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Sample records for microenvironment soluble domain

  1. Using Soluble Signals to Harness the Power of the Bone Marrow Microenvironment for Implant Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, Erica L; Krebsbach, Paul H

    2013-01-01

    Use of soluble signals for modulation of bone formation has become a significant clinical market in recent years. Improvements in implant site preparation and osseointegration have already been achieved with the use of recombinant PDGF and BMP on osteogenic scaffolds. Other states of insufficient bone such as osteoporosis are widely treated with inhibitors of osteoclast function or osteoblast anabolic agents. However, despite promising therapies targeting the osteoblast and osteoclast directly, therapies utilizing indirect regulation through secondary cellular nodes of control (NOC) are just beginning to emerge. This article will review current strategies for regulation of bone formation by targeting two primary NOCs, the osteoblast and osteoclast, as well as four secondary NOCs, the vascular, hematopoietic, mesenchymal and neural. PMID:21465000

  2. EDTA soluble chemical components and the conditioned medium from mobilized dental pulp stem cells contain an inductive microenvironment, promoting cell proliferation, migration, and odontoblastic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Rei; Hayashi, Yuki; Murakami, Hiroshi; Nakashima, Misako

    2016-05-25

    The critical challenge in tissue engineering is to establish an optimal combination of stem cells, signaling morphogenetic molecules, and extracellular matrix scaffold/microenvironment. The extracellular matrix components of teeth may be reconstituted as an inductive microenvironment in an ectopic tooth transplantation bioassay. Thus, the isolation and identification of the chemical components of the inductive microenvironment in pulp/dentin regeneration will accelerate progress towards the goal of tissue engineering of the tooth. The teeth demineralized in 0.6 M hydrochloric acid were sequentially extracted by 4.0 M guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl), pH 7.4, and 0.5 M ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), pH 7.4. The extracted teeth were transplanted into an ectopic site in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice with mobilized dental pulp stem cells (MDPSCs). The unextracted tooth served as a positive control. Furthermore, the soluble components for the inductive microenvironment, the GdnHCl extracts, or the EDTA extracts together with or without MDPSC conditioned medium (CM) were reconstituted systematically with autoclaved teeth in which the chemical components were completely inactivated and only the physical microenvironment was preserved. Their pulp/dentin regenerative potential and angiogenic potential were compared 28 days after ectopic tooth transplantation by histomorphometry and real-time RT-PCR analysis. Expression of an odontoblastic marker, enamelysin, and a pulp marker, thyrotropin-releasing hormone degrading enzyme (TRH-DE), was lower, and expression of a periodontal cell marker, anti-asporin/periodontal ligament-associated protein 1 (PLAP-1), was higher in the transplant of the EDTA-extracted teeth compared with the GdnHCl-extracted teeth. The autoclaved teeth reconstituted with the GdnHCl extracts or the EDTA extracts have weak regenerative potential and minimal angiogenic potential, and the CM significantly increased this potential

  3. Structural characterization of minor ampullate spidroin domains and their distinct roles in fibroin solubility and fiber formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenwei Gao

    Full Text Available Spider silk is protein fibers with extraordinary mechanical properties. Up to now, it is still poorly understood how silk proteins are kept in a soluble form before spinning into fibers and how the protein molecules are aligned orderly to form fibers. Minor ampullate spidroin is one of the seven types of silk proteins, which consists of four types of domains: N-terminal domain, C-terminal domain (CTD, repetitive domain (RP and linker domain (LK. Here we report the tertiary structure of CTD and secondary structures of RP and LK in aqueous solution, and their roles in protein stability, solubility and fiber formation. The stability and solubility of individual domains are dramatically different and can be explained by their distinct structures. For the tri-domain miniature fibroin, RP-LK-CTD(Mi, the three domains have no or weak interactions with one another at low protein concentrations (<1 mg/ml. The CTD in RP-LK-CTD(Mi is very stable and soluble, but it cannot stabilize the entire protein against chemical and thermal denaturation while it can keep the entire tri-domain in a highly water-soluble state. In the presence of shear force, protein aggregation is greatly accelerated and the aggregation rate is determined by the stability of folded domains and solubility of the disordered domains. Only the tri-domain RP-LK-CTD(Mi could form silk-like fibers, indicating that all three domains play distinct roles in fiber formation: LK as a nucleation site for assembly of protein molecules, RP for assistance of the assembly and CTD for regulating alignment of the assembled molecules.

  4. Expression, purification and characterization of the soluble CUA domain of cytochrome c oxidase of Paracoccus versutus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The key subunit Ⅱ of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) contains a soluble binuclear copper center (CuA) do main. The CuA domain of Paracoccus versutus was cloned,expressed, purified and characterized. The gene encoding the CuA domain in pET11d vector was expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3). The results showed that the CuA domain was ex pressed mostly in inclusion bodies and the CuA domain pro tein synthesized in E. coli cells represents approximately 10percent of the total cellular proteins. Dissolved in urea, dia lyzed and recombined with Cu+/Cu2+ and purified by the Q-sepharose fast flow anion-exchange column and Sephadex G-75 gel filtration column, the soluble purple-colored protein,which shows a single band in electrophoresis, was obtained.The UV-visible absorption spectrum of CuA domain showed that there are intense band at 478 mn and a shoulder peak at 530 nm, and two weak bands at 360 and 806 nm respectively,which can be assigned to the charge transfer and the interac tions of obitals of Cu-S and Cu-Cu in the mixed-valence binuclear metal center (Cu2S2R2). The far-UV CD spectrum indicated that this domain is predominantly in β-sheet structure. The fluorescence spectra showed that its maximal excitation wavelength and maximal emission wavelength are at 280 and 345 nm, respectively.

  5. Inhibition of collagen fibrillogenesis by cells expressing soluble extracellular domains of DDR1 and DDR2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Lisa A; Blissett, Angela R; Calomeni, Edward P; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2010-01-22

    Collagen fiber assembly affects many physiological processes and is tightly controlled by collagen-binding proteins. However, to what extent membrane-bound versus cell-secreted collagen-binding proteins affect collagen fibrillogenesis is not well understood. In our previous studies, we had demonstrated that the membrane-anchored extracellular domain (ECD) of the collagen receptor discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) inhibits fibrillogenesis of collagen endogenously secreted by the cells. These results led to a novel functional role of the DDR2 ECD. However, since soluble forms of DDR1 and DDR2 containing its ECD are known to naturally exist in the extracellular matrix, in this work we investigated if these soluble DDR ECDs may have a functional role in modulating collagen fibrillogenesis. For this purpose, we created mouse osteoblast cell lines stably secreting DDR1 or DDR2 ECD as soluble proteins. Transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, and hydroxyproline assays were used to demonstrate that DDR ECD expression reduced the rate and quantity of collagen deposition and induced significant changes in fiber morphology and matrix mineralization. Collectively, our studies advance our understanding of DDR receptors as powerful regulators of collagen deposition in the ECM and elucidate their multifaceted role in ECM remodeling.

  6. Fluorescent fusion proteins of soluble guanylyl cyclase indicate proximity of the heme nitric oxide domain and catalytic domain.

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    Tobias Haase

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To examine the structural organisation of heterodimeric soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET was measured between fluorescent proteins fused to the amino- and carboxy-terminal ends of the sGC beta1 and alpha subunits. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cyan fluorescent protein (CFP was used as FRET donor and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP as FRET acceptor. After generation of recombinant baculovirus, fluorescent-tagged sGC subunits were co-expressed in Sf9 cells. Fluorescent variants of sGC were analyzed in vitro in cytosolic fractions by sensitized emission FRET. Co-expression of the amino-terminally tagged alpha subunits with the carboxy-terminally tagged beta1 subunit resulted in an enzyme complex that showed a FRET efficiency of 10% similar to fluorescent proteins separated by a helix of only 48 amino acids. Because these findings indicated that the amino-terminus of the alpha subunits is close to the carboxy-terminus of the beta1 subunit we constructed fusion proteins where both subunits are connected by a fluorescent protein. The resulting constructs were not only fluorescent, they also showed preserved enzyme activity and regulation by NO. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on the ability of an amino-terminal fragment of the beta1 subunit to inhibit activity of an heterodimer consisting only of the catalytic domains (alphacatbetacat, Winger and Marletta (Biochemistry 2005, 44:4083-90 have proposed a direct interaction of the amino-terminal region of beta1 with the catalytic domains. In support of such a concept of "trans" regulation of sGC activity by the H-NOX domains our results indicate that the domains within sGC are organized in a way that allows for direct interaction of the amino-terminal regulatory domains with the carboxy-terminal catalytic region. In addition, we constructed "fluorescent-conjoined" sGC's by fusion of the alpha amino-terminus to the beta1 carboxy-terminus leading to a

  7. Tumor microenvironment and therapeutic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ting; Dai, Yun

    2017-02-28

    The tumor microenvironment significantly influences therapeutic response and clinical outcome. Microenvironment-mediated drug resistance can be induced by soluble factors secreted by tumor or stromal cells. The adhesion of tumor cells to stromal fibroblasts or to components of the extracellular matrix can also blunt therapeutic response. Microenvironment-targeted therapy strategies include inhibition of the extracellular ligand-receptor interactions and downstream pathways. Immune cells can both improve and obstruct therapeutic efficacy and may vary in their activation status within the tumor microenvironment; thus, re-programme of the immune response would be substantially more beneficial. The development of rational drug combinations that can simultaneously target tumor cells and the microenvironment may represent a solution to overcome therapeutic resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The roles of cysteines in the heme domain of human soluble guanylate cyclase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Fang Zhong; Xiao Xiao Liu; Jie Pan; Zhong Xian Huang; Xiang Shi Tan

    2012-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is a critical heme-containing enzyme involved in NO signaling.The dimerization of sGC subunits is necessary for its bioactivity and its mechanism is a striiking and an indistinct issue.The roles of heme domain cysteines of the sGC on the dimerization and heme binding were investigated herein.The site-directed mutations of three conserved cysteines (C78A,C 122A and C 174S) were studied systematically and the three mutants were characterized by gel filtration analysis,UV-vis spectroscopy and heime transfer examination.Cys78 was involved in heme binding but not referred to the dimerization,while Cys174 was demonstrated to be involved in the homodimerization.These results provide new insights into the cysteine-related dimerization regulation of sGC.

  9. A docking approach to the study of copper trafficking proteins: interaction between metallochaperones and soluble domains of copper ATPases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnesano, F.; Banci, L.; Bertini, I.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.

    2004-01-01

    A structural model of the transient complex between the yeast copper chaperone Atx1 and the first soluble domain of the copper transporting ATPase Ccc2 was obtained with HADDOCK, combining NMR chemical shift mapping information with in silico docking. These two proteins are involved in copper traffi

  10. Soluble CLEC2 Extracellular Domain Improves Glucose and Lipid Homeostasis by Regulating Liver Kupffer Cell Polarization

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    Xinle Wu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The polarization of tissue resident macrophages toward the alternatively activated, anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype is believed to positively impact obesity and insulin resistance. Here we show that the soluble form of the extracellular domain (ECD of C-type lectin-like receptor 2, CLEC2, regulates Kupffer cell polarization in the liver and improves glucose and lipid parameters in diabetic animal models. Over-expression of Fc-CLEC2(ECD in mice via in vivo gene delivery, or injection of recombinant Fc-CLEC2(ECD protein, results in a reduction of blood glucose and liver triglyceride levels and improves glucose tolerance. Furthermore, Fc-CLEC2(ECD treatment improves cytokine profiles and increases both the M2 macrophage population and the genes involved in the oxidation of lipid metabolism in the liver. These data reveal a previously unidentified role for CLEC2 as a regulator of macrophage polarity, and establish CLEC2 as a promising therapeutic target for treatment of diabetes and liver disease.

  11. Identification of residues in the heme domain of soluble guanylyl cyclase that are important for basal and stimulated catalytic activity.

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    Padmamalini Baskaran

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide signals through activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC, a heme-containing heterodimer. NO binds to the heme domain located in the N-terminal part of the β subunit of sGC resulting in increased production of cGMP in the catalytic domain located at the C-terminal part of sGC. Little is known about the mechanism by which the NO signaling is propagated from the receptor domain (heme domain to the effector domain (catalytic domain, in particular events subsequent to the breakage of the bond between the heme iron and Histidine 105 (H105 of the β subunit. Our modeling of the heme-binding domain as well as previous homologous heme domain structures in different states point to two regions that could be critical for propagation of the NO activation signal. Structure-based mutational analysis of these regions revealed that residues T110 and R116 in the αF helix-β1 strand, and residues I41 and R40 in the αB-αC loop mediate propagation of activation between the heme domain and the catalytic domain. Biochemical analysis of these heme mutants allows refinement of the map of the residues that are critical for heme stability and propagation of the NO/YC-1 activation signal in sGC.

  12. Betaglycan has two independent domains required for high affinity TGF-β binding: proteolytic cleavage separates the domains and inactivates the neutralizing activity of the soluble receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Valentín; Vilchis-Landeros, M. Magdalena; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Huang, Tao; Villarreal, Maria M.; Hinck, Andrew P.; López-Casillas, Fernando; Montiel, Jose-Luis

    2009-01-01

    Summary Betaglycan is a co-receptor for members of the TGF-β superfamily. Mutagenesis has identified two ligand binding regions, one at the membrane-distal and the other at the membrane-proximal half of the betaglycan ectodomain. Here we show that partial plasmin digestion of soluble betaglycan produces two proteolysis-resistant fragments of 45 and 55 kDa, consistent with the predicted secondary structure, which indicates an intervening non-structured linker region separating the highly structured N- and C-terminal domains. Amino terminal sequencing indicates that the 45 and 55 kDa fragments correspond, respectively, to the membrane-distal and -proximal regions. Plasmin treatment of membrane betaglycan results in the production of equivalent proteolysis-resistant fragments. The 45 and 55 kDa fragments, as well as their recombinant soluble counterparts, Sol Δ10 and Sol Δ11, bind TGF-β, nonetheless, compared to intact soluble betaglycan, have severely diminished ability to block TGF-β activity. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis indicates that soluble betaglycan has Kds in the low nanomolar range for the three TGF-β isoforms, while those for Sol Δ10 and Sol Δ11 are 1 – 2 orders of magnitude higher. SPR analysis further shows that the Kds of Sol Δ11 are not changed in the presence of Sol Δ10, indicating that the high affinity of soluble betaglycan is a consequence of tethering of the domains together. Overall, these results, suggest that betaglycan ectodomain exhibits a bi-lobular structure in which each lobule folds independently, binds TGF-β through distinct non-overlapping interfaces, and that linker modification may be an approach to improve soluble betaglycan’s TGF-β neutralizing activity. PMID:19842711

  13. Receptor-binding domain of SARS-Cov spike protein: Soluble expression in purification and functional characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Chen; Lin Miao; Jia-Ming Li; Yan-Ying Li; Qing-Yu Zhu; Chang-Lin Zhou; Hong-Qing Fang; Hui-Peng Chen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To find a soluble and functional recombinant receptor-binding domain of severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-Cov), and to analyze its receptor binding ability.METHODS: Three fusion tags (glutathione S-transferase,GST; thioredoxin, Trx; maltose-binding protein, MBP),which preferably contributes to increasing solubility and to facilitating the proper folding of heteroprotein, were used to acquire the soluble and functional expression of RBD protein in Escherichia coli( BL21( DE3 ) and Rosetta-gamiB(DE3) strains). The receptor binding ability of the purified soluble RBD protein was then detected by ELISA and flow cytometry assay.RESULTS: RBD of SARS-Cov spike protein was expressed as inclusion body when fused as TrxA tag form in both BL21 (DE3) and Rosetta-gamiB (DE3) under many different cultures and induction conditions. And there was no visible expression band on SDS-PAGE when RBD was expressed as MBP tagged form. Only GST tagged RBD was soluble expressed in BL21(DE3), and the protein was purified by AKTA Prime Chromatography system. The ELISA data anti-RBD mouse monoclonal antibody 1A5. Further flow cytometry assay demonstrated the high efficiency of RBD's binding ability to ACE2 (angiotensin-converting enzyme 2)positive Vero E6 cell. And ACE2 was proved as a cellular receptor that meditated an initial-affinity interaction with SARS-Cov spike protein. The geometrical mean of GST and respectively.CONCLUSION: In this paper, we get sufficient soluble N terminal GST tagged RBD protein expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3); data from ELISA and flow cytometry assay demonstrate that the recombinant protein is functional and binding to ACE2 positive Vero E6 cell efficiently. And the recombinant RBD derived from E. coli can be used to developing subunit vaccine to block S protein binding with receptor and to neutralizing SARS-Cov infection.

  14. Calpain-Mediated Processing of Adenylate Cyclase Toxin Generates a Cytosolic Soluble Catalytically Active N-Terminal Domain.

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    Kepa B Uribe

    Full Text Available Bordetella pertussis, the whooping cough pathogen, secretes several virulence factors among which adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT is essential for establishment of the disease in the respiratory tract. ACT weakens host defenses by suppressing important bactericidal activities of the phagocytic cells. Up to now, it was believed that cell intoxication by ACT was a consequence of the accumulation of abnormally high levels of cAMP, generated exclusively beneath the host plasma membrane by the toxin N-terminal catalytic adenylate cyclase (AC domain, upon its direct translocation across the lipid bilayer. Here we show that host calpain, a calcium-dependent Cys-protease, is activated into the phagocytes by a toxin-triggered calcium rise, resulting in the proteolytic cleavage of the toxin N-terminal domain that releases a catalytically active "soluble AC". The calpain-mediated ACT processing allows trafficking of the "soluble AC" domain into subcellular organella. At least two strategic advantages arise from this singular toxin cleavage, enhancing the specificity of action, and simultaneously preventing an indiscriminate activation of cAMP effectors throughout the cell. The present study provides novel insights into the toxin mechanism of action, as the calpain-mediated toxin processing would confer ACT the capacity for a space- and time-coordinated production of different cAMP "pools", which would play different roles in the cell pathophysiology.

  15. Involvement of urokinase receptor in the cross-talk between human hematopoietic stem cells and bone marrow microenvironment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selleri, Carmine; Montuori, Nunzia; Salvati, Annamaria

    2016-01-01

    microenvironment.uPAR is a three domain receptor (DIDIIDIII) which binds urokinase, vitronectin, integrins. uPAR can be cleaved and shed from the cell surface generating full-length and cleaved soluble forms (suPAR and DIIDIII-suPAR). DIIDIII-suPAR can bind fMLF receptors through the SRSRY sequence (residues 88......, is indeed down-regulated by pre-transplant conditioning, probably to favour HSC homing. BM full-length suPAR and DIIDIII-suPAR may be involved in HSC lodgement within the BM by contributing to a suitable microenvironment....

  16. Soluble Expression and Purification of the Catalytic Domain of Human Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jia; Cao, Xiaodan; Zhou, Shengmin; Chen, Chao; Yu, Haijun; Zhou, Yao; Wang, Ping

    2015-08-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a key role in angiogenesis through binding to its specific receptors, which mainly occurs to VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR-2), a kinase insert domain-containing receptor. Therefore, the disruption of VEGFR-2 signaling provides a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer by inhibiting abnormal or tumorinduced angiogenesis. To explore this potential, we expressed the catalytic domain of VEGFR- 2 (VEGFR-2-CD) as a soluble active kinase in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein was purified and the VEGFR-2-CD activity was investigated. The obtained VEGFR-2-CD showed autophosphorylation activity and phosphate transfer activity comparable to the commercial enzyme. Furthermore, the IC50 value of known VEGFR-2 inhibitor was determined using the purified VEGFR-2-CD. These results indicated a possibility for functional and economical VEGFR-2-CD expression in E. coli to use for inhibitor screening.

  17. Crystal Structure of the Signaling Helix Coiled-coil Domain of the b1 Subunit of the Soluble guanylyl Cyclase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, X.; Beuve, A; van den Akker, F

    2010-01-01

    The soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a heterodimeric enzyme that, upon activation by nitric oxide, stimulates the production of the second messenger cGMP. Each sGC subunit harbor four domains three of which are used for heterodimerization: H-NOXA/H-NOBA domain, coiled-coil domain (CC), and catalytic guanylyl cyclase domain. The CC domain has previously been postulated to be part of a larger CC family termed the signaling helix (S-helix) family. Homodimers of sGC have also been observed but are not functionally active yet are likely transient awaiting their intended heterodimeric partner. To investigate the structure of the CC S-helix region, we crystallized and determined the structure of the CC domain of the sGC{beta}1 subunit comprising residues 348-409. The crystal structure was refined to 2.15 {angstrom} resolution. The CC structure of sGC{beta}1 revealed a tetrameric arrangement comprised of a dimer of CC dimers. Each monomer is comprised of a long a-helix, a turn near residue P399, and a short second a-helix. The CC structure also offers insights as to how sGC homodimers are not as stable as (functionally) active heterodimers via a possible role for inter-helix salt-bridge formation. The structure also yielded insights into the residues involved in dimerization. In addition, the CC region is also known to harbor a number of congenital and man-made mutations in both membrane and soluble guanylyl cyclases and those function-affecting mutations have been mapped onto the CC structure. This mutant analysis indicated an importance for not only certain dimerization residue positions, but also an important role for other faces of the CC dimer which might perhaps interact with adjacent domains. Our results also extend beyond guanylyl cyclases as the CC structure is, to our knowledge, the first S-helix structure and serves as a model for all S-helix containing family members.

  18. Crystal structure of the signaling helix coiled-coil domain of the β1 subunit of the soluble guanylyl cyclase

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    van den Akker Focco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC is a heterodimeric enzyme that, upon activation by nitric oxide, stimulates the production of the second messenger cGMP. Each sGC subunit harbor four domains three of which are used for heterodimerization: H-NOXA/H-NOBA domain, coiled-coil domain (CC, and catalytic guanylyl cyclase domain. The CC domain has previously been postulated to be part of a larger CC family termed the signaling helix (S-helix family. Homodimers of sGC have also been observed but are not functionally active yet are likely transient awaiting their intended heterodimeric partner. Results To investigate the structure of the CC S-helix region, we crystallized and determined the structure of the CC domain of the sGCβ1 subunit comprising residues 348-409. The crystal structure was refined to 2.15 Å resolution. Conclusions The CC structure of sGCβ1 revealed a tetrameric arrangement comprised of a dimer of CC dimers. Each monomer is comprised of a long a-helix, a turn near residue P399, and a short second a-helix. The CC structure also offers insights as to how sGC homodimers are not as stable as (functionally active heterodimers via a possible role for inter-helix salt-bridge formation. The structure also yielded insights into the residues involved in dimerization. In addition, the CC region is also known to harbor a number of congenital and man-made mutations in both membrane and soluble guanylyl cyclases and those function-affecting mutations have been mapped onto the CC structure. This mutant analysis indicated an importance for not only certain dimerization residue positions, but also an important role for other faces of the CC dimer which might perhaps interact with adjacent domains. Our results also extend beyond guanylyl cyclases as the CC structure is, to our knowledge, the first S-helix structure and serves as a model for all S-helix containing family members.

  19. Chemical enhancer solubility in human stratum corneum lipids and enhancer mechanism of action on stratum corneum lipid domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Sarah A; Li, S Kevin

    2010-01-04

    Previously, chemical enhancer-induced permeation enhancement on human stratum corneum (SC) lipoidal pathway at enhancer thermodynamic activities approaching unity in the absence of cosolvents (defined as Emax) was determined and hypothesized to be related to the enhancer solubilities in the SC lipid domain. The objectives of the present study were to (a) quantify enhancer uptake into SC lipid domain at saturation, (b) elucidate enhancer mechanism(s) of action, and (c) study the SC lipid phase behavior at Emax. It was concluded that direct quantification of enhancer uptake into SC lipid domain using intact SC was complicated. Therefore a liposomal model of extracted human SC lipids was used. In the liposome study, enhancer uptake into extracted human SC lipid liposomes (EHSCLL) was shown to correlate with Emax. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to evaluate lipid phase alterations in enhancer-treated intact SC. IR spectra demonstrated an increase in the lipid domain fluidity and DSC thermograms indicated a decrease in the phase transition temperature with increasing Emax. These results suggest that the enhancer mechanism of action is through enhancer intercalation into SC intercellular lipids and subsequent lipid lamellae fluidization related to enhancer lipid concentration.

  20. Soluble FGFR4 extracellular domain inhibits FGF19-induced activation of FGFR4 signaling and prevents nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Qiang [State Key Laboratory of Stress Cell Biology, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen (China); The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen (China); Jiang, Yuan; An, Yuan; Zhao, Na; Zhao, Yang [State Key Laboratory of Stress Cell Biology, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen (China); Yu, Chundong, E-mail: cdyu@xmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Stress Cell Biology, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen (China)

    2011-06-17

    Highlights: {yields} Soluble FGFR4 extracellular domain (FGFR4-ECD) was effectively expressed. {yields} FGFR4-ECD inhibited FGF19-induced activation of FGFR4 signaling. {yields} FGFR4-ECD reduced palmitic acid-induced steatosis of HepG2 cells. {yields} FGFR4-ECD reduced tetracycline-induced fatty liver in mice. {yields} FGFR4-ECD partially restored tetracycline-repressed PPAR{alpha} expression. -- Abstract: Fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor that plays a crucial role in the regulation of hepatic bile acid and lipid metabolism. FGFR4 underlies high-fat diet-induced hepatic steatosis, suggesting that inhibition of FGFR4 activation may be an effective way to prevent or treat nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). To determine whether neutralization of FGFR4 ligands by soluble FGFR4 extracellular domain (FGFR4-ECD) can inhibit the activation of FGFR4, we constructed FGFR4-ECD expression vector and showed that FGFR4-ECD was effectively expressed in cells and secreted into culture medium. FGFR4-ECD inhibited FGF19-induced activation of FGFR4 signaling and reduced steatosis of HepG2 induced by palmitic acid in vitro. Furthermore, in a tetracycline-induced fatty liver model, expression of FGFR4-ECD in mouse liver reduced the accumulation of hepatic lipids and partially restored the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}), which promotes the mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation but is repressed by tetracycline. Taken together, these results demonstrate that FGFR4-ECD can block FGFR4 signaling and prevent hepatic steatosis, highlighting the potential value of inhibition of FGFR4 signaling as a method for therapeutic intervention against NAFLD.

  1. Water-soluble, recombinant CuA-domain of the cytochrome ba3 subunit II from Thermus thermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutter, C E; Sanders, D; Wittung, P; Malmström, B G; Aasa, R; Richards, J H; Gray, H B; Fee, J A

    1996-03-19

    Recently, the genes of cytochrome ba3 from thermus thermophilus [Keightley, J.A., et al. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 20345-20358], a homolog of the heme-copper oxidase family, have been cloned. We report here expression of a truncated gene, encoding the copper A (CuA) domain of cytochrome ba3, that is regulated by a T7 RNA polymerase promoter in Escherichia coli. The CuA-containing domain is purified in high yields as a water-soluble, thermostable, purple-colored protein. Copper analysis by chemical assay, mass spectrometry, X-ray fluorescence, and EPR spin quantification show that this protein contains two copper ions bound in a mixed-valence state, indicating that the CuA site in cytochrome ba3, is a binuclear center. The absorption spectrum of the CuA site, free of the heme interference in cytochrome ba3, is similar to the spectra of other soluble fragments from the aa3-type oxidase of Parachccus denitrificans [Lappalainen, P., et al. (1993) J. Biol Chem. 268, 26416-26421] and the caa3-type oxidase of Bacillus subtilis [von Wachenfeldt, C. et al. (1994) FEBS Lett. 340, 109-113]. There are intense bands at 480 nm (3100 M(-1) cm(-1)) and 530 nm (3200 M(-1) cm(-1)), a band in the near -IR centered at 790 nm (1900 M(-1) cn(-1)), and a weaker band at 363 nm (1300M(-1) cm(-1)). The visible CD spectrum shows a positive-going band at 460 nm and a negative-going band at 527 nm, the opposite signs of which may result from the binuclear nature of the site. The secondary structure prediction from the far-UV CD spectrum indicates that this domain is predominantly beta-sheet, in agreement with the recent X-ray structure reported for the complete P. denitrificans cytochrome aa3 molecule [Iwata, S., et al. (1995) Nature 376, 660-669] and the engineered, purple CyoA protein [Wilmanns, M., et al. (1996) Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 92, 11955-11959]. However, the thermostability of the fragment described here (Tm approximately 80 degrees C) and the stable binding of copper over a

  2. Lymphoma Microenvironment and Immunotherapy.

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    Xu, Mina L; Fedoriw, Yuri

    2016-03-01

    Understanding of the lymphoma tumor microenvironment is poised to expand in the era of next-generation sequencing studies of the tumor cells themselves. Successful therapies of the future will rely on deeper appreciation of the interactions between elements of the microenvironment. Although the phenotypic, cytogenetic, and molecular characterization of tumor cells in lymphomas has progressed faster than most other solid organ tumors, concrete advancements in understanding the lymphoma microenvironment have been fewer. This article explores the composition of the lymphoma tumor microenvironment; its role in immune surveillance, evasion, and drug resistance; and its potential role in the development of targeted therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The pancreas cancer microenvironment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Feig, Christine; Gopinathan, Aarthi; Neesse, Albrecht; Chan, Derek S; Cook, Natalie; Tuveson, David A

    2012-01-01

    .... The PDA stroma, aptly termed the tumor microenvironment, occupies the majority of the tumor mass, and consists of a dynamic assortment of extracellular matrix components and nonneoplastic cells...

  4. Soluble FGFR4 extracellular domain inhibits FGF19-induced activation of FGFR4 signaling and prevents nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiang; Jiang, Yuan; An, Yuan; Zhao, Na; Zhao, Yang; Yu, Chundong

    2011-06-17

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor that plays a crucial role in the regulation of hepatic bile acid and lipid metabolism. FGFR4 underlies high-fat diet-induced hepatic steatosis, suggesting that inhibition of FGFR4 activation may be an effective way to prevent or treat nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). To determine whether neutralization of FGFR4 ligands by soluble FGFR4 extracellular domain (FGFR4-ECD) can inhibit the activation of FGFR4, we constructed FGFR4-ECD expression vector and showed that FGFR4-ECD was effectively expressed in cells and secreted into culture medium. FGFR4-ECD inhibited FGF19-induced activation of FGFR4 signaling and reduced steatosis of HepG2 induced by palmitic acid in vitro. Furthermore, in a tetracycline-induced fatty liver model, expression of FGFR4-ECD in mouse liver reduced the accumulation of hepatic lipids and partially restored the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), which promotes the mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation but is repressed by tetracycline. Taken together, these results demonstrate that FGFR4-ECD can block FGFR4 signaling and prevent hepatic steatosis, highlighting the potential value of inhibition of FGFR4 signaling as a method for therapeutic intervention against NAFLD.

  5. NMR structure and action on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors of water-soluble domain of human LYNX1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Mineev, Konstantin S; D'Hoedt, Dieter; Kasheverov, Igor E; Filkin, Sergey Yu; Krivolapova, Alexandra P; Janickova, Helena; Dolezal, Vladimir; Dolgikh, Dmitry A; Arseniev, Alexander S; Bertrand, Daniel; Tsetlin, Victor I; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P

    2011-03-25

    Discovery of proteins expressed in the central nervous system sharing the three-finger structure with snake α-neurotoxins provoked much interest to their role in brain functions. Prototoxin LYNX1, having homology both to Ly6 proteins and three-finger neurotoxins, is the first identified member of this family membrane-tethered by a GPI anchor, which considerably complicates in vitro studies. We report for the first time the NMR spatial structure for the water-soluble domain of human LYNX1 lacking a GPI anchor (ws-LYNX1) and its concentration-dependent activity on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). At 5-30 μM, ws-LYNX1 competed with (125)I-α-bungarotoxin for binding to the acetylcholine-binding proteins (AChBPs) and to Torpedo nAChR. Exposure of Xenopus oocytes expressing α7 nAChRs to 1 μM ws-LYNX1 enhanced the response to acetylcholine, but no effect was detected on α4β2 and α3β2 nAChRs. Increasing ws-LYNX1 concentration to 10 μM caused a modest inhibition of these three nAChR subtypes. A common feature for ws-LYNX1 and LYNX1 is a decrease of nAChR sensitivity to high concentrations of acetylcholine. NMR and functional analysis both demonstrate that ws-LYNX1 is an appropriate model to shed light on the mechanism of LYNX1 action. Computer modeling, based on ws-LYNX1 NMR structure and AChBP x-ray structure, revealed a possible mode of ws-LYNX1 binding.

  6. NMR Structure and Action on Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors of Water-soluble Domain of Human LYNX1*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N.; Shenkarev, Zakhar O.; Shulepko, Mikhail A.; Mineev, Konstantin S.; D'Hoedt, Dieter; Kasheverov, Igor E.; Filkin, Sergey Yu.; Krivolapova, Alexandra P.; Janickova, Helena; Dolezal, Vladimir; Dolgikh, Dmitry A.; Arseniev, Alexander S.; Bertrand, Daniel; Tsetlin, Victor I.; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P.

    2011-01-01

    Discovery of proteins expressed in the central nervous system sharing the three-finger structure with snake α-neurotoxins provoked much interest to their role in brain functions. Prototoxin LYNX1, having homology both to Ly6 proteins and three-finger neurotoxins, is the first identified member of this family membrane-tethered by a GPI anchor, which considerably complicates in vitro studies. We report for the first time the NMR spatial structure for the water-soluble domain of human LYNX1 lacking a GPI anchor (ws-LYNX1) and its concentration-dependent activity on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). At 5–30 μm, ws-LYNX1 competed with 125I-α-bungarotoxin for binding to the acetylcholine-binding proteins (AChBPs) and to Torpedo nAChR. Exposure of Xenopus oocytes expressing α7 nAChRs to 1 μm ws-LYNX1 enhanced the response to acetylcholine, but no effect was detected on α4β2 and α3β2 nAChRs. Increasing ws-LYNX1 concentration to 10 μm caused a modest inhibition of these three nAChR subtypes. A common feature for ws-LYNX1 and LYNX1 is a decrease of nAChR sensitivity to high concentrations of acetylcholine. NMR and functional analysis both demonstrate that ws-LYNX1 is an appropriate model to shed light on the mechanism of LYNX1 action. Computer modeling, based on ws-LYNX1 NMR structure and AChBP x-ray structure, revealed a possible mode of ws-LYNX1 binding. PMID:21252236

  7. Neuropilin-1 stimulates tumor growth by increasing fibronectin fibril assembly in the tumor microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaqoob, Usman; Cao, Sheng; Shergill, Uday; Jagavelu, Kumaravelu; Geng, Zhimin; Yin, Meng; de Assuncao, Thiago M; Cao, Ying; Szabolcs, Anna; Thorgeirsson, Snorri; Schwartz, Martin; Yang, Ju Dong; Ehman, Richard; Roberts, Lewis; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Shah, Vijay H.

    2012-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment, including stromal myofibroblasts and associated matrix proteins, regulates cancer cell invasion and proliferation. Here we report that neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) orchestrates communications between myofibroblasts and soluble fibronectin (FN) that promote α5β1 integrin-dependent FN fibril assembly, matrix stiffness, and tumor growth. Tumor growth and FN fibril assembly was reduced by genetic depletion or antibody neutralization of NRP-1 from stromal myofibroblasts in vivo. Mechanistically, the increase in FN fibril assembly required glycosylation of serine 612 of the extracellular domain of NRP-1, an intact intracellular NRP-1 SEA domain, and intracellular associations between NRP-1, the scaffold protein GIPC, and the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase c-Abl, that augmented α5β1 FN fibril assembly activity. Analysis of human cancer specimens established an association between tumoral NRP-1 levels and clinical outcome. Our findings indicate that NRP-1 activates the tumor microenvironment, thereby promoting tumor growth. These results not only identify new molecular mechanisms of FN fibril assembly but also have important implications for therapeutic targeting of the myofibroblast in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:22738912

  8. Expression by Streptomyces lividans of the Rat α Integrin CD11b A-Domain as a Secreted and Soluble Recombinant Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorra Zouari Ayadi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We already reported the use of a long synthetic signal peptide (LSSP to secrete the Streptomyces sp. TO1 amylase by Streptomyces lividans strain. We herein report the expression and secretion of the rat CD11b A-domain using the same LSSP and S. lividans as host strain. We have used the Escherichia coli/Streptomyces shuttle vector pIJ699 for the cloning of the A-domain DNA sequence downstream of LSSP and under the control of the constitutive ermE-up promoter of Streptomyces erythraeus. Using this construct and S. lividans as a host strain, we achieved the expression of 8 mg/L of soluble secreted recombinant form of the A-domain of the rat leukocyte β2 integrin CD11/CD18 alpha M subunit (CD11b. This secreted recombinant CD11b A-domain reacted with a function blocking antibody showing that this protein is properly folded and probably functional. These data support the capability of Streptomyces to produce heterologous recombinant proteins as soluble secreted form using the “LSSP” synthetic signal peptide.

  9. Inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling by a soluble collagen-derived frizzled domain interacting with Wnt3a and the receptors frizzled 1 and 8.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismaïl Hendaoui

    Full Text Available The Wnt/β-catenin pathway controls cell proliferation, death and differentiation. Several families of extracellular proteins can antagonize Wnt/β-catenin signaling, including the decoy receptors known as secreted frizzled related proteins (SFRPs, which have a cysteine-rich domain (CRD structurally similar to the extracellular Wnt-binding domain of the frizzled receptors. SFRPs inhibit Wnt signaling by sequestering Wnts through the CRD or by forming inactive complexes with the frizzled receptors. Other endogenous molecules carrying frizzled CRDs inhibit Wnt signaling, such as V3Nter, which is proteolytically derived from the cell surface component collagen XVIII and contains a biologically active frizzled domain (FZC18 inhibiting in vivo cell proliferation and tumor growth in mice. We recently showed that FZC18 expressing cells deliver short-range signals to neighboring cells, decreasing their proliferation in vitro and in vivo through the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Here, using low concentrations of soluble FZC18 and Wnt3a, we show that they physically interact in a cell-free system. In addition, soluble FZC18 binds the frizzled 1 and 8 receptors' CRDs, reducing cell sensitivity to Wnt3a. Conversely, inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling was partially rescued by the expression of full-length frizzled 1 and 8 receptors, but enhanced by the expression of a chimeric cell-membrane-tethered frizzled 8 CRD. Moreover, soluble, partially purified recombinant FZC18_CRD inhibited Wnt3a-induced β-catenin activation. Taken together, the data indicate that collagen XVIII-derived frizzled CRD shifts Wnt sensitivity of normal cells to a lower pitch and controls their growth.

  10. Role of the Tumor Microenvironment in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soysal, Savas D; Tzankov, Alexandar; Muenst, Simone E

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, it has been shown that breast cancer consists not only of neoplastic cells, but also of significant alterations in the surrounding stroma or tumor microenvironment. These alterations are now recognized as a critical element for breast cancer development and progression, as well as potential therapeutic targets. Various components of the breast cancer microenvironment, such as suppressive immune cells, soluble factors and altered extracellular matrix, act together to impede effective antitumor immunity and promote breast cancer progression and metastasis. Stromal cells in the breast cancer microenvironment are characterized by molecular alterations and aberrant signaling pathways, some of which are prognostic of clinical outcome. Several new therapies targeting stromal components are in development or undergoing clinical trials. We focus herein on the composition of the breast cancer microenvironment and concomitant molecular alterations, the specific interplay between various cell types and cancer cells, and the clinical implications of these findings. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Targets in the microenvironment of rectal cancer : A focus on angiogenic growth factors and chemokines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamas, Karin Rita

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells interact with each other, and with cells of the tumor microenvironment. This coincides with the production of numerous soluble factors which can stimulate cancer cell growth and migration. In addition the tumor microenvironment can facilitate cancer cells to escape the effect of

  12. Targets in the microenvironment of rectal cancer : A focus on angiogenic growth factors and chemokines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamas, Karin Rita

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells interact with each other, and with cells of the tumor microenvironment. This coincides with the production of numerous soluble factors which can stimulate cancer cell growth and migration. In addition the tumor microenvironment can facilitate cancer cells to escape the effect of antican

  13. The effect of environmental chemicals on the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Stephanie C; Vaccari, Monica; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Brown, Dustin G; Chapellier, Marion; Christopher, Joseph; Curran, Colleen S; Forte, Stefano; Hamid, Roslida A; Heneberg, Petr; Koch, Daniel C; Krishnakumar, P K; Laconi, Ezio; Maguer-Satta, Veronique; Marongiu, Fabio; Memeo, Lorenzo; Mondello, Chiara; Raju, Jayadev; Roman, Jesse; Roy, Rabindra; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Ryeom, Sandra; Salem, Hosni K; Scovassi, A Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Soucek, Laura; Vermeulen, Louis; Whitfield, Jonathan R; Woodrick, Jordan; Colacci, Annamaria; Bisson, William H; Felsher, Dean W

    2015-06-01

    Potentially carcinogenic compounds may cause cancer through direct DNA damage or through indirect cellular or physiological effects. To study possible carcinogens, the fields of endocrinology, genetics, epigenetics, medicine, environmental health, toxicology, pharmacology and oncology must be considered. Disruptive chemicals may also contribute to multiple stages of tumor development through effects on the tumor microenvironment. In turn, the tumor microenvironment consists of a complex interaction among blood vessels that feed the tumor, the extracellular matrix that provides structural and biochemical support, signaling molecules that send messages and soluble factors such as cytokines. The tumor microenvironment also consists of many host cellular effectors including multipotent stromal cells/mesenchymal stem cells, fibroblasts, endothelial cell precursors, antigen-presenting cells, lymphocytes and innate immune cells. Carcinogens can influence the tumor microenvironment through effects on epithelial cells, the most common origin of cancer, as well as on stromal cells, extracellular matrix components and immune cells. Here, we review how environmental exposures can perturb the tumor microenvironment. We suggest a role for disrupting chemicals such as nickel chloride, Bisphenol A, butyltins, methylmercury and paraquat as well as more traditional carcinogens, such as radiation, and pharmaceuticals, such as diabetes medications, in the disruption of the tumor microenvironment. Further studies interrogating the role of chemicals and their mixtures in dose-dependent effects on the tumor microenvironment could have important general mechanistic implications for the etiology and prevention of tumorigenesis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Binding of spermine and ifenprodil to a purified, soluble regulatory domain of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Xia; Tomitori, Hideyuki; Mizuno, Satomi; Higashi, Kyohei; Füll, Christine; Fukiwake, Tomohide; Terui, Yusuke; Leewanich, Pathama; Nishimura, Kazuhiro; Toida, Toshihiko; Williams, Keith; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Igarashi, Kazuei

    2008-01-01

    The binding of spermine and ifenprodil to the amino terminal regulatory (R) domain of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor was studied using purified regulatory domains of the NR1, NR2A and NR2B subunits, termed NR1-R, NR2A-R and NR2B-R. The R domains were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified to near homogeneity. The Kd values for binding of [14C]spermine to NR1-R, NR2A-R and NR2B-R were 19, 140 and 33 µM, respectively. [3H]Ifenprodil bound to NR1-R (Kd, 0.18 µM) and NR2B-R (Kd, 0.21 µ...

  15. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenny, P.A.; Lee, G.Y.; Bissell, M.J.

    2006-11-07

    Despite some notable successes cancer remains, for the most part, a seemingly intractable problem. There is, however, a growing appreciation that targeting the tumor epithelium in isolation is not sufficient as there is an intricate mutually sustaining synergy between the tumor epithelial cells and their surrounding stroma. As the details of this dialogue emerge, new therapeutic targets have been proposed. The FDA has already approved drugs targeting microenvironmental components such as VEGF and aromatase and many more agents are in the pipeline. In this article, we describe some of the 'druggable' targets and processes within the tumor microenvironment and review the approaches being taken to disrupt these interactions.

  16. Soluble T cell receptor Vβ domains engineered for high-affinity binding to staphylococcal or streptococcal superantigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Preeti; Wang, Ningyan; Kranz, David M

    2014-01-28

    Staphylococcus aureus and group A Streptococcus secrete a collection of toxins called superantigens (SAgs), so-called because they stimulate a large fraction of an individual's T cells. One consequence of this hyperactivity is massive cytokine release leading to severe tissue inflammation and, in some cases, systemic organ failure and death. The molecular basis of action involves the binding of the SAg to both a T cell receptor (TCR) on a T cell and a class II product of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on an antigen presenting cell. This cross-linking leads to aggregation of the TCR complex and signaling. A common feature of SAgs is that they bind with relatively low affinity to the variable region (V) of the beta chain of the TCR. Despite this low affinity binding, SAgs are very potent, as each T cell requires only a small fraction of their receptors to be bound in order to trigger cytokine release. To develop high-affinity agents that could neutralize the activity of SAgs, and facilitate the development of detection assays, soluble forms of the Vβ regions have been engineered to affinities that are up to 3 million-fold higher for the SAg. Over the past decade, six different Vβ regions against SAgs from S. aureus (SEA, SEB, SEC3, TSST-1) or S. pyogenes (SpeA and SpeC) have been engineered for high-affinity using yeast display and directed evolution. Here we review the engineering of these high-affinity Vβ proteins, structural features of the six different SAgs and the Vβ proteins, and the specific properties of the engineered Vβ regions that confer high-affinity and specificity for their SAg ligands.

  17. Soluble T Cell Receptor Vβ Domains Engineered for High-Affinity Binding to Staphylococcal or Streptococcal Superantigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus and group A Streptococcus secrete a collection of toxins called superantigens (SAgs, so-called because they stimulate a large fraction of an individual’s T cells. One consequence of this hyperactivity is massive cytokine release leading to severe tissue inflammation and, in some cases, systemic organ failure and death. The molecular basis of action involves the binding of the SAg to both a T cell receptor (TCR on a T cell and a class II product of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC on an antigen presenting cell. This cross-linking leads to aggregation of the TCR complex and signaling. A common feature of SAgs is that they bind with relatively low affinity to the variable region (V of the beta chain of the TCR. Despite this low affinity binding, SAgs are very potent, as each T cell requires only a small fraction of their receptors to be bound in order to trigger cytokine release. To develop high-affinity agents that could neutralize the activity of SAgs, and facilitate the development of detection assays, soluble forms of the Vβ regions have been engineered to affinities that are up to 3 million-fold higher for the SAg. Over the past decade, six different Vβ regions against SAgs from S. aureus (SEA, SEB, SEC3, TSST-1 or S. pyogenes (SpeA and SpeC have been engineered for high-affinity using yeast display and directed evolution. Here we review the engineering of these high-affinity Vβ proteins, structural features of the six different SAgs and the Vβ proteins, and the specific properties of the engineered Vβ regions that confer high-affinity and specificity for their SAg ligands.

  18. Tumor Microenvironment in the Brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorger, Mihaela [Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, St. James’s University Hospital, Beckett Street, Leeds, LS9 7TF (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-22

    In addition to malignant cancer cells, tumors contain a variety of different stromal cells that constitute the tumor microenvironment. Some of these cell types provide crucial support for tumor growth, while others have been suggested to actually inhibit tumor progression. The composition of tumor microenvironment varies depending on the tumor site. The brain in particular consists of numerous specialized cell types such as microglia, astrocytes, and brain endothelial cells. In addition to these brain-resident cells, primary and metastatic brain tumors have also been shown to be infiltrated by different populations of bone marrow-derived cells. The role of different cell types that constitute tumor microenvironment in the progression of brain malignancies is only poorly understood. Tumor microenvironment has been shown to be a promising therapeutic target and diagnostic marker in extracranial malignancies. A better understanding of tumor microenvironment in the brain would therefore be expected to contribute to the development of improved therapies for brain tumors that are urgently required due to a poor availability of treatments for these malignancies. This review summarizes some of the known interactions between brain tumors and different stromal cells, and also discusses potential therapeutic approaches within this context.

  19. Dynamic microenvironments: the fourth dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbitt, Mark W; Anseth, Kristi S

    2012-11-14

    The extracellular space, or cell microenvironment, choreographs cell behavior through myriad controlled signals, and aberrant cues can result in dysfunction and disease. For functional studies of human cell biology or expansion and delivery of cells for therapeutic purposes, scientists must decipher this intricate map of microenvironment biology and develop ways to mimic these functions in vitro. In this Perspective, we describe technologies for four-dimensional (4D) biology: cell-laden matrices engineered to recapitulate tissue and organ function in 3D space and over time.

  20. Targeting the Neural Microenvironment in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0505 TITLE: Targeting the Neural Microenvironment in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Michael Ittmann MD PhD...CONTRACT NUMBER Targeting the Neural Microenvironment in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0505 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...tumor microenvironment plays an important role in the initiation and progression of PCa. One important component of this microenvironment is nerves

  1. Tumor microenvironment: Sanctuary of the devil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Lanlan; Chen, Ye

    2015-11-01

    Tumor cells constantly interact with the surrounding microenvironment. Increasing evidence indicates that targeting the tumor microenvironment could complement traditional treatment and improve therapeutic outcomes for these malignancies. In this paper, we review new insights into the tumor microenvironment, and summarize selected examples of the cross-talk between tumor cells and their microenvironment, which have enhanced our understanding of pathophysiology of the microenvironment. We believe that this rapidly moving field promises many more to come, and they will guide the rational design of combinational therapies for success in cancer eradication. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The external microenvironment of healing skin wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Carla R; Nuutila, Kristo; Lee, Cameron Cy

    2015-01-01

    The skin wound microenvironment can be divided into two main components that influence healing: the external wound microenvironment, which is outside the wound surface; and the internal wound microenvironment, underneath the surface, to which the cells within the wound are exposed. Treatment...... methods that directly alter the features of the external wound microenvironment indirectly affect the internal wound microenvironment due to the exchange between the two compartments. In this review, we focus on the effects of temperature, pressure (positive and negative), hydration, gases (oxygen...

  3. High-level soluble expression of the functional peptide derived from the C-terminal domain of the sea cucumber lysozyme and analysis of its antimicrobial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Cong

    2014-11-01

    Conclusion: These results indicate that the expressed rSjLys-C is a highly soluble product and has a strong antimicrobial activity. Therefore, gaining a large quantity of biologically active rSjLys-C will be used for further biochemical and structural studies and provide a potential use in aquaculture and medicine.

  4. The soluble extracellular domain of EphB4 (sEphB4) antagonizes EphB4-EphrinB2 interaction, modulates angiogenesis, and inhibits tumor growth

    OpenAIRE

    Kertesz, Nathalie; Krasnoperov, Valery; Reddy, Ramachandra; Leshanski, Lucy; Kumar, S. Ram; Zozulya, Sergey; Gill, Parkash S.

    2006-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase EphB4 and its ligand EphrinB2 play a crucial role in vascular development during embryogenesis. The soluble monomeric derivative of the extracellular domain of EphB4 (sEphB4) was designed as an antagonist of EphB4/EphrinB2 signaling. sEphB4 blocks activation of EphB4 and EphrinB2; suppresses endothelial cell migration, adhesion, and tube formation in vitro; and inhibits the angiogenic effects of various growth factors (VEGF and bFGF) in vivo. sEphB4 also inhibits ...

  5. Biomolecule delivery to engineer the cellular microenvironment for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Corey J; Kim, Jayoung; Green, Jordan J

    2014-07-01

    To realize the potential of regenerative medicine, controlling the delivery of biomolecules in the cellular microenvironment is important as these factors control cell fate. Controlled delivery for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine often requires bioengineered materials and cells capable of spatiotemporal modulation of biomolecule release and presentation. This review discusses biomolecule delivery from the outside of the cell inwards through the delivery of soluble and insoluble biomolecules as well as from the inside of the cell outwards through gene transfer. Ex vivo and in vivo therapeutic strategies are discussed, as well as combination delivery of biomolecules, scaffolds, and cells. Various applications in regenerative medicine are highlighted including bone tissue engineering and wound healing.

  6. Biomimetic microenvironments for regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Sagar N; Kim, Bogeun; Walma, Alexander M Cruz; Choi, Sung Chul; Wu, Hui; Mao, Jeremy J; Jun, Ho-Wook; Cheon, Kyounga

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative endodontics has been proposed to replace damaged and underdeveloped tooth structures with normal pulp-dentin tissue by providing a natural extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicking environment; stem cells, signaling molecules, and scaffolds. In addition, clinical success of the regenerative endodontic treatments can be evidenced by absence of signs and symptoms; no bony pathology, a disinfected pulp, and the maturation of root dentin in length and thickness. In spite of the various approaches of regenerative endodontics, there are several major challenges that remain to be improved: a) the endodontic root canal is a strong harbor of the endodontic bacterial biofilm and the fundamental etiologic factors of recurrent endodontic diseases, (b) tooth discolorations are caused by antibiotics and filling materials, (c) cervical root fractures are caused by endodontic medicaments, (d) pulp tissue is not vascularized nor innervated, and (e) the dentin matrix is not developed with adequate root thickness and length. Generally, current clinical protocols and recent studies have shown a limited success of the pulp-dentin tissue regeneration. Throughout the various approaches, the construction of biomimetic microenvironments of pulp-dentin tissue is a key concept of the tissue engineering based regenerative endodontics. The biomimetic microenvironments are composed of a synthetic nano-scaled polymeric fiber structure that mimics native pulp ECM and functions as a scaffold of the pulp-dentin tissue complex. They will provide a framework of the pulp ECM, can deliver selective bioactive molecules, and may recruit pluripotent stem cells from the vicinity of the pulp apex. The polymeric nanofibers are produced by methods of self-assembly, electrospinning, and phase separation. In order to be applied to biomedical use, the polymeric nanofibers require biocompatibility, stability, and biodegradability. Therefore, this review focuses on the development and application of the

  7. Microenvironments Dictating Tumor Cell Dormancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragado, Paloma; Sosa, Maria Soledad; Keely, Patricia; Condeelis, John

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms driving dormancy of disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) remain largely unknown. Here, we discuss experimental evidence and theoretical frameworks that support three potential scenarios contributing to tumor cell dormancy. The first scenario proposes that DTCs from invasive cancers activate stress signals in response to the dissemination process and/or a growth suppressive target organ microenvironment inducing dormancy. The second scenario asks whether therapy and/or micro-environmental stress conditions (e.g. hypoxia) acting on primary tumor cells carrying specific gene signatures prime new DTCs to enter dormancy in a matching target organ microenvironment that can also control the timing of DTC dormancy. The third and final scenario proposes that early dissemination contributes a population of DTCs that are unfit for immediate expansion and survive mostly in an arrested state well after primary tumor surgery, until genetic and/or epigenetic mechanisms activate their proliferation. We propose that DTC dormancy is ultimately a survival strategy that when targeted will eradicate dormant DTCs preventing metastasis. For these non-mutually exclusive scenarios we review experimental and clinical evidence in their support. PMID:22527492

  8. A bladder cancer microenvironment simulation system based on a microfluidic co-culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng-fei; Cao, Yan-wei; Zhang, Shu-dong; Zhao, Yang; Liu, Xiao-guang; Shi, Hao-qing; Hu, Ke-yao; Zhu, Guan-qun; Ma, Bo; Niu, Hai-tao

    2015-11-10

    A tumor microenvironment may promote tumor metastasis and progression through the dynamic interplay between neoplastic cells and stromal cells. In this work, the most representative and significant stromal cells, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and macrophages were used as vital component elements and combined with bladder cancer cells to construct a bladder cancer microenvironment simulation system. This is the first report to explore bladder cancer microenvironments based on 4 types of cells co-cultured simultaneously. This simulation system comprises perfusion equipment, matrigel channel units, a medium channel and four indirect contact culture chambers, allowing four types of cells to simultaneously interact through soluble biological factors and metabolites. With this system, bladder cancer cells (T24) with a tendency to form a 'reticular' structure under 3 dimensional culture conditions were observed in real time. The microenvironment characteristics of paracrine interactions and cell motility were successfully simulated in this system. The phenotype change process in stromal cells was successfully reproduced in this system by testing the macrophage effector molecule Arg-1. Arg-1 was highly expressed in the simulated tumor microenvironment group. To develop "precision medicine" in bladder cancer therapy, bladder cancer cells were treated with different clinical 'neo-adjuvant' chemotherapy schemes in this system, and their sensitivity differences were fully reflected. This work provides a preliminary foundation for neo-adjuvant chemotherapy in bladder cancer, a theoretical foundation for tumor microenvironment simulation and promotes individual therapy in bladder cancer patients.

  9. The role of microenvironment and immunity in drug response in leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Emyr; Qattan, Malak; Mutti, Luciano; Demonacos, Constantinos; Krstic-Demonacos, Marija

    2016-03-01

    Leukemia is a cancer of the white blood cells, with over 54,000 new cases per year diagnosed worldwide and a 5-year survival rate below 60%. This highlights a need for research into the mechanisms behind its etiology and causes of therapy failure. The bone marrow microenvironment, in which adult stem cells are maintained in healthy individuals, has been implicated as a source of chemoresistance and disease relapse. Here the various ways that the microenvironment can contribute to the resistance and persistence of leukemia are discussed. The targeting of the microenvironment by leukemia cells to create an environment more suitable for cancer progression is described. The role of soluble factors, drug transporters, microvesicles, as well as the importance of direct cell-cell contact, in addition to the effects of inflammation and immune surveillance in microenvironment-mediated drug resistance are discussed. An overview of the clinical potential of translating research findings to patients is also provided. Understanding of and further research into the role of the bone marrow microenvironment in leukemia progression and relapse are crucial towards developing more effective treatments and reduction in patient morbidity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Tumor Microenvironment Regulation of Cancer Cell Survival, Metastasis, Inflammation, and Immune Surveillance edited by Peter Ruvolo and Gregg L. Semenza. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Cell Microenvironment Engineering and Monitoring for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine: The Recent Advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthes, Julien; Özçelik, Hayriye; Hindié, Mathilde; Ndreu-Halili, Albana; Hasan, Anwarul

    2014-01-01

    In tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, the conditions in the immediate vicinity of the cells have a direct effect on cells' behaviour and subsequently on clinical outcomes. Physical, chemical, and biological control of cell microenvironment are of crucial importance for the ability to direct and control cell behaviour in 3-dimensional tissue engineering scaffolds spatially and temporally. In this review, we will focus on the different aspects of cell microenvironment such as surface micro-, nanotopography, extracellular matrix composition and distribution, controlled release of soluble factors, and mechanical stress/strain conditions and how these aspects and their interactions can be used to achieve a higher degree of control over cellular activities. The effect of these parameters on the cellular behaviour within tissue engineering context is discussed and how these parameters are used to develop engineered tissues is elaborated. Also, recent techniques developed for the monitoring of the cell microenvironment in vitro and in vivo are reviewed, together with recent tissue engineering applications where the control of cell microenvironment has been exploited. Cell microenvironment engineering and monitoring are crucial parts of tissue engineering efforts and systems which utilize different components of the cell microenvironment simultaneously can provide more functional engineered tissues in the near future. PMID:25143954

  11. Human response to an individually controlled microenvironment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Knudsen, G.L.

    2007-01-01

    The response of 48 subjects to an individually controlled microenvironment was studied at room air temperatures of 20 degrees C, 22 degrees C, and 26 degrees C An individually controlled system (ICS) comprising personalized ventilation, an under-desk air terminal device supplying cool air, a chair...... who are comfortable with their microenvironment....

  12. The external microenvironment of healing skin wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Carla R; Nuutila, Kristo; Lee, Cameron C Y; Kiwanuka, Elizabeth; Singh, Mansher; Caterson, Edward J; Eriksson, Elof; Sørensen, Jens A

    2015-01-01

    The skin wound microenvironment can be divided into two main components that influence healing: the external wound microenvironment, which is outside the wound surface; and the internal wound microenvironment, underneath the surface, to which the cells within the wound are exposed. Treatment methods that directly alter the features of the external wound microenvironment indirectly affect the internal wound microenvironment due to the exchange between the two compartments. In this review, we focus on the effects of temperature, pressure (positive and negative), hydration, gases (oxygen and carbon dioxide), pH, and anti-microbial treatment on the wound. These factors are well described in the literature and can be modified with treatment methods available in the clinic. Understanding the roles of these factors in wound pathophysiology is of central importance in wound treatment. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  13. Optical microassembly platform for constructing reconfigurable microenvironment for biomedical studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigo, Peter John; Kelemen, Lóránd; Palima, Darwin

    2009-01-01

    Cellular development is highly influenced by the surrounding microenvironment. We propose user-reconfigurable microenvironments and bio-compatible scaffolds as an approach for understanding cellular development processes. We demonstrate a model platform for constructing versatile microenvironments...

  14. A starch-binding domain identified in α-amylase (AmyP) represents a new family of carbohydrate-binding modules that contribute to enzymatic hydrolysis of soluble starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hui; Zheng, Yunyun; Chen, Maojiao; Wang, Ying; Xiao, Yazhong; Gao, Yi

    2014-04-02

    A novel starch-binding domain (SBD) that represents a new carbohydrate-binding module family (CBM69) was identified in the α-amylase (AmyP) of the recently established alpha-amylase subfamily GH13_37. The SBD and its homologues come mostly from marine bacteria, and phylogenetic analysis indicates that they are closely related to the CBM20 and CBM48 families. The SBD exhibited a binding preference toward raw rice starch, but the truncated mutant (AmyPΔSBD) still retained similar substrate preference. Kinetic analyses revealed that the SBD plays an important role in soluble starch hydrolysis because different catalytic efficiencies have been observed in AmyP and the AmyPΔSBD.

  15. Accurate quantitation for in vitro refolding of single domain antibody fragments expressed as inclusion bodies by referring the concomitant expression of a soluble form in the periplasms of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Tomoaki; Nishida, Yuichi; Takizawa, Keiji; Cui, Yue; Tsutsumi, Koki; Hamada, Takashi; Nishi, Yoshisuke

    2017-03-01

    Single domain antibody fragments from two species, a camel VHH (PM1) and a shark VNAR (A6), were derived from inclusion bodies of E. coli and refolded in vitro following three refolding recipes for comparing refolding efficiencies: three-step cold dialysis refolding (TCDR), one-step hot dialysis refolding (OHDR), and one-step cold dialysis refolding (OCDR), as these fragments were expressed as 'a soluble form' either in cytoplasm or periplasm, but the amount were much less than those expressed as 'an insoluble form (inclusion body)' in cytoplasm and periplasm. In order to verify the refolding efficiencies from inclusion bodies correctly, proteins purified from periplasmic soluble fractions were used as reference samples. These samples showed far-UV spectra of a typical β-sheet-dominant structure in circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and so did the refolded samples as well. As the maximal magnitude of ellipticity in millidegrees (θmax) observed at a given wave length was proportional to the concentrations of the respective reference samples, we could draw linear regression lines for the magnitudes vs. sample concentrations. By using these lines, we measured the concentrations for the refolded PM1 and A6 samples purified from solubilized cytoplasmic insoluble fractions. The refolding efficiency of PM1 was almost 50% following TCDR and 40% and 30% following OHDR and OCDR, respectively, whereas the value of A6 was around 30% following TCDR, and out of bound for quantitation following the other two recipes. The ELISA curves, which were derived from the refolded samples, coincided better with those obtained from the reference samples after converting the values from the protein-concentrations at recovery to the ones of refolded proteins using recovery ratios, indicating that such a correction gives better results for the accurate measure of the ELISA curves than those without correction. Our method require constructing a dual expression system, expressed both in

  16. H2O2 production rate in Lactobacillus johnsonii is modulated via the interplay of a heterodimeric flavin oxidoreductase with a soluble 28 Kd PAS domain containing protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo B Valladares

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Host and commensals crosstalk, mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS, has triggered a growing scientific interest to understand the mechanisms governing such interaction. However, the majority of the scientific studies published do not evaluate the ROS production by commensals bacteria. In this context we recently showed that Lactobacillus johnsonii N6.2, a strain of probiotic value, modulates the activity of the critical enzymes 2,3-indoleamine dioxygenase via H2O2 production. L. johnsonii N6.2 by decreasing IDO activity, is able to modify the tryptophan/kynurenine ratio in the host blood with further systemic consequences. Understanding the mechanisms of H2O2 production is critical to predict the probiotic value of these strains and to optimize bacterial biomass production in industrial processes. We performed a transcriptome analysis to identify genes differentially expressed in L. johnsonii N6.2 cells collected from cultures grown under different aeration conditions. Herein we described the biochemical characteristics of a heterodimeric FMN reductase (FRedA/B whose in vitro activity is controlled by LjPAS protein with a typical Per-Arnst-Sim (PAS sensor domain. Interestingly, LjPAS is fused to the FMN reductase domains in other lactobacillaceae. In L. johnsonii, LjPAS is encoded by an independent gene which expression is repressed under anaerobic conditions (>3 fold. Purified LjPAS was able to slow down the FRedA/B initial activity rate when the holoenzyme precursors (FredA, FredB and FMN were mixed in vitro. Altogether the results obtained suggest that LjPAS module regulates the H2O2 production helping the cells to minimize oxidative stress in response to environmental conditions.

  17. The Soluble Periplasmic Domains of Escherichia coli Cell Division Proteins FtsQ/FtsB/FtsL Form a Trimeric Complex with Submicromolar Affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glas, Marjolein; van den Berg van Saparoea, H Bart; McLaughlin, Stephen H; Roseboom, Winfried; Liu, Fan; Koningstein, Gregory M; Fish, Alexander; den Blaauwen, Tanneke; Heck, Albert J R; de Jong, Luitzen; Bitter, Wilbert; de Esch, Iwan J P; Luirink, Joen

    2015-08-28

    Cell division in Escherichia coli involves a set of essential proteins that assembles at midcell to form the so-called divisome. The divisome regulates the invagination of the inner membrane, cell wall synthesis, and inward growth of the outer membrane. One of the divisome proteins, FtsQ, plays a central but enigmatic role in cell division. This protein associates with FtsB and FtsL, which, like FtsQ, are bitopic inner membrane proteins with a large periplasmic domain (denoted FtsQp, FtsBp, and FtsLp) that is indispensable for the function of each protein. Considering the vital nature and accessible location of the FtsQBL complex, it is an attractive target for protein-protein interaction inhibitors intended to block bacterial cell division. In this study, we expressed FtsQp, FtsBp, and FtsLp individually and in combination. Upon co-expression, FtsQp was co-purified with FtsBp and FtsLp from E. coli extracts as a stable trimeric complex. FtsBp was also shown to interact with FtsQp in the absence of FtsLp albeit with lower affinity. Interactions were mapped at the C terminus of the respective domains by site-specific cross-linking. The binding affinity and 1:1:1 stoichiometry of the FtsQpBpLp complex and the FtsQpBp subcomplex were determined in complementary surface plasmon resonance, analytical ultracentrifugation, and native mass spectrometry experiments.

  18. Microenvironment Determinants of Brain Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Chenyu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Metastasis accounts for 90% of cancer-related mortality. Brain metastases generally present during the late stages in the natural history of cancer progression. Recent advances in cancer treatment and management have resulted in better control of systemic disease metastatic to organs other than the brain and improved patient survival. However, patients who experience recurrent disease manifest an increasing number of brain metastases, which are usually refractory to therapies. To meet the new challenges of controlling brain metastasis, the research community has been tackling the problem with novel experimental models and research tools, which have led to an improved understanding of brain metastasis. The time-tested "seed-and-soil" hypothesis of metastasis indicates that successful outgrowth of deadly metastatic tumors depends on permissible interactions between the metastatic cancer cells and the site-specific microenvironment in the host organs. Consistently, recent studies indicate that the brain, the major component of the central nervous system, has unique physiological features that can determine the outcome of metastatic tumor growth. The current review summarizes recent discoveries on these tumor-brain interactions, and the potential clinical implications these novel findings could have for the better treatment of patients with brain metastasis.

  19. Soluble NCAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is a membrane-bound glycoprotein involved in homophilic interactions that facilitate cell-cell adhesion. In addition to a number of membrane-bound isoforms, NCAM also exists in several soluble isoforms that have been identified in cerebrospinal fluid, bloo...

  20. Role of tumor microenvironment in triple-negative breast cancer and its prognostic significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tianjian; Di, Genhong

    2017-06-01

    Breast cancer has been shown to live in the tumor microenvironment, which consists of not only breast cancer cells themselves but also a significant amount of pathophysiologically altered surrounding stroma and cells. Diverse components of the breast cancer microenvironment, such as suppressive immune cells, re-programmed fibroblast cells, altered extracellular matrix (ECM) and certain soluble factors, synergistically impede an effective anti-tumor response and promote breast cancer progression and metastasis. Among these components, stromal cells in the breast cancer microenvironment are characterized by molecular alterations and aberrant signaling pathways, whereas the ECM features biochemical and biomechanical changes. However, triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), the most aggressive subtype of this disease that lacks effective therapies available for other subtypes, is considered to feature a unique microenvironment distinct from that of other subtypes, especially compared to Luminal A subtype. Because these changes are now considered to significantly impact breast cancer development and progression, these unique alterations may serve as promising prognostic factors of clinical outcome or potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of TNBC. In this review, we focus on the composition of the TNBC microenvironment, concomitant distinct biological alteration, specific interplay between various cell types and TNBC cells, and the prognostic implications of these findings.

  1. Stroma as an Active Player in the Development of the Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucci, L

    2015-12-01

    The stroma is a considerable part of the tumor microenvironment. Because of its complexity, it can influence both cancer and immune cells in their behavior and cross-talk. Aside from soluble products released by non-cancer and cancer cells, extracellular matrix components have been increasingly recognized as more than just minor players in the constitution, development and regulation of the tumor microenvironment. The variations in the connective scaffold architecture, induced by transforming growth factor beta, lysyl oxidase and metalloproteinase activity, create different conditions of ECM density and stiffness. They exert broad effects on immune cells (e.g. physical barriers, modulation by release of stored TGF-β1), mesenchymal cells (transition to myofibroblasts), epithelial cells (epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition), cancer cells (progression to metastatic phenotype) and stem cells (activation of differentiation addressed by the microenvironment characteristics). Physiological mechanisms of the wound healing process, as well as mechanisms of fibrosis in some chronic pathologies, closely recall aspects of cancer deregulated biology. Their elucidation can provide a better understanding of tumor microenvironment immunobiology. In the following short review, we will focus on some aspects of the fibrous stroma to highlight its active participation in the tumor microenvironment constitution, tumor progression and the local immunological network.

  2. Increased activity of the Vesicular Soluble N-Ethylmaleimide-sensitive Factor Attachment Protein Receptor TI-VAMP/VAMP7 by Tyrosine Phosphorylation in the Longin Domain*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgo, Andrea; Casano, Alessandra M.; Kuster, Aurelia; Arold, Stefan T.; Wang, Guan; Nola, Sébastien; Verraes, Agathe; Dingli, Florent; Loew, Damarys; Galli, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Vesicular (v)- and target (t)-SNAREs play essential roles in intracellular membrane fusion through the formation of cytoplasmic α-helical bundles. Several v-SNAREs have a Longin N-terminal extension that, by promoting a closed conformation, plays an autoinhibitory function and decreases SNARE complex formation and membrane fusion efficiency. The molecular mechanism leading to Longin v-SNARE activation is largely unknown. Here we find that exocytosis mediated by the Longin v-SNARE TI-VAMP/VAMP7 is activated by tonic treatment with insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 but not by depolarization and intracellular calcium rise. In search of a potential downstream mechanism, we found that TI-VAMP is phosphorylated in vitro by c-Src kinase on tyrosine 45 of the Longin domain. Accordingly, a mutation of tyrosine 45 into glutamate, but not phenylalanine, activates both t-SNARE binding and exocytosis. Activation of TI-VAMP-mediated exocytosis thus relies on tyrosine phosphorylation. PMID:23471971

  3. Increased activity of the vesicular soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor TI-VAMP/VAMP7 by tyrosine phosphorylation in the Longin domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgo, Andrea; Casano, Alessandra M; Kuster, Aurelia; Arold, Stefan T; Wang, Guan; Nola, Sébastien; Verraes, Agathe; Dingli, Florent; Loew, Damarys; Galli, Thierry

    2013-04-26

    Vesicular (v)- and target (t)-SNAREs play essential roles in intracellular membrane fusion through the formation of cytoplasmic α-helical bundles. Several v-SNAREs have a Longin N-terminal extension that, by promoting a closed conformation, plays an autoinhibitory function and decreases SNARE complex formation and membrane fusion efficiency. The molecular mechanism leading to Longin v-SNARE activation is largely unknown. Here we find that exocytosis mediated by the Longin v-SNARE TI-VAMP/VAMP7 is activated by tonic treatment with insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 but not by depolarization and intracellular calcium rise. In search of a potential downstream mechanism, we found that TI-VAMP is phosphorylated in vitro by c-Src kinase on tyrosine 45 of the Longin domain. Accordingly, a mutation of tyrosine 45 into glutamate, but not phenylalanine, activates both t-SNARE binding and exocytosis. Activation of TI-VAMP-mediated exocytosis thus relies on tyrosine phosphorylation.

  4. A rice-based soluble form of a murine TNF-specific llama variable domain of heavy-chain antibody suppresses collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Michiyo; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Kurokawa, Shiho; Mejima, Mio; Kuroda, Masaharu; Park, Eun Jeong; Scheller, Jürgen; Nakanishi, Ushio; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2014-04-10

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) plays a pivotal role in chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease. Although anti-TNF antibody therapy is now commonly used to treat patients suffering from these inflammatory conditions, the cost of treatment continues to be a concern. Here, we developed a rice transgenic system for the production of a llama variable domain of a heavy-chain antibody fragment (VHH) specific for mouse TNF in rice seeds (MucoRice-mTNF-VHH). MucoRice-mTNF-VHH was produced at high levels in the rice seeds when we used our most recent transgene-overexpression system with RNA interference technology that suppresses the production of major rice endogenous storage proteins while enhancing the expression of the transgene-derived protein. Production levels of mTNF-VHH in rice seeds reached an average of 1.45% (w/w). Further, approximately 91% of mTNF-VHH was released easily when the powder form of MucoRice-mTNF-VHH was mixed with PBS. mTNF-VHH purified by means of single-step gel filtration from rice PBS extract showed high neutralizing activity in an in vitro mTNF cytotoxicity assay using WEHI164 cells. In addition, purified mTNF-VHH suppressed progression of collagen-induced arthritis in mice. These results show that this rice-expression system is useful for the production of neutralizing VHH antibody specific for mTNF.

  5. Regulation of invadopodia by the tumor microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Christine M; Courtneidge, Sara A

    2014-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment consists of stromal cells, extracellular matrix (ECM), and signaling molecules that communicate with cancer cells. As tumors grow and develop, the tumor microenvironment changes. In addition, the tumor microenvironment is not only influenced by signals from tumor cells, but also stromal components contribute to tumor progression and metastasis by affecting cancer cell function. One of the mechanisms that cancer cells use to invade and metastasize is mediated by actin-rich, proteolytic structures called invadopodia. Here, we discuss how signals from the tumor environment, including growth factors, hypoxia, pH, metabolism, and stromal cell interactions, affect the formation and function of invadopodia to regulate cancer cell invasion and metastasis. Understanding how the tumor microenvironment affects invadopodia biology could aid in the development of effective therapeutics to target cancer cell invasion and metastasis. PMID:24714597

  6. Microenvironment Tracker (MicroTrac) Factsheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    MicroTrac is a model developed by EPA that uses GPS data to estimate time of day and duration that people spend in different microenvironments, such as indoors and outdoors at home, work, school, and inside vehicles.

  7. The Vascular Microenvironment and Systemic Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Frech

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of the vascular microenvironment in the pathogenesis Systemic Sclerosis (SSc is appreciated clinically as Raynaud's syndrome with capillary nail bed change. This manifestation of vasculopathy is used diagnostically in both limited and diffuse cutaneous subsets of SSc, and is thought to precede fibrosis. The degree of subsequent fibrosis may also be determined by the vascular microenvironment. This paper describes why the vascular microenvironment might determine the degree of end-organ damage that occurs in SSc, with a focus on vascular cell senescence, endothelial progenitor cells (EPC including multipotential mesenchymal stem cells (MSC, pericytes, and angiogenic monocytes. An explanation of the role of EPC, pericytes, and angiogenic monocytes is important to an understanding of SSc pathogenesis. An evolving understanding of the vascular microenvironment in SSc may allow directed treatment.

  8. Microenvironment of liver regeneration in liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Han-Min; Ye, Zhi-Hua

    2017-07-01

    The occurrence and development of liver cancer are essentially the most serious outcomes of uncontrolled liver regeneration. The progression of liver cancer is inevitably related to the abnormal microenvironment of liver regeneration. The deterioration observed in the microenvironment of liver regeneration is a necessary condition for the occurrence, development and metastasis of cancer. Therefore, the use of a technique to prevent and treat liver cancer via changes in the microenvironment of liver regeneration is a novel strategy. This strategy would be an effective way to delay, prevent or even reverse cancer occurrence, development and metastasis through an improvement in the liver regeneration microenvironment along with the integrated regulation of multiple components, targets, levels, channels and time sequences. In addition, the treatment of "tonifying Shen (Kidney) to regulate liver regeneration and repair by affecting stem cells and their microenvironment" can regulate "the dynamic imbalance between the normal liver regeneration and the abnormal liver regeneration"; this would improve the microenvironment of liver regeneration, which is also a mechanism by which liver cancer may be prevented or treated.

  9. Transcriptomic Microenvironment of Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossé, Yohan; Sazonova, Olga; Gaudreault, Nathalie; Bastien, Nathalie; Conti, Massimo; Pagé, Sylvain; Trahan, Sylvain; Couture, Christian; Joubert, Philippe

    2017-03-01

    Background: Tissues surrounding tumors are increasingly studied to understand the biology of cancer development and identify biomarkers.Methods: A unique geographic tissue sampling collection was obtained from patients that underwent curative lobectomy for stage I pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Tumor and nontumor lung samples located at 0, 2, 4, and 6 cm away from the tumor were collected. Whole-genome gene expression profiling was performed on all samples (n = 5 specimens × 12 patients = 60). Analyses were carried out to identify genes differentially expressed in the tumor compared with adjacent nontumor lung tissues at different distances from the tumor as well as to identify stable and transient genes in nontumor tissues with respect to tumor proximity.Results: The magnitude of gene expression changes between tumor and nontumor sites was similar with increasing distance from the tumor. A total of 482 up- and 843 downregulated genes were found in tumors, including 312 and 566 that were consistently differentially expressed across nontumor sites. Twenty-nine genes induced and 34 knocked-down in tumors were also identified. Tumor proximity analyses revealed 15,700 stable genes in nontumor lung tissues. Gene expression changes across nontumor sites were subtle and not statistically significant.Conclusions: This study describes the transcriptomic microenvironment of lung adenocarcinoma and adjacent nontumor lung tissues collected at standardized distances relative to the tumor.Impact: This study provides further insights about the molecular transitions that occur from normal tissue to lung adenocarcinoma and is an important step to develop biomarkers in nonmalignant lung tissues. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(3); 389-96. ©2016 AACR.

  10. [Effects of fruit bag color on the microenvironment, yield and quality of tomato fruits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Gao, Fang-sheng; Xu, Kun; Xu, Ning

    2013-08-01

    In order to clarify the ecological and biological effects of fruit bagging, tomato variety JYK was taken as the test material to study the changes of the microenvironment in different color fruit bags and the effects of these changes on the fruit development, yield and quality, with the treatment without fruit bagging as the control (CK). The results showed that bagging with different color fruit bags had positive effects in decreasing the light intensity of the microenvironment and increasing its temperature and humidity, and thus, increased the single fruit mass and promoted the harvest stage advanced. Black bag had the best effects in increasing microenvironment temperature and fruit mass, with the single fruit mass increased by 27.2% and the harvest period shortened by 10 days, compared with CK. The fruit maturation period in colorless bag, blue bag and red bag was shortened by 8, 3 and 2 days, and the single mass was increased by 11.8%, 6.4% and 4.8%, respectively. Moreover, the coloring and lycopene content of the fruits with different color bags bagging were improved, but the fruit rigidity and fruit soluble solid, soluble protein, and soluble sugar contents were decreased. Therefore, bagging with different color bags could improve the yield of tomato fruits, but decrease the fruit nutritional quality.

  11. Photo-dynamics of the BLUF domain containing soluble adenylate cyclase (nPAC) from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penzkofer, A., E-mail: alfons.penzkofer@physik.uni-regensburg.de [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetsstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany); Stierl, M.; Hegemann, P. [Institut fuer Biologie/Experimentelle Biophysik, Humboldt Universitaet zu Berlin, Invalidenstrasse 42, D-10115 Berlin (Germany); Kateriya, Suneel [Department of Biochemistry, University of Delhi South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi 110021 (India)

    2011-08-25

    Graphical abstract: The photoactivated adenylyl cyclase (nPAC) from Naegleria gruberi was expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli and its photo-cycling dynamics was studied by optical absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Highlights: {yields} Photo-activated adenylyl cyclase (nPAC) from Naegleria gruberi NEG-M was expressed. {yields} Photodynamics of BLUF domain in BLUF sensor - cyclase actuator protein was studied. {yields} Photo-excitation caused BLUF photo-cycling and permanent protein re-conformation. {yields} Re-conformed protein enabled photo-induced flavin reduction by proton transfer. {yields} Fluorescence of flavin in dark- and light-adapted state of nPAC was characterized. - Abstract: The amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M comprises a BLUF (blue light sensor using flavin) regulated adenylate cyclase (nPAC). The nPAC gene was expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli and the photo-dynamics of the nPAC protein was studied by optical absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Blue-light exposure of nPAC caused a typical BLUF-type photo-cycle behavior (spectral absorption red-shift, fluorescence quenching, absorption and fluorescence recovery in the dark). Additionally, time-delayed reversible photo-induced one-electron reduction of fully oxidized flavin (Fl{sub ox}) to semi-reduced flavin (FlH{sup {center_dot}}) occurred. Furthermore, photo-excitation of FlH{sup {center_dot}} caused irreversible electron transfer to fully reduced anionic flavin (FlH{sup -}). A photo-induced electron transfer from Tyr or Trp to flavin (Tyr{sup {center_dot}+}-Fl{sup {center_dot}-} or Trp{sup {center_dot}+}-Fl{sup {center_dot}-} radical ion-pair formation) is thought to cause H-bond restructuring responsible for BLUF-type photo-cycling and permanent protein re-conformation enabling photo-induced flavin reduction by proton transfer. Some photo-degradation of Fl{sub ox} to lumichrome was observed. A model of the photo-dynamics of nPAC is developed.

  12. Addition of TAT protein transduction domain and GrpE to human p53 provides soluble fusion proteins that can be transduced into dendritic cells and elicit p53-specific T-cell responses in HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, S; Buus, S; Claesson, M H

    2007-01-01

    in our laboratory were unsuccessful. Here, we show that fusion of an 11-amino-acid region of the human immunodeficiency virus TAT protein transduction domain (PTD) to human p53 increases the solubility of the otherwise insoluble p53 protein and this rTAT-p53 protein can be transduced into human monocyte...

  13. Hyaluronan: A modulator of the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanmee, Theerawut; Ontong, Pawared; Itano, Naoki

    2016-05-28

    Tumors are cellular masses formed through dynamic interactions between tumor cells and a mixed population of stromal cells. Crosstalk between oncogenic and adjacent stromal cells contributes to the formation of a "tumor microenvironment" influencing the tumor cell behaviors of proliferation, invasion, and metastatic spread throughout cancer progression. The composition and structure of the tumor microenvironment vary among different types of tumors and are extensively remodeled in close association with tumor advancement. The tumor microenvironment is composed not only of cellular compartments, such as endothelial cells, fibroblasts, inflammatory cells, and immune cells, but also of bioactive substances, including growth factors and the extracellular matrix. Hyaluronan (HA) is a major component of the extracellular matrix, and the degree of HA accumulation is strongly correlated with a poor prognosis in advanced cancer patients. Emerging evidence has suggested that HA creates a specific microenvironment that is favorable for tumor angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. This review highlights the prominent roles of HA as a modulator of the tumor microenvironment and addresses the recent advances regarding HA function in cancer stem cell niches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Molecular imaging of the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhuxian; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2017-04-01

    The tumor microenvironment plays a critical role in tumor initiation, progression, metastasis, and resistance to therapy. It is different from normal tissue in the extracellular matrix, vascular and lymphatic networks, as well as physiologic conditions. Molecular imaging of the tumor microenvironment provides a better understanding of its function in cancer biology, and thus allowing for the design of new diagnostics and therapeutics for early cancer diagnosis and treatment. The clinical translation of cancer molecular imaging is often hampered by the high cost of commercialization of targeted imaging agents as well as the limited clinical applications and small market size of some of the agents. Because many different cancer types share similar tumor microenvironment features, the ability to target these biomarkers has the potential to provide clinically translatable molecular imaging technologies for a spectrum of cancers and broad clinical applications. There has been significant progress in targeting the tumor microenvironment for cancer molecular imaging. In this review, we summarize the principles and strategies of recent advances made in molecular imaging of the tumor microenvironment, using various imaging modalities for early detection and diagnosis of cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Engineering biomolecular microenvironments for cell instructive biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custódio, Catarina A; Reis, Rui L; Mano, João F

    2014-06-01

    Engineered cell instructive microenvironments with the ability to stimulate specific cellular responses are a topic of high interest in the fabrication and development of biomaterials for application in tissue engineering. Cells are inherently sensitive to the in vivo microenvironment that is often designed as the cell "niche." The cell "niche" comprising the extracellular matrix and adjacent cells, influences not only cell architecture and mechanics, but also cell polarity and function. Extensive research has been performed to establish new tools to fabricate biomimetic advanced materials for tissue engineering that incorporate structural, mechanical, and biochemical signals that interact with cells in a controlled manner and to recapitulate the in vivo dynamic microenvironment. Bioactive tunable microenvironments using micro and nanofabrication have been successfully developed and proven to be extremely powerful to control intracellular signaling and cell function. This Review is focused in the assortment of biochemical signals that have been explored to fabricate bioactive cell microenvironments and the main technologies and chemical strategies to encode them in engineered biomaterials with biological information.

  16. Soluble vs. insoluble fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insoluble vs. soluble fiber; Fiber - soluble vs. insoluble ... There are 2 different types of fiber -- soluble and insoluble. Both are important for health, digestion, and preventing diseases. Soluble fiber attracts water and turns to gel during digestion. ...

  17. Targeting the Tumor Microenvironment: Focus on Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengjuan Fan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumorigenesis is a complex multistep process involving not only genetic and epigenetic changes in the tumor cell but also selective supportive conditions of the deregulated tumor microenvironment. One key compartment of the microenvironment is the vascular niche. The role of angiogenesis in solid tumors but also in hematologic malignancies is now well established. Research on angiogenesis in general, and vascular endothelial growth factor in particular, is a major focus in biomedicine and has led to the clinical approval of several antiangiogenic agents including thalidomide, bevacizumab, sorafenib, sunitinib, pazopanib, temesirolimus, and everolimus. Indeed, antiangiogenic agents have significantly changed treatment strategies in solid tumors (colorectal cancer, renal cell carcinoma, and breast cancer and multiple myeloma. Here we illustrate important aspects in the interrelationship between tumor cells and the microenvironment leading to tumor progression, with focus on angiogenesis, and summarize derived targeted therapies.

  18. Targeting the tumor microenvironment: focus on angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Fengjuan; Schimming, Alexander; Jaeger, Dirk; Podar, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Tumorigenesis is a complex multistep process involving not only genetic and epigenetic changes in the tumor cell but also selective supportive conditions of the deregulated tumor microenvironment. One key compartment of the microenvironment is the vascular niche. The role of angiogenesis in solid tumors but also in hematologic malignancies is now well established. Research on angiogenesis in general, and vascular endothelial growth factor in particular, is a major focus in biomedicine and has led to the clinical approval of several antiangiogenic agents including thalidomide, bevacizumab, sorafenib, sunitinib, pazopanib, temesirolimus, and everolimus. Indeed, antiangiogenic agents have significantly changed treatment strategies in solid tumors (colorectal cancer, renal cell carcinoma, and breast cancer) and multiple myeloma. Here we illustrate important aspects in the interrelationship between tumor cells and the microenvironment leading to tumor progression, with focus on angiogenesis, and summarize derived targeted therapies.

  19. Role of the tumor microenvironment in regulating apoptosis and cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaacoub, Katherine; Pedeux, Remy; Tarte, Karin; Guillaudeux, Thierry

    2016-08-10

    Apoptosis is a gene-directed program that is engaged to efficiently eliminate dysfunctional cells. Evasion of apoptosis may be an important gate to tumor initiation and therapy resistance. Like any other developmental program, apoptosis can be disrupted by several genetic aberrations driving malignant cells into an uncontrolled progression and survival. For its sustained growth, cancer develops in a complex environment, which provides survival signals and rescues malignant cells from apoptosis. Recent studies have clearly shown a wide interaction between tumor cells and their microenvironment, confirming the influence of the surrounding cells on tumor expansion and invasion. These non-malignant cells not only intensify tumor cells growth but also upgrade the process of metastasis. The strong crosstalk between malignant cells and a reactive microenvironment is mediated by soluble chemokines and cytokines, which act on tumor cells through surface receptors. Disturbing the microenvironment signaling might be an encouraging approach for patient's treatment. Therefore, the ultimate knowledge of "tumor-microenvironment" interactions facilitates the identification of novel therapeutic procedures that mobilize cancer cells from their supportive cells. This review focuses on cancer progression mediated by the dysfunction of apoptosis and by the fundamental relationship between tumor and reactive cells. New insights and valuable targets for cancer prevention and therapy are also presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. NK cells in the tumor microenvironment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Stine K; Gao, Yanhua; Basse, Per H

    2014-01-01

    The presence of natural killer (NK) cells in the tumor microenvironment correlates with outcome in a variety of cancers. However, the role of intratumoral NK cells is unclear. Preclinical studies have shown that, while NK cells efficiently kill circulating tumor cells of almost any origin...

  1. Effect of the Premalignant and Tumor Microenvironment on Immune Cell Cytokine Production in Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Sara D. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Medical University of South Carolina, 173 Ashley Avenue, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); De Costa, Anna-Maria A. [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina, 135 Rutledge Avenue, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, 96 Jonathan Lucas Street, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Young, M. Rita I., E-mail: rita.young@va.gov [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina, 135 Rutledge Avenue, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, 96 Jonathan Lucas Street, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Medical Research Service (151), Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 109 Bee Street, Charleston, SC 29401 (United States)

    2014-04-02

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is marked by immunosuppression, a state in which the established tumor escapes immune attack. However, the impact of the premalignant and tumor microenvironments on immune reactivity has yet to be elucidated. The purpose of this study was to determine how soluble mediators from cells established from carcinogen-induced oral premalignant lesions and HNSCC modulate immune cell cytokine production. It was found that premalignant cells secrete significantly increased levels of G-CSF, RANTES, MCP-1, and PGE{sub 2} compared to HNSCC cells. Splenocytes incubated with premalignant supernatant secreted significantly increased levels of Th1-, Th2-, and Th17-associated cytokines compared to splenocytes incubated with HNSCC supernatant. These studies demonstrate that whereas the premalignant microenvironment elicits proinflammatory cytokine production, the tumor microenvironment is significantly less immune stimulatory and may contribute to immunosuppression in established HNSCC.

  2. Manipulation of the extracellular microenvironment by micro- and nanotechnology approaches to improve the generation of pancreatic endocrine cells from human embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Camilla Holzmann; Rønn Petersen, Dorthe

    mellitus, the hES cells must be differentiated into mature functional insulin producing beta-cells. Current differentiation protocols focus on the addition of soluble molecules whereas the impact of the physical microenvironment has been mainly unattended. However, the physical microenvironment plays...... an essential role in cellular behaviour during development and recent studies have demonstrated the effect of the physical environment in in vitro stem cell differentiation. Thus, understanding the role of the physical microenvironment is vital for the development of effective and consistent differentiation...... have a functional role in stem cell differentiation and should be taken into consideration in order to obtain efficient and consistent differentiation protocols. With the second strategy the physical microenvironment was manipulated with topographies in micro and nanoscale which have different elastics...

  3. Characterizing the Microenvironment Surrounding Phosphorylated Protein Sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-Cai Fan; Xue-Gong Zhang

    2005-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays an important role in various cellular processes. Due to its high complexity, the mechanism needs to be further studied. In the last few years, many methods have been contributed to this field, but almost all of them investigated the mechanism based on protein sequences around protein sites. In this study, we implement an exploration by characterizing the microenvironment surrounding phosphorylated protein sites with a modified shell model, and obtain some significant properties by the rank-sum test, such as the lack of some classes of residues, atoms, and secondary structures. Furthermore, we find that the depletion of some properties affects protein phosphorylation remarkably. Our results suggest that it is a meaningful direction to explore the mechanism of protein phosphorylation from microenvironment and we expect further findings along with the increasing size of phosphorylation and protein structure data.

  4. 3D Neutrophil Tractions in Changing Microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyjanova, Jennet; Flores, Estefany; Reichner, Jonathan; Franck, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Neutrophils are well-known as first responders to defend the body against life threatening bacterial diseases, infections and inflammation. The mechanical properties and the local topography of the surrounding microenvironment play a significant role in the regulating neutrophil behavior including cell adhesion, migration and generation of tractions. In navigating to the site of infection, neutrophils are exposed to changing microenvironments that differ in their composition, structure and mechanical properties. Our goal is to investigate neutrophil behavior, specifically migration and cellular tractions in a well-controlled 3D in vitro system. By utilizing an interchangeable 2D-3D sandwich gel structure system with tunable mechanical properties neutrophil migration and cell tractions can be computed as a function of gel stiffness and geometric dimensionality.

  5. Biological stoichiometry in tumor micro-environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Kareva

    Full Text Available Tumors can be viewed as evolving ecological systems, in which heterogeneous populations of cancer cells compete with each other and somatic cells for space and nutrients within the ecosystem of the human body. According to the growth rate hypothesis (GRH, increased phosphorus availability in an ecosystem, such as the tumor micro-environment, may promote selection within the tumor for a more proliferative and thus potentially more malignant phenotype. The applicability of the GRH to tumor growth is evaluated using a mathematical model, which suggests that limiting phosphorus availability might promote intercellular competition within a tumor, and thereby delay disease progression. It is also shown that a tumor can respond differently to changes in its micro-environment depending on the initial distribution of clones within the tumor, regardless of its initial size. This suggests that composition of the tumor as a whole needs to be evaluated in order to maximize the efficacy of therapy.

  6. Biological stoichiometry in tumor micro-environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kareva, Irina

    2013-01-01

    Tumors can be viewed as evolving ecological systems, in which heterogeneous populations of cancer cells compete with each other and somatic cells for space and nutrients within the ecosystem of the human body. According to the growth rate hypothesis (GRH), increased phosphorus availability in an ecosystem, such as the tumor micro-environment, may promote selection within the tumor for a more proliferative and thus potentially more malignant phenotype. The applicability of the GRH to tumor growth is evaluated using a mathematical model, which suggests that limiting phosphorus availability might promote intercellular competition within a tumor, and thereby delay disease progression. It is also shown that a tumor can respond differently to changes in its micro-environment depending on the initial distribution of clones within the tumor, regardless of its initial size. This suggests that composition of the tumor as a whole needs to be evaluated in order to maximize the efficacy of therapy.

  7. Calcite Biohybrids as Microenvironment for Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razi Vago

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A new type of composite 3D biomaterial that provides extracellular cues that govern the differentiation processes of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs has been developed. In the present study, we evaluated the chondrogenecity of a biohybrid composed of a calcium carbonate scaffold in its calcite polymorph and hyaluronic acid (HA. The source of the calcite scaffolding is an exoskeleton of a sea barnacle Tetraclita rifotincta (T. rifotincta, Pilsbry (1916. The combination of a calcium carbonate-based bioactive scaffold with a natural polymeric hydrogel is designed to mimic the organic-mineral composite of developing bone by providing a fine-tuned microenvironment. The results indicate that the calcite-HA interface creates a suitable microenvironment for the chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs, and therefore, the biohybrid may provide a tool for tissue-engineered cartilage.

  8. The hypoxic tumour microenvironment and metastatic progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subarsky, Patrick; Hill, Richard P

    2003-01-01

    The microenvironment of solid tumours contains regions of poor oxygenation and high acidity. Growing evidence from clinical and experimental studies points to a fundamental role for hypoxia in metastatic progression. Prolonged hypoxia increases genomic instability, genomic heterogeneity, and may act as a selective pressure for tumour cell variants. Hypoxia can also act in an epigenetic fashion, altering the expression of genes. Hypoxia-induced changes in gene expression alter non-specific stress responses, anaerobic metabolism, angiogenesis, tissue remodeling, and cell-cell contacts. Experimental studies have demonstrated that inhibition of proteins involved in these processes can modify metastasis formation, suggesting a causal role in metastatic progression. Recent advances in high-throughput screening techniques have allowed identification of many hypoxia-induced genes that are involved in the processes associated with metastasis. Here we review the epigenetic control of gene expression by the hypoxic microenvironment and its potential contribution to metastatic progression.

  9. The role of bone marrow microenvironment in platelet production and their implications for the treatment of thrombocytopenic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-Ying; Ye, Shuang; Zhong, Hua

    2017-06-01

    Impaired platelet production has been found to be an important pathological mechanism of thrombocytopenia in many diseases. Platelet generation is a complex process that mainly occurs in the bone marrow, and thus is closely regulated by the bone marrow microenvironment. This review attempts to summarize the most current knowledge referring the role of bone marrow microenvironment in the regulation of platelet production. The effects of multiple microenvironment ingredients in regulating megakaryopoiesis and thrombocytopoiesis have been discussed. Abnormalities of these components in thrombocytopenic diseases are also described. Thrombocytopenia is a common clinical manifestation of a variety of diseases. The functional importance of platelets has driven the developments of a broad range of studies. Platelet generation mainly occurs within the bone marrow, where the cells, soluble factors, and extracellular matrix proteins collaboratively form a complex regulatory network, directing megakaryocytic proliferation and differentiation. Alteration in any part of the regulating network may result in defective platelet formation, and eventually lead to thrombocytopenia. A variety of thrombocytopenic diseases have been found to be related with the disregulated bone marrow microenvironment. Identification of the variations of these niche ingredients in certain diseases has facilitated the developments of multiple therapeutic regimes. Further studies that can combine these niche factors with their downstream regulatory factors will be beneficial for developing more effective therapies. Further definition of the role of bone marrow microenvironment in platelet generation may deepen our understanding of the underlying mechanisms as well as provide new therapeutic targets for thrombocytopenic diseases.

  10. Microenvironment interactions and B-cell receptor signaling in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: Implications for disease pathogenesis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Hacken, Elisa; Burger, Jan A

    2016-03-01

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) is a malignancy of mature B lymphocytes which are highly dependent on interactions with the tissue microenvironment for their survival and proliferation. Critical components of the microenvironment are monocyte-derived nurselike cells (NLCs), mesenchymal stromal cells, T cells and NK cells, which communicate with CLL cells through a complex network of adhesion molecules, chemokine receptors, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family members, and soluble factors. (Auto-) antigens and/or autonomous mechanisms activate the B-cell receptor (BCR) and its downstream signaling cascade in secondary lymphatic tissues, playing a central pathogenetic role in CLL. Novel small molecule inhibitors, including the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor ibrutinib and the phosphoinositide-3-kinase delta (PI3Kδ) inhibitor idelalisib, target BCR signaling and have become the most successful new therapeutics in this disease. We here review the cellular and molecular characteristics of CLL cells, and discuss the cellular components and key pathways involved in the cross-talk with their microenvironment. We also highlight the relevant novel treatment strategies, focusing on immunomodulatory agents and BCR signaling inhibitors and how these treatments disrupt CLL-microenvironment interactions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Tumor Microenvironment Regulation of Cancer Cell Survival, Metastasis, Inflammation, and Immune Surveillance edited by Peter Ruvolo and Gregg L. Semenza. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Cell Interactions within Biomimetic Apatite Microenvironments

    OpenAIRE

    Tsang, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive ceramics, such as calcium phosphate-based materials, have been studied extensively for the regeneration of bone tissue. Accelerated apatite coatings prepared from biomimetic methods is one approach that has had a history of success in both in vitro and in vivo studies for bone regeneration [1]-[4]. However, how cells interact within the apatite microenvironment remains largely unclear, despite the vast literature available today. In response, this thesis evaluates the in vitro i...

  12. Targeting the tumour microenvironment in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jean M; Coleman, Robert L; Sood, Anil K

    2016-03-01

    The study of cancer initiation, growth, and metastasis has traditionally been focused on cancer cells, and the view that they proliferate due to uncontrolled growth signalling owing to genetic derangements. However, uncontrolled growth in tumours cannot be explained solely by aberrations in cancer cells themselves. To fully understand the biological behaviour of tumours, it is essential to understand the microenvironment in which cancer cells exist, and how they manipulate the surrounding stroma to promote the malignant phenotype. Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynaecologic cancer worldwide. The majority of patients will have objective responses to standard tumour debulking surgery and platinum-taxane doublet chemotherapy, but most will experience disease recurrence and chemotherapy resistance. As such, a great deal of effort has been put forth to develop therapies that target the tumour microenvironment in ovarian cancer. Herein, we review the key components of the tumour microenvironment as they pertain to this disease, outline targeting opportunities and supporting evidence thus far, and discuss resistance to therapy.

  13. Probing the tumor microenvironment: collection and induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, James K.; Padgen, Michael R.; Wang, Yarong; Entenberg, David; Gertler, Frank; Condeelis, John S.; Castracane, James

    2012-03-01

    The Nano Intravital Device, or NANIVID, is under development as an optically transparent, implantable tool to study the tumor microenvironment. Two etched glass substrates are sealed using a thin polymer membrane to create a reservoir with a single outlet. This reservoir is loaded with a hydrogel blend that contains growth factors or other chemicals to be delivered to the tumor microenvironment. When the device is implanted in the tumor, the hydrogel will swell and release these entrapped molecules, forming a gradient. Validation of the device has been performed in vitro using epidermal growth factor (EGF) and MenaINV, a highly invasive, rat mammary adenocarcinoma cell line. In both 2-D and 3-D environments, cells migrated toward the gradient of EGF released from the device. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of White Leghorn chicken eggs is being utilized to grow xenograft tumors that will be used for ex vivo cell collection. Device optimization is being performed for in vivo use as a tool to collect the invasive cell population. Preliminary cell collection experiments in vivo were performed using a mouse model of breast cancer. As a second application, the device is being explored as a delivery vehicle for chemicals that induce controlled changes in the tumor microenvironment. H2O2 was loaded in the device and generated intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells near the device outlet. In the future, other induction targets will be explored, including hypoglycemia and the manipulation of extracellular matrix stiffness.

  14. Effects of laser immunotherapy on tumor microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquaviva, Joseph T.; Wood, Ethan W.; Hasanjee, Aamr; Chen, Wei R.; Vaughan, Melville B.

    2014-02-01

    The microenvironments of tumors are involved in a complex and reciprocal dialog with surrounding cancer cells. Any novel treatment must consider the impact of the therapy on the microenvironment. Recently, clinical trials with laser immunotherapy (LIT) have proven to effectively treat patients with late-stage, metastatic breast cancer and melanoma. LIT is the synergistic combination of phototherapy (laser irradiation) and immunological stimulation. One prominent cell type found in the tumor stroma is the fibroblast. Fibroblast cells can secrete different growth factors and extracellular matrix modifying molecules. Furthermore, fibroblast cells found in the tumor stroma often express alpha smooth muscle actin. These particular fibroblasts are coined cancer-associated fibroblast cells (CAFs). CAFs are known to facilitate the malignant progression of tumors. A collagen lattice assay with human fibroblast cells is used to elucidate the effects LIT has on the microenvironment of tumors. Changes in the contraction of the lattice, the differentiation of the fibroblast cells, as well as the proliferation of the fibroblast cells will be determined.

  15. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in tumor microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yingying

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT plays crucial roles in the formation of the body plan and also in the tumor invasion process. In addition, EMT also causes disruption of cell-cell adherence, loss of apico-basal polarity, matrix remodeling, increased motility and invasiveness in promoting tumor metastasis. The tumor microenvironment plays an important role in facilitating cancer metastasis and may induce the occurrence of EMT in tumor cells. A large number of inflammatory cells infiltrating the tumor site, as well as hypoxia existing in a large area of tumor, in addition many stem cells present in tumor microenvironment, such as cancer stem cells (CSCs, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, all of these may be the inducers of EMT in tumor cells. The signaling pathways involved in EMT are various, including TGF-β, NF-κB, Wnt, Notch, and others. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge about the role of the tumor microenvironment in EMT and the related signaling pathways as well as the interaction between them.

  16. Soluble organic nanotubes for catalytic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Linfeng; Yang, Kunran; Zhang, Hui; Liao, Xiaojuan; Huang, Kun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we report a novel method for constructing a soluble organic nanotube supported catalyst system based on single-molecule templating of core-shell bottlebrush copolymers. Various organic or metal catalysts, such as sodium prop-2-yne-1-sulfonate (SPS), 1-(2-(prop-2-yn-1-yloxy)ethyl)-1H-imidazole (PEI) and Pd(OAc)2 were anchored onto the tube walls to functionalize the organic nanotubes via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction. Depending on the ‘confined effect’ and the accessible cavity microenvironments of tubular structures, the organic nanotube catalysts showed high catalytic efficiency and site-isolation features. We believe that the soluble organic nanotubes will be very useful for the development of high performance catalyst systems due to their high stability of support, facile functionalization and attractive textural properties.

  17. Immune suppressive mechanisms in the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, David H; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    Effective immunotherapy, whether by checkpoint blockade or adoptive cell therapy, is limited in most patients by a key barrier: the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Suppression of tumor-specific T cells is orchestrated by the activity of a variety of stromal myeloid and lymphoid cells. These often display inducible suppressive mechanisms that are triggered by the same anti-tumor inflammatory response that the immunotherapy intends to create. Therefore, a more comprehensive understanding of how the immunosuppressive milieu develops and persists is critical in order to harness the full power of immunotherapy of cancer.

  18. Entourage: the immune microenvironment following follicular lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    In follicular lymphoma, nonmalignant immune cells are important. Follicular lymphoma depends on CD4+ cells, but CD8+ cells counteract it. We hypothesized that the presence of follicular lymphoma is associated with higher CD4+ than CD8+ cell numbers in the tumor microenvironment but not in the immune system. Using flow cytometry, pre-treatment and follow-up CD4/CD8 ratios were estimated in the bone marrow, blood and lymph nodes of untreated follicular lymphoma patients in two independent data ...

  19. Modeling of Sulfide Microenvironments on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenzer, S. P.; Bridges, J. C.; McAdam, A.; Steer, E. D.; Conrad, P. G.; Kelley, S. P.; Wiens, R. C.; Mangold, N.; Grotzinger, J.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Franz, H. B.; Sutter, B.

    2016-01-01

    Yellowknife Bay (YKB; sol 124-198) is the second site that the Mars Science Laboratory Rover Curiosity investigated in detail on its mission in Gale Crater. YKB represents lake bed sediments from an overall neutral pH, low salinity environment, with a mineralogical composition which includes Ca-sulfates, Fe oxide/hydroxides, Fe-sulfides, amorphous material, and trioctahedral phyllosilicates. We investigate whether sulfide alteration could be associated with ancient habitable microenvironments in the Gale mudstones. Some textural evidence for such alteration may be pre-sent in the nodules present in the mudstone.

  20. Targeting the Prostate Cancer Microenvironment to Improve Therapeutic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    1 Award Number: (W81XWH-12-1-0182 TITLE: Targeting the Prostate Cancer Microenvironment to Improve Therapeutic Outcomes PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Yu...From - To) 15 May/2012–15 May 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0182 Targeting the Prostate Cancer Microenvironment to...the hypothesis that DNA damaging therapeutics generates responses in benign cell types comprising the tumor microenvironment (TME) that promote tumor

  1. Tumor Microenvironment Inflammation and Obesity in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0064 TITLE: Tumor Microenvironment Inflammation and Obesity in Advanced Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...1 Apr 2014 - 31 Mar 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Tumor Microenvironment Inflammation and Obesity in Advanced 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Prostate Cancer 5b...Background: The goal of this pilot study was to examine the relationship between inflammation markers in the tumor microenvironment and PCa outcomes by

  2. Cancer Cell Colonisation in the Bone Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Casina; Vargas, Geoffrey; Le Pape, François; Clézardin, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Bone metastases are a common complication of epithelial cancers, of which breast, prostate and lung carcinomas are the most common. The establishment of cancer cells to distant sites such as the bone microenvironment requires multiple steps. Tumour cells can acquire properties to allow epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, extravasation and migration. Within the bone metastatic niche, disseminated tumour cells may enter a dormancy stage or proliferate to adapt and survive, interacting with bone cells such as hematopoietic stem cells, osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Cross-talk with the bone may alter tumour cell properties and, conversely, tumour cells may also acquire characteristics of the surrounding microenvironment, in a process known as osteomimicry. Alternatively, these cells may also express osteomimetic genes that allow cell survival or favour seeding to the bone marrow. The seeding of tumour cells in the bone disrupts bone-forming and bone-resorbing activities, which can lead to macrometastasis in bone. At present, bone macrometastases are incurable with only palliative treatment available. A better understanding of how these processes influence the early onset of bone metastasis may give insight into potential therapies. This review will focus on the early steps of bone colonisation, once disseminated tumour cells enter the bone marrow. PMID:27782035

  3. Cancer Cell Colonisation in the Bone Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casina Kan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Bone metastases are a common complication of epithelial cancers, of which breast, prostate and lung carcinomas are the most common. The establishment of cancer cells to distant sites such as the bone microenvironment requires multiple steps. Tumour cells can acquire properties to allow epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, extravasation and migration. Within the bone metastatic niche, disseminated tumour cells may enter a dormancy stage or proliferate to adapt and survive, interacting with bone cells such as hematopoietic stem cells, osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Cross-talk with the bone may alter tumour cell properties and, conversely, tumour cells may also acquire characteristics of the surrounding microenvironment, in a process known as osteomimicry. Alternatively, these cells may also express osteomimetic genes that allow cell survival or favour seeding to the bone marrow. The seeding of tumour cells in the bone disrupts bone-forming and bone-resorbing activities, which can lead to macrometastasis in bone. At present, bone macrometastases are incurable with only palliative treatment available. A better understanding of how these processes influence the early onset of bone metastasis may give insight into potential therapies. This review will focus on the early steps of bone colonisation, once disseminated tumour cells enter the bone marrow.

  4. Brownian rod scheme in microenvironment sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Gralinski

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuations of freely translating spherical particles via Brownian motion should provide inexhaustible information about the micro-environment, but is beset by the problem of particles drifting away from the venue of measurement as well as colliding with other particles. We propose a scheme here to circumvent this in which a Brownian rod that lies in proximity to a cylindrical pillar is drawn in by a tuneable attractive force from the pillar. The force is assumed to act through the centre of each body and the motion exclusive to the x-y plane. Simulation studies show two distinct states, one in which the rod is moving freely (state I and the other in which the rod contacts the cylinder surface (state II. Information about the micro-environment could be obtained by tracking the rotational diffusion coefficient Dθ populating in either of these two states. However, the magnitude of the normalized charge product in excess of 6.3x104 was found necessary for a rod of 6.81 × 0.93 μm2 (length × diameter and 10μm diameter cylindrical pillar to minimize deviation errors. It was also found that the extent of spatial sensing coverage could be controlled by varying the charge level. The conditions needed to ascertain the rotational sampling for angle determination through the Hough transform were also discussed.

  5. Gas solubilities widespread applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gerrard, William

    1980-01-01

    Gas Solubilities: Widespread Applications discusses several topics concerning the various applications of gas solubilities. The first chapter of the book reviews Henr's law, while the second chapter covers the effect of temperature on gas solubility. The third chapter discusses the various gases used by Horiuti, and the following chapters evaluate the data on sulfur dioxide, chlorine data, and solubility data for hydrogen sulfide. Chapter 7 concerns itself with solubility of radon, thoron, and actinon. Chapter 8 tackles the solubilities of diborane and the gaseous hydrides of groups IV, V, and

  6. Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Mechanobiology: Manipulating the Biophysical Microenvironment for Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Ronald G; Simmons, Craig A

    2015-11-01

    A stem cell in its microenvironment is subjected to a myriad of soluble chemical cues and mechanical forces that act in concert to orchestrate cell fate. Intuitively, many of these soluble and biophysical factors have been the focus of intense study to successfully influence and direct cell differentiation in vitro. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have been of considerable interest in these studies due to their great promise for regenerative medicine. Culturing and directing differentiation of hPSCs, however, is currently extremely labor-intensive and lacks the efficiency required to generate large populations of clinical-grade cells. Improved efficiency may come from efforts to understand how the cell biophysical signals can complement biochemical signals to regulate cell pluripotency and direct differentiation. In this concise review, we explore hPSC mechanobiology and how the hPSC biophysical microenvironment can be manipulated to maintain and differentiate hPSCs into functional cell types for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering applications.

  7. Elevated CO2 benefits the soil microenvironment in the rhizosphere of Robinia pseudoacacia L. seedlings in Cd- and Pb-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuping; Jia, Xia; Zhao, Yonghua; Bai, Bo; Chang, Yafei

    2017-02-01

    Soil contamination by heavy metals in combination with elevated atmospheric CO2 has important effects on the rhizosphere microenvironment by influencing plant growth. Here, we investigated the response of the R. pseudoacacia rhizosphere microenvironment to elevated CO2 in combination with cadmium (Cd)- and lead (Pb)-contamination. Organic compounds (total soluble sugars, soluble phenolic acids, free amino acids, and organic acids), microbial abundance and activity, and enzyme activity (urease, dehydrogenase, invertase, and β-glucosidase) in rhizosphere soils increased significantly (p soil microbial community in the rhizosphere. Heavy metals alone resulted in an increase in total soluble sugars, free amino acids, and organic acids, a decrease in phenolic acids, microbial populations and biomass, and enzyme activity, and a change in microbial community in rhizosphere soils. Elevated CO2 led to an increase in organic compounds, microbial populations, biomass, and activity, and enzyme activity (except for l-asparaginase), and changes in microbial community under Cd, Pb, or Cd + Pb treatments relative to ambient CO2. In addition, elevated CO2 significantly (p soils. Overall, elevated CO2 benefited the rhizosphere microenvironment of R. pseudoacacia seedlings under heavy metal stress, which suggests that increased atmospheric CO2 concentrations could have positive effects on soil fertility and rhizosphere microenvironment under heavy metals.

  8. Domains and domain loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haberland, Hartmut

    2005-01-01

    The domain concept, originally suggested by Schmidt-Rohr in the 1930’s (as credited in Fishman’s writings in the 1970s), was an attempt to sort out different areas of language use in multilingual societies, which are relevant for language choice. In Fishman’s version, domains were considered...... not described in terms of domains, and recent research e.g. about the multilingual communities in the Danish-German border area seems to confirm this....

  9. Eukaryotic protein domains as functional units of cellular evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Jing; Xie, Xueying; Chen, Chen

    2009-01-01

    Modular protein domains are functional units that can be modified through the acquisition of new intrinsic activities or by the formation of novel domain combinations, thereby contributing to the evolution of proteins with new biological properties. Here, we assign proteins to groups with related...... biological processes. Evolutionary jumps are associated with a domain that coordinately acquires a new intrinsic function and enters new domain clubs, thereby providing the modified domain with access to a new cellular microenvironment. We also coordinately analyzed the covalent and noncovalent interactions...... that domains, and the proteins in which they reside, are selected during evolution through reciprocal interactions with protein domains in their local microenvironment. Based on this scheme, we propose a mechanism by which Tudor domains may have evolved to support different modes of epigenetic regulation...

  10. Nonzero Solubility Rule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尉志武; 周蕊; 刘芸

    2002-01-01

    A solubility-related rule, nonzero solubility rule, is introduced in this paper. It is complementary to the existing rules such as the "like dissolves like" rule and can be understood on the basis of classical chemical thermodynamics.

  11. Cross-talk between the epidermal growth factor-like repeats/fibronectin 6-8 repeats domains of Tenascin-R and microglia modulates neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hong; Huang, Wenhui; Niu, Rui; Sun, Lixin; Zhang, Luyong

    2008-01-01

    Mounting evidence has demonstrated that the microenvironment of stem/progenitor cells plays an important role in their proliferation and commitment to their fate. However, it remains unclear how all elements, such as astrocytes, microglia, extracellular matrix molecules, soluble factors, and their cross-talk interactions in the microenvironments, affect neural stem/progenitor cell fate. This work explored the influences of cross-talk between Tenascin-R (TN-R) and microglia on neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation. Our results show that microglia triggered by TN-R distinct domains EGF-like repeats (EGFL) and fibronectin 6-8 repeats (FN6-8) significantly enhanced the proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells and also obviously induced the differentiation into neurons but not oligodendrocytes. Neurite processes of neurons generated from neural progenitor cells were promoted by both EGFL and FN6-8 domains-activated microglia. Microglia triggered by EGFL and FN6-8 secreted brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta); interestingly, FN6-8 could activate microglia to secrete nerve growth factor in addition to BDNF and TGF-beta, but EGFL domain could not. All these data implied that the cross-talk between TN-R distinct domains EGFL/FN6-8 and microglia promoted neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation and induced their differentiation into neurons.

  12. Microenvironment interactions and B-cell receptor signaling in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: implications for disease pathogenesis and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Hacken, Elisa; Burger, Jan A.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) is a malignancy of mature B lymphocytes which are highly dependent on interactions with the tissue microenvironment for their survival and proliferation. Critical components of the microenvironment are monocyte-derived nurselike cells (NLCs), mesenchymal stromal cells, T cells and NK cells, which communicate with CLL cells through a complex network of adhesion molecules, chemokine receptors, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family members, and soluble factors. (Auto-) antigens and/or autonomous mechanisms activate the B-cell receptor (BCR) and its downstream signaling cascade in secondary lymphatic tissues, playing a central pathogenetic role in CLL. Novel small molecule inhibitors, including the Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor ibrutinib and the phosphoinositide-3-kinase delta (PI3Kδ) inhibitor idelalisib, target BCR signaling and have become the most successful new therapeutics in this disease. We here review the cellular and molecular characteristics of CLL cells, and discuss the cellular components and key pathways involved in the cross-talk with their microenvironment. We also highlight the relevant novel treatment strategies, focusing on immunomodulatory agents and BCR signaling inhibitors and how these treatments disrupt CLL-microenvironment interactions. PMID:26193078

  13. Of Microenvironments and Mammary Stem Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaBarge, Mark A; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2007-06-01

    In most adult tissues there reside pools of stem and progenitor cells inside specialized microenvironments referred to as niches. The niche protects the stem cells from inappropriate expansion and directs their critical functions. Thus guided, stem cells are able to maintain tissue homeostasis throughout the ebb and flow of metabolic and physical demands encountered over a lifetime. Indeed, a pool of stem cells maintains mammary gland structure throughout development, and responds to the physiological demands associated with pregnancy. This review discusses how stem cells were identified in both human and mouse mammary glands; each requiring different techniques that were determined by differing biological needs and ethical constraints. These studies together create a robust portrait of mammary gland biology and identify the location of the stem cell niche, elucidate a developmental hierarchy, and suggest how the niche might be manipulated for therapeutic benefit.

  14. Human response to an individually controlled microenvironment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Knudsen, G.L.

    2007-01-01

    The response of 48 subjects to an individually controlled microenvironment was studied at room air temperatures of 20 degrees C, 22 degrees C, and 26 degrees C An individually controlled system (ICS) comprising personalized ventilation, an under-desk air terminal device supplying cool air, a chair...... with convectively heated backrest, an under-desk radiant heating panel, and a floor-heating panel were used. The temperature of the air supplied from the personalized ventilation and the under-desk device was 20 degrees C The subjects were provided with control of the flow rate and direction of the personalized air...... at a room temperature of 22 degrees C without ICS. Thus, ICS will increase the number of satisfied occupants when applied in practice. The design and control of the ICS, as well as the background air distribution in a room, should be carefully considered in order to obtain the maximum number of occupants...

  15. Sensitivity of Dendritic Cells to Microenvironment Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, Juliana Maria; Rumjanek, Vivian Mary

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells are antigen-presenting cells capable of either activating the immune response or inducing and maintaining immune tolerance. They do this by integrating stimuli from the environment and changing their functional status as a result of plasticity. The modifications suffered by these cells have consequences in the way the organism may respond. In the present work two opposing situations known to affect dendritic cells are analyzed: tumor growth, leading to a microenvironment that favors the induction of a tolerogenic profile, and organ transplantation, which leads to a proinflammatory profile. Lessons learned from these situations may help to understand the mechanisms of modulation resulting not only from the above circumstances, but also from other pathologies. PMID:27088097

  16. Targeting Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Acidic Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; Roland, Christina L.; Deng, Defeng; Arumugam, Thiruvengadam; Moshnikova, Anna; Andreev, Oleg A.; Reshetnyak, Yana K.; Logsdon, Craig D.

    2014-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the USA, accounting for ~40,000 deaths annually. The dismal prognosis for PDAC is largely due to its late diagnosis. Currently, the most sensitive diagnosis of PDAC requires invasive procedures, such as endoscopic ultrasonography, which has inherent risks and accuracy that is highly operator dependent. Here we took advantage of a general characteristic of solid tumors, the acidic microenvironment that is generated as a by-product of metabolism, to develop a novel approach of using pH (Low) Insertion Peptides (pHLIPs) for imaging of PDAC. We show that fluorescently labeled pHLIPs can localize and specifically detect PDAC in human xenografts as well as PDAC and PanIN lesions in genetically engineered mouse models. This novel approach may improve detection, differential diagnosis and staging of PDAC.

  17. Sensitivity of Dendritic Cells to Microenvironment Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Maria Motta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are antigen-presenting cells capable of either activating the immune response or inducing and maintaining immune tolerance. They do this by integrating stimuli from the environment and changing their functional status as a result of plasticity. The modifications suffered by these cells have consequences in the way the organism may respond. In the present work two opposing situations known to affect dendritic cells are analyzed: tumor growth, leading to a microenvironment that favors the induction of a tolerogenic profile, and organ transplantation, which leads to a proinflammatory profile. Lessons learned from these situations may help to understand the mechanisms of modulation resulting not only from the above circumstances, but also from other pathologies.

  18. Amyloid Fibril Solubility

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzi, L G

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that amyloid fibril solubility is protein specific, but how solubility depends on the interactions between the fibril building blocks is not clear. Here we use a simple protein model and perform Monte Carlo simulations to directly measure the solubility of amyloid fibrils as a function of the interaction between the fibril building blocks. Our simulations confirms that the fibril solubility depends on the fibril thickness and that the relationship between the interactions and the solubility can be described by a simple analytical formula. The results presented in this study reveal general rules how side-chain side-chain interactions, backbone hydrogen bonding and temperature affect amyloid fibril solubility, which might prove a powerful tool to design protein fibrils with desired solubility and aggregation properties in general.

  19. Screening and analysis of breast cancer genes regulated by the human mammary microenvironment in a humanized mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Mingjie; Wang, Jue; Ling, Lijun; Xue, Dandan; Wang, Shui; Zhao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Tumor microenvironments play critical regulatory roles in tumor growth. Although mouse cancer models have contributed to the understanding of human tumor biology, the effectiveness of mouse cancer models is limited by the inability of the models to accurately present humanized tumor microenvironments. Previously, a humanized breast cancer model in severe combined immunodeficiency mice was established, in which human breast cancer tissue was implanted subcutaneously, followed by injection of human breast cancer cells. It was demonstrated that breast cancer cells showed improved growth in the human mammary microenvironment compared with a conventional subcutaneous mouse model. In the present study, the novel mouse model and microarray technology was used to analyze changes in the expression of genes in breast cancer cells that are regulated by the human mammary microenvironment. Humanized breast and conventional subcutaneous mouse models were established, and orthotopic tumor cells were obtained from orthotopic tumor masses by primary culture. An expression microarray using Illumina HumanHT-12 v4 Expression BeadChip and database analyses were performed to investigate changes in gene expression between tumors from each microenvironment. A total of 94 genes were differentially expressed between the primary cells cultured from the humanized and conventional mouse models. Significant upregulation of genes that promote cell proliferation and metastasis or inhibit apoptosis, such as SH3-domain binding protein 5 (BTK-associated), sodium/chloride cotransporter 3 and periostin, osteoblast specific factor, and genes that promote angiogenesis, such as KIAA1618, was also noted. Other genes that restrain cell proliferation and accelerate cell apoptosis, including tripartite motif containing TRIM36 and NES1, were downregulated. The present results revealed differences in various aspects of tumor growth and metabolism between the two model groups and indicated the functional

  20. [Prostate cancer microenvironment: Its structure, functions and therapeutic applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorion, R; Bladou, F; Spatz, A; van Kempen, L; Irani, J

    2016-06-01

    In the field of prostate cancer there is a growing tendency for more and more studies to emphasise the predominant role of the zone situated between the tumour and the host: the tumour microenvironment. The aim of this article is to describe the structure and the functions of the prostate cancer microenvironment as well as the principal treatments that are being applied to it. PubMed and ScienceDirect databases have been interrogated using the association of keywords "tumour microenvironment" and "neoplasm therapy" along with "microenvironnement tumoral" and "traitements". Of the 593 articles initially found, 50 were finally included. The tumour microenvironment principally includes host elements that are diverted from their primary functions and encourage the development of the tumour. In it we find immunity cells, support tissue as well as vascular and lymphatic neovascularization. Highlighting the major role played by this microenvironment has led to the development of specific treatments, notably antiangiogenic therapy and immunotherapy. The tumour microenvironment, the tumour and the host influence themselves mutually and create a variable situation over time. Improvement of the knowledge of the prostate cancer microenvironment gradually enables us to pass from an approach centred on the tumour to a broader approach to the whole tumoral ecosystem. This enabled the emergence of new treatments whose place in the therapeutic arsenal still need to be found. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Regulation of prostate cancer progression by the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiao, Stephen L; Chu, Gina Chia-Yi; Chung, Leland W K

    2016-09-28

    Prostate cancer remains the most frequently diagnosed cancer in men in North America, and despite recent advances in treatment patients with metastatic disease continue to have poor five-year survival rates. Recent studies in prostate cancer have revealed the critical role of the tumor microenvironment in the initiation and progression to advanced disease. Experimental data have uncovered a reciprocal relationship between the cells in the microenvironment and malignant tumor cells in which early changes in normal tissue microenvironment can promote tumorigenesis and in turn tumor cells can promote further pro-tumor changes in the microenvironment. In the tumor microenvironment, the presence of persistent immune infiltrates contributes to the recruitment and reprogramming of other non-immune stromal cells including cancer-associated fibroblasts and a unique recently identified population of metastasis-initiating cells (MICs). These MICs, which can also be found as part of the circulating tumor cell (CTC) population in PC patients, promote cancer cell transformation, enhance metastatic potential and confer therapeutic resistance. MICs act can on other cells within the tumor microenvironment in part by secreting exosomes that reprogram adjacent stromal cells to create a more favorable tumor microenvironment to support continued cancer growth and progression. We review here the current data on the intricate relationship between inflammation, reactive stroma, tumor cells and disease progression in prostate cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Integrating the glioblastoma microenvironment into engineered experimental models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Weikun; Sohrabi, Alireza; Seidlits, Stephanie K

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most lethal cancer originating in the brain. Its high mortality rate has been attributed to therapeutic resistance and rapid, diffuse invasion – both of which are strongly influenced by the unique microenvironment. Thus, there is a need to develop new models that mimic individual microenvironmental features and are able to provide clinically relevant data. Current understanding of the effects of the microenvironment on GBM progression, established experimental models of GBM and recent developments using bioengineered microenvironments as ex vivo experimental platforms that mimic the biochemical and physical properties of GBM tumors are discussed. PMID:28883992

  3. Crystalline calcium carbonate and hydrogels as microenvironment for stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astachov, Liliana; Nevo, Zvi; Aviv, Moran; Vago, Razi

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell development and fate decisions are dictated by the microenvironment in which the stem cell is embedded. Among the advanced goals of tissue engineering is the creation of a microenvironment that will support the maintenance and differentiation of the stem cell--based on embryonic and adult stem cells as potent, cellular sources--for a variety of clinical applications. This review discusses some of the approaches used to create regulatory and instructive microenvironments for the directed differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) using three-dimensional crystalline calcium carbonate biomaterials of marine origin combined with a hydrated gel based on hyaluronan.

  4. Soluble oil cutting fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawlinson, A.P.; White, J.

    1987-06-23

    A soluble oil, suitable when diluted with water, for use as a cutting fluid comprises an alkali or alkaline-earth metal alkyl benzene sulphonate, a fatty acid diethanolamide, a mixed alkanolamine borate, a polyisobutenesuccinimide and a major proportion of mineral oil. The soluble oil is relatively stable without the need for a conventional coupling agent and some soluble oil emulsions are bio-static even though conventional biocides are not included.

  5. Microenvironment Tracker (MicroTrac) | Science Inventory ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epidemiologic studies have shown associations between air pollution concentrations measured at central-site ambient monitors and adverse health outcomes. Using central-site concentrations as exposure surrogates, however, can lead to exposure errors due to time spent in various indoor and outdoor microenvironments (ME) with pollutant concentrations that can be substantially different from central-site concentrations. These exposure errors can introduce bias and incorrect confidence intervals in health effect estimates, which diminish the power of such studies to establish correct conclusions about the exposure and health effects association. The significance of this issue was highlighted in the National Research Council (NRC) Report “Research Priorities for Airborne Particulate Matter”, which recommends that EPA address exposure error in health studies. To address this limitation, we developed MicroTrac, an automated classification model that estimates time of day and duration spent in eight ME (indoors and outdoors at home, work, school; inside vehicles; other locations) from personal global positioning system (GPS) data and geocoded boundaries of buildings (e.g., home, work, school). MicroTrac has several innovative design features: (1) using GPS signal quality to account for GPS signal loss inside certain buildings, (2) spatial buffering of building boundaries to account for the spatial inaccuracy of the GPS device, and (3) temporal buffering of GPS positi

  6. Shaping of the tumor microenvironment: Stromal cells and vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonska, Marzenna; Agarwal, Nitin K; Vega, Francisco

    2015-10-01

    Lymphomas develop and progress in a specialized tissue microenvironment such as bone marrow as well as secondary lymphoid organs such as lymph node and spleen. The lymphoma microenvironment is characterized by a heterogeneous population of stromal cells, including fibroblastic reticular cells, nurse-like cells, mesenchymal stem cells, follicular dendritic cells, and inflammatory cells such as macrophages, T- and B-cells. These cell populations interact with the lymphoma cells to promote lymphoma growth, survival and drug resistance through multiple mechanisms. Angiogenesis is also recognized as an important factor associated with lymphoma progression. In recent years, we have learned that the interaction between the malignant and non-malignant cells is bidirectional and resembles, at least in part, the pattern seen between non-neoplastic lymphoid cells and the normal microenvironment of lymphoid organs. A summary of the current knowledge of lymphoma microenvironment focusing on the cellular components will be reviewed here. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Remodeling Components of the Tumor Microenvironment to Enhance Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkretsi, Vasiliki; Stylianou, Andreas; Papageorgis, Panagiotis; Polydorou, Christiana; Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos

    2015-01-01

    Solid tumor pathophysiology is characterized by an abnormal microenvironment that guides tumor progression and poses barriers to the efficacy of cancer therapies. Most common among tumor types are abnormalities in the structure of the tumor vasculature and stroma. Remodeling the tumor microenvironment with the aim to normalize any aberrant properties has the potential to improve therapy. In this review, we discuss structural abnormalities of the tumor microenvironment and summarize the therapeutic strategies that have been developed to normalize tumors as well as their potential to enhance therapy. Finally, we present different in vitro models that have been developed to analyze and better understand the effects of the tumor microenvironment on cancer cell behavior. PMID:26528429

  8. Microenvironment Tracker (MicroTrac) Model helps track air quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    MicroTrac is a model that uses global positioning system (GPS) data to estimate time of day and duration that people spend in different microenvironments (e.g., indoors and outdoors at home, work, school).

  9. Dry Eye Management: Targeting the Ocular Surface Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaobo; M, Vimalin Jeyalatha; Qu, Yangluowa; He, Xin; Ou, Shangkun; Bu, Jinghua; Jia, Changkai; Wang, Junqi; Wu, Han; Liu, Zuguo; Li, Wei

    2017-06-29

    Dry eye can damage the ocular surface and result in mild corneal epithelial defect to blinding corneal pannus formation and squamous metaplasia. Significant progress in the treatment of dry eye has been made in the last two decades; progressing from lubricating and hydrating the ocular surface with artificial tear to stimulating tear secretion; anti-inflammation and immune regulation. With the increase in knowledge regarding the pathophysiology of dry eye, we propose in this review the concept of ocular surface microenvironment. Various components of the microenvironment contribute to the homeostasis of ocular surface. Compromise in one or more components can result in homeostasis disruption of ocular surface leading to dry eye disease. Complete evaluation of the microenvironment component changes in dry eye patients will not only lead to appropriate diagnosis, but also guide in timely and effective clinical management. Successful treatment of dry eye should be aimed to restore the homeostasis of the ocular surface microenvironment.

  10. Microenvironment-Centred Dynamics in Aggressive B-Cell Lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matilde Cacciatore

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive B-cell lymphomas share high proliferative and invasive attitudes and dismal prognosis despite heterogeneous biological features. In the interchained sequence of events leading to cancer progression, neoplastic clone-intrinsic molecular events play a major role. Nevertheless, microenvironment-related cues have progressively come into focus as true determinants for this process. The cancer-associated microenvironment is a complex network of nonneoplastic immune and stromal cells embedded in extracellular components, giving rise to a multifarious crosstalk with neoplastic cells towards the induction of a supportive milieu. The immunological and stromal microenvironments have been classically regarded as essential partners of indolent lymphomas, while considered mainly negligible in the setting of aggressive B-cell lymphomas that, by their nature, are less reliant on external stimuli. By this paper we try to delineate the cardinal microenvironment-centred dynamics exerting an influence over lymphoid clone progression in aggressive B-cell lymphomas.

  11. Dry Eye Management: Targeting the Ocular Surface Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaobo; Jeyalatha M, Vimalin; Qu, Yangluowa; He, Xin; Ou, Shangkun; Bu, Jinghua; Jia, Changkai; Wang, Junqi; Wu, Han; Liu, Zuguo

    2017-01-01

    Dry eye can damage the ocular surface and result in mild corneal epithelial defect to blinding corneal pannus formation and squamous metaplasia. Significant progress in the treatment of dry eye has been made in the last two decades; progressing from lubricating and hydrating the ocular surface with artificial tear to stimulating tear secretion; anti-inflammation and immune regulation. With the increase in knowledge regarding the pathophysiology of dry eye, we propose in this review the concept of ocular surface microenvironment. Various components of the microenvironment contribute to the homeostasis of ocular surface. Compromise in one or more components can result in homeostasis disruption of ocular surface leading to dry eye disease. Complete evaluation of the microenvironment component changes in dry eye patients will not only lead to appropriate diagnosis, but also guide in timely and effective clinical management. Successful treatment of dry eye should be aimed to restore the homeostasis of the ocular surface microenvironment. PMID:28661456

  12. Multi-frequency EPR evidence for a binuclear CuA center in cytochrome c oxidase: studies with a 63Cu- and 65Cu-enriched, soluble domain of the cytochrome ba3 subunit II from Thermus thermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fee, J A; Sanders, D; Slutter, C E; Doan, P E; Aasa, R; Karpefors, M; Vänngård, T

    1995-07-01

    We have recorded multi-frequency EPR spectra of 63Cu- and 65Cu-labeled, water-soluble CuA-protein from the cytochrome ba3 of T. thermophilus. The spectrum taken at the highest frequency (34.03 GHz) shows no hyperfine structure and is nominally axial with apparent gz approximately 2.18 and gxy approximately 2.00. The spectrum taken at the lowest frequency (3.93 GHz) shows a rich hyperfine structure. Analyses of the spectra show that the observed splitting arises from an interaction of the unpaired electron with two Cu nuclei and support the notion that CuA is a mixed-valent [Cu(II)/Cu(I)] complex in which the unpaired electronic spin is distributed evenly over the two Cu ions.

  13. Dissecting Biology of Solid Tumour: The Microenvironment and Cancer Progression

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Focus on cancer therapy is experiencing a major paradigm shift from ways of attacking tumor cells to a strategy for specifically targeting the tumor microenvironment (TME). This approach requires a comprehensive understanding of roles of each component of the tumor environment. A description of the tumor microenvironment and its impact on tumor progression is presented here. Available studies indicate that both tumor/epithelial and stroma characteristics play important roles in cancer progres...

  14. Microenvironment -Programmed Metastatic Prostate Cancer Stem Cells (mPCSCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0352 TITLE: Microenvironment-Programmed Metastatic Prostate Cancer Stem Cells (mPCSCs) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dean...G. Tang, M.D., Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Houston, TX 77030 REPORT DATE: October 2016 TYPE OF...Sep 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Microenvironment-Programmed Metastatic Prostate Cancer Stem Cells (mPCSCs) 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  15. Cell and Signal Components of the Microenvironment of Bone Metastasis Are Affected by Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Bendinelli

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bone metastatic cells release bone microenvironment proteins, such as the matricellular protein SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine, and share a cell signaling typical of the bone metabolism controlled by Runx2. The megakaryocytes in the bone marrow engrafted by the metastases seem to be one of the principal microenvironment sources of the biological stimuli, implicated in the formation of an osteoblastic niche, and affecting metastasis phenotype and colonization. Educated platelets in the circulation might derive from megakaryocytes in bone metastasis. The evaluation of predictive markers in the circulating platelets might be useful for the stratification of patients for therapeutic purposes. The hypoxic environment in bone metastasis is one of the key regulators of the network of the biological soluble and structural components of the matrix. In bone metastatic cells under hypoxia, similar patterns of Runx2 and SPARC are observed, both showing downregulation. Conversely, hypoxia induces Endothelin 1, which upregulates SPARC, and these biological stimuli may be considered prognostic markers of bone metastasis in breast carcinoma patients.

  16. Cell and Signal Components of the Microenvironment of Bone Metastasis Are Affected by Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendinelli, Paola; Maroni, Paola; Matteucci, Emanuela; Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina

    2016-01-01

    Bone metastatic cells release bone microenvironment proteins, such as the matricellular protein SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine), and share a cell signaling typical of the bone metabolism controlled by Runx2. The megakaryocytes in the bone marrow engrafted by the metastases seem to be one of the principal microenvironment sources of the biological stimuli, implicated in the formation of an osteoblastic niche, and affecting metastasis phenotype and colonization. Educated platelets in the circulation might derive from megakaryocytes in bone metastasis. The evaluation of predictive markers in the circulating platelets might be useful for the stratification of patients for therapeutic purposes. The hypoxic environment in bone metastasis is one of the key regulators of the network of the biological soluble and structural components of the matrix. In bone metastatic cells under hypoxia, similar patterns of Runx2 and SPARC are observed, both showing downregulation. Conversely, hypoxia induces Endothelin 1, which upregulates SPARC, and these biological stimuli may be considered prognostic markers of bone metastasis in breast carcinoma patients. PMID:27187355

  17. The Solubility of struvite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, H. K.; Andersen, Bertel Lohmann; Blom, A.

    1997-01-01

    The solubility of magnesium-amonium-phosphate (struvite) has been studied emloying the radioisotope 32P as tracer. The amount of sample in solution is determined by measuring the Cherenkov radiation due to the beta-particles emitted from this radionuclide. The thermodynamic solubility product...

  18. The bone marrow microenvironment - Home of the leukemic blasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafat, Manar S; Gnaneswaran, Bruno; Bowles, Kristian M; Rushworth, Stuart A

    2017-09-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML) is a genetically, biologically and clinically heterogeneous set of diseases, which are characterised by an increased growth of abnormal myeloid progenitor cells within the bone marrow (BM). Ex-vivo AML exhibits a high level of spontaneous apoptosis. Furthermore, relapse for patients achieving remission occurs from minimal residual disease harboured within the BM microenvironment. Taken together, these observations illustrate the importance of the BM microenvironment in sustaining AML. While significant progress has been made elaborating the small-scale genetic mutations and larger-scale chromosomal translocations that contribute to the development of AML and its prognosis in response to treatment, less is understood about the complex microenvironment of the BM, which is known to be a key player in the pathogenesis of the disease. As we look towards future therapies, the consideration that the BM microenvironment is uniquely important as a niche for AML - coupled with the idea that leukaemic blasts are more likely to be genetically unstable and therefore evolve resistance to conventional chemotherapies - make the functions of the non-malignant cells of the BM attractive targets for therapy. In this review, we discuss the microanatomy of the BM and provide an overview of the evidence supporting the role of the BM microenvironment in creating conditions conducive to the survival and proliferation of AML blasts. Ultimately, we examine the therapeutic potential of uncoupling AML from the BM microenvironment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The emerging immunological role of post-translational modifications by reactive nitrogen species in cancer microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco eDe Sanctis

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Under many inflammatory contexts, such as tumor progression, systemic and peripheral immune response is tailored by reactive nitrogen species (RNS-dependent post-translational modifications, suggesting a biological function for these chemical alterations. RNS modify both soluble factors and receptors essential to induce and maintain a tumor-specific immune response, creating a chemical barrier that impairs effector T cell infiltration and functionality in tumor microenvironment and supports the escape phase of cancer. RNS generation during tumor growth mainly depends on nitric oxide production by both tumor cells and tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells that constitutively activate essential metabolic pathways of L-arginine catabolism. This review provides an overview of the potential immunological and biological role of RNS-induced modifications and addresses new approaches targeting RNS either in search of novel biomarkers or to improve anti-cancer treatment.

  20. The emerging immunological role of post-translational modifications by reactive nitrogen species in cancer microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, Francesco; Sandri, Sara; Ferrarini, Giovanna; Pagliarello, Irene; Sartoris, Silvia; Ugel, Stefano; Marigo, Ilaria; Molon, Barbara; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Under many inflammatory contexts, such as tumor progression, systemic and peripheral immune response is tailored by reactive nitrogen species (RNS)-dependent post-translational modifications, suggesting a biological function for these chemical alterations. RNS modify both soluble factors and receptors essential to induce and maintain a tumor-specific immune response, creating a "chemical barrier" that impairs effector T cell infiltration and functionality in tumor microenvironment and supports the escape phase of cancer. RNS generation during tumor growth mainly depends on nitric oxide production by both tumor cells and tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells that constitutively activate essential metabolic pathways of l-arginine catabolism. This review provides an overview of the potential immunological and biological role of RNS-induced modifications and addresses new approaches targeting RNS either in search of novel biomarkers or to improve anti-cancer treatment.

  1. Are soluble and membrane-bound rat brain acetylcholinesterase different

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andres, C.; el Mourabit, M.; Stutz, C.; Mark, J.; Waksman, A. (Centre de Neurochimie du C.N.R.S., Strasbourg, (France))

    1990-11-01

    Salt-soluble and detergent-soluble acetylcholinesterases (AChE) from adult rat brain were purified to homogeneity and studied with the aim to establish the differences existing between these two forms. It was found that the enzymatic activities of the purified salt-soluble AChE as well as the detergent-soluble AChE were dependent on the Triton X-100 concentration. Moreover, the interaction of salt-soluble AChE with liposomes suggests amphiphilic behaviour of this enzyme. Serum cholinesterase (ChE) did not bind to liposomes but its activity was also detergent-dependent. Detergent-soluble AChE remained in solution below critical micellar concentrations of Triton X-100. SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of purified, Biobeads-treated and iodinated detergent-soluble 11 S AChE showed, under non reducing conditions, bands of 69 kD, 130 kD and greater than 250 kD corresponding, respectively, to monomers, dimers and probably tetramers of the same polypeptide chain. Under reducing conditions, only a 69 kD band was detected. It is proposed that an amphiphilic environment stabilizes the salt-soluble forms of AChE in the brain in vivo and that detergent-soluble Biobeads-treated 11 S AChE possess hydrophobic domain(s) different from the 20 kD peptide already described.

  2. Exosome mediated communication within the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milane, Lara; Singh, Amit; Mattheolabakis, George; Suresh, Megha; Amiji, Mansoor M

    2015-12-10

    It is clear that exosomes (endosome derived vesicles) serve important roles in cellular communication both locally and distally and that the exosomal process is abnormal in cancer. Cancer cells are not malicious cells; they are cells that represent 'survival of the fittest' at its finest. All of the mutations, abnormalities, and phenomenal adaptations to a hostile microenvironment, such as hypoxia and nutrient depletion, represent the astute ability of cancer cells to adapt to their environment and to intracellular changes to achieve a single goal - survival. The aberrant exosomal process in cancer represents yet another adaptation that promotes survival of cancer. Cancer cells can secrete more exosomes than healthy cells, but more importantly, the content of cancer cells is distinct. An illustrative distinction is that exosomes derived from cancer cells contain more microRNA than healthy cells and unlike exosomes released from healthy cells, this microRNA can be associated with the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) which is required for processing mature and biologically active microRNA. Cancer derived exosomes have the ability to transfer metastatic potential to a recipient cell and cancer exosomes function in the physical process of invasion. In this review we conceptualize the aberrant exosomal process (formation, content selection, loading, trafficking, and release) in cancer as being partially attributed to cancer specific differences in the endocytotic process of receptor recycling/degradation and plasma membrane remodeling and the function of the endosome as a signaling entity. We discuss this concept and, to advance comprehension of exosomal function in cancer as mediators of communication, we detail and discuss exosome biology, formation, and communication in health and cancer; exosomal content in cancer; exosomal biomarkers in cancer; exosome mediated communication in cancer metastasis, drug resistance, and interfacing with the immune system; and

  3. Optimizing solubility: kinetic versus thermodynamic solubility temptations and risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saal, Christoph; Petereit, Anna Christine

    2012-10-09

    The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of kinetic and thermodynamic solubility data in guiding medicinal chemistry during lead optimization. The solubility of 465 research compounds was measured using a kinetic and a thermodynamic solubility assay. In the thermodynamic assay, polarized-light microscopy was used to investigate whether the result referred to the crystalline or to the amorphous compound. From the comparison of kinetic and thermodynamic solubility data it was noted that kinetic solubility measurements frequently yielded results which show considerably higher solubility compared to thermodynamic solubility. This observation is ascribed to the fact that a kinetic solubility assay typically delivers results which refer to the amorphous compound. In contrast, results from thermodynamic solubility determinations more frequently refer to a crystalline phase. Accordingly, thermodynamic solubility data--especially when used together with an assessment of the solid state form--are deemed to be more useful in guiding solubility optimization for research compounds.

  4. Domain analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjørland, Birger

    2017-01-01

    The domain-analytic approach to knowledge organization (KO) (and to the broader field of library and information science, LIS) is outlined. The article reviews the discussions and proposals on the definition of domains, and provides an example of a domain-analytic study in the field of art studie....... Varieties of domain analysis as well as criticism and controversies are presented and discussed....

  5. Soluble CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parkner, Tina; Sørensen, L P; Nielsen, A R

    2012-01-01

    Soluble CD163 (sCD163) was recently identified as a strong risk marker for developing type 2 diabetes. We hypothesised that sCD163 independently associates with insulin resistance.......Soluble CD163 (sCD163) was recently identified as a strong risk marker for developing type 2 diabetes. We hypothesised that sCD163 independently associates with insulin resistance....

  6. Multiparametric classification links tumor microenvironments with tumor cell phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojana Gligorijevic

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available While it has been established that a number of microenvironment components can affect the likelihood of metastasis, the link between microenvironment and tumor cell phenotypes is poorly understood. Here we have examined microenvironment control over two different tumor cell motility phenotypes required for metastasis. By high-resolution multiphoton microscopy of mammary carcinoma in mice, we detected two phenotypes of motile tumor cells, different in locomotion speed. Only slower tumor cells exhibited protrusions with molecular, morphological, and functional characteristics associated with invadopodia. Each region in the primary tumor exhibited either fast- or slow-locomotion. To understand how the tumor microenvironment controls invadopodium formation and tumor cell locomotion, we systematically analyzed components of the microenvironment previously associated with cell invasion and migration. No single microenvironmental property was able to predict the locations of tumor cell phenotypes in the tumor if used in isolation or combined linearly. To solve this, we utilized the support vector machine (SVM algorithm to classify phenotypes in a nonlinear fashion. This approach identified conditions that promoted either motility phenotype. We then demonstrated that varying one of the conditions may change tumor cell behavior only in a context-dependent manner. In addition, to establish the link between phenotypes and cell fates, we photoconverted and monitored the fate of tumor cells in different microenvironments, finding that only tumor cells in the invadopodium-rich microenvironments degraded extracellular matrix (ECM and disseminated. The number of invadopodia positively correlated with degradation, while the inhibiting metalloproteases eliminated degradation and lung metastasis, consistent with a direct link among invadopodia, ECM degradation, and metastasis. We have detected and characterized two phenotypes of motile tumor cells in vivo, which

  7. Immunological Microenvironment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Its Clinical Implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Naoshi; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2017-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the prognosis of patients with advanced stage of disease remains unfavorable. Several immune therapies have been applied to HCC, and their responses have not been satisfactory. The immune response to cancer is determined by the balance between the antigenicity of the tumor and the microenvironment of cancer tissues. Generally, accumulated genetic mutations are observed in HCC, which may lead to increased neoantigens on cancer cells with high antigenicity. However, cancer cells may evade the immune system because of alterations in molecules and cellular pathways involved in antigen processing and presentation. In addition, hypoxia in tissue induces several cytokines, chemokines, and immunosuppressive molecules from HCC cells and stromal cells. These cells also produce cytokines that attract regulatory T cells infiltrating tumor tissues and contribute to establishing an immunosuppressive microenvironment. Some cancers show a good response to immune checkpoint therapy. However, prolonged stabilization of disease for this treatment is reportedly 12-41% in patients with advanced cancer. Therefore, immunosuppressive forces in the microenvironment of HCC may cause resistance to immune therapy, and modification of the tumor microenvironment may restore normal anticancer immunity. In this review, we focus on the immunological microenvironment of HCC tissues and discuss how the immunosuppressive environment of HCC should be modulated to achieve a favorable response to immune therapy, such as immune checkpoint therapy, in HCC. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. One microenvironment does not fit all: heterogeneity beyond cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ik Sun; Zhang, Xiang H-F

    2016-12-01

    Human cancers exhibit formidable molecular heterogeneity, to a large extent accounting for the incomplete and transitory efficacy of current anti-cancer therapies. However, neoplastic cells alone do not manifest the disease, but conscript a battery of non-tumor cells to enable and sustain hallmark capabilities of cancer. Escaping immunosurveillance is one of such capabilities. Tumors evolve immunosuppressive microenvironment to subvert anti-tumor immunity. In this review, we will focus on tumor-associated myeloid cells, which constitute an essential part of the immune microenvironment and reciprocally interact with cancer cells to establish malignancy toward metastasis. The diversity and plasticity of these cells constitute another layer of heterogeneity, beyond the heterogeneity of cancer cells themselves. We envision that immune microenvironment co-evolves with the genetic heterogeneity of tumor. Addressing the question of how genetically distinct tumors shape and are shaped by unique immune microenvironment will provide an attractive rationale to develop novel immunotherapeutic modalities. Here, we discuss the complex nature of tumor microenvironment, with an emphasis on the cellular and functional heterogeneity among tumor-associated myeloid cells as well as immune environment heterogeneity in the context of a full spectrum of human breast cancers.

  9. Targeting SDF-1 in multiple myeloma tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyssou, Juliette M C; Ghobrial, Irene M; Roccaro, Aldo M

    2016-09-28

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a type of B-cell malignancy that remains incurable to date. The bone marrow (BM) microenvironment plays a crucial role in MM progression. The chemokine SDF-1 (CXCL12) is an important actor of the BM microenvironment that has the ability to regulate numerous processes related to its malignant transformation during MM development. The activity of SDF-1 is mainly mediated by its specific receptor CXCR4, which is expressed at the surface of MM cells and various other BM cell types. Current treatments available for MM patients mainly target tumor cells but have limited effects on the BM microenvironment. In this context, SDF-1 and CXCR4 represent ideal targets for the normalization of the MM-supportive BM microenvironment. The present review focuses on the activity of SDF-1 in the MM BM microenvironment and the current efforts carried out to target the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis for treatment of MM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Microenvironment and autophagy cross-talk: Implications in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Luciana R; Vessoni, Alexandre T; Menck, Carlos F M

    2016-05-01

    There are many ongoing clinical trials to validate tumour microenvironment or autophagic pathway components as targets for anticancer therapies. Different components of the tumour microenvironment play important roles in tumour cell responses, directly affecting malignant transformation, drug resistance and metastasis. Autophagy is also related to chemotherapy responses by inducing tumour cell death or survival. Thus, the autophagy pathway may act as oncosuppressor, in addition to protecting cells from chemotherapy. The cross-talk between the microenvironment and autophagy is very complex and poorly understood. In a recent study using a three-dimensional (3D) cell culture model, the well-documented chemotherapy-mediated activation of autophagy was impaired in breast cancer cells, suggesting a context-dependent outcome for autophagy modulators, under the control of the p53 protein. A deeper understanding of this microenvironment/autophagy interplay may provide important clues for identifying differences in the tumour cell signalling network from in vitro basic research studies to the actual clinical context. In this work, we summarize the role of the microenvironment and autophagy in physiological and tumourigenic conditions, their interactions, and the challenges related to the use of drugs that target these pathways in cancer treatment protocols, emphasizing the potential use of 3D cell culture models in preclinical studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The First Tianjin, China Forum on Tumor Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Evan T.; Li, Lu-Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Although it is well recognized that the tumor microenvironment plays a key role in regulating tumor progression the mechanisms through which this occurs need to be defined. Current international research activities towards defining the role of the tumor microenvironment in cancer progression were the subject of the 1st Tianjin Forum on Tumor Microenvironment held at Nankai University in Tianjin, China, July 2 to 4, 2010. The importance of variety of processes, such as inflammation and angiogenesis, in the role of tumor progression were described for multiple tumor types including breast, prostate, and hepatic cancers as well as the process of bone metastasis. Identification of novel signaling pathways that impact both angiogenesis and bone remodeling were presented. Several themes emerged from this meeting including that (1) tumor cells modify the microenvironment to enhance their own survival and progression; (2) targeting host factors, in addition to targeting tumor cells, will have important therapeutic effects; and (3) host cells distribution within the tumor has both prognostic and therapeutic significance. Several priorities for future research were defined including use of a systems biology approach to define the role of host factors in tumor progression; defining the importance of targeting both arms of the bone remodeling process for therapy of bone metastasis and determining how different cell subsets contribute to microenvironment-mediated regulation of tumor progression. PMID:21224351

  12. Liver regeneration microenvironment of hepatocellular carcinoma for prevention and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hanmin; Zhang, Lisheng

    2017-01-01

    Research on liver cancer prevention and treatment has mainly focused on the liver cancer cells themselves. Currently, liver cancers are no longer viewed as only collections of genetically altered cells but as aberrant organs with a plastic stroma, matrix, and vasculature. Improving the microenvironment of the liver to promote liver regeneration and repair by affecting immune function, inflammation and vasculature can regulate the dynamic imbalance between normal liver regeneration and repair and abnormal liver regeneration, thus improving the microenvironment of liver regeneration for the prevention and treatment of liver cancer. This review addresses the basic theory of the liver regeneration microenvironment, including the latest findings on immunity, inflammation and vasculature. Attention is given to the potential design of molecular targets in the microenvironment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In an effort to improve the liver regeneration microenvironment of HCC, researchers have extensively utilized the enhancement of immunity, anti-inflammation and the vasculature niche, which are discussed in detail in this review. In addition, the authors summarize the latest pro-fibrotic transition characteristics of the vascular niche and review potential cell therapies for liver disease. PMID:27655683

  13. Multimodal imaging of lung cancer and its microenvironment (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariri, Lida P.; Niederst, Matthew J.; Mulvey, Hillary; Adams, David C.; Hu, Haichuan; Chico Calero, Isabel; Szabari, Margit V.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Bouma, Brett E.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Despite significant advances in targeted therapies for lung cancer, nearly all patients develop drug resistance within 6-12 months and prognosis remains poor. Developing drug resistance is a progressive process that involves tumor cells and their microenvironment. We hypothesize that microenvironment factors alter tumor growth and response to targeted therapy. We conducted in vitro studies in human EGFR-mutant lung carcinoma cells, and demonstrated that factors secreted from lung fibroblasts results in increased tumor cell survival during targeted therapy with EGFR inhibitor, gefitinib. We also demonstrated that increased environment stiffness results in increased tumor survival during gefitinib therapy. In order to test our hypothesis in vivo, we developed a multimodal optical imaging protocol for preclinical intravital imaging in mouse models to assess tumor and its microenvironment over time. We have successfully conducted multimodal imaging of dorsal skinfold chamber (DSC) window mice implanted with GFP-labeled human EGFR mutant lung carcinoma cells and visualized changes in tumor development and microenvironment facets over time. Multimodal imaging included structural OCT to assess tumor viability and necrosis, polarization-sensitive OCT to measure tissue birefringence for collagen/fibroblast detection, and Doppler OCT to assess tumor vasculature. Confocal imaging was also performed for high-resolution visualization of EGFR-mutant lung cancer cells labeled with GFP, and was coregistered with OCT. Our results demonstrated that stromal support and vascular growth are essential to tumor progression. Multimodal imaging is a useful tool to assess tumor and its microenvironment over time.

  14. Schwann cells: a new player in the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunimovich, Yuri L; Keskinov, Anton A; Shurin, Galina V; Shurin, Michael R

    2017-08-01

    Cancerous cells must cooperate with the surrounding stroma and non-malignant cells within the microenvironment to support the growth and invasion of the tumor. The nervous system is a component of every organ system of the body, and therefore, is invariably at the front line of the tumor invasion. Due to the complexity of the nervous system physiology, this review separately discusses the contributions of the central and peripheral nervous systems to the tumorigenesis and tumor progression. We further focus the discussion on the evidence that Schwann cells aid in tumor growth and invasion. Schwann cells, a largely unexplored element of the tumor microenvironment, may participate in the creation of tumor-favorable conditions through both bi-directional interaction with cancer cells and the facilitation of the immune-suppressive microenvironment through the mechanism of neural repair and immunomodulation.

  15. microRNA-mediated regulation of the tumor microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Jonathan; Shahi, Payam; Werb, Zena

    2013-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment includes cells such as fibroblasts, immune cells, endothelial cells, as well as extracellular matrix (ECM), proteases, and cytokines. Together, these components participate in a complex crosstalk with neoplastic tumor cells that affects growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs involved in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression and have recently emerged as important players involved in regulating multiple aspects of cancer biology and the tumor microenvironment. Differential miRNA expression in both the epithelial and stromal compartments of tumors compared with normal tissue suggests that miRNAs are important drivers of tumorigenesis and metastasis. This review article summarizes our current understanding of the diverse roles of miRNAs involved in tumor microenvironment regulation and underscores the importance of miRNAs within multiple cell types that contribute to the hallmarks of cancer. PMID:24036551

  16. Nanomedicine as a potent strategy in melanoma tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pautu, Vincent; Leonetti, Daniela; Lepeltier, Elise; Clere, Nicolas; Passirani, Catherine

    2017-02-20

    Melanoma originated from melanocytes is the most aggressive type of skin cancer. Despite considerable progresses in clinical treatment with the discovery of BRAF or MEK inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies, the durability of response to treatment is often limited to the development of acquired resistance and systemic toxicity. The limited success of conventional treatment highlights the importance of understanding the role of melanoma tumor microenvironment in tumor developement and drug resistance. Nanoparticles represent a promising strategy for the development of new cancer treatments able to improve the bioavailability of drugs and increase their penetration by targeting specifically tumors cells and/or tumor environment. In this review, we will discuss the main influence of tumor microenvironment in melanoma growth and treatment outcome. Furthermore, third generation loaded nanotechnologies represent an exciting tool for detection, treatment, and escape from possible mechanism of resistance mediated by tumor microenvironment, and will be highlighted in this review.

  17. Microenvironment-derived factors driving metastatic plasticity in melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Isabella S; Heilmann, Silja; Kansler, Emily R

    2017-01-01

    Cellular plasticity is a state in which cancer cells exist along a reversible phenotypic spectrum, and underlies key traits such as drug resistance and metastasis. Melanoma plasticity is linked to phenotype switching, where the microenvironment induces switches between invasive/MITF(LO) versus...... proliferative/MITF(HI) states. Since MITF also induces pigmentation, we hypothesize that macrometastatic success should be favoured by microenvironments that induce a MITF(HI)/differentiated/proliferative state. Zebrafish imaging demonstrates that after extravasation, melanoma cells become pigmented and enact...

  18. The Aged Microenvironment Influences Prostate Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Igh-6 Igj Igk-V8 4933421E11Rik Npy Ccl8 Rbp2 0710005M24Rik Psmb8 D1Ertd448e Lamb1-1 Col1a2 Polr2d Slc38a5 Col3a1 Nup160 1300006C19Rik Fstl1...member 3 +6.9 anion exchanger activity; sulfate porter activity BC020489 cDNA sequence BC020489 +6.5 LOC432593 Hypothetical gene supported by...1.6 BC050196 cDNA sequence BC050196 +1.6 Olfr788 olfactory receptor 788 +1.5 Ccdc106 coiled-coil domain containing 106 -2.37 Grik4 glutamate

  19. The multifaceted role of the microenvironment in liver metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van den Eynden, Gert G; Majeed, Ali W; Illemann, Martin

    2013-01-01

    arriving in the liver via the bloodstream encounter the microenvironment of the hepatic sinusoid. The interactions of the tumor cells with hepatic sinusoidal and extrasinusoidal cells (endothelial, Kupffer, stellate, and inflammatory cells) determine their fate. The sinusoidal cells can have a dual role...

  20. Modulation of tumor microenvironment by chemopreventive natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sin-Aye; Surh, Young-Joon

    2017-08-01

    The tumor microenvironment provides a niche in which cancer cells and their surrounding stromal cells reside and in which their interactions occur. The cross talk between cancer and stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment promotes many biological processes to support cancer cell growth, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Recently, not only cancer cells but also multiple types of surrounding stromal cells, including endothelial cells, immune cells, and fibroblasts in the tumor microenvironment, have been recognized to be attractive targets for reducing resistance to anticancer therapy and tumor recurrence. Many natural products present in fruits, vegetables, herbs, spices, and some marine organisms have been reported to inhibit, delay, or reverse multistage carcinogenesis and to inhibit the proliferation of cancerous cells and the self-renewal capacity of preexisting cancer stem-like cells. Some of these naturally occurring chemopreventive and anticarcinogenic substances can modulate the signal transduction involved in maintaining the activities/functions of stromal cells and their interactions with cancer cells within the tumor microenvironment. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  1. Tumor microenvironment derived exosomes pleiotropically modulate cancer cell metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are a major cellular component of tumor microenvironment in most solid cancers. Altered cellular metabolism is a hallmark of cancer, and much of the published literature has focused on neoplastic cell-autonomous processes for these adaptations. We demonstrate tha...

  2. The mechanical microenvironment in cancer: How physics affects tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelkerke, Anika; Bussink, Johan; Rowan, Alan E; Span, Paul N

    2015-12-01

    The tumour microenvironment contributes greatly to the response of tumour cells. It consists of chemical gradients, for example of oxygen and nutrients. However, a physical environment is also present. Apart from chemical input, cells also receive physical signals. Tumours display unique mechanical properties: they are a lot stiffer than normal tissue. This may be either a cause or a consequence of cancer, but literature suggests it has a major impact on tumour cells as will be described in this review. The mechanical microenvironment may cause malignant transformation, possibly through activation of oncogenic pathways and inhibition of tumour suppressor genes. In addition, the mechanical microenvironment may promote tumour progression by influencing processes such as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, enhancing cell survival through autophagy, but also affects sensitivity of tumour cells to therapeutics. Furthermore, multiple intracellular signalling pathways prove sensitive to the mechanical properties of the microenvironment. It appears the increased stiffness is unlikely to be caused by increased stiffness of the tumour cells themselves. However, there are indications that tumours display a higher cell density, making them more rigid. In addition, increased matrix deposition in the tumour, as well as increased interstitial fluid pressure may account for the increased stiffness of tumours. Overall, tumour mechanics are significantly different from normal tissue. Therefore, this feature should be further explored for use in cancer prevention, detection and treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Immune-suppressive properties of the tumor microenvironment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Jürgen C; Andersen, Mads Hald; Schrama, David

    2013-01-01

    Solid tumors are more than an accumulation of cancer cells. Indeed, cancerous cells create a permissive microenvironment by exploiting non-transformed host cells. Thus, solid tumors rather resemble abnormal organs composed of the cancerous cells itself and the stroma providing the supportive...

  4. Fundamentals of microfluidic cell culture in controlled microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Edmond W K; Beebe, David J

    2010-03-01

    Microfluidics has the potential to revolutionize the way we approach cell biology research. The dimensions of microfluidic channels are well suited to the physical scale of biological cells, and the many advantages of microfluidics make it an attractive platform for new techniques in biology. One of the key benefits of microfluidics for basic biology is the ability to control parameters of the cell microenvironment at relevant length and time scales. Considerable progress has been made in the design and use of novel microfluidic devices for culturing cells and for subsequent treatment and analysis. With the recent pace of scientific discovery, it is becoming increasingly important to evaluate existing tools and techniques, and to synthesize fundamental concepts that would further improve the efficiency of biological research at the microscale. This tutorial review integrates fundamental principles from cell biology and local microenvironments with cell culture techniques and concepts in microfluidics. Culturing cells in microscale environments requires knowledge of multiple disciplines including physics, biochemistry, and engineering. We discuss basic concepts related to the physical and biochemical microenvironments of the cell, physicochemical properties of that microenvironment, cell culture techniques, and practical knowledge of microfluidic device design and operation. We also discuss the most recent advances in microfluidic cell culture and their implications on the future of the field. The goal is to guide new and interested researchers to the important areas and challenges facing the scientific community as we strive toward full integration of microfluidics with biology.

  5. Tumor-Associated Macrophages and Neutrophils in Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaehong Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Distinct tumor microenvironment forms in each progression step of cancer and has diverse capacities to induce both adverse and beneficial consequences for tumorigenesis. It is now known that immune cells can be activated to favor tumor growth and progression, most probably influenced by the tumor microenvironment. Tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils can exert protumoral functions, enhancing tumor cell invasion and metastasis, angiogenesis, and extracellular matrix remodeling, while inhibiting the antitumoral immune surveillance. Considering that neutrophils in inflammatory environments recruit macrophages and that recruited macrophages affect neutrophil functions, there may be various degrees of interaction between tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. Platelets also play an important role in the recruitment and regulation of monocytic and granulocytic cells in the tumor tissues, suggesting that platelet function may be essential for generation of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. In this review, we will explore the biology of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils and their possible interactions in the tumor microenvironment. Special attention will be given to the recruitment and activation of these tumor-associated cells and to the roles they play in maintenance of the tumor microenvironment and progression of tumors.

  6. Operation of the computer model for microenvironment atomic oxygen exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassa, R. J.; Gillis, J. R.; Gruenbaum, P. E.

    1995-01-01

    A computer model for microenvironment atomic oxygen exposure has been developed to extend atomic oxygen modeling capability to include shadowing and reflections. The model uses average exposure conditions established by the direct exposure model and extends the application of these conditions to treat surfaces of arbitrary shape and orientation.

  7. Functional live cell imaging of the pulmonary neuroepithelial body microenvironment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Proost, Ian; Pintelon, Isabel; Brouns, Inge; Kroese, A; Riccardi, Daniela; Kemp, Paul J.; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Adriaensen, Dirk

    2008-01-01

    Pulmonary neuroepithelial bodies (NEBs) are densely innervated groups of neuroendocrine cells invariably accompanied by Clara-like cells. Together with NEBs, Clara-like cells form the so-called "NEB microenvironment," which recently has been assigned a potential pulmonary stem cell niche. Conclusive

  8. Functional live cell imaging of the pulmonary neuroepithelial body microenvironment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Proost, Ian; Pintelon, Isabel; Brouns, Inge; Kroese, A; Riccardi, Daniela; Kemp, Paul J.; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Adriaensen, Dirk

    Pulmonary neuroepithelial bodies (NEBs) are densely innervated groups of neuroendocrine cells invariably accompanied by Clara-like cells. Together with NEBs, Clara-like cells form the so-called "NEB microenvironment," which recently has been assigned a potential pulmonary stem cell niche. Conclusive

  9. Microenvironments and microscale productivity of cyanobacterial desert crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Pichel, F.; Belnap, Jayne

    1996-01-01

    We used microsensors to characterize physicochemical microenvironments and photosynthesis occurring immediately after water saturation in two desert soil crusts from southeastern Utah, which were formed by the cyanobacteria Microcoleus vaginatus Gomont, Nostoc spp., and Scytonema sp. The light fields within the crusts presented steep vertical gradients in magnitude and spectral composition. Near-surface light-trapping zones were formed due to the scattering nature of the sand particles, but strong light attenuation resulted in euphotic zones only ca. 1 mm deep, which were progressively enriched in longer wavelengths with depth. Rates of gross photosynthesis (3.4a??9.4 mmol O2A?ma??2A?ha??1) and dark respiration (0.81a??3.1 mmol Oa??2A?ma??2A?ha??1) occurring within 1 to several mm from the surface were high enough to drive the formation of marked oxygen microenvironments that ranged from oxygen supersaturation to anoxia. The photosynthetic activity also resulted in localized pH values in excess of 10, 2a??3 units above the soil pH. Differences in metabolic parameters and community structure between two types of crusts were consistent with a successional pattern, which could be partially explained on the basis of the microenvironments. We discuss the significance of high metabolic rates and the formation of microenvironments for the ecology of desert crusts, as well as the advantages and limitations of microsensor-based methods for crust investigation.

  10. Hypoxia in the glioblastoma microenvironment: shaping the phenotype of cancer stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, Nicole; Larion, Mioara; Giles, Amber J; Seldomridge, Ashlee N; Sizdahkhani, Saman; Gilbert, Mark R; Park, Deric M

    2017-07-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive malignant primary brain tumor. Cellular heterogeneity is a characteristic feature of the disease and contributes to the difficulty in formulating effective therapies. Glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) have been identified as a subpopulation of tumor cells that are thought to be largely responsible for resistance to treatment. Intratumoral hypoxia contributes to maintenance of the GSCs by supporting the critical stem cell traits of multipotency, self-renewal, and tumorigenicity. This review highlights the interaction of GSCs with the hypoxic tumor microenvironment, exploring the mechanisms underlying the contribution of GSCs to tumor vessel dynamics, immune modulation, and metabolic alteration. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  11. Stepwise development of thymic microenvironments in vivo is regulated by thymocyte subsets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. van Ewijk (Willem); G. Hollander; C. Terhorst; B. Wang (Baoping)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractT-cell development is under the tight control of thymic microenvironments. Conversely, the integrity of thymic microenvironments depends on the physical presence of developing thymocytes, a phenomenon designated as 'thymic crosstalk'. We now show, using thre

  12. Solubility Part 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tantra, Ratna; Bolea, Eduardo; Bouwmeester, H.; Rey-Castro, Carlos; David, C.A.A.; Dogné, Jean Michel; Laborda, Francisco; Laloy, Julie; Robinson, Kenneth N.; Undas, A.K.; Zande, van der M.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of different methods that can potentially be used to determine the solubility of nanomaterials. In general, the methods presented can be broadly divided into four categories: separation methods, methods to quantify free ions, methods to quantify total dissolved

  13. Fumaric acid microenvironment tablet formulation and process development for crystalline cenicriviroc mesylate, a BCS IV compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menning, Mark M; Dalziel, Sean M

    2013-11-04

    Cenicriviroc mesylate (CVC) is a potent dual antagonist of C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) and C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2) in phase 2b development as an entry inhibitor for HIV-1 infection treatment.1,2 CVC is a weak base exhibiting BCS IV characteristics with a highly pH dependent solubility profile (>100 mg/mL for pH 4) and low Caco-2 cell line permeability. Previous tablet formulations of CVC, including spray-dried dispersion and a wet granulation with citric acid, had been found unacceptable for commercial use due to chemical and physical instability or unacceptably high excipient loading precluding fixed-dose combinability. A high drug loading, 26% (w/w), acidic microenvironment tablet formulation with fumaric acid solubilizer (1:1 CVC/fumaric acid) and a dry granulation process was developed iteratively through a sequence of prototypes characterized by beagle dog absorption studies, focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM), dynamic vapor sorption (DVS), and accelerated stability testing. The fumaric acid based dry granulated product demonstrated a mean bioavailability comparable to an oral solution dose in a dog model. Stability and moisture sensitivity of the formulation were improved via the dry granulation process technique and the use of fumaric acid. It is hypothesized that the observed slow dissolution kinetics of fumaric acid prolongs an acidic microenvironment around the agglomerated CVC crystals and excipients leading to increased CVC dissolution and thereby absorption. The fumaric acid formulation also demonstrated absorption resilience to gastric pH extremes in a dog model. This optimized formulation and process enables CVC to be a viable candidate for current HIV treatment paradigms of single once daily fixed-dose combination products.

  14. Improving drug delivery to solid tumors: priming the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawar, Iftikhar Ali; Kim, Jung Ho; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2015-03-10

    Malignant transformation and growth of the tumor mass tend to induce changes in the surrounding microenvironment. Abnormality of the tumor microenvironment provides a driving force leading not only to tumor progression, including invasion and metastasis, but also to acquisition of drug resistance, including pharmacokinetic (drug delivery-related) and pharmacodynamic (sensitivity-related) resistance. Drug delivery systems exploiting the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect and active targeting moieties were expected to be able to cope with delivery-related drug resistance. However, recent evidence supports a considerable barrier role of tumors via various mechanisms, which results in imperfect or inefficient EPR and/or targeting effect. The components of the tumor microenvironment such as abnormal tumor vascular system, deregulated composition of the extracellular matrix, and interstitial hypertension (elevated interstitial fluid pressure) collectively or cooperatively hinder the drug distribution, which is prerequisite to the efficacy of nanoparticles and small-molecule drugs used in cancer medicine. Hence, the abnormal tumor microenvironment has recently been suggested to be a promising target for the improvement of drug delivery to improve therapeutic efficacy. Strategies to modulate the abnormal tumor microenvironment, referred to here as "solid tumor priming" (vascular normalization and/or solid stress alleviation leading to improvement in blood perfusion and convective molecular movement), have shown promising results in the enhancement of drug delivery and anticancer efficacy. These strategies may provide a novel avenue for the development of new chemotherapeutics and combination chemotherapeutic regimens as well as reassessment of previously ineffective agents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Engineering Approaches for Understanding Osteogenesis: Hydrogels as Synthetic Bone Microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, J M; Oyen, M L

    2016-11-01

    The microenvironment, which can be considered the sum of all the components and conditions surrounding a particular cell, is critical to moderating cellular behavior. In bone, interactions with the microenvironment can influence osteogenic differentiation, and subsequent extracellular matrix deposition, mineralization, and bone growth. Beyond regenerative medicine purposes, tissue engineering tools, namely cell-scaffold constructs, can be used as models of the bone microenvironment. Hydrogels, which are hydrophilic polymer networks, are popularly used for cell culture constructs due to their substantial water content and their ability to be tailored for specific applications. As synthetic microenvironments, a level of control can be exerted on the hydrogel structure and material properties, such that individual contributions from the scaffold on cellular behavior can be observed. Both biochemical and mechanical stimuli have been shown to modulate cellular behaviors. Hydrogels can be modified to present cell-interactive ligands, include osteoinductive moieties, vary mechanical properties, and be subject to external mechanical stimulation, all of which have been shown to affect osteogenic differentiation. Following "bottom-up" fabrication methods, levels of complexity can be introduced to hydrogel systems, such that the synergistic effects of multiple osteogenic cues can be observed. This review explores the utility of hydrogel scaffolds as synthetic bone microenvironments to observe both individual and synergistic effects from biochemical and mechanical signals on osteogenic differentiation. Ultimately, a better understanding of how material properties can influence cellular behavior will better inform design of tissue engineering scaffolds, not just for studying cell behavior, but also for regenerative medicine purposes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. tRNA concentration fine tunes protein solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedyunin, Ivan; Lehnhardt, Lothar; Böhmer, Nadine; Kaufmann, Paul; Zhang, Gong; Ignatova, Zoya

    2012-09-21

    Clusters of codons pairing to low-abundance tRNAs synchronize the translation with co-translational folding of single domains in multidomain proteins. Although proven with some examples, the impact of the ribosomal speed on the folding and solubility on a global, cell-wide level remains elusive. Here we show that upregulation of three low-abundance tRNAs in Escherichia coli increased the aggregation propensity of several cellular proteins as a result of an accelerated elongation rate. Intriguingly, alterations in the concentration of the natural tRNA pool compromised the solubility of various chaperones consequently rendering the solubility of some chaperone-dependent proteins.

  17. Recapitulation of complex transport and action of drugs at the tumor microenvironment using tumor-microenvironment-on-chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bumsoo; Qu, Chunjing; Park, Kinam; Konieczny, Stephen F; Korc, Murray

    2016-09-28

    Targeted delivery aims to selectively distribute drugs to targeted tumor tissues but not to healthy tissues. This can address many clinical challenges by maximizing the efficacy but minimizing the toxicity of anti-cancer drugs. However, a complex tumor microenvironment poses various barriers hindering the transport of drugs and drug delivery systems. New tumor models that allow for the systematic study of these complex environments are highly desired to provide reliable test beds to develop drug delivery systems for targeted delivery. Recently, research efforts have yielded new in vitro tumor models, the so called tumor-microenvironment-on-chip, that recapitulate certain characteristics of the tumor microenvironment. These new models show benefits over other conventional tumor models, and have the potential to accelerate drug discovery and enable precision medicine. However, further research is warranted to overcome their limitations and to properly interpret the data obtained from these models. In this article, key features of the in vivo tumor microenvironment that are relevant to drug transport processes for targeted delivery were discussed, and the current status and challenges for developing in vitro transport model systems were reviewed.

  18. Soluble and insoluble fiber (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietary fiber is the part of food that is not affected by the digestive process in the body. ... of the stool. There are two types of dietary fiber, soluble and insoluble. Soluble fiber retains water and ...

  19. Tumour microenvironments induce expression of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR and concomitant activation of gelatinolytic enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Synnøve Magnussen

    Full Text Available The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR is associated with poor prognosis in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, and increased expression of uPAR is often found at the invasive tumour front. The aim of the current study was to elucidate the role of uPAR in invasion and metastasis of OSCC, and the effects of various tumour microenvironments in these processes. Furthermore, we wanted to study whether the cells' expression level of uPAR affected the activity of gelatinolytic enzymes.The Plaur gene was both overexpressed and knocked-down in the murine OSCC cell line AT84. Tongue and skin tumours were established in syngeneic mice, and cells were also studied in an ex vivo leiomyoma invasion model. Soluble factors derived from leiomyoma tissue, as well as purified extracellular matrix (ECM proteins, were assessed for their ability to affect uPAR expression, glycosylation and cleavage. Activity of gelatinolytic enzymes in the tissues were assessed by in situ zymography.We found that increased levels of uPAR did not induce tumour invasion or metastasis. However, cells expressing low endogenous levels of uPAR in vitro up-regulated uPAR expression both in tongue, skin and leiomyoma tissue. Various ECM proteins had no effect on uPAR expression, while soluble factors originating from the leiomyoma tissue increased both the expression and glycosylation of uPAR, and possibly also affected the proteolytic processing of uPAR. Tumours with high levels of uPAR, as well as cells invading leiomyoma tissue with up-regulated uPAR expression, all displayed enhanced activity of gelatinolytic enzymes.Although high levels of uPAR are not sufficient to induce invasion and metastasis, the activity of gelatinolytic enzymes was increased. Furthermore, several tumour microenvironments have the capacity to induce up-regulation of uPAR expression, and soluble factors in the tumour microenvironment may have an important role in the regulation of posttranslational

  20. Uranyl Oxalate Solubility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leturcq, G.; Costenoble, S.; Grandjean, S. [CEA Marcoule DEN/DRCP/SCPS/LCA - BP17171 - 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    The solubility of uranyl oxalate was determined at ambient temperature by precipitation in oxalic-nitric solutions, using an initial uranyl concentration of 0.1 mol/L. Oxalic concentration varied from 0.075 to 0.3 mol/L while nitric concentration ranged between 0.75 and 3 mol/L. Dissolution tests, using complementary oxalic-nitric media, were carried out for 550 hours in order to study the kinetic to reach thermodynamic equilibrium. Similar solubility values were reached by dissolution and precipitation. Using the results, it was possible to draw the solubility surface versus oxalic and nitric concentrations and to determine both the apparent solubility constant of UO{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, 3H{sub 2}O (Ks) and the apparent formation constant of the first uranyl-oxalate complex UO{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4} (log {beta}1), for ionic strengths varying between 1 and 3 mol/L. Ks and log {beta}1 values were found to vary from 1.9 10{sup -8} to 9.2 10{sup -9} and from 5.95 to 6.06, respectively, when ionic strength varied from 1 to 3 mol/L. A second model may fit our data obtained at an ionic strength of 3 mol/L suggesting as reported by Moskvin et al. (1959) that no complexes are formed for [H{sup +}] at 3 M. The Ks value would then be 1.3 10{sup -8}. (authors)

  1. Microscopic views of drug solubility

    OpenAIRE

    Bondesson, Laban

    2006-01-01

    The development of computational models for predicting drug solubility has increased drastically during the last decades. Nevertheless these models still have diffculties to estimate the aqueous solubility as accurate as desired. In this thesis di erent aspects that are known to have a large impact on the aqueous solubility of a molecule have been studied in detail using various theoretical methods with intension to provide microscopic view on drug solubility. The rst aspect studied is the hy...

  2. Pulsation-limited oxygen diffusion in the tumour microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milotti, Edoardo; Stella, Sabrina; Chignola, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxia is central to tumour evolution, growth, invasion and metastasis. Mathematical models of hypoxia based on reaction-diffusion equations provide seemingly incomplete descriptions as they fail to predict the measured oxygen concentrations in the tumour microenvironment. In an attempt to explain the discrepancies, we consider both the inhomogeneous distribution of oxygen-consuming cells in solid tumours and the dynamics of blood flow in the tumour microcirculation. We find that the low-frequency oscillations play an important role in the establishment of tumour hypoxia. The oscillations interact with consumption to inhibit oxygen diffusion in the microenvironment. This suggests that alpha-blockers-a class of drugs used to treat hypertension and stress disorders, and known to lower or even abolish low-frequency oscillations of arterial blood flow -may act as adjuvant drugs in the radiotherapy of solid tumours by enhancing the oxygen effect.

  3. Effect of papaya seed extract on microenvironment of cauda epididymis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.J. Verma; N.J. Chinoy

    2001-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of aqueous Carica papaya seed extract on microenvironment of cauda epididymis.Methods: Adult male albino rats were intrauscularly administered with 0 (control) or 0.5 mg papaya seed ex tract/kg body weight for 7 days. Cauda epididymal tubular content was collected by micropuncture technique; epididy real luminal fluid and sperm pellets were separately analyzed. Results: The results revealed that the extract treat ment caused significant reduction, as compared with control, in total protein and sialic acid contents in both epididymal fluid and sperm pellet. As compared with control, significantly lowered acid phosphatase activity was recorded in spermpellet but was higher in epididymal fluid after the treatment. The extract treatment also caused significant reduction in level of inorganic phosphorus in the ePididymal fluid. Conclusion: It is concluded that the aqueous papaya seed ex tract alters cauda epididymal microenvironment.

  4. Microenvironment-Driven Resistance to BRAF Inhibition Comes of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Dinoop Ravindran; Schaider, Helmut

    2015-12-01

    Increasingly comprehensive observations indicate that the tumor microenvironment contributes to drug resistance toward small molecule inhibitors. Fedorenko et al. describe a role for fibroblasts in creating a favorable niche for melanoma cell survival if treated with the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib. TGF-β released by vemurafenib-treated melanoma cells stimulated fibroblasts for increased α-smooth muscle actin, neuregulin (NRG), and fibronectin expression. Off-target effects of vemurafenib led to paradoxical secretion of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) by fibroblasts. Combined inhibition of BRAF/MET/HER kinases was insufficient to reverse the protective effect of the fibroblasts, whereas reversal was achieved by combined BRAF/PI3K inhibition. A thorough understanding of the complex spatiotemporal interactions in tumor microenvironments holds promise for improved targeting using combination therapies in patients with melanoma.

  5. Engineering three-dimensional cell mechanical microenvironment with hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guoyou; Wang, Lin; Wang, Shuqi; Han, Yulong; Wu, Jinhui; Zhang, Qiancheng; Xu, Feng; Lu, Tian Jian

    2012-12-01

    Cell mechanical microenvironment (CMM) significantly affects cell behaviors such as spreading, migration, proliferation and differentiation. However, most studies on cell response to mechanical stimulation are based on two-dimensional (2D) planar substrates, which cannot mimic native three-dimensional (3D) CMM. Accumulating evidence has shown that there is a significant difference in cell behavior in 2D and 3D microenvironments. Among the materials used for engineering 3D CMM, hydrogels have gained increasing attention due to their tunable properties (e.g. chemical and mechanical properties). In this paper, we provide an overview of recent advances in engineering hydrogel-based 3D CMM. Effects of mechanical cues (e.g. hydrogel stiffness and externally induced stress/strain in hydrogels) on cell behaviors are described. A variety of approaches to load mechanical stimuli in 3D hydrogel-based constructs are also discussed.

  6. A study for radiation-related tumor microenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Young Sook; Hong, Seok Il; Kim, Young Soon; Jin Yong Jae; Lee, Tae Hee; Chung, Eun Kyung; Yi, Jae Yeun; Park, Myung Jin; Kim, Yun Young; Kang, Sin Keun

    1999-04-01

    In this study, we attempted to elucidate the mechanism involved in radiation-induced modification and changes of biological factors and physicochemical factors of tumor microenvironment and develop techniques and agents for the modification of tumor microenvironment which is favorable for efficient radio-cancer therapy based on our basic study. We established in vitro tumor invasion and angiogenesis model, elucidated the importance of MMPs activation and the MMPs/TIMPs complex in the invasive transition of tumor. Furthermore we showed the signaling pathway for MMPs induction through EGF receptor and TGF beta 1 stimulated E-M transition. We also established primary culture of human endothelial cells and tubule forming condition which is utilized for the detection of novel angiogenic factors. We also identified hypoxia induced signaling pathway and showed that GBE improved blood perfusion which may increase the effectiveness of radio-cancer therapy.

  7. Remodelling the vascular microenvironment of glioblastoma with alpha-particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behling, Katja; Maguire, William F.; Di Gialleonardo, Valentina; Heeb, Lukas E.M.; Hassan, Iman F.; Veach, Darren R.; Keshari, Kayvan R.; Gutin, Philip H.; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Tumors escape anti-angiogenic therapy by activation of pro-angiogenic signaling pathways. Bevacizumab is approved for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma, but patients inevitably develop resistance to this angiogenic inhibitor. We investigated targeted α-particle therapy with 225Ac-E4G10 as an anti-vascular approach and previously showed increased survival and tumor control in a high-grade transgenic orthotopic glioblastoma model. Here we investigate changes in tumor-vascular morphology and functionality caused by 225Ac-E4G10. Methods We investigated remodeling of tumor microenvironment in transgenic Ntva glioblastoma mice using a therapeutic 7.4 kBq dose of 225Ac-E4G10. Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical analyses imaged morphological changes in the tumor blood brain barrier microenvironment. Multi-color flow cytometry quantified the endothelial progenitor cell population in the bone marrow. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaged functional changes of the tumor vascular network. Results The mechanism of drug action is a combination of glioblastoma vascular microenvironment remodeling, edema relief, and depletion of regulatory T and endothelial progenitor cells. The primary remodeling event is the reduction of both endothelial and perivascular cell populations. Tumor-associated edema and necrosis was lessened and resulted in increased perfusion and reduced diffusion. Pharmacological uptake of dasatinib into tumor was enhanced following α-particle therapy. Conclusion Targeted anti-vascular α-particle radiation remodels the glioblastoma vascular microenvironment via a multimodal mechanism of action and provides insight into the vascular architecture of Platelet-derived growth factor driven glioblastoma. PMID:27261519

  8. Microenvironments and Signaling Pathways Regulating Early Dissemination, Dormancy, and Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    in different target organs. We then processed them using the C1 Fluidigm system and submitted these samples for RNAseq analysis. This effort was...microenvironment. Plans for the coming year: We will receive complete RNAseq data soon and perform bioinformatics analysis to compare the expression...protocol to obtain single-cell RNASeq using C1 Single-Cell and Illumina Systems. This pipeline was applied for single cell analysis from early cancer

  9. Obesity, metabolism and the microenvironment: Links to cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Historically, cancer research has focused on identifying mutations or amplification of genes within the tumor, which informed the development of targeted therapies against affected pathways. This work often considers tumor cells in isolation; however, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the microenvironment surrounding tumor cells strongly influences tumor onset and progression. This is the so-called "seed and soil" hypothesis wherein the seed (cancer cell) is fed and molded by the meta...

  10. Tissue-engineered microenvironment systems for modeling human vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourovskaia, Anna; Fauver, Mark; Kramer, Gregory; Simonson, Sara; Neumann, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The high attrition rate of drug candidates late in the development process has led to an increasing demand for test assays that predict clinical outcome better than conventional 2D cell culture systems and animal models. Government agencies, the military, and the pharmaceutical industry have started initiatives for the development of novel in-vitro systems that recapitulate functional units of human tissues and organs. There is growing evidence that 3D cell arrangement, co-culture of different cell types, and physico-chemical cues lead to improved predictive power. A key element of all tissue microenvironments is the vasculature. Beyond transporting blood the microvasculature assumes important organ-specific functions. It is also involved in pathologic conditions, such as inflammation, tumor growth, metastasis, and degenerative diseases. To provide a tool for modeling this important feature of human tissue microenvironments, we developed a microfluidic chip for creating tissue-engineered microenvironment systems (TEMS) composed of tubular cell structures. Our chip design encompasses a small chamber that is filled with an extracellular matrix (ECM) surrounding one or more tubular channels. Endothelial cells (ECs) seeded into the channels adhere to the ECM walls and grow into perfusable tubular tissue structures that are fluidically connected to upstream and downstream fluid channels in the chip. Using these chips we created models of angiogenesis, the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and tumor-cell extravasation. Our angiogenesis model recapitulates true angiogenesis, in which sprouting occurs from a "parent" vessel in response to a gradient of growth factors. Our BBB model is composed of a microvessel generated from brain-specific ECs within an ECM populated with astrocytes and pericytes. Our tumor-cell extravasation model can be utilized to visualize and measure tumor-cell migration through vessel walls into the surrounding matrix. The described technology can be used

  11. Lifetime-based sensing:  influence of the microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draxler, S; Lippitsch, M E

    1996-03-01

    The influence of the microenvironment on the fluorescence behavior of indicator molecules is investigated. A model is developed to describe the fluorescence decay of indicator molecules in a nonuniform medium. Its consequences for fluorescence lifetime-based chemical sensors are discussed and verified in two examples, namely, a pH sensor using a pyrene compound in a hydrogel and a ruthenium complex for oxygen sensing embedded in a polystyrene membrane.

  12. NFAT Signaling and the Tumorigenic Microenvironment of the Prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    two main areas ( divided into 3 specific aims). First, the detailed study of the tumorigenic microenvironment and the correlation between NFATc1 and...antigen deprivation in mice with NFAT activation in the prostate. We have completed the study if termination of NFATc1 activation halts prostate...of the prostate gland and for the survival and proliferation of the epithelial cells,2 androgen deprivation has been a key therapeutic strategy in

  13. Effect of pazopanib on tumor microenvironment and liposome delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Tailor, Tina D.; Hanna, Gabi; Yarmolenko, Pavel S.; Dreher, Matthew R.; Betof, Allison S.; Nixon, Andrew B.; Spasojevic, Ivan; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    Pathological angiogenesis creates an abnormal microenvironment in solid tumors, characterized by elevated interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) and hypoxia. Emerging theories suggest that judicious downregulation of pro-angiogenic signaling pathways may transiently “normalize” the vascular bed, making it more suitable for drug delivery and radiotherapy. In this work, we investigate the role of pazopanib, a small-molecule inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors and platele...

  14. Monitoring changes of tumor microenvironment in colorectal submucosa using multiphoton microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jingting; Jiang, Weizhong; Yang, Yinghong; Feng, Changyin; Chen, Zhifen; Guan, Guoxian; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2015-01-01

    Recently, targeting tumor microenvironment has become a novel approach for cancer therapy. Collagen is one of important components of tissue microenvironment, and has been considered as a new visible target for cancer therapy. In this work, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) was used to monitor the changes of collagen in tumor microenvironment during tumor progression. It was found that MPM facilitates imaging of tumor cells and collagen. MPM images in different tumor microenvironment during tumor progression shows obvious increase in cell number and collagen degration. In addition, the quantitative analysis of collagen content and orientation index in tumor microenvironment shows significant alteration during tumor progression. These results suggest that MPM has the ability to monitor the changes of collagen morphology in tumor microenvironment and quantify content and orientation index of collagen during tumor progression. Therefore this technique is a powerful imaging tool for the investigation of targeting tumor microenvironment for cancer therapy. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Current Multistage Drug Delivery Systems Based on the Tumor Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Binlong; Dai, Wenbing; He, Bing; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xueqing; Wang, Yiguang; Zhang, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    The development of traditional tumor-targeted drug delivery systems based on EPR effect and receptor-mediated endocytosis is very challenging probably because of the biological complexity of tumors as well as the limitations in the design of the functional nano-sized delivery systems. Recently, multistage drug delivery systems (Ms-DDS) triggered by various specific tumor microenvironment stimuli have emerged for tumor therapy and imaging. In response to the differences in the physiological blood circulation, tumor microenvironment, and intracellular environment, Ms-DDS can change their physicochemical properties (such as size, hydrophobicity, or zeta potential) to achieve deeper tumor penetration, enhanced cellular uptake, timely drug release, as well as effective endosomal escape. Based on these mechanisms, Ms-DDS could deliver maximum quantity of drugs to the therapeutic targets including tumor tissues, cells, and subcellular organelles and eventually exhibit the highest therapeutic efficacy. In this review, we expatiate on various responsive modes triggered by the tumor microenvironment stimuli, introduce recent advances in multistage nanoparticle systems, especially the multi-stimuli responsive delivery systems, and discuss their functions, effects, and prospects. PMID:28255348

  16. Role of the Microenvironment in Ovarian Cancer Stem Cell Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquier, Jennifer; Rafii, Arash

    2013-01-01

    Despite recent progresses in cancer therapy and increased knowledge in cancer biology, ovarian cancer remains a challenging condition. Among the latest concepts developed in cancer biology, cancer stem cells and the role of microenvironment in tumor progression seem to be related. Indeed, cancer stem cells have been described in several solid tumors including ovarian cancers. These particular cells have the ability to self-renew and reconstitute a heterogeneous tumor. They are characterized by specific surface markers and display resistance to therapeutic regimens. During development, specific molecular cues from the tumor microenvironment can play a role in maintaining and expanding stemness of cancer cells. The tumor stroma contains several compartments: cellular component, cytokine network, and extracellular matrix. These different compartments interact to form a permissive niche for the cancer stem cells. Understanding the molecular cues underlying this crosstalk will allow the design of new therapeutic regimens targeting the niche. In this paper, we will discuss the mechanisms implicated in the interaction between ovarian cancer stem cells and their microenvironment. PMID:23484135

  17. Tumor microenvironment-mediated chemoresistance in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velaei, Kobra; Samadi, Nasser; Barazvan, Balal; Soleimani Rad, Jafar

    2016-12-01

    Therapy resistance or tumor relapse in cancer is common. Tumors develop resistance to chemotherapeutic through a variety of mechanisms, with tumor microenvironment (TM) serving pivotal roles. Using breast cancer as a paradigm, we propose that responses of cancer cells to drugs are not exclusively determined by their intrinsic characteristics but are also controlled by deriving signals from TM. Affected microenvironment by chemotherapy is an avenue to promote phenotype which tends to resist on to be ruined. Therefore, exclusively targeting cancer cells does not demolish tumor recurrence after chemotherapy. Regardless of tumor-microenvironment pathways and their profound influence on the responsiveness of treatment, diversity of molecular properties of breast cancer also behave differently in terms of response to chemotherapy. And also it is assumed that there is cross-talk between phenotypic diversity and TM. Collectively, raising complex signal from TM in chemotherapy condition often encourages cancer cells are not killed but strengthen. Here, we summarized how TM modifies responses to chemotherapy in breast cancer. We also discussed successful treatment strategies have been considered TM in breast cancer treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Intraportal islet transplantation: the impact of the liver microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaune, Vaihere; Berney, Thierry; Lacotte, Stéphanie; Toso, Christian

    2017-03-01

    The portal vein remains the preferred site for pancreatic islet transplantation due to its easy access and low morbidity. However, despite great progress in isolation and transplantation protocols over the past few years, it is still associated with the early loss of some 50-70% of transplanted islets. The complex liver microenvironment itself presumably plays an important role in this loss. The present review focuses on the specifics of the liver microenvironment, notably the localized hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury following transplantation, the low oxygenation of the portal vein, the instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction, the endogenous liver immune system, and the gut-liver axis, and how they can each have an impact on the transplanted islets. It identifies the potential, or already applied, clinical interventions for improving intraportal islet survival, and pinpoints those promising areas still lacking preclinical research. Future interventions on clinical intraportal islet transplantation need to take into account the global context of the liver microenvironment, with multi-point interventions being most likely to improve early islet survival and engraftment. © 2017 The Authors. Transplant International published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Steunstichting ESOT.

  19. Composite alginate gels for tunable cellular microenvironment mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavari, Adele; Nydén, Magnus; Weitz, David A.; Ehrlicher, Allen J.

    2016-08-01

    The mechanics of the cellular microenvironment can be as critical as biochemistry in directing cell behavior. Many commonly utilized materials derived from extra-cellular-matrix create excellent scaffolds for cell growth, however, evaluating the relative mechanical and biochemical effects independently in 3D environments has been difficult in frequently used biopolymer matrices. Here we present 3D sodium alginate hydrogel microenvironments over a physiological range of stiffness (E = 1.85 to 5.29 kPa), with and without RGD binding sites or collagen fibers. We use confocal microscopy to measure the growth of multi-cellular aggregates (MCAs), of increasing metastatic potential in different elastic moduli of hydrogels, with and without binding factors. We find that the hydrogel stiffness regulates the growth and morphology of these cell clusters; MCAs grow larger and faster in the more rigid environments similar to cancerous breast tissue (E = 4–12 kPa) as compared to healthy tissue (E = 0.4–2 kpa). Adding binding factors from collagen and RGD peptides increases growth rates, and change maximum MCA sizes. These findings demonstrate the utility of these independently tunable mechanical/biochemistry gels, and that mechanical confinement in stiffer microenvironments may increase cell proliferation.

  20. Obesity, metabolism and the microenvironment: Links to cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Sneha; Johnson, Amy R.; Makowski, Liza

    2013-01-01

    Historically, cancer research has focused on identifying mutations or amplification of genes within the tumor, which informed the development of targeted therapies against affected pathways. This work often considers tumor cells in isolation; however, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the microenvironment surrounding tumor cells strongly influences tumor onset and progression. This is the so-called “seed and soil” hypothesis wherein the seed (cancer cell) is fed and molded by the metabolites, growth factors, modifications of the extracellular matrix or angiogenic factors provided by the soil (or stroma). Currently, 65% of the US population is obese or overweight; similarly staggering figures are reported in US children and globally. Obesity mediates and can exacerbate, both normal and tumor microenvironment dysfunction. Many obesity-associated endocrine, metabolic and inflammatory mediators are suspected to play a role in oncogenesis by modifying systemic nutrient metabolism and the nutrient substrates available locally in the stroma. It is vitally important to understand the biological processes linking obesity and cancer to develop better intervention strategies aimed at curbing the carcinogenic events associated with obesity. In this review, obesity-driven changes in both the normal and tumor microenvironment, alterations in metabolism, and release of signaling molecules such as endocrine, growth, and inflammatory mediators will be highlighted. In addition, we will discuss the effects of the timing of obesity onset or particular “windows of susceptibility,” with a focus on breast cancer etiology. PMID:24227994

  1. Obesity, metabolism and the microenvironment: Links to cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sneha Sundaram

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Historically, cancer research has focused on identifying mutations or amplification of genes within the tumor, which informed the development of targeted therapies against affected pathways. This work often considers tumor cells in isolation; however, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the microenvironment surrounding tumor cells strongly influences tumor onset and progression. This is the so-called "seed and soil" hypothesis wherein the seed (cancer cell is fed and molded by the metabolites, growth factors, modifications of the extracellular matrix or angiogenic factors provided by the soil (or stroma. Currently, 65% of the US population is obese or overweight; similarly staggering figures are reported in US children and globally. Obesity mediates and can exacerbate, both normal and tumor microenvironment dysfunction. Many obesity-associated endocrine, metabolic and inflammatory mediators are suspected to play a role in oncogenesis by modifying systemic nutrient metabolism and the nutrient substrates available locally in the stroma. It is vitally important to understand the biological processes linking obesity and cancer to develop better intervention strategies aimed at curbing the carcinogenic events associated with obesity. In this review, obesity-driven changes in both the normal and tumor microenvironment, alterations in metabolism, and release of signaling molecules such as endocrine, growth, and inflammatory mediators will be highlighted. In addition, we will discuss the effects of the timing of obesity onset or particular "windows of susceptibility," with a focus on breast cancer etiology.

  2. Aging of the microenvironment influences clonality in hematopoiesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virag Vas

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of the age-associated exponential increase in the incidence of leukemia are not known in detail. Leukemia as well as aging are initiated and regulated in multi-factorial fashion by cell-intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The role of aging of the microenvironment for leukemia initiation/progression has not been investigated in great detail so far. Clonality in hematopoiesis is tightly linked to the initiation of leukemia. Based on a retroviral-insertion mutagenesis approach to generate primitive hematopoietic cells with an intrinsic potential for clonal expansion, we determined clonality of transduced hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs exposed to a young or aged microenvironment in vivo. While HPCs displayed primarily oligo-clonality within a young microenvironment, aged animals transplanted with identical pool of cells displayed reduced clonality within transduced HPCs. Our data show that an aged niche exerts a distinct selection pressure on dominant HPC-clones thus facilitating the transition to mono-clonality, which might be one underlying cause for the increased age-associated incidence of leukemia.

  3. Precision assembly of complex cellular microenvironments using holographic optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkham, Glen R; Britchford, Emily; Upton, Thomas; Ware, James; Gibson, Graham M; Devaud, Yannick; Ehrbar, Martin; Padgett, Miles; Allen, Stephanie; Buttery, Lee D; Shakesheff, Kevin

    2015-02-26

    The accurate study of cellular microenvironments is limited by the lack of technologies that can manipulate cells in 3D at a sufficiently small length scale. The ability to build and manipulate multicellular microscopic structures will facilitate a more detailed understanding of cellular function in fields such as developmental and stem cell biology. We present a holographic optical tweezers based technology to accurately generate bespoke cellular micro-architectures. Using embryonic stem cells, 3D structures of varying geometries were created and stabilized using hydrogels and cell-cell adhesion methods. Control of chemical microenvironments was achieved by the temporal release of specific factors from polymer microparticles positioned within these constructs. Complex co-culture micro-environmental analogues were also generated to reproduce structures found within adult stem cell niches. The application of holographic optical tweezers-based micromanipulation will enable novel insights into biological microenvironments by allowing researchers to form complex architectures with sub-micron precision of cells, matrices and molecules.

  4. SECs (Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells), Liver Microenvironment, and Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Vaishaali; Harris, Edward N.

    2017-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a wound-healing response to chronic liver injury such as alcoholic/nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and viral hepatitis with no FDA-approved treatments. Liver fibrosis results in a continual accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and paves the way for replacement of parenchyma with nonfunctional scar tissue. The fibrotic condition results in drastic changes in the local mechanical, chemical, and biological microenvironment of the tissue. Liver parenchyma is supported by an efficient network of vasculature lined by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs). These nonparenchymal cells are highly specialized resident endothelial cell type with characteristic morphological and functional features. Alterations in LSECs phenotype including lack of LSEC fenestration, capillarization, and formation of an organized basement membrane have been shown to precede fibrosis and promote hepatic stellate cell activation. Here, we review the interplay of LSECs with the dynamic changes in the fibrotic liver microenvironment such as matrix rigidity, altered ECM protein profile, and cell-cell interactions to provide insight into the pivotal changes in LSEC physiology and the extent to which it mediates the progression of liver fibrosis. Establishing the molecular aspects of LSECs in the light of fibrotic microenvironment is valuable towards development of novel therapeutic and diagnostic targets of liver fibrosis. PMID:28293634

  5. Proteoglycans in cancer biology, tumour microenvironment and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iozzo, Renato V; Sanderson, Ralph D

    2011-05-01

    Proteoglycans, key molecular effectors of cell surface and pericellular microenvironments, perform multiple functions in cancer and angiogenesis by virtue of their polyhedric nature and their ability to interact with both ligands and receptors that regulate neoplastic growth and neovascularization. Some proteoglycans such as perlecan, have pro- and anti-angiogenic activities, whereas other proteoglycans, such as syndecans and glypicans, can also directly affect cancer growth by modulating key signalling pathways. The bioactivity of these proteoglycans is further modulated by several classes of enzymes within the tumour microenvironment: (i) sheddases that cleave transmembrane or cell-associated syndecans and glypicans, (ii) various proteinases that cleave the protein core of pericellular proteoglycans and (iii) heparanases and endosulfatases which modify the structure and bioactivity of various heparan sulphate proteoglycans and their bound growth factors. In contrast, some of the small leucine-rich proteoglycans, such as decorin and lumican, act as tumour repressors by physically antagonizing receptor tyrosine kinases including the epidermal growth factor and the Met receptors or integrin receptors thereby evoking anti-survival and pro-apoptotic pathways. In this review we will critically assess the expanding repertoire of molecular interactions attributed to various proteoglycans and will discuss novel proteoglycan functions modulating cancer progression, invasion and metastasis and how these factors regulate the tumour microenvironment.

  6. Probing sol-gel matrices microenvironments by PGSE HR-MAS NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ana S D; Barreiros, Susana; Cabrita, Eurico J

    2017-05-01

    We applied Pulsed Gradient Spin Echo diffusion with high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR to study sol-gel matrices used to encapsulate enzymes for biocatalysis (TMOS/MTMS and TMOS/BTMS) to gain insight into the local chemical microenvironment. Transport properties of solvents with different polarities (1-pentanol, acetonitrile and n-hexane) were studied through their apparent self-diffusion coefficients. The spin echo attenuation of the solvents shows two distinct diffusion domains, one with fast diffusion (Dfast ) associated with interparticle diffusion and another with slow diffusion (Dslow ) corresponding to the displacement inside the pores within the sol-gel particles. The analysis of the root mean square displacements at different diffusion times showed that the Dfast domain has a free diffusion regime in both matrices (the root mean square displacement is linearly dependent of the diffusion time), while the Dslow domain shows a different regime that depends on the matrix. We investigated the exchange regime between the two diffusion sites. In both matrices, n-hexane was in intermediate exchange between diffusion domains, while the polar solvents were in slow exchange in TMOS/BTMS and in intermediate exchange in TMOS/MTMS. Data were fitted for TMOS/BTMS with the Kärger model, and the physical parameters were obtained. The results add to the evidence that the pores are a hydrophobic environment but that the presence of some free hydrophilic groups inside the pore, as observed in the TMOS/BTMS, has a key role in slowing down the exchange of polar solvents and that this is relevant to explain previously reported enzyme activity in these materials. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Soluble porphyrin polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gust, Jr., John Devens; Liddell, Paul Anthony

    2015-07-07

    Porphyrin polymers of Structure 1, where n is an integer (e.g., 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or greater) ##STR00001## are synthesized by the method shown in FIGS. 2A and 2B. The porphyrin polymers of Structure 1 are soluble in organic solvents such as 2-MeTHF and the like, and can be synthesized in bulk (i.e., in processes other than electropolymerization). These porphyrin polymers have long excited state lifetimes, making the material suitable as an organic semiconductor for organic electronic devices including transistors and memories, as well as solar cells, sensors, light-emitting devices, and other opto-electronic devices.

  8. Human mammary progenitor cell fate decisions are products of interactions with combinatorial microenvironments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaBarge, Mark A; Nelson, Celeste M; Villadsen, Rene; Fridriksdottir, Agla; Ruth, Jason R; Stampfer, Martha R; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2008-09-19

    In adult tissues, multi-potent progenitor cells are some of the most primitive members of the developmental hierarchies that maintain homeostasis. That progenitors and their more mature progeny share identical genomes, suggests that fate decisions are directed by interactions with extrinsic soluble factors, ECM, and other cells, as well as physical properties of the ECM. To understand regulation of fate decisions, therefore, would require a means of understanding carefully choreographed combinatorial interactions. Here we used microenvironment protein microarrays to functionally identify combinations of cell-extrinsic mammary gland proteins and ECM molecules that imposed specific cell fates on bipotent human mammary progenitor cells. Micropatterned cell culture surfaces were fabricated to distinguish between the instructive effects of cell-cell versus cell-ECM interactions, as well as constellations of signaling molecules; and these were used in conjunction with physiologically relevant 3 dimensional human breast cultures. Both immortalized and primary human breast progenitors were analyzed. We report on the functional ability of those proteins of the mammary gland that maintain quiescence, maintain the progenitor state, and guide progenitor differentiation towards myoepithelial and luminal lineages.

  9. Engineering the human pluripotent stem cell microenvironment to direct cell fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazeltine, Laurie B.; Selekman, Joshua A.; Palecek, Sean P.

    2013-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including both embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, offer a potential cell source for research, drug screening, and regenerative medicine applications due to their unique ability to self-renew or differentiate to any somatic cell type. Before the full potential of hPSCs can be realized, robust protocols must be developed to direct their fate. Cell fate decisions are based on components of the surrounding microenvironment, including soluble factors, substrate or extracellular matrix, cell-cell interactions, mechanical forces, and 2D or 3D architecture. Depending on their spatio-temporal context, these components can signal hPSCs to either self-renew or differentiate to cell types of the ectoderm, mesoderm, or endoderm. Researchers working at the interface of engineering and biology have identified various factors which can affect hPSC fate, often based on lessons from embryonic development, and they have utilized this information to design in vitro niches which can reproducibly direct hPSC fate. This review highlights culture systems that have been engineered to promote self-renewal or differentiation of hPSCs, with a focus on studies that have elucidated the contributions of specific microenvironmental cues in the context of those culture systems. We propose the use of microsystems technologies for high-throughput screening of spatial-temporal presentation of cues, as this has been demonstrated to be a powerful approach for differentiating hPSCs to desired cell types. PMID:23510904

  10. Monocyte/macrophage-derived soluble CD163: A novel biomarker in multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Nørgaard; Abildgaard, Niels; Maniecki, Maciej B

    2014-01-01

    fluids (soluble CD163, sCD163). In this study, we examined serum sCD163 as a biomarker in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. METHODS: Peripheral blood (n = 104) and bone marrow (n = 17) levels of sCD163 were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: At diagnosis, high s......CD163 was associated with higher stage according to the International Staging System (ISS) and with other known prognostic factors in multiple myeloma (creatinine, C-reactive protein, and beta-2 microglobulin). Soluble CD163 decreased upon high-dose treatment, and in a multivariate survival analysis...... in bone marrow samples than in the matched blood samples, which indicate a localized production of sCD163 within the bone marrow microenvironment. CONCLUSIONS: Soluble CD163 was found to be a prognostic marker in patients with multiple myeloma. This may indicate that macrophages and/or monocytes have...

  11. The E1 copper binding domain of full-length amyloid precursor protein mitigates copper-induced growth inhibition in brain metastatic prostate cancer DU145 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gough, Mallory, E-mail: m.gough1@lancaster.ac.uk; Blanthorn-Hazell, Sophee, E-mail: s.blanthorn-hazell@lancaster.ac.uk; Delury, Craig, E-mail: c.delury@lancaster.ac.uk; Parkin, Edward, E-mail: e.parkin@lancaster.ac.uk

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: • Copper levels are elevated in the tumour microenvironment. • APP mitigates copper-induced growth inhibition of DU145 prostate cancer (PCa) cells. • The APP intracellular domain is a prerequisite; soluble forms have no effect. • The E1 CuBD of APP is also a prerequisite. • APP copper binding potentially mitigates copper-induced PCa cell growth inhibition. - Abstract: Copper plays an important role in the aetiology and growth of tumours and levels of the metal are increased in the serum and tumour tissue of patients affected by a range of cancers including prostate cancer (PCa). The molecular mechanisms that enable cancer cells to proliferate in the presence of elevated copper levels are, therefore, of key importance in our understanding of tumour growth progression. In the current study, we have examined the role played by the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in mitigating copper-induced growth inhibition of the PCa cell line, DU145. A range of APP molecular constructs were stably over-expressed in DU145 cells and their effects on cell proliferation in the presence of copper were monitored. Our results show that endogenous APP expression was induced by sub-toxic copper concentrations in DU145 cells and over-expression of the wild-type protein was able to mitigate copper-induced growth inhibition via a mechanism involving the cytosolic and E1 copper binding domains of the full-length protein. APP likely represents one of a range of copper binding proteins that PCa cells employ in order to ensure efficient proliferation despite elevated concentrations of the metal within the tumour microenvironment. Targeting the expression of such proteins may contribute to therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancers.

  12. Obesity and Cancer Mechanisms: Tumor Microenvironment and Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyengar, Neil M; Gucalp, Ayca; Dannenberg, Andrew J; Hudis, Clifford A

    2016-12-10

    Purpose There is growing evidence that inflammation is a central and reversible mechanism through which obesity promotes cancer risk and progression. Methods We review recent findings regarding obesity-associated alterations in the microenvironment and the local and systemic mechanisms through which these changes support tumor growth. Results Locally, hyperadiposity is associated with altered adipose tissue function, adipocyte death, and chronic low-grade inflammation. Most individuals who are obese harbor inflamed adipose tissue, which resembles chronically injured tissue, with immune cell infiltration and remodeling. Within this distinctly altered local environment, several pathophysiologic changes are found that may promote breast and other cancers. Consistently, adipose tissue inflammation is associated with a worse prognosis in patients with breast and tongue cancers. Systemically, the metabolic syndrome, including dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, occurs in the setting of adipose inflammation and operates in concert with local mechanisms to sustain the inflamed microenvironment and promote tumor growth. Importantly, adipose inflammation and its protumor consequences can be found in some individuals who are not considered to be obese or overweight by body mass index. Conclusion The tumor-promoting effects of obesity occur at the local level via adipose inflammation and associated alterations in the microenvironment, as well as systemically via circulating metabolic and inflammatory mediators associated with adipose inflammation. Accurately characterizing the obese state and identifying patients at increased risk for cancer development and progression will likely require more precise assessments than body mass index alone. Biomarkers of adipose tissue inflammation would help to identify high-risk populations. Moreover, adipose inflammation is a reversible process and represents a novel therapeutic target that warrants further study to break the obesity

  13. Engineered nanomedicine for myeloma and bone microenvironment targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Archana; Reagan, Michaela R; Basto, Pamela; Mishima, Yuji; Kamaly, Nazila; Glavey, Siobhan; Zhang, Sufeng; Moschetta, Michele; Seevaratnam, Dushanth; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Jinhe; Memarzadeh, Masoumeh; Wu, Jun; Manier, Salomon; Shi, Jinjun; Bertrand, Nicolas; Lu, Zhi Ning; Nagano, Kenichi; Baron, Roland; Sacco, Antonio; Roccaro, Aldo M; Farokhzad, Omid C; Ghobrial, Irene M

    2014-07-15

    Bone is a favorable microenvironment for tumor growth and a frequent destination for metastatic cancer cells. Targeting cancers within the bone marrow remains a crucial oncologic challenge due to issues of drug availability and microenvironment-induced resistance. Herein, we engineered bone-homing polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) for spatiotemporally controlled delivery of therapeutics to bone, which diminish off-target effects and increase local drug concentrations. The NPs consist of poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), polyethylene glycol (PEG), and bisphosphonate (or alendronate, a targeting ligand). The engineered NPs were formulated by blending varying ratios of the synthesized polymers: PLGA-b-PEG and alendronate-conjugated polymer PLGA-b-PEG-Ald, which ensured long circulation and targeting capabilities, respectively. The bone-binding ability of Ald-PEG-PLGA NPs was investigated by hydroxyapatite binding assays and ex vivo imaging of adherence to bone fragments. In vivo biodistribution of fluorescently labeled NPs showed higher retention, accumulation, and bone homing of targeted Ald-PEG-PLGA NPs, compared with nontargeted PEG-PLGA NPs. A library of bortezomib-loaded NPs (bone-targeted Ald-Bort-NPs and nontargeted Bort-NPs) were developed and screened for optimal physiochemical properties, drug loading, and release profiles. Ald-Bort-NPs were tested for efficacy in mouse models of multiple myeloma (MM). Results demonstrated significantly enhanced survival and decreased tumor burden in mice pretreated with Ald-Bort-NPs versus Ald-Empty-NPs (no drug) or the free drug. We also observed that bortezomib, as a pretreatment regimen, modified the bone microenvironment and enhanced bone strength and volume. Our findings suggest that NP-based anticancer therapies with bone-targeting specificity comprise a clinically relevant method of drug delivery that can inhibit tumor progression in MM.

  14. Dysregulated pH in Tumor Microenvironment Checkmates Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaleh Barar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The dysregulation of pH by cancerous cells of solid tumors is able to create a unique milieu that is in favor of progression, invasion and metastasis as well as chemo-/immuno-resistance traits of solid tumors. Bioelements involved in pH dysregulation provide new set of oncotargets, inhibition of which may result in better clinical outcome. Methods: To study the impacts of pH dysregulation, we investigated the tumor development and progression in relation with Warburg effect, glycolysis and formation of aberrant tumor microenvironment. Results: The upregulation of glucose transporter GLUT-1 and several enzymes involve in glycolysis exacerbates this phenomenon. The accumulation of lactic acids in cancer cells provokes upregulation of several transport machineries (MCT-1, NHE-1, CA IX and H+ pump V-ATPase resulting in reinforced efflux of proton into extracellular fluid. This deviant event makes pH to be settled at 7.4 and 6.6 respectively in cancer cells cytoplasm and extracellular fluid within the tumor microenvironment, which in return triggers secretion of lysosomal components (various enzymes in acidic milieu with pH 5 into cytoplasm. All these anomalous phenomena make tumor microenvironment (TME to be exposed to cocktail of various enzymes with acidic pH, upon which extracellular matrix (ECM can be remodeled and even deformed, resulting in emergence of a complex viscose TME with high interstitial fluid pressure. Conclusion: It seems that pH dysregulation is able to remodel various physiologic functions and make solid tumors to become much more invasive and metastatic. It also can cause undesired resistance to chemotherapy and immunotherapy. Hence, cancer therapy needs to be reinforced using specific inhibitors of bioelements involved in pH dysregulation of TME in solid tumors.

  15. Impact of Microenvironment and Stem-Like Plasticity in Cholangiocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raggi, Chiara; Invernizzi, Pietro; Andersen, Jesper Bøje

    2014-01-01

    Clinical complexity, anatomic diversity and molecular heterogeneity of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) represent a major challenge in the assessment of effective targeted therapies. Molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying diversity of CCA growth patterns remain a key issue and a clinical concern...... or tumor microenvironment (TME) likely promotes initiation and progression of this malignancy contributing to its heterogeneity. This review will emphasize the dynamic interplay between stem-like intrinsic and TME-extrinsic pathways, which may represent novel options for multi-targeted therapies in CCA....

  16. Combined Effects of Pericytes in the Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Lopes Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pericytes are multipotent perivascular cells whose involvement in vasculature development is well established. Evidences in the literature also suggest that pericytes display immune properties and that these cells may serve as an in vivo reservoir of stem cells, contributing to the regeneration of diverse tissues. Pericytes are also capable of tumor homing and are important cellular components of the tumor microenvironment (TME. In this review, we highlight the contribution of pericytes to some classical hallmarks of cancer, namely, tumor angiogenesis, growth, metastasis, and evasion of immune destruction, and discuss how collectively these hallmarks could be tackled by therapies targeting pericytes, providing a rationale for cancer drugs aiming at the TME.

  17. Low Dose IR Creates an Oncogenic Microenvironment by Inducing Premature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Zhi-Min [Harvard School of Public Health

    2013-04-28

    Introduction Much of the work addressing ionizing radiation-induced cellular response has been carried out mainly with the traditional cell culture technique involving only one cell type, how cellular response to IR is influenced by the tissue microenvironment remains elusive. By use of a three-dimensional (3D) co-culture system to model critical interactions of different cell types with their neighbors and with their environment, we recently showed that low-dose IR-induced extracellular signaling via the tissue environment affects profoundly cellular responses. This proposal aims at determining the response of mammary epithelial cells in a tissue-like setting.

  18. Switching off malignant mesothelioma: exploiting the hypoxic microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabavi, Noushin; Bennewith, Kevin L; Churg, Andrew; Wang, Yuzhuo; Collins, Colin C; Mutti, Luciano

    2016-11-01

    Malignant mesotheliomas are aggressive, asbestos-related cancers with poor patient prognosis, typically arising in the mesothelial surfaces of tissues in pleural and peritoneal cavity. The relative unspecific symptoms of mesotheliomas, misdiagnoses, and lack of precise targeted therapies call for a more critical assessment of this disease. In the present review, we categorize commonly identified genomic aberrations of mesotheliomas into their canonical pathways and discuss targeting these pathways in the context of tumor hypoxia, a hallmark of cancer known to render solid tumors more resistant to radiation and most chemo-therapy. We then explore the concept that the intrinsic hypoxic microenvironment of mesotheliomas can be Achilles' heel for targeted, multimodal therapeutic intervention.

  19. Probing the luminal microenvironment of reconstituted epithelial microtissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerchiari, Alec E.; Samy, Karen E.; Todhunter, Michael E.; Schlesinger, Erica; Henise, Jeff; Rieken, Christopher; Gartner, Zev J.; Desai, Tejal A.

    2016-01-01

    Polymeric microparticles can serve as carriers or sensors to instruct or characterize tissue biology. However, incorporating microparticles into tissues for in vitro assays remains a challenge. We exploit three-dimensional cell-patterning technologies and directed epithelial self-organization to deliver microparticles to the lumen of reconstituted human intestinal microtissues. We also develop a novel pH-sensitive microsensor that can measure the luminal pH of reconstituted epithelial microtissues. These studies offer a novel approach for investigating luminal microenvironments and drug-delivery across epithelial barriers. PMID:27619235

  20. Brain Metastases from Colorectal Cancer: Microenvironment and Molecular Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Wen Zang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is one of the most common digestive tract malignancies in the world. Owing to the newer and more effective systemic therapies, the life of colorectal cancer patients can be remarkably prolonged, and the incidence of brain metastases is increasing. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms of brain metastasis from colorectal cancer. Here we review the tumor microenvironment and metastasis associated molecules in brain metastases from colorectal cancer. A further understanding of these mechanisms will help us to propose better strategies for colorectal cancer patients with brain metastasis and improve their life quality.

  1. Combined Effects of Pericytes in the Tumor Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Aline Lopes; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith

    2015-01-01

    Pericytes are multipotent perivascular cells whose involvement in vasculature development is well established. Evidences in the literature also suggest that pericytes display immune properties and that these cells may serve as an in vivo reservoir of stem cells, contributing to the regeneration of diverse tissues. Pericytes are also capable of tumor homing and are important cellular components of the tumor microenvironment (TME). In this review, we highlight the contribution of pericytes to some classical hallmarks of cancer, namely, tumor angiogenesis, growth, metastasis, and evasion of immune destruction, and discuss how collectively these hallmarks could be tackled by therapies targeting pericytes, providing a rationale for cancer drugs aiming at the TME. PMID:26000022

  2. Water-soluble cavitands - synthesis, solubilities and binding properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middel, Oskar; Verboom, Willem; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2002-01-01

    Water-soluble cavitand receptors have been obtained by the introduction of ionizable groups (5, 21-28, 39) and neutral hydrophilic tetraethylene glycol based dendritic wedges (19, 20). The synthesis of these cavitands and a study of their water solubilities and binding properties toward neutral orga

  3. Tumor Microenvironment Gene Signature as a Prognostic Classifier and Therapeutic Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0107 TITLE: Tumor Microenvironment Gene Signature as a Prognostic Classifier and Therapeutic Target PRINCIPAL...AND SUBTITLE Tumor Microenvironment Gene Signature as a 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0107 Prognostic Classifier and Therapeutic Target 5b...Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We identified a tumor microenvironment -based activated fibroblast

  4. Novel Therapeutic Targets to Inhibit Tumor Microenvironment Induced Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0163 TITLE: Novel Therapeutic Targets to Inhibit Tumor Microenvironment Induced Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer...15Sep2014 - 14Sep2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0163 Novel Therapeutic Targets to Inhibit Tumor Microenvironment Induced...Annual Progress Report W81XWH-13-1-0163 Novel Therapeutic Targets to Inhibit Tumor Microenvironment Induced Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

  5. A bladder cancer microenvironment simulation system based on a microfluidic co-culture model

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Peng-Fei; Cao, Yan-wei; Zhang, Shu-Dong; Zhao, Yang; Liu, Xiao-guang; Shi, Hao-qing; Hu, Ke-yao; Zhu, Guan-qun; Ma, Bo; Niu, Hai-Tao

    2015-01-01

    A tumor microenvironment may promote tumor metastasis and progression through the dynamic interplay between neoplastic cells and stromal cells. In this work, the most representative and significant stromal cells, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and macrophages were used as vital component elements and combined with bladder cancer cells to construct a bladder cancer microenvironment simulation system. This is the first report to explore bladder cancer microenvironments based on 4 types of cell...

  6. Optimization of translation profiles enhances protein expression and solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Anne-Katrin; Saffert, Paul; Liebeton, Klaus; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-01-01

    mRNA is translated with a non-uniform speed that actively coordinates co-translational folding of protein domains. Using structure-based homology we identified the structural domains in epoxide hydrolases (EHs) and introduced slow-translating codons to delineate the translation of single domains. These changes in translation speed dramatically improved the solubility of two EHs of metagenomic origin in Escherichia coli. Conversely, the importance of transient attenuation for the folding, and consequently solubility, of EH was evidenced with a member of the EH family from Agrobacterium radiobacter, which partitions in the soluble fraction when expressed in E. coli. Synonymous substitutions of codons shaping the slow-transiting regions to fast-translating codons render this protein insoluble. Furthermore, we show that low protein yield can be enhanced by decreasing the free folding energy of the initial 5'-coding region, which can disrupt mRNA secondary structure and enhance ribosomal loading. This study provides direct experimental evidence that mRNA is not a mere messenger for translation of codons into amino acids but bears an additional layer of information for folding, solubility and expression level of the encoded protein. Furthermore, it provides a general frame on how to modulate and fine-tune gene expression of a target protein.

  7. Optimization of translation profiles enhances protein expression and solubility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Katrin Hess

    Full Text Available mRNA is translated with a non-uniform speed that actively coordinates co-translational folding of protein domains. Using structure-based homology we identified the structural domains in epoxide hydrolases (EHs and introduced slow-translating codons to delineate the translation of single domains. These changes in translation speed dramatically improved the solubility of two EHs of metagenomic origin in Escherichia coli. Conversely, the importance of transient attenuation for the folding, and consequently solubility, of EH was evidenced with a member of the EH family from Agrobacterium radiobacter, which partitions in the soluble fraction when expressed in E. coli. Synonymous substitutions of codons shaping the slow-transiting regions to fast-translating codons render this protein insoluble. Furthermore, we show that low protein yield can be enhanced by decreasing the free folding energy of the initial 5'-coding region, which can disrupt mRNA secondary structure and enhance ribosomal loading. This study provides direct experimental evidence that mRNA is not a mere messenger for translation of codons into amino acids but bears an additional layer of information for folding, solubility and expression level of the encoded protein. Furthermore, it provides a general frame on how to modulate and fine-tune gene expression of a target protein.

  8. Impact craters as biospheric microenvironments, Lawn Hill Structure, Northern Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, John; Brasier, Martin

    2006-04-01

    Impact craters on Mars act as traps for eolian sediment and in the past may have provided suitable microenvironments that could have supported and preserved a stressed biosphere. If this is so, terrestrial impact structures such as the 18-km-diameter Lawn Hill Structure, in northern Australia, may prove useful as martian analogs. We sampled outcrop and drill core from the carbonate fill of the Lawn Hill Structure and recorded its gamma-log signature. Facies data along with whole rock geochemistry and stable isotope signatures show that the crater fill is an outlier of the Georgina Basin and was formed by impact at, or shortly before, approximately 509-506 million years ago. Subsequently, it was rapidly engulfed by the Middle Cambrian marine transgression, which filled it with shallow marine carbonates and evaporites. The crater formed a protected but restricted microenvironment in which sediments four times the thickness of the nearby basinal succession accumulated. Similar structures, common on the martian surface, may well have acted as biospheric refuges as the planet's water resources declined. Low-pH aqueous environments on Earth similar to those on Mars, while extreme, support diverse ecologies. The architecture of the eolian crater fill would have been defined by long-term ground water cycles resulting from intermittent precipitation in an extremely arid climate. Nutrient recycling, critical to a closed lacustrine sub-ice biosphere, could be provided by eolian transport onto the frozen water surface.

  9. Apoptosis and the thymic microenvironment in murine lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeoka, Y; Taguchi, N; Shultz, L; Boyd, R L; Naiki, M; Ansari, A A; Gershwin, M E

    1999-11-01

    The thymus of New Zealand black (NZB) mice undergoes premature involution. In addition, cultured thymic epithelial cells from NZB mice undergo accelerated preprogrammed degeneration. NZB mice also have distinctive and well-defined abnormalities of thymic architecture involving stromal cells, defined by staining with monoclonal antibodies specific for the thymic microenvironment. We took advantage of these findings, as well as our large panel of monoclonal antibodies which recognize thymic stroma, to study the induction of apoptosis in the thymus of murine lupus and including changes of epithelial architecture. We studied NZB, MRL/lpr, BXSB/Yaa, C3H/gld mice and BALB/c and C57BL/6 as control mice. Apoptosis was studied both at basal levels and following induction with either dexamethasone or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The apoptotic cells were primarily found in the thymic cortex, and the frequency of apoptosis in murine lupus was less than 20% of controls. Moreover, all strains of murine lupus had severe abnormalities of the cortical network. These changes were not accentuated by dexamethasone treatment in cultured thymocytes. However, the thymus in murine lupus was less susceptible to LPS-induced apoptosis than control mice. Finally we note that the number of thymic nurse cells (TNC) was lowest in NZB mice. Our findings demonstrate significant abnormalities in the induction of apoptosis and the formation of TNC-like epithelial cells in SLE mice, and suggest that the abnormalities of the thymic microenvironment have an important role in the pathogenesis of murine lupus.

  10. Multiple Myeloma Macrophages: Pivotal Players in the Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Berardi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor microenvironment is essential for multiple myeloma (MM growth, progression, and drug resistance through provision of survival signals and secretion of growth and proangiogenic factors. This paper examines the importance of macrophages within MM bone marrow (BM microenvironment, referred to as MM-associated macrophages, as a potential niche component that supports tumor plasma cells. These macrophages are derived from peripheral blood monocytes recruited into the tumor. Upon activation by MM plasma cells and mesenchymal stromal cells, macrophages can release growth factors, proteolytic enzymes, cytokines, and inflammatory mediators that promote plasma cell growth and survival. Macrophages promote tumor progression through several mechanisms including angiogenesis, growth, and drug resistance. Indeed, these macrophages are essential for the induction of an angiogenic response through vasculogenic mimicry, and this ability proceeds in step with progression of the plasma cell tumors. Data suggest that macrophages play an important role in the biology and survival of patients with MM, and they may be a target for the MM antivascular management.

  11. Emergence of therapy resistance in multiple myeloma in heterogeneous microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Amy; Zhang, Qiucen; Lambert, Guillaume; Khin, Zayar; Silva, Ariosto; Gatenby, Robert; Kim, Hyungsung; Pourmand, Nader; Austin, Robert; Sturm, James

    2014-03-01

    Cancer chemotherapy resistance is always a problem that is not clear considering spatial heterogeneity in the tumor microenvironment. We culture multiple myeloma in a gradient from 0 to 20 nM of doxorubicin (genotoxic drug) across 2 mm wide region in a microfluidic device which mimics the tumor microenvironment with a chemotherapy drug gradient and microhabitats. Resistance of the multiple myeloma cells to doxorubicin emerged within two weeks. For the resistant cells evolved from the devices, the doxorubicin concentration that inhibits 50% of the controlled population increased by 16-fold than the parental cells. Whole transcriptome sequencing revealed that 39% of newly acquired mutational hotspots (the genes with more than 3 non-synonymous point mutation) of the resistant cells are involved in apoptosis and DNA repair. On the other hand, 40% of the non-mutated genes that are abnormally regulated in the resistant cells, are involved in metabolism, biosynthesis, and biomolecular transport. Among them, metabolic drug efflux pumps and oxidative stress scavengers are up-regulated to reduce the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin and further result in the resistance. The roles of the spatial drug gradients and microhabitats in rapid emergence of cancer resistance will be discussed. The project described was supported by the National Science Foundation and the National Cancer Institute.

  12. Multiparametric probing of microenvironment with solvatochromic fluorescent dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klymchenko, Andrey S; Demchenko, Alexander P

    2008-01-01

    We describe new methodology for multiparametric probing of weak non-covalent interactions in the medium based on response of environment-sensitive fluorescent dyes. The commonly used approach is based on correlation of one spectroscopic parameter (e.g. wavelength shift) with environment polarity, which describes a superposition of universal and specific (such as hydrogen bonding) interactions. In our approach, by using several independent spectroscopic parameters of a dye, we monitor simultaneously each individual type of the interactions. For deriving these extra parameters the selected dye should exist in several excited and/or ground states. In the present work, we applied 4'-(diethylamino)-3-hydroxyflavone, which undergoes the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) and thus exhibits an additional emission band belonging to an ESIPT product (tautomer) form of the dye. The spectroscopic characteristics of the excited normal and the tautomer states as well as of the ESIPT reaction of the dye are differently sensitive to the different types of interactions with microenvironment and therefore can be used for its multiparametric description. The new methodology allowed us to monitor simultaneously three fundamental physicochemical parameters of probe microenvironment: polarity, electronic polarizability and H-bond donor ability. The applications of this approach to binary solvent mixtures, reverse micelles, lipid bilayers and binding sites of proteins are presented and the limitations of this approach are discussed. We believe that the methodology of multiparametric probing will extend the capabilities of fluorescent probes as the tools in biomolecular and cellular research.

  13. Carcinoma Cell Hyaluronan as a "Portable" Cancerized Prometastatic Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turley, Eva A; Wood, David K; McCarthy, James B

    2016-05-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is a structurally simple polysaccharide, but its ability to act as a template for organizing pericellular matrices and its regulated synthesis and degradation are key to initiating repair responses. Importantly, these HA functions are usurped by tumor cells to facilitate progression and metastasis. Recent advances have identified the functional complexities associated with the synthesis and degradation of HA-rich matrices. Three enzymes synthesize large HA polymers while multiple hyaluronidases or tissue free radicals degrade these into smaller bioactive fragments. A family of extracellular and cell-associated HA-binding proteins/receptors translates the bioinformation encrypted in this complex polymer mixture to activate signaling networks required for cell survival, proliferation, and migration in an actively remodeling microenvironment. Changes in HA metabolism within both the peritumor stroma and parenchyma are linked to tumor initiation, progression, and poor clinical outcome. We review evidence that metastatic tumor cells must acquire the capability to autonomously synthesize, assemble, and process their own "portable" HA-rich microenvironments to survive in the circulation, metastasize to ectopic sites, and escape therapeutic intervention. Strategies to disrupt the HA machinery of primary tumor and circulating tumor cells may enhance the effectiveness of current conventional and targeted therapies. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2507-12. ©2016 AACR.

  14. Interstitial fluid: the overlooked component of the tumor microenvironment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiig Helge

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interstitium, situated between the blood and lymph vessels and the cells, consists of a solid or matrix phase and a fluid phase, together constituting the tissue microenvironment. Here we focus on the interstitial fluid phase of tumors, i.e., the fluid bathing the tumor and stromal cells. Novel knowledge on this compartment may provide important insight into how tumors develop and how they respond to therapy. Results We discuss available techniques for interstitial fluid isolation and implications of recent findings with respect to transcapillary fluid balance and uptake of macromolecular therapeutic agents. By the development of new methods it is emerging that local gradients exist in signaling substances from neoplastic tissue to plasma. Such gradients may provide new insight into the biology of tumors and mechanistic aspects linked to therapy. The emergence of sensitive proteomic technologies has made the interstitial fluid compartment in general and that of tumors in particular a highly valuable source for tissue-specific proteins that may serve as biomarker candidates. Potential biomarkers will appear locally at high concentrations in the tissue of interest and will eventually appear in the plasma, where they are diluted. Conclusions Access to fluid that reliably reflects the local microenvironment enables us to identify substances that can be used in early detection and monitoring of disease.

  15. Oxidative and Nitrosative Stress in the Metastatic Microenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Ángel L. [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 15 Av. Blasco Ibañez, 46010 Valencia (Spain); Mena, Salvador [Green Molecular S.L., Pol. Ind. La Coma-Parc Cientific, 46190 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Estrela, José M., E-mail: jose.m.estrela@uv.es [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 15 Av. Blasco Ibañez, 46010 Valencia (Spain)

    2010-03-26

    Metastases that are resistant to conventional therapies are the main cause of most cancer-related deaths in humans. Tumor cell heterogeneity, which associates with genomic and phenotypic instability, represents a major problem for cancer therapy. Additional factors, such as the attack of immune cells or organ-specific microenvironments, also influence metastatic cell behavior and the response to therapy. Interaction of cancer and endothelial cells in capillary beds, involving mechanical contact and transient adhesion, is a critical step in the initiation of metastasis. This interaction initiates a cascade of activation pathways that involves cytokines, growth factors, bioactive lipids and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) produced by either the cancer cell or the endothelium. Vascular endothelium-derived NO and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} are cytotoxic for the cancer cells, but also help to identify some critical molecular targets that appear essential for survival of invasive metastatic cell subsets. Surviving cancer cells that extravasate and start colonization of an organ or tissue can still be attacked by macrophages and be influenced by specific intraorgan microenvironment conditions. At all steps; from the primary tumor until colonization of a distant organ; metastatic cells undergo a dynamic process of constant adaptations that may lead to the survival of highly resistant malignant cell subsets. In this sequence of molecular events both ROS and RNS play key roles.

  16. Interleukin-5 facilitates lung metastasis by modulating the immune microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaynagetdinov, Rinat; Sherrill, Taylor P; Gleaves, Linda A; McLoed, Allyson G; Saxon, Jamie A; Habermann, Arun C; Connelly, Linda; Dulek, Daniel; Peebles, R Stokes; Fingleton, Barbara; Yull, Fiona E; Stathopoulos, Georgios T; Blackwell, Timothy S

    2015-04-15

    Although the lung is the most common metastatic site for cancer cells, biologic mechanisms regulating lung metastasis are not fully understood. Using heterotopic and intravenous injection models of lung metastasis in mice, we found that IL5, a cytokine involved in allergic and infectious diseases, facilitates metastatic colonization through recruitment of sentinel eosinophils and regulation of other inflammatory/immune cells in the microenvironment of the distal lung. Genetic IL5 deficiency offered marked protection of the lungs from metastasis of different types of tumor cells, including lung cancer, melanoma, and colon cancer. IL5 neutralization protected subjects from metastasis, whereas IL5 reconstitution or adoptive transfer of eosinophils into IL5-deficient mice exerted prometastatic effects. However, IL5 deficiency did not affect the growth of the primary tumor or the size of metastatic lesions. Mechanistic investigations revealed that eosinophils produce CCL22, which recruits regulatory T cells to the lungs. During early stages of metastasis, Treg created a protumorigenic microenvironment, potentially by suppressing IFNγ-producing natural killer cells and M1-polarized macrophages. Together, our results establish a network of allergic inflammatory circuitry that can be co-opted by metastatic cancer cells to facilitate lung colonization, suggesting interventions to target this pathway may offer therapeutic benefits to prevent or treat lung metastasis.

  17. Nanocomposite Membranes Enhance Bone Regeneration Through Restoring Physiological Electric Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuehui; Zhang, Chenguang; Lin, Yuanhua; Hu, Penghao; Shen, Yang; Wang, Ke; Meng, Song; Chai, Yuan; Dai, Xiaohan; Liu, Xing; Liu, Yun; Mo, Xiaoju; Cao, Cen; Li, Shue; Deng, Xuliang; Chen, Lili

    2016-08-23

    Physiological electric potential is well-known for its indispensable role in maintaining bone volume and quality. Although implanted biomaterials simulating structural, morphological, mechanical, and chemical properties of natural tissue or organ has been introduced in the field of bone regeneration, the concept of restoring physiological electric microenvironment remains ignored in biomaterials design. In this work, a flexible nanocomposite membrane mimicking the endogenous electric potential is fabricated to explore its bone defect repair efficiency. BaTiO3 nanoparticles (BTO NPs) were first coated with polydopamine. Then the composite membranes are fabricated with homogeneous distribution of Dopa@BTO NPs in poly(vinylidene fluoridetrifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE)) matrix. The surface potential of the nanocomposite membranes could be tuned up to -76.8 mV by optimizing the composition ratio and corona poling treatment, which conform to the level of endogenous biopotential. Remarkably, the surface potential of polarized nanocomposite membranes exhibited a dramatic stability with more than half of original surface potential remained up to 12 weeks in the condition of bone defect. In vitro, the membranes encouraged bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) activity and osteogenic differentiation. In vivo, the membranes sustainably maintained the electric microenvironment giving rise to rapid bone regeneration and complete mature bone-structure formation. Our findings evidence that physiological electric potential repair should be paid sufficient attention in biomaterials design, and this concept might provide an innovative and well-suited strategy for bone regenerative therapies.

  18. The role of the microenvironment in tumor growth and invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yangjin; Stolarska, Magdalena A.; Othmer, Hans G.

    2011-01-01

    Mathematical modeling and computational analysis are essential for understanding the dynamics of the complex gene networks that control normal development and homeostasis, and can help to understand how circumvention of that control leads to abnormal outcomes such as cancer. Our objectives here are to discuss the different mechanisms by which the local biochemical and mechanical microenvironment, which is comprised of various signaling molecules, cell types and the extracellular matrix (ECM), affects the progression of potentially-cancerous cells, and to present new results on two aspects of these effects. We first deal with the major processes involved in the progression from a normal cell to a cancerous cell at a level accessible to a general scientific readership, and we then outline a number of mathematical and computational issues that arise in cancer modeling. In Section 2 we present results from a model that deals with the effects of the mechanical properties of the environment on tumor growth, and in Section 3 we report results from a model of the signaling pathways and the tumor microenvironment (TME), and how their interactions affect the development of breast cancer. The results emphasize anew the complexities of the interactions within the TME and their effect on tumor growth, and show that tumor progression is not solely determined by the presence of a clone of mutated immortal cells, but rather that it can be ‘community-controlled’. It Takes a Village – Hilary Clinton PMID:21736894

  19. Inflammatory Alterations of the Extracellular Matrix in the Tumor Microenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iijima, Junko [Department of Molecular Biosciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-Ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Konno, Kenjiro [Department of Animal Medical Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-Ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Itano, Naoki, E-mail: itanon@cc.kyoto-su.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Biosciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-Ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan)

    2011-08-09

    Complex interactions between cancer cells and host stromal cells result in the formation of the “tumor microenvironment”, where inflammatory alterations involve the infiltration of tumor-associated fibroblasts and inflammatory leukocytes that contribute to the acquisition of malignant characteristics, such as increased cancer cell proliferation, invasiveness, metastasis, angiogenesis, and avoidance of adaptive immunity. The microenvironment of a solid tumor is comprised not only of cellular compartments, but also of bioactive substances, including cytokines, growth factors, and extracellular matrix (ECM). ECM can act as a scaffold for cell migration, a reservoir for cytokines and growth factors, and a signal through receptor binding. During inflammation, ECM components and their degraded fragments act directly and indirectly as inflammatory stimuli in certain cases and regulate the functions of inflammatory and immune cells. One such ECM component, hyaluronan, has recently been implicated to modulate innate immune cell function through pattern recognition toll-like receptors and accelerate the recruitment and activation of tumor-associated macrophages in inflamed cancers. Here, we will summarize the molecular mechanism linking inflammation with ECM remodeling in the tumor microenvironment, with a particular emphasis on the role of hyaluronan in controlling the inflammatory response.

  20. Pure Phase Solubility Limits: LANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Stockman

    2001-01-26

    The natural and engineered system at Yucca Mountain (YM) defines the site-specific conditions under which one must determine to what extent the engineered and the natural geochemical barriers will prevent the release of radioactive material from the repository. Most important mechanisms for retention or enhancement of radionuclide transport include precipitation or co-precipitation of radionuclide-bearing solid phases (solubility limits), complexation in solution, sorption onto surfaces, colloid formation, and diffusion. There may be many scenarios that could affect the near-field environment, creating chemical conditions more aggressive than the conditions presented by the unperturbed system (such as pH changes beyond the range of 6 to 9 or significant changes in the ionic strength of infiltrated waters). For an extended period of time, the near-field water composition may be quite different and more extreme in pH, ionic strength, and CO{sub 2} partial pressure (or carbonate concentration) than waters at some distance from the repository. Reducing conditions, high pH (up to 11), and low carbonate concentration may be present in the near-field after reaction of infiltrating groundwater with engineered barrier systems, such as cementitious materials. In the far-field, conditions are controlled by the rock-mass buffer providing a near-neutral, oxidizing, low-ionic-strength environment that controls radionuclide solubility limits and sorption capacities. There is the need for characterization of variable chemical conditions that affect solubility, speciation, and sorption reactions. Modeling of the groundwater chemistry is required and leads to an understanding of solubility and speciation of the important radionuclides. Because experimental studies cannot be performed under the numerous potential chemical conditions, solubility limitations must rely on geochemical modeling of the radionuclide's chemistry. Fundamental thermodynamic properties, such as solubility

  1. Trusted Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Theis Solberg; Torbensen, Rune

    2012-01-01

    that enables secure end-to-end communication with home automation devices, and it supports device revocations as well as a structure of intersecting sets of nodes for scalability. Devices in the Trusted Domain are registered in a list that is distributed using a robust epidemic protocol optimized...

  2. Domain crossing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schraefel, M. C.; Rouncefield, Mark; Kellogg, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    In CSCW, how much do we need to know about another domain/culture before we observe, intersect and intervene with designs. What optimally would that other culture need to know about us? Is this a “how long is a piece of string” question, or an inquiry where we can consider a variety of contexts a...

  3. Cloud droplet activation: solubility revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. T. Padró

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Soluble compounds present in atmospheric aerosol facilitate their transformation into cloud droplets by depressing the equilibrium vapor pressure required for activation. Their impact depends on the amount of dissolved substance in the aerosol aqueous phase, which in turn is controlled by its solubility. This study explores the impact of particle curvature on solubility, expressed in terms of a Kelvin enhancement. The augmented solubility, termed "Curvature Enhanced Solubility" (CES, is then introduced into Köhler theory for assessment of its impact on CCN activity for several organic compounds with a wide range of aqueous solubility. The interfacial energy between solute and aqueous phase required for quantification of CES is determined from existing correlations based on bulk solubility, and concurrent measurements of contact angle and surface tension. A number of important findings arise from this study: i CES can substantially increase solubility and impact CCN activity but only if the aerosol is initially wet, ii CES can stabilize highly supersaturated solutions, and provide a mechanism for retention of an aerosol aqueous phase even at very low relative humidity (RH, and, iii trace amounts of surfactant impurities can magnify the impact of CES.

  4. A Soluble, Folded Protein without Charged Amino Acid Residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Casper; Kofoed, Christian; Espersen, Roall

    2016-01-01

    Charges are considered an integral part of protein structure and function, enhancing solubility and providing specificity in molecular interactions. We wished to investigate whether charged amino acids are indeed required for protein biogenesis and whether a protein completely free of titratable...... side chains can maintain solubility, stability, and function. As a model, we used a cellulose-binding domain from Cellulomonas fimi, which, among proteins of more than 100 amino acids, presently is the least charged in the Protein Data Bank, with a total of only four titratable residues. We find...

  5. Domain interplay in the urokinase receptor. Requirement for the third domain in high affinity ligand binding and demonstration of ligand contact sites in distinct receptor domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Ronne, E; Dano, K

    1996-01-01

    The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a membrane protein comprised of three extracellular domains. In order to study the importance of this domain organization in the ligand-binding process of the receptor we subjected a recombinant, soluble uPAR (suPAR) to specific proteolytic c...

  6. The Role of Tumor Microenvironment in Chemoresistance: To Survive, Keep Your Enemies Closer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthebane, Dimakatso Alice; Rowe, Arielle; Thomford, Nicholas Ekow; Shipanga, Hendrina; Munro, Daniella; Mazeedi, Mohammad A M Al; Almazyadi, Hashim A M; Kallmeyer, Karlien; Dandara, Collet; Pepper, Michael S; Parker, M Iqbal; Dzobo, Kevin

    2017-07-21

    Chemoresistance is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in cancer and it continues to be a challenge in cancer treatment. Chemoresistance is influenced by genetic and epigenetic alterations which affect drug uptake, metabolism and export of drugs at the cellular levels. While most research has focused on tumor cell autonomous mechanisms of chemoresistance, the tumor microenvironment has emerged as a key player in the development of chemoresistance and in malignant progression, thereby influencing the development of novel therapies in clinical oncology. It is not surprising that the study of the tumor microenvironment is now considered to be as important as the study of tumor cells. Recent advances in technological and analytical methods, especially 'omics' technologies, has made it possible to identify specific targets in tumor cells and within the tumor microenvironment to eradicate cancer. Tumors need constant support from previously 'unsupportive' microenvironments. Novel therapeutic strategies that inhibit such microenvironmental support to tumor cells would reduce chemoresistance and tumor relapse. Such strategies can target stromal cells, proteins released by stromal cells and non-cellular components such as the extracellular matrix (ECM) within the tumor microenvironment. Novel in vitro tumor biology models that recapitulate the in vivo tumor microenvironment such as multicellular tumor spheroids, biomimetic scaffolds and tumor organoids are being developed and are increasing our understanding of cancer cell-microenvironment interactions. This review offers an analysis of recent developments on the role of the tumor microenvironment in the development of chemoresistance and the strategies to overcome microenvironment-mediated chemoresistance. We propose a systematic analysis of the relationship between tumor cells and their respective tumor microenvironments and our data show that, to survive, cancer cells interact closely with tumor microenvironment

  7. Monocyte/macrophage-derived soluble CD163: a novel biomarker in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Morten N; Abildgaard, Niels; Maniecki, Maciej B; Møller, Holger J; Andersen, Niels F

    2014-07-01

    Macrophages play an important role in cancer by suppression of adaptive immunity and promotion of angiogenesis and metastasis. Tumor-associated macrophages strongly express the hemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163, which can also be found as a soluble protein in serum and other body fluids (soluble CD163, sCD163). In this study, we examined serum sCD163 as a biomarker in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Peripheral blood (n = 104) and bone marrow (n = 17) levels of sCD163 were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. At diagnosis, high sCD163 was associated with higher stage according to the International Staging System (ISS) and with other known prognostic factors in multiple myeloma (creatinine, C-reactive protein, and beta-2 microglobulin). Soluble CD163 decreased upon high-dose treatment, and in a multivariate survival analysis including the covariates treatment modality and age at diagnosis, higher levels of sCD163 were associated with poor outcome (HR = 1.82; P = 0.010). The prognostic significance of sCD163 was lost when including ISS stage in the model (HR = 1.51; P = 0.085). Soluble CD163 values were significantly higher in bone marrow samples than in the matched blood samples, which indicate a localized production of sCD163 within the bone marrow microenvironment. Soluble CD163 was found to be a prognostic marker in patients with multiple myeloma. This may indicate that macrophages and/or monocytes have an important role in the bone marrow microenvironment of myeloma patients, supporting myeloma cell proliferation and survival. We propose the serum sCD163 value 1.8 mg/L as a cutoff concentration for survival analysis in patients with multiple myeloma, which should be validated in future studies. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Establishing epithelial glandular polarity: interlinked roles for ARF6, Rac1, and the matrix microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleon, Christine L; Sedgwick, Alanna; Hartsell, Alyssa; Dai, Michael; Whittington, Catherine; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry; D'Souza-Schorey, Crislyn

    2012-12-01

    Epithelial cysts comprise the structural units of the glandular epithelium. Although glandular inversion in epithelial tumors is thought to be a potential mechanism for the establishment of metastatic disease, little is known about the morphogenic cues and signaling pathways that govern glandular polarity and organization. Using organotypic cultures of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells in reconstituted basement membrane, we show that cellular depletion of the small GTP-binding protein ARF6 promotes the formation of inverted cysts, wherein the apical cell membrane faces the cyst exterior, and the basal domain faces the central lumen, while individual cell polarity is maintained. These cysts are also defective in interactions with laminin at the cyst-matrix interface. This inversion of glandular orientation is accompanied by Rac1 inactivation during early cystogenesis, and temporal activation of Rac1 is sufficient to recover the normal cyst phenotype. In an unnatural collagen I microenvironment, ARF6-depleted, inverted epithelial cysts exhibit some loss of cell polarity, a marked increase in Rho activation and Rac1 inactivation, and striking rearrangement of the surrounding collagen I matrix. These studies demonstrate the importance of ARF6 as a critical determinant of glandular orientation and the matrix environment in dictating structural organization of epithelial cysts.

  9. The role of sphingosine-1-phosphate in the tumor microenvironment and its clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Masato; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Rashid, Omar M; Takabe, Kazuaki; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2017-04-01

    Elucidating the interaction between cancer and non-cancer cells, such as blood vessels, immune cells, and other stromal cells, in the tumor microenvironment is imperative in understanding the mechanisms underlying cancer progression and metastasis, which is expected to lead to the development of new therapeutics. Sphingosine-1-phosphate is a bioactive lipid mediator that promotes cell survival, proliferation, migration, angiogenesis/lymphangiogenesis, and immune responsiveness, which are all factors involved in cancer progression. Sphingosine-1-phosphate is generated inside cancer cells by sphingosine kinases and then exported into the tumor microenvironment. Although sphingosine-1-phosphate is anticipated to play an important role in the tumor microenvironment and cancer progression, determining sphingosine-1-phosphate levels in the tumor microenvironment has been difficult due to a lack of established methods. We have recently developed a method to measure sphingosine-1-phosphate levels in the interstitial fluid that bathes cancer cells in the tumor microenvironment, and reported that high levels of sphingosine-1-phosphate exist in the tumor interstitial fluid. Importantly, sphingosine-1-phosphate can be secreted from cancer cells and non-cancer components such as immune cells and vascular/lymphatic endothelial cells in the tumor microenvironment. Furthermore, sphingosine-1-phosphate affects both cancer and non-cancer cells in the tumor microenvironment promoting cancer progression. Here, we review the roles of sphingosine-1-phosphate in the interaction between cancer and non-cancer cells in tumor microenvironment, and discuss future possibilities for targeted therapies against sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling for cancer patients.

  10. Remodeling of the Tumor Microenvironment Predicts Increased Risk of Cancer in Postmenopausal Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Cecilie L; Willumsen, Nicholas; Kehlet, Stephanie N

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An altered tumor microenvironment is one of the earliest signs of cancer and an important driver of the disease. We have seen previously that biomarkers reflecting tumor microenvironment modifications, such as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-degraded type 1 collagen (C1M), MMP-degraded...

  11. Targeting cell-impermeable prodrug activation to tumor microenvironment eradicates multiple drug-resistant neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenyuan; Luo, Yunping; Sun, Chengzao; Liu, Yuan; Kuo, Paul; Varga, Janos; Xiang, Rong; Reisfeld, Ralph; Janda, Kim D; Edgington, Thomas S; Liu, Cheng

    2006-01-15

    The tumor microenvironment is notably enriched with a broad spectrum of proteases. The proteolytic specificities of peptide substrates provide modular chemical tools for the rational design of cell-impermeable prodrugs that are specifically activated by proteases extracellularly in the tumor microenvironment. Targeting cell-impermeable prodrug activation to tumor microenvironment will significantly reduce drug toxicity to normal tissues. The activated prodrug attacks both tumor and stroma cells through a "bystander effect" without selectively deleting target-producing cells, therefore further minimizing resistance and toxicity. Here, we showed that legumain, the only asparaginyl endopeptidase of the mammalian genome, is highly expressed by neoplastic, stromal, and endothelial cells in solid tumors. Legumain is present extracellularly in the tumor microenvironment, associated with matrix as well as cell surfaces and functional locally in the reduced pH of the tumor microenvironment. A novel legumain-activated, cell-impermeable doxorubicin prodrug LEG-3 was designed to be activated exclusively in the tumor microenvironment. Upon administration, there is a profound increase of the end-product doxorubicin in nuclei of cells in tumors but little in other tissues. This tumor microenvironment-activated prodrug completely arrested growth of a variety of neoplasms, including multidrug-resistant tumor in vivo and significantly extended survival without evidence of myelosuppression or cardiac toxicity. The tumor microenvironment-activated prodrug design can be extended to other proteases and chemotherapeutic compounds and provides new potentials for the rational development of more effective functionally targeted cancer therapeutics.

  12. Fabrication of highly modulable fibrous 3D extracellular microenvironments

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xixiang

    2017-06-13

    Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro scaffolds that mimic the irregular fibrous structures of in vivo extracellular matrix (ECM) are critical for many important biological applications. However, structural properties modulation of fibrous 3D scaffolds remains a challenge. Here, we report the first highly modulable 3D fibrous scaffolds self-assembled by high-aspect-ratio (HAR) microfibers. The scaffolds structural properties can be easily tailored to incorporate various physical cues, including geometry, stiffness, heterogeneity and nanotopography. Moreover, the fibrous scaffolds are readily and accurately patterned on desired locations of the substrate. Cell culture exhibits that our scaffolds can elicit strong bidirectional cell-material interactions. Furthermore, a functional disparity between the two-dimensional substrate and our 3D scaffolds is identified by cell spreading and proliferation data. These results prove the potential of the proposed scaffold as a biomimetic extracellular microenvironment for cell study.

  13. Microenvironment Dependent Photobiomodulation on Function-Specific Signal Transduction Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timon Cheng-Yi Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular photobiomodulation on a cellular function has been shown to be homeostatic. Its function-specific pathway mechanism would be further discussed in this paper. The signal transduction pathways maintaining a normal function in its function-specific homeostasis (FSH, resisting the activation of many other irrelative signal transduction pathways, are so sparse that it can be supposed that there may be normal function-specific signal transduction pathways (NSPs. A low level laser irradiation or monochromatic light may promote the activation of partially activated NSP and/or its redundant NSP so that it may induce the second-order phase transition of a function from its dysfunctional one far from its FSH to its normal one in a function-specific microenvironment and may also induce the first-order functional phase transition of the normal function from low level to high level.

  14. Exosomes in tumor microenvironment influence cancer progression and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlert, Christoph; Kalluri, Raghu

    2013-04-01

    Exosomes are small membrane vesicles of endocytic origin with a size of 50-100 nm. They can contain microRNAs, mRNAs, DNA fragments, and proteins, which are shuttled from a donor cell to recipient cells. Many different cell types including immune cells, mesenchymal cells, and cancer cells release exosomes. There is emerging evidence that cancer-derived exosomes contribute to the recruitment and reprogramming of constituents associated with tumor environment. Here, we discuss different mechanisms associated with biogenesis, payload, and transport of exosomes. We highlight the functional relevance of exosomes in cancer, as related to tumor microenvironment, tumor immunology, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Exosomes may exert an immunosuppressive function as well as trigger an anti-tumor response by presenting tumor antigens to dendritic cells. Exosomes may serve as cancer biomarkers and aid in the treatment of cancer.

  15. Acidic extracellular microenvironment promotes the invasion and cathepsin B secretion of PC-3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li; Fang, You-Qiang; Zhang, Tian-Yu; Ge, Bo; Tang, Rong-Jing; Huang, Jie-Fu; Jiang, Lei-Ming; Tan, Ning

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of acidic microenvironment on the invasion of prostatic carcinoma PC-3 cells and to explore the potential mechanism. PC-3 cells were maintained in medium at different pHs (pH 7.4, pH 7.0 and pH 6.6). Invasion and metastasis of PC-3 cells were investigated in vitro. Acridine orange staining was performed, followed by laser confocal scanning microscopy for the localization of lysosomes. Western blot assay and ELISA were employed to evaluate the effect of acidic microenvironment on the cathepsin B secretion. Acidic microenvironment remarkably promote the invasion and migration of PC-3 cells (Pmicroenvironment promoted the cathepsin B secretion in PC- cells. Acidic microenvironment may significantly promote the invasion of PC-3 cells and increase the secretion of cathepsin B. This suggests that the acidic microenvironment induced invasion of PC- cells is related to the elevated cathepsin B secretion.

  16. Tracking microbial colonization patterns associated with micro-environments of rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Hannes; Eickhorst, Thilo

    2015-04-01

    The interface between soil and roots (i.e. the rhizosphere) represents a highly dynamic micro-environment for microbial populations. Root-derived compounds are released into the rhizosphere and may attract, stimulate, or inhibit native soil microorganisms. Microbes associated with the rhizosphere, in turn, may have deleterious, neutral, or promoting effects on the plant. Such influences of microbial populations on the plant and vice versa are likely to be greatest in close vicinity to the root surface. It is therefore essential to detect and visualize preferential micro-sites of microbial root colonization to identify potential areas of microbe-plant interaction. We present a single-cell based approach allowing for the localization, quantification, and visualization of native microbial populations in the rhizosphere and on the rhizoplane of soil-grown roots in situ. Catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH) in combination with confocal laser scanning microscopy was applied to observe colonization densities and patterns of microbial populations associated with wetland rice. Hybridizations with domain- and phylum-specific oligonucleotide probes showed that the growth stage of the rice plant as well as the distance to the root surface had a strong influence on microbial colonization patterns. Three-dimensional visualizations of root-associated microbes revealed micro-sites of preferential colonization. Highest cell numbers of archaea and bacteria were found at flowering stage of rice plant development. Irregular distribution patterns of microbiota observed at early growth stages shifted towards more uniform colonization with plant age. Accordingly, the highest colonization densities shifted from the tip to more mature regions of rice roots. Methanogenic archaea and methanotrophic bacteria were found to be co-localized at basal regions of lateral roots. Beneficial effects of a close association with root surfaces were indicated by

  17. Epstein-Bar Virus Status Correlates with Composition and Prognostic Impact of the Tumor Microenvironment in Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, Peter; Bendix, Knud; Honoré, Bent

    Epstein-Bar Virus Status Correlates with Composition and Prognostic Impact of the Tumor Microenvironment in Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma......Epstein-Bar Virus Status Correlates with Composition and Prognostic Impact of the Tumor Microenvironment in Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma...

  18. Epstein-Bar Virus Status Correlates with Composition and Prognostic Impact of the Tumor Microenvironment in Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, Peter; Bendix, Knud; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Epstein-Bar Virus Status Correlates with Composition and Prognostic Impact of the Tumor Microenvironment in Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma......Epstein-Bar Virus Status Correlates with Composition and Prognostic Impact of the Tumor Microenvironment in Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma...

  19. Pure Phase Solubility Limits: LANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Stockman

    2001-01-26

    The natural and engineered system at Yucca Mountain (YM) defines the site-specific conditions under which one must determine to what extent the engineered and the natural geochemical barriers will prevent the release of radioactive material from the repository. Most important mechanisms for retention or enhancement of radionuclide transport include precipitation or co-precipitation of radionuclide-bearing solid phases (solubility limits), complexation in solution, sorption onto surfaces, colloid formation, and diffusion. There may be many scenarios that could affect the near-field environment, creating chemical conditions more aggressive than the conditions presented by the unperturbed system (such as pH changes beyond the range of 6 to 9 or significant changes in the ionic strength of infiltrated waters). For an extended period of time, the near-field water composition may be quite different and more extreme in pH, ionic strength, and CO{sub 2} partial pressure (or carbonate concentration) than waters at some distance from the repository. Reducing conditions, high pH (up to 11), and low carbonate concentration may be present in the near-field after reaction of infiltrating groundwater with engineered barrier systems, such as cementitious materials. In the far-field, conditions are controlled by the rock-mass buffer providing a near-neutral, oxidizing, low-ionic-strength environment that controls radionuclide solubility limits and sorption capacities. There is the need for characterization of variable chemical conditions that affect solubility, speciation, and sorption reactions. Modeling of the groundwater chemistry is required and leads to an understanding of solubility and speciation of the important radionuclides. Because experimental studies cannot be performed under the numerous potential chemical conditions, solubility limitations must rely on geochemical modeling of the radionuclide's chemistry. Fundamental thermodynamic properties, such as solubility

  20. Clinical impact of chemotherapy to improve tumor microenvironment of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchikawa, Takahiro; Takeuchi, Shintaro; Nakamura, Toru; Shichinohe, Toshiaki; Hirano, Satoshi

    2016-11-15

    A perioperative multimodal strategy including combination chemotherapy and radiotherapy, in addition to surgical resection, has been acknowledged to improve patient prognosis. However chemotherapy has not been actively applied as an immunomodulating modality because of concerns about various immunosuppressive effects. It has recently been shown that certain chemotherapeutic agents could modify tumor microenvironment and host immune responses through several underlying mechanisms such as immunogenic cell death, local T-cell infiltration and also the eradication of immune-suppressing regulatory cells such as regulatory T cells (Tregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. With the better understanding of the cell components in the tumor microenvironment and the effect of chemotherapy to improve tumor microenvironment, it has been gradually clear that the chemotherapeutic agents is two-edged sword to have both immune promoting and suppressing effects. The cellular components of the tumor microenvironment include infiltrating T lymphocytes, dendritic cells, regulatory T cells, tumor associated macrophages, myeloid derived suppressor cells and cancer associated fibroblasts. Based on the better understanding of tumor microenvironment following chemotherapy, the treatment protocol could be modified as personalized medicine and the prognosis of pancreas cancer would be more improved utilizing multimodal chemotherapy. Here we review the recent advances of chemotherapy to improve tumor microenvironment of pancreatic cancer, introducing the unique feature of tumor microenvironment of pancreatic cancer, interaction between anti-cancer reagents and these constituting cells and future prospects.

  1. Molecular deconstruction, detection, and computational prediction of microenvironment-modulated cellular responses to cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labarge, Mark A; Parvin, Bahram; Lorens, James B

    2014-04-01

    The field of bioengineering has pioneered the application of new precision fabrication technologies to model the different geometric, physical or molecular components of tissue microenvironments on solid-state substrata. Tissue engineering approaches building on these advances are used to assemble multicellular mimetic-tissues where cells reside within defined spatial contexts. The functional responses of cells in fabricated microenvironments have revealed a rich interplay between the genome and extracellular effectors in determining cellular phenotypes and in a number of cases have revealed the dominance of microenvironment over genotype. Precision bioengineered substrata are limited to a few aspects, whereas cell/tissue-derived microenvironments have many undefined components. Thus, introducing a computational module may serve to integrate these types of platforms to create reasonable models of drug responses in human tissues. This review discusses how combinatorial microenvironment microarrays and other biomimetic microenvironments have revealed emergent properties of cells in particular microenvironmental contexts, the platforms that can measure phenotypic changes within those contexts, and the computational tools that can unify the microenvironment-imposed functional phenotypes with underlying constellations of proteins and genes. Ultimately we propose that a merger of these technologies will enable more accurate pre-clinical drug discovery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Proteomic profiling of the tumor microenvironment: recent insights and the search for biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Although gain of oncogene functions and loss of tumor suppressor functions are driving forces in tumor development, the tumor microenvironment, comprising the extracellular matrix, surrounding stroma, signaling molecules and infiltrating immune and other cell populations, is now also recognized as crucial to tumor development and metastasis. Many interactions at the tumor cell-environment interface occur at the protein level. Proteomic approaches are contributing to the definition of the protein constituents of the microenvironment and their sources, modifications, interactions and turnover, as well as providing information on how these features relate to tumor development and progression. Recently, proteomic studies have revealed how cancer cells modulate the microenvironment through their secreted proteins and how they can alter their protein constituents to adapt to the microenvironment. Moreover, the release of proteins from the microenvironment into the circulatory system has relevance for the development of blood-based cancer diagnostics. Here, we review how proteomic approaches are being applied to studies of the tumor microenvironment to decipher tumor-stroma interactions and to elucidate the role of host cells in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24713112

  3. Role of chemokines and their receptors in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: function in microenvironment and targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ting-Ting; Fan, Lei; Li, Jian-Yong; Xu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines produced in distinct tissue microenvironments sustain migration of mature lymphocytes in lymphoglandula. Chemokine receptors expressed on chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells regulate the migration of the leukemia cells within the bone marrow (BM), lymphoid organs in collaboration with chemokines. Chemokines form a pro-survival circuitry by regulating leukocyte trafficking, maintaining extended lymphocyte survival. Therefore, chemokines in tumor cell-microenvironment interactions represent a target for treatment of CLL. AMD3100 disrupts the CLL/microenvironment interactions and influences CXCL12/CXCR4 survival signaling. Fostamatinib, ibrutinib, and GS-1101 as B-cell receptor (BCR)-related kinase inhibitors inhibit BCR- and chemokine-receptor-signal-regulated kinase and have a good clinical response in CLL. Lenalidomide, sorafenib, and dasatinib are other additional drugs associated with chemokine in microenvironment. Inhibiting signaling through chemokine and microenvironment associated signaling are emerging as innovative therapeutic targets in CLL. In this article, we reviewed the role of chemokines in CLL microenvironment and novel therapeutics targeting CLL microenvironment.

  4. Identification of Senescent Cells in the Bone Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Joshua N; Fraser, Daniel G; Wang, Haitao; Jaehn, Katharina; Ogrodnik, Mikolaj B; Weivoda, Megan M; Drake, Matthew T; Tchkonia, Tamara; LeBrasseur, Nathan K; Kirkland, James L; Bonewald, Lynda F; Pignolo, Robert J; Monroe, David G; Khosla, Sundeep

    2017-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a fundamental mechanism by which cells remain metabolically active yet cease dividing and undergo distinct phenotypic alterations, including upregulation of p16Ink4a, profound secretome changes, telomere shortening, and decondensation of pericentromeric satellite DNA. Because senescent cells accumulate in multiple tissues with aging, these cells and the dysfunctional factors they secrete, termed the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), are increasingly recognized as promising therapeutic targets to prevent age-related degenerative pathologies, including osteoporosis. However, the cell type(s) within the bone microenvironment that undergoes senescence with aging in vivo has remained poorly understood, largely because previous studies have focused on senescence in cultured cells. Thus in young (age 6 months) and old (age 24 months) mice, we measured senescence and SASP markers in vivo in highly enriched cell populations, all rapidly isolated from bone/marrow without in vitro culture. In both females and males, p16Ink4a expression by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (rt-qPCR) was significantly higher with aging in B cells, T cells, myeloid cells, osteoblast progenitors, osteoblasts, and osteocytes. Further, in vivo quantification of senescence-associated distension of satellites (SADS), ie, large-scale unraveling of pericentromeric satellite DNA, revealed significantly more senescent osteocytes in old compared with young bone cortices (11% versus 2%, p < 0.001). In addition, primary osteocytes from old mice had sixfold more (p < 0.001) telomere dysfunction-induced foci (TIFs) than osteocytes from young mice. Corresponding with the age-associated accumulation of senescent osteocytes was significantly higher expression of multiple SASP markers in osteocytes from old versus young mice, several of which also showed dramatic age-associated upregulation in myeloid cells. These data show that with aging, a subset of cells

  5. SOLUBILITY ENHANCEMENT OF POORLY WATER SOLUBLE DRUGS BY SOLID DISPERSIO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amita Verm

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid dispersions have been employed to enhance the dissolution rates of poorly water-soluble drugs. Many approaches have been investigated for the preparation of solid dispersions. This paper reports the various solubility enhancement strategies in solid dispersion. The approaches described are fusion (melting, solvent evaporation, lyophilization (freeze drying, melt agglomeration process, extruding method, spray drying technology, use of surfactant, electro static spinning method and super critical fluid technology. This paper also highlights the potential applications and limitations of theseapproaches in solid dispersions.

  6. Subjective Evaluation of the Microenvironment Generated by a Hospital Bed with Localized Ventilation System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehayova, Nushka; Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2016-01-01

    A novel method for local hospital bed ventilation, called HBIVCU (Hospital Bed with Integrated Ventilation and Cleansing Unit), was studied in a human subject experiment. The goal of this study was to identify human response to the microenvironment generated by a hospital bed with installed HBIVCU...... and to compare with human response to the micro-environment at a hospital bed without local ventilation. 32 participants took part in two experimental conditions - hospital bed with and without installed HBIVCU. Subject’s votes on the bed microenvironment were collected via standardized questionnaires...

  7. .Gov Domains API

    Data.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration — This dataset offers the list of all .gov domains, including state, local, and tribal .gov domains. It does not include .mil domains, or other federal domains outside...

  8. Mitochondrial Regulation of the Muscle Microenvironment in Critical Limb Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Terence E; Schmidt, Cameron A; Green, Tom D; Brown, David A; Neufer, P Darrell; McClung, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    Critical limb ischemia (CLI) is the most severe clinical presentation of peripheral arterial disease and manifests as chronic limb pain at rest and/or tissue necrosis. Current clinical interventions are largely ineffective and therapeutic angiogenesis based trials have shown little efficacy, highlighting the dire need for new ideas and novel therapeutic approaches. Despite a decade of research related to skeletal muscle as a determinant of morbidity and mortality outcomes in CLI, very little progress has been made toward an effective therapy aimed directly at the muscle myopathies of this disease. Within the muscle cell, mitochondria are well positioned to modulate the ischemic cellular response, as they are the principal sites of cellular energy production and the major regulators of cellular redox charge and cell death. In this mini review, we update the crucial importance of skeletal muscle to CLI pathology and examine the evolving influence of muscle and endothelial cell mitochondria in the complex ischemic microenvironment. Finally, we discuss the novelty of muscle mitochondria as a therapeutic target for ischemic pathology in the context of the complex co-morbidities often associated with CLI.

  9. Mitochondrial Regulation of the Muscle Microenvironment in Critical Limb Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terence E. Ryan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Critical limb ischemia (CLI is the most severe clinical presentation of peripheral arterial disease and manifests as chronic limb pain at rest and/or tissue necrosis. Current clinical interventions are largely ineffective and therapeutic angiogenesis based trials have shown little efficacy, highlighting the dire need for new ideas and novel therapeutic approaches. Despite a decade of research related to skeletal muscle as a determinant of morbidity and mortality outcomes in CLI, very little progress has been made towards an effective therapy aimed directly at the muscle myopathies of this disease. Within the muscle cell, mitochondria are well positioned to modulate the ischemic cellular response, as they are the principal sites of cellular energy production and the major regulators of cellular redox charge and cell death. In this mini review, we update the crucial importance of skeletal muscle to CLI pathology and examine the evolving influence of muscle and endothelial cell mitochondria in the complex ischemic microenvironment. Finally, we discuss the novelty of muscle mitochondria as a therapeutic target for ischemic pathology in the context of the complex co-morbidities often associated with CLI.

  10. GPS-based Microenvironment Tracker (MicroTrac) Model to ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    A critical aspect of air pollution exposure assessment is the estimation of the time spent by individuals in various microenvironments (ME). Accounting for the time spent in different ME with different pollutant concentrations can reduce exposure misclassifications, while failure to do so can add uncertainty and bias to risk estimates. In this study, a classification model, called MicroTrac, was developed to estimate time of day and duration spent in eight ME (indoors and outdoors at home, work, school; inside vehicles; other locations) from global positioning system (GPS) data and geocoded building boundaries. Based on a panel study, MicroTrac estimates were compared to 24 h diary data from 7 participants on workdays and 2 participants on nonworkdays, with corresponding GPS data and building boundaries of home, school, and work. MicroTrac correctly classified the ME for 99.5% of the daily time spent by the participants. The capability of MicroTrac could help to reduce the time-location uncertainty in air pollution exposure models and exposure metrics for individuals in health studies. The National Exposure Research Laboratory’s (NERL’s) Human Exposure and Atmospheric Sciences Division (HEASD) conducts research in support of EPA’s mission to protect human health and the environment. HEASD’s research program supports Goal 1 (Clean Air) and Goal 4 (Healthy People) of EPA’s strategic plan. More specifically, our division conducts research to characterize

  11. Peritoneal inflammation – A microenvironment for Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jinsong

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC is a significant cause of cancer related morbidity and mortality in women. Preferential involvement of peritoneal structures contributes to the overall poor outcome in EOC patients. Advances in biotechnology, such as cDNA microarray, are a product of the Human Genome Project and are beginning to provide fresh opportunities to understand the biology of EOC. In particular, it is now possible to examine in depth, at the molecular level, the complex relationship between the tumor itself and its surrounding microenvironment. This review focuses on the anatomy, physiology, and current immunobiologic research of peritoneal structures, and addresses certain potentially useful animal models. Changes in both the inflammatory and non-inflammatory cell compartments, as well as alterations to the extracellular matrix, appear to be signal events that contribute to the remodeling effects of the peritoneal stroma and surface epithelial cells on tumor growth and spread. These alterations may involve a number of proteins, including cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, either membrane or non-membrane bound, and integrins. Interactions between these molecules and molecular structures within the extracellular matrix, such as collagens and the proteoglycans, may contribute to a peritoneal mesothelial surface and stromal environment that is conducive to tumor cell proliferation and invasion. These alterations need to be examined and defined as possible prosnosticators and as therapeutic or diagnostic targets.

  12. Natural Compounds Regulate Glycolysis in Hypoxic Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Li Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the early twentieth century, Otto Heinrich Warburg described an elevated rate of glycolysis occurring in cancer cells, even in the presence of atmospheric oxygen (the Warburg effect. Recently it became a therapeutically interesting strategy and is considered as an emerging hallmark of cancer. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1 is one of the key transcription factors that play major roles in tumor glycolysis and could directly trigger Warburg effect. Thus, how to inhibit HIF-1-depended Warburg effect to assist the cancer therapy is becoming a hot issue in cancer research. In fact, HIF-1 upregulates the glucose transporters (GLUT and induces the expression of glycolytic enzymes, such as hexokinase, pyruvate kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase. So small molecules of natural origin used as GLUT, hexokinase, or pyruvate kinase isoform M2 inhibitors could represent a major challenge in the field of cancer treatment. These compounds aim to suppress tumor hypoxia induced glycolysis process to suppress the cell energy metabolism or enhance the susceptibility of tumor cells to radio- and chemotherapy. In this review, we highlight the role of natural compounds in regulating tumor glycolysis, with a main focus on the glycolysis under hypoxic tumor microenvironment.

  13. Influential parameters on particle exposure of pedestrians in urban microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonanno, G.; Fuoco, F. C.; Stabile, L.

    2011-03-01

    Exposure to particle concentrations in urban areas was evaluated in several studies since airborne particles are considered to bring about adverse health effects. Transportation modes and urban microenvironments account for the highest contributions to the overall daily particle exposure concentration. In the present study an evaluation of the influential parameters affecting particle exposure of pedestrian in urban areas is reported. Street geometry, traffic mode, wind speed and direction effects were analyzed through an experimental campaign performed in different streets of an Italian town. To this purpose a high-resolution time measurement apparatus was used in order to capture the dynamic of the freshly emitted particles. Number, surface area and mass concentrations and distributions were measured continuously along both the sides of street canyons and avenue canyons during 10-minutes walking routes. The combined effect of street geometry and wind direction may contribute strongly to dilute the fresh particles emitted by vehicles. In particular, street canyons are characterized by lower ventilation phenomena which lead to similar concentration values on both the side of the street. Higher wind speed was found to decrease concentrations in the canyon. Traffic mode also seems to influence exposure concentrations. In particular, submicrometer particle mass concentration was higher as the traffic is more congested; otherwise, coarse fraction dominates mass exposure concentration along street characterized by a more fluent traffic, showing a typical resuspension modality.

  14. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy improves local microenvironment after spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Wang; Shuquan Zhang; Min Luo; Yajun Li

    2014-01-01

    Clinical studies have shown that hyperbaric oxygen therapy improves motor function in patients with spinal cord injury. In the present study, we explored the mechanisms associated with the recovery of neurological function after hyperbaric oxygen therapy in a rat model of spinal cord injury. We established an acute spinal cord injury model using a modiifcation of the free-falling object method, and treated the animals with oxygen at 0.2 MPa for 45 minutes, 4 hours after injury. The treatment was administered four times per day, for 3 days. Compared with model rats that did not receive the treatment, rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen had fewer apoptotic cells in spinal cord tissue, lower expression levels of aquaporin 4/9 mRNA and protein, and more NF-200 positive nerve ifbers. Furthermore, they had smaller spinal cord cavities, rapid recovery of somatosensory and motor evoked potentials, and notably better recovery of hindlimb motor function than model rats. Our ifndings indicate that hyperbaric oxygen therapy reduces apop-tosis, downregulates aquaporin 4/9 mRNA and protein expression in injured spinal cord tissue, improves the local microenvironment for nerve regeneration, and protects and repairs the spinal cord after injury.

  15. The Role of Chemoattractant Receptors in Shaping the Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiamin Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemoattractant receptors are a family of seven transmembrane G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs initially found to mediate the chemotaxis and activation of immune cells. During the past decades, the functions of these GPCRs have been discovered to not only regulate leukocyte trafficking and promote immune responses, but also play important roles in homeostasis, development, angiogenesis, and tumor progression. Accumulating evidence indicates that chemoattractant GPCRs and their ligands promote the progression of malignant tumors based on their capacity to orchestrate the infiltration of the tumor microenvironment by immune cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and mesenchymal cells. This facilitates the interaction of tumor cells with host cells, tumor cells with tumor cells, and host cells with host cells to provide a basis for the expansion of established tumors and development of distant metastasis. In addition, many malignant tumors of the nonhematopoietic origin express multiple chemoattractant GPCRs that increase the invasiveness and metastasis of tumor cells. Therefore, GPCRs and their ligands constitute targets for the development of novel antitumor therapeutics.

  16. Targeting tumor microenvironment: crossing tumor interstitial fluid by multifunctional nanomedicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadollah Omidi

    2014-06-01

    Results: We reviewed all relevant literature for the impacts of tumor interstitium and microvasculature within the TME as well as the significance of the implemented strategies. Results: While tumorigenesis initiation seems to be in close relation with an emergence of hypoxia and alterations in epigenetic/genetic materials, large panoplies of molecular events emerge as intricate networks during oncogenesis to form unique lenient TME in favor of tumor progression. Within such irregular interstitium, immune system displays defective surveillance functionalities against malignant cells. Solid tumors show multifacial traits with coadaptation and self-regulation potentials, which bestow profound resistance against the currently used conventional chemotherapy and immunotherapy agents that target solely one face of the disease. Conclusion: The cancerous cells attain unique abilities to form its permissive microenvironment, wherein (a extracellular pH is dysregulated towards acidification, (b extracellular matrix (ECM is deformed, (c stromal cells are cooperative with cancer cells, (d immune system mechanisms are defective, (e non-integrated irregular microvasculature with pores (120-1200 nm are formed, and (h interstitial fluid pressure is high. All these phenomena are against cancer treatment modalities. As a result, to control such abnormal pathophysiologic traits, novel cancer therapy strategies need to be devised using multifunctional nanomedicines and theranostics.

  17. Model of spacecraft atomic oxygen and solar exposure microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassa, R. J.; Pippin, H. G.

    1993-01-01

    Computer models of environmental conditions in Earth orbit are needed for the following reasons: (1) derivation of material performance parameters from orbital test data, (2) evaluation of spacecraft hardware designs, (3) prediction of material service life, and (4) scheduling spacecraft maintenance. To meet these needs, Boeing has developed programs for modeling atomic oxygen (AO) and solar radiation exposures. The model allows determination of AO and solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposures for spacecraft surfaces (1) in arbitrary orientations with respect to the direction of spacecraft motion, (2) overall ranges of solar conditions, and (3) for any mission duration. The models have been successfully applied to prediction of experiment environments on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and for analysis of selected hardware designs for deployment on other spacecraft. The work on these models has been reported at previous LDEF conferences. Since publication of these reports, a revision has been made to the AO calculation for LDEF, and further work has been done on the microenvironments model for solar exposure.

  18. Exosomes: A Promising Factor Involved in Cancer Hypoxic Microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Yang, X; Yang, Y; Zhu, H; Chen, X; Zhang, H; Wang, F; Qin, Q; Cheng, H; Sun, X

    2015-01-01

    As a significant tumor feature, hypoxia can trigger cancer adaptive processes, induce malignant phenotype development, and promote drug resistance. Previous studies demonstrated that exosomes are critical during these procedures. Exosomes are small vesicles formed in vesicular bodies in the endosomal network. These small vesicles are mainly involved in the transport of bioactive molecules between cells. Exosomes are also involved in the mediation of some cellular communications depending on derived donor cells; thus, recipient cells undergo phenotypic changes. Furthermore, hypoxia can remarkably stimulate exosomal secretion; for instance, nucleic acids and proteins as transmission signals in exosomes in a tumor microenvironment are involved in various functions, such as inducing intratumoral heterogeneity, altering immunological responses, producing cancer-associated fibroblasts, and promoting angiogenesis and metastasis. Moreover, exosome contents resemble those of a donor cell; this finding indicates that exosomes may also be regarded as suitable biomarkers of hypoxia status. Therefore, exosomes can be used to facilitate diagnosis and prognosis with minimal invasive procedures. Further studies on exosomes in cancer may provide new therapeutic strategies.

  19. The Solubility Rules: Why Are All Acetates Soluble?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sluys, William G.

    2001-01-01

    According to the solubility rules presented in many introductory chemistry texts, all (or most) acetate salts are soluble in aqueous solution. The thermodynamic factors that contribute to the solubility of acetates are compared with those of other slightly basic anions. In particular, the hydration enthalpy of acetate is calculated using the Born-Haber approach, from lattice energies, heats of solution, and the hydration energies of several cations. The hydration enthalpy of acetate (-375 kJ/mol) is similar to that of chloride ({355 kJ/mol), nitrite ({383 kJ/mol), and nitrate ({370 kJ/mol), which are all considerably less exothermic than fluoride ({497 kJ/mol). This was somewhat unexpected, since hydration enthalpies generally correlate well with the acid-base properties of an ion, and acetate is more basic than fluoride. Factors influencing the solubility and acid-base properties of acetates, such as the electron donating and hydrophobic nature of the methyl group, are discussed in light of the thermodynamic data.

  20. Solubility database for TILA-99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuorinen, U.; Carlsson, T. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland); Kulmala, S.; Hakanen, M. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Lab. of Radiochemistry; Ahonen, L. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-11-01

    The safety assessment of spent fuel disposal requires solubility values for several elements estimated in Finnish disposal conditions. In Finland four sites (Haestholmen, Kivetty, Olkiluoto and Romuvaara) are investigated for the disposal of spent fuel. Haestholmen and OLkiluoto are onshore sites, while Kivetty and Romuvaara are inland sites. Based on groundwater analysis and classification according to salinity at the planned disposal depth mainly fresh groundwater is encountered at Kivetty and Romuvaara, while brackish and saline water-types are met at Haestholmen and Olkiluoto. Very saline, almost brine-type water ({approx}70 g/l) has been found in the deepest parts of the investigated bedrock at one of the sites (Olkiluoto). The reference waters and conditions were chosen according to the water-types. The considered reference conditions incorporated both the near- and far-field, and both oxidizing and reducing conditions were considered. In the reference conditions, the changes in solubilities were also estimated as caused by possible variations in the pH, carbonate content and redox conditions. Uranium, which is the main component of spent fuel is dealt with in a separate report presenting the solubility of uranium and spent fuel dissolution. In this work the solubilities of all the other elements of concern (Am, Cu, Nb, Np, Pa, Pd, Pu, Ra, Se, Sn, Tc, Zr, Cm, Ni, Sr, Th, C, Cl, Cs, Fe, Ho, I, and Sm) in the safety assessment are considered. Some discussion on the corrosion of the spent fuel canister is also presented. For the estimation of solubilities of the elements in question, literature data was collected that mainly comprised experimentally measured concentrations. The sources used were spent fuel experiments, concentrations measured in solubility measurements, natural concentrations and concentrations from natural analogue sites (especially Palmottu and Hyrkkoelae in Finland) as well as the concentrations measured at the Finnish investigation sites

  1. Preliminary considerations concerning actinide solubilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, T.W.; Bayhurst, B.P.; Daniels, W.R.; Erdal, B.R.; Ogard, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    Work at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory on the fundamental solution chemistry of the actinides has thus far been confined to preliminary considerations of the problems involved in developing an understanding of the precipitation and dissolution behavior of actinide compounds under environmental conditions. Attempts have been made to calculate solubility as a function of Eh and pH using the appropriate thermodynamic data; results have been presented in terms of contour maps showing lines of constant solubility as a function of Eh and pH. Possible methods of control of the redox potential of rock-groundwater systems by the use of Eh buffers (redox couples) is presented.

  2. Tumor-like microenvironment in oral lichen planus: evidence of malignant transformation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qiao; Zhang, Jing; Ye, Xiaojing; Zhou, Gang

    2017-06-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a T-cell-mediated chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease affecting 0.1% to 4% of the world population. The WHO has already recognized it as an oral potentially malignant disorder. However, the reasons for the malignant transformation of OLP are far from being elucidated clearly. The purpose of this review is to clarify how the tumor-like microenvironment in OLP mediates its potentially malignant transformation. Areas covered: We review published articles on the microenvironment characteristics of tumors, the pathogenesis of OLP, and clinical studies of OLP. The main sources of literature derive from MEDLINE/Pubmed and Thomson Reuter's Web of Science. Expert commentary: The tumor-like microenvironment, including hypoxic, inflammatory, immune and acid microenvironment, greatly contributes to carcinogenesis of OLP patients. In order to effectively monitor the malignant transformation of OLP, future studies should focus on long-term follow-up and select important detection biomarkers.

  3. Targeting the tumor microenvironment as a potential therapeutic approach in colorectal cancer: Rational and progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Afsane; Khazaei, Majid; Hassanian, Seyed Mahdi; ShahidSales, Soodabeh; Joudi-Mashhad, Mona; Maftouh, Mina; Jazayeri, Mir Hadi; Parizade, Mohammad Reza; Ferns, Gordon A; Avan, Amir

    2017-06-02

    Colorectal cancer (CC) is often diagnosed at a late stage when tumor metastasis may have already occurred. Current treatments are often ineffective in metastatic disease, and consequently late diagnosis is often associated with poor outcomes in CC. Alternative strategies are therefore urgently required. An interaction between epithelial cancer cells and their tissue microenvironment is a contributor to metastasis, and therefore recent studies are beginning to focus on the properties of the tumor microenvironment and the mechanism by which the metastatic cells exploit the tumor microenvironment for survival, immune evasion, and growth. We have reviewed the development of the combined therapeutic approaches that have focused on targeting the microenvironment of CC. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. New Insights into the Role of Autophagy in Tumor Immune Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chia-Jung; Liao, Wan-Ting; Wu, Meng-Yu; Chu, Pei-Yi

    2017-07-19

    The tumor microenvironment is a complex system that is affected by various factors, including hypoxia, acidosis, and immune and inflammatory responses, which have significant effects on tumor adhesion, invasion, metastasis, angiogenesis, and autophagy. In this hostile tumor microenvironment, autophagy of tumor cells can promote tumor growth and metastasis. As autophagy is a double-edged sword in tumors, treatment of cancer via regulation of autophagy is extremely complicated. Therefore, understanding the relationship between tumor autophagy and the tumor microenvironment is extremely important. As the immune milieu plays an important role in tumor development, immunotherapy has become a promising form of cancer therapy. A multi-pronged treatment approach using immunotherapy and molecular targets may become the major direction for future cancer treatments. This article reviews existing knowledge regarding the immune factors in the tumor microenvironment and the status of tumor autophagy research.

  5. Biodegradable Hollow Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles for Regulating Tumor Microenvironment and Enhancing Antitumor Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Miao; Tang, Jiamin; Qiao, Qi; Wu, Tingting; Qi, Yan; Tan, Songwei; Gao, Xueqin; Zhang, Zhiping

    2017-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that regulating tumor microenvironment plays a vital role in improving antitumor efficiency. Herein, to remodel tumor immune microenvironment and elicit synergistic antitumor effects, lipid-coated biodegradable hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticle (dHMLB) was constructed with co-encapsulation of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), doxorubicin (DOX) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) for chemo-immunotherapy. The nanoparticle-mediated combinational therapy provided a benign regulation on tumor microenvironment through activation of tumor infiltrating T lymphocytes and natural killer cells, promotion of cytokines secretion of IFN-γ and IL-12, and down-regulation of immunosuppressive myeloid-derived suppressor cells, cytokine IL-10 and TGF-β. ATRA/DOX/IL-2 co-loaded dHMLB demonstrated significant tumor growth and metastasis inhibition, and also exhibited favorable biodegradability and safety. This nanoplatform has great potential in developing a feasible strategy to remodel tumor immune microenvironment and achieve enhanced antitumor effect.

  6. The Role of miRNAs as Key Regulators in the Neoplastic Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. K. Wentz-Hunter

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The neoplastic microenvironment has been recognized to play a critical role in the development of cancer. Although a large body of evidence has established the importance of the cancer microenvironment, the manners of crosstalk between it and the cancer cells still remains unclear. Emerging mechanisms of communication include microRNAs (miRNAs. miRNAs are small noncoding RNA molecules that are involved in the posttranscriptional regulation of mRNA. Both intracellular and circulating miRNAs are differentially expressed in cancer and some of these alterations have been correlated with clinical patient outcomes. The role of miRNAs in the tumor microenvironment has only recently become a focus of research, however. In this paper, we discuss the influence of miRNAs on the tumor microenvironment as it relates to cancer progression. We conclude that miRNAs are a critical component in understanding invasion and metastasis of cancer cells.

  7. Jawbone microenvironment promotes periodontium regeneration by regulating the function of periodontal ligament stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bin; Liu, Wenjia; Liu, Yihan; Zhao, Xicong; Zhang, Hao; Luo, Zhuojing; Jin, Yan

    2017-01-01

    During tooth development, the jawbone interacts with dental germ and provides the development microenvironment. Jawbone-derived mesenchymal stem cells (JBMSCs) maintain this microenvironment for root and periodontium development. However, the effect of the jawbone microenvironment on periodontium tissue regeneration is largely elusive. Our previous study showed that cell aggregates (CAs) of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promoted periodontium regeneration on the treated dentin scaffold. Here, we found that JBMSCs enhanced not only the osteogenic differentiation of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) but also their adhesion to titanium (Ti) material surface. Importantly, the compound CAs of PDLSCs and JBMSCs regenerated periodontal ligament-like fibers and mineralized matrix on the Ti scaffold surface, both in nude mice ectopic and minipig orthotopic transplantations. Our data revealed that an effective regenerative microenvironment, reconstructed by JBMSCs, promoted periodontium regeneration by regulating PDLSCs function on the Ti material. PMID:28053317

  8. Amino acid function relates to its embedded protein microenvironment: A study on disulfide-bridged cystine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Akshay; Apostol, Marcin I; Bandyopadhyay, Debashree

    2016-11-01

    In our previous study, we have shown that the microenvironments around conserved amino acids are also conserved in protein families (Bandyopadhyay and Mehler, Proteins 2008; 72:646-659). In this study, we have hypothesized that amino acids perform similar functions when embedded in a certain type of protein microenvironment. We have tested this hypothesis on the microenvironments around disulfide-bridged cysteines from high-resolution protein crystal structures. Although such cystines mainly play structural role in proteins, in certain enzymes they participate in catalysis and redox reactions. We have performed and report a functional annotation of enzymatically active cystines to their respective microenvironments. Three protein microenvironment clusters were identified: (i) buried-hydrophobic, (ii) exposed-hydrophilic, and (iii) buried-hydrophilic. The buried-hydrophobic cluster encompasses a small group of 22 redox-active cystines, mostly in alpha-helical conformations in a -C-x-x-C- motif from the Oxido-reductase enzyme class. All these cystines have high strain energy and near identical microenvironments. Most of the active cystines in hydrolase enzyme class belong to buried hydrophilic microenvironment cluster. In total there are 34 half-cystines detected in buried hydrophilic cluster from hydrolases, as a part of enzyme active site. Even within the buried hydrophilic cluster, there is clear separation of active half-cystines between surface exposed part of the protein and protein interior. Half-cystines toward the surface exposed region are higher in number compared to those in protein interior. Apart from cystines at the active sites of the enzymes, many more half-cystines were detected in buried hydrophilic cluster those are part of the microenvironment of enzyme active sites. However, no active half-cystines were detected in extremely hydrophilic microenvironment cluster, that is, exposed hydrophilic cluster, indicating that total exposure of cystine

  9. Upregulation of Syndecan-1 in the bone marrow microenvironment in multiple myeloma is associated with angiogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Niels F; Kristensen, Ida B; Preiss, Birgitte S

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Syndecan-1 (SDC1), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and interleukin-6 (IL6) are expressed by malignant plasma cells and cells in the bone marrow microenvironment and may be involved in the angiogenic process in multiple myeloma (MM). METHODS...... expression of HGF, VEGF and IL6 was seen. CONCLUSION: Our study indicates that SDC1 expressed by the bone marrow microenvironment is involved in angiogenesis in MM....

  10. Aerobic glycolysis and high level of lactate in cancer metabolism and microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Jiang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic abnormalities is a hallmark of cancer. About 100 years ago, Nobel laureate Otto Heinrich Warburg first described high rate of glycolysis in cancer cells. Recently more and more novel opinions about cancer metabolism supplement to this hypothesis, consist of glucose uptake, lactic acid generation and secretion, acidification of the microenvironment and cancer immune evasion. Here we briefly review metabolic pathways generating lactate, and discuss the function of higher lactic acid in cancer microenvironments.

  11. Using microarrays to study the microenvironment in tumor biology: The crucial role of statistics

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Microarrays represent a potentially powerful tool for better understanding the role of the microenvironment on tumor biology. To make the best use of microarray data and avoid incorrect or unsubstantiated conclusions, care must be taken in the statistical analysis. To illustrate the statistical issues involved we discuss three microarray studies related to the microenvironment and tumor biology involving: (i) prostatic stroma cells in cancer and non-cancer tissues; (ii) breast stroma and epit...

  12. AI-05IMPACT OF GBM MICROENVIRONMENT ON EXPRESSION PROFILE OF BONE MARROW DERIVED PROGENITOR CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Burrell, Kelly; Singh, Sanjay; Agnihotri, Sameer; Hill, Richard; Aldape, Kenneth; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2014-01-01

    We have recently shown that bone marrow derived cells (BMDC) provide a distinct tumor region dependent contribution to glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) neovascularization. The influence of GBM microenvironment on differentiation and modulation of expression factors by BMDC however remains unknown. In this study we establish the differential expression profile of BMDC as a consequence of recruitment and interaction with the GBM microenvironment and in response to radiation (RTx) and anti-angiogen...

  13. Solubility limits on radionuclide dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1984-12-31

    This paper examines the effects of solubility in limiting dissolution rates of a number of important radionuclides from spent fuel and high-level waste. Two simple dissolution models were used for calculations that would be characteristics of a Yucca Mountain repository. A saturation-limited dissolution model, in which the water flowing through the repository is assumed to be saturated with each waste element, is very conservative in that it overestimates dissolution rates. A diffusion-limited dissolution model, in which element-dissolution rates are limited by diffusion of waste elements into water flowing past the waste, is more realistic, but it is subject to some uncertainty at this time. Dissolution rates of some elements (Pu, Am, Sn, Th, Zr, Sm) are always limited by solubility. Dissolution rates of other elements (Cs, Tc, Np, Sr, C, I) are never solubility limited; their release would be limited by dissolution of the bulk waste form. Still other elements (U, Cm, Ni, Ra) show solubility-limited dissolution under some conditions. 9 references, 3 tables.

  14. A High-Throughput Screening Model of the Tumor Microenvironment for Ovarian Cancer Cell Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal-Nag, Madhu; McGee, Lauren; Guha, Rajarshi; Lengyel, Ernst; Kenny, Hilary A; Ferrer, Marc

    2017-06-01

    The tumor microenvironment plays an important role in the processes of tumor growth, metastasis, and drug resistance. We have used a multilayered 3D primary cell culture model that reproduces the human ovarian cancer metastatic microenvironment to study the effect of the microenvironment on the pharmacological responses of different classes of drugs on cancer cell proliferation. A collection of oncology drugs was screened to identify compounds that inhibited the proliferation of ovarian cancer cells growing as monolayers or forming spheroids, on plastic and on a 3D microenvironment culture model of the omentum metastatic site, and also cells already in preformed spheroids. Target-based analysis of the pharmacological responses revealed that several classes of targets were more efficacious in cancer cells growing in the absence of the metastatic microenvironment, and other target classes were less efficacious in cancer cells in preformed spheres compared to forming spheroid cultures. These findings show that both the cellular context of the tumor microenvironment and cell adhesion mode have an essential role in cancer cell drug resistance. Therefore, it is important to perform screens for new drugs using model systems that more faithfully recapitulate the tissue composition at the site of tumor growth and metastasis.

  15. Development and characterization of a microfluidic model of the tumour microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuso, Jose M; Virumbrales-Muñoz, María; Lacueva, Alodia; Lanuza, Pilar M; Checa-Chavarria, Elisa; Botella, Pablo; Fernández, Eduardo; Doblare, Manuel; Allison, Simon J; Phillips, Roger M; Pardo, Julián; Fernandez, Luis J; Ochoa, Ignacio

    2016-10-31

    The physical microenvironment of tumours is characterized by heterotypic cell interactions and physiological gradients of nutrients, waste products and oxygen. This tumour microenvironment has a major impact on the biology of cancer cells and their response to chemotherapeutic agents. Despite this, most in vitro cancer research still relies primarily on cells grown in 2D and in isolation in nutrient- and oxygen-rich conditions. Here, a microfluidic device is presented that is easy to use and enables modelling and study of the tumour microenvironment in real-time. The versatility of this microfluidic platform allows for different aspects of the microenvironment to be monitored and dissected. This is exemplified here by real-time profiling of oxygen and glucose concentrations inside the device as well as effects on cell proliferation and growth, ROS generation and apoptosis. Heterotypic cell interactions were also studied. The device provides a live 'window' into the microenvironment and could be used to study cancer cells for which it is difficult to generate tumour spheroids. Another major application of the device is the study of effects of the microenvironment on cellular drug responses. Some data is presented for this indicating the device's potential to enable more physiological in vitro drug screening.

  16. Tumor Microenvironment Targeting and Responsive Peptide-Based Nanoformulations for Improved Tumor Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hao; Ding, Yanping; Mujeeb, Ayeesha; Zhao, Ying; Nie, Guangjun

    2017-09-01

    The tumor microenvironment participates in all stages of tumor progression and has emerged as a promising therapeutic target for cancer therapy. Rapid progress in the field of molecular self-assembly using various biologic molecules has resulted in the fabrication of nanoformulations that specifically target and regulate microenvironment components to inhibit tumor growth. This inhibition process is based on differentiating between biophysicochemical cues guiding tumor and normal tissue microenvironments. Peptides and peptide derivatives, owing to their biocompatibility, chemical versatility, bioactivity, environmental sensitivity, and biologic recognition abilities, have been widely used as building blocks to construct multifunctional nanostructures for targeted drug delivery and controlled release. Several groups of peptides have been identified as having the ability to penetrate plasma membranes, regulate the essential signaling pathways of angiogenesis and immune reactions, and recognize key components in the tumor microenvironment (such as vascular systems, stromal cells, and abnormal tumor biophysicochemical features). Thus, using different modules, various functional peptides, and their derivatives can be integrated into nanoformulations specifically targeting the tumor microenvironment with increased selectivity, on-demand response, elevated cellular uptake, and improved tumor therapy. In this review, we introduce several groups of functional peptides and highlight peptide-based nanoformulations that specifically target the tumor microenvironment. We also provide our perspective on the development of smart drug-delivery systems with enhanced therapeutic efficacy. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  17. Functional and Biomimetic Materials for Engineering of the Three-Dimensional Cell Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guoyou; Li, Fei; Zhao, Xin; Ma, Yufei; Li, Yuhui; Lin, Min; Jin, Guorui; Lu, Tian Jian; Genin, Guy M; Xu, Feng

    2017-10-09

    The cell microenvironment has emerged as a key determinant of cell behavior and function in development, physiology, and pathophysiology. The extracellular matrix (ECM) within the cell microenvironment serves not only as a structural foundation for cells but also as a source of three-dimensional (3D) biochemical and biophysical cues that trigger and regulate cell behaviors. Increasing evidence suggests that the 3D character of the microenvironment is required for development of many critical cell responses observed in vivo, fueling a surge in the development of functional and biomimetic materials for engineering the 3D cell microenvironment. Progress in the design of such materials has improved control of cell behaviors in 3D and advanced the fields of tissue regeneration, in vitro tissue models, large-scale cell differentiation, immunotherapy, and gene therapy. However, the field is still in its infancy, and discoveries about the nature of cell-microenvironment interactions continue to overturn much early progress in the field. Key challenges continue to be dissecting the roles of chemistry, structure, mechanics, and electrophysiology in the cell microenvironment, and understanding and harnessing the roles of periodicity and drift in these factors. This review encapsulates where recent advances appear to leave the ever-shifting state of the art, and it highlights areas in which substantial potential and uncertainty remain.

  18. Optimization of the tumor microenvironment and nanomedicine properties simultaneously to improve tumor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Shi, Wei; Jiang, Ting; Wang, Lanting; Mei, Heng; Lu, Heng; Hu, Yu; Pang, Zhiqing

    2016-09-20

    Effective delivery of nanomedicines to tumor tissues depends on both the tumor microenvironment and nanomedicine properties. Accordingly, tumor microenvironment modification or advanced design of nanomedicine was emerging to improve nanomedicine delivery to tumors. However, few studies have emphasized the necessity to optimize the tumor microenvironment and nanomedicine properties simultaneously to improve tumor treatment. In the present study, imatinib mesylate (IMA) was used to normalize the tumor microenvironment including platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β expression inhibition, tumor vessel normalization, and tumor perfusion improvement as demonstrated by immunofluorescence staining. In addition, the effect of tumor microenvironment normalization on tumor delivery of nanomedicines with different sizes was carefully investigated. It was shown that IMA treatment significantly reduced the accumulation of nanoparticles (NPs) around 110 nm but enhanced the accumulation of micelles around 23 nm by in vivo fluorescence imaging experiment. Furthermore, IMA treatment limited the distribution of NPs inside tumors but increased that of micelles with a more homogeneous pattern. Finally, the anti-tumor efficacy study displayed that IMA pretreatment could significantly increase the therapeutic effects of paclitaxel-loaded micelles. All-together, a new strategy to improve nanomedicine delivery to tumor was provided by optimizing both nanomedicine size and the tumor microenvironment simultaneously, and it will have great potential in clinics for tumor treatment.

  19. Self-assembled peptide nanoparticles as tumor microenvironment activatable probes for tumor targeting and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying; Ji, Tianjiao; Wang, Hai; Li, Suping; Zhao, Yuliang; Nie, Guangjun

    2014-03-10

    Design of specific and sensitive imaging probes for targeting tumor microenvironment holds great promise to achieve precise detection and rapid responsiveness to neoplastic tissues. Dysregulated pH, one of the most remarkable hallmarks of tumor microenvironment, can be considered as a good specific trigger for the design of broad-spectrum and local-environment responsive imaging probes. However, the current existing design strategies for pH-responsive systems are insufficient to meet the needs for a rapid and tumor-specific diagnosis. Here we reported a novel biomimetic nanostructure based on oligopeptide self-assembly that can quickly switch into dissociated stage with active fluorescence property from self-assembled stage with quenched fluorescence activity when encountering a subtle pH-change in tumor microenvironment (pH 6.8 vs. 7.4). This oligopeptide-assembly is examined as tumor microenvironment activatable probes for both intratumoral and intravenous in vivo tumor imaging. Through the distinct fluorescent intensities, it is validated that the acidic tumor microenvironment can activate stronger fluorescence signals. The tailor-made self-assembled oligopeptide nanomaterials have the potential for efficient and specific in situ diagnosis of various solid tumors with a weakly acidic microenvironment, which is expected to be of crucial importance for clinical tumor diagnostics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Porcine spermatogonial stem cells self-renew effectively in a three dimensional culture microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Eun; Park, Min Hee; Kim, Min Seong; Park, Yeo Reum; Yun, Jung Im; Cheong, Hee Tae; Kim, Minseok; Choi, Jung Hoon; Lee, Eunsong; Lee, Seung Tae

    2017-08-17

    Generally, self-renewal of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) is maintained in vivo in a three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment consisting of the seminiferous tubule basement membrane, indicating the importance of the 3D microenvironment for in vitro culture of SSCs. Here, we report a 3D culture microenvironment that effectively maintains porcine SSC self-renewal during culture. Porcine SSCs were cultured in an agarose-based 3D hydrogel and in 2D culture plates either with or without feeder cells. Subsequently, the effects of 3D culture on the maintenance of undifferentiated SSCs were identified by analyzing cell colony formation and morphology, AP activity, and transcriptional and translational regulation of self-renewal-related genes and the effects on proliferation by analyzing cell viability and single cell-derived colony number. The 3D culture microenvironment constructed using a 0.2% (w/v) agarose-based 3D hydrogel showed the strongest maintenance of porcine SSC self-renewal and induced significant improvements in proliferation compared with 2D culture microenvironments. These results demonstrate that self-renewal of porcine SSCs can be maintained more effectively in a 3D than in a 2D culture microenvironment. Moreover, this will play a significant role in developing novel culture systems for SSCs derived from diverse species in the future, which will contribute to SSC-related research. © 2017 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  1. A method to establish a mouse model of bone marrow microenvironment injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wenzhe; Ge, Quanhu; Wan, Longfei; Wang, Xiaoyi; Chen, Xueling; Wu, Xiangwei

    2017-06-13

    A normal bone marrow microenvironment plays a very important role in the normal functioning of hematopoietic stem cells. Once disturbed, this microenvironment can become favorable for the occurrence of blood disorders, cancers, and other diseases. Therefore, further studies on the bone marrow microenvironment should be performed to reveal regulatory and stem cell fate determination mechanisms and promote the development of bone marrow transplantation, tissue repair and regenerative medicine, and other fields. A small animal model for further research is also urgently needed. In this study, an electric shock device was designed to elicit a femur bone marrow microenvironment injury in mice. A wire was inserted into the distal femur but not into the proximal femur, and the bone marrow microenvironment was evidently damaged by application of 100 ± 10 V for 1.5 ± 0.5 min; mortality, however, was low in the mice. Gross observation, hematoxylin and eosin staining, immunohistochemistry, bright-field microscopy, and micro-CT scanning were also conducted. A large number of new blood capillaries and sinusoids appeared in the injured distal femur after 2 weeks. The capillaries in the injured femur disappeared after 4 weeks, and mature blood vessels were scattered throughout the injured area. Red blood cells disappeared, and the cellular structure and trabecular bone were better than those observed 2 weeks previously. Thus, we developed a simply operated, accurate, reliable, and easily controlled small animal model as a good technical platform to examine angiogenesis and segmentation damage in the bone marrow microenvironment.

  2. Role of the tumor microenvironment in mature B-cell lymphoid malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Nathan H; Cheah, Chan Yoon; Gascoyne, Randy D; Gribben, John; Neelapu, Sattva S; Ghia, Paolo; Bollard, Catherine; Ansell, Stephen; Curran, Michael; Wilson, Wyndham H; O'Brien, Susan; Grant, Cliona; Little, Richard; Zenz, Thorsten; Nastoupil, Loretta J; Dunleavy, Kieron

    2016-05-01

    The tumor microenvironment is the cellular and molecular environment in which the tumor exists and with which it continuously interacts. In B-cell lymphomas, this microenvironment is intriguing in that it plays critical roles in the regulation of tumor cell survival and proliferation, fostering immune escape as well as the development of treatment resistance. The purpose of this review is to summarize the proceedings of the Second Annual Summit on the Immune Microenvironment in Hematologic Malignancies that took place on September 11-12, 2014 in Dublin, Ireland. We provide a timely overview of the composition and biological relevance of the cellular and molecular microenvironment interface and discuss the role of interactions between the microenvironment and neoplastic cells in a variety of B-cell lymphomas. In addition, we focus on various novel therapeutic strategies that target the tumor microenvironment, including agents that modulate B-cell receptor pathways and immune-checkpoints, chimeric antigen receptor T cells and immunomodulatory agents. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  3. Optimization of the tumor microenvironment and nanomedicine properties simultaneously to improve tumor therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ting; Wang, Lanting; Mei, Heng; Lu, Heng; Hu, Yu; Pang, Zhiqing

    2016-01-01

    Effective delivery of nanomedicines to tumor tissues depends on both the tumor microenvironment and nanomedicine properties. Accordingly, tumor microenvironment modification or advanced design of nanomedicine was emerging to improve nanomedicine delivery to tumors. However, few studies have emphasized the necessity to optimize the tumor microenvironment and nanomedicine properties simultaneously to improve tumor treatment. In the present study, imatinib mesylate (IMA) was used to normalize the tumor microenvironment including platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β expression inhibition, tumor vessel normalization, and tumor perfusion improvement as demonstrated by immunofluorescence staining. In addition, the effect of tumor microenvironment normalization on tumor delivery of nanomedicines with different sizes was carefully investigated. It was shown that IMA treatment significantly reduced the accumulation of nanoparticles (NPs) around 110 nm but enhanced the accumulation of micelles around 23 nm by in vivo fluorescence imaging experiment. Furthermore, IMA treatment limited the distribution of NPs inside tumors but increased that of micelles with a more homogeneous pattern. Finally, the anti-tumor efficacy study displayed that IMA pretreatment could significantly increase the therapeutic effects of paclitaxel-loaded micelles. All-together, a new strategy to improve nanomedicine delivery to tumor was provided by optimizing both nanomedicine size and the tumor microenvironment simultaneously, and it will have great potential in clinics for tumor treatment. PMID:27566585

  4. Development and characterization of a microfluidic model of the tumour microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuso, Jose M.; Virumbrales-Muñoz, María; Lacueva, Alodia; Lanuza, Pilar M.; Checa-Chavarria, Elisa; Botella, Pablo; Fernández, Eduardo; Doblare, Manuel; Allison, Simon J.; Phillips, Roger M.; Pardo, Julián; Fernandez, Luis J.; Ochoa, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    The physical microenvironment of tumours is characterized by heterotypic cell interactions and physiological gradients of nutrients, waste products and oxygen. This tumour microenvironment has a major impact on the biology of cancer cells and their response to chemotherapeutic agents. Despite this, most in vitro cancer research still relies primarily on cells grown in 2D and in isolation in nutrient- and oxygen-rich conditions. Here, a microfluidic device is presented that is easy to use and enables modelling and study of the tumour microenvironment in real-time. The versatility of this microfluidic platform allows for different aspects of the microenvironment to be monitored and dissected. This is exemplified here by real-time profiling of oxygen and glucose concentrations inside the device as well as effects on cell proliferation and growth, ROS generation and apoptosis. Heterotypic cell interactions were also studied. The device provides a live ‘window’ into the microenvironment and could be used to study cancer cells for which it is difficult to generate tumour spheroids. Another major application of the device is the study of effects of the microenvironment on cellular drug responses. Some data is presented for this indicating the device’s potential to enable more physiological in vitro drug screening. PMID:27796335

  5. WE-E-BRE-12: Tumor Microenvironment Dynamics Following Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, D; Niles, D; Adamson, E; Torres, A; Kissick, M; Eliceiri, K; Kimple, R [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: This work aims to understand the radiation-induced interplay between tumor oxygenation and metabolic activity. These dynamics can potentially serve as biomarkers in assessing treatment response allowing for patient-specific adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Using patient-derived xenografts of head and neck cancer we assessed tumor oxygenation via fiber-optic probe monitored hemoglobin saturation and Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) MRI. Measurements were taken before and after a 10 Gy dose of radiation. Changes in metabolic activity were measured via Fluorescence Lifetime IMaging (FLIM) with the appropriate controls following a 10 Gy dose of radiation. FLIM can non-invasively monitor changes in fluorescence in response to the microenvironment including being able to detect free and bound states of the intrinsically fluorescent metabolite NADH (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide). With this information FLIM can accurately quantify the metabolic state of cells that have been radiated. To model the observed changes, a two-compartment, source-sink simulation relating hemoglobin saturation and metabolic activity was performed using MATLAB. Results: Hemoglobin saturation as measured by interstitial probe and BOLD-MRI decreased by 30% within 15 minutes following radiation. FLIM demonstrated a decrease in the mean fluorescence lifetime of NADH by 100 ps following 10 Gy indicating a shift towards glycolytic pathways. Simulation of radiation-induced alterations in tumor oxygenation demonstrated that these changes can be the result of changes in either vasculature or metabolic activity. Conclusion: Radiation induces significant changes in hemoglobin saturation and metabolic activity. These alterations occur on time scales approximately the duration of common radiation treatments. Further understanding these dynamics has important implications with regard to improvement of therapy and biomarkers of treatment response.

  6. Radiation impairs perineural invasion by modulating the nerve microenvironment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L Bakst

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Perineural invasion (PNI by cancer cells is an ominous clinical event that is associated with increased local recurrence and poor prognosis. Although radiation therapy (RT may be delivered along the course of an invaded nerve, the mechanisms through which radiation may potentially control PNI remain undefined. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: An in vitro co-culture system of dorsal root ganglia (DRG and pancreatic cancer cells was used as a model of PNI. An in vivo murine sciatic nerve model was used to study how RT to nerve or cancer affects nerve invasion by cancer. RESULTS: Cancer cell invasion of the DRG was partially dependent on DRG secretion of glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF. A single 4 Gy dose of radiation to the DRG alone, cultured with non-radiated cancer cells, significantly inhibited PNI and was associated with decreased GDNF secretion but intact DRG viability. Radiation of cancer cells alone, co-cultured with non-radiated nerves, inhibited PNI through predominantly compromised cancer cell viability. In a murine model of PNI, a single 8 Gy dose of radiation to the sciatic nerve prior to implantation of non-radiated cancer cells resulted in decreased GDNF expression, decreased PNI by imaging and histology, and preservation of sciatic nerve motor function. CONCLUSIONS: Radiation may impair PNI through not only direct effects on cancer cell viability, but also an independent interruption of paracrine mechanisms underlying PNI. RT modulation of the nerve microenvironment may decrease PNI, and hold significant therapeutic implications for RT dosing and field design for patients with cancers exhibiting PNI.

  7. MR-Visible Lipids and the Tumor Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delikatny, E. James; Chawla, Sanjeev; Leung, Daniel-Joseph; Poptani, Harish

    2013-01-01

    MR-visible lipids or mobile lipids are defined as lipids that are observable using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in cells and in tissues. These MR-visible lipids are composed of triglycerides and cholesterol esters that accumulate in intracellular neutral lipid droplets, where their MR visibility is conferred as a result of the increased molecular motion available in this unique physical environment. This review will discuss factors that lead to the biogenesis of MR-visible lipids in cancer cells and in other cell types such as immune cells and fibroblasts. We focus on the accumulations of mobile lipids that are inducible in cultured cells by a number of stresses, including culture conditions and in response to activating stimuli or apoptotic cell death induced by anticancer drugs. This is compared with animal tumor models, where increases in mobile lipids are observed in response to chemo and radiotherapy, and to human tumors where mobile lipids are observed predominantly in high-grade brain tumors and in regions of necrosis. Conducive conditions for mobile lipid formation in the tumor microenvironment will be discussed including low pH, oxygen availability and the presence of inflammatory cells. It is concluded that MR-visible lipids appear in cancer cells and human tumors as a stress response. Mobile lipids stored as neutral lipid droplets may play a role in detoxification of the cell or act as an alternate energy source, especially in cancer cells, which often grow in ischemic/hypoxic environments. The role of MR-visible lipids in cancer diagnosis and assessment of treatment response both in animal models of cancer as well as human brain tumors will also be discussed. Although technical limitations exist in the accurate detection of intratumoral mobile lipids, early increases in mobile lipids after therapeutic interventions may be used as a potential biomarker for assessing treatment response in cancer. PMID:21538631

  8. Endostatin induces proliferation of oral carcinoma cells but its effect on invasion is modified by the tumor microenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alahuhta, Ilkka [Research Group of Cancer and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu (Finland); Medical Research Center, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu (Finland); Aikio, Mari [Biocenter Oulu and Faculty of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, University of Oulu (Finland); Oulu Center for Cell-Matrix Research, University of Oulu (Finland); Väyrynen, Otto; Nurmenniemi, Sini [Research Group of Cancer and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu (Finland); Medical Research Center, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu (Finland); Suojanen, Juho [Department of Oral and Maxillo-facial Diseases, University of Helsinki, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Teppo, Susanna [Research Group of Cancer and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu (Finland); Medical Research Center, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu (Finland); Pihlajaniemi, Taina; Heljasvaara, Ritva [Biocenter Oulu and Faculty of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, University of Oulu (Finland); Oulu Center for Cell-Matrix Research, University of Oulu (Finland); Salo, Tuula [Research Group of Cancer and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu (Finland); Medical Research Center, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu (Finland); Department of Oral and Maxillo-facial Diseases, University of Helsinki, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Department of Oral Diagnosis, School of Dentistry, State University of Campinas, Piracicaba, Sao Paolo (Brazil); Nyberg, Pia, E-mail: pia.nyberg@oulu.fi [Research Group of Cancer and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu (Finland); Medical Research Center, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu (Finland)

    2015-08-01

    The turnover of extracellular matrix liberates various cryptic molecules with novel biological activities. Endostatin is an endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor that is derived from the non-collagenous domain of collagen XVIII. Although there are a large number of studies on its anti-tumor effects, the molecular mechanisms are not yet completely understood, and the reasons why endostatin has not been successful in clinical trials are unclear. Research has mostly focused on its anti-angiogenic effect in tumors. Here, we aimed to elucidate how endostatin affects the behavior of aggressive tongue HSC-3 carcinoma cells that were transfected to overproduce endostatin. Endostatin inhibited the invasion of HSC-3 cells in a 3D collagen–fibroblast model. However, it had no effect on invasion in a human myoma organotypic model, which lacks vital fibroblasts. Recombinant endostatin was able to reduce the Transwell migration of normal fibroblasts, but had no effect on carcinoma associated fibroblasts. Surprisingly, endostatin increased the proliferation and decreased the apoptosis of cancer cells in organotypic models. Also subcutaneous tumors overproducing endostatin grew bigger, but showed less local invasion in nude mice xenografts. We conclude that endostatin affects directly to HSC-3 cells increasing their proliferation, but its net effect on cancer invasion seem to depend on the cellular composition and interactions of tumor microenvironment. - Highlights: • Endostatin affects not only angiogenesis, but also carcinoma cells and fibroblasts. • Endostatin increased carcinoma cell proliferation, but decreased 3D invasion. • The invasion inhibitory effect was sensitive to the microenvironment composition. • Fibroblasts may be a factor regulating the fluctuating roles of endostatin.

  9. Parathyroid hormone administration improves bone marrow microenvironment and partially rescues haematopoietic defects in Bmi1-null mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruinan Lu

    Full Text Available The epigenetic regulator Bmi1 is key in haematopoietic stem cells, and its inactivation leads to defects in haematopoiesis. Parathyroid hormone (PTH, an important modulator of bone homeostasis, also regulates haematopoiesis, so we asked whether PTH administration improves bone marrow microenvironment and rescues the haematopoietic defects in Bmi1-null mice. The mice were treated with PTH1-34 (containing the first 34 residues of mature PTH, an anabolic drug currently used for treating osteoporosis, and compared with the vehicle-treated Bmi1-/- and wild-type littermates in terms of skeletal and haematopoietic phenotypes. We found that the administration significantly increased all parameters related to osteoblastic bone formation and significantly reduced the adipocyte number and PPARγ expression. The bone marrow cellularity, numbers of haematopoietic progenitors and stem cells in the femur, and numbers of lymphocytes and other white blood cells in the peripheral blood all increased significantly when compared to vehicle-treated Bmi1-/- mice. Moreover, the number of Jagged1-positive cells and percentage of Notch intracellular domain-positive bone marrow cells and protein expression levels of Jagged1 and NICD in bone tissue were also increased in Bmi1-/- mice upon PTH1-34 administration,whereas the up-regulation of PTH on both Notch1 and Jagged1 gene expression was blocked by the Notch inhibitor DAPT administration. These results thus indicate that PTH administration activates the notch pathway and partially rescues haematopoietic defects in Bmi1-null mice, further suggesting that haematopoietic defects in the animals are not only a result of reduced self-renewal of haematopoietic stem cells but also due to impaired bone marrow microenvironment.

  10. RAGE mediates S100A7-induced breast cancer growth and metastasis by modulating the tumor microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, Mohd W.; Wani, Nissar Ahmad; Ahirwar, Dinesh K.; Powell, Catherine A.; Ravi, Janani; Elbaz, Mohamad; Zhao, Helong; Padilla, Laura; Zhang, Xiaoli; Shilo, Konstantin; Ostrowski, Michael; Shapiro, Charles; Carson, William E.; Ganju, Ramesh K.

    2015-01-01

    RAGE is a multi-functional receptor implicated in diverse processes including inflammation and cancer. In this study, we report that RAGE expression is upregulated widely in aggressive triple-negative breast cancer cells, both in primary tumors and lymph node metastases. In evaluating the functional contributions of RAGE in breast cancer, we found RAGE-deficient mice displayed a reduced propensity for breast tumor growth. In an established model of lung metastasis, systemic blockade by injection of a RAGE neutralizing antibody inhibited metastasis development. Mechanistic investigations revealed that RAGE bound to the pro-inflammatory ligand S100A7 and mediated its ability to activate ERK, NF-κB and cell migration. In an S100A7 transgenic mouse model of breast cancer (mS100a7a15 mice), administration of either RAGE neutralizing antibody or soluble RAGE was sufficient to inhibit tumor progression and metastasis. In this model, we found that RAGE/S100A7 conditioned the tumor microenvironment by driving the recruitment of MMP9-positive tumor-associated macrophages. Overall, our results highlight RAGE as a candidate biomarker for triple-negative breast cancers and they reveal a functional role for RAGE/S100A7 signaling in linking inflammation to aggressive breast cancer development. PMID:25572331

  11. Synergistic COX2 Induction by IFNγ and TNFα Self-Limits Type-1 Immunity in the Human Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jeffrey L; Obermajer, Nataša; Odunsi, Kunle; Edwards, Robert P; Kalinski, Pawel

    2016-04-01

    Maintenance of CTL-, Th1-, and NK cell-mediated type-1 immunity is essential for effective antitumor responses. Unexpectedly, we observed that the critical soluble mediators of type-1 immune effector cells, IFNγ and TNFα, synergize in the induction of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), the key enzyme in prostaglandin (PG)E2 synthesis, and the subsequent hyperactivation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) within the tumor microenvironment (TME) of ovarian cancer patients. MDSC hyperactivation by type-1 immunity and the resultant overexpression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS/NOS2), IL10, and additional COX2 result in strong feedback suppression of type-1 immune responses. This paradoxical immune suppression driven by type-1 immune cell activation was found to depend on the synergistic action of IFNγ and TNFα, and could not be reproduced by either of these factors alone. Importantly, from a therapeutic standpoint, these negative feedback limiting type-1 responses could be eliminated by COX2 blockade, allowing amplification of type-1 immunity in the ovarian cancer TME. Our data demonstrate a new mechanism underlying the self-limiting nature of type-1 immunity in the human TME, driven by the synergistic induction of COX2 by IFNγ and TNFα, and provide a rationale for targeting the COX2-PGE2 axis to enhance the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapies.

  12. De novo design of synthetic prion domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toombs, James A; Petri, Michelina; Paul, Kacy R; Kan, Grace Y; Ben-Hur, Asa; Ross, Eric D

    2012-04-24

    Prions are important disease agents and epigenetic regulatory elements. Prion formation involves the structural conversion of proteins from a soluble form into an insoluble amyloid form. In many cases, this structural conversion is driven by a glutamine/asparagine (Q/N)-rich prion-forming domain. However, our understanding of the sequence requirements for prion formation and propagation by Q/N-rich domains has been insufficient for accurate prion propensity prediction or prion domain design. By focusing exclusively on amino acid composition, we have developed a prion aggregation prediction algorithm (PAPA), specifically designed to predict prion propensity of Q/N-rich proteins. Here, we show not only that this algorithm is far more effective than traditional amyloid prediction algorithms at predicting prion propensity of Q/N-rich proteins, but remarkably, also that PAPA is capable of rationally designing protein domains that function as prions in vivo.

  13. Solubility of sparingly soluble drug derivatives of anthranilic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domańska, Urszula; Pobudkowska, Aneta; Pelczarska, Aleksandra

    2011-03-24

    This work is a continuation of our systematic study of the solubility of pharmaceuticals (Pharms). All substances here are derivatives of anthranilic acid, and have an anti-inflammatory direction of action (niflumic acid, flufenamic acid, and diclofenac sodium). The basic thermal properties of pure Pharms, i.e., melting and glass-transition temperatures as well as the enthalpy of melting, have been measured with the differential scanning microcalorimetry technique (DSC). Molar volumes have been calculated with the Barton group contribution method. The equilibrium mole fraction solubilities of three pharmaceuticals were measured in a range of temperatures from 285 to 355 K in three important solvents for Pharm investigations: water, ethanol, and 1-octanol using a dynamic method and spectroscopic UV-vis method. The experimental solubility data have been correlated by means of the commonly known G(E) equation: the NRTL, with the assumption that the systems studied here have revealed simple eutectic mixtures. pK(a) precise measurement values have been investigated with the Bates-Schwarzenbach spectrophotometric method.

  14. Smooth Muscle Stiffness Sensitivity is Driven by Soluble and Insoluble ECM Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, William G.; Rattan, Shruti; Nguyen, Thuy V.; Grunwald, Michael S.; Barney, Christopher W.; Crosby, Alfred J.; Peyton, Shelly R.

    2015-01-01

    Smooth muscle cell (SMC) invasion into plaques and subsequent proliferation is a major factor in the progression of atherosclerosis. During disease progression, SMCs experience major changes in their microenvironment, such as what integrin-binding sites are exposed, the portfolio of soluble factors available, and the elasticity and modulus of the surrounding vessel wall. We have developed a hydrogel biomaterial platform to examine the combined effect of these changes on SMC phenotype. We were particularly interested in how the chemical microenvironment affected the ability of SMCs to sense and respond to modulus. To our surprise, we observed that integrin binding and soluble factors are major drivers of several critical SMC behaviors, such as motility, proliferation, invasion, and differentiation marker expression, and these factors modulated the effect of stiffness on proliferation and migration. Overall, modulus only modestly affected behaviors other than proliferation, relative to integrin binding and soluble factors. Surprisingly, pathological behaviors (proliferation, motility) are not inversely related to SMC marker expression, in direct conflict with previous studies on substrates coupled with single extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. A high-throughput bead-based ELISA approach and inhibitor studies revealed that differentiation marker expression is mediated chiefly via focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling, and we propose that integrin binding and FAK drive the transition from a migratory to a proliferative phenotype. We emphasize the importance of increasing the complexity of in vitro testing platforms to capture these subtleties in cell phenotypes and signaling, in order to better recapitulate important features of in vivo disease and elucidate potential context-dependent therapeutic targets. PMID:26495043

  15. Soluble-oil cutting fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawlinson, A.P.; Whitby, R.D.; White, J.

    1989-04-11

    A composition for the preparation of a soluble oil for use in a cutting fluid comprises a mineral oil and, as an emuslifier, an effective amount of a sulfonate of a branched polymer of a C/sub 3/ to C/sub 5/ olefin. Preferably the polyolefin chain of the sulphonate has an average molecular weight in the range 275 to 560 and the polyolefin is polyisobutene. A soluble oil can be prepared from the above composition by the addition of a conventional corrosion inhibitor and diluted with water to make a cutting fluid. Advantages of the novel emulsifier are that it is resistant to breakdown by micro-organisms and does not require the addition of a coupling agent.

  16. Microenvironment and microbiology of skin wounds: the role of bacterial biofilms and related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalise, A; Bianchi, A; Tartaglione, C; Bolletta, E; Pierangeli, M; Torresetti, M; Marazzi, M; Di Benedetto, G

    2015-01-01

    Wound healing is a systemic response to injury that impacts the entire body and not just the site of tissue damage; it represents one of the most complex biological processes. Our knowledge of wound healing continues to evolve and it is now clear that the wound microenvironment plays a crucial role. The interactions between cells and the surface microenvironment, referred to as the "biofilm," contributes to skin homeostasis and healing. Understanding the functional complexity of the wound microenvironment informs how various factors such as age, ischemia, or bacterial infections can impair or arrest the normal healing processes, and it also allows for the possibility of acting therapeutically on healing defects with microenvironment manipulation. Microbes represent a particularly important factor for influencing the wound microenvironment and therefore wound healing. Moreover, the role of infections, particularly those that are sustained by biofilm-forming bacteria, is mutually related to other microenvironment aspects, such as humidity, pH, metalloproteinases, and reactive oxygen species, on which the modern research of new therapeutic strategies is focused. Today, chronic wounds are a rapidly growing health care burden and it is progressively understood that many non-healing wounds might benefit from therapies that target microorganisms and their biofilm communities. There is no doubt that host factors like perfusion impairments, venous insufficiency, pressure issues, malnutrition, and comorbidities strongly impact the healing processes and therefore must be targeted in the therapeutic management, but this approach might be not enough. In this article, we detail how bacterial biofilms and related factors impair wound healing, the reasons they must be considered a treatment target that is as important as the host's local and systemic pathologic conditions, and the latest therapeutic strategies derived from the comprehension of the wound microenvironment. Copyright

  17. DT-13 inhibits cancer cell migration by regulating NMIIA indirectly in the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hongzhi; Huang, Yue; Hou, Xiaoyin; Yu, Xiaowen; Lin, Sensen; Wei, Xiaohui; Li, Ruiming; Khan, Ghulam Jilany; Yuan, Shengtao; Sun, Li

    2016-08-01

    Tumor metastasis is one of the main causes of mortality among patients with malignant tumors. Previous studies concerning tumor metastasis have merely focused on the cancer cells in the tumor. However, an increasing number of studies show that the tumor microenvironment plays a vital role in the progression of cancer, particularly in tumor metastasis. Since fibroblasts and adipocytes are two of the most representative mesenchymal cells in the tumor microenvironment, we established a hypoxia-induced cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF) model and a chemically induced adipocyte model to reveal the effect of the microenvironment on cancer development. In these models, the conditioned medium from the tumor microenvironment was found to significantly promote the migration of human lung cancer cell line 95D and regulate the expression of non-muscle myosin IIA (NMIIA), which is consistent with results in the published literature. Then, we confirmed the hypothesis that the tumor microenvironment can regulate NMIIA in cancer cells and facilitate migration by using the non-muscle myosin II inhibitor, blebbistatin. Thus, this is the first report that the tumor microenvironment can promote cancer cell migration by regulating the expression of NMIIA. Our present data also indicated that DT-13, the saponin monomer 13 of dwarf lilyturf tuber, inhibited cancer cell migration in the tumor microenvironment model. Further results showed that DT-13 exhibited anti-migratory effects by inhibiting the c-raf/ERK1/2 signaling pathway. Consequently, our research confirmed that DT-13 significantly inhibited 95D cell migration in vitro, indicating the potential anti-metastatic effect of DT-13 on lung cancer and the scientific basis for drug development.

  18. Targeting the Prometastatic Microenvironment of the Involuting Mammary Gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    stained tissues) before being mounted in Cytoseal (VWR). For immunohistochemistry (IHC), citric acid antigen retrieval was performed by submerging...in this cycle are that LTBP1 expression is robustly elevated during involution, a window of development associated with heightened risk of highly...reporter comprises the signal peptide and the first 165 amino acids of Ltbp1L protein followed by the ROR1 transmembrane domain fused in-frame with β

  19. Effect of micro-environment modification and polymer type on the in-vitro dissolution behavior and in-vivo performance of amorphous solid dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weiwei; Pan, Baoliang

    2017-06-15

    This study investigates the effects of micro-environment modification and polymer type on the in-vitro dissolution behavior and in-vivo performance of micro-environment pH modifying solid dispersions (pHM-SD) for the poorly water-soluble model drug Toltrazuril (TOL). Various pHM-SDs were prepared using Ca(OH)2 as a pH-modifier in hydrophilic polymers, including polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG6000), polyvinylpyrrolidone k30 (PVPk30) and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC). Based on the results of physicochemical characterizations and in-vitro dissolution testing, the representative ternary (Ca(OH)2:TOL:PEG6000/HPMC/PVPk30=1:8:24, w/w/w) and binary (TOL:PVPk30=1:3, w/w) solid dispersions were selected and optimized to perform in-vivo pharmacokinetic study. The micro-environment pH modification improved the in-vitro water-solubility and in-vivo bioavailability of parent drug TOL. Furthermore, the addition of alkalizers not only enhanced the release and absorption of prototype drug, but also promoted the generation of active metabolites, including toltrazuril sulfoxide (TOLSO) and toltrazuril sulfone (TOLSO2). The in-vitro dissolution profiles and in-vivo absorption, distribution and metabolism behaviors of the pHM-SDs varied with polymer type. Moreover, in-vivo bioavailability of three active pharmaceutical ingredients increased with an increase in in-vitro dissolution rates of the drug from the pHM-SDs prepared with various polymers. Therefore, a non-sink in-vitro dissolution method can be used to predict the in-vivo performance of pHM-SDs formulated with various polymers with trend consistency. In-vitro and in-vivo screening procedures revealed that the pHM-SD composed of Ca(OH)2, TOL and PVPk30 at a weight ratio of 1:8:24, of which the safety was adequately proved via histopathological examination, may be a promising candidate for providing better clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Soluble Precursor Route to Polyanilines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    condensation were not successful, but further work produced polymer under the following conditions: Synthesis Diketone I (2.40 g, 10.0 mmol) in 10 mL...goal of producing a processible form of the conducting polymer polyaniline (PANI), the Phase I program concentrated on development of the synthesis of...extension of the original research to a Phase II effort. Diketone - Diamine Polycondensation Towards a Soluble PAni Precursor To achieve the

  1. A Study on Solubilization of Poorly Soluble Drugs by Cyclodextrins and Micelles: Complexation and Binding Characteristics of Sulfamethoxazole and Trimethoprim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinem Göktürk

    2012-01-01

    > α-CD. With taking into consideration of solubilization capacity of SDS micelles, it has been found that the solubility enhancement of TMP is much higher than that of SMX in the presence of SDS micelles. The binding constants of SMX and TMP obtained from the Benesi-Hildebrand equation are also confirmed by the estimated surface properties of SDS, employing the surface tension measurements. In order to elucidate the solubilization characteristics the surface tension measurements were also performed for nonionic surfactant Triton X-100. Polarity of the microenvironment and probable location of SMX and TMP were also discussed in the presence of various organic solvents.

  2. The Solubility Parameters of Ionic Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Marciniak

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The Hildebrand’s solubility parameters have been calculated for 18 ionic liquids from the inverse gas chromatography measurements of the activity coefficients at infinite dilution. Retention data were used for the calculation. The solubility parameters are helpful for the prediction of the solubility in the binary solvent mixtures. From the solubility parameters, the standard enthalpies of vaporization of ionic liquids were estimated.

  3. Inhibitory effect of soluble platelet-derived growth factor receptor β on intraosseous growth of breast cancer cells in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Hongchao; Takahashi, Tetsuyuki; Bando, Yoshimi; Izumi, Keisuke; Uehara, Hisanori

    2011-10-01

    Bone metastasis is a frequent complication of advanced breast cancer. On the basis of functional and molecular evidence, signaling mediated by the binding of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB and -DD to PDGF receptor β (PDGFRβ) is critical for the survival and growth of metastatic breast cancer cells within the bone microenvironment. In this study, we propose a new approach to blocking PDGFRβ signaling using soluble PDGFRβ (sPDGFRβ) as a decoy receptor for PDGF-BB and -DD secreted from tumor cells and bone marrow stromal cells. A bone-seeking TNBCT/Bo cell line was established by in vivo selection from TNBCT human breast cancer cells, which are negative for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 protein expression. The TNBCT/Bo cells were transfected with a mammalian expression vector encoding the extracellular domain of PDGFRβ. A stable transfectant (TNBCT/Bo-sPDGFRβ) grew at a similar rate to that of control cells under normal culture conditions, although growth stimulation of human fibroblasts with PDGF-BB was neutralized by the culture medium from TNBCT/Bo-sPDGFRβ cells. Intratibial injection of TNBCT/Bo-sPDGFRβ cells into athymic nude mice resulted in a significant decrease in tumor incidence compared with control mice (P growth correlated with decreased cancer cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and recruitment of stromal cells, and with an increase in the number of apoptotic cells. These findings suggest that sPDGFRβ is useful for the treatment of breast cancer bone metastasis.

  4. Bicarbonate-Regulated Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuttke MS

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC represents a novel form of mammalian adenylyl cyclase structurally, molecularly, and biochemically distinct from the G protein-regulated, transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs. sAC possesses no transmembrane domains and is insensitive to classic modulators of tmACs, such as heterotrimeric G proteins and P site ligands. Thus, sAC defines an independently regulated cAMP signaling system within mammalian cells. sAC is directly stimulated by bicarbonate ion both in vivo in heterologously expressing cells and in vitro using purified protein. sAC appears to be the predominant form of adenylyl cyclase (AC in mammalian sperm, and its direct activation by bicarbonate provides a mechanism for generating the cAMP required to complete the bicarbonate-induced processes necessary for fertilization, including hyperactivated motility, capacitation, and the acrosome reaction. Immunolocalization studies reveal sAC is also abundantly expressed in other tissues which respond to bicarbonate or carbon dioxide levels suggesting it may function as a general bicarbonate/CO(2 sensor throughout the body.

  5. Targeting tumor microenvironment with PEG-based amphiphilic nanoparticles to overcome chemoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shizhu; Yang, Keni; Tuguntaev, Ruslan G; Mozhi, Anbu; Zhang, Jinchao; Wang, Paul C; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2016-02-01

    Multidrug resistance is one of the biggest obstacles in the treatment of cancer. Recent research studies highlight that tumor microenvironment plays a predominant role in tumor cell proliferation, metastasis, and drug resistance. Hence, targeting the tumor microenvironment provides a novel strategy for the evolution of cancer nanomedicine. The blooming knowledge about the tumor microenvironment merging with the design of PEG-based amphiphilic nanoparticles can provide an effective and promising platform to address the multidrug resistant tumor cells. This review describes the characteristic features of tumor microenvironment and their targeting mechanisms with the aid of PEG-based amphiphilic nanoparticles for the development of newer drug delivery systems to overcome multidrug resistance in cancer cells. Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Many cancers develop multidrug resistance towards chemotherapeutic agents with time and strategies are urgently needed to combat against this. In this review article, the authors discuss the current capabilities of using nanomedicine to target the tumor microenvironments, which would provide new insight to the development of novel delivery systems for the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Modification of Antitumor Immunity and Tumor Microenvironment by Resveratrol in Mouse Renal Tumor Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Yang, Sixing; Liao, Wenbiao; Xiong, Yunhe

    2015-06-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) microenvironment plays critical roles in antitumor immune response. Resveratrol exhibits a direct antitumor effect in various tumor models. However, the immunomodulatory effect of resveratrol on RCC microenvironment is unknown. In this study, we found that administration of low dose of resveratrol inhibits Renca tumor growth and its inhibition effect depends on CD8(+) T cells. Moreover, the proportion of regulatory T cells is decreased, while the proportion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells does not alter after resveratrol treatment. More importantly, massive amount of activated CD8(+) T cells accumulates in tumor microenvironment in the resveratrol-treated group and shows increased cytotoxicity, as indicated by a higher expression of Fas ligand. We also found that resveratrol switches the expression of T-helper (Th) 2 cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 to Th 1 cytokines with dominance of interferon (IFN)-γ, which increases the expression of Fas in Renca cells. Furthermore, we found resveratrol down-regulates angiogenesis along with decreased level of vascular endothelial growth factor in tumor microenvironment. Our results strongly suggest that resveratrol might be used for RCC immunotherapy through modulating tumor microenvironment.

  7. Tumor Microenvironment Modulation by Cyclopamine Improved Photothermal Therapy of Biomimetic Gold Nanorods for Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ting; Zhang, Bo; Shen, Shun; Tuo, Yanyan; Luo, Zimiao; Hu, Yu; Pang, Zhiqing; Jiang, Xinguo

    2017-09-20

    Due to the rich stroma content and poor blood perfusion, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is a tough cancer that can hardly be effectively treated by chemotherapeutic drugs. Tumor microenvironment modulation or advanced design of nanomedicine to achieve better therapeutic benefits for PDA treatment was widely advocated by many reviews. In the present study, a new photothermal therapy strategy of PDA was developed by combination of tumor microenvironment modulation and advanced design of biomimetic gold nanorods. On one hand, biomimetic gold nanorods were developed by coating gold nanorods (GNRs) with erythrocyte membrane (MGNRs). It was shown that MGNRs exhibited significantly higher colloidal stability in vitro, stronger photothermal therapeutic efficacy in vitro, and longer circulation in vivo than GNRs. On the other hand, tumor microenvironment modulation by cyclopamine treatment successfully disrupted the extracellular matrix of PDA and improved tumor blood perfusion. Moreover, cyclopamine treatment significantly increased the accumulation of MGNRs in tumors by 1.8-fold and therefore produced higher photothermal efficiency in vivo than the control group. Finally, cyclopamine treatment combined with photothermal MGNRs achieved the most significant shrinkage of Capan-2 tumor xenografts among all the treatment groups. Therefore, with the integrated advantages of tumor microenvironment regulation and long-circulation biomimetic MGNRs, effective photothermal therapy of PDA was achieved. In general, this new strategy of combining tumor microenvironment modulation and advanced design of biomimetic nanoparticles might have great potential in PDA therapy.

  8. Critical role of tumor microenvironment in shaping NK functions: implication of hypoxic stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meriem eHasmim

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Blurring the boundary between innate and adaptive immune system, natural killer (NK cells, a key component of the innate immunity, are recognized as potent anti-cancer mediators. Extensive studies have been detailed on how NK cells get activated and recognize cancer cells. In contrast, few studies have been focused on how tumor microenvironment-mediated immunosubversion and immunoselection of tumor resistant variants may impair NK cell function. Accumulating evidences indicate that several cell subsets (macrophages, myeloid-derived suppressive cells, T regulatory cells, dendritic cells, cancer-associated fibroblasts, and tumor cells, their secreted factors as well as metabolic components (i.e. hypoxia have immunosuppressive roles in the tumor microenvironment and are able to condition NK cells to become anergic. In this review, we will describe how NK cells react with different stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment. This will be followed by a discussion on the role of hypoxic stress in the regulation of NK functions. The aim of this review is to provide a better understanding of how the tumor microenvironment impairs NK functions, thereby limiting the use of NK cell-based therapy, and we will attempt to suggest more efficient tools to establish a more favorable tumor microenvironment to boost NK cytotoxicity and control tumor progression.

  9. Biomechanical remodeling of the microenvironment by stromal Caveolin-1 favors tumor invasion and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Jacky G.; Minguet, Susana; Navarro-Lérida, Inmaculada; Lazcano, Juan José; Samaniego, Rafael; Calvo, Enrique; Tello, Marta; Osteso-Ibáñez, Teresa; Pellinen, Teijo; Echarri, Asier; Cerezo, Ana; Klein-Szanto, Andres J.P.; Garcia, Ricardo; Keely, Patricia J.; Sánchez-Mateos, Paloma; Cukierman, Edna; Del Pozo, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Mechanotransduction, a key determinant of tissue homeostasis and tumor progression, is driven by intercellular adhesions, cell contractility and forces generated with the microenvironment, dependent on extracellular matrix composition, organization and compliance. Caveolin-1 (Cav1) favors cell elongation in 3D cultures and promotes Rho-and force-dependent contraction, matrix alignment and microenvironment stiffening through regulation of p190RhoGAP. In turn, microenvironment remodeling by Cav1-fibroblasts forces cell elongation. Cav1-deficient mice have disorganized stromal tissue architecture. Stroma associated with human carcinomas and melanoma metastases is enriched in Cav1-expressing carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). Cav1 expression in breast CAFs correlates with low survival, and Cav1 depletion in CAFs decreases CAF contractility. Consistently, fibroblast expression of Cav1, through p190RhoGAP regulation, favors directional migration and invasiveness of carcinoma cells in vitro. In vivo, stromal Cav1 remodels peri- and intratumoral microenvironments to facilitate tumor invasion, correlating with increased metastatic potency. Thus, Cav1 modulates tissue responses through force-dependent architectural regulation of the microenvironment. PMID:21729786

  10. Targeting the microenvironment in chronic lymphocytic leukemia is changing the therapeutic landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Jan A

    2012-11-01

    Despite ongoing efforts to decipher the cancer genome, discoveries of new targetable genetic lesions within cancer cells are rare. Therefore, alternative approaches are needed. Signals from the microenvironment are increasingly recognized as drivers of disease progression in hematologic and solid cancers. Consequently, there is growing interest in targeting the tumor-microenvironment cross-talk. This review highlights recent therapeutic advances in targeting the microenvironment in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). CLL is the poster child for microenvironment-dependent malignancies, because the clonal CLL B cells are highly dependent on external signals for maintenance and expansion. These pathways recapitulate those responsible for normal B-cell expansion in germinal centers. The most prominent, conserved mechanism is B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling, which promotes CLL cell survival and expansion in lymphatic tissue areas designated proliferation centers. BCR signaling now can be targeted by new targeted kinase inhibitors. Small molecule inhibitors of BCR signaling kinases, Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) inhibitor ibrutinib and the phosphoinositide 3'-kinase delta (PI3Kδ) inhibitor GS-1101, are currently transforming the landscape of CLL therapy. This development exemplifies that the microenvironment has become a lively successful area of translational research.

  11. Natural product derivative BIO promotes recovery after myocardial infarction via unique modulation of the cardiac microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Sook; Jeong, Hye-Yun; Kim, Ah Ra; Kim, Woong-Hee; Cho, Haaglim; Um, JungIn; Seo, Youngha; Kang, Wan Seok; Jin, Suk-Won; Kim, Min Chul; Kim, Yong-Chul; Jung, Da-Woon; Williams, Darren R; Ahn, Youngkeun

    2016-08-11

    The cardiac microenvironment includes cardiomyocytes, fibroblasts and macrophages, which regulate remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI). Targeting this microenvironment is a novel therapeutic approach for MI. We found that the natural compound derivative, BIO ((2'Z,3'E)-6-Bromoindirubin-3'-oxime) modulated the cardiac microenvironment to exert a therapeutic effect on MI. Using a series of co-culture studies, BIO induced proliferation in cardiomyocytes and inhibited proliferation in cardiac fibroblasts. BIO produced multiple anti-fibrotic effects in cardiac fibroblasts. In macrophages, BIO inhibited the expression of pro-inflammatory factors. Significantly, BIO modulated the molecular crosstalk between cardiac fibroblasts and differentiating macrophages to induce polarization to the anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype. In the optically transparent zebrafish-based heart failure model, BIO induced cardiomyocyte proliferation and completely recovered survival rate. BIO is a known glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibitor, but these effects could not be recapitulated using the classical inhibitor, lithium chloride; indicating novel therapeutic effects of BIO. We identified the mechanism of BIO as differential modulation of p27 protein expression and potent induction of anti-inflammatory interleukin-10. In a rat MI model, BIO reduced fibrosis and improved cardiac performance. Histological analysis revealed modulation of the cardiac microenvironment by BIO, with increased presence of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. Our results demonstrate that BIO produces unique effects in the cardiac microenvironment to promote recovery post-MI.

  12. Definition of the domain boundaries is critical to the expression of the nucleotide-binding domains of P-glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Ian D; Berridge, Georgina; Linton, Kenneth J; Higgins, Christopher F; Callaghan, Richard

    2003-11-01

    Heterologous expression of domains of eukaryotic proteins is frequently associated with formation of inclusion bodies, consisting of aggregated mis-folded protein. This phenomenon has proved a significant barrier to the characterization of domains of eukaryotic ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. We hypothesized that the solubility of heterologously expressed nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) of ABC transporters is dependent on the definition of the domain boundaries. In this paper we have defined a core NBD, and tested the effect of extensions to and deletions of this core domain on protein expression. Of 10 NBDs constructed, only one was expressed as a soluble protein in Escherichia coli, with expression of the remaining NBDs being associated with inclusion body formation. The soluble NBD protein we have obtained corresponds to residues 386-632 of P-glycoprotein and represents an optimally defined domain. The NBD has been isolated and purified to 95% homogeneity by a two-step purification protocol, involving affinity chromatography and gel filtration. Although showing no detectable ATP hydrolysis, the protein retains specific ATP binding and has a secondary structure compatible with X-ray crystallographic data on bacterial NBDs. We have interpreted our results in terms of homology models, which suggest that the N-terminal NBD of P-glycoprotein can be produced as a stable, correctly folded, isolate domain with judicious design of the expression construct.

  13. Osteoprotegerin rich tumor microenvironment: implications in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Sudeshna; Sharma-Walia, Neelam

    2016-01-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a soluble decoy receptor for tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL). It belongs to the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF). OPG was initially discovered to contribute to homeostasis of bone turnover due to its capability of binding to receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kB). However, apart from bone turnover, OPG plays important and diverse role(s) in many biological functions. Besides having anti-osteoclastic activity, OPG is thought to exert a protective anti-apoptotic action in OPG-expressing tumors by overcoming the physiologic mechanism of tumor surveillance exerted by TRAIL. Along with inhibiting TRAIL induced apoptosis, it can induce proliferation by binding to various cell surface receptors and thus turning on the canonical cell survival and proliferative pathways. OPG also induces angiogenesis, one of the hallmarks of cancer, thus facilitating tumor growth. Recently, the understanding of OPG and its different roles has been augmented substantially. This review is aimed at providing a very informative overview as to how OPG affects cancer progression especially breast cancer. PMID:27072583

  14. Breast cancer by proxy: can the microenvironment be both the cause and consequence?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most clear-cut examples of a solid tumor in which systemic cues play a decisive part in its development. The breast tissue is constantly subjected to changes in hormone levels and modifications in the microenvironment. This scenario is even more striking during tumor...... development because of the dramatic loss or aberration of basement membrane (BM) and myoepithelial cells and the gain of peritumoral myofibroblasts. We suggest that the microenvironment, defined here as all components of the mammary gland other than luminal and/or tumor epithelial cells, might be instrumental...... in maintaining organ integrity and in promoting, and at times even initiating, breast cancer development. As such, the tumor microenvironment and its constituents, alone or in combination, might serve as promising targets for therapy....

  15. Tumor Evolution of Glioma-Intrinsic Gene Expression Subtypes Associates with Immunological Changes in the Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qianghu; Hu, Baoli; Hu, Xin; Kim, Hoon; Squatrito, Massimo; Scarpace, Lisa; deCarvalho, Ana C; Lyu, Sali; Li, Pengping; Li, Yan; Barthel, Floris; Cho, Hee Jin; Lin, Yu-Hsi; Satani, Nikunj; Martinez-Ledesma, Emmanuel; Zheng, Siyuan; Chang, Edward; Sauvé, Charles-Etienne Gabriel; Olar, Adriana; Lan, Zheng D; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Phillips, Joanna J; Berger, Mitchel S; Gabrusiewicz, Konrad R; Wang, Guocan; Eskilsson, Eskil; Hu, Jian; Mikkelsen, Tom; DePinho, Ronald A; Muller, Florian; Heimberger, Amy B; Sulman, Erik P; Nam, Do-Hyun; Verhaak, Roel G W

    2017-07-10

    We leveraged IDH wild-type glioblastomas, derivative neurospheres, and single-cell gene expression profiles to define three tumor-intrinsic transcriptional subtypes designated as proneural, mesenchymal, and classical. Transcriptomic subtype multiplicity correlated with increased intratumoral heterogeneity and presence of tumor microenvironment. In silico cell sorting identified macrophages/microglia, CD4(+) T lymphocytes, and neutrophils in the glioma microenvironment. NF1 deficiency resulted in increased tumor-associated macrophages/microglia infiltration. Longitudinal transcriptome analysis showed that expression subtype is retained in 55% of cases. Gene signature-based tumor microenvironment inference revealed a decrease in invading monocytes and a subtype-dependent increase in macrophages/microglia cells upon disease recurrence. Hypermutation at diagnosis or at recurrence associated with CD8(+) T cell enrichment. Frequency of M2 macrophages detection associated with short-term relapse after radiation therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Regulation of mesenchymal stem cell 3D microenvironment: From macro to microfluidic bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sart, Sébastien; Agathos, Spiros N; Li, Yan; Ma, Teng

    2016-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have emerged as an important cell type in cell therapy and tissue engineering. In these applications, maintaining the therapeutic properties of hMSCs requires tight control of the culture environments and the structural cell organizations. Bioreactor systems are essential tools to achieve these goals in the clinical-scale expansion and tissue engineering applications. This review summarizes how different bioreactors provide cues to regulate the structure and the chemico-mechanical microenvironment of hMSCs with a focus on 3D organization. In addition to conventional bioreactors, recent advances in microfluidic bioreactors as a novel approach to better control the hMSC microenvironment are also discussed. These advancements highlight the key role of bioreactor systems in preserving hMSC's functional properties by providing dynamic and temporal regulation of in vitro cellular microenvironment.

  17. Breast cancer by proxy: Can the microenvironment be both the cause and consequence?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J

    2008-11-16

    Breast cancer is one of the most clear-cut examples of a solid tumor in which systemic cues play a decisive part in its development. The breast tissue is constantly subjected to changes in hormone levels and modifications in the microenvironment. This scenario is even more striking during tumor development because of the dramatic loss or aberration of basement membrane (BM) and myoepithelial cells and the gain of peritumoral myofibroblasts. We suggest that the microenvironment, defined here as all components of the mammary gland other than luminal and/or tumor epithelial cells, might be instrumental in maintaining organ integrity and in promoting, and at times even initiating, breast cancer development. As such, the tumor microenvironment and its constituents, alone or in combination, might serve as promising targets for therapy.

  18. Regulatory T Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment and Cancer Progression: Role and Therapeutic Targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Belal; Elkord, Eyad

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have seen significant efforts in understanding and modulating the immune response in cancer. In this context, immunosuppressive cells, including regulatory T cells (Tregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), have come under intense investigation for their proposed roles in suppressing tumor-specific immune responses and establishing an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, thus enabling tumor immune evasion. Additionally, recent evidence indicates that Tregs comprise diverse and heterogeneous subsets; phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets of tumor-infiltrating Tregs could contribute differently to cancer prognosis and clinical outcomes. Understanding Treg biology in the setting of cancer, and specifically the tumor microenvironment, is important for designing effective cancer therapies. In this review, we critically examine the role of Tregs in the tumor microenvironment and in cancer progression focusing on human studies. We also discuss the impact of current therapeutic modalities on Treg biology and the therapeutic opportunities for targeting Tregs to enhance anti-tumor immune responses and clinical benefits. PMID:27509527

  19. [Design of an anesthesia and micro-environment information management system in mobile operating room].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianwen; Liu, Zhiguo; Zhang, Wenchang; Wu, Qingfu; Tan, Shulin

    2013-08-01

    We have designed a mobile operating room information management system. The system is composed of a client and a server. A client, consisting of a PC, medical equipments, PLC and sensors, provides the acquisition and processing of anesthesia and micro-environment data. A server is a powerful computer that stores the data of the system. The client gathers the medical device data by using the C/S mode, and analyzes the obtained HL7 messages through the class library call. The client collects the micro-environment information with PLC, and finishes the data reading with the OPC technology. Experiment results showed that the designed system could manage the patient anesthesia and micro-environment information well, and improve the efficiency of the doctors' works and the digital level of the mobile operating room.

  20. Protein domain prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingolfsson, Helgi; Yona, Golan

    2008-01-01

    Domains are considered to be the building blocks of protein structures. A protein can contain a single domain or multiple domains, each one typically associated with a specific function. The combination of domains determines the function of the protein, its subcellular localization and the interacti

  1. New and paradoxical roles of matrix metalloproteinases in the tumor microenvironment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noël, Agnès; Gutiérrez-Fernández, Ana; Sounni, Nor Eddine

    2012-01-01

    Processes such as cell proliferation, angiogenesis, apoptosis, or invasion are strongly influenced by the surrounding microenvironment of the tumor. Therefore, the ability to change these surroundings represents an important property through which tumor cells are able to acquire specific functions......, revealing that the genes encoding metalloproteinases, such as MMP8, MMP27, ADAM7, and ADAM29, are recurrently mutated in specific tumors, while several ADAMTSs are epigenetically silenced in different cancers. The importance of these proteases in modifying the tumor microenvironment highlights the need...

  2. Proteomic characterization of the interstitial fluid perfusing the breast tumor microenvironment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celis, Julio E; Gromov, Pavel; Cabezón, Teresa

    2004-01-01

    of biomarkers, the tumor interstitial fluid (TIF) that perfuses the breast tumor microenvironment. We collected TIFs from small pieces of freshly dissected invasive breast carcinomas and analyzed them by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in combination with matrix-assisted laser desorption......, or externalized due to cell death--produced by the complex network of cell types that make up the tumor microenvironment. So far, we have identified 267 primary translation products including, but not limited to, proteins involved in cell proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, metastasis, inflammation, protein...

  3. Tumor Microenvironment Metabolism: A New Checkpoint for Anti-Tumor Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharping, Nicole E.; Delgoffe, Greg M.

    2016-01-01

    When a T cell infiltrates a tumor, it is subjected to a variety of immunosuppressive and regulatory signals in the microenvironment. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that due to the proliferative and energetically-deregulated nature of tumor cells, T cells also operate at a metabolic disadvantage. The nutrient dearth of the tumor microenvironment (TME) creates “metabolic checkpoints” upon infiltrating T cells, impacting their ability to survive, proliferate and function effectively. In this review, we summarize the basics of tumor cell and T cell metabolism and discuss recent advances elucidating the individual metabolic checkpoints exerted on T cells that drive their dysfunction in the TME. PMID:27929420

  4. Microsensor measurements of the external and internal microenvironment of Fucus vesiculosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spilling, Kristian; Titelman, Josefin; Greve, Tina M.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the O2, pH, and irradiance microenvironment in and around the tissue of the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus L. using microsensors. Microsensors are ideal tools for gaining new insights into what limits and controls macroalgal activity and growth at very fine spatial (...) and temporal (seconds) scales. This first microsensor investigation of a fucoid macroalga revealed differences in the microenvironment and metabolic activities at the level of different cell layers and thallus structures. F. vesiculosus responded quickly to rapid shifts in irradiance resulting in a highly...

  5. [Advances in the effects of pH value of micro-environment on wound healing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ruirui; Li, Na; Wei, Li

    2016-04-01

    Wound healing is a complex regeneration process, which is affected by lots of endogenous and exogenous factors. Researches have confirmed that acid environment could prevent wound infection and accelerate wound healing by inhibiting bacteria proliferation, promoting oxygen release, affecting keratinocyte proliferation and migration, etc. In this article, we review the literature to identify the potential relationship between the pH value of wound micro-environment and the progress of wound healing, and summarize the clinical application of variation of pH value of micro-environment in wound healing, thereby to provide new treatment strategy for wound healing.

  6. Enzymatic activity of soluble and membrane tethered peptide pro-hormone convertase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzaniti, Angela; Mains, Richard E

    2002-05-01

    Pro-hormone convertases PC1 and PC2 perform endoproteolytic cleavages of precursors in peptide-containing secretory granules. PC1 and PC2 are soluble, secreted with bioactive peptides. Evolutionarily related PCs have membrane tethers, not secreted. We tethered PC1 to the transmembrane-cytoplasmic domains (CD) of a granule enzyme (peptidylglycine-alpha-amidating monooxygenase; PAM) and Golgi-localized PC8. The tethered PC1 is far more stable to elevated temperature and denaturants than soluble PC1, and more active. Both tethers allow PC1 to visit the cell surface transiently, cleaving soluble molecules outside the cell. Both membrane-bound PC1 chimeras cleave membrane PAM into soluble active fragments when PAM is expressed on adjacent cells.

  7. Membrane binding domains

    OpenAIRE

    Hurley, James H.

    2006-01-01

    Eukaryotic signaling and trafficking proteins are rich in modular domains that bind cell membranes. These binding events are tightly regulated in space and time. The structural, biochemical, and biophysical mechanisms for targeting have been worked out for many families of membrane binding domains. This review takes a comparative view of seven major classes of membrane binding domains, the C1, C2, PH, FYVE, PX, ENTH, and BAR domains. These domains use a combination of specific headgroup inter...

  8. Cloud processing of soluble gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laj, P.; Fuzzi, S.; Facchini, M. C.; Lind, J. A.; Orsi, G.; Preiss, M.; Maser, R.; Jaeschke, W.; Seyffer, E.; Helas, G.; Acker, K.; Wieprecht, W.; Möller, D.; Arends, B. G.; Mols, J. J.; Colvile, R. N.; Gallagher, M. W.; Beswick, K. M.; Hargreaves, K. J.; Storeton-West, R. L.; Sutton, M. A.

    Experimental data from the Great Dun Fell Cloud Experiment 1993 were used to investigate interactions between soluble gases and cloud droplets. Concentrations of H 2O 2, SO 2, CH 3COOOH, HCOOH, and HCHO were monitored at different sites within and downwind of a hill cap cloud and their temporal and spatial evolution during several cloud events was investigated. Significant differences were found between in-cloud and out-of-cloud concentrations, most of which could not be explained by simple dissolution into cloud droplets. Concentration patterns were analysed in relation to the chemistry of cloud droplets and the gas/liquid equilibrium. Soluble gases do not undergo similar behaviour: CH 3COOH simply dissolves in the aqueous phase and is outgassed upon cloud dissipation; instead, SO 2 is consumed by its reaction with H 2O 2. The behaviour of HCOOH is more complex because there is evidence for in-cloud chemical production. The formation of HCOOH interferes with the odd hydrogen cycle by enhancing the liquid-phase production of H 2O 2. The H 2O 2 concentration in cloud therefore results from the balance of consumption by oxidation of SO 2 in-cloud production, and the rate by which it is supplied to the system by entrainment of new air into the clouds.

  9. In vitro solubility assays in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerns, Edward H; Di, Li; Carter, Guy T

    2008-11-01

    The solubility of a compound depends on its structure and solution conditions. Structure determines the lipophilicity, hydrogen bonding, molecular volume, crystal energy and ionizability, which determine solubility. Solution conditions are affected by pH, co-solvents, additives, ionic strength, time and temperature. Many drug discovery experiments are conducted under "kinetic" solubility conditions. In drug discovery, solubility has a major impact on bioassays, formulation for in vivo dosing, and intestinal absorption. A good goal for the solubility of drug discovery compounds is >60 ug/mL. Equilibrium solubility assays can be conducted in moderate throughput, by incubating excess solid with buffer and agitating for several days, prior to filtration and HPLC quantitation. Kinetic solubility assays are performed in high throughput with shorter incubation times and high throughput analyses using plate readers. The most frequently used of these are the nephelometric assay and direct UV assay, which begin by adding a small volume of DMSO stock solution of each test compound to buffer. In nephelometry, this solution is serially diluted across a microtitre plate and undissolved particles are detected via light scattering. In direct UV, undissolved particles are separated by filtration, after which the dissolved material is quantitated using UV absorption. Equilibrium solubility is useful for preformulation. Kinetic solubility is useful for rapid compound assessment, guiding optimization via structure modification, and diagnosing bioassays. It is often useful to customize solubility experiments using conditions that answer specific research questions of drug discovery teams, such as compound selection and vehicle development for pharmacology and PK studies.

  10. Prevention and Treatment of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis by Soluble CD83

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinser, Elisabeth; Lechmann, Matthias; Golka, Antje; Lutz, Manfred B.; Steinkasserer, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    CD83 is up-regulated on the surface of dendritic cells (DCs) during maturation and has been widely used as a marker for mature DCs. Recently, we reported the recombinant expression of the extracellular immunoglobulin domain of human CD83 (hCD83ext). Using this soluble form of CD83, allogeneic as well as specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte proliferation could be blocked in vitro. Here we report the functional analysis of soluble CD83 in vivo, using murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) as a model. Strikingly, only three injections of soluble CD83 prevented the paralysis associated with EAE almost completely. In addition, even when the EAE was induced a second time, CD83-treated mice were protected, indicating a long-lasting suppressive effect. Furthermore, soluble CD83 strongly reduced the paralysis in different therapeutic settings. Most important, even when the treatment was delayed until the disease symptoms were fully established, soluble CD83 clearly reduced the paralyses. In addition, also when EAE was induced a second time, soluble CD83-treated animals showed reduced disease symptoms. Finally, hCD83ext treatment almost completely reduced leukocyte infiltration in the brain and in the spinal cord. In summary, this work strongly supports an immunosuppressive role of soluble CD83, thereby indicating its therapeutic potential in the regulation of immune disorders in vivo. PMID:15289503

  11. LRIG1 extracellular domain: structure and function analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yibin; Soo, Priscilla; Walker, Francesca; Zhang, Hui Hua; Redpath, Nicholas; Tan, Chin Wee; Nicola, Nicos A; Adams, Timothy E; Garrett, Thomas P; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Burgess, Antony W

    2015-05-22

    We have expressed and purified three soluble fragments of the human LRIG1-ECD (extracellular domain): the LRIG1-LRR (leucine-rich repeat) domain, the LRIG1-3Ig (immunoglobulin-like) domain, and the LRIG1-LRR-1Ig fragment using baculovirus vectors in insect cells. The two LRIG1 domains crystallised so that we have been able to determine the three-dimensional structures at 2.3Å resolution. We developed a three-dimensional structure for the LRIG1-ECD using homology modelling based on the LINGO-1 structure. The LRIG1-LRR domain and the LRIG1-LRR-1Ig fragment are monomers in solution, whereas the LRIG1-3Ig domain appears to be dimeric. We could not detect any binding of the LRIG1 domains or the LRIG1-LRR-1Ig fragment to the EGF receptor (EGFR), either in solution using biosensor analysis or when the EGFR was expressed on the cell surface. The FLAG-tagged LRIG1-LRR-1Ig fragment binds weakly to colon cancer cells regardless of the presence of EGFRs. Similarly, neither the soluble LRIG1-LRR nor the LRIG1-3Ig domains nor the full-length LRIG1 co-expressed in HEK293 cells inhibited ligand-stimulated activation of cell-surface EGFR.

  12. Starch-binding domain shuffling in Aspergillus niger glucoamylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornett, Catherine A G; Fang, Tsuei-Yun; Reilly, Peter J; Ford, Clark

    2003-07-01

    Aspergillus niger glucoamylase (GA) consists mainly of two forms, GAI [from the N-terminus, catalytic domain + linker + starch-binding domain (SBD)] and GAII (catalytic domain + linker). These domains were shuffled to make RGAI (SBD + linker + catalytic domain), RGAIDeltaL (SBD + catalytic domain) and RGAII (linker + catalytic domain), with domains defined by function rather than by tertiary structure. In addition, Paenibacillus macerans cyclomaltodextrin glucanotransferase SBD replaced the closely related A.niger GA SBD to give GAE. Soluble starch hydrolysis rates decreased as RGAII approximately GAII approximately GAI > RGAIDeltaL approximately RGAI approximately GAE. Insoluble starch hydrolysis rates were GAI > RGAIDeltaL > RGAI > GAE approximately RGAII > GAII, while insoluble starch-binding capacities were GAI > RGAI > RGAIDeltaL > RGAII > GAII > GAE. These results indicate that: (i) moving the SBD to the N-terminus or replacing the native SBD somewhat affects soluble starch hydrolysis; (ii) SBD location significantly affects insoluble starch binding and hydrolysis; (iii) insoluble starch hydrolysis is imperfectly correlated with its binding by the SBD; and (iv) placing the P.macerans cyclomaltodextrin glucanotransferase SBD at the end of a linker, instead of closely associated with the rest of the enzyme, severely reduces its ability to bind and hydrolyze insoluble starch.

  13. Insights into the role of components of the tumor microenvironment in oral carcinoma call for new therapeutic approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salo, Tuula, E-mail: Tuula.salo@oulu.fi [Department of Diagnostics and Oral Medicine, Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, and Medical Research Center, Oulu (Finland); Oulu University Central Hospital, Oulu (Finland); Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Vered, Marilena [Institute of Pathology, The Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Ramat Gan (Israel); Department of Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine, School of Dentistry, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Bello, Ibrahim O. [Department of Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Nyberg, Pia [Oulu University Central Hospital, Oulu (Finland); Bitu, Carolina Cavalcante [Department of Diagnostics and Oral Medicine, Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, and Medical Research Center, Oulu (Finland); Zlotogorski Hurvitz, Ayelet [Department of Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine, School of Dentistry, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Campus, Petah Tikva (Israel); Dayan, Dan [Department of Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine, School of Dentistry, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2014-07-15

    The research on oral cancer has focused mainly on the cancer cells, their genetic changes and consequent phenotypic modifications. However, it is increasingly clear that the tumor microenvironment (TME) has been shown to be in a dynamic state of inter-relations with the cancer cells. The TME contains a variety of components including the non-cancerous cells (i.e., immune cells, resident fibroblasts and angiogenic vascular cells) and the ECM milieu [including fibers (mainly collagen and fibronectin) and soluble factors (i.e., enzymes, growth factors, cytokines and chemokines)]. Thus, it is currently assumed that TME is considered a part of the cancerous tissue and the functionality of its key components constitutes the setting on which the hallmarks of the cancer cells can evolve. Therefore, in terms of controlling a malignancy, one should control the growth, invasion and spread of the cancer cells through modifications in the TME components. This mini review focuses on the TME as a diagnostic approach and reports the recent insights into the role of different TME key components [such as carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and inflammation (CAI) cells, angiogenesis, stromal matrix molecules and proteases] in the molecular biology of oral carcinoma. Furthermore, the impact of TME components on clinical outcomes and the concomitant need for development of new therapeutic approaches will be discussed. - Highlights: • Tumor depth and budding, hypoxia and TME cells associate with worse prognosis. • Pro-tumoral CAFs and CAI cells aid proliferation, invasion and spread hypoxia. • Some ECM-bound factors exert pro-angiogenic or pro-tumor activities. • Tumor spread is greatly dependent on ECM proteolysis, mediated by TME cells. • Direct targeting of TME components for treatment is still experimental.

  14. Domains via Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Guoqiang; CHEN Yixiang

    2001-01-01

    This paper provides a concrete and simple introduction to two pillars of domain theory: (1) solving recursive domain equations, and (2) universal and saturated domains. Our exposition combines Larsen and Winskel's idea on solving domain equations using information systems with Girard's idea of stable domain theory in the form of coherence spaces, or graphs.Detailed constructions are given for universal and even homogeneous objects in two categories of graphs: one representing binary complete, prime algebraic domains with complete primes covering the bottom; the other representing ω-algebraic, prime algebraic lattices. The backand-forth argument in model theory helps to enlighten the constructions.

  15. Dye solubility in supercritical carbon dioxide fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Jun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical carbon dioxide fluid is an alternative solvent for the water of the traditional dyeing. The solubility of dyestuff affects greatly the dyeing process. A theoretical model for predicting the dye solubility is proposed and verified experimentally. The paper concludes that the pressure has a greater impact on the dyestuff solubility than temperature, and an optimal dyeing condition is suggested for the highest distribution coefficient of dyestuff.

  16. Structural and Functional Highlights of Vacuolar Soluble Protein 1 from Pathogen Trypanosoma brucei brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamwal, Abhishek; Round, Adam R; Bannwarth, Ludovic; Venien-Bryan, Catherine; Belrhali, Hassan; Yogavel, Manickam; Sharma, Amit

    2015-12-18

    Trypanosoma brucei (T. brucei) is responsible for the fatal human disease called African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness. The causative parasite, Trypanosoma, encodes soluble versions of inorganic pyrophosphatases (PPase), also called vacuolar soluble proteins (VSPs), which are localized to its acidocalcisomes. The latter are acidic membrane-enclosed organelles rich in polyphosphate chains and divalent cations whose significance in these parasites remains unclear. We here report the crystal structure of T. brucei brucei acidocalcisomal PPases in a ternary complex with Mg(2+) and imidodiphosphate. The crystal structure reveals a novel structural architecture distinct from known class I PPases in its tetrameric oligomeric state in which a fused EF hand domain arranges around the catalytic PPase domain. This unprecedented assembly evident from TbbVSP1 crystal structure is further confirmed by SAXS and TEM data. SAXS data suggest structural flexibility in EF hand domains indicative of conformational plasticity within TbbVSP1.

  17. Structural and Functional Highlights of Vacuolar Soluble Protein 1 from Pathogen Trypanosoma brucei brucei*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamwal, Abhishek; Round, Adam R.; Bannwarth, Ludovic; Venien-Bryan, Catherine; Belrhali, Hassan; Yogavel, Manickam; Sharma, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei (T. brucei) is responsible for the fatal human disease called African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness. The causative parasite, Trypanosoma, encodes soluble versions of inorganic pyrophosphatases (PPase), also called vacuolar soluble proteins (VSPs), which are localized to its acidocalcisomes. The latter are acidic membrane-enclosed organelles rich in polyphosphate chains and divalent cations whose significance in these parasites remains unclear. We here report the crystal structure of T. brucei brucei acidocalcisomal PPases in a ternary complex with Mg2+ and imidodiphosphate. The crystal structure reveals a novel structural architecture distinct from known class I PPases in its tetrameric oligomeric state in which a fused EF hand domain arranges around the catalytic PPase domain. This unprecedented assembly evident from TbbVSP1 crystal structure is further confirmed by SAXS and TEM data. SAXS data suggest structural flexibility in EF hand domains indicative of conformational plasticity within TbbVSP1. PMID:26494625

  18. An Implantable Device for Manipulation of the in vivo Tumor Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, James K.

    In the past decade, it has become increasingly recognized that interactions between cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment (TME) regulate metastasis. One such interaction is the paracrine loop between macrophages and cancer cells which drives metastatic invasion in mammary tumors. Tumor associated macrophages release epidermal growth factor (EGF), a chemoattractant which induces the migration of cancer cells toward the blood vessels. The cancer cells reciprocate by releasing a macrophage chemoattractant, colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1), resulting in the co-migration of both cell types and subsequent intravasation. In this work, a new technology has been developed for studying the mechanisms by which invasive tumor cells migrate in vivo toward gradients of EGF. Conventional in vitro methods used for studying tumor cell migration lack the complexity found in the TME and are therefore of limited relevance to in vivo metastasis. The Nano Intravital Device (NANIVID) has been designed as an implantable tool to manipulate the TME through the generation of soluble factor gradients. The NANIVID consists of two etched glass substrates, loaded with a hydrogel containing EGF, and sealed together using a polymer membrane. When implanted in vivo, the hydrogel will swell and release the entrapped EGF, forming a diffusion gradient in the tumor over many hours. The NANIVID design has been optimized for use with multiphoton-based intravital imaging, to monitor migration toward the device at single-cell resolution. Stabilization techniques have been developed to minimize imaging artifacts caused by breathing and specimen movement over the course of the experiment. The NANIVID has been validated in vivo using a mouse model of metastasis. When implanted in MDA-MB-231 xenograft tumors grown in SCID mice, chemotaxis of tumor cells was induced by the EGF gradient generated by the device. Cell motility parameters including velocity, directionality, and chemotactic index were

  19. Expression of osteoblast and osteoclast regulatory genes in the bone marrow microenvironment in multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ida B; Christensen, Jacob Haaber; Lyng, Maria Bibi

    2014-01-01

    of osteoclast regulators (RANK, RANKL, OPG, TRAIL, MIP1A), Wnt inhibitors (DKK1, SFRP2, SFRP3, sclerostin, WIF1) and osteoblast transcription factors (RUNX2, osterix) by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment using snap-frozen BM biopsies...

  20. Cancer prevention and therapy through the modulation of the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Stephanie C; Amedei, Amedeo; Aquilano, Katia; Azmi, Asfar S; Benencia, Fabian; Bhakta, Dipita; Bilsland, Alan E; Boosani, Chandra S; Chen, Sophie; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Crawford, Sarah; Fujii, Hiromasa; Georgakilas, Alexandros G; Guha, Gunjan; Halicka, Dorota; Helferich, William G; Heneberg, Petr; Honoki, Kanya; Keith, W Nicol; Kerkar, Sid P; Mohammed, Sulma I; Niccolai, Elena; Nowsheen, Somaira; Vasantha Rupasinghe, H P; Samadi, Abbas; Singh, Neetu; Talib, Wamidh H; Venkateswaran, Vasundara; Whelan, Richard L; Yang, Xujuan; Felsher, Dean W

    2015-12-01

    Cancer arises in the context of an in vivo tumor microenvironment. This microenvironment is both a cause and consequence of tumorigenesis. Tumor and host cells co-evolve dynamically through indirect and direct cellular interactions, eliciting multiscale effects on many biological programs, including cellular proliferation, growth, and metabolism, as well as angiogenesis and hypoxia and innate and adaptive immunity. Here we highlight specific biological processes that could be exploited as targets for the prevention and therapy of cancer. Specifically, we describe how inhibition of targets such as cholesterol synthesis and metabolites, reactive oxygen species and hypoxia, macrophage activation and conversion, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase regulation of dendritic cells, vascular endothelial growth factor regulation of angiogenesis, fibrosis inhibition, endoglin, and Janus kinase signaling emerge as examples of important potential nexuses in the regulation of tumorigenesis and the tumor microenvironment that can be targeted. We have also identified therapeutic agents as approaches, in particular natural products such as berberine, resveratrol, onionin A, epigallocatechin gallate, genistein, curcumin, naringenin, desoxyrhapontigenin, piperine, and zerumbone, that may warrant further investigation to target the tumor microenvironment for the treatment and/or prevention of cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dynamic Microenvironment Induces Phenotypic Plasticity of Esophageal Cancer Cells Under Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calibasi Kocal, Gizem; Güven, Sinan; Foygel, Kira; Goldman, Aaron; Chen, Pu; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Baskin, Yasemin; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-12-01

    Cancer microenvironment is a remarkably heterogeneous composition of cellular and non-cellular components, regulated by both external and intrinsic physical and chemical stimuli. Physical alterations driven by increased proliferation of neoplastic cells and angiogenesis in the cancer microenvironment result in the exposure of the cancer cells to elevated levels of flow-based shear stress. We developed a dynamic microfluidic cell culture platform utilizing eshopagael cancer cells as model cells to investigate the phenotypic changes of cancer cells upon exposure to fluid shear stress. We report the epithelial to hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal transition as a result of decreasing E-Cadherin and increasing N-Cadherin and vimentin expressions, higher clonogenicity and ALDH positive expression of cancer cells cultured in a dynamic microfluidic chip under laminar flow compared to the static culture condition. We also sought regulation of chemotherapeutics in cancer microenvironment towards phenotypic control of cancer cells. Such in vitro microfluidic system could potentially be used to monitor how the interstitial fluid dynamics affect cancer microenvironment and plasticity on a simple, highly controllable and inexpensive bioengineered platform.

  2. Targeting stromal glutamine synthetase in tumors disrupts tumor microenvironment-regulated cancer cell growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive stromal cells are an integral part of tumor microenvironment (TME) and interact with cancer cells to regulate their growth. Although targeting stromal cells could be a viable therapy to regulate the communication between TME and cancer cells, identification of stromal targets that make canc...

  3. Personal exposure monitoring of PM2.5 in indoor and outdoor microenvironments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinle, Susanne; Reis, Stefan; Sabel, Clive E

    2015-01-01

    to define six microenvironments (MEs) to assess everyday exposure of individuals to short-term PM2.5 concentrations. The Dylos was combined with a GPS receiver to track movement and exposure of individuals across the MEs. Seventeen volunteers collected 35 profiles. Profiles may have a different overall...

  4. Remodeling the blood-brain barrier microenvironment by natural products for brain tumor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiao; Chen, Rujing; Liu, Mei; Feng, Jianfang; Chen, Jun; Hu, Kaili

    2017-09-01

    Brain tumor incidence shows an upward trend in recent years; brain tumors account for 5% of adult tumors, while in children, this figure has increased to 70%. Moreover, 20%-30% of malignant tumors will eventually metastasize into the brain. Both benign and malignant tumors can cause an increase in intracranial pressure and brain tissue compression, leading to central nervous system (CNS) damage which endangers the patients' lives. Despite the many approaches to treating brain tumors and the progress that has been made, only modest gains in survival time of brain tumor patients have been achieved. At present, chemotherapy is the treatment of choice for many cancers, but the special structure of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits most chemotherapeutic agents from passing through the BBB and penetrating into tumors in the brain. The BBB microenvironment contains numerous cell types, including endothelial cells, astrocytes, peripheral cells and microglia, and extracellular matrix (ECM). Many chemical components of natural products are reported to regulate the BBB microenvironment near brain tumors and assist in their treatment. This review focuses on the composition and function of the BBB microenvironment under both physiological and pathological conditions, and the current research progress in regulating the BBB microenvironment by natural products to promote the treatment of brain tumors.

  5. The Host Microenvironment Influences Prostate Cancer Invasion, Systemic Spread, Bone Colonization, and Osteoblastic Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Sourik S.; Li, Xiaohong; Miranti, Cindy K.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer death in men worldwide. Most PCa deaths are due to osteoblastic bone metastases. What triggers PCa metastasis to the bone and what causes osteoblastic lesions remain unanswered. A major contributor to PCa metastasis is the host microenvironment. Here, we address how the primary tumor microenvironment influences PCa metastasis via integrins, extracellular proteases, and transient epithelia-mesenchymal transition (EMT) to promote PCa progression, invasion, and metastasis. We discuss how the bone-microenvironment influences metastasis; where chemotactic cytokines favor bone homing, adhesion molecules promote colonization, and bone-derived signals induce osteoblastic lesions. Animal models that fully recapitulate human PCa progression from primary tumor to bone metastasis are needed to understand the PCa pathophysiology that leads to bone metastasis. Better delineation of the specific processes involved in PCa bone metastasize is needed to prevent or treat metastatic PCa. Therapeutic regimens that focus on the tumor microenvironment could add to the PCa pharmacopeia. PMID:25566502

  6. The Impact of the Tumor Microenvironment on the Properties of Glioma Stem-Like Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audia, Alessandra; Conroy, Siobhan; Glass, Rainer; Bhat, Krishna P L

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common and highly malignant primary brain tumor, and patients affected with this disease exhibit a uniformly dismal prognosis. Glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) are a subset of cells within the bulk tumor that possess self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation properties similar to somatic stem cells. These cells also are at the apex of the cellular hierarchy and cause tumor initiation and expansion after chemo-radiation. These traits make them an attractive target for therapeutic development. Because GSCs are dependent on the brain microenvironment for their growth, and because non-tumorigenic cell types in the microenvironment can influence GSC phenotypes and treatment response, a better understanding of these cell types is needed. In this review, we provide a focused overview of the contributions from the microenvironment to GSC homing, maintenance, phenotypic plasticity, and tumor initiation. The interaction of GSCs with the vascular compartment, mesenchymal stem cells, immune system, and normal brain cell types are discussed. Studies that provide mechanistic insight into each of these GSC-microenvironment interactions are warranted in the future.

  7. Oncogenic driver genes and the inflammatory microenvironment dictate liver tumor phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matter, Matthias S; Marquardt, Jens U; Andersen, Jesper B

    2016-01-01

    The majority of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) develops in the background of chronic liver inflammation caused by viral hepatitis and alcoholic or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. However, the impact of different types of chronic inflammatory microenvironments on the phenotypes of tumors generated...

  8. The Influence of Primary Microenvironment on Prostate Cancer Osteoblastic Bone LesionDevelopment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    additional avenues www.frontiersin.org December 2014 | Volume 4 | Article 364 | 1 Ganguly et al. Microenvironment of prostate cancer metastasis for...through interactions with Frontiers in Oncology | Cancer Endocrinology December 2014 | Volume 4 | Article 364 | 4...autoimmune arthritis have higher incidence of breast cancer www.frontiersin.org December 2014 | Volume 4 | Article 364 | 5

  9. Tumor suppressor ARF regulates tissue microenvironment and tumor growth through modulation of macrophage polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-García, Lidia; Herranz, Sandra; Higueras, María Angeles; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2016-10-11

    Tumor microenvironment has been described to play a key role in tumor growth, progression, and metastasis. Macrophages are a major cellular constituent of the tumor stroma, and particularly tumor associated macrophages (TAMs or M2-like macrophages) exert important immunosuppressive activity and a pro-tumoral role within the tumor microenvironment. Alternative-reading frame (ARF) gene is widely inactivated in human cancer. We have previously demonstrated that ARF deficiency severely impairs inflammatory response establishing a new role for ARF in the regulation of innate immunity. On the basis of these observations, we hypothesized that ARF may also regulates tumor growth through recruitment and modulation of the macrophage phenotype in the tumor microenvironment. Xenograft assays of B16F10 melanoma cells into ARF-deficient mice resulted in increased tumor growth compared to those implanted in WT control mice. Tumors from ARF-deficient mice exhibited significantly increased number of TAMs as well as microvascular density. Transwell assays showed crosstalk between tumor cells and macrophages. On the one hand, ARF-deficient macrophages modulate migratory ability of the tumor cells. And on the other, tumor cells promote the skewing of ARF-/- macrophages toward a M2-type polarization. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that ARF deficiency facilitates the infiltration of macrophages into the tumor mass and favors their polarization towards a M2 phenotype, thus promoting tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth. This work provides novel information about the critical role of ARF in the modulation of tumor microenvironment.

  10. A photoclickable peptide microarray platform for facile and rapid screening of 3-D tissue microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sadhana; Floren, Michael; Ding, Yonghui; Stenmark, Kurt R; Tan, Wei; Bryant, Stephanie J

    2017-10-01

    Microarrays are powerful experimental tools for high-throughput screening of cellular behavior in multivariate microenvironments. Here, we present a new, facile and rapid screening method for probing cellular behavior in 3D tissue microenvironments. This method utilizes a photoclickable peptide microarray platform developed using electrospun fibrous poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels and microarray contact printing. We investigated the utility of this platform with five different peptide motifs and ten cell types including stem, terminally differentiated, cancer or immune cells that were from either primary origin or cell lines and from different species. We validated the capabilities of this platform to screen arrays consisting of multiple peptide motifs and concentrations for selectivity to cellular adhesion and morphology. Moreover, this platform is amenable to controlled spatial presentation of peptides. We show that by leveraging the differential attachment affinities for two cell types to two different peptides, this platform can also be used to investigate cell-cell interactions through miniature co-culture peptide arrays. Our fibrous peptide microarray platform enables high-throughput screening of 3D tissue microenvironments in a facile and rapid manner to investigate cell-matrix interactions and cell-cell signaling and to identify optimal tissue microenvironments for cell-based therapies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Engineering of Three-Dimensional Microenvironments to Promote Contractile Behavior in Primary Intestinal Organoids

    OpenAIRE

    DiMarco, Rebecca L.; Su, James; Yan, Kelley S.; Dewi, Ruby; Kuo, Calvin J.; Heilshorn, Sarah C.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple culture techniques now exist for the long-term maintenance of neonatal primary murine intestinal organoids in vitro; however, the achievement of contractile behavior within cultured organoids has thus far been infrequent and unpredictable. Here we combine finite element simulation of oxygen transport and quantitative comparative analysis of cellular microenvironments to elucidate the critical variables that promote reproducible intestinal organoid contraction. Experimentally, oxygen ...

  12. 3D bioprinting: improving in vitro models of metastasis with heterogeneous tumor microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albritton, Jacob L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Even with many advances in treatment over the past decades, cancer still remains a leading cause of death worldwide. Despite the recognized relationship between metastasis and increased mortality rate, surprisingly little is known about the exact mechanism of metastatic progression. Currently available in vitro models cannot replicate the three-dimensionality and heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment sufficiently to recapitulate many of the known characteristics of tumors in vivo. Our understanding of metastatic progression would thus be boosted by the development of in vitro models that could more completely capture the salient features of cancer biology. Bioengineering groups have been working for over two decades to create in vitro microenvironments for application in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Over this time, advances in 3D printing technology and biomaterials research have jointly led to the creation of 3D bioprinting, which has improved our ability to develop in vitro models with complexity approaching that of the in vivo tumor microenvironment. In this Review, we give an overview of 3D bioprinting methods developed for tissue engineering, which can be directly applied to constructing in vitro models of heterogeneous tumor microenvironments. We discuss considerations and limitations associated with 3D printing and highlight how these advances could be harnessed to better model metastasis and potentially guide the development of anti-cancer strategies. PMID:28067628

  13. Human body micro-environment: The benefits of controlling airflow interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the micro-environment around a human body, and especially on its interaction with the surrounding environment. Research on the free convection flow generated by a human body (including the convective boundary layer around the body and the thermal plume above the body), its...

  14. Visualizing the Tumor Microenvironment of Liver Metastasis by Spinning Disk Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babes, Liane; Kubes, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Intravital microscopy has evolved into an invaluable technique to study the complexity of tumors by visualizing individual cells in live organisms. Here, we describe a method for employing intravital spinning disk confocal microscopy to picture high-resolution tumor-stroma interactions in real time. We depict in detail the surgical procedures to image various tumor microenvironments and different cellular components in the liver.

  15. Targeting FPR1 and CXCR4 in cancer and the contribution of the tumor microenvironment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Solid tumors can be primarily resistant or could become resistant to therapy, due to the protective effect of their direct tumor environment, which is called the microenvironment. UMCG-researcher Jennifer Boer studied the interaction of glioblastoma (GBM) and prostate cancer cells with their tumor

  16. Stromal cells and integrins: conforming to the needs of the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alphonso, Aimee; Alahari, Suresh K

    2009-12-01

    The microenvironment of a tumor is constituted of a heterogenous population of stromal cells, extracellular matrix components, and secreted factors, all of which make the tumor microenvironment distinct from that of normal tissue. Unlike healthy cells, tumor cells require these unique surroundings to metastasize, spread, and form a secondary tumor at a distant site. In this review, we discuss that stromal cells such as fibroblasts and immune cells including macrophages, their secreted factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, and various chemokines, and the integrins that connect the various cell types play a particularly vital role in the survival of a growing tumor mass. Macrophages and fibroblasts are uniquely plastic cells because they are not only able to switch from tumor suppressing to tumor supporting phenotypes but also able to adopt various tumor-supporting functions based on their location within the microenvironment. Integrins serve as the backbone for all of these prometastatic operations because their function as cell-cell and cell-matrix signal transducers are important for the heterogenous components of the microenvironment to communicate.

  17. Brucite microbialites in living coral skeletons: Indicators of extreme microenvironments in shallow-marine settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothdurft, L.D.; Webb, G.E.; Buster, N.A.; Holmes, C.W.; Sorauf, J.E.; Kloprogge, J.T.

    2005-01-01

    Brucite [Mg(OH)2] microbialites occur in vacated interseptal spaces of living scleractinian coral colonies (Acropora, Pocillopora, Porites) from subtidal and intertidal settings in the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, and subtidal Montastraea from the Florida Keys, United States. Brucite encrusts microbial filaments of endobionts (i.e., fungi, green algae, cyanobacteria) growing under organic biofilms; the brucite distribution is patchy both within interseptal spaces and within coralla. Although brucite is undersaturated in seawater, its precipitation was apparently induced in the corals by lowered pCO 2 and increased pH within microenvironments protected by microbial biofilms. The occurrence of brucite in shallow-marine settings highlights the importance of microenvironments in the formation and early diagenesis of marine carbonates. Significantly, the brucite precipitates discovered in microenvironments in these corals show that early diagenetic products do not necessarily reflect ambient seawater chemistry. Errors in environmental interpretation may arise where unidentified precipitates occur in microenvironments in skeletal carbonates that are subsequently utilized as geochemical seawater proxies. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  18. Molecular imaging of the tumor microenvironment for precision medicine and theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penet, Marie-France; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Chen, Zhihang; Jin, Jiefu; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2014-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality from cancer and their associated conditions and treatments continue to extract a heavy social and economic global burden despite the transformative advances in science and technology in the twenty-first century. In fact, cancer incidence and mortality are expected to reach pandemic proportions by 2025, and costs of managing cancer will escalate to trillions of dollars. The inability to establish effective cancer treatments arises from the complexity of conditions that exist within tumors, the plasticity and adaptability of cancer cells coupled with their ability to escape immune surveillance, and the co-opted stromal cells and microenvironment that assist cancer cells in survival. Stromal cells, although destroyed together with cancer cells, have an ever-replenishing source that can assist in resurrecting tumors from any residual cancer cells that may survive treatment. The tumor microenvironment landscape is a continually changing landscape, with spatial and temporal heterogeneities that impact and influence cancer treatment outcome. Importantly, the changing landscape of the tumor microenvironment can be exploited for precision medicine and theranostics. Molecular and functional imaging can play important roles in shaping and selecting treatments to match this landscape. Our purpose in this review is to examine the roles of molecular and functional imaging, within the context of the tumor microenvironment, and the feasibility of their applications for precision medicine and theranostics in humans. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. 3D bioprinting: improving in vitro models of metastasis with heterogeneous tumor microenvironments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob L. Albritton

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Even with many advances in treatment over the past decades, cancer still remains a leading cause of death worldwide. Despite the recognized relationship between metastasis and increased mortality rate, surprisingly little is known about the exact mechanism of metastatic progression. Currently available in vitro models cannot replicate the three-dimensionality and heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment sufficiently to recapitulate many of the known characteristics of tumors in vivo. Our understanding of metastatic progression would thus be boosted by the development of in vitro models that could more completely capture the salient features of cancer biology. Bioengineering groups have been working for over two decades to create in vitro microenvironments for application in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Over this time, advances in 3D printing technology and biomaterials research have jointly led to the creation of 3D bioprinting, which has improved our ability to develop in vitro models with complexity approaching that of the in vivo tumor microenvironment. In this Review, we give an overview of 3D bioprinting methods developed for tissue engineering, which can be directly applied to constructing in vitro models of heterogeneous tumor microenvironments. We discuss considerations and limitations associated with 3D printing and highlight how these advances could be harnessed to better model metastasis and potentially guide the development of anti-cancer strategies.

  20. Acidic Tumor Microenvironment and pH-Sensing G protein-Coupled Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvin R. Justus

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The tumor microenvironment is acidic due to glycolytic cancer cell metabolism, hypoxia, and deficient blood perfusion. It is proposed that acidosis in the tumor microenvironment is an important stress factor and selection force for cancer cell somatic evolution. Acidic pH has pleiotropic effects on the proliferation, migration, invasion, metastasis and therapeutic response of cancer cells and the function of immune cells, vascular cells, and other stromal cells. However, the molecular mechanisms by which cancer cells and stromal cells sense and respond to acidic pH in the tumor microenvironment are poorly understood. In this article the role of a family of pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs in tumor biology is reviewed. Recent studies show that the pH-sensing GPCRs, including GPR4, GPR65 (TDAG8, GPR68 (OGR1, and GPR132 (G2A, regulate cancer cell metastasis and proliferation, immune cell function, inflammation, and blood vessel formation. Activation of the proton-sensing GPCRs by acidosis transduces multiple downstream G protein signaling pathways. Since GPCRs are major drug targets, small molecule modulators of the pH-sensing GPCRs are being actively developed and evaluated. Research on the pH-sensing GPCRs will continue to provide important insights into the molecular interaction between tumor and its acidic microenvironment and may identify new targets for cancer therapy and chemoprevention.

  1. Human mammary microenvironment better regulates the biology of human breast cancer in humanized mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ming-Jie; Wang, Jue; Xu, Lu; Zha, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Yi; Ling, Li-Jun; Wang, Shui

    2015-02-01

    During the past decades, many efforts have been made in mimicking the clinical progress of human cancer in mouse models. Previously, we developed a human breast tissue-derived (HB) mouse model. Theoretically, it may mimic the interactions between "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin and human breast cancer cells. However, detailed evidences are absent. The present study (in vivo, cellular, and molecular experiments) was designed to explore the regulatory role of human mammary microenvironment in the progress of human breast cancer cells. Subcutaneous (SUB), mammary fat pad (MFP), and HB mouse models were developed for in vivo comparisons. Then, the orthotopic tumor masses from three different mouse models were collected for primary culture. Finally, the biology of primary cultured human breast cancer cells was compared by cellular and molecular experiments. Results of in vivo mouse models indicated that human breast cancer cells grew better in human mammary microenvironment. Cellular and molecular experiments confirmed that primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model showed a better proliferative and anti-apoptotic biology than those from SUB to MFP mouse models. Meanwhile, primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model also obtained the migratory and invasive biology for "species-specific" tissue metastasis to human tissues. Comprehensive analyses suggest that "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin better regulates the biology of human breast cancer cells in our humanized mouse model of breast cancer, which is more consistent with the clinical progress of human breast cancer.

  2. The bed and the bugs: interactions between the tumor microenvironment and cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaño, Zafira; Fillmore, Christine M; Kim, Carla F; McAllister, Sandra S

    2012-10-01

    Tumors have been increasingly recognized as organs with a complexity that approaches, and may even exceed, that of healthy tissues. When viewed from this perspective, the biology of a tumor can be understood only by studying tumor cell heterogeneity and the microenvironment that is constructed during the course of tumorigenesis and malignant progression. Recent work has revealed the existence of cancer stem cells, the "bugs", with the capacity for self-renewal and tumor propagation. In addition, it is now recognized that the tumor microenvironment, the "bed", plays a critical role in supporting cancer stem cells and also may promote neoplasia and malignant progression. The interdependence of the cell-intrinsic features of cancer, including the cancer stem cell "bugs" and the tumor microenvironment "bed", is only beginning to be understood. In this review, we highlight the rapidly evolving concepts about the interactions between tumor stem cells and their microenvironment, the insights gained from studying their normal tissue counterparts, and the questions and controversies surrounding this area of research, with an emphasis on breast and lung cancer. Finally, we address evidence supporting the notion that eliminating the bed as well as the bugs should lead to more effective and personalized cancer treatments that improve patient outcome. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Targeting FPR1 and CXCR4 in cancer and the contribution of the tumor microenvironment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Solid tumors can be primarily resistant or could become resistant to therapy, due to the protective effect of their direct tumor environment, which is called the microenvironment. UMCG-researcher Jennifer Boer studied the interaction of glioblastoma (GBM) and prostate cancer cells with their tumor m

  4. Microenvironment promotes tumor cell reprogramming in human breast cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio D'Anselmi

    Full Text Available The microenvironment drives mammary gland development and function, and may influence significantly both malignant behavior and cell growth of mammary cancer cells. By restoring context, and forcing cells to properly interpret native signals from the microenvironment, the cancer cell aberrant behavior can be quelled, and organization re-established. In order to restore functional and morphological differentiation, human mammary MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cancer cells were allowed to grow in a culture medium filled with a 10% of the albumen (EW, Egg White from unfertilized chicken egg. That unique microenvironment behaves akin a 3D culture and induces MCF-7 cells to produce acini and branching duct-like structures, distinctive of mammary gland differentiation. EW-treated MDA-MB-231 cells developed buds of acini and duct-like structures. Both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells produced β-casein, a key milk component. Furthermore, E-cadherin expression was reactivated in MDA-MB-231 cells, as a consequence of the increased cdh1 expression; meanwhile β-catenin - a key cytoskeleton component - was displaced behind the inner cell membrane. Such modification hinders the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in MDA-MB-231 cells. This differentiating pathway is supported by the contemporary down-regulation of canonical pluripotency markers (Klf4, Nanog. Given that egg-conditioned medium behaves as a 3D-medium, it is likely that cancer phenotype reversion could be ascribed to the changed interactions between cells and their microenvironment.

  5. The impact of chronic intermittent hypoxia on hematopoiesis and the bone marrow microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Martins, Inês; Remédio, Leonor; Matias, Inês; Diogo, Lucília N; Monteiro, Emília C; Dias, Sérgio

    2016-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a highly prevalent sleep-related breathing disorder which is associated with patient morbidity and an elevated risk of developing hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. There is ample evidence for the involvement of bone marrow (BM) cells in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases but a connection between OSA and modulation of the BM microenvironment had not been established. Here, we studied how chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) affected hematopoiesis and the BM microenvironment, in a rat model of OSA. We show that CIH followed by normoxia increases the bone marrow hypoxic area, increases the number of multipotent hematopoietic progenitors (CFU assay), promotes erythropoiesis, and increases monocyte counts. In the BM microenvironment of CIH-subjected animals, the number of VE-cadherin-expressing blood vessels, particularly sinusoids, increased, accompanied by increased smooth muscle cell coverage, while vWF-positive vessels decreased. Molecularly, we investigated the expression of endothelial cell-derived genes (angiocrine factors) that could explain the cellular phenotypes. Accordingly, we observed an increase in colony-stimulating factor 1, vascular endothelium growth factor, delta-like 4, and angiopoietin-1 expression. Our data shows that CIH induces vascular remodeling in the BM microenvironment, which modulates hematopoiesis, increasing erythropoiesis, and circulating monocytes. Our study reveals for the first time the effect of CIH in hematopoiesis and suggests that hematopoietic changes may occur in OSA patients.

  6. Issues concerning the determination of solubility products of sparingly soluble crystalline solids. Solubility of HfO{sub 2}(cr)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Dhanpat [Rai Enviro-Chem, LLC, Yachats, OR (United States); Kitamura, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki (Japan); Rosso, Kevin M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Sasaki, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Taishi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Solubility studies were conducted with HfO{sub 2}(cr) solid as a function HCl and ionic strength ranging from 2.0 to 0.004 mol kg{sup -1}. These studies involved (1) using two different amounts of the solid phase, (2) acid washing the bulk solid phase, (3) preheating the solid phase to 1400 C, and (4) heating amorphous HfO{sub 2}(am) suspensions to 90 C to ascertain whether the HfO{sub 2}(am) converts to HfO{sub 2}(cr) and to determine the solubility from the oversaturation direction. Based on the results of these treatments it is concluded that the HfO{sub 2}(cr) contains a small fraction of less crystalline, but not amorphous, material [HfO{sub 2}(lcr)] and this, rather than the HfO{sub 2}(cr), is the solubility-controlling phase in the range of experimental variables investigated in this study. The solubility data are interpreted using both the Pitzer and SIT models and they provide log{sub 10} K{sup 0} values of -(59.75±0.35) and -(59.48±0.41), respectively, for the solubility product of HfO{sub 2}(lcr)[HfO{sub 2}(lcr) + 2H{sub 2}O ↔ Hf{sup 4+} + 4OH{sup -}]. The log{sub 10} of the solubility product of HfO{sub 2}(cr) is estimated to be < -63. The observation of a small fraction of less crystalline higher solubility material is consistent with the general picture that mineral surfaces are often structurally and/or compositionally imperfect leading to a higher solubility than the bulk crystalline solid. This study stresses the urgent need, during interpretation of solubility data, of taking precautions to make certain that the observed solubility behavior for sparingly-soluble solids is assigned to the proper solid phase.

  7. The effect of commuting microenvironment on commuter exposures to vehicular emission in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, L. Y.; Chan, C. Y.; Qin, Y.

    Vehicular exhaust emission has gradually become the major air pollution source in modern cities and traffic related exposure is found to contribute significantly to total human exposure level. A comprehensive survey was conducted from November 1995 to July 1996 in Hong Kong to assess the effect of traffic-induced air pollution inside different commuting microenvironments on commuter exposure. Microenvironmental monitoring is performed for six major public commuting modes (bus, light bus, MTR, railway, tram, ferry), plus private car and roadside pavement. Traffic-related pollutants, CO, NO x, THC and O 3 were selected as the target pollutants. The results indicate that commuter exposure is highly influenced by the choice of commuting microenvironment. In general, the exposure level in decreasing order of measured pollutant level for respective commuting microenvironments are: private car, the group consisting light bus, bus, tram and pavement, MTR and train, and finally ferry. In private car, the CO level is several times higher than that in the other microenvironments with a trip averaged of 10.1 ppm and a maximum of 24.9 ppm. Factors such as the body position of the vehicle, intake point of the ventilation system, fuel used, ventilation, transport mode, road and driving conditions were used in the analysis. Inter-microenvironment, intra-microenvironment and temporal variation of CO concentrations were used as the major indicator. The low body position and low intake point of the ventilation system of the private car are believed to be the cause of higher intake of exhaust of other vehicles and thus result in high pollution level in this microenvironment. Compared with other metropolis around the world and the Hong Kong Air Quality Objectives (HKAQO), exposure levels of commuter to traffic-related air pollution in Hong Kong are relatively low for most pollutants measured. Only several cases of exceedence of HKAQO by NO 2 were recorded. The strong prevailing wind

  8. Microfluidic Biopsy Trapping Device for the Real-Time Monitoring of Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holton, Angela Babetski; Sinatra, Francy L; Kreahling, Jenny; Conway, Amy J; Landis, David A; Altiok, Soner

    2017-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is composed of cellular and stromal components such as tumor cells, mesenchymal cells, immune cells, cancer associated fibroblasts and the supporting extracellular matrix. The tumor microenvironment provides crucial support for growth and progression of tumor cells and affects tumor response to therapeutic interventions. To better understand tumor biology and to develop effective cancer therapeutic agents it is important to develop preclinical platforms that can faithfully recapitulate the tumor microenvironment and the complex interaction between the tumor and its surrounding stromal elements. Drug studies performed in vitro with conventional two-dimensional cancer cell line models do not optimally represent clinical drug response as they lack true tumor heterogeneity and are often performed in static culture conditions lacking stromal tumor components that significantly influence the metabolic activity and proliferation of cells. Recent microfluidic approaches aim to overcome such obstacles with the use of cell lines derived in artificial three-dimensional supportive gels or micro-chambers. However, absence of a true tumor microenvironment and full interstitial flow, leads to less than optimal evaluation of tumor response to drug treatment. Here we report a continuous perfusion microfluidic device coupled with microscopy and image analysis for the assessment of drug effects on intact fresh tumor tissue. We have demonstrated that fine needle aspirate biopsies obtained from patient-derived xenograft models of adenocarcinoma of the lung can successfully be analyzed for their response to ex vivo drug treatment within this biopsy trapping microfluidic device, wherein a protein kinase C inhibitor, staurosporine, was used to assess tumor cell death as a proof of principle. This approach has the potential to study tumor tissue within its intact microenvironment to better understand tumor response to drug treatments and eventually to choose the

  9. Role of Immunotherapy in Targeting the Bone Marrow Microenvironment in Multiple Myeloma: An Evolving Therapeutic Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Clement

    2017-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (referred to henceforth as myeloma) is a B-cell malignancy characterized by unregulated growth of plasma cells in the bone marrow. The treatment paradigm for myeloma underwent significant evolution in the last decade, with an improved understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease as well as the development of therapeutic agents that target not only the tumor cells but also their microenvironment. Despite these therapeutic advances, the prognosis of patients with relapsed or refractory myeloma remains poor. Accordingly, a need exists for new therapeutic avenues that can overcome resistance to current therapies and improve survival outcomes. In addition, myeloma is associated with progressive immune dysregulation, with defects in T-cell immunity, natural killer cell function, and the antigen-presenting capacity of dendritic cells, resulting in a tumor microenvironment that promotes disease tolerance and progression. Together, the immunosuppressive microenvironment and oncogenic mutations activate signaling networks that promote myeloma cell survival. Immunotherapy incorporates novel treatment options (e.g., monoclonal antibodies, antibody-drug conjugates, chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy, immune checkpoint inhibitors, bispecific antibodies, and tumor vaccines) either alone or in combination with existing lines of therapies (e.g., immunomodulatory agents, proteasome inhibitors, and histone deacetylase inhibitors) to enhance the host anti myeloma immunity within the bone marrow microenvironment and improve clinical response. Following the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of daratumumab and elotuzumab in 2015, more immunotherapeutic agents are expected to be become available as valuable treatment options in the near future. This review provides a basic understanding of the role of immunotherapy in modulating the bone marrow tumor microenvironment and its role in the treatment of myeloma. Clinical efficacy and safety of recently

  10. The prognostic value and pathobiological significance of Glasgow microenvironment score in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi-Hua; Ji, Cheng-Dong; Zhu, Jiang; Xiao, Hua-Liang; Zhao, Hai-Bin; Cui, You-Hong; Bian, Xiu-Wu

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the prognostic value and pathobiological significance of Glasgow microenvironment score (GMS), a parameter based on tumor stroma percentage and inflammatory cell infiltration, in gastric cancer. A total of 225 cases of gastric cancer were histologically reviewed, and GMS was evaluated for each case. The association between GMS and patients' survival was investigated. Then the relationship between GMS and mismatch repair (MMR) status, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection were determined using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and in situ hybridization, and the expression of PD1/PD-L1 was examined. Furthermore, the amount of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), the content and maturity of collagen components were detected using IHC, Picrosirius Red staining and second harmonic generation imaging. GMS was significantly associated with clinical outcomes of gastric cancer, and multivariate analysis indicated that GMS was an independent factor (HR 1.725, P = 0.002). Low GMS was a manifestation of better prognosis and inflammatory tumor microenvironment, which was related to MMR deficiency (P = 0.042) and EBV infection (P = 0.032), and within this microenvironment, expression of PD-L1 in carcinoma cells (P = 0.030) or in inflammatory cells (P = 0.029) was significantly higher. In contrast, high GMS linked to a poorer survival and desmoplastic stroma, in which there existed markedly increased CAFs and collagen deposition. GMS can serve as a useful prognostic factor for gastric cancer, and according to GMS, the tumor microenvironment in this cancer type may be partially classified as inflammatory or desmoplastic microenvironment that possesses different pathobiological features.

  11. Human embryonic stem cell microenvironment suppresses the tumorigenic phenotype of aggressive cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postovit, Lynne-Marie; Margaryan, Naira V; Seftor, Elisabeth A; Kirschmann, Dawn A; Lipavsky, Alina; Wheaton, William W; Abbott, Daniel E; Seftor, Richard E B; Hendrix, Mary J C

    2008-03-18

    Embryonic stem cells sustain a microenvironment that facilitates a balance of self-renewal and differentiation. Aggressive cancer cells, expressing a multipotent, embryonic cell-like phenotype, engage in a dynamic reciprocity with a microenvironment that promotes plasticity and tumorigenicity. However, the cancer-associated milieu lacks the appropriate regulatory mechanisms to maintain a normal cellular phenotype. Previous work from our laboratory reported that aggressive melanoma and breast carcinoma express the embryonic morphogen Nodal, which is essential for human embryonic stem cell (hESC) pluripotency. Based on the aberrant expression of this embryonic plasticity gene by tumor cells, this current study tested whether these cells could respond to regulatory cues controlling the Nodal signaling pathway, which might be sequestered within the microenvironment of hESCs, resulting in the suppression of the tumorigenic phenotype. Specifically, we discovered that metastatic tumor cells do not express the inhibitor to Nodal, Lefty, allowing them to overexpress this embryonic morphogen in an unregulated manner. However, exposure of the tumor cells to a hESC microenvironment (containing Lefty) leads to a dramatic down-regulation in their Nodal expression concomitant with a reduction in clonogenicity and tumorigenesis accompanied by an increase in apoptosis. Furthermore, this ability to suppress the tumorigenic phenotype is directly associated with the secretion of Lefty, exclusive to hESCs, because it is not detected in other stem cell types, normal cell types, or trophoblasts. The tumor-suppressive effects of the hESC microenvironment, by neutralizing the expression of Nodal in aggressive tumor cells, provide previously unexplored therapeutic modalities for cancer treatment.

  12. Probing the electrostatics of active site microenvironments along the catalytic cycle for Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C Tony; Layfield, Joshua P; Stewart, Robert J; French, Jarrod B; Hanoian, Philip; Asbury, John B; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Benkovic, Stephen J

    2014-07-23

    Electrostatic interactions play an important role in enzyme catalysis by guiding ligand binding and facilitating chemical reactions. These electrostatic interactions are modulated by conformational changes occurring over the catalytic cycle. Herein, the changes in active site electrostatic microenvironments are examined for all enzyme complexes along the catalytic cycle of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (ecDHFR) by incorporation of thiocyanate probes at two site-specific locations in the active site. The electrostatics and degree of hydration of the microenvironments surrounding the probes are investigated with spectroscopic techniques and mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations. Changes in the electrostatic microenvironments along the catalytic environment lead to different nitrile (CN) vibrational stretching frequencies and (13)C NMR chemical shifts. These environmental changes arise from protein conformational rearrangements during catalysis. The QM/MM calculations reproduce the experimentally measured vibrational frequency shifts of the thiocyanate probes across the catalyzed hydride transfer step, which spans the closed and occluded conformations of the enzyme. Analysis of the molecular dynamics trajectories provides insight into the conformational changes occurring between these two states and the resulting changes in classical electrostatics and specific hydrogen-bonding interactions. The electric fields along the CN axes of the probes are decomposed into contributions from specific residues, ligands, and solvent molecules that make up the microenvironments around the probes. Moreover, calculation of the electric field along the hydride donor-acceptor axis, along with decomposition of this field into specific contributions, indicates that the cofactor and substrate, as well as the enzyme, impose a substantial electric field that facilitates hydride transfer. Overall, experimental and theoretical data provide evidence for

  13. Domains of laminin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvall, E; Wewer, U M

    1996-01-01

    Extracellular matrix molecules are often very large and made up of several independent domains, frequently with autonomous activities. Laminin is no exception. A number of globular and rod-like domains can be identified in laminin and its isoforms by sequence analysis as well as by electron...... microscopy. Here we present the structure-function relations in laminins by examination of their individual domains. This approach to viewing laminin is based on recent results from several laboratories. First, some mutations in laminin genes that cause disease have affected single laminin domains, and some...... laminin isoforms lack particular domains. These mutants and isoforms are informative with regard to the activities of the mutated and missing domains. These mutants and isoforms are informative with regard to the activities of the mutated and missing domains. Second, laminin-like domains have now been...

  14. Cellular interactions with tissue-engineered microenvironments and nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhi

    Tissue-engineered hydrogels composed of intermolecularlly crosslinked hyaluronan (HA-DTPH) and fibronectin functional domains (FNfds) were applied as a physiological relevant ECM mimic with controlled mechanical and biochemical properties. Cellular interactions with this tissue-engineered environment, especially physical interactions (cellular traction forces), were quantitatively measured by using the digital image speckle correlation (DISC) technique and finite element method (FEM). By correlating with other cell functions such as cell morphology and migration, a comprehensive structure-function relationship between cells and their environments was identified. Furthermore, spatiotemporal redistribution of cellular traction stresses was time-lapse measured during cell migration to better understand the dynamics of cell mobility. The results suggest that the reinforcement of the traction stresses around the nucleus, as well as the relaxation of nuclear deformation, are critical steps during cell migration, serving as a speed regulator, which must be considered in any dynamic molecular reconstruction model of tissue cell migration. Besides single cell migration, en masse cell migration was studied by using agarose droplet migration assay. Cell density was demonstrated to be another important parameter to influence cell behaviors besides substrate properties. Findings from these studies will provide fundamental design criteria to develop novel and effective tissue-engineered constructs. Cellular interactions with rutile and anatase TiO2 nanoparticles were also studied. These particles can penetrate easily through the cell membrane and impair cell function, with the latter being more damaging. The exposure to nanoparticles was found to decrease cell area, cell proliferation, motility, and contractility. To prevent this, a dense grafted polymer brush coating was applied onto the nanoparticle surface. These modified nanoparticles failed to adhere to and penetrate

  15. Molecular evolution and functional divergence of soluble starch synthase genes in cassava (manihot esculenta crantz).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zefeng; Wang, Yifan; Xu, Shuhui; Xu, Chenwu; Yan, Changjie

    2013-01-01

    Soluble starch synthases (SSs) are major enzymes involved in starch biosynthesis in plants. Cassava starch has many remarkable characteristics, which should be influenced by the evolution of SS genes in this starchy root crop. In this work, we performed a comprehensive phylogenetic and evolutionary analysis of the soluble starch synthases in cassava. Genome-wide identification showed that there are 9 genes encoding soluble starch synthases in cassava. All of the soluble starch synthases encoded by these genes contain both Glyco_transf_5 and Glycos_transf_1 domains, and a correlation analysis showed evidence of coevolution between these 2 domains in cassava SS genes. The SS genes in land plants can be divided into 6 subfamilies that were formed before the origin of seed plants, and species-specific expansion has contributed to the evolution of this family in cassava. A functional divergence analysis for this family provided statistical evidence for shifted evolutionary rates between the subfamilies of land plant soluble starch synthases. Although the main selective pressure acting on land plant SS genes was purifying selection, our results also revealed that point mutation with positive selection contributed to the evolution of 2 SS genes in cassava. The remarkable cassava starch characteristics might be the result of both the duplication and adaptive selection of SS genes.

  16. Solubility Enhancement of a Poorly Water Soluble Drug by Forming Solid Dispersions using Mechanochemical Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Rojas-Oviedo, I.; Retchkiman-Corona, B.; Quirino-Barreda, C. T.; Cárdenas, J.; Schabes-Retchkiman, P. S.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanochemical activation is a practical cogrinding operation used to obtain a solid dispersion of a poorly water soluble drug through changes in the solid state molecular aggregation of drug-carrier mixtures and the formation of noncovalent interactions (hydrogen bonds) between two crystalline solids such as a soluble carrier, lactose, and a poorly soluble drug, indomethacin, in order to improve its solubility and dissolution rate. Samples of indomethacin and a physical mixture with a weigh...

  17. Soluble Collectin-12 (CL-12) Is a Pattern Recognition Molecule Initiating Complement Activation via the Alternative Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ying Jie; Hein, Estrid; Munthe-Fog, Lea; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole; Bayarri-Olmos, Rafael; Romani, Luigina; Garred, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Soluble defense collagens including the collectins play important roles in innate immunity. Recently, a new member of the collectin family named collectin-12 (CL-12 or CL-P1) has been identified. CL-12 is highly expressed in umbilical cord vascular endothelial cells as a transmembrane receptor and may recognize certain bacteria and fungi, leading to opsonophagocytosis. However, based on its structural and functional similarities with soluble collectins, we hypothesized the existence of a fluid-phase analog of CL-12 released from cells, which may function as a soluble pattern-recognition molecule. Using recombinant CL-12 full length or CL-12 extracellular domain, we determined the occurrence of soluble CL-12 shed from in vitro cultured cells. Western blot showed that soluble recombinant CL-12 migrated with a band corresponding to ∼ 120 kDa under reducing conditions, whereas under nonreducing conditions it presented multimeric assembly forms. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis of human umbilical cord plasma enabled identification of a natural soluble form of CL-12 having an electrophoretic mobility pattern close to that of shed soluble recombinant CL-12. Soluble CL-12 could recognize Aspergillus fumigatus partially through the carbohydrate-recognition domain in a Ca(2+)-independent manner. This led to activation of the alternative pathway of complement exclusively via association with properdin on A. fumigatus as validated by detection of C3b deposition and formation of the terminal complement complex. These results demonstrate the existence of CL-12 in a soluble form and indicate a novel mechanism by which the alternative pathway of complement may be triggered directly by a soluble pattern-recognition molecule.

  18. Applications of soluble dietary fibers in beverages

    OpenAIRE

    C. I. Beristain; M. E. Rodríguez-Huezo; C. Lobato-Calleros; F. Cruz-Sosa; R. Pedroza-Islas; J. R. Verde-Calvo

    2006-01-01

    In this work the importance of soluble dietary fibers in the human diet is discussed. Traditional and new sources of soluble dietary fiber are mentioned, and a description of how to apply them in different types of beverages such as energy drinks, sport drinks, carbonated beverages and protein-based beverages in order to achieve enhanced functional properties is given.

  19. A Colorful Solubility Exercise for Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugrue, Christopher R.; Mentzen, Hans H., II; Linton, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    A discovery chemistry laboratory has been developed for the introductory organic chemistry student to investigate the concepts of polarity, miscibility, solubility, and density. The simple procedure takes advantage of the solubility of two colored dyes in a series of solvents or solvent mixtures, and the diffusion of colors can be easily…

  20. A Colorful Solubility Exercise for Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugrue, Christopher R.; Mentzen, Hans H., II; Linton, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    A discovery chemistry laboratory has been developed for the introductory organic chemistry student to investigate the concepts of polarity, miscibility, solubility, and density. The simple procedure takes advantage of the solubility of two colored dyes in a series of solvents or solvent mixtures, and the diffusion of colors can be easily…

  1. Solubility Characteristics of PCBM and C60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, David; Howell, Jason

    2016-11-10

    Empirical data indicate that several good solvents for C60 and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) have substantial polar and hydrogen-bonding components, which are not intrinsic to the structure of the C60 and PCBM molecules themselves. Functional solubility parameter (FSP) and convex solubility parameter (CSP) computations are performed on C60 and PCBM using solubility data available in the literature. The CSP and FSP results are compared to previously reported Hansen solubility parameters (HSPs) and to the parameters calculated using additive functional group contribution methods. The CSP and FSP methods confirm the anomalously large polar and hydrogen-bonding parameters, δP and δH, obtained experimentally for C60 and PCBM. This behavior, which is quite irregular given the structure of the molecules, is due to the fact that several good solvents have high δP and δH values. Thus, these irregularities are highlighted by the CSP and FSP calculations. Additional contradictory solubility characteristics are disclosed by comparing the experimental solubility parameters to a linear solvation energy relationship (LSER) model, additive functional group calculations, and COSMO-RS computations. The FSP solubility function strongly suggests that the solubility parameters do not accurately represent the cohesive energy density properties of C60 and PCBM, as intended, but rather they manifest the properties of the solvents, e.g., high δP and δH values, that are necessary to accommodate these molecules in the liquid phase.

  2. A framework for API solubility modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conte, Elisa; Gani, Rafiqul; Crafts, Peter

    The solubility of solid organic compounds in water and organic solvents is a fundamental thermodynamic property for many purposes such as product-process design and optimization, for the chemical and pharmaceutical industry. Experimental literature solubility data are usually scarce and temperature...

  3. Evaluation of experimental data for wax and diamondoids solubility in gaseous systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammadi, Amir H.; Gharagheizi, Farhad; Eslamimanesh, Ali

    2012-01-01

    The Leverage statistical approach is herein applied for evaluation of experimental data of the paraffin waxes/diamondoids solubility in gaseous systems. The calculation steps of this algorithm consist of determination of the statistical Hat matrix, sketching the Williams Plot, and calculation...... of the residuals of two selected correlations results. In addition, the applicability domains of the investigated correlations and quality of the existing experimental data are examined accompanied by outlier diagnostics. Two previously applied Chrastil-type correlations including the original Chrastil and Mèndez...... of the corresponding solubilities are statistically valid and correct, and none of the experimental data can be designated as outliers....

  4. Light extinction method for solubility measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shui Wang; Jingkang Wang; Qiuxiang Yin; Yongli Wang

    2005-01-01

    A novel measurement method for chemical solubility determination is brought forward, in which the advantages of two kinds of traditional methods are united. The results show that the concentration of unsolved particles suspending in the solution can be determined by measuring I/I0 (ratio of the transmission intensity to the incident intensity) of the laser beam permeating through the solution according to Lamben-Beer law. The biggest relative deviation for the solubility data determined is less than 1.5% for the sparingly soluble substances and 0.3% for the opulently soluble substances. By comparison of the experimental solubility data with previous data, the light extinction method is demonstrated to be stable and reliable.

  5. Critical assessment of day time traffic noise level at curbside open-air microenvironment of Kolkata City, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu Chowdhury, Anirban; Debsarkar, Anupam; Chakrabarty, Shibnath

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the research work is to assess day time traffic noise level at curbside open-air microenvironment of Kolkata city, India under heterogeneous environmental conditions. Prevailing traffic noise level in terms of A-weighted equivalent noise level (Leq) at the microenvironment was in excess of 12.6 ± 2.1 dB(A) from the day time standard of 65 dB(A) for commercial area recommended by the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) of India. Noise Climate and Traffic Noise Index of the microenvironment were accounted for 13 ± 1.8 dB(A) and 88.8 ± 6.1 dB(A) respectively. A correlation analysis explored that prevailing traffic noise level of the microenvironment had weak negative (-0.21; p microenvironment of Kolkata City was higher than the standard recommended by CPCB of India. It was highly annoying also. Air temperature and relative humidity had little influence and the peak noise component had the most significant influence on the prevailing traffic noise level at curbside open-air microenvironment. Therefore, traffic noise level at the microenvironment of the city can be reduced with careful honking and driving.

  6. Direct laser writing by two-photon polymerization as a tool for developing microenvironments for evaluation of bacterial growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otuka, A.J.G. [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, CP.369, 13560-970 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Corrêa, D.S. [Laboratório Nacional de Nanotecnologia para o Agronegócio (LNNA), Embrapa Instrumentação, Rua XV de Novembro, 1452, CP.741, 13560-970 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Fontana, C.R. [Department of Clinical Analysis, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo State (UNESP), 1621 Expedicionarios do Brasil Street, Araraquara, Sao Paulo 14801-960 (Brazil); Mendonça, C.R., E-mail: crmendon@ifsc.usp.br [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, CP.369, 13560-970 São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2014-02-01

    Monitoring bacteria growth and motion in environments is fundamental to understand, for instance, how they proliferate and contaminate organism. Therefore, techniques to fabricate microenvironments for in situ and in vivo studies are interesting for that purpose. In this work we used two-photon polymerization to fabricate microenvironments and, as a proof of principle, we demonstrated the development of the bacteria ATCC 25922 Escherichia coli (E. coli) into the microstructure surroundings. Two varieties of polymeric microenvironments are presented: (i) a microenvironment doped at specific site with ciprofloxacin, an antibiotic typically used in the treatment of diseases caused by E. coli and (ii) micro-fences, which serve as traps for bacteria. These microenvironments, fabricated by two-photon polymerization, may be a potential platform for drug delivery system, by promoting or inhibiting the growth of bacteria in specific biological or synthetic sites. - Highlights: • Microenvironments were fabricated by two-photon polymerization. • We demonstrated the development of Escherichia coli into the microstructure surroundings. • Microenvironment doped with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin was fabricated. • Micro-fences, which serve as traps for bacteria, were also produced.

  7. Importance of the stem cell microenvironment for ophthalmological cell-based therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Peng-Xia; Wang, Bo-Wen; Wang, Zhi-Chong

    2015-03-26

    Cell therapy is a promising treatment for diseases that are caused by cell degeneration or death. The cells for clinical transplantation are usually obtained by culturing healthy allogeneic or exogenous tissue in vitro. However, for diseases of the eye, obtaining the adequate number of cells for clinical transplantation is difficult due to the small size of tissue donors and the frequent needs of long-term amplification of cells in vitro, which results in low cell viability after transplantation. In addition, the transplanted cells often develop fibrosis or degrade and have very low survival. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) are also promising candidates for cell therapy. Unfortunately, the differentiation of ESCs can bring immune rejection, tumorigenicity and undesired differentiated cells, limiting its clinical application. Although iPS cells can avoid the risk of immune rejection caused by ES cell differentiation post-transplantation, the low conversion rate, the risk of tumor formation and the potentially unpredictable biological changes that could occur through genetic manipulation hinder its clinical application. Thus, the desired clinical effect of cell therapy is impaired by these factors. Recent research findings recognize that the reason for low survival of the implanted cells not only depends on the seeded cells, but also on the cell microenvironment, which determines the cell survival, proliferation and even reverse differentiation. When used for cell therapy, the transplanted cells need a specific three-dimensional structure to anchor and specific extra cellular matrix components in addition to relevant cytokine signaling to transfer the required information to support their growth. These structures present in the matrix in which the stem cells reside are known as the stem cell microenvironment. The microenvironment interaction with the stem cells provides the necessary homeostasis for cell maintenance and growth. A

  8. Indomethacin solubility estimation in 1,4-dioxane + water mixtures by the extended hildebrand solubility approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller A Ruidiaz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Extended Hildebrand Solubility Approach (EHSA was successfully applied to evaluate the solubility of Indomethacin in 1,4-dioxane + water mixtures at 298.15 K. An acceptable correlation-performance of EHSA was found by using a regular polynomial model in order four of the W interaction parameter vs. solubility parameter of the mixtures (overall deviation was 8.9%. Although the mean deviation obtained was similar to that obtained directly by means of an empiric regression of the experimental solubility vs. mixtures solubility parameters, the advantages of EHSA are evident because it requires physicochemical properties easily available for drugs.

  9. Structure of Concatenated HAMP Domains Provides a Mechanism for Signal Transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airola, Michael V.; Watts, Kylie J.; Bilwes, Alexandrine M.; Crane, Brian R. (Cornell); (Lorma Linda U)

    2010-08-23

    HAMP domains are widespread prokaryotic signaling modules found as single domains or poly-HAMP chains in both transmembrane and soluble proteins. The crystal structure of a three-unit poly-HAMP chain from the Pseudomonas aeruginosa soluble receptor Aer2 defines a universal parallel four-helix bundle architecture for diverse HAMP domains. Two contiguous domains integrate to form a concatenated di-HAMP structure. The three HAMP domains display two distinct conformations that differ by changes in helical register, crossing angle, and rotation. These conformations are stabilized by different subsets of conserved residues. Known signals delivered to HAMP would be expected to switch the relative stability of the two conformations and the position of a coiled-coil phase stutter at the junction with downstream helices. We propose that the two conformations represent opposing HAMP signaling states and suggest a signaling mechanism whereby HAMP domains interconvert between the two states, which alternate down a poly-HAMP chain.

  10. Functional Implications of Domain Organization Within Prokaryotic Rhomboid Proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, Rashmi; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2015-01-01

    Intramembrane proteases are membrane embedded enzymes that cleave transmembrane substrates. This interesting class of enzyme and its water mediated substrate cleavage mechanism occurring within the hydrophobic lipid bilayer has drawn the attention of researchers. Rhomboids are a family of ubiquitous serine intramembrane proteases. Bacterial forms of rhomboid proteases are mainly composed of six transmembrane helices that are preceded by a soluble N-terminal domain. Several crystal structures of the membrane domain of the E. coli rhomboid protease ecGlpG have been solved. Independently, the ecGlpG N-terminal cytoplasmic domain structure was solved using both NMR and protein crystallography. Despite these structures, we still do not know the structure of the full-length protein, nor do we know the functional role of these domains in the cell. This chapter will review the structural and functional roles of the different domains associated with prokaryotic rhomboid proteases. Lastly, we will address questions remaining in the field.

  11. Adverse genomic alterations and stemness features are induced by field cancerization in the microenvironment of hepatocellular carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castven, Darko; Fischer, Michael; Becker, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) commonly develops in chronically damaged liver tissues. The resulting regenerative and inflammatory processes create an adverse milieu that promotes tumor-initiation and progression. A better understanding of the hepatic tumor-microenvironment interaction might infer.......Prognostic significance of the permissive liver microenvironment might be a consequence of a pro-oncogenic field effect that is caused by chronic regenerative processes. Activation of key oncogenic features and immune-response signaling indicates that the cross-talk between tumor and microenvironment might be a promising...

  12. CYCLODEXTRIN INCLUSION COMPLEX TO ENHANCE SOLUBILITY OF POORLY WATER SOLUBLE DRUGS: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.B. Chaudhary * 1 and J. K. Patel 2

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Low solubility compounds show dissolution rate limited absorption and hence poor absorption, distribution and target organ delivery. Improvement of aqueous solubility in such a case is valuable goal to improve therapeutic efficacy. Complexation with CDs by different methods like physical mixing, melting, kneding, spray drying, freeze drying, co-evaporation has been reported to enhance the solubility, dissolution rate and bioavability of poorly water soluble drugs. The formation of inclusion complex can be confirmed by DSC, FTIR, XRD and SEM study. This review aims to assess the use of cyclodextrines as complexing agents to enhance the solubility of poorly soluble drugs and hence to resolve the many issues associated with developing and commercializing poorly water soluble drugs.

  13. Pten in the Breast Tumor Microenvironment: Modeling Tumor-Stroma Co-Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Julie A.; Li, Fu; Leone, Gustavo; Ostrowski, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    Solid human tumors and their surrounding microenvironment are hypothesized to co-evolve in a manner that promotes tumor growth, invasiveness and spread. Mouse models of cancer have focused on genetic changes in the epithelial tumor cells and therefore have not robustly tested this hypothesis. We have recently developed a murine breast cancer model that ablates the PTEN tumor suppressor pathway in stromal fibroblasts. Remarkably, the model resembles human breast tumors both at morphologic and molecular levels. We propose that such models reflect subtypes of tumor-stromal co-evolution relevant to human breast cancer, and will therefore be useful in defining the mechanisms that underpin tumor-stroma crosstalk. Additionally, these models should also aid in molecularly classifying human breast tumors based on both the microenvironment subtypes they contain as well as on the tumor subtype. PMID:21303970

  14. Emergent Behavior from A Cellular Automaton Model for Invasive Tumor Growth in Heterogeneous Microenvironments

    CERN Document Server

    Jiao, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Understanding tumor invasion and metastasis is of crucial importance for both fundamental cancer research and clinical practice. In vitro experiments have established that the invasive growth of malignant tumors is characterized by the dendritic invasive branches composed of chains of tumor cells emanating from the primary tumor mass. The preponderance of previous tumor simulations focused on non-invasive (or proliferative) growth. The formation of the invasive cell chains and their interactions with the primary tumor mass and host microenvironment are not well understood. Here, we present a novel cellular automaton (CA) model that enables one to efficiently simulate invasive tumor growth in a heterogeneous host microenvironment. By taking into account a variety of microscopic-scale tumor-host interactions, including the short-range mechanical interactions between tumor cells and tumor stroma, degradation of extracellular matrix by the invasive cells and oxygen/nutrient gradient driven cell motions, our CA mo...

  15. Reprogramming of the Tumor Microenvironment by Stromal Pten-regulated miR-320

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronisz, A; Godlewski, J; Wallace, JA; Merchant, AS; Nowicki, MO; Mathsyaraja, H; Srinivasan, R; Trimboli, AJ; Martin, CK; Li, F; Yu, L; Fernandez, SA; Pécot, T; Rosol, TJ; Cory, S; Hallett, M; Park, M; Piper, MG; Marsh, CB; Yee, LD; Jimenez, RE; Nuovo, G; Lawler, SE; Chiocca, EA; Leone, G; Ostrowski, MC

    2011-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (Pten) in stromal fibroblasts suppresses epithelial mammary tumors, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Using proteomic and expression profiling, we show that Pten loss from mammary stromal fibroblasts activates an oncogenic secretome that orchestrates the transcriptional reprogramming of other cell types in the microenvironment. Downregulation of miR-320 and upregulation of one of its direct targets, ETS2, are critical events in Pten-deleted stromal fibroblasts responsible for inducing this oncogenic secretome, which in turn promotes tumor angiogenesis and tumor cell invasion. Expression of the Pten-miR-320-Ets2 regulated secretome distinguished human normal breast stroma from tumor stroma and robustly correlated with recurrence in breast cancer patients. This work reveals miR-320 as a critical component of the Pten tumor suppressor axis that acts in stromal fibroblasts to reprogram the tumor microenvironment and curtail tumor progression. PMID:22179046

  16. Tumour microenvironment and radiation response in sarcomas originating from tumourigenic human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Andrea, Filippo Peder; Safwat, Akmal Ahmed; Burns, Jorge S.

    2012-01-01

    to determine whether this heterogeneity persisted in tumours established from these clones, and whether the response to radiation treatment was principally governed by cell intrinsic qualities or by factors pertaining to the tumour microenvironment, such as the degree of hypoxia and vascularisation. Methods......: Immune deficient female mice were implanted on the backs with cells from one of the clones. The subsequent tumours were subjected to either radiation treatment or had the tumour microenvironment assayed, when they reached 400mm3. Radiation was given as a single fraction of 0 to 15 Gy and the degree...... of tumour control and time to three times the treatment volume were noted. Tumours used for the microenvironmental assay had intratumoral hypoxia measured by the Eppendorf oxygen electrode and Pimonidazole staining, and the extent of vascularisation determined by a microvasculature density assay using...

  17. The role of the tissue microenvironment in the regulation of cancer cell motility and invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brábek Jan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During malignant neoplastic progression the cells undergo genetic and epigenetic cancer-specific alterations that finally lead to a loss of tissue homeostasis and restructuring of the microenvironment. The invasion of cancer cells through connective tissue is a crucial prerequisite for metastasis formation. Although cell invasion is foremost a mechanical process, cancer research has focused largely on gene regulation and signaling that underlie uncontrolled cell growth. More recently, the genes and signals involved in the invasion and transendothelial migration of cancer cells, such as the role of adhesion molecules and matrix degrading enzymes, have become the focus of research. In this review we discuss how the structural and biomechanical properties of extracellular matrix and surrounding cells such as endothelial cells influence cancer cell motility and invasion. We conclude that the microenvironment is a critical determinant of the migration strategy and the efficiency of cancer cell invasion.

  18. Bone Marrow Cells in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Create a Proinflammatory Microenvironment Influencing Normal Hematopoietic Differentiation Fates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Vilchis-Ordoñez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL is a serious public health problem in the pediatric population worldwide, contributing to 85% of deaths from childhood cancers. Understanding the biology of the disease is crucial for its clinical management and the development of therapeutic strategies. In line with that observed in other malignancies, chronic inflammation may contribute to a tumor microenvironment resulting in the damage of normal processes, concomitant to development and maintenance of neoplastic cells. We report here that hematopoietic cells from bone marrow B-ALL have the ability to produce proinflammatory and growth factors, including TNFα, IL-1β, IL-12, and GM-CSF that stimulate proliferation and differentiation of normal stem and progenitor cells. Our findings suggest an apparently distinct CD13+CD33+ population of leukemic cells contributing to a proinflammatory microenvironment that may be detrimental to long-term normal hematopoiesis within B-ALL bone marrow.

  19. Induction of mitochondrial dysfunction as a strategy for targeting tumour cells in metabolically compromised microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaonan; Fryknäs, Mårten; Hernlund, Emma; Fayad, Walid; De Milito, Angelo; Olofsson, Maria Hägg; Gogvadze, Vladimir; Dang, Long; Påhlman, Sven; Schughart, Leoni A Kunz; Rickardson, Linda; D'Arcy, Padraig; Gullbo, Joachim; Nygren, Peter; Larsson, Rolf; Linder, Stig

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal vascularization of solid tumours results in the development of microenvironments deprived of oxygen and nutrients that harbour slowly growing and metabolically stressed cells. Such cells display enhanced resistance to standard chemotherapeutic agents and repopulate tumours after therapy. Here we identify the small molecule VLX600 as a drug that is preferentially active against quiescent cells in colon cancer 3-D microtissues. The anticancer activity is associated with reduced mitochondrial respiration, leading to bioenergetic catastrophe and tumour cell death. VLX600 shows enhanced cytotoxic activity under conditions of nutrient starvation. Importantly, VLX600 displays tumour growth inhibition in vivo. Our findings suggest that tumour cells in metabolically compromised microenvironments have a limited ability to respond to decreased mitochondrial function, and suggest a strategy for targeting the quiescent populations of tumour cells for improved cancer treatment.

  20. Obesity-Induced Changes in Adipose Tissue Microenvironment and Their Impact on Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster, José J; Ouchi, Noriyuki; Gokce, Noyan; Walsh, Kenneth

    2016-05-27

    Obesity is causally linked with the development of cardiovascular disorders. Accumulating evidence indicates that cardiovascular disease is the collateral damage of obesity-driven adipose tissue dysfunction that promotes a chronic inflammatory state within the organism. Adipose tissues secrete bioactive substances, referred to as adipokines, which largely function as modulators of inflammation. The microenvironment of adipose tissue will affect the adipokine secretome, having actions on remote tissues. Obesity typically leads to the upregulation of proinflammatory adipokines and the downregulation of anti-inflammatory adipokines, thereby contributing to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we focus on the microenvironment of adipose tissue and how it influences cardiovascular disorders, including atherosclerosis and ischemic heart diseases, through the systemic actions of adipokines. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Crosstalk between tumor cells and microenvironment via Wnt pathway in colorectal cancer dissemination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan Huang; Xiang Du

    2008-01-01

    Invasion and metastasis are the deadly face of malignant tumors. Considering the high rate of incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer, it is critical to determine the mechanisms of its dissemination. In the parallel investigation of the invasive front and tumor center area of colorectal cancer (CRC), observation of heterogeneous p-catenin distribution and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) at the invasive front suggested that there might be a crosstalk between tumor cells and the tumor microenvironment. Wnt signaling pathway is also involved in the cancer progression due to its key role in CRC tumorigenesis. Moreover, in recent years, there is increasing evidence that the regulators of microenvironment, including extracellular matrix, growth factors and inflammatory factors, are associated with the activation of Wnt pathway and the mobility of tumor cells. In this review, we will try to explain how these molecules trigger metastasis via the Wnt pathway.

  2. Trabectedin and Plitidepsin: Drugs from the Sea that Strike the Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M. Galmarini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevailing paradigm states that cancer cells acquire multiple genetic mutations in oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes whose respective activation/up-regulation or loss of function serve to impart aberrant properties, such as hyperproliferation or inhibition of cell death. However, a tumor is now considered as an organ-like structure, a complex system composed of multiple cell types (e.g., tumor cells, inflammatory cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, etc. all embedded in an inflammatory stroma. All these components influence each other in a complex and dynamic cross-talk, leading to tumor cell survival and progression. As the microenvironment has such a crucial role in tumor pathophysiology, it represents an attractive target for cancer therapy. In this review, we describe the mechanism of action of trabectedin and plitidepsin as an example of how these specific drugs of marine origin elicit their antitumor activity not only by targeting tumor cells but also the tumor microenvironment.

  3. Macrophages: Regulators of the Inflammatory Microenvironment during Mammary Gland Development and Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Nicholas J; Chuntova, Pavlina; Schwertfeger, Kathryn L

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are critical mediators of inflammation and important regulators of developmental processes. As a key phagocytic cell type, macrophages evolved as part of the innate immune system to engulf and process cell debris and pathogens. Macrophages produce factors that act directly on their microenvironment and also bridge innate immune responses to the adaptive immune system. Resident macrophages are important for acting as sensors for tissue damage and maintaining tissue homeostasis. It is now well-established that macrophages are an integral component of the breast tumor microenvironment, where they contribute to tumor growth and progression, likely through many of the mechanisms that are utilized during normal wound healing responses. Because macrophages contribute to normal mammary gland development and breast cancer growth and progression, this review will discuss both resident mammary gland macrophages and tumor-associated macrophages with an emphasis on describing how macrophages interact with their surrounding environment during normal development and in the context of cancer.

  4. Role of Age-Associated Alterations of the Dermal Extracellular Matrix Microenvironment in Human Skin Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Taihao; Fisher, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Human skin is largely composed of a collagen-rich connective tissue, which provides structural and functional support. The collagen-rich connective tissue is produced, organized, and maintained by dermal fibroblasts. During aging, dermal collagen fibrils undergo progressive loss and fragmentation, leading to thin and structurally weakened skin. Age-related alterations of collagen fibrils impairs skin structure and function and creates a tissue microenvironment that promotes age-related skin diseases, such as delayed wound healing and skin cancer development. This review describes cellular mechanisms that give rise to self-perpetuating, collagen fibril fragmentation that creates an age-associated dermal microenvironment (AADM), which contributes to decline of human skin function. PMID:25660807

  5. Dissecting the Multiple Myeloma-bone microenvironment reveals new therapeutic opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shay, G; Hazlehurst, L; Lynch, CC

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a plasma cell skeletal malignancy. While therapeutic agents such as bortezomib and lenalidomide have significantly improved overall survival, the disease is currently incurable with the emergence of drug resistance limiting the efficacy of chemotherapeutic strategies. Failure to cure the disease is in part due to the underlying genetic heterogeneity of the cancer. Myeloma progression is critically dependent on the surrounding microenvironment. Defining the interactions between myeloma cells and the more genetically stable hematopoietic and mesenchymal components of the bone microenvironment is critical for the development of new therapeutic targets. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of how microenvironmental elements contribute to myeloma progression and therapeutically, how those elements can or are currently being targeted in a bid to eradicate the disease. PMID:26423531

  6. Breathing and Cross-Infection Risk in the Microenvironment around People

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Zajas, Jan Jakub; Litewnicki, Michal

    2014-01-01

    The paper focuses on the characteristics of cross-infection risk in a room with an air distribution which creates fully mixed conditions. Several experiments are made to develop models for the flow in the microenvironment and models for the cross-infection risk. The first part of the measurements...... covers experiments with one thermal manikin simulating a person. The exhalation flow in the microenvironment is examined in order to provide a description of its behavior, and to create a mathematical model of velocity and concentration distribution. The description works for different activity levels...... (breathing frequency and volume flow) and it includes a study of the influence of the thermal boundary layer of the manikin. Second part covers measurements with the use of two manikins. It is examined how one exhaling manikin can influence another regarding cross-infection risks. This study includes...

  7. Solubilities of uranium for TILA-99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ollila, K. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland); Ahonen, L. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-11-01

    This report presents the evaluation of the uranium solubilities in the reference waters of TILA-99. The behaviour of uranium has been discussed separately in the near-field and far-field conditions. The bentonite/groundwater interactions have been considered in the compositions of the fresh and saline near-field reference waters. The far-field groundwaters` compositions include fresh, brackish, saline and very saline, almost brine-type compositions. The pH and redox conditions, as the main parameters affecting the solubilities, are considered. A literature study was made in order to obtain information on the recent dissolution and leaching experiments of UO{sub 2} and spent fuel. The latest literature includes studies on UO{sub 2} solubility under anoxic conditions, in which the methods for simulating the reducing conditions of deep groundwater have been improved. Studies on natural uraninite and its alteration products give a valuable insight into the long-term behaviour of spent fuel. Also the solubility equilibria for some relevant poorly known uranium minerals have been determined. The solubilities of the selected solubility-limiting phases were calculated using the geochemical code, EQ3/6. The NEA database for uranium was the basis for the modelling. The recently extended and updated SR `97 database was used for comparison. The solubility products for uranophane were taken from the latest literature. The recommended values for solubilities were given after a comparison between the calculated solubilities, experimental information and measured concentrations in natural groundwaters. The experiments include several UO{sub 2} dissolution studies in synthetic groundwaters with compositions close to the reference groundwaters. (author) 81 refs.

  8. Tumor microenvironment tenascin-C promotes glioblastoma invasion and negatively regulates tumor proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Shuli; Lal, Bachchu; Tung, Brian; Wang, Shervin; Goodwin, C Rory; Laterra, John

    2016-04-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most frequent and aggressive primary brain tumor in adults. Recent research on cancer stroma indicates that the brain microenvironment plays a substantial role in tumor malignancy and treatment responses to current antitumor therapy. In this work, we have investigated the effect of alterations in brain tumor extracellular matrix tenascin-C (TNC) on brain tumor growth patterns including proliferation and invasion. Since intracranial xenografts from patient-derived GBM neurospheres form highly invasive tumors that recapitulate the invasive features demonstrated in human patients diagnosed with GBM, we studied TNC gain-of-function and loss-of function in these GBM neurospheres in vitro and in vivo. TNC loss-of-function promoted GBM neurosphere cell adhesion and actin cytoskeleton organization. Yet, TNC loss-of-function or exogenous TNC had no effect on GBM neurosphere cell growth in vitro. In animal models, decreased TNC in the tumor microenvironment was accompanied by decreased tumor invasion and increased tumor proliferation, suggesting that TNC regulates the "go-or-grow" phenotypic switch of glioma in vivo. We demonstrated that decreased TNC in the tumor microenvironment modulated behaviors of stromal cells including endothelial cells and microglia, resulting in enlarged tumor blood vessels and activated microglia in tumors. We further demonstrated that tumor cells with decreased TNC expression are sensitive to anti-proliferative treatment in vitro. Our findings suggest that detailed understanding of how TNC in the tumor microenvironment influences tumor behavior and the interactions between tumor cells and surrounding nontumor cells will benefit novel combinatory antitumor strategies to treat malignant brain tumors. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. CXCR7 maintains osteosarcoma invasion after CXCR4 suppression in bone marrow microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yan; Wu, Chunlei; Wang, Jing; Liu, Na

    2017-05-01

    The major cause of death in osteosarcoma is the invasion and metastasis. Better understanding of the molecular mechanism of osteosarcoma invasion is essential in developing effective tumor-suppressive therapies. Interaction between chemokine receptors plays a crucial role in regulating osteosarcoma invasion. Here, we investigated the relationship between CXCR7 and CXCR4 in osteosarcoma invasion induced by bone marrow microenvironment. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were co-cultured with osteosarcoma cells to mimic actual bone marrow microenvironment. Osteosarcoma cell invasion and CXCL12/CXCR4 activation were observed within this co-culture model. Interestingly, in this co-culture model, osteosarcoma cell invasion was not inhibited by suppressing CXCR4 expression with neutralizing antibody or specific inhibitor AMD3100. Downstream signaling extracellular signal-regulated kinase and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 were not significantly affected by CXCR4 inhibition. However, suppressing CXCR4 led to CXCR7 upregulation. Constitutive expression of CXCR7 could maintain osteosarcoma cell invasion when CXCR4 was suppressed. Simultaneously, inhibiting CXCR4 and CXCR7 compromised osteosarcoma invasion in co-culture system and suppressed extracellular signal-regulated kinase and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signals. Moreover, bone marrow microenvironment, not CXCL12 alone, is required for CXCR7 activation after CXCR4 suppression. Taken together, suppressing CXCR4 is not enough to impede osteosarcoma invasion in bone marrow microenvironment since CXCR7 is activated to sustain invasion. Therefore, inhibiting both CXCR4 and CXCR7 could be a promising strategy in controlling osteosarcoma invasion.

  10. Neutrophils drive accelerated tumor progression in the collagen-dense mammary tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Mendoza, María G; Inman, David R; Ponik, Suzanne M; Jeffery, Justin J; Sheerar, Dagna S; Van Doorn, Rachel R; Keely, Patricia J

    2016-05-11

    High mammographic density has been correlated with a 4-fold to 6-fold increased risk of developing breast cancer, and is associated with increased stromal deposition of extracellular matrix proteins, including collagen I. The molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for high breast tissue density are not completely understood. We previously described accelerated tumor formation and metastases in a transgenic mouse model of collagen-dense mammary tumors (type I collagen-α1 (Col1α1)(tm1Jae) and mouse mammary tumor virus - polyoma virus middle T antigen (MMTV-PyVT)) compared to wild-type mice. Using ELISA cytokine arrays and multi-color flow cytometry analysis, we studied cytokine signals and the non-malignant, immune cells in the collagen-dense tumor microenvironment that may promote accelerated tumor progression and metastasis. Collagen-dense tumors did not show any alteration in immune cell populations at late stages. The cytokine signals in the mammary tumor microenvironment were clearly different between wild-type and collagen-dense tumors. Cytokines associated with neutrophil signaling, such as granulocyte monocyte-colony stimulated factor (GM-CSF), were increased in collagen-dense tumors. Depleting neutrophils with anti-Ly6G (1A8) significantly reduced the number of tumors, and blocked metastasis in over 80 % of mice with collagen-dense tumors, but did not impact tumor growth or metastasis in wild-type mice. Our study suggests that tumor progression in a collagen-dense microenvironment is mechanistically different, with pro-tumor neutrophils, compared to a non-dense microenvironment.

  11. Aerobic glycolysis and high level of lactate in cancer metabolism and microenvironment

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic abnormalities is a hallmark of cancer. About 100 years ago, Nobel laureate Otto Heinrich Warburg first described high rate of glycolysis in cancer cells. Recently more and more novel opinions about cancer metabolism supplement to this hypothesis, consist of glucose uptake, lactic acid generation and secretion, acidification of the microenvironment and cancer immune evasion. Here we briefly review metabolic pathways generating lactate, and discuss the function of higher lactic acid i...

  12. Alexa Fluor-labeled Fluorescent Cellulose Nanocrystals for Bioimaging Solid Cellulose in Spatially Structured Microenvironments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grate, Jay W.; Mo, Kai-For; Shin, Yongsoon; Vasdekis, Andreas; Warner, Marvin G.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Orr, Galya; Hu, Dehong; Dehoff, Karl J.; Brockman, Fred J.; Wilkins, Michael J.

    2015-03-18

    Cellulose nanocrystal materials have been labeled with modern Alexa Fluor dyes in a process that first links the dye to a cyanuric chloride molecule. Subsequent reaction with cellulose nanocrystals provides dyed solid microcrystalline cellulose material that can be used for bioimaging and suitable for deposition in films and spatially structured microenvironments. It is demonstrated with single molecular fluorescence microscopy that these films are subject to hydrolysis by cellulose enzymes.

  13. Proteomic profiling of the tumor microenvironment: recent insights and the search for biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Although gain of oncogene functions and loss of tumor suppressor functions are driving forces in tumor development, the tumor microenvironment, comprising the extracellular matrix, surrounding stroma, signaling molecules and infiltrating immune and other cell populations, is now also recognized as crucial to tumor development and metastasis. Many interactions at the tumor cell-environment interface occur at the protein level. Proteomic approaches are contributing to the definition of the prot...

  14. Role of Age-Associated Alterations of the Dermal Extracellular Matrix Microenvironment in Human Skin Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Quan, Taihao; Fisher, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    Human skin is largely composed of a collagen-rich connective tissue, which provides structural and functional support. The collagen-rich connective tissue is produced, organized, and maintained by dermal fibroblasts. During aging, dermal collagen fibrils undergo progressive loss and fragmentation, leading to thin and structurally weakened skin. Age-related alterations of collagen fibrils impairs skin structure and function and creates a tissue microenvironment that promotes age-related skin d...

  15. High throughput screening to investigate the interaction of stem cells with their extracellular microenvironment

    OpenAIRE

    Ankam, Soneela; Teo, Benjamin KK; Kukumberg, Marek; Yim, Evelyn KF

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells in vivo are housed within a functional microenvironment termed the “stem cell niche.” As the niche components can modulate stem cell behaviors like proliferation, migration and differentiation, evaluating these components would be important to determine the most optimal platform for their maintenance or differentiation. In this review, we have discussed methods and technologies that have aided in the development of high throughput screening assays for stem cell research, including ...

  16. Genomic Diversity and the Microenvironment as Drivers of Progression in DCIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    microenvironment, mammographic biomarkers 3. ACCOMPLISHMENTS What were the major goals of the project? Aim 1. Determine whether genetic diversity...of genetic diversity, microenvironmental diversity, and/or mammographic biomarkers can be used to predict which DCIS tumors are most likely to...series of pilot experiments to determine the best resource (Washington University) that we will use to perform the genomic sequencing of our tumors. We

  17. Dynamic formation of microenvironments at the myotendinous junction correlates with muscle fiber morphogenesis in zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Snow, Chelsi J.; Henry, Clarissa A.

    2008-01-01

    Muscle development involves the specification and morphogenesis of muscle fibers that attach to tendons. After attachment, muscles and tendons then function as an integrated unit to transduce force to the skeletal system and stabilize joints. The attachment site is the myotendinous junction, or MTJ, and is the primary site of force transmission. We find that attachment of fast-twitch myofibers to the MTJ correlates with the formation of novel microenvironments within the MTJ. The expression o...

  18. Rapid fabrication of complex 3D extracellular microenvironments by dynamic optical projection stereolithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, A Ping; Qu, Xin; Soman, Pranav; Hribar, Kolin C; Lee, Jin W; Chen, Shaochen; He, Sailing

    2012-08-16

    The topographic features of the extracelluar matrix (ECM) lay the foundation for cellular behavior. A novel biofabrication method using a digital-mirror device (DMD), called dynamic optical projection stereolithography (DOPsL) is demonstrated. This robust and versatile platform can generate complex biomimetic scaffolds within seconds. Such 3D scaffolds have promising potentials for studying cell interactions with microenvironments in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Regulation of Mcl-1 Expression in Context to Bone Marrow Stromal Microenvironment in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumudha Balakrishnan, PhD

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence suggests that the resistance of CLL cells to apoptosis is partly mediated through the interactions between leukemia cells and adjacent stromal cells residing in the lymphatic tissue or bone marrow microenvironment. Mcl-1, an anti-apoptotic protein that is associated with failure to treatment is up-regulated in CLL lymphocytes after interaction with microenvironment. However, the regulation of its expression in context to microenvironment is unclear. We evaluated and compared changes in Mcl-1 in CLL B-cells in suspension culture and when co-cultured on stromal cells. The blockade of apoptosis in co-cultured CLL cells is associated with diminution in caspase-3 and PARP cleavage and is not dependent on cytogenetic profile or prognostic factors of the disease. Stroma-derived resistance to apoptosis is associated with a cascade of transcriptional events such as increase in levels of total RNA Pol II and its phosphorylation at Ser2 and Ser5, increase in the rate of global RNA synthesis, and amplification of Mcl-1 transcript levels. The latter is associated with increase in Mcl-1 protein level without an impact on the levels of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Post-translational modifications of protein kinases show increased phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473, Erk at Thr202/Tyr204 and Gsk-3β at Ser9 and augmentation of total Mcl-1 accumulation along with phosphorylation at Ser159/Thr163 sites. Collectively, stroma-induced apoptosis resistance is mediated through signaling proteins that regulate transcriptional and translational expression and post-translational modification of Mcl-1 in CLL cells in context to bone marrow stromal microenvironment.

  20. Regulation of Mcl-1 expression in context to bone marrow stromal microenvironment in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Kumudha; Burger, Jan A; Fu, Min; Doifode, Tejaswini; Wierda, William G; Gandhi, Varsha

    2014-12-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that the resistance of CLL cells to apoptosis is partly mediated through the interactions between leukemia cells and adjacent stromal cells residing in the lymphatic tissue or bone marrow microenvironment. Mcl-1, an anti-apoptotic protein that is associated with failure to treatment is up-regulated in CLL lymphocytes after interaction with microenvironment. However, the regulation of its expression in context to microenvironment is unclear. We evaluated and compared changes in Mcl-1 in CLL B-cells in suspension culture and when co-cultured on stromal cells. The blockade of apoptosis in co-cultured CLL cells is associated with diminution in caspase-3 and PARP cleavage and is not dependent on cytogenetic profile or prognostic factors of the disease. Stroma-derived resistance to apoptosis is associated with a cascade of transcriptional events such as increase in levels of total RNA Pol II and its phosphorylation at Ser2 and Ser5, increase in the rate of global RNA synthesis, and amplification of Mcl-1 transcript levels. The latter is associated with increase in Mcl-1 protein level without an impact on the levels of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Post-translational modifications of protein kinases show increased phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473, Erk at Thr202/Tyr204 and Gsk-3β at Ser9 and augmentation of total Mcl-1 accumulation along with phosphorylation at Ser159/Thr163 sites. Collectively, stroma-induced apoptosis resistance is mediated through signaling proteins that regulate transcriptional and translational expression and post-translational modification of Mcl-1 in CLL cells in context to bone marrow stromal microenvironment. Copyright © 2014 Neoplasia Press, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Bone Marrow Cells in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Create a Proinflammatory Microenvironment Influencing Normal Hematopoietic Differentiation Fates

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) is a serious public health problem in the pediatric population worldwide, contributing to 85% of deaths from childhood cancers. Understanding the biology of the disease is crucial for its clinical management and the development of therapeutic strategies. In line with that observed in other malignancies, chronic inflammation may contribute to a tumor microenvironment resulting in the damage of normal processes, concomitant to development and maintena...

  2. Molecular Thermodynamic Modeling of Mixed Solvent Solubility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Martin Dela; Abildskov, Jens; O’Connell, John P.

    2010-01-01

    A method based on statistical mechanical fluctuation solution theory for composition derivatives of activity coefficients is employed for estimating dilute solubilities of 11 solid pharmaceutical solutes in nearly 70 mixed aqueous and nonaqueous solvent systems. The solvent mixtures range from...... nearly ideal to strongly nonideal. The database covers a temperature range from 293 to 323 K. Comparisons with available data and other existing solubility methods show that the method successfully describes a variety of observed mixed solvent solubility behaviors using solute−solvent parameters from...

  3. Water Soluble Polymers for Pharmaceutical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veeran Gowda Kadajji

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Advances in polymer science have led to the development of novel drug delivery systems. Some polymers are obtained from natural resources and then chemically modified for various applications, while others are chemically synthesized and used. A large number of natural and synthetic polymers are available. In the present paper, only water soluble polymers are described. They have been explained in two categories (1 synthetic and (2 natural. Drug polymer conjugates, block copolymers, hydrogels and other water soluble drug polymer complexes have also been explained. The general properties and applications of different water soluble polymers in the formulation of different dosage forms, novel delivery systems and biomedical applications will be discussed.

  4. Translation domains in multiferroics

    OpenAIRE

    Meier, D; Leo, N; Jungk, T.; Soergel, E.; Becker, P.; Bohaty, L.; Fiebig, M.

    2010-01-01

    Translation domains differing in the phase but not in the orientation of the corresponding order parameter are resolved in two types of multiferroics. Hexagonal (h-) YMnO$_3$ is a split-order-parameter multiferroic in which commensurate ferroelectric translation domains are resolved by piezoresponse force microscopy whereas MnWO$_4$ is a joint-order-parameter multiferroic in which incommensurate magnetic translation domains are observed by optical second harmonic generation. The pronounced ma...

  5. Frustratingly Easy Domain Adaptation

    CERN Document Server

    Daumé, Hal

    2009-01-01

    We describe an approach to domain adaptation that is appropriate exactly in the case when one has enough ``target'' data to do slightly better than just using only ``source'' data. Our approach is incredibly simple, easy to implement as a preprocessing step (10 lines of Perl!) and outperforms state-of-the-art approaches on a range of datasets. Moreover, it is trivially extended to a multi-domain adaptation problem, where one has data from a variety of different domains.

  6. Staggered domain wall fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Hoelbling, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We construct domain wall fermions with a staggered kernel and investigate their spectral and chiral properties numerically in the Schwinger model. In some relevant cases we see an improvement of chirality by more than an order of magnitude as compared to usual domain wall fermions. Moreover, we present first results for four-dimensional quantum chromodynamics, where we also observe significant reductions of chiral symmetry violations for staggered domain wall fermions.

  7. Immune adaptive microenvironment profiles in intracerebral and intrasplenic lymphomas share common characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnou, S; Galand, C; Daussy, C; Crozet, L; Fridman, W H; Sautès-Fridman, C; Fisson, S

    2011-01-01

    A large body of evidence indicates that the immune microenvironment controls tumour development. Primary central nervous system lymphomas (PCNSL) are aggressive tumours growing in the central nervous system (CNS). To evaluate the role and characteristics of this immune-privileged site in anti-tumour defences, we compared the cellular and molecular immune microenvironments of growing murine lymphoma B cells injected into the brain or the spleen. In the brain, immune cells, including dendritic cells and T lymphocytes with a large proportion of CD4+forkhead box P3 (FoxP3+) regulatory T cells, rapidly infiltrated the tumour microenvironment. These populations also increased in number in the spleen. The T cell cytokine profiles in tumour-bearing mice were similar in the two sites, with predominant T helper type 1 (Th1)/Th17 polarization after polyclonal stimulation, although some interleukin (IL)-4 could also be found. We demonstrated that these T cells have anti-tumour activity in the CNS, although less than in the spleen: nude mice that received lymphoma cells intracerebrally died significantly earlier than immunocompetent animals. These results demonstrate that the brain is able to recruit all the major actors to mount a specific anti-tumour immune response against lymphoma. PMID:21668435

  8. The acidic microenvironment as a possible niche of dormant tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppicelli, Silvia; Andreucci, Elena; Ruzzolini, Jessica; Laurenzana, Anna; Margheri, Francesca; Fibbi, Gabriella; Del Rosso, Mario; Bianchini, Francesca; Calorini, Lido

    2017-08-01

    Although surgical excision, chemo-, and radio-therapy are clearly advanced, tumors may relapse due to cells of the so-called "minimal residual disease". Indeed, small clusters of tumor cells persist in host tissues after treatment of the primary tumor elaborating strategies to survive and escape from immunological attacks before their relapse: this variable period of remission is known as "cancer dormancy". Therefore, it is crucial to understand and consider the major concepts addressing dormancy, to identify new targets and disclose potential clinical strategies. Here, we have particularly focused the relationships between tumor microenvironment and cancer dormancy, looking at a re-appreciated aspect of this compartment that is the low extracellular pH. Accumulating evidences indicate that acidity of tumor microenvironment is associated with a poor prognosis of tumor-bearing patients, stimulates a chemo- and radio-therapy resistant phenotype, and suppresses the tumoricidal activity of cytotoxic lymphocytes and natural killer cells, and all these aspects are useful for dormancy. Therefore, this review discusses the possibility that acidity of tumor microenvironment may provide a new, not previously suggested, adequate milieu for "dormancy" of tumor cells.

  9. Adipocytes and Macrophages Interplay in the Orchestration of Tumor Microenvironment: New Implications in Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Luís Henrique; Corrêa, Rafael; Farinasso, Cecília Menezes; de Sant’Ana Dourado, Lívia Pimentel; Magalhães, Kelly Grace

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation has been known as one of the main keys to the establishment and progression of cancers. Chronic low-grade inflammation is also a strategic condition that underlies the causes and development of metabolic syndrome and obesity. Moreover, obesity has been largely related to poor prognosis of tumors by modulating tumor microenvironment with secretion of several inflammatory mediators by tumor-associated adipocytes (TAAs), which can modulate and recruit tumor-associated macrophages. Thus, the understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlay and link inflammation, obesity, and cancer is crucial to identify potential targets that interfere with this important route. Knowledge about the exact role of each component of the tumor microenvironment is not yet fully understood, but the new insights in literature highlight the essential role of adipocytes and macrophages interplay as key factor to determine the fate of cancer progression. In this review article, we focus on the functions of adipocytes and macrophages orchestrating cellular and molecular mechanisms that lead to inflammatory modulation in tumor microenvironment, which will be crucial to cancer establishment. We also emphasized the mechanisms by which the tumor promotes itself by recruiting and polarizing macrophages, discussing the role of adipocytes in this process. In addition, we discuss here the newest possible anticancer therapeutic treatments aiming to retard the development of the tumor based on what is known about cancer, adipocyte, and macrophage polarization. PMID:28970834

  10. Evaluation of cage micro-environment of mice housed on various types of bedding materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, E.; Stockwell, J.D.; Schweitzer, I.; Langley, S.H.; Smith, A.L.

    2004-01-01

    A variety of environmental factors can affect the outcomes of studies using laboratory rodents. One such factor is bedding. Several new bedding materials and processing methods have been introduced to the market in recent years, but there are few reports of their performance. In the studies reported here, we have assessed the cage micro-environment (in-cage ammonia levels, temperature, and humidity) of mice housed on various kinds of bedding and their combinations. We also compared results for bedding supplied as Nestpaks versus loose bedding. We studied C57BL/6J mice (commonly used) and NOD/LtJ mice (heavy soilers) that were maintained, except in one study, in static duplex cages. In general, we observed little effect of bedding type on in-cage temperature or humidity; however, there was considerable variation in ammonia concentrations. The lowest ammonia concentrations occurred in cages housing mice on hardwood bedding or a mixture of corncob and alpha cellulose. In one experiment comparing the micro-environments of NOD/LtJ male mice housed on woodpulp fiber bedding in static versus ventilated caging, we showed a statistically significant decrease in ammonia concentrations in ventilated cages. Therefore, our data show that bedding type affects the micro-environment in static cages and that effects may differ for ventilated cages, which are being used in vivaria with increasing frequency.

  11. Identification of recurring protein structure microenvironments and discovery of novel functional sites around CYS residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Tianyun

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of structural genomics presents significant challenges in the annotation of biologically uncharacterized proteins. Unfortunately, our ability to analyze these proteins is restricted by the limited catalog of known molecular functions and their associated 3D motifs. Results In order to identify novel 3D motifs that may be associated with molecular functions, we employ an unsupervised, two-phase clustering approach that combines k-means and hierarchical clustering with knowledge-informed cluster selection and annotation methods. We applied the approach to approximately 20,000 cysteine-based protein microenvironments (3D regions 7.5 Å in radius and identified 70 interesting clusters, some of which represent known motifs (e.g. metal binding and phosphatase activity, and some of which are novel, including several zinc binding sites. Detailed annotation results are available online for all 70 clusters at http://feature.stanford.edu/clustering/cys. Conclusions The use of microenvironments instead of backbone geometric criteria enables flexible exploration of protein function space, and detection of recurring motifs that are discontinuous in sequence and diverse in structure. Clustering microenvironments may thus help to functionally characterize novel proteins and better understand the protein structure-function relationship.

  12. The senescent microenvironment promotes the emergence of heterogeneous cancer stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Vega, Luis Jaime; Jouravleva, Karina; Ortiz-Montero, Paola; Liu, Win-Yan; Galeano, Jorge Luis; Romero, Martha; Popova, Tatiana; Bacchetti, Silvia; Vernot, Jean Paul; Londoño-Vallejo, Arturo

    2015-10-01

    There is a well-established association between aging and the onset of metastasis. Although the mechanisms through which age impinges upon the malignant phenotype remain uncharacterized, the role of a senescent microenvironment has been emphasized. We reported previously that human epithelial cells that undergo telomere-driven chromosome instability (T-CIN) display global microRNA (miR) deregulation and develop migration and invasion capacities. Here, we show that post-crisis cells are not able to form tumors unless a senescent microenvironment is provided. The characterization of cell lines established from such tumors revealed that these cells have acquired cell autonomous tumorigenicity, giving rise to heterogeneous tumors. Further experiments demonstrate that explanted cells, while displaying differences in cell differentiation markers, are all endowed of enhanced stem cell properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation capacity. Treatments of T-CIN+ cells with senescence-conditioned media induce sphere formation exclusively in cells with senescence-associated tumorigenicity, a capacity that depends on miR-145 repression. These results indicate that the senescent microenvironment, while promoting further transdifferentiations in cells with genome instability, is able to propel the progression of premalignant cells towards a malignant, cell stem-like state.

  13. Overcoming the Immunosuppressive Tumor Microenvironment of Hodgkin Lymphoma Using Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruella, Marco; Klichinsky, Michael; Kenderian, Saad S; Shestova, Olga; Ziober, Amy; Kraft, Daniel O; Feldman, Michael; Wasik, Mariusz A; June, Carl H; Gill, Saar

    2017-10-01

    Patients with otherwise treatment-resistant Hodgkin lymphoma could benefit from chimeric antigen receptor T-cell (CART) therapy. However, Hodgkin lymphoma lacks CD19 and contains a highly immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment (TME). We hypothesized that in Hodgkin lymphoma, CART should target both malignant cells and the TME. We demonstrated CD123 on both Hodgkin lymphoma cells and TME, including tumor-associated macrophages (TAM). In vitro, Hodgkin lymphoma cells convert macrophages toward immunosuppressive TAMs that inhibit T-cell proliferation. In contrast, anti-CD123 CART recognized and killed TAMs, thus overcoming immunosuppression. Finally, we showed in immunodeficient mouse models that CART123 eradicated Hodgkin lymphoma and established long-term immune memory. A novel platform that targets malignant cells and the microenvironment may be needed to successfully treat malignancies with an immunosuppressive milieu.Significance: Anti-CD123 chimeric antigen receptor T cells target both the malignant cells and TAMs in Hodgkin lymphoma, thereby eliminating an important immunosuppressive component of the tumor microenvironment. Cancer Discov; 7(10); 1154-67. ©2017 AACR.This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 1047. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Adipocytes and Macrophages Interplay in the Orchestration of Tumor Microenvironment: New Implications in Cancer Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Henrique Corrêa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation has been known as one of the main keys to the establishment and progression of cancers. Chronic low-grade inflammation is also a strategic condition that underlies the causes and development of metabolic syndrome and obesity. Moreover, obesity has been largely related to poor prognosis of tumors by modulating tumor microenvironment with secretion of several inflammatory mediators by tumor-associated adipocytes (TAAs, which can modulate and recruit tumor-associated macrophages. Thus, the understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlay and link inflammation, obesity, and cancer is crucial to identify potential targets that interfere with this important route. Knowledge about the exact role of each component of the tumor microenvironment is not yet fully understood, but the new insights in literature highlight the essential role of adipocytes and macrophages interplay as key factor to determine the fate of cancer progression. In this review article, we focus on the functions of adipocytes and macrophages orchestrating cellular and molecular mechanisms that lead to inflammatory modulation in tumor microenvironment, which will be crucial to cancer establishment. We also emphasized the mechanisms by which the tumor promotes itself by recruiting and polarizing macrophages, discussing the role of adipocytes in this process. In addition, we discuss here the newest possible anticancer therapeutic treatments aiming to retard the development of the tumor based on what is known about cancer, adipocyte, and macrophage polarization.

  15. Oxygen microenvironment affects the uptake of nanoparticles in head and neck tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Eunice Y.; Hodge, Sasson; Tai, Katherine; Hou, Huagang; Khan, Nadeem; Hoopes, P. Jack; Samkoe, Kimberley S.

    2013-02-01

    Survival of head and neck cancer patients has not improved in several decades despite advances in diagnostic and therapeutic techniques. Tumor hypoxia in head and neck cancers is a critical factor that leads to poor prognosis, resistance to radiation and chemotherapies, and increased metastatic potential. Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (mNPHT) is a promising therapy for hypoxic tumors because nanoparticles (NP) can be directly injected into, or targeted to, hypoxic tumor cells and exposed to alternating magnetic fields (AMF) to induce hyperthermia. Magnetic NPHT can improve therapeutic effectiveness by two modes of action: 1) direct killing of hypoxic tumor cells; and 2) increase in tumor oxygenation, which has the potential to make the tumor more susceptible to adjuvant therapies such as radiation and chemotherapy. Prior studies in breast cancer cells demonstrated that a hypoxic microenvironment diminished NP uptake in vitro; however, mNPHT with intratumoral NP injection in hypoxic tumors increased tumor oxygenation and delayed tumor growth. In this study, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines were incubated in normoxic, hypoxic, and hyperoxic conditions with iron oxide NP for 4-72 hours. After incubation, the cells were analyzed for iron uptake by mass spectrometry, Prussian blue staining, and electron microscopy. In contrast to breast cancer cells, uptake of NPs was increased in hypoxic microenvironments as compared to normoxic conditions in HNSCC cells. In future studies, we will confirm the effect of the oxygen microenvironment on NP uptake and efficacy of mNPHT both in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Effect of tumor cells and tumor microenvironment on NK-cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Massimo; Cantoni, Claudia; Pietra, Gabriella; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo

    2014-06-01

    The ability of tumors to manage an immune-mediated attack has been recently included in the "next generation" of cancer hallmarks. In solid tumors, the microenvironment that is generated during the first steps of tumor development has a pivotal role in immune regulation. An intricate net of cross-interactions occurring between tumor components, stromal cells, and resident or recruited immune cells skews the possible acute inflammatory response toward an aberrant ineffective chronic inflammatory status that favors the evasion from the host's defenses. Natural killer (NK) cells have powerful cytotoxic activity, but their activity may be eluded by the tumor microenvironment. Immunosubversion, immunoediting or immunoselection of poorly immunogenic tumor cells and interference with tumor infiltration play a major role in evading NK-cell responses to tumors. Tumor cells, tumor-associated fibroblasts and tumor-induced aberrant immune cells (i.e. tolerogenic or suppressive macrophages, dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells) can interfere with NK-cell activation pathways or the complex receptor array that regulate NK-cell activation and antitumor activity. Thus, the definition of tumor microenvironment-related immunosuppressive factors, along with the identification of new classes of tissue-residing NK-like innate lymphoid cells, represent key issues to design effective NK-cell-based therapies of solid tumors.

  17. Endocrine disruptors and the tumor microenvironment: A new paradigm in breast cancer biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Hope; Pashos, Nicholas; Martin, Elizabeth; Mclachlan, John; Bunnell, Bruce; Burow, Matthew

    2017-12-05

    Breast cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed malignancies in women and is characterized by predominantly estrogen dependent growth. Endocrine disruptors (EDCs) have estrogenic properties which have been shown to increase breast cancer risk. While the direct effects of EDCs on breast cancer cell biology and tumor progression have been well studied, the roles for EDCs on tumor microenvironment composition, signaling and structure are incompletely defined. Estrogen targeting of tumor stromal cells can drive paracrine signaling to breast cancer cells regulating tumorigenesis and progression. Additionally, estrogen and estrogen receptor signaling has been shown to alter breast architecture and extracellular matrix component synthesis. Unsurprisingly, EDCs have been shown to induce structural changes in the mammary gland as well as increased collagen fibers in the tissue stroma. Previous work demonstrates that human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) are essential components of the tumor microenvironment and are direct targets of both estrogens and EDCs. Furthermore, estrogen-stem cell cross talk has been implicated in breast cancer progression and results in increased tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis and invasion. This review aims to dissect the possible relationship and mechanisms between EDCs, the tumor microenvironment, and breast cancer progression. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Differentiation Induction of Mouse Neural Stem Cells in Hydrogel Tubular Microenvironments with Controlled Tube Dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoe, Hiroaki; Kato-Negishi, Midori; Itou, Akane; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a tubular 3D microenvironment created in a calcium alginate hydrogel microtube with respect to the effect of scaffold dimensions on the differentiation of mouse neuronal stem cells (mNSCs) is evaluated. Five types of hydrogel microtubes with different core diameters (≈65-200 μm) and shell thicknesses (≈30-110 μm) are fabricated by using a double coaxial microfluidic device, and differentiation of encapsulated mNSCs is induced by changing the growth medium to the differentiation medium. The influence of the microtube geometries is examined by using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and fluorescent immunocytochemistry. The analyses reveal that differences in microtube thickness within 30-110 μm affected the relative Tuj1 expression but do not affect the morphology of encapsulated mNSCs. The diameters of cores influence both the relative Tuj1 expression and morphology of the differentiated neurons. It is found that the tubular microenvironment with a core diameter of less than ≈100 μm contributes to forming highly viable and aligned neural tissue. The tubular microenvironment can provide an effective method for constructing microfiber-shaped neural tissues with geometrically controlled differentiation induction.

  19. Microbiota-Modulated Metabolites Shape the Intestinal Microenvironment by Regulating NLRP6 Inflammasome Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Maayan; Thaiss, Christoph A; Zeevi, David; Dohnalová, Lenka; Zilberman-Schapira, Gili; Mahdi, Jemal Ali; David, Eyal; Savidor, Alon; Korem, Tal; Herzig, Yonatan; Pevsner-Fischer, Meirav; Shapiro, Hagit; Christ, Anette; Harmelin, Alon; Halpern, Zamir; Latz, Eicke; Flavell, Richard A; Amit, Ido; Segal, Eran; Elinav, Eran

    2015-12-01

    Host-microbiome co-evolution drives homeostasis and disease susceptibility, yet regulatory principles governing the integrated intestinal host-commensal microenvironment remain obscure. While inflammasome signaling participates in these interactions, its activators and microbiome-modulating mechanisms are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the microbiota-associated metabolites taurine, histamine, and spermine shape the host-microbiome interface by co-modulating NLRP6 inflammasome signaling, epithelial IL-18 secretion, and downstream anti-microbial peptide (AMP) profiles. Distortion of this balanced AMP landscape by inflammasome deficiency drives dysbiosis development. Upon fecal transfer, colitis-inducing microbiota hijacks this microenvironment-orchestrating machinery through metabolite-mediated inflammasome suppression, leading to distorted AMP balance favoring its preferential colonization. Restoration of the metabolite-inflammasome-AMP axis reinstates a normal microbiota and ameliorates colitis. Together, we identify microbial modulators of the NLRP6 inflammasome and highlight mechanisms by which microbiome-host interactions cooperatively drive microbial community stability through metabolite-mediated innate immune modulation. Therefore, targeted "postbiotic" metabolomic intervention may restore a normal microenvironment as treatment or prevention of dysbiosis-driven diseases.

  20. Construction of extracellular microenvironment to improve surface endothelialization of NiTi alloy substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Peng, E-mail: liupeng79@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology of Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); State Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers, Department of Macromolecular Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zhao, Yongchun; Yan, Ying; Hu, Yan; Yang, Weihu [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology of Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Cai, Kaiyong, E-mail: kaiyong_cai@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology of Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2015-10-01

    To mimic extracellular microenvironment of endothelial cell, a bioactive multilayered structure of gelatin/chitosan pair, embedding with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), was constructed onto NiTi alloy substrate surface via a layer-by-layer assembly technique. The successful fabrication of the multilayered structure was demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, contact angle measurement, attenuated total reflection-fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The growth behaviors of endothelial cells on various NiTi alloy substrates were investigated in vitro. Cytoskeleton observation, MTT assay, and wound healing assay proved that the VEGF-embedded multilayer structure positively stimulated adhesion, proliferation and motogenic responses of endothelial cells. More importantly, the present system promoted the nitric oxide production of endothelial cells. The approach affords an alternative to construct extracellular microenvironment for improving surface endothelialization of a cardiovascular implant. - Highlights: • Biofunctional multilayer films mimicking extracellular microenvironment were successfully fabricated. • Multilayered structure stimulated the biological responses of endothelial cells. • The approach affords an efficient approach for surface endothelialization of stent implant.

  1. Amoeboid-mesenchymal migration plasticity promotes invasion only in complex heterogeneous microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talkenberger, Katrin; Ada Cavalcanti-Adam, Elisabetta; Voss-Böhme, Anja; Deutsch, Andreas

    2017-08-23

    During tissue invasion individual tumor cells exhibit two interconvertible migration modes, namely mesenchymal and amoeboid migration. The cellular microenvironment triggers the switch between both modes, thereby allowing adaptation to dynamic conditions. It is, however, unclear if this amoeboid-mesenchymal migration plasticity contributes to a more effective tumor invasion. We address this question with a mathematical model, where the amoeboid-mesenchymal migration plasticity is regulated in response to local extracellular matrix resistance. Our numerical analysis reveals that extracellular matrix structure and presence of a chemotactic gradient are key determinants of the model behavior. Only in complex microenvironments, if the extracellular matrix is highly heterogeneous and a chemotactic gradient directs migration, the amoeboid-mesenchymal migration plasticity allows a more widespread invasion compared to the non-switching amoeboid and mesenchymal modes. Importantly, these specific conditions are characteristic for in vivo tumor invasion. Thus, our study suggests that in vitro systems aiming at unraveling the underlying molecular mechanisms of tumor invasion should take into account the complexity of the microenvironment by considering the combined effects of structural heterogeneities and chemical gradients on cell migration.

  2. Microenvironment is involved in cellular response to hydrostatic pressures during chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Rui; Hao, Jin; Song, Jinlin; Zhao, Zhihe; Fang, Shanbao; Wang, Yating; Li, Juan

    2014-06-01

    Chondrocytes integrate numerous microenvironmental cues to mount physiologically relevant differentiation responses, and the regulation of mechanical signaling in chondrogenic differentiation is now coming into intensive focus. To facilitate tissue-engineered chondrogenesis by mechanical strategy, a thorough understanding about the interactional roles of chemical factors under mechanical stimuli in regulating chondrogenesis is in great need. Therefore, this study attempts to investigate the interaction of rat MSCs with their microenvironment by imposing dynamic and static hydrostatic pressure through modulating gaseous tension above the culture medium. Under dynamic pressure, chemical parameters (pH, pO2, and pCO2) were kept in homeostasis. In contrast, pH was remarkably reduced due to increased pCO2 under static pressure. MSCs under the dynamically pressured microenvironment exhibited a strong accumulation of GAG within and outside the alginate beads, while cells under the statically pressured environment lost newly synthesized GAG into the medium with a speed higher than its production. In addition, the synergic influence on expression of chondrogenic genes was more persistent under dynamic pressure than that under static pressure. This temporal contrast was similar to that of activation of endogenous TGF-β1. Taken altogether, it indicates that a loading strategy which can keep a homeostatic chemical microenvironment is preferred, since it might sustain the stimulatory effects of mechanical stimuli on chondrogenesis via activation of endogenous TGF-β1.

  3. Essential Microenvironment for Thymopoiesis is Preserved in Human Adult and Aged Thymus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Shiraishi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal human thymuses at various ages were immunohistologically examined in order to determine whether adult or aged thymus maintained the microenvironment for the T cell development and thymopoiesis was really ongoing. To analyze the thymic microenvironment, two monoclonal antibodies (MoAb were employed. One is MoAb to IL-1 receptor (IL-1R recognizing medullary and subcapsular cortical epithelial cells of normal infant human thymus. The other is UH-1 MoAb recognizing thymic epithelial cells within the cortex, which are negative with IL-1R-MoAb. Thymus of subjects over 20 years of age was split into many fragments and dispersed in the fatty tissue. However, the microenvironment of each fragment was composed of both IL-1R positive and UH-1 positive epithelial cells, and the UH-1 positive portion was populated with lymphocytes showing a follicle-like appearance. Lymphocytes in these follicle-like portions were mostly CD4+CD8+ double positive cells and contained many proliferating cells as well as apoptotic cells. Thus these follicle-like portions in adult and aged thymus were considered to be functioning as cortex as in infant thymus. Proliferative activity of thymocytes in the thymic cortex and the follicle-like portions definitely declined with advance of age, while incidence of apoptotic thymocytes increased with aging.

  4. Nanochips of Tantalum Oxide Nanodots as artificial-microenvironments for monitoring Ovarian cancer progressiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Udesh; Wang, Ssu-Meng; Chu, Ying Hao; Huang, Guewha S.; Lin, Yan Ren; Hung, Yao Ching; Chen, Wen Liang

    2016-08-01

    Nanotopography modulates cell characteristics and cell behavior. Nanotopological cues can be exploited to investigate the in-vivo modulation of cell characteristics by the cellular microenvironment. However, the studies explaining the modulation of tumor cell characteristics and identifying the transition step in cancer progressiveness are scarce. Here, we engineered nanochips comprising of Tantalum oxide nanodot arrays of 10, 50, 100 and 200 nm as artificial microenvironments to study the modulation of cancer cell behavior. Clinical samples of different types of Ovarian cancer at different stages were obtained, primary cultures were established and then seeded on different nanochips. Immunofluorescence (IF) was performed to compare the morphologies and cell characteristics. Indices corresponding to cell characteristics were defined. A statistical comparison of the cell characteristics in response to the nanochips was performed. The cells displayed differential growth parameters. Morphology, Viability, focal adhesions, microfilament bundles and cell area were modulated by the nanochips which can be used as a measure to study the cancer progressiveness. The ease of fabrication of nanochips ensures mass-production. The ability of the nanochips to act as artificial microenvironments and modulate cell behavior may lead to further prospects in the markerless monitoring of the progressiveness and ultimately, improving the prognosis of Ovarian cancer.

  5. Tumor-Associated Macrophages as Major Players in the Tumor Microenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanmee, Theerawut [Institute of Advanced Technology, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Ontong, Pawared [Division of Engineering (Biotechnology), Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Konno, Kenjiro [Department of Animal Medical Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Itano, Naoki, E-mail: itanon@cc.kyoto-su.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Technology, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Division of Engineering (Biotechnology), Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Department of Molecular Biosciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan)

    2014-08-13

    During tumor progression, circulating monocytes and macrophages are actively recruited into tumors where they alter the tumor microenvironment to accelerate tumor progression. Macrophages shift their functional phenotypes in response to various microenvironmental signals generated from tumor and stromal cells. Based on their function, macrophages are divided broadly into two categories: classical M1 and alternative M2 macrophages. The M1 macrophage is involved in the inflammatory response, pathogen clearance, and antitumor immunity. In contrast, the M2 macrophage influences an anti-inflammatory response, wound healing, and pro-tumorigenic properties. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) closely resemble the M2-polarized macrophages and are critical modulators of the tumor microenvironment. Clinicopathological studies have suggested that TAM accumulation in tumors correlates with a poor clinical outcome. Consistent with that evidence, experimental and animal studies have supported the notion that TAMs can provide a favorable microenvironment to promote tumor development and progression. In this review article, we present an overview of mechanisms responsible for TAM recruitment and highlight the roles of TAMs in the regulation of tumor angiogenesis, invasion, metastasis, immunosuppression, and chemotherapeutic resistance. Finally, we discuss TAM-targeting therapy as a promising novel strategy for an indirect cancer therapy.

  6. Stemness in Cancer: Stem Cells, Cancer Stem Cells, and Their Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro M. Aponte

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stemness combines the ability of a cell to perpetuate its lineage, to give rise to differentiated cells, and to interact with its environment to maintain a balance between quiescence, proliferation, and regeneration. While adult Stem Cells display these properties when participating in tissue homeostasis, Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs behave as their malignant equivalents. CSCs display stemness in various circumstances, including the sustaining of cancer progression, and the interaction with their environment in search for key survival factors. As a result, CSCs can recurrently persist after therapy. In order to understand how the concept of stemness applies to cancer, this review will explore properties shared between normal and malignant Stem Cells. First, we provide an overview of properties of normal adult Stem Cells. We thereafter elaborate on how these features operate in CSCs. We then review the organization of microenvironment components, which enables CSCs hosting. We subsequently discuss Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells (MSCs, which, although their stemness properties are limited, represent essential components of the Stem Cell niche and tumor microenvironment. We next provide insights of the therapeutic strategies targeting Stem Cell properties in tumors and the use of state-of-the-art techniques in future research. Increasing our knowledge of the CSCs microenvironment is key to identifying new therapeutic solutions.

  7. Modulation of Acid Sphingomyelinase in Melanoma Reprogrammes the Tumour Immune Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Assi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The inflammatory microenvironment induces tumours to acquire an aggressive and immunosuppressive behaviour. Since acid sphingomyelinase (A-SMase downregulation in melanoma was shown to determine a malignant phenotype, we aimed here to elucidate the role of A-SMase in the regulation of tumour immunogenic microenvironment using in vivo melanoma models in which A-SMase was either downregulated or maintained at constitutively high levels. We found high levels of inflammatory factors in low A-SMase expressing tumours, which also displayed an immunosuppressive/protumoural microenvironment: high levels of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs and regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs, as well as low levels of dendritic cells (DCs. In contrast, the restoration of A-SMase in melanoma cells not only reduced tumour growth and immunosuppression, but also induced a high recruitment at tumour site of effector immune cells with an antitumoural function. Indeed, we observed a poor homing of MDSCs and Tregs and the increased recruitment of CD8+ and CD4+ T lymphocytes as well as the infiltration of DCs and CD8+/CD44high T lymphocytes. This study demonstrates that change of A-SMase expression in cancer cells is sufficient per se to tune in vivo melanoma growth and that A-SMase levels modulate immune cells at tumour site. This may be taken into consideration in the setting of therapeutic strategies.

  8. Astrocytes from the brain microenvironment alter migration and morphology of metastatic breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumakovich, Marina A; Mencio, Caitlin P; Siglin, Jonathan S; Moriarty, Rebecca A; Geller, Herbert M; Stroka, Kimberly M

    2017-08-09

    Tumor cell metastasis to the brain involves cell migration through biochemically and physically complex microenvironments at the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The current understanding of tumor cell migration across the BBB is limited. We hypothesize that an interplay between biochemical cues and physical cues at the BBB affects the mechanisms of brain metastasis. We found that astrocyte conditioned medium (ACM) applied directly to tumor cells increased tumor cell velocity, induced elongation, and promoted actin stress fiber organization. Notably, treatment of the extracellular matrix with ACM led to even more significant increases in tumor cell velocity in comparison with ACM treatment of cells directly. Furthermore, inhibiting matrix metalloproteinases in ACM reversed ACM's effect on tumor cells. The effects of ACM on tumor cell morphology and migration also depended on astrocytes' activation state. Finally, using a microfluidic device, we found that the effects of ACM were abrogated in confinement. Overall, our work demonstrates that astrocyte-secreted factors alter migration and morphology of metastatic breast tumor cells, and this effect depends on the cells' mechanical microenvironment.-Shumakovich, M. A., Mencio, C. P., Siglin, J. S., Moriarty, R. A., Geller, H. M., Stroka, K. M. Astrocytes from the brain microenvironment alter migration and morphology of metastatic breast cancer cells. © FASEB.

  9. Dynamic formation of microenvironments at the myotendinous junction correlates with muscle fiber morphogenesis in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Chelsi J; Henry, Clarissa A

    2009-01-01

    Muscle development involves the specification and morphogenesis of muscle fibers that attach to tendons. After attachment, muscles and tendons then function as an integrated unit to transduce force to the skeletal system and stabilize joints. The attachment site is the myotendinous junction, or MTJ, and is the primary site of force transmission. We find that attachment of fast-twitch myofibers to the MTJ correlates with the formation of novel microenvironments within the MTJ. The expression or activation of two proteins involved in anchoring the intracellular cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix, Focal adhesion kinase (Fak) and beta-dystroglycan is up-regulated. Conversely, the extracellular matrix protein Fibronectin (Fn) is down-regulated. This degradation of Fn as fast-twitch fibers attach to the MTJ results in Fn protein defining a novel microenvironment within the MTJ adjacent to slow-twitch, but not fast-twitch, muscle. Interestingly, however, Fak, laminin, Fn and beta-dystroglycan concentrate at the MTJ in mutants that do not have slow-twitch fibers. Taken together, these data elucidate novel and dynamic microenvironments within the MTJ and indicate that MTJ morphogenesis is spatially and temporally complex.

  10. PTPROt maintains T cell immunity in the microenvironment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jiajie; Deng, Lei; Zhuo, Han; Lin, Zhe; Chen, Yun; Jiang, Runqiu; Chen, Dianyu; Zhang, Xudong; Huang, Xingxu; Sun, Beicheng

    2015-08-01

    Intratumoral T cells play a central role in anti-tumor immunity, and the balance between T effector cells (Teff) and regulatory T cells (Treg) affects the prognosis of cancer patients. However, educated by tumor microenvironment, T cells frequently fail in their responsibility. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of truncated isoform of protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor-type O (PTPROt) in T cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity. We recruited 70 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients and 30 healthy volunteers for clinical investigation, and analyzed cellular tumor immunity by using ptpro(-/-) C57BL/6 mice and NOD/SCID mice. PTPROt expression was significantly downregulated in human HCC-infiltrating T cells due to the hypoxia microenvironment; PTPROt expression highly correlated with the intratumoral Teff/Treg ratio and clinicopathologic characteristics. Moreover, PTPROt deficiency attenuated T cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity and remarkably promoted mouse HCC growth. Mechanistically, deletion of PTPROt decreased Teff quantity and quality through phosphorylation of lymphocyte-specific tyrosine kinase, but increased Treg differentiation through phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5. In support of the Teff/Treg homeostasis, PTPROt serves as an important tumor suppressor in HCC microenvironment. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Systematic Pan-Cancer Analysis Reveals Immune Cell Interactions in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varn, Frederick S; Wang, Yue; Mullins, David W; Fiering, Steven; Cheng, Chao

    2017-03-15

    With the recent advent of immunotherapy, there is a critical need to understand immune cell interactions in the tumor microenvironment in both pan-cancer and tissue-specific contexts. Multidimensional datasets have enabled systematic approaches to dissect these interactions in large numbers of patients, furthering our understanding of the patient immune response to solid tumors. Using an integrated approach, we inferred the infiltration levels of distinct immune cell subsets in 23 tumor types from The Cancer Genome Atlas. From these quantities, we constructed a coinfiltration network, revealing interactions between cytolytic cells and myeloid cells in the tumor microenvironment. By integrating patient mutation data, we found that while mutation burden was associated with immune infiltration differences between distinct tumor types, additional factors likely explained differences between tumors originating from the same tissue. We concluded this analysis by examining the prognostic value of individual immune cell subsets as well as how coinfiltration of functionally discordant cell types associated with patient survival. In multiple tumor types, we found that the protective effect of CD8(+) T cell infiltration was heavily modulated by coinfiltration of macrophages and other myeloid cell types, suggesting the involvement of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in tumor development. Our findings illustrate complex interactions between different immune cell types in the tumor microenvironment and indicate these interactions play meaningful roles in patient survival. These results demonstrate the importance of personalized immune response profiles when studying the factors underlying tumor immunogenicity and immunotherapy response. Cancer Res; 77(6); 1271-82. ©2017 AACR.

  12. Pragmatic circuits frequency domain

    CERN Document Server

    Eccles, William

    2006-01-01

    Pragmatic Circuits: Frequency Domain goes through the Laplace transform to get from the time domain to topics that include the s-plane, Bode diagrams, and the sinusoidal steady state. This second of three volumes ends with a-c power, which, although it is just a special case of the sinusoidal steady state, is an important topic with unique techniques and terminology. Pragmatic Circuits: Frequency Domain is focused on the frequency domain. In other words, time will no longer be the independent variable in our analysis. The two other volumes in the Pragmatic Circuits series include titles on DC

  13. Solubility prediction of satranidazole in propylene glycol-water mixtures using extended hildebrand solubility approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P B Rathi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Extended Hildebrand solubility approach is used to estimate the solubility of satranidazole in binary solvent systems. The solubility of satranidazole in various propylene glycol-water mixtures was analyzed in terms of solute-solvent interactions using a modified version of Hildebrand-Scatchard treatment for regular solutions. The solubility equation employs term interaction energy (W to replace the geometric mean (δ1δ2 , where δ1 and δ2 are the cohesive energy densities for the solvent and solute, respectively. The new equation provides an accurate prediction of solubility once the interaction energy, W, is obtained. In this case, the energy term is regressed against a polynomial in δ1 of the binary mixture. A quartic expression of W in terms of solvent solubility parameter was found for predicting the solubility of satranidazole in propylene glycol-water mixtures. The expression yields an error in mole fraction solubility of ~3.74%, a value approximating that of the experimentally determined solubility. The method has potential usefulness in preformulation and formulation studies during which solubility prediction is important for drug design.

  14. Effect of Cyclodextrin Types and Co-Solvent on Solubility of a Poorly Water Soluble Drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charumanee, Suporn; Okonogi, Siriporn; Sirithunyalug, Jakkapan; Wolschann, Peter; Viernstein, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the solubility of piroxicam (Prx) depending on the inclusion complexation with various cyclodextrins (CDs) and on ethanol as a co-solvent. The phase-solubility method was applied to determine drug solubility in binary and ternary systems. The results showed that in systems consisting of the drug dissolved in ethanol–water mixtures, the drug solubility increased exponentially with a rising concentration of ethanol. The phase solubility measurements of the drug in aqueous solutions of CDs, β-CD and γ-CD exhibited diagrams of AL-type, whereas 2,6-dimethyl-β-CD revealed AP-type. The destabilizing effect of ethanol as a co-solvent was observed for all complexes regardless of the CD type, as a consequence of it the lowering of the complex formation constants. In systems with a higher concentration of ethanol, the drug solubility was increased in opposition to the decreasing complex formation constants. According to this study, the type of CDs played a more important role on the solubility of Prx, and the use of ethanol as a co-solvent exhibited no synergistic effect on the improvement of Prx solubility. The Prx solubility was increased again due to the better solubility in ethanol. PMID:27763573

  15. Solubility prediction of satranidazole in propylene glycol-water mixtures using extended hildebrand solubility approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, P B

    2011-11-01

    Extended Hildebrand solubility approach is used to estimate the solubility of satranidazole in binary solvent systems. The solubility of satranidazole in various propylene glycol-water mixtures was analyzed in terms of solute-solvent interactions using a modified version of Hildebrand-Scatchard treatment for regular solutions. The solubility equation employs term interaction energy (W) to replace the geometric mean (δ(1)δ(2)), where δ(1) and δ(2) are the cohesive energy densities for the solvent and solute, respectively. The new equation provides an accurate prediction of solubility once the interaction energy, W, is obtained. In this case, the energy term is regressed against a polynomial in δ(1) of the binary mixture. A quartic expression of W in terms of solvent solubility parameter was found for predicting the solubility of satranidazole in propylene glycol-water mixtures. The expression yields an error in mole fraction solubility of ~3.74%, a value approximating that of the experimentally determined solubility. The method has potential usefulness in preformulation and formulation studies during which solubility prediction is important for drug design.

  16. Effect of Cyclodextrin Types and Co-Solvent on Solubility of a Poorly Water Soluble Drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suporn Charumanee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the solubility of piroxicam (Prx depending on the inclusion complexation with various cyclodextrins (CDs and on ethanol as a co-solvent. The phase-solubility method was applied to determine drug solubility in binary and ternary systems. The results showed that in systems consisting of the drug dissolved in ethanol–water mixtures, the drug solubility increased exponentially with a rising concentration of ethanol. The phase solubility measurements of the drug in aqueous solutions of CDs, β-CD and γ-CD exhibited diagrams of AL-type, whereas 2,6-dimethyl-β-CD revealed AP-type. The destabilizing effect of ethanol as a co-solvent was observed for all complexes regardless of the CD type, as a consequence of it the lowering of the complex formation constants. In systems with a higher concentration of ethanol, the drug solubility was increased in opposition to the decreasing complex formation constants. According to this study, the type of CDs played a more important role on the solubility of Prx, and the use of ethanol as a co-solvent exhibited no synergistic effect on the improvement of Prx solubility. The Prx solubility was increased again due to the better solubility in ethanol.

  17. Microenvironments and anomalous benthic foraminiferal distribution within the neritic regime of the Dabhol-Vengurla sector (Arabian Sea)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.; Nigam, R.

    An anomalous distribution of benthic Foraminifera within the neritic regime at a few stations indicates the existence of microenvironments. The vertical distribution is marked by the restricted occurrence of @iCibicides@@ group at only one station...

  18. Visualizing domain wall and reverse domain superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iavarone, M; Moore, S A; Fedor, J; Ciocys, S T; Karapetrov, G; Pearson, J; Novosad, V; Bader, S D

    2014-08-28

    In magnetically coupled, planar ferromagnet-superconductor (F/S) hybrid structures, magnetic domain walls can be used to spatially confine the superconductivity. In contrast to a superconductor in a uniform applied magnetic field, the nucleation of the superconducting order parameter in F/S structures is governed by the inhomogeneous magnetic field distribution. The interplay between the superconductivity localized at the domain walls and far from the walls leads to effects such as re-entrant superconductivity and reverse domain superconductivity with the critical temperature depending upon the location. Here we use scanning tunnelling spectroscopy to directly image the nucleation of superconductivity at the domain wall in F/S structures realized with Co-Pd multilayers and Pb thin films. Our results demonstrate that such F/S structures are attractive model systems that offer the possibility to control the strength and the location of the superconducting nucleus by applying an external magnetic field, potentially useful to guide vortices for computing application.

  19. Portability of oxidase domains in nonribosomal peptide synthetase modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Tanya L; Walsh, Christopher T

    2004-12-21

    Oxazole and thiazole rings are present in numerous nonribosomal peptide natural products. Oxidase domains are responsible for catalyzing the oxidation of thiazolines and oxazolines to yield fully aromatic heterocycles. Unlike most domains, the placement of oxidase domains within assembly line modules varies. Noting this tolerance, we investigated the portability of an oxidase domain to a heterologous assembly line. The epimerase domain of PchE, involved in pyochelin biosynthesis, was replaced with the oxidase domain from MtaD, involved in myxothiazol biosynthesis. The chimeric module was expressed in soluble form as a flavin mononucleotide-containing flavoprotein. The functionality of the inserted oxidase domain was assayed within PchE and in transfer of the growing siderophore acyl chain from PchE to the next downstream module. While pyochelin-like product release was not observed downstream, the robust activity of the transplanted oxidase domain and the ability of the chimeric module to produce an advanced intermediate bound to the synthetase underscore the possibility of future engineering within nonribosomal peptide synthetase pathways using oxidase domains.

  20. Targeting of Cancer Stem Cells and Their Microenvironment in Early-Stage Mutant K-ras Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    1 Í AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0338 TITLE: Targeting of Cancer Stem Cells and Their Microenvironment in Early-Stage Mutant K-ras Lung... Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: James Kim, MD. PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS SOUTHWESTERN MEDICAL Dallas, TX 75390 REPORT DATE...15 Sep 2014 - 14 Sep 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Targeting of Cancer Stem Cells and Their Microenvironment in Early-Stage Mutant

  1. Mining the tissue-tissue gene co-expression network for tumor microenvironment study and biomarker prediction

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent discovery in tumor development indicates that the tumor microenvironment (mostly stroma cells) plays an important role in cancer development. To understand how the tumor microenvironment (TME) interacts with the tumor, we explore the correlation of the gene expressions between tumor and stroma. The tumor and stroma gene expression data are modeled as a weighted bipartite network (tumor-stroma coexpression network) where the weight of an edge indicates the correlation between...

  2. Hansen Solubility Parameters for Octahedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    and thermal and electrical insulation enhancers. The inorganic core is both mechanically robust, resistant to oxidation, and thermally stable, and...Choi, P.; Kavassalis, T. A.; Rudin, A. Estimation of Hansen Solubility Parameters for (Hydroxyethyl)- Cellulose and (Hydroxypropyl) Cellulose through

  3. Changes in protein solubility, fermentative capacity, viscoelasticity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-05-14

    May 14, 2014 ... solubility, fermentative capacity and viscoelasticity of frozen dough. In addition to examining ... A dynamic ... ten protein fractions of higher molecular weight and are .... An SE-HPLC system (Varian ProStar equipment, Model.

  4. Organogel formation rationalized by Hansen solubility parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynal, Matthieu; Bouteiller, Laurent

    2011-08-07

    Some organic compounds gelate particular solvents by forming a network of anisotropic fibres. We show that Hansen solubility parameters can be used to predict the range of solvents that are likely to be gelled by any given gelator.

  5. Enhanced dopant solubility in strained silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adey, J [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Jones, R [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Briddon, P R [Physics Centre, School of Natural Science, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2004-12-22

    The effect of biaxial strain on the solubility of the common donor arsenic and acceptor boron is calculated using spin-polarized local density functional theory. The change in solubility with strain is considered in terms of contributions from the change in total energy and Fermi energy with strain. The solubility of boron is found to be enhanced by compressive biaxial strain due to a reduction in the total energy of the small substitutional impurity and an increase in the Fermi energy for compressive strain. The solubility of arsenic is shown to be enhanced by tensile strain and this is due entirely to the change in Fermi energy. For boron as well as arsenic the change in Fermi energy with strain is shown to make the dominant contribution.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF SOLUBILITY PRODUCT VISUALIZATION TOOLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.F. Turner; A.T. Pauli; J.F. Schabron

    2004-05-01

    Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed software for the visualization of data acquired from solubility tests. The work was performed in conjunction with AB Nynas Petroleum, Nynashamn, Sweden who participated as the corporate cosponsor for this Jointly Sponsored Research (JSR) task. Efforts in this project were split between software development and solubility test development. The Microsoft Windows-compatible software developed inputs up to three solubility data sets, calculates the parameters for six solid body types to fit the data, and interactively displays the results in three dimensions. Several infrared spectroscopy techniques have been examined for potential use in determining bitumen solubility in various solvents. Reflectance, time-averaged absorbance, and transmittance techniques were applied to bitumen samples in single and binary solvent systems. None of the techniques were found to have wide applicability.

  7. Polymer Solar Cells: Solubility Controls Fiber Network Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Franeker, Jacobus J; Heintges, Gaël H L; Schaefer, Charley; Portale, Giuseppe; Li, Weiwei; Wienk, Martijn M; van der Schoot, Paul; Janssen, René A J

    2015-09-16

    The photoactive layer of polymer solar cells is commonly processed from a four-component solution, containing a semiconducting polymer and a fullerene derivative dissolved in a solvent-cosolvent mixture. The nanoscale dimensions of the polymer-fullerene morphology that is formed upon drying determines the solar cell performance, but the fundamental processes that govern the size of the phase-separated polymer and fullerene domains are poorly understood. Here, we investigate morphology formation of an alternating copolymer of diketopyrrolopyrrole and a thiophene-phenyl-thiophene oligomer (PDPPTPT) with relatively long 2-decyltetradecyl (DT) side chains blended with [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester. During solvent evaporation the polymer crystallizes into a fibrous network. The typical width of these fibers is analyzed by quantification of transmission electron microscopic images, and is mainly determined by the solubility of the polymer in the cosolvent and the molecular weight of the polymer. A higher molecular weight corresponds to a lower solubility and film processing results in a smaller fiber width. Surprisingly, the fiber width is not related to the drying rate or the amount of cosolvent. We have made solar cells with fiber widths ranging from 28 to 68 nm and found an inverse relation between fiber width and photocurrent. Finally, by mixing two cosolvents, we develop a ternary solvent system to tune the fiber width. We propose a model based on nucleation-and-growth which can explain these measurements. Our results show that the width of the semicrystalline polymer fibers is not the result of a frozen dynamical state, but determined by the nucleation induced by the polymer solubility.

  8. Engineering Cellular Microenvironments with Photo- and Enzymatically Responsive Hydrogels: Toward Biomimetic 3D Cell Culture Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Roger Y; Smith, Laura J; Shoichet, Molly S

    2017-04-18

    Conventional cell culture techniques using 2D polystyrene or glass have provided great insight into key biochemical mechanisms responsible for cellular events such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and cell-cell interactions. However, the physical and chemical properties of 2D culture in vitro are dramatically different than those found in the native cellular microenvironment in vivo. Cells grown on 2D substrates differ significantly from those grown in vivo, and this explains, in part, why many promising drug candidates discovered through in vitro drug screening assays fail when they are translated to in vivo animal or human models. To overcome this obstacle, 3D cell culture using biomimetic hydrogels has emerged as an alternative strategy to recapitulate native cell growth in vitro. Hydrogels, which are water-swollen polymers, can be synthetic or naturally derived. Many methods have been developed to control the physical and chemical properties of the hydrogels to match those found in specific tissues. Compared to 2D culture, cells cultured in 3D gels with the appropriate physicochemical cues can behave more like they naturally do in vivo. While conventional hydrogels involve modifications to the bulk material to mimic the static aspects of the cellular microenvironment, recent progress has focused on using more dynamic hydrogels, the chemical and physical properties of which can be altered with external stimuli to better mimic the dynamics of the native cellular microenvironment found in vivo. In this Account, we describe our progress in designing stimuli-responsive, optically transparent hydrogels that can be used as biomimetic extracellular matrices (ECMs) to study cell differentiation and migration in the context of modeling the nervous system and cancer. Specifically, we developed photosensitive agarose and hyaluronic acid hydrogels that are activated by single or two-photon irradiation for biomolecule immobilization at specific volumes within the 3D

  9. A family of E. coli expression vectors for laboratory scale and high throughput soluble protein production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bottomley Stephen P

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past few years, both automated and manual high-throughput protein expression and purification has become an accessible means to rapidly screen and produce soluble proteins for structural and functional studies. However, many of the commercial vectors encoding different solubility tags require different cloning and purification steps for each vector, considerably slowing down expression screening. We have developed a set of E. coli expression vectors with different solubility tags that allow for parallel cloning from a single PCR product and can be purified using the same protocol. Results The set of E. coli expression vectors, encode for either a hexa-histidine tag or the three most commonly used solubility tags (GST, MBP, NusA and all with an N-terminal hexa-histidine sequence. The result is two-fold: the His-tag facilitates purification by immobilised metal affinity chromatography, whilst the fusion domains act primarily as solubility aids during expression, in addition to providing an optional purification step. We have also incorporated a TEV recognition sequence following the solubility tag domain, which allows for highly specific cleavage (using TEV protease of the fusion protein to yield native protein. These vectors are also designed for ligation-independent cloning and they possess a high-level expressing T7 promoter, which is suitable for auto-induction. To validate our vector system, we have cloned four different genes and also one gene into all four vectors and used small-scale expression and purification techniques. We demonstrate that the vectors are capable of high levels of expression and that efficient screening of new proteins can be readily achieved at the laboratory level. Conclusion The result is a set of four rationally designed vectors, which can be used for streamlined cloning, expression and purification of target proteins in the laboratory and have the potential for being adaptable to a high

  10. Solubility Products of M(II) - Carbonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grauer, Rolf; Berner, Urs [ed.

    1999-01-01

    Many solubility data for M(II) carbonates commonly compiled in tables are contradictory and sometimes obviously wrong. The quality of such data has been evaluated based on the original publications and reliable solubility constants have been selected for the carbonates of Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb with the help of cross-comparisons. (author) translated from a PSI internal report written in German in 1994 (TM-44-94-05). 5 figs., 1 tab., 68 refs.

  11. Correlation of Helium Solubility in Liquid Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDresar, Neil T.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    A correlation has been developed for the equilibrium mole fraction of soluble gaseous helium in liquid nitrogen as a function of temperature and pressure. Experimental solubility data was compiled and provided by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Data from six sources was used to develop a correlation within the range of 0.5 to 9.9 MPa and 72.0 to 119.6 K. The relative standard deviation of the correlation is 6.9 percent.

  12. Low Soluble Syndecan-1 Precedes Preeclampsia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin E Gandley

    Full Text Available Syndecan-1 (Sdc1; CD138 is a major transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the extracellular, luminal surface of epithelial cells and syncytiotrophoblast, thus comprising a major component of the glycocalyx of these cells. The "soluble" (shed form of Sdc1 has paracrine and autocrine functions and is normally produced in a regulated fashion. We compared plasma soluble Sdc1 concentrations, in relation to placental Sdc1 expression, in uncomplicated (control and preeclamptic pregnancies.We evaluated soluble Sdc1 across uncomplicated pregnancy, and between preeclamptic, gestational hypertensive and control patients at mid-pregnancy (20 weeks and 3rd trimester by ELISA. Placental expression level of Sdc1 was compared between groups in relation to pre-delivery plasma soluble Sdc1. Participants were recruited from Magee-Womens Hospital.In uncomplicated pregnancy, plasma soluble Sdc1 rose significantly in the 1st trimester, and reached an approximate 50-fold increase at term compared to post pregnancy levels. Soluble Sdc1 was lower at mid-pregnancy in women who later developed preeclampsia (P<0.05, but not gestational hypertension, compared to controls, and remained lower at late pregnancy in preeclampsia (P<0.01 compared to controls. Sdc1 was prominently expressed on syncytiotrophoblast of microvilli. Syncytiotrophoblast Sdc1 immunostaining intensities, and mRNA content in villous homogenates, were lower in preeclampsia vs. controls (P<0.05. Soluble Sdc1 and Sdc1 immunostaining scores were inversely associated with systolic blood pressures, and positively correlated with infant birth weight percentile.Soluble Sdc1 is significantly lower before the clinical onset of preeclampsia, with reduced expression of Sdc1 in the delivered placenta, suggesting a role for glycocalyx disturbance in preeclampsia pathophysiology.

  13. The vigorous immune microenvironment of microsatellite instable colon cancer is balanced by multiple counter-inhibitory checkpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llosa, Nicolas J; Cruise, Michael; Tam, Ada; Wicks, Elizabeth C; Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M; Taube, Janis M; Blosser, Richard L; Fan, Hongni; Wang, Hao; Luber, Brandon S; Zhang, Ming; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Vogelstein, Bert; Sears, Cynthia L; Anders, Robert A; Pardoll, Drew M; Housseau, Franck

    2015-01-01

    We examined the immune microenvironment of primary colorectal cancer using immunohistochemistry, laser capture microdissection/qRT-PCR, flow cytometry, and functional analysis of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. A subset of colorectal cancer displayed high infiltration with activated CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) as well as activated Th1 cells characterized by IFNγ production and the Th1 transcription factor TBET. Parallel analysis of tumor genotypes revealed that virtually all of the tumors with this active Th1/CTL microenvironment had defects in mismatch repair, as evidenced by microsatellite instability (MSI). Counterbalancing this active Th1/CTL microenvironment, MSI tumors selectively demonstrated highly upregulated expression of multiple immune checkpoints, including five-PD-1, PD-L1, CTLA-4, LAG-3, and IDO-currently being targeted clinically with inhibitors. These findings link tumor genotype with the immune microenvironment, and explain why MSI tumors are not naturally eliminated despite a hostile Th1/CTL microenvironment. They further suggest that blockade of specific checkpoints may be selectively efficacious in the MSI subset of colorectal cancer. The findings reported in this article are the first to demonstrate a link between a genetically defined subtype of cancer and its corresponding expression of immune checkpoints in the tumor microenvironment. The mismatch repair-defective subset of colorectal cancer selectively upregulates at least five checkpoint molecules that are targets of inhibitors currently being clinically tested. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Solubility of deposited airborne heavy metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizmecioglu, Sibel C.; Muezzinoglu, Aysen

    2008-09-01

    Toxic effects of heavy metals in water and soil environments are important. Quantifying the heavy metal concentrations and their solubilities in dry and wet deposition samples is part of atmospheric research. Soluble fractions of the deposited air pollutants are important in food chain mechanisms as heavy metals may cause ecotoxic impacts. In this study, the solubilities of Cr, Cd, Pb, Cu, Zn, and Ni were investigated in deposition samples for total, dissolved, and suspended fractions after collection in a surrogate, water-surface sampler in Izmir, Turkey, during October 2003 to June 2004. To find overall solubility of each metal in dry and wet deposition samples, concentrations in soluble and suspended phases of aqueous solutions were analyzed separately. Ratios between total and dissolved forms and the metals in the same forms were analyzed and evaluated statistically. It was found that the deposited metal fluxes were significantly correlated in wet deposition with the highest correlation between Cd and Pb in the soluble and total forms. Comparatively smaller correlations were found between these metal fluxes in dry deposition samples. Results of this study showed the importance of metal pollution, especially ecotoxic properties of heavy metals in wet deposition far more than dry deposition.

  15. The enterprise engineering domain

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Vries, M

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available representation of the EE domain within the emerging EE discipline. We used a questionnaire to gather the views of EE and enterprise architecture (EA) researchers and practitioners on the EE domain. The main contributions of this article include: (1...

  16. Domain wall filters

    CERN Document Server

    Bär, O; Neuberger, H; Witzel, O; Baer, Oliver; Narayanan, Rajamani; Neuberger, Herbert; Witzel, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    We propose using the extra dimension separating the domain walls carrying lattice quarks of opposite handedness to gradually filter out the ultraviolet fluctuations of the gauge fields that are felt by the fermionic excitations living in the bulk. This generalization of the homogeneous domain wall construction has some theoretical features that seem nontrivial.

  17. Domain Walls on Singularities

    CERN Document Server

    Halyo, Edi

    2009-01-01

    We describe domain walls that live on $A_2$ and $A_3$ singularities. The walls are BPS if the singularity is resolved and non--BPS if it is deformed and fibered. We show that these domain walls may interpolate between vacua that support monopoles and/or vortices.

  18. Domains of Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne, Robert M.

    In planning educational research, recognition needs to be made of five domains of learning: (1) motor skills, (2) verbal information, (3) intellectual skills, (4) cognitive strategies, and (5) attitudes. In being cognizant of these domains, the researcher is able to distinguish the parts of a content area which are subject to different…

  19. A Domain Analysis Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    Bauhaus , a prototype CASE workstation for D-SAPS development. [ARAN88A] Guillermo F. Arango. Domain Engineering for Software Reuse. PhD thesis...34 VITA90B: Domain Analysis within the ISEC Rapid Center 48 CMU/SEI-90-SR-3 Appendix III Alphabetical by Organization/Project BAUHAUS * ALLE87A

  20. Expression of beclin-1 in the microenvironment of invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast: correlation with prognosis and the cancer-stromal interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akemi Morikawa

    Full Text Available We examined the pathobiological properties of beclin-1, which is a key regulator of autophagosome formation in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast, with a particular focus on the cancer microenvironment. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that cancer cells and stromal mesenchymal cells expressed beclin-1 in 68 and 38 of 115 invasive ductal cancers, respectively. Expression of beclin-1 in cancer or stromal cells alone did not correlate with patient prognosis. In contrast, loss of beclin-1 in cancer cells and overexpression in stromal mesenchymal cells was associated with local cancer recurrence, postoperative lymph node metastasis, and a poor disease-free survival rate. A comprehensive gene expression analysis was performed on a co-culture of breast cancer cells and mesenchymal stromal cells, that latter of which either expressed beclin-1 or was depleted of beclin-1 by siRNA. Notably, siRNA-mediated downregulation of beclin-1 in mesenchymal cells co-cultured with breast cancer cells decreased the levels of various pro-inflammatory cytokines, their receptors, and collagen receptors. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis confirmed that reduction of stromal beclin-1 expression decreased the expression of IL-1β and collagen receptor discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2. Microenvironmental IL-1β is believed to play an important role in tumor invasion. Recent work has also indicated that overexpression of DDR2 contributes to breast cancer invasion and lymph node metastasis. Taken together, these findings indicate beclin-1 expression in the stroma might be important for shaping the breast cancer microenvironment and thus could be a potent molecular target in patients with invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast.