2006-12-26

    A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  15. Microfabricated particle focusing device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravula, Surendra K.; Arrington, Christian L.; Sigman, Jennifer K.; Branch, Darren W.; Brener, Igal; Clem, Paul G.; James, Conrad D.; Hill, Martyn; Boltryk, Rosemary June

    2013-04-23

    A microfabricated particle focusing device comprises an acoustic portion to preconcentrate particles over large spatial dimensions into particle streams and a dielectrophoretic portion for finer particle focusing into single-file columns. The device can be used for high throughput assays for which it is necessary to isolate and investigate small bundles of particles and single particles.

  16. Biological assays in microfabricated structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Daniel M.; Fare, Thomas L.; Dong, Qianping; Fan, Z. Hugh; Davis, Timothy J.; Kumar, Rajan

    1999-04-01

    Microfluidic control in microfabricated glass channels enables miniaturized, fast, and multianalyte assays. We are applying this technology in several areas, including real- time environmental monitoring for airborne biological agents. Two complementary approaches are being used in parallel. the first is assaying for the presence of nucleotide sequences that are markers for specific hazardous, engineered bacteria. The second is an assay that monitors the functionality of an in vitro biochemical pathway, in which the pathway that is chosen is sensitive to the presence of the class of toxins to be detected. The first approach is discussed here. The detected signal from the nucleic-acid-based assay is from fluorescently labeled probes that hybridize to bead-bound amplified DNA sequences. Detection approaches and their benefits will be discussed.

  17. Microfabricated bragg waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Hadley, G. Ronald

    2004-10-19

    A microfabricated Bragg waveguide of semiconductor-compatible material having a hollow core and a multilayer dielectric cladding can be fabricated by integrated circuit technologies. The microfabricated Bragg waveguide can comprise a hollow channel waveguide or a hollow fiber. The Bragg fiber can be fabricated by coating a sacrificial mandrel or mold with alternating layers of high- and low-refractive-index dielectric materials and then removing the mandrel or mold to leave a hollow tube with a multilayer dielectric cladding. The Bragg channel waveguide can be fabricated by forming a trench embedded in a substrate and coating the inner wall of the trench with a multilayer dielectric cladding. The thicknesses of the alternating layers can be selected to satisfy the condition for minimum radiation loss of the guided wave.

  18. Introduction to microfabrication

    CERN Document Server

    Franssila, Sami

    2010-01-01

    This accessible text is now fully revised and updated, providing an overview of fabrication technologies and materials needed to realize modern microdevices. It demonstrates how common microfabrication principles can be applied in different applications, to create devices ranging from nanometer probe tips to meter scale solar cells, and a host of microelectronic, mechanical, optical and fluidic devices in between. Latest developments in wafer engineering, patterning, thin films, surface preparation and bonding are covered. This second edition includes:expanded sections on MEMS

  19. Microfabricated Formaldehyde Gas Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, Karen C.; Ko, Frank K.; Jonas Flueckiger

    2009-01-01

    Formaldehyde is a volatile organic compound that is widely used in textiles, paper, wood composites, and household materials. Formaldehyde will continuously outgas from manufactured wood products such as furniture, with adverse health effects resulting from prolonged low-level exposure. New, microfabricated sensors for formaldehyde have been developed to meet the need for portable, low-power gas detection. This paper reviews recent work including silicon microhotplates for metal oxide-based d...

  20. Laser precision microfabrication

    CERN Document Server

    Sugioka, Koji; Pique, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Miniaturization and high precision are rapidly becoming a requirement for many industrial processes and products. As a result, there is greater interest in the use of laser microfabrication technology to achieve these goals. This book composed of 16 chapters covers all the topics of laser precision processing from fundamental aspects to industrial applications to both inorganic and biological materials. It reviews the sate of the art of research and technological development in the area of laser processing.

  1. Microfabricated hydrogen sensitive membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naddaf, A.; Kraetz, L. [Lehrstuhl fuer Thermische Verfahrenstechnik, Technische Universitaet Kaiserslautern (Germany); Detemple, P.; Schmitt, S.; Hessel, V. [Institut fuer Mikrotechnik Mainz GmbH, Mainz (Germany); Faqir, N. [University of Jordan, Amman (Jordan); Bart, H.J.

    2009-01-15

    Thin, defect-free palladium, palladium/copper and palladium/silver hydrogen absorbing membranes were microfabricated. A dual sputtering technique was used to deposit the palladium alloy membranes of only 1 {mu}m thickness on a nonporous silicon substrate. Advanced silicon etching (ASE) was applied on the backside to create a mechanically stable support structure for the thin films. Performance evaluation was carried out for different gases in a temperature range of 20 C to 298 C at a constant differential pressure of 110 kPa at the two sides of the membrane. The composite membranes show an excellent permeation rate of hydrogen, which appears to be 0.05 Pa m{sup 3} s{sup -1} and 0.01.10{sup -3} Pa m{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 20 C for the microfabricated 23 % silver and the 53 % copper composite membranes, respectively. The selectivity to hydrogen over a gas mixture containing, in addition to hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and nitrogen was measured. The mass spectrometer did not detect any CO{sub 2} or CO, showing that the membrane is completely hydrogen selective. The microfabricated membranes exhibit both high mechanical strength (they easily withstand pressures up to 4 bar) and high thermal stability (up to 650 C). (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  2. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othman, A., E-mail: aliman@ppinang.uitm.edu.my; Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA Malaysia, 40450, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Ain, M. F. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Seri Ampangan, 14300,Nibong Tebal, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2015-03-30

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  3. Microfabricated therapeutic actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Abraham P.; Northrup, M. Allen; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Benett, William J.

    1999-01-01

    Microfabricated therapeutic actuators are fabricated using a shape memory polymer (SMP), a polyurethane-based material that undergoes a phase transformation at a specified temperature (Tg). At a temperature above temperature Tg material is soft and can be easily reshaped into another configuration. As the temperature is lowered below temperature Tg the new shape is fixed and locked in as long as the material stays below temperature Tg. Upon reheating the material to a temperature above Tg, the material will return to its original shape. By the use of such SMP material, SMP microtubing can be used as a release actuator for the delivery of embolic coils through catheters into aneurysms, for example. The microtubing can be manufactured in various sizes and the phase change temperature Tg is determinate for an intended temperature target and intended use.

  4. Microfabricated triggered vacuum switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesler, Alexander W [Tijeras, NM; Schare, Joshua M [Albuquerque, NM; Bunch, Kyle [Albuquerque, NM

    2010-05-11

    A microfabricated vacuum switch is disclosed which includes a substrate upon which an anode, cathode and trigger electrode are located. A cover is sealed over the substrate under vacuum to complete the vacuum switch. In some embodiments of the present invention, a metal cover can be used in place of the trigger electrode on the substrate. Materials used for the vacuum switch are compatible with high vacuum, relatively high temperature processing. These materials include molybdenum, niobium, copper, tungsten, aluminum and alloys thereof for the anode and cathode. Carbon in the form of graphitic carbon, a diamond-like material, or carbon nanotubes can be used in the trigger electrode. Channels can be optionally formed in the substrate to mitigate against surface breakdown.

  5. Microfabricated ion frequency standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, Peter; Biedermann, Grant; Blain, Matthew G.; Stick, Daniel L.; Serkland, Darwin K.; Olsson, III, Roy H.

    2010-12-28

    A microfabricated ion frequency standard (i.e. an ion clock) is disclosed with a permanently-sealed vacuum package containing a source of ytterbium (Yb) ions and an octupole ion trap. The source of Yb ions is a micro-hotplate which generates Yb atoms which are then ionized by a ultraviolet light-emitting diode or a field-emission electron source. The octupole ion trap, which confines the Yb ions, is formed from suspended electrodes on a number of stacked-up substrates. A microwave source excites a ground-state transition frequency of the Yb ions, with a frequency-doubled vertical-external-cavity laser (VECSEL) then exciting the Yb ions up to an excited state to produce fluorescent light which is used to tune the microwave source to the ground-state transition frequency, with the microwave source providing a precise frequency output for the ion clock.

  6. Microfabricated Bulk Piezoelectric Transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barham, Oliver M.

    Piezoelectric voltage transformers (PTs) can be used to transform an input voltage into a different, required output voltage needed in electronic and electro- mechanical systems, among other varied uses. On the macro scale, they have been commercialized in electronics powering consumer laptop liquid crystal displays, and compete with an older, more prevalent technology, inductive electromagnetic volt- age transformers (EMTs). The present work investigates PTs on smaller size scales that are currently in the academic research sphere, with an eye towards applications including micro-robotics and other small-scale electronic and electromechanical sys- tems. PTs and EMTs are compared on the basis of power and energy density, with PTs trending towards higher values of power and energy density, comparatively, indicating their suitability for small-scale systems. Among PT topologies, bulk disc-type PTs, operating in their fundamental radial extension mode, and free-free beam PTs, operating in their fundamental length extensional mode, are good can- didates for microfabrication and are considered here. Analytical modeling based on the Extended Hamilton Method is used to predict device performance and integrate mechanical tethering as a boundary condition. This model differs from previous PT models in that the electric enthalpy is used to derive constituent equations of motion with Hamilton's Method, and therefore this approach is also more generally applica- ble to other piezoelectric systems outside of the present work. Prototype devices are microfabricated using a two mask process consisting of traditional photolithography combined with micropowder blasting, and are tested with various output electri- cal loads. 4mm diameter tethered disc PTs on the order of .002cm. 3 , two orders smaller than the bulk PT literature, had the followingperformance: a prototype with electrode area ratio (input area / output area) = 1 had peak gain of 2.3 (+/- 0.1), efficiency of 33 (+/- 0

  7. Microfabrication using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolfree, D.W.L. [CCLRC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire (United Kingdom)

    1998-04-01

    The realization of precision deep microstructures requires high-energy, intense parallel beams of x-rays from synchrotron radiation sources and novel process technology. Deep x-ray lithography with synchrotron radiation is basically a shadow printing process in which a two-dimensional pattern is accurately transferred from a mask into a resist material by chemical changes induced by the radiation. Subsequent electroforming and moulding processes are used to manufacture microstructures from metals, plastics and ceramics. This process, known as LIGA (LIthographie, Galvanoformung, and Abformung), first developed in Germany, is based on a combination of lithography, electroforming and replication processes. The development of the LIGA process for the fabrication of a wide range of precision microstructures has been stimulated by the increasing use of synchrotron radiation sources for lithography. Applications for microstructures exist in many sectors of industry. These include chemical and process engineering, biomedical instrumentation, automotive and aerospace technology, environmental monitoring and information technology. Emphasis is placed on three main areas, micromechanics, micro-optics and microfluidics, which are emerging with the widest range of industrial applications. This paper reviews the progress being made in microfabrication technology using x-ray beam lithography and the LIGA process. It includes a description of synchrotron radiation, storage ring sources, the fabrication processes, applications and potential markets. Reference is also made to European networks and R and D activity worldwide. (author)

  8. Analysis of G-5x Quadruplex DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weglarz, Meredith; Vesenka, James; Fritzsche, Wolfgang; Yerkes, Sarah; Kmiec, Eric

    2008-10-01

    Pure guanine-rich oligonucleotide (GRO) DNA will self-assemble into quadruplex "G-wire" DNA in the absence of stabilizing monovalent cations. Atomic force microscopy of GRO G-wires bound to freshly cleaved mica and imaged in air reveal extensive networks of connected quadruplex DNA auto-oriented on the next nearest neighbor spacing of the mica substrate. Electrical measurements of GRO G-wires across micro-fabricated gold electrodes on silicon oxide indicate the GRO G-wire networks are electrical insulators. The suspected random nature of the GRO incorporation into quadruplex DNA suggested an alternative mechanism of incorporating metal ions into G-wires: through direct weak ionic binding to the extensive phosphate backbone exposure of both the quadruplex and partially assembled oligonucelotide sequences. High densities of GRO mixed with CuCl2 or AgNO3 produced dramatically wider wires that we believe are combinations of weakly interacting metal ions and GRO. After reduction by exposure to light the Ag+ doped structures appear to be electrically conductive. This process provides a simpler method for the creation of nanometer-scale conductive wires.

  9. Microfabrication of Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, Benjamin M

    2003-04-07

    We discuss the potential for using microfabrication techniques for laser-driven accelerator construction. We introduce microfabrication processes in general, and then describe our investigation of a particular trial process. We conclude by considering the issues microfabrication raises for possible future structures.

  10. Microfabrication as a scientific tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, R E; Liao, P F; Skocpol, W J; Jackel, L D; Craighead, H G

    1983-07-08

    Research in microfabrication not only serves the microelectronics industry but also can provide research tools for studying the behavior of matter at submicrometer dimensions. A variety of techniques including optical, x-ray, and electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching can be used to make structures, devices, and arrays only hundreds of atoms across. Microfabrication techniques have been applied to experiments on surface-enhanced Raman scattering, transport in one-dimensional conductors, and macroscopic quantum tunneling. Recent progress is extending these techniques to scales of less than 100 angstroms.

  11. Control of magnetotactic bacterium in a micro-fabricated maze

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khalil, I.S.M.; Pichel, Marc Philippe; Pichel, M.P.; Reefman, B.A.; Sardan Sukas, Ö.; Abelmann, Leon; Misra, Sarthak

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the closed-loop control of a magnetotactic bacterium (MTB), i.e., Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum, within a micro-fabricated maze using a magneticbased manipulation system. The effect of the channel wall on the motion of the MTB is experimentally analyzed. This analysis is done by

  12. A Single-Molecule Barcoding System using Nanoslits for DNA Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Kyubong; Schramm, Timothy M.; Schwartz, David C.

    Single DNA molecule approaches are playing an increasingly central role in the analytical genomic sciences because single molecule techniques intrinsically provide individualized measurements of selected molecules, free from the constraints of bulk techniques, which blindly average noise and mask the presence of minor analyte components. Accordingly, a principal challenge that must be addressed by all single molecule approaches aimed at genome analysis is how to immobilize and manipulate DNA molecules for measurements that foster construction of large, biologically relevant data sets. For meeting this challenge, this chapter discusses an integrated approach for microfabricated and nanofabricated devices for the manipulation of elongated DNA molecules within nanoscale geometries. Ideally, large DNA coils stretch via nanoconfinement when channel dimensions are within tens of nanometers. Importantly, stretched, often immobilized, DNA molecules spanning hundreds of kilobase pairs are required by all analytical platforms working with large genomic substrates because imaging techniques acquire sequence information from molecules that normally exist in free solution as unrevealing random coils resembling floppy balls of yarn. However, nanoscale devices fabricated with sufficiently small dimensions fostering molecular stretching make these devices impractical because of the requirement of exotic fabrication technologies, costly materials, and poor operational efficiencies. In this chapter, such problems are addressed by discussion of a new approach to DNA presentation and analysis that establishes scaleable nanoconfinement conditions through reduction of ionic strength; stiffening DNA molecules thus enabling their arraying for analysis using easily fabricated devices that can also be mass produced. This new approach to DNA nanoconfinement is complemented by the development of a novel labeling scheme for reliable marking of individual molecules with fluorochrome labels

  13. Microfabricated Tactile Sensors for Biomedical Applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Saccomandi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades, tactile sensors based on different sensing principles have been developed due to the growing interest in robotics and, mainly, in medical applications. Several technological solutions have been employed to design tactile sensors; in particular, solutions based on microfabrication present several attractive features. Microfabrication technologies allow for developing miniaturized sensors with good performance in terms of metrological properties (e.g., accuracy, sensitivity, low power consumption, and frequency response. Small size and good metrological properties heighten the potential role of tactile sensors in medicine, making them especially attractive to be integrated in smart interfaces and microsurgical tools. This paper provides an overview of microfabricated tactile sensors, focusing on the mean principles of sensing, i.e., piezoresistive, piezoelectric and capacitive sensors. These sensors are employed for measuring contact properties, in particular force and pressure, in three main medical fields, i.e., prosthetics and artificial skin, minimal access surgery and smart interfaces for biomechanical analysis. The working principles and the metrological properties of the most promising tactile, microfabricated sensors are analyzed, together with their application in medicine. Finally, the new emerging technologies in these fields are briefly described.

  14. Microfabricated tactile sensors for biomedical applications: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano; Oddo, Calogero Maria; Zollo, Loredana; Silvestri, Sergio; Guglielmelli, Eugenio

    2014-12-01

    During the last decades, tactile sensors based on different sensing principles have been developed due to the growing interest in robotics and, mainly, in medical applications. Several technological solutions have been employed to design tactile sensors; in particular, solutions based on microfabrication present several attractive features. Microfabrication technologies allow for developing miniaturized sensors with good performance in terms of metrological properties (e.g., accuracy, sensitivity, low power consumption, and frequency response). Small size and good metrological properties heighten the potential role of tactile sensors in medicine, making them especially attractive to be integrated in smart interfaces and microsurgical tools. This paper provides an overview of microfabricated tactile sensors, focusing on the mean principles of sensing, i.e., piezoresistive, piezoelectric and capacitive sensors. These sensors are employed for measuring contact properties, in particular force and pressure, in three main medical fields, i.e., prosthetics and artificial skin, minimal access surgery and smart interfaces for biomechanical analysis. The working principles and the metrological properties of the most promising tactile, microfabricated sensors are analyzed, together with their application in medicine. Finally, the new emerging technologies in these fields are briefly described.

  15. Rapid preparation and single-cell analysis of concentrated blood smears using a high-throughput blood cell separator and a microfabricated grid film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Dongwon; Oh, Sein; Kim, Byeongyeon; Hahn, Young Ki; Choi, Sungyoung

    2017-07-21

    Cytological examination of peripheral white blood cells inhomogeneously distributed on a blood smear is currently limited by the low abundance and random sampling of the target cells. To address the challenges, we present a new approach to prepare and analyze concentrated blood smears by rapidly enriching white blood cells up to 32-fold with 92% recovery on average at a high throughput (1mL/min) using a deterministic migration-based separator and by systematically analyzing a large number of the cells distributed over a blood slide using a microfabricated grid film. We anticipate that our approach will improve the clinical utility of blood smear tests, while offering the capability to detect rare cell populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Microfabricated magnetic structures for future medicine: from sensors to cell actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitol, Elina A; Novosad, Valentyn; Rozhkova, Elena A

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the prospective medical application of magnetic carriers microfabricated by top-down techniques. Physical methods allow the fabrication of a variety of magnetic structures with tightly controlled magnetic properties and geometry, which makes them very attractive for a cost-efficient mass-production in the fast growing field of nanomedicine. Stand-alone fabricated particles along with integrated devices combining lithographically defined magnetic structures and synthesized magnetic tags will be considered. Applications of microfabricated multifunctional magnetic structures for future medicinal purposes range from ultrasensitive in vitro diagnostic bioassays, DNA sequencing and microfluidic cell sorting to magnetomechanical actuation, cargo delivery, contrast enhancement and heating therapy. PMID:23148542

  17. Bovine and equine forensic DNA analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Goor, L.H.P.

    2011-01-01

    Animal forensic DNA analysis is being used for human criminal investigations (e.g traces from cats and dogs), wildlife management, breeding and food safety. The most common DNA markers used for such forensic casework are short tandem repeats (STR). Rules and guidelines concerning quality assurance

  18. In Cellulo DNA Analysis: LMPCR Footprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouin, Régen; Bastien, Nathalie; Millau, Jean-François; Vigneault, François; Paradis, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The in cellulo analysis of protein-DNA interactions and chromatin structure is very important to better understand the mechanisms involved in the regulation of gene expression. The nuclease-hypersensitive sites and sequences bound by transcription factors often correspond to genetic regulatory elements. Using the ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction (LMPCR) technology, it is possible to precisely analyze these DNA sequences to demonstrate the existence of DNA-protein interactions or unusual DNA structures directly in living cells. Indeed, the ideal chromatin substrate is, of course, found inside intact cells. LMPCR, a genomic sequencing technique that map DNA single-strand breaks at the sequence level of resolution, is the method of choice for in cellulo footprinting and DNA structure studies because it can be used to investigate complex animal genomes, including human. The detailed conventional and automated LMPCR protocols are presented in this chapter.

  19. In cellulo DNA analysis (LMPCR footprinting).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouin, Régen; Bastien, Nathalie; Millau, Jean-François; Vigneault, François; Paradis, Isabelle

    2009-01-01

    The in cellulo analysis of DNA protein interactions and chromatin structure is very important to better understand the mechanisms involved in the regulation of gene expression. The nuclease-hypersensitive sites and sequences bound by transcription factors often correspond to genetic regulatory elements. Using the Ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction (LMPCR) technology, it is possible to precisely analyze these DNA sequences to demonstrate the existence of DNA-protein interactions or unusual DNA structures directly in living cells. Indeed, the ideal chromatin substrate is, of course, found inside intact cells. LMPCR, a genomic-sequencing, technique that map DNA single-strand breaks at the sequence level of resolution, is the method of choice for in cellulo footprinting and DNA structure studies because it can be used to investigate any complex genomes, including human. The detailed conventional and automated LMPCR protocols are presented in this chapter.

  20. Nanopore sensors for DNA analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solovyeva, Vita; Venkatesan, B.M.; Shim, Jeong

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state nanopore sensors are promising devices for single DNA molecule detection and sequencing. This paper presents a review of our work on solid-state nanopores performed over the last decade. In particular, here we discuss atomic-layer-deposited (ALD)-based, graphene-based, and functionali......Solid-state nanopore sensors are promising devices for single DNA molecule detection and sequencing. This paper presents a review of our work on solid-state nanopores performed over the last decade. In particular, here we discuss atomic-layer-deposited (ALD)-based, graphene...

  1. A microfabricated amperometric moisture sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiao-Li; Xingguo, Xiong; Dallas, Tim; Gangopadhyay, Shubhra; Temkin, Henryk; Wang, Xuejun; Walulu, Richard; Li, Jianzhong; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2002-02-11

    We describe a microfabricated moisture sensor with interdigitated Au or Pt electrodes on a silicon substrate. The sensor active area is covered with a spin-coated, baked-on layer of Nafion(R) perfluorosulfonate ionomer of submicron thickness. The sensor responds to moisture with a 10-90% rise time of 50-100 ms and a 90-10% fall time of 20-30 ms, faster than any other presently available sensor. The logarithm of the sensor current is related to the cube root of the moisture level at a given temperature. At 23 degrees C, the sensor easily measures relative humidities as low as 10%. The sensor response at a given absolute humidity level decreases exponentially with increasing temperature. The film is stable up to a temperature of 150 degrees C, permitting elevated temperature moisture measurement. Since sorbed water is actively decomposed electrolytically, the sensors exhibit negligible hysteresis. Response reproducibility of an individual sensor is <1%, that between identically made sensors is <5%, suggesting mass production techniques without individual calibration will be acceptable for all but the most demanding situation.

  2. Analysis of Ancient DNA in Microbial Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgé, Olivier; Bennett, E Andrew; Massilani, Diyendo; Daligault, Julien; Pruvost, Melanie; Geigl, Eva-Maria; Grange, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The development of next-generation sequencing has led to a breakthrough in the analysis of ancient genomes, and the subsequent genomic analyses of the skeletal remains of ancient humans have revolutionized the knowledge of the evolution of our species, including the discovery of a new hominin, and demonstrated admixtures with more distantly related archaic populations such as Neandertals and Denisovans. Moreover, it has also yielded novel insights into the evolution of ancient pathogens. The analysis of ancient microbial genomes allows the study of their recent evolution, presently over the last several millennia. These spectacular results have been attained despite the degradation of DNA after the death of the host, which results in very short DNA molecules that become increasingly damaged, only low quantities of which remain. The low quantity of ancient DNA molecules renders their analysis difficult and prone to contamination with modern DNA molecules, in particular via contamination from the reagents used in DNA purification and downstream analysis steps. Finally, the rare ancient molecules are diluted in environmental DNA originating from the soil microorganisms that colonize bones and teeth. Thus, ancient skeletal remains can share DNA profiles with environmental samples and identifying ancient microbial genomes among the more recent, presently poorly characterized, environmental microbiome is particularly challenging. Here, we describe the methods developed and/or in use in our laboratory to produce reliable and reproducible paleogenomic results from ancient skeletal remains that can be used to identify the presence of ancient microbiota.

  3. Electrochemical biosensing strategies for DNA methylation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Tanvir; Mahmudunnabi, Golam; Masud, Mostafa Kamal; Islam, Md Nazmul; Ooi, Lezanne; Konstantinov, Konstantin; Hossain, Md Shahriar Al; Martinac, Boris; Alici, Gursel; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; Shiddiky, Muhammad J A

    2017-08-15

    DNA methylation is one of the key epigenetic modifications of DNA that results from the enzymatic addition of a methyl group at the fifth carbon of the cytosine base. It plays a crucial role in cellular development, genomic stability and gene expression. Aberrant DNA methylation is responsible for the pathogenesis of many diseases including cancers. Over the past several decades, many methodologies have been developed to detect DNA methylation. These methodologies range from classical molecular biology and optical approaches, such as bisulfite sequencing, microarrays, quantitative real-time PCR, colorimetry, Raman spectroscopy to the more recent electrochemical approaches. Among these, electrochemical approaches offer sensitive, simple, specific, rapid, and cost-effective analysis of DNA methylation. Additionally, electrochemical methods are highly amenable to miniaturization and possess the potential to be multiplexed. In recent years, several reviews have provided information on the detection strategies of DNA methylation. However, to date, there is no comprehensive evaluation of electrochemical DNA methylation detection strategies. Herein, we address the recent developments of electrochemical DNA methylation detection approaches. Furthermore, we highlight the major technical and biological challenges involved in these strategies and provide suggestions for the future direction of this important field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Advanced microfabrication technologies for microspacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezzo, M.; Bagepalli, B.; Kodiyalam, S.; Korham, C.; Browall, K.; Alexander, Norman

    1993-06-01

    Advanced microfabrication technologies offer the prospect of reducing the weight and size of spacecraft through the use of lighter and stronger materials in conjunction with new mechanical/structural design concepts and design optimization methods. At the same time, electronic components have been scaled down while increasing functional utility. A two-fold benefit is derived for space applications through the use of less expensive components and the lower launch costs associated with lighter components. GE-CRD is actively pursuing research in these key technologies for a wide range of applications including satellites. These key technologies will be reviewed and an update on GE progress will be given. The need to reduce weight and lower cost, while maintaining product quality and reliability are primary drivers in the design of satellites, in general, and microsatellites in particular. For the structural subsystem, these requirements pose a complex design problem unless new mechanical design concepts and computer-aided design optimization methods are employed. Several new concepts, such as battery packs doubling as panel reinforcements and fuel tanks as integral structural members, need to utilized. In addition, new viscoelastic material damping concepts for spacecraft components provide for lighter weight/lower cost designs, while satisfying the structural dynamics requirements. High density interconnect (HDI) technology permits the use of bare IC's on a ceramic substrate with 90 percent active area utilization. A copper/polyimide multilayer structure is the backbone of the technology, which has demonstrated a size/weight reduction of greater than 10x compared to printed circuit board with performance up to the GHz level. HDI modules have exceptional mechanical robustness as evidenced by survival of 180 kg rapid acceleration tests. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are redefining sensors and actuators by miniaturization through micromachining techniques

  5. Encoded evidence: DNA in forensic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobling, Mark A; Gill, Peter

    2004-10-01

    Sherlock Holmes said "it has long been an axiom of mine that the little things are infinitely the most important", but never imagined that such a little thing, the DNA molecule, could become perhaps the most powerful single tool in the multifaceted fight against crime. Twenty years after the development of DNA fingerprinting, forensic DNA analysis is key to the conviction or exoneration of suspects and the identification of victims of crimes, accidents and disasters, driving the development of innovative methods in molecular genetics, statistics and the use of massive intelligence databases.

  6. DNA analysis in Disaster Victim Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montelius, Kerstin; Lindblom, Bertil

    2012-06-01

    DNA profiling and matching is one of the primary methods to identify missing persons in a disaster, as defined by the Interpol Disaster Victim Identification Guide. The process to identify a victim by DNA includes: the collection of the best possible ante-mortem (AM) samples, the choice of post-mortem (PM) samples, DNA-analysis, matching and statistical weighting of the genetic relationship or match. Each disaster has its own scenario, and each scenario defines its own methods for identification of the deceased.

  7. New technologies for DNA analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGinn, Steven; Bauer, David; Brefort, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The REvolutionary Approaches and Devices for Nucleic Acid analysis (READNA) project received funding from the European Commission for 4 1/2 years. The objectives of the project revolved around technological developments in nucleic acid analysis. The project partners have discovered, created and d...

  8. Fundamental aspects of phase separation microfabrication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bikel, M.

    2009-01-01

    In the research featured in this PhD thesis, the fundamental aspects of Phase Separation MicroFabrication (PSµF) were studied. PSµF is a technique through which polymeric porous films with defined structures on their surfaces can be created. This is achieved by phase separation of polymer solutions

  9. State of the art in microfabrication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2014-01-01

    In this review paper the state of the art in microfabrication is presented. The focus is on trends in integrated circuit fabrication by mainstream industrial players. The article starts with Moore’s Law, describing its inception as well as the evolution of Moore’s metric of the number of components

  10. Processing of Nanostructured Devices Using Microfabrication Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W (Inventor); Xu, Jennifer C (Inventor); Evans, Laura J (Inventor); Kulis, Michael H (Inventor); Berger, Gordon M (Inventor); Vander Wal, Randall L (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods that incorporate nanostructures into microdevices are discussed herein. These systems and methods can allow for standard microfabrication techniques to be extended to the field of nanotechnology. Sensors incorporating nanostructures can be fabricated as described herein, and can be used to reliably detect a range of gases with high response.

  11. Impulse cytophotometric DNA analysis in pituitary adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahyai, A; Hori, A; Bockermann, V; Rama, B; Blech, M; Markakis, E

    1988-01-01

    Flow cytometric DNA analysis was carried out on 32 microsurgically removed pituitary adenomas. Additionally, the histograms of tumor cell nuclei of 7 patients were compared with those of the cultured cells from the same tumor samples. The tumors were classified into 3 groups according to the proliferation index (PI) of the flow cytometric results: 1) tumors with DNA patterns of slow proliferation (PI under 10), to which the majority of the examined pituitary adenomas belonged; 2) pituitary adenomas with diploid karyograms and PI values from 10 to 15; 3) diploid or aneuploid karyograms with PI values above 15. The third group were characterized histologically by increased chromatin content, nuclear polymorphism, mitoses, and extrapituitary infiltration of the tumor cells, and were, therefore, no longer benign. However, there was no direct relationship between the intensity of hormone secretory activity of the tumors and DNA ploidy. Cultured adenoma cells examined by flow cytometry remained stable in all cases but one.

  12. Molecular DNA Analysis in Forensic Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumache, Raluca; Ciocan, Veronica; Muresan, Camelia; Enache, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Serological and biochemical identification methods used in forensics have several major disadvantages, such as: long time in processing biological sample and lack of sensitivity and specificity. In the last 30 years, DNA molecular analysis has become an important tool in forensic investigations. DNA profiling is based on the short tandem repeats (STR) and aids in human identification from biological samples. Forensic genetics, can provide information on the events which occurred at the crime scene or to supplement other methods of forensic identification. Currently, the methods used in identification are based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses. This method analyses the autosomal STRs, the Y-chromosome, and the mitochondrial DNA. Correlation of biological samples present at the crime scene with identification, selection, and the probative value factor is therefore the first aspect to be taken into consideration in the forensic genetic analysis. In the last decade, because of the advances in the field of molecular biology, new biomarkers such as: microRNAs (miR), messenger RNA (mRNA), and DNA methylation have been studied and proposed to be used in the forensic identifications of body fluids.

  13. Taxonomy of pasteurella anatipestifer. 1. DNA base composition and DNA-DNA hybridization analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangun, A; Johnson, J L; Tripathy, D N

    1987-01-01

    DNA was isolated from 15 strains of Pasteurella anatipestifer and from one strain each of Moraxella nonliquefaciens, M. bovis, Pasteurella multocida, P. haemolytica, P. gallinarum, P. pneumotropica, and P. ureae. The guanine-plus-cytosine contents of P. anatipestifer ranged from 32 to 35 mole %, whereas those of Moraxella and Pasteurella spp. were much higher, ranging from 40 to 45 mole %. DNA-DNA hybridization analysis revealed that homology of nine P. anatipestifer strains to strains ATCC 11845 and PA 15 was 52 to 100%, whereas homology of Moraxella and Pasteurella strains to these strains was only 3 to 17%. Similarly, homology of P. anatipestifer strains, Moraxella, and Pasteurella species other than P. multocida to P. multocida reference strain P-2192 was low. These results strongly suggest that P. anatipestifer is genetically unrelated to either Pasteurella or Moraxella.

  14. Versatile laser microfabrication techniques for lab-on-chip devices in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-06

    Feb 6, 2014 ... Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/pram/082/02/0243-0248. Keywords. Microfluidics; lab-on-chip; micropatterning; laser direct writing; soft lithography; uranium analysis. Abstract. In a plethora of microfabrication processes available now-a-days, one needs to choose the best possible option ...

  15. Optical pumping in a microfabricated Rb vapor cell using a microfabricated Rb discharge light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatraman, V.; Kang, S.; Affolderbach, C.; Mileti, G., E-mail: gaetano.mileti@unine.ch [Laboratoire Temps-Fréquence, University of Neuchâtel, Neuchâtel 2000 (Switzerland); Shea, H. [Microsystems for Space Technologies Laboratory, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Neuchâtel 2002 (Switzerland)

    2014-02-03

    Miniature (microfabricated alkali vapor resonance cell using (1) a microfabricated Rb discharge lamp light source, as well as (2) a conventional glass-blown Rb discharge lamp. The microfabricated Rb lamp cell is a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) light source, having the same inner cell volume of around 40 mm{sup 3} as that of the resonance cell, both filled with suitable buffer gases. A miniature (∼2 cm{sup 3} volume) test setup based on the M{sub z} magnetometer interrogation technique was used for observation of optical-radiofrequency double-resonance signals, proving the suitability of the microfabricated discharge lamp to introduce efficient optical pumping. The pumping ability of this light source was found to be comparable to or even better than that of a conventional glass-blown lamp. The reported results indicate that the micro-fabricated DBD discharge lamp has a high potential for the development of a new class of miniature atomic clocks, magnetometers, and quantum sensors.

  16. Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Roy H.; El-Kady, Ihab F.; McCormick, Frederick; Fleming, James G.; Fleming, Carol

    2010-06-08

    A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic two-dimensional array of scatterers embedded within the matrix material membrane, wherein the scatterer material has a density and/or elastic constant that is different than the matrix material and wherein the periodicity of the array causes destructive interference of the acoustic wave within an acoustic bandgap. The membrane can be suspended above a substrate by an air or vacuum gap to provide acoustic isolation from the substrate. The device can be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Such microfabricated bulk wave phononic bandgap devices are useful for acoustic isolation in the ultrasonic, VHF, or UHF regime (i.e., frequencies of order 1 MHz to 10 GHz and higher, and lattice constants of order 100 .mu.m or less).

  17. Single-molecule analysis using DNA origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Arivazhagan; Endo, Masayuki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2012-01-23

    During the last two decades, scientists have developed various methods that allow the detection and manipulation of single molecules, which have also been called "in singulo" approaches. Fundamental understanding of biochemical reactions, folding of biomolecules, and the screening of drugs were achieved by using these methods. Single-molecule analysis was also performed in the field of DNA nanotechnology, mainly by using atomic force microscopy. However, until recently, the approaches used commonly in nanotechnology adopted structures with a dimension of 10-20 nm, which is not suitable for many applications. The recent development of scaffolded DNA origami by Rothemund made it possible for the construction of larger defined assemblies. One of the most salient features of the origami method is the precise addressability of the structures formed: Each staple can serve as an attachment point for different kinds of nanoobjects. Thus, the method is suitable for the precise positioning of various functionalities and for the single-molecule analysis of many chemical and biochemical processes. Here we summarize recent progress in the area of single-molecule analysis using DNA origami and discuss the future directions of this research. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Mitochondrial DNA analysis of ancient Peruvian highlanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Ken-ichi; Adachi, Noboru; Guillen, Sonia; Shimada, Izumi

    2006-09-01

    Ancient DNA recovered from 57 individuals excavated by Hiram Bingham at the rural communities of Paucarcancha, Patallacta, and Huata near the famed Inca royal estate and ritual site of Machu Picchu was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction, and the results were compared with ancient and modern DNA from various Central Andean areas to test their hypothesized indigenous highland origins. The control and coding regions of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of 35 individuals in this group were sequenced, and the haplogroups of each individual were determined. The frequency data for the haplogroups of these samples show clear proximity to those of modern Quechua and Aymara populations in the Peruvian and Bolivian highlands, and contrast with those of pre-Hispanic individuals of the north coast of Peru that we defined previously. Our study suggests a strong genetic affinity between sampled late pre-Hispanic individuals and modern Andean highlanders. A previous analysis of the Machu Picchu osteological collection suggests that the residents there were a mixed group of natives from various coastal and highland regions relocated by the Inca state for varied purposes. Overall, our study indicates that the sampled individuals from Paucarcancha and Patallacta were indigenous highlanders who provided supportive roles for nearby Machu Picchu. 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Phylogenetic analysis of ancient DNA using BEAST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Simon Y W

    2012-01-01

    Under exceptional circumstances, it is possible to obtain DNA sequences from samples that are up to hundreds of thousands of years old. These data provide an opportunity to look directly at past genetic diversity, to trace the evolutionary process through time, and to infer demographic and phylogeographic trends. Ancient DNA (aDNA) data sets have some degree of intrinsic temporal structure because the sequences have been obtained from samples of different ages. When analyzing these data sets, it is usually necessary to take the sampling times into account. A number of phylogenetic methods have been designed with this purpose in mind. Here I describe the steps involved in Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of aDNA data. I outline a procedure that can be used to co-estimate the genealogical relationships, mutation rate, evolutionary timescale, and demographic history of the study species in a single analytical framework. A number of modifications to the methodology can be made in order to deal with complicating factors such as postmortem damage, sequences from undated samples, and data sets with low information content.

  20. A DNA Structure-Based Bionic Wavelet Transform and Its Application to DNA Sequence Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Chen

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA sequence analysis is of great significance for increasing our understanding of genomic functions. An important task facing us is the exploration of hidden structural information stored in the DNA sequence. This paper introduces a DNA structure-based adaptive wavelet transform (WT – the bionic wavelet transform (BWT – for DNA sequence analysis. The symbolic DNA sequence can be separated into four channels of indicator sequences. An adaptive symbol-to-number mapping, determined from the structural feature of the DNA sequence, was introduced into WT. It can adjust the weight value of each channel to maximise the useful energy distribution of the whole BWT output. The performance of the proposed BWT was examined by analysing synthetic and real DNA sequences. Results show that BWT performs better than traditional WT in presenting greater energy distribution. This new BWT method should be useful for the detection of the latent structural features in future DNA sequence analysis.

  1. Food Fish Identification from DNA Extraction through Sequence Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.

    2015-01-01

    This experiment exposed 3rd and 4th y undergraduates and graduate students taking a course in advanced food analysis to DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and DNA sequence analysis. Students provided their own fish sample, purchased from local grocery stores, and the class as a whole extracted DNA, which was then subjected to PCR,…

  2. Statistical analysis of post mortem DNA damage-derived miscoding lesions in Neandertal mitochondrial DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vives, Sergi; Gilbert, M Thomas; Arenas, Conchita

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: We have analysed the distribution of post mortem DNA damage derived miscoding lesions from the datasets of seven published Neandertal specimens that have extensive cloned sequence coverage over the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) hypervariable region 1 (HVS1). The analysis was res...

  3. Statistical analysis of post mortem DNA damage-derived miscoding lesions in Neandertal mitochondrial DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Vives (Sergi); M.T. Gilbert (Thomas); C. Arenas (Conchita); E. Gigli (Elena); O. Lao Grueso (Oscar); C. Lalueza-Fox (Carles)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground. We have analysed the distribution of post mortem DNA damage derived miscoding lesions from the datasets of seven published Neandertal specimens that have extensive cloned sequence coverage over the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) hypervariable region 1 (HVS1). The analysis was

  4. DNA methylation analysis in human cancer

    OpenAIRE

    O'Sullivan, Eileen; Goggins, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The functional impact of aberrant DNA methylation and the widespread alterations in DNA methylation in cancer development has led to the development of a variety of methods to characterize the DNA methylation patterns. This chapter will critique and describe the major approaches to analyzing DNA methylation.

  5. Optical Forces Near Microfabricated Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    the Maxwell Stress Tensor (22). 15 26 2.1 Design For concreteness , we consider a silicon photonic crystal ( = 11.9) with a square lattice of holes of...Erickson, ”Stability analysis of optofluidic transport on solid- core waveguiding structures,” Nanotechnology 19, 045704 (2008). [61] M. L. Juan, R

  6. 3D laser microfabrication principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Misawa, Hiroaki

    2006-01-01

    A thorough introduction to 3D laser microfabrication technology, leading readers from the fundamentals and theory to its various potent applications, such as the generation of tiny objects or three-dimensional structures within the bulk of transparent materials. The book also presents new theoretical material on dielectric breakdown, allowing a better understanding of the differences between optical damage on surfaces and inside the bulk, as well as a look into the future.Chemists, physicists, materials scientists and engineers will find this a valuable source of interdisciplinary know

  7. Trends in Microfabrication Capabilities & Device Architectures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Todd [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, Adam [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lentine, Tony [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mudrick, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Okandan, Murat [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rodrigues, Arun [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The last two decades have seen an explosion in worldwide R&D, enabling fundamentally new capabilities while at the same time changing the international technology landscape. The advent of technologies for continued miniaturization and electronics feature size reduction, and for architectural innovations, will have many technical, economic, and national security implications. It is important to anticipate possible microelectronics development directions and their implications on US national interests. This report forecasts and assesses trends and directions for several potentially disruptive microfabrication capabilities and device architectures that may emerge in the next 5-10 years.

  8. Superimposed Code Theorectic Analysis of DNA Codes and DNA Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    table-mers) which are found at the ends of the substrand to be selectively amplified. By incubating a DNA memory mixture with oligonucleotide...data entry ( , ,0∗ ∗ ) ks S∈ , in other words a partial or fuzzy ComDMem. Each edge is equivalent to positive PCR reactions. One can construct a

  9. FaSTR DNA: a new expert system for forensic DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Timothy; McCabe, Brendan; Harbison, Sally Ann

    2008-06-01

    The automation of DNA profile analysis of reference and crime samples continues to gain pace driven in part by a realisation by the criminal justice system of the positive impact DNA technology can have in aiding in the solution of crime and the apprehension of suspects. Expert systems to automate the profile analysis component of the process are beginning to be developed. In this paper, we report the validation of a new expert system FaSTR DNA, an expert system suitable for the analysis of DNA profiles from single source reference samples and from crime samples. We compare the performance of FaSTR DNA with that of other equivalent systems, GeneMapper ID v3.2 (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA) and FSS-i(3) v4 (The Forensic Science Service((R)) DNA expert System Suite FSS-i(3), Forensic Science Service, Birmingham, UK) with GeneScan Analysis v3.7/Genotyper v3.7 software (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA, USA) with manual review. We have shown that FaSTR DNA provides an alternative solution to automating DNA profile analysis and is appropriate for implementation into forensic laboratories. The FaSTR DNA system was demonstrated to be comparable in performance to that of GeneMapper ID v3.2 and superior to that of FSS-i(3) v4 for the analysis of DNA profiles from crime samples.

  10. Microfabrication and nanotechnology in stent design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Adam W; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2011-01-01

    Intravascular stents were first introduced in the 1980s as an adjunct to primary angioplasty for management of early complications, including arterial dissection, or treatment of an inadequate technical outcome due to early elastic recoil of the atherosclerotic lesion. Despite the beneficial effects of stenting, persistent high rates of restenosis motivated the design of drug-eluting stents for delivery of agents to limit the proliferative and other inflammatory responses within the vascular wall that contribute to the development of a restenotic lesion. These strategies have yielded a significant reduction in the incidence of restenosis, but challenges remain, including incomplete repair of the endothelium at the site of vascular wall injury that may be associated with a late risk of thrombosis. A failure of vessel wall healing has been attributed primarily to the use of polymeric stent coatings, but the effects of the eluted drug and other material properties or design features of the stent cannot be excluded. Improvements in stent microfabrication, as well as the introduction of alternative materials may help to address those limitations that inhibit stent performance. This review describes the application of novel microfabrication processes and the evolution of new nanotechnologies that hold significant promise in eliminating existing shortcomings of current stent platforms. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  11. Durable microfabricated high-speed humidity sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuban, Petr; Berg, Jordan M; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2004-05-01

    We describe a durable microfabricated humidity sensor made of interdigitated rhodium electrodes on a silicon substrate covered with a sensing film of Nafion perfluorosulfonate ionomer. Rhodium electrodes are much less prone to oxidative degradation compared to previously described gold electrode-based sensors. Even with dc excitation, Rh electrode sensors exhibit excellent long-term response stability. It has been found that low-amplitude (+/-1 V) square wave excitation can prolong the usability of gold electrode-based sensors to at least several months; however, this mode of interrogation cannot provide subsecond response times. Rhodium deposition on the microsensors is much more difficult than that of gold. We were able to attain crack-free Rh deposits by adaptation of pulsed electroplating techniques. At excitation voltages of >2 V dc, the Rh sensors respond to moisture with 10 90% rise and fall times of 30-50 ms. These are the fastest microfabricated water vapor sensors reported to date. We demonstrate applications as a breath monitor. Such sensors should also be of utility in atmospheric eddy measurements. Short-term repeatability is better than 0.6% RSD (n = 7).

  12. Cutting-edge microfabricated biomedical tools for human pluripotent stem cell research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Ken-ichiro

    2013-12-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (hESCs and hiPSCs, respectively), continue to attract researchers and clinicians as well as patients worldwide because of their applicability in regenerative medicine, cell-based therapies, and drug discovery. However, conventional biomedical approaches for stem cell research provide only limited insights regarding how stem cells are regulated in our body and how we could control them. To accelerate the progress of stem cell research and their applications, interdisciplinary research needs to be carried out to enable access of or mimic in vivo physiological conditions and to investigate their functions. In the past few decades, progress in microfabrication engineering has had a tremendous impact in both academia and industry (electronics, mechanics, chemicals, and environments), and many people have realized that microfabricated tools hold great potential for applications in stem cell research because they allow precise manipulation of a wide range of biological materials, including small molecules, DNA/RNA, proteins, cells, and tissues. In this review, I describe advanced microfabricated tools for studying the mechanisms of in vivo stem cell regulation and precise manipulation of stem cells, notably hPSCs, and concerns of using such tools for stem cell research.

  13. Optimization of DNA isolation and PCR protocol for RAPD analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hope&shola

    of DNA isolation and PCR conditions for RAPD analysis of selected medicinal and aromatic plants of conservation concern from Peninsular ... The technique is ideal for isolation of DNA from different plant species and the DNA isolated was used for ..... showed a reading of between 1.6 to 1.7 after calculating the 260/280 nm ...

  14. Identification of the source of ivory idol by DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sandeep Kumar; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Singh, Lalji

    2011-09-01

    In this study, we describe a forensic case dealing with the identification of the source of the processed ivory object by DNA analysis. Two pieces of Lord Krishna's idols from a shop were confiscated by an investigating agency of the Indian government and forwarded to us to identify the source of its origin. We succeeded in isolating DNA from both processed ivory idols by using the phenol/chloroform DNA extraction method. The extracted DNA was subjected to PCR amplification using an elephant-specific mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop marker. DNA sequence analysis of the amplified fragment of mtDNA D-loop region confirmed that the idols were consistent with Asian elephant with 99% similarity. © 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  15. Evaluation of New Technologies for Forensic DNA Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Divne, Anna-Maria

    2005-01-01

    DNA samples from crime scenes or mass disasters are often limited and degraded which limits the possibility of successful traditional STR analysis. Moreover, there is a need to decrease the turnaround time in criminal investigations. These circumstances require a wider set of assays and technologies to be investigated for potential use in forensic DNA analysis, which has been explored in this thesis work. DNA analysis can also provide a useful tool in forensic pathology investigations. In a ...

  16. The future of forensic DNA analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, John M.

    2015-01-01

    The author's thoughts and opinions on where the field of forensic DNA testing is headed for the next decade are provided in the context of where the field has come over the past 30 years. Similar to the Olympic motto of ‘faster, higher, stronger’, forensic DNA protocols can be expected to become more rapid and sensitive and provide stronger investigative potential. New short tandem repeat (STR) loci have expanded the core set of genetic markers used for human identification in Europe and the USA. Rapid DNA testing is on the verge of enabling new applications. Next-generation sequencing has the potential to provide greater depth of coverage for information on STR alleles. Familial DNA searching has expanded capabilities of DNA databases in parts of the world where it is allowed. Challenges and opportunities that will impact the future of forensic DNA are explored including the need for education and training to improve interpretation of complex DNA profiles. PMID:26101278

  17. Integrated microfluidic biochips for DNA microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Robin Hui; Dill, Kilian; Fuji, H Sho; McShea, Andy

    2006-03-01

    A fully integrated and self-contained microfluidic biochip device has been developed to automate the fluidic handling steps required to perform a gene expression study of the human leukemia cell line (K-562). The device consists of a DNA microarray semiconductor chip with 12,000 features and a microfluidic cartridge that consists of microfluidic pumps, mixers, valves, fluid channels and reagent storage chambers. Microarray hybridization and subsequent fluidic handling and reactions (including a number of washing and labeling steps) were performed in this fully automated and miniature device before fluorescent image scanning of the microarray chip. Electrochemical micropumps were integrated in the cartridge to provide pumping of liquid solutions. A micromixing technique based on gas bubbling generated by electrochemical micropumps was developed. Low-cost check valves were implemented in the cartridge to prevent cross-talk of the stored reagents. A single-color transcriptional analysis of K-562 cells with a series of calibration controls (spiked-in controls) was performed to characterize this new platform with regard to sensitivity, specificity and dynamic range. The device detected sample RNAs with a concentration as low as 0.375 pM. Detection was quantitative over more than 3 orders of magnitude. Experiments also demonstrated that chip-to-chip variability was low, indicating that the integrated microfluidic devices eliminate manual fluidic handling steps that can be a significant source of variability in genomic analysis.

  18. META2: Intercellular DNA Methylation Pairwise Annotation and Integrative Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Binhua Tang

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide deciphering intercellular differential DNA methylation as well as its roles in transcriptional regulation remains elusive in cancer epigenetics. Here we developed a toolkit META2 for DNA methylation annotation and analysis, which aims to perform integrative analysis on differentially methylated loci and regions through deep mining and statistical comparison methods. META2 contains multiple versatile functions for investigating and annotating DNA methylation profiles. Benchmarked w...

  19. Microfabrication of hard x-ray lenses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stöhr, Frederik

    This thesis deals with the development of silicon compound refractive lenses (Si-CRLs) for shaping hard x-ray beams. The CRLs are to be fabricated using state of the art microfabrication techniques. The primary goal of the thesis work is to produce Si-CRLs with considerably increased structure...... developed. Inverse replica molding in PDMS of the CRLs was established as an effective way to circumvent the limitations AFM probes have when concave surfaces need to be characterized, e.g. due to the finite lengths of AFM probes. Four different x-ray optical components have been designed, manufactured...... of space for sample surroundings and ensure low-divergent and wide x-ray beams with narrow waists. Both results are substantial improvements to what was available at the start of this thesis work. The challenge of making x-ray objectives in silicon by interdigitation of lenslets alternately focusing...

  20. A high performance microfabricated surface ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobser, Daniel; Blain, Matthew; Haltli, Raymond; Hollowell, Andrew; Revelle, Melissa; Stick, Daniel; Yale, Christopher; Maunz, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Microfabricated surface ion traps present a natural solution to the problem of scalability in trapped ion quantum computing architectures. We address some of the chief concerns about surface ion traps by demonstrating low heating rates, long trapping times as well as other high-performance features of Sandia's high optical access (HOA-2) trap. For example, due to the HOA's specific electrode layout, we are able to rotate principal axes of the trapping potential from 0 to 2 π without any change in the secular trap frequencies. We have also achieved the first single-qubit gates with a diamond norm below a rigorous fault tolerance threshold, and a two-qubit Mølmer-Sørensen gate with a process fidelity of 99.58(6). Here we present specific details of trap capabilities, such as shuttling and ion reordering, as well as details of our high fidelity single- and two-qubit gates.

  1. Micromanipulation and microfabrication for optical microrobotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palima, Darwin; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Vizsnyiczai, Gaszton

    2012-01-01

    to microfabricated, free-standing waveguides can be used not only to redirect light for targeted delivery of optical energy but can also for targeted delivery of optical force, which can serve to further extend the manipulation arms in optical robotics. Moreover, light deflection with waveguide also creates a recoil......Robotics can use optics feedback in vision-based control of intelligent robotic guidance systems. With light’s miniscule momentum, shrinking robots down to the microscale regime creates opportunities for exploiting optical forces and torques in microrobotic actuation and control. Indeed...... and fabricated them by two-photon polymerization. These microstructures were then handled using our biophotonics workstation (BWS) for proof-of-principle demonstrations of optical actuation, akin to 6DOF actuation of robotic micromanipulators. Furthermore, we also show an example of dynamic behavior...

  2. Optimization of DNA isolation and PCR protocol for RAPD analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic analysis of plants relies on high yields of pure DNA samples. Here we present the optimization of DNA isolation and PCR conditions for RAPD analysis of selected medicinal and aromatic plants of conservation concern from Peninsular India containing high levels of polysaccharides, polyphenols and secondary ...

  3. Mitochondrial DNA analysis reveals a low nucleotide diversity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mitochondrial DNA analysis reveals a low nucleotide diversity of Caligula japonica in China. ... Mitochondrial DNA analysis reveals a low nucleotide diversity of Caligula japonica in China. Y Li, B Yang, H Wang, R Xia, L Wang, Z Zhang, L Qin, Y Liu ...

  4. Applicability of DNA analysis on adhesive tape in forensic casework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zech, Wolf-Dieter; Malik, Naseem; Thali, Michael

    2012-07-01

    Adhesive tape is commonly used in crimes and is often the subject of forensic evaluation. DNA analysis of adhesive tape can provide DNA profiles of suspects. The object of this study was to evaluate the applicability of DNA analysis on adhesive tape samples in forensic casework. We retrospectively reviewed all cases involving adhesive tape or similar items received by our institute for DNA analysis during the past 11 years. From 100 forensic cases reviewed, 150 adhesive tape samples were examined. A total of 98 DNA profiles were obtained from these samples. Sixty-two of the profiles provided feasible case-relevant information. In conclusion, DNA profiling of adhesive tape samples can be useful in a variety of forensic cases. © 2012 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  5. Microfabricated, 94 GHz, 25 W, Helical Traveling Wave Tube Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Teraphysics Corporation proposes to design and develop a microfabricated, 94 GHz, 25 W traveling wave tube (TWT) with 53% efficiency for NASA applications. In Phase...

  6. What Can Mitochondrial DNA Analysis Tell Us About Mood Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Takaoki; Kato, Tadafumi

    2017-09-21

    Variants in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins in bipolar disorder, depression, or other psychiatric disorders have been studied for decades, since mitochondrial dysfunction was first suggested in the brains of patients with these diseases. Candidate gene association studies initially resulted in findings compatible with the mitochondrial dysfunction hypothesis. Many of those studies, however, were conducted with modest sample sizes (N mood disorders and somatic mtDNA mutations (deletions and point mutations) in brain regions that accumulate a high amount of mtDNA mutations and/or are involved in the regulation of mood. Two lines of robust evidence supporting the importance of mtDNA mutations in brain tissues for mood disorders have come from clinical observation of mitochondrial disease patients who carry primary mtDNA mutations or accumulate secondary mtDNA mutations due to nuclear mutations and an animal model study. More than half of mitochondrial disease patients have comorbid mood disorders, and mice with neuron-specific accumulation of mtDNA mutations show spontaneous depression-like episodes. In this review, we first summarize the current knowledge of mtDNA and its genetics and discuss what mtDNA analysis tells us about neuropsychiatric disorders based on an example of Parkinson's disease. We also discuss challenges and future directions beyond mtDNA analysis toward an understanding of the pathophysiology of "idiopathic" mood disorders. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Optical biosensing strategies for DNA methylation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazmul Islam, Md; Yadav, Sharda; Hakimul Haque, Md; Munaz, Ahmed; Islam, Farhadul; Al Hossain, Md Shahriar; Gopalan, Vinod; Lam, Alfred K; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; Shiddiky, Muhammad J A

    2017-06-15

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification of DNA, where a methyl group is added at the fifth carbon of the cytosine base to form 5 methyl cytosine (5mC) without altering the DNA sequences. It plays important roles in regulating many cellular processes by modulating key genes expression. Alteration in DNA methylation patterns becomes particularly important in the aetiology of different diseases including cancers. Abnormal methylation pattern could contribute to the pathogenesis of cancer either by silencing key tumor suppressor genes or by activating oncogenes. Thus, DNA methylation biosensing can help in the better understanding of cancer prognosis and diagnosis and aid the development of therapies. Over the last few decades, a plethora of optical detection techniques have been developed for analyzing DNA methylation using fluorescence, Raman spectroscopy, surface plasmon resonance (SPR), electrochemiluminescence and colorimetric readouts. This paper aims to comprehensively review the optical strategies for DNA methylation detection. We also present an overview of the remaining challenges of optical strategies that still need to be focused along with the lesson learnt while working with these techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The future of forensic DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, John M

    2015-08-05

    The author's thoughts and opinions on where the field of forensic DNA testing is headed for the next decade are provided in the context of where the field has come over the past 30 years. Similar to the Olympic motto of 'faster, higher, stronger', forensic DNA protocols can be expected to become more rapid and sensitive and provide stronger investigative potential. New short tandem repeat (STR) loci have expanded the core set of genetic markers used for human identification in Europe and the USA. Rapid DNA testing is on the verge of enabling new applications. Next-generation sequencing has the potential to provide greater depth of coverage for information on STR alleles. Familial DNA searching has expanded capabilities of DNA databases in parts of the world where it is allowed. Challenges and opportunities that will impact the future of forensic DNA are explored including the need for education and training to improve interpretation of complex DNA profiles. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Extraction of DNA by magnetic ionic liquids: tunable solvents for rapid and selective DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kevin D; Nacham, Omprakash; Yu, Honglian; Li, Tianhao; Yamsek, Melissa M; Ronning, Donald R; Anderson, Jared L

    2015-02-03

    DNA extraction represents a significant bottleneck in nucleic acid analysis. In this study, hydrophobic magnetic ionic liquids (MILs) were synthesized and employed as solvents for the rapid and efficient extraction of DNA from aqueous solution. The DNA-enriched microdroplets were manipulated by application of a magnetic field. The three MILs examined in this study exhibited unique DNA extraction capabilities when applied toward a variety of DNA samples and matrices. High extraction efficiencies were obtained for smaller single-stranded and double-stranded DNA using the benzyltrioctylammonium bromotrichloroferrate(III) ([(C8)3BnN(+)][FeCl3Br(-)]) MIL, while the dicationic 1,12-di(3-hexadecylbenzimidazolium)dodecane bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide bromotrichloroferrate(III) ([(C16BnIM)2C12(2+)][NTf2(-), FeCl3Br(-)]) MIL produced higher extraction efficiencies for larger DNA molecules. The MIL-based method was also employed for the extraction of DNA from a complex matrix containing albumin, revealing a competitive extraction behavior for the trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium tetrachloroferrate(III) ([P6,6,6,14(+)][FeCl4(-)]) MIL in contrast to the [(C8)3BnN(+)][FeCl3Br(-)] MIL, which resulted in significantly less coextraction of albumin. The MIL-DNA method was employed for the extraction of plasmid DNA from bacterial cell lysate. DNA of sufficient quality and quantity for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification was recovered from the MIL extraction phase, demonstrating the feasibility of MIL-based DNA sample preparation prior to downstream analysis.

  10. A Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroup I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revesz Peter Z.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent recovery of ancient DNA from a growing number of human samples shows that mitochondrial DNA haplogroup I was introduced to Europe after the end of the Last Glacial Maximum. This paper provides a spatio-temporal analysis of the various subhaplogroups of mitochondrial DNA I. The study suggests that haplogroup I diversified into haplogroups I1, I2’3, I4 and I5 at specific regions in Eurasia and then spread southward to Crete and Egypt.

  11. Rapid DNA analysis for automated processing and interpretation of low DNA content samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turingan, Rosemary S; Vasantgadkar, Sameer; Palombo, Luke; Hogan, Catherine; Jiang, Hua; Tan, Eugene; Selden, Richard F

    2016-01-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) analysis of casework samples with low DNA content include those resulting from the transfer of epithelial cells from the skin to an object (e.g., cells on a water bottle, or brim of a cap), blood spatter stains, and small bone and tissue fragments. Low DNA content (LDC) samples are important in a wide range of settings, including disaster response teams to assist in victim identification and family reunification, military operations to identify friend or foe, criminal forensics to identify suspects and exonerate the innocent, and medical examiner and coroner offices to identify missing persons. Processing LDC samples requires experienced laboratory personnel, isolated workstations, and sophisticated equipment, requires transport time, and involves complex procedures. We present a rapid DNA analysis system designed specifically to generate STR profiles from LDC samples in field-forward settings by non-technical operators. By performing STR in the field, close to the site of collection, rapid DNA analysis has the potential to increase throughput and to provide actionable information in real time. A Low DNA Content BioChipSet (LDC BCS) was developed and manufactured by injection molding. It was designed to function in the fully integrated Accelerated Nuclear DNA Equipment (ANDE) instrument previously designed for analysis of buccal swab and other high DNA content samples (Investigative Genet. 4(1):1-15, 2013). The LDC BCS performs efficient DNA purification followed by microfluidic ultrafiltration of the purified DNA, maximizing the quantity of DNA available for subsequent amplification and electrophoretic separation and detection of amplified fragments. The system demonstrates accuracy, precision, resolution, signal strength, and peak height ratios appropriate for casework analysis. The LDC rapid DNA analysis system is effective for the generation of STR profiles from a wide range of sample types. The technology broadens the range of sample

  12. DNA Methylation Signature Analysis: How Easy Is It to Perform?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piperi, Christina; Farmaki, Elena; Vlastos, Fotis; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G.; Martinet, Nadine

    2008-01-01

    Epigenetic changes, or heritable alterations in gene function that do not affect DNA sequence, are rapidly gaining acceptance as co-conspirators in carcinogenesis. Although DNA methylation signature analysis by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction has been a breakthrough method in speed and sensitivity for gene methylation studies, several factors still limit its application as a routine diagnostic and prognostic test. PMID:19183791

  13. Study of Cell Migration in Microfabricated Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Pablo; Terriac, Emmanuel; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria; Piel, Matthieu

    2014-01-01

    The method described here allows the study of cell migration under confinement in one dimension. It is based on the use of microfabricated channels, which impose a polarized phenotype to cells by physical constraints. Once inside channels, cells have only two possibilities: move forward or backward. This simplified migration in which directionality is restricted facilitates the automatic tracking of cells and the extraction of quantitative parameters to describe cell movement. These parameters include cell velocity, changes in direction, and pauses during motion. Microchannels are also compatible with the use of fluorescent markers and are therefore suitable to study localization of intracellular organelles and structures during cell migration at high resolution. Finally, the surface of the channels can be functionalized with different substrates, allowing the control of the adhesive properties of the channels or the study of haptotaxis. In summary, the system here described is intended to analyze the migration of large cell numbers in conditions in which both the geometry and the biochemical nature of the environment are controlled, facilitating the normalization and reproducibility of independent experiments. PMID:24637569

  14. Study of cell migration in microfabricated channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Pablo; Terriac, Emmanuel; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria; Piel, Matthieu

    2014-02-21

    The method described here allows the study of cell migration under confinement in one dimension. It is based on the use of microfabricated channels, which impose a polarized phenotype to cells by physical constraints. Once inside channels, cells have only two possibilities: move forward or backward. This simplified migration in which directionality is restricted facilitates the automatic tracking of cells and the extraction of quantitative parameters to describe cell movement. These parameters include cell velocity, changes in direction, and pauses during motion. Microchannels are also compatible with the use of fluorescent markers and are therefore suitable to study localization of intracellular organelles and structures during cell migration at high resolution. Finally, the surface of the channels can be functionalized with different substrates, allowing the control of the adhesive properties of the channels or the study of haptotaxis. In summary, the system here described is intended to analyze the migration of large cell numbers in conditions in which both the geometry and the biochemical nature of the environment are controlled, facilitating the normalization and reproducibility of independent experiments.

  15. Microfabricated electrochemical sensors for combustion applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulcano Rossi, Vitor A.; Mullen, Max R.; Karker, Nicholas A.; Zhao, Zhouying; Kowarz, Marek W.; Dutta, Prabir K.; Carpenter, Michael A.

    2015-05-01

    A new design for the miniaturization of an existing oxygen sensor is proposed based on the application of silicon microfabrication technologies to a cm sized O2 sensor demonstrated by Argonne National Laboratory and The Ohio State University which seals a metal/metal oxide within the structure to provide an integrated oxygen reference. The structural and processing changes suggested will result in a novel MEMS-based device meeting the semiconductor industry standards for cost efficiency and mass production. The MEMS design requires thin film depositions to create a YSZ membrane, palladium oxide reference and platinum electrodes. Pt electrodes are studied under operational conditions ensuring film conductivity over prolonged usage. SEM imaging confirms void formation after extended tests, consistent with the literature. Furthermore, hydrophilic bonding of pairs of silicon die samples containing the YSZ membrane and palladium oxide is discussed in order to create hermetic sealed cavities for oxygen reference. The introduction of tensile Si3N4 films to the backside of the silicon die generates bowing of the chips, compromising bond quality. This effect is controlled through the application of pressure during the initial bonding stages. In addition, KOH etching of the bonded die samples is discussed, and a YSZ membrane that survives the etching step is characterized by Raman spectroscopy.

  16. Research highlights: printing the future of microfabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Peter; Murray, Coleman; Kim, Donghyuk; Di Carlo, Dino

    2014-05-07

    In this issue we highlight emerging microfabrication approaches suitable for microfluidic systems with a focus on "additive manufacturing" processes (i.e. printing). In parallel with the now-wider availability of low cost consumer-grade 3D printers (as evidenced by at least three brands of 3D printers for sale in a recent visit to an electronics store in Akihabara, Tokyo), commercial-grade 3D printers are ramping to higher and higher resolution with new capabilities, such as printing of multiple materials of different transparency, and with different mechanical and electrical properties. We highlight new work showing that 3D printing (stereolithography approaches in particular) has now risen as a viable technology to print whole microfluidic devices. Printing on 2D surfaces such as paper is an everyday experience, and has been used widely in analytical chemistry for printing conductive materials on paper strips for glucose and other electrochemical sensors. We highlight recent work using electrodes printed on paper for digital microfluidic droplet actuation. Finally, we highlight recent work in which printing of membrane-bound droplets that interconnect through bilayer membranes may open up an entirely new approach to microfluidic manufacturing of soft devices that mimic physiological systems.

  17. Microfabricated therapeutic actuators and release mechanisms therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Abraham P.; Fitch, Joseph P.; Schumann, Daniel L.; Da Silva, Luiz; Benett, William J.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2000-01-01

    Microfabricated therapeutic actuators are fabricated using a shape memory polymer (SMP), a polyurethane-based material that undergoes a phase transformation at a specified temperature (Tg). At a temperature above temperature Tg material is soft and can be easily reshaped into another configuration. As the temperature is lowered below temperature Tg the new shape is fixed and locked in as long as the material stays below temperature Tg. Upon reheating the material to a temperature above Tg, the material will return to its original shape. By the use of such SMP material, SMP microtubing can be used as a retaining/release actuator for the delivery of material, such as embolic coils, for example, through catheters into aneurysms, for example. The microtubing can be manufactured in various sizes and the phase change temperature Tg is determinate for an intended temperature target and intended use. The SMP microtubing can be positioned around or within an end of a deposit material. Various heating arrangements can be utilized with the SMP release mechanism, and the SMP microtubing can include a metallic coating for enhanced light absorption.

  18. Microfabrication of Microchannels for Fuel Cell Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ho Su; Park, Dong Sam

    2010-01-01

    Portable electronic devices such as notebook computers, PDAs, cellular phones, etc., are being widely used, and they increasingly need cheap, efficient, and lightweight power sources. Fuel cells have been proposed as possible power sources to address issues that involve energy production and the environment. In particular, a small type of fuel-cell system is known to be suitable for portable electronic devices. The development of micro fuel cell systems can be achieved by the application of microchannel technology. In this study, the conventional method of chemical etching and the mechanical machining method of micro end milling were used for the microfabrication of microchannel for fuel cell separators. The two methods were compared in terms of their performance in the fabrication with regards to dimensional errors, flatness, straightness, and surface roughness. Following microchannel fabrication, the powder blasting technique is introduced to improve the coating performance of the catalyst on the surface of the microchannel. Experimental results show that end milling can remarkably increase the fabrication performance and that surface treatment by powder blasting can improve the performance of catalyst coating. PMID:22315533

  19. Microfabricated adhesive mimicking gecko foot-hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geim, A K; Dubonos, S V; Grigorieva, I V; Novoselov, K S; Zhukov, A A; Shapoval, S Yu

    2003-07-01

    The amazing climbing ability of geckos has attracted the interest of philosophers and scientists alike for centuries. However, only in the past few years has progress been made in understanding the mechanism behind this ability, which relies on submicrometre keratin hairs covering the soles of geckos. Each hair produces a miniscule force approximately 10(-7) N (due to van der Waals and/or capillary interactions) but millions of hairs acting together create a formidable adhesion of approximately 10 N x cm(-2): sufficient to keep geckos firmly on their feet, even when upside down on a glass ceiling. It is very tempting to create a new type of adhesive by mimicking the gecko mechanism. Here we report on a prototype of such 'gecko tape' made by microfabrication of dense arrays of flexible plastic pillars, the geometry of which is optimized to ensure their collective adhesion. Our approach shows a way to manufacture self-cleaning, re-attachable dry adhesives, although problems related to their durability and mass production are yet to be resolved.

  20. Microfabricated adhesive mimicking gecko foot-hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geim, A. K.; Dubonos, S. V.; Grigorieva, I. V.; Novoselov, K. S.; Zhukov, A. A.; Shapoval, S. Yu.

    2003-07-01

    The amazing climbing ability of geckos has attracted the interest of philosophers and scientists alike for centuries. However, only in the past few years has progress been made in understanding the mechanism behind this ability, which relies on submicrometre keratin hairs covering the soles of geckos. Each hair produces a miniscule force ~10-7 N (due to van der Waals and/or capillary interactions) but millions of hairs acting together create a formidable adhesion of ~10 N cm-2: sufficient to keep geckos firmly on their feet, even when upside down on a glass ceiling. It is very tempting to create a new type of adhesive by mimicking the gecko mechanism. Here we report on a prototype of such 'gecko tape' made by microfabrication of dense arrays of flexible plastic pillars, the geometry of which is optimized to ensure their collective adhesion. Our approach shows a way to manufacture self-cleaning, re-attachable dry adhesives, although problems related to their durability and mass production are yet to be resolved.

  1. Microfabrication of Microchannels for Fuel Cell Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Su Jang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Portable electronic devices such as notebook computers, PDAs, cellular phones, etc., are being widely used, and they increasingly need cheap, efficient, and lightweight power sources. Fuel cells have been proposed as possible power sources to address issues that involve energy production and the environment. In particular, a small type of fuel-cell system is known to be suitable for portable electronic devices. The development of micro fuel cell systems can be achieved by the application of microchannel technology. In this study, the conventional method of chemical etching and the mechanical machining method of micro end milling were used for the microfabrication of microchannel for fuel cell separators. The two methods were compared in terms of their performance in the fabrication with regards to dimensional errors, flatness, straightness, and surface roughness. Following microchannel fabrication, the powder blasting technique is introduced to improve the coating performance of the catalyst on the surface of the microchannel. Experimental results show that end milling can remarkably increase the fabrication performance and that surface treatment by powder blasting can improve the performance of catalyst coating.

  2. Microfluidic Devices for Forensic DNA Analysis: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijns, Brigitte; van Asten, Arian; Tiggelaar, Roald; Gardeniers, Han

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic devices may offer various advantages for forensic DNA analysis, such as reduced risk of contamination, shorter analysis time and direct application at the crime scene. Microfluidic chip technology has already proven to be functional and effective within medical applications, such as for point-of-care use. In the forensic field, one may expect microfluidic technology to become particularly relevant for the analysis of biological traces containing human DNA. This would require a number of consecutive steps, including sample work up, DNA amplification and detection, as well as secure storage of the sample. This article provides an extensive overview of microfluidic devices for cell lysis, DNA extraction and purification, DNA amplification and detection and analysis techniques for DNA. Topics to be discussed are polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on-chip, digital PCR (dPCR), isothermal amplification on-chip, chip materials, integrated devices and commercially available techniques. A critical overview of the opportunities and challenges of the use of chips is discussed, and developments made in forensic DNA analysis over the past 10–20 years with microfluidic systems are described. Areas in which further research is needed are indicated in a future outlook. PMID:27527231

  3. Microfluidic Devices for Forensic DNA Analysis: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijns, Brigitte; van Asten, Arian; Tiggelaar, Roald; Gardeniers, Han

    2016-08-05

    Microfluidic devices may offer various advantages for forensic DNA analysis, such as reduced risk of contamination, shorter analysis time and direct application at the crime scene. Microfluidic chip technology has already proven to be functional and effective within medical applications, such as for point-of-care use. In the forensic field, one may expect microfluidic technology to become particularly relevant for the analysis of biological traces containing human DNA. This would require a number of consecutive steps, including sample work up, DNA amplification and detection, as well as secure storage of the sample. This article provides an extensive overview of microfluidic devices for cell lysis, DNA extraction and purification, DNA amplification and detection and analysis techniques for DNA. Topics to be discussed are polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on-chip, digital PCR (dPCR), isothermal amplification on-chip, chip materials, integrated devices and commercially available techniques. A critical overview of the opportunities and challenges of the use of chips is discussed, and developments made in forensic DNA analysis over the past 10-20 years with microfluidic systems are described. Areas in which further research is needed are indicated in a future outlook.

  4. Microfabricated structures and devices featuring nanostructured titania thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monkowski, Adam J.

    2007-05-01

    When titanium reacts with hydrogen peroxide at 80°C--100°C, a nanostructured titania (NST) thin film is formed on the titanium surface. This nanostructured film is particularly suited for integration with thin film and bulk microfabrication techniques. The ability to manufacture devices in a batch format is a principal advantage of microfabrication-based production. To reliably produce arrays of micro-patterned NST thin films on the wafer scale, a patterning guideline must be considered. The formation of NST relies on a re-deposition process; adequate ti-peroxo species must be generated and remain at the solid-solution interface. Numerical analysis of the characteristic transient diffusion behavior for various micro-patterns has been compared with experimental data to generate a criterion to guide the design of NST micro-patterns. Wafer scale arrays of NST micro gas-sensors have been fabricated using standard thin film techniques. Sensing elements are 20 mum on a side. High sensitivity to hydrogen is achieved by modification of the sensors with platinum nanoparticles. When exposed to a 10 mT partial pressure of hydrogen at 250°C, the functionalized devices exhibit more than one order of magnitude resistance decrease with a response time of approximately 7 sec. Titanium microstructures formed using the titanium ICP deep etch (TIDE) process have been integrated with NST films to produce an ordered nanostructure-microstructure composite (3D-NST). The process developed allows for the incorporation of a planar top surface, advantageous for bonding and sealing applications, in which the nanostructured thin film is formed only on feature sidewalls and floors. When titanium microstructures are spaced less than 1 mum apart, titania nanostructures bridge adjacent features. NST and 3D-NST structures have been assembled and tested in a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) device. The NST film is approximately 900nm thick; this yielded a DSSC with an efficiency of 1.8%, similar

  5. Gene Expression Analysis Using Agilent DNA Microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Hybridization of labeled cDNA to microarrays is an intuitively simple and a vastly underestimated process. If it is not performed, optimized, and standardized with the same attention to detail as e.g., RNA amplification, information may be overlooked or even lost. Careful balancing of the amount ...

  6. Meta-analysis of DNA methylation biomarkers in hepatocellular carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Cheng; Li, Jinyun; Huang, Tao; Duan, Shiwei; Dai, Dongjun; Jiang, Danjie; Sui, Xinbing; Li, Da; Chen, Yidan; Ding, Fei; Huang, Changxin; Chen, Gongying; Wang, Kaifeng

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism in the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we conducted a systematic meta-analysis to evaluate the contribution of DNA methylation to the risk of HCC. A total of 2109 publications were initially retrieved from PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, Embase, CNKI and Wanfang literature database. After a four-step filtration, we harvested 144 case-control articles in the meta-analysis. Our results revealed that 24 genes (carcinoma t...

  7. UPDG: Utilities package for data analysis of Pooled DNA GWAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Daniel WH

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite being a well-established strategy for cost reduction in disease gene mapping, pooled DNA association study is much less popular than the individual DNA approach. This situation is especially true for pooled DNA genomewide association study (GWAS, for which very few computer resources have been developed for its data analysis. This motivates the development of UPDG (Utilities package for data analysis of Pooled DNA GWAS. Results UPDG represents a generalized framework for data analysis of pooled DNA GWAS with the integration of Unix/Linux shell operations, Perl programs and R scripts. With the input of raw intensity data from GWAS, UPDG performs the following tasks in a stepwise manner: raw data manipulation, correction for allelic preferential amplification, normalization, nested analysis of variance for genetic association testing, and summarization of analysis results. Detailed instructions, procedures and commands are provided in the comprehensive user manual describing the whole process from preliminary preparation of software installation to final outcome acquisition. An example dataset (input files and sample output files is also included in the package so that users can easily familiarize themselves with the data file formats, working procedures and expected output. Therefore, UPDG is especially useful for users with some computer knowledge, but without a sophisticated programming background. Conclusions UPDG provides a free, simple and platform-independent one-stop service to scientists working on pooled DNA GWAS data analysis, but with less advanced programming knowledge. It is our vision and mission to reduce the hindrance for performing data analysis of pooled DNA GWAS through our contribution of UPDG. More importantly, we hope to promote the popularity of pooled DNA GWAS, which is a very useful research strategy.

  8. Bioinformatics analysis of circulating cell-free DNA sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Landon L; Jiang, Peiyong

    2015-10-01

    The discovery of cell-free DNA molecules in plasma has opened up numerous opportunities in noninvasive diagnosis. Cell-free DNA molecules have become increasingly recognized as promising biomarkers for detection and management of many diseases. The advent of next generation sequencing has provided unprecedented opportunities to scrutinize the characteristics of cell-free DNA molecules in plasma in a genome-wide fashion and at single-base resolution. Consequently, clinical applications of circulating cell-free DNA analysis have not only revolutionized noninvasive prenatal diagnosis but also facilitated cancer detection and monitoring toward an era of blood-based personalized medicine. With the remarkably increasing throughput and lowering cost of next generation sequencing, bioinformatics analysis becomes increasingly demanding to understand the large amount of data generated by these sequencing platforms. In this Review, we highlight the major bioinformatics algorithms involved in the analysis of cell-free DNA sequencing data. Firstly, we briefly describe the biological properties of these molecules and provide an overview of the general bioinformatics approach for the analysis of cell-free DNA. Then, we discuss the specific upstream bioinformatics considerations concerning the analysis of sequencing data of circulating cell-free DNA, followed by further detailed elaboration on each key clinical situation in noninvasive prenatal diagnosis and cancer management where downstream bioinformatics analysis is heavily involved. We also discuss bioinformatics analysis as well as clinical applications of the newly developed massively parallel bisulfite sequencing of cell-free DNA. Finally, we offer our perspectives on the future development of bioinformatics in noninvasive diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Air-sampled Filter Analysis for Endotoxins and DNA Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang-Yona, Naama; Mazar, Yinon; Pardo, Michal; Rudich, Yinon

    2016-03-07

    Outdoor aerosol research commonly uses particulate matter sampled on filters. This procedure enables various characterizations of the collected particles to be performed in parallel. The purpose of the method presented here is to obtain a highly accurate and reliable analysis of the endotoxin and DNA content of bio-aerosols extracted from filters. The extraction of high molecular weight organic molecules, such as lipopolysaccharides, from sampled filters involves shaking the sample in a pyrogen-free water-based medium. The subsequent analysis is based on an enzymatic reaction that can be detected using a turbidimetric measurement. As a result of the high organic content on the sampled filters, the extraction of DNA from the samples is performed using a commercial DNA extraction kit that was originally designed for soils and modified to improve the DNA yield. The detection and quantification of specific microbial species using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) analysis are described and compared with other available methods.

  10. DNA analysis for mysteries buried in history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanuj Kanchan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the years DNA technology has proved to be a path breaking invention and this technological advancement in modern investigations will hopefully solve many more mysteries in the time to come. However, the developing world is lagging far behind owing to financial constraints and has resorted to relatively less reliable methods during investigations. Hopefully, developing nations too will follow suit in utilizing this technology to its potential.

  11. Google matrix analysis of DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandiah, Vivek; Shepelyansky, Dima L

    2013-01-01

    For DNA sequences of various species we construct the Google matrix [Formula: see text] of Markov transitions between nearby words composed of several letters. The statistical distribution of matrix elements of this matrix is shown to be described by a power law with the exponent being close to those of outgoing links in such scale-free networks as the World Wide Web (WWW). At the same time the sum of ingoing matrix elements is characterized by the exponent being significantly larger than those typical for WWW networks. This results in a slow algebraic decay of the PageRank probability determined by the distribution of ingoing elements. The spectrum of [Formula: see text] is characterized by a large gap leading to a rapid relaxation process on the DNA sequence networks. We introduce the PageRank proximity correlator between different species which determines their statistical similarity from the view point of Markov chains. The properties of other eigenstates of the Google matrix are also discussed. Our results establish scale-free features of DNA sequence networks showing their similarities and distinctions with the WWW and linguistic networks.

  12. Google matrix analysis of DNA sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Kandiah

    Full Text Available For DNA sequences of various species we construct the Google matrix [Formula: see text] of Markov transitions between nearby words composed of several letters. The statistical distribution of matrix elements of this matrix is shown to be described by a power law with the exponent being close to those of outgoing links in such scale-free networks as the World Wide Web (WWW. At the same time the sum of ingoing matrix elements is characterized by the exponent being significantly larger than those typical for WWW networks. This results in a slow algebraic decay of the PageRank probability determined by the distribution of ingoing elements. The spectrum of [Formula: see text] is characterized by a large gap leading to a rapid relaxation process on the DNA sequence networks. We introduce the PageRank proximity correlator between different species which determines their statistical similarity from the view point of Markov chains. The properties of other eigenstates of the Google matrix are also discussed. Our results establish scale-free features of DNA sequence networks showing their similarities and distinctions with the WWW and linguistic networks.

  13. [Microsatellite DNA analysis as a tool for forensic paternity testing (DNA paternity testing)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselinović, Igor

    2006-01-01

    MICROSATELLITE ANALYSIS: By using serological or HLA-testing, the alleged father can be excluded as the biological father, but, regardless of the degree of probability, positive paternity results cannot be obtained without DNA testing. According to the results of the National Human Genome Project, human genome consists of approximately 30.000 genes. The vast majority of human DNA is not organized in genes and has no genetic expression or visible function. Non-coding DNA contains genetic markers important for human identification. Short tandem repeats, or STRs, are a class of microsatellites consisting of tandemly repeated sequences of 2 to 6 base pair length monomers. Most of the microsatellites show a high degree of polymorphism, which can be evaluated by PCR technique, and used in criminalistics, forensic identification and parentage testing. A source of DNA in parentage testing are blood samples or buccal swabs which are routinelly used. Amplification of isolated DNA can be performed in 25-30 cycles by PCR, and fragments are separated by capillary electrophoresis. The probability of paternity of 99.99% or higher corresponds to the paternity "practically proven", indicating that the alleged father is the biological father. Such results can be obtained only by DNA testing. DNA-testing laboratories are required to conduct validation of laboratory facilities, equipment and staff and are subject to permanent control by the society.

  14. Single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of European archaeological M. leprae DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire L Watson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leprosy was common in Europe eight to twelve centuries ago but molecular confirmation of this has been lacking. We have extracted M. leprae ancient DNA (aDNA from medieval bones and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP typed the DNA, this provides insight into the pattern of leprosy transmission in Europe and may assist in the understanding of M. leprae evolution. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Skeletons have been exhumed from 3 European countries (the United Kingdom, Denmark and Croatia and are dated around the medieval period (476 to 1350 A.D.. we tested for the presence of 3 previously identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 10 aDNA extractions. M. leprae aDNA was extracted from 6 of the 10 bone samples. SNP analysis of these 6 extractions were compared to previously analysed European SNP data using the same PCR assays and were found to be the same. Testing for the presence of SNPs in M. leprae DNA extracted from ancient bone samples is a novel approach to analysing European M. leprae DNA and the findings concur with the previously published data that European M. leprae strains fall in to one group (SNP group 3. CONCLUSIONS: These findings support the suggestion that the M. leprae genome is extremely stable and show that archaeological M. leprae DNA can be analysed to gain detailed information about the genotypic make-up of European leprosy, which may assist in the understanding of leprosy transmission worldwide.

  15. DNA-seq analysis of Garcinia mangostana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Bakar, Syuhaidah; Sampathrajan, Sureshkumar; Loke, Kok-Keong; Goh, Hoe-Han; Mohd Noor, Normah

    2015-01-01

    Mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana Linn.) is a tropical tree mainly found in South East Asia and considered as “the queen of fruits”. The asexually produced fruit is dark purple or reddish in color, with white flesh which is slightly acidic with sweet flavor and a pleasant aroma. The purple pericarp tissue is rich in xanthones which are useful for medical purposes. We performed the first genome sequencing of this commercially important fruit tree to study its genome composition and attempted draft genome assembly. Raw reads of the DNA sequencing project have been deposited to SRA database with the accession number SRX1426419. PMID:26981362

  16. Detection of Adult Green Sturgeon Using Environmental DNA Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S Bergman

    Full Text Available Environmental DNA (eDNA is an emerging sampling method that has been used successfully for detection of rare aquatic species. The Identification of sampling tools that are less stressful for target organisms has become increasingly important for rare and endangered species. A decline in abundance of the Southern Distinct Population Segment (DPS of North American Green Sturgeon located in California's Central Valley has led to its listing as Threatened under the Federal Endangered Species Act in 2006. While visual surveys of spawning Green Sturgeon in the Central Valley are effective at monitoring fish densities in concentrated pool habitats, results do not scale well to the watershed level, providing limited spatial and temporal context. Unlike most traditional survey methods, environmental DNA analysis provides a relatively quick, inexpensive tool that could efficiently monitor the presence and distribution of aquatic species. We positively identified Green Sturgeon DNA at two locations of known presence in the Sacramento River, proving that eDNA can be effective for monitoring the presence of adult sturgeon. While further study is needed to understand uncertainties of the sampling method, our study represents the first documented detection of Green Sturgeon eDNA, indicating that eDNA analysis could provide a new tool for monitoring Green Sturgeon distribution in the Central Valley, complimenting traditional on-going survey methods.

  17. Detection of Adult Green Sturgeon Using Environmental DNA Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Paul S.; Schumer, Gregg; Blankenship, Scott; Campbell, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) is an emerging sampling method that has been used successfully for detection of rare aquatic species. The Identification of sampling tools that are less stressful for target organisms has become increasingly important for rare and endangered species. A decline in abundance of the Southern Distinct Population Segment (DPS) of North American Green Sturgeon located in California’s Central Valley has led to its listing as Threatened under the Federal Endangered Species Act in 2006. While visual surveys of spawning Green Sturgeon in the Central Valley are effective at monitoring fish densities in concentrated pool habitats, results do not scale well to the watershed level, providing limited spatial and temporal context. Unlike most traditional survey methods, environmental DNA analysis provides a relatively quick, inexpensive tool that could efficiently monitor the presence and distribution of aquatic species. We positively identified Green Sturgeon DNA at two locations of known presence in the Sacramento River, proving that eDNA can be effective for monitoring the presence of adult sturgeon. While further study is needed to understand uncertainties of the sampling method, our study represents the first documented detection of Green Sturgeon eDNA, indicating that eDNA analysis could provide a new tool for monitoring Green Sturgeon distribution in the Central Valley, complimenting traditional on-going survey methods. PMID:27096433

  18. Detection of Adult Green Sturgeon Using Environmental DNA Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Paul S; Schumer, Gregg; Blankenship, Scott; Campbell, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) is an emerging sampling method that has been used successfully for detection of rare aquatic species. The Identification of sampling tools that are less stressful for target organisms has become increasingly important for rare and endangered species. A decline in abundance of the Southern Distinct Population Segment (DPS) of North American Green Sturgeon located in California's Central Valley has led to its listing as Threatened under the Federal Endangered Species Act in 2006. While visual surveys of spawning Green Sturgeon in the Central Valley are effective at monitoring fish densities in concentrated pool habitats, results do not scale well to the watershed level, providing limited spatial and temporal context. Unlike most traditional survey methods, environmental DNA analysis provides a relatively quick, inexpensive tool that could efficiently monitor the presence and distribution of aquatic species. We positively identified Green Sturgeon DNA at two locations of known presence in the Sacramento River, proving that eDNA can be effective for monitoring the presence of adult sturgeon. While further study is needed to understand uncertainties of the sampling method, our study represents the first documented detection of Green Sturgeon eDNA, indicating that eDNA analysis could provide a new tool for monitoring Green Sturgeon distribution in the Central Valley, complimenting traditional on-going survey methods.

  19. Mesoscopic Model for Free Energy Landscape Analysis of DNA sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Tapia-Rojo, R; Mazo, J J; Falo, F; 10.1103/PhysRevE.86.021908

    2012-01-01

    A mesoscopic model which allows us to identify and quantify the strength of binding sites in DNA sequences is proposed. The model is based on the Peyrard-Bishop-Dauxois model for the DNA chain coupled to a Brownian particle which explores the sequence interacting more importantly with open base pairs of the DNA chain. We apply the model to promoter sequences of different organisms. The free energy landscape obtained for these promoters shows a complex structure that is strongly connected to their biological behavior. The analysis method used is able to quantify free energy differences of sites within genome sequences.

  20. Analysis of the mycoplasma genome by recombinant DNA technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, C; Frydenberg, J; Christiansen, Gunna

    1984-01-01

    A library of DNA fragments from Mycoplasma sp. strain PG50 has been made in the vector pBR325. Analysis in Escherichia coli minicells of randomly picked clones from this library demonstrated that many plasmids can promote synthesis of mycoplasma protein in the E. coli genetic background. Screening....... The DNA sequence of 16S rRNA and the surrounding control regions has been determined....

  1. DNA methylation and genetic diversity analysis of genus Cycas in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mallory

    2012-01-12

    Jan 12, 2012 ... deciduous forests (central Thailand). Where, Pi is the frequency of the present or absent allele (Ott,. 1991). Principal component analysis (PCA) was also performed for cluster analysis. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION. MSAP band patterns and DNA methylation percentages in Cycas. From 11 pairs of EcoRI+ ...

  2. Microfluidic devices for forensic DNA analysis: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijns, Brigitte Bibiche; van Asten, A.; Tiggelaar, Roald M.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic devices may offer various advantages for forensic DNA analysis, such as reduced risk of contamination, shorter analysis time and direct application at the crime scene. Microfluidic chip technology has already proven to be functional and effective within medical applications, such as for

  3. Isolation and analysis of high quality nuclear DNA with reduced organellar DNA for plant genome sequencing and resequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Kerry A; Wang, Wenqin; Zdepski, Anna; Michael, Todd P

    2011-05-20

    High throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies have revolutionized the field of genomics by drastically reducing the cost of sequencing, making it feasible for individual labs to sequence or resequence plant genomes. Obtaining high quality, high molecular weight DNA from plants poses significant challenges due to the high copy number of chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA, as well as high levels of phenolic compounds and polysaccharides. Multiple methods have been used to isolate DNA from plants; the CTAB method is commonly used to isolate total cellular DNA from plants that contain nuclear DNA, as well as chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA. Alternatively, DNA can be isolated from nuclei to minimize chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA contamination. We describe optimized protocols for isolation of nuclear DNA from eight different plant species encompassing both monocot and eudicot species. These protocols use nuclei isolation to minimize chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA contamination. We also developed a protocol to determine the number of chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA copies relative to the nuclear DNA using quantitative real time PCR (qPCR). We compared DNA isolated from nuclei to total cellular DNA isolated with the CTAB method. As expected, DNA isolated from nuclei consistently yielded nuclear DNA with fewer chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA copies, as compared to the total cellular DNA prepared with the CTAB method. This protocol will allow for analysis of the quality and quantity of nuclear DNA before starting a plant whole genome sequencing or resequencing experiment. Extracting high quality, high molecular weight nuclear DNA in plants has the potential to be a bottleneck in the era of whole genome sequencing and resequencing. The methods that are described here provide a framework for researchers to extract and quantify nuclear DNA in multiple types of plants.

  4. Isolation and analysis of high quality nuclear DNA with reduced organellar DNA for plant genome sequencing and resequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdepski Anna

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High throughput sequencing (HTS technologies have revolutionized the field of genomics by drastically reducing the cost of sequencing, making it feasible for individual labs to sequence or resequence plant genomes. Obtaining high quality, high molecular weight DNA from plants poses significant challenges due to the high copy number of chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA, as well as high levels of phenolic compounds and polysaccharides. Multiple methods have been used to isolate DNA from plants; the CTAB method is commonly used to isolate total cellular DNA from plants that contain nuclear DNA, as well as chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA. Alternatively, DNA can be isolated from nuclei to minimize chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA contamination. Results We describe optimized protocols for isolation of nuclear DNA from eight different plant species encompassing both monocot and eudicot species. These protocols use nuclei isolation to minimize chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA contamination. We also developed a protocol to determine the number of chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA copies relative to the nuclear DNA using quantitative real time PCR (qPCR. We compared DNA isolated from nuclei to total cellular DNA isolated with the CTAB method. As expected, DNA isolated from nuclei consistently yielded nuclear DNA with fewer chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA copies, as compared to the total cellular DNA prepared with the CTAB method. This protocol will allow for analysis of the quality and quantity of nuclear DNA before starting a plant whole genome sequencing or resequencing experiment. Conclusions Extracting high quality, high molecular weight nuclear DNA in plants has the potential to be a bottleneck in the era of whole genome sequencing and resequencing. The methods that are described here provide a framework for researchers to extract and quantify nuclear DNA in multiple types of plants.

  5. Isolation and analysis of high quality nuclear DNA with reduced organellar DNA for plant genome sequencing and resequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background High throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies have revolutionized the field of genomics by drastically reducing the cost of sequencing, making it feasible for individual labs to sequence or resequence plant genomes. Obtaining high quality, high molecular weight DNA from plants poses significant challenges due to the high copy number of chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA, as well as high levels of phenolic compounds and polysaccharides. Multiple methods have been used to isolate DNA from plants; the CTAB method is commonly used to isolate total cellular DNA from plants that contain nuclear DNA, as well as chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA. Alternatively, DNA can be isolated from nuclei to minimize chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA contamination. Results We describe optimized protocols for isolation of nuclear DNA from eight different plant species encompassing both monocot and eudicot species. These protocols use nuclei isolation to minimize chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA contamination. We also developed a protocol to determine the number of chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA copies relative to the nuclear DNA using quantitative real time PCR (qPCR). We compared DNA isolated from nuclei to total cellular DNA isolated with the CTAB method. As expected, DNA isolated from nuclei consistently yielded nuclear DNA with fewer chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA copies, as compared to the total cellular DNA prepared with the CTAB method. This protocol will allow for analysis of the quality and quantity of nuclear DNA before starting a plant whole genome sequencing or resequencing experiment. Conclusions Extracting high quality, high molecular weight nuclear DNA in plants has the potential to be a bottleneck in the era of whole genome sequencing and resequencing. The methods that are described here provide a framework for researchers to extract and quantify nuclear DNA in multiple types of plants. PMID:21599914

  6. PLOJDY ANALYSIS AND DNA CONTENT OF MUTANT BANANA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAK CHAI

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutagens cause random changes in the nuclear DNA or cytoplasmic organelles, resulting in gene, chromosomal or genomic mutations and hence, create variability. In this study, flow cytometry (FCM was used to determine ploidy levels and DNA content in gamma-irradiated variants of mutated Pisang Berangan (cv. Intan, AAA - a local banana genotype. Induced variants such as shor t plant stature (stunted growth, late flowering plants (late maturity and abnormalities in bunch characters were selected to stud y possible changes at the DNA level. The study showed that DNA content of mutated plants differed from non-irradiated control and that irradiation had the most effect at high doses (40 and 60 Gy. The increase of DNA content in 20 Gy and 30 Gy treated plants was not more than that of the control plants. The values of genomic DNA content of gamma-irra diation variants decreased as the dose of irradiation increased from 20 to 60 Gy, indicating that the high dose of gamma-irradiation had a significant effect on the genome of the plants. The analysis further showed that phenotypic variation due to mutagenesis was reflected in the DNA content of the plants. The results also showed that ploidy levels were not affected by gamma-irradiation even at high doses.

  7. META2: Intercellular DNA Methylation Pairwise Annotation and Integrative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binhua Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide deciphering intercellular differential DNA methylation as well as its roles in transcriptional regulation remains elusive in cancer epigenetics. Here we developed a toolkit META2 for DNA methylation annotation and analysis, which aims to perform integrative analysis on differentially methylated loci and regions through deep mining and statistical comparison methods. META2 contains multiple versatile functions for investigating and annotating DNA methylation profiles. Benchmarked with T-47D cell, we interrogated the association within differentially methylated CpG (DMC and region (DMR candidate count and region length and identified major transition zones as clues for inferring statistically significant DMRs; together we validated those DMRs with the functional annotation. Thus META2 can provide a comprehensive analysis approach for epigenetic research and clinical study.

  8. Quantitative proteomic analysis of yeast DNA replication proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Takashi; Stead, David A; Hiraga, Shin-ichiro; ten Have, Sara; Donaldson, Anne D

    2012-06-01

    Chromatin is dynamically regulated, and proteomic analysis of its composition can provide important information about chromatin functional components. Many DNA replication proteins for example bind chromatin at specific times during the cell cycle. Proteomic investigation can also be used to characterize changes in chromatin composition in response to perturbations such as DNA damage, while useful information is obtained by testing the effects on chromatin composition of mutations in chromosome stability pathways. We have successfully used the method of stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) for quantitative proteomic analysis of normal and pathological changes to yeast chromatin. Here we describe this proteomic method for analyzing changes to Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromatin, illustrating the procedure with an analysis of the changes that occur in chromatin composition as cells progress from a G1 phase block (induced by alpha factor) into S phase (in the presence of DNA replication inhibitor hydroxyurea). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Flow cytometry-based DNA hybridization and polymorphism analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, H.; Kommander, K.; White, P.S.; Nolan, J.P.

    1998-07-01

    Functional analysis of the humane genome, including the quantification of differential gene expression and the identification of polymorphic sites and disease genes, is an important element of the Human Genome Project. Current methods of analysis are mainly gel-based assays that are not well-suited to rapid genome-scale analyses. To analyze DNA sequence on a large scale, robust and high throughput assays are needed. The authors are developing a suite of microsphere-based approaches employing fluorescence detection to screen and analyze genomic sequence. The approaches include competitive DNA hybridization to measure DNA or RNA targets in unknown samples, and oligo ligation or extension assays to analyze single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Apart from the advances of sensitivity, simplicity, and low sample consumption, these flow cytometric approaches have the potential for high throughput multiplexed analysis using multicolored microspheres and automated sample handling.

  10. Shrinkage effects during polmer phase separation on microfabricated molds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bikel, M.; Punt, Ineke G.M.; Lammertink, Rob G.H.; Wessling, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Phase separation microfabrication (PSμF) is a fabrication method that allows the preparation of membranes having micropattern surface topologies. PSμF entails the phase separation of a polymer solution cast onto structured supports. The polymer solution wets the features and upon phase separation

  11. Microfabricated Silicon Microneedle Array for Transdermal Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jing; Tay, Francis Eh; Miao, Jianmin; Iliescu, Ciprian

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents developed processes for silicon microneedle arrays microfabrication. Three types of microneedles structures were achieved by isotropic etching in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) using SF6/O2 gases, combination of isotropic etching with deep etching, and wet etching, respectively. A microneedle array with biodegradable porous tips was further developed based on the fabricated microneedles.

  12. Field-effect flow control for microfabricated fluidic networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schasfoort, Richardus B.M.; Schlautmann, Stefan; Hendrikse, J.; van den Berg, Albert

    1999-01-01

    The magnitude and direction of the electro-osmotic flow (EOF) inside a microfabricated fluid channel can be controlled by a perpendicular electric field of 1.5 megavolts per centimeter generated by a voltage of only 50 volts. A microdevice called a "flowFET," with functionality comparable to that of

  13. Microfabricated Silicon Microneedle Array for Transdermal Drug Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, J [Mechanical Engineering National University of Singapore, 119260, Singapore (Singapore); Tay, F E [Mechanical Engineering National University of Singapore, 119260, Singapore (Singapore); Miao Jianmin [MicroMachines Center, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore); Iliescu, C [Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, 31 Biopolis Way, Nanos, 04-01, 138669 (Singapore)

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents developed processes for silicon microneedle arrays microfabrication. Three types of microneedles structures were achieved by isotropic etching in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) using SF{sub 6}/O{sub 2} gases, combination of isotropic etching with deep etching, and wet etching, respectively. A microneedle array with biodegradable porous tips was further developed based on the fabricated microneedles.

  14. DNA nanotechnology for nucleic acid analysis: multifunctional molecular DNA machine for RNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, A J; Bengtson, H N; Rohde, K H; Kolpashchikov, D M

    2016-12-06

    The Nobel prize in chemistry in 2016 was awarded for 'the design and synthesis of molecular machines'. Here we designed and assembled a molecular machine for the detection of specific RNA molecules. An association of several DNA strands, named multifunctional DNA machine for RNA analysis (MDMR1), was designed to (i) unwind RNA with the help of RNA-binding arms, (ii) selectively recognize a targeted RNA fragment, (iii) attract a signal-producing substrate and (iv) amplify the fluorescent signal by catalysis. MDMR1 enabled detection of 16S rRNA at concentrations ∼24 times lower than that by a traditional deoxyribozyme probe.

  15. Targeted deep DNA methylation analysis of circulating cell-free DNA in plasma using massively parallel semiconductor sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaca-Paniagua, Felipe; Oliver, Javier; Nogueira da Costa, Andre; Merle, Philippe; McKay, James; Herceg, Zdenko; Holmila, Reetta

    2015-01-01

    To set up a targeted methylation analysis using semiconductor sequencing and evaluate the potential for studying methylation in circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA). Methylation of VIM, FBLN1, LTBP2, HINT2, h19 and IGF2 was analyzed in plasma cfDNA and white blood cell DNA obtained from eight hepatocellular carcinoma patients and eight controls using Ion Torrent™ PGM sequencer. h19 and IGF2 showed consistent methylation levels and methylation was detected for VIM and FBLN1, whereas LTBP2 and HINT2 did not show methylation for target regions. VIM gene promoter methylation was higher in HCC cfDNA than in cfDNA of controls or white blood cell DNA. Semiconductor sequencing is a suitable method for analyzing methylation profiles in cfDNA. Furthermore, differences in cfDNA methylation can be detected between controls and hepatocellular carcinoma cases, even though due to the small sample set these results need further validation.

  16. In vivo footprinting and DNA affinity chromatography for analysis of p53 DNA binding ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Maria Patricia; Cain, Christine; Bargonetti, Jill

    2003-01-01

    p53 is a sequence-specific DNA binding protein. The p53 consensus is two copies of 5'- RRRC(A/T)(T/A)GYYY-3'. The interaction of p53 with specific DNA binding sites (DBS) has been analyzed extensively using electrophoretic mobility shift analysis (EMSA). These studies do not address the interaction of p53 with nuclear chromatin or the stability of p53-DBS interactions. In vivo footprinting examines the dynamic interactions of p53 protein in nuclear chromatin. p53 DBS affinity chromatography compares the stability of p53 from different cellular extracts with different DBS. Isogenic strains expressing high p53 levels, and deleted for p53, are required for controlled experiments using both methods. Different systems can be used to generate sufficient p53 protein (including DNA damage), and this results in the analysis of different forms of p53. A comparison of different cellular sources of high levels of p53 (in the presence and absence of DNA damage) vs different p53 DBS is required to appreciate the complexity of the regulation. Methods for comparing p53 from three different cellular sources with different DBS are presented here. The p53 research community needs to expand this analysis to complete the picture of how p53 differentially regulates transcription of target genes in nuclear chromatin.

  17. Sequencing and Analysis of Neanderthal Genomic DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noonan, James P.; Coop, Graham; Kudaravalli, Sridhar; Smith,Doug; Krause, Johannes; Alessi, Joe; Chen, Feng; Platt, Darren; Paabo,Svante; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2006-06-13

    Recovery and analysis of multiple Neanderthal autosomalsequences using a metagenomic approach reveals that modern humans andNeanderthals split ~;400,000 years ago, without significant evidence ofsubsequent admixture.

  18. DNA hybridization sensing for cytogenetic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Dapra, Johannes; Brøgger, Anna Line

    2013-01-01

    Cytogenetic analysis focuses on studying the cell structure, mainly in respect to chromosome content and their structure. Chromosome abnormalities, such as translocations may cause various genetic disorders, but are also associated with heametological malignancies. Chromosome translocations are r...

  19. Statistical analysis of post mortem DNA damage-derived miscoding lesions in Neandertal mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gigli Elena

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have analysed the distribution of post mortem DNA damage derived miscoding lesions from the datasets of seven published Neandertal specimens that have extensive cloned sequence coverage over the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA hypervariable region 1 (HVS1. The analysis was restricted to C→T and G→A miscoding lesions (the predominant manifestation of post mortem damage that are seen at a frequency of more than one clone among sequences from a single PCR, but do not represent the true endogenous sequence. Findings The data indicates an extreme bias towards C→T over G→A miscoding lesions (observed ratio of 67:2 compared to an expected ratio of 7:2, implying that the mtDNA Light strand molecule suffers proportionally more damage-derived miscoding lesions than the Heavy strand. Conclusion The clustering of Cs in the Light strand as opposed to the singleton pattern of Cs in the Heavy strand could explain the observed bias, a phenomenon that could be further tested with non-PCR based approaches. The characterization of the HVS1 hotspots will be of use to future Neandertal mtDNA studies, with specific regards to assessing the authenticity of new positions previously unknown to be polymorphic.

  20. Genome wide application of DNA melting analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Daniel; Everaers, Ralf

    2009-01-21

    Correspondences between functional and thermodynamic melting properties in a genome are being increasingly employed for ab initio gene finding and for the interpretation of the evolution of genomes. Here we present the first systematic genome wide comparison between biologically coding domains and thermodynamically stable regions. In particular, we develop statistical methods to estimate the reliability of the resulting predictions. Not surprisingly, we find that the success of the approach depends on the difference in GC content between the coding and the non-coding parts of the genome and on the percentage of coding base-pairs in the sequence. These prerequisites vary strongly between species, where we observe no systematic differences between eukaryotes and prokaryotes. We find a number of organisms in which the strong correlation of coding domains and thermodynamically stable regions allows us to identify putative exons or genes to complement existing approaches. In contrast to previous investigations along these lines we have not employed the Poland-Scheraga (PS) model of DNA melting but use the earlier Zimm-Bragg (ZB) model. The Ising-like form of the ZB model can be viewed as an approximation to the PS model, with averaged loop entropies included into the cooperative factor [Formula: see text]. This results in a speed-up by a factor of 20-100 compared to the Fixman-Freire algorithm for the solution of the PS model. We show that for genomic sequences the resulting systematic errors are negligible compared to the parameterization uncertainty of the models. We argue that for limited computing resources, available CPU power is better invested in broadening the statistical base for genomic investigations than in marginal improvements of the description of the physical melting behavior.

  1. Unlocking Barriers to DNA Vaccine Immunogenicity: A Cross-Species Analysis of Cytosolic DNA Sensing in Skeletal Muscle Myocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0505 TITLE: Unlocking Barriers to DNA Vaccine Immunogenicity: A Cross-Species Analysis of Cytosolic DNA Sensing in...REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 10 Sept 2016 – 9 Sept 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Unlocking Barriers to DNA Vaccine ...DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT DNA vaccine technology holds

  2. 28 CFR 28.13 - Analysis and indexing of DNA samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Analysis and indexing of DNA samples. 28.13 Section 28.13 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DNA IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM DNA Sample Collection, Analysis, and Indexing § 28.13 Analysis and indexing of DNA samples. (a) The Federal Bureau of...

  3. Supervised DNA Barcodes species classification: analysis, comparisons and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitschek, Emanuel; Fiscon, Giulia; Felici, Giovanni

    2014-04-11

    Specific fragments, coming from short portions of DNA (e.g., mitochondrial, nuclear, and plastid sequences), have been defined as DNA Barcode and can be used as markers for organisms of the main life kingdoms. Species classification with DNA Barcode sequences has been proven effective on different organisms. Indeed, specific gene regions have been identified as Barcode: COI in animals, rbcL and matK in plants, and ITS in fungi. The classification problem assigns an unknown specimen to a known species by analyzing its Barcode. This task has to be supported with reliable methods and algorithms. In this work the efficacy of supervised machine learning methods to classify species with DNA Barcode sequences is shown. The Weka software suite, which includes a collection of supervised classification methods, is adopted to address the task of DNA Barcode analysis. Classifier families are tested on synthetic and empirical datasets belonging to the animal, fungus, and plant kingdoms. In particular, the function-based method Support Vector Machines (SVM), the rule-based RIPPER, the decision tree C4.5, and the Naïve Bayes method are considered. Additionally, the classification results are compared with respect to ad-hoc and well-established DNA Barcode classification methods. A software that converts the DNA Barcode FASTA sequences to the Weka format is released, to adapt different input formats and to allow the execution of the classification procedure. The analysis of results on synthetic and real datasets shows that SVM and Naïve Bayes outperform on average the other considered classifiers, although they do not provide a human interpretable classification model. Rule-based methods have slightly inferior classification performances, but deliver the species specific positions and nucleotide assignments. On synthetic data the supervised machine learning methods obtain superior classification performances with respect to the traditional DNA Barcode classification methods. On

  4. Improved Algorithm for Analysis of DNA Sequences Using Multiresolution Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Inbamalar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioinformatics and genomic signal processing use computational techniques to solve various biological problems. They aim to study the information allied with genetic materials such as the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA, the ribonucleic acid (RNA, and the proteins. Fast and precise identification of the protein coding regions in DNA sequence is one of the most important tasks in analysis. Existing digital signal processing (DSP methods provide less accurate and computationally complex solution with greater background noise. Hence, improvements in accuracy, computational complexity, and reduction in background noise are essential in identification of the protein coding regions in the DNA sequences. In this paper, a new DSP based method is introduced to detect the protein coding regions in DNA sequences. Here, the DNA sequences are converted into numeric sequences using electron ion interaction potential (EIIP representation. Then discrete wavelet transformation is taken. Absolute value of the energy is found followed by proper threshold. The test is conducted using the data bases available in the National Centre for Biotechnology Information (NCBI site. The comparative analysis is done and it ensures the efficiency of the proposed system.

  5. Improved algorithm for analysis of DNA sequences using multiresolution transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inbamalar, T M; Sivakumar, R

    2015-01-01

    Bioinformatics and genomic signal processing use computational techniques to solve various biological problems. They aim to study the information allied with genetic materials such as the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), the ribonucleic acid (RNA), and the proteins. Fast and precise identification of the protein coding regions in DNA sequence is one of the most important tasks in analysis. Existing digital signal processing (DSP) methods provide less accurate and computationally complex solution with greater background noise. Hence, improvements in accuracy, computational complexity, and reduction in background noise are essential in identification of the protein coding regions in the DNA sequences. In this paper, a new DSP based method is introduced to detect the protein coding regions in DNA sequences. Here, the DNA sequences are converted into numeric sequences using electron ion interaction potential (EIIP) representation. Then discrete wavelet transformation is taken. Absolute value of the energy is found followed by proper threshold. The test is conducted using the data bases available in the National Centre for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) site. The comparative analysis is done and it ensures the efficiency of the proposed system.

  6. Sequencing and Analysis of Neanderthal Genomic DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Noonan, James P.; Coop, Graham; Kudaravalli, Sridhar; Smith, Doug; Krause, Johannes; Alessi, Joe; Chen, Feng; Platt, Darren; Paabo, Svante; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2006-01-01

    Our knowledge of Neanderthals is based on a limited number of remains and artifacts from which we must make inferences about their biology, behavior, and relationship to ourselves. Here, we describe the characterization of these extinct hominids from a new perspective, based on the development of a Neanderthal metagenomic library and its high-throughput sequencing and analysis. Several lines of evidence indicate that the 65,250 base pairs of hominid sequence so far identified in the library a...

  7. Differential DNA Methylation Analysis without a Reference Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klughammer, Johanna; Datlinger, Paul; Printz, Dieter; Sheffield, Nathan C; Farlik, Matthias; Hadler, Johanna; Fritsch, Gerhard; Bock, Christoph

    2015-12-22

    Genome-wide DNA methylation mapping uncovers epigenetic changes associated with animal development, environmental adaptation, and species evolution. To address the lack of high-throughput methods for DNA methylation analysis in non-model organisms, we developed an integrated approach for studying DNA methylation differences independent of a reference genome. Experimentally, our method relies on an optimized 96-well protocol for reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS), which we have validated in nine species (human, mouse, rat, cow, dog, chicken, carp, sea bass, and zebrafish). Bioinformatically, we developed the RefFreeDMA software to deduce ad hoc genomes directly from RRBS reads and to pinpoint differentially methylated regions between samples or groups of individuals (http://RefFreeDMA.computational-epigenetics.org). The identified regions are interpreted using motif enrichment analysis and/or cross-mapping to annotated genomes. We validated our method by reference-free analysis of cell-type-specific DNA methylation in the blood of human, cow, and carp. In summary, we present a cost-effective method for epigenome analysis in ecology and evolution, which enables epigenome-wide association studies in natural populations and species without a reference genome. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Differential DNA Methylation Analysis without a Reference Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Klughammer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide DNA methylation mapping uncovers epigenetic changes associated with animal development, environmental adaptation, and species evolution. To address the lack of high-throughput methods for DNA methylation analysis in non-model organisms, we developed an integrated approach for studying DNA methylation differences independent of a reference genome. Experimentally, our method relies on an optimized 96-well protocol for reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS, which we have validated in nine species (human, mouse, rat, cow, dog, chicken, carp, sea bass, and zebrafish. Bioinformatically, we developed the RefFreeDMA software to deduce ad hoc genomes directly from RRBS reads and to pinpoint differentially methylated regions between samples or groups of individuals (http://RefFreeDMA.computational-epigenetics.org. The identified regions are interpreted using motif enrichment analysis and/or cross-mapping to annotated genomes. We validated our method by reference-free analysis of cell-type-specific DNA methylation in the blood of human, cow, and carp. In summary, we present a cost-effective method for epigenome analysis in ecology and evolution, which enables epigenome-wide association studies in natural populations and species without a reference genome.

  9. Identification of Campylobacter pyloridis isolates by restriction endonuclease DNA analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langenberg, W.; Rauws, E. A.; Widjojokusumo, A.; Tytgat, G. N.; Zanen, H. C.

    1986-01-01

    Campylobacter pyloridis isolates recovered from gastric biopsy specimens of 16 patients were examined by restriction endonuclease DNA analysis with HindIII. For 8 of these 16 patients two different isolates were compared to study the persistence of the colonizing strains and the stability of their

  10. A fast analysis system for forensic DNA reference samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, Johannes; Albinsson, Linda; Ansell, Carina; Tapper, Helene; Hansson, Oskar; Holgersson, Stig; Ansell, Ricky

    2008-06-01

    On January 1st, 2006, the Swedish legislation on obtaining DNA reference samples from suspects and the recording of DNA profiles in databases was changed. As a result the number of samples analysed at the Swedish National Laboratory of Forensic Science (SKL) increased from about 4500 in 2005 to more than 25,000 in 2006. To meet this challenge, SKL launched a new analysis system to create an unbroken chain, from sampling to incorporation of a profile in the national DNA database and subsequent automatic generation of digitally signed hit reports. The system integrates logistics, digital data transfer, new functions in LIMS (ForumDNA Version 4, Ida Infront AB) and laboratory automation. Buccal swab samples are secured on a FTA card attached to an identity form, which is barcoded with a unique sample ID. After sampling, the police officer sends a digital request to SKL. The sample is automatically registered in LIMS and processed on delivery. The resulting DNA profiles are automatically classified according to quality using a custom-made expert system. Building the evaluation around mathematical rules makes it reproducible, standardised and minimises manual work and clerk errors. All samples are run in duplicate and the two profiles are compared within LIMS before incorporation in the database. In the first year of operation, the median time for completion of an analysis was 3 days, measured from delivery of the sample to incorporation of the profile in the national DNA database. In spite of the dramatic increase in the number of reference samples there was no backlog.

  11. Hydrogel microfabrication technology toward three dimensional tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiki Yanagawa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of biologically relevant three-dimensional (3D tissue constructs is essential for the alternative methods of organ transplantation in regenerative medicine, as well as the development of improved drug discovery assays. Recent technological advances in hydrogel microfabrication, such as micromolding, 3D bioprinting, photolithography, and stereolithography, have led to the production of 3D tissue constructs that exhibit biological functions with precise 3D microstructures. Furthermore, microfluidics technology has enabled the development of the perfusion culture of 3D tissue constructs with vascular networks. In this review, we present these hydrogel microfabrication technologies for the in vitro reconstruction and cultivation of 3D tissues. Additionally, we discuss current challenges and future perspectives of 3D tissue engineering.

  12. In-vacuum active electronics for microfabricated ion traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guise, Nicholas D; Fallek, Spencer D; Hayden, Harley; Pai, C-S; Volin, Curtis; Brown, K R; Merrill, J True; Harter, Alexa W; Amini, Jason M; Lust, Lisa M; Muldoon, Kelly; Carlson, Doug; Budach, Jerry

    2014-06-01

    The advent of microfabricated ion traps for the quantum information community has allowed research groups to build traps that incorporate an unprecedented number of trapping zones. However, as device complexity has grown, the number of digital-to-analog converter (DAC) channels needed to control these devices has grown as well, with some of the largest trap assemblies now requiring nearly one hundred DAC channels. Providing electrical connections for these channels into a vacuum chamber can be bulky and difficult to scale beyond the current numbers of trap electrodes. This paper reports on the development and testing of an in-vacuum DAC system that uses only 9 vacuum feedthrough connections to control a 78-electrode microfabricated ion trap. The system is characterized by trapping single and multiple (40)Ca(+) ions. The measured axial mode stability, ion heating rates, and transport fidelities for a trapped ion are comparable to systems with external (air-side) commercial DACs.

  13. Contact printed masks for 3D microfabrication in negative resists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Häfliger, Daniel; Boisen, Anja

    2005-01-01

    We present a process based on contact printed shadow masks for three dimensional microfabrication of soft and sensitive overhanging membranes in SU-8. A metal mask is transferred onto unexposed SU-8 from an elastomer stamp made of polydimethylsiloxane. This mask is subsequently embedded into the ......We present a process based on contact printed shadow masks for three dimensional microfabrication of soft and sensitive overhanging membranes in SU-8. A metal mask is transferred onto unexposed SU-8 from an elastomer stamp made of polydimethylsiloxane. This mask is subsequently embedded...... into the negative resist to protect buried material from UV-exposure. Unlike direct evaporation-deposition of a mask onto the SU-8, printing avoids high stress and radiation, thus preventing resist wrinkling and prepolymerization. We demonstrate effective monolithic fabrication of soft, 4-μm thick and 100-μm long...

  14. A universal DNA mini-barcode for biodiversity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meusnier, Isabelle; Singer, Gregory A C; Landry, Jean-François; Hickey, Donal A; Hebert, Paul D N; Hajibabaei, Mehrdad

    2008-05-12

    The goal of DNA barcoding is to develop a species-specific sequence library for all eukaryotes. A 650 bp fragment of the cytochrome c oxidase 1 (CO1) gene has been used successfully for species-level identification in several animal groups. It may be difficult in practice, however, to retrieve a 650 bp fragment from archival specimens, (because of DNA degradation) or from environmental samples (where universal primers are needed). We used a bioinformatics analysis using all CO1 barcode sequences from GenBank and calculated the probability of having species-specific barcodes for varied size fragments. This analysis established the potential of much smaller fragments, mini-barcodes, for identifying unknown specimens. We then developed a universal primer set for the amplification of mini-barcodes. We further successfully tested the utility of this primer set on a comprehensive set of taxa from all major eukaryotic groups as well as archival specimens. In this study we address the important issue of minimum amount of sequence information required for identifying species in DNA barcoding. We establish a novel approach based on a much shorter barcode sequence and demonstrate its effectiveness in archival specimens. This approach will significantly broaden the application of DNA barcoding in biodiversity studies.

  15. A universal DNA mini-barcode for biodiversity analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hebert Paul DN

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The goal of DNA barcoding is to develop a species-specific sequence library for all eukaryotes. A 650 bp fragment of the cytochrome c oxidase 1 (CO1 gene has been used successfully for species-level identification in several animal groups. It may be difficult in practice, however, to retrieve a 650 bp fragment from archival specimens, (because of DNA degradation or from environmental samples (where universal primers are needed. Results We used a bioinformatics analysis using all CO1 barcode sequences from GenBank and calculated the probability of having species-specific barcodes for varied size fragments. This analysis established the potential of much smaller fragments, mini-barcodes, for identifying unknown specimens. We then developed a universal primer set for the amplification of mini-barcodes. We further successfully tested the utility of this primer set on a comprehensive set of taxa from all major eukaryotic groups as well as archival specimens. Conclusion In this study we address the important issue of minimum amount of sequence information required for identifying species in DNA barcoding. We establish a novel approach based on a much shorter barcode sequence and demonstrate its effectiveness in archival specimens. This approach will significantly broaden the application of DNA barcoding in biodiversity studies.

  16. Contact printed masks for 3D microfabrication in negative resists

    OpenAIRE

    Häfliger, Daniel; Boisen, Anja

    2005-01-01

    We present a process based on contact printed shadow masks for three dimensional microfabrication of soft and sensitive overhanging membranes in SU-8. A metal mask is transferred onto unexposed SU-8 from an elastomer stamp made of polydimethylsiloxane. This mask is subsequently embedded into the negative resist to protect buried material from UV-exposure. Unlike direct evaporation-deposition of a mask onto the SU-8, printing avoids high stress and radiation, thus preventing resist wrinkling a...

  17. Micro-Fabricated DC Comparison Calorimeter for RF Power Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilel Neji

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Diode detection and bolometric detection have been widely used to measure radio frequency (RF power. However, flow calorimeters, in particular micro-fabricated flow calorimeters, have been mostly unexplored as power meters. This paper presents the design, micro-fabrication and characterization of a flow calorimeter. This novel device is capable of measuring power from 100 \\(\\mu\\W to 200 mW. It has a 50-Ohm load that is heated by the RF source, and the heat is transferred to fluid in a microchannel. The temperature change in the fluid is measured by a thermistor that is connected in one leg of a Wheatstone bridge. The output voltage change of the bridge corresponds to the RF power applied to the load. The microfabricated device measures 25.4 mm \\(\\times\\ 50.8 mm, excluding the power supplies, microcontroller and fluid pump. Experiments demonstrate that the micro-fabricated sensor has a sensitivity up to 22 \\(\\times\\ \\(10^{-3}\\ V/W. The typical resolution of this micro-calorimeter is on the order of 50 \\(\\mu\\W, and the best resolution is around 10 \\(\\mu\\W. The effective efficiency is 99.9\\% from 0–1 GHz and more than 97.5\\% at frequencies up to 4 GHz. The measured reflection coefficient of the 50-Ohm load and coplanar wave guide is less than \\(-25\\ dB from 0–2 GHz and less than \\(-16\\ dB at 2–4 GHz.

  18. Micro-fabricated DC comparison calorimeter for RF power measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neji, Bilel; Xu, Jing; Titus, Albert H; Meltzer, Joel

    2014-10-27

    Diode detection and bolometric detection have been widely used to measure radio frequency (RF) power. However, flow calorimeters, in particular micro-fabricated flow calorimeters, have been mostly unexplored as power meters. This paper presents the design, micro-fabrication and characterization of a flow calorimeter. This novel device is capable of measuring power from 100 μW to 200 mW. It has a 50-Ohm load that is heated by the RF source, and the heat is transferred to fluid in a microchannel. The temperature change in the fluid is measured by a thermistor that is connected in one leg of a Wheatstone bridge. The output voltage change of the bridge corresponds to the RF power applied to the load. The microfabricated device measures 25.4 mm × 50.8 mm, excluding the power supplies, microcontroller and fluid pump. Experiments demonstrate that the micro-fabricated sensor has a sensitivity up to 22 × 10⁻³ V/W. The typical resolution of this micro-calorimeter is on the order of 50 μW, and the best resolution is around 10 μW. The effective efficiency is 99.9% from 0−1 GHz and more than 97.5% at frequencies up to 4 GHz. The measured reflection coefficient of the 50-Ohm load and coplanar wave guide is less than −25 dB from 0−2 GHz and less than −16 dB at 2−4 GHz.

  19. The evolving impact of microfabrication and nanotechnology on stent design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caves, Jeffrey M; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2006-12-01

    Noncoronary atherosclerotic vascular disease, including symptomatic lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD), promises to extract a steadily rising medical and economic toll over the coming decades. Although drug-eluting stents have led to substantial advances in the management of coronary atherosclerosis, endovascular treatment of noncoronary, peripheral arterial lesions continues to yield high restenosis rates and early clinical failures. In this report, we review recent developments in microfabrication and nanotechnology strategies that offer new opportunities for improving stent-based technology for the treatment of more extensive and complex lesions. In this regard, stents with microfabricated reservoirs for controlled temporal and spatial drug release have already been successfully applied to coronary lesions. Microfabricated needles to pierce lesions and deliver therapeutics deep within the vascular wall represent an additional microscale approach. At the nanoscale, investigators have primarily sought to alter the strut surface texture or coat the stent to enhance inductive or conductive schemes for endothelialization and host artery integration. Nanotechnology research that identifies promising strategies to limit restenosis through targeted drug delivery after angioplasty and stenting is also reviewed.

  20. Quality assurance in DNA image analysis on diploid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thunnissen, F B; Ellis, I O; Jutting, U

    1997-01-01

    DNA image analysis is presently performed in many laboratories. Before general extrapolation of results between different laboratories, validation has to be performed for interlaboratory studies on DNA image analysis. The aim of this study was to establish the performance of different DNA image analysis instruments when measuring different diploid cells. On three separate parts of the same object slide, human liver cells, white blood cells, and imprints of a breast fibroadenoma were sampled. In this quality assurance interlaboratory study, 13 laboratories participated voluntarily. Two slides were sent to each participating laboratory: one Feulgen and one unstained to be stained according the participating laboratory in-house procedure. The features integrated optical density (IOD) and object AREA were recorded for each nucleus. For calculation of the results, the average IOD value of liver diploid cells was set at 2c. A striking difference was observed between the different presumed diploid cell types, from almost 1c to 3c. This variation was not dependent on central or in-house staining. Although in-house calibration was performed for each image analysis system, a surprisingly large variation existed in the reported object AREA, irrespective of the cell type. These results clearly demonstrate that measurements performed in one laboratory cannot be extrapolated to the outcome of others and support the need for standardization. The use of external control cells works well for comparison of instruments. In conclusion, in DNA image analysis quality control is necessary, standardization is obligatory, and the use of an internal control for determination of the diploid peak in a histogram of patient samples is recommended.

  1. Meta-analysis of DNA methylation biomarkers in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Li, Jinyun; Huang, Tao; Duan, Shiwei; Dai, Dongjun; Jiang, Danjie; Sui, Xinbing; Li, Da; Chen, Yidan; Ding, Fei; Huang, Changxin; Chen, Gongying; Wang, Kaifeng

    2016-12-06

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism in the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we conducted a systematic meta-analysis to evaluate the contribution of DNA methylation to the risk of HCC. A total of 2109 publications were initially retrieved from PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, Embase, CNKI and Wanfang literature database. After a four-step filtration, we harvested 144 case-control articles in the meta-analysis. Our results revealed that 24 genes (carcinoma tissues vs adjacent tissues), 17 genes (carcinoma tissues vs normal tissues) and six genes (carcinoma serums vs normal serums) were significantly hypermethylated in HCC. Subgroup meta-analysis by geographical populations showed that six genes (carcinoma tissues vs adjacent tissues) and four genes (carcinoma tissues vs normal tissues) were significantly hypermethylated in HCC. Our meta-analysis identified the correlations between a number of aberrant methylated genes (p16, RASSF1A, GSTP1, p14, CDH1, APC, RUNX3, SOCS1, p15, MGMT, SFRP1, WIF1, PRDM2, DAPK1, RARβ, hMLH1, p73, DLC1, p53, SPINT2, OPCML and WT1) and HCC. Aberrant DNA methylation might become useful biomarkers for the prediction and diagnosis of HCC.

  2. Quantitative DNA methylation analysis of candidate genes in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Erin M; Riggs, Bridget M; Delmas, Amber L; Koch, Abby; Hakam, Ardeshir; Brown, Kevin D

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation has been observed in cervical cancer; however, most studies have used non-quantitative approaches to measure DNA methylation. The objective of this study was to quantify methylation within a select panel of genes previously identified as targets for epigenetic silencing in cervical cancer and to identify genes with elevated methylation that can distinguish cancer from normal cervical tissues. We identified 49 women with invasive squamous cell cancer of the cervix and 22 women with normal cytology specimens. Bisulfite-modified genomic DNA was amplified and quantitative pyrosequencing completed for 10 genes (APC, CCNA, CDH1, CDH13, WIF1, TIMP3, DAPK1, RARB, FHIT, and SLIT2). A Methylation Index was calculated as the mean percent methylation across all CpG sites analyzed per gene (~4-9 CpG site) per sequence. A binary cut-point was defined at >15% methylation. Sensitivity, specificity and area under ROC curve (AUC) of methylation in individual genes or a panel was examined. The median methylation index was significantly higher in cases compared to controls in 8 genes, whereas there was no difference in median methylation for 2 genes. Compared to HPV and age, the combination of DNA methylation level of DAPK1, SLIT2, WIF1 and RARB with HPV and age significantly improved the AUC from 0.79 to 0.99 (95% CI: 0.97-1.00, p-value = 0.003). Pyrosequencing analysis confirmed that several genes are common targets for aberrant methylation in cervical cancer and DNA methylation level of four genes appears to increase specificity to identify cancer compared to HPV detection alone. Alterations in DNA methylation of specific genes in cervical cancers, such as DAPK1, RARB, WIF1, and SLIT2, may also occur early in cervical carcinogenesis and should be evaluated.

  3. Quantitative DNA methylation analysis of candidate genes in cervical cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin M Siegel

    Full Text Available Aberrant DNA methylation has been observed in cervical cancer; however, most studies have used non-quantitative approaches to measure DNA methylation. The objective of this study was to quantify methylation within a select panel of genes previously identified as targets for epigenetic silencing in cervical cancer and to identify genes with elevated methylation that can distinguish cancer from normal cervical tissues. We identified 49 women with invasive squamous cell cancer of the cervix and 22 women with normal cytology specimens. Bisulfite-modified genomic DNA was amplified and quantitative pyrosequencing completed for 10 genes (APC, CCNA, CDH1, CDH13, WIF1, TIMP3, DAPK1, RARB, FHIT, and SLIT2. A Methylation Index was calculated as the mean percent methylation across all CpG sites analyzed per gene (~4-9 CpG site per sequence. A binary cut-point was defined at >15% methylation. Sensitivity, specificity and area under ROC curve (AUC of methylation in individual genes or a panel was examined. The median methylation index was significantly higher in cases compared to controls in 8 genes, whereas there was no difference in median methylation for 2 genes. Compared to HPV and age, the combination of DNA methylation level of DAPK1, SLIT2, WIF1 and RARB with HPV and age significantly improved the AUC from 0.79 to 0.99 (95% CI: 0.97-1.00, p-value = 0.003. Pyrosequencing analysis confirmed that several genes are common targets for aberrant methylation in cervical cancer and DNA methylation level of four genes appears to increase specificity to identify cancer compared to HPV detection alone. Alterations in DNA methylation of specific genes in cervical cancers, such as DAPK1, RARB, WIF1, and SLIT2, may also occur early in cervical carcinogenesis and should be evaluated.

  4. GenePublisher: automated analysis of DNA microarray data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Steen; Workman, Christopher; Sicheritz-Ponten, T.

    2003-01-01

    GenePublisher, a system for automatic analysis of data from DNA microarray experiments, has been implemented with a web interface at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/GenePublisher. Raw data are uploaded to the server together with aspecification of the data. The server performs normalization......, statistical analysis and visualization of the data. The results are run against databases of signal transduction pathways, metabolic pathways and promoter sequences in order to extract more information. The results of the entire analysis are summarized in report form and returned to the user....

  5. GEAR: genomic enrichment analysis of regional DNA copy number changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Min; Jung, Yu-Chae; Rhyu, Mun-Gan; Jung, Myeong Ho; Chung, Yeun-Jun

    2008-02-01

    We developed an algorithm named GEAR (genomic enrichment analysis of regional DNA copy number changes) for functional interpretation of genome-wide DNA copy number changes identified by array-based comparative genomic hybridization. GEAR selects two types of chromosomal alterations with potential biological relevance, i.e. recurrent and phenotype-specific alterations. Then it performs functional enrichment analysis using a priori selected functional gene sets to identify primary and clinical genomic signatures. The genomic signatures identified by GEAR represent functionally coordinated genomic changes, which can provide clues on the underlying molecular mechanisms related to the phenotypes of interest. GEAR can help the identification of key molecular functions that are activated or repressed in the tumor genomes leading to the improved understanding on the tumor biology. GEAR software is available with online manual in the website, http://www.systemsbiology.co.kr/GEAR/.

  6. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for fast DNA analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.H.; Ch`ang, L.Y.; Taranenko, N.I.; Allman, S.L.; Tang, K.; Matteson, K.J.

    1995-09-01

    During the past few years, major effort has been directed toward developing mass spectrometry to measure biopolymers because of the great potential benefit to biomedical research. Hellenkamp and his co-workers were the first to report that large polypeptide molecules can be ionized and detected without significant fragmentation when a greater number of nicotinic acid molecules are used as a matrix. This method is now well known as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). Since then, various groups have reported measurements of very large proteins by MALDI. Reliable protein analysis by MALDI is more or less well established. However, the application of MALDI to nucleic acids analysis has been found to be much more difficult. Most research on the measurement of nucleic acid by MALDI were stimulated by the Human Genome Project. Up to now, the only method for reliable routine analysis of nucleic acid is gel electrophoresis. Different sizes of nucleic acids can be separated in gel medium when a high electric field is applied to the gel. However, the time needed to separate different sizes of DNA segments usually takes from several minutes to several hours. If MALDI can be successfully used for nucleic acids analysis, the analysis time can be reduced to less than I millisecond. In addition, no tagging with radioactive materials or chemical dyes is needed. In this work, we will review recent progress related to MALDI for DNA analysis.

  7. Flow cytometric analysis of oil palm: a preliminary analysis for cultivars and genomic DNA alteration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warawut Chuthammathat

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available DNA contents of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq. cultivars were analyzed by flow cytometry using different external reference plant species. Analysis using corn (Zea mays line CE-777 as a reference plant gave the highest DNA content of oil palm (4.72±0.23 pg 2C-1 whereas the DNA content was found to be lower when using soybean (Glycine max cv. Polanka (3.77±0.09 pg 2C-1 or tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum cv. Stupicke (4.25±0.09 pg 2C-1 as a reference. The nuclear DNA contents of Dura (D109, Pisifera (P168 and Tenera (T38 cultivars were 3.46±0.04, 3.24±0.03 and 3.76±0.04 pg 2C-1 nuclei, respectively, using soybean as a reference. One haploid genome of oil palm therefore ranged from 1.56 to 1.81±109 base pairs. DNA contents from one-year-old calli and cell suspension of oil palm were found to be significantly different from those of seedlings. It thus should be noted that genomic DNA alteration occurred in these cultured tissues. We therefore confirm that flow cytometric analysis could verify cultivars, DNA content and genomic DNA alteration of oil palm using soybean as an external reference standard.

  8. Genome-Wide Analysis of DNA Methylation in Human Amnion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinsil Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The amnion is a specialized tissue in contact with the amniotic fluid, which is in a constantly changing state. To investigate the importance of epigenetic events in this tissue in the physiology and pathophysiology of pregnancy, we performed genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of human amnion from term (with and without labor and preterm deliveries. Using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation27 BeadChip, we identified genes exhibiting differential methylation associated with normal labor and preterm birth. Functional analysis of the differentially methylated genes revealed biologically relevant enriched gene sets. Bisulfite sequencing analysis of the promoter region of the oxytocin receptor (OXTR gene detected two CpG dinucleotides showing significant methylation differences among the three groups of samples. Hypermethylation of the CpG island of the solute carrier family 30 member 3 (SLC30A3 gene in preterm amnion was confirmed by methylation-specific PCR. This work provides preliminary evidence that DNA methylation changes in the amnion may be at least partially involved in the physiological process of labor and the etiology of preterm birth and suggests that DNA methylation profiles, in combination with other biological data, may provide valuable insight into the mechanisms underlying normal and pathological pregnancies.

  9. DNA sequence analysis using hierarchical ART-based classification networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeBlanc, C.; Hruska, S.I. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Katholi, C.R.; Unnasch, T.R. [Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Adaptive resonance theory (ART) describes a class of artificial neural network architectures that act as classification tools which self-organize, work in real-time, and require no retraining to classify novel sequences. We have adapted ART networks to provide support to scientists attempting to categorize tandem repeat DNA fragments from Onchocerca volvulus. In this approach, sequences of DNA fragments are presented to multiple ART-based networks which are linked together into two (or more) tiers; the first provides coarse sequence classification while the sub- sequent tiers refine the classifications as needed. The overall rating of the resulting classification of fragments is measured using statistical techniques based on those introduced to validate results from traditional phylogenetic analysis. Tests of the Hierarchical ART-based Classification Network, or HABclass network, indicate its value as a fast, easy-to-use classification tool which adapts to new data without retraining on previously classified data.

  10. DNA microarray data and contextual analysis of correlation graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hingamp Pascal

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA microarrays are used to produce large sets of expression measurements from which specific biological information is sought. Their analysis requires efficient and reliable algorithms for dimensional reduction, classification and annotation. Results We study networks of co-expressed genes obtained from DNA microarray experiments. The mathematical concept of curvature on graphs is used to group genes or samples into clusters to which relevant gene or sample annotations are automatically assigned. Application to publicly available yeast and human lymphoma data demonstrates the reliability of the method in spite of its simplicity, especially with respect to the small number of parameters involved. Conclusions We provide a method for automatically determining relevant gene clusters among the many genes monitored with microarrays. The automatic annotations and the graphical interface improve the readability of the data. A C++ implementation, called Trixy, is available from http://tagc.univ-mrs.fr/bioinformatics/trixy.html.

  11. Manipulation and in situ transmission electron microscope characterization of sub-100 nm nanostructures using a microfabricated nanogripper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cagliani, Alberto; Wierzbicki, Rafal; Occhipini, Luigi

    2010-01-01

    We present here a polysilicon electrothermal microfabricated nanogripper capable of manipulating nanowires and nanotubes in the sub-100 nm range. The nanogripper was fabricated with a mix and match microfabrication process, combining high throughput of photolithography with 10 nm resolution...

  12. Complete sequence analysis of 18S rDNA based on genomic DNA extraction from individual Demodex mites (Acari: Demodicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ya-E; Xu, Ji-Ru; Hu, Li; Wu, Li-Ping; Wang, Zheng-Hang

    2012-05-01

    The study for the first time attempted to accomplish 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) complete sequence amplification and analysis for three Demodex species (Demodex folliculorum, Demodex brevis and Demodex canis) based on gDNA extraction from individual mites. The mites were treated by DNA Release Additive and Hot Start II DNA Polymerase so as to promote mite disruption and increase PCR specificity. Determination of D. folliculorum gDNA showed that the gDNA yield reached the highest at 1 mite, tending to descend with the increase of mite number. The individual mite gDNA was successfully used for 18S rDNA fragment (about 900 bp) amplification examination. The alignments of 18S rDNA complete sequences of individual mite samples and those of pooled mite samples ( ≥ 1000mites/sample) showed over 97% identities for each species, indicating that the gDNA extracted from a single individual mite was as satisfactory as that from pooled mites for PCR amplification. Further pairwise sequence analyses showed that average divergence, genetic distance, transition/transversion or phylogenetic tree could not effectively identify the three Demodex species, largely due to the differentiation in the D. canis isolates. It can be concluded that the individual Demodex mite gDNA can satisfy the molecular study of Demodex. 18S rDNA complete sequence is suitable for interfamily identification in Cheyletoidea, but whether it is suitable for intrafamily identification cannot be confirmed until the ascertainment of the types of Demodex mites parasitizing in dogs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Phylogenetic analysis of DNA demethylase genes in angiosperm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiuxiang; Xue, Qingzhong; Xu, Jianhong

    2014-03-01

    The DNA methylation patterns and levels are depended on the function of DNA methyltransferase and DNA demethylase, and DNA demethylase plays a critical role in active DNA demethylation. In this paper, all homologous DNA demethylase gene copies were identified in monocots (O. sativa and S. bicolor) and dicotyledon (A.thaliana and P. trichocarpa) based on ten known DNA demethylase genes from rice and Arabidopsis. Two types of new DNA demethy-lase-like genes (DML4 and DML5) were identified. Tandem duplication, segmental duplication and whole genome duplica-tion exist in DNA demethylase gene family in plants, which result in neofunctionalization and subfunctionalization upon the phylogeny of conserved glycosylase domains and chromosomal locations of genes. Furthermore, the expression of DNA demethylase genes was investigated in different tissues. This study will facilitate our understanding of the relationship be-tween function and evolution of DNA demethylase, and utilizing the DNA demethylase genes in plants.

  14. Identification of two groups of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis strains by restriction endonuclease analysis and DNA hybridization.

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, D M; Gabric, D M; de Lisle, G W

    1990-01-01

    Genomic DNA was prepared from four reference strains of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis and 46 isolates of this organism from New Zealand, Australia, Canada, and Norway and also from two mycobactin-dependent "wood pigeon" strains. The DNA was characterized by restriction endonuclease analysis, both with and without DNA hybridization, with a probe specific to a repetitive DNA sequence in M. paratuberculosis. Both techniques differentiated M. paratuberculosis strains into two groups, but DNA hyb...

  15. Origins of an Unmarked Georgia Cemetery Using Ancient DNA Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozga, Andrew T; Tito, Raúl Y; Kemp, Brian M; Matternes, Hugh; Obregon-Tito, Alexandra; Neal, Leslie; Lewis, Cecil M

    2015-04-01

    Determining the origins of those buried within undocumented cemeteries is of incredible importance to historical archaeologists and, in many cases, the nearby communities. In the case of Avondale Burial Place, a cemetery in Bibb County, Georgia, in use from 1820 to 1950, all written documentation of those interred within it has been lost. Osteological and archaeological evidence alone could not describe, with confidence, the ancestral origins of the 101 individuals buried there. In the present study, we used ancient DNA extraction methods in well-preserved skeletal fragments from 20 individuals buried in Avondale Burial Place to investigate the origins of the cemetery. Through examination of hypervariable region I (HVR1) in the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA), we determined haplotypes for all 20 of these individuals. Eighteen of these individuals belong to the L or U haplogroups, suggesting that Avondale Burial Place was most likely used primarily as a resting place for African Americans. After the surrounding Bibb County community expressed interest in investigating potential ancestral relationships to those within the cemetery, eight potential descendants provided saliva to obtain mtDNA HVR1 information. Three individuals from Avondale Burial Place matched three individuals with oral history ties to the cemetery. Using the online tool EMPOP, we calculated the likelihood of these exact matches occurring by chance alone (< 1%). The present findings exhibit the importance of genetic analysis of cemetery origins when archaeological and osteological data are inconclusive for estimating ancestry of anonymous historical individuals.

  16. Multiplexed DNA Methylation Analysis of Target Regions Using Microfluidics (Fluidigm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamowicz, Martyna; Maratou, Klio; Aitman, Timothy J

    2018-01-01

    Whole genome shotgun bisulfite sequencing is a method used to generate genome-wide methylation profiles. There are many available protocols to validate the results of this genome-wide method, but they mostly share the limitation of measuring methylation at a small number of CpG positions in small numbers of samples. We developed a multiplexed DNA methylation analysis protocol, which allows for the simultaneous quantitative measurement of cytosine methylation at single nucleotide resolution in 48 PCR amplicons and 48 samples utilizing the microfluidic system established by Fluidigm. Following bisulfite conversion of 500 ng of the target DNA, a PCR reaction is performed using a 48.48 Access Array, which allows parallel amplification of 48 samples by 48 primer pairs. The products of each reaction are labeled with individual, sample specific tags, pooled in a single library and sequenced using the Illumina MiSeq sequencer. The advantages of this system are: speed, small amount of input material, single nucleotide resolution, high coverage of each locus, low cost of simultaneously assaying multiple CpG loci in multiple DNA samples and high reproducibility.

  17. A Comparative Structure/Function Analysis of Two Type IV Pilin DNA Receptors Defines a Novel Mode of DNA Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Jamie-Lee; Xu, Yingqi; Ward, Philip N; Lea, Susan M; Matthews, Stephen J; Pelicic, Vladimir

    2016-06-07

    DNA transformation is a widespread process allowing bacteria to capture free DNA by using filamentous nano-machines composed of type IV pilins. These proteins can act as DNA receptors as demonstrated by the finding that Neisseria meningitidis ComP minor pilin has intrinsic DNA-binding ability. ComP binds DNA better when it contains the DNA-uptake sequence (DUS) motif abundant in this species genome, playing a role in its trademark ability to selectively take up its own DNA. Here, we report high-resolution structures for meningococcal ComP and Neisseria subflava ComPsub, which recognize different DUS motifs. We show that they are structurally identical type IV pilins that pack readily into filament models and display a unique DD region delimited by two disulfide bonds. Functional analysis of ComPsub defines a new mode of DNA binding involving the DD region, adapted for exported DNA receptors. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. ANALYSIS OF ANCIENT DNA FROM FOSSIL CORALLINES (CORALLINALES, RHODOPHYTA)(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughey, Jeffery R; Braga, Juan C; Aguirre, Julio; Woelkerling, William J; Webster, Jody M

    2008-04-01

    The field of molecular paleontology has recently made significant contributions to anthropology and biology. Hundreds of ancient DNA studies have been published, but none has targeted fossil coralline algae. Using regions of the SSU gene, we analyzed rDNA from fossil coralline algae of varying ages and states of preservation from Spain, Papua New Guinea (PNG), and the Great Barrier Reef (GBR). Specimens from PNG, GBR, and some localities from Spain did not contain endogenous ancient DNA. Reproducible sequence data were obtained from specimens ∼550 years old from near Cadiz, Spain, and from rocky-shore deposits in Carboneras, Almeria Province of Spain (∼78,000 years before present [YBP]). Based on BLAST searches and a phylogenetic analysis of sequences, an undescribed coralline alga belonging to the Melobesioideae was discovered in the Carboneras material as well as the following coralline genera: Jania, Lithophyllum, Lithothamnion, Mesophyllum, and Phymatolithon. DNA from fleshy brown and red macroalgae was also discovered in the specimens from Carboneras. The coralline algae identified using molecular techniques were in agreement with those based on morphological methods. The identified taxa are common in the present-day southeastern Spain littoral zone. Amino acid racemization, concentration ratios, and specific concentrations failed to show a correlation between biomolecular preservation and PCR amplification success. Results suggest that molecular investigations on fossil algae, although limited by technical difficulties, are feasible. Validity of our results was established using authentication criteria and a self-critical approach to compliance. © 2008 Phycological Society of America.

  19. Analysis of DNA methylation in various swine tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Yang

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is known to play an important role in regulating gene expression during biological development and tissue differentiation in eukaryotes. In this study, we used the fluorescence-labeled methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (F-MSAP method to assess the extent and pattern of cytosine methylation in muscle, heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney and stomach from the swine strain Laiwu, and we also examined specific methylation patterns in the seven tissues. In total, 96,371 fragments, each representing a recognition site cleaved by either or both EcoRI + HpaII and EcoRI + MspI, the HpaII and MspI are isoschizomeric enzymes, were amplified using 16 pairs of selective primers. A total of 50,094 sites were found to be methylated at cytosines in seven tissues. The incidence of DNA methylation was approximately 53.99% in muscle, 51.24% in the heart, 50.18% in the liver, 53.31% in the spleen, 51.97% in the lung, 51.15% in the kidney and 53.39% in the stomach, as revealed by the incidence of differential digestion. Additionally, differences in DNA methylation levels imply that such variations may be related to specific gene expression during tissue differentiation, growth and development. Three types of bands were generated in the F-MSAP profile, the total numbers of these three types of bands in the seven tissues were 46,277, 24,801 and 25,293, respectively.In addition, different methylation patterns were observed in seven tissues from pig, and almost all of the methylation patterns detected by F-MSAP could be confirmed by Southern analysis using the isolated amplified fragments as probes. The results clearly demonstrated that the F-MSAP technique can be adapted for use in large-scale DNA methylation detection in the pig genome.

  20. Microfabricated optically pumped magnetometer arrays for biomedical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, A. R.; Sheng, D.; Krzyzewski, S. P.; Geller, S.; Knappe, S.

    2017-02-01

    Optically-pumped magnetometers have demonstrated magnetic field measurements as precise as the best superconducting quantum interference device magnetometers. Our group develops miniature alkali atom-based magnetic sensors using microfabrication technology. Our sensors do not require cryogenic cooling, and can be positioned very close to the sample, making these sensors an attractive option for development in the medical community. We will present our latest chip-scale optically-pumped gradiometer developed for array applications to image magnetic fields from the brain noninvasively. These developments should lead to improved spatial resolution, and potentially sensitive measurements in unshielded environments.

  1. Enhanced adhesion for LIGA microfabrication by using a buffer layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajikar, Sateesh S.; DeCarlo, Francesco; Song, Joshua J.

    1998-05-22

    The present invention is an improvement on the LIGA microfabrication process wherein a buffer layer is applied to the upper or working surface of a substrate prior to the placement of a resist onto the surface of the substrate. The buffer layer is made from an inert low-Z material (low atomic weight), a material that absorbs secondary X-rays emissions from the substrate that are generated from the substrate upon exposure to a primary X-rays source. Suitable materials for the buffer layer include polyamides and polyimide. The preferred polyimide is synthesized from pyromellitic anhydride and oxydianiline (PMDA-ODA).

  2. Enhanced adhesion for LIGA microfabrication by using a buffer layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajikar, Sateesh S.; De Carlo, Francesco; Song, Joshua J.

    2004-01-27

    The present invention is an improvement on the LIGA microfabrication process wherein a buffer layer is applied to the upper or working surface of a substrate prior to the placement of a resist onto the surface of the substrate. The buffer layer is made from an inert low-Z material (low atomic weight), a material that absorbs secondary X-rays emissions from the substrate that are generated from the substrate upon exposure to a primary X-rays source. Suitable materials for the buffer layer include polyamides and polyimide. The preferred polyimide is synthesized form pyromellitic anhydride and oxydianiline (PMDA-ODA).

  3. Enhanced adhesion for LIGA microfabrication by using a buffer layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajikar, Sateesh S. (San Jose, CA); De Carlo, Francesco (Darien, IL); Song, Joshua J. (Naperville, IL)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is an improvement on the LIGA microfabrication process wherein a buffer layer is applied to the upper or working surface of a substrate prior to the placement of a resist onto the surface of the substrate. The buffer layer is made from an inert low-Z material (low atomic weight), a material that absorbs secondary X-rays emissions from the substrate that are generated from the substrate upon exposure to a primary X-rays source. Suitable materials for the buffer layer include polyamides and polyimide. The preferred polyimide is synthesized form pyromellitic anhydride and oxydianiline (PMDA-ODA).

  4. Microfabricated Millimeter-Wave High-Power Vacuum Electronic Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    colin.joye@nrl.navy.mil Microfabricated Millimeter-Wave High-Power Vacuum Electronic Amplifiers Figure 2. Results from the 220 GHz TWT . (a) Small signal...Completed tube under hot test. 220 GHz TWT Demonstration The 220 GHz TWT device was based on spare parts from a commercially available CPI VKY2444T G...existing parts, our TWT bested this COTS EIK performance by a factor of 12x in power and 50x in bandwidth for the same size, weight and prime power

  5. Microfabricated Reference Electrodes and their Biosensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jamal Deen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades, there has been an increasing trend towards miniaturization of both biological and chemical sensors and their integration with miniaturized sample pre-processing and analysis systems. These miniaturized lab-on-chip devices have several functional advantages including low cost, their ability to analyze smaller samples, faster analysis time, suitability for automation, and increased reliability and repeatability. Electrical based sensing methods that transduce biological or chemical signals into the electrical domain are a dominant part of the lab-on-chip devices. A vital part of any electrochemical sensing system is the reference electrode, which is a probe that is capable of measuring the potential on the solution side of an electrochemical interface. Research on miniaturization of this crucial component and analysis of the parameters that affect its performance, stability and lifetime, is sparse. In this paper, we present the basic electrochemistry and thermodynamics of these reference electrodes and illustrate the uses of reference electrodes in electrochemical and biological measurements. Different electrochemical systems that are used as reference electrodes will be presented, and an overview of some contemporary advances in electrode miniaturization and their performance will be provided.

  6. Electrochemical Sensors for Clinic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Li

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Demanded by modern medical diagnosis, advances in microfabrication technology have led to the development of fast, sensitive and selective electrochemical sensors for clinic analysis. This review addresses the principles behind electrochemical sensor design and fabrication, and introduces recent progress in the application of electrochemical sensors to analysis of clinical chemicals such as blood gases, electrolytes, metabolites, DNA and antibodies, including basic and applied research. Miniaturized commercial electrochemical biosensors will form the basis of inexpensive and easy to use devices for acquiring chemical information to bring sophisticated analytical capabilities to the non-specialist and general public alike in the future.

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of the genus Hordeum using repetitive DNA sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svitashev, S.; Bryngelsson, T.; Vershinin, A.

    1994-01-01

    over all chromosomes of H. vulgare and the wild barley species H. bulbosum, H. marinum and H. murinum. Southern blot hybridization revealed different levels of polymorphism among barley species and the RFLP data were used to generate a phylogenetic tree for the genus Hordeum. Our data are in a good......A set of six cloned barley (Hordeum vulgare) repetitive DNA sequences was used for the analysis of phylogenetic relationships among 31 species (46 taxa) of the genus Hordeum, using molecular hybridization techniques. In situ hybridization experiments showed dispersed organization of the sequences...

  8. DNA shotgun sequencing analysis of Garcinia mangostana L. variety Mesta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syuhaidah Abu Bakar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana Linn. is an ultra-tropical tree characterized by its unique dark purple fruits with white flesh. The xanthone-rich purple pericarp tissue contains valuable compounds with medicinal properties. Following previously reported genome sequencing of a common variety of mangosteen [1], we performed another whole genome sequencing of a commercially popular variety of this fruit species (var. Mesta for comparative analysis of its genome composition. Raw reads of the DNA sequencing project were deposited to SRA database with the accession number SRX2709728.

  9. High-throughput screening of suppression subtractive hybridization cDNA libraries using DNA microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Noëlani; Crampton, Bridget G; Hein, Ingo; Birch, Paul R J; Berger, Dave K

    2004-11-01

    Efficient construction of cDNA libraries enriched for differentially expressed transcripts is an important first step in many biological investigations. We present a quantitative procedure for screening cDNA libraries constructed by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). The methodology was applied to two independent SSHs from pearl millet and banana. Following two-color cyanin dye labeling and hybridization of subtracted tester with either unsubtracted driver or unsubtracted tester cDNAs to the SSH libraries arrayed on glass slides, two values were calculated for each clone, an enrichment ratio 1 (ER1) and an enrichment ratio 2 (ER2). Graphical representation of ER1 and ER2 enabled the identification of clones that were likely to represent up-regulated transcripts. Normalization of each clone by the SSH process was determined from the ER2 values, thereby indicating whether clones represented rare or abundant transcripts. Differential expression of pearl millet and banana clones identified from both libraries by this quantitative approach was verified by inverse Northern blot analysis.

  10. Targeted Retrieval and Analysis of Five Neandertal mtDNA Genomes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adrian W. Briggs; Jeffrey M. Good; Richard E. Green; Johannes Krause; Tomislav Maricic; Udo Stenzel; Carles Lalueza-Fox; Pavao Rudan; Dejana Brajković; Željko Kućan; Ivan Gušić; Ralf Schmitz; Vladimir B. Doronichev; Liubov V. Golovanova; Marco de la Rasilla; Javier Fortea; Antonio Rosas; Svante Pääbo

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of Neandertal DNA holds great potential for investigating the population history of this group of hominins, but progress has been limited due to the rarity of samples and damaged state of the DNA...

  11. Comparison between microfabrication technologies for metal tooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uriarte, L.; Herrero, A.; Ivanov, A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is based on the information gathered within the Multi-Material Micro-Manufacture (4M) Network activities in the Processing of Metals Division (Task 7.2 'Tooling') (www.4m-net.org). The aim of the task involves a systematic analysis of the partners' expertise in different......, the current limitations of these technologies concerning feature sizes, surface finish, aspect ratios, etc. have been identified. The main conclusion drawn is the absence of a consolidated technology to produce three-dimensional free-form shapes smaller than 100-200 mu m to date....

  12. Analysis of phage Mu DNA transposition by whole-genome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (Trilink Biotechnologies) were employed. Sample DNA. (ChIP or processed Mu DNA) was amplified with Cy5-9mer primer, and reference DNA (Input or whole genome DNA) with Cy3-9mer primer. The samples were loaded on microarray slides and subjected to standard hybridization procedures (NimbleGen Arrays User's ...

  13. Removal of endotoxins from plasmid DNA: analysis of aggregative interaction of mobile divalent metal cations with endotoxins and plasmid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongkudon, Clarence M; Hodges, Emma; Murphy, Kathleen; Danquah, Michael K

    2012-11-01

    Endotoxin lipopolysaccharide removal from plasmid DNA-based vaccine remains a very challenging task for bioprocess engineers. This paper examined the potential use and advantages of divalent cation (Zn(2+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+)) induced aggregation as a plasmid DNA purification method for lipopolysaccharide removal. Analysis of zeta potential, hydrodynamic size, percentage of aggregation; UV-Vis spectroscopy and electron microscopy were performed to determine the optimal cation for preferential aggregation of lipopolysaccharide over plasmid DNA. The results from the hydrodynamic size analysis showed that the addition of Zn(2+) resulted in the maximum theoretical number of lipopolysaccharide molecules per aggregate particle. Dynamic light scattering analysis showed that plasmid DNA aggregates formed a larger maximum hydrodynamic size when it was treated with Ca(2+) than the other two cations. The K(m) value for lipopolysaccharide-Zn(2+) was substantially low (0.28 M) and considerably large (>2 M) for plasmid DNA-Zn(2+). Scatchard plots for plasmid DNA cations showed positive slopes indicating that there was a minimum concentration of plasmid DNA or cations before a significant aggregation occurred. This work concluded that Zn(2+) had the most preferential aggregative interaction with lipopolysaccharide compared to Mg(2+) and Ca(2+). © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Note: Development of a microfabricated sensor to measure thermal conductivity of picoliter scale liquid samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byoung Kyoo; Yi, Namwoo; Park, Jaesung; Kim, Dongsik

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a thermal analysis device, which can measure thermal conductivity of picoliter scale liquid sample. We employ the three omega method with a microfabricated AC thermal sensor with nanometer width heater. The liquid sample is confined by a micro-well structure fabricated on the sensor surface. The performance of the instrument was verified by measuring the thermal conductivity of 27-picoliter samples of de-ionized (DI) water, ethanol, methanol, and DI water-ethanol mixtures with accuracies better than 3%. Furthermore, another analytical scheme allows real-time thermal conductivity measurement with 5% accuracy. To the best of our knowledge, this technique requires the smallest volume of sample to measure thermal property ever.

  15. Geometric Optimization of Microfabricated Silicon Electrodes for Corona Discharge-Based Electrohydrodynamic Thrusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel S. Drew

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Electrohydrodynamic thrust is an emerging propulsion mechanism for flying insect-scale robots. There is a need to both minimize the operating voltage and maximize the output force when designing microfabricated electrodes for use in these robots. In this work, an array of hybrid wire-needle and grid electrode geometries were fabricated and characterized to attempt to minimize both corona discharge onset voltage and thrust loss factor. Statistical analysis of this dataset was performed to screen for factors with significant effects. An optimized emitter electrode decreased onset voltage by 22%. Loss factor was found to vary significantly (as much as 30% based on collector grid geometric parameters without affecting discharge characteristics. The results from this study can be used to drive further optimization of thrusters, with the final goal of providing a path towards autonomous flying microrobots powered by atmospheric ion engines.

  16. Affordable Hands-On DNA Sequencing and Genotyping: An Exercise for Teaching DNA Analysis to Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Kushani; Thomas, Shelby; Stein, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we describe a 5-week laboratory exercise for undergraduate biology and biochemistry students in which students learn to sequence DNA and to genotype their DNA for selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Students use miniaturized DNA sequencing gels that require approximately 8 min to run. The students perform G, A, T, C…

  17. Independent component analysis of Alzheimer's DNA microarray gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanderburg Charles R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene microarray technology is an effective tool to investigate the simultaneous activity of multiple cellular pathways from hundreds to thousands of genes. However, because data in the colossal amounts generated by DNA microarray technology are usually complex, noisy, high-dimensional, and often hindered by low statistical power, their exploitation is difficult. To overcome these problems, two kinds of unsupervised analysis methods for microarray data: principal component analysis (PCA and independent component analysis (ICA have been developed to accomplish the task. PCA projects the data into a new space spanned by the principal components that are mutually orthonormal to each other. The constraint of mutual orthogonality and second-order statistics technique within PCA algorithms, however, may not be applied to the biological systems studied. Extracting and characterizing the most informative features of the biological signals, however, require higher-order statistics. Results ICA is one of the unsupervised algorithms that can extract higher-order statistical structures from data and has been applied to DNA microarray gene expression data analysis. We performed FastICA method on DNA microarray gene expression data from Alzheimer's disease (AD hippocampal tissue samples and consequential gene clustering. Experimental results showed that the ICA method can improve the clustering results of AD samples and identify significant genes. More than 50 significant genes with high expression levels in severe AD were extracted, representing immunity-related protein, metal-related protein, membrane protein, lipoprotein, neuropeptide, cytoskeleton protein, cellular binding protein, and ribosomal protein. Within the aforementioned categories, our method also found 37 significant genes with low expression levels. Moreover, it is worth noting that some oncogenes and phosphorylation-related proteins are expressed in low levels. In

  18. [Liquid biopsy analysis using cell-free DNA (cfDNA): Opportunities and limitations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, E; Kloten, V

    2015-11-01

    Molecular biological analysis of nucleic acids in blood or other bodily fluids (i.e. liquid biopsy analyses) may supplement the pathologists' diagnostic armamentarium in a reasonable way-particularly in cancer precision medicine. Within the field of oncology, liquid biopsy can potentially be used to monitor tumor burden in the blood and to early detect emerging resistance in the course of targeted cancer therapies. An already approved application of liquid biopsy is the detection of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) driver mutations in blood samples of lung cancer patients in those cases where no tissue biopsy is available. However, there is still currently considerable insecurity associated with blood-based DNA analytic methods that must be solved before liquid biopsy can be implemented for broader routine application in the diagnosis of cancer. In this article, the current state of development of liquid biopsy in molecular diagnostics from a pathology point of view is presented.

  19. The Development and Use of Internal Amplification Controls (IACs) with DNA Profiling Kits for Forensic DNA Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahra, Nathalie; Goodwin, William

    2016-01-01

    Biological samples recovered for forensic investigations are often degraded and/or have low amounts of DNA; in addition, in some instances the samples may be contaminated with chemicals that can act as PCR inhibitors. As a consequence this can make interpretation of the results challenging with the possibility of having partial profiles and false negative results. Because of the impact of DNA analysis on forensic investigations, it is important to monitor the process of DNA profiling, in particular the amplification reaction. In this chapter we describe a method for the in-house generation and use of internal amplification controls (IACs) with DNA profiling kits to monitor the success of the PCR proces. In the example we show the use of the SGM Plus® kit. These controls can also be used to aid the interpretation of the DNA profile.

  20. DNA analysis of dust particles sampled from the Turin Shroud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barcaccia Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Turin Shroud is traditionally considered the burial cloth in which the body of Jesus Christ was enveloped after his dead about 2000 years ago. Here we report the main findings from the analysis of genomic DNA extracted from dust particles, which were vacuumed from the backside of Turin Shroud corresponding to internal parts of the body image and the lateral edge used for its radiocarbon dating. Specific plant chloroplast DNA (cpDNA and human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA target regions were analyzed to identify plant taxonomic entities and human genetic lineages. Plant species native to the Mediterranean countries and widespread in the Middle East (Vavilov’s centers of origin V and IV, respectively were identified, in addition to others living in temperate and boreal regions of the northern hemisphere or having their primary center of origin and distribution in central and eastern Asia (mainly China, I or native only to the Americas. Since many of these species were introduced into Europe after the Marco Polo travels and Christopher Columbus voyages, our findings suggest a geographic scenario for which only some of the detected plant cpDNAs are compatible with the supposed origin and trail of the relic, whereas others are likely from a historical interval later than the Medieval period. As for human mtDNAs, our analyses allowed the detection of sequences from multiple subjects, which clustered into a number of western Eurasian haplogroups, including some known to be typical of western Europe (H1 and H3, the Near East (H13 and H33, the Arabian Peninsula (R0a and the Indian sub-continent (M56 and R8. Such mitogenome diversity could be due to contacts with subjects of different ethnic origins in recent centuries, but it is also compatible with the historic path followed by the Turin Shroud during its supposed 2000-year journey from the Near East. Furthermore it raises the possibility of an Indian manufacture of the linen cloth.

  1. DNA flow cytometric analysis in variable types of hydropic placentas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Atabaki pasdar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Differential diagnosis between complete hydatidiform mole, partial hydatidiform mole and hydropic abortion, known as hydropic placentas is still a challenge for pathologists but it is very important for patient management. Objective: We analyzed the nuclear DNA content of various types of hydropic placentas by flowcytometry. Materials and Methods: DNA ploidy analysis was performed in 20 non-molar (hydropic and non-hydropic spontaneous abortions and 20 molar (complete and partial moles, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples by flow cytometry. The criteria for selection were based on the histopathologic diagnosis. Results: Of 10 cases histologically diagnosed as complete hydatiform mole, 9 cases yielded diploid histograms, and 1 case was tetraploid. Of 10 partial hydatidiform moles, 8 were triploid and 2 were diploid. All of 20 cases diagnosed as spontaneous abortions (hydropic and non-hydropic yielded diploid histograms. Conclusion: These findings signify the importance of the combined use of conventional histology and ploidy analysis in the differential diagnosis of complete hydatidiform mole, partial hydatidiform mole and hydropic abortion.

  2. Hardware Accelerator for the Multifractal Analysis of DNA Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte-Sanchez, Jorge E; Velasco-Medina, Jaime; Moreno, Pedro A

    2017-07-24

    The multifractal analysis has allowed to quantify the genetic variability and non-linear stability along the human genome sequence. It has some implications in explaining several genetic diseases given by some chromosome abnormalities, among other genetic particularities. The multifractal analysis of a genome is carried out by dividing the complete DNA sequence in smaller fragments and calculating the generalized dimension spectrum of each fragment using the chaos game representation and the box-counting method. This is a time consuming process because it involves the processing of large data sets using floating-point representation. In order to reduce the computation time, we designed an application-specific processor, here called multifractal processor, which is based on our proposed hardware-oriented algorithm for calculating efficiently the generalized dimension spectrum of DNA sequences. The multifractal processor was implemented on a low-cost SoC-FPGA and was verified by processing a complete human genome. The execution time and numeric results of the Multifractal processor were compared with the results obtained from the software implementation executed in a 20-core workstation, achieving a speed up of 2.6x and an average error of 0.0003%.

  3. DNA Microarray Data Analysis: A Novel Biclustering Algorithm Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchagang, Alain B.; Tewfik, Ahmed H.

    2006-12-01

    Biclustering algorithms refer to a distinct class of clustering algorithms that perform simultaneous row-column clustering. Biclustering problems arise in DNA microarray data analysis, collaborative filtering, market research, information retrieval, text mining, electoral trends, exchange analysis, and so forth. When dealing with DNA microarray experimental data for example, the goal of biclustering algorithms is to find submatrices, that is, subgroups of genes and subgroups of conditions, where the genes exhibit highly correlated activities for every condition. In this study, we develop novel biclustering algorithms using basic linear algebra and arithmetic tools. The proposed biclustering algorithms can be used to search for all biclusters with constant values, biclusters with constant values on rows, biclusters with constant values on columns, and biclusters with coherent values from a set of data in a timely manner and without solving any optimization problem. We also show how one of the proposed biclustering algorithms can be adapted to identify biclusters with coherent evolution. The algorithms developed in this study discover all valid biclusters of each type, while almost all previous biclustering approaches will miss some.

  4. Jet Penetration into a Scaled Microfabricated Stirling Cycle Regenerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liyong; Simon, Terrence W.; Mantell, Susan; Ibrahim, Mournir; Gedeon, David; Tew, Roy

    2008-01-01

    The cooler and heater adjacent to the regenerator of a Stirling cycle engine have tubes or channels which form jets that pass into the regenerator while diffusing within the matrix. An inactive part of the matrix, beyond the cores of these jets, does not participate fully in the heat transfer between the flow of working fluid and the regenerator matrix material, weakening the regenerator s ability to exchange heat with the working fluid. The objective of the present program is to document this effect on the performance of the regenerator and to develop a model for generalizing the results. However, the small scales of actual Stirling regenerator matrices (on the order of tens of microns) make direct measurements of this effect very difficult. As a result, jet spreading within a regenerator matrix has not been characterized well and is poorly understood. Also, modeling is lacking experimental verification. To address this, a large-scale mockup of thirty times actual scale was constructed and operated under conditions that are dynamically similar to the engine operation. Jet penetration with round jets and slot jets into the microfabricated regenerator geometry are then measured by conventional means. The results are compared with those from a study of spreading of round jets within woven screen regenerator for further documentation of the comparative performance of the microfabricated regenerator geometry.

  5. Ball-grid array architecture for microfabricated ion traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guise, Nicholas D., E-mail: nicholas.guise@gtri.gatech.edu; Fallek, Spencer D.; Stevens, Kelly E.; Brown, K. R.; Volin, Curtis; Harter, Alexa W.; Amini, Jason M. [Georgia Tech Research Institute, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Higashi, Robert E.; Lu, Son Thai; Chanhvongsak, Helen M.; Nguyen, Thi A.; Marcus, Matthew S.; Ohnstein, Thomas R.; Youngner, Daniel W. [Honeywell International, Golden Valley, Minnesota 55422 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    State-of-the-art microfabricated ion traps for quantum information research are approaching nearly one hundred control electrodes. We report here on the development and testing of a new architecture for microfabricated ion traps, built around ball-grid array (BGA) connections, that is suitable for increasingly complex trap designs. In the BGA trap, through-substrate vias bring electrical signals from the back side of the trap die to the surface trap structure on the top side. Gold-ball bump bonds connect the back side of the trap die to an interposer for signal routing from the carrier. Trench capacitors fabricated into the trap die replace area-intensive surface or edge capacitors. Wirebonds in the BGA architecture are moved to the interposer. These last two features allow the trap die to be reduced to only the area required to produce trapping fields. The smaller trap dimensions allow tight focusing of an addressing laser beam for fast single-qubit rotations. Performance of the BGA trap as characterized with {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ions is comparable to previous surface-electrode traps in terms of ion heating rate, mode frequency stability, and storage lifetime. We demonstrate two-qubit entanglement operations with {sup 171}Yb{sup +} ions in a second BGA trap.

  6. Flexible, Penetrating Brain Probes Enabled by Advances in Polymer Microfabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahuva Weltman

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The acquisition of high-fidelity, long-term neural recordings in vivo is critically important to advance neuroscience and brain–machine interfaces. For decades, rigid materials such as metal microwires and micromachined silicon shanks were used as invasive electrophysiological interfaces to neurons, providing either single or multiple electrode recording sites. Extensive research has revealed that such rigid interfaces suffer from gradual recording quality degradation, in part stemming from tissue damage and the ensuing immune response arising from mechanical mismatch between the probe and brain. The development of “soft” neural probes constructed from polymer shanks has been enabled by advancements in microfabrication; this alternative has the potential to mitigate mismatch-related side effects and thus improve the quality of recordings. This review examines soft neural probe materials and their associated microfabrication techniques, the resulting soft neural probes, and their implementation including custom implantation and electrical packaging strategies. The use of soft materials necessitates careful consideration of surgical placement, often requiring the use of additional surgical shuttles or biodegradable coatings that impart temporary stiffness. Investigation of surgical implantation mechanics and histological evidence to support the use of soft probes will be presented. The review concludes with a critical discussion of the remaining technical challenges and future outlook.

  7. Efficiency of methylated DNA immunoprecipitation bisulphite sequencing for whole-genome DNA methylation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hae Min; Lee, Sangseon; Chae, Heejoon; Kim, RyongNam; Kwon, Mi Jeong; Oh, Ensel; Choi, Yoon-La; Kim, Sun; Shin, Young Kee

    2016-08-01

    We compared four common methods for measuring DNA methylation levels and recommended the most efficient method in terms of cost and coverage. The DNA methylation status of liver and stomach tissues was profiled using four different methods, whole-genome bisulphite sequencing (WG-BS), targeted bisulphite sequencing (Targeted-BS), methylated DNA immunoprecipitation sequencing (MeDIP-seq) and methylated DNA immunoprecipitation bisulphite sequencing (MeDIP-BS). We calculated DNA methylation levels using each method and compared the results. MeDIP-BS yielded the most similar DNA methylation profile to WG-BS, with 20 times less data, suggesting remarkable cost savings and coverage efficiency compared with the other methods. MeDIP-BS is a practical cost-effective method for analyzing whole-genome DNA methylation that is highly accurate at base-pair resolution.

  8. mtDNA-Server: next-generation sequencing data analysis of human mitochondrial DNA in the cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissensteiner, Hansi; Forer, Lukas; Fuchsberger, Christian; Schöpf, Bernd; Kloss-Brandstätter, Anita; Specht, Günther; Kronenberg, Florian; Schönherr, Sebastian

    2016-07-08

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) allows investigating mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) characteristics such as heteroplasmy (i.e. intra-individual sequence variation) to a higher level of detail. While several pipelines for analyzing heteroplasmies exist, issues in usability, accuracy of results and interpreting final data limit their usage. Here we present mtDNA-Server, a scalable web server for the analysis of mtDNA studies of any size with a special focus on usability as well as reliable identification and quantification of heteroplasmic variants. The mtDNA-Server workflow includes parallel read alignment, heteroplasmy detection, artefact or contamination identification, variant annotation as well as several quality control metrics, often neglected in current mtDNA NGS studies. All computational steps are parallelized with Hadoop MapReduce and executed graphically with Cloudgene. We validated the underlying heteroplasmy and contamination detection model by generating four artificial sample mix-ups on two different NGS devices. Our evaluation data shows that mtDNA-Server detects heteroplasmies and artificial recombinations down to the 1% level with perfect specificity and outperforms existing approaches regarding sensitivity. mtDNA-Server is currently able to analyze the 1000G Phase 3 data (n = 2,504) in less than 5 h and is freely accessible at https://mtdna-server.uibk.ac.at. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. An analysis of the use of genomic DNA as a universal reference in two channel DNA microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapur Vivek

    2005-05-01

    assays using genomic DNA as a reference. We conclude that the use of genomic DNA as reference DNA should greatly facilitate comparative transcriptome analysis.

  10. Applied Geophysics in the world of tomorrow - Microfabrication arrives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    Instrument manufacturers have a unique perspective on the design and use of geophysical equipment. The field instrument must provide reliable and repeatable performance in every climate condition and environmental extreme. The gear must be easy to use and more importantly easy to understand for non-native English speakers. I have traveled the world installing, repairing, commissioning and demonstrating geophysical survey systems. Everywhere I have traveled there is one unassailable fact - our geophysicist compatriots in developed and developing countries are hungry for information and hungry for technology. They want more and better systems to help improve their understanding of the subsurface. And they want to serve their countries by helping to exploit natural resources. I hold up for your review the first highly successful portable magnetometer, the G-856. Designed in 1981 with over 5000 sold, it is still produced in record numbers today for use all over the world. How could it be that a rather simple device could be so long lived, and make such an impact in exploration programs for 32 years? The answer is in producing reliable and easy to use equipment that is affordable. One might compare it to the iPad or Android device of today. The innovative and no-frills interface has attracted users from all markets including mining, oil/gas, archaeology, environmental, UXO/military and forensics. Powerful ancillary software to process the data has always been included at no charge, offering geoscientists a solution rather than a black box. Many of our technologies are poised for dramatic breakthroughs in miniaturization and interconnectivity. I point specifically to the micro-fabrication of the cesium vapor magnetometer. Initiated 5 years ago in conjunction with NIST, Geometrics has embarked on a high stakes game of minimizing size, weight, power consumption and price while eliminating dead zones and maintaining or increasing sensitivity and sample speed. These new

  11. Genetic differentiation in the striped dolphin Stenella coeruleoalba from European waters according to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) restriction analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Martínez, J; Moya, A; Raga, J A; Latorre, A

    1999-06-01

    We used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) restriction analysis to study genetic variation in 98 striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) stranded on coasts from different European countries and from animals caught by fisheries. A total of 63 different restriction sites was mapped after digestion of mtDNA with 15 restriction endonucleases that yielded a total of 27 haplotypes. No haplotype was shared between Mediterranean and Atlantic areas. All the analyses indicate the existence of two different populations with a very limited gene flow across the Strait of Gibraltar.

  12. Flow cytometric fluorescence lifetime analysis of DNA binding fluorochromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crissman, Harry A.; Cui, H. H. (H. Helen); Steinkamp, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    Most flow cytometry (FCM) applications monitor fluorescence intensity to quantitate the various cellular parameters; however, the fluorescence emission also contains information relative to the fluorescence lifetime. Recent developments in FCM (Pinsky et al., 1993; Steinkamp & Crissman, 1993; Steinkamp et al., 1993), provide for the measurement of fluorescence lifetime which is also commonly referred to as fluorescence decay, or the time interval in which a fluorochrome remains in the excited state. Many unbound fluorochromes have characteristic lifetime values that are determined by their molecular structure; however, when the probe becomes bound, the lifetime value is influenced by a number of factors that affect the probe interaction with a target molecule. Monitoring the changes in the lifetime of the probe yields information relating to the molecular conformation, the functional state or activity of the molecular target. In addition, the lifetime values can be used as signatures to resolve the emissions of multiple fluorochrome labels with overlapping emission spectra that cannot be resolved by conventional FCM methodology. Such strategies can increase the number of fluorochrome combinations used in a flow cytometer with a single excitation source. Our studies demonstrate various applications of lifetime measurements for the analysis of the binding of different fluorochromes to DNA in single cells. Data presented in this session will show the utility of lifetime measurements for monitoring changes in chromatin structure associated with cell cycle progression, cellular differentiation, or DNA damage, such as induced during apoptosis. Several studies show that dyes with specificity for nucleic acids display different lifetime values when bound to DNA or to dsRNA. The Phase Sensitive Flow Cytometer is a multiparameter instrument, capable of performing lifetime measurements in conjunction with all the conventional FCM measurements. Future modifications of this

  13. Targeted DNA methylation analysis by next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masser, Dustin R; Stanford, David R; Freeman, Willard M

    2015-02-24

    The role of epigenetic processes in the control of gene expression has been known for a number of years. DNA methylation at cytosine residues is of particular interest for epigenetic studies as it has been demonstrated to be both a long lasting and a dynamic regulator of gene expression. Efforts to examine epigenetic changes in health and disease have been hindered by the lack of high-throughput, quantitatively accurate methods. With the advent and popularization of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, these tools are now being applied to epigenomics in addition to existing genomic and transcriptomic methodologies. For epigenetic investigations of cytosine methylation where regions of interest, such as specific gene promoters or CpG islands, have been identified and there is a need to examine significant numbers of samples with high quantitative accuracy, we have developed a method called Bisulfite Amplicon Sequencing (BSAS). This method combines bisulfite conversion with targeted amplification of regions of interest, transposome-mediated library construction and benchtop NGS. BSAS offers a rapid and efficient method for analysis of up to 10 kb of targeted regions in up to 96 samples at a time that can be performed by most research groups with basic molecular biology skills. The results provide absolute quantitation of cytosine methylation with base specificity. BSAS can be applied to any genomic region from any DNA source. This method is useful for hypothesis testing studies of target regions of interest as well as confirmation of regions identified in genome-wide methylation analyses such as whole genome bisulfite sequencing, reduced representation bisulfite sequencing, and methylated DNA immunoprecipitation sequencing.

  14. Applying DNA computation to intractable problems in social network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rick C S; Yang, Stephen J H

    2010-09-01

    From ancient times to the present day, social networks have played an important role in the formation of various organizations for a range of social behaviors. As such, social networks inherently describe the complicated relationships between elements around the world. Based on mathematical graph theory, social network analysis (SNA) has been developed in and applied to various fields such as Web 2.0 for Web applications and product developments in industries, etc. However, some definitions of SNA, such as finding a clique, N-clique, N-clan, N-club and K-plex, are NP-complete problems, which are not easily solved via traditional computer architecture. These challenges have restricted the uses of SNA. This paper provides DNA-computing-based approaches with inherently high information density and massive parallelism. Using these approaches, we aim to solve the three primary problems of social networks: N-clique, N-clan, and N-club. Their accuracy and feasible time complexities discussed in the paper will demonstrate that DNA computing can be used to facilitate the development of SNA. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. On-Chip DNA Methylation Analysis Using Osmium Complexation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Sugizaki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of a reaction for detecting the presence/absence of one methyl group in a long DNA strand is a chemically and biologically challenging research subject. A newly designed chemical assay on a chip for the typing of DNA methylation has been developed. A methylation-detection probe fixed at the bottom of microwells was crosslinked with methylated DNA mediated by osmium complexation and contributes to selective amplification of methylated DNA.

  16. SED, a normalization free method for DNA microarray data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huajun; Huang, Hui

    2004-09-02

    Analysis of DNA microarray data usually begins with a normalization step where intensities of different arrays are adjusted to the same scale so that the intensity levels from different arrays can be compared with one other. Both simple total array intensity-based as well as more complex "local intensity level" dependent normalization methods have been developed, some of which are widely used. Much less developed methods for microarray data analysis include those that bypass the normalization step and therefore yield results that are not confounded by potential normalization errors. Instead of focusing on the raw intensity levels, we developed a new method for microarray data analysis that maps each gene's expression intensity level to a high dimensional space of SEDs (Signs of Expression Difference), the signs of the expression intensity difference between a given gene and every other gene on the array. Since SED are unchanged under any monotonic transformation of intensity levels, the SED based method is normalization free. When tested on a multi-class tumor classification problem, simple Naive Bayes and Nearest Neighbor methods using the SED approach gave results comparable with normalized intensity-based algorithms. Furthermore, a high percentage of classifiers based on a single gene's SED gave good classification results, suggesting that SED does capture essential information from the intensity levels. The results of testing this new method on multi-class tumor classification problems suggests that the SED-based, normalization-free method of microarray data analysis is feasible and promising.

  17. Genetic variation and DNA markers in forensic analysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-07-30

    Jul 30, 2014 ... Mitochondrial DNA does not recombine and thus there is no change between parent and child, unlike nuclear. DNA. MtDNA is only passed on from mother to child and this is an important fact ... structure and location of diseases genes are determined ... disease genes) studies owing to these features and to.

  18. Genetic Approaches to Appearance and Ancestry : Improving Forensic DNA Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C. Chaitanya (Lakshmi)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractTraditionally, routine forensic casework is based on comparative grounds. DNA profiles obtained from crime-scenes are compared with those of potential suspects or DNA profiles deposited in forensic DNA databases. The principal limitation of such comparative approach is that trace

  19. Sequence analysis of mitochondrial DNA hypervariable region III of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aims of this research were to study mitochondrial DNA hypervariable region III and establish the degree of variation characteristic of a fragment. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a small circular genome located within the mitochondria in the cytoplasm of the cell and a smaller 1.2 kb pair fragment, called the control ...

  20. Mitochondrial DNA analysis reveals a low nucleotide diversity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-17

    Jun 17, 2009 ... Biotechnology, Shenyang Agricultural University. DNA isolation, polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. Total genomic DNA was extracted from partial abdomen of pupa according to the method previously published (Zhao et al., 2000). The COI gene was PCR amplified (polymerase chain ...

  1. Mitochondrial DNA analysis of two Southern African indigenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1998-03-20

    Mar 20, 1998 ... chondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been found to be extremely useful in assessing genetic relationships between closely related species as a result of the mode of inheritance, its rapid mutation rate and lack of recombination (Brown et al., 1979). ln a number of studies, the mtDNA of cattle has been investigated.

  2. Human identification and analysis of DNA in bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamura, Edna Sadayo Miazato; Soares-Vieira, José Arnaldo; Muñoz, Daniel Romero

    2004-12-01

    The introduction of molecular biology techniques, especially of DNA analysis, for human identification is a recent advance in legal medicine. Substantial effort has continuously been made in an attempt to identify cadavers and human remains after wars, socio-political problems and mass disasters. In addition, because of the social dynamics of large cities, there are always cases of missing people, as well as unidentified cadavers and human remains that are found. In the last few years, there has also been an increase in requests for exhumation of human remains in order to determine genetic relationships in civil suits and court action. The authors provide an extensive review of the literature regarding the use of this new methodology for human identification of ancient or recent bones.

  3. Cytometric analysis of shape and DNA content in mammalian sperm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gledhill, B.L.

    1983-10-10

    Male germ cells respond dramatically to a variety of insults and are important reproductive dosimeters. Semen analyses are very useful in studies on the effects of drugs, chemicals, and environmental hazards on testicular function, male fertility and heritable germinal mutations. Sperm were analyzed by flow cytometry and slit-scan flow analysis for injury following the exposure of testes to mutagens. The utility of flow cytometry in genotoxin screening and monitoring of occupational exposure was evaluated. The technique proved valuable in separation of X- and Y-chromosome bearing sperm and the potential applicability of this technique in artificial insemination and a solution, of accurately assessing the DNA content of sperm were evaluated-with reference to determination of X- and Y-chromosome bearing sperm.

  4. Coincident In Vitro Analysis of DNA-PK-Dependent and -Independent Nonhomologous End Joining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia L. Hendrickson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In mammalian cells, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are primarily repaired by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ. The current model suggests that the Ku 70/80 heterodimer binds to DSB ends and recruits DNA-PKcs to form the active DNA-dependent protein kinase, DNA-PK. Subsequently, XRCC4, DNA ligase IV, XLF and most likely, other unidentified components participate in the final DSB ligation step. Therefore, DNA-PK plays a key role in NHEJ due to its structural and regulatory functions that mediate DSB end joining. However, recent studies show that additional DNA-PK-independent NHEJ pathways also exist. Unfortunately, the presence of DNA-PKcs appears to inhibit DNA-PK-independent NHEJ, and in vitro analysis of DNA-PK-independent NHEJ in the presence of the DNA-PKcs protein remains problematic. We have developed an in vitro assay that is preferentially active for DNA-PK-independent DSB repair based solely on its reaction conditions, facilitating coincident differential biochemical analysis of the two pathways. The results indicate the biochemically distinct nature of the end-joining mechanisms represented by the DNA-PK-dependent and -independent NHEJ assays as well as functional differences between the two pathways.

  5. Simultaneous analysis of micro-RNA and DNA for determining the body fluid origin of DNA profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Donny; Uchimoto, Mari L; Williams, Graham

    2013-07-01

    Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) can be specifically expressed in forensically relevant body fluids such as blood or saliva. The aim of the study was to develop a simultaneous extraction and analysis protocol that allows for the acquisition of a DNA profile and the identity of the body fluid using a single process. DNA and micro-RNA were extracted from blood and saliva before undergoing a cDNA synthesis step by using stem-loop reverse transcription PCR. The resulting extracts containing DNA and cDNA synthesized from body fluid-specific miRNA markers then underwent standard STR analysis using a modified ABI AmpFℓSTR(®) NGM SElect™ kit. In all samples, a full DNA profile was obtained along with additional peaks corresponding to the miRNA marker targeted. In all cases, blood samples profiled exhibited a peak indicating the presence of the blood-specific miRNA marker and the saliva sample profiled exhibited a peak indicating the presence of the saliva-specific miRNA marker. © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  6. Analysis of T-DNA/Host-Plant DNA Junction Sequences in Single-Copy Transgenic Barley Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne G. Bartlett

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sequencing across the junction between an integrated transfer DNA (T-DNA and a host plant genome provides two important pieces of information. The junctions themselves provide information regarding the proportion of T-DNA which has integrated into the host plant genome, whilst the transgene flanking sequences can be used to study the local genetic environment of the integrated transgene. In addition, this information is important in the safety assessment of GM crops and essential for GM traceability. In this study, a detailed analysis was carried out on the right-border T-DNA junction sequences of single-copy independent transgenic barley lines. T-DNA truncations at the right-border were found to be relatively common and affected 33.3% of the lines. In addition, 14.3% of lines had rearranged construct sequence after the right border break-point. An in depth analysis of the host-plant flanking sequences revealed that a significant proportion of the T-DNAs integrated into or close to known repetitive elements. However, this integration into repetitive DNA did not have a negative effect on transgene expression.

  7. Superimposed Code Theoretic Analysis of Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) Codes and DNA Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    to be selectively amplified. By incubating a DNA memory mixture with oligonucleotide recognition site PCR primers and the enzyme DNA polymerase...subset of the pairs from a data entry ks S∈ , in other words a partial or fuzzy ComDMem. Each edge is equivalent to positive PCR reactions. One can

  8. Y-STR analysis on DNA mixture samples--results of a collaborative project of the ENFSI DNA Working Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parson, Walther; Niederstätter, Harald; Lindinger, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    The ENFSI (European Network of Forensic Science Institutes) DNA Working Group undertook a collaborative project on Y-STR typing of DNA mixture samples that were centrally prepared and thoroughly tested prior to the shipment. Four commercial Y-STR typing kits (Y-Filer, Applied Biosystems, Foster...... from the peak heights of the obtained Y-STR genotypes. Variation in quantity and quality of the shipped DNA can be excluded as reason for the observed differences because both samples and shipping conditions were found to be reproducible in an earlier study. The results suggest that in some cases...... a laboratory-specific optimization process is indicated to reach a comparable sensitivity for the analysis of minute amounts of DNA....

  9. A novel kinetic analysis to calculate nucleotide affinity of proofreading DNA polymerases. Application to phi 29 DNA polymerase fidelity mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saturno, J; Blanco, L; Salas, M; Esteban, J A

    1995-12-29

    Amino acids Tyr254 and Tyr390 of phi 29 DNA polymerase belong to one of the most conserved regions in eukaryotic-type DNA polymerases. In this paper we report a mutational study of these two residues to address their role in nucleotide selection. This study was carried out by means of a new kinetic analysis that takes advantage of the competition between DNA polymerization and 3'-->5' exonuclease activity to measure the Km values for correct and incorrect nucleotides in steady-state conditions. This method is valid for any 3'-->5' exonuclease-containing DNA polymerase, without any restriction concerning catalytic rates of nucleotide incorporation. The results showed that the discrimination factor achieved by phi 29 DNA polymerase in the nucleotide binding step of DNA polymerization is 2.4 x 10(3), that is, a wrong nucleotide is bound with a 2.4 x 10(3)-fold lower affinity than the correct one. Mutants Y254F, Y390F, and Y390S showed discrimination values of 7.0 x 10(2), > 1.9 x 10(3), and 2.9 x 10(2), respectively. The reduced accuracy of nucleotide binding produced by mutations Y254F and Y390S lead us to propose that phi 29 DNA polymerase residues Tyr254 and Tyr390, highly conserved in eukaryotic-type DNA polymerases, are involved in nucleotide binding selection, thus playing a crucial role in the fidelity of DNA replication. Comparison of the discrimination factors of mutants Y390S and Y390F strongly suggests that the phenyl ring of Tyr390 is directly involved in checking base-pairing correctness of the incoming nucleotide.

  10. Vertically integrated analysis of human DNA. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, M.

    1997-10-01

    This project has been oriented toward improving the vertical integration of the sequential steps associated with the large-scale analysis of human DNA. The central focus has been on an approach to the preparation of {open_quotes}sequence-ready{close_quotes} maps, which is referred to as multiple-complete-digest (MCD) mapping, primarily directed at cosmid clones. MCD mapping relies on simple experimental steps, supported by advanced image-analysis and map-assembly software, to produce extremely accurate restriction-site and clone-overlap maps. We believe that MCD mapping is one of the few high-resolution mapping systems that has the potential for high-level automation. Successful automation of this process would be a landmark event in genome analysis. Once other higher organisms, paving the way for cost-effective sequencing of these genomes. Critically, MCD mapping has the potential to provide built-in quality control for sequencing accuracy and to make possible a highly integrated end product even if there are large numbers of discontinuities in the actual sequence.

  11. Genetic alterations of hepatocellular carcinoma by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis and cloning sequencing of tumor differential DNA fragment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Zhi-Hong; Cong, Wen-Ming; Zhang, Shu-Hui; Wu, Meng-Chao

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the genetic alterations and their association with clinicopathological characteristics of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and to find the tumor related DNA fragments. METHODS: DNA isolated from tumors and corresponding noncancerous liver tissues of 56 HCC patients was amplified by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) with 10 random 10-mer arbitrary primers. The RAPD bands showing obvious differences in tumor tissue DNA corresponding to that of normal tissue were separated, purified, cloned and sequenced. DNA sequences were analyzed and compared with GenBank data. RESULTS: A total of 56 cases of HCC were demonstrated to have genetic alterations, which were detected by at least one primer. The detestability of genetic alterations ranged from 20% to 70% in each case, and 17.9% to 50% in each primer. Serum HBV infection, tumor size, histological grade, tumor capsule, as well as tumor intrahepatic metastasis, might be correlated with genetic alterations on certain primers. A band with a higher intensity of 480 bp or so amplified fragments in tumor DNA relative to normal DNA could be seen in 27 of 56 tumor samples using primer 4. Sequence analysis of these fragments showed 91% homology with Homo sapiens double homeobox protein DUX10 gene. CONCLUSION: Genetic alterations are a frequent event in HCC, and tumor related DNA fragments have been found in this study, which may be associated with hepatocarcin-ogenesis. RAPD is an effective method for the identification and analysis of genetic alterations in HCC, and may provide new information for further evaluating the molecular mechanism of hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:15996039

  12. A review of microfabrication techniques and dielectrophoretic microdevices for particle manipulation and separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M.; Li, W. H.; Zhang, J.; Alici, G.; Wen, W.

    2014-02-01

    The development of lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices over the past decade has attracted growing interest. LOC devices aim to achieve the miniaturization, integration, automation and parallelization of biological and chemical assays. One of the applications, the ability to effectively and accurately manipulate and separate micro- and nano-scale particles in an aqueous solution, is particularly appealing in biological, chemical and medical fields. Among the technologies that have been developed and implemented in microfluidic microsystems for particle manipulation and separation (such as mechanical, inertial, hydrodynamic, acoustic, optical, magnetic and electrical methodologies), dielectrophoresis (DEP) may prove to be the most popular because of its label-free nature, ability to manipulate neutral bioparticles, analyse with high selectivity and sensitivity, compatibility with LOC devices, and easy and direct interface with electronics. The required spatial electric non-uniformities for the DEP effect can be generated by patterning microelectrode arrays within microchannels, or placing insulating obstacles within a microchannel and curving the microchannels. A wide variety of electrode- and insulator-based DEP microdevices have been developed, fabricated, and successfully employed to manipulate and separate bioparticles (i.e. DNA, proteins, bacteria, viruses, mammalian and yeast cells). This review provides an overview of the state-of-the-art of microfabrication techniques and of the structures of dielectrophoretic microdevices aimed towards different applications. The techniques used for particle manipulation and separation based on microfluidics are provided in this paper. In addition, we also present the theoretical background of DEP.

  13. DNA sequencing analysis of several G6PD variants previously defined by PCR-restriction enzyme analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Vaca

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of a corroborative DNA sequencing analysis for five glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD mutations previously defined by PCR-restriction enzyme analysis are presented. The suitability for performing DNA sequencing analysis is discussed along with the importance of selecting the proper PCR-REA strategy in order to define the presence of a specific mutation .

  14. SU-8 as a Material for Microfabricated Particle Physics Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Maoddi, Pietro; Jiguet, Sebastien; Renaud, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Several recent detector te chnologies developed for particle physics applications are based on microfabricated structures. Dete ctors built with this approach generally exhibit the overall best performance in te rms of spatial and time resolution. Many properties of the SU-8 photoepoxy make it suitable for the manufacturing of microstructured particle detectors. This arti cle aims to review some emerging detector technologies making use of SU-8 microstructu ring, namely micropatte rn gaseous detectors and microfluidic scintillation detectors. Th e general working principle and main process steps for the fabrication of each device are reported, with a focus on the advantages brought to the device functionality by the us e of SU-8. A novel process based on multiple bonding steps for the fabrication of thin multila yer microfluidic scin tillation detectors developed by the authors is presented. Finally, a brief overview of the applications for the discussed devices is given.

  15. Rapid microfabrication of transparent materials using filamented femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butkus, S.; Gaižauskas, E.; Paipulas, D.; Viburys, Ž.; Kaškelyė, D.; Barkauskas, M.; Alesenkov, A.; Sirutkaitis, V.

    2014-01-01

    Microfabrication of transparent materials using femtosecond laser pulses has showed good potential towards industrial application. Maintaining pulse energies exceeding the critical self-focusing threshold by more than 100-fold produced filaments that were used for micromachining purposes. This article demonstrates two different micromachining techniques using femtosecond filaments generated in different transparent media (water and glass). The stated micromachining techniques are cutting and welding of transparent samples. In addition, cutting and drilling experiments were backed by theoretical modelling giving a deeper insight into the whole process. We demonstrate cut-out holes in soda-lime glass having thickness up to 1 mm and aspect ratios close to 20, moreover, the fabrication time is of the order of tens of seconds, in addition, grooves and holes were fabricated in hardened 1.1 mm thick glass (Corning Gorilla glass). Glass welding was made possible and welded samples were achieved after several seconds of laser fabrication.

  16. A Microfabricated Involute-Foil Regenerator for Stirling Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tew, Roy; Ibrahim, Mounir; Danila, Daniel; Simon, Terrence; Mantell, Susan; Sun, Liyong; Gedeon, David; Kelly, Kevin; McLean, Jeffrey; Qiu, Songgang

    2007-01-01

    A segmented involute-foil regenerator has been designed, microfabricated and tested in an oscillating-flow rig with excellent results. During the Phase I effort, several approximations of parallel-plate regenerator geometry were chosen as potential candidates for a new microfabrication concept. Potential manufacturers and processes were surveyed. The selected concept consisted of stacked segmented-involute-foil disks (or annular portions of disks), originally to be microfabricated from stainless-steel via the LiGA (lithography, electroplating, and molding) process and EDM. During Phase II, re-planning of the effort led to test plans based on nickel disks, microfabricated via the LiGA process, only. A stack of nickel segmented-involute-foil disks was tested in an oscillating-flow test rig. These test results yielded a performance figure of merit (roughly the ratio of heat transfer to pressure drop) of about twice that of the 90 percent random fiber currently used in small approx.100 W Stirling space-power convertors-in the Reynolds Number range of interest (50 to 100). A Phase III effort is now underway to fabricate and test a segmented-involute-foil regenerator in a Stirling convertor. Though funding limitations prevent optimization of the Stirling engine geometry for use with this regenerator, the Sage computer code will be used to help evaluate the engine test results. Previous Sage Stirling model projections have indicated that a segmented-involute-foil regenerator is capable of improving the performance of an optimized involute-foil engine by 6 to 9 percent; it is also anticipated that such involute-foil geometries will be more reliable and easier to manufacture with tight-tolerance characteristics, than random-fiber or wire-screen regenerators. Beyond the near-term Phase III regenerator fabrication and engine testing, other goals are (1) fabrication from a material suitable for high temperature Stirling operation (up to 850 C for current engines; up to 1200 C

  17. A Comparative Analysis of Translesion DNA Synthesis Catalyzed by a High-Fidelity DNA Polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasari, Anvesh; Deodhar, Tejal; Berdis, Anthony J

    2017-07-21

    Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) is the ability of DNA polymerases to incorporate nucleotides opposite and beyond damaged DNA. TLS activity is an important risk factor for the initiation and progression of genetic diseases such as cancer. In this study, we evaluate the ability of a high-fidelity DNA polymerase to perform TLS with 8-oxo-guanine (8-oxo-G), a highly pro-mutagenic DNA lesion formed by reactive oxygen species. Results of kinetic studies monitoring the incorporation of modified nucleotide analogs demonstrate that the binding affinity of the incoming dNTP is controlled by the overall hydrophobicity of the nucleobase. However, the rate constant for the polymerization step is regulated by hydrogen-bonding interactions made between the incoming nucleotide with 8-oxo-G. Results generated here for replicating the miscoding 8-oxo-G are compared to those published for the replication of the non-instructional abasic site. During the replication of both lesions, binding of the nucleotide substrate is controlled by energetics associated with nucleobase desolvation, whereas the rate constant for the polymerization step is influenced by the physical nature of the DNA lesion, that is, miscoding versus non-instructional. Collectively, these studies highlight the importance of nucleobase desolvation as a key physical feature that enhances the misreplication of structurally diverse DNA lesions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparative analysis of protocols for DNA extraction from soybean caterpillars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, J; Valmorbida, I; da Costa, I F D; Guedes, J V C

    2016-04-07

    Genomic DNA extraction is crucial for molecular research, including diagnostic and genome characterization of different organisms. The aim of this study was to comparatively analyze protocols of DNA extraction based on cell lysis by sarcosyl, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, and sodium dodecyl sulfate, and to determine the most efficient method applicable to soybean caterpillars. DNA was extracted from specimens of Chrysodeixis includens and Spodoptera eridania using the aforementioned three methods. DNA quantification was performed using spectrophotometry and high molecular weight DNA ladders. The purity of the extracted DNA was determined by calculating the A260/A280 ratio. Cost and time for each DNA extraction method were estimated and analyzed statistically. The amount of DNA extracted by these three methods was sufficient for PCR amplification. The sarcosyl method yielded DNA of higher purity, because it generated a clearer pellet without viscosity, and yielded high quality amplification products of the COI gene I. The sarcosyl method showed lower cost per extraction and did not differ from the other methods with respect to preparation times. Cell lysis by sarcosyl represents the best method for DNA extraction in terms of yield, quality, and cost effectiveness.

  19. Analysis of the role of PCNA-DNA contacts during clamp loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goedken Eric R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sliding clamps, such as Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA in eukaryotes, are ring-shaped protein complexes that encircle DNA and enable highly processive DNA replication by serving as docking sites for DNA polymerases. In an ATP-dependent reaction, clamp loader complexes, such as the Replication Factor-C (RFC complex in eukaryotes, open the clamp and load it around primer-template DNA. Results We built a model of RFC bound to PCNA and DNA based on existing crystal structures of clamp loaders. This model suggests that DNA would enter the clamp at an angle during clamp loading, thereby interacting with positively charged residues in the center of PCNA. We show that simultaneous mutation of Lys 20, Lys 77, Arg 80, and Arg 149, which interact with DNA in the RFC-PCNA-DNA model, compromises the ability of yeast PCNA to stimulate the DNA-dependent ATPase activity of RFC when the DNA is long enough to extend through the clamp. Fluorescence anisotropy binding experiments show that the inability of the mutant clamp proteins to stimulate RFC ATPase activity is likely caused by reduction in the affinity of the RFC-PCNA complex for DNA. We obtained several crystal forms of yeast PCNA-DNA complexes, measuring X-ray diffraction data to 3.0 Å resolution for one such complex. The resulting electron density maps show that DNA is bound in a tilted orientation relative to PCNA, but makes different contacts than those implicated in clamp loading. Because of apparent partial disorder in the DNA, we restricted refinement of the DNA to a rigid body model. This result contrasts with previous analysis of a bacterial clamp bound to DNA, where the DNA was well resolved. Conclusion Mutational analysis of PCNA suggests that positively charged residues in the center of the clamp create a binding surface that makes contact with DNA. Disruption of this positive surface, which had not previously been implicated in clamp loading function, reduces RFC

  20. Effect of food processing on plant DNA degradation and PCR-based GMO analysis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryson, Nicolas

    2010-03-01

    The applicability of a DNA-based method for GMO detection and quantification depends on the quality and quantity of the DNA. Important food-processing conditions, for example temperature and pH, may lead to degradation of the DNA, rendering PCR analysis impossible or GMO quantification unreliable. This review discusses the effect of several food processes on DNA degradation and subsequent GMO detection and quantification. The data show that, although many of these processes do indeed lead to the fragmentation of DNA, amplification of the DNA may still be possible. Length and composition of the amplicon may, however, affect the result, as also may the method of extraction used. Also, many techniques are used to describe the behaviour of DNA in food processing, which occasionally makes it difficult to compare research results. Further research should be aimed at defining ingredients in terms of their DNA quality and PCR amplification ability, and elaboration of matrix-specific certified reference materials.

  1. Comprehensive analysis of preeclampsia-associated DNA methylation in the placenta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianjiao Chu

    Full Text Available A small number of recent reports have suggested that altered placental DNA methylation may be associated with early onset preeclampsia. It is important that further studies be undertaken to confirm and develop these findings. We therefore undertook a systematic analysis of DNA methylation patterns in placental tissue from 24 women with preeclampsia and 24 with uncomplicated pregnancy outcome.We analyzed the DNA methylation status of approximately 27,000 CpG sites in placental tissues in a massively parallel fashion using an oligonucleotide microarray. Follow up analysis of DNA methylation at specific CpG loci was performed using the Epityper MassArray approach and high-throughput bisulfite sequencing.Preeclampsia-specific DNA methylation changes were identified in placental tissue samples irrespective of gestational age of delivery. In addition, we identified a group of CpG sites within specific gene sequences that were only altered in early onset-preeclampsia (EOPET although these DNA methylation changes did not correlate with altered mRNA transcription. We found evidence that fetal gender influences DNA methylation at autosomal loci but could find no clear association between DNA methylation and gestational age.Preeclampsia is associated with altered placental DNA methylation. Fetal gender should be carefully considered during the design of future studies in which placental DNA is analyzed at the level of DNA methylation. Further large-scale analyses of preeclampsia-associated DNA methylation are necessary.

  2. Structural analysis of DNA sequence: evidence for lateral gene transfer in Thermotoga maritima

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worning, Peder; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Nelson, K. E.

    2000-01-01

    The recently published complete DNA sequence of the bacterium Thermotoga maritima provides evidence, based on protein sequence conservation, for lateral gene transfer between Archaea and Bacteria. We introduce a new method of periodicity analysis of DNA sequences, based on structural parameters......, which brings independent evidence for the lateral gene transfer in the genome of T.maritima, The structural analysis relates the Archaea-like DNA sequences to the genome of Pyrococcus horikoshii. Analysis of 24 complete genomic DNA sequences shows different periodicity patterns for organisms...

  3. Magnetic separation in microfluidic systems using microfabricated electromagnets - Experiments and simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smistrup, Kristian; Hansen, Ole; Bruus, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    We present experiments and simulations of magnetic separation of magnetic beads in a microfluidic channel. The separation is obtained by microfabricated electromagnets. The results of our simulations using FEMLAB and Mathematica are compared with experimental results obtained using our own...

  4. Progress Toward a Microfabricated Gas Turbine Generator for Soldier Portable Power Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jacobson, S. A; Das, S; Savoulides, N; Steyn, J. L; Lang, J; Li, H. Q; Livermore, C; Schmidt, M. A; Teo, C. J; Umans, S. D; Epstein, A. H; Arnold, D. P; Park, J-W; Zana, I; Allen, M. G

    2004-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) turbocharger and electric generator devices have been fabricated and tested as part of a program at MIT to develop a microfabricated gas turbine generator for portable power applications...

  5. Hydrodynamic loading and viscous damping of patterned perforations on microfabricated resonant structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Kidong; Shim, Jeong; Solovyeva, Vita

    2012-01-01

    We examined the hydrodynamic loading of vertically resonating microfabricated plates immersed in liquids with different viscosities. The planar structures were patterned with focused ion beam, perforating various shapes with identical area but varying perimeters. The hydrodynamic loading of vario...

  6. Effective DNA extraction method for fragment analysis using capillary sequencer of the kelp, Saccharina

    OpenAIRE

    Maeda, Takashi; Kawai, Tadashi; NAKAOKA, MASAHIRO; Yotsukura, Norishige

    2013-01-01

    The DNA fragment analysis can become an effective tool to study genetic differences between not only species but also individuals on saccharinan kelp from which the little genetic diversity was reported. This time, extraction methods of suitable DNA for use in the analysis with a capillary sequencer was examined on Saccharina japonica var. diabolica that contains polysaccharide abundantly. When AFLP was performed using genomic DNA extracted by seven different methods: (1) commercial kit, (2) ...

  7. Computational structural analysis: multiple proteins bound to DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrija Tomovic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With increasing numbers of crystal structures of proteinratioDNA and proteinratioproteinratioDNA complexes publically available, it is now possible to extract sufficient structural, physical-chemical and thermodynamic parameters to make general observations and predictions about their interactions. In particular, the properties of macromolecular assemblies of multiple proteins bound to DNA have not previously been investigated in detail. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have performed computational structural analyses on macromolecular assemblies of multiple proteins bound to DNA using a variety of different computational tools: PISA; PROMOTIF; X3DNA; ReadOut; DDNA and DCOMPLEX. Additionally, we have developed and employed an algorithm for approximate collision detection and overlapping volume estimation of two macromolecules. An implementation of this algorithm is available at http://promoterplot.fmi.ch/Collision1/. The results obtained are compared with structural, physical-chemical and thermodynamic parameters from proteinratioprotein and single proteinratioDNA complexes. Many of interface properties of multiple proteinratioDNA complexes were found to be very similar to those observed in binary proteinratioDNA and proteinratioprotein complexes. However, the conformational change of the DNA upon protein binding is significantly higher when multiple proteins bind to it than is observed when single proteins bind. The water mediated contacts are less important (found in less quantity between the interfaces of components in ternary (proteinratioproteinratioDNA complexes than in those of binary complexes (proteinratioprotein and proteinratioDNA.The thermodynamic stability of ternary complexes is also higher than in the binary interactions. Greater specificity and affinity of multiple proteins binding to DNA in comparison with binary protein-DNA interactions were observed. However, protein-protein binding affinities are stronger in

  8. [DNA extraction methods of compost for molecular ecology analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhao-Hui; Xiao, Yong; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Liu, Yun-Guo; Deng, Jiu-Hua

    2006-08-01

    Molecular ecology provides new techniques for studying compost microbes, and the DNA extraction is the basis of molecular techniques. Because of the contamination of humic acids, it turns to be more difficult for compost microbial DNA extraction. Three different approaches, named as lysozyme lysis, ultrasonic lysis and proteinase K lysis with CTAB, were used to extract the total DNA from compost. The detection performed on a nucleic acids and protein analyzer showed that all the three approaches produced high DNA yields. The agarose gel electrophoresis showed that the DNA fragments extracted from compost had a length of about 23 kb. A eubacterial 16S rRNA gene targeted primer pair (27F and 1 495R) was used for PCR amplification, and all the samples got almost the full length 16S rDNA sequence (about 1.5 kb). After digested by restriction endonucleases (Hae Ill and Alu I), the restriction map showed relatively identical microbial diversity in the DNA, which was extracted by the three different approaches. All the compost microbial DNA extracted by the three different approaches could be used for molecular ecological study, and researchers should choose the right approach for extracting microbial DNA from compost based on the facts.

  9. Universal platform for quantitative analysis of DNA transposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pajunen Maria I

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Completed genome projects have revealed an astonishing diversity of transposable genetic elements, implying the existence of novel element families yet to be discovered from diverse life forms. Concurrently, several better understood transposon systems have been exploited as efficient tools in molecular biology and genomics applications. Characterization of new mobile elements and improvement of the existing transposition technology platforms warrant easy-to-use assays for the quantitative analysis of DNA transposition. Results Here we developed a universal in vivo platform for the analysis of transposition frequency with class II mobile elements, i.e., DNA transposons. For each particular transposon system, cloning of the transposon ends and the cognate transposase gene, in three consecutive steps, generates a multifunctional plasmid, which drives inducible expression of the transposase gene and includes a mobilisable lacZ-containing reporter transposon. The assay scores transposition events as blue microcolonies, papillae, growing within otherwise whitish Escherichia coli colonies on indicator plates. We developed the assay using phage Mu transposition as a test model and validated the platform using various MuA transposase mutants. For further validation and to illustrate universality, we introduced IS903 transposition system components into the assay. The developed assay is adjustable to a desired level of initial transposition via the control of a plasmid-borne E. coli arabinose promoter. In practice, the transposition frequency is modulated by varying the concentration of arabinose or glucose in the growth medium. We show that variable levels of transpositional activity can be analysed, thus enabling straightforward screens for hyper- or hypoactive transposase mutants, regardless of the original wild-type activity level. Conclusions The established universal papillation assay platform should be widely applicable to a

  10. Preparation of genomic DNA for RAPD analysis from thick-walled dormant teliospores of Tilletia species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, D R; Weber, D J

    1995-07-01

    We describe a method for isolating genomic DNA from teliospores of Tilletia caries (DC) Tul., T. controversa Kuhn and T. foetida (T. laevis) (Wallr.) Liro. for random-amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. DNA analysis of teliospores of covered smut or bunt has been difficult because of the thick wall and the high lipid content of the spores. This method overcomes these problems and yields sufficient quantities of DNA from the three species' teliospores for RAPDs. DNA quality appears to be good with very little degradation. RAPD amplifications of the extracted DNAs are reproducible and produce numerous large molecular weight bands from each individual. This procedure should permit the use of DNA analysis techniques to study species and races of Tilletia as well as fungi with similar spore structure.

  11. Infectivity analysis of two variable DNA B components of Mungbean ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-Vigna; NES, nuclear export signal; NLS, nuclear localization signal; nt, nucleotide; oc, open circu- lar; OD, optical density; ORF ..... upstream of the stem-loop structure in all five DNA Bs of. MYMV-Vig. Four DNA ..... features (3-nt deletion in first iteron and the 18-nt inser- tion) were also found in ...

  12. Infectivity analysis of two variable DNA B components of Mungbean ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-Vigna (MYMV-Vig), a Begomovirus that causes yellow mosaic disease, was cloned from field-infected blackgram (Vigna mungo). One DNA A clone (KA30) and five different DNA B clones (KA21, KA22, KA27, KA28 and KA34) were obtained. The sequence identity in the 150-nt common ...

  13. Sequence analysis of mitochondrial DNA hypervariable region III of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    2015-07-01

    Jul 1, 2015 ... degradation; third, higher rate of evolution: DNA alterations (mutations) occur in a number of ... The result is that the rate of change, or evolutionary rate, of mitochondrial DNA is about five times greater .... example mass graves in mass disasters, there are newly discovered forensically validated methods ...

  14. The application of DNA microarrays in gene expression analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hal, van N.L.W.; Vorst, O.; Houwelingen, van A.M.M.L.; Kok, E.J.; Peijnenburg, A.A.C.M.; Aharoni, A.; Tunen, van A.J.; Keijer, J.

    2000-01-01

    DNA microarray technology is a new and powerful technology that will substantially increase the speed of molecular biological research. This paper gives a survey of DNA microarray technology and its use in gene expression studies. The technical aspects and their potential improvements are discussed.

  15. Electrochemical sandwich assay for attomole analysis of DNA and RNA from beer spoilage bacteria Lactobacillus brevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipovskov, Stepan; Saunders, Aaron M; Nielsen, Jesper S; Hansen, Majken H; Gothelf, Kurt V; Ferapontova, Elena E

    2012-01-01

    Attomole (10(-18)mol) levels of RNA and DNA isolated from beer spoilage bacterial cells Lactobacillus brevis have been detected by the electrochemical sandwich DNA hybridization assay exploiting enzymatic activity of lipase. DNA sequences specific exclusively to L. brevis DNA and RNA were selected and used for probe and target DNA design. The assay employs magnetic beads (MB) modified with a capture DNA sequence and a reporter DNA probe labeled with the enzyme, both made to be highly specific for L. brevis DNA. Lipase-labeled DNAs captured on MBs in the sandwich assay were collected on gold electrodes modified with a ferrocene (Fc)-terminated SAM formed by aliphatic esters. Lipase hydrolysis of the ester bond released a fraction of the Fc redox active groups from the electrode surface, decreasing the electrochemical signal from the surface-confined Fc. The assay, shown to be efficient for analysis of short synthetic DNA sequences, was ineffective with genomic double stranded bacterial DNA, but it allowed down to 16 amole detection of 1563 nts long RNA, isolated from bacterial ribosomes without the need for PCR amplification, and single DNA strands produced from ribosomal RNA. No interference from E. coli RNA was registered. The assay allowed analysis of 400 L. brevis cells isolated from 1L of beer, which fits the "alarm signal" range (from 1 to 100 cells per 100mL). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Thermodynamic and Structural Analysis of DNA Damage Architectures Related to Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J. Amato

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Damaged DNA, generated by the abstraction of one of five hydrogen atoms from the 2′-deoxyribose ring of the nucleic acid, can contain a variety of lesions, some of which compromise physiological processes. Recently, DNA damage, resulting from the formation of a C3′-thymidinyl radical in DNA oligomers, was found to be dependent on nucleic acid structure. Architectures relevant to DNA replication were observed to generate larger amounts of strand-break and 1-(2′-deoxy-β-D-threo-pentofuranosylthymidine formation than that observed for duplex DNA. To understand how this damage can affect the integrity of DNA, the impact of C3′-thymidinyl radical derived lesions on DNA stability and structure was characterized using biophysical methods. DNA architectures evaluated include duplex DNA (dsDNA, single 3′ or 5′-overhangs (OvHgs, and forks. Thermal melting analysis and differential scanning calorimetry measurements indicate that an individual 3′-OvHg is more destabilizing than a 5′-OvHg. The presence of a terminal 3′ or 5′ phosphate decreases the ΔG25 to the same extent, while the effect of the phosphate at the ss-dsDNA junction of OvHgs is dependent on sequence. Additionally, the effect of 1-(2′-deoxy-β-D-threo-pentofuranosylthymidine is found to depend on DNA architecture and proximity to the 3′ end of the damaged strand.

  17. Comparative analysis of 12 different kits for bisulfite conversion of circulating cell-free DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worm Ørntoft, Mai-Britt; Jensen, Sarah Østrup; Hansen, Thomas Birkballe; Bramsen, Jesper Bertram; Andersen, Claus Lindbjerg

    2017-08-01

    Blood circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is becoming popular in the search of promising predictive and prognostic biomarkers. Among these biomarkers, cfDNA methylation markers have especially gained considerable attention. A significant challenge in the utilization of cfDNA methylation markers is the limited amount of cfDNA available for analyses; reportedly, bisulfite conversion (BSC) reduce cfDNA amounts even further. Nevertheless, few efforts have focused on ensuring high cfDNA conversion efficiency and recovery after BSC. To compare cfDNA recovery of different BSC methods, we compared 12 different commercially available BSC kits. We tested whether DNA recovery was affected by the molecular weight and/or quantity of input DNA. We also tested BSC efficiency for each kit. We found that recovery varied for DNA fragments of different lengths: certain kits recovered short fragments better than others, and only 3 kits recovered DNA fragments of BSC, a linear relation was found between input and recovery amount. Overall, mean recovery ranged between 9 and 32%, with BSC efficiency of 97-99.9%. When plasma cfDNA was used as input for BSC, recovery varied from 22% for the poorest and 66% for the best performing kits, while conversion efficiency ranged from 96 to 100% among different kits. In conclusion, clear performance differences exist between commercially available BSC kits, both in terms of DNA recovery and conversion efficiency. The choice of BSC kit can substantially impact the amount of converted cfDNA available for downstream analysis, which is critical in a cfDNA methylation marker setting.

  18. Analysis of cellular and extracellular DNA in fingerprints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Button, Julie M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-09

    It has been previously shown that DNA can be recovered from latent fingerprints left on various surfaces [R. A. H. van Oorschot and M. K. Jones, Nature 387, 767 (1997)]. However, the source of the DNA, extracellular versus cellular origin, is difficult to determine. If the DNA is cellular, it is believed to belong to skin cells while extracellular DNA is believed to originate from body fluids such as sweat [D. J. Daly et. al, Forensic Sci. Int. Genet. 6, 41-46 (2012); V. V. Vlassov et. al, BioEssays 29, 654-667 (2007)]. The origin of the DNA in fingerprints has implications for processing and interpretation of forensic evidence. The determination of the origin of DNA in fingerprints is further complicated by the fact that the DNA in fingerprints tends to be at a very low quantity [R. A. H. van Oorschot and M. K. Jones, Nature 387, 767 (1997)]. This study examined fingerprints from five volunteers left on sterilized glass slides and plastic pens. Three fingerprints were left on each glass slide (thumb, index, and middle fingers) while the pens were held as if one was writing with them. The DNA was collected from the objects using the wet swabbing technique (TE buffer). Following collection, the cellular and extracellular components of each sample were separated using centrifugation and an acoustofluidics system. Centrifugation is still the primary separation technique utilized in forensics laboratories, while acoustic focusing uses sound waves to focus large particles (cells) into low pressure nodes, separating them from the rest of the sample matrix. After separation, all samples were quantified using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). The overall trend is that there is more DNA in the extracellular fractions than cellular fractions for both centrifugation and acoustofluidic processing. Additionally, more DNA was generally collected from the pen samples than the samples left on glass slides.

  19. An auditory display tool for DNA sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Mark D

    2017-04-24

    DNA Sonification refers to the use of an auditory display to convey the information content of DNA sequence data. Six sonification algorithms are presented that each produce an auditory display. These algorithms are logically designed from the simple through to the more complex. Three of these parse individual nucleotides, nucleotide pairs or codons into musical notes to give rise to 4, 16 or 64 notes, respectively. Codons may also be parsed degenerately into 20 notes with respect to the genetic code. Lastly nucleotide pairs can be parsed as two separate frames or codons can be parsed as three reading frames giving rise to multiple streams of audio. The most informative sonification algorithm reads the DNA sequence as codons in three reading frames to produce three concurrent streams of audio in an auditory display. This approach is advantageous since start and stop codons in either frame have a direct affect to start or stop the audio in that frame, leaving the other frames unaffected. Using these methods, DNA sequences such as open reading frames or repetitive DNA sequences can be distinguished from one another. These sonification tools are available through a webpage interface in which an input DNA sequence can be processed in real time to produce an auditory display playable directly within the browser. The potential of this approach as an analytical tool is discussed with reference to auditory displays derived from test sequences including simple nucleotide sequences, repetitive DNA sequences and coding or non-coding genes. This study presents a proof-of-concept that some properties of a DNA sequence can be identified through sonification alone and argues for their inclusion within the toolkit of DNA sequence browsers as an adjunct to existing visual and analytical tools.

  20. Additive direct-write microfabrication for MEMS: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Kwok Siong

    2017-12-01

    manufacturing technologies, it is possible to fabricate unsophisticated micrometer scale structures at adequate resolutions and precisions using materials that range from polymers, metals, ceramics, to composites. In both academia and industry, direct-write additive manufacturing offers extraordinary promises to revolutionize research and development in microfabrication and MEMS technologies. Importantly, direct-write additive manufacturing could appreciably augment current MEMS fabrication technologies, enable faster design-to-product cycle, empower new paradigms in MEMS designs, and critically, encourage wider participation in MEMS research at institutions or for individuals with limited or no access to cleanroom facilities. This article aims to provide a limited review of the current landscape of direct-write additive manufacturing techniques that are potentially applicable for MEMS microfabrication.

  1. Additive direct-write microfabrication for MEMS: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Kwok Siong

    2017-10-01

    manufacturing technologies, it is possible to fabricate unsophisticated micrometer scale structures at adequate resolutions and precisions using materials that range from polymers, metals, ceramics, to composites. In both academia and industry, direct-write additive manufacturing offers extraordinary promises to revolutionize research and development in microfabrication and MEMS technologies. Importantly, direct-write additive manufacturing could appreciably augment current MEMS fabrication technologies, enable faster design-to-product cycle, empower new paradigms in MEMS designs, and critically, encourage wider participation in MEMS research at institutions or for individuals with limited or no access to cleanroom facilities. This article aims to provide a limited review of the current landscape of direct-write additive manufacturing techniques that are potentially applicable for MEMS microfabrication.

  2. Analysis of mitochondrial DNA alteration in new phenotype ACOS

    OpenAIRE

    Carpagnano, G. E.; Lacedonia, D.; Malerba, M; Palmiotti, G. A.; Cotugno, G.; Carone, M.; Foschino-Barbaro, M P

    2016-01-01

    Background Mitochondria contain their own DNA (MtDNA) that is very sensitive to oxidative stress and as a consequence could be damaged in quantity. Oxidative stress is largely recognized to play a key role in the pathogenesis of asthma and COPD and might have a role in the new intermediate phenotype ACOS (asthma-COPD overlap syndrome). The aim of this study was to investigate MtDNA alterations, as an expression of mitochondrial dysfunction, in ACOS and to verify whether they might help in the...

  3. DNA conformational analysis in solution by uranyl mediated photocleavage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E.; Møllegaard, N E; Jeppesen, C

    1990-01-01

    Uranyl mediated photocleavage of double stranded DNA is proposed as a general probing for DNA helix conformation in terms of minor groove width/electronegative potential. Specifically, it is found that A/T-tracts known to constitute strong distamycin binding sites are preferentially photocleaved ......, uranyl photocleavage of the internal control region (ICR) of the 5S-RNA gene yields a cleavage modulation pattern fully compatible with that obtained by DNase I which also--in a more complex way--senses DNA minor groove width....

  4. Analysis of epigenetic modifications of DNA in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lasse Sommer; Treppendahl, Marianne Bach; Grønbæk, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetics, the study of somatically heritable changes in gene expression not related to changes in the DNA sequence, is a rapidly expanding research field that plays important roles in healthy as well as in diseased cells. DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation are epigenetic modifications found...... in human cells, which are deeply implicated in normal cellular processes as well as in several major human diseases. Here, a range of different methods for the analyses of DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation at locus-specific and genome-wide scales is described....

  5. A Microfabricated Segmented-Involute-Foil Regenerator for Enhancing Reliability and Performance of Stirling Engines. Phase III Final Report for the Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology NRA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mounir B.; Gedeon, David; Wood, Gary; McLean, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Under Phase III of NASA Research Announcement contract NAS3-03124, a prototype nickel segmented-involute-foil regenerator was microfabricated and tested in a Sunpower Frequency-Test-Bed (FTB) Stirling convertor. The team for this effort consisted of Cleveland State University, Gedeon Associates, Sunpower Inc. and International Mezzo Technologies. Testing in the FTB convertor produced about the same efficiency as testing with the original random-fiber regenerator. But the high thermal conductivity of the prototype nickel regenerator was responsible for a significant performance degradation. An efficiency improvement (by a 1.04 factor, according to computer predictions) could have been achieved if the regenerator was made from a low-conductivity material. Also, the FTB convertor was not reoptimized to take full advantage of the microfabricated regenerator s low flow resistance; thus, the efficiency would likely have been even higher had the FTB been completely reoptimized. This report discusses the regenerator microfabrication process, testing of the regenerator in the Stirling FTB convertor, and the supporting analysis. Results of the pre-test computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of the effects of the regenerator-test-configuration diffusers (located at each end of the regenerator) are included. The report also includes recommendations for further development of involute-foil regenerators from a higher-temperature material than nickel.

  6. Comparison of the Electrophoretic Method with the Sedimentation Method for the Analysis of DNA Strand Breaks

    OpenAIRE

    OSAMU, YAMAMOTO; MASAAKI, OGAWA; Masaharu, Hoshi; Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine and Biology, Hiroshima University

    1982-01-01

    Application of electrophoresis to the analysis of DNA strand breaks was studied comparing with the sedimentation analysis. A BRL gel electrophoresis system (Type V16) was used for this study. Calf thymus DNA (1 mg/ml) irradiated with ^Co gamma-rays in SSC solution was applied to both the electrophoretic analysis and the sedimentation analysis. Lamda phage DNA and its fragments were employed as the standard size molecules. In a range from 1 k base pairs to 6 k base pairs in length for double s...

  7. Ratchet Nanofiltration of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Joel D. P.; Joswiak, Mark N.; Olson, Daniel W.; Park, Sung-Gyu

    2013-01-01

    The DNA nanofilter is a microfabricated electrophoretic separation device consisting of a periodic array of thin slits (circa 60 nm) separated by deeper wells (circa 320 nm). We demonstrate that this device can act as a tuneable, clog-free filter when operating in a low frequency, asymmetric field inversion mode. This filtration occurs by using the asymmetric field inversion to achieve bi-directional migration of short (less than 1000 bp) DNA. Moreover, similar ratchet-type operation can improve separations when compared to a constant field separation in the same device. These modes of operation enhance the utility of the DNA nanofilter as a component of integrated lab-on-a-chip devices. The experimental data confirm theoretical predictions for the bidirectional transport of DNA in entropy-based separations. PMID:23896739

  8. Identification of unknown body using DNA analysis and dental characteristics in chest X-ray photograph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minaguchi, Kiyoshi; Maruyama, Sayaka; Kasahara, Iku; Nohira, Chizuru; Hanaoka, Yoichi; Tsai, Tohkai; Kiriyama, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki

    2005-11-01

    An unknown skeletonized body was identified by DNA analysis and dental information. The body had already been cremated when a candidate for the unknown body was proposed. Therefore, for DNA analysis we used teeth that had been kept for a long time after use for serological examination. We also used a chest X-ray photograph of the candidate and photographs of dentition, as well as dental X-ray photographs taken when the unknown body was found. Because DNA obtained from teeth was highly degraded, we amplified three PCR fragments to determine the 766 bp mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence including HV1 and HV2. Polymorphism of the ABO locus was also analyzed using small PCR fragments. Although the isolated DNA was contaminated, probably with DNA from a different individual, DNA polymorphisms of mtDNA and the ABO locus could be analyzed. We discuss the reliability of our conclusions from the point of view of the necessity of constructing an accurate mtDNA database. Although a dentist who had treated the teeth of the unknown body could not be found, a chest X-ray photograph for medical diagnosis was very useful in comparing dental characteristics, as it included an image of the frontal part of the lower jaw and upper teeth.

  9. Evaluation of DNA extraction methods for the analysis of microbial community in biological activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lu; Gao, Naiyun; Deng, Yang

    2012-01-01

    It is difficult to isolate DNA from biological activated carbon (BAC) samples used in water treatment plants, owing to the scarcity of microorganisms in BAC samples. The aim of this study was to identify DNA extraction methods suitable for a long-term, comprehensive ecological analysis of BAC microbial communities. To identify a procedure that can produce high molecular weight DNA, maximizes detectable diversity and is relatively free from contaminants, the microwave extraction method, the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) extraction method, a commercial DNA extraction kit, and the ultrasonic extraction method were used for the extraction of DNA from BAC samples. Spectrophotometry, agarose gel electrophoresis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) analysis were conducted to compare the yield and quality of DNA obtained using these methods. The results showed that the CTAB method produce the highest yield and genetic diversity of DNA from BAC samples, but DNA purity was slightly less than that obtained with the DNA extraction-kit method. This study provides a theoretical basis for establishing and selecting DNA extraction methods for BAC samples.

  10. DNA from buccal swabs suitable for high-throughput SNP multiplex analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, Gai L; Gibson, Catherine S; O'Callaghan, Michael E; Goldwater, Paul N; Dekker, Gustaaf A; Haan, Eric A; MacLennan, Alastair H

    2009-12-01

    We sought a convenient and reliable method for collection of genetic material that is inexpensive and noninvasive and suitable for self-collection and mailing and a compatible, commercial DNA extraction protocol to meet quantitative and qualitative requirements for high-throughput single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) multiplex analysis on an automated platform. Buccal swabs were collected from 34 individuals as part of a pilot study to test commercially available buccal swabs and DNA extraction kits. DNA was quantified on a spectrofluorometer with Picogreen dsDNA prior to testing the DNA integrity with predesigned SNP multiplex assays. Based on the pilot study results, the Catch-All swabs and Isohelix buccal DNA isolation kit were selected for our high-throughput application and extended to a further 1140 samples as part of a large cohort study. The average DNA yield in the pilot study (n=34) was 1.94 microg +/- 0.54 with a 94% genotyping pass rate. For the high-throughput application (n=1140), the average DNA yield was 2.44 microg +/- 1.74 with a >or=93% genotyping pass rate. The Catch-All buccal swabs are a convenient and cost-effective alternative to blood sampling. Combined with the Isohelix buccal DNA isolation kit, they provided DNA of sufficient quantity and quality for high-throughput SNP multiplex analysis.

  11. First records of Phytophthora spp. based on DNA analysis in Lithuania

    OpenAIRE

    Vitas, Adomas; Oszako, Tomasz; Nowakowska, Justyna A.; Sikora, Katarzyna; Stankevičienė, Antanina

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of alien invasive species of Phytophthora genus causing serious forest tree species diseases was carried out in Lithuania. The presence of Phytophthora DNA was recorded for the first time using real-time PCR analysis on 23 DNA samples. The sampling includes wood from diseased trees, leaves from shrubs, leaves baited in water, and soil samples taken around diseased plants. Extracted DNA from soil and plant tissues was tested for the presence of Phytophthora. All analysed samples...

  12. DNA sequence and prokaryotic expression analysis of vitellogenin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-02-08

    Feb 8, 2010 ... In this study, the DNA sequence of vitellogenin from Antheraea pernyi (Ap-Vg) was identified and its functional ..... silk-producing insects based on 16S ribosomal RNA and cytochrome oxidase subunit I genes. J. Genet.

  13. Microchip-based cell lysis and DNA extraction from sperm cells for application to forensic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienvenue, Joan M; Duncalf, Natalie; Marchiarullo, Daniel; Ferrance, Jerome P; Landers, James P

    2006-03-01

    The current backlog of casework is among the most significant challenges facing crime laboratories at this time. While the development of next-generation microchip-based technology for expedited forensic casework analysis offers one solution to this problem, this will require the adaptation of manual, large-volume, benchtop chemistry to small volume microfluidic devices. Analysis of evidentiary materials from rape kits where semen or sperm cells are commonly found represents a unique set of challenges for on-chip cell lysis and DNA extraction that must be addressed for successful application. The work presented here details the development of a microdevice capable of DNA extraction directly from sperm cells for application to the analysis of sexual assault evidence. A variety of chemical lysing agents are assessed for inclusion in the extraction protocol and a method for DNA purification from sperm cells is described. Suitability of the extracted DNA for short tandem repeat (STR) analysis is assessed and genetic profiles shown. Finally, on-chip cell lysis methods are evaluated, with results from fluorescence visualization of cell rupture and DNA extraction from an integrated cell lysis and purification with subsequent STR amplification presented. A method for on-chip cell lysis and DNA purification is described, with considerations toward inclusion in an integrated microdevice capable of both differential cell sorting and DNA extraction. The results of this work demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating microchip-based cell lysis and DNA extraction into forensic casework analysis.

  14. DNA binding site analysis of Burkholderia thailandensis response regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak-Lovato, Kristy L; Hickmott, Alexana J; Maity, Tuhin S; Bulyk, Martha L; Dunbar, John; Hong-Geller, Elizabeth

    2012-07-01

    Bacterial response regulators (RR) that function as transcription factors in two component signaling pathways are crucial for ensuring tight regulation and coordinated expression of the genome. Currently, consensus DNA binding sites in the promoter for very few bacterial RRs have been identified. A systematic method to characterize these DNA binding sites for RRs would enable prediction of specific gene expression patterns in response to extracellular stimuli. To identify RR DNA binding sites, we functionally activated RRs using beryllofluoride and applied them to a protein-binding microarray (PBM) to discover DNA binding motifs for RRs expressed in Burkholderia, a Gram-negative bacterial genus. We identified DNA binding motifs for conserved RRs in Burkholderia thailandensis, including KdpE, RisA, and NarL, as well as for a previously uncharacterized RR at locus BTH_II2335 and its ortholog in the human pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei at locus BPSS2315. We further demonstrate RR binding of predicted genomic targets for the two orthologs using gel shift assays and reveal a pattern of RR regulation of expression of self and other two component systems. Our studies illustrate the use of PBMs to identify DNA binding specificities for bacterial RRs and enable prediction of gene regulatory networks in response to two component signaling. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. The effect of sperm DNA fragmentation on miscarriage rates: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Lynne; Gallos, Ioannis D; Conner, Sarah J; Rajkhowa, Madhurima; Miller, David; Lewis, Sheena; Kirkman-Brown, Jackson; Coomarasamy, Arri

    2012-10-01

    Is there an association between high levels of sperm DNA damage and miscarriage? Miscarriage rates are positively correlated with sperm DNA damage levels. Most ejaculates contain a subpopulation of sperm with DNA damage, also referred to as DNA fragmentation, in the form of double or single-strand breaks which have been induced in the DNA prior to or following ejaculation. This DNA damage may be particularly elevated in some subfertile men, hence several studies have examined the link between sperm DNA damage levels and conception and miscarriage rates. A systematic review and meta-analysis of studies which examined the effect of sperm DNA damage on miscarriage rates was performed. Searches were conducted on MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library without any language restrictions from database inception to January 2012. We used the terms 'DNA damage' or 'DNA fragmentation' combined with 'miscarriage', 'abortion' or 'pregnancy' to generate a set of relevant citations. Data extraction was performed by two reviewers. Study quality was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Meta-analysis of relative risks of miscarriage was performed with a random effects model. Subgroup analyses were performed by the type of DNA damage test, whether the sperm examined were prepared or from raw semen and for pregnancies resulting from IVF or ICSI treatment. We identified 16 cohort studies (2969 couples), 14 of which were prospective. Eight studies used acridine orange-based assays, six the TUNEL assay and two the COMET assay. Meta-analysis showed a significant increase in miscarriage in patients with high DNA damage compared with those with low DNA damage [risk ratio (RR) = 2.16 (1.54, 3.03), P < 0.00001)]. A subgroup analysis showed that the miscarriage association is strongest for the TUNEL assay (RR = 3.94 (2.45, 6.32), P < 0.00001). There is some variation in study characteristics, including the use of different assays and different thresholds for DNA damage and the

  16. Multi-marker analysis of circulating cell-free DNA toward personalized medicine for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouliere, Florent; El Messaoudi, Safia; Pang, Dalong; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Thierry, Alain R

    2014-07-01

    Development of a Q-PCR-based assay for the high-performance analysis of circulating cell-free DNA (ccfDNA) requires good knowledge of its structure and size. In this work, we present the first visual determination of ccfDNA by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) on plasma samples from colorectal cancer (CRC) patients and healthy donors. In addition to the examination of fragment size distribution profile as performed by Q-PCR, this analysis confirms that ccfDNA is highly fragmented and that more than 80% of ccfDNA fragments in CRC plasma are below 145 bp. We adapted an Allele-Specific Blocker (ASB) Q-PCR to small ccfDNA fragments to determine simultaneously the total ccfDNA concentration, the presence of point mutation, the proportion of mutated allele, and a ccfDNA integrity index. The data validated analytically these four parameters in 124 CRC clinical samples and 71 healthy individuals. The multi-marker method, termed Intplex, enables sensitive and specific non-invasive analysis of tumor ccfDNA, which has great potential in terms of cost, quality control, and easy implementation in every clinical center laboratory. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Enhanced genetic analysis of single human bioparticles recovered by simplified micromanipulation from forensic 'touch DNA' evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farash, Katherine; Hanson, Erin K; Ballantyne, Jack

    2015-03-09

    DNA profiles can be obtained from 'touch DNA' evidence, which comprises microscopic traces of human biological material. Current methods for the recovery of trace DNA employ cotton swabs or adhesive tape to sample an area of interest. However, such a 'blind-swabbing' approach will co-sample cellular material from the different individuals, even if the individuals' cells are located in geographically distinct locations on the item. Thus, some of the DNA mixtures encountered in touch DNA samples are artificially created by the swabbing itself. In some instances, a victim's DNA may be found in significant excess thus masking any potential perpetrator's DNA. In order to circumvent the challenges with standard recovery and analysis methods, we have developed a lower cost, 'smart analysis' method that results in enhanced genetic analysis of touch DNA evidence. We describe an optimized and efficient micromanipulation recovery strategy for the collection of bio-particles present in touch DNA samples, as well as an enhanced amplification strategy involving a one-step 5 µl microvolume lysis/STR amplification to permit the recovery of STR profiles from the bio-particle donor(s). The use of individual or few (i.e., "clumps") bioparticles results in the ability to obtain single source profiles. These procedures represent alternative enhanced techniques for the isolation and analysis of single bioparticles from forensic touch DNA evidence. While not necessary in every forensic investigation, the method could be highly beneficial for the recovery of a single source perpetrator DNA profile in cases involving physical assault (e.g., strangulation) that may not be possible using standard analysis techniques. Additionally, the strategies developed here offer an opportunity to obtain genetic information at the single cell level from a variety of other non-forensic trace biological material.

  18. DNA adducts and cancer risk in prospective studies: a pooled analysis and a meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veglia, Fabrizio; Loft, Steffen; Matullo, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    in which bulky DNA adducts have been measured in blood samples collected from healthy subjects (N = 1947; average follow-up 51-137 months). In addition, we have performed a meta-analysis by identifying all articles on the same subject published up to the end of 2006, including case-control studies......). The association was evident only in current smokers and was absent in former smokers. Also the meta-analysis, which included both lung and bladder cancers, showed a statistically significant association in current smokers, whereas the results in never smokers were equivocal; in former smokers, no association...

  19. Optimization of nanofountain probe microfabrication enables large-scale nanopatterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safi, Asmahan; Kang, Wonmo; Czapleski, David; Divan, Ralu; Moldovan, Nicolae; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2013-12-01

    A technological gap in nanomanufacturing has prevented the translation of many nanomaterial discoveries into real-world commercialized products. Bridging this gap requires a paradigm shift in methods for fabricating nanoscale devices in a reliable and repeatable fashion. Here we present the optimized fabrication of a robust and scalable nanoscale delivery platform, the nanofountain probe (NFP), for parallel direct-write of functional materials. Microfabrication of a new generation of NFP was realized with the aim of increasing the uniformity of the device structure. Optimized probe geometry was integrated into the design and fabrication process by modifying the precursor mask dimensions and by using an isotropic selective dry etching of the outer shell that defines the protrusion area. Probes with well-conserved sharp tips and controlled protrusion lengths were obtained. Sealing effectiveness of the channels was optimized. A conformal tetraethyl orthosilicate based oxide layer increased the sealing efficacy while minimizing the required thickness. A compensation scheme based on the residual stresses in each layer was implemented to minimize bending of the cantilever after releasing the device. The device was tested by patterning ferritin catalyst arrays on silicon dioxide with sub-100 nm resolution. The optimized probes increased the control over the parallel patterning resolution which enables manufacturing of ordered arrays of nanomaterials.

  20. DNA and RNA analysis of blood and muscle from bodies with variable postmortem intervals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob; Lesnikova, Iana; Funder, Anette Mariane Daa

    2014-01-01

    The breakdown of DNA and RNA in decomposing human tissue represents a major obstacle for postmortem forensic molecular analysis. This study investigated the feasibility of performing PCR-based molecular analysis of blood and muscle tissue from 45 autopsy cases with defined postmortem intervals......) DNA fragments from all samples with postmortem intervals below 3 days whereas 400-600 bp long fragments typically could be amplified from the most decomposed muscle specimens. RNA was less stable than DNA in postmortem muscle tissue, yet selected mRNA molecules could be detected by reverse......-transcriptase PCR in all samples up to 3 days after death. We conclude that analysis of DNA from bodies with a wide postmortem interval range is usually possible whereas the consistency of RNA analyses decreases considerably 3 days postmortem. We showed that muscle tissue is a highly usable source of DNA and RNA...

  1. Assembly and structural analysis of a covalently closed nano-scale DNA cage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Félicie Faucon; Knudsen, Bjarne; Oliveira, Cristiano Luis Pinto De

    2008-01-01

    are necessary before complex DNA structures can be routinely designed for the use in basal science and/or biotechnology. Here we present the design, construction and structural analysis of a covalently closed and stable 3D DNA structure with the connectivity of an octahedron, as defined by the double...

  2. Orbicularis oculi muscle biopsies for mitochondrial DNA analysis in suspected mitochondrial myopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Roefs (Anne); P.J. Waters (Paula); G.R.W. Moore (G. R. Wayne); P.J. Dolman (Peter)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAims: We wished to demonstrate the feasibility of performing diagnostic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis on biopsies of the orbicularis oculi muscle in patients with a chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) phenotype and suspicion of an underlying mitochondrial disorder.

  3. Perinatal hepatitis B virus detection by hepatitis B virus-DNA analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    de Virgiliis, S; Frau, F; G. Sanna; Turco, M P; Figus, A L; Cornacchia, G; Cao, A.

    1985-01-01

    Maternal transmission of hepatitis B virus infection in relation to the hepatitis B e antigen/antibody system and serum hepatitis B virus-DNA were evaluated. Results indicate that hepatitis B virus-DNA analysis can identify hepatitis B serum antigen positive mothers who may transmit infection to their offspring.

  4. Forensic Analysis of Canine DNA Samples in the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Tobin M.; Bradley, Sharonda Q.; Fekete, Brenda L.; Millard, Julie T.; LaRiviere, Frederick J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in canine genomics have allowed the development of highly distinguishing methods of analysis for both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. We describe a laboratory exercise suitable for an undergraduate biochemistry course in which the polymerase chain reaction is used to amplify hypervariable regions of DNA from dog hair and saliva…

  5. AN IMAGE-ANALYSIS TECHNIQUE FOR DETECTION OF RADIATION-INDUCED DNA FRAGMENTATION AFTER CHEF ELECTROPHORESIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ROSEMANN, M; KANON, B; KONINGS, AWT; KAMPINGA, HH

    CHEF-electrophoresis was used as a technique to detect radiation-induced DNA breakage with special emphasis to biological relevant X-ray doses (0-10 Gy). Fluorescence detection of DNA-fragments using a sensitive image analysis system was directly compared with conventional scintillation counting of

  6. Utility of commercial DNA analysis in detecting malignancy within pancreatic cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Linda S; Wu, Bechien U; Banks, Peter A; Kadiyala, Vivek; Mehta, Shivani; Saltzman, John R; Thompson, Christopher C; Bellizzi, Andrew M

    2013-03-10

    Pancreatic cysts raise concern because of their malignant potential. Our aims were to assess accuracy of DNA analysis in detecting malignant pancreatic cysts at EUS-FNA and to determine whether DNA analysis added to imaging and cyst fluid studies enhanced International Association of Pancreatology (IAP) guidelines for resection of pancreatic cysts. This is a retrospective study including pancreatic cysts undergoing EUS-FNA and DNA analysis with k-ras and loss of heterozygosity testing. Diagnostic models of 2006 and 2012 IAP guidelines, DNA analysis alone, and DNA combined with 2012 IAP guidelines were developed, and area under receiver operator characteristic curves (AUC) compared to determine the added value of DNA for detecting malignant cysts at the time of EUS-FNA. Two-hundreds and fifty-seven patients were included with 8 (3.1%) malignant cysts. Solid component (P<0.001), main pancreatic duct dilation (P=0.012), suspicious or malignant cytology (P=0.001), and high DNA quantity (P<0.001) were associated with malignancy. Concurrent high amplitude k-ras with loss of heterozygosity mutations was highly specific (98.4%) though insensitive (12.5%) for malignancy. The 2012 IAP guideline (AUC=0.87; 95% CI: 0.82-0.91) was superior to 2006 IAP guideline (AUC=0.54; 95% CI: 0.47-0.60) and DNA analysis alone (AUC=0.60; 95% CI: 0.53-0.66) for detecting malignant cysts (P=0.004 and P=0.002, respectively). Addition of DNA did not improve performance of the 2012 IAP guideline (AUC=0.84; 95% CI: 0.79-0.88). Commercial DNA analysis does not add useful information beyond imaging and cytology for detection of malignant pancreatic cysts. The 2012 IAP guideline better predicted malignant cysts than the 2006 IAP guideline.

  7. Utility of amplification enhancers in low copy number DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Pamela L; King, Jonathan L; Budowle, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    One parameter that impacts the robustness and reliability of forensic DNA analyses is the amount of template DNA used in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). With short tandem repeat (STR) typing, low copy number (LCN) DNA samples can present exaggerated stochastic effects during the PCR that result in heterozygote peak height imbalance, allele drop out, and increased stutter. Despite these effects, there has been little progress toward decreasing the formation of stutter products and heterozygote peak imbalance effects during PCR. In an attempt to develop a more robust system that is less refractory to stochastic effects, the PCR additives, betaine, DMSO, PEG, and PCRboost®, were investigated on low-quantity DNA samples. The effects of the additives were assessed by evaluating STR typing results. Of the four additives, the only positive effects were observed with betaine treatment. Betaine, at a final concentration of 1.25 mol/L, was found to improve the robustness of the amplification, specifically by decreasing stutter in a dual locus system. In contrast, the addition of 1.25 mol/L betaine to commercial STR amplification kits did not affect stutter ratios. However, the addition of betaine did lead to increased yield of PCR products in all commercial kits tested. The results support that betaine can improve amplification efficiency of LCN DNA samples.

  8. High-resolution analysis of cytosine methylation in ancient DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastien Llamas

    Full Text Available Epigenetic changes to gene expression can result in heritable phenotypic characteristics that are not encoded in the DNA itself, but rather by biochemical modifications to the DNA or associated chromatin proteins. Interposed between genes and environment, these epigenetic modifications can be influenced by environmental factors to affect phenotype for multiple generations. This raises the possibility that epigenetic states provide a substrate for natural selection, with the potential to participate in the rapid adaptation of species to changes in environment. Any direct test of this hypothesis would require the ability to measure epigenetic states over evolutionary timescales. Here we describe the first single-base resolution of cytosine methylation patterns in an ancient mammalian genome, by bisulphite allelic sequencing of loci from late Pleistocene Bison priscus remains. Retrotransposons and the differentially methylated regions of imprinted loci displayed methylation patterns identical to those derived from fresh bovine tissue, indicating that methylation patterns are preserved in the ancient DNA. Our findings establish the biochemical stability of methylated cytosines over extensive time frames, and provide the first direct evidence that cytosine methylation patterns are retained in DNA from ancient specimens. The ability to resolve cytosine methylation in ancient DNA provides a powerful means to study the role of epigenetics in evolution.

  9. GENETIC AND MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND TOLERANCE PATHWAYS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUTHERLAND, B.M.

    2001-07-26

    Radiation can damage cellular components, including DNA. Organisms have developed a panoply of means of dealing with DNA damage. Some repair paths have rather narrow substrate specificity (e.g. photolyases), which act on specific pyrimidine photoproducts in a specific type (e.g., DNA) and conformation (double-stranded B conformation) of nucleic acid. Others, for example, nucleotide excision repair, deal with larger classes of damages, in this case bulky adducts in DNA. A detailed discussion of DNA repair mechanisms is beyond the scope of this article, but one can be found in the excellent book of Friedberg et al. [1] for further detail. However, some DNA damages and paths for repair of those damages important for photobiology will be outlined below as a basis for the specific examples of genetic and molecular analysis that will be presented below.

  10. Plasmids in methanotrophic bacteria: isolation, characterization and DNA hybridization analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lidstrom, M.E.; Wopat, A.E.

    1984-01-01

    Ten strains of obligate methanotrophs were screened for the presence of plasmid DNA using a variety of methods. Plasmids were detected in all strains except Methylococcus capsulatus Bath. No significant similarity between plasmids was observed with respect to size or restriction digest patterns except for three strains of Methylosinus trichosporium, which appeared to contain the same three plasmids. Nitrocellulose filter hybridization revealed that the plasmid DNA from the M. trichosporium strains shared a small region of homology with the plasmid DNA from Methylosinus sporium 5. All of the plasmids remain cryptic. As the first step in characterization, a restriction digest map of the 55 kb plasmid found in Methylomonas albus BG8 was constructed. 22 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  11. Plasmids in methanotrophic bacteria: isolation, characterization and DNA hybridization analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidstrom, M E; Wopat, A E

    1984-11-01

    Ten strains of obligate methanotrophs were screened for the presence of plasmid DNA using a variety of methods. Plasmids were detected in all strains except Methylococcus capsulatus Bath. No significant similarity between plasmids was observed with respect to size or restriction digest patterns except for three strains of Methylosinus trichosporium, which appeared to contain the same three plasmids. Nitrocellulose filter hybridization revealed that the plasmid DNA from the M. trichosporium strains shared a small region of homology with the plasmid DNA from Methylosinus sporium 5. All of the plasmids remain cryptic. As the first step in characterization, a restriction digest map of the 55 kb plasmid found in Methylomonas albus BG8 was constructed.

  12. Comparison of DNA extraction methods for meat analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalçınkaya, Burhanettin; Yumbul, Eylem; Mozioğlu, Erkan; Akgoz, Muslum

    2017-04-15

    Preventing adulteration of meat and meat products with less desirable or objectionable meat species is important not only for economical, religious and health reasons, but also, it is important for fair trade practices, therefore, several methods for identification of meat and meat products have been developed. In the present study, ten different DNA extraction methods, including Tris-EDTA Method, a modified Cetyltrimethylammonium Bromide (CTAB) Method, Alkaline Method, Urea Method, Salt Method, Guanidinium Isothiocyanate (GuSCN) Method, Wizard Method, Qiagen Method, Zymogen Method and Genespin Method were examined to determine their relative effectiveness for extracting DNA from meat samples. The results show that the salt method is easy to perform, inexpensive and environmentally friendly. Additionally, it has the highest yield among all the isolation methods tested. We suggest this method as an alternative method for DNA isolation from meat and meat products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Nucleoside analysis of DNA from Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma equiperdum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozatier, M; De Brij, R J; Den Engelse, L; Johnson, P J; Borst, P

    1988-11-01

    We have digested trypanosome DNA with a combination of pancreatic DNase I, nuclease P1 and bovine alkaline phosphatase and fractionated the resulting nucleosides on a Supelcosil LC-18-S column by high pressure liquid chromatography. We find less than 0.1% unusual nucleosides, both in Trypanosoma brucei and in a Trypanosoma equiperdum stock, in contrast to a previous report of an unusual nucleoside replacing dC at 1.3% of total nucleosides in T. equiperdum. Our results agree with previous suggestions that the modification of inactive telomeric expression sites for variant-specific surface glycoprotein genes in T. brucei only affects a very small fraction of the total DNA.

  14. Mislabelling of spanish commercial semipreserved anchovies detected by DNA analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaya Velasco

    2014-06-01

    Although there are several studies presenting DNA methodologies for the identification of anchovies, this is one of the first studies aiming the evaluation of the level of mislabeling in this kind of products in Europe. Sixty three commercial semi preserved anchovy products were collected in different types of food markets in four Spanish cities to check their labelling. Species determination in these commercial products was performed by sequencing two different DNA fragments of mitochondrial cyt b. Results revealed that the level of mislabeling regarding species was higher than 16% in these products. The most frequent substitution found was Engraulis anchoita declared as Engraulis encrasicolus.

  15. Sensitive DIP-STR markers for the analysis of unbalanced mixtures from "touch" DNA samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldoni, Fabio; Castella, Vincent; Grosjean, Frederic; Hall, Diana

    2017-05-01

    Casework samples collected for forensic DNA analysis can produce genomic mixtures in which the DNA of the alleged offender is masked by high quantities of DNA coming from the victim. DIP-STRs are novel genetic markers specifically developed to enable the target analysis of a DNA of interest in the presence of exceeding quantities of a second DNA (up to 1000-fold). The genotyping system, which is based on allele-specific amplifications of haplotypes formed by a deletion/insertion polymorphism (DIP) and a short tandem repeat (STR), combines the capacity of targeting the DNA of an individual with a strong identification power. Finally, DIP-STRs are autosomal markers therefore they can be applied to any combination of major and minor DNA. In this study we aimed to assess the ability of DIP-STRs to detect the minor contributor on challenging "touch" DNA samples simulated with representative crime-associated substrates and to compare their performance to commonly used male-specific markers (Y-STRs). As part of a comprehensive study on the relative DNA contribution of two persons handling the same object, we selected 71 unbalanced contact traces of which 14 comprised a male minor DNA contributor mixed to a female major DNA contributor. Using a set of six DIP-STRs, one to four markers were found to be informative for the minor DNA detection across traces. When compared to Y-STRs (14 traces), the DIP-STRs showed similar sensitivity in detecting the minor DNA across substrate materials with a similar occurrence of allele drop-out. Conversely, because of the sex combination of the two users of the object, 57 remaining traces could only be investigated by DIP-STRs. Of these, 30 minor DNA contributors could be detected by all informative markers while 12 traces showed events of allele drop-out. Finally, 15 traces showed no amplification of the minor DNA. These last 15 samples were mostly characterized by a combination of short handling time of the object, low DNA recovery and

  16. Spectral analysis of naturally occurring methylxanthines (theophylline, theobromine and caffeine) binding with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Irudayam Maria; Prakash, Halan; Prathiba, Jeyaguru; Raghunathan, Raghavachary; Malathi, Raghunathan

    2012-01-01

    Nucleic acids exist in a dynamic equilibrium with a number of molecules that constantly interact with them and regulate the cellular activities. The inherent nature of the structure and conformational integrity of these macromolecules can lead to altered biological activity through proper targeting of nucleic acids binding ligands or drug molecules. We studied the interaction of naturally occurring methylxanthines such as theophylline, theobromine and caffeine with DNA, using UV absorption and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic methods, and especially monitored their binding affinity in the presence of Mg(2+) and during helix-coil transitions of DNA by temperature (T(m)) or pH melting profiles. The study indicates that all these molecules effectively bind to DNA in a dose dependent manner. The overall binding constants of DNA-theophylline = 3.5×10(3) M(-1), DNA-theobromine = 1.1×10(3) M(-1), and DNA-Caffeine = 3.8×10(3) M(-1). On the other hand T(m)/pH melting profiles showed 24-35% of enhanced binding activity of methylxanthines during helix-coil transitions of DNA rather than to its native double helical structure. The FTIR analysis divulged that theophylline, theobromine and caffeine interact with all the base pairs of DNA (A-T; G-C) and phosphate group through hydrogen bond (H-bond) interaction. In the presence of Mg(2+), methylxanthines altered the structure of DNA from B to A-family. However, the B-family structure of DNA remained unaltered in DNA-methylxanthines complexes or in the absence of Mg(2+). The spectral analyses indicated the order of binding affinity as "caffeine≥theophylline>theobromine" to the native double helical DNA, and "theophylline≥theobromine>caffeine to the denatured form of DNA and in the presence of divalent metal ions.

  17. Spectral analysis of naturally occurring methylxanthines (theophylline, theobromine and caffeine binding with DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irudayam Maria Johnson

    Full Text Available Nucleic acids exist in a dynamic equilibrium with a number of molecules that constantly interact with them and regulate the cellular activities. The inherent nature of the structure and conformational integrity of these macromolecules can lead to altered biological activity through proper targeting of nucleic acids binding ligands or drug molecules. We studied the interaction of naturally occurring methylxanthines such as theophylline, theobromine and caffeine with DNA, using UV absorption and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopic methods, and especially monitored their binding affinity in the presence of Mg(2+ and during helix-coil transitions of DNA by temperature (T(m or pH melting profiles. The study indicates that all these molecules effectively bind to DNA in a dose dependent manner. The overall binding constants of DNA-theophylline = 3.5×10(3 M(-1, DNA-theobromine = 1.1×10(3 M(-1, and DNA-Caffeine = 3.8×10(3 M(-1. On the other hand T(m/pH melting profiles showed 24-35% of enhanced binding activity of methylxanthines during helix-coil transitions of DNA rather than to its native double helical structure. The FTIR analysis divulged that theophylline, theobromine and caffeine interact with all the base pairs of DNA (A-T; G-C and phosphate group through hydrogen bond (H-bond interaction. In the presence of Mg(2+, methylxanthines altered the structure of DNA from B to A-family. However, the B-family structure of DNA remained unaltered in DNA-methylxanthines complexes or in the absence of Mg(2+. The spectral analyses indicated the order of binding affinity as "caffeine≥theophylline>theobromine" to the native double helical DNA, and "theophylline≥theobromine>caffeine to the denatured form of DNA and in the presence of divalent metal ions.

  18. Spectral Analysis of Naturally Occurring Methylxanthines (Theophylline, Theobromine and Caffeine) Binding with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Irudayam Maria; Prakash, Halan; Prathiba, Jeyaguru; Raghunathan, Raghavachary; Malathi, Raghunathan

    2012-01-01

    Nucleic acids exist in a dynamic equilibrium with a number of molecules that constantly interact with them and regulate the cellular activities. The inherent nature of the structure and conformational integrity of these macromolecules can lead to altered biological activity through proper targeting of nucleic acids binding ligands or drug molecules. We studied the interaction of naturally occurring methylxanthines such as theophylline, theobromine and caffeine with DNA, using UV absorption and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic methods, and especially monitored their binding affinity in the presence of Mg2+ and during helix-coil transitions of DNA by temperature (Tm) or pH melting profiles. The study indicates that all these molecules effectively bind to DNA in a dose dependent manner. The overall binding constants of DNA-theophylline = 3.5×103 M−1, DNA-theobromine = 1.1×103 M−1, and DNA-Caffeine = 3.8×103 M−1. On the other hand Tm/pH melting profiles showed 24–35% of enhanced binding activity of methylxanthines during helix-coil transitions of DNA rather than to its native double helical structure. The FTIR analysis divulged that theophylline, theobromine and caffeine interact with all the base pairs of DNA (A-T; G-C) and phosphate group through hydrogen bond (H-bond) interaction. In the presence of Mg2+, methylxanthines altered the structure of DNA from B to A-family. However, the B-family structure of DNA remained unaltered in DNA-methylxanthines complexes or in the absence of Mg2+. The spectral analyses indicated the order of binding affinity as “caffeine≥theophylline>theobromine” to the native double helical DNA, and “theophylline≥theobromine>caffeine to the denatured form of DNA and in the presence of divalent metal ions. PMID:23236361

  19. Genome-wide DNA methylation patterns and transcription analysis in sheep muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Couldrey

    Full Text Available DNA methylation plays a central role in regulating many aspects of growth and development in mammals through regulating gene expression. The development of next generation sequencing technologies have paved the way for genome-wide, high resolution analysis of DNA methylation landscapes using methodology known as reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS. While RRBS has proven to be effective in understanding DNA methylation landscapes in humans, mice, and rats, to date, few studies have utilised this powerful method for investigating DNA methylation in agricultural animals. Here we describe the utilisation of RRBS to investigate DNA methylation in sheep Longissimus dorsi muscles. RRBS analysis of ∼1% of the genome from Longissimus dorsi muscles provided data of suitably high precision and accuracy for DNA methylation analysis, at all levels of resolution from genome-wide to individual nucleotides. Combining RRBS data with mRNAseq data allowed the sheep Longissimus dorsi muscle methylome to be compared with methylomes from other species. While some species differences were identified, many similarities were observed between DNA methylation patterns in sheep and other more commonly studied species. The RRBS data presented here highlights the complexity of epigenetic regulation of genes. However, the similarities observed across species are promising, in that knowledge gained from epigenetic studies in human and mice may be applied, with caution, to agricultural species. The ability to accurately measure DNA methylation in agricultural animals will contribute an additional layer of information to the genetic analyses currently being used to maximise production gains in these species.

  20. Analysis of Mitochondrial DNA from a Burned, Ninhydrin-Treated Paper Towel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buś, Magdalena M; Nilsson, Martina; Allen, Marie

    2016-05-01

    Contact-based evidence is likely to have limited quantities of DNA and may yield mixed profiles due to preexisting or contaminating DNA. In a recent arson investigation, a paper towel was collected and used as circumstantial evidence. The paper towel was partially burned and was likely set on fire with flammable liquid. As part of the investigation, the paper towel was treated with ninhydrin to visualize fingerprint evidence. Initial DNA analysis of two swabs was negative for short tandem repeat (STR) markers and revealed a mixture of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Analysis of 13 additional cuttings yielded four more mixed profiles, but also two samples with a common single-source profile. The single-source mtDNA profile matched that of the primary suspect in the case. Thus, even if initial mtDNA analysis yields a mixed profile, a sampling strategy involving multiple locations can improve the chance of obtaining valuable single-source mtDNA profiles from compromised evidence in criminal casework. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  1. Product differentiation by analysis of DNA melting curves during the polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ririe, K M; Rasmussen, R P; Wittwer, C T

    1997-02-15

    A microvolume fluorometer integrated with a thermal cycler was used to acquire DNA melting curves during polymerase chain reaction by fluorescence monitoring of the double-stranded DNA specific dye SYBR Green I. Plotting fluorescence as a function of temperature as the thermal cycler heats through the dissociation temperature of the product gives a DNA melting curve. The shape and position of this DNA melting curve are functions of the GC/AT ratio, length, and sequence and can be used to differentiate amplification products separated by less than 2 degrees C in melting temperature. Desired products can be distinguished from undesirable products, in many cases eliminating the need for gel electrophoresis. Analysis of melting curves can extend the dynamic range of initial template quantification when amplification is monitored with double-stranded DNA specific dyes. Complete amplification and analysis of products can be performed in less than 15 min.

  2. Comparisons of Non-Gaussian Statistical Models in DNA Methylation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanyu Ma

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available As a key regulatory mechanism of gene expression, DNA methylation patterns are widely altered in many complex genetic diseases, including cancer. DNA methylation is naturally quantified by bounded support data; therefore, it is non-Gaussian distributed. In order to capture such properties, we introduce some non-Gaussian statistical models to perform dimension reduction on DNA methylation data. Afterwards, non-Gaussian statistical model-based unsupervised clustering strategies are applied to cluster the data. Comparisons and analysis of different dimension reduction strategies and unsupervised clustering methods are presented. Experimental results show that the non-Gaussian statistical model-based methods are superior to the conventional Gaussian distribution-based method. They are meaningful tools for DNA methylation analysis. Moreover, among several non-Gaussian methods, the one that captures the bounded nature of DNA methylation data reveals the best clustering performance.

  3. Comparisons of non-Gaussian statistical models in DNA methylation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhanyu; Teschendorff, Andrew E; Yu, Hong; Taghia, Jalil; Guo, Jun

    2014-06-16

    As a key regulatory mechanism of gene expression, DNA methylation patterns are widely altered in many complex genetic diseases, including cancer. DNA methylation is naturally quantified by bounded support data; therefore, it is non-Gaussian distributed. In order to capture such properties, we introduce some non-Gaussian statistical models to perform dimension reduction on DNA methylation data. Afterwards, non-Gaussian statistical model-based unsupervised clustering strategies are applied to cluster the data. Comparisons and analysis of different dimension reduction strategies and unsupervised clustering methods are presented. Experimental results show that the non-Gaussian statistical model-based methods are superior to the conventional Gaussian distribution-based method. They are meaningful tools for DNA methylation analysis. Moreover, among several non-Gaussian methods, the one that captures the bounded nature of DNA methylation data reveals the best clustering performance.

  4. OPTSDNA: Performance evaluation of an efficient distributed bioinformatics system for DNA sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Ibrahim; Sheel, Chotan

    2013-01-01

    Storage of sequence data is a big concern as the amount of data generated is exponential in nature at several locations. Therefore, there is a need to develop techniques to store data using compression algorithm. Here we describe optimal storage algorithm (OPTSDNA) for storing large amount of DNA sequences of varying length. This paper provides performance analysis of optimal storage algorithm (OPTSDNA) of a distributed bioinformatics computing system for analysis of DNA sequences. OPTSDNA algorithm is used for storing various sizes of DNA sequences into database. DNA sequences of different lengths were stored by using this algorithm. These input DNA sequences are varied in size from very small to very large. Storage size is calculated by this algorithm. Response time is also calculated in this work. The efficiency and performance of the algorithm is high (in size calculation with percentage) when compared with other known with sequential approach.

  5. Polyhalite microfabrics in an Alpine evaporite mélange: Hallstatt, Eastern Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorn, Anja; Neubauer, Franz; Bernroider, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    In the Hallstatt salt mine (Austria), polyhalite rocks occur in 0.5–1 m thick and several metre long tectonic lenses within the protocataclasite to protomylonite matrix of the Alpine Haselgebirge Fm.. Thin section analysis of Hallstatt polyhalites reveals various fabric types similar to metamorphic rocks of crust-forming minerals, e.g. quartz and feldspar. Polyhalite microfabrics from Hallstatt include: (1) polyhalite mylonites, (2) metamorphic reaction fabrics, (3) vein-filling, fibrous polyhalite and (4) cavity-filling polyhalite. The polyhalite mylonites contain a wide range of shear fabrics commonly known in mylonitic quartzo–feldspathic shear zones within the ductile crust and developed from a more coarse-grained precursor rock. The mylonites are partly overprinted by recrystallised, statically grown polyhalite grains. Metamorphic reaction fabrics of polyhalite fibres between blödite (or astrakhanite) [Na2Mg(SO4)2.4H2O] and anhydrite have also been found. According to previous reports, blödite may occur primarily as nodules or intergrown with löweite. Reaction fabrics may have formed by exsolution, (re-)crystallisation, parallel growth or replacement. This fabric type was only found in one sample in relation with the decomposition of blödite at ca. 61 °C in the presence of halite or slightly above, testifying, therefore, a late stage prograde fabric significantly younger than the main polyhalite formation. PMID:26806997

  6. A multiplex panel of short-amplicon insertion-deletion DNA polymorphisms for forensic analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Santos, V R D; Pena, H B; Pena, S D J

    2015-01-01

    .... To optimize the panel for application with degraded DNA samples, which are commonly encountered in fo-rensic analysis, we have significantly reduced the amplicon size of the INDELs and developed a new multiplex panel...

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of flatfish (Order Pleuronectiformes) based on mitochondrial 16s rDNA sequences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pardo, Belén G; Machordom, Annie; Foresti, Fausto; Porto-Foresti, Fábio; Azevedo, Marisa F. C; Bañon, Rafael; Sánchez, Laura; Martínez, Paulino

    2005-01-01

    .... In the present study, the phylogenetic relationships of 30 flatfish species pertaining to seven different families were examined by sequence analysis of the first half of the 16S mitochondrial DNA gene...

  8. DNA analysis by single molecule stretching in nanofluidic biochips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abad, E.; Juarros, A.; Retolaza, A.

    2011-01-01

    Imprint Lithography (NIL) technology combined with a conventional anodic bonding of the silicon base and Pyrex cover. Using this chip, we have performed single molecule imaging on a bench-top fluorescent microscope system. Lambda phage DNA was used as a model sample to characterize the chip. Single molecules of λ...

  9. POSA : Perl objects for DNA sequencing data analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aerts, JA; Jungerius, BJ; Groenen, MA

    2004-01-01

    Background: Capillary DNA sequencing machines allow the generation of vast amounts of data with little hands-on time. With this expansion of data generation, there is a growing need for automated data processing. Most available software solutions, however, still require user intervention or provide

  10. POSA: perl objects for DNA sequencing data analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aerts, J.A.; Jungerius, B.J.; Groenen, M.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Background - Capillary DNA sequencing machines allow the generation of vast amounts of data with little hands-on time. With this expansion of data generation, there is a growing need for automated data processing. Most available software solutions, however, still require user intervention or provide

  11. Flow cytometric DNA ploidy analysis of ovarian granulosa cell tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Chadha; C.J. Cornelisse; A. Schabert (A.)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractAbstract The nuclear DNA content of 50 ovarian tumors initially diagnosed as granulosa cell tumors was measured by flow cytometry using paraffin-embedded archival material. The follow-up period of the patients ranged from 4 months to 19 years. Thirty-eight tumors were diploid or

  12. Mitochondrial DNA analysis reveals a low nucleotide diversity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-17

    Jun 17, 2009 ... breeds of pigs in South west China: An approach from mitochondrial. DNA polymorphism. Biochem. Genet. 31: 51-60. Liu YQ, Lu C, Qin L, Xiang ZH (2006). Genetic relationships of. Antheraea pernyi cultivars based on RAPD markers. Scientia. Agricultura Sinica, 39: 2608-2614. Nei M, Kumar S (2000).

  13. Genetic variation and DNA markers in forensic analysis | Hameed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The light has been focused and directed in this study to establish the basic forensic genetic information, knowledge, data and statistics which might be so ultimately helpful practically in forensic science and criminology and to let evaluate and present the DNA weight evidences in medico-legal institute and courts of law.

  14. DNA sequence and prokaryotic expression analysis of vitellogenin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the DNA sequence of vitellogenin from Antheraea pernyi (Ap-Vg) was identified and its functional domain (30-740 aa, Ap-Vg-1) was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells. The recombinant Ap-Vg-1 proteins were purified and used for antibody preparation. The results showed that the intact DNA ...

  15. DNA methylation and genetic diversity analysis of genus Cycas in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    10 Cycas species as well as one subspecies localized in Thailand were studied using the methylation sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP) technique. 11 MSAP primer combinations were used and 720 MSAP bands were generated. The percentages of DNA methylation estimated from MSAP fingerprints were in ...

  16. Analysis and classification of DNA-binding sites in single-stranded and double-stranded DNA-binding proteins using protein information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Juan; Xiong, Yi; Zhu, Lida; Zhou, Xionghui

    2014-08-01

    Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) and double-stranded DNA-binding proteins (DSBs) play different roles in biological processes when they bind to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) or double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). However, the underlying binding mechanisms of SSBs and DSBs have not yet been fully understood. Here, the authors firstly constructed two groups of ssDNA and dsDNA specific binding sites from two non-redundant sets of SSBs and DSBs. They further analysed the relationship between the two classes of binding sites and a newly proposed set of features (residue charge distribution, secondary structure and spatial shape). To assess and utilise the predictive power of these features, they trained a classification model using support vector machine to make predictions about the ssDNA and the dsDNA binding sites. The author's analysis and prediction results indicated that the two classes of binding sites can be distinguishable by the three types of features, and the final classifier using all the features achieved satisfactory performance. In conclusion, the proposed features will deepen their understanding of the specificity of proteins which bind to ssDNA or dsDNA.

  17. Silicon-based microfabricated microbial fuel cell toxicity sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila, D; Esquivel, J P; Sabaté, N; Mas, J

    2011-01-15

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been used for several years as biosensors for measuring environmental parameters such as biochemical oxygen demand and water toxicity. The present study is focused on the detection of toxic matter using a novel silicon-based MFC. Like other existing toxicity sensors based on MFCs, this device is capable of detecting the variation on the current produced by the cell when toxic compounds are present in the medium. The MFC approach presented in this work aims to obtain a simple, compact and planar device for its further application as a biosensor in the design and fabrication of equipment for toxicity monitoring. It consists on a proton exchange membrane placed between two microfabricated silicon plates that act as current collectors. An array of square 80 μm × 80 μm vertical channels, 300 μm deep, have been defined trough the plates over an area of 6 mm × 6 mm. The final testing assembly incorporates two perspex pieces positioned onto the plates as reservoirs with a working volume of 144 μL per compartment. The operation of the microdevice as a direct electron transfer MFC has been validated by comparing its performance against a larger scale MFC, run under the same conditions. The device has been tested as a toxicity sensor by setting it at a fixed current while monitoring changes in the output power. A drop in the power production is observed when a toxic compound is added to the anode compartment. The compact design of the device makes it suitable for its incorporation into measurement equipment either as an individual device or as an array of sensors for high throughput processing. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Microfabricated planar glass gas chromatography with photoionization detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Alastair C; Hamilton, Jacqueline F; Rhodes, Christopher N; Halliday, Jaydene; Bartle, Keith D; Homewood, Philip; Grenfell, Robin J P; Goody, Brian; Harling, Alice M; Brewer, Paul; Vargha, Gergely; Milton, Martin J T

    2010-01-29

    We report the development of a microfabricated gas chromatography system suitable for the separation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and compatible with use as a portable measurement device. Hydrofluoric acid etching of 95x95mm Schott B270 wafers has been used to give symmetrical hemi-spherical channels within a glass substrate. Two matching glass plates were subsequently cold bonded with the channels aligned; the flatness of the glass surfaces resulted in strong bonding through van der Waals forces. The device comprised gas fluidic interconnections, injection zone and 7.5 and 1.4m long, 320microm internal diameter capillaries. Optical microscopy confirmed the capillaries to have fully circular channel profiles. Direct column heating and cooling could be achieved using a combination of resistive heaters and Peltier devices. The low thermal conductivity of glass allowed for multiple uniform temperature zones to be achieved within a single glass chip. Temperature control over the range 10-200 degrees C was achieved with peak power demand of approximately 25W. The 7.5m capillary column was static coated with a 2microm film of non-polar dimethylpolysiloxane stationary phase. A standard FID and a modified lightweight 100mW photoionization detector (PID) were coupled to the column and performance tested with gas mixtures of monoaromatic and monoterpene species at the parts per million concentration level. The low power GC-PID device showed good performance for a small set of VOCs and sub ng detection sensitivity to monoaromatics. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Urine Cell-Free DNA Integrity Analysis for Early Detection of Prostate Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurioli, Giorgia; Martignano, Filippo; Foca, Flavia; Gunelli, Roberta; Cicchetti, Giacomo; De Giorgi, Ugo; Zoli, Wainer; Calistri, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The detection of tumor-specific markers in urine has paved the way for new early noninvasive diagnostic approaches for prostate cancer. We evaluated the DNA integrity in urine supernatant to verify its capacity to discriminate between prostate cancer and benign diseases of the urogenital tract. Patients and Methods. A total of 131 individuals were enrolled: 67 prostate cancer patients and 64 patients with benign diseases of the urogenital tract (control group). Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels were determined. Urine cell-free (UCF) DNA was isolated and sequences longer than 250 bp corresponding to 3 genes (c-MYC, HER2, and AR) were quantified by Real-Time PCR to assess UCF-DNA integrity. Results. UCF-DNA was quantifiable in all samples, while UCF-DNA integrity was evaluable in all but 16 samples. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed an area under the curve of 0.5048 for UCF-DNA integrity and 0.8423 for PSA. Sensitivity was 0.58 and 0.95 for UCF-DNA integrity and PSA, respectively. Specificity was 0.44 and 0.69, respectively. Conclusions. UCF-DNA integrity showed lower accuracy than PSA and would not seem to be a reliable marker for early prostate cancer diagnosis. Despite this, we believe that UCF-DNA could represent a source of other biomarkers and could detect gene alterations. PMID:26412928

  20. Optimization of DNA Extraction for RAPD and ISSR Analysis of Arbutus unedo L. Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Baptista

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetic analysis of plants relies on high yields of pure DNA. For the strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo this represents a great challenge since leaves can accumulate large amounts of polysaccharides, polyphenols and secondary metabolites, which co-purify with DNA. For this specie, standard protocols do not produce efficient yields of high-quality amplifiable DNA. Here, we present for the first time an improved leaf-tissue protocol, based on the standard cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide protocol, which yields large amounts of high-quality amplifiable DNA. Key steps in the optimized protocol are the addition of antioxidant compounds—namely polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP, 1,4-dithiothreitol (DTT and 2-mercaptoethanol, in the extraction buffer; the increasing of CTAB (3%, w/v and sodium chloride (2M concentration; and an extraction with organic solvents (phenol and chloroform with the incubation of samples on ice. Increasing the temperature for cell lyses to 70 °C also improved both DNA quality and yield. The yield of DNA extracted was 200.0 ± 78.0 µg/µL and the purity, evaluated by the ratio A260/A280, was 1.80 ± 0.021, indicative of minimal levels of contaminating metabolites. The quality of the DNA isolated was confirmed by random amplification polymorphism DNA and by inter-simple sequence repeat amplification, proving that the DNA can be amplified via PCR.

  1. Microneedles with intrinsic immunoadjuvant properties: microfabrication, protein stability, and modulated release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianov, Alexander K; Marin, Alexander; DeCollibus, Daniel P

    2011-01-01

    Intradermal immunization using microneedles requires compatible immunoadjuvant system. To address this challenge, we investigated microneedles coated with polyphosphazene polyelectrolyte, which served both as microfabrication material and an immunoadjuvant compound. Coated microneedles were fabricated by depositing formulations containing Poly[di(carboxylatophenoxy)phosphazene], PCPP, on metal shafts, and their physico-chemical characterization was conducted. Microfabrication of PCPP-coated microneedles exhibited strong dependence on protein-PCPP interactions in solutions and allowed for high efficiency of protein encapsulation. 70°C thermal inactivation studies demonstrated a remarkable increase in functional stability of protein in coated microneedles compared to solution formulation. A potential for modulation of protein release from coated microneedles has been demonstrated through ionic complexation of PCPP with small ions. Microneedles containing PCPP coatings provide improved protein stability, modulated release, and protein-friendly microfabrication process.

  2. Intrinsic Dynamics Analysis of a DNA Octahedron by Elastic Network Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Hu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA is a fundamental component of living systems where it plays a crucial role at both functional and structural level. The programmable properties of DNA make it an interesting building block for the construction of nanostructures. However, molecular mechanisms for the arrangement of these well-defined DNA assemblies are not fully understood. In this paper, the intrinsic dynamics of a DNA octahedron has been investigated by using two types of Elastic Network Models (ENMs. The application of ENMs to DNA nanocages include the analysis of the intrinsic flexibilities of DNA double-helices and hinge sites through the calculation of the square fluctuations, as well as the intrinsic collective dynamics in terms of cross-collective map calculation coupled with global motions analysis. The dynamics profiles derived from ENMs have then been evaluated and compared with previous classical molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. The results presented here revealed that ENMs can provide useful insights into the intrinsic dynamics of large DNA nanocages and represent a useful tool in the field of structural DNA nanotechnology.

  3. Determining the optimal forensic DNA analysis procedure following investigation of sample quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedell, Ronny; Hedman, Johannes; Mostad, Petter

    2017-07-17

    Crime scene traces of various types are routinely sent to forensic laboratories for analysis, generally with the aim of addressing questions about the source of the trace. The laboratory may choose to analyse the samples in different ways depending on the type and quality of the sample, the importance of the case and the cost and performance of the available analysis methods. Theoretically well-founded guidelines for the choice of analysis method are, however, lacking in most situations. In this paper, it is shown how such guidelines can be created using Bayesian decision theory. The theory is applied to forensic DNA analysis, showing how the information from the initial qPCR analysis can be utilized. It is assumed the alternatives for analysis are using a standard short tandem repeat (STR) DNA analysis assay, using the standard assay and a complementary assay, or the analysis may be cancelled following quantification. The decision is based on information about the DNA amount and level of DNA degradation of the forensic sample, as well as case circumstances and the cost for analysis. Semi-continuous electropherogram models are used for simulation of DNA profiles and for computation of likelihood ratios. It is shown how tables and graphs, prepared beforehand, can be used to quickly find the optimal decision in forensic casework.

  4. Validation of human papillomavirus genotyping by signature DNA sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sin Hang; Vigliotti, Veronica S; Vigliotti, Jessica S; Pappu, Suri

    2009-05-22

    Screening with combined cytologic and HPV testing has led to the highest number of excessive colposcopic referrals due to high false positive rates of the current HPV testing in the USA. How best to capitalize on the enhanced sensitivity of HPV DNA testing while minimizing false-positive results from its lower specificity is an important task for the clinical pathologists. The HPV L1 gene DNA in liquid-based Pap cytology specimens was initially amplified by the degenerate MY09/MY11 PCR primers and then re-amplified by the nested GP5+/GP6+ primers, or the heminested GP6/MY11, heminested GP5/MY09 primers or their modified equivalent without sample purification or DNA extraction. The nested PCR products were used for direct automated DNA sequencing. A 34- to 50-base sequence including the GP5+ priming site was selected as the signature sequence for routine genotyping by online BLAST sequence alignment algorithms. Of 3,222 specimens, 352 were found to contain HPV DNA, with 92% of the positive samples infected by only 1 of the 35 HPV genotypes detected and 8% by more than 1 HPV genotype. The most common genotype was HPV-16 (68 isolates), followed by HPV-52 (25 isolates). More than half (53.7%) of the total number of HPV isolates relied on a nested PCR for detection although the majority of HPV-16, -18, -31, -33 -35 and -58 isolates were detected by a single MY09/MY11 PCR. Alignment of a 34-base sequence downstream of the GP5+ site failed to distinguish some isolates of HPV-16, -31 and -33. Novel variants of HPV with less than "100% identities" signature sequence match with those stored in the Genbank database were also detected by signature DNA sequencing in this rural and suburban population of the United States. Laboratory staff must be familiar with the limitations of the consensus PCR primers, the locations of the signature sequence in the L1 gene for some HPV genotypes, and HPV genotype sequence variants in order to perform accurate HPV genotyping.

  5. Validation of human papillomavirus genotyping by signature DNA sequence analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vigliotti Jessica S

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Screening with combined cytologic and HPV testing has led to the highest number of excessive colposcopic referrals due to high false positive rates of the current HPV testing in the USA. How best to capitalize on the enhanced sensitivity of HPV DNA testing while minimizing false-positive results from its lower specificity is an important task for the clinical pathologists. Methods The HPV L1 gene DNA in liquid-based Pap cytology specimens was initially amplified by the degenerate MY09/MY11 PCR primers and then re-amplified by the nested GP5+/GP6+ primers, or the heminested GP6/MY11, heminested GP5/MY09 primers or their modified equivalent without sample purification or DNA extraction. The nested PCR products were used for direct automated DNA sequencing. A 34- to 50-base sequence including the GP5+ priming site was selected as the signature sequence for routine genotyping by online BLAST sequence alignment algorithms. Results Of 3,222 specimens, 352 were found to contain HPV DNA, with 92% of the positive samples infected by only 1 of the 35 HPV genotypes detected and 8% by more than 1 HPV genotype. The most common genotype was HPV-16 (68 isolates, followed by HPV-52 (25 isolates. More than half (53.7% of the total number of HPV isolates relied on a nested PCR for detection although the majority of HPV-16, -18, -31, -33 -35 and -58 isolates were detected by a single MY09/MY11 PCR. Alignment of a 34-base sequence downstream of the GP5+ site failed to distinguish some isolates of HPV-16, -31 and -33. Novel variants of HPV with less than "100% identities" signature sequence match with those stored in the Genbank database were also detected by signature DNA sequencing in this rural and suburban population of the United States. Conclusion Laboratory staff must be familiar with the limitations of the consensus PCR primers, the locations of the signature sequence in the L1 gene for some HPV genotypes, and HPV genotype sequence

  6. Northern and Southern blot analysis of human RNA and DNA in autopsy material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, S; Rygaard, K; Asnaes, S

    1992-01-01

    Fresh biopsy material for molecular biological investigations is not obtainable from all relevant normal human tissues. We studied the feasibility of using RNA and DNA from autopsies for Northern and Southern blot analysis. Tissue samples from seven organs were obtained from 10 autopsies performed...... 21-118 h postmortem. Extracted RNA and DNA were examined by Northern and Southern blot analysis using oligo-labelled human DNA probes recognizing gene transcripts of 2-5 kb. The results indicated that, in general, Northern blot analysis was feasible with the applied probes when the tissue...... was obtained less than two days postmortem. Histological examination showing slight or no autolysis and the presence of ribosomal bands after gel electrophoresis were both indicative parameters of RNA preservation. DNA was appropriate for Southern blotting when the tissue was obtained less than three to five...

  7. Ancient DNA analysis of northeast Pacific humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae)

    OpenAIRE

    Arndt, Ursula Maria

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of this ancient DNA-based study was to analyze archaeological whale skeletal remains from the west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia to investigate population genetic diversities of humpback whales pre-dating industrial whaling. This study also examined whale hunting practices of early indigenous people by revealing potential species selections. Nuu-chah-nulth people are believed to have hunted whales for millennia and numerous whale bones have been recovered from arch...

  8. DNA barcoding analysis of Coleoidea (Mollusca: Cephalopoda) from Chinese waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lina; Zheng, Xiaodong; Kong, Lingfeng; Li, Qi

    2012-05-01

    Coleoids are part of the Cephalopoda class, which occupy an important position in most oceans both at an ecological level and at a commercial level. Nevertheless, some coleoid species are difficult to distinguish with traditional morphological identification in cases when specimens are heavily damaged during collection or when closely related taxa are existent. As a useful tool for rapid species assignment, DNA barcoding may offer significant potential for coleoid identification. Here, we used two mitochondrial fragments, cytochrome c oxidase I and the large ribosomal subunit (16S rRNA), to assess whether 34 coleoids accounting for about one-third of the Chinese coleoid fauna could be identified by DNA barcoding technique. The pairwise intra- and interspecific distances were assessed, and relationships among species were estimated by NJ and bayesian analyses. High levels of genetic differentiation within Loliolus beka led to an overlap between intra- and interspecific distances. All remaining species forming well-differentiated clades in the NJ and bayesian trees were identical for both fragments. Loliolus beka possessed two mitochondrial lineages with high levels of intraspecific distances, suggesting the occurrence of cryptic species. This study confirms the efficacy of DNA barcoding for identifying species as well as discovering cryptic diversity of Chinese coleoids. It also lays a foundation for other ecological and biological studies of Coleoidea. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Sensitive and specific KRAS somatic mutation analysis on whole-genome amplified DNA from archival tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eijk, Ronald; van Puijenbroek, Marjo; Chhatta, Amiet R; Gupta, Nisha; Vossen, Rolf H A M; Lips, Esther H; Cleton-Jansen, Anne-Marie; Morreau, Hans; van Wezel, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Kirsten RAS (KRAS) is a small GTPase that plays a key role in Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling; somatic mutations in KRAS are frequently found in many cancers. The most common KRAS mutations result in a constitutively active protein. Accurate detection of KRAS mutations is pivotal to the molecular diagnosis of cancer and may guide proper treatment selection. Here, we describe a two-step KRAS mutation screening protocol that combines whole-genome amplification (WGA), high-resolution melting analysis (HRM) as a prescreen method for mutation carrying samples, and direct Sanger sequencing of DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue, from which limited amounts of DNA are available. We developed target-specific primers, thereby avoiding amplification of homologous KRAS sequences. The addition of herring sperm DNA facilitated WGA in DNA samples isolated from as few as 100 cells. KRAS mutation screening using high-resolution melting analysis on wgaDNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue is highly sensitive and specific; additionally, this method is feasible for screening of clinical specimens, as illustrated by our analysis of pancreatic cancers. Furthermore, PCR on wgaDNA does not introduce genotypic changes, as opposed to unamplified genomic DNA. This method can, after validation, be applied to virtually any potentially mutated region in the genome.

  10. Identification by DNA analysis of the victims of the August 1996 Spitsbergen civil aircraft disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaisen, B; Stenersen, M; Mevåg, B

    1997-04-01

    Disaster victim identification traditionally relies on the combined efforts of police, dentists and pathologists, comparing ante mortem (AM) information from the missing persons with post mortem (PM) data from the dead bodies. In Western countries, dental evidence has ordinarily played the major role. DNA analysis has been used successfully in a number of large accidents to associate body parts and for purposes of identification, by comparing victims' DNA profiles with those of relatives. However, DNA typing is still not generally regarded as an essential part of disaster victim identification. Facing the August 1996 Spitsbergen aircraft accident in which 141 Russians and Ukrainians died and anticipating scanty ante mortem dental data, it was decided to use DNA profile analysis as the primary identification method. Material collected at the scene from all body parts, and blood sample from relatives were analysed at eight polymorphic microsatellite and minisatellite loci, DNA profile comparisons enabled us to sort the 257 typed body parts into 141 individuals, as well as identifying the 139 victims for whom reference samples were available. Identification by DNA analysis was then followed by comparisons of traditional AM and PM data, and within day 20 of the accident the identities of all victims were confidently established. This investigation indicates that it might be feasible to replace traditional identification efforts with DNA typing.

  11. Comparison of Automated and Manual DNA Isolation Methods for DNA Methylation Analysis of Biopsy, Fresh Frozen, and Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Colorectal Cancer Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmár, Alexandra; Péterfia, Bálint; Wichmann, Barnabás; Patai, Árpád V; Barták, Barbara K; Nagy, Zsófia B; Furi, István; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2015-12-01

    Automated DNA isolation can decrease hands-on time in routine pathology. Our aim was to apply automated DNA isolation and perform DNA methylation analyses. DNA isolation was performed manually from fresh frozen (CRC = 10, normal = 10) specimens and colonic biopsies (CRC = 10, healthy = 10) with QIAamp DNA Mini Kit and from FFPE blocks (CRC = 10, normal = 10) with QIAamp DNA FFPET Kit. Automated DNA isolation was performed with MagNA Pure DNA and Viral NA SV kit on MagNA Pure 96 system. DNA methylation of MAL, SFRP1, and SFRP2 were analyzed with methylation-specific high-resolution melting analysis. Yield of automatically isolated samples was equal in fresh frozens and significantly lower compared to manually isolated biopsy and FFPE samples. OD260/280 of fresh frozen and biopsy samples were similar after both isolations, automated isolation resulted in lower purity in FFPE samples. Both protocols resulted in similar OD260/230 from fresh frozens, automated isolation method was superior in biopsies and manual protocol in FFPE samples. DNA methylation of biopsies, fresh frozen samples were highly similar after both methods, results of automatically and manually isolated FFPE samples were different. Automated DNA isolation from fresh frozen samples can be suitable for high-throughput laboratories. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  12. DNA sequencing with capillary electrophoresis and single cell analysis with mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fung, N.

    1998-03-27

    Since the first demonstration of the laser in the 1960`s, lasers have found numerous applications in analytical chemistry. In this work, two different applications are described, namely, DNA sequencing with capillary gel electrophoresis and single cell analysis with mass spectrometry. Two projects are described in which high-speed DNA separations with capillary gel electrophoresis were demonstrated. In the third project, flow cytometry and mass spectrometry were coupled via a laser vaporization/ionization interface and individual mammalian cells were analyzed. First, DNA Sanger fragments were separated by capillary gel electrophoresis. A separation speed of 20 basepairs per minute was demonstrated with a mixed poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) sieving solution. In addition, a new capillary wall treatment protocol was developed in which bare (or uncoated) capillaries can be used in DNA sequencing. Second, a temperature programming scheme was used to separate DNA Sanger fragments. Third, flow cytometry and mass spectrometry were coupled with a laser vaporization/ionization interface.

  13. Image data analysis in qPCR: A method for smart analysis of DNA amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Orazio Spata

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a method for the direct quantitative analysis of amplified DNA via q-Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR in miniaturised silicon-based chip system is presented. The designed tool presented here allows the automatic extraction of meaningful information from input fluorescent images by means of digital image processing algorithm. In particular, a smart mathematical model, optimizing the integration of all the analysis steps of the fluorescence data from on chip multiple real time PCR, is described. Such a tool is able to load the digital input images, select and smartly detect the region of interest for fluorescence, elaborate the data input, calculate the average fluorescence values and finally, plot the fitted curve as output, giving also, for each well, both the Cycle Threshold (CT and Slope parameters.

  14. Characterizing the distribution of an endangered salmonid using environmental DNA analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laramie, Matthew B.; Pilliod, David S.; Goldberg, Caren S.

    2015-01-01

    Determining species distributions accurately is crucial to developing conservation and management strategies for imperiled species, but a challenging task for small populations. We evaluated the efficacy of environmental DNA (eDNA) analysis for improving detection and thus potentially refining the known distribution of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Methow and Okanogan Subbasins of the Upper Columbia River, which span the border between Washington, USA and British Columbia, Canada. We developed an assay to target a 90 base pair sequence of Chinook DNA and used quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to quantify the amount of Chinook eDNA in triplicate 1-L water samples collected at 48 stream locations in June and again in August 2012. The overall probability of detecting Chinook with our eDNA method in areas within the known distribution was 0.77 (±0.05 SE). Detection probability was lower in June (0.62, ±0.08 SE) during high flows and at the beginning of spring Chinook migration than during base flows in August (0.93, ±0.04 SE). In the Methow subbasin, mean eDNA concentration was higher in August compared to June, especially in smaller tributaries, probably resulting from the arrival of spring Chinook adults, reduced discharge, or both. Chinook eDNA concentrations did not appear to change in the Okanogan subbasin from June to August. Contrary to our expectations about downstream eDNA accumulation, Chinook eDNA did not decrease in concentration in upstream reaches (0–120 km). Further examination of factors influencing spatial distribution of eDNA in lotic systems may allow for greater inference of local population densities along stream networks or watersheds. These results demonstrate the potential effectiveness of eDNA detection methods for determining landscape-level distribution of anadromous salmonids in large river systems.

  15. AQME: A forensic mitochondrial DNA analysis tool for next-generation sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturk-Andreaggi, Kimberly; Peck, Michelle A; Boysen, Cecilie; Dekker, Patrick; McMahon, Timothy P; Marshall, Charla K

    2017-11-01

    The feasibility of generating mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) data has expanded considerably with the advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS), specifically in the generation of entire mtDNA genome (mitogenome) sequences. However, the analysis of these data has emerged as the greatest challenge to implementation in forensics. To address this need, a custom toolkit for use in the CLC Genomics Workbench (QIAGEN, Hilden, Germany) was developed through a collaborative effort between the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System - Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory (AFMES-AFDIL) and QIAGEN Bioinformatics. The AFDIL-QIAGEN mtDNA Expert, or AQME, generates an editable mtDNA profile that employs forensic conventions and includes the interpretation range required for mtDNA data reporting. AQME also integrates an mtDNA haplogroup estimate into the analysis workflow, which provides the analyst with phylogenetic nomenclature guidance and a profile quality check without the use of an external tool. Supplemental AQME outputs such as nucleotide-per-position metrics, configurable export files, and an audit trail are produced to assist the analyst during review. AQME is applied to standard CLC outputs and thus can be incorporated into any mtDNA bioinformatics pipeline within CLC regardless of sample type, library preparation or NGS platform. An evaluation of AQME was performed to demonstrate its functionality and reliability for the analysis of mitogenome NGS data. The study analyzed Illumina mitogenome data from 21 samples (including associated controls) of varying quality and sample preparations with the AQME toolkit. A total of 211 tool edits were automatically applied to 130 of the 698 total variants reported in an effort to adhere to forensic nomenclature. Although additional manual edits were required for three samples, supplemental tools such as mtDNA haplogroup estimation assisted in identifying and guiding these necessary modifications to the AQME-generated profile. Along

  16. Rational design of DNA-actuated enzyme nanoreactors guided by single molecule analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Soma; Adendorff, Matthew R.; Liu, Minghui; Yan, Hao; Bathe, Mark; Walter, Nils G.

    2016-01-01

    The control of enzymatic reactions using nanoscale DNA devices offers a powerful application of DNA nanotechnology uniquely derived from actuation. However, previous characterization of enzymatic reaction rates using bulk biochemical assays reported suboptimal function of DNA devices such as tweezers. To gain mechanistic insight into this deficiency and to identify design rules to improve their function, here we exploit the synergy of single molecule imaging and computational modeling to characterize the three-dimensional structures and catalytic functions of DNA tweezer-actuated nanoreactors. Our analysis revealed two important deficiencies - incomplete closure upon actuation and conformational heterogeneity. Upon rational redesign of the Holliday junctions located at their hinge and arms, we found that the DNA tweezers could be more completely and uniformly closed. A novel single molecule enzyme assay was developed to demonstrate that our design improvements yield significant, independent enhancements in the fraction of active enzyme nanoreactors and their individual substrate turnover frequencies. The sequence-level design strategies explored here may aid more broadly in improving the performance of DNA-based nanodevices including biological and chemical sensors.The control of enzymatic reactions using nanoscale DNA devices offers a powerful application of DNA nanotechnology uniquely derived from actuation. However, previous characterization of enzymatic reaction rates using bulk biochemical assays reported suboptimal function of DNA devices such as tweezers. To gain mechanistic insight into this deficiency and to identify design rules to improve their function, here we exploit the synergy of single molecule imaging and computational modeling to characterize the three-dimensional structures and catalytic functions of DNA tweezer-actuated nanoreactors. Our analysis revealed two important deficiencies - incomplete closure upon actuation and conformational

  17. Ancient DNA analysis identifies marine mollusc shells as new metagenomic archives of the past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Der Sarkissian, Clio; Pichereau, Vianney; Dupont, Catherine; Ilsøe, Peter C; Perrigault, Mickael; Butler, Paul; Chauvaud, Laurent; Eiríksson, Jón; Scourse, James; Paillard, Christine; Orlando, Ludovic

    2017-09-01

    Marine mollusc shells enclose a wealth of information on coastal organisms and their environment. Their life history traits as well as (palaeo-) environmental conditions, including temperature, food availability, salinity and pollution, can be traced through the analysis of their shell (micro-) structure and biogeochemical composition. Adding to this list, the DNA entrapped in shell carbonate biominerals potentially offers a novel and complementary proxy both for reconstructing palaeoenvironments and tracking mollusc evolutionary trajectories. Here, we assess this potential by applying DNA extraction, high-throughput shotgun DNA sequencing and metagenomic analyses to marine mollusc shells spanning the last ~7,000 years. We report successful DNA extraction from shells, including a variety of ancient specimens, and find that DNA recovery is highly dependent on their biomineral structure, carbonate layer preservation and disease state. We demonstrate positive taxonomic identification of mollusc species using a combination of mitochondrial DNA genomes, barcodes, genome-scale data and metagenomic approaches. We also find shell biominerals to contain a diversity of microbial DNA from the marine environment. Finally, we reconstruct genomic sequences of organisms closely related to the Vibrio tapetis bacteria from Manila clam shells previously diagnosed with Brown Ring Disease. Our results reveal marine mollusc shells as novel genetic archives of the past, which opens new perspectives in ancient DNA research, with the potential to reconstruct the evolutionary history of molluscs, microbial communities and pathogens in the face of environmental changes. Other future applications include conservation of endangered mollusc species and aquaculture management. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Flow cytometric analysis of cellular DNA content in human astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahyai, A

    1988-01-01

    This report presents a flow-cytometric analysis of cellular DNA in biopsies and primary cell cultures of 21 human astrocytomas and 19 oligodendrogliomas. A distinct correlation between histological dedifferentiation and pathological DNA distribution was found. Classification was made according to increasing histological anaplasia, corresponding to a four-grade scale and proliferation index (PI). Four types of gliomas were defined according to characteristic DNA patterns and proliferative activities in comparison to their histological grading: 1. purely diploid DNA patterns with low 4C (premitotic) peaks and PI values up to 10 in well-differentiated gliomas; 2. increase of tetraploid cells and PI of 10-16 in tumors with histological grades II or II-III; 3. diploid-tetraploid DNA distribution with PI values up to 30-31 and malignancy grade III; 4. polyploid and aneuploid karyograms with excessive 4C increase, emerging in grade III and especially grade III-IV of these gliomas. Varying DNA distribution during tumor development could be observed in a malignant transformation of an oligodendroglioma I to a glioblastoma after a course of 3 1/2 years. A more detailed subdivision of these tumors according to their DNA content and proliferative activity was achieved. With the exception of occasional variation in karyograms, DNA distribution usually remained stable in primary tissue cultures (PTC).

  19. A novel method for comparative analysis of DNA sequences by Ramanujan-Fourier transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Changchuan; Yin, Xuemeng E; Wang, Jiasong

    2014-12-01

    Alignment-free sequence analysis approaches provide important alternatives over multiple sequence alignment (MSA) in biological sequence analysis because alignment-free approaches have low computation complexity and are not dependent on high level of sequence identity. However, most of the existing alignment-free methods do not employ true full information content of sequences and thus can not accurately reveal similarities and differences among DNA sequences. We present a novel alignment-free computational method for sequence analysis based on Ramanujan-Fourier transform (RFT), in which complete information of DNA sequences is retained. We represent DNA sequences as four binary indicator sequences and apply RFT on the indicator sequences to convert them into frequency domain. The Euclidean distance of the complete RFT coefficients of DNA sequences are used as similarity measures. To address the different lengths of RFT coefficients in Euclidean space, we pad zeros to short DNA binary sequences so that the binary sequences equal the longest length in the comparison sequence data. Thus, the DNA sequences are compared in the same dimensional frequency space without information loss. We demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed method by presenting experimental results on hierarchical clustering of genes and genomes. The proposed method opens a new channel to biological sequence analysis, classification, and structural module identification.

  20. Efficiency of EGFR mutation analysis for small microdissected cytological specimens using multitech DNA extraction solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seo Young; Lee, Hoon Taek

    2015-07-01

    The microdissection method has greatly facilitated the isolation of pure cell populations for accurate analysis of mutations. However, the absence of coverslips in these preparations leads to poor resolution of cellular morphological features. In the current study, the authors developed the MultiTech DNA extraction solution to improve the visualization of cell morphology for microdissection and tested it for the preservation of morphological properties of cells, quality of DNA, and ability to detect mutations. A total of 121 cytological samples, including fine-needle aspirates, sputum, pleural fluid, and bronchial washings, were selected from hospital archives. DNA extracted from microdissected cells was evaluated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation analysis using pyrosequencing, Sanger sequencing, and peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-mediated real-time polymerase chain reaction clamping. Morphological features of cells as well as DNA quality and quantity were analyzed in several cytological samples to assess the performance of the MultiTech DNA extraction solution. The results were compared with previous EGFR mutation tests. The MultiTech DNA extraction solution improved the morphology of archived stained cells before microdissection and provided a higher DNA yield than the commercial QIAamp DNA Mini Kit in samples containing a minimal number of cells (25-50 cells). The authors were able to detect identical EGFR mutations by using different analysis platforms and consistently identified these mutations in samples comprising as few as 25 microdissected cells. The MultiTech DNA extraction solution is a reliable medium that improves the resolution of cell morphology during microdissection. It was particularly useful in EGFR mutations of samples containing a small number of cells. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  1. DNA Extraction Protocol for Biological Ingredient Analysis of Liuwei Dihuang Wan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinwei Cheng

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM preparations are widely used for healthcare and clinical practice. So far, the methods commonly used for quality evaluation of TCM preparations mainly focused on chemical ingredients. The biological ingredient analysis of TCM preparations is also important because TCM preparations usually contain both plant and animal ingredients, which often include some mis-identified herbal materials, adulterants or even some biological contaminants. For biological ingredient analysis, the efficiency of DNA extraction is an important factor which might affect the accuracy and reliability of identification. The component complexity in TCM preparations is high, and DNA might be destroyed or degraded in different degrees after a series of processing procedures. Therefore, it is necessary to establish an effective protocol for DNA extraction from TCM preparations. In this study, we chose a classical TCM preparation, Liuwei Dihuang Wan (LDW, as an example to develop a TCM-specific DNA extraction method. An optimized cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB method (TCM-CTAB and three commonly-used extraction kits were tested for extraction of DNA from LDW samples. Experimental results indicated that DNA with the highest purity and concentration was obtained by using TCM-CTAB. To further evaluate the different extraction methods, amplification of the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2 and the chloroplast genome trnL intron was carried out. The results have shown that PCR amplification was successful only with template of DNA extracted by using TCM-CTAB. Moreover, we performed high-throughput 454 sequencing using DNA extracted by TCM-CTAB. Data analysis showed that 3–4 out of 6 prescribed species were detected from LDW samples, while up to 5 contaminating species were detected, suggesting TCM-CTAB method could facilitate follow-up DNA-based examination of TCM preparations.

  2. DNA extraction protocol for biological ingredient analysis of Liuwei Dihuang Wan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xinwei; Chen, Xiaohua; Su, Xiaoquan; Zhao, Huanxin; Han, Maozhen; Bo, Cunpei; Xu, Jian; Bai, Hong; Ning, Kang

    2014-06-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) preparations are widely used for healthcare and clinical practice. So far, the methods commonly used for quality evaluation of TCM preparations mainly focused on chemical ingredients. The biological ingredient analysis of TCM preparations is also important because TCM preparations usually contain both plant and animal ingredients, which often include some mis-identified herbal materials, adulterants or even some biological contaminants. For biological ingredient analysis, the efficiency of DNA extraction is an important factor which might affect the accuracy and reliability of identification. The component complexity in TCM preparations is high, and DNA might be destroyed or degraded in different degrees after a series of processing procedures. Therefore, it is necessary to establish an effective protocol for DNA extraction from TCM preparations. In this study, we chose a classical TCM preparation, Liuwei Dihuang Wan (LDW), as an example to develop a TCM-specific DNA extraction method. An optimized cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) method (TCM-CTAB) and three commonly-used extraction kits were tested for extraction of DNA from LDW samples. Experimental results indicated that DNA with the highest purity and concentration was obtained by using TCM-CTAB. To further evaluate the different extraction methods, amplification of the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) and the chloroplast genome trnL intron was carried out. The results have shown that PCR amplification was successful only with template of DNA extracted by using TCM-CTAB. Moreover, we performed high-throughput 454 sequencing using DNA extracted by TCM-CTAB. Data analysis showed that 3-4 out of 6 prescribed species were detected from LDW samples, while up to 5 contaminating species were detected, suggesting TCM-CTAB method could facilitate follow-up DNA-based examination of TCM preparations. Copyright © 2014. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Deciphering the Epigenetic Code: An Overview of DNA Methylation Analysis Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umer, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Methylation of cytosine in DNA is linked with gene regulation, and this has profound implications in development, normal biology, and disease conditions in many eukaryotic organisms. A wide range of methods and approaches exist for its identification, quantification, and mapping within the genome. While the earliest approaches were nonspecific and were at best useful for quantification of total methylated cytosines in the chunk of DNA, this field has seen considerable progress and development over the past decades. Recent Advances: Methods for DNA methylation analysis differ in their coverage and sensitivity, and the method of choice depends on the intended application and desired level of information. Potential results include global methyl cytosine content, degree of methylation at specific loci, or genome-wide methylation maps. Introduction of more advanced approaches to DNA methylation analysis, such as microarray platforms and massively parallel sequencing, has brought us closer to unveiling the whole methylome. Critical Issues: Sensitive quantification of DNA methylation from degraded and minute quantities of DNA and high-throughput DNA methylation mapping of single cells still remain a challenge. Future Directions: Developments in DNA sequencing technologies as well as the methods for identification and mapping of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine are expected to augment our current understanding of epigenomics. Here we present an overview of methodologies available for DNA methylation analysis with special focus on recent developments in genome-wide and high-throughput methods. While the application focus relates to cancer research, the methods are equally relevant to broader issues of epigenetics and redox science in this special forum. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1972–1986. PMID:23121567

  4. AFM 4.0: a toolbox for DNA microarray analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Breitkreutz, Bobby-Joe; Jorgensen, Paul; Breitkreutz, Ashton; Tyers, Mike

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a series of programs, collectively packaged as Array File Maker 4.0 (AFM), that manipulate and manage DNA microarray data. AFM 4.0 is simple to use, applicable to any organism or microarray, and operates within the familiar confines of Microsoft Excel. Given a database of expression ratios, AFM 4.0 generates input files for clustering, helps prepare colored figures and Venn diagrams, and can uncover aneuploidy in yeast microarray data. AFM 4.0 should be especially useful to ...

  5. The impact of DNA contamination of bone samples in forensic case analysis and anthropological research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Wurmb-Schwark, Nicole; Heinrich, Anke; Freudenberg, Mechthild; Gebühr, Michael; Schwark, Thorsten

    2008-05-01

    Contamination precautions and quality control are great issues when human bones are investigated genetically. This is especially true for historical samples with only minute amounts of usually highly degraded DNA. But also in forensic routine analysis, sometimes DNA has to be isolated from bones in equally bad conditions, e.g. from burned victims. In such cases, there are several eventualities to contaminate the sample with foreign DNA, for example caused by the recovery of the bones, by trace investigation on a crime scene, or - of course - during handling in the lab. We present the investigation of artificially contaminated historical bone samples which contained no original DNA. Three different kind of contamination were studied: (1) touching of the samples, (2) application of saliva, and (3) application of pure DNA. The samples were genetically investigated without and with the employment of a defined cleaning protocol of the bones. The results show that pure DNA can usually not be removed from the bones and that saliva is a similar thread for subsequent DNA analysis. After the cleaning procedure about 70% of saliva contaminated samples still yielded reproducible STR profiles implicating severe problems for the investigation of highly degraded bone fragments. Simple touching of the specimens seems not to be a real problem for genetic investigations since the obtained signals were not reproducible.

  6. Random amplified polymorphic DNA and restriction enzyme analysis of PCR amplified rDNA in taxonomy: Two identification techniques for food-borne yeasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baleiras Couto, M.M.; Vogels, J.T.W.E.; Hofstra, H.; Veld, J.H.J. Huis in't; Vossen, J.M.B.M. van der

    1995-01-01

    The random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) assay and the restriction enzyme analysis of PCR amplified rDNA are compared for the identification of the common spoilage yeasts Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Z. rouxii, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida valida and C. lipolytica. Both techniques proved to be

  7. The Potential of Cosmetic Applicators as a Source of DNA for Forensic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamowicz, Michael S; Labonte, Renáe D; Schienman, John E

    2015-07-01

    Personal products, such as toothbrushes, have been used as both known reference and evidentiary samples for forensic DNA analysis. This study examined the viability of a broad selection of cosmetic applicators for use as targets for human DNA extraction and short tandem repeat (STR) analysis using standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR) conditions. Applicator types included eyeliner smudgers, pencils and crayons, eye shadow sponges, mascara wands, concealer wands, face makeup sponges, pads and brushes, lipsticks and balms, and lip gloss wands. The quantity and quality of DNA extracted from each type of applicator were examined by assessing the number of loci successfully amplified and the peak balance of the heterozygous alleles in each full STR profile. While degraded DNA, stochastic amplification, and PCR inhibition were observed for some items, full STR profiles were developed for 14 of 76 applicators. The face makeup sponge applicators yielded the highest proportional number of full STR profiles (4/7). © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  8. WEB-THERMODYN: sequence analysis software for profiling DNA helical stability

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Yanlin; Kowalski, David

    2003-01-01

    WEB-THERMODYN analyzes DNA sequences and computes the DNA helical stability, i.e. the free energy required to unwind and separate the strands of the double helix. A helical stability profile across a selected DNA region or the entire sequence is generated by sliding-window analysis. WEB-THERMODYN can predict sites of low helical stability present at regulatory regions for transcription and replication and can be used to test the influence of mutations. The program can be accessed at: http://w...

  9. A Cross-Cancer Genetic Association Analysis of the DNA Repair and DNA Damage Signaling Pathways for Lung, Ovary, Prostate, Breast, and Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarbrough, Peter M; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Iversen, Edwin S; Brhane, Yonathan; Amos, Christopher I; Kraft, Peter; Hung, Rayjean J; Sellers, Thomas A; Witte, John S; Pharoah, Paul; Henderson, Brian E; Gruber, Stephen B; Hunter, David J; Garber, Judy E; Joshi, Amit D; McDonnell, Kevin; Easton, Doug F; Eeles, Ros; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Muir, Kenneth; Doherty, Jennifer A; Schildkraut, Joellen M

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage is an established mediator of carcinogenesis, although genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified few significant loci. This cross-cancer site, pooled analysis was performed to increase the power to detect common variants of DNA repair genes associated with cancer susceptibility. We conducted a cross-cancer analysis of 60,297 single nucleotide polymorphisms, at 229 DNA repair gene regions, using data from the NCI Genetic Associations and Mechanisms in Oncology (GAME-ON) Network. Our analysis included data from 32 GWAS and 48,734 controls and 51,537 cases across five cancer sites (breast, colon, lung, ovary, and prostate). Because of the unavailability of individual data, data were analyzed at the aggregate level. Meta-analysis was performed using the Association analysis for SubSETs (ASSET) software. To test for genetic associations that might escape individual variant testing due to small effect sizes, pathway analysis of eight DNA repair pathways was performed using hierarchical modeling. We identified three susceptibility DNA repair genes, RAD51B (P associations with cancer risk in the base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, and homologous recombination pathways. Only three susceptibility loci were identified, which had all been previously reported. In contrast, hierarchical modeling identified several pleiotropic cancer risk associations in key DNA repair pathways. Results suggest that many common variants in DNA repair genes are likely associated with cancer susceptibility through small effect sizes that do not meet stringent significance testing criteria. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Analysis of human accelerated DNA regions using archaic hominin genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernán A Burbano

    Full Text Available Several previous comparisons of the human genome with other primate and vertebrate genomes identified genomic regions that are highly conserved in vertebrate evolution but fast-evolving on the human lineage. These human accelerated regions (HARs may be regions of past adaptive evolution in humans. Alternatively, they may be the result of non-adaptive processes, such as biased gene conversion. We captured and sequenced DNA from a collection of previously published HARs using DNA from an Iberian Neandertal. Combining these new data with shotgun sequence from the Neandertal and Denisova draft genomes, we determine at least one archaic hominin allele for 84% of all positions within HARs. We find that 8% of HAR substitutions are not observed in the archaic hominins and are thus recent in the sense that the derived allele had not come to fixation in the common ancestor of modern humans and archaic hominins. Further, we find that recent substitutions in HARs tend to have come to fixation faster than substitutions elsewhere in the genome and that substitutions in HARs tend to cluster in time, consistent with an episodic rather than a clock-like process underlying HAR evolution. Our catalog of sequence changes in HARs will help prioritize them for functional studies of genomic elements potentially responsible for modern human adaptations.

  11. Analysis of Human Accelerated DNA Regions Using Archaic Hominin Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbano, Hernán A.; Green, Richard E.; Maricic, Tomislav; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; de la Rasilla, Marco; Rosas, Antonio; Kelso, Janet; Pollard, Katherine S.; Lachmann, Michael; Pääbo, Svante

    2012-01-01

    Several previous comparisons of the human genome with other primate and vertebrate genomes identified genomic regions that are highly conserved in vertebrate evolution but fast-evolving on the human lineage. These human accelerated regions (HARs) may be regions of past adaptive evolution in humans. Alternatively, they may be the result of non-adaptive processes, such as biased gene conversion. We captured and sequenced DNA from a collection of previously published HARs using DNA from an Iberian Neandertal. Combining these new data with shotgun sequence from the Neandertal and Denisova draft genomes, we determine at least one archaic hominin allele for 84% of all positions within HARs. We find that 8% of HAR substitutions are not observed in the archaic hominins and are thus recent in the sense that the derived allele had not come to fixation in the common ancestor of modern humans and archaic hominins. Further, we find that recent substitutions in HARs tend to have come to fixation faster than substitutions elsewhere in the genome and that substitutions in HARs tend to cluster in time, consistent with an episodic rather than a clock-like process underlying HAR evolution. Our catalog of sequence changes in HARs will help prioritize them for functional studies of genomic elements potentially responsible for modern human adaptations. PMID:22412940

  12. Implementation of DNA Mitochondrial Analysis in Rhinoclemmys nasuta (Testudines: Geoemydidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yherson Franchesco Molina Henao

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Rhinoclemmys nasuta (Testudines:Geoemydidae is considered an almost endemic specie to Colombia and the most primitive species of Rhynoclemmys. However, it is classified data deficient by IUCN because the available information is not enough to make a direct or indirect assessment of its extinction risk. Here, we describe the implementation of the method to analyze the mitochondrial DNA control sequence (mtDNA of R. nasuta in order to generate tools for future studies in systematics and population conservation. Genomic mtDNA was extracted by salting-out from blood samples from Isla Palma and Playa Chucheros (Bahía Málaga - Colombian Pacific Coast. The polymerase reaction chain (PCR was performed using a pair of degenerate primers (reported for Chrysemys picta, Testudines:Emydidae in polyacrylamide gel stained with silver nitrate. Fragments of 800pb were obtained and the sequencing reaction was effective.High homology percentage (> 92 % was established between the obtained sequences with mtDNA sequences from two species of Geoemydidae, Sacalia quadriocellata and Cuora aurocapitata which are deposited in the GenBank. This demonstrate an effective sequencing ofthe mtDNA control region of R. nasuta.IMPLEMENTACIÓN DE LA METODOLOGÍA DE ANÁLISIS DE ADN MITOCONDRIAL EN Rhinoclemmys nasuta (TESTUDINES:GEOEMYDIDAERhinoclemmys nasuta (Testudines: Geoemydidae es considerada una especie casi endémica de Colombia y la más primitiva del género, sin embargo, se encuentra clasificada por la IUCN como deficiente de datos, ya que la información disponible no es suficiente para hacer una evaluación directa o indirecta de su riesgo de extinción. Con el propósito de generar herramientas de análisis poblacional se describe la metodología de secuenciación de la región control del ADN mitocondrial (ADNmt para el análisis genético de poblaciones de Rhinoclemmys nasuta, que permita establecer bases para futuros estudios evolutivos y de conservación. Se

  13. Relationship between mitochondrial DNA A10398G polymorphism and Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Feifei; Zhang, Xiaona; Hou, Binghui; Xue, Li; Xie, Anmu

    2017-09-29

    Many studies have researched the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) A10398G in Parkinson's disease (PD) to determine the association between mtDNA A10398G and PD, but the results of their research were not consistent. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to demonstrate the connection between mtDNA A10398G and the susceptibility of PD. We searched PubMed, Web of Science, Springer Link, EMBASE and EBSCO databases up to identify relevant studies. Through strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, at last, 9 studies (total 3381 cases and 2810 controls) were included in our meta-analysis. We used the STATA 12.0 statistics software to calculate the pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to evaluate the genetic association between mtDNA A10398G and the risk of PD. We performed subgroup analysis to clarify the possible roles of the mtDNA A10398G polymorphism in the aetiology of PD in different ethnicities. Our meta-analysis indicates that although there was no significant association between mtDNA A10398G and PD in the Asian population (G vs. A: OR = 1.090, 95% CI = 0.939-1.284, P = 0.242), in the Caucasian population the G allele of mtDNA A10398G mutations may be a potential protective factor of PD (G vs. A: OR = 0.699, 95% CI = 0.546-0.895, P = 0.005). Further well-designed studies with larger samples are needed to validate these results.

  14. Software package for the design and analysis of DNA origami structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ebbe Sloth; Nielsen, Morten Muhlig; Dong, Mingdong

    A software package was developed for the semi-automated design of DNA origamis and further data analysis of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) images. As an example, we design the shape of a bottlenose dolphin and analyze it by means of high resolution AFM imaging. A high yield of DNA dolphins...... to contribute new tools and functionalities. Documentation, tutorials and software will be made available online....

  15. Analysis of DNA Sequences by An Optical Time-Integrating Correlator: Proof-Of-Concept Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-01

    est si lent que la cartographie et le sequengage de tout le genome humain exigent le developement de techniques revolutionnaires. Cette note technique...perform the analysis but the present process is so slow that the mapping and sequencing of the entire human genome requires a computational breakthrough... Genome Project is to map the entire mosaic of the human DNA. In an effort to reach that objective, biochemists try to match a particular segment of DNA

  16. Fetal DNA hypermethylation in tight junction pathway is associated with neural tube defects: A genome-wide DNA methylation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linlin; Lin, Shanshan; Zhang, Ji; Tian, Tian; Jin, Lei; Ren, Aiguo

    2017-02-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are a spectrum of severe congenital malformations of fusion failure of the neural tube during early embryogenesis. Evidence on aberrant DNA methylation in NTD development remains scarce, especially when exposure to environmental pollutant is taken into consideration. DNA methylation profiling was quantified using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 array in neural tissues from 10 NTD cases and 8 non-malformed controls (stage 1). Subsequent validation was performed using a Sequenom MassARRAY system in neural tissues from 20 NTD cases and 20 non-malformed controls (stage 2). Correlation analysis of differentially methylated CpG sites in fetal neural tissues and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons concentrations in fetal neural tissues and maternal serum was conducted. Differentially methylated CpG sites of neural tissues were further validated in fetal mice with NTDs induced by benzo(a)pyrene given to pregnant mice. Differentially hypermethylated CpG sites in neural tissues from 17 genes and 6 pathways were identified in stage 1. Subsequently, differentially hypermethylated CpG sites in neural tissues from 6 genes (BDKRB2, CTNNA1, CYFIP2, MMP7, MYH2, and TIAM2) were confirmed in stage 2. Correlation analysis showed that methylated CpG sites in CTNNA1 and MYH2 from NTD cases were positively correlated to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon level in fetal neural tissues and maternal serum. The correlation was confirmed in NTD-affected fetal mice that were exposed to benzo(a)pyrene in utero. In conclusion, hypermethylation of the CTNNA1 and MYH2 genes in tight junction pathway is associated with the risk for NTDs, and the DNA methylation aberration may be caused by exposure to benzo(a)pyrene.

  17. Field preservation and DNA extraction methods for intestinal microbial diversity analysis in earthworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakuria, Dwipendra; Schmidt, Olaf; Liliensiek, Ann-Kathrin; Egan, Damian; Doohan, Fiona M

    2009-03-01

    We assessed the effect of DNA extraction and sample preservation methods on the DNA yield and quality obtained from earthworm (Aporrectodea caliginosa Savigny) gut samples and on the results obtained by bacterial and fungal automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) of DNA extracts. Methods based on a hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide dithiotreitol (CTAB-DTT) extraction buffer yielded more favourable results than those based on a sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) buffer. For both of these buffers, incorporation of a bead-beating during the lysis step increased the ARISA-derived bacterial ribotype numbers and diversity estimates, as determined for gut wall samples (PDNA extracted by the CTAB-DTT and SDS-based methods were of comparable quality (P> or =0.05), the former method yielded >1.5 times more DNA from both gut contents and gut walls of earthworms than the latter method (both incorporating the bead beating step) (PDNA extracted by the CTAB-DTT- as compared to the SDS-based method (PDNA extracted by the CTAB-DTT (but not by the SDS-based) method (Global R=0.76, PCTAB-DTT-based method, we showed that earthworm preservation in ethanol yielded higher quality DNA from gut contents than preservation in either chloroform or liquid N, as determined by spectrophotometry, PCR inhibition analysis and bacterial and fungal ARISA (PCTAB-DTT-based DNA extraction method described herein are also suitable for the analysis of gut-associated microbiota in other soil and sediment feeding invertebrates.

  18. Comparison of hard tissues that are useful for DNA analysis in forensic autopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Yu; Ohira, Hiroshi; Tsuda, Yukio; Yamada, Yoshihiro

    2015-11-01

    Forensic analysis of DNA from hard tissues can be important when investigating a variety of cases resulting from mass disaster or criminal cases. This study was conducted to evaluate the most suitable tissues, method and sample size for processing of hard tissues prior to DNA isolation. We also evaluated the elapsed time after death in relation to the quantity of DNA extracted. Samples of hard tissues (37 teeth, 42 skull, 42 rib, and 39 nails) from 42 individuals aged between 50 and 83 years were used. The samples were taken from remains following forensic autopsy (from 2 days to 2 years after death). To evaluate the integrity of the nuclear DNA isolated, the percentage of allele calls for short tandem repeat profiles were compared between the hard tissues. DNA typing results indicated that until 1 month after death, any of the four hard tissue samples could be used as an alternative to teeth, allowing analysis of all of the loci. However, in terms of the sampling site, collection method and sample size adjustment, the rib appeared to be the best choice in view of the ease of specimen preparation. Our data suggest that the rib could be an alternative hard tissue sample for DNA analysis of human remains. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Enhanced electroanalysis in lithium potassium eutectic (LKE) using microfabricated square microelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Damion K; Blair, Ewen O; Terry, Jonathan G; Walton, Anthony J; Mount, Andrew R

    2014-11-18

    Molten salts (MSs) are an attractive medium for chemical and electrochemical processing and as a result there is demand for MS-compatible analysis technologies. However, MSs containing redox species present a challenging environment in which to perform analytical measurements because of their corrosive nature, significant thermal convection and the high temperatures involved. This paper outlines the fabrication and characterization of microfabricated square microelectrodes (MSMs) designed for electrochemical analysis in MS systems. Their design enables precise control over electrode dimension, the minimization of stress because of differential thermal expansion through design for high temperature operation, and the minimization of corrosive attack through effective insulation. The exemplar MS system used for characterization was lithium chloride/potassium chloride eutectic (LKE), which has potential applications in pyrochemical nuclear fuel reprocessing, metal refining, molten salt batteries and electric power cells. The observed responses for a range of redox ions between 400 and 500 °C (673 and 773 K) were quantitative and typical of microelectrodes. MSMs also showed the reduced iR drop, steady-state diffusion-limited response, and reduced sensitivity to convection seen for microelectrodes under ambient conditions and expected for these electrodes in comparison to macroelectrodes. Diffusion coefficients were obtained in close agreement with literature values, more readily and at greater precision and accuracy than both macroelectrode and previous microelectrode measurements. The feasibility of extracting individual physical parameters from mixtures of redox species (as required in reprocessing) and of the prolonged measurement required for online monitoring was also demonstrated. Together, this demonstrates that MSMs provide enhanced electrode devices widely applicable to the characterization of redox species in a range of MS systems.

  20. Infrared laser ablation sample transfer of tissue DNA for genomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kelin; Donnarumma, Fabrizio; Herke, Scott W; Herke, Patrick F; Murray, Kermit K

    2017-07-01

    Infrared (IR) laser ablation was used to remove material from tissue sections mounted on microscope slides, with subsequent capture in a solvent-containing microcentrifuge tube. Experiments conducted with a 3200-bp double-stranded plasmid DNA template demonstrated IR-laser ablation transfer of intact DNA. The transfer efficiency and the molecular integrity of the captured DNA were evaluated using Sanger sequencing, gel electrophoresis, and fluorimetric analysis. The plasmid DNA was reproducibly transferred with an efficiency of 59 ± 3% at laser fluences of between 10 and 20 kJ/m(2) at a wavelength of 3 μm. IR laser ablation sample transfer was then used to ablate and capture DNA from 50-μm-thick rat brain and kidney tissue sections. DNA was extracted from the captured material using five commercial DNA extraction kits that employed significantly divergent methodologies, with all kits recovering sufficient DNA for successful amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Four sets of primers were employed, targeting one region of the CYP 11b2 gene (376 bp) and three different regions of the Snn1g gene (298, 168, and 281 bp). The PCR results were not consistently reliable when using unpurified ablation samples; however, after extraction, all samples produced PCR products of the expected size. This work expands the sampling capabilities of IR laser ablation, demonstrating that DNA can be isolated from tissue samples for genomic assays. Due to the small size of the ablation regions (1 mm(2)), this technique will be useful for sampling discrete cell populations from tissue sections. Graphical abstract Infrared laser ablation transfer of intact DNA from a tissue section.

  1. Molecular analysis and genomic organization of major DNA satellites in banana (Musa spp..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Čížková

    Full Text Available Satellite DNA sequences consist of tandemly arranged repetitive units up to thousands nucleotides long in head-to-tail orientation. The evolutionary processes by which satellites arise and evolve include unequal crossing over, gene conversion, transposition and extra chromosomal circular DNA formation. Large blocks of satellite DNA are often observed in heterochromatic regions of chromosomes and are a typical component of centromeric and telomeric regions. Satellite-rich loci may show specific banding patterns and facilitate chromosome identification and analysis of structural chromosome changes. Unlike many other genomes, nuclear genomes of banana (Musa spp. are poor in satellite DNA and the information on this class of DNA remains limited. The banana cultivars are seed sterile clones originating mostly from natural intra-specific crosses within M. acuminata (A genome and inter-specific crosses between M. acuminata and M. balbisiana (B genome. Previous studies revealed the closely related nature of the A and B genomes, including similarities in repetitive DNA. In this study we focused on two main banana DNA satellites, which were previously identified in silico. Their genomic organization and molecular diversity was analyzed in a set of nineteen Musa accessions, including representatives of A, B and S (M. schizocarpa genomes and their inter-specific hybrids. The two DNA satellites showed a high level of sequence conservation within, and a high homology between Musa species. FISH with probes for the satellite DNA sequences, rRNA genes and a single-copy BAC clone 2G17 resulted in characteristic chromosome banding patterns in M. acuminata and M. balbisiana which may aid in determining genomic constitution in interspecific hybrids. In addition to improving the knowledge on Musa satellite DNA, our study increases the number of cytogenetic markers and the number of individual chromosomes, which can be identified in Musa.

  2. Molecular analysis and genomic organization of major DNA satellites in banana (Musa spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čížková, Jana; Hřibová, Eva; Humplíková, Lenka; Christelová, Pavla; Suchánková, Pavla; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2013-01-01

    Satellite DNA sequences consist of tandemly arranged repetitive units up to thousands nucleotides long in head-to-tail orientation. The evolutionary processes by which satellites arise and evolve include unequal crossing over, gene conversion, transposition and extra chromosomal circular DNA formation. Large blocks of satellite DNA are often observed in heterochromatic regions of chromosomes and are a typical component of centromeric and telomeric regions. Satellite-rich loci may show specific banding patterns and facilitate chromosome identification and analysis of structural chromosome changes. Unlike many other genomes, nuclear genomes of banana (Musa spp.) are poor in satellite DNA and the information on this class of DNA remains limited. The banana cultivars are seed sterile clones originating mostly from natural intra-specific crosses within M. acuminata (A genome) and inter-specific crosses between M. acuminata and M. balbisiana (B genome). Previous studies revealed the closely related nature of the A and B genomes, including similarities in repetitive DNA. In this study we focused on two main banana DNA satellites, which were previously identified in silico. Their genomic organization and molecular diversity was analyzed in a set of nineteen Musa accessions, including representatives of A, B and S (M. schizocarpa) genomes and their inter-specific hybrids. The two DNA satellites showed a high level of sequence conservation within, and a high homology between Musa species. FISH with probes for the satellite DNA sequences, rRNA genes and a single-copy BAC clone 2G17 resulted in characteristic chromosome banding patterns in M. acuminata and M. balbisiana which may aid in determining genomic constitution in interspecific hybrids. In addition to improving the knowledge on Musa satellite DNA, our study increases the number of cytogenetic markers and the number of individual chromosomes, which can be identified in Musa.

  3. PtRu colloid nanoparticles for CO oxidation in microfabricated reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klerke, Asbjørn; Saadi, Souheil; Toftegaard, Maja Bøg

    2006-01-01

    The catalytic activity of PtRu colloid nanoparticles for CO oxidation is investigated in microfabricated reactors. The measured catalytic performance describes a volcano curve as a function of the Pt/Ru ratio. The apparent activation energies for the different alloy catalysts are between 21 and 117...

  4. A review of microfabrication technologies: application to x-ray optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan Malek, C

    1991-01-01

    We present an outline of various microfabrication techniques and processes, particularly for applications to x-ray optics. Emphasis is placed on both high resolution diffractive components such as gratings and zone plates and multidimensional reflective diffracting structures using multilayer interference mirrors. Some selected examples are also discussed.

  5. Free flow zone electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing using a microfabricated glass device with ion permeable membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohlheyer, D.; Besselink, G.A.J.; Schlautmann, Stefan; Schasfoort, Richardus B.M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a microfabricated free-flow electrophoresis device with integrated ion permeable membranes. In order to obtain continuous lanes of separated components an electrical field is applied perpendicular to the sample flow direction. This sample stream is sandwiched between two sheath

  6. Detection of adsorbed explosive molecules using thermal response of suspended microfabricated bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yi, Dechang; Greve, Anders; Hales, Jan Harry

    2008-01-01

    Here we present a thermophysical technique that is capable of differentiating vapor phase adsorbed explosives from nonexplosives and is additionally capable of differentiating individual species of common explosive vapors. This technique utilizes pairs of suspended microfabricated silicon bridges...... unique signals for subnanogram quantities of adsorbed explosives within 50 ms. (C) 2008 American Institute of Physics....

  7. Optimized mtDNA Control Region Primer Extension Capture Analysis for Forensically Relevant Samples and Highly Compromised mtDNA of Different Age and Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra Eduardoff

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA has proven useful in forensic genetics and ancient DNA (aDNA studies, where specimens are often highly compromised and DNA quality and quantity are low. In forensic genetics, the mtDNA control region (CR is commonly sequenced using established Sanger-type Sequencing (STS protocols involving fragment sizes down to approximately 150 base pairs (bp. Recent developments include Massively Parallel Sequencing (MPS of (multiplex PCR-generated libraries using the same amplicon sizes. Molecular genetic studies on archaeological remains that harbor more degraded aDNA have pioneered alternative approaches to target mtDNA, such as capture hybridization and primer extension capture (PEC methods followed by MPS. These assays target smaller mtDNA fragment sizes (down to 50 bp or less, and have proven to be substantially more successful in obtaining useful mtDNA sequences from these samples compared to electrophoretic methods. Here, we present the modification and optimization of a PEC method, earlier developed for sequencing the Neanderthal mitochondrial genome, with forensic applications in mind. Our approach was designed for a more sensitive enrichment of the mtDNA CR in a single tube assay and short laboratory turnaround times, thus complying with forensic practices. We characterized the method using sheared, high quantity mtDNA (six samples, and tested challenging forensic samples (n = 2 as well as compromised solid tissue samples (n = 15 up to 8 kyrs of age. The PEC MPS method produced reliable and plausible mtDNA haplotypes that were useful in the forensic context. It yielded plausible data in samples that did not provide results with STS and other MPS techniques. We addressed the issue of contamination by including four generations of negative controls, and discuss the results in the forensic context. We finally offer perspectives for future research to enable the validation and accreditation of the PEC MPS

  8. Optimized mtDNA Control Region Primer Extension Capture Analysis for Forensically Relevant Samples and Highly Compromised mtDNA of Different Age and Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eduardoff, Mayra; Xavier, Catarina; Strobl, Christina; Casas-Vargas, Andrea; Parson, Walther

    2017-01-01

    The analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has proven useful in forensic genetics and ancient DNA (aDNA) studies, where specimens are often highly compromised and DNA quality and quantity are low. In forensic genetics, the mtDNA control region (CR) is commonly sequenced using established Sanger-type Sequencing (STS) protocols involving fragment sizes down to approximately 150 base pairs (bp). Recent developments include Massively Parallel Sequencing (MPS) of (multiplex) PCR-generated libraries using the same amplicon sizes. Molecular genetic studies on archaeological remains that harbor more degraded aDNA have pioneered alternative approaches to target mtDNA, such as capture hybridization and primer extension capture (PEC) methods followed by MPS. These assays target smaller mtDNA fragment sizes (down to 50 bp or less), and have proven to be substantially more successful in obtaining useful mtDNA sequences from these samples compared to electrophoretic methods. Here, we present the modification and optimization of a PEC method, earlier developed for sequencing the Neanderthal mitochondrial genome, with forensic applications in mind. Our approach was designed for a more sensitive enrichment of the mtDNA CR in a single tube assay and short laboratory turnaround times, thus complying with forensic practices. We characterized the method using sheared, high quantity mtDNA (six samples), and tested challenging forensic samples (n = 2) as well as compromised solid tissue samples (n = 15) up to 8 kyrs of age. The PEC MPS method produced reliable and plausible mtDNA haplotypes that were useful in the forensic context. It yielded plausible data in samples that did not provide results with STS and other MPS techniques. We addressed the issue of contamination by including four generations of negative controls, and discuss the results in the forensic context. We finally offer perspectives for future research to enable the validation and accreditation of the PEC MPS method for

  9. Improved reproducibility in genome-wide DNA methylation analysis for PAXgene-fixed samples compared with restored formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Gitte Brinch; Hager, Henrik; Hansen, Lise Lotte; Tost, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Formalin fixation has been the standard method for conservation of clinical specimens for decades. However, a major drawback is the high degradation of nucleic acids, which complicates its use in genome-wide analyses. Unbiased identification of biomarkers, however, requires genome-wide studies, precluding the use of the valuable archives of specimens with long-term follow-up data. Therefore, restoration protocols for DNA from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples have been developed, although they are cost-intensive and time-consuming. An alternative to FFPE and snap-freezing is the PAXgene Tissue System, developed for simultaneous preservation of morphology, proteins, and nucleic acids. In the current study, we compared the performance of DNA from either PAXgene or formalin-fixed tissues to snap-frozen material for genome-wide DNA methylation analysis using the Illumina 450K BeadChip. Quantitative DNA methylation analysis demonstrated that the methylation profile in PAXgene-fixed tissues showed, in comparison with restored FFPE samples, a higher concordance with the profile detected in frozen samples. We demonstrate, for the first time, that DNA from PAXgene conserved tissue performs better compared with restored FFPE DNA in genome-wide DNA methylation analysis. In addition, DNA from PAXgene tissue can be directly used on the array without prior restoration, rendering the analytical process significantly more time- and cost-effective. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Establishing paternity in Whooping Cranes (Grus americana) by DNA analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmire, Jonathan L.; Gee, George F.; Hardekopf, C.L.; Mark, G.A.

    1992-01-01

    DNA fingerprinting was used to study paternity and genetic variability within a captive flock of Whooping Cranes (Grus americana). Fingerprint patterns for 42 individuals were obtained by digesting genomic crane DNAs with HaeIII followed by electrophoresis, blotting, and hybridization to the M13 minisatellite probe. Despite finding reduced levels of genetic variation in the Whooping Crane due to a population "bottleneck," these polymorphisms were successfully used to determine paternity in six of seven cases of captive propagation where the maternal-offspring relationship was known, but where the sire was unknown. These determinations of paternity are required for effective genetic management of the crane flock. These results also revealed a number of heterozygous minisatellite loci that will be valuable in future assessments of genetic variability in this endangered species.

  11. Multiplex pyrosequencing of InDel markers for forensic DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, Magdalena M; Karas, Ognjen; Allen, Marie

    2016-12-01

    The capillary electrophoresis (CE) technology is commonly used for fragment length separation of markers in forensic DNA analysis. In this study, pyrosequencing technology was used as an alternative and rapid tool for the analysis of biallelic InDel (insertion/deletion) markers for individual identification. The DNA typing is based on a subset of the InDel markers that are included in the Investigator ® DIPplex Kit, which are sequenced in a multiplex pyrosequencing analysis. To facilitate the analysis of degraded DNA, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragments were kept short in the primer design. Samples from individuals of Swedish origin were genotyped using the pyrosequencing strategy and analysis of the Investigator ® DIPplex markers with CE. A comparison between the pyrosequencing and CE data revealed concordant results demonstrating a robust and correct genotyping by pyrosequencing. Using optimal marker combination and a directed dispensation strategy, five markers could be multiplexed and analyzed simultaneously. In this proof-of-principle study, we demonstrate that multiplex InDel pyrosequencing analysis is possible. However, further studies on degraded samples, lower DNA quantities, and mixtures will be required to fully optimize InDel analysis by pyrosequencing for forensic applications. Overall, although CE analysis is implemented in most forensic laboratories, multiplex InDel pyrosequencing offers a cost-effective alternative for some applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Shape Analysis of DNA-Au Hybrid Particles by Analytical Ultracentrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Maximilan J; Holder, Isabelle T; Schmid, Marius; Fernandez Espin, Vanesa; Garcia de la Torre, Jose; Hartig, Jörg S; Cölfen, Helmut

    2016-08-23

    Current developments in nanotechnology have increased the demand for nanocrystal assemblies with well-defined shapes and tunable sizes. DNA is a particularly well-suited building block in nanoscale assemblies because of its scalable sizes, conformational variability, and convenient self-assembly capabilities via base pairing. In hybrid materials, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can be assembled into nanoparticle structures with programmable interparticle distances by applying appropriate DNA sequences. However, the development of stoichiometrically defined DNA/NP structures is still challenging since product mixtures are frequently obtained and their purification and characterization is the rate-limiting step in the development of DNA-NP hybrid assemblies. Improvements in nanostructure fractionation and characterization techniques offer great potential for nanotechnology applications in general. This study reports the application of analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) for the characterization of anisotropic DNA-linked metal-crystal assemblies. On the basis of transmission electron microscopy data and the DNA primary sequence, hydrodynamic bead models are set up for the interpretation of the measured frictional ratios and sedimentation coefficients. We demonstrate that the presence of single DNA strands on particle surfaces as well as the shape factors of multiparticle structures in mixtures can be quantitatively described by AUC. This study will significantly broaden the possibilities to analyze mixtures of shape-anisotropic nanoparticle assemblies. By establishing insights into the analysis of nanostructure mixtures based on fundamental principles of sedimentation, a wide range of potential applications in basic research and industry become accessible.

  13. Isolation of DNA topoisomerase II gene from Pleurotus ostreatus and its application in phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C X; Zhang, J X; Huang, C Y; Chen, Q; Wang, H X

    2007-11-01

    We performed experiments to isolate DNA topoisomerase II gene from Pleurotus ostereatus and to discuss its application as a feasible and credible molecular maker in phylogenitic analysis. A fragment of PosTopII was amplified from a P. ostreatus cDNA clone by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR), using degenerate primers and primer walking. The full-length gene sequence was obtained with 3' and 5'-full RACE-PCR. The PosTopII cDNA is 4808 bp length and contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 4713 bp. The predicted peptide has 1571 amino acids, and exhibits strong sequence homology to other eukaryotic topoisomerase II. The PosTopII sequence was compared with the homologous genes to determine it can be used as a reliable molecular maker for P. ostreatus. The complete sequence of PosTopII cDNA clone was obtained. The phylogenetic relationships were consistent with other classification methods based on the morpological characteristics and rDNA gene sequences. This is the first report on isolation of a DNA topoisomerse II from P. ostreatus. Findings from this study indicate that the DNA topoisomers II can be applied as a reliable meker for taxonomic distinction in the genus Pleurotus.

  14. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis in cohesin mutant human cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinglan; Zhang, Zhe; Bando, Masashige; Itoh, Takehiko; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Li, Jennifer R.; Clark, Dinah; Kaur, Maninder; Tatsuro, Kondo; Kline, Antonie D.; Chang, Celia; Vega, Hugo; Jackson, Laird G.; Spinner, Nancy B.; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Krantz, Ian D.

    2010-01-01

    The cohesin complex has recently been shown to be a key regulator of eukaryotic gene expression, although the mechanisms by which it exerts its effects are poorly understood. We have undertaken a genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in cohesin-deficient cell lines from probands with Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS). Heterozygous mutations in NIPBL, SMC1A and SMC3 genes account for ∼65% of individuals with CdLS. SMC1A and SMC3 are subunits of the cohesin complex that controls sister chromatid cohesion, whereas NIPBL facilitates cohesin loading and unloading. We have examined the methylation status of 27 578 CpG dinucleotides in 72 CdLS and control samples. We have documented the DNA methylation pattern in human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) as well as identified specific differential DNA methylation in CdLS. Subgroups of CdLS probands and controls can be classified using selected CpG loci. The X chromosome was also found to have a unique DNA methylation pattern in CdLS. Cohesin preferentially binds to hypo-methylated DNA in control LCLs, whereas the differential DNA methylation alters cohesin binding in CdLS. Our results suggest that in addition to DNA methylation multiple mechanisms may be involved in transcriptional regulation in human cells and in the resultant gene misexpression in CdLS. PMID:20448023

  15. Traditional Mold Analysis Compared to a DNA-based Method of Mold Analysis with Applications in Asthmatics' Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traditional environmental mold analysis is based-on microscopic observations and counting of mold structures collected from the air on a sticky surface or culturing of molds on growth media for identification and quantification. A DNA-based method of mold analysis called mol...

  16. Adélie penguin population diet monitoring by analysis of food DNA in scats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarman, Simon N; McInnes, Julie C; Faux, Cassandra; Polanowski, Andrea M; Marthick, James; Deagle, Bruce E; Southwell, Colin; Emmerson, Louise

    2013-01-01

    The Adélie penguin is the most important animal currently used for ecosystem monitoring in the Southern Ocean. The diet of this species is generally studied by visual analysis of stomach contents; or ratios of isotopes of carbon and nitrogen incorporated into the penguin from its food. There are significant limitations to the information that can be gained from these methods. We evaluated population diet assessment by analysis of food DNA in scats as an alternative method for ecosystem monitoring with Adélie penguins as an indicator species. Scats were collected at four locations, three phases of the breeding cycle, and in four different years. A novel molecular diet assay and bioinformatics pipeline based on nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (SSU rDNA) sequencing was used to identify prey DNA in 389 scats. Analysis of the twelve population sample sets identified spatial and temporal dietary change in Adélie penguin population diet. Prey diversity was found to be greater than previously thought. Krill, fish, copepods and amphipods were the most important food groups, in general agreement with other Adélie penguin dietary studies based on hard part or stable isotope analysis. However, our DNA analysis estimated that a substantial portion of the diet was gelatinous groups such as jellyfish and comb jellies. A range of other prey not previously identified in the diet of this species were also discovered. The diverse prey identified by this DNA-based scat analysis confirms that the generalist feeding of Adélie penguins makes them a useful indicator species for prey community composition in the coastal zone of the Southern Ocean. Scat collection is a simple and non-invasive field sampling method that allows DNA-based estimation of prey community differences at many temporal and spatial scales and provides significant advantages over alternative diet analysis approaches.

  17. Adelie penguin population diet monitoring by analysis of food DNA in scats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon N Jarman

    Full Text Available The Adélie penguin is the most important animal currently used for ecosystem monitoring in the Southern Ocean. The diet of this species is generally studied by visual analysis of stomach contents; or ratios of isotopes of carbon and nitrogen incorporated into the penguin from its food. There are significant limitations to the information that can be gained from these methods. We evaluated population diet assessment by analysis of food DNA in scats as an alternative method for ecosystem monitoring with Adélie penguins as an indicator species. Scats were collected at four locations, three phases of the breeding cycle, and in four different years. A novel molecular diet assay and bioinformatics pipeline based on nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (SSU rDNA sequencing was used to identify prey DNA in 389 scats. Analysis of the twelve population sample sets identified spatial and temporal dietary change in Adélie penguin population diet. Prey diversity was found to be greater than previously thought. Krill, fish, copepods and amphipods were the most important food groups, in general agreement with other Adélie penguin dietary studies based on hard part or stable isotope analysis. However, our DNA analysis estimated that a substantial portion of the diet was gelatinous groups such as jellyfish and comb jellies. A range of other prey not previously identified in the diet of this species were also discovered. The diverse prey identified by this DNA-based scat analysis confirms that the generalist feeding of Adélie penguins makes them a useful indicator species for prey community composition in the coastal zone of the Southern Ocean. Scat collection is a simple and non-invasive field sampling method that allows DNA-based estimation of prey community differences at many temporal and spatial scales and provides significant advantages over alternative diet analysis approaches.

  18. Analisis heteroplasmy DNA mitokondria pulpa gigi pada identifikasi personal forensik (Heteroplasmy analysis of dental pulp mitochondrial DNA in forensic personal identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardyni Febri K

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA sequence analysis of the hypervariable control region has been shown to be an effective tool for personal identification. The high copy and maternal mode of inheritance make mtDNA analysis particularly useful when old samples or degradation of biological samples prohibits the detection of nuclear DNA analysis. Dental pulp is covered with hard tissue such as dentin and enamel. It is highly capable of protecting the DNA and thus is extremely useful. One of the diasadvantages of mitochondrial DNA is heteroplasmy. Heteroplasmy is the presence of a mixture of more than one type of an organellar genome within a cell or individual. It can lead to ambiguity in forensic personal identification. Due to that, the evidence of heteroplasmy in dental pulp is needed. Purpose: The study was aimed to determine the heteroplasmy occurance of mitocondrial DNA in dental pulp. Methods: Blood and teeth samples were taken from 6 persons, each samples was extracted with DNAzol. DNA samples were amplified with PCR and sequencing to analyze the nucleotide sequences polymorphism of the hypervariable region 1 in mtDNA and compared with revised Cambridge Reference Sequence (rCRS. results: The dental pulp and blood nucleotide sequence of hypervariable region 1 mitochondrial DNA showed polymorphism when compared with rCRS and heteroplasmy when compared between dental pulp with blood. Conclusion: The study showed that heteroplasmy was found in mithocondrial DNA from dental pulp.latar belakang: Analisis sekuens DNA mitokondria (mtDNA regio kontrol hypervariable telah terbukti menjadi alat efektif untuk identifikasi personal. Kopi DNA yang banyak dan pewarisan maternal membuat analisis mtDNA sangat berguna ketika sampel lama atau sampel biologis yang terdegradasi menghambat deteksi analisis DNA inti. Pulpa gigi terlindung jaringan keras seperti dentin dan enamel. Hal ini membuat pulpa mampu melindungi DNA dan dengan demikian sangat berguna

  19. Principles, Practice, and Evolution of Capillary Electrophoresis as a Tool for Forensic DNA Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewale, J G; Qi, L; Calandro, L M

    2012-07-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a versatile and widely used analysis platform with application in diverse areas such as analytical chemistry, chiral separations, clinical, forensics, molecular biology, natural products, organic chemistry, and the pharmaceutical industry. Forensic applications of CE include fragment analysis, DNA sequencing, SNP typing, and analysis of gunshot residues, explosive residues, and drugs. Fragment analysis is a widely used method for short tandem repeat (STR) profiling for human identification (HID) due to the single-base resolution capability of CE. This approach circumvents the tedious and expensive approach of DNA sequencing for STR typing. The high sizing precision, ability to detect fluorescence emitted from multiple dyes, automated electrophoretic runs, and data collection software are key factors in the worldwide adoption of CE as the preferred platform for forensic DNA analysis. The most common CE systems used in forensic DNA analysis include the ABI PRISM® 310, 3100, 3100 Avant, 3130, 3130xl, 3500, and 3500xL Genetic Analyzers (GAs). The 3500 series GAs are developed with features useful for forensic scientists, including a normalization feature for analysis of the data designed to reduce the variation in peak height from instrument to instrument and injection to injection. Other hardware and software features include improved temperature control, radio frequency identification (RFID) tags for monitoring instrument consumables, HID-focused software features, and security and maintenance. Copyright © 2012 Central Police University.

  20. Evaluation of growth conditions and DNA extraction techniques used in the molecular analysis of dermatophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnat, S; Nowakiewicz, A; Ziółkowska, G; Trościańczyk, A; Majer-Dziedzic, B; Zięba, P

    2017-05-01

    Recent molecular methods for diagnosis of superficial mycoses have determined the need for a rapid and easy method of extracting DNA. The aim of study was to determine growth conditions and techniques of DNA extraction for Microsporum canis, Trichophyton mentagrophytes and T. verrucosum. Samples were prepared of each of the DNA extraction methods (phenol-chloroform, CTAB and four different kits) for all of the incubation periods (4, 7 and 10 days) of the cultures on the solid and in the liquid medium. The highest DNA concentrations were obtained using the phenol-chloroform method. The concentration of DNA extracted with the CTAB method accounted for 62·21%, for kits it corresponded from 35·53 to 15·41%. The analysis of the DNA weight yield revealed the highest isolation efficiency of the phenol-chloroform method, 1 mg of mycelium yielded 223·8 μg DNA. Lower DNA yield (by 39·32%) was obtained with the CTAB method; in the case of kits by 68·46-85·32%. In most of the techniques, the DNA yield on the solid medium was higher. In summary, the highest DNA yield was noted in the 7-day cultures and extraction with the phenol-chloroform method. Importantly, the type of culture was not relevant for the diagnostic result. Most mycoses are caused by fungi that reside in nature. The severity of the infection depends on the pathogenic attributes, socioeconomic factors and local environmental conditions. Recent diagnosis increasingly relies on not only the clinical features. Molecular identifications have determined the need for a rapid and easy method of extracting DNA. Usually two factors have to be considered: maximize the DNA yield and ensure that the extracted DNA is susceptible to enzymatic reactions. These data suggest that phenol-chloroform methods and a 7-day culture period may be useful for validation and constitute the first step of molecular diagnosis of dermatophytes. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Removing external DNA contamination from arthropod predators destined for molecular gut-content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstone, Matthew H; Weber, Donald C; Coudron, Thomas A; Payton, Mark E; Hu, Jing S

    2012-05-01

    Ecological research requires large samples for statistical validity, typically hundreds or thousands of individuals, which are most efficiently gathered by mass-collecting techniques. For the study of interspecific interactions, molecular gut-content analysis enables detection of arthropod predation with minimal disruption of community interactions. Field experiments have demonstrated that standard mass-collection methods, such as sweep netting, vacuum sampling and foliage beating, sometimes lead to contamination of predators with nontarget DNA, thereby compromising resultant gut-content data. We deliberately contaminated immature Coleomegilla maculata and Podisus maculiventris that had been fed larvae of Leptinotarsa decemlineata by topically applying homogenate of the alternate prey Leptinotarsa juncta. We then attempted to remove contaminating DNA by washing in ethanol or bleach. A 40-min wash with end-over-end rotation in 80% EtOH did not reliably reduce external DNA contamination. Identical treatment with 2.5% commercial bleach removed most externally contaminating DNA without affecting the detectability of the target prey DNA in the gut. Use of this bleaching protocol, perhaps with minor modifications tailored to different predator-prey systems, should reliably eliminate external DNA contamination, thereby alleviating concerns about this possible source of cross-contamination for mass-collected arthropod predators destined for molecular gut-content analysis. Published 2012. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  2. Breathing dynamics based parameter sensitivity analysis of hetero-polymeric DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talukder, Srijeeta; Sen, Shrabani; Chaudhury, Pinaki, E-mail: pinakc@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 A P C Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India); Chakraborti, Prantik; Banik, Suman K., E-mail: skbanik@jcbose.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Bose Institute, 93/1 A P C Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India); Metzler, Ralf, E-mail: rmetzler@uni-potsdam.de [Institute for Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, D-14476 Potsdam-Golm, Germany and Physics Department, Tampere University of Technology, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2014-03-28

    We study the parameter sensitivity of hetero-polymeric DNA within the purview of DNA breathing dynamics. The degree of correlation between the mean bubble size and the model parameters is estimated for this purpose for three different DNA sequences. The analysis leads us to a better understanding of the sequence dependent nature of the breathing dynamics of hetero-polymeric DNA. Out of the 14 model parameters for DNA stability in the statistical Poland-Scheraga approach, the hydrogen bond interaction ε{sub hb}(AT) for an AT base pair and the ring factor ξ turn out to be the most sensitive parameters. In addition, the stacking interaction ε{sub st}(TA-TA) for an TA-TA nearest neighbor pair of base-pairs is found to be the most sensitive one among all stacking interactions. Moreover, we also establish that the nature of stacking interaction has a deciding effect on the DNA breathing dynamics, not the number of times a particular stacking interaction appears in a sequence. We show that the sensitivity analysis can be used as an effective measure to guide a stochastic optimization technique to find the kinetic rate constants related to the dynamics as opposed to the case where the rate constants are measured using the conventional unbiased way of optimization.

  3. Optimization of Cyanine Dye Stability and Analysis of FRET Interaction on DNA Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel von der Haar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The application of DNA microarrays for high throughput analysis of genetic regulation is often limited by the fluorophores used as markers. The implementation of multi-scan techniques is limited by the fluorophores’ susceptibility to photobleaching when exposed to the scanner laser light. This paper presents combined mechanical and chemical strategies which enhance the photostability of cyanine 3 and cyanine 5 as part of solid state DNA microarrays. These strategies are based on scanning the microarrays while the hybridized DNA is still in an aqueous solution with the presence of a reductive/oxidative system (ROXS. Furthermore, the experimental setup allows for the analysis and eventual normalization of Förster-resonance-energy-transfer (FRET interaction of cyanine-3/cyanine-5 dye combinations on the microarray. These findings constitute a step towards standardization of microarray experiments and analysis and may help to increase the comparability of microarray experiment results between labs.

  4. A technique for setting analytical thresholds in massively parallel sequencing-based forensic DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Brian; King, Jonathan L; Budowle, Bruce; Armogida, Luigi

    2017-01-01

    Amplicon (targeted) sequencing by massively parallel sequencing (PCR-MPS) is a potential method for use in forensic DNA analyses. In this application, PCR-MPS may supplement or replace other instrumental analysis methods such as capillary electrophoresis and Sanger sequencing for STR and mitochondrial DNA typing, respectively. PCR-MPS also may enable the expansion of forensic DNA analysis methods to include new marker systems such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertion/deletions (indels) that currently are assayable using various instrumental analysis methods including microarray and quantitative PCR. Acceptance of PCR-MPS as a forensic method will depend in part upon developing protocols and criteria that define the limitations of a method, including a defensible analytical threshold or method detection limit. This paper describes an approach to establish objective analytical thresholds suitable for multiplexed PCR-MPS methods. A definition is proposed for PCR-MPS method background noise, and an analytical threshold based on background noise is described.

  5. RNA/DNA co-analysis from human menstrual blood and vaginal secretion stains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haas, Claus; Hanson, E; Anjos, M J

    2014-01-01

    The European DNA Profiling Group (EDNAP) organized a fourth and fifth collaborative exercise on RNA/DNA co-analysis for body fluid identification and STR profiling. The task was to identify dried menstrual blood and vaginal secretion stains using specific RNA biomarkers, and additionally test 3...... laboratories, using RNA extraction or RNA/DNA co-extraction methods. Two novel menstrual blood mRNA multiplexes were used: MMP triplex (MMP7, MMP10, MMP11) and MB triplex (MSX1, LEFTY2, SFRP4) in conjunction with a housekeeping gene triplex (B2M, UBC, UCE). Two novel mRNA multiplexes and a HBD1 singleplex were....... The simultaneous extraction of RNA and DNA allowed for positive identification of the tissue/fluid source of origin by mRNA profiling as well as a simultaneous identification of the body fluid donor by STR profiling, also from old and compromised casework samples. The results of this and the previous collaborative...

  6. Analysis of DNA methylation variation in sibling tobacco ( Nicotiana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP) analysis were used to investigate the genome of two sibling tobacco cultivars, Yunyan85 and Yunyan87, their parent K326 and the other tobacco cultivar NC89. AFLP analysis indicated that, the genome primary ...

  7. ArrayQuest: a web resource for the analysis of DNA microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barth Jeremy L

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous microarray analysis programs have been created through the efforts of Open Source software development projects. Providing browser-based interfaces that allow these programs to be executed over the Internet enhances the applicability and utility of these analytic software tools. Results Here we present ArrayQuest, a web-based DNA microarray analysis process controller. Key features of ArrayQuest are that (1 it is capable of executing numerous analysis programs such as those written in R, BioPerl and C++; (2 new analysis programs can be added to ArrayQuest Methods Library at the request of users or developers; (3 input DNA microarray data can be selected from public databases (i.e., the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC DNA Microarray Database or Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO or it can be uploaded to the ArrayQuest center-point web server into a password-protected area; and (4 analysis jobs are distributed across computers configured in a backend cluster. To demonstrate the utility of ArrayQuest we have populated the methods library with methods for analysis of Affymetrix DNA microarray data. Conclusion ArrayQuest enables browser-based implementation of DNA microarray data analysis programs that can be executed on a Linux-based platform. Importantly, ArrayQuest is a platform that will facilitate the distribution and implementation of new analysis algorithms and is therefore of use to both developers of analysis applications as well as users. ArrayQuest is freely available for use at http://proteogenomics.musc.edu/arrayquest.html.

  8. Analysis of the Expression of Repetitive DNA Elements in Osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan D. Ho

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma (OS is a rare malignant bone tumor. It affects mostly young persons and has poor outcome with the present treatment. No improvement was observed since the introduction of chemotherapy. The better understanding of osteosarcoma development could indicate better management strategy. Repetitive DNA elements were found to play a role in cancer mechanism especially in epithelial tumors but not yet analyzed in osteosarcoma. We conducted the study to analyse the expression profile of repetitive elements (RE in osteosarcoma.Methods: Fresh bone paired (tumor and normal bone samples were obtained from excised parts of tumors of 18 patients with osteosarcoma. We performed sequencing of RNA extracted from 36 samples (18 tumor tissues and 18 normal bone for controls, mapped raw reads to the human genome and identified the REs. EdgeR package was used to analyse the difference in expression of REs between osteosarcoma and normal bone.Results: 82 REs were found differentially expressed (FDR < 0.05 between osteosarcoma and normal bone. Out of all significantly changed REs, 35 were upregulated and 47 were downregulated. HERVs (THE1C-int, LTR5, MER57F and MER87B and satellite elements (HSATII, ALR-alpha were the most significantly differential expressed elements between osteosarcoma and normal tissues. These results suggest significant impact of REs in the osteosarcoma. The role of REs should be further studied to understand the mechanism they have in the genesis of osteosarcoma.

  9. Digital analysis of cDNA abundance; expression profiling by means of restriction fragment fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regenbogen Johannes

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression profiling among different tissues is of paramount interest in various areas of biomedical research. We have developed a novel method (DADA, Digital Analysis of cDNA Abundance, that calculates the relative abundance of genes in cDNA libraries. Results DADA is based upon multiple restriction fragment length analysis of pools of clones from cDNA libraries and the identification of gene-specific restriction fingerprints in the resulting complex fragment mixtures. A specific cDNA cloning vector had to be constructed that governed missing or incomplete cDNA inserts which would generate misleading fingerprints in standard cloning vectors. Double stranded cDNA was synthesized using an anchored oligo dT primer, uni-directionally inserted into the DADA vector and cDNA libraries were constructed in E. coli. The cDNA fingerprints were generated in a PCR-free procedure that allows for parallel plasmid preparation, labeling, restriction digest and fragment separation of pools of 96 colonies each. This multiplexing significantly enhanced the throughput in comparison to sequence-based methods (e.g. EST approach. The data of the fragment mixtures were integrated into a relational database system and queried with fingerprints experimentally produced by analyzing single colonies. Due to limited predictability of the position of DNA fragments on the polyacrylamid gels of a given size, fingerprints derived solely from cDNA sequences were not accurate enough to be used for the analysis. We applied DADA to the analysis of gene expression profiles in a model for impaired wound healing (treatment of mice with dexamethasone. Conclusions The method proved to be capable of identifying pharmacologically relevant target genes that had not been identified by other standard methods routinely used to find differentially expressed genes. Due to the above mentioned limited predictability of the fingerprints, the method was yet tested only with

  10. Identification of a cat eye syndrome using DNA sequence dosage analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulle, F; Lespinasse, J; Pawlak, A; Vadot, E; Sastre, J; Noël, B; Guellaen, G

    1996-01-01

    We report here the detection of a Cat Eye Syndrome (CES) in a woman who does not exhibit the related phenotype, due to intensive surgery. The analysis of her karyotype reveals a small supernumerary bisatellited chromosome likely to correspond to a fragment of chromosome 13, 15, 21 or 22 on banding analysis. Southern blot of genomic DNA of this patient and her parents hybridized with probes specific of these chromosomes, revealed a DNA amplification of the 22q11 region for the patient, likely to correspond to a CES.

  11. Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification Technique for Copy Number Analysis on Small Amounts of DNA Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karina; Andersen, Paal; Larsen, Lars

    2008-01-01

    analysis on small amounts of DNA. Six patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) were used in this study. DNA was extracted from both whole blood and DBSS and subjected to MLPA analysis using normal and modified probes. Results were analyzed using GeneMarker and manual Excel analysis. A total...

  12. Detection of a putative virulence cadF gene of Campylobacter jejuni obtained from different sources using a microfabricated PCR chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Claus Riber; El-Ali, Jamil; Perch-Nielsen, Ivan R.

    2005-01-01

    A microfabricated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip made of epoxy-based photoresist (SU-8) was recently designed and developed. In this study, we tested whether the PCR chip could be used for rapid detection of a potential virulence determinant, the cadF gene of Campylobacter jejuni. PCR...... was performed using published PCR conditions and primers for the C. jejuni cadF gene. DNA isolated from a C. jejuni reference strain CCUG 11284, C. jejuni isolates obtained from different sources (chicken and human), and Campylobacter whole cells were used as templates in the PCR tests. Conventional PCR in tube...... was used as the control. After optimization of the PCR chip, PCR positives on the chip were obtained from 91.0% (10/11) of the tested chips. A fast transition time was achieved with the PCR chip, and therefore a faster cycling time and a shorter PCR program were obtained. Using the PCR chip, the cadF gene...

  13. Comprehensive DNA Adduct Analysis Reveals Pulmonary Inflammatory Response Contributes to Genotoxic Action of Magnetite Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kousuke Ishino

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanosized-magnetite (MGT is widely utilized in medicinal and industrial fields; however, its toxicological properties are not well documented. In our previous report, MGT showed genotoxicity in both in vitro and in vivo assay systems, and it was suggested that inflammatory responses exist behind the genotoxicity. To further clarify mechanisms underlying the genotoxicity, a comprehensive DNA adduct (DNA adductome analysis was conducted using DNA samples derived from the lungs of mice exposed to MGT. In total, 30 and 42 types of DNA adducts were detected in the vehicle control and MGT-treated groups, respectively. Principal component analysis (PCA against a subset of DNA adducts was applied and several adducts, which are deduced to be formed by inflammation or oxidative stress, as the case of etheno-deoxycytidine (εdC, revealed higher contributions to MGT exposure. By quantitative-LC-MS/MS analysis, εdC levels were significantly higher in MGT-treated mice than those of the vehicle control. Taken together with our previous data, it is suggested that inflammatory responses might be involved in the genotoxicity induced by MGT in the lungs of mice.

  14. Forensic soil DNA analysis using high-throughput sequencing: a comparison of four molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jennifer M; Weyrich, Laura S; Cooper, Alan

    2014-11-01

    Soil analysis, such as mineralogy, geophysics, texture and colour, are commonly used in forensic casework to link a suspect to a crime scene. However, DNA analysis can also be applied to characterise the vast diversity of organisms present in soils. DNA metabarcoding and high-throughput sequencing (HTS) now offer a means to improve discrimination between forensic soil samples by identifying individual taxa and exploring non-culturable microbial species. Here, we compare the small-scale reproducibility and resolution of four molecular markers targeting different taxa (bacterial 16S rRNA, eukaryotic18S rRNA, plant trnL intron and fungal internal transcribed spacer I (ITS1) rDNA) to distinguish two sample sites. We also assess the background DNA level associated with each marker and examine the effects of filtering Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) detected in extraction blank controls. From this study, we show that non-bacterial taxa in soil, particularly fungi, can provide the greatest resolution between the sites, whereas plant markers may be problematic for forensic discrimination. ITS and 18S markers exhibit reliable amplification, and both show high discriminatory power with low background DNA levels. The 16S rRNA marker showed comparable discriminatory power post filtering; however, presented the highest level of background DNA. The discriminatory power of all markers was increased by applying OTU filtering steps, with the greatest improvement observed by the removal of any sequences detected in extraction blanks. This study demonstrates the potential use of multiple DNA markers for forensic soil analysis using HTS, and identifies some of the standardisation and evaluation steps necessary before this technique can be applied in casework. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. MethVisual - visualization and exploratory statistical analysis of DNA methylation profiles from bisulfite sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zackay, Arie; Steinhoff, Christine

    2010-12-15

    Exploration of DNA methylation and its impact on various regulatory mechanisms has become a very active field of research. Simultaneously there is an arising need for tools to process and analyse the data together with statistical investigation and visualisation. MethVisual is a new application that enables exploratory analysis and intuitive visualization of DNA methylation data as is typically generated by bisulfite sequencing. The package allows the import of DNA methylation sequences, aligns them and performs quality control comparison. It comprises basic analysis steps as lollipop visualization, co-occurrence display of methylation of neighbouring and distant CpG sites, summary statistics on methylation status, clustering and correspondence analysis. The package has been developed for methylation data but can be also used for other data types for which binary coding can be inferred. The application of the package, as well as a comparison to existing DNA methylation analysis tools and its workflow based on two datasets is presented in this paper. The R package MethVisual offers various analysis procedures for data that can be binarized, in particular for bisulfite sequenced methylation data. R/Bioconductor has become one of the most important environments for statistical analysis of various types of biological and medical data. Therefore, any data analysis within R that allows the integration of various data types as provided from different technological platforms is convenient. It is the first and so far the only specific package for DNA methylation analysis, in particular for bisulfite sequenced data available in R/Bioconductor enviroment. The package is available for free at http://methvisual.molgen.mpg.de/ and from the Bioconductor Consortium http://www.bioconductor.org.

  16. MethVisual - visualization and exploratory statistical analysis of DNA methylation profiles from bisulfite sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zackay Arie

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exploration of DNA methylation and its impact on various regulatory mechanisms has become a very active field of research. Simultaneously there is an arising need for tools to process and analyse the data together with statistical investigation and visualisation. Findings MethVisual is a new application that enables exploratory analysis and intuitive visualization of DNA methylation data as is typically generated by bisulfite sequencing. The package allows the import of DNA methylation sequences, aligns them and performs quality control comparison. It comprises basic analysis steps as lollipop visualization, co-occurrence display of methylation of neighbouring and distant CpG sites, summary statistics on methylation status, clustering and correspondence analysis. The package has been developed for methylation data but can be also used for other data types for which binary coding can be inferred. The application of the package, as well as a comparison to existing DNA methylation analysis tools and its workflow based on two datasets is presented in this paper. Conclusions The R package MethVisual offers various analysis procedures for data that can be binarized, in particular for bisulfite sequenced methylation data. R/Bioconductor has become one of the most important environments for statistical analysis of various types of biological and medical data. Therefore, any data analysis within R that allows the integration of various data types as provided from different technological platforms is convenient. It is the first and so far the only specific package for DNA methylation analysis, in particular for bisulfite sequenced data available in R/Bioconductor enviroment. The package is available for free at http://methvisual.molgen.mpg.de/ and from the Bioconductor Consortium http://www.bioconductor.org.

  17. The logic of DNA replication in double-stranded DNA viruses: insights from global analysis of viral genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazlauskas, Darius; Krupovic, Mart; Venclovas, Česlovas

    2016-06-02

    Genomic DNA replication is a complex process that involves multiple proteins. Cellular DNA replication systems are broadly classified into only two types, bacterial and archaeo-eukaryotic. In contrast, double-stranded (ds) DNA viruses feature a much broader diversity of DNA replication machineries. Viruses differ greatly in both completeness and composition of their sets of DNA replication proteins. In this study, we explored whether there are common patterns underlying this extreme diversity. We identified and analyzed all major functional groups of DNA replication proteins in all available proteomes of dsDNA viruses. Our results show that some proteins are common to viruses infecting all domains of life and likely represent components of the ancestral core set. These include B-family polymerases, SF3 helicases, archaeo-eukaryotic primases, clamps and clamp loaders of the archaeo-eukaryotic type, RNase H and ATP-dependent DNA ligases. We also discovered a clear correlation between genome size and self-sufficiency of viral DNA replication, the unanticipated dominance of replicative helicases and pervasive functional associations among certain groups of DNA replication proteins. Altogether, our results provide a comprehensive view on the diversity and evolution of replication systems in the DNA virome and uncover fundamental principles underlying the orchestration of viral DNA replication. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Quantitative analysis of DNA methylation after whole bisulfitome amplification of a minute amount of DNA from body fluids.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaissiere, T.; Cuenin, C.; Paliwal, A.; Vineis, P.; Hoek, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069553475; Krzyzanowski, M.; Airoldi, L.; Dunning, A.; Garte, S.; Malaveille, C.; Overvad, K.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Linseisen, J.; Boeing, H.; Trichopoulou, A.; Trichopoulous, D.; Kaladidi, A.; Palli, D.; Krogh, V.; Tumino, R.; Panico, S.; Bueno de Mesquita, H.B.; Peeters, P.H.M.; Kumle, M.; Gonzalez, C.A.; Martinez, C.; Dorronsoro, M.; Barricarte, A.; Navarro, C.; Quiros, J.R.; Berglund, B.; Janzon, L.; Jarvholm, B.; Day, N.E.; Key, T.J.; Saracci, R.; Kaaks, R.; Riboli, E.; Hainaut, P.; Herceg, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Cell-free circulating DNA isolated from the plasma of individuals with cancer has been shown to harbor cancer-associated changes in DNA methylation, and thus it represents an attractive target for biomarker discovery. However, the reliable detection of DNA methylation changes in body fluids has

  19. Structure of bacterial chromosome: An analysis of DNA-protein interactions in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Hołówka

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available According to recent reports, bacterial chromosomes exhibit a hierarchical organization. The number of proteins that bind DNA are responsible for local and global organization of the DNA ensuring proper chromosome compaction. Advanced molecular biology techniques combined with high-throughput DNA sequencing methods allow a precise analysis of bacterial chromosome structures on a local and global scale. Methods such as in vivo footprinting and ChIP-seq allow to map binding sites of analyzed proteins in certain chromosomal regions or along the whole chromosome while analysis of the spatial interactions on global scale could be performed by 3C techniques. Additional insight into complex structures created by chromosome-organizing proteins is provided by high-resolution fluorescence microscopy techniques.

  20. Long-term storage of samples for flow cytometric DNA analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vindeløv, L L; Christensen, I J; Keiding, N

    1983-01-01

    A simple procedure for long-term storage of cells for flow cytometric DNA analysis was developed and tested. The cells were stored as single cells or fine-needle aspirates suspended in a citrate buffer with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), or as small blocks of tissue from solid tumors. The cells were...... the capacity of our flow cytometer. The method was a prerequisite for developing an accurate standardization procedure for DNA content determination....... stored for up to one year by freezing at -80 degrees C. Statistical analysis of the results showed no change in the fractions of cells in the cell cycle phases as determined by deconvolution of the DNA-histograms. It was found that in addition to the intrinsic sample variation from the parameter...

  1. Multiplex SNP analysis on whole genome amplified DNA from archived dried bloodspots, a validation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedegaard, Kristine C.; Parner, Erik; Hooper, Craig W.

    on whole genome amplified (WGA) DNA from archived dried bloodspots. METHODS AND MATERIAL: The chemically synthesized new base pair (isoC and isoG) allow for the creation of new DNA strands that provide superior specificity and allow development of assays with greater sensitivity than conventional methods...... is a further development of allele specific primer extension (ASPE) for multiplex SNP analysis based on the Luminex 100 IS platform. It uses isobases (isoC and isoG) and the software MultiCode-PLx platform for data analysis and data handling. We validate the EraGen multicode system in two 6-plex assays used....... To validate the method 900 WGA DNA samples were genotyped in duplets. 10-20 % of all samples were sequenced to be used as reference. Accuracy and repeatability was estimated for each SNP. Robustness was estimated as rate of conclusive outcomes for each SNP. RESULTS: The accuracy ranged from 98...

  2. Microfluidic extraction, stretching and analysis of human chromosomal DNA from single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, Jaime J; Topolancik, Juraj; Tian, Harvey C; Wallin, Christopher B; Latulippe, David R; Szeto, Kylan; Murphy, Patrick J; Cipriany, Benjamin R; Levy, Stephen L; Soloway, Paul D; Craighead, Harold G

    2012-11-21

    We describe a microfluidic device for the extraction, purification and stretching of human chromosomal DNA from single cells. A two-dimensional array of micropillars in a microfluidic polydimethylsiloxane channel was designed to capture a single human cell. Megabase-long DNA strands released from the cell upon lysis are trapped in the micropillar array and stretched under optimal hydrodynamic flow conditions. Intact chromosomal DNA is entangled in the array, while other cellular components are washed from the channel. To demonstrate the entrapment principle, a single chromosome was hybridized to whole chromosome paints, and imaged by fluorescence microscopy. DNA extracted from a single cell and small cell populations (less than 100) was released from the device by restriction endonuclease digestion under continuous flow and collected for off-chip analysis. Quantification of the extracted material reveals that the microdevice efficiently extracts essentially all chromosomal DNA. The device described represents a novel platform to perform a variety of analyses on chromosomal DNA at the single cell level.

  3. Microfluidic extraction, stretching and analysis of human chromosomal DNA from single cells†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, Jaime J.; Topolancik, Juraj; Tian, Harvey C.; Wallin, Christopher B.; Latulippe, David R.; Szeto, Kylan; Murphy, Patrick J.; Cipriany, Benjamin R.; Levy, Stephen L.; Soloway, Paul D.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a microfluidic device for the extraction, purification and stretching of human chromosomal DNA from single cells. A two-dimensional array of micropillars in a microfluidic polydimethylsiloxane channel was designed to capture a single human cell. Megabase-long DNA strands released from the cell upon lysis are trapped in the micropillar array and stretched under optimal hydrodynamic flow conditions. Intact chromosomal DNA is entangled in the array, while other cellular components are washed from the channel. To demonstrate the entrapment principle, a single chromosome was hybridized to whole chromosome paints, and imaged by fluorescence microscopy. DNA extracted from a single cell and small cell populations (less than 100) was released from the device by restriction endonuclease digestion under continuous flow and collected for offchip analysis. Quantification of the extracted material reveals that the microdevice efficiently extracts essentially all chromosomal DNA. The device described represents a novel platform to perform a variety of analyses on chromosomal DNA at the single cell level. PMID:23018789

  4. Application of neural networks and other machine learning algorithms to DNA sequence analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapedes, A.; Barnes, C.; Burks, C.; Farber, R.; Sirotkin, K.

    1988-01-01

    In this article we report initial, quantitative results on application of simple neutral networks, and simple machine learning methods, to two problems in DNA sequence analysis. The two problems we consider are: (1) determination of whether procaryotic and eucaryotic DNA sequences segments are translated to protein. An accuracy of 99.4% is reported for procaryotic DNA (E. coli) and 98.4% for eucaryotic DNA (H. Sapiens genes known to be expressed in liver); (2) determination of whether eucaryotic DNA sequence segments containing the dinucleotides ''AG'' or ''GT'' are transcribed to RNA splice junctions. Accuracy of 91.2% was achieved on intron/exon splice junctions (acceptor sites) and 92.8% on exon/intron splice junctions (donor sites). The solution of these two problems, by use of information processing algorithms operating on unannotated base sequences and without recourse to biological laboratory work, is relevant to the Human Genome Project. A variety of neural network, machine learning, and information theoretic algorithms are used. The accuracies obtained exceed those of previous investigations for which quantitative results are available in the literature. They result from an ongoing program of research that applies machine learning algorithms to the problem of determining biological function of DNA sequences. Some predictions of possible new genes using these methods are listed -- although a complete survey of the H. sapiens and E. coli sections of GenBank will be given elsewhere. 36 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. The DNA sequence, annotation and analysis of human chromosome 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muzny, Donna M; Scherer, Steven E; Kaul, Rajinder

    2006-01-01

    After the completion of a draft human genome sequence, the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium has proceeded to finish and annotate each of the 24 chromosomes comprising the human genome. Here we describe the sequencing and analysis of human chromosome 3, one of the largest human chr...

  6. BIOLOG - a DNA sequence analysis system in PROLOG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyall, A; Hammond, P; Brough, D; Glover, D

    1984-01-11

    BIOLOG contains facilities for the analysis of nucleic acid sequences. These facilities are available through queries and commands of the underlying implementation language PROLOG. Familiarity with PROLOG is gained by using the built-in BIOLOG functions. This experience should enable the user to extend the current system and define new facilities.

  7. Stochastic filtering of quantitative data from STR DNA analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Mogensen, Helle Smidt

    due to the apparatus used for measurements). Pull-up effects (more systematic increase caused by overlap in the spectrum) Stutters (peaks located four basepairs before the true peak). We present filtering techniques for all three technical artifacts based on statistical analysis of data from...

  8. Conformational analysis of site-specific DNA cross-links of cisplatin-distamycin conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostrhunova, H; Brabec, V

    2000-10-17

    The requirement for novel platinum antitumor drugs led to the concept of synthesis of novel platinum drugs based on targeting cisplatin to various carrier molecules. We have shown [Loskotova, H., and Brabec, V. (1999) Eur. J. Biochem. 266, 392-402] that attachment of DNA minor-groove-binder distamycin to cisplatin changes several features of DNA-binding mode of the parent platinum drug. Major differences comprise different conformational changes in DNA and a considerably higher interstrand cross-linking efficiency. The studies of the present work have been directed to the analysis of oligodeoxyribonucleotide duplexes containing single, site-specific adducts of platinum-distamycin conjugates. These uniquely modified duplexes were analyzed by Maxam-Gilbert footprinting, phase-sensitive gel electrophoresis bending assay and chemical probes of DNA conformation. The results have indicated that the attachment of distamycin to cisplatin mainly affects the sites involved in the interstrand cross-links so that these adducts are preferentially formed between complementary guanine and cytosine residues. This interstrand cross-link bends the helix axis by approximately 35 degrees toward minor groove, unwinds DNA by approximately 95 degrees and distorts DNA symmetrically around the adduct. In addition, CD spectra of restriction fragments modified by the cisplatin-distamycin conjugates have demonstrated that distamycin moiety in the interstrand cross-links of these compounds interacts with DNA. This interaction facilitates the formation of these adducts. Hence, the structural impact of the specific interstrand cross-link detected in this study deserves attention when biological behavior of cisplatin derivatives targeted by oligopeptide DNA minor-groove-binders is evaluated.

  9. Charging YOYO-1 on capillary wall for online DNA intercalation and integrating this approach with multiplex PCR and bare narrow capillary-hydrodynamic chromatography for online DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huang; Zhu, Zaifang; Lu, Joann Juan; Liu, Shaorong

    2015-02-03

    Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been widely utilized for high-throughput pathogen identification. Often, a dye is used to intercalate the amplified DNA fragments, and identifications of the pathogens are carried out by DNA melting curve analysis or gel electrophoresis. Integrating DNA amplification and identification is a logic path toward maximizing the benefit of multiplex PCR. Although PCR and gel electrophoresis have been integrated, replenishing the gels after each run is tedious and time-consuming. In this technical note, we develop an approach to address this issue. We perform multiplex PCR inside a capillary, transfer the amplified fragments to a bare narrow capillary, and measure their lengths online using bare narrow capillary-hydrodynamic chromatography (BaNC-HDC), a new technique recently developed in our laboratory for free-solution DNA separation. To intercalate the DNA with YOYO-1 (a fluorescent dye) for BaNC-HDC, we flush the capillary column with a YOYO-1 solution; positively charged YOYO-1 is adsorbed (or charged) onto the negatively charged capillary wall. As DNA molecules are driven down the column for separation, they react with the YOYO-1 stored on the capillary wall and are online-intercalated with the dye. With a single YOYO-1 charging, the column can be used for more than 40 runs, although the fluorescence signal intensities of the DNA peaks decrease gradually. Although the dye-DNA intercalation occurs during the separation, it does not affect the retention times, separation efficiencies, or resolutions.

  10. Charging YOYO-1 on Capillary Wall for Online DNA Intercalation and Integrating This Approach with Multiplex PCR and Bare Narrow Capillary–Hydrodynamic Chromatography for Online DNA Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been widely utilized for high-throughput pathogen identification. Often, a dye is used to intercalate the amplified DNA fragments, and identifications of the pathogens are carried out by DNA melting curve analysis or gel electrophoresis. Integrating DNA amplification and identification is a logic path toward maximizing the benefit of multiplex PCR. Although PCR and gel electrophoresis have been integrated, replenishing the gels after each run is tedious and time-consuming. In this technical note, we develop an approach to address this issue. We perform multiplex PCR inside a capillary, transfer the amplified fragments to a bare narrow capillary, and measure their lengths online using bare narrow capillary–hydrodynamic chromatography (BaNC-HDC), a new technique recently developed in our laboratory for free-solution DNA separation. To intercalate the DNA with YOYO-1 (a fluorescent dye) for BaNC-HDC, we flush the capillary column with a YOYO-1 solution; positively charged YOYO-1 is adsorbed (or charged) onto the negatively charged capillary wall. As DNA molecules are driven down the column for separation, they react with the YOYO-1 stored on the capillary wall and are online-intercalated with the dye. With a single YOYO-1 charging, the column can be used for more than 40 runs, although the fluorescence signal intensities of the DNA peaks decrease gradually. Although the dye-DNA intercalation occurs during the separation, it does not affect the retention times, separation efficiencies, or resolutions. PMID:25555111

  11. Expression and DNA methylation analysis of SNRPN in Prader-Willi patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn, C.C.; Jong, M.T.C.; Driscoll, D.J. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The human SNRPN gene is one of a gene family that encode proteins involved in pre-mRNA splicing and maps to the Prader-Willi syndrome critical region in 15q11-q13. We have previously demonstrated functional imprinting of SNRPN, with absent expression in PWS skin fibroblasts and lymphoblasts. We now show a similar lack of expression in blood of PWS patients, which appear to correlate with DNA methylation of NotI sites in the 5{prime} region of the gene. RNA and DNA was extracted from peripheral blood of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) deletion patients to be used for RT-PCR with SNRPN gene-specific primers and DNA methylation analysis. Either no or highly reduced levels of SNRPN RT-PCR product were detected in nine PWS samples but was present in normals, AS patients, and one clinically typical PWS patient. Parent-of-origin DNA methylation imprints are also present within the SNRPN gene. PWS patients having only a maternal contribution of SNRPN have several NotI restriction sites near the transcription start site which are methylated, while these same sites are unmethylated on the paternal chromosome (i.e., AS samples). Several CpG sites approximately 22 kb downstream of the transcription start site are methylated preferentially on the paternal allele. These observations for human SNRPN are similar to those of the mouse imprinted gene Igf2r, which exhibits DNA methylation of a CpG island 27 kb from the transcription start site on the expressed allele, and DNA methylation in the promoter region of the repressed allele. We suggest that RT-PCR and/or DNA methylation analysis from blood of PWS patients may be the most accurate means of diagnosing classical PWS. These results further indicate a role for SNRPN in the pathogenesis of PWS, and may serve as a model to study other human imprinted genes.

  12. The DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 13

    OpenAIRE

    Dunham, A.; Matthews, L. H.; Burton, J.; Ashurst, J. L.; Howe, K. L.; Ashcroft, K. J.; Beare, D. M.; Burford, D. C.; Hunt, S. E.; Griffiths-Jones, S.; Jones, M. C.; Keenan, S. J.; Oliver, K.; Scott, C. E.; Ainscough, R.

    2004-01-01

    Chromosome 13 is the largest acrocentric human chromosome. It carries genes involved in cancer including the breast cancer type 2 (BRCA2) and retinoblastoma (RB1) genes, is frequently rearranged in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, and contains the DAOA locus associated with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. We describe completion and analysis of 95.5 megabases (Mb) of sequence from chromosome 13, which contains 633 genes and 296 pseudogenes. We estimate that more than 95.4% of the prot...

  13. DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 9

    OpenAIRE

    Humphray, S. J.; Oliver, K.; Hunt, A. R.; Plumb, R. W.; Loveland, J. E.; Howe, K. L.; Andrews, T. D.; Searle, S.; Hunt, S. E.; Scott, C. E.; Jones, M. C.; Ainscough, R.; Almeida, J. P.; Ambrose, K. D.; Ashwell, R. I. S.

    2004-01-01

    Chromosome 9 is highly structurally polymorphic. It contains the largest autosomal block of heterochromatin, which is heteromorphic in 6–8% of humans, whereas pericentric inversions occur in more than 1% of the population. The finished euchromatic sequence of chromosome 9 comprises 109,044,351 base pairs and represents >99.6% of the region. Analysis of the sequence reveals many intra- and interchromosomal duplications, including segmental duplications adjacent to both the centromere and the l...

  14. Evaluation of numerical analysis of PFGE-DNA profiles for differentiating Campylobacter fetus subspecies by comparison with phenotypic, PCR and 16S rDNA sequencing methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    On, Stephen L.W.; Harrington, C.S.

    2001-01-01

    Aims: To assess the efficacy of numerical analysis of PFGE-DNA profiles for identification and differentiation of Campylobacter fetus subspecies. Methods and Results: 31 Camp. fetus strains were examined by phenotypic, PCR- and PFGE-based methods, and the 16S rDNA sequences of 18 strains compared....... The remaining two strains were identified as Camp. fetus subsp. venerealis by either phenotypic or PCR methods, but not both. At higher similarity levels, clusters containing isolates from each of two countries were identified, suggesting that certain clones predominate in certain geographical regions....... Conclusions: Numerical analysis of PFGE-DNA profiles is an effective method for differentiating Camp. fetus subspecies. Significance and Impact of the Study: Critical comparison of PFGE, PCR, 16S rDNA sequencing and phenotypic methods for differentiation of Camp. fetus subspecies was attained. Novel...

  15. Analysis of DNA from post-blast pipe bomb fragments for identification and determination of ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasker, Esiri; LaRue, Bobby; Beherec, Charity; Gangitano, David; Hughes-Stamm, Sheree

    2017-05-01

    Improvised explosive devices (IEDs) such as pipe bombs are weapons used to detrimentally affect people and communities. A readily accessible brand of exploding targets called Tannerite® has been identified as a potential material for abuse as an explosive in pipe bombs. The ability to recover and genotype DNA from such weapons may be vital in the effort to identify suspects associated with these devices. While it is possible to recover DNA from post-blast fragments using short tandem repeat markers (STRs), genotyping success can be negatively affected by low quantities of DNA, degradation, and/or PCR inhibitors. Alternative markers such as insertion/null (INNULs) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are bi-allelic genetic markers that are shorter genomic targets than STRs for amplification, which are more likely to resist degradation. In this study, we constructed pipe bombs that were spiked with known amounts of biological material to: 1) recover "touch" DNA from the surface of the device, and 2) recover traces of blood from the ends of wires (simulated finger prick). The bombs were detonated with the binary explosive Tannerite® using double-base smokeless powder to initiate the reaction. DNA extracted from the post-blast fragments was quantified with the Quantifiler® Trio DNA Quantification Kit. STR analysis was conducted using the GlobalFiler® Amplification Kit, INNULs were amplified using an early-access version of the InnoTyper™ 21 Kit, and SNP analysis via massively parallel sequencing (MPS) was performed using the HID-Ion Ampliseq™ Identity and Ancestry panels using the Ion Chef and Ion PGM sequencing system. The results of this study showed that INNUL markers resulted in the most complete genetic profiles when compared to STR and SNP profiles. The random match probabilities calculated for samples using INNULs were lower than with STRs when less than 14 STR alleles were reported. These results suggest that INNUL analysis may be well suited for

  16. Isolation of rye-specific DNA fragment and genetic diversity analysis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 89; Issue 4. Isolation of rye-specific DNA fragment and genetic diversity analysis of rye genus Secale L. using wheat SSR markers. Shulan Fu Zongxiang Tang Zhenglong Ren Huaiqiong Zhang Benju Yan. Research Note Volume 89 Issue 4 December 2010 pp 489-492 ...

  17. Integrated fluorescence sensing in a lab-on-a-chip for DNA analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dongre, C.; van Weerd, J.; van Weeghel, R.; Martinez-Vazquez, R.; Osellame, R.; Ramponi, R.; Cerullo, G.; Dekker, R.; Dekker, R; Besselink, G.A.J.; van den Vlekkert, H.H.; Hoekstra, Hugo; Pollnau, Markus; Meijer, G.C.M.

    2009-01-01

    We report on monolithic optical sensor integration in a lab-on-a-chip toward onchip diagnosis of all kinds of genetic diseases, e.g. breast cancer. Such an analysis of genetic diseases is based on the capillary electrophoresis separation of DNA fragments amplified from diagnostically relevant

  18. Comparison of DNA extraction protocols for the analysis of gut microbiota in fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Andrea M; Mohammed, Haitham H; Arias, Covadonga R

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the impacts of bacterial DNA extraction methodology on downstream analysis of fish gut microbiota. Feces and intestine samples were taken from three sympatric freshwater fish species with varying diets. Samples were processed immediately (approximately 4 h after capture; fresh), stored at -20 °C for 15 days or preserved in RNAlater® reagent for 15 days. DNA was then extracted using two commercial kits: one designed for animal tissues and one specifically formulated for stool samples. Microbial community fingerprints were generated using ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis. Factors including diversity as depicted by band number, band intensity, repeatability and practicalities such as cost and time were considered. Despite significant differences in microbiota structure, results were similar between feces and intestine samples. Frozen samples were consistently outperformed by other storage methods and the stool kit typically outperformed the tissue kit. Overall, we recommend extraction of bacterial DNA from fresh samples using the stool kit for both sample types. If samples cannot be processed immediately, preservation in RNAlater® is preferred to freezing. Choice of DNA extraction method significantly influences the results of downstream microbial community analysis and thus should be taken into consideration for metadata analysis. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Impact of HIV Type 1 DNA Levels on Spontaneous Disease Progression: A Meta-Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsiara, Chrissa G; Nikolopoulos, Georgios K; Bagos, Pantelis G

    2012-01-01

    , and to compare the prognostic information obtained by HIV-1 DNA with that derived from plasma HIV-1 RNA. Eligible articles were identified through a comprehensive search of Medline, ISI Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar. The analysis included univariate and bivariate random-effects models...

  20. Detection of cervical neoplasia by DNA methylation analysis in cervico-vaginal lavages, a feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijsink, J. J. H.; Yang, N.; Lendvai, A.; Klip, H. G.; Volders, H. H.; Buikema, H. J.; van Hemel, B. M.; Voll, M.; Bennink, H. J. T. Coelingh; Schuuring, E.; Wisman, G. B. A.; van der Zee, A. G. J.

    Objective. To explore the feasibility of DNA methylation analysis for the detection of cervical neoplasia in self-obtained cervico-vaginal lavages. Methods. Lavages collected by a self-sampling device and paired cervical scrapings were obtained from 20 cervical cancer patients and 23 patients

  1. Genetic characterization of Phytophthora nicotianae by the analysis of polymorphic regions of the mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new method based on the analysis of mitochondrial intergenic regions characterized by intraspecific variation in DNA sequences was developed and applied to the study of the plant pathogen Phytophthora nicotianae. Two regions flanked by genes trny and rns and trnw and cox2 were identified by compa...

  2. Discrimination of bromodeoxyuridine labelled and unlabelled mitotic cells in flow cytometric bromodeoxyuridine/DNA analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P O; Larsen, J K; Christensen, I J

    1994-01-01

    Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) labelled and unlabelled mitotic cells, respectively, can be discriminated from interphase cells using a new method, based on immunocytochemical staining of BrdUrd and flow cytometric four-parameter analysis of DNA content, BrdUrd incorporation, and forward and orthogona...

  3. Construction of a full-length cDNA library and analysis of expressed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sunny t

    2015-06-10

    Jun 10, 2015 ... Biotechnol. 16:95-104. Talon M, Gmitter FG Jr. (2008). Citrus genomics. Int. J. Plant Genomics. 2008:528361. Tran T, Vu TQC, Abdullah MP, Omar H, Noroozi M, Ky H, Napis S. (2011). Construction of cDNA library and preliminary analysis of expressed sequence tags from green microalga Ankistrodesmus.

  4. Circular Dichroism for the Analysis of Protein-DNA Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlett, Garry; Siligardi, Giuliano; Kneale, Geoffrey G

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to provide information on the practical aspects of circular dichroism (CD) and synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) in protein-nucleic acids interaction solution studies. The chapter will describe the guidelines appropriate to designing experiments and conducting correct data interpretation, the use of both benchtop and synchrotron CD approaches is discussed and the advantages of SRCD outlined. Further information and a good general review of the field a can be found in Gray (Circular Dichroism of protein-nucleic acid interactions. In: Fasman GD (ed) Circular dichroism and the conformational analysis of biomolecules. Plenum Press, New York. pp 469-500, 1996).

  5. Determining physical constraints in transcriptional initiationcomplexes using DNA sequence analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shultzaberger, Ryan K.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Moses, Alan M.; Eisen,Michael B.

    2007-07-01

    Eukaryotic gene expression is often under the control ofcooperatively acting transcription factors whose binding is limited bystructural constraints. By determining these structural constraints, wecan understand the "rules" that define functional cooperativity.Conversely, by understanding the rules of binding, we can inferstructural characteristics. We have developed an information theory basedmethod for approximating the physical limitations of cooperativeinteractions by comparing sequence analysis to microarray expressiondata. When applied to the coordinated binding of the sulfur amino acidregulatory protein Met4 by Cbf1 and Met31, we were able to create acombinatorial model that can correctly identify Met4 regulatedgenes.

  6. Photocleavable DNA Barcoding Antibodies for Multiplexed Protein Analysis in Single Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullal, Adeeti V; Weissleder, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    We describe a DNA-barcoded antibody sensing technique for single cell protein analysis in which the barcodes are photocleaved and digitally detected without amplification steps (Ullal et al., Sci Transl Med 6:219, 2014). After photocleaving the unique ~70 mer DNA barcodes we use a fluorescent hybridization technology for detection, similar to what is commonly done for nucleic acid readouts. This protocol offers a simple method for multiplexed protein detection using 100+ antibodies and can be performed on clinical samples as well as single cells.

  7. Visual DSD: a design and analysis tool for DNA strand displacement systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakin, Matthew R; Youssef, Simon; Polo, Filippo; Emmott, Stephen; Phillips, Andrew

    2011-11-15

    The Visual DSD (DNA Strand Displacement) tool allows rapid prototyping and analysis of computational devices implemented using DNA strand displacement, in a convenient web-based graphical interface. It is an implementation of the DSD programming language and compiler described by Lakin et al. (2011) with additional features such as support for polymers of unbounded length. It also supports stochastic and deterministic simulation, construction of continuous-time Markov chains and various export formats which allow models to be analysed using third-party tools.

  8. Nonlinear matching measure for the analysis of on-off type DNA microarray images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong D.; Park, Misun; Kim, Jongwon

    2003-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a new nonlinear matching measure for automatic analysis of the on-off type DNA microarray images in which the hybridized spots are detected by the template matching method. The targeting spots of HPV DNA chips are designed for genotyping the human papilloma virus(HPV). The proposed measure is obtained by binarythresholding over the whole template region and taking the number of white pixels inside the spotted area. This measure is evaluated in terms of the accuracy of the estimated marker location to show better performance than the normalized covariance.

  9. Morphology and size dependence of silver microstructures in fatty salts-assisted multiphoton photoreduction microfabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Yao-Yu.; Dong, Xian-Zi [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Organic NanoPhotonics and Key Laboratory of Photochemical Conversion and Functional Materials, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Beijing (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Takeyasu, Nobuyuki [RIKEN (Institute of Physical and Chemical Research), Nanophotonics Laboratory, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Tanaka, Takuo [RIKEN (Institute of Physical and Chemical Research), Metamaterials Laboratory, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Zhao, Zhen-Sheng; Duan, Xuan-Ming [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Organic NanoPhotonics and Key Laboratory of Photochemical Conversion and Functional Materials, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Beijing (China); Kawata, Satoshi [RIKEN (Institute of Physical and Chemical Research), Nanophotonics Laboratory, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Osaka University, Department of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2009-08-15

    The morphology and size dependence of silver microstructures in a novel microfabrication process, fatty salts-assisted multiphoton photoreduction (MPR), were investigated by using the fatty salts with different carbon chain lengths (C{sub n}:n=4,5,7,9) under varied powers and irradiation times of a femtosecond near-infrared laser with the wavelength of 800 nm. Not only the feature size of the silver structures was reduced but also the surface smoothness was improved by increasing the chain length of the fatty salts. The highest resolution of a silver line was obtained to be 285 nm, which exceeded the diffraction limit. The fatty salts-assisted MPR microfabrication approach would provide an efficient protocol for fabricating metallic micro/nanostructures with fine morphology and size and could play an important role in the fabrication of the metallic micro/nanostructures for applications in photonics and electronics as well as in sensors. (orig.)

  10. Microfabricated tissues for investigating traction forces involved in cell migration and tissue morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerger, Bryan A; Siedlik, Michael J; Nelson, Celeste M

    2017-05-01

    Cell-generated forces drive an array of biological processes ranging from wound healing to tumor metastasis. Whereas experimental techniques such as traction force microscopy are capable of quantifying traction forces in multidimensional systems, the physical mechanisms by which these forces induce changes in tissue form remain to be elucidated. Understanding these mechanisms will ultimately require techniques that are capable of quantifying traction forces with high precision and accuracy in vivo or in systems that recapitulate in vivo conditions, such as microfabricated tissues and engineered substrata. To that end, here we review the fundamentals of traction forces, their quantification, and the use of microfabricated tissues designed to study these forces during cell migration and tissue morphogenesis. We emphasize the differences between traction forces in two- and three-dimensional systems, and highlight recently developed techniques for quantifying traction forces.

  11. Micro-fabricated integrated coil and magnetic circuit and method of manufacturing thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailovich, Robert E.; Papavasiliou, Alex P.; Mehrotra, Vivek; Stupar, Philip A.; Borwick, III, Robert L.; Ganguli, Rahul; DeNatale, Jeffrey F.

    2017-03-28

    A micro-fabricated electromagnetic device is provided for on-circuit integration. The electromagnetic device includes a core. The core has a plurality of electrically insulating layers positioned alternatingly between a plurality of magnetic layers to collectively form a continuous laminate having alternating magnetic and electrically insulating layers. The electromagnetic device includes a coil embedded in openings of the semiconductor substrate. An insulating material is positioned in the cavity and between the coil and an inner surface of the core. A method of manufacturing the electromagnetic device includes providing a semiconductor substrate having openings formed therein. Windings of a coil are electroplated and embedded in the openings. The insulating material is coated on or around an exposed surface of the coil. Alternating magnetic layers and electrically insulating layers may be micro-fabricated and electroplated as a single and substantially continuous segment on or around the insulating material.

  12. Terahertz Response of a Microfabricated Rod Split-Ring-Resonator Electromagnetic Metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, H. O.; Casse, B. D.; Wilhelmi, O.; Saw, B. T.

    2005-02-01

    The first electromagnetic metamaterials (EM3) produced by microfabrication are reported. They are based on the rod split-ring-resonator design as proposed by Pendry et al. [IEEE Trans. Microwave Theory Tech. 47, 2075 (1999)IETMAB0018-948010.1109/22.798002] and experimentally confirmed by Smith et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-9007 84, 4184 (2000)10.1103/PhysRevLett.84.4184] in the GHz frequency range. Numerical simulation and experimental results from far infrared (FIR) transmission spectroscopy support the conclusion that the microfabricated composite material is EM3 in the range 1 2.7 THz. This extends the frequency range in which EM3 are available by about 3 orders of magnitude well into the FIR, thereby widely opening up opportunities to verify the unusual physical implications on electromagnetic theory as well as to build novel electromagnetic and optical devices.

  13. Laser subtractive-additive-welding microfabrication for Lab-On-Chip (LOC) applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonušauskas, Linas; RekštytÄ--, Sima; Buivydas, Ričardas; Butkus, Simas; Paipulas, Domas; Gadonas, Roaldas; Juodkazis, Saulius; Malinauskas, Mangirdas

    2017-02-01

    An approach employing ultrafast laser hybrid microfabrication combining ablation, 3D nanolithography and welding is proposed for the realization of Lab-On-Chip (LOC) device. The same laser setup is shown to be suitable for fabricating microgrooves in glass slabs, polymerization of fine meshes inside them, and, lastly, sealing the whole chip with cover glass into one monolithic piece. The created micro fluidic device proved its particle sorting function by separating 1 μm and 10 μm polystyrene spheres from a mixture. Next, a lens adapter for a cell phone's camera was manufactured via thermal extrusion 3D printing technique which allowed to achieve sufficient magnification to clearly resolve <10 μm features. All together shows fs-laser microfabrication technology as a flexible and versatile tool for study and manufacturing of Lab-On-Chip devices.

  14. The DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilig, Roland; Eckenberg, Ralph; Petit, Jean-Louis; Fonknechten, Núria; Da Silva, Corinne; Cattolico, Laurence; Levy, Michaël; Barbe, Valérie; de Berardinis, Véronique; Ureta-Vidal, Abel; Pelletier, Eric; Vico, Virginie; Anthouard, Véronique; Rowen, Lee; Madan, Anup; Qin, Shizhen; Sun, Hui; Du, Hui; Pepin, Kymberlie; Artiguenave, François; Robert, Catherine; Cruaud, Corinne; Brüls, Thomas; Jaillon, Olivier; Friedlander, Lucie; Samson, Gaelle; Brottier, Philippe; Cure, Susan; Ségurens, Béatrice; Anière, Franck; Samain, Sylvie; Crespeau, Hervé; Abbasi, Nissa; Aiach, Nathalie; Boscus, Didier; Dickhoff, Rachel; Dors, Monica; Dubois, Ivan; Friedman, Cynthia; Gouyvenoux, Michel; James, Rose; Madan, Anuradha; Mairey-Estrada, Barbara; Mangenot, Sophie; Martins, Nathalie; Ménard, Manuela; Oztas, Sophie; Ratcliffe, Amber; Shaffer, Tristan; Trask, Barbara; Vacherie, Benoit; Bellemere, Chadia; Belser, Caroline; Besnard-Gonnet, Marielle; Bartol-Mavel, Delphine; Boutard, Magali; Briez-Silla, Stéphanie; Combette, Stephane; Dufossé-Laurent, Virginie; Ferron, Carolyne; Lechaplais, Christophe; Louesse, Claudine; Muselet, Delphine; Magdelenat, Ghislaine; Pateau, Emilie; Petit, Emmanuelle; Sirvain-Trukniewicz, Peggy; Trybou, Arnaud; Vega-Czarny, Nathalie; Bataille, Elodie; Bluet, Elodie; Bordelais, Isabelle; Dubois, Maria; Dumont, Corinne; Guérin, Thomas; Haffray, Sébastien; Hammadi, Rachid; Muanga, Jacqueline; Pellouin, Virginie; Robert, Dominique; Wunderle, Edith; Gauguet, Gilbert; Roy, Alice; Sainte-Marthe, Laurent; Verdier, Jean; Verdier-Discala, Claude; Hillier, LaDeana; Fulton, Lucinda; McPherson, John; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Wilson, Richard; Scarpelli, Claude; Gyapay, Gábor; Wincker, Patrick; Saurin, William; Quétier, Francis; Waterston, Robert; Hood, Leroy; Weissenbach, Jean

    2003-02-06

    Chromosome 14 is one of five acrocentric chromosomes in the human genome. These chromosomes are characterized by a heterochromatic short arm that contains essentially ribosomal RNA genes, and a euchromatic long arm in which most, if not all, of the protein-coding genes are located. The finished sequence of human chromosome 14 comprises 87,410,661 base pairs, representing 100% of its euchromatic portion, in a single continuous segment covering the entire long arm with no gaps. Two loci of crucial importance for the immune system, as well as more than 60 disease genes, have been localized so far on chromosome 14. We identified 1,050 genes and gene fragments, and 393 pseudogenes. On the basis of comparisons with other vertebrate genomes, we estimate that more than 96% of the chromosome 14 genes have been annotated. From an analysis of the CpG island occurrences, we estimate that 70% of these annotated genes are complete at their 5' end.

  15. Using multiplex PCR amplification and typing kits for the analysis of DNA evidence in a serial killer case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochmeister, M N; Budowle, B; Eisenberg, A; Borer, U V; Dirnhofer, R

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of DNA evidence in a serial killer case was performed using the AmpliType HLA-DQ alpha-, AmpliType PM-, and the GenePrint STR Multiplex System PCR Amplification Kits. In addition, a sex typing procedure using the X-Y homologous gene amelogenin was carried out. DNA profiles from a single hair with attached sheath material, recovered from underneath the seat cover of the suspect's car seat were compared with DNA profiles derived from reference head hairs from a homicide victim. From the evidentiary sample only 9 ng of human DNA could be recovered. In a sample, where the quantity of DNA becomes a critical issue a powerful route is the simultaneous amplification of several loci (multiplex PCR). This is the first report where commercially available multiplex PCR amplification and typing kits have been introduced for the analysis of DNA evidence in a serial killer case and the analysis has been admitted in court.

  16. [Diagnostic value of mitochondrial DNA analysis in chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornblum, C; Kunz, W S; Klockgether, T; Roggenkämper, P; Schröder, R

    2004-12-01

    Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) is a mitochondrial cytopathy presenting with ptosis and external ophthalmoparesis. Mitochondrial disorders are characterized by a broad clinical spectrum and genetic background with marked genotype/phenotype variability. The routine diagnostic work-up usually includes clinical and laboratory examinations as well as histological and histochemical analysis of skeletal muscle biopsy. In our case only an additional molecular biological examination allowed the diagnosis of CPEO. We report a 35-year-old woman with a 7-years history of slowly progressive diplopia due to impaired ocular motility and bilateral ptosis. We performed ophthalmological and neurological examinations, laboratory testing, lower limb skeletal muscle biopsy including histological and histochemical investigations, biochemical analysis of respiratory chain enzymes in skeletal muscle homogenate and molecular genetic testing of skeletal muscle DNA. Although clinical, laboratory, histological and biochemical analyses did not give any hints suggesting a mitochondrial cytopathy, molecular genetic testing of total DNA from skeletal muscle tissue by Southern blot analysis finally revealed a 3.8 kb mitochondrial DNA deletion with a degree of heteroplasmy of 45 %. In patients with unexplained binocular diplopia , oculomotor deficits and/or acquired ptosis, an underlying mitochondrial cytopathy should be considered. Even in the case of inconspicuous skeletal muscle histology and biochemistry, molecular genetic testing of skeletal muscle DNA is advisable in order to establish the diagnosis.

  17. Characterization of Penicillium species by ribosomal DNA sequencing and BOX, ERIC and REP-PCR analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, Cristina; Cubero, Jaime; Melgarejo, Paloma

    2009-07-01

    The genus Penicillium is one of the largest and widely distributed fungal genera described to date. As a result, its taxonomic classification and species discrimination within this genus has become complicated. In this study, 52 isolates that belonged to the Penicillum genus and other related genera were characterized using two DNA-based methods: (i) analysis of the nucleotide sequences of internal transcribed spacers in ribosomal DNA and (ii) analysis of DNA fingerprints that were generated by polymerase chain reactions with specific primers for enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) and repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) sequences, and BOX elements. Using both methods, Penicillium species were discriminated from other fungal genera. Furthermore, Penicillium species that include strains which are used as biocontrol agents, such as P. glabrum, P. purpurogenum, and P. oxalicum, could be distinguished from other Penicillium species using these techniques. Based on our findings, we propose that a polyphasic approach that includes analysis of the nucleotide sequences of ribosomal DNA and detecting the presence of highly conserved, repeated nucleotide sequences can be used to determine the genetic relationships between different Penicillium species. Furthermore, we propose that our results can be used as a start point to develop a strategy to monitor the environmental presence of particular strains of Penicillium species when they are used as biocontrol agents.

  18. [THE OPTIMAL CONDITIONS OF STORAGE OF SPERMATOZOA FOR ANALYSIS OF DNA FRAGMENTATION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tataru, D A; Markova, E V; Osadchuk, L V; Sheina, E V; Svetlakov, A V

    2015-04-01

    The analysis of fragmentation of DNA of spermatozoons using technique of flow cytometry to evaluate male fertility more and more often begins to be applied in clinical diagnostic. However, development of optimal protocol of storage and preparation of spermatozoons for analysis still is at the stage of experimental elaboration. The studv was carried out to analyse effect of different conditions of preparation of ejaculate for adequate evaluation of index of fragmentation of DNA of spermatozoons using sperm chromatin structure assay technique. The sampling consisted of 20 patients of the Krasnoyarsk center of reproductive medicine. The sperm chromatin structure assay technique was applied to evaluate index of fragmentation of DNA of spermatozoons in fresh native ejaculate and after storage of spermatozoons under different temperature (37, 25 and 4 degrees C) and duration (1-2 and 1-3 days) and conditions of storage (-20 or -70 degrees C) of frozen spermatozoons (as native ejaculate or in TNE-buffer). It is demonstrated that index of fragmentation of DNA of spermatozoons has no significant alterations in ejaculate stored under 4 degrees C during 48 hours. In case of storage of ejaculate under 25 or 37 degrees C index of fragmentation of DNA of spermatozoons significantly increases already after first day of storage. The incubation of ejaculate under 37 degrees C results in increasing of index of fragmentation of DNA of spermatozoons already after first hour. The individual differences are established related to degree of increasing of index of fragmentation of DNA of spermatozoons because of impact of studied temperatures of ejaculate incubation. The storage of spermatozoons under temperature of - 20 and -70 degrees C in native ejaculate or in TNE-buffer has no effect of index of fragmentation of DNA of spermatozoons with measurement during 1-2 hours. Therefore, storage and transportation of native ejaculate under 4 degrees C during 1-2 days or in frozen condition

  19. Meta-Analysis of Mitochondrial DNA Variation in the Iberian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barral-Arca, Ruth; Pischedda, Sara; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Pastoriza, Ana; Mosquera-Miguel, Ana; López-Soto, Manuel; Martinón-Torres, Federico; Álvarez-Iglesias, Vanesa; Salas, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The Iberian Peninsula has been the focus of attention of numerous studies dealing with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation, most of them targeting the control region segment. In the present study we sequenced the control region of 3,024 Spanish individuals from areas where available data were still limited. We also compiled mtDNA haplotypes from the literature involving 4,588 sequences and 28 population groups or small regions. We meta-analyzed all these data in order to shed further light on patterns of geographic variation, taking advantage of the large sample size and geographic coverage, in contrast with the atomized sampling strategy of previous work. The results indicate that the main mtDNA haplogroups show primarily clinal geographic patterns across the Iberian geography, roughly along a North-South axis. Haplogroup HV0 (where haplogroup U is nested) is more prevalent in the Franco Cantabrian region, in good agreement with previous findings that identified this area as a climate refuge during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), prior to a subsequent demographic re-expansion towards Central Europe and the Mediterranean. Typical sub-Saharan and North African lineages are slightly more prevalent in South Iberia, although at low frequencies; this pattern has been shaped mainly by the transatlantic slave trade and the Arab invasion of the Iberian Peninsula. The results also indicate that summary statistics that aim to measure molecular variation, or AMOVA, have limited sensitivity to detect population substructure, in contrast to patterns revealed by phylogeographic analysis. Overall, the results suggest that mtDNA variation in Iberia is substantially stratified. These patterns might be relevant in biomedical studies given that stratification is a common cause of false positives in case-control mtDNA association studies, and should be also considered when weighting the DNA evidence in forensic casework, which is strongly dependent on haplotype frequencies. PMID

  20. [Cloning and tissue expression pattern analysis of the human citrate synthase cDNA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q; Yu, L; Han, X F; Fu, Q; Zhang, J X; Tang, H; Zhao, S Y

    2000-09-01

    Tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is an important way to generate ATP, which is widely distributed in the cells of animal, plant or microorganism. It catalyses the catabolism of sugar as well as protein and fat. Citrate synthase plays a key role in regulating TCA cycle and is responsible for catalysing the synthesis of citrate from oxaloacetate and acetyl CoA. Screening of genomic informatics was performed by using pig citrate synthase cDNA as a probe and a contig which is 1636 bp long and has highly homologous to the pig citrate synthase cDNA was obtained from selected ESTs with the ASSEMBLY program. According to the sequence of this contig, a pair of primers was designed and used to amplify cDNA libraries. A 1492 bp cDNA containing an open reading frame encoding 466 amino acids was cloned from human testis and skeletal muscle cDNA libraries. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cDNA showed 95%, 92% and 60.9% identity to pig, chicken and yeast citrate synthase respectively. Because the deduced amino acids sequence contains a highly conserved motif of citrate synthase from three different species, it is believed that this cDNA may be a transcript of human citrate synthase gene. Northern analysis showed that the human citrate synthase was expressed at high level in heart and muscle, at middle level in brain, kidney and pancreas tissues, not detectable in thymus and small intestine tissues, and at low level in other nine tested human tissues.

  1. Microfabricated inserts for magic angle coil spinning (MACS wireless NMR spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlad Badilita

    Full Text Available This article describes the development and testing of the first automatically microfabricated probes to be used in conjunction with the magic angle coil spinning (MACS NMR technique. NMR spectroscopy is a versatile technique for a large range of applications, but its intrinsically low sensitivity poses significant difficulties in analyzing mass- and volume-limited samples. The combination of microfabrication technology and MACS addresses several well-known NMR issues in a concerted manner for the first time: (i reproducible wafer-scale fabrication of the first-in-kind on-chip LC microresonator for inductive coupling of the NMR signal and reliable exploitation of MACS capabilities; (ii improving the sensitivity and the spectral resolution by simultaneous spinning the detection microcoil together with the sample at the "magic angle" of 54.74° with respect to the direction of the magnetic field (magic angle spinning - MAS, accompanied by the wireless signal transmission between the microcoil and the primary circuit of the NMR spectrometer; (iii given the high spinning rates (tens of kHz involved in the MAS methodology, the microfabricated inserts exhibit a clear kinematic advantage over their previously demonstrated counterparts due to the inherent capability to produce small radius cylindrical geometries, thus tremendously reducing the mechanical stress and tearing forces on the sample. In order to demonstrate the versatility of the microfabrication technology, we have designed MACS probes for various Larmor frequencies (194, 500 and 700 MHz testing several samples such as water, Drosophila pupae, adamantane solid and LiCl at different magic angle spinning speeds.

  2. Monolithic integration of optical waveguides for absorbance detection in microfabricated electrophoresis devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Petersen, Nickolaj Jacob; Hübner, Jörg

    2001-01-01

    The fabrication and performance of an electrophoretic separation chip with integrated of optical waveguides for absorption detection is presented. The device was fabricated on a silicon substrate by standard microfabrication techniques with the use of two photolithographic mask steps. The wavegui.......2 mum rhodamine 110, 8 mum 2,7-dichlorofluorescein, 10 mum fluorescein and 18 mum 5-carboxyfluorescein was demonstrated on the device using the detection cell for absorption measurements at 488 nm....

  3. Design, Microfabrication and Characterization of a Power Delivery System for new Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARUSO Massimo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design, microfabrication and characterization of a wireless power delivery system capable of driving a surface acoustic wave sensor (SAW for biomedical applications. The system consists of two planar, spiral-square microcoils, which have been geometrically optimized in order to maximize the quality factor Q. The integration of the SAW - microcoil system into artificial implant sites will allow a real-time biofilm growth monitoring and treatment, providing countless advantages to the related medical applications.

  4. Assessing the Risk of Secondary Transfer Via Fingerprint Brush Contamination Using Enhanced Sensitivity DNA Analysis Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolivar, Paula-Andrea; Tracey, Martin; McCord, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the extent of cross-contamination of DNA resulting from secondary transfer due to fingerprint brushes used on multiple items of evidence. Analysis of both standard and low copy number (LCN) STR was performed. Two different procedures were used to enhance sensitivity, post-PCR cleanup and increased cycle number. Under standard STR typing procedures, some additional alleles were produced that were not present in the controls or blanks; however, there was insufficient data to include the contaminant donor as a contributor. Inclusion of the contaminant donor did occur for one sample using post-PCR cleanup. Detection of the contaminant donor occurred for every replicate of the 31 cycle amplifications; however, using LCN interpretation recommendations for consensus profiles, only one sample would include the contaminant donor. Our results indicate that detection of secondary transfer of DNA can occur through fingerprint brush contamination and is enhanced using LCN-DNA methods. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  5. Visual DSD: a design and analysis tool for DNA strand displacement systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakin, Matthew R.; Youssef, Simon; Polo, Filippo; Emmott, Stephen; Phillips, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Summary: The Visual DSD (DNA Strand Displacement) tool allows rapid prototyping and analysis of computational devices implemented using DNA strand displacement, in a convenient web-based graphical interface. It is an implementation of the DSD programming language and compiler described by Lakin et al. (2011) with additional features such as support for polymers of unbounded length. It also supports stochastic and deterministic simulation, construction of continuous-time Markov chains and various export formats which allow models to be analysed using third-party tools. Availability: Visual DSD is available as a web-based Silverlight application for most major browsers on Windows and Mac OS X at http://research.microsoft.com/dna. It can be installed locally for offline use. Command-line versions for Windows, Mac OS X and Linux are also available from the web page. Contact: aphillip@microsoft.com Supplementary Information:Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:21984756

  6. Integrating ethical analysis "into the DNA" of synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heavey, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    Current ethical analysis tends to evaluate synthetic biology at an overview level. Synthetic biology, however, is an umbrella term that covers a variety of areas of research. These areas contain, in turn, a hierarchy of different research fields. This abstraction hierarchy-the term is borrowed from engineering-permits synthetic biologists to specialise to a very high degree. Though synthetic biology per se may create profound ethical challenges, much of the day-to-day research does not. Yet seemingly innocuous research could lead to ethically problematic results. For example, Dolly the sheep resulted from a long series of research steps, none of which presented any ethical problems. The atomic bomb was developed as a result of Einstein's uncontentions theoretical research that proved the equivalence of matter and energy. Therefore it would seem wise for ethicists to evaluate synbio research across its subfields and through its abstraction hierarchies, comparing and inter-relating the various areas of research. In addition, it would be useful if journals that publish synbio papers require an ethical statement from authors, as standard practice, so as to encourage scientists to constantly engage with ethical issues in their work. Also, this would allow an ethical snapshot of the state of the research at any given time to exist, allowing for accurate evaluation by scientists and ethicists, regulators and policymakers.

  7. Comparative (Computational Analysis of the DNA Methylation Status of Trinucleotide Repeat Expansion Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadmersad Ghorbani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have examined DNA methylation in different trinucleotide repeat diseases. We have combined this data and used a pattern searching algorithm to identify motifs in the DNA surrounding aberrantly methylated CpGs found in the DNA of patients with one of the three trinucleotide repeat (TNR expansion diseases: fragile X syndrome (FRAXA, myotonic dystrophy type I (DM1, or Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA. We examined sequences surrounding both the variably methylated (VM CpGs, which are hypermethylated in patients compared with unaffected controls, and the nonvariably methylated CpGs which remain either always methylated (AM or never methylated (NM in both patients and controls. Using the J48 algorithm of WEKA analysis, we identified that two patterns are all that is necessary to classify our three regions CCGG* which is found in VM and not in AM regions and AATT* which distinguished between NM and VM + AM using proportional frequency. Furthermore, comparing our software with MEME software, we have demonstrated that our software identifies more patterns than MEME in these short DNA sequences. Thus, we present evidence that the DNA sequence surrounding CpG can influence its susceptibility to be de novo methylated in a disease state associated with a trinucleotide repeat.

  8. Comparative (Computational) Analysis of the DNA Methylation Status of Trinucleotide Repeat Expansion Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Simon J. E.; Pook, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have examined DNA methylation in different trinucleotide repeat diseases. We have combined this data and used a pattern searching algorithm to identify motifs in the DNA surrounding aberrantly methylated CpGs found in the DNA of patients with one of the three trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion diseases: fragile X syndrome (FRAXA), myotonic dystrophy type I (DM1), or Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA). We examined sequences surrounding both the variably methylated (VM) CpGs, which are hypermethylated in patients compared with unaffected controls, and the nonvariably methylated CpGs which remain either always methylated (AM) or never methylated (NM) in both patients and controls. Using the J48 algorithm of WEKA analysis, we identified that two patterns are all that is necessary to classify our three regions CCGG∗ which is found in VM and not in AM regions and AATT∗ which distinguished between NM and VM + AM using proportional frequency. Furthermore, comparing our software with MEME software, we have demonstrated that our software identifies more patterns than MEME in these short DNA sequences. Thus, we present evidence that the DNA sequence surrounding CpG can influence its susceptibility to be de novo methylated in a disease state associated with a trinucleotide repeat. PMID:24455203

  9. Analysis of Oligonucleotide DNA Binding and Sedimentation Properties of Montmorillonite Clay Using Ultraviolet Light Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, Gary W.; Sowersby, Drew S.; Roberts, Rachel D.; Robson, Michael H.; Lewis, L. Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Smectite clays such as montmorillonite form complexes with a variety of biomolecules, including the nucleic acids DNA and RNA. Most previous studies of DNA adsorption onto clay have relied upon spectrophotometric analysis after separation of free nucleic acids from bound complexes by centrifugation. In the current work we demonstrate that such studies produce a consistent error due to (a) incomplete sedimentation of montmorillonite and (b) strong absorbance of the remaining clay at 260 nm. Clay sedimentation efficiency was strongly dependent upon cation concentration (Na+ or Mg2+) and on the level of dispersion of the original suspension. An improved clay:DNA adsorption assay was developed and utilized to assess the impact of metal counterions on binding of single-stranded DNA to montmorillonite. X-ray diffraction demonstrated, for the first time, formation of intercalated structures consistent with orientation of the DNA strands parallel to the clay surface. Observed gallery spacings were found to closely match values calculated utilizing atomistic modeling techniques. PMID:19061334

  10. Investigating human cancer etiology by DNA lesion footprinting and mutagenicity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besaratinia, Ahmad; Pfeifer, Gerd P

    2006-08-01

    Many genotoxic carcinogens are known to leave unique signatures on cancer-related genes. The signature of carcinogens is manifested by the induction of characteristic mutations at distinctive nucleotide positions along oncogenes and/or tumor suppressor genes. Often, the nucleotide positions, wherein mutations occur, co-localize with the sites of initial DNA damage induced by the respective carcinogens. Thus, DNA damage-targeted mutation can be a predictor of carcinogenicity of genotoxins. Today, genomic sequencing technologies for investigating human cancer etiology are based on DNA-lesion footprinting in conjunction with mutagenicity analysis of genotoxic carcinogens. In this review article, we discuss the ligation-mediated PCR and terminal transferase-dependent-PCR, two versatile DNA-lesion footprinting techniques. We highlight the in vitro shuttle vector-based mutation systems for investigating site-specific mutagenicity of carcinogens and the in vivo transgenic rodent mutation systems for exploring DNA damaging and mutagenic properties of carcinogens. We present examples of application of each of these methodologies to human cancer etiology, and provide prospective views on investigations using these technologies for carcinogenicity testing.

  11. Combining Electro-Osmotic Flow and FTA® Paper for DNA Analysis on Microfluidic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Wimbles

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available FTA® paper can be used to protect a variety of biological samples prior to analysis, facilitating ease-of-transport to laboratories or long-term archive storage. The use of FTA® paper as a solid phase eradicates the need to elute the nucleic acids from the matrix prior to DNA amplification, enabling both DNA purification and polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based DNA amplification to be performed in a single chamber on the microfluidic device. A disc of FTA® paper, containing a biological sample, was placed within the microfluidic device on top of wax-encapsulated DNA amplification reagents. The disc containing the biological sample was then cleaned up using Tris-EDTA (TE buffer, which was passed over the disc, via electro-osmotic flow, in order to remove any potential inhibitors of downstream processes. DNA amplification was successfully performed (from buccal cells, whole blood and semen using a Peltier thermal cycling system, whereupon the stored PCR reagents were released during the initial denaturing step due to the wax barrier melting between the FTA® disc and PCR reagents. Such a system offers advantages in terms of a simple sample introduction interface and the ability to process archived samples in an integrated microfluidic environment with minimal risk of contamination.

  12. Forensic animal DNA analysis using economical two-step direct PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitpipit, Thitika; Chotigeat, Wilaiwan; Linacre, Adrian; Thanakiatkrai, Phuvadol

    2014-03-01

    Wildlife forensic DNA analysis by amplification of a mitochondrial locus followed by DNA sequencing is routine, yet suffers from being costly and time-consuming. To address these disadvantages we report on a low-cost two-step direct PCR assay to efficiently analyze 12 forensically relevant mammalian sample types without DNA extraction. A cytochrome oxidase I degenerate-universal primer pair was designed and validated for the developed assay. The 12 sample types, which included bone, horn, feces, and urine, were amplified successfully by the assay using a pre-direct PCR dilution protocol. The average amplification success rate was as high as 92.5 % (n = 350), with an average PCR product concentration of 220.71 ± 180.84 ng/μL. Differences in amplification success rate and PCR product quantity between sample types were observed; however, most samples provided high quality sequences, permitting a 100 % nucleotide similarity to their respective species via BLAST database queries. The combination of PBS and Phire(®) Hot Start II DNA polymerase gave comparable amplification success rate and amplicon quantity with the proprietary commercial kits (P > 0.05, n = 350) but at considerably lower cost. The stability of the assay was tested by successfully amplifying samples that had been stored for up to 12 months. Our data indicate that this low-cost two-step direct amplification assay has the potential to be a valuable tool for the forensic DNA community.

  13. [Analysis of 5S rDNA changes in synthetic allopolyploids Triticum x Aegilops].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherban', A B; Sergeeva, E M; Badaeva, E D; Salina, E A

    2008-01-01

    By the example of three synthetic allopolyploids: Aegilops sharonensis x Ae. umbellulata (2n =28), Triticum urartu x Ae. tauschii (2n =28), T. dicoccoides x Ae. tauschii (2n =42) the 5S rDNA changes at the early stage of allopolyploidization were investigated. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), the quantitative changes affecting the separate loci of one of the parental genomes were revealed in plants of S3 generation of each hybrid combination. Souther hybridization with genomic DNA of allopolyploid T. urartu x Ae. tauschii (TMU38 x TQ27) revealed lower intensity of the fragments from Ae. tauschii compared with the T. urartu fragments. It may be confirmation of the reduction of signal on 1D chromosome that was revealed in this hybrid using FISH. Both appearance of a new 5S rDNA fragments and full disappearance of fragments from parental species were not showed by Southern hybridization, as well as PCR-analysis of 5-15 plants of S2-S3 generations. The changes were not found under comparison of primary structure of nine 5S rDNA sequences of allopolyploid TMU38 x TQ27 with analogous sequences from parental species genomes. The observable similarity by FISH results of one of the studied synthetic allopolyploids with natural allopolyploid of similar genome composition indicates the early formation of unique for each allopolyploid 5S rDNA organization.

  14. Hybrid Origins of Citrus Varieties Inferred from DNA Marker Analysis of Nuclear and Organelle Genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokurou Shimizu

    Full Text Available Most indigenous citrus varieties are assumed to be natural hybrids, but their parentage has so far been determined in only a few cases because of their wide genetic diversity and the low transferability of DNA markers. Here we infer the parentage of indigenous citrus varieties using simple sequence repeat and indel markers developed from various citrus genome sequence resources. Parentage tests with 122 known hybrids using the selected DNA markers certify their transferability among those hybrids. Identity tests confirm that most variant strains are selected mutants, but we find four types of kunenbo (Citrus nobilis and three types of tachibana (Citrus tachibana for which we suggest different origins. Structure analysis with DNA markers that are in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium deduce three basic taxa coinciding with the current understanding of citrus ancestors. Genotyping analysis of 101 indigenous citrus varieties with 123 selected DNA markers infers the parentages of 22 indigenous citrus varieties including Satsuma, Temple, and iyo, and single parents of 45 indigenous citrus varieties, including kunenbo, C. ichangensis, and Ichang lemon by allele-sharing and parentage tests. Genotyping analysis of chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes using 11 DNA markers classifies their cytoplasmic genotypes into 18 categories and deduces the combination of seed and pollen parents. Likelihood ratio analysis verifies the inferred parentages with significant scores. The reconstructed genealogy identifies 12 types of varieties consisting of Kishu, kunenbo, yuzu, koji, sour orange, dancy, kobeni mikan, sweet orange, tachibana, Cleopatra, willowleaf mandarin, and pummelo, which have played pivotal roles in the occurrence of these indigenous varieties. The inferred parentage of the indigenous varieties confirms their hybrid origins, as found by recent studies.

  15. Hybrid Origins of Citrus Varieties Inferred from DNA Marker Analysis of Nuclear and Organelle Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Tokurou; Kitajima, Akira; Nonaka, Keisuke; Yoshioka, Terutaka; Ohta, Satoshi; Goto, Shingo; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Mochizuki, Takako; Nagasaki, Hideki; Kaminuma, Eli; Nakamura, Yasukazu

    2016-01-01

    Most indigenous citrus varieties are assumed to be natural hybrids, but their parentage has so far been determined in only a few cases because of their wide genetic diversity and the low transferability of DNA markers. Here we infer the parentage of indigenous citrus varieties using simple sequence repeat and indel markers developed from various citrus genome sequence resources. Parentage tests with 122 known hybrids using the selected DNA markers certify their transferability among those hybrids. Identity tests confirm that most variant strains are selected mutants, but we find four types of kunenbo (Citrus nobilis) and three types of tachibana (Citrus tachibana) for which we suggest different origins. Structure analysis with DNA markers that are in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium deduce three basic taxa coinciding with the current understanding of citrus ancestors. Genotyping analysis of 101 indigenous citrus varieties with 123 selected DNA markers infers the parentages of 22 indigenous citrus varieties including Satsuma, Temple, and iyo, and single parents of 45 indigenous citrus varieties, including kunenbo, C. ichangensis, and Ichang lemon by allele-sharing and parentage tests. Genotyping analysis of chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes using 11 DNA markers classifies their cytoplasmic genotypes into 18 categories and deduces the combination of seed and pollen parents. Likelihood ratio analysis verifies the inferred parentages with significant scores. The reconstructed genealogy identifies 12 types of varieties consisting of Kishu, kunenbo, yuzu, koji, sour orange, dancy, kobeni mikan, sweet orange, tachibana, Cleopatra, willowleaf mandarin, and pummelo, which have played pivotal roles in the occurrence of these indigenous varieties. The inferred parentage of the indigenous varieties confirms their hybrid origins, as found by recent studies.

  16. Application of environmental DNA analysis to inform invasive fish eradication operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Phillip I.; Copp, Gordon H.; Créach, Véronique; Vilizzi, Lorenzo; Britton, J. R.

    2017-04-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) detection of non-native species has considerable potential to inform management decisions, including identifying the need for population control and/or eradication. An invasive species of European concern is the Asian cyprinid fish, topmouth gudgeon ( Pseudorasbora parva) . Here, eDNA analyses were applied at a commercial angling venue in southern England to inform operations aiming to eradicate P. parva, which had only ever been observed in one of the venue's seven unconnected angling ponds. Eradication of P. parva was initially attempted by repeated depletion of the population using fish traps (crayfish traps fitted with 5 mm mesh netting) and the introduction of native predators over a 4-year period. The very low number of P. parva captured following these eradication efforts suggested a possible population crash. Conventional PCR analysis of water samples using species-specific primers was applied to all seven ponds to confirm that P. parva was present in only one pond, that the eradication attempt had indeed failed and that the species' distribution in the pond appeared to be restricted to three bankside locations. The continued presence of P. parva at these locations was confirmed by subsequent trapping. Water samples from an adjacent, unconnected stream were also analysed using the eDNA methodology, but no DNA of P. parva was detected. The results suggest that further management action to eradicate P. parva be focused on the pond shown to contain the isolated P. parva population and thereby eliminate the risk of further dispersal. This study is the first to apply eDNA analysis to assess the efficacy of an eradication attempt and to provide evidence that the species was unlikely to be present in the other ponds, thus reducing the resources needed to control the species.

  17. Analysis of DNA methylation and gene expression in radiation-resistant head and neck tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaofei; Liu, Liang; Mims, Jade; Punska, Elizabeth C; Williams, Kristin E; Zhao, Weiling; Arcaro, Kathleen F; Tsang, Allen W; Zhou, Xiaobo; Furdui, Cristina M

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to radiation therapy constitutes a significant challenge in the treatment of head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC). Alteration in DNA methylation is thought to play a role in this resistance. Here, we analyzed DNA methylation changes in a matched model of radiation resistance for HNSCC using the Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. Our results show that compared to radiation-sensitive cells (SCC-61), radiation-resistant cells (rSCC-61) had a significant increase in DNA methylation. After combining these results with microarray gene expression data, we identified 84 differentially methylated and expressed genes between these 2 cell lines. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed ILK signaling, glucocorticoid receptor signaling, fatty acid α-oxidation, and cell cycle regulation as top canonical pathways associated with radiation resistance. Validation studies focused on CCND2, a protein involved in cell cycle regulation, which was identified as hypermethylated in the promoter region and downregulated in rSCC-61 relative to SCC-61 cells. Treatment of rSCC-61 and SCC-61 with the DNA hypomethylating agent 5-aza-2'deoxycitidine increased CCND2 levels only in rSCC-61 cells, while treatment with the control reagent cytosine arabinoside did not influence the expression of this gene. Further analysis of HNSCC data from The Cancer Genome Atlas found increased methylation in radiation-resistant tumors, consistent with the cell culture data. Our findings point to global DNA methylation status as a biomarker of radiation resistance in HNSCC, and suggest a need for targeted manipulation of DNA methylation to increase radiation response in HNSCC. PMID:25961636

  18. Microfabrication of a platform to measure and manipulate the mechanics of engineered microtissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramade, Alexandre; Legant, Wesley R; Picart, Catherine; Chen, Christopher S; Boudou, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Engineered tissues can be used to understand fundamental features of biology, develop organotypic in vitro model systems, and as engineered tissue constructs for replacing damaged tissue in vivo. However, a key limitation is an inability to test the wide range of parameters that might impact the engineered tissue in a high-throughput manner and in an environment that mimics the three-dimensional (3D) native architecture. We developed a microfabricated platform to generate arrays of microtissues embedded within 3D micropatterned matrices. Microcantilevers simultaneously constrain microtissue formation and report forces generated by the microtissues in real time, opening the possibility to use high-throughput, low-volume screening for studies on engineered tissues. Thanks to the micrometer scale of the microtissues, this platform is also suitable for high-throughput monitoring of drug-induced effect on architecture and contractility in engineered tissues. Moreover, independent variations of the mechanical stiffness of the cantilevers and collagen matrix allow the measurement and manipulation of the mechanics of the microtissues. Thus, our approach will likely provide valuable opportunities to elucidate how biomechanical, electrical, biochemical, and genetic/epigenetic cues modulate the formation and maturation of 3D engineered tissues. In this chapter, we describe the microfabrication, preparation, and experimental use of such microfabricated tissue gauges. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Multi-photon microfabrication of three-dimensional capillary-scale vascular networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skylar-Scott, Mark A.; Liu, Man-Chi; Wu, Yuelong; Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    2017-02-01

    Biomimetic models of microvasculature could enable assays of complex cellular behavior at the capillary-level, and enable efficient nutrient perfusion for the maintenance of tissues. However, existing three-dimensional printing methods for generating perfusable microvasculature with have insufficient resolution to recapitulate the microscale geometry of capillaries. Here, we present a collection of multiphoton microfabrication methods that enable the production of precise, three-dimensional, branched microvascular networks in collagen. When endothelial cells are added to the channels, they form perfusable lumens with diameters as small as 10 μm. Using a similar photochemistry, we also demonstrate the micropatterning of proteins embedded in microfabricated collagen scaffolds, producing hybrid scaffolds with both defined microarchitecture with integrated gradients of chemical cues. We provide examples for how these hybrid microfabricated scaffolds could be used in angiogenesis and cell homing assays. Finally, we describe a new method for increasing the micropatterning speed by synchronous laser and stage scanning. Using these technologies, we are working towards large-scale (>1 cm), high resolution ( 1 μm) scaffolds with both microarchitecture and embedded protein cues, with applications in three-dimensional assays of cellular behavior.

  20. Microfabricated device for co-culture of sympathetic neuron and iPS-derived cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Akimasa; Shimba, Kenta; Takayama, Yuzo; Kotani, Kiyoshi; Lee, Jong-Kook; Noshiro, Makoto; Jimbo, Yasuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPS-CMs) has been expected as a cell source for therapy of serious heart failure. However, it is unclear whether the function of iPS-CMs is modulated by the host sympathetic nervous system. Here we developed a device for co-culture of sympathetic neurons and iPS-CMs using microfabrication technique. The device consisted of a culture chamber and a microelectrode-array (MEA) substrate. The superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons were co-cultured with iPS-CMs in a microfabricated device, which had multiple compartments. Several days after seeding, synapses were formed between SCG neurons and iPS-CMs, as confirmed by immunostaining. Spontaneous electrical activities of the SCG neurons and the iPS-CMs were observed from the electrode of the MEA substrate. The beat rate of iPS-CMs increased after electrical stimulation of the co-cultured SCG neurons. Such changes in the beat rate were prevented in the presence of propranolol, a β-adrenoreceptor antagonist. These results suggest that the microfabricated device will be utilized for studying the functional modulation of iPS-CMs by connected sympathetic neurons.

  1. STR analysis of human DNA from maggots fed on decomposing bodies: Assessment of the time period for successful analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Gachuiri Njau

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Frequently, forensic entomology is applied in the use of insect maggots for the identification of specimens or remains of humans. Maggot crop analysis could be valuable in criminal investigations when maggots are found at a crime scene and a corpse is absent. Human short tandem repeat (STR has previously been used to support the association of maggots to a specific corpse but not in the period at which the body has been decomposing. The aim of this research was to assess the time period for successful STR analyses of human DNA from third instar maggots (Protophormia terraenovae obtained from decomposing human corpses as well as to investigate the human DNA turnover and degradation in the maggot crop after they are removed from food and/or are fed on a beef (a new/different food source. Results showed that the amount of human DNA recovered from maggots decreased with time in all cases. For maggots fed on beef, the human DNA could only be recovered up to day two and up to day four for the starved maggots. STR analyses of human DNA from maggots’ crop content using 16 loci generated profiles that matched those of reference samples although some of the alleles were not amplifiable therefore generating partial profiles for the samples starved for 4 days and those fed on beef. This may be due to nuclease activity present in the gut of larvae that may have caused degradation of DNA and consequently reduction in DNA yield. It was possible to identify the decomposing body using STRs as markers.

  2. Freezing fecal samples prior to DNA extraction affects the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio determined by downstream quantitative PCR analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, Martin Iain; Bergström, Anders; Licht, Tine Rask

    Freezing stool samples prior to DNA extraction and downstream analysis is widely used in metagenomic studies of the human microbiota but may affect the inferred community composition. In this study DNA was extracted either directly or following freeze storage of three homogenized human fecal...... samples using three different extraction methods. No consistent differences were observed in DNA yields between extractions on fresh and frozen samples, however differences were observed between extraction methods. Quantitative PCR analysis was subsequently performed on all DNA samples using six different...

  3. Freezing fecal samples prior to DNA extraction affects the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio determined by downstream quantitative PCR analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, Martin Iain; Bergström, Anders; Licht, Tine Rask

    2012-01-01

    Freezing stool samples prior to DNA extraction and downstream analysis is widely used in metagenomic studies of the human microbiota but may affect the inferred community composition. In this study, DNA was extracted either directly or following freeze storage of three homogenized human fecal...... samples using three different extraction methods. No consistent differences were observed in DNA yields between extractions on fresh and frozen samples; however, differences were observed between extraction methods. Quantitative PCR analysis was subsequently performed on all DNA samples using six...

  4. Determining the role of mother race in neonatal outcome of trisomies 21, 18 and 13 using cell free DNA analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Najmie Saadati; Razieh Mohammad Jaafari; Mojgan Barati; Maria Cheraghi; Gholamreza Shariati; Maedeh Sohani

    2016-01-01

    To determine the role of mother race in neonatal outcome of trisomies 21, 18 and 13 using cell free DNA (cf-DNA) analysis. All women administered for a sonographic imaging at their 10-22 weeks’ gestation which were qualified for cf-DNA testing were suggested for increasing aneuploidy risk, between March 1, 2015 to March 30 , 2016. The cf-DNA analysis was conducted after women received genetic counseling in a specialty laboratory. The results were validated by amniocentesis. A tota...

  5. [Identification of Aloe species by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shioda, Hiroko; Satoh, Kanako; Nagai, Fumiko; Okubo, Tomoko; Seto, Takako; Hamano, Tomoko; Kamimura, Hisashi; Kano, Itsu

    2003-08-01

    Juice and integument of leaves of 3 Aloe species, Aloe vera, A. ferox and A. africana, are not allowed to be used as food according to the Pharmaceutical Affairs Law in Japan. On the other hand, whole leaves of A. arborescens can be used as food. The present study was designed to distinguish Aloe species by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. DNA was isolated from fresh and dried leaves of the 4 Aloe species. Five out of 32 different 10-mer primers examined were useful for analysis. By comparison of the characteristic bands of PCR products on agarose gel, it was possible to distinguish the 4 species. Thus, the botanical species of Aloe in commercial food products can be identified by RAPD analysis.

  6. Simple Elastic Network Models for Exhaustive Analysis of Long Double-Stranded DNA Dynamics with Sequence Geometry Dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Isami, Shuhei; Nishimori, Hiraku; Awazu, Akinori

    2015-01-01

    Simple elastic network models of DNA were developed to reveal the structure-dynamics relationships for several nucleotide sequences. First, we propose a simple all-atom elastic network model of DNA that can explain the profiles of temperature factors for several crystal structures of DNA. Second, we propose a coarse-grained elastic network model of DNA, where each nucleotide is described only by one node. This model could effectively reproduce the detailed dynamics obtained with the all-atom elastic network model according to the sequence-dependent geometry. Through normal-mode analysis for the coarse-grained elastic network model, we exhaustively analyzed the dynamic features of a large number of long DNA sequences, approximately $\\sim 150$ bp in length. These analyses revealed positive correlations between the nucleosome-forming abilities and the inter-strand fluctuation strength of double-stranded DNA for several DNA sequences.

  7. Simple Elastic Network Models for Exhaustive Analysis of Long Double-Stranded DNA Dynamics with Sequence Geometry Dependence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhei Isami

    Full Text Available Simple elastic network models of DNA were developed to reveal the structure-dynamics relationships for several nucleotide sequences. First, we propose a simple all-atom elastic network model of DNA that can explain the profiles of temperature factors for several crystal structures of DNA. Second, we propose a coarse-grained elastic network model of DNA, where each nucleotide is described only by one node. This model could effectively reproduce the detailed dynamics obtained with the all-atom elastic network model according to the sequence-dependent geometry. Through normal-mode analysis for the coarse-grained elastic network model, we exhaustively analyzed the dynamic features of a large number of long DNA sequences, approximately ∼150 bp in length. These analyses revealed positive correlations between the nucleosome-forming abilities and the inter-strand fluctuation strength of double-stranded DNA for several DNA sequences.

  8. Enhanced low-template DNA analysis conditions and investigation of allele dropout patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedell, Ronny; Dufva, Charlotte; Ansell, Ricky; Mostad, Petter; Hedman, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Forensic DNA analysis applying PCR enables profiling of minute biological samples. Enhanced analysis conditions can be applied to further push the limit of detection, coming with the risk of visualising artefacts and allele imbalances. We have evaluated the consecutive increase of PCR cycles from 30 to 35 to investigate the limitations of low-template (LT) DNA analysis, applying the short tandem repeat (STR) analysis kit PowerPlex ESX 16. Mock crime scene DNA extracts of four different quantities (from around 8-84 pg) were tested. All PCR products were analysed using 5, 10 and 20 capillary electrophoresis (CE) injection seconds. Bayesian models describing allele dropout patterns, allele peak heights and heterozygote balance were developed to assess the overall improvements in EPG quality with altered PCR/CE settings. The models were also used to evaluate the impact of amplicon length, STR marker and fluorescent label on the risk for allele dropout. The allele dropout probability decreased for each PCR cycle increment from 30 to 33 PCR cycles. Irrespective of DNA amount, the dropout probability was not affected by further increasing the number of PCR cycles. For the 42 and 84 pg samples, mainly complete DNA profiles were generated applying 32 PCR cycles. For the 8 and 17 pg samples, the allele dropouts decreased from 100% using 30 cycles to about 75% and 20%, respectively. The results for 33, 34 and 35 PCR cycles indicated that heterozygote balance and stutter ratio were mainly affected by DNA amount, and not directly by PCR cycle number and CE injection settings. We found 32 and 33 PCR cycles with 10 CE injection seconds to be optimal, as 34 and 35 PCR cycles did not improve allele detection and also included CE saturation problems. We find allele dropout probability differences between several STR markers. Markers labelled with the fluorescent dyes CXR-ET (red in electropherogram) and TMR-ET (shown as black) generally have higher dropout risks compared with those

  9. Quantitative analysis of DNA methylation in the promoter region of the methylguanine-O(6) -DNA-methyltransferase gene by COBRA and subsequent native capillary gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goedecke, Simon; Mühlisch, Jörg; Hempel, Georg; Frühwald, Michael C; Wünsch, Bernhard

    2015-12-01

    Along with histone modifications, RNA interference and delayed replication timing, DNA methylation belongs to the key processes in epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Therefore, reliable information about the methylation level of particular DNA fragments is of major interest. Herein the methylation level at two positions of the promoter region of the gene methylguanine-O(6) -DNA-Methyltransferase (MGMT) was investigated. Previously, it was demonstrated that the epigenetic status of this DNA region correlates with response to alkylating anticancer agents. An automated CGE method with LIF detection was established to separate the six DNA fragments resulting from combined bisulfite restriction analysis of the methylated and non-methylated MGMT promoter. In COBRA, the DNA was treated with bisulfite converting cytosine into uracil. During PCR uracil pairs with adenine, which changes the original recognition site of the restriction enzyme Taql. Artificial probes generated by mixing appropriate amounts of DNA after bisulfite treatment and PCR amplification were used for validation of the method. The methylation levels of these samples could be determined with high accuracy and precision. DNA samples prepared by mixing the corresponding clones first and then performing PCR amplification led to non-linear correlation between the corrected peak areas and the methylation levels. This effect is explained by slightly different PCR amplification of DNA with different sequences present in the mixture. The superiority of CGE over PAGE was clearly demonstrated. Finally, the established method was used to analyze the methylation levels of human brain tumor tissue samples. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Chemiluminescence analysis for HBV-DNA hybridization detection with magnetic nanoparticles based DNA extraction from positive whole blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Nongyue; Wang, Fang; Ma, Chao; Li, Chuanyan; Zeng, Xin; Deng, Yan; Zhang, Liming; Li, Zhiyang

    2013-02-01

    Molecular detection of HBV has a significant impact on prognosis and therapy of the disease. In this paper, a sensitive nucleic acid detection method of HBV was established taking advantage of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), chemiluminescence (CL) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). HBV-DNA was extracted from hepatitis B positive human blood samples using MNPs adsorption method and biotin was labeled on the DNA segment after base insertion of bintin-dUTP in PCR. The biotinylated DNA segment was captured by amino probe immobilized on carboxyl MNPs and was detected by the chemiluminescence system of alkaline phosphatase catalyzing 3-(2'-spiroadamantane)-4-methoxy-4-(3"-phosphoryloxy) phenyl-1, 2-dioxetane. Different concentrations of HBV-DNA were detected under the optimized experiment conditions and the relevant CL intensity were obtained, which provided a novel research or clinic diagnosis method for the quantification detection of HBV-DNA.

  11. A preliminary analysis of the DNA and diet of the extinct Beothuk: a systematic approach to ancient human DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuch, Melanie; Gröcke, Darren R; Knyf, Martin C

    2007-01-01

    We have used a systematic protocol for extracting, quantitating, sexing and validating ancient human mitochondrial and nuclear DNA of one male and one female Beothuk, a Native American population from Newfoundland, which became extinct approximately 180 years ago. They carried mtDNA haplotypes......, which fall within haplogroups X and C, consistent with Northeastern Native populations today. In addition we have sexed the male using a novel-sexing assay and confirmed the authenticity of his Y chromosome with the presence of the Native American specific Y-QM3 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP......, Nonosabasut) were of admixed (European-Native American) descent. We also analyzed patterns of DNA damage in the clones of authentic mtDNA sequences; there is no tendency for DNA damage to occur preferentially at previously defined mutational hotspots, suggesting that such mutational hotspots...

  12. Genome wide DNA methylation analysis of Haloferax volcanii H26 and identification of DNA methyltransferase related PD-(D/EXK nuclease family protein HVO_A0006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew eOuellette

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Restriction-modification (RM systems have evolved to protect the cell from invading DNAs and are composed of two enzymes: a DNA methyltransferase and a restriction endonuclease. Although RM systems are present in both archaeal and bacterial genomes, DNA methylation in archaea has not been well defined. In order to characterize the function of RM systems in archaeal species, we have made use of the model haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii. A genomic DNA methylation analysis of H. volcanii strain H26 was performed using PacBio single molecule real-time (SMRT sequencing. This analysis was also performed on a strain of H. volcanii in which an annotated DNA methyltransferase gene HVO_A0006 was deleted from the genome. Sequence analysis of H26 revealed two motifs which are modified in the genome: Cm4TAG and GCAm6BN6VTGC. Analysis of the ∆HVO_A0006 strain indicated that it exhibited reduced adenine methylation compared to the parental strain and altered the detected adenine motif. However, protein domain architecture analysis and amino acid alignments revealed that HVO_A0006 is homologous only to the N-terminal endonuclease region of Type IIG RM proteins and contains a PD-(D/EXK nuclease motif, suggesting that HVO_A0006 is a PD-(D/EXK nuclease family protein. Further bioinformatic analysis of the HVO_A0006 gene demonstrating that the gene is rare among the Halobacteria. It is surrounded by two transposition genes suggesting that HVO_A0006 is a fragment of a Type IIG RM gene, which has likely been acquired through gene transfer, and affects restriction-modification activity by interacting with another RM system component(s. Here, we present the first genome-wide characterization of DNA methylation in an archaeal species and examine the function of a DNA methyltransferase related gene HVO_A0006.

  13. About DNA databasing and investigative genetic analysis of externally visible characteristics: A public survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieger, Martin; Utz, Silvia

    2015-07-01

    During the last decade, DNA profiling and the use of DNA databases have become two of the most employed instruments of police investigations. This very rapid establishment of forensic genetics is yet far from being complete. In the last few years novel types of analyses have been presented to describe phenotypically a possible perpetrator. We conducted the present study among German speaking Swiss residents for two main reasons: firstly, we aimed at getting an impression of the public awareness and acceptance of the Swiss DNA database and the perception of a hypothetical DNA database containing all Swiss residents. Secondly, we wanted to get a broader picture of how people that are not working in the field of forensic genetics think about legal permission to establish phenotypic descriptions of alleged criminals by genetic means. Even though a significant number of study participants did not even know about the existence of the Swiss DNA database, its acceptance appears to be very high. Generally our results suggest that the current forensic use of DNA profiling is considered highly trustworthy. However, the acceptance of a hypothetical universal database would be only as low as about 30% among the 284 respondents to our study, mostly because people are concerned about the security of their genetic data, their privacy or a possible risk of abuse of such a database. Concerning the genetic analysis of externally visible characteristics and biogeographical ancestry, we discover a high degree of acceptance. The acceptance decreases slightly when precise characteristics are presented to the participants in detail. About half of the respondents would be in favor of the moderate use of physical traits analyses only for serious crimes threatening life, health or sexual integrity. The possible risk of discrimination and reinforcement of racism, as discussed by scholars from anthropology, bioethics, law, philosophy and sociology, is mentioned less frequently by the study

  14. Antioxidant, DNA protective efficacy and HPLC analysis of Annona muricata (soursop) extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, V Cijo; Kumar, D R Naveen; Suresh, P K; Kumar, R Ashok

    2015-04-01

    Annona muricata is a naturally occurring edible plant with wide array of therapeutic potentials. In India, it has a long history of traditional use in treating various ailments. The present investigation was carried out to characterize the phytochemicals present in the methanolic and aqueous leaf extracts of A. muricata, followed by validation of its radical scavenging and DNA protection activities. The extracts were also analyzed for its total phenolic contents and subjected to HPLC analysis to determine its active metabolites. The radical scavenging activities were premeditated by various complementary assays (DRSA, FRAP and HRSA). Further, its DNA protection efficacy against H2O2 induced toxicity was evaluated using pBR322 plasmid DNA. The results revealed that the extracts were highly rich in various phytochemicals including luteolin, homoorientin, tangeretin, quercetin, daidzein, epicatechin gallate, emodin and coumaric acid. Both the extracts showed significant (p < 0.05) radical scavenging activities, while methanolic extract demonstrated improved protection against H2O2-induced DNA damage when compared to aqueous extract. A strong positive correlation was observed for the estimated total phenolic contents and radical scavenging potentials of the extracts. Further HPLC analysis of the phyto-constituents of the extracts provides a sound scientific basis for compound isolation.

  15. Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA Analysis of Heterodera cruciferae and H. schachtii populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caswell-Chen, E P; Williamson, V M; Wu, F F

    1992-09-01

    Heterodera schachtii and H. cruciferae are sympatric in California and frequently occur in the same field upon the same host. We have investigated the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of nematode DNA sequences to differentiate H. schachtii and H. cruciferae and to assess genetic variability within each species. Single, random oligodeoxyribonucleotide primers were used to generate PCR-amplified fragments, termed RAPD (random amplified polymorphic DNA) markers, from genomic DNA of each species. Each of 19 different random primers yielded from 2 to 12 fragments whose size ranged from 200 to 1,500 bp. Reproducible differences in fragment patterns allowed differentiation of the two species with each primer. Similarities and differences among six different geographic populations of H. schachtii were detected. The potential application of RAPD analysis to relationships among nematode populations was assessed through cluster analysis of these six different populations, with 78 scorable markers from 10 different random primers. DNA from single cysts was successfully amplified, and genetic variability was revealed within geographic populations. The use of RAPD markers to assess genetic variability is a simple, reproducible technique that does not require radioisotopes. This powerful new technique can be used as a diagnostic tool and should have broad application in nematology.

  16. Design and characterization of microfabricated on-chip HPLC columns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruyne, S.

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of liquid mixtures, as e.g. encountered in environmental monitoring, food safety analysis, the development of novel pharmaceutical compounds, etc... is usually carried out using chromatogaphic separatoin techniques. Theoretical calculations have shown that the efficiency of these

  17. Analysis of mitochondrial DNA HVR1 haplotype of pure-bred domestic dogs in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Sho; Chong, Yong Hwa; Shito, Masayuki; Kasuga, Manami; Kawakami, Tsuyoshi; Udagawa, Chihiro; Aoki, Hiroshi; Bonkobara, Makoto; Tsuchida, Shuichi; Sakamoto, Atsushi; Okuda, Hiroshi; Nagai, Atsushi; Omi, Toshinori

    2013-11-01

    To develop DNA markers for forensic analysis, we examined the hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) sequences of 447 pure-bred domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) that had been bred and raised in Japan. HVR1 is a 660-bp stretch of mitochondrial (mt) DNA. Among the 447 HVR1 sequences examined, we identified 58 haplotypes from 47 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and two insertion-deletion (InDel) polymorphisms. The haplotype diversity inferred from inter-breed analysis (N=154, 88 breeds) was 0.929±0.011. Intra-breed analysis showed that the haplotype diversity of Golden Retrievers (N=53), Labrador Retrievers (N=67), Miniature Dachshunds (N=61), Toy Poodles (N=62), and Welsh Corgis (N=50) was 0.624±0.052, 0.722±0.029, 0.922±0.010, 0.877±0.020, and 0.443±0.084, respectively. The results of this genotype analysis were used to construct a dataset consisting of dog mtDNA HVR1 sequences for use in forensic applications in Japan. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic linkage analysis of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis using human chromosome 21 microsatellite DNA markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, D.R.; Sapp, P.; O`Regan, J.; McKenna-Yasek, D.; Schlumpf, K.S.; Haines, J.L.; Gusella, J.F.; Horvitz, H.R.; Brown, R.H. Jr. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1994-05-15

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; Lou Gehrig`s Disease) is a lethal neurodegenerative disease of upper and lower motorneurons in the brain and spinal cord. We previously reported linkage of a gene for familial ALS (FALS) to human chromosome 21 using 4 restriction fragment length polymorphism DNA markers and identified disease-associated mutations in the superoxide dismutase (SOD)-1 gene in some ALS families. We report here the genetic linkage data that led us to examine the SOD-1 gene for mutations. We also report a new microsatellite DNA marker for D21S63, derived from the cosmid PW517. Ten microsatellite DNA markers, including the new marker D21S63, were used to reinvestigate linkage of FALS to chromosome 21. Genetic linkage analysis performed with 13 ALS familes for these 10 DNA markers confirmed the presence of a FALS gene on chromosome 21. The highest total 2-point LOD score for all families was 4.33, obtained at a distance of 10 cM from the marker D21S223. For 5 ALS families linked to chromosome 21, a peak 2-point LOD score of 5.94 was obtained at the DNA marker D21S223. A multipoint score of 6.50 was obtained with the markers D21S213, D21S223, D21S167, and FALS for 5 chromosome 21-linked ALS families. The haplotypes of these families for the 10 DNA markers reveal recombination events that further refined the location of the FALS gene to a segment of approximately 5 megabases (Mb) between D21S213 and D21S219. The only characterized gene within this segment was SOD-1, the structural gene for Cu, Zn SOD. 30 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. An integrated system of ABO typing and multiplex STR testing for forensic DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xianhua; He, Juan; Jia, Fei; Shen, Hongying; Zhao, Jinling; Chen, Chuguang; Bai, Liping; Liu, Feng; Hou, Guangwei; Guo, Faye

    2012-12-01

    A new amplification system for ABO and STR genotyping in a single reaction has been successfully developed. Two types of information can be obtained from a biological sample at one time. One is the classical information of ABO blood group typing for screening suspects and the other is STR information for individual identification. The system allows for the simultaneous detection of 15 autosomal STR loci (containing all CODIS STR loci as well as Penta D and Penta E), six ABO genotypes (O/O, B/B, A/A, A/O, A/B, and B/O) and the gender-determining locus Amelogenin. Primers are designed so that the amplicons are distributed ranging from 75bp to 500bp within a four-dye fluorescent design, leaving a fourth dye for the internal size standard. With 30 cycles, the results showed that the optimal amount of DNA template for this multiplex ranges from 250pg to 2ng and the lowest detection threshold is 125pg (as low as 63pg for ABO loci). For the DNA template outside the optimal detection range, we could adjust the number of cycles to obtain the robust profiles. Mixture studies showed that over 83% of minor alleles were detected at 1:9 ratios. The full profiles were still observed when 4ng of degraded DNA was digested by DNase I and 1ng undegraded DNA was added to 40μM haematin. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based conditions including the concentrations of primers, magnesium and the Taq polymerase as well as volume, cycle numbers and annealing temperature were examined and optimised. In addition, the system was validated by 364 bloodstain samples and 32 common casework samples. According to the Chinese National Standards and Scientific Working Group on DNA Analysis Methods (SWGDAM) guidelines, our system demonstrates good detection performance and is an ideal tool for forensic DNA typing with potential application. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Comprehensive DNA methylation analysis of human neuroblastoma cells treated with blonanserin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Yui; Nishioka, Masaki; Bundo, Miki; Sunaga, Fumiko; Kasai, Kiyoto; Iwamoto, Kazuya

    2014-03-20

    Blonanserin is a second-generation antipsychotic drug for schizophrenia. The pharmacological actions of blonanserin are shown to be the antagonism of dopamine receptor 2 and serotonin receptors. However, its molecular mechanisms in brain cells have not been fully characterized. Accumulating evidence suggests that antipsychotic drugs and mood stabilizers show epigenetic effects on a wide range of genes in animal and cellular models. We performed genome-wide DNA methylation analysis targeting 479,814 CpG sites of cultured human neuroblastoma cells administered with blonanserin. We found that 3,057 CpG sites showed statistically significant changes in DNA methylation at two different doses of blonanserin (1.36 nM and 13.6 nM). These included hypermethylated CpG sites that were enriched in genes related to axonogenesis and cell morphogenesis involved in neuron differentiation. We also showed that the global effect on DNA methylome depends on the concentration of the drug. With a high dose of blonanserin, the overall methylation levels across all CpG sites significantly increased. These increases in DNA methylation were prominent in the CpG sites distant from promoter regions. We further examined DNA methylation changes in specific genes implicated for the actions of antipsychotic drugs, such as the dopamine receptor 2 (DRD2) gene and the serotonin receptor 2A (HTR2A) gene. We observed that CpG sites that were located within DRD2 and HTR2A genes were significantly hypermethylated by blonanserin. The DNA methylation changes induced by the treatment with blonanserin will be useful for understanding its pharmacological actions at the cellular level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. DNA content analysis allows discrimination between Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naves, Lucila Langoni; da Silva, Marcos Vinícius; Fajardo, Emanuella Francisco; da Silva, Raíssa Bernardes; De Vito, Fernanda Bernadelli; Rodrigues, Virmondes; Lages-Silva, Eliane; Ramírez, Luis Eduardo; Pedrosa, André Luiz

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, a human protozoan parasite, is the causative agent of Chagas disease. Currently the species is divided into six taxonomic groups. The genome of the CL Brener clone has been estimated to be 106.4-110.7 Mb, and DNA content analyses revealed that it is a diploid hybrid clone. Trypanosoma rangeli is a hemoflagellate that has the same reservoirs and vectors as T. cruzi; however, it is non-pathogenic to vertebrate hosts. The haploid genome of T. rangeli was previously estimated to be 24 Mb. The parasitic strains of T. rangeli are divided into KP1(+) and KP1(-). Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the DNA content in different strains of T. cruzi and T. rangeli by flow cytometry. All T. cruzi and T. rangeli strains yielded cell cycle profiles with clearly identifiable G1-0 (2n) and G2-M (4n) peaks. T. cruzi and T. rangeli genome sizes were estimated using the clone CL Brener and the Leishmania major CC1 as reference cell lines because their genome sequences have been previously determined. The DNA content of T. cruzi strains ranged from 87,41 to 108,16 Mb, and the DNA content of T. rangeli strains ranged from 63,25 Mb to 68,66 Mb. No differences in DNA content were observed between KP1(+) and KP1(-) T. rangeli strains. Cultures containing mixtures of the epimastigote forms of T. cruzi and T. rangeli strains resulted in cell cycle profiles with distinct G1 peaks for strains of each species. These results demonstrate that DNA content analysis by flow cytometry is a reliable technique for discrimination between T. cruzi and T. rangeli isolated from different hosts.

  2. Functional analysis of an acid adaptive DNA adenine methyltransferase from Helicobacter pylori 26695.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Banerjee

    Full Text Available HP0593 DNA-(N(6-adenine-methyltransferase (HP0593 MTase is a member of a Type III restriction-modification system in Helicobacter pylori strain 26695. HP0593 MTase has been cloned, overexpressed and purified heterologously in Escherichia coli. The recognition sequence of the purified MTase was determined as 5'-GCAG-3'and the site of methylation was found to be adenine. The activity of HP0593 MTase was found to be optimal at pH 5.5. This is a unique property in context of natural adaptation of H. pylori in its acidic niche. Dot-blot assay using antibodies that react specifically with DNA containing m6A modification confirmed that HP0593 MTase is an adenine-specific MTase. HP0593 MTase occurred as both monomer and dimer in solution as determined by gel-filtration chromatography and chemical-crosslinking studies. The nonlinear dependence of methylation activity on enzyme concentration indicated that more than one molecule of enzyme was required for its activity. Analysis of initial velocity with AdoMet as a substrate showed that two molecules of AdoMet bind to HP0593 MTase, which is the first example in case of Type III MTases. Interestingly, metal ion cofactors such as Co(2+, Mn(2+, and also Mg(2+ stimulated the HP0593 MTase activity. Preincubation and isotope partitioning analyses clearly indicated that HP0593 MTase-DNA complex is catalytically competent, and suggested that DNA binds to the MTase first followed by AdoMet. HP0593 MTase shows a distributive mechanism of methylation on DNA having more than one recognition site. Considering the occurrence of GCAG sequence in the potential promoter regions of physiologically important genes in H. pylori, our results provide impetus for exploring the role of this DNA MTase in the cellular processes of H. pylori.

  3. A pedigree-based analysis of mitochondrial DNA diversity in a dog population on the example of German Hovawarts

    OpenAIRE

    S. Zielińska; I. Głażewska

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to illustrate the use of pedigree analysis to evaluate mtDNA diversity in a selected population of pedigree dogs, to describe the paths of mtDNA inheritance and to estimate the spread of potential pedigree errors or mutations that occurred in different generations of ancestors. Hovawart, old German breed, was used as an example. The number and frequencies of mtDNA haplotypes were calculated based on numbers of dam lines and their representatives...

  4. Detection of somatic mutations by high-resolution DNA melting (HRM analysis in multiple cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Gonzalez-Bosquet

    Full Text Available Identification of somatic mutations in cancer is a major goal for understanding and monitoring the events related to cancer initiation and progression. High resolution melting (HRM curve analysis represents a fast, post-PCR high-throughput method for scanning somatic sequence alterations in target genes. The aim of this study was to assess the sensitivity and specificity of HRM analysis for tumor mutation screening in a range of tumor samples, which included 216 frozen pediatric small rounded blue-cell tumors as well as 180 paraffin-embedded tumors from breast, endometrial and ovarian cancers (60 of each. HRM analysis was performed in exons of the following candidate genes known to harbor established commonly observed mutations: PIK3CA, ERBB2, KRAS, TP53, EGFR, BRAF, GATA3, and FGFR3. Bi-directional sequencing analysis was used to determine the accuracy of the HRM analysis. For the 39 mutations observed in frozen samples, the sensitivity and specificity of HRM analysis were 97% and 87%, respectively. There were 67 mutation/variants in the paraffin-embedded samples, and the sensitivity and specificity for the HRM analysis were 88% and 80%, respectively. Paraffin-embedded samples require higher quantity of purified DNA for high performance. In summary, HRM analysis is a promising moderate-throughput screening test for mutations among known candidate genomic regions. Although the overall accuracy appears to be better in frozen specimens, somatic alterations were detected in DNA extracted from paraffin-embedded samples.

  5. Current and Emerging Technologies for the Analysis of the Genome-Wide and Locus-Specific DNA Methylation Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tost, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is the most studied epigenetic modification, and altered DNA methylation patterns have been identified in cancer and more recently also in many other complex diseases. Furthermore, DNA methylation is influenced by a variety of environmental factors, and the analysis of DNA methylation patterns might allow deciphering previous exposure. Although a large number of techniques to study DNA methylation either genome-wide or at specific loci have been devised, they all are based on a limited number of principles for differentiating the methylation state, viz., methylation-specific/methylation-dependent restriction enzymes, antibodies or methyl-binding proteins, chemical-based enrichment, or bisulfite conversion. Second-generation sequencing has largely replaced microarrays as readout platform and is also becoming more popular for locus-specific DNA methylation analysis. In this chapter, the currently used methods for both genome-wide and locus-specific analysis of 5-methylcytosine and as its oxidative derivatives, such as 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, are reviewed in detail, and the advantages and limitations of each approach are discussed. Furthermore, emerging technologies avoiding PCR amplification and allowing a direct readout of DNA methylation are summarized, together with novel applications, such as the detection of DNA methylation in single cells or in circulating cell-free DNA.

  6. Barcoded DNA-tag reporters for multiplex cis-regulatory analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongmin Nam

    Full Text Available Cis-regulatory DNA sequences causally mediate patterns of gene expression, but efficient experimental analysis of these control systems has remained challenging. Here we develop a new version of "barcoded" DNA-tag reporters, "Nanotags" that permit simultaneous quantitative analysis of up to 130 distinct cis-regulatory modules (CRMs. The activities of these reporters are measured in single experiments by the NanoString RNA counting method and other quantitative procedures. We demonstrate the efficiency of the Nanotag method by simultaneously measuring hourly temporal activities of 126 CRMs from 46 genes in the developing sea urchin embryo, otherwise a virtually impossible task. Nanotags are also used in gene perturbation experiments to reveal cis-regulatory responses of many CRMs at once. Nanotag methodology can be applied to many research areas, ranging from gene regulatory networks to functional and evolutionary genomics.

  7. Ribosomal DNA sequence analysis shows that the basidiomycete C30 belongs to the genus Trametes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klonowska, Agnieszka; Gaudin, Christian; Ruzzi, Maurizio; Colao, Maria Chiara; Tron, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    The basidiomycete C30 was considered as an isolate of a population of Marasmius quercophilus collected on evergreen oak litter from the Mediterranean forest. Recent phenotypic studies have clearly shown that it differs from newly characterized M. quercophilus isolates. Subsequent analysis of laccase genes revealed that C30 sequences are similar to laccase encoding sequences from organisms belonging to the polyporoid clade. Comparison of sequences of the C30 ITS regions, including 5.8S rDNA, with those found in databanks confirmed that C30 is not a Marasmius. Finally, 25S rDNA analysis revealed that C30 is closely related to the Coriolaceae and, in particular, to Trametes trogii.

  8. Primary ovary choriocarcinoma: individual DNA polymorphic analysis as a strategy to confirm diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Nalesso

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Primary choriocarcinoma of the ovary is rare. Furthermore, this tumor can arise from gestational tissue or pure germ cells of the ovary, with the latter resulting in non-gestational choriocarcinoma. While the clinical characteristics and histology of both tumor types are identical, differentiation of these tumors is necessary for effective treatment. One strategy for the differentiation of these tumors types is to assay for the presence of paternal DNA. Accordingly, in the present case, a patient with primary choriocarcinoma of the ovary with a non-gestational origin was confirmed by DNA analysis. The patient subsequently exhibited an excellent response to chemotherapy, and following surgery, achieved complete remission. A pathological analysis of surgical specimens further confirmed the absence of tumor.

  9. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis and variation of essential oil components of Atractylodes plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohjyouma, M; Nakajima, S; Namera, A; Shimizu, R; Mizukami, H; Kohda, H

    1997-05-01

    Total DNAs were prepared from the leaves of Atractylodes lancea DE CANDOLLE, A. chinensis KOIDZUMI, A. lancea var. simplicifolia KITAMURA, A. japonica KOIDZUMI ex KITAMURA and A. ovata DE CANDOLLE. The DNAs were subjected to random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. Some primers showed the definitive polymorphic DNA patterns in A. lancea, A. japonica and A. ovata. The RAPD of A. lancea var. simplicifolia and one of A. chinensis gave similar patterns to those of A. lancea, but one of the other A. chinensis gave a similar pattern to A. japonica. Furthermore, quantitative analysis of atractylon, hinesol, beta-eudesmol and atractylodin in the rhizomes was done using gas chromatography. Though atractylon was detected not only in A. japonica and A. ovata but also in some of A. lancea, their RAPD profiles revealed the presence of intraspecific variation with A. lancea.

  10. Spectrophotometric analysis of flavonoid-DNA interactions and DNA damaging/protecting and cytotoxic potential of flavonoids in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusak, Gordana; Piantanida, Ivo; Masić, Lozika; Kapuralin, Katarina; Durgo, Ksenija; Kopjar, Nevenka

    2010-10-06

    The ability of luteolin, kaempferol and apigenin to bind to calf thymus (ct)-DNA, mode of action and stability of flavonoids in buffer were investigated. Spectrophotometric analysis revealed a rapid degradation of apigenin in an aqueous medium, while kaempferol and luteolin were stable for 24h upon dissolution in water. Spectrophotometric study of the interactions of kaempferol and luteolin with calf thymus DNA suggests classic intercalation as their dominant binding mode to DNA. Cytotoxicity/genotoxicity and cytoprotective/genoprotective effects of flavonoids in non-stressed and hydrogen peroxide stressed human peripheral lymphocytes were investigated using the fluorescent dye exclusion method and alkaline comet assay. Flavonoids revealed significant genoprotective effects in hydrogen peroxide stressed cells and in cells submitted to longer incubation in the cell culture medium. Luteolin, followed by apigenin and kaempferol, was shown to be the most effective in protecting DNA from oxidative damage induced by hydrogen peroxide. However, the investigated flavonoids also induced DNA damage, indicating their prooxidative capacity. The balance between the protection of DNA from oxidative damage and prooxidative effects was strongly dependent on flavonoid concentration and the incubation period. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. MultiPipMaker and supporting tools: alignments and analysis of multiple genomic DNA sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, Scott; Elnitski, Laura; Li, Mei; Weirauch, Matt; Riemer, Cathy; Smit, Arian; Green, Eric D.; Hardison, Ross C.; Miller, Webb

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of multiple sequence alignments can generate important, testable hypotheses about the phylogenetic history and cellular function of genomic sequences. We describe the MultiPipMaker server, which aligns multiple, long genomic DNA sequences quickly and with good sensitivity (available at http://bio.cse.psu.edu/ since May 2001). Alignments are computed between a contiguous reference sequence and one or more secondary sequences, which can be finished or draft sequence. The outputs includ...

  12. Sample Preservation, DNA or RNA Extraction and Data Analysis for High-Throughput Phytoplankton Community Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Mäki

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton is the basis for aquatic food webs and mirrors the water quality. Conventionally, phytoplankton analysis has been done using time consuming and partly subjective microscopic observations, but next generation sequencing (NGS technologies provide promising potential for rapid automated examination of environmental samples. Because many phytoplankton species have tough cell walls, methods for cell lysis and DNA or RNA isolation need to be efficient to allow unbiased nucleic acid retrieval. Here, we analyzed how two phytoplankton preservation methods, three commercial DNA extraction kits and their improvements, three RNA extraction methods, and two data analysis procedures affected the results of the NGS analysis. A mock community was pooled from phytoplankton species with variation in nucleus size and cell wall hardness. Although the study showed potential for studying Lugol-preserved sample collections, it demonstrated critical challenges in the DNA-based phytoplankton analysis in overall. The 18S rRNA gene sequencing output was highly affected by the variation in the rRNA gene copy numbers per cell, while sample preservation and nucleic acid extraction methods formed another source of variation. At the top, sequence-specific variation in the data quality introduced unexpected bioinformatics bias when the sliding-window method was used for the quality trimming of the Ion Torrent data. While DNA-based analyses did not correlate with biomasses or cell numbers of the mock community, rRNA-based analyses were less affected by different RNA extraction procedures and had better match with the biomasses, dry weight and carbon contents, and are therefore recommended for quantitative phytoplankton analyses.

  13. Genome-Wide Methylated DNA Immunoprecipitation Analysis of Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Hao-ran; Qiu, Li-hua; Zhang, Zhi-qing; Qin, Yuan-yuan; Cao, Cong; Di, Wen

    2013-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a complex, heterogeneous disorder of uncertain etiology. Recent studies suggested that insulin resistance (IR) plays an important role in the development of PCOS. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the molecular mechanism of IR in PCOS. We employed genome-wide methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) analysis to characterize genes that are differentially methylated in PCOS patients vs. healthy controls. Besides, we also identified the different...

  14. Direct voltammetric analysis of DNA modified with enzymatically incorporated 7-deazapurines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pivoňková, Hana; Horáková Brázdilová, Petra; Fojtová, Miloslava; Fojta, Miroslav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 16 (2010), s. 6807-6813 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040901; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : modified DNA * 7-deazapurines * voltammetric analysis Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 5.874, year: 2010

  15. DNA nanotechnology for nucleic acid analysis: DX motif-based sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M; Gerasimova, Yulia V; Khan, Mohammad S

    2011-11-25

    A light on the tiles: A sensor that fluoresces in the presence of specific nucleic acids was designed and characterized. The sensor uses a molecular beacon probe and three adaptor strands to form a five-stranded assembly, a DX-tile, with a specific analyte. This sensor is a highly selective and affordable tool for the real-time analysis of DNA and RNA. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Mutation analysis of HSFY gene by DNA sequencing in Turkish men with idiopathic infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Semerci, C Nur; Alataş, Erkan; Sılan, Fatma; N. Lale, Şatıroğlu Tufan; Dodurga, Yavuz; Şatıroğlu, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In this study we planned to HSFY gene mutations in Turkish infertile men with azoospermia, oligospermia and/or poor motility/morphology. METHODS: From three distinct medical centers, 41 Turkish infertile men were contributed to this study. The patients had no endocrine or obstructive causes of spermatogenic failure and no Y microdeletion, and had normal karyotype were included the study. Mutation analysis of the HSFY gene was performed by DNA sequencing. RESULTS: No varian...

  17. Taenia solium cysticercosis in Bali, Indonesia: serology and mtDNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudewi, A A R; Wandra, T; Artha, A; Nkouawa, A; Ito, A

    2008-01-01

    An active Taenia solium cysticercosis case in Bali, Indonesia, was followed-up by serology and computed tomography. Serology using semi-purified glycoprotein and recombinant antigens showed a drastic drop in titers after calcification of the cysts. Three paraffin-embedded cysts, prepared for histopathological examination, from three other patients were used for mtDNA analysis. The sequences of cox1 gene from T. solium cysticerci from Bali differed from those in Papua and other Asian countries.

  18. Assessing Mitochondrial DNA Variation and Copy Number in Lymphocytes of ~2,000 Sardinians Using Tailored Sequencing Analysis Tools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ding

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available DNA sequencing identifies common and rare genetic variants for association studies, but studies typically focus on variants in nuclear DNA and ignore the mitochondrial genome. In fact, analyzing variants in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA sequences presents special problems, which we resolve here with a general solution for the analysis of mtDNA in next-generation sequencing studies. The new program package comprises 1 an algorithm designed to identify mtDNA variants (i.e., homoplasmies and heteroplasmies, incorporating sequencing error rates at each base in a likelihood calculation and allowing allele fractions at a variant site to differ across individuals; and 2 an estimation of mtDNA copy number in a cell directly from whole-genome sequencing data. We also apply the methods to DNA sequence from lymphocytes of ~2,000 SardiNIA Project participants. As expected, mothers and offspring share all homoplasmies but a lesser proportion of heteroplasmies. Both homoplasmies and heteroplasmies show 5-fold higher transition/transversion ratios than variants in nuclear DNA. Also, heteroplasmy increases with age, though on average only ~1 heteroplasmy reaches the 4% level between ages 20 and 90. In addition, we find that mtDNA copy number averages ~110 copies/lymphocyte and is ~54% heritable, implying substantial genetic regulation of the level of mtDNA. Copy numbers also decrease modestly but significantly with age, and females on average have significantly more copies than males. The mtDNA copy numbers are significantly associated with waist circumference (p-value = 0.0031 and waist-hip ratio (p-value = 2.4×10-5, but not with body mass index, indicating an association with central fat distribution. To our knowledge, this is the largest population analysis to date of mtDNA dynamics, revealing the age-imposed increase in heteroplasmy, the relatively high heritability of copy number, and the association of copy number with metabolic traits.

  19. Microarray-Based Analysis of Methylation Status of CpGs in Placental DNA and Maternal Blood DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatt, Lotte; Aagaard, Mads M.; Graakjær, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic markers for cell free fetal DNA in the maternal blood circulation are highly interesting in the field of non-invasive prenatal testing since such markers will offer a possibility to quantify the amount of fetal DNA derived from different chromosomes in a maternal blood sample. The aim...... of the present study was to define new fetal specific epigenetic markers present in placental DNA that can be utilized in non-invasive prenatal diagnosis. We have conducted a high-resolution methylation specific beadchip microarray study assessing more than 450.000 CpG sites. We have analyzed the DNA methylation...... with a potential for aneuploidy testing as well as a list of markers for regions harboring sub-microscopic deletion- or duplication syndromes....

  20. Identification of DNA-binding protein target sequences by physical effective energy functions: free energy analysis of lambda repressor-DNA complexes.

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    Caselle Michele

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Specific binding of proteins to DNA is one of the most common ways gene expression is controlled. Although general rules for the DNA-protein recognition can be derived, the ambiguous and complex nature of this mechanism precludes a simple recognition code, therefore the prediction of DNA target sequences is not straightforward. DNA-protein interactions can be studied using computational methods which can complement the current experimental methods and offer some advantages. In the present work we use physical effective potentials to evaluate the DNA-protein binding affinities for the λ repressor-DNA complex for which structural and thermodynamic experimental data are available. Results The binding free energy of two molecules can be expressed as the sum of an intermolecular energy (evaluated using a molecular mechanics forcefield, a solvation free energy term and an entropic term. Different solvation models are used including distance dependent dielectric constants, solvent accessible surface tension models and the Generalized Born model. The effect of conformational sampling by Molecular Dynamics simulations on the computed binding energy is assessed; results show that this effect is in general negative and the reproducibility of the experimental values decreases with the increase of simulation time considered. The free energy of binding for non-specific complexes, estimated using the best energetic model, agrees with earlier theoretical suggestions. As a results of these analyses, we propose a protocol for the prediction of DNA-binding target sequences. The possibility of searching regulatory elements within the bacteriophage λ genome using this protocol is explored. Our analysis shows good prediction capabilities, even in absence of any thermodynamic data and information on the naturally recognized sequence. Conclusion This study supports the conclusion that physics-based methods can offer a completely complementary