WorldWideScience

Sample records for microcrack interaction effects

  1. Effect of nickel titanium file design on the root surface strain and apical microcracks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamleh, Ahmed; Adorno, Carlos G; Ebihara, Arata; Suda, Hideaki

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of nickel titanium file design on the root surface strain generated and apical microcracks caused during canal shaping. Thirty-three mandibular incisors were distributed into LightSpeed X, FlexMaster and a control group. A strain gauge was fixed apically on the proximal root surface to determine the maximum strain during canal shaping. Except for the control group, all root canals were enlarged to size 50. Images were taken after removing the apical 1 and 2 mm of the root end. Mean maximum strain values and presence of microcracks were statistically compared using the t-test and chi-square test, respectively. During canal shaping, the strain increased cumulatively with mean maximum strains of 808.2 ± 228.8 and 525.1 ± 168.9 microstrain in LightSpeed X and FlexMaster, respectively (P = 0.004). Both systems caused comparable microcracks. Although LightSpeed X produced higher maximum strain, no difference in microcrack development was found between both systems.

  2. A THEORY OF EFFECTIVE THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY FOR MATRIX-INCLUSION- MICROCRACK THREE-PHASE HETEROGENEOUS MATERIALS BASED ON MICROMECHANICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Qingjie; Zhai Pengcheng; Li Yao

    2000-01-01

    The effective thermal conductivity of matrix-inclusion-microcrack three-phase heterogeneous materials is investigated with a self-consistent micromechanical method (SCM) and a random microstucture finite element method(RMFEM). In the SCM, microcracks are assumed to be randomly distributed and pen ny-shaped and inclusions to be spherical, the crack effect is accounted for by introducing a crack density pa rameter, the effective thermal conductivity is derived which relates the macroscopic behavior to the crack density parameter. In the RMFEM, the highly irregular microstructure of the heterogeneous media is accu rately described, the interaction among the matrix-inclusion-microcracks is exactly treated, the inclusion shape effect and crack size effect are considered. A Ni/ZrO2 particulate composite material containing ran domly distributed, penny-shaped cracks is examined as an example. The main results obtained are: (1) the effective thermal conductivity is sensitive to the crack density and exhibits essentially a linear relationship with the density parameter; (2) the inclusion shape has a significant effect on the effective thermal conductiv ity and a polygon-shaped inclusion is more effective in increasing or decreasing the effective thermal conduc tivity than a sphere-shaped one; and (3) the SCM and RMFEM are compared and the two methods give the same effective property in the case in which the matrix thermal conductivity λ1 is greater than the inclusion one λ2 . In the inverse case of λ1 < λ2, the two methods agree as the inclusion volume fraction and crack density are low and differ as they are high. A reasonable explanation for the agreement and deviation between the two methods in the case of λ1 < λ2 is made.

  3. Cure effects on microcracking in IM7 fiber/Matrimid 5292{reg_sign} BMI composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilenski, M.S.; Shin, E.; Morgan, R.J.; Drzal, L.T. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Initial results from a study of the microcracking behavior of the Matrimid 5292{reg_sign} BMI/IM7 carbon fiber system are presented. Studies were performed to determine the composite`s Stress Free Temperature (SFT) which is seen to control the presence and extent of microcracking. The SFT was determined using asymmetric laminates [0{sub 2}/90{sub 2}]. Varied post-cure cycles were utilized and it was found that until complete cure is obtained, the SFT is a function of the highest temperature experienced by the laminate, with little effect of previous thermal history. The reactions necessary to fully cure this system are not active at temperatures below 250 C, ruling out the possibility of obtaining a fully cured composite with a low SFT through extended post-cures at lower temperatures.

  4. Microcracking in calcite and dolomite marble: microstructural influences and effects on properties

    OpenAIRE

    Shushakova, Victoria; Fuller, Edwin; Siegesmund, Siegfried

    2012-01-01

    Microstructure‐based finite-element analysis with a microcracking algorithm was used to simulate an actual degradation phenomenon of marble structures, i.e., microcracking. Both microcrack initiation and crack propagation were characterized, as were their dependence on lattice preferred orientation (LPO), grain shape preferred orientation (SPO), grain size, marble composition (calcite and dolomite) and grain‐boundary fracture toughness. Two LPOs were analyzed: a random orientation distributio...

  5. Effects of surface roughness on magnetic flux leakage testing of micro-cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhiyang; Sun, Yanhua; Yang, Yun; Kang, Yihua

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic flux leakage (MFL) testing owns the advantages of high inspection sensitivity and stability, but its testing results are always affected by surface roughness. The relationship between the surface roughness ({{R}a} ) and detection signals for surface-breaking cracks is mainly discussed. The existence of roughness magnetic compression effect (RMCE) in present MFL testing is specially pointed out and its relevant theory is also analyzed, which manifest themselves in the compression of MFL signal in its peak value and the baseline drifts mixed with noise. An experimental investigation on surface comparators with different arithmetic average height ({{R}a} ) and artificial notch size, is performed to analyze the effects of surface roughness on detection signals of cracks. The detection limit (DL) of micro-crack is analyzed by comparing the {{B}y} noise-signal ratio ({{S}y} ) and peak-peak signals of the cracks. Meanwhile, {{S}y} increases with the {{R}a} and R{{S}m} , in this case, relatively shallow defects cannot be clearly distinguished at determined rough surface. Afterwards, a series of simulations are designed and performed to verify the effects of surface roughness on characteristic {{B}y} of the electromagnetic field, and a theoretical DL of micro-crack is presented as: DL=2.88{{R}a}+7.00 . Furthermore, the optimal lift-off value is selected for the micro-cracks’ detection to weaken the negative magnetic compression effect. MFL signals cannot reflect the accurate sizes of the cracks on rough surface due to the RMCE and its relevant phenomenon. The discovery and results will benefit the quantitative evaluation of the MFL testing.

  6. Effects of Thermally Induced Microcracking on the Quasi Static and Dynamic Response of Salem Limestone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-30

    differential scanning calorimetry ...levels of induced microcracking can be obtained. 3.3.3 X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, and differential scanning calorimetry To...changes), specimens were examined using x-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). These

  7. Effect of microcracking on the fracture toughness and fracture surface fractal dimension of lithia-based glass-ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, J.Y.; Anusavice, K.J.; Balasubramaniam, B.; Mecholsky, J.J. Jr. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The effect of thermally induced microcracks on the fracture toughness and fractal dimension of fully crystalline lithia disilicate glass-ceramics was studied. The fracture toughness, K{sub IC}, for the nonmicrocracked lithia disilicate, 3.02 {+-} 0.12 MPa {center_dot} m{sup 1/2}, was significantly greater than the value of 1.31 {+-} 0.05 MPa {center_dot} m{sup 1/2} for the microcracked specimens. The fractal dimensional increment, D*, was 0.24 {+-} 0.01 for nonmicrocracked lithia disilicate specimens compared with a value of 0.18 {+-} 0.01 for the microcracked specimens. The relationship between K{sub IC} and D* implies that the two materials exhibit dissimilar fracture behavior of microstructural differences. Estimates of the characteristic length involved in the fracture process, a{sub 0}, indicate that the materials have an identical fracture process at the atomic level. This paper contradiction may be explained by the scale on which the measurements were taken. It is suggested that fractal analysis at the atomic level would yield equivalent D* values for the two different microstructures.

  8. Effects of CO2 on P-wave attenuation in porous media with micro-cracks: A synthetic modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekanem, A. M.; Li, X. Y.; Chapman, M.; Main, I. G.

    2016-12-01

    The presence of CO2 in hydrocarbon reservoirs can cause significant changes in seismic wave properties. In turn these properties can be used to map CO2 saturation in hydrocarbon reservoirs or aquifers - either from natural sources or by injection from the surface. We present the results of a synthetic modelling study of the effects of supercritical CO2 saturation on P-wave attenuation in a medium consisting of four horizontal layers, including a target aquifer. The target aquifer is modelled fully by an effective medium containing pores saturated with brine and/or CO2 and randomly-aligned microcracks at different densities. The other layers are modelled solely by their bulk seismic velocities and densities. We first compute synthetic seismograms for a reference case where the third layer is completely isotropic with no cracks, no pores and no fluid saturation. We then calculate synthetic seismograms for finite crack densities of 0.01, 0.02 and 0.03 at varying degrees of CO2 saturation in the third layer. The results of our analysis indicate that attenuation is sensitive both to CO2 saturation and the crack density. For a given crack density, attenuation increases gradually with decreasing percentage of CO2 saturation and reaches a maximum at around 10% saturation. The induced attenuation increases with crack density and with offset. These observations hold out the potential of using seismic attenuation as an additional diagnostic in the characterisation of rock formations for a variety of applications, including hydrocarbon exploration and production, subsurface storage of CO2 or geothermal energy extraction.

  9. Effect of blast furnace slag on self-healing of microcracks in cementitious materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Haoliang, E-mail: haoliang.huang@tudelft.nl [Microlab, Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Delft University of Technology (Netherlands); Ye, Guang [Microlab, Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Delft University of Technology (Netherlands); Magnel Laboratory for Concrete Research, Department of Structural Engineering, Ghent University (Belgium); Damidot, Denis [Université Lille Nord de France (France); EM Douai, LGCgE-MPE-GCE, Douai (France)

    2014-06-01

    The physico-chemical process of self-healing in blast furnace slag cement paste was investigated in this paper. With a high slag content i.e., 66% in cement paste and saturated Ca(OH)₂ solution as activator, it was found that the reaction products formed in cracks are composed of C-S-H, ettringite, hydrogarnet and OH–hydrotalcite. The fraction of C-S-H in the reaction products is much larger than the other minerals. Large amount of ettringite formed in cracks indicates the leaching of SO₄⁻² ions from the bulk paste and consequently the recrystallization. Self-healing proceeds fast within 50 h and then slows down. According to thermodynamic modeling, when the newly formed reaction products are carbonated, the filling fraction of crack increases first and then decreases. Low soluble minerals such as silica gel, gibbsite and calcite are formed. Compared to Portland cement paste, the potential of self-healing in slag cement paste is higher when the percentage of slag is high. Highlights: • Self-healing reaction products in slag cement paste were characterized. • Self-healing reaction products formed in time were quantified with image analysis. • Self-healing in slag cement paste was simulated with a reactive transport model. • Effect of carbonation on self-healing was investigated by thermodynamic modeling. • Effect of slag on self-healing was discussed based on experiments and simulation.

  10. Microscopic study of stress effects around micro-crack tips using a non-contact stress-induced light scattering method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Y.; Terasaki, N.; Nonaka, K.

    2016-09-01

    Fine-polishing techniques may cause micro-cracks under glass substrate surfaces. According to highly requirement from production field, a thermal stress-induced light scattering method (T-SILSM) was successfully developed for a non-contact inspection to detect the micro-cracks through changing in the intensity of light scattering accompanied by applying thermal stress at the responding position of the micro-cracks. In this study, in order to investigate that the origin of the measuring principle in microscopic order, a newly developed microscopic T-SILSM system with a rotation stage and a numerical simulation analysis were used to investigate the following; (1) the scattering points and surface in the micro-crack, (2) the stress concentration points in the micro-crack, and (3) the relationship between these information and the point in which intensity of the light scattering changes in the micro-crack through T-SILSM. Light scattering was observed at the responding position of the micro-crack with selectivity in the direction of laser irradiation even in the microscopic order. In addition, the position of the changes in the light scattering in was at both tips in the micro-crack, and it was consistent with the stress concentration point in the micro-crack. Therefore, it can be concluded that the intentional change in light scattering though T-SILSM is originated from light scattering at micro-crack and also from stress concentration and consecutive change in refractive index at both tips in micro-crack.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Nonlinear Lamb Waves Used in a Thin Plate for Detecting Buried Micro-Cracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Wan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Compared with conventional linear ultrasonic inspection methods, which are sensitive only to severe defects, nonlinear ultrasonic inspection methods are better for revealing micro-cracks in thin plates. However, most nonlinear ultrasonic inspection methods have only been experimentally investigated using bulk or Rayleigh waves. Numerical studies, especially numerical simulations of Lamb ultrasonic waves, have seldom been reported. In this paper, the interaction between nonlinear S0 mode Lamb waves and micro-cracks of various lengths and widths buried in a thin metallic plate was simulated using the finite element method (FEM. The numerical results indicate that after interacting with a micro-crack, a new wave-packet was generated in addition to the S0 mode wave-packet. The second harmonics of the S0 mode Lamb waves and the new wave-packet were caused by nonlinear acoustic effects at the micro-crack. An amplitude ratio indicator is thus proposed for the early detection of buried micro-cracks.

  12. CONSERVATION LAWS IN FINITE MICROCRACKING BRITTLE SOLIDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Defa; Chen Yiheng; Fukui Takuo

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses the conservation laws in finite brittle solids with microcracks.The discussion is limited to the 2-D cases. First, after considering the combination of the PseudoTraction Method and the indirect Boundary Element Method, a versatile method for solving multicrack interacting problems in finite plane solids is proposed, by which the fracture parameters (SIF and path-independent integrals) can be calculated with a desirable accuracy. Second, with the aid of the method proposed, the roles the conservation laws play in the fracture analysis for finite microcracking solids are studied. It is concluded that the conservation laws do play important roles in not only the fracture analysis but also the analysis of damage and stability for the finite microcracking system. Finally, the physical interpretation of the M-integral is discussed further.An explicit relation between the M-integral and the crack face area, I.e., M = GS, has been discovered using the analytical method, which can shed some light on the Damage Mechanics issues from a different perspective.

  13. The experimental investigation of microcracks nucleation in typical tectonics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The evolution and nucleation of microcracks in typical tectonics are investigated in the experiment of fracture of marble specimen. The change of state during nucleation of microcracks is observed. The controlling effect of tectonics on evolution of microcracks is analyzed by using the damage mechanics theory. These characteristics can be analogized to kilometer meters as the first effect of earthquake precursors. These studies may be helpful to interpret the foreshock or general foreshock in the moderate or short stage before strong earthquakes. The other physical precursors are second or third effect. The local density of microcracks increasing abruptly may be helpful to interpret the phenomenon that part precursor records appear catastrophic jump. The part out of nucleation where some microcracks heal and the density change reversibly may be helpful to interpret the phenomenon that some precursors records appear reverse change. The area difference of microcracks accumulation and evolution in different part of typical tectonics is studied. This difference may be helpful to interpret the characteristics (including the area) of earthquake preparation of different tectonics, and further to interpret the difference of the precursors between plate edge and intraplate. These differences may be introduced by the scholars with different points of view as to discuss about the existence of precursors before earthquakes. However, when the precursor records are studied, one must notice the geology background in different areas.

  14. Microcracks and Overpressure- Induced Fractures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmed M. Al - QAHTANI

    2001-01-01

    The microfractures and natural fractures studies have a great significance in the hydrocarbon accumulation exploration and can be a good supporter for wide geophysical study on the major structures. This paper is a brief review on microcracks and overpressure- induced fracture. It is to discuss different views on the mechanism of fractures in the subsurface of the earth.

  15. NEW DESCRIPTION OF MICROCRACK DAMAGE BASED ON CONSERVATION LAWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈宜亨

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a new description for brittle solids with micro-cracks under plane strain assumption. The basic idea is to extend the conservationlaws such as the Jj-vector and M-integral analysis used in single crack problems tostrongly interacting crack problems. The M-integral contains two distinct parts. Oneof them is a summation from the well-known relation between the M-integral and thestress intensity factors (SIF) at both tips of each crack. The other, called as theadditional contribution, is obtained from the two components of the Jj-vector andthe coordinates of each microcrack center in a global system. Of great significanceis the clarification of the confusion about the dependence of the M-integral on theorigin selection of global coordinates, provided that the vector vanishes at infinityand that the closed contour chosen to calculate the integral and the vector enclosesall the microcracks completely. The M-integral is equivalent to the decrease of thetotal potential energy of the microcracking solids with the strong interaction beingtaken into account. The M-integral analysis, from a physical point of view, doesplay an important role in evaluating the damage level of brittle solids with stronglyinteracting microcracks.

  16. Marble decay due to microcracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shushakova, V.; Fuller, E. R., Jr.; Heidelbach, F.; Siegesmund, S.

    2012-04-01

    An actual degradation phenomenon of marble structures, i.e., microcracking, is examined via computer simulations with a microstructure-based finite element modelling. Crack initiation and crack propagation were characterized, as well their dependence on grain- shape preferred orientation (SPO), lattice preferred orientation (LPO), grain size and grain-boundary fracture toughness. Calcite is used as an illustrative example. Results are expected to be general for myriad marble microstructures, as the thermophysical properties of various marbles do not differ that much. Three SPOs were analyzed: equiaxed grains; elongated grains and a mixture of equiaxed and elongated grains. Six LPOs were considered: a random orientation distribution function (ODF); an ODF with strong directional crystal texture generated via March Dollase fiber-texture; and four types of actual marble texture as measured on marble samples with electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD). Two different grain sizes were analyzed: fine grains range up to 200μm and medium size grains of approximate 1mm. The fracture surface energy for the grain boundaries was chosen to be 20 % and 40 % of the fracture surface energy of a grain, so that both intergranular and transgranular fractures were possible. Simulations were performed for both heating and cooling by 50 °C in steps of 1 °C. Microcracking results were correlated with the thermoelastic responses (indicators) related to degradation. Certain combinations of SPO, LPO, grain size, and grain-boundary fracture toughness have a significant influence on the thermal-elastic response of marble. For instance, thermal stresses and elastic strain energy are a strong function of the LPO. With increasing LPO the strain energy density and the maximum principal stress decreases. With decreasing grain size and increasing LPO and SPO, the area of microcracking is smaller and microcracking commences at a higher temperature differential.

  17. Generation mechanism of nonlinear ultrasonic Lamb waves in thin plates with randomly distributed micro-cracks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Youxuan; Li, Feilong; Cao, Peng; Liu, Yaolu; Zhang, Jianyu; Fu, Shaoyun; Zhang, Jun; Hu, Ning

    2017-08-01

    Since the identification of micro-cracks in engineering materials is very valuable in understanding the initial and slight changes in mechanical properties of materials under complex working environments, numerical simulations on the propagation of the low frequency S0 Lamb wave in thin plates with randomly distributed micro-cracks were performed to study the behavior of nonlinear Lamb waves. The results showed that while the influence of the randomly distributed micro-cracks on the phase velocity of the low frequency S0 fundamental waves could be neglected, significant ultrasonic nonlinear effects caused by the randomly distributed micro-cracks was discovered, which mainly presented as a second harmonic generation. By using a Monte Carlo simulation method, we found that the acoustic nonlinear parameter increased linearly with the micro-crack density and the size of micro-crack zone, and it was also related to the excitation frequency and friction coefficient of the micro-crack surfaces. In addition, it was found that the nonlinear effect of waves reflected by the micro-cracks was more noticeable than that of the transmitted waves. This study theoretically reveals that the low frequency S0 mode of Lamb waves can be used as the fundamental waves to quantitatively identify micro-cracks in thin plates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. ESEM drying tests: microcracking initiation in thin cement paste due to early age drying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jankovic, D.

    2009-01-01

    Scattered and discontinues microcracking as a subsequent side-effect of deformations due to early age drying, occurs in thin (approximately 1 mm thick) cement paste samples, when stepwise dried in ESEM. Microcracking of cement paste and restrains appear to be practically unavoidable. They are relate

  19. Effect of micro-cracking on the thermal conductivity and thermal expansion of tialite (Al2TiO5 ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanathan Papitha

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The pure and magnesium silicate (Mg2+/Si4+ doped tialite ceramics were prepared from the homogenized mixture of alumina and titania by uniaxial pressing and pressure-less sintering at 1550 °C in air. Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion of the doped and undoped tialite ceramics were measured from 30 to 700 °C. The identical trend in the behaviour of these thermal properties most probably is influenced by the population, size and shape of microcracks present throughout the grain and grain boundaries as complemented by the microstructural observations. The observed decrease in thermal properties of the doped in comparison to the pure tialite can be attributed to the substitutional Mg2+ and Si4+ at Al3+ site in Al2TiO5 which promotes the phonon scattering and causes modifications in micro-crack density and the morphology of the cracks.

  20. Identification of microcracks caused by autogenous shrinkage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Guang, Ye

    2005-01-01

    Detection and quantification of microcracks caused by restrained autogenous shrinkage in high-performance concrete is difficult. Available techniques either lack the required resolution or may cause further cracks indistinguishable from the original ones. The new technique presented in this paper...... microscopy, electron probe micro analysis, EPMA, and scanning electron microscopy, SEM. A preliminary analysis of the observed microcracks is presented in this paper....

  1. Evaluation of enamel micro-cracks characteristics after removal of metal brackets in adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumbryte, Irma; Linkeviciene, Laura; Malinauskas, Mangirdas; Linkevicius, Tomas; Peciuliene, Vytaute; Tikuisis, Kristupas

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare enamel micro-crack characteristics of adult patients before and after removal of metal brackets. After the examination with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), 45 extracted human teeth were divided into three groups of equal size: group 1, the teeth having enamel micro-cracks, group 2, the teeth without initial enamel micro-cracks, and group 3, control group to study the effect of dehydration on existing micro-cracks or formation of new ones. For all the teeth in groups 1 and 2, the same bonding and debonding procedures of metal brackets were conducted. The length and width of the longest enamel micro-crack were measured for all the teeth before and after removal of metal brackets. The changes in the location of the micro-cracks were also evaluated. In group 3, teeth were subjected to the same analysis but not bonded. The mean overall width of micro-cracks after removal of metal brackets was 3.82 μm greater than before bonding procedure (P micro-cracks in first zone (cervical third) and third zone (occlusal third) after debonding procedure (P micro-cracks were found in 6 of 15 (40 per cent) examined teeth. Greatest changes in the width of enamel micro-cracks after debonding procedure appear in the cervical third of the tooth. On the basis of this result, the dentist must pay extra care and attention to this specific area of enamel during removal of metal brackets in adult patients.

  2. Growth of Casting Microcrack and Micropore in Single-crystal Superalloys Analysed by Three-Dimensional Unit Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Finite element (FE) analysis was employed to investigate the casting microcrack and micropore growth in nickel-base single-crystal superalloys DD3. Based on the finite deformation rate-dependent crystallographic constitutive equation, the simulations of casting microcrack and micropore growth in three-dimensional unit cell model were carried out in a range of parameters including stress triaxiality, Lode parameter and type of activated slip systems. The FE results show that the stress triaxiality has profound effects on growth behavior,and the Lode parameter is also important for the casting microcrack and micropore growth. The type of operative slip systems has remarkable effect on casting microcrack and micropore growth, so the life of singlecrystal component is associated with the type of activated slip systems, which is related to Schmid factor and the number of activated slip systems. The growth comparison between microcrack and micropore reveals that when the material is subjected to large deformation, the growth rate of microcrack is faster than that of micropore, i.e. microcrack is more dangerous than micropore; the microcrack is easier to result in brittle fracture than micropore. The stress triaxiality and Lode parameter have strong influence on the growth of microcrack and micropore.

  3. Time-lapsed assessment of microcrack initiation and propagation in murine cortical bone at submicrometer resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voide, R; Schneider, P; Stauber, M; Wyss, P; Stampanoni, M; Sennhauser, U; van Lenthe, G H; Müller, R

    2009-08-01

    mechanisms. In conclusion, this study showed the power of SR CT for 3D visualization and quantification of the different ultrastructural phases of the intracortical bone porosity. We particularly postulate the necessity of 3D imaging techniques to unravel microcrack initiation and propagation and their effects on bone mechanics. We believe that this new investigation tool will be very useful to further enhance our understanding of bone failure mechanisms.

  4. Root surface strain during canal shaping and its influence on apical microcrack development: a preliminary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamleh, A; Komabayashi, T; Ebihara, A; Nassar, M; Watanabe, S; Yoshioka, T; Miyara, K; Suda, H

    2015-12-01

    To determine the root surface strain (RSS) generated during root canal shaping and its effects on apical microcrack development. Twenty-five extracted human mandibular premolars were selected and decoronated. The teeth were instrumented with either the ProTaper (PT) or WaveOne (WO) (Dentsply Maillefer) NiTi rotary systems (n = 10 per group) or used as controls (n = 5). Instrumented root canals were enlarged to ProTaper F4 (size 40, 0.06 taper) or using WaveOne LARGE (size 40, 0.08 taper) instruments according to the manufacturer's instructions. An electrical strain gage (KFG02-120-C1-16, Kyowa Dengyo, Tokyo, Japan) was fixed on the proximal root surface and connected to a strain amplifier via a bridge box in order to measure RSS. During canal shaping, the strain output of the amplifier was recorded. The instantaneous RSS induced by each instrument and the maximum RSSs were determined. All teeth were then stained with contrast media and imaged with micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) at an isotropic resolution of 10 μm to detect microcracks. The mean maximum RSS values (microstrain) and mean number of microcracks recorded for both groups were tested for statistical significance using Mann-Whitney U-test. Presence/absence of microcracks in both groups was compared by chi-square tests. Increased baseline RSS from strain accumulation during canal shaping was observed, with similar maximum RSS (mean ± SD) for PT (416.6 ± 185.1 μstrain) and WO (398.2 ± 163.8 μstrain) (P = 0.94). The interevaluator reliability for microcrack detection using micro-CT had a kappa value of 0.998. Compared to the PT group, there was a trend for fewer samples with microcracks in the WO group (P = 0.051). On the micro-CT images, apical microcracks were detected in 20 PT and 11 WO samples (P = 0.10). The microcracks were observed in the buccolingual direction in all WO and 81% of PT samples. No vertical root fractures were found. The maximum RSS obtained during canal

  5. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS ON EVOLUTION PROCESS FOR DAMAGE MICROCRACK HEALING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Peizhen; Li Zhonghua; Sun Jun

    2000-01-01

    Based on the thermal kinetic and mass conservation, a series of controlling equations for the finite element are derived and related programs are developed to simulate the damage microcrack healing process controlled by surface diffusion. Two kinds of typical models for microcrack splitting are proposed, i.e., the grain boundary energy existing on the crack surface and residual stresses applying on the crack surface. And the conditions of microcrack splitting in the two models are given as a function of the microcrack aspect ratio. The microcrack with traction-free surfaces will directly evolve into a spheroid.

  6. Examining the role of Microcracks in Modelling the Permeability Evolution of Crustal Rocks at Elevated Hydrostatic Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, P. M.; Schubnel, A.; Meredith, P. G.; Young, P.

    2005-12-01

    A key consequence of the presence of void space within rock is its significant influence upon fluid transport properties. This observation is fundamental to our understanding of crustal evolution and energy resource management, for example the efficient recovery of hydrocarbon and water resources, and the safe disposal of hazardous waste. However, the processes responsible for porosity formation are diverse, ranging from depositional processes such as sedimentary sorting and grain alignment, through diagenetic processes such as compaction and cementation, to deformational processes such as microcracking. The porosity that evolves from the superposition of these processes over time may therefore have a complex geometry or fabric. In addition, many of these processes have an inherent directionality which may lead to anisotropy of the void space, and all have been shown to play important roles in influencing the fluid transport properties of rock. The measurement of permeability at elevated pressures and the calculation of permeability from other data (such as elastic wave velocity) remains non-trivial. In particular, in order to test models that predict such relations, ideally both elastic wave velocity and permeability should be measured simultaneously. In this study, we use a novel apparatus in order to measure elastic wave velocities (P and S) contemporaneously with permeability and porosity for three rock types, a high porosity sandstone (Bentheim), a tight sandstone (Crab Orchard), and a microcracked granite (Takidani). This laboratory data is then used with permeability models of Gueguen and Dienes and Kozeny-Carman to investigate the role that void space of differing apertures imparts on the measured permeability of different rock types. Using the Kachanov non-interactive effective medium theory, measured elastic wave velocities are inverted using a least square fit, permitting the recovery of crack density evolution with increasing hydrostatic pressure. This

  7. RECOVERY ACT: MULTIMODAL IMAGING FOR SOLAR CELL MICROCRACK DETECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janice Hudgings; Lawrence Domash

    2012-02-08

    Undetected microcracks in solar cells are a principal cause of failure in service due to subsequent weather exposure, mechanical flexing or diurnal temperature cycles. Existing methods have not been able to detect cracks early enough in the production cycle to prevent inadvertent shipment to customers. This program, sponsored under the DOE Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross-Cutting Technologies program, studied the feasibility of quantifying surface micro-discontinuities by use of a novel technique, thermoreflectance imaging, to detect surface temperature gradients with very high spatial resolution, in combination with a suite of conventional imaging methods such as electroluminescence. The project carried out laboratory tests together with computational image analyses using sample solar cells with known defects supplied by industry sources or DOE National Labs. Quantitative comparisons between the effectiveness of the new technique and conventional methods were determined in terms of the smallest detectable crack. Also the robustness of the new technique for reliable microcrack detection was determined at various stages of processing such as before and after antireflectance treatments. An overall assessment is that the new technique compares favorably with existing methods such as lock-in thermography or ultrasonics. The project was 100% completed in Sept, 2010. A detailed report of key findings from this program was published as: Q.Zhou, X.Hu, K.Al-Hemyari, K.McCarthy, L.Domash and J.Hudgings, High spatial resolution characterization of silicon solar cells using thermoreflectance imaging, J. Appl. Phys, 110, 053108 (2011).

  8. Microcracks repairing technique for gun barrel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Xu-dong; WU Bin; SU Bing; WANG Cheng-tao

    2004-01-01

    When a gun fires the diffusion of chemical species from the propellant gas, such as CO, CO2, H2, H2O and N2, into the hot surface through the microcracks forms reaction products and speeds up the erosion process.Therefore, crack repairing and healing can be a possible measure for protecting against erosion of gun bore. The present study develops a novel nanocomposite with the size of 30 - 150 nm to repair and heal the microcracks so that the propellant gas can be prevented from reacting with the steel. Sample of gun steel 40CrNiMoV plate (10 mm× 10 mm × 2 mm) is prepared and a fishtail crack is generated through a repeated plastic deformation process. The crackrepairing results show that the fishtail crack become shorter and narrower. A new phase is formed, which is found to have the elements, such as Ca, La, from the raw materials of nanocomposite by energy spectrum analysis.

  9. Microcracking in composite laminates under thermal and mechanical loading. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddocks, Jason R.

    1995-01-01

    Composites used in space structures are exposed to both extremes in temperature and applied mechanical loads. Cracks in the matrix form, changing the laminate thermoelastic properties. The goal of the present investigation is to develop a predictive methodology to quantify microcracking in general composite laminates under both thermal and mechanical loading. This objective is successfully met through a combination of analytical modeling and experimental investigation. In the analysis, the stress and displacement distributions in the vicinity of a crack are determined using a shear lag model. These are incorporated into an energy based cracking criterion to determine the favorability of crack formation. A progressive damage algorithm allows the inclusion of material softening effects and temperature-dependent material properties. The analysis is implemented by a computer code which gives predicted crack density and degraded laminate properties as functions of any thermomechanical load history. Extensive experimentation provides verification of the analysis. AS4/3501-6 graphite/epoxy laminates are manufactured with three different layups to investigate ply thickness and orientation effects. Thermal specimens are cooled to progressively lower temperatures down to -184 C. After conditioning the specimens to each temperature, cracks are counted on their edges using optical microscopy and in their interiors by sanding to incremental depths. Tensile coupons are loaded monotonically to progressively higher loads until failure. Cracks are counted on the coupon edges after each loading. A data fit to all available results provides input parameters for the analysis and shows them to be material properties, independent of geometry and loading. Correlation between experiment and analysis is generally very good under both thermal and mechanical loading, showing the methodology to be a powerful, unified tool. Delayed crack initiation observed in a few cases is attributed to a

  10. Characterizing microcrack orientation distribution functions in osteonal bone samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfram, U; Schwiedrzik, J J; Mirzaali, M J; Bürki, A; Varga, P; Olivier, C; Peyrin, F; Zysset, P K

    2016-12-01

    Prefailure microdamage in bone tissue is considered to be the most detrimental factor in defining its strength and toughness with respect to age and disease. To understand the influence of microcracks on bone mechanics it is necessary to assess their morphology and three-dimensional distribution. This requirement reaches beyond classic histology and stereology, and methods to obtain such information are currently missing. Therefore, the aim of the study was to develop a methodology that allows to characterize three-dimensional microcrack distributions in bulk bone samples. Four dumbbell-shaped specimens of human cortical bone of a 77-year-old female donor were loaded beyond yield in either tension, compression or torsion (one control). Subsequently, synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography (SRμCT) was used to obtain phase-contrast images of the damaged samples. A microcrack segmentation algorithm was developed and used to segment microcrack families for which microcrack orientation distribution functions were determined. Distinct microcrack families were observed for each load case that resulted in distinct orientation distribution functions. Microcracks had median areas of approximately 4.7 μm(2) , 33.3 μm(2) and 64.0 μm(2) for tension, compression and torsion. Verifying the segmentation algorithm against a manually segmented ground truth showed good results when comparing the microcrack orientation distribution functions. A size dependence was noted when investigating the orientation distribution functions with respect to the size of the volume of interest used for their determination. Furthermore, a scale separation between tensile, compressive and torsional microcracks was noticeable. Visual comparison to classic histology indicated that microcrack families were successfully distinguished. We propose a methodology to analyse three-dimensional microcrack distributions in overloaded cortical bone. Such information could improve our understanding of

  11. 晶体相场法研究应力状态及晶体取向对微裂纹尖端扩展行为的影响∗%Study on the effect of stress state and crystal orientation on micro-crack tip propagation b ehavior in phase field crystal metho d

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    A nanometer scale mechanism for micro crack propagation under uniaxial tension in single crystals is investigated using phase field crystal (PFC) simulation. The uniaxial tensile loading is strain controlled. And three initial typical stresses of pre-existing center crack in (111) crystal plane of face centered cubic structure are chosen to study the effects of initial stress state on micro-crack propagation. Moreover, the influences of different crystal orientations, when the crystal suffers from uniaxial tension, are also investigated. Due to the influence of time scale and length scale in the PFC method, the motion of dislocations, vacancies, shear band and twinning structure should be observed and described during the propagation process of micro cracks. In addition, the free energy curves of different processes are drawn and discussed in order to explain the different behaviors of the crystal in the propagation of cracks. Simulation results show that the propagation behavior of micro cracks can be closely associated with the initial stress state. It is found that the propagation behavior mainly occurs in the ⟨0¯11⟩(111) slip system. Besides, the crystal orientation has a significant effect on the mechanism of activation and evolution. In the pre-stretching system, slip dislocation is induced near the micro-crack tip, and then its slide in [0¯11] direction will cause the cleavage of a certain crystal plane, and promote the micro cracks to extend. However, to a certain level, the propagating direction of the micro-crack tip will turn to another slip direction [10¯1]. As a result, zigzag edge appears. By contrast, in the pre-shear system, the tip of the micro crack propagates in a cleavage mode, and results in the appearance of slip dislocation [10¯1] near the micro-crack tip. Afterwards, the motion of slip dislocation promotes the production of vacancies. And owing to the aggregation and combination of vacancies, secondary cracks form and propagate in

  12. Granite microcracks: Structure and connectivity at different depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Fan; Dong, Yan-Hui; Xu, Zhi-Fang; Zhou, Peng-Peng; Wang, Li-Heng; Tong, Shao-Qing; Duan, Rui-Qi

    2016-07-01

    Granite is one rock type used to host high-level radioactive waste repositories, and the structure of microcracks in the rock can influence its hydraulic characteristics. Thus, a quantitative analysis of granite microcracks is relevant for understanding the hydrogeological characteristics of the rocks surrounding geological repositories. The analysis can also contribute scientific data to a seepage model for low permeability rocks and materials with microscopic pores. In this study, seven granite core samples were drilled from different depths up to 600 m in Alxa, Inner Mongolia, China. Using a grid survey method and image processing technology, micrographs were converted into binary images of microcracks. The geometric parameters of the microcracks, including their quantity, width, cranny ratio, crack intersections and dimensional parameters of the fracture network, were analyzed in order to fully describe their spatial distribution. In addition, the morphological characteristics and elemental compositions of the microcracks were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDS), and the natural moisture content was also determined through heated. Finally, two-dimensional microcrack network seepage models of the granite samples were simulated using the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), which revealed the influence of the microcrack structure on their connectivity. The results show that the growth and development of microcracks in the granite samples generally decreases as sampling depth increases in this study area. Connectivity is positively correlated with a number of the geometric parameters: the quantity of microcracks, the cranny ratio, the number of crack intersections and dimensional parameters of the fracture network, which is revealed in the two-dimensional microcrack network seepage models for these granite samples.

  13. The Dependence of the Change in the Coefficient of Thermal Expansion of Graphite Fiber Reinforced Polyimide IM7-K3B on Microcracking due to Thermal Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Melissa C.

    1995-01-01

    Composite IM7-K3B was subjected to a simulated high speed aircraft thermal environment to determine the effects of microcracking on the change in CTE. IM7-K3B is a graphite fiber reinforced polyimide laminate, manufactured by Dupont. The lay-up for the material was (0.90((Sub 3)(Sub s))). The specimens were placed in a laser-interferometric dilatometer to obtain thermal expansion measurements and were then repeatedly cycled between -65 F and 350 F up to 1000 cycles. After cycling they were scanned for microcracks at a magnification of 400x. The material was expected not to crack and to have a near zero CTE. Some microcracking did occur in all specimens and extensive microcracking occurred in one specimen. Further testing is required to determine how closely the CTE and microcracking are related.

  14. The effect of crack orientation on the nonlinear interaction of a P wave with an S wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    TenCate, J. A.; Malcolm, A. E.; Feng, X.; Fehler, M. C.

    2016-06-01

    Cracks, joints, fluids, and other pore-scale structures have long been hypothesized to be the cause of the large elastic nonlinearity observed in rocks. It is difficult to definitively say which pore-scale features are most important, however, because of the difficulty in isolating the source of the nonlinear interaction. In this work, we focus on the influence of cracks on the recorded nonlinear signal and in particular on how the orientation of microcracks changes the strength of the nonlinear interaction. We do this by studying the effect of orientation on the measurements in a rock with anisotropy correlated with the presence and alignment of microcracks. We measure the nonlinear response via the traveltime delay induced in a low-amplitude P wave probe by a high-amplitude S wave pump. We find evidence that crack orientation has a significant effect on the nonlinear signal.

  15. Phonon spectrum and related thermodynamic properties of microcrack in bcc-Fe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Li-Xia; Wang, Chong-Yu

    2006-09-01

    The phonon spectrum and the related thermodynamic properties of microcracks in bcc-Fe are studied with the recursion method by using the Finnis-Sinclair (F-S) N-body potential. The initial configuration of the microcracks is established from an anisotropic linear elastic solution and relaxed to an equilibrium by molecular dynamics method. It is shown that the local vibrational density of states of the atoms near a crack tip is considerably different from the bulk phonon spectrum, which is closely associated with the local stress field around the crack tip; meanwhile, the local vibrational energies of atoms near the crack tip are higher than those of atoms in a perfect crystal. These results imply that the crack tip zone is in a complex stress state and closely related to the structure evolution of cracks. It is also found that the phonon excitation is a kind of local effect induced by microcracks. In addition, the microcrack system has a higher vibrational entropy, which reflects the character of phonon spectrum related to the stress field induced by cracks.

  16. Phonon spectrum and related thermodynamic properties of microcrack in bcc-Fe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Li-Xia; Wang Chong-Yu

    2006-01-01

    The phonon spectrum and the related thermodynamic properties of microcracks in bcc-Fe are studied with the recursion method by using the Finnis-Sinclair (F-S) N-body potential. The initial configuration of the microcracks is established from an anisotropic linear elastic solution and relaxed to an equilibrium by molecular dynamics method.It is shown that the local vibrational density of states of the atoms near a crack tip is considerably different from the bulk phonon spectrum, which is closely associated with the local stress field around the crack tip; meanwhile, the local vibrational energies of atoms near the crack tip are higher than those of atoms in a perfect crystal. These results imply that the crack tip zone is in a complex stress state and closely related to the structure evolution of cracks. It is also found that the phonon excitation is a kind of local effect induced by microcracks. In addition, the microcrack system has a higher vibrational entropy, which reflects the character of phonon spectrum related to the stress field induced by cracks.

  17. A Nanocomposite Approach to Microcrack Prevention in Composite Cryotanks Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Nanomaterials and nanocomposites offer great potential for improvement in many applications. One such NASA application is the prevention of microcracking as well as...

  18. Parallel Microcracks-based Ultrasensitive and Highly Stretchable Strain Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amjadi, Morteza; Turan, Mehmet; Clementson, Cameron P; Sitti, Metin

    2016-03-01

    There is an increasing demand for flexible, skin-attachable, and wearable strain sensors due to their various potential applications. However, achieving strain sensors with both high sensitivity and high stretchability is still a grand challenge. Here, we propose highly sensitive and stretchable strain sensors based on the reversible microcrack formation in composite thin films. Controllable parallel microcracks are generated in graphite thin films coated on elastomer films. Sensors made of graphite thin films with short microcracks possess high gauge factors (maximum value of 522.6) and stretchability (ε ≥ 50%), whereas sensors with long microcracks show ultrahigh sensitivity (maximum value of 11,344) with limited stretchability (ε ≤ 50%). We demonstrate the high performance strain sensing of our sensors in both small and large strain sensing applications such as human physiological activity recognition, human body large motion capturing, vibration detection, pressure sensing, and soft robotics.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation of microcrack healing in aluminium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The molecular dynamics method is used to simulate microcrack healing during heating or under compressive stress. A center microcrack in an Al crystal could be sealed under a critical compressive stress or by heating it over a critical temperature. During microcrack healing, dislocation and vacancy are generated and moved, and sometimes twin appears. The critical temperature necessary for microcrack healing depends upon the orientation of the crack plane. For example, the critical temperature of the crack along the ( 111 ) plane is the lowest. When there are pre-existing dislocations around the microcrack, the critical temperature necessary for microcrack healing will decrease. The energy condition for crack healing is б2π a ( 1 - v2 ) / E + UT/ A ≥ 2 γ + γp, where б is the applied compressive stress, a the length of the crack, γ the Poisson' s ratio, E the Young' s modulus, UT heat energy driving crack healing, A the area of the crack, γ the surface energy, and γp the plastic deformation work. Pre-existing dislocations can reduce γp.

  20. Explicit formulation of the J2-integral in anisotropic materials and its application in microcrack shielding problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈宜亨; 马浩

    1997-01-01

    The explicit formulation of the J2-integral in anisotropic bodies and its application in microcrack shielding problems are discussed. With analytical treatments and numerical examinations, it is proved that there is a redistribution law for the remote J-integral in a discrete model of microcrack shielding problems, i.e. the projected conservation law of the Jk-vector. In this law, the J2-integral which was disregarded by Herrmann (1981) is proved to be of the same significance as the J1-integral. It is also concluded that the two energy dissipative processes due to the mi crocrack damage, i. e. the reduction in the effective moduli and the release of residual stresses, can be described by using the dissipation of the remote J-integral spreading across the microcrack damage zone.

  1. CHARACTERISTICS OF FATIGUE SURFACE MICROCRACK GROWTH IN VICINAL INCLUSION FOR POWDER METALLURGY ALLOYS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangXishu; LiYongqiang

    2003-01-01

    Inclusion flaw is one of the worst flaws of powder metallurgy. The inclusion flaw plays an important role in the failure of high temperature turbine materials in aircraft components and automotive parts, especially fatigue failure. In this paper, an experimental investigation of fatigue microcrack propagation in the vicinal inclusion were carried out by the servo-hydraulic fatigue test system with scanning electron microscope (SEM). It has been found from the SEM images that the fatigue surface microcrack occurs in the matrix and inclusion. According to the SEM images, the characteristics of fatigue crack initiation and growth in vicinal inclusion for powder metallurgy alloys are analyzed in detail. The effect of the geometrical shape and material type of surface inclusions on the cracking is also discussed with the finite element method (FEM).

  2. Nanoscale experimental study of the morphology of a microcrack in silicon by transmission electron microscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D S Liu; C W Zhao; X H Hou

    2013-05-01

    A microcrack in a silicon single crystal was experimentally investigated using highresolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). In particular, the numerical Moiré (NM) method was used to visualize the deformations and defects. The lattice structure of the microcrack was carefully observed at the nanoscale. HRTEM images of the microcrack demonstrated that the lattice structure of most of the microcrack regions is regular with good periodicity. In addition, the microcrack cleavage expands alternately along different crystal planes, where the principal cleavage plane is the (1 1 1) crystal plane. The NM maps showed no sharp plastic deformation around the microcrack, but discrete edge dislocations can be found only near the crack tip.

  3. Characterizing the influence of stress-induced microcracks on the laboratory strength and fracture development in brittle rocks using a finite-discrete element method-micro discrete fracture network FDEM-mDFN approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pooya Hamdi; Doug Stead; Davide Elmo

    2015-01-01

    abstract Heterogeneity is an inherent component of rock and may be present in different forms including mineral heterogeneity, geometrical heterogeneity, weak grain boundaries and micro-defects. Microcracks are usually observed in crystalline rocks in two forms: natural and stress-induced; the amount of stress-induced microcracking increases with depth and in-situ stress. Laboratory results indicate that the physical properties of rocks such as strength, deformability, P-wave velocity and permeability are influenced by increase in microcrack intensity. In this study, the finite-discrete element method (FDEM) is used to model microcrack heterogeneity by introducing into a model sample sets of microcracks using the proposed micro discrete fracture network (mDFN) approach. The characteristics of the microcracks required to create mDFN models are obtained through image analyses of thin sections of Lac du Bonnet granite adopted from published literature. A suite of two-dimensional laboratory tests including uniaxial, triaxial compression and Brazilian tests is simulated and the results are compared with laboratory data. The FDEM-mDFN models indicate that micro-heterogeneity has a profound influence on both the me-chanical behavior and resultant fracture pattern. An increase in the microcrack intensity leads to a reduction in the strength of the sample and changes the character of the rock strength envelope. Spalling and axial splitting dominate the failure mode at low confinement while shear failure is the dominant failure mode at high confinement. Numerical results from simulated compression tests show that microcracking reduces the cohesive component of strength alone, and the frictional strength component remains unaffected. Results from simulated Brazilian tests show that the tensile strength is influenced by the presence of microcracks, with a reduction in tensile strength as microcrack intensity increases. The importance of microcrack heterogeneity in reproducing

  4. Properties of microcracks formed on surface of concrete at steam curing period; Concrete no joki yosei katei de hasseisuru hyomen bisai hibiware no seijo ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otsuka, K. [Tohoku Gakuin Univ., Miyagi (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Shoya, M. [Hachinohe Inst. of Technology, Aomori (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Koseki, K. [PS Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Aba, M. [Tohoku Gakuin Univ., Miyagi (Japan). Graduate School

    1995-08-20

    Development of microcracks on the surface of steam curing concrete is considered as a main cause for damage claim on manufactured products while in use. Melting and freezing characters of seepage liquid through surface cracks are regarded as drawbacks for the durability of manufactured products. In this study, an unique X-ray inspection technique is developed to investigate the microcrack formation. Considering reinforced concrete specimens, effects of steam curing conditions on the formation of microcracks are investigated by experiments. Three different kinds of microcracks are observed at each steam curing conditions. Influences of various factors on microcrack formation are also studied. Impacts of pre-curing period, rate of cooling and rate of temperature rise on the microcrack formation are very large, large and small respectively. Again the results are analyzed by comparing with various steam curing specifications from the crack prevention point of view. The results under pre-curing condition are not satisfied with the steam curing specifications. 9 refs., 28 figs., 11 tabs.

  5. Microcracks in compact bone: a three-dimensional view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsin, S; O'Brien, F J; Lee, T C

    2006-07-01

    Microcracks have been implicated in the loss of bone quality for osteoporosis. In order to detect and monitor their growth, and to use these data to predict fractures, it is essential to obtain quantitative data regarding their shape in three dimensions. Beam-shaped bone samples from sheep radii were prepared and stained with fluorochrome dyes and tested in cyclical fatigue under four-point bending in a servo-hydraulic fatigue-testing machine. Samples were tested at a frequency of 30 Hz under load control at a stress range of 100 MPa. Holes were drilled into bone samples and used as reference points for reconstructions. A series of thin longitudinal sections were cut using a sledge macrotome. A two-dimensional image of each section was examined using an epifluorescence microscope and images transferred to a PC via a CCD low-light colour video camera. A three-dimensional image of each microcrack was reconstructed using computer software, and its dimensions measured. Cracks were elliptical in shape, longer in the longitudinal direction and with a mean aspect ratio of 5.5 +/- 1.05. The mean (+/- SD) length and width of labelled microcracks were 488 +/- 151 and 88 +/- 21 microm, respectively.

  6. Investigation of the microcrack evolution in a Ti-based bulk metallic glass matrix composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongsheng Wang; Zhenxi Guo; Rui Ma; Guojian Hao; Yong Zhang; Junpin Lin; Manling Sui

    2014-01-01

    The initiation and evolution behavior of the shear-bands and microcracks in a Ti-based metallic-glass-matrix composite (MGMC) were investigated by using an in-situ tensile test under transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that the plastic deformation of the Ti-based MGMC related with the generation of the plastic deformation zone in crystalline and shear deformation zone in glass phase near the crack tip. The dendrites can suppress the propagation of the shear band effectively. Before the rapid propagation of cracks, the extending of plastic deformation zone and shear deformation zone ahead of crack tip is the main pattern in the composite.

  7. Formation of Microcracks During Micro-Arc Oxidation in a Phytic Acid-Containing Solution on Two-Phase AZ91HP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, R. F.; Chang, W. H.; Jiang, L. F.; Qu, B.; Zhang, S. F.; Qiao, L. P.; Xiang, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    Micro-arc oxidation (MAO) is an effective method to produce ceramic coatings on magnesium alloys and can considerably improve their corrosion resistance. The coating properties are closely related with microcracks, which are always inevitably developed on the coating surface. In order to find out the formation and development regularity of microcracks, anodic coatings developed on two-phase AZ91HP after different anodizing times were fabricated in a solution containing environmentally friendly organic electrolyte phytic acid. The results show that anodic film is initially developed on the α phase. At 50 s, anodic coatings begin to develop on the β phase, evidencing the formation of a rough area. Due to the coating successive development, the microcracks initially appear at the boundary between the initially formed coating on the α phase and the subsequently developed coating on the β phase. With the prolonging treatment time, the microcracks near the β phase become evident. After treating for 3 min, the originally rough area on the β phase disappears and the coatings become almost uniform with microcracks randomly distributed on the sample surface. Inorganic phosphates are found in MAO coatings, suggesting that phytate salts are decomposed due to the high instantaneous temperature on the sample surface resulted from spark discharge.

  8. MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATION OF THE ROLE OF DISLOCATIONS IN MICROCRACK HEALING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Shen; Gao Kewei; Qiao Lijie; Chu Wuyang; Zhou Fuxin

    2000-01-01

    The molecular dynamics method is used to simulate microcrack healing during heating or/and under compressive stress. A centre microcrack in Cu crystal would be sealed under compressive stress or by heating. The role of compressive stress and heating in crack healing was additive. During microcrack healing,dislocation generation and motion occurred. When there were pre-existing dislocations around the microcrack, the critical temperature or compressive stress necessary for microcrack healing would decrease, and, the higher the number of dislocations,the lower the critical temperature or compressive stress. The critical temperaturenecessary for microcrack healing depended upon the orientation of the crack plane.For example, the critical temperature for the crack along the (001) plane was the lowest, i.e. 770K.

  9. Automatic Detection and Evaluation of Solar Cell Micro-Cracks in Electroluminescence Images Using Matched Filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spataru, Sergiu; Hacke, Peter; Sera, Dezso

    2016-11-21

    A method for detecting micro-cracks in solar cells using two dimensional matched filters was developed, derived from the electroluminescence intensity profile of typical micro-cracks. We describe the image processing steps to obtain a binary map with the location of the micro-cracks. Finally, we show how to automatically estimate the total length of each micro-crack from these maps, and propose a method to identify severe types of micro-cracks, such as parallel, dendritic, and cracks with multiple orientations. With an optimized threshold parameter, the technique detects over 90 % of cracks larger than 3 cm in length. The method shows great potential for quantifying micro-crack damage after manufacturing or module transportation for the determination of a module quality criterion for cell cracking in photovoltaic modules.

  10. Microcrack porosity and in situ stress in Illinois Borehole UPH 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, S. R.; Wang, H. F.

    1986-09-01

    Differential strain analysis was used to study microcracks in granite core taken from 0.7 to 1.6 km depth from Illinois Deep Hole UPH 3. The majority of the microcracks are believed to have been generated by stress relief upon removal of the core from depth. Volumetric microcrack porosity was found to vary by an order of magnitude. Low values of microcrack porosity were found in highly fractured intervals, where large, open fractures have relaxed a portion of the in situ stress. Plotting microcrack porosity against mean in situ stress reveals a strong positive correlation over a range of 25 MPa. Large, subvertical fractures may locally influence the orientation of stress relief microcracks. The direction of maximum horizontal crack strain was found to be subparallel to the strike of the nearest large fracture in 7 of 8 fine-grained samples.

  11. Field Detection of Microcracks to Define the Nucleation Stage of Earthquake Occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Fujinawa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Main shocks of natural earthquakes are known to be accompanied by preshocks which evolve following the modified Ohmori’s law in average over many samples. Individual preshock activity, however, is far less systematic for predictive purposes. On the other hand, the microcracks in laboratory rock experiments are always preceded to final rupture. And, previous investigations of field acoustic emissions showed that the activity increases prominently before and after the main shock. But there is no detection of any phenomena to identify the nucleation stage. Here we show that a special underground electric field measurement could detect microcracks. Pulse-like variations were classified into three groups (A, B, C by frequency. The B-type is suggested to define the nucleation period: activity increases sharply following the modified Omori’s law before the main shock and there is no activity afterward. The B-type is subgrouped into three types possibly corresponding to crack-rupture modes. The variations are supposed to be induced by crack occurrence through electrokinetic effects in the elastic-porous medium. The detection distance is suggested to be several orders larger than that of the acoustic emission due to the effective smallness of dissipation rate, and the waveform can be used to infer the rupture mode.

  12. Microcrack formation in high-deformed titanium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gridnev, V.N.; Ivasishin, O.M.; Svechnikov, V.L. (AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Metallofiziki)

    1984-10-01

    ..cap alpha..-phase interlayers on the ..cap alpha../..beta.. boundary with orientation different from a matrix alloys can act as cause of titanium alloys hardening with simultaneous decrease of their ductility. Electron microexamination of the structure of ..cap alpha..-phase located both on interfaces and in ..cap alpha..-grain volume provides evidence that deformation twinning on different planes and slip in a matrix ..cap alpha..-phase are the mechanism of the ..cap alpha..-phase formation. Examples of ..cap alpha..-phase participation with orientation different from the matrix one are presented in the process of microcracks formation.

  13. Tough, Microcracking-Resistant, High-Temperature Polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pater, Ruth H.; Razon, Pert; Smith, Ricky; Working, Dennis; Chang, Alice; Gerber, Margaret

    1990-01-01

    Simultaneous synthesis from thermosetting and thermoplastic components yields polyimide with outstanding properties. Involves process in which one polymer cross-linked in immediate presence of other, undergoing simultaneous linear chain extension. New material, LaRC-RP40 synthesized from high-temperature thermosetting imide prepolymer and from thermoplastic monomer. Three significantly improved properties: toughness, resistance to microcracking, and glass-transition temperature. Shows promise as high-temperature matrix resin for variety of components of aircraft engines and for use in other aerospace structures.

  14. Cortical bone tissue resists fatigue fracture by deceleration and arrest of microcrack growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkus, O; Rimnac, C M

    2001-06-01

    Knowledge of kinetics of fatigue crack growth of microcracks is important so as to understand the dynamics of bone adaptation, remodeling, and the etiology of fatigue-based failures of cortical bone tissue. In this respect, theoretical models (Taylor, J. Biomech., 31 (1998) 587-592; Taylor and Prendergast, Proc. Instn. Mech. Engrs. Part H 211 (1997) 369-375) of microcrack growth in cortical bone have predicted a decreasing microcrack growth rate with increasing microcrack length. However, these predictions have not been observed directly. This study investigated microcrack growth and arrest through observations of surface microcracks during cyclic loading (R=0.1, 50-80MPa) of human femoral cortical bone (male, n=4, age range: 37-40yr) utilizing a video microscopy system. The change in crack length and orientation of eight surface microcracks were measured with the number of fatigue cycles from four specimens. At the applied cyclic stresses, the microcracks propagated and arrested in generally less than 10,000 cycles. The fatigue crack growth rate of all microcracks decreased with increasing crack length following initial identification, consistent with theoretical predictions. The growth rate of the microcracks was observed to be in the range of 5x10(-5) to 5x10(-7)mmcycle(-1). In addition, many of the microcracks were observed not to grow beyond 150 microm and a cyclic stress intensity factor of 0.5MNm(-3/2). The results of this study suggest that cortical bone tissue may resist fracture at the microscale by deceleration of fatigue crack growth and arrest of microcracks.

  15. Nonlinear guided wave circular array system for microcrack monitoring in spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Reliable monitoring of the microcrack formation in the complex composite structure components in NASA spacecraft and launch vehicles is critical for vehicle...

  16. Modelling of microcracks image treated with fluorescent dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glebov, Victor; Lashmanov, Oleg U.

    2015-06-01

    The main reasons of catastrophes and accidents are high level of wear of equipment and violation of the production technology. The methods of nondestructive testing are designed to find out defects timely and to prevent break down of aggregates. These methods allow determining compliance of object parameters with technical requirements without destroying it. This work will discuss dye penetrant inspection or liquid penetrant inspection (DPI or LPI) methods and computer model of microcracks image treated with fluorescent dye. Usually cracks on image look like broken extended lines with small width (about 1 to 10 pixels) and ragged edges. The used method of inspection allows to detect microcracks with depth about 10 or more micrometers. During the work the mathematical model of image of randomly located microcracks treated with fluorescent dye was created in MATLAB environment. Background noises and distortions introduced by the optical systems are considered in the model. The factors that have influence on the image are listed below: 1. Background noise. Background noise is caused by the bright light from external sources and it reduces contrast on the objects edges. 2. Noises on the image sensor. Digital noise manifests itself in the form of randomly located points that are differing in their brightness and color. 3. Distortions caused by aberrations of optical system. After passing through the real optical system the homocentricity of the bundle of rays is violated or homocentricity remains but rays intersect at the point that doesn't coincide with the point of the ideal image. The stronger the influence of the above-listed factors, the worse the image quality and therefore the analysis of the image for control of the item finds difficulty. The mathematical model is created using the following algorithm: at the beginning the number of cracks that will be modeled is entered from keyboard. Then the point with random position is choosing on the matrix whose size is

  17. Quantification of shrinkage microcracking in young mortar with fluorescence light microscopy and ESEM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschop, J.; Van Mier, J.C.M.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper a method is described to quantify shrinkage microcracking in young mortar by means of crack mapping. Visualisation of the microcracks is realised with two techniques: Fluorescence Light Microscopy (FLM) and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM). The preliminary results obta

  18. Automatic Detection and Evaluation of Solar Cell Micro-Cracks in Electroluminescence Images Using Matched Filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spataru, Sergiu; Hacke, Peter; Sera, Dezso

    2016-01-01

    A method for detecting micro cracks in solar cell using two dimensional matched filters was developed, derived from the electroluminescence intensity profile of typical microcracks. We describe the image processing steps to obtain a binary map with the location of the micro-cracks. Finally, we sh...

  19. Master plot analysis of microcracking in graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nairn, John A.; Hu, Shoufeng; Bark, Jong Song

    1993-01-01

    We used a variational stress analysis and an energy release rate failure criterion to construct a master plot analysis of matrix microcracking. In the master plot, the results for all laminates of a single material are predicted to fall on a single line whose slope gives the microcracking toughness of the material. Experimental results from 18 different layups of AS4/3501-6 laminates show that the master plot analysis can explain all observations. In particular, it can explain the differences between microcracking of central 90 deg plies and of free-surface 90 deg plies. Experimental results from two different AS4/PEEK laminates tested at different temperatures can be explained by a modified master plot that accounts for changes in the residual thermal stresses. Finally, we constructed similar master plot analyses for previous literature microcracking models. All microcracking theories that ignore the thickness dependence of the stresses gave poor results.

  20. New insights on microcrack propagation in bcc iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borodin, V.A. [PRC Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Karlsruher Inst. fuer Technologie (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Vladimirov, P.V.; Moeslang, A. [Karlsruher Inst. fuer Technologie (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Three-dimensional molecular dynamics simulations of micro-crack propagation in alpha-iron evidence high sensitivity of lattice transformation modes at the tips of propagating cracks to the crack plane orientation and expansion direction. The crack initiation on {l_brace}001{r_brace} planes is preceded with the emission of compact slip bands from the pre-crack tips, in agreement with the earlier quasi-two-dimensional simulations. Moreover, the compact slip bands emanating from the crack tips remain an essential feature of the crack propagation on {l_brace}001{r_brace} planes. On the contrary, crack propagation on {l_brace}110{r_brace} plane is accompanied with the formation of subgrains at the crack tip and the emission of dislocations. (orig.)

  1. Investigation of the microcrack evolution in a Ti-based bulk metallic glass matrix composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsheng Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The initiation and evolution behavior of the shear-bands and microcracks in a Ti-based metallic-glass–matrix composite (MGMC were investigated by using an in-situ tensile test under transmission electron microscopy (TEM. It was found that the plastic deformation of the Ti-based MGMC related with the generation of the plastic deformation zone in crystalline and shear deformation zone in glass phase near the crack tip. The dendrites can suppress the propagation of the shear band effectively. Before the rapid propagation of cracks, the extending of plastic deformation zone and shear deformation zone ahead of crack tip is the main pattern in the composite.

  2. Transition from Multiple Macro-Cracking to Multiple Micro-Cracking in Cementitious Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jun; LENG Bing

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the possibility of transition from multiple macro-cracking to multiple micro-cracking in cementitious composites.Conventional polyvinyl alcohol fiber reinforced cementitious composites normally exhibit macroscopic strain-hardening and multiple cracking after the first cracks appear.However,the individual crack width at the saturated stage is normally 60 to 80 μm.In the current study,the effect of fine aggregate size on the cracking performance,especially the individual crack width in the strain-hardening stage was studied by bending tests.The results show that the individual crack widths can be reduced from 60-80 μm to 10-30 μm by modifying the particle size of the fine aggregates used in the composites.

  3. Snow fracture: From micro-cracking to global failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelli, Achille; Reiweger, Ingrid; Schweizer, Jürg

    2017-04-01

    Slab avalanches are caused by a crack forming and propagating in a weak layer within the snow cover, which eventually causes the detachment of the overlying cohesive slab. The gradual damage process leading to the nucleation of the initial failure is still not entirely understood. Therefore, we studied the damage process preceding snow failure by analyzing the acoustic emissions (AE) generated by bond failure or micro-cracking. The AE allow studying the ongoing progressive failure in a non-destructive way. We performed fully load-controlled failure experiments on snow samples presenting a weak layer and recorded the generated AE. The size and frequency of the generated AE increased before failure revealing an acceleration of the damage process with increased size and frequency of damage and/or microscopic cracks. The AE energy was power-law distributed and the exponent (b-value) decreased approaching failure. The waiting time followed an exponential distribution with increasing exponential coefficient λ before failure. The decrease of the b-value and the increase of λ correspond to a change in the event distribution statistics indicating a transition from homogeneously distributed uncorrelated damage producing mostly small AE to localized damage, which cause larger correlated events which leads to brittle failure. We observed brittle failure for the fast experiment and a more ductile behavior for the slow experiments. This rate dependence was reflected also in the AE signature. In the slow experiments the b value and λ were almost constant, and the energy rate increase was moderate indicating that the damage process was in a stable state - suggesting the damage and healing processes to be balanced. On a shorter time scale, however, the AE parameters varied indicating that the damage process was not steady but consisted of a sum of small bursts. We assume that the bursts may have been generated by cascades of correlated micro-cracks caused by localization of

  4. Multi-shell effective interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Tsunoda, Naofumi; Hjorth-Jensen, Morten; Otsuka, Takaharu

    2013-01-01

    Background: Effective interactions, either derived from microscopic theories or based on fitting selected properties of nuclei in specific mass regions, are widely used inputs to shell-model studies of nuclei. Until recently, most shell-model calculations have been confined to a single oscillator shell. Recent interest in nuclei away from the stability line, requires however larger shell-model spaces. Since the derivation of microscopic effective interactions has been limited to degenerate model spaces, there are both conceptual and practical limits to present shell-model calculations that utilize such interactions. Purpose: The aim of this work is to present a novel microscopic method to calculate effective interactions for the nuclear shell model. Its main difference from existing theories is that it can be applied not only to degenerate model spaces but also to non-degenerate model spaces. Methods: The formalism is presented in the form of many-body perturbation theory based on the recently developed Exten...

  5. Finite Element Modeling of Thermal Cycling Induced Microcracking in Carbon/Epoxy Triaxial Braided Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Morscher, Gregory; Martin, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    The microcrack distribution and mass change in PR520/T700s and 3502/T700s carbon/epoxy braided composites exposed to thermal cycling was evaluated experimentally. Acoustic emission was utilized to record the crack initiation and propagation under cyclic thermal loading between -55 C and 120 C. Transverse microcrack morphology was investigated using X-ray Computed Tomography. Different performance of two kinds of composites was discovered and analyzed. Based on the observations of microcrack formation, a meso-mechanical finite element model was developed to obtain the resultant mechanical properties. The simulation results exhibited a decrease in strength and stiffness with increasing crack density. Strength and stiffness reduction versus crack densities in different orientations were compared. The changes of global mechanical behavior in both axial and transverse loading conditions were studied. Keywords: Thermal cycles; Microcrack; Finite Element Model; Braided Composite

  6. In situ Observations of Microcrack Nucleation and Bluntness in Ductile Fracture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈奇志; 褚武扬; 肖纪美

    1994-01-01

    Nucleating of a microcrack within nanometres and blunting into a void are studied through in situ tensile test for thin foil specimens of type 310 steel by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The mechanism of microcrack nucleation is analyzed by means of microfracture mechanics. The results show that a main crack tip may be still sharp after dislocations are emitted from the crack tip and dislocation free zone (DFZ) forms so that the local stress near the crack tip in the DFZ is high enough to equal the cohesive strength and then a microcrack initiates in the DFZ. The microcracks initiating in the DFZ will blunt into voids through the movement o. the existing dislocations and/or those emanated from the crack tip and nearby dislocation sources. The discontinuous voids resulting from the blunt of the microcracks in the DFZ will link with each other and with the main crack, resulting in a zig-zag crack propagation. A microcrack will nucleate at the main crack tip and the new crack will blunt rather tha

  7. Investigation of Macroscopic Brittle Creep Failure Caused by Microcrack Growth Under Step Loading and Unloading in Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaozhao; Shao, Zhushan

    2016-07-01

    The growth of subcritical cracks plays an important role in the creep of brittle rock. The stress path has a great influence on creep properties. A micromechanics-based model is presented to study the effect of the stress path on creep properties. The microcrack model of Ashby and Sammis, Charles' Law, and a new micro-macro relation are employed in our model. This new micro-macro relation is proposed by using the correlation between the micromechanical and macroscopic definition of damage. A stress path function is also introduced by the relationship between stress and time. Theoretical expressions of the stress-strain relationship and creep behavior are derived. The effects of confining pressure on the stress-strain relationship are studied. Crack initiation stress and peak stress are achieved under different confining pressures. The applied constant stress that could cause creep behavior is predicted. Creep properties are studied under the step loading of axial stress or the unloading of confining pressure. Rationality of the micromechanics-based model is verified by the experimental results of Jinping marble. Furthermore, the effects of model parameters and the unloading rate of confining pressure on creep behavior are analyzed. The coupling effect of step axial stress and confining pressure on creep failure is also discussed. The results provide implications on the deformation behavior and time-delayed rockburst mechanism caused by microcrack growth on surrounding rocks during deep underground excavations.

  8. Theory of cyclic creep of concrete based on Paris law for fatigue growth of subcritical microcracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazant, Zdenek P.; Hubler, Mija H.

    2014-02-01

    Recent investigations prompted by a disaster in Palau revealed that worldwide there are 69 long-span segmental prestressed-concrete box-girder bridges that suffered excessive multi-decade deflections, while many more surely exist. Although the excessive deflections were shown to be caused mainly by obsolescence of design recommendations or codes for static creep, some engineers suspect that cyclic creep might have been a significant additional cause. Many investigators explored the cyclic creep of concrete experimentally, but a rational mathematical model that would be anchored in the microstructure and would allow extrapolation to a 100-year lifetime is lacking. Here it is assumed that the cause of cyclic creep is the fatigue growth of pre-existing microcracks in hydrated cement. The resulting macroscopic strain is calculated by applying fracture mechanics to the microcracks considered as either tensile or, in the form of a crushing band, as compressive. This leads to a mathematical model for cyclic creep in compression, which is verified and calibrated by laboratory test data from the literature. The cyclic creep is shown to be proportional to the time average of stress and to the 4th power of the ratio of the stress amplitude to material strength. The power of 4 is supported by the recent finding that, on the atomistic scale, the Paris law should have the exponent of 2 and that the exponent must increase due to scale bridging. Exponent 4 implies that cyclic creep deflections are enormously sensitive to the relative amplitude of the applied cyclic stress. Calculations of the effects of cyclic creep in six segmental prestressed concrete box girders indicate that, because of self-weight dominance, the effect on deflections absolutely negligible for large spans (>150m). For small spans (<40m) the cyclic creep deflections are not negligible but do not matter since the static creep causes in such bridges upward deflections. However, the cyclic creep is shown to cause

  9. Simulation of photoacoustic imaging of microcracks in silicon wafers using a structure-changeable multilayered thermal diffusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Toshihiko; Kitamori, Takehiko; Sawada, Tsuguo

    2007-03-01

    The detection characteristics for photoacoustic imaging of microcracks in silicon wafers were theoretically and quantitatively investigated using a numerical simulation. The simulation is based on a one-dimensional multilayered thermal diffusion model coupled with the thermal-wave impedance of each layer, the layer structures of which are constructed along the wafer surface and are variable according to the scanning position of the point heat source. As the modulation frequency was reduced, the spatial resolution of the temperature amplitude profile at the cracks decreased, showing good agreement with the experimentally obtained photoacoustic amplitude images. At a modulation frequency of 200 kHz, for cracks with narrow air gaps of up to 20 nm, which is much smaller than both the beam spot size of 1.5 microm and the thermal diffusion length of 12 microm, the temperature amplitude is twice that of regions without cracks, and the temperature contrast increased with an increase in the modulation frequency. These calculation results suggest the effectiveness of using a high modulation frequency, making it possible to detect microcracks of the order of 10 nm.

  10. Effective interactions between fluid membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Bing-Sui

    2016-01-01

    A self-consistent theory is proposed for the general problem of interacting undulating fluid membranes subject to the constraint that they do not interpenetrate. We implement the steric constraint via an exact functional integral representation, and through the use of a saddle-point approximation transform it into a novel effective steric potential. The steric potential is found to consist of two contributions: one generated by zero mode fluctuations of the membranes, and the other by thermal bending fluctuations. For membranes of cross-sectional area $S$, we find that the bending fluctuation part scales with the inter-membrane separation $d$ as $d^{-2}$ for $d \\ll \\sqrt{S}$, but crosses over to $d^{-4}$ scaling for $d \\gg \\sqrt{S}$, whereas the zero mode part of the steric potential always scales as $d^{-2}$. For membranes interacting exclusively via the steric potential, we obtain closed-form expressions for the effective interaction potential and for the rms undulation amplitude $\\sigma$, which becomes sma...

  11. Tensor Interaction Effect in Dibaryon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ling-Zhi; PANG Hou-Rong; PING Jia-Lun; WANG Fan

    2005-01-01

    The gluon and Goldstone boson induced tensor interaction effect on the dibaryon mass and the D-wave decay width has been studied in the quark delocalization, color screening model. The effective S-D wave transition interactions induced by gluon and Goldstone boson exchanges decrease quickly as the increasing of the channel strangeness. The K and η meson tensor contribution is negligible in this model. No six-quark state in the light flavor world can become a bound one by the help of these tensor interactions except the deuteron. The partial D-wave decay width of Ijp = 1/2 2+NΩ state to spin 0, 1 ∧([1]) final state is 20.7 keV and 63.1 keV respectively. It is a very narrow dibaryon resonance and might be detected in the relativistic heavy ion reaction by the existing RHIC detectors through the reconstruction of the ∧([1]) vertex mass and the future COMPAS detector at CERN and FAIR project in Germany.

  12. A New Rock Strength Criterion from Microcracking Mechanisms Which Provides Theoretical Evidence of Hybrid Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qi-Zhi

    2017-02-01

    A proper criterion describing when material fails is essential for deep understanding and constitutive modeling of rock damage and failure by microcracking. Physically, such a criterion should be the global effect of local mechanical response and microstructure evolution inside the material. This paper aims at deriving a new mechanisms-based failure criterion for brittle rocks, based on micromechanical unilateral damage-friction coupling analyses rather than on the basic results from the classical linear elastic fracture mechanics. The failure functions respectively describing three failure modes (purely tensile mode, tensile-shear mode as well as compressive-shear mode) are achieved in a unified upscaling framework and illustrated in the Mohr plane and also in the plane of principal stresses. The strength envelope is proved to be continuous and smooth with a compressive to tensile strength ratio dependent on material properties. Comparisons with experimental data are finally carried out. By this work, we also provide a theoretical evidence on the hybrid failure and the smooth transition from tensile failure to compressive-shear failure.

  13. Dependence of Microcrack Behavior in Wood on Moisture Content during Drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Yamamoto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A modified confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM system was developed not only to observe the microcracks on the surface of Cryptomeria japonica D. Don in situ at the cellular level but also to obtain information about the moisture content (MC of the wood surface by measuring the change in its electrical resistivity. The sequential images and changes in the electrical resistivity of the wood surface indicated that microcracks formed between the tracheid and ray parenchyma in the latewood region at >1.0E + 07 Ω/sq (square. Microcracks formed when the MC of the wood surface was below the fiber saturation point determined through regression analysis of the surface electrical resistivity and MC. Most of the microcracks develop when the surface electrical resistivity ranged from 3.95E + 10 to 3.60E + 12 Ω/sq. When the surface MC was ~2.5%, microcracks closed and the surface electrical resistivity was either ~1.00E + 15 Ω/sq or outside the measurement range. The modified CLSM and the method to measure the MC of the wood surface can be used to acquire information about the surface MC in specific areas shown in CLSM images. The findings indicated that the MC of the surface of the wood plays an important role in suppressing the emergence of microcracks in drying wood. The modified CLSM system and the method of measuring the MC of the surface of wood can be used to efficiently evaluate methods of drying wood and the quality of dried wood.

  14. Finite element analysis of grain-matrix micro-cracking in shale within the context of a multiscale modeling approach for fracture (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regueiro, R. A.; Yu, S.

    2010-12-01

    The paper models grain-scale micro-cracking in shale at grain-matrix interfaces, assuming constituents are composed of quart silt grains and compacted clay matrix for a typical shale. The influence of grain-matrix-grain interaction on micro-crack patterns is investigated. Elasto-plastic pressure-sensitive cohesive-surface models are inserted at grain-matrix interfaces and intra-clay-matrix finite element facets, while a bulk elasto-plasticity model with bifurcation is employed for the clay matrix to compare to the intra-clay-matrix cohesive-surface model. Numerical examples are presented under two-dimensional plane strain condition at small strains. A procedure is proposed to upscale grain-scale micro-cracking to predict macro-fracture nucleation and propagation in shale and other bound particulate materials. It is shown that using cohesive surface elements (CSEs) at all finite element facets in the clay matrix mesh to simulate micro-cracking in the clay matrix leads to mesh-dependent results. Using CSEs at grain-clay-matrix interfaces is physical and not mesh dependent. We also considered using bulk pressure-sensitive elasto-plasticity with bifurcation condition within the clay matrix to attempt to predict onset of localization around grains in the simulations. It was encouraging to see that for both the single grain and multiple grain simulations, the finite element region in the clay matrix meshes where bifurcation was first detected around the grains was nearly the same. This gives us confidence that once a proper post-bifurcation constitutive model is implemented within an embedded discontinuity formulation, micro-cracking nucleation and propagation at the grain-scale in shale can be properly simulated, which will provide the basis for up-scaling to macro-cracks within a multiscale method for fracture in shale. Other items to address in future research are: (i) include transverse isotropy (elastic and plastic) for the bulk clay matrix elasto-plasticity model

  15. Interaction effects in comorbid psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Jared W; Chmielewski, Michael S; Bagby, R Michael

    2015-07-01

    Comorbidity in psychopathology is the norm. Despite some initial evidence, few studies have examined if the presence of comorbid conditions changes the expression of the pathology, either through increased severity of the syndrome(s) or by expanding to symptoms beyond the syndrome(s) (i.e., symptom overextension). The following report provides an illustration of interactive effects and overextension in comorbid pathology. A large pool of patients from a university hospital were assessed using SCID-I/P interviews. Of these, 230 patients diagnosed with major depressive disorder, social phobia, or both were included in the study. Symptoms not belonging to either index condition (major depressive disorder or social phobia) reliably overextended in comorbid cases (odds ratios between 2.82 and 15.75). Current research methodologies (e.g., structured interviews) do not allow for the examination of overextended symptoms. The authors make a call for future psychopathological research to search systematically for interactive effects by adopting more inclusive or flexible assessments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A critical evaluation of theories for predicting microcracking in composite laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nairn, John A.; Hu, Shoufeng; Bark, Jong S.

    1993-01-01

    We present experimental results on 21 different layups of Hercules AS4 carbon fiber/3501-6 epoxy laminates. All laminates had 90 deg plies; some had them in the middle, while some had them on a free surface. During tensile loading, the first form of damage in all laminates was microcracking of the 90 deg plies. For each laminate, we recorded both the crack density and the complete distribution of crack spacings as a function of the applied load. By rearranging various microcracking theories, we developed a master-curve approach that permitted plotting the results from all laminates on a single plot. By comparing master-curve plots for different theories, it was possible to critically evaluate the quality of those theories. We found that a critical-energy-release-rate criterion calculated using a 2D variational stress analysis gave the best results. All microcracking theories based on a strength-failure criteria gave poor results. All microcracking theories using 1D stress analyses, regardless of the failure criterion, also gave poor results.

  17. Research on Microcrack Extension Mechanism of SiCp/Al in the Machining Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志军; 王领; 王利波

    2012-01-01

    The generation and development of microcracks of SiCp/Al materials in the machining process were researched, and the forming causes and mechanism of the cut surface morphology for ap = 0. 2 mm or ap = 0.4 mm and at 2 m/rain 10 m/min were systematically analyzed. The supporting and " floor " roles of aluminum are wake at a shallower cutting depth and a lower speed, the SiC particles are shed under the role of cutting force, and the microcrack size of cut surface is larger. With the increase in the cutting depth and the cutting speed, the cutting temperature increases, the supporting and "floor" roles of aluminum are enhanced, the shedding and fracture of the reinforcement particles are flexible under the ac- tion of the cutting force, the fracture of cutting transforms from brittle to ductile, and the expansion of microcrack on the en- tire surface tends to balance with a smaller size. A curve between the cutting force and the cutting speed was plotted, a microcrack form of the cut surface was given, and some theoretical basis is provided for the mechanical processing and the surface quality.

  18. Final State Interactions Effects in Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golan, Tomasz [Univ. of Wroctaw (Poland); Juszczak, Cezary [Univ. of Wroctaw (Poland); Sobczyk, Jan T. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Final State Interactions effects are discussed in the context of Monte Carlo simulations of neutrino-nucleus interactions. A role of Formation Time is explained and several models describing this effect are compared. Various observables which are sensitive to FSI effects are reviewed including pion-nucleus interaction and hadron yields in backward hemisphere. NuWro Monte Carlo neutrino event generator is described and its ability to understand neutral current $\\pi^0$ production data in $\\sim 1$ GeV neutrino flux experiments is demonstrated.

  19. Ultrasonic Assessment of Impact-Induced Damage and Microcracking in Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyekanyesi, John (Technical Monitor); Liaw, Benjamin; Villars, Esther; Delmont, Frantz

    2003-01-01

    The main objective of this NASA Faculty Awards for Research (FAR) project is to conduct ultrasonic assessment of impact-induced damage and microcracking in fiber-metal laminated (FML) composites at various temperatures. It is believed that the proposed study of impact damage assessment on FML composites will benefit several NASA's missions and current interests, such as ballistic impact testing of composite fan containment and high strain rate deformation modeling of polymer matrix composites. Impact-induced damage mechanisms in GLARE and ARALL fiber-metal laminates subject to instrumented drop-weight impacts at various temperatures were studied. GLARE and ARALL are hybrid composites made of alternating layers of aluminum and glass- (for GLARE) and aramid- (for ARALL) fiber reinforced epoxy. Damage in pure aluminum panels impacted by foreign objects was mainly characterized by large plastic deformation surrounding a deep penetration dent. On the other hand, plastic deformation in fiber-metal laminates was often not as severe although the penetration dent was still produced. The more stiff fiber-reinforced epoxy layers provided better bending rigidity; thus, enhancing impact damage tolerance. Severe cracking, however, occurred due to the use of these more brittle fiber-reinforced epoxy layers. Fracture patterns, e.g., crack length and delamination size, were greatly affected by the lay-up configuration rather than by the number of layers, which implies that thickness effect was not significant for the panels tested in this study. Immersion ultrasound techniques were then used to assess damages generated by instrumented drop-weight impacts onto these fiber-metal laminate panels as well as 2024-T3 aluminum/cast acrylic sandwich plates adhered by epoxy. Depending on several parameters, such as impact velocity, mass, temperature, laminate configuration, sandwich construction, etc., various types of impact damage were observed, including plastic deformation, radiating

  20. Ultrasonic Assessment of Impact-Induced Damage and Microcracking in Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Benjamin; Zeichner, Glenn; Liu, Yanxiong; Bowles, Kenneth J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The main objective of this NASA FAR project is to conduct ultrasonic assessment of impact-induced damage and microcracking in polymer matrix composites at various temperatures. It is believed that the proposed study of impact damage assessment on polymer matrix composites will benefit several NASA's missions and current interests, such as ballistic impact testing of composite fan containment and high strain rate deformation modeling of polymer matrix composites. Currently, impact-induced delamination and fracture in 6061-T6 aluminum/cast acrylic sandwich plates adhered by epoxy were generated in an instrumented drop-weight impact machine. Although only a small dent was produced on the aluminum side when a hemispherical penetrator tup was dropped onto it from a couple of inches, a large ring of delamination at the interface was observed. The delamination damage was often accompanied by severe shattering in the acrylic substratum. Damage patterns in the acrylic layer include radial and ring cracks and, together with delamination at the interface, may cause peeling-off of acrylic material from the sandwich plate. Theory of stress-wave propagation can be used to explain these damage patterns. The impact tests were conducted at various temperatures. The results also show clearly that temperature effect is very important in impact damage. For pure cast acrylic nil-ductile transition (NDT) occurs between 185-195 F Excessive impact energy was dissipated into fracture energy when tested at temperature below this range or through plastic deformation when tested at temperature above the NDT temperature. Results from this study will be used as baseline data for studying fiber-metal laminates, such as GLARE and ARALL for advanced aeronautical and astronautical applications.

  1. Moderating influences on interactivity effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorveld, H.; van Noort, G.

    2012-01-01

    Research on website interactivity is widespread and there are two important reasons for this popularity. The first is that interactivity is assumed to be the key characteristic that distinguishes communication in traditional media from communication in new media such as websites (Chung and Zhao, 200

  2. Effective resonant interactions via a driving field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimov, A B [Departamento de FIsica, Universidad de Guadalajara, Revolucion 1500, Guadalajara 44420 (Mexico); Sainz, I [Departamento de FIsica, Universidad de Guadalajara, Revolucion 1500, Guadalajara 44420 (Mexico); Saavedra, C [Center for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information, Departamento de FIsica, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla 160-C, Concepcion (Chile)

    2004-11-01

    Effective resonant quantum atom-field interactions are studied. These resonant interactions are induced by the presence of an external classical driving field. An adequate choice for frequencies of the driving field produces nonlinear effective Hamiltonians both for atom-field and for spin-spin interactions. It is shown that the exact numerical evolution for each resonance condition is well described by the corresponding effective Hamiltonian.

  3. Experimental Investigations on Microcracks in Vibrational and Conventional Drilling of Cortical Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone drilling is widely used in orthopedic surgery. Microcracks will be generated in bone drilling, which may cause fatigue damages and stress fractures. Fresh bovine cortical bones were drilled via vibrational and conventional ways. Drilling operations were performed by a dynamic material testing machine, which can provide the vibration while maintaining uniform feed motion. The drill site and bone debris were observed through scanning electron microscope (SEM. The experimental results showed that fewer and shorter micro-cracks were formed in vibrational drilling than those formed in conventional way. And the surface morphology of bone debris from two different drilling ways was also quite different. It is expected that vibrational drilling in orthopedic surgery operation could decrease the microdamage to the bone, which could lower the incidence of stress fracture and contribute to the postoperative recovery.

  4. Microcrack Identification in Cement-Based Materials Using Nonlinear Acoustic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X. J.; Kim, J.-Y.; Qu, J.; Kurtis, K. E.; Wu, S. C.; Jacobs, L. J.

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents results from tests that use nonlinear acoustic waves to distinguish microcracks in cement-based materials. Portland cement mortar samples prepared with alkali-reactive aggregate were exposed to an aggressive environment to induce cracking were compared to control samples, of the same composition, but which were not exposed to aggressive conditions. Two nonlinear ultrasonic methods were used to characterize the samples, with the aim of identifying the time and extent of microcracking; these techniques were a nonlinear acoustical modulation (NAM) method and a harmonic amplitude relation (HAR) method. These nonlinear acoustic results show that both methods can distinguish damaged samples from undamaged ones, demonstrating the potential of nonlinear acoustic waves to provide a quantitative evaluation of the deterioration of cement-based materials.

  5. Necrotrophic fungi associated with epidermal microcracking caused by chilling injury in pickling cucumber fruit

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work was to visualize the association between microcracking and other epidermal chilling injury symptoms, and to identify rots in cucumber fruit (Cucumis sativus L.) by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Depressed epidermal areas and surface cracking due to damages of subepidermal cells characterized the onset of pitting in cucumber fruit. The germination of conidia of Alternaria alternata, with some of them evident on the fractures in the cultivar Trópico, occurred aft...

  6. Micro-CT assessment of dentinal micro-cracks after root canal filling procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-Deus, G; Belladonna, F G; Silva, E J N L; Souza, E M; Carvalhal, J C A; Perez, R; Lopes, R T; Versiani, M A

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the frequency of dentinal micro-cracks after root canal filling procedures with GuttaCore (GC), cold lateral compaction (CLC) and warm vertical compaction (WVC) techniques in mandibular molars using micro-computed tomographic analysis. Thirty mesial roots of mandibular molars, with a type II Vertucci's canal configuration, were prepared to working length with a Reciproc R40 instrument and randomly assigned to one of the three experimental groups (n = 10), according to the technique used for root filling: GC, CLC or WVC. The GC group was filled with a size 40 GC obturator, whilst CLC and WVC groups used conventional gutta-percha cones. AH Plus sealer was used in all groups. The specimens were scanned at an isotropic resolution of 14.25 μm before and after root canal preparation and after root filling. Then, all pre- and postoperative cross-sectional images of the roots (n = 41 660) were screened to identify the presence of dentinal defects. Overall, 30.75% (n = 12 810) of the pre- + post-filling images displayed dentinal defects. In the GC, CLC and WVC groups, dentinal micro-cracks were observed in 18.68% (n = 2510), 15.99% (n = 2389) and 11.34% (n = 1506) of the cross-sectional images, respectively. All micro-cracks identified in the post-filling scans were also observed in the corresponding post-preparation images. Root fillings in all techniques did not induce the development of new dentinal micro-cracks. © 2016 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Elasticity Anisotropy Due To Foliation and Microcracks In Serpentinized Ultramafic Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, I.; Suh, M.; Woo, Y.; Hao, T.

    We carried out an ultrasonic study in serpentinized ultramafic rocks which are in- terpreted as originating from a slightly depleted upper mantle, and as having been emplaced in the crust through the large fault zones striking N10E in the middle of Korean peninsula. Measurements of compressional and shear wave velocities were conducted under hydrostatic confining pressures up to 70 MPa on cylindrical speci- mens cored along and across the foliation planes. The sonic wave velocity increases systematically with a decreasing rate as the confining pressure is raised. This nonlin- ear behavior is recognized as a result of the gradual closure of microcracks in rock specimens. Our tests also revealed that the foliation of the rock specimens induces a clear velocity anisotropy between two orthogonal directions with faster velocity along the foliation plane and slower across the plane. We calculated the dynamic elastic moduli of the rock specimens with two assumptions; one is that the specimens are transversely isotropic due to the foliation, and the other is that the actual wave surface of energy propagation from a point source is an ellipsoid. The calculated elasticity anisotropy varies systematically with increasing confining pressure, initially fast and gradually slowdown. This nonlinear variation is probably due to the gradual closure of microcracks with preferred orientation as a similar fashion in the velocity incre- ment. Depending on the angle between the preferred orientation of microcracks and the direction of foliation, the anisotropy either increases or decreases as a function of the confining pressure. Once cracks are closed mechanically at high confining pres- sure, any remaining anisotropy is considered as an intrinsic characteristic caused by the foliation of the metamorphic rock. In conclusion, the elastic anisotropy is primar- ily caused by the preferred orientation of constituent minerals due to metamorphism, and secondly by the preferred orientation of

  8. Microcrack study of granitic cores from Illinois deep borehole UPH 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowallis, Bart J.; Wang, Herbert F.

    1983-09-01

    Microcracks were examined in five granite samples ranging in depth of origin from 696 to 1572 m by optical and scanning electron microscope observations and by elastic property measurements. The samples were obtained from the continuous crystalline core from Illinois deep borehole UPH 3 located in Stephenson County, Illinois. The core is a fine-grained granite at the top and it becomes progressively coarser with depth. Cracks and fractures can be seen with the unaided eye in most of the core. Many of the larger fractures are coated or filled with secondary minerals. Long, narrow, tapered cracks which are open have not been observed in other midcontinent granites. These narrow cracks have sharp, matching edges and appear to be fresh. They are attributed to stress relief due to removal of the core by drilling. This interpretation is supported by measurements of velocity and strain as a function of confining pressure. The velocity and static bulk modulus at 1-bar pressure were smaller for samples originating from greater depths, indicating progressively greater stress relief cracking for deeper samples. The crack spectrum derived from the strain measurements showed that the majority of the crack porosity was for cracks with closure pressures between 150 and 225 bars. The conclusion that stress relief microcracks occur with greater concentrations in cores from greater depths implies that cautious interpretation must be made of laboratory measured physical properties which are sensitive to open microcracks.

  9. In Situ Tomography of Microcracking in Cross Ply Carbon Fiber Composites with Pre-existing Debonding Damage

    KAUST Repository

    Traudes, Daniel

    2012-07-01

    Carbon fiber based composites are an essential material in weight-critical applications such as in the aerospace industry. However, these materials are susceptible to damage such as matrix microcracking and fiber/matrix debonding (diffuse damage), which occurs at stresses much lower than the failure stress. A T700/M21 [0/90]s laminate was tensile loaded to introduce diffuse damage and prepared for a study on the initiation of transverse microcracks. The material was tensile loaded in a [+45/-45]s orientation to induce diffuse damage. A diffuse damage indicator was developed by measuring the decrease in shear stiffness. Samples with diffuse damage levels of 0, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, and 0.25 were prepared to be tensile tested in a [0/90]s orientation to induce microcracks. A successful development of the microcracking test procedure was performed. The edge of the material was studied with optical microscopy and x-ray to establish the structure of the fiber bundle geometry when undamaged. A sample containing microcracks was treated with diiodomethane dye penetrant, which successfully highlighted microcracks during x-ray imaging. The application time was not sufficient to produce consistent x-ray images over time, so a 45 minute soak time was recommended instead. The same damaged sample was subjected to a tomographic scan without a dye penetrant and while unloaded. Transverse microcracks were successfully identified from the data, although the results were not clean enough and likely omitted some smaller microcracks. Results are expected to be cleaner if performed during tensile testing. Future tensile testing will quantify the induced crack density of samples containing various degrees of initial diffuse damage, either using x-rays with a dye penetrant or using x-ray microtomography.

  10. Effects of interactions in two dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shashkin, A A; Kapustin, A A; Deviatov, E V; Dolgopolov, V T [Institute of Solid State Physics, Chernogolovka, Moscow District 142432 (Russian Federation); Kvon, Z D [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Kravchenko, S V [Physics Department, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)], E-mail: s.kravchenko@neu.edu

    2009-05-29

    Strong electron-electron interactions in dilute two-dimensional electron systems in silicon lead to Pauli spin susceptibility growing critically at low electron densities. This effect originates from renormalization of the effective mass rather than the g-factor. The relative mass enhancement is system and disorder independent, which suggests that it is determined by electron-electron interactions only.

  11. Effective interactions of DNA-stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaurrea Velasco, Clara; Likos, Christos N.; Kahl, Gerhard

    2015-09-01

    We put forward a model that allows the calculation of the effective potential of two interacting DNA-stars, i.e., three-armed, Y-shaped, charged macromolecules, built up by three intertwined single-stranded DNAs. These particles are assumed to float on a flat interface separating two media with different dielectric properties. As the only input, our model requires the charge density along the branches and the interaction between two infinitesimally short segments, along two interacting rods. With this effective interaction at hand, a detailed investigations of the self-assembly scenarios of these molecules either via computer simulations or via theoretical frameworks comes within reach.

  12. Effects of Economic Interactions on Credit Risk

    CERN Document Server

    Hatchett, J P L

    2005-01-01

    We study a credit risk model which captures effects of economic interactions on a firm's default probability. Economic interactions are represented as a functionally defined graph, and the existence of both cooperative, and competitive, business relations is taken into account. We provide an analytic solution of the model in a limit where the number of business relations of each company is large, but the overall fraction of the economy with which a given company interacts may be small. While the effects of economic interactions are relatively weak in typical (most probable) scenarios, they are pronounced in situations of economic stress, and thus lead to a substantial fattening of the tails of loss distributions in large loan portfolios. This manifests itself in a pronounced enhancement of the Value at Risk computed for interacting economies in comparison with their non-interacting counterparts.

  13. Interactions effects in granular powder systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hilo, M.; Bsoul, I.; Rousan, A.; Hudeish, A.

    2004-05-01

    In this paper the effects of interactions in doped barium ferrite powder system at different concentrations are examined. At low concentrations ( Ms<2 emu/g), the coercivity is observed to decrease linearly with increasing particle concentration. In addition, the measured Δ M curves for all samples examined showed negative profiles, which indicates that, the predominant dipolar interactions are negative. The linear decrease in coercivity is attributed to be due to the increase in the strength of the negative dipolar interactions.

  14. Meissner effect and a stringlike interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Chandrasekhar; Lahiri, Amitabha

    2016-01-01

    We find that a recently proposed interaction involving the vorticity current of electrons, which radiatively induces a photon mass in 3+1 dimensions in the low-energy effective theory, corresponds to confining strings (linear potential) between electrons.

  15. Generation and characterization of microcracks in structural materials; Generacion y Caracterizacion de Microgrietas en materiales estructurales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menendez, E.; Frutos, J. de

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we study how to generate and accelerate, expansive phenomena within cementitious composites, considering elements of addiction using both fly ash and slag. We present results of monitoring of these processes from the beginning and characterize chemical, microstructural, and crystallographic by X-ray diffraction, backscattering electron microscopy, X-ray dispersive energy and mercury porosimetry. These data are supplemented with values of mechanical behavior of materials to determine their functionality. As a result of these studies, we propose a model for the generation and progression of microcracks for each alteration processes studied. (Author) 7 refs.

  16. Effectiveness of Artistic Interaction through Video Conferencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan Duygu Erişti

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated Turkish and Canadian primary school students’ ways of expressing their perception of interactive art education through video conferencing and that of cultural interaction through pictorial representations. The qualitative research data were collected in the form of pictures and interviews on interactive art education along with cultural components depicted in pictures. The results obtained were analyzed and interpreted based on the quantitative content analysis method. The research results revealed that the majority of the students explained their viewpoints through the effectiveness of the process. The students highlighted the importance of learning a different culture, learning about a different art technique and recognizing new friends in the process. The synchronization regarding interactive art education through videoconferencing was another important experience reflected by the students. Most of the students indicated that interactive art education through videoconferencing encouraged them to learn and understand about different cultures, helped them develop cultural awareness, attracted their attention and increased their motivation.

  17. Numerical modelling of the mechanical behaviour of an osteon with microcracks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giner, Eugenio; Arango, Camila; Vercher, Ana; Javier Fuenmayor, F

    2014-09-01

    In this work, we present two strategies for the numerical modelling of microcracks and damage within an osteon. A numerical model of a single osteon under compressive diametral load is developed, including lamellae organized concentrically around the haversian canal and the presence of lacunae. Elastic properties have been estimated from micromechanical models that consider the mineralized collagen fibrils reinforced with hydroxyapatite crystals and the dominating orientation of the fibrils in each lamella. Microcracks are simulated through the node release technique, enabling propagation along the lamellae interfaces by application of failure criteria initially conceived for composite materials, in particular the Brewer and Lagacé criterion for delamination. A second approach is also presented, which is based on the progressive degradation of the stiffness at the element level as the damage increases. Both strategies are discussed, showing a good agreement with experimental evidence reported by other authors. It is concluded that interlaminar shear stresses are the main cause of failure of an osteon under compressive diametral load. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. On Continuum Damage Modeling of Fiber Reinforced Viscoelastic Composites with Microcracks in terms of Invariants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melek Usal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A continuum damage model is developed for the linear viscoelastic behavior of composites with microcracks consisting of an isotropic matrix reinforced by two arbitrarily independent and inextensible fiber families. Despite the fact that the matrix material is isotropic, the model in consideration bears the characteristic of directed media included in the transverse isotropy symmetry group solely due to its fibers distributions and the existence of microcracks. Using the basic laws of continuum damage mechanics and equations belonging to kinematics and deformation geometries of fibers, the constitutive functions have been obtained. It has been detected as a result of the thermodynamic constraints that the stress potential function is dependent on two symmetric tensors and two vectors, whereas the dissipative stress function is dependent on four symmetric tensors and two vectors. To determine arguments of the constitutive functionals, findings relating to the theory of invariants have been used as a method because of the fact that isotropy constraint is imposed on the material. As a result the linear constitutive equations of elastic stress, dissipative stress, and strain energy density release rate have been written in terms of material coordinate description. Using these expressions, total stress has been found.

  19. Estimating Interaction Effects With Incomplete Predictor Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, Craig K.; Baraldi, Amanda N.; Cham, Heining

    2014-01-01

    The existing missing data literature does not provide a clear prescription for estimating interaction effects with missing data, particularly when the interaction involves a pair of continuous variables. In this article, we describe maximum likelihood and multiple imputation procedures for this common analysis problem. We outline 3 latent variable model specifications for interaction analyses with missing data. These models apply procedures from the latent variable interaction literature to analyses with a single indicator per construct (e.g., a regression analysis with scale scores). We also discuss multiple imputation for interaction effects, emphasizing an approach that applies standard imputation procedures to the product of 2 raw score predictors. We thoroughly describe the process of probing interaction effects with maximum likelihood and multiple imputation. For both missing data handling techniques, we outline centering and transformation strategies that researchers can implement in popular software packages, and we use a series of real data analyses to illustrate these methods. Finally, we use computer simulations to evaluate the performance of the proposed techniques. PMID:24707955

  20. Particles inside electrolytes with ion-specific interactions, their effective charge distributions, and effective interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Mingnan; Liang, Yihao; Xing, Xiangjun

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we explore the statistical physics of colloidal particles that interact with electrolytes via ion-specific interactions. Firstly we study particles interacting weakly with electrolyte using linear response theory. We find that the mean potential around a particle is linearly determined by the effective charge distribution of the particle, which depends both on the bare charge distribution and on ion-specific interactions. We also discuss the effective interaction between two such particles and show that, in the far field regime, it is bilinear in the effective charge distributions of two particles. We subsequently generalize the above results to the more complicated case where particles interact strongly with the electrolyte. Our results indicate that in order to understand the statistical physics of non-dilute electrolytes, both ion-specific interactions and ionic correlations have to be addressed in a single unified and consistent framework. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11174196 and 91130012).

  1. Healed microcrack orientations in granite from Illinois borehole UPH-3 and their relationship to the rock's stress history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowallis, Bart J.; Wang, Herbert F.; Jang, Bo-An

    1987-04-01

    Oriented granite cores from the Illinois borehole UPH-3 contain planes of secondary fluid inclusions, which represent healed microcracks. They record the orientation of a paleostress field, with the maximum stress in the horizontal plane oriented to the NNW about 90° from the present stress field orientation. These bubble planes probably formed while the granite was still quite warm (> 400° C) during initial cooling, uplift, and unroofing of the granite prior to deposition of younger overlying Cambrian sediments. The bubble planes have a much more uniform orientation than the open microcracks, which formed by stress-relief when the core was removed from the borehole.

  2. Tests of Higgs and Top Effective Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Díaz-Cruz, J L; Toscano, J J

    1997-01-01

    We study the possibility to detect heavy physics effects in the interactions of Higgs bosons and the top quark at future colliders using the effective Lagrangian approach. The modification of the interactions may enhance the production of Higgs bosons at hadron colliders through the mechanisms of gluon fusion and associated production with a W boson or $t\\bar{t}$ pairs. The most promising signature is through the decay of the Higgs boson into two photons, whose branching ratio is also enhanced in this approach. As a consequence of our analysis we get a bound on the chromomagnetic dipole moment of the top quark.

  3. Planning for effective interaction with FDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurgin, Elizabeth A

    2004-12-01

    Manufacturers of diabetes devices can facilitate the formal regulatory approval process through early interaction with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Effective planning can help manage commonly perceived risks of interaction with the Agency, introduce new technologies to regulatory reviewers, and inform the manufacturer's product development strategy. This article reviews key aspects of the FDA evaluation process and suggests strategies that may facilitate effective communication with the Agency. Integrating early communication with FDA into broader product commercialization planning can streamline regulatory review and lead to early product launch into reimbursed markets.

  4. Legacy effects of aboveground-belowground interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostenko, Olga; van de Voorde, Tess F J; Mulder, Patrick P J; van der Putten, Wim H; Martijn Bezemer, T

    2012-08-01

    Root herbivory can greatly affect the performance of aboveground insects via changes in plant chemistry. These interactions have been studied extensively in experiments where aboveground and belowground insects were feeding on the same plant. However, little is known about how aboveground and belowground organisms interact when they feed on plant individuals that grow after each other in the same soil. We show that feeding by aboveground and belowground insect herbivores on ragwort (Jacobaea vulgaris) plants exert unique soil legacy effects, via herbivore-induced changes in the composition of soil fungi. These changes in the soil biota induced by aboveground and belowground herbivores of preceding plants greatly influenced the pyrrolizidine alkaloid content, biomass and aboveground multitrophic interactions of succeeding plants. We conclude that plant-mediated interactions between aboveground and belowground insects are also important when they do not feed simultaneously on the same plant.

  5. Effects of hydrodynamic interactions in bacterial swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Suddhashil; Lun Wu, Xiao

    2008-03-01

    The lack of precise experimental data has prevented the investigation of the effects of long range hydrodynamic interactions in bacterial swimming. We perform measurements on various strains of bacteria with the aid of optical tweezers to shed light on this aspect of bacterial motility. Geometrical parameters recorded by fluorescence microscopy are used with theories which model flagella propulsion (Resistive force theory & Lighthill's formulation which includes long range interactions). Comparison of the predictions of these theories with experimental data, observed directly from swimming bacterium, led to the conclusion that while long range inetractions were important for single polar flagellated strains (Vibrio Alginolyticus & Caulobacter Crescentus), local force theory was adequate to describe the swimming of multi-flagellated Esherichia Coli. We performed additional measurements on E. Coli minicells (miniature cells with single polar flagellum) to try and determine the cause of this apparent effect of shielding of long range interactions in multiple flagellated bacteria.

  6. Efimov effect for P-wave interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braaten, Eric [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Hagen, Philipp; Hammer, Hans-Werner [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik and Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Universitaet Bonn (Germany); Platter, Lucas [Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Fundamental Physics, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2012-07-01

    Nonrelativistic particles with short-range interactions that produce a P-wave threshold resonance can exhibit the Efimov effect: if the inverse scattering volume 1/a and the P-wave effective range r are simultaneously tuned to zero, there is an infinite sequence of three-body bound states called Efimov states that have an accumulation point at the threshold. The discrete scaling factor that characterizes the Efimov effect depends on the mass ratios and the symmetries of the three particles. There is no Efimov effect if all three particles are identical, but it can occur if two identical particles have a resonant P-wave interaction with a third particle. The spectrum of Efimov trimers is compatible with discrete scale invariance. The Efimov trimers disappear through the three-particle threshold at values of a and r that differ by appropriate powers of the discrete scaling factor.

  7. Self-healing of Micro-cracks in Engineered Cementitious Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryanto B.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The performance of an Engineered Cementitious Composite (ECC to self-heal micro-cracks under a controlled laboratory environment is presented. Ten dog-bone shaped samples were prepared; five of them were preloaded to known strains and then left to heal in water in a temperature-controlled laboratory. Ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV measurements were undertaken to monitor the crack-healing process. It was found that all samples exhibited recoveries in UPV and were able to recover to between 96.6% and 98% of their pre-test UPV values over a period of four weeks. An accelerated rate of healing was observed in the initial two-day period immediately following the preloading test.

  8. Statistical properties of microcracking in polyurethane foams under tensile test, influence of temperature and density

    CERN Document Server

    Deschanel, Stéphanie; Vigier, Gérard; Godin, Nathalie; Ciliberto, Sergio

    2006-01-01

    We report tensile failure experiments on polyurethane (PU) foams. Experiments have been performed by imposing a constant strain rate. We work on heterogeneous materials for whom the failure does not occur suddenly and can develop as a multistep process through a succession of microcracks that end at pores. The acoustic energy and the waiting times between acoustic events follow power-law distributions. This remains true while the foam density is varied. However, experiments at low temperatures (PU foams more brittle) have not yielded power-laws for the waiting times. The cumulative acoustic energy has no power law divergence at the proximity of the failure point which is qualitatively in agreement with other experiments done at imposed strain. We notice a plateau in cumulative acoustic energy that seems to occur when a single crack starts to propagate.

  9. Preparation and characterization of microcrack-free thick YBa2Cu3O7-δ films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    High quality epitaxial YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) superconducting films were fabricated on (00l) LaAlO3 substrates using the direct-current sputtering method. The attainment of an unusually high film thickness (up to 2.0 μm) without microcracking was attributed in part to the presence of pores correlated with yttrium-rich composition in the films. The influence of the film thickness on the microstructure was investigated by X-ray diffraction conventional scan (θ-2θ, ω-scan, pole figure) and high-resolution reciprocal space mapping. The films were c-axis oriented with no a-axis-oriented grains up to the thickness of 2 μm. The surface morphology and the critical current density (Jc) strongly depended on the film thickness.Furthermore, the reasons for these thickness dependences were elucidated in derail.

  10. Influence of the crystalline orientations on microcrack initiation in low-cycle fatigue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, P. [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); ECLille, LML, F-59650 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); CNRS, UMR 8107, UMR 8579 (France); Aubin, V., E-mail: veronique.aubin@ecp.fr [ECP, MSSMat, F-92295 Châtenay-Malabry (France); CNRS, UMR 8107, UMR 8579 (France); Alvarez-Armas, I.; Armas, A. [IFIR, CONICET, Universidad Nacional de Rosario (Argentina)

    2013-06-20

    Present study aims at analyzing the crack initiation in an austenitic stainless steel in low-cycle fatigue. A fatigue test was carried out using a polished specimen. The surface of the specimen was observed in situ during the fatigue test, in order to establish the time of slip activity or crack initiation. After a number of cycles sufficient to initiate small cracks, the test was stopped and the surface observed by scanning electron microscopy. The electron backscattered diffraction technique (EBSD) was used to identify the orientations of surface grains in the central zone of the fatigue specimen. Crack-initiation sites and slip systems associated to the initiated microcracks were identified. The criterion of the maximum Schmid factor explains two-thirds of the cracks initiated in slip systems; however if the favorably oriented slip band with respect to this criterion makes an angle of around 45° to the loading direction, a crack may initiate in another slip system.

  11. The effect of dipolar interaction on the magnetic isotope effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mojaza, Matin; Pedersen, Jørgen Boiden; Lukzen, Nikita

    2010-01-01

    A multi-channel kinetic description is used to study the magnetic isotope effect (MIE) in zero magnetic field. The maximal isotope effect is equal to the number of channels, two for the hyperfine interaction but four for the electron spin dipole–dipole interaction of the intermediate radical pair....... Quantum mechanical calculations agree with these conclusion and show that large MIE may be obtained even in the presence of a strong exchange interaction. The observed magnesium isotope effect on the rate of enzymatic synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is approximately 3 implying that the dipolar...

  12. The Efimov effect with finite range interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platter, Lucas

    2017-01-01

    Systems of strongly interacting atoms are receiving a lot of attention because of their interesting features in the few- and many-body sector. Strong interactions are frequently obtained in experiment by using a Feshbach resonance to tune the scattering to large values. A striking feature of three-body systems with a large scattering is the emergence of a discrete scaling symmetry that is also known as the Efimov effect. The Efimov effect has been observed through the measurement of loss rates in experiments with ultracold atoms. It is, however, also relevant to nuclear physics where the three-nucleon bound state and some halo nuclei are considered to be examples of Efimov states. Such systems can be modeled conveniently with the zero-range limit, however, in many of such experiments the finite range of the interaction leads to significant corrections that need to be taken into account. I will discuss how a finite effective range can be included in calculations for three-body systems that display the Efimov effect and how this leads to novel universal relations. Applications to experiments with homonuclear and heteronuclear ultracold atomic gases are discussed. National Science Foundation PHY-1516077, PHY-1555030.

  13. Pairing properties of realistic effective interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargano A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the pairing properties of an effective shell-model interaction defined within a model space outside 132Sn and derived by means of perturbation theory from the CD-Bonn free nucleon-nucleon potential. It turns out that the neutron pairing component of the effective interaction is significantly weaker than the proton one, which accounts for the large pairing gap difference observed in the two-valence identical particle nuclei 134Sn and 134Te. The role of the contribution arising from one particle-one hole excitations in determining the pairing force is discussed and its microscopic structure is also analyzed in terms of the multipole decomposition.

  14. Effective models for interacting quarks from QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braghin, Fabio L. [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2012-07-01

    Full text: In this work the Quantum Chromodynamics ( QCD ) path integral is considered with the introduction of auxiliary variables for composite gluon fields. One of these variables eventually leads to the gluon condensates of order 2 and another one corresponds to an anti - symmetric composite gluon configuration. Gluon degrees of freedom, and part of the quark degrees of freedom, are integrated out and two different limits of the resulting effective quark interactions are analysed. (author)

  15. Antibiotics: neuropsychiatric effects and psychotropic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternbach, H; State, R

    1997-01-01

    Antibiotics are the second most commonly prescribed class of medication in the United States. An awareness and understanding of their potential effects on the central nervous system and their interactions with psychotropic agents is important in the evaluation of neuropsychiatric signs and symptoms in patients. Since the introduction of antibiotic agents in the 1930s, numerous (primarily anecdotal) reports have appeared describing psychiatric side effects ranging from anxiety and panic to major depression, psychosis, and delirium in patients with and without a premorbid psychiatric history. Risk factors have included prior psychopathology, coexisting medical conditions, slow acetylator status, advanced age, concomitant medications, and increased permeability of the blood-brain barrier, as well as high antibiotic dosage and intrathecal or intravenous administration. Psychiatric toxicity may result from various mechanisms of action, including antagonism of gamma-aminobutyric acid or pyridoxine, adverse interactions with alcohol, or inhibition of protein synthesis. Adverse pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between antibiotics and concomitant medications including lithium, benzodiazepines, carbamazepine, valproate, neuroleptics, antidepressants, methadone, and disulfiram have also been reported. Because such effects are often not recognized by clinicians, accurate epidemiologic data on their incidence are not available.

  16. Interaction effects in magnetic oxide nanoparticle systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raksha Sharma; C Pratima; Subhalakshmi Lamba; S Annapoorni

    2005-10-01

    The interaction effects in magnetic nanoparticle system were studied through a Monte Carlo simulation. The results of simulations were compared with two different magnetic systems, namely, iron oxide polymer nanocomposites prepared by polymerization over core and nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite thin films prepared by sol–gel process. The size of the particles in the nanocomposites were estimated to be ∼ 15 nm with very little agglomeration. The low values of the coercivity obtained from the hysteresis measurements performed confirm that the system is superparamagnetic. SEM studies showed the cobalt ferrite films to have a nanocrystalline character, with particle sizes in the nanometer range. Hysteresis measurements performed on the thin films coated on silicon do not give evidence of the superparamagnetic transition up to room temperature and the coercivity is found to increase with decreasing film thickness. Comparison with simulations indicate that the nanocomposites behave like a strongly interacting array where exchange interactions lead to high blocking temperatures, whereas the films are representative of a semi-infinite array of magnetic clusters with weak interactions and thickness-dependent magnetic properties.

  17. A preliminary investigation of microcracks in the overcored borehole 210-020-RST1, 240 level of the Underground Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGregor, R.G.

    1992-05-01

    A section of borehole 210-020-RST1 was sampled and thin sections were cut in order to investigate the occurrence of microcracks within the borehole. The petrology of the sample was described and the presence of microcracks was noted. In total, 1894 microcracks were recorded during the investigation. Microcrack sets were defined on the basis of filling type (or lack of filling) and three-dimensional orientations attributed to the microcrack sets based on structural observations. Many microcrack sets are shown to have similar orientations to mesoscopic fractures observed within the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) lease area and within the URL subsurface. The relative age of observed microcracks, in terms of fillings, is from oldest to youngest: fluid-inclusion-filled fractures; unknown filled fractures; chlorite-filled fractures; and coeval in formation, chlorite-, hematite- and sericite-filled fractures. Fractures without filling are considered the youngest. Plates documenting some observed fractures are included. Biases in the generation and interpretation of the data are discussed and alternatives are mentioned. (auth)

  18. Effective interaction between helical bio-molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Allahyarov, E

    1999-01-01

    The effective interaction between two parallel strands of helicalbio-molecules, such as deoxyribose nucleic acids (DNA), is calculated usingcomputer simulations of the "primitive" model of electrolytes. In particular westudy a simple model for B-DNA incorporating explicitly its charge pattern as adouble-helix structure. The effective force and the effective torque exertedonto the molecules depend on the central distance and on the relativeorientation. The contributions of nonlinear screening by monovalent counterionsto these forces and torques are analyzed and calculated for different saltconcentrations. As a result, we find that the sign of the force dependssensitively on the relative orientation. For intermolecular distances smallerthan $6\\AA$ it can be both attractive and repulsive. Furthermore we report anonmonotonic behaviour of the effective force for increasing saltconcentration. Both features cannot be described within linear screeningtheories. For large distances, on the other hand, the results agree...

  19. Stress Effects on Multiple Memory System Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Deborah; Calabrese, Pasquale

    2016-01-01

    Extensive behavioural, pharmacological, and neurological research reports stress effects on mammalian memory processes. While stress effects on memory quantity have been known for decades, the influence of stress on multiple memory systems and their distinct contributions to the learning process have only recently been described. In this paper, after summarizing the fundamental biological aspects of stress/emotional arousal and recapitulating functionally and anatomically distinct memory systems, we review recent animal and human studies exploring the effects of stress on multiple memory systems. Apart from discussing the interaction between distinct memory systems in stressful situations, we will also outline the fundamental role of the amygdala in mediating such stress effects. Additionally, based on the methods applied in the herein discussed studies, we will discuss how memory translates into behaviour.

  20. Stress Effects on Multiple Memory System Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Ness

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive behavioural, pharmacological, and neurological research reports stress effects on mammalian memory processes. While stress effects on memory quantity have been known for decades, the influence of stress on multiple memory systems and their distinct contributions to the learning process have only recently been described. In this paper, after summarizing the fundamental biological aspects of stress/emotional arousal and recapitulating functionally and anatomically distinct memory systems, we review recent animal and human studies exploring the effects of stress on multiple memory systems. Apart from discussing the interaction between distinct memory systems in stressful situations, we will also outline the fundamental role of the amygdala in mediating such stress effects. Additionally, based on the methods applied in the herein discussed studies, we will discuss how memory translates into behaviour.

  1. Synchrotron radiation micro-CT at the micrometer scale for the analysis of the three-dimensional morphology of microcracks in human trabecular bone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymeric Larrue

    Full Text Available Bone quality is an important concept to explain bone fragility in addition to bone mass. Among bone quality factors, microdamage which appears in daily life is thought to have a marked impact on bone strength and plays a major role in the repair process. The starting point for all studies designed to further our understanding of how bone microdamage initiate or dissipate energy, or to investigate the impact of age, gender or disease, remains reliable observation and measurement of microdamage. In this study, 3D Synchrotron Radiation (SR micro-CT at the micrometric scale was coupled to image analysis for the three-dimensional characterization of bone microdamage in human trabecular bone specimens taken from femoral heads. Specimens were imaged by 3D SR micro-CT with a voxel size of 1.4 µm. A new tailored 3D image analysis technique was developed to segment and quantify microcracks. Microcracks from human trabecular bone were observed in different tomographic sections as well as from 3D renderings. New 3D quantitative measurements on the microcrack density and morphology are reported on five specimens. The 3D microcrack density was found between 3.1 and 9.4/mm3 corresponding to a 2D density between 0.55 and 0.76 /mm2. The microcrack length and width measured in 3D on five selected microcrack ranged respectively from 164 µm to 209 µm and 100 µm to 120 µm. This is the first time that various microcracks in unloaded human trabecular bone--from the simplest linear crack to more complex cross-hatch cracks--have been examined and quantified by 3D imaging at this scale. The suspected complex morphology of microcracks is here considerably more evident than in the 2D observations. In conclusion, this technique opens new perspective for the 3D investigation of microcracks and the impact of age, disease or treatment.

  2. Website interactivity effects explained by consumers' online flow experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noort, G.; Voorveld, H.; van Reijmersdal, E.

    2010-01-01

    Website interactivity created numerous opportunities for marketers to inform and persuade consumers and received extensive attention in the marketing literature. However, research on cognitive responses to website interactivity is scarce and does not provide insights in how interactivity effects can

  3. Order effect in interactive information retrieval evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Melanie Landvad; Borlund, Pia

    2016-01-01

    , the phenomenon is not yet fully understood or investigated in relation to IIR; hence the objective is to increase the knowledge of this phenomenon in the context of IIR as it has implications for test design of IIR studies. Design/methodology/approach – Order effect is studied via partly a literature review...... and partly an empirical IIR study. The empirical IIR study is designed as a classic between-groups design. The IIR search behaviour was logged and complementary post-search interviews were conducted. Findings – The order effect between groups and within search tasks were measured against nine classic IIR...... performance parameters of search interaction behaviour. Order effect is seen with respect to three performance parameters (website changes, visit of webpages, and formulation of queries) shown by an increase in activity on the last performed search. Further the theories with respect to motivation, fatigue...

  4. Initiation and growth of microcracks in high strength steel butt welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Edward

    1993-05-01

    Early tests such as the explosion bulge test created a preference for overmatched welds (welds which are stronger than the base metal) which eventually became codified for many structural applications. While an overmatched system offers advantages such as the shedding of strain to the base plate, it requires the use of expensive fabrication procedures to avoid cracking. Undermatched welding of some high strength steels may offer reductions in welding costs with little sacrifice in weld performance or low cycle fatigue integrity. An experimental study was carried out to observe microcrack initiation and growth of overmatched and undermatched butt welded high strength steel samples using globally elastic low cycle fatigue testing. First, 1 inch thick HY-80 and HY-100 base plates were multipass, spray gas metal arc welded (GMAW) with overmatching and undermatching filler metal using a semiautomatic welding machine. Second, 1/4 inch thick MIL-A-46100 high hardness armor plates (HHA) were manually, two pass spray GMAW welded with two grades of undermatching consumables. Weld reinforcements were removed from all HY specimens and six HHA specimens. All specimens had a crack initiator slit machined in the test section. The specimens were fatigue tested by transverse tensile loading with a 12 to 13 Hz tension-tension profile. The loading range was from 10% to 85% of the tensile strength of the HY steel base plate and HHA weld metal respectively. Crack initiation and propagation was observed in situ using a confocal scanning laser microscope.

  5. Controlled wettability based on reversible micro-cracking on a shape memory polymer surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yu; Liu, Yuxuan; Wang, Wenxin; Leng, Jinsong; Jin, Peng

    2016-03-14

    Wettability modification on a polymer surface is of immense importance for flexible electronics and biomedical applications. Herein, controlled wettability of a styrene-based shape memory polymer has been realized by introducing micro-cracks on the polymer surface for the first time. The cracks were purposely prepared by thin metal film constrained deformation on the polymer. After the removal of the metallic film, wettability was dramatically enhanced by showing a remarkable reduction in the contact angle with water droplets from 85° to 25°. Subsequent systematic characterization techniques like XPS and SEM revealed that such observation could be attributed to the increased density of hydrophilic groups and the roughened surface. In addition, by controlling the temperature for annealing the treated polymer, the surface could be switched reversely to water-repellent. Therefore, this paper offers a smart tactic to manipulate the surface wettability of a shape memory polymer freely. The features of the controlled wettability surface such as high tenability, high stability and easy fabrication are promising for microfluidic switching and molecule/cell capture-release.

  6. Microcracking and macroscopic failure in intermetallic titanium aluminides; Mikrorissbildung und makroskopisches Versagen in intermetallischen Titanaluminiden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesand-Valk, B. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofforschung

    2000-07-01

    This paper deals with the correlations between microstructural disorder, that means statistical distribution of phases and local material properties, and macroscopic failure of disordered multiphase materials. On a microscopic level the microstructural disorder leads to randomly distributed local damage before failure (in brittle materials to microcracks) and eventually to localisation of damage. On a macroscopic level the value and scatter of fracture strength and its dependence on specimen size are essentially determined by the microstructural disorder. The failure behaviour is treated by using the discrete chain-of-bundles-model, which treats the details of the microstructure not explicitly but as locally distributed fluctuations of characteristical material parameters. The model has been verified by comparing with experimental results for four intermetallic titanium aluminides and its validity has been demonstrated. (orig.) [German] Die Arbeit behandelt die Zusammenhaenge zwischen der Stochastizitaet des Gefueges, das heisst, einer statistischen Verteilung von Phasen und lokalen Materialeigenschaften und dem makroskopischen Versagen von ungeordneten mehrphasigen Werkstoffen. Auf mikroskopischer Ebene fuehrt die Stochastizitaet des Gefueges vor dem Versagen zu lokalen Schaedigungen (in sproeden Werkstoffen zu Mikrorissen) und schliesslich (abhaengig vom Grad der Unordnung) zur Lokalisierung des Bruchgeschehens. Makroskopisch werden die Groesse und Streuung von Bruchfestigkeitswerten und ihre Probengroessenabhaengigkeit durch die mikrostrukturelle Unordnung wesentlich bestimmt. Dieses Versagensverhalten wird in dem diskreten Chain-of-Bundles-Modell beschrieben, das die Details der Mikrostruktur nicht explizit sondern als lokale statistische Schwankungen von charakteristischen Werkstoffparametern erfasst. Am Beispiel von vier ausgewaehlten Titan-Aluminiden wird das Modell validiert und verifiziert. (orig.)

  7. Assessing Spurious Interaction Effects in Structural Equation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harring, Jeffrey R.; Weiss, Brandi A.; Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have stressed the importance of simultaneously estimating interaction and quadratic effects in multiple regression analyses, even if theory only suggests an interaction effect should be present. Specifically, past studies suggested that failing to simultaneously include quadratic effects when testing for interaction effects could…

  8. Efimov effect for three interacting bosonic dipoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yujun; D'Incao, J P; Greene, Chris H

    2011-06-10

    Three oriented bosonic dipoles are treated by using the hyperspherical adiabatic representation, providing numerical evidence that the Efimov effect persists near a two-dipole resonance and in a system where angular momentum is not conserved. Our results further show that the Efimov features in scattering observables become universal, with a known three-body parameter; i.e., the resonance energies depend only on the two-body physics, which also has implications for the universal spectrum of the four-dipole problem. Moreover, the Efimov states should be long-lived, which is favorable for their creation and manipulation in ultracold dipolar gases. Finally, deeply bound two-dipole states are shown to be relatively stable against collisions with a third dipole, owing to the emergence of a repulsive interaction originating in the angular momentum nonconservation for this system.

  9. Mesomechanics simulation of micro-crack extension process for asphalt mixture%沥青混合料裂缝扩展过程细观力学模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李蕊; 常明丰; 李彦伟; 石鑫; 杜群乐

    2011-01-01

    采用离散元方法构建了沥青混合料马歇尔数字试件,模拟了间接拉伸试验,研究了粘结强度比、颗粒摩擦因数和加载速率对微裂缝扩展过程的影响,分析了试件内部颗粒的细观响应。模拟结果表明:粘结强度比越大,沥青的粘结特性越明显,使得微裂缝的类型由法向渐变为切向,当粘结强度比由0.500增大到4.000时,接触力减小了78.05%,位移减小了78.57%;摩擦因数的增大,提高了集料的粗糙度,当摩擦因数由0.3增大到0.7时,接触力增大了31.21%,位移减小了21.45%,但其对微裂缝的分布影响不大,主要为法向微裂缝;当加载速率由0.03mm·s^-1增大到0.07mm·s^-1时,接触力增大了3.50%,微裂缝的类型、数量与位移大小基本不变,相比沥青和集料,加载条件对微裂缝扩展的影响很小。%: Marshall numerical specimens of asphalt mixture were made by using discrete element method, indirect tensile test was conducted, the influences of parallel-bond strength ratios, particle friction coefficients and loading velocities on micro-crack extension processes were studied, and the mesomechanics responses of particles in the specimens were analyzed. Simulated result indicates that the bonding characteristics of asphalt are more obvious when the parallelbond strength ratio is larger, which makes the types of micro cracks change from normal microcracks to tangential micro cracks. When the ratio changes from 0. 500 to 4. 000, the contact force reduces by 78.05%, and the displacement reduces by 78.57%. The roughness of aggregate increases with the increase of friction coefficient. When the coefficient changes from 0.3 to 0.7, the contact force increases by 31.21%, and the displacement reduces by 21.45%, but there is little effect on the distribution of micro-cracks that are mainly normal micro-cracks. When the loading velocity changes from 0.03 mm · s

  10. Transient radon signals driven by fluid pressure pulse, micro-crack closure, and failure during granite deformation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girault, Frédéric; Schubnel, Alexandre; Pili, Éric

    2017-09-01

    In seismically active fault zones, various crustal fluids including gases are released at the surface. Radon-222, a radioactive gas naturally produced in rocks, is used in volcanic and tectonic contexts to illuminate crustal deformation or earthquake mechanisms. At some locations, intriguing radon signals have been recorded before, during, or after tectonic events, but such observations remain controversial, mainly because physical characterization of potential radon anomalies from the upper crust is lacking. Here we conducted several month-long deformation experiments under controlled dry upper crustal conditions with a triaxial cell to continuously monitor radon emission from crustal rocks affected by three main effects: a fluid pressure pulse, micro-crack closure, and differential stress increase to macroscopic failure. We found that these effects are systematically associated with a variety of radon signals that can be explained using a first-order advective model of radon transport. First, connection to a source of deep fluid pressure (a fluid pressure pulse) is associated with a large transient radon emission increase (factor of 3-7) compared with the background level. We reason that peak amplitude is governed by the accumulation time and the radon source term, and that peak duration is controlled by radioactive decay, permeability, and advective losses of radon. Second, increasing isostatic compression is first accompanied by an increase in radon emission followed by a decrease beyond a critical pressure representing the depth below which crack closure hampers radon emission (150-250 MPa, ca. 5.5-9.5 km depth in our experiments). Third, the increase of differential stress, and associated shear and volumetric deformation, systematically triggers significant radon peaks (ca. 25-350% above background level) before macroscopic failure, by connecting isolated cracks, which dramatically enhances permeability. The detection of transient radon signals before rupture

  11. Effectiveness of Artistic Interaction through Video Conferencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eristi, Suzan Duygu

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated Turkish and Canadian primary school students' ways of expressing their perception of interactive art education through video conferencing and that of cultural interaction through pictorial representations. The qualitative research data were collected in the form of pictures and interviews on interactive art education along…

  12. Discrete solvent effects on the effective interaction between charged colloids

    CERN Document Server

    Allahyarov, E

    2000-01-01

    Using computer simulations of two charged colloidal spheres with their counterions in a hard sphere solvent, we show that the granular nature of the solvent significantly influences the effective colloidal interaction. For divalent counterions, the total effective force can become attractive generated by counterion hydration, while for monovalent counterions the forces are repulsive and well-described by a solvent-induced colloidal charge renormalization. Both effects are not contained in the traditional "primitive" approaches but can be accounted for in a solvent-averaged primitive model.

  13. Effective interactions for extreme isospin conditions; Interactions effectives pour des conditions extremes d`isospin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabanat, E.

    1995-01-01

    One of the main goal in nuclear physics research is the study of nuclei in extreme conditions of spin and isospin. The more performing tools for theoretical predictions in this field are microscopic methods such as the Hartree-Fock one based on independent particle approximation. The main ingredient for such an approach is the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction. The actual trend being the study of nuclei more and more far from the stability valley, it is necessary to cast doubt over the validity of usual effective interaction. This work constitute a study on the way one can construct a new interaction allowing some theoretical predictions on nuclei far from the stability. We have thus made a complete study of symmetric infinite nuclear matter and asymmetric one up to pure neutron matter. One shows that the asymmetry coefficient, which was considered until now as fixing isospin properties, is not sufficient to have a correct description of very exotic isospin states. A new type of constraint is shown for fixing this degree of freedom: the neutron matter equation of state. One include this equation of state, taken from a theoretical model giving a good description of radii and masses of neutron stars. One can thus expect to build up new Skyrme interaction with realistic properties of ground state of very neutron-rich nuclei. (author). 63 refs., 68 figs., 15 tabs.

  14. Effectiveness of Artistic Interaction through Video Conferencing

    OpenAIRE

    Suzan Duygu Erişti

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated Turkish and Canadian primary school students’ ways of expressing their perception of interactive art education through video conferencing and that of cultural interaction through pictorial representations. The qualitative research data were collected in the form of pictures and interviews on interactive art education along with cultural components depicted in pictures. The results obtained were analyzed and interpreted based on the quantitative content analysis method...

  15. Effects and Mechanisms of Surface Topography on the Antiwear Properties of Molluscan Shells (Scapharca subcrenata Using the Fluid-Solid Interaction Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limei Tian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface topography (surface morphology and structure of the left Scapharca subcrenata shell differs from that of its right shell. This phenomenon is closely related to antiwear capabilities. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects and mechanisms of surface topography on the antiwear properties of Scapharca subcrenata shells. Two models are constructed—a rib morphology model (RMM and a coupled structure model (CSM—to mimic the topographies of the right and left shells. The antiwear performance and mechanisms of the two models are studied using the fluid-solid interaction (FSI method. The simulation results show that the antiwear capabilities of the CSM are superior to those of the RMM. The CSM is also more conducive to decreasing the impact velocity and energy of abrasive particles, reducing the probability of microcrack generation, extension, and desquamation. It can be deduced that in the real-world environment, Scapharca subcrenata’s left shell sustains more friction than its right shell. Thus, the coupled structure of the left shell is the result of extensive evolution.

  16. Global nuclear structure effects of tensor interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Zalewski, M; Rafalski, M; Satula, W; Werner, T R; Wyss, R A

    2009-01-01

    A direct fit of the isoscalar spin-orbit (SO) and both isoscalar and isovector tensor coupling constants to the f5/2-f7/2 SO splittings in 40Ca, 56Ni, and 48Ca nuclei requires a drastic reduction of the isoscalar SO strength and strong attractive tensor coupling constants. The aim of this work is to address further consequences of these strong attractive tensor and weak SO fields on binding energies, nuclear deformability, and high-spin states. In particular, we show that contribution to the nuclear binding energy due to the tensor field shows generic magic structure with tensorial magic numbers at N(Z)=14, 32, 56, or 90 corresponding to the maximum spin-asymmetries in 1d5/2, 1f7/2-2p3/2, 1g9/2-2d5/2 and 1h11/2-2f7/2 single-particle configurations and that these numbers are smeared out by pairing correlations and deformation effects. We also examine the consequences of strong attractive tensor fields and weak SO interaction on nuclear stability at the drip lines, in particular close to the tensorial doubly ma...

  17. Modality shift effects mimic multisensory interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gondan, Matthias; Vorberg, D.; Greenlee, M.W.

    2007-01-01

    A frequent approach to study interactions of the auditory and the visual system is to measure event-related potentials (ERPs) to auditory, visual, and auditory-visual stimuli (A, V, AV). A nonzero result of the AV - (A + V) comparison indicates that the sensory systems interact at a specific...

  18. The Effect of Water on Crack Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaede, O.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2009-04-01

    While the mechanical coupling between pore fluid and solid phase is relatively well understood, quantitative studies dealing with chemical-mechanical weakening in geological materials are rare. Many classical poroelastic problems can be addressed with the simple law of effective stress. Experimental studies show that the presence of a chemically active fluid can have effects that exceed the predictions of the law of effective stress. These chemical fluid-rock interactions alter the mechanical properties of the solid phase. Especially chemical-mechanical weakening has important ramifications for many areas of applied geosciences ranging from nuclear waste disposal over reservoir enhancement to fault stability. In this study, we model chemically induced changes of the size of the process zone around a crack tip. The knowledge of the process zone size is used to extend existing effective medium approximations of cracked solids. The stress distribution around a crack leads to a chemical potential gradient. This gradient will be a driver for mass diffusion through the solid phase. As an example, mass diffusion is towards the crack tip for a mode I crack. In this case a chemical reaction, that weakens the solid phase, will increase the size of the process zone around the crack tip. We apply our model to the prominent hydrolytic weakening effect observed in the quartz-water system (Griggs and Blacic, 1965). Hydrolytic weakening is generally attributed to water hydrolyzing the strong Si-O bonds of the quartz crystal. The hydrolysis replaces a Si-O-Si bridge with a relatively weak hydrogen bridge between two silanol groups. This enhances dislocation mobility and hence the yield stress is reduced. The plastic process zone around a crack tip is therefore larger in a wet crystal than in a dry crystal. We calculate the size of the process zone by solving this coupled mechanical-chemical problem with the Finite Element code ABAQUS. We consider single crack, collinear crack and

  19. Microevolutionary Effects of Habitat Fragmentation on Plant-Animal Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Fontúrbel, Francisco E.; Maureen M. Murúa

    2014-01-01

    Plant-animal interactions are a key component for biodiversity maintenance, but they are currently threatened by human activities. Habitat fragmentation might alter ecological interactions due to demographic changes, spatial discontinuities, and edge effects. Also, there are less evident effects of habitat fragmentation that potentially alter selective forces and compromise the fitness of the interacting species. Changes in the mutualistic and antagonistic interactions in fragmented habitats ...

  20. Evaluation of microcrack formation in root canals after instrumentation with different NiTi rotary file systems: a scanning electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çiçek, Ersan; Koçak, Mustafa Murat; Sağlam, Baran Can; Koçak, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the dentinal microcrack formation of ProTaper Universal, ProTaper Next, and WaveOne. Sixty extracted mandibular molars were selected. The mesial roots were resected and randomly divided into four groups (n = 15). The canals were prepared with hand files (group 1), ProTaper Universal (group 2), ProTaper Next (group 3), and WaveOne (group 4) instrument systems. The roots were separated horizontally at 3, 6, and 9 mm from the apex. Digital images were captured at ×40 magnification using scanning electron microscopy to detect microcrack formation. Statistical analysis was performed by Pearson Chi-square test. The prevalence of microcracks in group 2, group 3, and group 4 were significantly higher when compared to group 1 (p  0.05) in all sections. All instruments caused microcracks except for hand file. The highest percentage of microcrack was recorded in 3 mm section for all groups.

  1. Effects of interactions between humans and domesticated animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokkers, E.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Humans have many kinds of relationships with domesticated animals. To maintain relationships interactions are needed. Interactions with animals may be beneficial for humans but may also be risky. Scientific literature on effects of human¿animal relationships and interactions in a workplace, health-c

  2. A Proposal for Measuring Interactivity that Brings Learning Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tosh Yamamoto

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available It is proposed in this paper that some type of way to measure and visualize interactivity in the multimedia or e-Learning contents is necessary in order to clearly identify interactivity that brings learning effectiveness. Interactivity during learning will arouse students’ intellectual curiosity and motivate them to learn further. Although the interaction in the communication between the teacher and his/her students in a regular classroom is ideal, it is not possible to maintain the equivalence in the multimedia or e-Learning contents. In order to rigorously formalize the field of measuring interactivity as a theory, theoretical constructs such as interactivity, interest, knowledge, and experience are redefined first. Then, the defined “interactivity” is broken down to subcomponents to develop an assessment tool for the interactivity which brings learning effectiveness. In the end, it is proved that the interactivity in learning can be measured.

  3. Effects of Intergenerational Interaction on Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Carmen Requena; Gonzalez, Marta Zubiaur

    2008-01-01

    The world population pyramid has changed shape. However, this does not mean that societies have changed their negative concept of old age. Our study proposes an intergenerational service-learning program with 179 university students and 101 slightly depressed elderly people. The results show that the elderly people who interacted improved in…

  4. An Energy-Equivalent d+/d− Damage Model with Enhanced Microcrack Closure-Reopening Capabilities for Cohesive-Frictional Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Miguel; Tesei, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, an energy-equivalent orthotropic d+/d− damage model for cohesive-frictional materials is formulated. Two essential mechanical features are addressed, the damage-induced anisotropy and the microcrack closure-reopening (MCR) effects, in order to provide an enhancement of the original d+/d− model proposed by Faria et al. 1998, while keeping its high algorithmic efficiency unaltered. First, in order to ensure the symmetry and positive definiteness of the secant operator, the new formulation is developed in an energy-equivalence framework. This proves thermodynamic consistency and allows one to describe a fundamental feature of the orthotropic damage models, i.e., the reduction of the Poisson’s ratio throughout the damage process. Secondly, a “multidirectional” damage procedure is presented to extend the MCR capabilities of the original model. The fundamental aspects of this approach, devised for generic cyclic conditions, lie in maintaining only two scalar damage variables in the constitutive law, while preserving memory of the degradation directionality. The enhanced unilateral capabilities are explored with reference to the problem of a panel subjected to in-plane cyclic shear, with or without vertical pre-compression; depending on the ratio between shear and pre-compression, an absent, a partial or a complete stiffness recovery is simulated with the new multidirectional procedure. PMID:28772793

  5. An Energy-Equivalent d⁺/d(-) Damage Model with Enhanced Microcrack Closure-Reopening Capabilities for Cohesive-Frictional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Miguel; Tesei, Claudia

    2017-04-20

    In this paper, an energy-equivalent orthotropic d⁺/d(-) damage model for cohesive-frictional materials is formulated. Two essential mechanical features are addressed, the damage-induced anisotropy and the microcrack closure-reopening (MCR) effects, in order to provide an enhancement of the original d⁺/d(-) model proposed by Faria et al. 1998, while keeping its high algorithmic efficiency unaltered. First, in order to ensure the symmetry and positive definiteness of the secant operator, the new formulation is developed in an energy-equivalence framework. This proves thermodynamic consistency and allows one to describe a fundamental feature of the orthotropic damage models, i.e., the reduction of the Poisson's ratio throughout the damage process. Secondly, a "multidirectional" damage procedure is presented to extend the MCR capabilities of the original model. The fundamental aspects of this approach, devised for generic cyclic conditions, lie in maintaining only two scalar damage variables in the constitutive law, while preserving memory of the degradation directionality. The enhanced unilateral capabilities are explored with reference to the problem of a panel subjected to in-plane cyclic shear, with or without vertical pre-compression; depending on the ratio between shear and pre-compression, an absent, a partial or a complete stiffness recovery is simulated with the new multidirectional procedure.

  6. Effects of interactions between humans and domesticated animals

    OpenAIRE

    Bokkers, E.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Humans have many kinds of relationships with domesticated animals. To maintain relationships interactions are needed. Interactions with animals may be beneficial for humans but may also be risky. Scientific literature on effects of human¿animal relationships and interactions in a workplace, health-care and residential context has been reviewed to develop ideas about the effects farm animals can have on humans. Although there are quite a few studies, the variety of methods, the complexity of t...

  7. Explaining Interaction Effects within and across Levels of Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Ulf; Cuervo-Cazurra, Alvaro; Nielsen, Bo Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Many manuscripts submitted to the Journal of International Business Studies propose an interaction effect in their models in an effort to explain the complexity and contingency of relationships across borders. In this article, we provide guidance on how best to explain the interaction effects...

  8. Genotype W environment interaction effects on some physiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genotype W environment interaction effects on some physiological yield ... Ghana Journal of Agricultural Science ... study the yield basis and environmental effects on 31cowpea genotypes of early, medium and late maturities. ... Article Metrics.

  9. Evidence for multiple stressor interactions and effects on coral reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Stephen S; Graham, Nicholas A J; Connolly, Sean R

    2014-03-01

    Concern is growing about the potential effects of interacting multiple stressors, especially as the global climate changes. We provide a comprehensive review of multiple stressor interactions in coral reef ecosystems, which are widely considered to be one of the most sensitive ecosystems to global change. First, we synthesized coral reef studies that examined interactions of two or more stressors, highlighting stressor interactions (where one stressor directly influences another) and potentially synergistic effects on response variables (where two stressors interact to produce an effect that is greater than purely additive). For stressor-stressor interactions, we found 176 studies that examined at least 2 of the 13 stressors of interest. Applying network analysis to analyze relationships between stressors, we found that pathogens were exacerbated by more costressors than any other stressor, with ca. 78% of studies reporting an enhancing effect by another stressor. Sedimentation, storms, and water temperature directly affected the largest number of other stressors. Pathogens, nutrients, and crown-of-thorns starfish were the most-influenced stressors. We found 187 studies that examined the effects of two or more stressors on a third dependent variable. The interaction of irradiance and temperature on corals has been the subject of more research (62 studies, 33% of the total) than any other combination of stressors, with many studies reporting a synergistic effect on coral symbiont photosynthetic performance (n = 19). Second, we performed a quantitative meta-analysis of existing literature on this most-studied interaction (irradiance and temperature). We found that the mean effect size of combined treatments was statistically indistinguishable from a purely additive interaction, although it should be noted that the sample size was relatively small (n = 26). Overall, although in aggregate a large body of literature examines stressor effects on coral reefs and coral

  10. Spin effects in the weak interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freedman, S.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA) Chicago Univ., IL (USA). Dept. of Physics Chicago Univ., IL (USA). Enrico Fermi Inst.)

    1990-01-01

    Modern experiments investigating the beta decay of the neutron and light nuclei are still providing important constraints on the theory of the weak interaction. Beta decay experiments are yielding more precise values for allowed and induced weak coupling constants and putting constraints on possible extensions to the standard electroweak model. Here we emphasize the implications of recent experiments to pin down the strengths of the weak vector and axial vector couplings of the nucleon.

  11. Effective polarization interaction potentials of the partially ionized dense plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramazanov, T S [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96a, 050012 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Dzhumagulova, K N [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96a, 050012 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Omarbakiyeva, Yu A [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96a, 050012 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Roepke, G [Institute of Physics, University of Rostock, D-18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2006-04-28

    The effective polarization interaction potential between charged and neutral particles is considered for a partially ionized plasma. This pseudopotential is deduced taking into account quantum-mechanical effects at short distances as well as screening effects at large distances. Furthermore, a cutoff radius is obtained using a modified effective-range theory. Explicit results for parameters describing the interaction of the atom with charged particles are given.

  12. Effect Modification and Interaction Terms: It Takes Two to Tango.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jupiter, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    In this Investigators' Corner I look more deeply into the previously discussed phenomenon of effect modification. I revisit an explanation and examples of the phenomenon and then examine how to account for it statistically. Specifically, I show, in detail, how to write a regression equation that includes interaction terms that account for the effect modification. Finally, I look at interpretation of regression coefficients both with and without the presence of effect modification, and the associated interaction terms.

  13. Global environmental effects versus galaxy interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, Josefa; Padilla, Nelson; Alonso, M Sol; Lambas, Diego G

    2009-01-01

    We explore properties of close galaxy pairs and merging systems selected from the SDSS-DR4 in different environments with the aim to assess the relative importance of the role of interactions over global environmental processes. For this purpose, we perform a comparative study of galaxies with and without close companions as a function of local density and host-halo mass, carefully removing sources of possible biases. We find that at low and high local density environments, colours and morphologies of close galaxy pairs are very similar to those of isolated galaxies. At intermediate densities, we detect significant differences, indicating that close pairs could have experienced a more rapid transition onto the red sequence than isolated galaxies. The presence of a correlation between colours and morphologies indicates that the physical mechanism responsible for the colour transformation also operates changing galaxy morphologies. Regardless of dark matter halo mass, we show that the percentage of red galaxies...

  14. Personality Factors and Expectation Effects in Teacher-Student Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Robert S.

    Although the effect of teacher expectations on student performance has been well documented, little research has focused on the effect of teacher personality styles on student-teacher interactions. To investigate the effect of teachers' locus of control and their expectations of their own effectiveness on student success, 77 female college…

  15. Edge-effect interactions in fragmented and patchy landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porensky, Lauren M; Young, Truman P

    2013-06-01

    Ecological edges are increasingly recognized as drivers of landscape patterns and ecosystem processes. In fragmented and patchy landscapes (e.g., a fragmented forest or a savanna with scattered termite mounds), edges can become so numerous that their effects pervade the entire landscape. Results of recent studies in such landscapes show that edge effects can be altered by the presence or proximity of other nearby edges. We considered the theoretical significance of edge-effect interactions, illustrated various landscape configurations that support them and reviewed existing research on this topic. Results of studies from a variety of locations and ecosystem types show that edge-effect interactions can have significant consequences for ecosystems and conservation, including higher tree mortality rates in tropical rainforest fragments, reduced bird densities in grassland fragments, and bush encroachment and reduced wildlife densities in a tropical savanna. To clarify this underappreciated concept and synthesize existing work, we devised a conceptual framework for edge-effect interactions. We first worked to reduce terminological confusion by clarifying differences among terms such as edge intersection and edge interaction. For cases in which nearby edge effects interact, we proposed three possible forms of interaction: strengthening (presence of a second edge causes stronger edge effects), weakening (presence of a second edge causes weaker edge effects), and emergent (edge effects change completely in the presence of a second edge). By clarifying terms and concepts, this framework enables more precise descriptions of edge-effect interactions and facilitates comparisons of results among disparate study systems and response variables. A better understanding of edge-effect interactions will pave the way for more appropriate modeling, conservation, and management in complex landscapes. © 2013 Society for Conservation Biology.

  16. Effect of situation on mother-infant interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, A Janneke B M; Vreeswijk, Charlotte M J M; van Bakel, Hedwig J A

    2013-02-01

    Research has shown that the early parent-infant relationship is of critical importance for children's developmental outcomes. While the effect of different settings on mother-infant interactive behavior is well studied, only few researchers systematically examined the effect of situational variables on mother-infant interaction. In the present study the effect of situational variables within the home setting on the quality of mother-infant interaction at 6 months was examined as well as the consistency in the quality of behaviors of mother and infant across these situations. During a home visit 292 mother-infant dyads were videotaped in three different situations (i.e., free play, face-to-face play, and diaper change). Interactive behaviors of mother and infant were assessed with the NICHD global ratings scales. Results showed substantial effects of situation on the interactive behavior of the mother-infant dyad. Despite the observed situational effects maternal sensitivity to non-distress, intrusiveness, stimulation of development, and positive regard and all five infant behavioral scales remained stable across the different situations. Insight into situational effects within the home setting on the quality of mother-infant interactive behavior may assist researchers to make well-informed decisions about measuring the parent-infant interaction in one or more specific situations.

  17. Effectiveness of Interactive Video to Teach CPR Theory and Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyness, Ann L.

    This study investigated whether an interactive video system of instruction taught cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) as effectively as traditional instruction. Using standards of the American Heart Association, the study was designed with two randomized groups to be taught either by live instruction or by interactive video. Subjects were 100…

  18. The Effects of Learning in Interactive Monetary Policy Committees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berk, Jan Marc; Bierut, Beata K.

    2004-01-01

    We develop a theoretical framework for studying the effects of interaction on the quaJity of decision-making by monetary policy committees. We show that interaction, i.e. increasing one's expertise through an exchange of views, is most likely not to result in interdependent voting behaviour.Therefor

  19. The Effects of Learning in Interactive Monetary Policy Committees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Berk (Jan Marc); B.K. Bierut

    2004-01-01

    textabstractWe develop a theoretical framework for studying the effects of interaction on the quaJity of decision-making by monetary policy committees. We show that interaction, i.e. increasing one's expertise through an exchange of views, is most likely not to result in interdependent voting behavi

  20. Technique development for modulus, microcracking, hermeticity, and coating evaluation capability characterization of SiC/SiC tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Xunxiang [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ang, Caen K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Singh, Gyanender P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Driven by the need to enlarge the safety margins of nuclear fission reactors in accident scenarios, research and development of accident-tolerant fuel has become an important topic in the nuclear engineering and materials community. A continuous-fiber SiC/SiC composite is under consideration as a replacement for traditional zirconium alloy cladding owing to its high-temperature stability, chemical inertness, and exceptional irradiation resistance. An important task is the development of characterization techniques for SiC/SiC cladding, since traditional work using rectangular bars or disks cannot directly provide useful information on the properties of SiC/SiC composite tubes for fuel cladding applications. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory, experimental capabilities are under development to characterize the modulus, microcracking, and hermeticity of as-fabricated, as-irradiated SiC/SiC composite tubes. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy has been validated as a promising technique to evaluate the elastic properties of SiC/SiC composite tubes and microcracking within the material. A similar technique, impulse excitation, is efficient in determining the basic mechanical properties of SiC bars prepared by chemical vapor deposition; it also has potential for application in studying the mechanical properties of SiC/SiC composite tubes. Complete evaluation of the quality of the developed coatings, a major mitigation strategy against gas permeation and hydrothermal corrosion, requires the deployment of various experimental techniques, such as scratch indentation, tensile pulling-off tests, and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, a comprehensive permeation test station is being established to assess the hermeticity of SiC/SiC composite tubes and to determine the H/D/He permeability of SiC/SiC composites. This report summarizes the current status of the development of these experimental capabilities.

  1. X-ray computed microtomography of three-dimensional microcracks and self-healing in engineered cementitious composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shuai; Li, Mo

    2015-01-01

    Concrete cracking and deterioration can potentially be addressed by innovative self-healing cementitious materials, which can autogenously regain transport properties and mechanical characteristics after the damage self-healing process. For the development of such materials, it is crucial, but challenging, to precisely characterize the extent and quality of self-healing due to a variety of factors. This study adopted x-ray computed microtomography (μCT) to derive three-dimensional morphological data on microcracks before and after healing in engineered cementitious composite (ECC). Scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy were also used to morphologically and chemically analyze the healing products. This work showed that the evolution of the microcrack 3D structure due to self-healing in cementitious materials can be directly and quantitatively characterized by μCT. A detailed description of the μCT image analysis method applied to ECC self-healing was presented. The results revealed that the self-healing extent and rate strongly depended on initial surface crack width, with smaller crack width favoring fast and robust self-healing. We also found that the self-healing mechanism in cementitious materials is dependent on crack depth. The region of a crack close to the surface (from 0 to around 50-150 μm below the surface) can be sealed quickly with crystalline precipitates. However, at greater depths the healing process inside the crack takes a significantly longer time to occur, with healing products more likely resulting from continued hydration and pozzolanic reactions. Finally, the μCT method was compared with other self-healing characterization methods, with discussions on its importance in generating new scientific knowledge for the development of robust self-healing cementitious materials.

  2. Medium effects in $K^+$ nuclear interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, E; Mares, J

    1997-01-01

    Total and reaction cross sections are derived self consistently from the attenuation cross sections measured in transmission experiments at the AGS for K^+ on Li^6, C, Si and Ca in the momentum range of 500-700 MeV/c by using a V_{opt}=t_{eff}(rho)rho optical potential. Self consistency requires, for the KN in-medium t matrix, that Im t_{eff}(rho) increases linearly with the average nuclear density in excess of a threshold value of 0.088+-0.004 fm^-3. The density dependence of Re t_{eff}(rho) is studied phenomenologically, and also applying a relativistic mean field approach, by fitting the integral cross sections. The real part of the optical potential is found to be systematically less repulsive with increasing energy than expected from the free-space repulsive KN interaction. When the elastic scattering data for Li^6 and C at 715 MeV/c are included in the analysis, a tendency of Re V_{opt} to generate an attractive pocket at the nuclear surface is observed.

  3. Effect of Coulomb interaction on multi-electronwave packet dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiokawa, T. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, 305-8571 (Japan); Takada, Y. [Faculty of Engineering, Tokyo University of Science, Chiyoda, Tokyo, 102-0073, Japan and CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (Japan); Konabe, S.; Hatsugai, Y. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, 305-8571, Japan and CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (Japan); Muraguchi, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8579, Japan and CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (Japan); Endoh, T. [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8579, Japan and Center for Spintronics Integrated Systems, Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8577, Japan and CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (Japan); Shiraishi, K. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, 305-8571, Japan and Center for Computational Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, 305-8577, Japan and CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (Japan)

    2013-12-04

    We have investigated the effect of Coulomb interaction on electron transport in a one-dimensional nanoscale structure using a multi-electron wave packet approach. To study the time evolution, we numerically solve the time-dependent Hartree-Fock equation, finding that the electron wave packet dynamics strongly depends on the Coulomb interaction strength. When the Coulomb interaction is large, each electron wave packet moves separately in the presence of an electric field. With weak Coulomb interaction, however, the electron wave packets overlap, forming and moving as one collective wave packet.

  4. Effect of Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction on magnetic vortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. M. Luo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya (DM interaction on the vortex in magnetic microdisk was investigated by micro-magnetic simulation based on the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation. Our results show that the DM interaction modifies the size of the vortex core, and also induces an out-of-plane magnetization component at the edge and inside the disk. The DM interaction can destabilizes one vortex handedness, generate a bias field to the vortex core and couple the vortex polarity and chirality. This DM-interaction-induced coupling can therefore provide a new way to control vortex polarity and chirality.

  5. EFFECTS OF LONG-RANGE INTERACTIONS ON THE FERROELECTRIC FILM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴银忠; 李振亚

    2001-01-01

    The effect of long-range interactions on the spontaneous polarization and the Curie temperature of the ferroelectricfilm is investigated by use of the Landau theory. On the assumption that the nearest-n eighbour interaction remains constant, we find that the spontaneous polarization and the phase transition temperature increase with the enhancement of the long-range interactions. In the case of positive extrapolation length, the critical thickness of the ferroelectric film,in which a size-driven phase transition occurs, decreases with the enhancement of the long-range interactions.

  6. Spin-dependent effective interactions for halo nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Garrido, E; Jensen, A S

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the spin-dependence of the effective two-body interactions appropriate for three-body computations. The only reasonable choice seems to be the fine and hyperfine interactions known for atomic electrons interacting with the nucleus. One exception is the nucleon-nucleon interaction imposing a different type of symmetry. We use the two-neutron halo nucleus 11Li as illustration. We demonstrate that models with the wrong spin-dependence are basically without predictive power. The Pauli forbidden core and valence states must be consistently treated.

  7. New effects in the interaction between electromagnetic sources mediated by nonminimal Lorentz violating interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Borges, L H C; Barone, F A

    2016-01-01

    This paper is dedicated to the study of interactions between external sources for the electromagnetic field in a Lorentz symmetry breaking scenario. We focus on a particular higher derivative, Lorentz violating interaction that arises from a specific model that was argued to lead to interesting effects in the low energy phenomenology of light pseudoscalars interacting with photons. The kind of higher derivative Lorentz violating interaction we discuss do not appear in the well known Standard Model Extension, therefore they are called nonminimal. They are usually expected to be relevant only at very high energies, but we argue they might also induce relevant effects in low energy phenomena. Special attention is given for phenomena that have no counterpart in Maxwell theory.

  8. New effects in the interaction between electromagnetic sources mediated by nonminimal Lorentz violating interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, L.H.C.; Ferrari, A.F. [Universidade Federal do ABC, Centro de Ciencias Naturais e Humanas, Santo Andre, SP (Brazil); Barone, F.A. [Universidade Federal de Itajuba, IFQ, Itajuba, MG (Brazil)

    2016-11-15

    This paper is dedicated to the study of interactions between external sources for the electromagnetic field in the presence of Lorentz symmetry breaking. We focus on a higher derivative, Lorentz violating interaction that arises from a specific model that was argued to lead to interesting effects in the low energy phenomenology of light pseudoscalars interacting with photons. The kind of higher derivative Lorentz violating interaction we discuss are called nonminimal. They are usually expected to be relevant only at very high energies, but we argue they might also induce relevant effects in low energy phenomena. Indeed, we show that the Lorentz violating background considered by us leads to several phenomena that have no counterpart in Maxwell theory, such as nontrivial torques on isolated electric dipoles, as well as nontrivial forces and torques between line currents and point like charges, as well as among Dirac strings and other electromagnetic sources. (orig.)

  9. Microevolutionary Effects of Habitat Fragmentation on Plant-Animal Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco E. Fontúrbel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant-animal interactions are a key component for biodiversity maintenance, but they are currently threatened by human activities. Habitat fragmentation might alter ecological interactions due to demographic changes, spatial discontinuities, and edge effects. Also, there are less evident effects of habitat fragmentation that potentially alter selective forces and compromise the fitness of the interacting species. Changes in the mutualistic and antagonistic interactions in fragmented habitats could significantly influence the plant reproductive output and the fauna assemblage associated with. Fragmented habitats may trigger contemporary evolution processes and open new evolutionary opportunities. Interacting parties with a diffuse and asymmetric relationship are less susceptible to local extinction but more prone to evolve towards new interactions or autonomy. However, highly specialized mutualisms are likely to disappear. On the other hand, ecological interactions may mutually modulate their response in fragmented habitats, especially when antagonistic interactions disrupt mutualistic ones. Ecoevolutionary issues of habitat fragmentation have been little explored, but the empiric evidence available suggests that the complex modification of ecological interactions in fragmented habitats might lead to nonanalogous communities on the long term.

  10. Effects of dipole-dipole interaction on entanglement transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Hong; Xiong Heng-Na

    2008-01-01

    A system consisting of two different atoms interacting with a two-mode vacuum, where each atom is resonant only with one cavity mode, is considered.The effects of dipole-dipole (dd) interaction between two atoms on the atom-atom entanglement and mode-mode entanglement are investigated. For a weak dd interaction, when the atoms are initially separable, the entanglement between them can be induced by the dd interaction, and the entanglement transfer between the atoms and the modes occurs efficiently; when the atoms are initially entangled, the entanglement transfer is almost not influenced by the dd interaction. However, for a strong dd interaction, it is difficult to transfer the entanglement from the atoms to the modes, but the atom-atom entanglement can be maintained when the atoms are initially entangled.

  11. Determining the Effect of Interactive Invention Instructional Strategy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    First Lady

    Key Words: Interactive invention, achievement in Physics, Pre-service teachers ... country has been changing from one system of education to another. However, the .... Where the main effects were significant, the multiple classification analysis.

  12. Effects of Website Interactivity on Online Retail Shopping Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Hafizul

    Motivations to engage in retail online shopping can include both utilitarian and hedonic shopping dimensions. To cater to these consumers, online retailers can create a cognitively and esthetically rich shopping environment, through sophisticated levels of interactive web utilities and features, offering not only utilitarian benefits and attributes but also providing hedonic benefits of enjoyment. Since the effect of interactive websites has proven to stimulate online consumer’s perceptions, this study presumes that websites with multimedia rich interactive utilities and features can influence online consumers’ shopping motivations and entice them to modify or even transform their original shopping predispositions by providing them with attractive and enhanced interactive features and controls, thus generating a positive attitude towards products and services offered by the retailer. This study seeks to explore the effects of Web interactivity on online consumer behavior through an attitudinal model of technology acceptance.

  13. Effective Field Theory of Interactions on the Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente, Manuel; Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas

    2015-12-01

    We consider renormalization of effective field theory interactions by discretizing the continuum on a tight-binding lattice. After studying the one-dimensional problem, we address s-wave collisions in three dimensions and relate the bare lattice coupling constants to the continuum coupling constants. Our method constitutes a very simple avenue for the systematic renormalization in effective field theory, and is especially useful as the number of interaction parameters increases.

  14. Effect of interband interaction on isotope effect exponent of MgB2 superconductors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Udomsamuthirun; C Kumvongsa; A Burakorn; P Changkanarth

    2006-03-01

    The exact formula of c's equation and the isotope effect exponent of two-band s-wave superconductors in the weak-coupling limit are derived by considering the influence of interband interaction. In each band, our model consists of two pairing interactions: the electron-phonon interaction and non-electron-phonon interaction. We find that the isotope effect exponent of MgB2, = 0.3 with c ≈ 40 K can be found in the weak coupling regime and interband interaction of electron-phonon shows more effect on the isotope effect exponent than on the interband interaction of non-phonon.

  15. Many-body fits of phase-equivalent effective interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Calvin W

    2010-01-01

    In many-body theory it is often useful to renormalize short-distance, high-momentum components of an interaction via unitary transformations. Such transformations preserve the on-shell physical observables of the two-body system (mostly phase-shifts, hence unitarily-connected effective interactions are often called phase-equivalent), while modifying off-shell T-matrix elements influential in many-body systems. In this paper I lay out a general and systematic approach for controlling the off-shell behavior of an effective interaction, which can be adjusted to many-body properties, and present an application to trapped fermions at the unitary

  16. Interaction-Free Effects Between Distant Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonov, Yakir; Elitzur, Avshalom C; Smolin, Lee

    2016-01-01

    A gedankenexperiment is presented where an excited and a ground-state atom are positioned such that, within the former's half-life time, they exchange a photon with 50% probability. A measurement of their energy state will therefore indicate in 50% of the cases that no photon was exchanged. Yet other measurements would reveal that, by the mere possibility of exchange, the two atoms become entangled. Consequently, the "no exchange" result, apparently precluding entanglement, is non-locally established between the atoms by this very entanglement. When densely repeated several times, this result gives rise to the Quantum Zeno effect as well, again exerted between distant atoms without photon exchange. We discuss these experiments as variants of IFM, now generalized for both spatial and temporal uncertainties. We next employ weak measurements for a sharper and simpler elucidation of the paradox. Interpretational issues are discussed in the conclusion, and a resolution is offered within the Two-State Vector Formal...

  17. [Parodontitis pathogenetic factors, their interaction and effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipiani, Nana V; Iverieli, M; Mosemgvdlishvili, N; Kipiani, Nino V; Jafaridze, S

    2014-03-01

    Induced by microbial intervention oxidative stress causes electronic transport disorder in gingival cells mitochondrias as well as decrease of energogenesis and increase of lipoperoxidation. In oral cavity local immunity is decreased in parodontitis, that is related with immunoglobulin A deficiency and lysozyme activity decrease. Against this background, microbial factors damaging effect on periodont is intensified. In parodontitis the free nitric oxide (NO) content decrease in gingival tissues and its appearance in saliva is related with transformation of NO into toxic peroxinitrite, that on its turn enhances oxidation, parodontal injury, cell degra dation and necrosis. Nitrooxide defficiency in gingival mucosal cells is characterized by decreased protein P-53 expression and terminal differentiation disorder of the cells. Mitochodria related energogenesis disorder in gums causes inhibition of their cell regeneration, which together with apoptotic changes is characterized with parodontal tissue destruction and depletion.

  18. Interaction effects in a microscopic quantum wire model with strong spin-orbit interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, G. W.; Ganahl, M.; Schuricht, D.; Evertz, H. G.; Andergassen, S.

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the effect of strong interactions on the spectral properties of quantum wires with strong Rashba spin-orbit (SO) interaction in a magnetic field, using a combination of matrix product state and bosonization techniques. Quantum wires with strong Rashba SO interaction and magnetic field exhibit a partial gap in one-half of the conducting modes. Such systems have attracted wide-spread experimental and theoretical attention due to their unusual physical properties, among which are spin-dependent transport, or a topological superconducting phase when under the proximity effect of an s-wave superconductor. As a microscopic model for the quantum wire we study an extended Hubbard model with SO interaction and Zeeman field. We obtain spin resolved spectral densities from the real-time evolution of excitations, and calculate the phase diagram. We find that interactions increase the pseudo gap at k = 0 and thus also enhance the Majorana-supporting phase and stabilize the helical spin order. Furthermore, we calculate the optical conductivity and compare it with the low energy spiral Luttinger liquid result, obtained from field theoretical calculations. With interactions, the optical conductivity is dominated by an excotic excitation of a bound soliton-antisoliton pair known as a breather state. We visualize the oscillating motion of the breather state, which could provide the route to their experimental detection in e.g. cold atom experiments.

  19. Breit interaction effect on dielectronic recombination of heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Nobuyuki

    2016-11-01

    Interaction of highly charged heavy ions with electrons is one of the most important atomic processes in high temperature plasmas, including astrophysical plasmas such as solar corona and artificial plasmas such as fusion reactor plasmas. Therefore it has been well studied to date, both theoretically and experimentally, to accumulate the atomic data required for understanding or controlling such plasmas. However, there still remains interesting subjects that receive remarkable attention from the atomic physics point of view. One of them, which is the subject of this review, is substantially large Breit interaction effects on the resonance recombination process called dielectronic recombination. The Breit interaction is a relativistic effect in the electron-electron interaction potential; it is thus generally important for highly charged heavy ions. However, in the calculation of the energy levels for heavy ions, the Breit interaction is still a small perturbation compared with the main Coulomb term. On the other hand for the dielectronic recombination, it was found that the Breit interaction can enhance the cross sections significantly. It was also found that the Breit interaction can play not only an important, but even a dominant role in determining the angular distribution of x-rays emitted in the recombination processes. This topical review introduces the recent experimental and theoretical activities to clarify the essential origin of the strong effects.

  20. Effective field theory analysis of the self-interacting chameleon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanctuary, Hillary; Sturani, Riccardo

    2010-08-01

    We analyse the phenomenology of a self-interacting scalar field in the context of the chameleon scenario originally proposed by Khoury and Weltman. In the absence of self-interactions, this type of scalar field can mediate long range interactions and simultaneously evade constraints from violation of the weak equivalence principle. By applying to such a scalar field the effective field theory method proposed for Einstein gravity by Goldberger and Rothstein, we give a thorough perturbative evaluation of the importance of non-derivative self-interactions in determining the strength of the chameleon mediated force in the case of orbital motion. The self-interactions are potentially dangerous as they can change the long range behaviour of the field. Nevertheless, we show that they do not lead to any dramatic phenomenological consequence with respect to the linear case and solar system constraints are fulfilled.

  1. Impact of nonlinear effective interactions on GFT quantum gravity condensates

    CERN Document Server

    Pithis, Andreas G A; Tomov, Petar

    2016-01-01

    We present the numerical analysis of effectively interacting Group Field Theory (GFT) models in the context of the GFT quantum gravity condensate analogue of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation for real Bose-Einstein condensates including combinatorially local interaction terms. Thus we go beyond the usually considered construction for free models. More precisely, considering such interactions in a weak regime, we find solutions for which the expectation value of the number operator N is finite, as in the free case. When tuning the interaction to the strongly nonlinear regime, however, we obtain solutions for which N grows and eventually blows up, which is reminiscent of what one observes for real Bose-Einstein condensates, where a strong interaction regime can only be realized at high density. This behaviour suggests the breakdown of the Bogoliubov ansatz for quantum gravity condensates and the need for non-Fock representations to describe the system when the condensate constituents are strongly correlated. Furthe...

  2. Interaction mechanisms and biological effects of static magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1994-06-01

    Mechanisms through which static magnetic fields interact with living systems are described and illustrated by selected experimental observations. These mechanisms include electrodynamic interactions with moving, ionic charges (blood flow and nerve impulse conduction), magnetomechanical interactions (orientation and translation of molecules structures and magnetic particles), and interactions with electronic spin states in charge transfer reactions (photo-induced electron transfer in photosynthesis). A general summary is also presented of the biological effects of static magnetic fields. There is convincing experimental evidence for magnetoreception mechanisms in several classes of lower organisms, including bacteria and marine organisms. However, in more highly evolved species of animals, there is no evidence that the interactions of static magnetic fields with flux densities up to 2 Tesla (1 Tesla [T] = 10{sup 4} Gauss) produce either behavioral or physiolocical alterations. These results, based on controlled studies with laboratory animals, are consistent with the outcome of recent epidemiological surveys on human populations exposed occupationally to static magnetic fields.

  3. SU(2) Higher-order effective quark interactions from polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braghin, Fábio L.

    2016-10-01

    Higher order quark effective interactions are found for SU(2) flavor by departing from a non-local quark-quark interaction. By integrating out a component of the quark field, the determinant is expanded in chirally symmetric and symmetry breaking effective interactions up to the fifth order in the quark bilinears. The resulting coupling constants are resolved in the leading order of the longwavelength limit and exact numerical ratios between several of these coupling constants are obtained in the large quark mass limit. In this level, chiral invariant interactions only show up in even powers of the quark bilinears, i.e. O(ψ bar ψ) 2 n (n = 1 , 2 , 3 , . .), whereas (explicit) chiral symmetry breaking terms emerge as O(ψ bar ψ) n being always proportional to some power of the Lagrangian quark mass.

  4. Partial wave decomposition of finite-range effective tensor interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Davesne, D; Pastore, A; Navarro, J

    2016-01-01

    We perform a detailed analysis of the properties of the finite-range tensor term associated with the Gogny and M3Y effective interactions. In particular, by using a partial wave decomposition of the equation of state of symmetric nuclear matter, we show how we can extract their tensor parameters directly from microscopic results based on bare nucleon-nucleon interactions. Furthermore, we show that the zero-range limit of both finite-range interactions has the form of the N3LO Skyrme pseudo-potential, which thus constitutes a reliable approximation in the density range relevant for finite nuclei. Finally, we use Brueckner-Hartree-Fock results to fix the tensor parameters for the three effective interactions.

  5. Site-City Interaction through Modifications of Site Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Semblat, Jean-François; Guéguen, Philippe; Bard, Pierre-Yves; Duval, Anne Marie

    2009-01-01

    The analysis of seismic site effects generally disregards the influence of surface structures on the free field motion in densely urbanized areas. This paper aims at investigating this particular problem called site-city interaction especially by comparison to the "free-field" amplification process. Several evidences (experimental, analytical, numerical) of the site-city interaction phenomenon have been given in previous work (Gu\\'eguen, Bard, Semblat 2000). The influence of site city-interaction could be large for structures having eigenfrequencies close to that of the surface soil layers. Furthermore, the density of structures is also an important governing parameter of the problem. Considering a specific site (Nice, France) where site-city interaction is supposed to be significant, we start from detailed experimental and numerical studies of seismic site effects giving both amplification levels and occuring frequencies, as well as the location of the maximum amplification areas. The influence of site-city ...

  6. Nuclear Effects in Neutrino Interactions at Low Momentum Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miltenberger, Ethan Ryan [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This is a study to identify predicted effects of the carbon nucleus environment on neutrino - nucleus interactions with low momentum transfer. A large sample of neutrino interaction data collected by the MINERvA experiment is analyzed to show the distribution of charged hadron energy in a region with low momentum transfer. These distributions reveal a major discrepancy between the data and a popular interaction model with only the simplest Fermi gas nuclear effects. Detailed analysis of systematic uncertainties due to energy scale and resolution can account for only a little of the discrepancy. Two additional nuclear model effects, a suppression/screening effect (RPA), and the addition of a meson exchange current process (MEC), are shown to improve the description of the data.

  7. Retardation effects in induced atomic dipole-dipole interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, S D

    2016-01-01

    We present mean-field calculations of azimuthally averaged retarded dipole-dipole interactions in a Bose-Einstein condensate induced by a laser, at both long and short wavelengths. Our calculations demonstrate that dipole-dipole interactions become significantly stronger at shorter wavelengths, by as much as 30-fold, due to retardation effects. This enhancement, along with inclusion of the dynamic polarizability, indicate a method of inducing long-range interatomic interactions in neutral atom condensates at significantly lower intensities than previously realized.

  8. Spin-Seebeck effect in a strongly interacting Fermi gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, C.H.; Stoof, H.T.C.; Duine, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    We study the spin-Seebeck effect in a strongly interacting, two-component Fermi gas and propose an experiment to measure this effect by relatively displacing spin-up and spin-down atomic clouds in a trap using spin-dependent temperature gradients. We compute the spin-Seebeck coefficient and related

  9. Evaluating Differential Effects Using Regression Interactions and Regression Mixture Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horn, M. Lee; Jaki, Thomas; Masyn, Katherine; Howe, George; Feaster, Daniel J.; Lamont, Andrea E.; George, Melissa R. W.; Kim, Minjung

    2015-01-01

    Research increasingly emphasizes understanding differential effects. This article focuses on understanding regression mixture models, which are relatively new statistical methods for assessing differential effects by comparing results to using an interactive term in linear regression. The research questions which each model answers, their…

  10. Spin-Seebeck effect in a strongly interacting Fermi gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, C.H.; Stoof, H.T.C.; Duine, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    We study the spin-Seebeck effect in a strongly interacting, two-component Fermi gas and propose an experiment to measure this effect by relatively displacing spin-up and spin-down atomic clouds in a trap using spin-dependent temperature gradients. We compute the spin-Seebeck coefficient and related

  11. Interactions between chemical additives and their effects on emulsion separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, M.; Stewart, A.C.; Davies, G.A.

    1996-12-31

    In offshore production, chemical additives are used to combat various operational problems such as corrosion, scaling, foaming and emulsion formation etc. Although individual chemicals may be found to be effective when used alone, there is no guarantee that they will perform as well when present as part of the complex cocktail of additives in the production fluids entering the primary separator. Little is known about interactions between these chemical additives and their effects on gas/oil/water phase separation. This paper will report results from a multi-national sponsored project with the aim of understanding the ways in which chemical additives interact and their effects on emulsion stability with an ultimate objective of developing a strategy for reduction of the chemical inventory offshore. The chemical additives studied include demulsifiers, corrosion inhibitors, scale inhibitors and antifoamants. Both interfacial tension and surface film pressure measurements have been successfully employed to identify interactions between chemical additives and their synergistic effects. Emulsion stability has been measured through conventional bottle tests. It was found that in most cases corrosion inhibitors increased emulsion stability considerably when present both alone and as part of a binary mixture. Interactions between the corrosion inhibitors and some of the demulsifiers were also observed. In contrast the de-foamant and scale inhibitors had little effect on emulsion stability and in most cases did not interact with the other additives.

  12. Effective interaction: From nuclear reactions to neutron stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D N Basu

    2014-05-01

    An equation of state (EoS) for symmetric nuclear matter is constructed using the density-dependent M3Y effective interaction and extended for isospin asymmetric nuclear matter. Theoretically obtained values of symmetric nuclear matter incompressibility, isobaric incompressibility, symmetry energy and its slope agree well with experimentally extracted values. Folded microscopic potentials using this effective interaction, whose density dependence is determined from nuclear matter calculations, provide excellent descriptions for proton, alpha and cluster radioactivities, elastic and inelastic scattering. The nuclear deformation parameters extracted from inelastic scattering of protons agree well with other available results. The high density behaviour of symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter satisfies the constraints from the observed flow data of heavy-ion collisions. The neutron star properties studied using -equilibrated neutron star matter obtained from this effective interaction reconcile with the recent observations of the massive compact stars.

  13. Climate-chemical interactions and greenhouse effects of trace gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Guang-Yu; Fan, Xiao-Biao

    1994-01-01

    A completely coupled one-dimensional radiative-convective (RC) and photochemical-diffusion (PC) model has been developed recently and used to study the climate-chemical interactions. The importance of radiative-chemical interactions within the troposphere and stratosphere has been examined in some detail. We find that increases of radiatively and/or chemically active trace gases such as CO2, CH4 and N2O have both the direct effects and the indirect effects on climate change by changing the atmospheric O3 profile through their interaction with chemical processes in the atmosphere. It is also found that the climatic effect of ozone depends strongly on its vertical distribution throughout the troposphere and stratosphere, as well on its column amount in the atmosphere.

  14. The effect of lateral interaction on traffic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouadi, M.; Jetto, K.; Benyoussef, A.; Kenz, A.

    2016-10-01

    We propose an extended cellular automaton model for traffic flow, taking into account lateral interactions with defects and between vehicles. The fundamental diagram for a given defects density on the road is studied. It is found that the plateau size increases linearly with the decreasing road width for little defects densities. Furthermore, the capacity increases linearly with the increasing road width. However, for a fixed road width, the capacity decreases exponentially with the increasing defects density. The lateral effects for non-mutual interactions between lanes and for the same maximal velocity is also investigated. It is found that the lateral effects on one lane are meaningful only when the density on the other lane is above the critical density. However, the lateral effects are always present if fast and slow lanes exist. Little differences have been found for the mutual interactions.

  15. Contact Interactions Probe Effective Dark Matter Models at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Dreiner, Herbi; Tattersall, Jamie

    2013-01-01

    Effective field theories provide a simple framework for probing possible dark matter (DM) models by reparametrising full interactions into a reduced number of operators with smaller dimensionality in parameter space. In many cases these models have four particle vertices, e.g. qqXX, leading to the pair production of dark matter particles, X, at a hadron collider from initial state quarks, q. In this analysis we show that for many fundamental DM models with s-channel DM couplings to qq-pairs, these effective vertices must also produce quark contact interactions (CI) of the form qqqq. The respective effective couplings are related by the common underlying theory which allows one to translate the upper limits from one coupling to the other. We show that at the LHC, the experimental limits on quark contact interactions give stronger translated limits on the DM coupling than the experimental searches for dark matter pair production.

  16. The Effects of Real-Time Interactive Multimedia Teleradiology System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Safadi, Lilac

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the design of a real-time interactive multimedia teleradiology system and assesses how the system is used by referring physicians in point-of-care situations and supports or hinders aspects of physician-radiologist interaction. We developed a real-time multimedia teleradiology management system that automates the transfer of images and radiologists' reports and surveyed physicians to triangulate the findings and to verify the realism and results of the experiment. The web-based survey was delivered to 150 physicians from a range of specialties. The survey was completed by 72% of physicians. Data showed a correlation between rich interactivity, satisfaction, and effectiveness. The results of our experiments suggest that real-time multimedia teleradiology systems are valued by referring physicians and may have the potential for enhancing their practice and improving patient care and highlight the critical role of multimedia technologies to provide real-time multimode interactivity in current medical care.

  17. A Contribution to Documenting and Validating Dynamic Interaction Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    2007-01-01

    On structures carrying humans (e.g. floors, grandstands in stadia etc.) there may be two different types of crowds present: Active and passive crowds of people. The active crowd, comprising people in motion, may generate dynamic loads causing the structure to vibrate. The passive (stationary) crowd....... Controlled laboratory tests, employing a vibrating test floor carrying stationary crowds of people, are designed and carried out to investigate the dynamic interaction. The paper describes the tests and the modal identification procedures employed for the assessment of model validity. Besides from aspects...... and a floor in vertical motion. The mechanism of crowd-structure interaction is not well understood and the primary aim of the paper is to present results of experimental investigations documenting effects of crowd-structure interaction and to exploring the validity of a crowd-structure interaction model...

  18. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations with chiral effective field theory interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezerlis, A; Tews, I; Epelbaum, E; Gandolfi, S; Hebeler, K; Nogga, A; Schwenk, A

    2013-07-19

    We present the first quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations with chiral effective field theory (EFT) interactions. To achieve this, we remove all sources of nonlocality, which hamper the inclusion in QMC calculations, in nuclear forces to next-to-next-to-leading order. We perform auxiliary-field diffusion Monte Carlo (AFDMC) calculations for the neutron matter energy up to saturation density based on local leading-order, next-to-leading order, and next-to-next-to-leading order nucleon-nucleon interactions. Our results exhibit a systematic order-by-order convergence in chiral EFT and provide nonperturbative benchmarks with theoretical uncertainties. For the softer interactions, perturbative calculations are in excellent agreement with the AFDMC results. This work paves the way for QMC calculations with systematic chiral EFT interactions for nuclei and nuclear matter, for testing the perturbativeness of different orders, and allows for matching to lattice QCD results by varying the pion mass.

  19. Effective Q-Q Interactions in Constituent Quark Models

    CERN Document Server

    Glozman, L Ya; Plessas, W; Varga, K; Wagenbrun, R F

    1998-01-01

    We study the performance of some recent potential models suggested as effective interactions between constituent quarks. In particular, we address constituent quark models for baryons with hybrid Q-Q interactions stemming from one-gluon plus meson exchanges. Upon recalculating two of such models we find them to fail in describing the N and \\Delta spectra. Our calculations are based on accurate solutions of the three-quark systems in both a variational Schrödinger and a rigorous Faddeev approach. It is argued that hybrid {Q-Q} interactions encounter difficulties in describing baryon spectra due to the specific contributions from one-gluon and pion exchanges together. In contrast, a chiral constituent quark model with a Q-Q interaction solely derived from Goldstone-boson exchange is capable of providing a unified description of both the N and \\Delta spectra in good agreement with phenomenology.

  20. Interactions between the Isolated-Interactive Elements Effect and Levels of Learner Expertise: Experimental Evidence from an Accountancy Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blayney, Paul; Kalyuga, Slava; Sweller, John

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated interactions between the isolated-interactive elements effect and levels of learner expertise with first year undergraduate university accounting students. The isolated-interactive elements effect occurs when learning is facilitated by initially presenting elements of information sequentially in an isolated form rather than…

  1. Interactions between the Isolated-Interactive Elements Effect and Levels of Learner Expertise: Experimental Evidence from an Accountancy Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blayney, Paul; Kalyuga, Slava; Sweller, John

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated interactions between the isolated-interactive elements effect and levels of learner expertise with first year undergraduate university accounting students. The isolated-interactive elements effect occurs when learning is facilitated by initially presenting elements of information sequentially in an isolated form rather than…

  2. Effective theory of interacting fermions in shaken square optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keleş, Ahmet; Zhao, Erhai; Liu, W. Vincent

    2017-06-01

    We develop a theory of weakly interacting fermionic atoms in shaken optical lattices based on the orbital mixing in the presence of time-periodic modulations. Specifically, we focus on fermionic atoms in a circularly shaken square lattice with near-resonance frequencies, i.e., tuned close to the energy separation between the s band and the p bands. First, we derive a time-independent four-band effective Hamiltonian in the noninteracting limit. Diagonalization of the effective Hamiltonian yields a quasienergy spectrum consistent with the full numerical Floquet solution that includes all higher bands. In particular, we find that the hybridized s band develops multiple minima and therefore nontrivial Fermi surfaces at different fillings. We then obtain the effective interactions for atoms in the hybridized s band analytically and show that they acquire momentum dependence on the Fermi surface even though the bare interaction is contactlike. We apply the theory to find the phase diagram of fermions with weak attractive interactions and demonstrate that the pairing symmetry is s +d wave. Our theory is valid for a range of shaking frequencies near resonance, and it can be generalized to other phases of interacting fermions in shaken lattices.

  3. Retracted: Evaluation of the incidence of microcracks caused by Mtwo and ProTaper NEXT rotary file systems versus the Self Adjusting File: A scanning electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, S G; Vijaywargiya, N; Dubey, S; Saxena, D; Kala, S

    2015-11-24

    The following article from International Endodontic Journal, 'Evaluation of the incidence of microcracks caused by Mtwo and ProTaper NEXT rotary file systems versus the Self Adjusting File: a scanning electron microscopic study' by S. G. Saha, N. Vijaywargiya, S. Dubey, D. Saxena & S. Kala, published online on 24 November 2015 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary. com), has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor in Chief, Prof. Paul Dummer, and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. The retraction has been agreed due to the consideration that the SEM methodology used by the authors has the potential to cause cracks and is thus is not suitable for the evaluation of micro-cracks in roots.

  4. Effects of an electric field on interaction of aromatic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Il Seung; Cho, Woo Jong; Kim, Kwang S

    2016-04-30

    The effect of uniform external electric field on the interactions between small aromatic compounds and an argon atom is investigated using post-HF (MP2, SCS-MP2, and CCSD(T)) and density functional (PBE0-D3, PBE0-TS, and vdW-DF2) methods. The electric field effect is quantified by the difference of interaction energy calculated in the presence and absence of the electric field. All the post-HF methods describe electric field effects accurately although the interaction energy itself is overestimated by MP2. The electric field effect is explained by classical electrostatic models, where the permanent dipole moment from mutual polarization mainly determines its sign. The size of π-conjugated system does not have significant effect on the electric field dependence. We found out that PBE0-based methods give reasonable interaction energies and electric field response in every case, while vdW-DF2 sometimes shows spurious artifact owing to its sensitivity toward the real space electron density. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Magnetoelectric Effects in Local Light-Matter Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y; Nori, Franco

    2013-01-01

    We study the generic interaction of a monochromatic electromagnetic field with bi-isotropic nanoparticles. Such an interaction is described by dipole-coupling terms associated with the breaking of dual, P- and T-symmetries, including the chirality and the nonreciprocal magnetoelectric effect. We calculate absorption rates, radiation forces, and radiation torques for the nanoparticles and introduce novel characteristics of the field quantifying the transfer of energy, momentum, and angular-momentum in these interactions. In particular, we put forward the concept of 'magnetoelectric energy density', quantifying the local PT-symmetry of the field. Akin to the 'super-chiral' light suggested recently for sensitive local probing of molecular chirality [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 163901 (2010); Science 332, 333 (2011)], here we describe a complex field for sensitive probing of the nonreciprocal magnetoelectric effect in nanoparticles or molecules.

  6. Micro-computed Tomography Assessment of Dentinal Micro-cracks after Root Canal Preparation with TRUShape and Self-adjusting File Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuolo, Mario Luis; De-Deus, Gustavo; Belladonna, Felipe Gonçalves; Silva, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal da; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu; Souza, Erick Miranda; Versiani, Marco Aurélio; Zaia, Alexandre Augusto

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the percentage frequency of dentinal micro-cracks observed after root canal preparation with TRUShape and Self-Adjusting File (SAF) systems by means of micro-computed tomography imaging analysis. A conventional full-sequence rotary system (BioRace) and a single-file reciprocation system (Reciproc) were used as reference techniques for comparison because of their known assertive cutting efficiency. Forty anatomically matched mandibular incisors were selected, scanned at a resolution of 14.25 μm, and assigned to 4 experimental groups (n = 10), according to the preparation protocol: TRUShape, SAF, BioRace, and Reciproc systems. After the experimental procedures, the specimens were scanned again, and the registered preoperative and postoperative cross-section images of the roots (n = 70,030) were screened to identify the presence of dentinal micro-cracks. Overall, dentinal defects were observed in 28,790 cross-section images (41.11%). In the TRUShape, SAF, BioRace, and Reciproc groups, dentinal micro-cracks were visualized in 56.47% (n = 9842), 42.38% (n = 7450), 32.90% (n = 5826), and 32.77% (n = 5672) of the slices, respectively. All dentinal defects observed in the postoperative data sets were already present in the corresponding preoperative images. None of the preparation systems induced the formation of new dentinal micro-cracks. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Predicting Drugs Side Effects Based on Chemical-Chemical Interactions and Protein-Chemical Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A drug side effect is an undesirable effect which occurs in addition to the intended therapeutic effect of the drug. The unexpected side effects that many patients suffer from are the major causes of large-scale drug withdrawal. To address the problem, it is highly demanded by pharmaceutical industries to develop computational methods for predicting the side effects of drugs. In this study, a novel computational method was developed to predict the side effects of drug compounds by hybridizing the chemical-chemical and protein-chemical interactions. Compared to most of the previous works, our method can rank the potential side effects for any query drug according to their predicted level of risk. A training dataset and test datasets were constructed from the benchmark dataset that contains 835 drug compounds to evaluate the method. By a jackknife test on the training dataset, the 1st order prediction accuracy was 86.30%, while it was 89.16% on the test dataset. It is expected that the new method may become a useful tool for drug design, and that the findings obtained by hybridizing various interactions in a network system may provide useful insights for conducting in-depth pharmacological research as well, particularly at the level of systems biomedicine.

  8. Predicting Molecular Crowding Effects in Ion-RNA Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tao; Zhu, Yuhong; He, Zhaojian; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2016-09-01

    We develop a new statistical mechanical model to predict the molecular crowding effects in ion-RNA interactions. By considering discrete distributions of the crowders, the model can treat the main crowder-induced effects, such as the competition with ions for RNA binding, changes of electrostatic interaction due to crowder-induced changes in the dielectric environment, and changes in the nonpolar hydration state of the crowder-RNA system. To enhance the computational efficiency, we sample the crowder distribution using a hybrid approach: For crowders in the close vicinity of RNA surface, we sample their discrete distributions; for crowders in the bulk solvent away from the RNA surface, we use a continuous mean-field distribution for the crowders. Moreover, using the tightly bound ion (TBI) model, we account for ion fluctuation and correlation effects in the calculation for ion-RNA interactions. Applications of the model to a variety of simple RNA structures such as RNA helices show a crowder-induced increase in free energy and decrease in ion binding. Such crowding effects tend to contribute to the destabilization of RNA structure. Further analysis indicates that these effects are associated with the crowder-ion competition in RNA binding and the effective decrease in the dielectric constant. This simple ion effect model may serve as a useful framework for modeling more realistic crowders with larger, more complex RNA structures.

  9. Associative Interactions in Crowded Solutions of Biopolymers Counteract Depletion Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Joost; Foschepoth, David; te Brinke, Esra; Boersma, Arnold J; Imamura, Hiromi; Rivas, Germán; Heus, Hans A; Huck, Wilhelm T S

    2015-10-14

    The cytosol of Escherichia coli is an extremely crowded environment, containing high concentrations of biopolymers which occupy 20-30% of the available volume. Such conditions are expected to yield depletion forces, which strongly promote macromolecular complexation. However, crowded macromolecule solutions, like the cytosol, are very prone to nonspecific associative interactions that can potentially counteract depletion. It remains unclear how the cytosol balances these opposing interactions. We used a FRET-based probe to systematically study depletion in vitro in different crowded environments, including a cytosolic mimic, E. coli lysate. We also studied bundle formation of FtsZ protofilaments under identical crowded conditions as a probe for depletion interactions at much larger overlap volumes of the probe molecule. The FRET probe showed a more compact conformation in synthetic crowding agents, suggesting strong depletion interactions. However, depletion was completely negated in cell lysate and other protein crowding agents, where the FRET probe even occupied slightly more volume. In contrast, bundle formation of FtsZ protofilaments proceeded as readily in E. coli lysate and other protein solutions as in synthetic crowding agents. Our experimental results and model suggest that, in crowded biopolymer solutions, associative interactions counterbalance depletion forces for small macromolecules. Furthermore, the net effects of macromolecular crowding will be dependent on both the size of the macromolecule and its associative interactions with the crowded background.

  10. Interaction Effects of Campus Racial Composition and Student Racial Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Ghazaleh, Nabil; Hoffman, John L.

    2016-01-01

    Drawing upon a sample of 13,025 students who attended the nine majority minority colleges of the Los Angeles Community College District, this study examined the interaction effects of the racial composition of the colleges on student persistence. Special attention was given to variables that paired students' race to the racial demography of the…

  11. Effective Student Learning of Fractions with an Interactive Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensberry, Karina K. R.; Moore, Emily B.; Perkins, Katherine K.

    2015-01-01

    Computer technology, when coupled with reform-based teaching practices, has been shown to be an effective way to support student learning of mathematics. The quality of the technology itself, as well as how it is used, impacts how much students learn. Interactive simulations are dynamic virtual environments similar to virtual manipulatives that…

  12. Interactive Distance Learning Effectively Provides Winning Sports Nutrition Workshops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Jennifer; Hoelscher-Day, Sharon; Begeman, Gale; Houtkooper, Linda

    2001-01-01

    Interactive distance-education (n=226) and face-to-face (n=129) continuing education workshops for health care and education professionals on sports nutrition were evaluated immediately and after 6 months. The well-designed distance-education format was as effective and acceptable as face to face and increased sports nutrition knowledge. (SK)

  13. Interactive Distance Learning Effectively Provides Winning Sports Nutrition Workshops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Jennifer; Hoelscher-Day, Sharon; Begeman, Gale; Houtkooper, Linda

    2001-01-01

    Interactive distance-education (n=226) and face-to-face (n=129) continuing education workshops for health care and education professionals on sports nutrition were evaluated immediately and after 6 months. The well-designed distance-education format was as effective and acceptable as face to face and increased sports nutrition knowledge. (SK)

  14. Effective field theory of interactions on the lattice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valiente, Manuel; Zinner, Nikolaj T.

    2015-01-01

    We consider renormalization of effective field theory interactions by discretizing the continuum on a tight-binding lattice. After studying the one-dimensional problem, we address s-wave collisions in three dimensions and relate the bare lattice coupling constants to the continuum coupling consta...

  15. Electron interactions in graphene through an effective Coulomb potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Joao N. B.; Adam, Shaffique

    A recent numerical work [H.-K. Tang et al, PRL 115, 186602 (2015)] considering graphene's π-electrons interacting through an effective Coulomb potential that is finite at short-distances, stressed the importance of the sp2 -electrons in determining the semimetal to Mott insulator phase transition in graphene. Some years ago, I. F. Herbut [PRL 97, 146401 (2006)] studied such a transition by mapping graphene's π-electrons into a Gross-Neveu model. From a different perspective, D. T. Son [PRB 75, 235423 (2007)] put the emphasis on the long-range interactions by modelling graphene as Dirac fermions interacting through a bare Coulomb potential. Here we build on these works and explore the phase diagram of Dirac fermions interacting through an effective Coulomb-like potential screened at short-distances. The interaction potential used allows for analytic results that controllably switch between the two perspectives above. This work was supported by the Singapore National Research Foundation (NRF-NRFF2012-01 and CA2DM medium-sized centre program) and by the Singapore Ministry of Education and Yale-NUS College (R-607-265-01312).

  16. A parallel architecture for interactively rendering scattering and refraction effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabei, Daniele; Hakke-Patil, Ajit; Banterle, Francesco; Di Benedetto, Marco; Ganovelli, Fabio; Pattanaik, Sumanta; Scopigno, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    A new method for interactive rendering of complex lighting effects combines two algorithms. The first performs accurate ray tracing in heterogeneous refractive media to compute high-frequency phenomena. The second applies lattice-Boltzmann lighting to account for low-frequency multiple-scattering effects. The two algorithms execute in parallel on modern graphics hardware. This article includes a video animation of the authors' real-time algorithm rendering a variety of scenes.

  17. Effects of a uniform acceleration on atom-field interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Marino, Jamir; Noto, Antonio; Passante, Roberto; Rizzuto, Lucia; Spagnolo, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    We review some quantum electrodynamical effects related to the uniform acceleration of atoms in vacuum. After discussing the energy level shifts of a uniformly accelerated atom in vacuum, we investigate the atom-wall Casimir-Polder force for accelerated atoms, and the van der Waals/Casimir-Polder interaction between two accelerated atoms. The possibility of detecting the Unruh effect through these phenomena is also discussed in detail.

  18. Effects of a uniform acceleration on atom-field interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Marino, Jamir; Passante, Roberto; Rizzuto, Lucia; Spagnolo, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    We review some quantum electrodynamical effects related to the uniform acceleration of atoms in vacuum. After discussing the energy level shifts of a uniformly accelerated atom in vacuum, we investigate the atom-wall Casimir-Polder force for accelerated atoms, and the van der Waals/Casimir-Polder interaction between two accelerated atoms. The possibility of detecting the Unruh effect through these phenomena is also discussed in detail.

  19. Interaction Effects between Openness and Fluid Intelligence Predicting Scholastic Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Figural reasoning as an indicator of fluid intelligence and the domains of the Five Factor Model were explored as predictors of scholastic performance. A total of 836 Chinese secondary school students (406 girls from grades 7 to 11 participated. Figural reasoning, as measured by Raven’s Standard Progressive Matrices, predicted performance in Math, Chinese, and English, and also for a composite score. Among the personality domains, Openness had a positive effect on performance for all subjects after controlling for all the other variables. For Conscientiousness, the effects were smaller and only significant for Math. Neuroticism had a negative effect on Math grades. The effects of Extraversion on all grades were very small and not significant. Most importantly, hierarchical latent regression analyses indicated that all interaction effects between Openness and figural reasoning were significant, revealing a compensatory interaction. Our results further suggest that scholastic performance basically relies on the same traits through the secondary school years. However, importance is given to interaction effects between ability and personality. Implications along with limitations and suggestions for future research are discussed.

  20. Approximation scheme based on effective interactions for stochastic gene regulation

    CERN Document Server

    Ohkubo, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Since gene regulatory systems contain sometimes only a small number of molecules, these systems are not described well by macroscopic rate equations; a master equation approach is needed for such cases. We develop an approximation scheme for dealing with the stochasticity of the gene regulatory systems. Using an effective interaction concept, original master equations can be reduced to simpler master equations, which can be solved analytically. We apply the approximation scheme to self-regulating systems with monomer or dimer interactions, and a two-gene system with an exclusive switch. The approximation scheme can recover bistability of the exclusive switch adequately.

  1. Depth of Field Effects for Interactive Direct Volume Rendering

    KAUST Repository

    Schott, Mathias

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, a method for interactive direct volume rendering is proposed for computing depth of field effects, which previously were shown to aid observers in depth and size perception of synthetically generated images. The presented technique extends those benefits to volume rendering visualizations of 3D scalar fields from CT/MRI scanners or numerical simulations. It is based on incremental filtering and as such does not depend on any precomputation, thus allowing interactive explorations of volumetric data sets via on-the-fly editing of the shading model parameters or (multi-dimensional) transfer functions. © 2011 The Author(s).

  2. Improving Effectiveness Of ELearning In Maintenance Using Interactive 3D

    CERN Document Server

    Baboo, S Santhosh

    2009-01-01

    In aerospace and defense, training is being carried out on the web by viewing PowerPoint presentations, manuals and videos that are limited in their ability to convey information to the technician. Interactive training in the form of 3D is a more cost effective approach compared to creation of physical simulations and mockups. This paper demonstrates how training using interactive 3D simulations in elearning achieves a reduction in the time spent in training and improves the efficiency of a trainee performing the installation or removal.

  3. Exploring nuclear effects in neutrino interactions with MINERvA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osmanov, B. [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 32611 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    With the new era of neutrino-oscillation experiments, it becomes crucially important to know the neutrino interaction cross-sections with a high precision. This is the primary scientific aim of MINERvA experiment located in Fermilab. Another task is to examine the nuclear medium effects in neutrino-induced interactions such as final state modifications in the nucleus. The MINERvA collaboration has all the necessary tools in hand to achieve the above-stated goals: high-intensity neutrino beam, fine-granulated detector with EM and hadron calorimetry regions, various integrated nuclear targets and high-statistics event sample.

  4. A single particle effective potential for interacting positron and positronium

    CERN Document Server

    Zubiaga, A; Puska, M

    2013-01-01

    We have studied small systems composed by an atom and a positron or a positronium atom. We have used many-body quantum mechanical calculations to describe the correlation effects of light particles. Explicitly correlated gaussian for the basis functions and a stochastical variational optimization method has allowed to obtain accurate wavefunctions and energies. We have discussed the chemistry of positrons in those systems by means of analyzing the densities of the light particles (electrons and positrons). During the discussion, we propose an effective potential that describes the properties of the positron in those systems, valid also when it forms a Ps cluster. The effective potential is a mean field description of the interaction of the positron that can be used to calculate the distribution of the positron and its interaction energy. This potential can be a step forward for an accurate single particle description of the positron in cases when it forms positronium, specially molecular soft matter.

  5. Renormalization Group Equation for Low Momentum Effective Nuclear Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Bogner, S K; Kuo, T T S; Brown, G E

    2001-01-01

    We consider two nonperturbative methods originally used to derive shell model effective interactions in nuclei. These methods have been applied to the two nucleon sector to obtain an energy independent effective interaction V_{low k}, which preserves the low momentum half-on-shell T matrix and the deuteron pole, with a sharp cutoff imposed on all intermediate state momenta. We show that V_{low k} scales with the cutoff precisely as one expects from renormalization group arguments. This result is a step towards reformulating traditional model space many-body calculations in the language of effective field theories and the renormalization group. The numerical scaling properties of V_{low k} are observed to be in excellent agreement with our exact renormalization group equation.

  6. Galvano-rotational effect induced by electroweak interactions in pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvornikov, Maxim [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, CP 66318, CEP 05314-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radiowave Propagation (IZMIRAN), 142190 Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation); Physics Faculty, National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Ave., 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-21

    We study electroweakly interacting particles in rotating matter. The existence of the electric current along the axis of the matter rotation is predicted in this system. This new galvano-rotational effect is caused by the parity violating interaction between massless charged particles in the rotating matter. We start with the exact solution of the Dirac equation for a fermion involved in the electroweak interaction in the rotating frame. This equation includes the noninertial effects. Then, using the obtained solution, we derive the induced electric current which turns out to flow along the rotation axis. We study the possibility of the appearance of the galvano-rotational effect in dense matter of compact astrophysical objects. The particular example of neutron and hypothetical quark stars is discussed. It is shown that, using this effect, one can expect the generation of toroidal magnetic fields comparable with poloidal ones in old millisecond pulsars. We also briefly discuss the generation of the magnetic helicity in these stars. Finally we analyze the possibility to apply the galvano-rotational effect for the description of the asymmetric neutrino emission from a neutron star to explain pulsars kicks.

  7. Nuclear matter from effective quark-quark interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldo, M; Fukukawa, K

    2014-12-12

    We study neutron matter and symmetric nuclear matter with the quark-meson model for the two-nucleon interaction. The Bethe-Bruckner-Goldstone many-body theory is used to describe the correlations up to the three hole-line approximation with no extra parameters. At variance with other nonrelativistic realistic interactions, the three hole-line contribution turns out to be non-negligible and to have a substantial saturation effect. The saturation point of nuclear matter, the compressibility, the symmetry energy, and its slope are within the phenomenological constraints. Since the interaction also reproduces fairly well the properties of the three-nucleon system, these results indicate that the explicit introduction of the quark degrees of freedom within the considered constituent quark model is expected to reduce the role of three-body forces.

  8. Long-range interaction effects on calcium-wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepseu, W. D.; Woafo, P.

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, numerical simulation of calcium waves in a network of cells coupled together by a paracrine signaling is investigated. The model takes into account the long-range interaction between cells due to the action of extracellular messengers, which provide links between first-neighbor cells, but also on cells located far away from the excited cell. When considering bidirectional coupling, the long-range interaction influences neither the frequency nor the amplitude of oscillations, contrary to one-directional coupling. The long-range interaction influences the speed of propagation of Ca2+ waves in the network and induces enlargement of the transition zone before the steady regime of propagation is attained. We also investigate the long-range effects on the colonization of a given niche by a pathogenic microorganism signal on calcium wave propagation in the network.

  9. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations with chiral effective field theory interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tews, Ingo

    2015-10-12

    The neutron-matter equation of state connects several physical systems over a wide density range, from cold atomic gases in the unitary limit at low densities, to neutron-rich nuclei at intermediate densities, up to neutron stars which reach supranuclear densities in their core. An accurate description of the neutron-matter equation of state is therefore crucial to describe these systems. To calculate the neutron-matter equation of state reliably, precise many-body methods in combination with a systematic theory for nuclear forces are needed. Chiral effective field theory (EFT) is such a theory. It provides a systematic framework for the description of low-energy hadronic interactions and enables calculations with controlled theoretical uncertainties. Chiral EFT makes use of a momentum-space expansion of nuclear forces based on the symmetries of Quantum Chromodynamics, which is the fundamental theory of strong interactions. In chiral EFT, the description of nuclear forces can be systematically improved by going to higher orders in the chiral expansion. On the other hand, continuum Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods are among the most precise many-body methods available to study strongly interacting systems at finite densities. They treat the Schroedinger equation as a diffusion equation in imaginary time and project out the ground-state wave function of the system starting from a trial wave function by propagating the system in imaginary time. To perform this propagation, continuum QMC methods require as input local interactions. However, chiral EFT, which is naturally formulated in momentum space, contains several sources of nonlocality. In this Thesis, we show how to construct local chiral two-nucleon (NN) and three-nucleon (3N) interactions and discuss results of first QMC calculations for pure neutron systems. We have performed systematic auxiliary-field diffusion Monte Carlo (AFDMC) calculations for neutron matter using local chiral NN interactions. By

  10. Inferring modulators of genetic interactions with epistatic nested effects models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirkl, Martin; Diekmann, Madeline; van der Wees, Marlies; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Fröhlich, Holger; Markowetz, Florian

    2017-04-01

    Maps of genetic interactions can dissect functional redundancies in cellular networks. Gene expression profiles as high-dimensional molecular readouts of combinatorial perturbations provide a detailed view of genetic interactions, but can be hard to interpret if different gene sets respond in different ways (called mixed epistasis). Here we test the hypothesis that mixed epistasis between a gene pair can be explained by the action of a third gene that modulates the interaction. We have extended the framework of Nested Effects Models (NEMs), a type of graphical model specifically tailored to analyze high-dimensional gene perturbation data, to incorporate logical functions that describe interactions between regulators on downstream genes and proteins. We benchmark our approach in the controlled setting of a simulation study and show high accuracy in inferring the correct model. In an application to data from deletion mutants of kinases and phosphatases in S. cerevisiae we show that epistatic NEMs can point to modulators of genetic interactions. Our approach is implemented in the R-package 'epiNEM' available from https://github.com/cbg-ethz/epiNEM and https://bioconductor.org/packages/epiNEM/.

  11. Examining Nuclear Effects in Neutrino Interactions with Transverse Kinematic Imbalance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Luke

    We present a Monte Carlo truth study examining nuclear effects in charged-current neutrino interactions using observables constructed in the transverse plane. Three distributions are introduced that show very weak dependence on neutrino flux and its associated uncertainty. Measurements comparing these distributions between quasi-elastic-like and single charged pion final states will provide new constraints of nuclear effects. It is suggested that the on-axis position in the NuMI beam provides the correct flux to take advantage of this reduced energy dependence in measuring nuclear effect-generated transverse imbalances.

  12. Prediction of Effective Drug Combinations by Chemical Interaction, Protein Interaction and Target Enrichment of KEGG Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug combinatorial therapy could be more effective in treating some complex diseases than single agents due to better efficacy and reduced side effects. Although some drug combinations are being used, their underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. Therefore, it is of great interest to deduce a novel drug combination by their molecular mechanisms in a robust and rigorous way. This paper attempts to predict effective drug combinations by a combined consideration of: (1 chemical interaction between drugs, (2 protein interactions between drugs’ targets, and (3 target enrichment of KEGG pathways. A benchmark dataset was constructed, consisting of 121 confirmed effective combinations and 605 random combinations. Each drug combination was represented by 465 features derived from the aforementioned three properties. Some feature selection techniques, including Minimum Redundancy Maximum Relevance and Incremental Feature Selection, were adopted to extract the key features. Random forest model was built with its performance evaluated by 5-fold cross-validation. As a result, 55 key features providing the best prediction result were selected. These important features may help to gain insights into the mechanisms of drug combinations, and the proposed prediction model could become a useful tool for screening possible drug combinations.

  13. Constraining gravitational interactions in the M theory effective action

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Anirban

    2013-01-01

    We consider purely gravitational interactions of the type D^{2k} R^4 in the effective action of M theory in 11 dimensional flat spacetime, where k \\geq 0. The duality between M theory on S^1 and type IIA string theory, and the structure of the dilaton dependence of string amplitudes, show that the only non-vanishing interactions in the M theory effective action have k=3n. The coefficient of the D^{6n} R^4 interaction in M theory is determined by the genus (n+1) string amplitude of the D^{6n} R^4 interaction in the type IIA theory. Focussing on the even-even spin structure part of the type IIA string amplitude, this coefficient is given by the type IIB genus (n+1) amplitude, which we constrain using supersymmetry, S-duality and maximal supergravity. The source terms of the Poisson equations satisfied by the S-duality invariant IIB couplings play a central role in the analysis. This procedure yields partial contributions to several multi-loop type IIB string amplitudes, from which we extract the coefficients of...

  14. Review about gabapentin misuse, interactions, contraindications and side effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Gabriel C

    2017-01-01

    The current work is targeted to review the risks of gabapentin misuse, its potential interactions with other drugs, side effects and use contraindications. This review consists of a total of 99 biographical references (from the year 1983 to 2016). A publication search of PubMed was performed from January 1983 to December 2016. It included animal studies, clinical studies, case studies and reviews related to gabapentin misuse, potential interactions, side effects and use contraindications. The search terms were gabapentin, anticonvulsant and antiepileptic. In general, it seems that gabapentin has risks of being misused based on the increased level of prescriptions, related fatalities, recreational misuse and higher doses of self-administration. The main reasons for gabapentin misuse are as follows: getting high, alleviating opioid withdrawal symptoms and potentiating methadone effects. Some of the main substances that interact with gabapentin are morphine, caffeine, losartan, ethacrynic acid, phenytoin, mefloquine and magnesium oxide. Some of the side effects caused by gabapentin are teratogenicity, hypoventilation, respiratory failure and myopathy. Finally, reports in general contraindicate the use of gabapentin in conditions such as myasthenia gravis and myoclonus. PMID:28223849

  15. Review about gabapentin misuse, interactions, contraindications and side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Gabriel C

    2017-01-01

    The current work is targeted to review the risks of gabapentin misuse, its potential interactions with other drugs, side effects and use contraindications. This review consists of a total of 99 biographical references (from the year 1983 to 2016). A publication search of PubMed was performed from January 1983 to December 2016. It included animal studies, clinical studies, case studies and reviews related to gabapentin misuse, potential interactions, side effects and use contraindications. The search terms were gabapentin, anticonvulsant and antiepileptic. In general, it seems that gabapentin has risks of being misused based on the increased level of prescriptions, related fatalities, recreational misuse and higher doses of self-administration. The main reasons for gabapentin misuse are as follows: getting high, alleviating opioid withdrawal symptoms and potentiating methadone effects. Some of the main substances that interact with gabapentin are morphine, caffeine, losartan, ethacrynic acid, phenytoin, mefloquine and magnesium oxide. Some of the side effects caused by gabapentin are teratogenicity, hypoventilation, respiratory failure and myopathy. Finally, reports in general contraindicate the use of gabapentin in conditions such as myasthenia gravis and myoclonus.

  16. Study on the Strategies of Distance Learning Support Services Based on Effective Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文琳; 靳桂阳

    2014-01-01

    The paper firstly analyzes the problems of distance learning interaction in order to clarify the significance of implement-ing effective interaction. Then it puts forward the learning support services strategies based on effective interaction, which means to design strategies from the perspective of effective interaction to improve the effect of distance learning.

  17. From resonantly interacting fermions with effective range to neutron matter

    CERN Document Server

    Lacroix, Denis

    2016-01-01

    A density functional theory is proposed for strongly interacting fermions with arbitrary large negative scattering length. The functional has only two parameters that are directly fixed to reproduce the universal properties of unitary gas: the so-called "Bertsch parameter" $\\xi_0$ and a parameter $\\eta_e$ related to the possible influence of the effective range $r_e$ at infinite scattering length $a$. Using most recent quantum Monte-Carlo (QMC) estimates of these two parameters, it is shown that the functional properly reproduces the experimental measurements of interacting Fermi systems not only at unitarity but also away from this limit over a wide range of $(ak_F)^{-1}$ values. The functional is applied to obtain an expression of the Tan's contact parameter including the effect of $r_e$. Application is finally made to neutron matter. It is shown that most recent QMC results are well reproduced.

  18. Postmaterialism, religiosity and ethnocentrism: Interactive effects on political preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todosijević Bojan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Relationships between value orientations and political attitudes are usually analyzed as linear and additive associations. Since values are commonly conceived as lacking independence of each other, particularly in politics where they usually appear in the shape of ‘ideological packages’, the paper examines how values interact when generating their political effects. We investigate the interactive effects between postmaterialism, religiosity and ethnocentrism when they are required to explain ideological and party preferences. The outlined problems are examined using the Dutch Parliamentary Election Studies (DPES data. Results show that political expression of some values (e.g., ethnocentrism is dependent on the level of the other values (e.g., postmaterialism. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 47010

  19. Climate change effects on beneficial plant-microorganism interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Compant, Stéphane; van der Heijden, Marcel G. A.; Sessitsch, Angela

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that beneficial plant-associated microorganisms may stimulate plant growth and enhance resistance to disease and abiotic stresses. The effects of climate change factors such as elevated CO2, drought and warming on beneficial plant-microorganism interactions are increasingly being explored. This now makes it possible to test whether some general patterns occur and whether different groups of plant-associated microorganisms respond differently or in the same way to climate chan...

  20. Review about gabapentin misuse, interactions, contraindications and side effects

    OpenAIRE

    Quintero, Gabriel C.

    2017-01-01

    Gabriel C Quintero Florida State University – Republic of Panama, Clayton, Panama Abstract: The current work is targeted to review the risks of gabapentin misuse, its potential interactions with other drugs, side effects and use contraindications. This review consists of a total of 99 biographical references (from the year 1983 to 2016). A publication search of PubMed was performed from January 1983 to December 2016. It included animal studies, clinical studies, case studies and rev...

  1. Climate change effects on beneficial plant-microorganism interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compant, Stéphane; van der Heijden, Marcel G A; Sessitsch, Angela

    2010-08-01

    It is well known that beneficial plant-associated microorganisms may stimulate plant growth and enhance resistance to disease and abiotic stresses. The effects of climate change factors such as elevated CO(2), drought and warming on beneficial plant-microorganism interactions are increasingly being explored. This now makes it possible to test whether some general patterns occur and whether different groups of plant-associated microorganisms respond differently or in the same way to climate change. Here, we review the results of 135 studies investigating the effects of climate change factors on beneficial microorganisms and their interaction with host plants. The majority of studies showed that elevated CO(2) had a positive influence on the abundance of arbuscular and ectomycorrhizal fungi, whereas the effects on plant growth-promoting bacteria and endophytic fungi were more variable. In most cases, plant-associated microorganisms had a beneficial effect on plants under elevated CO(2). The effects of increased temperature on beneficial plant-associated microorganisms were more variable, positive and neutral, and negative effects were equally common and varied considerably with the study system and the temperature range investigated. Moreover, numerous studies indicated that plant growth-promoting microorganisms (both bacteria and fungi) positively affected plants subjected to drought stress. Overall, this review shows that plant-associated microorganisms are an important factor influencing the response of plants to climate change.

  2. Interactions between space and effectiveness in human multisensory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidiffer, Aaron R; Stevenson, Ryan A; Krueger Fister, Juliane; Barnett, Zachary P; Wallace, Mark T

    2016-07-29

    Several stimulus factors are important in multisensory integration, including the spatial and temporal relationships of the paired stimuli as well as their effectiveness. Changes in these factors have been shown to dramatically change the nature and magnitude of multisensory interactions. Typically, these factors are considered in isolation, although there is a growing appreciation for the fact that they are likely to be strongly interrelated. Here, we examined interactions between two of these factors - spatial location and effectiveness - in dictating performance in the localization of an audiovisual target. A psychophysical experiment was conducted in which participants reported the perceived location of visual flashes and auditory noise bursts presented alone and in combination. Stimuli were presented at four spatial locations relative to fixation (0°, 30°, 60°, 90°) and at two intensity levels (high, low). Multisensory combinations were always spatially coincident and of the matching intensity (high-high or low-low). In responding to visual stimuli alone, localization accuracy decreased and response times (RTs) increased as stimuli were presented at more eccentric locations. In responding to auditory stimuli, performance was poorest at the 30° and 60° locations. For both visual and auditory stimuli, accuracy was greater and RTs were faster for more intense stimuli. For responses to visual-auditory stimulus combinations, performance enhancements were found at locations in which the unisensory performance was lowest, results concordant with the concept of inverse effectiveness. RTs for these multisensory presentations frequently violated race-model predictions, implying integration of these inputs, and a significant location-by-intensity interaction was observed. Performance gains under multisensory conditions were larger as stimuli were positioned at more peripheral locations, and this increase was most pronounced for the low-intensity conditions. These

  3. Nanoparticle-assay marker interaction: effects on nanotoxicity assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinxin; Xiong, Sijing; Huang, Liwen Charlotte; Ng, Kee Woei; Loo, Say Chye Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Protein-based cytotoxicity assays such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) are commonly used in cytotoxic evaluation of nanoparticles (NPs) despite numerous reports on possible interactions with protein markers in these assays that can confound the results obtained. In this study, conventional cytotoxicity assays where assay markers may (LDH and TNF- α) or may not (PicoGreen and WST-8) come into contact with NPs were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of NPs. The findings revealed selective interactions between negatively charged protein assay markers (LDH and TNF- α) and positively charged ZnO NPs under abiotic conditions. The adsorption and interaction with these protein assay markers were strongly influenced by surface charge, concentration, and specific surface area of the NPs, thereby resulting in less than accurate cytotoxic measurements, as observed from actual cell viability measurements. An improved protocol for LDH assay was, therefore, proposed and validated by eliminating any effects associated with protein-particle interactions. In view of this, additional measures and precautions should be taken when evaluating cytotoxicity of NPs with standard protein-based assays, particularly when they are of opposite charges.

  4. Effect of the interactions and environment on nuclear activity

    CERN Document Server

    Sabater, J; Argudo-Fernández, M

    2012-01-01

    We present a study of the prevalence of optical and radio nuclear activity with respect to the environment and interactions in a sample of SDSS galaxies. We defined a local density parameter and a tidal forces estimator and used a cluster richness estimator from the literature. The possible correlations between these parameters were removed using a principal component analysis. We applied a stratified statistical method that takes into account the effect of possible confounding factors like the galaxy mass. We found that the prevalence of optical AGN is a factor 2-3 lower in the densest environments, but increases by a factor of ~2 in the presence of strong one-on-one interactions. The importance of galaxy interactions decreases from star-forming nuclei (SFN) to Seyferts to LINERs to passive galaxies, in accordance with previous suggestions of an evolutionary time-sequence. The fraction of radio AGN increases strongly towards denser environments, and is enhanced by galaxy interactions. Overall, the results ag...

  5. Nanoparticle-assay marker interaction: effects on nanotoxicity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xinxin; Xiong, Sijing; Huang, Liwen Charlotte; Ng, Kee Woei, E-mail: kwng@ntu.edu.sg; Loo, Say Chye Joachim, E-mail: joachimloo@ntu.edu.sg [Nanyang Technological University, School of Materials Science and Engineering (Singapore)

    2015-01-15

    Protein-based cytotoxicity assays such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) are commonly used in cytotoxic evaluation of nanoparticles (NPs) despite numerous reports on possible interactions with protein markers in these assays that can confound the results obtained. In this study, conventional cytotoxicity assays where assay markers may (LDH and TNF- α) or may not (PicoGreen and WST-8) come into contact with NPs were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of NPs. The findings revealed selective interactions between negatively charged protein assay markers (LDH and TNF- α) and positively charged ZnO NPs under abiotic conditions. The adsorption and interaction with these protein assay markers were strongly influenced by surface charge, concentration, and specific surface area of the NPs, thereby resulting in less than accurate cytotoxic measurements, as observed from actual cell viability measurements. An improved protocol for LDH assay was, therefore, proposed and validated by eliminating any effects associated with protein–particle interactions. In view of this, additional measures and precautions should be taken when evaluating cytotoxicity of NPs with standard protein-based assays, particularly when they are of opposite charges.

  6. Modeling magnetized star-planet interactions: boundary conditions effects

    CERN Document Server

    Strugarek, Antoine; Matt, Sean P; Reville, Victor

    2013-01-01

    We model the magnetized interaction between a star and a close-in planet (SPMIs), using global, magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations. In this proceedings, we study the effects of the numerical boundary conditions at the stellar surface, where the stellar wind is driven, and in the planetary interior. We show that is it possible to design boundary conditions that are adequate to obtain physically realistic, steady-state solutions for cases with both magnetized and unmagnetized planets. This encourages further development of numerical studies, in order to better constrain and understand SPMIs, as well as their effects on the star-planet rotational evolution.

  7. Strongly Interacting Fermions and Phases of the Casimir Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Flachi, Antonino

    2013-01-01

    With the intent of exploring how the interplay between boundary effects and chiral symmetry breaking may alter the thermodynamical behavior of a system of strongly interacting fermions, we study the Casimir effect for the set-up of two parallel layers using a four-fermion effective field theory at zero density. This system reveals a number of interesting features. While for infinitely large separation (no boundaries), chiral symmetry is broken/restored via a second order phase transition, in the opposite case of small (and, in general, finite) separation the transition becomes first order, rendering effects of finite size, for the present set-up, similar to those of a chemical potential. Appropriately moving on the separation--temperature plane, it is possible to generate a peculiar behavior in the temperature dependence of the thermodynamic potential and of the condensate, compensating thermal with geometrical variations. A behavior similar to what we find here has been predicted to occur in bilayer graphene...

  8. Driven superconducting proximity effect in interacting quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moghaddam, Ali G.; Koenig, Juergen [Theoretische Physik, Univ. Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg (Germany); CeNIDE, Duisburg (Germany); Governale, Michele [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, PO Box 600, Wellington 6140 (New Zealand)

    2012-07-01

    We show that strong superconducting correlations can be induced in an interacting quantum dot (QD) using fast oscillations in the effective coupling between the dot and superconducting leads which drive the dot out of equilibrium. This is in contrast with the well-known equilibrium state suppression of proximity effect in interacting QDs. In fact although interaction prohibits the superposition of empty (0) and doubly-occupied (d) states, fast coherent dynamics accompanied by the fast variations in the tunnel coupling can produce a nonequilibrium finite probability for such a superposition. Subsequently the superconducting correlations are established inside the QD when the energy difference between 0 and d states coincide with the frequency of driving oscillations. Simultaneously the nonequilibrium occupation probabilities of 0 and d states cause a pumping current flowing to the normal lead connected to the dot. Finally we demonstrate coherent oscillations in both dot charge and current by applying a pulsed oscillatory field to the coupling of dot and superconductor which show the possibility of coherent manipulation in the subspace of 0 and d states by changing the pulse duration.

  9. Effects of threat management interactions on conservation priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Nancy A; Wilson, Kerrie A; Tulloch, Ayesha I T; Rhodes, Jonathan R; Hanson, Jeffrey O; Possingham, Hugh P

    2015-12-01

    Decisions need to be made about which biodiversity management actions are undertaken to mitigate threats and about where these actions are implemented. However, management actions can interact; that is, the cost, benefit, and feasibility of one action can change when another action is undertaken. There is little guidance on how to explicitly and efficiently prioritize management for multiple threats, including deciding where to act. Integrated management could focus on one management action to abate a dominant threat or on a strategy comprising multiple actions to abate multiple threats. Furthermore management could be undertaken at sites that are in close proximity to reduce costs. We used cost-effectiveness analysis to prioritize investments in fire management, controlling invasive predators, and reducing grazing pressure in a bio-diverse region of southeastern Queensland, Australia. We compared outcomes of 5 management approaches based on different assumptions about interactions and quantified how investment needed, benefits expected, and the locations prioritized for implementation differed when interactions were taken into account. Managing for interactions altered decisions about where to invest and in which actions to invest and had the potential to deliver increased investment efficiency. Differences in high priority locations and actions were greatest between the approaches when we made different assumptions about how management actions deliver benefits through threat abatement: either all threats must be managed to conserve species or only one management action may be required. Threatened species management that does not consider interactions between actions may result in misplaced investments or misguided expectations of the effort required to mitigate threats to species.

  10. Coupled effects of local movement and global interaction on contagion

    CERN Document Server

    Zhong, Li-Xin; Chen, Rong-Da; Qiu, Tian; Zhong, Chen-Yang

    2014-01-01

    By incorporating segregated spatial domain and individual-based linkage into the SIS (susceptible-infected-susceptible) model, we investigate the coupled effects of random walk and intragroup interaction on contagion. Compared with the situation where only local movement or individual-based linkage exists, the coexistence of them leads to a wider spread of infectious disease. The roles of narrowing segregated spatial domain and reducing mobility in epidemic control are checked, these two measures are found to be conducive to curbing the spread of infectious disease. Considering heterogeneous time scales between local movement and global interaction, a log-log relation between the change in the number of infected individuals and the timescale $\\tau$ is found. A theoretical analysis indicates that the evolutionary dynamics in the present model is related to the encounter probability and the encounter time. A functional relation between the epidemic threshold and the ratio of shortcuts, and a functional relation...

  11. Quantum Butterfly Effect in Weakly Interacting Diffusive Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Aavishkar A.; Chowdhury, Debanjan; Sachdev, Subir; Swingle, Brian

    2017-07-01

    We study scrambling, an avatar of chaos, in a weakly interacting metal in the presence of random potential disorder. It is well known that charge and heat spread via diffusion in such an interacting disordered metal. In contrast, we show within perturbation theory that chaos spreads in a ballistic fashion. The squared anticommutator of the electron-field operators inherits a light-cone-like growth, arising from an interplay of a growth (Lyapunov) exponent that scales as the inelastic electron scattering rate and a diffusive piece due to the presence of disorder. In two spatial dimensions, the Lyapunov exponent is universally related at weak coupling to the sheet resistivity. We are able to define an effective temperature-dependent butterfly velocity, a speed limit for the propagation of quantum information that is much slower than microscopic velocities such as the Fermi velocity and that is qualitatively similar to that of a quantum critical system with a dynamical critical exponent z >1 .

  12. Arsenic and selenium interactive effect on alga Desmodesmus quadricauda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramárová, Zuzana; Fargašová, Agáta; Molnárová, Marianna; Bujdoš, Marek

    2012-12-01

    Substances known to be toxic in one-component solutions often exhibit unexpected effects when present in mixtures. Only a few efforts have been made to assess the effect of As-Se mixture in algae or plants in general. Due to the lack of information on this topic, the aim of this study was to examine the As-Se interactive effect in the alga species Desmodesmus quadricauda. The initial density of algal cells was 1.9×10(4), cultures were permanently illuminated (70μEm(-2)s(-1)) and As and Se adverse effect was expressed as EC (effective concentration) value. For all experiments three EC (EC(10), EC(20), EC(50)) values for both metalloids were used: for As 26.20, 29.05, 35.38mg L(-1) and for Se 1.93, 3.65, 12.24mg L(-1), respectively. During this study algal biomass growth, lipid peroxidation and protein-bound thiol content parameters were used to assess the As-Se interactions. The reciprocal effect of the elements on their uptake by the alga was also determined. The As-treated algae supplemented with Se exhibited impaired growth indicating a synergistic interaction between the two elements. In samples treated with As-Se mixture, the total algal As content showed marked increase depending on the Se concentration in the mixture. Se uptake was also positively affected by rising As concentrations in the mixture. Consequently, the As-Se-treated algae experienced greater damage to membranes, evidenced by marked elevation of the TBARS (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) content. The TBARS content increased to a maximum level by 29.05mg L(-1) of As and 3.65mg L(-1) of Se, which was around 70 percent higher than that of the control. The thiol content was very close to that of the control treatment over the entire concentration range and for all As and Se combinations tested. Possible explanation for the synergism observed in D. quadricauda, is that the elevated uptake of As and Se upon their interaction and impaired antioxidant system, has added to the toxicity of the

  13. Environmental effects of ozone depletion and its interactions ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    When considering the effects of climate change, it has become clear that processes resulting in changes in stratospheric ozone are more complex than previously believed. As a result of this, human health and environmental issues will be longer-lasting and more regionally variable. Like the other Panels, the EEAP produces a detailed report every four years; the most recent was published as a series of seven papers in 2015 (Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2015, 14, 1-184). In the years in between, the EEAP produces less detailed and shorter Progress Reports of the relevant scientific findings. The most recent of these was for 2015 (Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2016, 15, 141-147). The present Progress Report for 2016 assesses some of the highlights and new insights with regard to the interactive nature of the direct and indirect effects of UV radiation, atmospheric processes, and climate change. The report is also published in (Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2017, DOI: 10.1039/c7pp90001e). The more detailed Quadrennial Assessment will be made available in 2018. The Parties to the Montreal Protocol are informed by three Panels of experts. One of these is the Environmental Effects Assessment Panel (EEAP), which deals with two focal issues. The first focus is the effects on increased UV radiation on human health, animals, plants, biogeochemistry, air quality, and materials. The second focus is on interactions between UV radiation and global climate change and how these may

  14. Effective interaction of electroweak-interacting dark matter with Higgs boson and its phenomenology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Hisano

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We study phenomenology of electroweak-interacting fermionic dark matter (DM with a mass of O(100 GeV. Constructing the effective Lagrangian that describes the interactions between the Higgs boson and the SU(2L isospin multiplet fermion, we evaluate the electric dipole moment (EDM of electron, the signal strength of Higgs boson decay to two photons and the spin-independent elastic-scattering cross section with proton. As representative cases, we consider the SU(2L triplet fermions with zero/nonzero hypercharges and SU(2L doublet fermion. It is found that the electron EDM gives stringent constraints on those model parameter spaces. In the cases of the triplet fermion with zero hypercharge and the doublet fermion, the Higgs signal strength does not deviate from the standard model prediction by more than a few % once the current DM direct detection constraint is taken into account, even if the CP violation is suppressed. On the contrary, O(10–20% deviation may occur in the case of the triplet fermion with nonzero hypercharge. Our representative scenarios may be tested by the future experiments.

  15. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions...... interaction between a human operator and an artificial actor or agent. We can apply insights from puppetry to develop culturally-aware robots. Here we describe the development of a robotic marionette theatre wherein robotic controllers assume the role of human puppeteers. The system has been built, tested...

  16. Salinity and copper interactive effects on Perez's frog Pelophylax perezi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Bárbara; Ribeiro, Rui; Domingues, Inês; Pereira, Ruth; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Lopes, Isabel

    2013-08-01

    The present study was intended to assess the influence of salinity on the effects of copper on 2 life stages of Pelophylax perezi. Single and combined effects of salinity (NaCl) and Cu on survival, malformations, body length, and biochemical markers (catalase [CAT], cholinesterases, lactate dehidrogenase [LDH], and glutathione S-transferase) of individuals were evaluated in a multifactorial design. Two experiments were performed, 1 with embryos and the other with tadpoles. Each of these life stages was exposed to individual and combinations of Cu (0.0-7.4 mg/L and 0.0-2.4 mg/L, respectively) and NaCl (0.0-10.2 g/L and 0.0-7.4 g/L, respectively) concentrations. Copper alone had a higher lethal toxicity to tadpoles (90%; 2.4 mg/L) than to embryos (65%; 7.4 mg/L). Conversely, NaCl alone had a higher lethal toxicity to embryos (100%; 6.9 g/L) than to tadpoles (50%; 7.4 g/L). The 4 lowest tested NaCl concentrations decreased the lethal effects of Cu to embryos and the incidence of malformations, but the same outcome was not observed for tadpoles. Regarding enzymatic activities, although significant interactions between Cu and NaCl were observed for the activity of CAT and LDH in embryo and tadpole, a consistent pattern of NaCl and Cu interactive effects was not observed. The authors' results suggest a life-stage dependence on the effects of exposure to the individual substances or their combination. Also, it was observed that moderate salinity might have a shield effect against Cu lethal toxicity for embryos of P. perezi. These results highlight the need within ecological risk evaluations to characterize the sensitivity of different amphibian life stages to individual chemicals but also their combination with other environmental conditions resulting from climate changes.

  17. Effect of an interband interaction on narrow-band superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajay; Patra, S.; Tripathi, R.S. [Department of Physics, Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, Pantnagar 263145 (India)

    1995-05-01

    The effect of an interband interaction ({ital U}{sub {ital s}{ital d}}) on narrow-band superconductivity in the presence of weak hybridization has been studied by extending the Anderson lattice Hamiltonian. We have employed Zubarev`s double-time Green`s-function technique and used a mean-field decoupling scheme to obtain the self-consistent expressions for the transition temperature ({ital T}{sub {ital c}}) and interband correlation parameter ({gamma}{sub {ital c}}). The {ital T}{sub {ital c}} is found to be dependent on both the interband interaction and on the strength of the hybridization between {ital s}- (or {ital p}-) and {ital d}-band electrons (within a two-band model). We have shown that the interband interaction ({ital U}{sub {ital s}{ital d}}) plays qualitatively the same role as that of hybridization ({ital V}). Finally, we have explained the relevance of our results in transition metals or electron-doped high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} superconductors under externally applied pressure.

  18. Interactive Effects of Nitrogen and Climate Change on Biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, E. M.; Bowman, W. D.; Clark, C. M.; Compton, J. E.; Pardo, L. H.; Soong, J.

    2011-12-01

    example, in certain arid ecosystems of southern California, elevated nitrogen has promoted invasions of annual non-native grasses. At the same time, a period of above-normal precipitation years has exacerbated the grass invasions. Increased grass cover has altered the hydrologic cycle of these areas and increased fire risk, ultimately leading to conversion of the ecosystem from diverse shrublands to less diverse grasslands. In addition to empirical studies, modeling can be used to simulate climate change and nitrogen interactions. The ForSAFE-VEG model, for example, has been used to examine climate change and nitrogen interactions in Rocky Mountain alpine vegetation communities. Results from both empirical studies and modeling indicate that nitrogen and climate change interact to drive losses in biodiversity greater than those caused by either stressor alone. Reducing inputs of anthropogenic reactive nitrogen may be an effective mitigation strategy for protecting biodiversity in the face of climate change.

  19. On the convergence of multi-channel effective interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, M; Kuo, T T S; Schaefer, B J; Wambach, J

    2006-01-01

    A detailed analysis of convergence properties of the Andreozzi-Lee-Suzuki iteration method, which is used for the calculation of low-momentum effective potentials Vlowk is presented. After summarizing different modifications of the iteration method for one-flavor channel we introduce a simple model in order to study the generalization of the iteration method to multi-flavor channels. The failure of a straightforward generalization is discussed. The introduction of a channel-dependent cutoff cures the conceptual and technical problems. This novel method has already been applied successfully for realistic hyperon-nucleon interactions.

  20. The effects of phase advances between interaction points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tepekian, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fischer, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gu, X. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Trbojevic, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2011-03-01

    In this note we perform simulation studies to investigate the effects of betatron phase advances between the beam-beam interaction points on half-integer resonance driving term, second order chromaticty and dynamic aperture in RHIC. The betatron phase advances are adjusted with artificial matrices inserted in the middle of arcs. The lattices for the 2011 RHIC polarized proton (p-p) run and 2010 RHIC Au-Au runs are used. We also scan the phase advances between IP8 and the electron lens for the proposed Blue ring lattice with head-on beam-beam compensation.

  1. Effects of intermolecular interaction on inelastic electron tunneling spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kula, Mathias; Luo, Yi

    2008-02-01

    We have examined the effects of intermolecular interactions on the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) of model systems: a pair of benzenethiol or a pair of benzenedithiol sandwiched between gold electrodes. The dependence of the IETS on the mutual position of and distance between the paired molecules has been predicted and discussed in detailed. It is shown that, although in most cases, there are clear spectral fingerprints present which allow identification of the actual structures of the molecules inside the junction. Caution must be exercised since some characteristic lines can disappear at certain symmetries. The importance of theoretical simulation is emphasized.

  2. Websites in brand communication: interactivity and cross-media effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorveld, H.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation gives insight into two elements that are critical for expanding our understanding of the websites of brands. The first element represents the key characteristic of websites: interactivity. The dissertation investigates two forms of interactivity: actual and perceived interactivity.

  3. Collisional interactions between self-interacting nonrelativistic boson stars: Effective potential analysis and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotner, Eric

    2016-09-01

    Scalar particles are a common prediction of many beyond the Standard Model theories. If they are light and cold enough, there is a possibility they may form Bose-Einstein condensates, which will then become gravitationally bound. These boson stars are solitonic solutions to the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations but may be approximated in the nonrelativistic regime with a coupled Schrödinger-Poisson system. General properties of single soliton states are derived, including the possibility of quartic self-interactions. Binary collisions between two solitons are then studied, and the effects of different mass ratios, relative phases, self-couplings, and separation distances are characterized, leading to an easy conceptual understanding of how these parameters affect the collision outcome in terms of conservation of energy. Applications to dark matter are discussed.

  4. Soft wall effects on interacting particles in billiards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, H A; Manchein, C; Beims, M W

    2008-10-01

    The effect of physically realizable wall potentials (soft walls) on the dynamics of two interacting particles in a one-dimensional (1D) billiard is examined numerically. The 1D walls are modeled by the error function and the transition from hard to soft walls can be analyzed continuously by varying the softness parameter sigma . For sigma-->0 the 1D hard wall limit is obtained and the corresponding wall force on the particles is the delta function. In this limit the interacting particle dynamics agrees with previous results obtained for the 1D hard walls. We show that the two interacting particles in the 1D soft walls model is equivalent to one particle inside a soft right triangular billiard. Very small values of sigma substantiously change the dynamics inside the billiard and the mean finite-time Lyapunov exponent decreases significantly as the consequence of regular islands which appear due to the low-energy double collisions (simultaneous particle-particle-1D wall collisions). The rise of regular islands and sticky trajectories induced by the 1D wall softness is quantified by the number of occurrences of the most probable finite-time Lyapunov exponent. On the other hand, chaotic motion in the system appears due to the high-energy double collisions. In general we observe that the mean finite-time Lyapunov exponent decreases when sigma increases, but the number of occurrences of the most probable finite-time Lyapunov exponent increases, meaning that the phase-space dynamics tends to be more ergodiclike. Our results suggest that the transport efficiency of interacting particles and heat conduction in periodic structures modeled by billiards will strongly be affected by the smoothness of physically realizable walls.

  5. Comparison of dentinal microcracks of oval shaped canal prepared with different nickel-titanium instruments%新型镍钛机动器械预备椭圆形根管牙本质微裂比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伍婉翠; 吴补领; 陈广盛

    2014-01-01

    目的:通过观察3种新型镍钛机动器械预备椭圆形根管后牙根牙本质微裂情况,比较不同根管预备器械对根管预备后牙根抗折能力的影响。方法收集65个具有椭圆形单根管的下颌前牙,分为3个试验组(每组n=20)和对照组(n=5),试验组分别用自调节锉(SAF)、ProTaper Universal和ProTaper Next进行根管预备,对照组不进行根管预备。离根尖3、6、9 mm处横断牙根,体视显微镜下评估牙本质微裂情况。结果 ProTaper Universal组根折发生率高于 ProTaper Next组和 SAF组(P<0.05)。ProTaper Next组和SAF组的牙根折裂发生率比较,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。结论新型镍钛器械ProTaper Next和 SAF根管预备后牙本质微裂形成少,能降低根管治疗后牙根折裂风险。%Objective To compare the effect of different nickel-titanium rotary files on fracture resistance of teeth by observing status of dentinal microcracks after root canal preparation with.Methods 6 5 mandibular anterior teeth with single oval canal were randomly divided into three experimental groups (n=20)and a control group (n=5),SAF、ProTaper Universal and ProTaper Next system were used to prepare root canal in experimental groups,while the control group were left unprepared.Roots were sectioned from 3,6,9 mm to the apex,its status of dentinal microcracks was evaluated under a stereomicroscope.Results Root fracture inci-dence rate of group ProTaper Universal was significantly higher than that of group SAF and group ProTaper Next (P0.05).Conclusion Roots with oval shaped canal prepared with SAF and ProTaper Next produce less dentinal microc-racks,which decrease risk of vertical root fracture.

  6. Study on Distance Learning Support Services Strategy Based on Effective Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文琳; 靳桂阳

    2014-01-01

    Achieving effective interaction can the students get good learning results, and enhance the quality of distance learning. The paper firstly analyzes the research on distance learning support services and the problems of distance learning interaction in or-der to clarify the significance of implementing effective interaction. Then it puts forward the learning support services strategies based on effective interaction, which means to promote distance learning interaction and enhance the students' self-learning abili-ty.

  7. Interactions among endophytic bacteria and fungi: effects and potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    W M M S Bandara; Gamini Seneviratne; S A Kulasooriya

    2006-12-01

    Plants benefit extensively by harbouring endophytic microbes. They promote plant growth and confer enhanced resistance to various pathogens. However, the way the interactions among endophytes influence the plant productivity has not been explained. Present study experimentally showed that endophytes isolated from rice (Oryza sativa) used as the test plant produced two types of interactions; biofilms (bacteria attached to mycelia) and mixed cultures with no such attachments. Acidity, as measured by pH in cultures with biofilms was higher than that of fungi alone, bacteria alone or the mixed cultures. Production of indoleacetic acid like substances (IAAS) of biofilms was higher than that of mixed cultures, fungi or bacteria. Bacteria and fungi produced higher quantities of IAAS than mixed cultures. In mixed cultures, the potential of IAAS production of resident microbes was reduced considerably. There was a negative relationship between IAAS and pH of the biofilms, indicating that IAAS was the main contributor to the acidity. However, such a relationship was not observed in mixed cultures. Microbial acid production is important for suppressing plant pathogens. Thus the biofilm formation in endophytic environment seems to be very important for healthy and improved plant growth. However, it is unlikely that an interaction among endophytes takes place naturally in the endophytic environment, due to physical barriers of plant tissues. Further, critical cell density dependant quorum sensing that leads to biofilm formation may not occur in the endophytic environment as there is a limited space. As such in vitro production and application of beneficial biofilmed inocula of endophytes are important for improved plant production in any agro-ecosystem. The conventional practice of plant inoculation with monocultures or mixed cultures of effective microbes may not give the highest microbial effect, which may only be achieved by biofilm formation.

  8. The radiation reaction effect in ultra intense laser foil interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimo, O.; Jirka, M.; Masek, M.; Limpouch, J.; Bussmann, M.; Korn, G.

    2013-05-01

    Since the radiation reaction effect on electron propagation is very small in most cases, it can be usually neglected and the Lorentz force equation can be applied. However, ultra-intense lasers with normalized vector potential of the order of 100 can accelerate electrons to relativistic velocities with very high gamma factor. When the electron is accelerated to such high velocities the amount of emitted radiation may become large and radiation damping and emission of energetic photons should be considered. This work studies the influence of the radiation reaction force on laser interaction with solid foil targets. It compares different approaches adopted in PIC simulations to take into account the radiation reaction. The simulations of a counter-propagating relativistic electron and an ultra-intense laser beam demonstrate a strong energy loss of electrons due to non-linear Compton scattering. The interaction of ultra-intense laser pulse with solid foil is studied using PIC simulations. It is shown that the effect of radiation reaction strongly depends on the recirculation of high-energy electrons. When the recirculation is efficient, the radiation coming from the target is much more intense and it shows different spectral and angular characteristics.

  9. Global fits of the dark matter-nucleon effective interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Catena, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    The effective theory of isoscalar dark matter-nucleon interactions mediated by heavy spin-one or spin-zero particles depends on 10 coupling constants besides the dark matter particle mass. Here we compare this 11-dimensional effective theory to current observations in a comprehensive statistical analysis of several direct detection experiments, including the recent LUX, SuperCDMS and CDMSlite results. From a multidimensional scan with about 3 million likelihood evaluations, we extract the marginalized posterior probability density functions (a Bayesian approach) and the profile likelihoods (a frequentist approach), as well as the associated credible regions and confidence levels, for each coupling constant vs dark matter mass and for each pair of coupling constants. We compare the Bayesian and frequentist approach in the light of the currently limited amount of data. We find that current direct detection data contain sufficient information to simultaneously constrain not only the familiar spin-independent and...

  10. Global Change Effects on Plant-Soil Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Marie

    Global change is expected to increasingly affect composition and functioning of soil communities. In terrestrial ecosystems, the plant-soil interactions will be of particular importance for the ecosystem response, including feed-back responses that may further increase climate change. The aim...... are able to determine effects of global change on the plant-soil system. By extraction and microscopy of nematode communities, we are able to characterize the trophic structure of a significant part of the rhizosphere community. The work compiled for this dissertation is based on field experiments...... effects. Furthermore, the plant functional type (shrub or grass) is more strongly determining the rhizosphere community structure than any global change factor. Frequent burning of prairie vegetation changes the soil community to an extent that alters the decomposition rate. Together, these results...

  11. Plasma effects in electromagnetic field interaction with biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R. P.; Batra, Karuna; Excell, Peter S.

    2011-02-01

    Theoretical analysis is presented of the nonlinear behavior of charge carriers in biological tissue under the influence of varying low-intensity electromagnetic (EM) field. The interaction occurs because of the nonlinear force arising due to the gradient of the EM field intensity acting on free electrons in the conduction band of proteins in metabolically active biological cell membrane receptors leading to a redistribution of charge carriers. Field dependence of the resulting dielectric constant is investigated by a suitable modification to include an additional electronic contribution term to the three-term Debye model. The exogenous EM field propagating in this nonlinear cellular medium satisfies the nonlinear Schrödinger equation and can be affected significantly. Resulting field effect can be substantially augmented and effective rectification/demodulation can occur. Possible implications of this modification on biological processes in white and grey matter are discussed.

  12. Strong delayed interactive effects of metal exposure and warming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debecker, Sara; Dinh, Khuong Van; Stoks, Robby

    2017-01-01

    As contaminants are often more toxic at higher temperatures, predicting their impact under global warming remains a key challenge for ecological risk assessment. Ignoring delayed effects, synergistic interactions between contaminants and warming, and differences in sensitivity across species......’ ranges could lead to an important underestimation of the risks. We addressed all three mechanisms by studying effects of larval exposure to zinc and warming before, during, and after metamorphosis in Ischnura elegans damselflies from high- and lowlatitude populations. By integrating these mechanisms...... was especially remarkable in high-latitude animals, as they appeared almost insensitive to zinc during the larval stage. Second, the well-known synergism between metals and warming was manifested not only during the larval stage but also after metamorphosis, yet notably only in low-latitude damselflies...

  13. Structural Priming and Frequency Effects Interact in Chinese Sentence Comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hang; Dong, Yanping; Boland, Julie E; Yuan, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Previous research in several European languages has shown that the language processing system is sensitive to both structural frequency and structural priming effects. However, it is currently not clear whether these two types of effects interact during online sentence comprehension, especially for languages that do not have morphological markings. To explore this issue, the present study investigated the possible interplay between structural priming and frequency effects for sentences containing the Chinese ambiguous construction V NP1 de NP2 in a self-paced reading experiment. The sentences were disambiguated to either the more frequent/preferred NP structure or the less frequent VP structure. Each target sentence was preceded by a prime sentence of three possible types: NP primes, VP primes, and neutral primes. When the ambiguous construction V NP1 de NP2 was disambiguated to the dispreferred VP structure, participants experienced more processing difficulty following an NP prime relative to following a VP prime or a neutral baseline. When the ambiguity was resolved to the preferred NP structure, prime type had no effect. These results suggest that structural priming in comprehension is modulated by the baseline frequency of alternative structures, with the less frequent structure being more subject to structural priming effects. These results are discussed in the context of the error-based, implicit learning account of structural priming.

  14. CO2 EFFECTS ON MOJAVE DESERT PLANT INTERACTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. A. DEFALCO; G. C. FERNANDEZ; S. D. SMITH; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    Seasonal and interannual droughts characteristic of deserts have the potential to modify plant interactions as atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations continue to rise. At the Nevada Desert FACE (free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment) facility in the northern Mojave Desert, the effects of elevated atmospheric C02 (550 vs. ambient {approx}360 {micro}mol mol{sup -1}) on plant interactions were examined during two years of high and low rainfall. Results suggest that CO{sub 2} effects on the interaction between native species and their understory herbs are dependent on the strength of competition when rainfall is plentiful, but are unimportant during annual drought. Seasonal rainfall for 1999 was 23% the long-term average for the area, and neither elevated CO{sub 2} nor the low production of herbaceous neighbors had an effect on relative growth rate (RGR, d{sup -1}) and reproductive effort (RE, number of flowers g{sup -1}) for Achnatherum hymenoides (early season perennial C{sub 3} grass), Pleuraphis rigida (late season perennial C{sub 4} grass), and Larrea tridentata (evergreen C{sub 3} shrub). In contrast, 1998 received 213% the average rainfall. Consequently, the decrease in RGR and increase in RE for Achnatherum, whose period of growth overlaps directly with that of its neighbors, was exaggerated at elevated CO{sub 2}. However, competitive effects of neighbors on Eriogonum trichopes (a winter annual growing in shrub interspaces), Pleuraphis and Larrea were not affected by elevated CO{sub 2}, and possible explanations are discussed. Contrary to expectations, the invasive annual neighbor Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens had little influence on target plant responses because densities in 1998 and 1999 at this site were well below those found in other studies where it has negatively affected perennial plant growth. The extent that elevated CO{sub 2} reduces the performance of Achnatherum in successive years to cause its loss from the plant community depends more on future pressure

  15. Effects of the Interaction between Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles and Hepatoma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Meizhen; XU Weiguo; CUI Bingcun; DAI Honglian; HAN Yingchao; YIN Yixia; LI Shipu

    2014-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of the anticancer effects of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanoparticles in vivo and in vitro, the effects of the interaction of HAP nanoparticles with hepatoma cells were explored. HAP nanoparticles were prepared by homogeneous precipitation and characterized by laser particle analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). HAP nanoparticles were observed to be uniformly distributed, with rod-like shapes and diameters in the range of 42.1-87.1 nm. Overnight attached, suspended, and proliferating Bel-7402 cells were incubated with HAP nanoparticles. Inverted microscopy observation revealed that HAP nanoparticles with a cell membrane showed good adsorption. TEM demonstrated that HAP nanoparticles were present on the surface of cells, continuously taken up by cells through endocytosis, and transported in vesicles close to the nucleus. Fluorescence microscopy showed that the concentrations of intracellular Ca2+labeled with Fluo-3 calcium fluorescent probe were significantly enhanced. In addition, inverted microscopy observation revealed that suspended cells treated with HAP nanoparticles did not adhere to the culture bottle, resulting in cell death. After the overnight attached cells were treated with HAP nanoparticles for 96 h with increasing doses of HAP nanoparticles, inverted microscopy observation revealed that cell proliferation was slowed and cell-cell adhesion was weakened. Feulgen staining and image analysis indicated that the nuclear DNA content of the cells was markedly reduced, and argyrophilic nucleolar organizer region (AgNOR) staining and image analysis indicated that the number of AgNORs was significantly decreased. Therefore, hepatoma cells brought about the adsorption, uptake, transport and degradation of HAP nanoparticles. In addition, HAP nanoparticles affected hepatoma cells with regard to cell-cell adhesion, cell and extracellular matrix adhesion, and DNA and protein synthesis;thus inhibiting cell proliferation. This

  16. Magnon Hall effect without Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owerre, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    Topological magnon bands and magnon Hall effect in insulating collinear ferromagnets are induced by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) even at zero magnetic field. In the geometrically frustrated star lattice, a coplanar/noncollinear \\mathbf{q}=0 magnetic ordering may be present due to spin frustration. This magnetic structure, however, does not exhibit topological magnon effects even with DMI in contrast to collinear ferromagnets. We show that a magnetic field applied perpendicular to the star plane induces a non-coplanar spin configuration with nonzero spin scalar chirality, which provides topological effects without the need of DMI. The non-coplanar spin texture originates from the topology of the spin configurations and does not need the presence of DMI or magnetic ordering, which suggests that this phenomenon may be present in the chiral spin liquid phases of frustrated magnetic systems. We propose that these anomalous topological magnon effects can be accessible in polymeric iron (III) acetate—a star-lattice antiferromagnet with both spin frustration and long-range magnetic ordering.

  17. Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The main theme of this anthology is the unique interaction between mathematics, physics and philosophy during the beginning of the 20th century. Seminal theories of modern physics and new fundamental mathematical structures were discovered or formed in this period. Significant physicists...... such as Lorentz and Einstein as well as mathematicians such as Poincare, Minkowski, Hilbert and Weyl contributed to this development. They created the new physical theories and the mathematical disciplines that play such paramount roles in their mathematical formulations. These physicists and mathematicians were...

  18. The effect of cultural interaction on cumulative cultural evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahashi, Wataru

    2014-07-07

    Cultural transmission and cultural evolution are important for animals, especially for humans. I developed a new analytical model of cultural evolution, in which each newborn learns cultural traits from multiple individuals (exemplars) in parental generation, individually explores around learned cultural traits, judges the utility of known cultural traits, and adopts a mature cultural trait. Cultural evolutionary speed increases when individuals explore a wider range of cultural traits, accurately judge the skill level of cultural traits (strong direct bias), do not strongly conform to the population mean, increase the exploration range according to the variety of socially learned cultural traits (condition dependent exploration), and make smaller errors in social learning. Number of exemplars, population size, similarity of cultural traits between exemplars, and one-to-many transmission have little effect on cultural evolutionary speed. I also investigated how cultural interaction between two populations with different mean skill levels affects their cultural evolution. A population sometimes increases in skill level more if it encounters a less skilled population than if it does not encounter anyone. A less skilled population sometimes exceeds a more skilled population in skill level by cultural interaction between both populations. The appropriateness of this analytical method is confirmed by individual-based simulations.

  19. Quantum Butterfly Effect in Weakly Interacting Diffusive Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aavishkar A. Patel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We study scrambling, an avatar of chaos, in a weakly interacting metal in the presence of random potential disorder. It is well known that charge and heat spread via diffusion in such an interacting disordered metal. In contrast, we show within perturbation theory that chaos spreads in a ballistic fashion. The squared anticommutator of the electron-field operators inherits a light-cone-like growth, arising from an interplay of a growth (Lyapunov exponent that scales as the inelastic electron scattering rate and a diffusive piece due to the presence of disorder. In two spatial dimensions, the Lyapunov exponent is universally related at weak coupling to the sheet resistivity. We are able to define an effective temperature-dependent butterfly velocity, a speed limit for the propagation of quantum information that is much slower than microscopic velocities such as the Fermi velocity and that is qualitatively similar to that of a quantum critical system with a dynamical critical exponent z>1.

  20. Hamiltonian multiplex interaction based on excitons effect in semiconductor QCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezu Jahanshir

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The subject of modern technology has been the focus of extensive theoretical investigations in semiconducting nanostructures which we know as quantum dots (QCs. The possibility of monitoring and controlling the properties of QCs attracted considerable attention to these objects, as an important basic system in future technology. So, the quantum-mechanical effects play a significant role in the description of the formation mechanism QCs, determination of mass spectrum, binding energy and other characteristics. Based on QFT and by using oscillator representation method (ORM and operator product expansion technique developed in QFT, we study the properties of electron-hole QDs, determine mass spectrum and peruse spin-spin interactions in exciton system and its multiple pair systems. This method has applications to calculate the binding energy of exciton system in ground and excited states with semi-nuclear structure in semiconductor QCs or cold atomic few-body systems and develop the general calculation’s theory of few-body systems based on the Coulomb interaction between particles by forming excitonic pairs in semiconductor QCs. We investigate the binding energy of exciton bound states. It is shown that fermion particles have a very small mass, and after bonding together by dynamically force, constituent particles become massive, which is analogous to what happens in QCD.

  1. Counting statistics for genetic switches based on effective interaction approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkubo, Jun

    2012-09-01

    Applicability of counting statistics for a system with an infinite number of states is investigated. The counting statistics has been studied a lot for a system with a finite number of states. While it is possible to use the scheme in order to count specific transitions in a system with an infinite number of states in principle, we have non-closed equations in general. A simple genetic switch can be described by a master equation with an infinite number of states, and we use the counting statistics in order to count the number of transitions from inactive to active states in the gene. To avoid having the non-closed equations, an effective interaction approximation is employed. As a result, it is shown that the switching problem can be treated as a simple two-state model approximately, which immediately indicates that the switching obeys non-Poisson statistics.

  2. Global Change Effects on Plant-Soil Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Marie

    Global change is expected to increasingly affect composition and functioning of soil communities. In terrestrial ecosystems, the plant-soil interactions will be of particular importance for the ecosystem response, including feed-back responses that may further increase climate change. The aim...... (Paper III). Furthermore, by way of meta-analysis, the role of organisms in global change effects on ecosystem function is modelled (Paper IV). Among CO2, warming and summer drought, CO2 is the factor most consistently impacting soil organisms. CO2 increases abundance of microorganisms and nematodes...... of this dissertation has been to determine how soil food web structure and function is affected when the quantity and quality of plant input is altered under global change. By studying the abundance and composition of soil organisms, particularly those in the rhizosphere, closely associated with living plants, we...

  3. High frequency chest compression effects on cardio-respiratory interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongwon; Lee, Yong Wan; Warwick, Warren J

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we present a quantitative approach to the analysis of the HFCC effect on heart rate changes in the respiratory stage according to different pulsation conditions with HFCC pulsation and without HFCC pulsation. We have shown that the heart rate increases with higher pressure settings revealing different patterns depending on the respiration stages. For our interaction study of how the heart and lungs were affected by HFCC, phase synchronization was considered and compared under different conditions which determine the real biological phenomenon for nonlinear or linear oscillatory coupling. The subject for this study was young and healthy, so these preliminary results should be verified with more detailed studies from abundant subjects to increase HFCC efficacy for lung disease patients. Interestingly, the indication or tracking of heart rate changes, respiration rate changes, or synchronization epoch can be the standard index for how much the cardiac and respiratory system improve using HFCC during therapy time or after therapy time.

  4. Super Efimov effect of resonantly interacting fermions in two dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Yusuke; Moroz, Sergej; Son, Dam Thanh

    2013-06-07

    We study a system of spinless fermions in two dimensions with a short-range interaction fine-tuned to a p-wave resonance. We show that three such fermions form an infinite tower of bound states of orbital angular momentum ℓ=±1 and their binding energies obey a universal doubly exponential scaling E(3)((n))∝exp(-2e(3πn/4+θ)) at large n. This "super Efimov effect" is found by a renormalization group analysis and confirmed by solving the bound state problem. We also provide an indication that there are ℓ=±2 four-body resonances associated with every three-body bound state at E(4)((n))∝exp(-2e(3πn/4+θ-0.188)). These universal few-body states may be observed in ultracold atom experiments and should be taken into account in future many-body studies of the system.

  5. The Statistical Multifragmentation Model with Skyrme Effective Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Souza, S R; Donangelo, R; Lynch, W G; Steiner, A W; Tsang, M B

    2009-01-01

    The Statistical Multifragmentation Model is modified to incorporate the Helmholtz free energies calculated in the finite temperature Thomas-Fermi approximation using Skyrme effective interactions. In this formulation, the density of the fragments at the freeze-out configuration corresponds to the equilibrium value obtained in the Thomas-Fermi approximation at the given temperature. The behavior of the nuclear caloric curve at constant volume is investigated in the micro-canonical ensemble and a plateau is observed for excitation energies between 8 and 10 MeV per nucleon. A kink in the caloric curve is found at the onset of this gas transition, indicating the existence of a small excitation energy region with negative heat capacity. In contrast to previous statistical calculations, this situation takes place even in this case in which the system is constrained to fixed volume. The observed phase transition takes place at approximately constant entropy. The charge distribution and other observables also turn ou...

  6. The Statistical Multifragmentation Model with Skyrme Effective Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, B V; Donangelo, R; Lynch, W G; Steiner, A W; Tsang, M B

    2010-01-01

    The Statistical Multifragmentation Model is modified to incorporate Helmholtz free energies calculated in the finite temperature Thomas-Fermi approximation using Skyrme effective interactions. In this formulation, the density of the fragments at the freeze-out configuration corresponds to the equilibrium value obtained in the Thomas-Fermi approximation at the given temperature. The behavior of the nuclear caloric curve, at constant volume, is investigated in the micro-canonical ensemble and a plateau is observed for excitation energies between 8 and 10 MeV per nucleon. A small kink in the caloric curve is found at the onset of this gas transition, indicating the existence of negative heat capacity, even in this case in which the system is constrained to a fixed volume, in contrast to former statistical calculations.

  7. Counting statistics for genetic switches based on effective interaction approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Ohkubo, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Applicability of counting statistics for a system with an infinite number of states is investigated. The counting statistics has been studied a lot for a system with a finite number of states. While it is possible to use the scheme in order to count specific transitions in a system with an infinite number of states in principle, we have non-closed equations in general. A simple genetic switch can be described by a master equation with an infinite number of states, and we use the counting statistics in order to count the number of transitions from inactive to active states in the gene. To avoid to have the non-closed equations, an effective interaction approximation is employed. As a result, it is shown that the switching problem can be treated as a simple two-state model approximately, which immediately indicates that the switching obeys non-Poisson statistics.

  8. Effects of dipole-dipole interaction between cigar-shaped BECs of cold alkali atoms: towards inverse-squared interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yue; Luo, Zhuxi; Wang, Ziqiang

    2014-07-30

    We show that the dipole-dipole coupling between Wannier modes in cigar-shaped Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) is significantly enhanced while the short-range coupling is strongly suppressed. As a result, the dipole-dipole interaction can become the dominant interaction between ultracold alkali Bose atoms. In the long length limit of a cigar-shaped BEC, the resulting effective one-dimensional models possess an effective inverse squared interacting potential, the Calogero-Sutherland potential, which plays a fundamental role in many fields of contemporary physics; but its direct experimental realization has been a challenge for a long time. We propose to realize the Calogero-Sutherland model in ultracold alkali Bose atoms and study the effects of the dipole-dipole interaction.

  9. Interacting Effects of TSH and Insulin on Human Differentiated Adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felske, D; Gagnon, A; Sorisky, A

    2015-08-01

    Subclinical hypothyroidism, characterized by an isolated rise in TSH serum levels with normal thyroid function, is a pro-inflammatory state associated with insulin resistance. Adipocytes express TSH receptors, but it is not known if TSH can directly inhibit insulin signaling. Using primary human differentiated adipocytes, we examined the effects of TSH on insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation, and whether conventional PKC (cPKC) were involved. The effect of insulin on TSH-stimulated lipolysis was also investigated. TSH inhibited insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in adipocytes by 54%. TSH activated cPKC, and Gö6976, a PKCα and -β1 inhibitor, prevented the inhibitory effect of TSH on the insulin response. Insulin reduced the ability of TSH to activate cPKC and to stimulate lipolysis.Our data reveal novel interactions between TSH and insulin. TSH inhibits insulin-stimulated Akt signaling in a cPKC-dependent fashion, whereas insulin blocks TSH-stimulated cPKC activity and lipolysis. TSH and insulin act on differentiated human adipocytes to modulate their respective intracellular signals. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Light interacting with atomic ensembles: collective, cooperative and mesoscopic effects

    CERN Document Server

    Guerin, W; Kaiser, R

    2016-01-01

    Cooperative scattering has been the subject of intense research in the last years. In this article, we discuss the concept of cooperative scattering from a broad perspective. We briefly review the various collective effects that occur when light interacts with an ensemble of atoms. We show that some effects that have been recently discussed in the context of "single-photon superradiance", or cooperative scattering in the linear-optics regime, can also be explained by "standard optics", i.e., using macroscopic quantities such as the susceptibility or the diffusion coefficient. We explain why some collective effects depend on the atomic density, and others on the optical depth. In particular, we show that, for a large and dilute atomic sample driven by a far-detuned laser, the decay of the fluorescence, which exhibits superradiant and subradiant dynamics, depends only on the on-resonance optical depth. We also discuss the link between concepts that are independently studied in the quantum-optics community and i...

  11. Effects of ethanol on the proteasome interacting proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fawzia; Bardag-Gorce

    2010-01-01

    Proteasome dysfunction has been repeatedly reported in alcoholic liver disease. Ethanol metabolism endproducts affect the structure of the proteasome, and, therefore, change the proteasome interaction with its regulatory complexes 19S and PA28, as well as its interacting proteins. Chronic ethanol feeding alters the ubiquitin-proteasome activity by altering the interaction between the 19S and the 20S proteasome interaction. The degradation of oxidized and damaged proteins is thus decreased and leads to accum...

  12. Constraining the surface properties of effective Skyrme interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodon, R.; Bender, M.; Bennaceur, K.; Meyer, J.

    2016-08-01

    Background: Deformation energy surfaces map how the total binding energy of a nuclear system depends on the geometrical properties of intrinsic configurations, thereby providing a powerful tool to interpret nuclear spectroscopy and large-amplitude collective-motion phenomena such as fission. The global behavior of the deformation energy is known to be directly connected to the surface properties of the effective interaction used for its calculation. Purpose: The precise control of surface properties during the parameter adjustment of an effective interaction is key to obtain a reliable and predictive description of nuclear properties. The most relevant indicator is the surface-energy coefficient asurf. There are several possibilities for its definition and estimation, which are not fully equivalent and require a computational effort that can differ by orders of magnitude. The purpose of this study is threefold: first, to identify a scheme for the determination of asurf that offers the best compromise between robustness, precision, and numerical efficiency; second, to analyze the correlation between values for asurf and the characteristic energies of the fission barrier of 240Pu; and third, to lay out an efficient and robust procedure for how the deformation properties of the Skyrme energy density functional (EDF) can be constrained during the parameter fit. Methods: There are several frequently used possibilities to define and calculate the surface energy coefficient asurf of effective interactions built for the purpose of self-consistent mean-field calculations. The most direct access is provided by the model system of semi-infinite nuclear matter, but asurf can also be extracted from the systematics of binding energies of finite nuclei. Calculations can be carried out either self-consistently [Hartree-Fock (HF)], which incorporates quantal shell effects, or in one of the semiclassical extended Thomas-Fermi (ETF) or modified Thomas-Fermi (MTF) approximations. The

  13. The effects of interaction compartments on stability for competitive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozdilsky, Ian D; Stone, Lewi; Solow, Andrew

    2004-03-21

    The interactions between species are unlikely to be randomly arranged, and there is increasing evidence that most interactions occur within small species sub-groups, or compartments, that do not strongly interact with one another. We examine whether arranging the interactions of a competitive system into compartments influences the system properties of linear stability, feasibility, reactivity, and biomass stability, thereby altering the likelihood of species persistence. Model Lotka-Volterra systems of diffuse competition were analysed with interactions arranged randomly and in compartments. It was found, using a variety of dynamical measures, that arranging interactions into compartments enhances the likelihood of species persistence. Since many natural competitive systems appear to have interactions arranged within compartments, this may be an outcome of the positive attributes that this form of organization offers.

  14. Climate Effects of Cloud Modified CCN-Cloud Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, S. R., Jr.; Hudson, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) play an important role in the climate system through the indirect aerosol effect (IAE). IAE is one of the least understood aspects of the climate system as many cloud processes are complicated. Many studies of aerosol-cloud interaction involve CCN interaction with cloud droplet concentrations (Nc), cloud microphysics, and radiative properties. However, fewer studies investigate how cloud processes modify CCN. Upon evaporation from non-precipitating clouds, CCN distributions develop bimodal shaped distributions (Hoppel et al. 1986). Activated CCN participate in cloud processing that is either chemical: aqueous oxidation; or physical: Brownian scavenging, collision and coalescence. Chemical processing does not change CCN concentration (NCCN) but reduces critical supersaturations (Sc; larger size) (Feingold and Kreidenweis, 2000) while physical processing reduces NCCN and Sc. These processes create the minima in the bimodal CCN distributions (Hudson et al., 2015). Updraft velocity (W) and NCCN are major factors on how these modified CCN distributions affect clouds. Panel a shows two nearby CCN distributions in the MArine Stratus/stratocumulus Experiment (MASE), which have similar concentrations, but the bimodal one (red) has been modified by cloud processing. In a simplified cloud droplet model, the modified CCN then produces higher Nc (panel b) and smaller droplet mean diameters (MD; panel c) when compared to the unmodified CCN (black) for W lower than 50 cm/s. The better CCN (lower Sc) increase competition among droplets reducing MD and droplet distribution spread (σ) which acts to reduce drizzle. Competition is created by limited available condensate due to lower S created by the low W (50 cm/s) typical of cumuli, Ncis reduced and MD is increased from the modified CCN distribution (panels b & c). Here, CCN cloud processing increases MD and σ leading to increased drizzle. Improved climate prediction requires a better understanding

  15. Constraining the surface properties of effective Skyrme interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Jodon, R; Bennaceur, K; Meyer, J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is threefold: first, to identify a scheme for the determination of the surface energy coefficient a_surf that offers the best compromise between robustness, precision, and numerical efficiency; second, to analyze the correlation between values for a_surf and the characteristic energies of the fission barrier of Pu240; and third, to lay out a procedure how the deformation properties of the Skyrme energy density functional (EDF) can be constrained during the parameter fit. There are several frequently used possibilities to define and calculate the surface energy coefficient a_surf of effective interactions. The most direct access is provided by the model system of semi-infinite nuclear matter, but a_surf can also be extracted from the systematics of binding energies of finite nuclei. Calculations can be carried out either self-consistently (HF), which incorporates quantal shell effects, or in one of the semi-classical Extended Thomas-Fermi (ETF) or Modified Thomas-Fermi (MTF) approxima...

  16. Effects of visual priming on taste-odor interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marije van Beilen

    Full Text Available Little is known about the influence of visual characteristics other than colour on flavor perception, and the complex interactions between more than two sensory modalities. This study focused on the effects of recognizability of visual (texture information on flavor perception of odorized sweet beverages. Participants rated the perceived sweetness of odorized sucrose solutions in the presence or absence of either a congruent or incongruent visual context. Odors were qualitatively reminiscent of sweet foods (strawberry and caramel or not (savoury. Visual context was either an image of the same sweet foods (figurative context or a visual texture derived from this product (non-figurative context. Textures were created using a texture synthesis method that preserved perceived food qualities while removing object information. Odor-taste combinations were rated sweeter within a figurative than a non-figurative context. This behaviour was exhibited for all odor-taste combinations, even in trials without images, indicating sustained priming by figurative visual context. A non-figurative context showed a transient sweetening effect. Sweetness was generally enhanced most by the strawberry odor. We conclude that the degree of recognizability of visual information (figurative versus non-figurative, influences flavor perception differently. Our results suggest that this visual context priming is mediated by separate sustained and transient processes that are differently evoked by figurative and non-figurative visual contexts. These components operate independent of the congruency of the image-odor-taste combinations.

  17. EFFECT OF INTERACTING RAREFACTION WAVES ON RELATIVISTICALLY HOT JETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Jin; Shibata, Kazunari [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Masada, Youhei, E-mail: jin@kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of System Informatics, Department of Computational Science, Kobe University, Kobe (Japan)

    2012-06-01

    The effect of rarefaction acceleration on the propagation dynamics and structure of relativistically hot jets is studied through relativistic hydrodynamic simulations. We emphasize the nonlinear interaction of rarefaction waves excited at the interface between a cylindrical jet and the surrounding medium. From simplified one-dimensional (1D) models with radial jet structure, we find that a decrease in the relativistic pressure due to the interacting rarefaction waves in the central zone of the jet transiently yields a more powerful boost of the bulk jet than that expected from single rarefaction acceleration. This leads to a cyclic in situ energy conversion between thermal and bulk kinetic energies, which induces radial oscillating motion of the jet. The oscillation timescale is characterized by the initial pressure ratio of the jet to the ambient medium and follows a simple scaling relation, {tau}{sub oscillation}{proportional_to}(P{sub jet,0}/P{sub amb,0}){sup 1/2}. Extended two-dimensional simulations confirm that this radial oscillating motion in the 1D system manifests as modulation of the structure of the jet in a more realistic situation where a relativistically hot jet propagates through an ambient medium. We find that when the ambient medium has a power-law pressure distribution, the size of the reconfinement region along the propagation direction of the jet in the modulation structure {lambda} evolves according to a self-similar relation {lambda}{proportional_to}t{sup {alpha}/2}, where {alpha} is the power-law index of the pressure distribution.

  18. Effect of multipolar interaction on the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Xiao-Feng; Gao Lei

    2007-01-01

    Nanofluids or liquids with suspended nanoparticles are likely to be the future heat transfer media, as they exhibit higher thermal conductivity than those of liquids. It has been proposed that nanoparticles are apt to congregate and form clusters, and hence the interaction between nanoparticles becomes important. In this paper, by taking into account the interaction between nearest-neighbour inclusions, we adopt the multiple image method to investigate the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids. Numerical results show that then the thermal conductivity ratio between the nanoparticles and fluids is large, and the two nanoparticles are close up and even touch, and the point-dipole theory such as Maxwell-Garnett theory becomes rough as many-body interactions are neglected. Our theoretical results on the effective thermal conductivity of CuO/water and Al2O3/water nanofluids are in good agreement with experimental data.

  19. New parameterizations of the Gogny effective nuclear interaction; Nouvelles parametrisations de l'interaction nucleaire effective de Gogny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chappert, F

    2007-06-15

    The effective interaction between nucleons is the basic input to microscopic calculations in nuclear structure. One of the forms used since the 1970's is the phenomenological effective force proposed by D. Gogny. This force gives excellent results in nuclei at the mean-field approximation. The presence of contact terms does not allow, however, to use it for the description of beyond mean-field correlations present in nuclei. In this work, we investigate some extensions of the Gogny force, and especially a generalization in which the zero range density dependent term has been replaced by a finite range term. The parameters occurring in the analytical form of the force have been adjusted on symmetric infinite nuclear matter and neutron matter properties, and on some selected observables for stable nuclei, especially those related to pairing correlations. We present the method to include this kind of force in Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations and we analyze the results obtained for various nuclei. The new versions of the Gogny force allow us to reproduce nuclear structure properties with improved accuracy as compared to the former version. (author)

  20. Analysis of digenic epistatic effects and QE interaction effects QTL controlling grain weight in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高用明; 朱军; 宋佑胜; 何慈信; 石春海; 邢永忠

    2004-01-01

    Immortalized F2 population of rice (Oryza sativa L.) was developed by randomly mating F1 among recombinant inbred (RI) lines derived from (Zhenshan 97B×Minghui 63),which allowed replications within and across environments.QTL (quantitative trait loci) mapping analysis on kilo-grain weight of immortalized F2 population was performed by using newly developed software for QTL mapping,QTL Mapper 2.0. Eleven distinctly digenic epistatic loci included a total of 15 QTL were located on eight chromosomes.QTL main effects of additive,dominance,and additive×additive,additive×dominance,and dominance×dominance interactions were estimated.Interaction effects between QTL main effects and environments (QE) were predicted.Less than 40% of single effects,most of which were additive effects,for identified QTL were significant at 5% level.The directional difference for QTL main effects suggested that these QTL were distributed in parents in the repulsion phase.This should make it feasible to improve kilo-grain weight of both parents by selecting appropriate new recombinants. Only few of the QE interaction effects were significant.Application prospect for QTL mapping achievements in genetic breeding was discussed.

  1. Sleep and environmental context: interactive effects for memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairney, Scott A; Durrant, Simon J; Musgrove, Hazel; Lewis, Penelope A

    2011-09-01

    Sleep after learning is often beneficial for memory. Reinstating an environmental context that was present at learning during subsequent retrieval also leads to superior declarative memory performance. This study examined how post-learning sleep, relative to wakefulness, impacts upon context-dependent memory effects. Thirty-two participants encoded word lists in each of two rooms (contexts), which were different in terms of size, odour and background music. Immediately after learning and following a night of sleep or a day of wakefulness, memory for all previously studied words was tested using a category-cued recall task in room one or two alone. Accordingly, a comparison could be made between words retrieved in an environmental context which was the same as, or different to, that of the learning phase. Memory performance was assessed by the difference between the number of words remembered at immediate and delayed retrieval. A 2 × 2 × 2 mixed ANOVA revealed an interaction between retrieval context (same/different to learning) and retention interval (sleep/wakefulness), which was driven by superior memory after sleep than after wake when learning and retrieval took place in different environmental contexts. Our findings suggest a sleep-related reduction in the extent to which context impacts upon retrieval. As such, these data provide initial support for the possibility that sleep dependent processes may promote a decontextualisation of recently formed declarative representations.

  2. Interactional effect of cerium and manganese on NO catalytic oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yanli; Huang, Yufen; Zhang, Hailong; Lan, Li; Zhao, Ming; Gong, Maochu; Chen, Yaoqiang; Wang, Jianli

    2017-04-01

    To preferably catalyze the oxidation of NO to NO2 in diesel after-treatment system, a series of CeO2-MnO x composite oxides was supported on silica-alumina material by the co-impregnation method. The maximum conversion of NO of the catalyst with a Ce/Mn weight ratio of 5:5 was improved by around 40%, compared to the supported manganese-only or cerium-only sample. And its maximum reaction rate was 0.056 μmol g(-1) s(-1) at 250 °C at the gas hourly space velocity of 30,000 h(-1). The experimental results suggested that Ce-Mn solid solution was formed, which could modulate the valence state of cerium and manganese and exhibit great redox properties. Moreover, the strong interaction between ceria and manganese resulted in the largest desorption amount of strong chemical oxygen and oxygen vacancies, leading to the maximum O α area ratio of 62.26% from the O 1s result. These effective oxygen species could be continually transferred to the surface, leading to the best NO catalytic activity of 5Ce5Mn/SA catalyst. Graphical abstract.

  3. Gas interaction effects on lunar bonded particles and their implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, N. R.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for an experimental investigation of gas-interaction effects on different Apollo 11 and Apollo 12 lunar-soil samples containing bonded particles. In the experiments, lunar fines were exposed to pure O2, pure water vapor, HCl, NH3, N2, HCOOH, and CH3NH2, in order to observe whether bonded particles would separate. In addition, repeated gas adsorption/desorption measurements were performed to determine the nature and reactive properties of the particle surfaces, and surface areas were measured for comparison with analogous terrestrial samples to determine whether the surface areas of highly radiation-damaged particles were larger or smaller. It is found that N2 is apparently ineffective in separating bonded particles and that the ratio of Apollo 11 to Apollo 12 bonded particles separated by a particular gas exposure ranges from 2.5 to 3.0. Possible reasons for differences in material surface properties at the two Apollo sites are considered, and it is concluded that material from a certain depth at some other site was transported to the Apollo 12 site and mixed with the original material in recent years (considerably less than 2000 years ago).

  4. The Effect of Convective Overstability on Planet Disk Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klahr, Hubert; Gomes, Aiara Lobo

    2016-10-01

    We run global two dimensional hydrodynamical simulations, using the PLUTO code and the planet-disk model of Uribe et al. 2011, to investigate the effect of the convective overstability (CO) on planet-disk interactions. First, we study the long-term evolution of planet-induced vortices. We found that the CO leads to smoother planetary gap edges, thus weaker planet-induced vortices. The main result was the observation of two generation of vortices, which can pose an explanation for the location of the vortex in the Oph IRS48 system. The lifetime of the primary vortices, as well as the birth time of the secondary vortices are shown to be highly dependent on the thermal relaxation timescale. Second, we study the long-term evolution of the migration of low mass planets and assess whether the CO can prevent the saturation of the horseshoe drag. We found that the disk parameters that favour slow inward or outward migration oppose the amplification of vortices, meaning that the CO does not seem to be a good mechanism to prevent the saturation of the horseshoe drag. On the other hand, we observed a planetary trap, caused by vortices formed in the horseshoe region. This trap may be an alternative mechanism to prevent the fast type I migration rates.

  5. Evolving effective behaviours to interact with tag-based populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucel, Osman; Crawford, Chad; Sen, Sandip

    2015-07-01

    Tags and other characteristics, externally perceptible features that are consistent among groups of animals or humans, can be used by others to determine appropriate response strategies in societies. This usage of tags can be extended to artificial environments, where agents can significantly reduce cognitive effort spent on appropriate strategy choice and behaviour selection by reusing strategies for interacting with new partners based on their tags. Strategy selection mechanisms developed based on this idea have successfully evolved stable cooperation in games such as the Prisoner's Dilemma game but relies upon payoff sharing and matching methods that limit the applicability of the tag framework. Our goal is to develop a general classification and behaviour selection approach based on the tag framework. We propose and evaluate alternative tag matching and adaptation schemes for a new, incoming individual to select appropriate behaviour against any population member of an existing, stable society. Our proposed approach allows agents to evolve both the optimal tag for the environment as well as appropriate strategies for existing agent groups. We show that these mechanisms will allow for robust selection of optimal strategies by agents entering a stable society and analyse the various environments where this approach is effective.

  6. Effects of azadirachtin on Rhodnius prolixus: immunity and trypanosoma interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia de Azambuja

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of azadirachtin, a tetranortriterpenoid from the neem tree Aradirachta indica J. on both immunity and Trypanosoma cruzi interaction within Rhodniusprolixus and other triatomines, were presented Given through a blood meal, azadirachtin affected the immune reactivity as shown by a significant reduction in numbers of hemocytes and consequently nodule formation follwing challenge with Enterobacter cloacae ß12, reduction in ability to produce antibacterial activities in the hemolymph when injected with bacteria, and decreased ability to destroy the infection caused by inoculation of E. cloacae cells. A single dose of azadirachtin was able to block the development of T. cruzi in R. prolixus if given through the meal at different intervals, together with, before or after parasite infection. Similary, these results were observed with different triatomine species and different strains of T. cruzi. Azadirachtin induced a permanent resistance of the vector against reinfection with T. cruzi. The significance of these data is discussed in relation to the general mode of azadirachtin action in insects.

  7. Role of endochondral ossification of articular cartilage and functional adaptation of the subchondral plate in the development of fatigue microcracking of joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, P; McCarthy, J; Radtke, C L; Markel, M D; Santschi, E M; Scollay, M C; Kalscheur, V L

    2006-03-01

    The mechanisms that regulate functional adaptation of the articular ends of long bones are poorly understood. However, endochondral ossification of articular cartilage and modeling/remodeling of the subchondral plate and epiphyseal trabeculae are important components of the adaptive response. We performed a histologic study of the distal end of the third metacarpal/metatarsal bone of Thoroughbreds after bones were bulk-stained in basic fuchsin and calcified sections were prepared. The Thoroughbred racehorse is a model of an extreme athlete which experiences particularly high cyclic strains in distal limb bones. The following variables were quantified: microcrack boundary density in calcified cartilage (N.Cr/B.Bd); blood vessel boundary density in calcified cartilage (N.Ve/B.Bd); calcified cartilage width (Cl.Cg.Wi); duplication of the tidemark; and bone volume fraction of the subchondral plate (B.Ar/T.Ar). Measurements were made in five joint regions (lateral condyle and condylar groove; sagittal ridge; medial condylar and condylar groove). N.Cr/B.Bd was site-specific and was increased in the condylar groove region; this is the joint region from which parasagittal articular fatigue (condylar) fractures are typically propagated. Formation of resorption spaces in the subchondral plate was co-localized with microcracking. N.Ve/B.Bd was also site-specific. In the sagittal ridge region, N.Ve/B.Bd was increased, Cl.Cg.Wi was decreased, and B.Ar/T.Ar was decreased, when compared with the other joint regions. Multiple tidemarks were seen in all joint regions. Cumulative athletic activity was associated with a significant decrease in B.Ar/T.Ar in the condylar groove regions. N.Cr/B.Bd was positively correlated with B.Ar/T.Ar (P condylar fatigue (stress) fracture. Functional adaptation of the joint likely protects hyaline cartilage from injury in the short-term but may promote joint degeneration and osteoarthritis with ongoing athleticism.

  8. The Effect of Star-Planet Interactions on Planetary Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Aomawa; Meadows, Victoria; Bitz, Cecilia; Pierrehumbert, Raymond; Joshi, Manoj; Robinson, Tyler; Agol, Eric; Barnes, Rory; Charnay, Benjamin; Virtual Planetary Laboratory

    2015-01-01

    In this work I explored the effect on planetary climate and habitability of interactions between a host star, an orbiting planet and additional planets in a stellar system. I developed and tested models that include both radiative and gravitational effects, and simulated planets covered by ocean, land and water ice, with incident stellar radiation from stars of different spectral types. These simulations showed that ice-covered conditions occurred on an F-dwarf planet with a much smaller decrease in stellar flux than planets orbiting stars with less near-UV radiation, due to ice reflecting strongly in the visible and near-UV. The surface ice-albedo feedback effect is less important at the outer edge of the habitable zone, where ˜3-10 bars of CO2 could entirely mask the climatic effect of ice and snow, leaving the traditional outer limit of the habitable zone unaffected by the spectral dependence of water ice and snow albedo. The exit out of global ice cover was also sensitive to host star spectral energy distribution. A planet orbiting an M-dwarf star exhibited a smaller resistance to melting out of a frozen state, requiring a smaller stellar flux to initiate deglaciation than planets orbiting hotter, brighter stars. Given their greater climate stability, planets orbiting cooler, lower-mass stars may be the best candidates for long-term habitability and life beyond the Solar System. A specific case was explored—that of Kepler-62f, a potentially habitable planet in a five-planet system orbiting a K-dwarf star. Simulations using a 3-D Global Climate Model indicated that Kepler-62f would have areas of the planet with surface temperatures above the freezing point of water with 1 bar or more of CO2 in its atmosphere. In a low-CO2 case, increases in planetary obliquity and orbital eccentricity coupled with an orbital configuration that places the summer solstice at or near pericenter generated regions of the planet with above-freezing surface temperatures, which may

  9. Effect of nonlocal dispersion on self-interacting excitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter Leth; Rasmussen, Kim; Gaididei, Yu.B.

    1996-01-01

    The dynamics of self-interacting quasiparticles in 1Dsystems with long-range dispersive interactions isexpressed in terms of a nonlocal nonlinear Schrödingerequation. Two branches of stationary solutions are found.The new branch which contains a cusp soliton is shown to beunstable and blowup is o...

  10. Effects of Video Interaction Guidance on early childhood teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fukkink, R.G.; Tavecchio, L.W.C.

    2010-01-01

    An experimental study showed that a video feedback intervention improved the interaction skills of early childhood education and care teachers. The teachers who had received the Video Interaction Guidance training appeared more stimulating in their behavior, were more sensitive and more verbally sti

  11. Effective Factors in Interactions within Japanese EFL Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maftoon, Parviz; Ziafar, Meisam

    2013-01-01

    Classroom interactional patterns depend on some contextual, cultural and local factors in addition to the methodologies employed in the classroom. In order to delineate such factors, the focus of classroom interaction research needs to shift from the observables to the unobservables like teachers' and learners' psychological states and cultural…

  12. Effect of nonlocal dispersion on self-interacting excitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter Leth; Rasmussen, Kim; Gaididei, Yu.B.

    1996-01-01

    The dynamics of self-interacting quasiparticles in 1Dsystems with long-range dispersive interactions isexpressed in terms of a nonlocal nonlinear Schrödingerequation. Two branches of stationary solutions are found.The new branch which contains a cusp soliton is shown to beunstable and blowup...

  13. Behavioral effects of ketamine and toxic interactions with psychostimulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamamoto Keiichi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anesthetic drug ketamine (KT has been reported to be an abused drug and fatal cases have been observed in polydrug users. In the present study, considering the possibility of KT-enhanced toxic effects of other drugs, and KT-induced promotion of an overdose without making the subject aware of the danger due to the attenuation of several painful subjective symptoms, the intraperitoneal (i.p. KT-induced alterations in behaviors and toxic interactions with popular co-abused drugs, the psychostimulants cocaine (COC and methamphetamine (MA, were examined in ICR mice. Results A single dose of KT caused hyperlocomotion in a low (30 mg/kg, i.p. dose group, and hypolocomotion followed by hyperlocomotion in a high (100 mg/kg, i.p. dose group. However, no behavioral alterations derived from enhanced stress-related depression or anxiety were observed in the forced swimming or the elevated plus-maze test. A single non-fatal dose of COC (30 mg/kg, i.p. or MA (4 mg/kg, i.p. caused hyperlocomotion, stress-related depression in swimming behaviors in the forced swimming test, and anxiety-related behavioral changes (preference for closed arms in the elevated plus-maze test. For the COC (30 mg/kg or MA (4 mg/kg groups of mice simultaneously co-treated with KT, the psychostimulant-induced hyperlocomotion was suppressed by the high dose KT, and the psychostimulant-induced behavioral alterations in the above tests were reversed by both low and high doses of KT. For the toxic dose COC (70 mg/kg, i.p.- or MA (15 mg/kg, i.p.-only group, mortality and severe seizures were observed in some animals. In the toxic dose psychostimulant-KT groups, KT attenuated the severity of seizures dose-dependently. Nevertheless, the mortality rate was significantly increased by co-treatment with the high dose KT. Conclusion Our results demonstrated that, in spite of the absence of stress-related depressive and anxiety-related behavioral alterations following a single

  14. Interaction of O-acylated chitosans with biomembrane models: probing the effects from hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavinatto, Adriana; Souza, Adriano L; Delezuk, Jorge A M; Pavinatto, Felippe J; Campana-Filho, Sérgio P; Oliveira, Osvaldo N

    2014-02-01

    One of the major challenges in establishing the mechanisms responsible for the chitosan action in biomedical applications lies in the determination of the molecular-level interactions with the cell membrane. In this study, we probed hydrophobic interactions and H-bonding in experiments with O,O'-diacetylchitosan (DACT) and O,O'-dipropionylchitosan (DPPCT) incorporated into monolayers of distinct phospholipids, the zwitterionic dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline (DPPC), and the negatively charged dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl glycerol (DPPG) and dimyristoyl phosphatidic acid (DMPA). The importance of hydrophobic interactions was confirmed with the larger effects observed for DACT and DPPCT than for parent chitosan (Chi), particularly for the more hydrophobic DPPCT. Such larger effects were noted in surface pressure isotherms and elasticity of the monolayers. Since H-bonding is hampered for the chitosan derivatives, which have part of their hydroxyl groups shielded by O-acylation, these effects indicate that H-bonding does not play an important role in the chitosan-membrane interactions. Using polarization-modulated infrared reflection absorption (PM-IRRAS) spectroscopy, we found that the chitosan derivatives were incorporated into the hydrophobic chain of the phospholipids, even at high surface pressures comparable to those in a real cell membrane. Taken together, these results indicate that the chitosan derivatives containing hydrophobic moieties would probably be more efficient than parent chitosan as antimicrobial agents, where interaction with the cell membrane is crucial.

  15. Interactive effects of copper and calcium in Daphnia pulex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Liorti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Many freshwater habitats around the world suffered dramatic water chemistry changes over the last century mostly due to anthropogenic activities, including an overall reduction in pH due to high sulfur emissions and unsustainable forestry practices. One consequence of this change in water chemistry is a drop in available calcium concentration, which creates problems for aquatic organisms that rely on dissolved calcium to build their exo- or endoskeletons and reinforce their carapace during regular molts. Daphnia populations in shield lakes in northern Ontario are also exposed to other stressors, including copper, which persists at high concentrations in many of these freshwater lakes and ponds due to mining and other human activities. Copper toxicity on animals is influenced by the availability of other competing ions, such as calcium. Using our newly developed high throughput toxicity screening system, we show that mortality of Daphnia pulex increases with exposure to low calcium (0.05 mg L-1 and high copper (300 µg L-1. When these two stressors were combined, we found that copper was less toxic at high calcium concentrations, indicating a protective effect of calcium against copper toxicity. We then established basic calcium uptake kinetics in D. pulex using radioactive tracer 45Ca and provide evidence that copper, at environmentally relevant concentrations, competes with calcium uptake based on Km and Vmax. Our data show that both calcium decline and copper increase in aquatic ecosystems may negatively impact natural Daphnia populations, and that interactions between these two metals may occur in natural environments that result in fitness consequences for zooplankton. 

  16. Modelling the fear effect in predator-prey interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoying; Zanette, Liana; Zou, Xingfu

    2016-11-01

    A recent field manipulation on a terrestrial vertebrate showed that the fear of predators alone altered anti-predator defences to such an extent that it greatly reduced the reproduction of prey. Because fear can evidently affect the populations of terrestrial vertebrates, we proposed a predator-prey model incorporating the cost of fear into prey reproduction. Our mathematical analyses show that high levels of fear (or equivalently strong anti-predator responses) can stabilize the predator-prey system by excluding the existence of periodic solutions. However, relatively low levels of fear can induce multiple limit cycles via subcritical Hopf bifurcations, leading to a bi-stability phenomenon. Compared to classic predator-prey models which ignore the cost of fear where Hopf bifurcations are typically supercritical, Hopf bifurcations in our model can be both supercritical and subcritical by choosing different sets of parameters. We conducted numerical simulations to explore the relationships between fear effects and other biologically related parameters (e.g. birth/death rate of adult prey), which further demonstrate the impact that fear can have in predator-prey interactions. For example, we found that under the conditions of a Hopf bifurcation, an increase in the level of fear may alter the direction of Hopf bifurcation from supercritical to subcritical when the birth rate of prey increases accordingly. Our simulations also show that the prey is less sensitive in perceiving predation risk with increasing birth rate of prey or increasing death rate of predators, but demonstrate that animals will mount stronger anti-predator defences as the attack rate of predators increases.

  17. Effect of Mineral and Microbe Interactions on Biomass Yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, S. A.; Block, K. A.; Katz, A.; Gottlieb, P.

    2016-12-01

    The ecological feedback of microbes (bacteria and viruses) in association with minerals is virtually unexplored in the context of characterizing how carbon cycles in the terrestrial ecosystem. These interactions include the ability for bacteriophage to control bacteria populations, the ability of minerals to provide a substrate for bacteria growth, and the effect of minerals on bacteriophage viability. We investigate bacteriophage aggregation with minerals in the clay size fraction (virus experiments, bacteriophage Φ6 was suspended with the minerals smectite, illite, kaolinite, and goethite at low divalent cation concentrations so aggregation was in the reaction limited colloidal aggregation (RLCA) regime, at neutral pH and room temperature conditions. Virus remained viable at a 1:1 virus-clay ratio for clays, and at an approximate 100:1 ratio for goethite. However, the number of plaque forming units was reduced by 99%. Electron micrographs show viable as well as partially disassembled virus, similar to the results found by Block et al. 2014. We found that inactivation of a 4 x 1011 cm-3 concentration of bacteriophage Φ6 by smectite, illite, kaolinite, and goethite, required a minimum sediment concentration of 1.5 x 1011 cm-3, 1.4 x 1011 cm-3, 2.5 x 1011 cm-3, and 1.1 x 109 cm-3, respectively. Mineral biofilms were generated by suspension of tropical soil clays with gram-positive and gram-negative microbes and characterized by x-ray diffraction and imaged by electron microscopy (SEM and TEM). Mineral biomass produced by gram negative organisms were subjected to virus infection to determine influence of minerals on community resilience. Lastly, we report biomass yield in each instance to quantify the influence of mineral composition on total biomass production.

  18. Interacting effects of insects and flooding on wood decomposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Ulyshen

    Full Text Available Saproxylic arthropods are thought to play an important role in wood decomposition but very few efforts have been made to quantify their contributions to the process and the factors controlling their activities are not well understood. In the current study, mesh exclusion bags were used to quantify how arthropods affect loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L. decomposition rates in both seasonally flooded and unflooded forests over a 31-month period in the southeastern United States. Wood specific gravity (based on initial wood volume was significantly lower in bolts placed in unflooded forests and for those unprotected from insects. Approximately 20.5% and 13.7% of specific gravity loss after 31 months was attributable to insect activity in flooded and unflooded forests, respectively. Importantly, minimal between-treatment differences in water content and the results from a novel test carried out separately suggest the mesh bags had no significant impact on wood mass loss beyond the exclusion of insects. Subterranean termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae: Reticulitermes spp. were 5-6 times more active below-ground in unflooded forests compared to flooded forests based on wooden monitoring stakes. They were also slightly more active above-ground in unflooded forests but these differences were not statistically significant. Similarly, seasonal flooding had no detectable effect on above-ground beetle (Coleoptera richness or abundance. Although seasonal flooding strongly reduced Reticulitermes activity below-ground, it can be concluded from an insignificant interaction between forest type and exclusion treatment that reduced above-ground decomposition rates in seasonally flooded forests were due largely to suppressed microbial activity at those locations. The findings from this study indicate that southeastern U.S. arthropod communities accelerate above-ground wood decomposition significantly and to a similar extent in both flooded and unflooded forests

  19. Interaction effects along the edge of a topological superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, Johannes S. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Wuerzburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany); Schnyder, Andreas P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany); Assaad, Fakher [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Topological nodal superconductors, such as d{sub xy}-wave and nodal non-centrosymmetric superconductors, exhibit protected zero-energy flat-band edge states. These zero-energy edge modes are protected by time-reversal and translation symmetry and their stability is guaranteed by the conservation of a quantized topological invariant. Here, we study the fate of these flat-band edge states in the presence of interactions. We find that Hubbard interactions lead to spontaneous breaking of time-reversal or translation symmetry at the edge of the system. For the d{sub xy}-wave superconductor in the presence of attractive Hubbard interactions we find that the flat-band states become unstable towards the formation of a charge-density wave state or a state with s-wave type pairing correlations. Repulsive Hubbard interactions, on the other hand, induce ferromagnetic order at the edge of the d{sub xy}-wave superconductor.

  20. Self-interaction effects on charge-transfer collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Quashie, Edwin E; Andrade, Xavier; Correa, Alfredo A

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the role of the self-interaction error in the simulation of collisions using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and Ehrenfest dynamics. We compare many different approximations of the exchange and correlation potential, using as a test system the collision of $\\mathrm{H^+ + CH_4}$ at $30~\\mathrm{eV}$. We find that semi-local approximations, like PBE, and even hybrid functionals, like B3LYP, produce qualitatively incorrect predictions for the scattering of the proton. This discrepancy appears because the self-interaction error allows the electrons to jump too easily to the proton, leading to radically different forces with respect to the non-self-interacting case. From our results, we conclude that using a functional that is self-interaction free is essential to properly describe charge-transfer collisions between ions and molecules in TDDFT.

  1. Effective Interaction: Communicating with and about People with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to interact with others when they are on duty. When the animal is not working, some owners ... that you extend to all job candidates and employees. Any initial concerns will quickly disappear as you ...

  2. The Effect of Facebook on Parasocial Interaction in Local News

    OpenAIRE

    Farmer, Whitney

    2012-01-01

    News agenciesâ ratings often hinge on the relationships their anchors build with viewers. Strong feelings of parasocial interaction, or these on-sided â relationshipsâ audiences feel with on-screen media figures, have been found to be a strong predictor of media use. Local news stations have long been challenged with ways to encourage these feelings of parasocial interaction. With local news ratings consistently falling, news agencies must consider new ways to gain untapped markets a...

  3. Gene-Environment Interactions in Asthma: Genetic and Epigenetic Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Uk; Kim, Jeong Dong; Park, Choon-Sik

    2015-07-01

    Over the past three decades, a large number of genetic studies have been aimed at finding genetic variants associated with the risk of asthma, applying various genetic and genomic approaches including linkage analysis, candidate gene polymorphism studies, and genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, contrary to general expectation, even single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) discovered by GWAS failed to fully explain the heritability of asthma. Thus, application of rare allele polymorphisms in well defined phenotypes and clarification of environmental factors have been suggested to overcome the problem of 'missing' heritability. Such factors include allergens, cigarette smoke, air pollutants, and infectious agents during pre- and post-natal periods. The first and simplest interaction between a gene and the environment is a candidate interaction of both a well known gene and environmental factor in a direct physical or chemical interaction such as between CD14 and endotoxin or between HLA and allergens. Several GWAS have found environmental interactions with occupational asthma, aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease, tobacco smoke-related airway dysfunction, and farm-related atopic diseases. As one of the mechanisms behind gene-environment interaction is epigenetics, a few studies on DNA CpG methylation have been reported on subphenotypes of asthma, pitching the exciting idea that it may be possible to intervene at the junction between the genome and the environment. Epigenetic studies are starting to include data from clinical samples, which will make them another powerful tool for re-search on gene-environment interactions in asthma.

  4. The effects of whole-class interactive instruction with single display groupware for triangles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caballero, D.; van Riesen, Siswa; Alvarez, S.; Nussbaum, M.; de Jong, Anthonius J.M.; Alario-Hoyos, C.

    2013-01-01

    Whole-class interactive instruction is an instructional approach in which all of the students in a class create knowledge together in an interactive way, mediated by the teacher. The current mixed-method study compared the effects of a specific implementation of whole-class interactive instruction,

  5. The effects of whole-class interactive instruction with single display groupware for triangles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caballero, D.; Riesen, van S.A.N.; Alvarez, S.; Nussbaum, M.; Jong, de T.; Alario-Hoyos, C.

    2013-01-01

    Whole-class interactive instruction is an instructional approach in which all of the students in a class create knowledge together in an interactive way, mediated by the teacher. The current mixed-method study compared the effects of a specific implementation of whole-class interactive instruction,

  6. Effects of Negotiated Interaction on Mongolian-Nationality EFL Learners' Spoken Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xueping

    2012-01-01

    The present study examines the effect of negotiated interaction on Mongolian-nationality EFL learners' spoken production, focusing on the teacher-learner interaction in a story-telling task. The study supports the hypothesis that interaction plays a facilitating role in language development for learners. Quantitative analysis shows that Mongolian…

  7. Interactive Whiteboard for Primary Schools in Mauritius: An Effective Tool or Just Another Trend?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadur, Goonesh Kumar; Oogarah, Deorani

    2013-01-01

    Mauritius is among the few African countries where the interactive whiteboard has been implemented in all primary schools. The interactive whiteboard is an important tool in the classroom as it changes the mode of instruction. Many researches have been carried out in many countries to investigate the effectiveness of the interactive whiteboard.…

  8. Who Is Controlling the Interaction? The Effect of Nonverbal Mirroring on Teacher-Student Rapport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang-yuan, Zhou; Wei, Guo

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of nonverbal mirroring on teacher-student rapport in one-on-one interactions. Nonverbal mirroring refers to the unconscious mimicry of the postures, mannerisms, facial expressions, and other behaviors of one's interaction partner in social interactions. In a within-subjects paradigm, students had four…

  9. Recursive partitioning for missing data imputation in the presence of interaction effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doove, L. L.; Van Buuren, S.; Dusseldorp, E.

    2014-01-01

    Standard approaches to implement multiple imputation do not automatically incorporate nonlinear relations like interaction effects. This leads to biased parameter estimates when interactions are present in a dataset. With the aim of providing an imputation method which preserves interactions in the

  10. Kernel Approach for Modeling Interaction Effects in Genetic Association Studies of Complex Quantitative Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadaway, K Alaine; Duncan, Richard; Conneely, Karen N; Almli, Lynn M; Bradley, Bekh; Ressler, Kerry J; Epstein, Michael P

    2015-07-01

    The etiology of complex traits likely involves the effects of genetic and environmental factors, along with complicated interaction effects between them. Consequently, there has been interest in applying genetic association tests of complex traits that account for potential modification of the genetic effect in the presence of an environmental factor. One can perform such an analysis using a joint test of gene and gene-environment interaction. An optimal joint test would be one that remains powerful under a variety of models ranging from those of strong gene-environment interaction effect to those of little or no gene-environment interaction effect. To fill this demand, we have extended a kernel machine based approach for association mapping of multiple SNPs to consider joint tests of gene and gene-environment interaction. The kernel-based approach for joint testing is promising, because it incorporates linkage disequilibrium information from multiple SNPs simultaneously in analysis and permits flexible modeling of interaction effects. Using simulated data, we show that our kernel machine approach typically outperforms the traditional joint test under strong gene-environment interaction models and further outperforms the traditional main-effect association test under models of weak or no gene-environment interaction effects. We illustrate our test using genome-wide association data from the Grady Trauma Project, a cohort of highly traumatized, at-risk individuals, which has previously been investigated for interaction effects. © 2015 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  11. Effect of interactions between harvester ants on forager decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob D Davidson

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Harvester ant colonies adjust their foraging activity to day-to-day changes in food availability and hour-to-hour changes in environmental conditions. This collective behavior is regulated through interactions, in the form of brief antennal contacts, between outgoing foragers and returning foragers with food. Here we consider how an ant, waiting in the entrance chamber just inside the nest entrance, uses its accumulated experience of interactions to decide whether to leave the nest to forage. Using videos of field observations, we tracked the interactions and foraging decisions of ants in the entrance chamber. Outgoing foragers tended to interact with returning foragers at higher rates than ants that returned to the deeper nest and did not forage. To provide a mechanistic framework for interpreting these results, we develop a decision model in which ants make decisions based upon a noisy accumulation of individual contacts with returning foragers. The model can reproduce core trends and realistic distributions for individual ant interaction statistics, and suggests possible mechanisms by which foraging activity may be regulated at an individual ant level.

  12. Modular Interactive Tiles for Rehabilitation – Evidence and Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik Hautop

    2010-01-01

    years) in daily use in a hospital rehabilitation unit e.g. for cardiac patients. Also, the tiles were tested for performing physical rehabilitation of stroke patients both in hospital, rehabilitation centre and in their private home. In all test cases qualitative feedback indicate that the patients find......We developed modular interactive tiles to be used for playful physiotherapy, which is supposed to motivate patients to engage in and perform physical rehabilitation exercises. We report on evidence for elderly training. We tested the modular interactive tiles for an extensive period of time (4...... the playful use of modular interactive tiles engaging and motivating for them to perform the rehabilitation. Also, test data suggest that some playful exercises on the tiles demand an average heart rate of 75% and 86% of the maximum heart rate....

  13. Preferential interactions and the effect of protein PEGylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Louise Stenstrup; Thulstrup, Peter Waaben; Kasimova, Marina Robertovna;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: PEGylation is a strategy used by the pharmaceutical industry to prolong systemic circulation of protein drugs, whereas formulation excipients are used for stabilization of proteins during storage. Here we investigate the role of PEGylation in protein stabilization by formulation...... excipients that preferentially interact with the protein. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The model protein hen egg white lysozyme was doubly PEGylated on two lysines with 5 kDa linear PEGs (mPEG-succinimidyl valerate, MW 5000) and studied in the absence and presence of preferentially excluded sucrose...... excipients. This suggests that formulation principles using preferentially interacting excipients are similar for PEGylated and non-PEGylated proteins....

  14. Modular Interactive Tiles for Rehabilitation – Evidence and Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik Hautop

    2010-01-01

    We developed modular interactive tiles to be used for playful physiotherapy, which is supposed to motivate patients to engage in and perform physical rehabilitation exercises. We report on evidence for elderly training. We tested the modular interactive tiles for an extensive period of time (4...... years) in daily use in a hospital rehabilitation unit e.g. for cardiac patients. Also, the tiles were tested for performing physical rehabilitation of stroke patients both in hospital, rehabilitation centre and in their private home. In all test cases qualitative feedback indicate that the patients find...

  15. The tri-trophic interactions hypothesis: interactive effects of host plant quality, diet breadth and natural enemies on herbivores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailen A Mooney

    Full Text Available Several influential hypotheses in plant-herbivore and herbivore-predator interactions consider the interactive effects of plant quality, herbivore diet breadth, and predation on herbivore performance. Yet individually and collectively, these hypotheses fail to address the simultaneous influence of all three factors. Here we review existing hypotheses, and propose the tri-trophic interactions (TTI hypothesis to consolidate and integrate their predictions. The TTI hypothesis predicts that dietary specialist herbivores (as compared to generalists should escape predators and be competitively dominant due to faster growth rates, and that such differences should be greater on low quality (as compared to high quality host plants. To provide a preliminary test of these predictions, we conducted an empirical study comparing the effects of plant (Baccharis salicifolia quality and predators between a specialist (Uroleucon macolai and a generalist (Aphis gossypii aphid herbivore. Consistent with predictions, these three factors interactively determine herbivore performance in ways not addressed by existing hypotheses. Compared to the specialist, the generalist was less fecund, competitively inferior, and more sensitive to low plant quality. Correspondingly, predator effects were contingent upon plant quality only for the generalist. Contrary to predictions, predator effects were weaker for the generalist and on low-quality plants, likely due to density-dependent benefits provided to the generalist by mutualist ants. Because the TTI hypothesis predicts the superior performance of specialists, mutualist ants may be critical to A. gossypii persistence under competition from U. macolai. In summary, the integrative nature of the TTI hypothesis offers novel insight into the determinants of plant-herbivore and herbivore-predator interactions and the coexistence of specialist and generalist herbivores.

  16. Interactive Effects of Metals and PAHs on Benthic Food Webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-14

    complex mixtures of contaminants influence benthic communities at the levels of microorganisms, microalgae , invertebrate grazers, and fish predators...diesel and metal contaminants interact to influence the microbial (bacteria and microalgae ), invertebrate, and juvenile fish components of the benthic...composition, and productivity; meiofaunal abundance and community composition; and meiofaunal grazing on microalgae . Microtox assays will also be performed

  17. Is Parent-Child Interaction Therapy Effective in Reducing Stuttering?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Sharon K.; Nicholas, Alison; Cook, Frances M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the efficacy of parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT) with young children who stutter. Method: This is a longitudinal, multiple single-subject study. The participants were 6 children aged 3;3-4;10 [years;months] who had been stuttering for longer than 12 months. Therapy consisted of 6 sessions of clinic-based therapy and…

  18. The effects of spatial scale on trophic interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppel, J. van de; Bardgett, R.D.; Bengtsson, J.; Rodriguez-Barrueco, C.; Rietkerk, M.G.; Wassen, M.J.; Wolters, V.

    2005-01-01

    Food chain models have dominated empirical studies of trophic interactions in the past decades, and have lead to important insights into the factors that control ecological communities. Despite the importance of food chain models in instigating ecological investigations, many empirical studies still

  19. The Effectiveness of Intensive Interaction, A Systematic Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Nick; Bodicoat, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intensive Interaction is an approach used for communicating with people with profound and multiple intellectual disabilities [PMID] or autism. It has gained increased recognition as a helpful technique, but the evidence has not been systematically reviewed. Method: Computerized and hand searches of the literature were conducted using…

  20. Interaction Effects in Cross-National Studies of Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Todd V.; Sabers, Darrell L.

    1995-01-01

    The Bateria Woodcock Psico-Educativa en Espanol was administered to urban children in grades 1, 3, 5, 8, and 11 in Spain, Puerto Rico, Mexico, Costa Rica, and Peru. Spain consistently ranked highest on all achievement clusters (subject areas). For the other countries, interactions of cluster by grade level preclude any interpretation of main…

  1. Effects of New Gravitational Interactions on Neutrinoless Double $\\beta$ Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H V; Sarkar, U

    2000-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that violations of Lorentz invariance orviolations of the equivalence principle can be constrained from thenon-observation of neutrinoless double beta decay. We generalize this analysisto all possible new gravitational interactions and discuss briefly theconstraints for different cases.

  2. Effects of nonlocal dispersive interactions on self-trapping excitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yu.B.; Mingaleev, S.F.; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    1997-01-01

    A one-dimensional discrete nonlinear Schrodinger (NLS) model with the power dependence r(-s) on the distance r of the dispersive interactions is proposed. The stationary states psi(n) of the system are studied both analytically and numerically. Two types of stationary states are investigated: on...

  3. The Impact of (In)effective Listening on Interpersonal Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedesco, Heather Noel

    2015-01-01

    On average, people spend between 45% and 70% of their day listening to others (Johnson, 1996). Despite the frequency with which people engage in this activity, its importance in interpersonal interactions may go overlooked. Individuals can typically identify that listening is a valued communication skill (Bambacas & Patrickson, 2008; Papa,…

  4. Evaluating the Use and Effectiveness of Learner Controlled, Interactive Videodisc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David D.; And Others

    The potential use of interactive videodiscs for teaching foreign languages, and factors to be considered in evaluating such programs, are discussed. Two types of existing programs, developed and used at Brigham Young University, are described: adaptations of existing video material, such as the classic Mexican film "Macario," and free branching…

  5. Effects of Imagined Interactions and Rehearsal on Speaking Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Charles W.; Honeycutt, James M.; Bodie, Graham D.

    2015-01-01

    Imagined interactions (IIs) constitute a type of social cognition that can reduce fear of communication. Through the mental preparation enabled by IIs, an individual can reduce disfluencies and mitigate the anxiety that arises from a speech. Study 1 indicated that rehearsal influences the reduction of silent pauses but not vocalized pauses. In…

  6. Fluid Structure Interaction Effect on Sandwich Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    14. SUBJECT TERMS Fluid Structure Interaction, FSI, composite, balsa, low velocity impact, sandwich composites, VARTM , Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer...11 1. Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding ( VARTM ) ...................11 2. Procedure...required equipment for VARTM composite production. ..............10 Figure 4. VARTM Lay-up (From [8

  7. Measurement of strong interaction effects in antiprotonic helium atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, J.D.; Gorringe, T.P.; Lowe, J.; Nelson, J.M.; Playfer, S.M.; Pyle, G.J.; Squier, G.T.A. (Birmingham Univ. (UK). Dept. of Physics); Baker, C.A.; Batty, C.J.; Clark, S.A.

    1984-09-27

    The strong interaction shift and width for the 2 p level and the width for the 3d level have been measured for antiprotonic helium atoms. The results are compared with optical model calculations. The possible existence of strongly bound antiproton states in nuclei is discussed.

  8. The Impact of (In)effective Listening on Interpersonal Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedesco, Heather Noel

    2015-01-01

    On average, people spend between 45% and 70% of their day listening to others (Johnson, 1996). Despite the frequency with which people engage in this activity, its importance in interpersonal interactions may go overlooked. Individuals can typically identify that listening is a valued communication skill (Bambacas & Patrickson, 2008; Papa,…

  9. Interactive Global Illumination Effects Using Deterministically Directed Layered Depth Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aalund, F. P.; Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas

    2015-01-01

    A layered depth map is an extension of the well-known depth map used in rasterization. Multiple layered depth maps can be used as a coarse scene representation. We develop two global illumination methods which use said scene representation. The first is an interactive ambient occlusion method...

  10. Skype Synchronous Interaction Effectiveness in a Quantitative Management Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Kenneth David

    2012-01-01

    An experiment compared asynchronous versus synchronous instruction in an online quantitative course. Mann-Whitney U-tests, correlation, analysis of variance, t tests, and multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) were utilized to test the hypothesis that more high-quality online experiential learning interactions would increase grade.…

  11. Substituent effects on non-covalent interactions with aromatic rings: insights from computational chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Rajesh K; Bloom, Jacob W G; An, Yi; Wheeler, Steven E

    2011-12-09

    Non-covalent interactions with aromatic rings pervade modern chemical research. The strength and orientation of these interactions can be tuned and controlled through substituent effects. Computational studies of model complexes have provided a detailed understanding of the origin and nature of these substituent effects, and pinpointed flaws in entrenched models of these interactions in the literature. Here, we provide a brief review of efforts over the last decade to unravel the origin of substituent effects in π-stacking, XH/π, and ion/π interactions through detailed computational studies. We highlight recent progress that has been made, while also uncovering areas where future studies are warranted.

  12. The Effects of Student-Faculty Interaction on Academic Self-Concept: Does Academic Major Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young K.; Sax, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    Using cross-classified multilevel modeling, this study attempted to improve our understanding of the group-level conditional effects of student-faculty interaction by examining the function of academic majors in explaining the effects of student-faculty interaction on students' academic self-concept. The study utilized data on 11,202…

  13. Effect of Grouping of Evidence Types on Learning about Interactions between Observed and Unobserved Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottman, Benjamin Margolin; Ahn, Woo-kyoung

    2011-01-01

    When a cause interacts with unobserved factors to produce an effect, the contingency between the observed cause and effect cannot be taken at face value to infer causality. Yet it would be computationally intractable to consider all possible unobserved, interacting factors. Nonetheless, 6 experiments found that people can learn about an unobserved…

  14. Teaching Presence in Computer Conferencing Learning Environments: Effects on Interaction, Cognition and Learning Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huahui; Sullivan, Kirk P. H.

    2017-01-01

    This exploratory study examined how the level and nature of teaching presence impacted two online forum discussions from three dimensions: participation and interaction, cognitive presence, and knowledge development via assimilating peer messages. Effects on participation and interaction were graphically depicted. Effects on cognitive presence and…

  15. Detection of Micro-Crack by Ultrasonic Approach of One-Sided Pitch-Catch Method Based on Laser Assisted Heating%基于激光辅助加热的激光超声投捕法识别微裂纹

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李加; 倪辰荫; 张宏超; 董利明; 沈中华

    2013-01-01

    Due to the geometry irregularities of specimens and the inhomogeneous of materials, micro-crack is usually generated by abrupt change of local stress. Traditional detecting techniques using ultrasound, such as pitch-catch method, are difficult to distinguish the micro-crack effectively, because the size of the cracks are so small that they are often hidden from ultrasonic detection by a stronger scattering from the very same structural imperfection, such as surface protuberance, surface grooves, corrosion pits, etc. The laser ultrasonic detecting system is built to detect the surface irregularities based on one-sided pitch-catch method. The laser line source is used to excite ultrasound and the optical deflection beam method is used to detect ultrasound. The traditional pitch-catch method, scanning laser source method and the scanning heating laser source method are used to detect the surface irregularities of specimen which contains a surface protuberance and a surface breaking micro-crack. The pitch-catch method requires high signal to noise ratio of signals and the reliability is poor. The scanning laser source method can detect both one but can not distinguish the crack from them. Based on the characteristics that the micro-crack can get closed partially after illuminated by heating laser, the scanning heating laser method can recognize it efficiently. The finite element method (FEM) is used to calculate the transmitted surface acoustic waves (SAW) which are influenced by different sizes of surface breaking cracks.%工件几何形状不规则或材料性质非均匀时,易发生局部应力突变,导致工件产生裂纹.利用传统的超声检测技术(如超声投捕法)对这种早期裂纹进行检测时,由于裂纹尺寸很小以及工件表面其他的散射物(如表面突起、凹槽和腐蚀坑等)对声波的影响,从而难以有效分辨微裂纹.搭建了基于激光超声投捕法的表面缺陷光学检测系统,超声信号由激光线源激

  16. Interactive effects of drought and pathogens in forest trees

    OpenAIRE

    Desprez Loustau, Marie Laure; Marcais, Benoit; Nageleisen, Louis Michel; Piou, Dominique; Vannini, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    Cette revue synthétise les connaissances actuelles sur les interactions entre sécheresse et maladies chez les arbres forestiers, avec trois grandes parties : (1) description des types d’interaction ; (2) connaissances acquises sur les mécanismes impliqués ; (3) trois études de cas bien étudiées. La première partie est basée sur l’analyse d’une base de données d’une centaine d’études, sélectionnées par recherche sur mots clés. La plupart de ces études se rapportent à des maladies favorisées pa...

  17. The interactive effects of conscientiousness and agreeableness on job performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, L A; Burke, Lisa A; Barrick, Murray R; Mount, Michael K

    2002-02-01

    The authors hypothesized that the relationship between conscientiousness and job performance would be stronger for persons high in agreeableness than for those low in agreeableness. Results of hierarchical moderated regression analyses for 7 independent samples of employees across diverse occupations provided support for the hypothesis in 5 of the samples. In samples supporting the hypothesis, among the highly conscientious workers, those low in agreeableness were found to receive lower ratings of job performance than workers high in agreeableness. One explanation for lack of an interaction between conscientiousness and agreeableness in the other 2 samples is that those jobs were not characterized by frequent, cooperative interactions with others. Overall, the results show that highly conscientious workers who lack interpersonal sensitivity may be ineffective, particularly in jobs requiring cooperative interchange with others.

  18. Coulomb Interactions and Mesoscopic Effects in Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Kane, Charlie; Balents, Leon; Fisher, Matthew

    1997-01-01

    We argue that long-range Coulomb forces convert an isolated (N,N) armchair carbon nanotube into a strongly-renormalized *Luttinger liquid*. At high temperatures, we find anomalous temperature dependences for the interaction and impurity contributions to the resistivity, and similar power-law dependences for the local tunneling density of states. At low temperatures, the nanotube exhibits spin-charge separation, visible as an extra energy scale in the discrete tunneling density of states (for ...

  19. Fluid Structure Interaction Effects on Composites Under Low Velocity Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Interaction, FSI, low velocity impact, carbon fiber reinforced polymers, CFRP, carbon nanotubes, CNT, vacuum assisted resin transfer molding, VARTM . 16...Ethyl Ketone Peroxide MWCNT Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube VARTM Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding xiv THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK...samples used in this research is known as vacuum assisted resin transfer molding ( VARTM ). VARTM is a very common method used in low pressure composite

  20. Interactions between soil biota and the effects on geomorphological features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitlin, Beryl; Hayashi, Masaki

    2012-07-01

    The interaction of animals with abiotic features of their environment has long been known to cause alterations to geomorphic features, and these interactions may cause feedback loops that further alter geomorphic features and animal communities. This paper samples the literature on selected burrowing animals in western North America, and discusses the interactions of animals with abiotic features of the environment and with each other, and the resulting impacts on geomorphic features and each other. As expected, burrowing characteristics of animals influence geomorphological processes. For example, pocket gophers and certain ground squirrels that burrow horizontal tunnels on sloping grounds seem to have significant impacts on horizontal movement of soils, whereas prairie dogs and harvester ants have more impact on vertical movement of soils. Burrowing animals, in general, increase the patchiness of the environment, which creates localized patch habitat for other plants and animals, thereby increasing biodiversity at the landscape scale. Burrowing animals influence and are influenced by microbes: sylvatic plague wiped out large populations of prairie dogs, earthworms cause major changes in soil microflora, pocket gophers and harvester ants cause changes in mycorrhizal communities, which in turn impact plant communities.

  1. Effective user guidance in online interactive semantic segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Jens; Bendszus, Martin; Debus, Jürgen; Heiland, Sabine; Maier-Hein, Klaus H.

    2017-03-01

    With the recent success of machine learning based solutions for automatic image parsing, the availability of reference image annotations for algorithm training is one of the major bottlenecks in medical image segmentation. We are interested in interactive semantic segmentation methods that can be used in an online fashion to generate expert segmentations. These can be used to train automated segmentation techniques or, from an application perspective, for quick and accurate tumor progression monitoring. Using simulated user interactions in a MRI glioblastoma segmentation task, we show that if the user possesses knowledge of the correct segmentation it is significantly (p <= 0.009) better to present data and current segmentation to the user in such a manner that they can easily identify falsely classified regions compared to guiding the user to regions where the classifier exhibits high uncertainty, resulting in differences of mean Dice scores between +0.070 (Whole tumor) and +0.136 (Tumor Core) after 20 iterations. The annotation process should cover all classes equally, which results in a significant (p <= 0.002) improvement compared to completely random annotations anywhere in falsely classified regions for small tumor regions such as the necrotic tumor core (mean Dice +0.151 after 20 it.) and non-enhancing abnormalities (mean Dice +0.069 after 20 it.). These findings provide important insights for the development of efficient interactive segmentation systems and user interfaces.

  2. Effects of interactions on the relaxation processes in magnetic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Lewis J.; Ostler, Thomas A.; Hovorka, O.; Wang, K. K.; Lu, B.; Ju, G. P.; Hohlfeld, J.; Bergman, B.; Koopmans, B.; Chantrell, Roy W.

    2016-10-01

    Controlling the relaxation of magnetization in magnetic nanostructures is key to optimizing magnetic storage device performance. This relaxation is governed by both intrinsic and extrinsic relaxation mechanisms and with the latter strongly dependent on the interactions between the nanostructures. In the present work we investigate laser induced magnetization dynamics in a broadband optical resonance type experiment revealing the role of interactions between nanostructures on the relaxation processes of granular magnetic structures. The results are corroborated by constructing a temperature dependent numerical micromagnetic model of magnetization dynamics based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch equation. The model predicts a strong dependence of damping on the key material properties of coupled granular nanostructures in good agreement with the experimental data. We show that the intergranular, magnetostatic and exchange interactions provide a large extrinsic contribution to the damping. Finally we show that the mechanism can be attributed to an increase in spin-wave degeneracy with the ferromagnetic resonance mode as revealed by semianalytical spin-wave calculations.

  3. Parity-Violating Interaction Effects in the np System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Schiavilla; J.A. Carlson; M. Paris

    2003-09-03

    We investigate parity-violating observables in the np system, including the longitudinal asymmetry and neutron-spin rotation in np elastic scattering, the photon asymmetry in np radiative capture, and the asymmetries in deuteron photo-disintegration d(gamma,n)p in the threshold region and electro-disintegration d(e,e`)np in quasi-elastic kinematics. To have an estimate of the model dependence for the various predictions, a number of different, latest-generation strong-interaction potentials--Argonne v18, Bonn 2000, and Nijmegen I--are used in combination with a weak-interaction potential consisting of pi-, rho-, and omega-meson exchanges--the model known as DDH. The complete bound and scattering problems in the presence of parity-conserving, including electromagnetic, and parity-violating potentials is solved in both configuration and momentum space. The issue of electromagnetic current conservation is examined carefully. We find large cancellations between the asymmetries induced by the parity-violating interactions and those arising from the associated pion-exchange currents. In the np capture, the model dependence is nevertheless quite small, because of constraints arising through the Siegert evaluation of the relevant E1 matrix elements. In quasi-elastic electron scattering these processes are found to be insignificant compared to the asymmetry produced by gamma-Z interference on individual nucleons.

  4. Comparison between Free and Immobilized Ion Effects on Hydrophobic Interactions: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Kai; Ma, C Derek; Abbott, Nicholas L; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Fundamental studies of the effect of specific ions on hydrophobic interactions are driven by the need to understand phenomena such as hydrophobically driven self-assembly or protein folding. Using beta-peptide-inspired nano-rods, we investigate the effects of both free ions (dissolved salts) and proximally immobilized ions on hydrophobic interactions. We find that the free ion effect is correlated with the water density fluctuation near a non-polar molecular surface, showing that such fluctuation can be an indicator of hydrophobic interactions in the case of solution additives. In the case of immobilized ion, our results demonstrate that hydrophobic interactions can be switched on and off by choosing different spatial arrangements of proximal ions on a nano-rod. For globally amphiphilic nano-rods, we find that the magnitude of the interaction can be further tuned using proximal ions with varying ionic sizes. In general, univalent proximal anions are found to weaken hydrophobic interactions. This is in contras...

  5. Spinning boson stars and Kerr black holes with scalar hair: the effect of self-interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Herdeiro, Carlos A R; Rúnarsson, Helgi F

    2016-01-01

    Self-interacting boson stars have been shown to alleviate the astrophysically low maximal mass of their non-self-interacting counterparts. We report some physical features of spinning self-interacting boson stars, namely their compactness, the occurence of ergo-regions and the scalar field profiles, for a sample of values of the coupling parameter. The results agree with the general picture that these boson stars are comparatively less compact than the non-self-interacting ones. We also briefly discuss the effect of scalar self-interactions on the properties of Kerr black holes with scalar hair.

  6. NMR Study on the Interaction of Trehalose with Lactose and Its Effect on the Hydrogen Bond Interaction in Lactose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Morssing Vilén

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Trehalose, a well-known stress-protector of biomolecules, has been investigated for its effect on the mobility, hydration and hydrogen bond interaction of lactose using diffusion-ordered NMR spectroscopy and NMR of hydroxy protons. In ternary mixtures of trehalose, lactose and water, the two sugars have the same rate of diffusion. The chemical shifts, temperature coefficients, vicinal coupling constants and ROE of the hydroxy protons in trehalose, lactose and sucrose were measured for the disaccharides alone in water/acetone-d6 solutions as well as in mixtures. The data indicated that addition of trehalose did not change significantly the strength of the hydrogen bond interaction between GlcOH3 and GalO5' in lactose. Small upfield shifts were however measured for all hydroxy protons when the sugar concentration was increased. The chemical shift of the GlcOH3 signal in lactose showed less change, attributed to the spatial proximity to GalO5'. Chemical exchange between hydroxy protons of lactose and trehalose was observed in the ROESY NMR spectra. Similar effects were observed with sucrose indicating no specific effect of trehalose at the concentrations investigated (73 to 763 mg/mL and suggesting that it is the concentration of hydroxy groups more than the type of sugars which is guiding intermolecular interactions.

  7. Multiple stressor effects in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii – Toward understanding mechanisms of interaction between effects of ultraviolet radiation and chemical pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkaric, Muris [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Toxicology, 8600, Duebendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland); Behra, Renata; Fischer, Beat B. [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Toxicology, 8600, Duebendorf (Switzerland); Junghans, Marion [Swiss Center for Applied Ecotoxicology Eawag-EPFL, 8600, Duebendorf (Switzerland); Eggen, Rik I.L., E-mail: rik.eggen@eawag.ch [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Toxicology, 8600, Duebendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Systematic study of multiple stressor effects of UVR and chemicals in C. reinhardtii. • UVR and chemicals did not act independently on algal photosynthesis and reproduction. • Multiple stressor effects of UVR and chemicals depended on chemical MOA. • Synergistic effect interactions not limited to oxidative stress inducing chemicals. • Multiple MOAs of UVR may limit applicability of current prediction models. - Abstract: The effects of chemical pollutants and environmental stressors, such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR), can interact when organisms are simultaneously exposed, resulting in higher (synergistic) or lower (antagonistic) multiple stressor effects than expected based on the effects of single stressors. Current understanding of interactive effects is limited due to a lack of mechanism-based multiple stressor studies. It has been hypothesized that effect interactions may generally occur if chemical and non-chemical stressors cause similar physiological effects in the organism. To test this hypothesis, we exposed the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to combinations of UVR and single chemicals displaying modes of action (MOA) similar or dissimilar to the impact of UVR on photosynthesis. Stressor interactions were analyzed based on the independent action model. Effect interactions were found to depend on the MOA of the chemicals, and also on their concentrations, the exposure time and the measured endpoint. Indeed, only chemicals assumed to cause effects on photosynthesis similar to UVR showed interactions with UVR on photosynthetic yield: synergistic in case of Cd(II) and paraquat and antagonistic in case of diuron. No interaction on photosynthesis was observed for S-metolachlor, which acts dissimilarly to UVR. However, combined effects of S-metolachlor and UVR on algal reproduction were synergistic, highlighting the importance of considering additional MOA of UVR. Possible mechanisms of stressor effect interactions are

  8. Thermal Rectification Effect of an Interacting Quantum Dot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xue-Ou; DONG Bing; LEI Xiao-Lin

    2008-01-01

    @@ We investigate the nonlinear thermal transport properties of a single interacting quantum dot with two energy levels tunnel-coupled to two electrodes using nonequilibrium Green function method and Hartree-Fock decoupling approximation. In the case of asymmetric tunnel-couplings to two electrodes, for example, when the upper level of the quantum dot is open for transport, whereas the lower level is blocked, our calculations predict a strong asymmetry for the heat (energy) current, which shows that the quantum dot system may act as a thermal rectifier in this specific situation.

  9. Low Scale Saturation of Effective NN Interactions and Their Symmetries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Ruiz Arriola

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Skyrme force parameters can be uniquely determined by coarse graining the Nucleon-Nucleon (NN interactions at a characteristic momentum scale. We show how exact V lowk potentials to second order in momenta are saturated with physical NN scattering threshold parameters at Center of Mass (CM cut-off scales of about Λ = 250 MeV for the S-waves and Λ = 100 MeV for the P-waves. The pattern of Wigner and Serber symmetries unveiled previously and suggested by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD large N c contracted symmetry emerges at these scales.

  10. Configuration interaction effects in rotational bands of superdeformed nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasman, R. R.

    1993-12-01

    A study of rotational bands in superdeformed minima is made within the context of cranking Hamiltonian with pairing. The calculations are carried out using many-body wave functions having good particle number. The wave functions are described in detail. The approach is applied to the strongly populated superdeformed band in 192Hg. It is found that the number projected cranking solutions give too large transition energies in this rotational band starting at moderate angular momenta. This deficiency is alleviated considerably with a configuration interaction calculation.

  11. EFFECT OF WEAK INTERACTIONS ON PHENOL ADSORPTION FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS BY AMINATED POLYMERIC ADSORBENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-ming Zhang; Jin-long Chen; Ai-min Li; Bing-cai Pan; Qun Chen; Ming-yang He; Quan-xing Zhang

    2006-01-01

    Adsorption behaviors of phenol from aqueous solutions have been investigated in batch systems at 303 K and 318 K respectively, using hypercrosslinked polymeric adsorbent (CHA 111), aminated hypercrosslinked polymeric adsorbents (NDA101, NDA 103, NDA105) and weakly basic polymeric adsorbent (D301) with a view to studying the effect of hydrogen bonding and Van der Waals interactions between adsorbate and the adsorbent. All adsorption isotherms can be well fitted by Langmuir and Freundlich equations. Compared with D301 driven by hydrogen bonding interaction only and CHA111 driven by Van der Waals interaction only, phenol adsorption on aminated adsorbents driven by both hydrogen bonding and Van der Waals interactions were apparently different, i.e., negative effect for NDA105, positive effect for NDA101 and synergistic effect for NDA103. In this synergistic action, some weak interactions would contribute more or less to the adsorption than they work individually.

  12. Structure-Interaction Effects In Novel Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Nam B.

    Recent advances in experimental and computational methods have opened up new directions in graphene fundamental studies. In addition to understanding the basic properties of this material and its quasi-one dimensional structures, significant efforts are devoted to describing their long ranged dispersive interactions. Other two-dimensional materials, such as silicene, germanene, and transition metal dichalcogenides, are also being investigated aiming at finding complementary to graphene systems with other "wonder" properties. The focus of this work is to utilize first principles simulations methods to build our basic knowledge of structure-interaction relations in two-dimensional materials and design their properties. In particular, mechanical folding and extended defects in zigzag and armchair graphene nanoribbons can be used to modulate their electronic and spin polarization characteristics and achieve different stacking patterns. Our simulations concerning zigzag silicene nanoribbons show width-dependent antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic transitions unlike the case of zigzag graphene nanoribbons, which are always antiferromagnetic. Heterostructures, build by stacking graphene, silicene, and MoS2, are also investigated. It is found that hybridization alters the electronic properties of the individual layers and new flexural and breathing phonon modes display unique behaviors in the heterostructure compositions. Anchored to SiC substrate graphene nanoribbons are also proposed as possible systems to be used in graphene electronics. Our findings are of importance not only for fundamental science, but they could also be used for future experimental developments.

  13. Effect of glycation of hemoglobin on its interaction with trifluoperazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Manoj; Roy, Anjana; Bose, Tania; Chakraborti, Abhay Sankar

    2006-04-01

    Trifluoperazine (TFZ), a phenothiazine drug, penetrates into human erythrocytes and releases oxygen by interaction with hemoglobin. TFZ-induced oxygen release from hyperglycemic erythrocytes isolated from diabetic patients is considerably less compared to that from the cells of normoglycemic individuals. In diabetes mellitus, hemoglobin is significantly glycated by glucose. Non-glycated hemoglobin, HbA0 and its major glycated analog, HbA1c have been separated from the blood samples of diabetic patients. TFZ releases considerable amount of oxygen from HbA0, but very little from HbA1c. Spectrofluorimetric studies reveal that TFZ forms excited state complexes with both HbA0 and HbAlc. Titration of HbA0 with TFZ in a spectrophotometric study exhibits two isosbestic points. Similar experiment with HbAlc causes gradual loss of the Soret peak without appearance of any isosbestic point indicating a possibility of heme loss during interaction, which is also supported by gel filtration experiment and SDS-PAGE experiment followed by heme staining. The results suggest that drug action on hemoglobin is influenced by glycation-induced structural modification of the protein.

  14. Preferential Interactions and the Effect of Protein PEGylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Stenstrup Holm

    Full Text Available PEGylation is a strategy used by the pharmaceutical industry to prolong systemic circulation of protein drugs, whereas formulation excipients are used for stabilization of proteins during storage. Here we investigate the role of PEGylation in protein stabilization by formulation excipients that preferentially interact with the protein.The model protein hen egg white lysozyme was doubly PEGylated on two lysines with 5 kDa linear PEGs (mPEG-succinimidyl valerate, MW 5000 and studied in the absence and presence of preferentially excluded sucrose and preferentially bound guanine hydrochloride. Structural characterization by far- and near-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy was supplemented by investigation of protein thermal stability with the use of differential scanning calorimetry, far and near-UV circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. It was found that PEGylated lysozyme was stabilized by the preferentially excluded excipient and destabilized by the preferentially bound excipient in a similar manner as lysozyme. However, compared to lysozyme in all cases the melting transition was lower by up to a few degrees and the calorimetric melting enthalpy was decreased to half the value for PEGylated lysozyme. The ratio between calorimetric and van't Hoff enthalpy suggests that our PEGylated lysozyme is a dimer.The PEGylated model protein displayed similar stability responses to the addition of preferentially active excipients. This suggests that formulation principles using preferentially interacting excipients are similar for PEGylated and non-PEGylated proteins.

  15. Assessment of Magnetostatic Interaction Effects on Thellier Paleointensity Determination by Experimental Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Z.; Zhao, X.

    2009-05-01

    The ability to control magnetic interactions between grains is of fundamental importance in paleointensity studies. We continued to perform experimental simulations to help understand the effect of magnetostatic interaction on Thellier type paleointensity experiments, using artificial synthesized magnetite grains mixed with both pseudo-single domain (PSD) and multidomain (MD) particles. Magnetite powders were mixed either with an Aron ceramic or were dispersed in matrix of Seto porcelain clay. The effects of interaction between grains can be observed from the magnetic behavior of specimens with different inter-grain distances. The maximum effect of domain's interaction can be estimated by comparing the behavior of specimens with large inter-grain distance (i.e., mostly dispersed-grains) with that of ideal non-interacting SD grains. Our results clearly show that (1) the interaction between grains (rather than domain's interaction) has particular disastrous effects on the Thellier-Coe paleointensity experiment; (2) interaction of large inter- grain distance samples adds an almost negative constant value to the applied external field (i.e., acting as an internal demagnetizing field); (3) interaction in shorter inter-grain distance samples mainly generates the difference in blocking and unblocking temperatures of the sample. Detailed results will be presented and discussed at the meeting.

  16. Molecular theory for the effects of solute attractive forces on hydrophobic interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhari, M I; Asthagiri, D; Tan, L; Pratt, L R

    2015-01-01

    We consider the local molecular field (LMF) theory for the effects of solute attractive forces on hydrophobic interactions. The principal result of LMF theory is outlined, then tested by obtaining radial distribution functions (rdfs) for Ar atoms in water, with and without attractive interactions distinguished by the Weeks-Chandler-Andersen (WCA) separation. Change from purely repulsive atomic solute interactions to include realistic attractive interactions substantially \\emph{diminishes} the strength of hydrophobic bonds. Since attractions make a big contribution to hydrophobic interactions, Pratt-Chandler theory, which did not include attractions, should not be simply comparable to computer simulation results with general physical interactions, including attractions. The rdfs permit evaluation of osmotic second virial coefficients $B_2$. Those $B_2$ are consistent with the conclusion that incorporation of attractive interactions leads to more positive (repulsive) values. In all cases here, $B_2$ becomes mor...

  17. Clinical handover as an interactive event: informational and interactional communication strategies in effective shift-change handovers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggins, Suzanne; Slade, Diana

    2012-01-01

    Clinical handover -- the transfer between clinicians of responsibility and accountability for patients and their care (AMA 2006) -- is a pivotal and high-risk communicative event in hospital practice. Studies focusing on critical incidents, mortality, risk and patient harm in hospitals have highlighted ineffective communication -- including incomplete and unstructured clinical handovers -- as a major contributing factor (NSW Health 2005; ACSQHC 2010). In Australia, as internationally, Health Departments and hospital management have responded by introducing standardised handover communication protocols. This paper problematises one such protocol - the ISBAR tool - and argues that the narrow understanding of communication on which such protocols are based may seriously constrain their ability to shape effective handovers. Based on analysis of audio-recorded shift-change clinical handovers between medical staff we argue that handover communication must be conceptualised as inherently interactive and that attempts to describe, model and teach handover practice must recognise both informational and interactive communication strategies. By comparing the communicative performance of participants in authentic handover events we identify communication strategies that are more and less likely to lead to an effective handover and demonstrate the importance of focusing close up on communication to improve the quality and safety of healthcare interactions.

  18. 基于微观裂隙扩张的采场底板突水机理研究%Mechanism study of floor water inrush around mining field based on micro-crack extension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高玉兵; 刘世奇; 吕斌; 李昆奇

    2016-01-01

    基于矿山压力和岩层控制理论,分析了工作面附近支承压力及底板水压的空间分布特征,确定了两者对底板的力学作用机制。通过建立裂隙力学模型,从微观角度研究了支承压力和水压对裂隙的作用效果;以薄板理论为依据,从宏观角度研究了含水层水压对底板有效隔水层的作用机理,并给出底板突水极限水压值的计算公式。结果表明:支承压力的增大会导致裂隙渗透系数的减小;水压的增大会导致岩体强度的降低和裂隙劈裂长度的增加。采场底板突水的实质是采动引起的矿山压力和承压水水压共同作用下微观裂隙的扩张和底板有效隔水层的断裂。%Based on the mine ground pressure and strata control theory, spatial distribution characteris-tics of ground pressure and floor water pressure around mining field have been analyzed in this paper, and then the mechanical effects of both these pressures on the coal floor have been determined. By set-ting up mechanics model, the effects of ground pressure and water pressure on a set of tilted cracks have been studied from a microcosmic point of view. Based on the thin plate theory, the effects of water pressure on the effective water-resisting layer have also been studied from a macroscopic point of view. Finally, a theoretical formulae of limiting hydraulic pressure has been deduced. The results have shown that the increase of abutment pressure can lead to the decrease of permeability coefficient; the increase of water pressure can cause the attenuation of rock mass strength and the increase of fissure length. The essence of water inrush in mining field is the result of propagation of micro-cracks and fracture damage of the effective water-resisting layer caused by ground pressure and water pressure.

  19. In-situ Research on Microcracks of Cross-rolling Molybdenum Strip in Forming Process%交叉轧制钼带成形过程显微裂纹的原位研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张青来; 陈骏; 韩伟东; 冯甜甜; 李敏; 陈康敏

    2012-01-01

    Using optical microscopy and field emission high-resolution electron microscopy, the microstructure and micro-cracks of the 0.2 mm thick cross-rolled molybdenum strip, its cold deep drawing parts and laser shock forming parts under high strain rate were ob- served and analyzed. The results showed that the cross-rolled molybdenum strip was composed with mutual overlapping and compact slender fibrous grains. Tensile fracture exhibited thin layers of ductile fracture and microcracks overlapping each other within the fibrous grains of polycrystalline molybdenum strip. And the microcracks appeared in the middle region of the thickness direction where interg- ranular combination was weak. Only when internal tensile stress was greater than the bonding strength of weak interface, microcracks were generated on the weak interface.%采用光学显微镜和热场发射高分辨率电镜对厚度为0.2 mm交叉轧制钼带及其冷拉深成形和高应变速率激光冲击成形试件的微观组织及显微裂纹进行观察和分析。结果表明:交叉轧制钼带由排列紧凑相互搭接的纤维状细长晶粒组成,拉伸断口呈薄层韧性断裂且晶内显微裂纹相互搭接;多晶钼带内部产生的显微裂纹均发生在晶间结合较弱的厚度方向中间区域,沿纤维晶界且相互搭接,仅在内部产生的拉应力大于弱界面结合强度时,弱界面将产生显微裂纹。

  20. Non-thermal effects of acceleration in the resonance interaction between two uniformly accelerated identical atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzuto, Lucia; Marino, Jamir; Noto, Antonio; Spagnolo, Salvatore; Passante, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We study the resonance interaction between two uniformly accelerated identical atoms, one excited and the other in the ground state, prepared in a correlated (symmetric or antisymmetric) state and interacting with the scalar field in the vacuum state. Because the two atoms are in a correlated state, the interaction is a second-order effect in the atom-field coupling. We separate the contributions of vacuum fluctuations and radiation reaction to the resonance energy shift of the system, and show that only radiation reaction contributes, while Unruh thermal fluctuations do not affect the resonant interatomic interaction. We also find that beyond a characteristic length scale associated to the breakdown of a local inertial description of the two-atom system, non-thermal effects in the radiation reaction correction change the distance-dependence of the resonance interaction. Finally, we generalize our model to the case of atoms interacting with the electromagnetic field, and shown that new features appear in the ...

  1. Effects of the protein denaturant guanidinium chloride on aqueous hydrophobic contact-pair interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Ryan D; Khajehpour, Mazdak

    2015-01-01

    Guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) is one of the most common protein denaturants. Although GdmCl is well known in the field of protein folding, the mechanism by which it denatures proteins is not well understood. In fact, there are few studies looking at its effects on hydrophobic interactions. In this work the effect of GdmCl on hydrophobic interactions has been studied by observing how the denaturant influences model systems of phenyl and alkyl hydrophobic contact pairs. Contact pair formation is monitored through the use of fluorescence spectroscopy, i.e., measuring the intrinsic phenol fluorescence being quenched by carboxylate ions. Hydrophobic interactions are isolated from other interactions through a previously developed methodology. The results show that GdmCl does not significantly affect hydrophobic interactions between small moieties such as methyl groups and phenol; while on the other hand, the interaction of larger hydrophobes such as hexyl and heptyl groups with phenol is significantly destabilized.

  2. Ion-mediated interactions between net-neutral slabs: Weak and strong disorder effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodrat, Malihe; Naji, Ali; Komaie-Moghaddam, Haniyeh; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the effective interaction between two randomly charged but otherwise net-neutral, planar dielectric slabs immersed in an asymmetric Coulomb fluid containing a mixture of mobile monovalent and multivalent ions. The presence of charge disorder on the apposed bounding surfaces of the slabs leads to substantial qualitative changes in the way they interact, as compared with the standard picture provided by the van der Waals and image-induced, ion-depletion interactions. While, the latter predict purely attractive interactions between strictly neutral slabs, we show that the combined effects from surface charge disorder, image depletion, Debye (or salt) screening, and also, in particular, their coupling with multivalent ions, give rise to a more diverse behavior for the effective interaction between net-neutral slabs at nano-scale separations. Disorder effects show large variation depending on the properly quantified strength of disorder, leading either to non-monotonic effective interaction with both repulsive and attractive branches when the surface charges are weakly disordered (small disorder variance) or to a dominating attractive interaction that is larger both in its range and magnitude than what is predicted from the van der Waals and image-induced, ion-depletion interactions, when the surfaces are strongly disordered (large disorder variance).

  3. Ion-mediated interactions between net-neutral slabs: Weak and strong disorder effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodrat, Malihe; Naji, Ali; Komaie-Moghaddam, Haniyeh; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2015-12-21

    We investigate the effective interaction between two randomly charged but otherwise net-neutral, planar dielectric slabs immersed in an asymmetric Coulomb fluid containing a mixture of mobile monovalent and multivalent ions. The presence of charge disorder on the apposed bounding surfaces of the slabs leads to substantial qualitative changes in the way they interact, as compared with the standard picture provided by the van der Waals and image-induced, ion-depletion interactions. While, the latter predict purely attractive interactions between strictly neutral slabs, we show that the combined effects from surface charge disorder, image depletion, Debye (or salt) screening, and also, in particular, their coupling with multivalent ions, give rise to a more diverse behavior for the effective interaction between net-neutral slabs at nano-scale separations. Disorder effects show large variation depending on the properly quantified strength of disorder, leading either to non-monotonic effective interaction with both repulsive and attractive branches when the surface charges are weakly disordered (small disorder variance) or to a dominating attractive interaction that is larger both in its range and magnitude than what is predicted from the van der Waals and image-induced, ion-depletion interactions, when the surfaces are strongly disordered (large disorder variance).

  4. Effects of solar UV radiation and climate change on biogeochemical cycling: interactions and feedbacks

    OpenAIRE

    Zepp, R. G.; D. J. Erickson; Paul, N.D.; Sulzberger, B.

    2011-01-01

    Solar UV radiation, climate and other drivers of global change are undergoing significant changes and models forecast that these changes will continue for the remainder of this century. Here we assess the effects of solar UV radiation on biogeochemical cycles and the interactions of these effects with climate change, including feedbacks on climate. Such interactions occur in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. While there is significant uncertainty in the quantification of these effects,...

  5. Interaction effects in a chaotic graphene quantum billiard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagymási, Imre; Vancsó, Péter; Pálinkás, András; Osváth, Zoltán

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the local electronic structure of a Sinai-like, quadrilateral graphene quantum billiard with zigzag and armchair edges using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at room temperature. It is revealed that besides the (√{3 }×√{3 }) R 30∘ superstructure, which is caused by the intervalley scattering, its overtones also appear in the STM measurements, which are attributed to the Umklapp processes. We point out that these results can be well understood by taking into account the Coulomb interaction in the quantum billiard, accounting for both the measured density of state values and the experimentally observed topography patterns. The analysis of the level-spacing distribution substantiates the experimental findings as well. We also reveal the magnetic properties of our system which should be relevant in future graphene based electronic and spintronic applications.

  6. Effects of learning from interaction with physical or mediated devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Robin

    2013-05-01

    Online learning tools and course materials have not only taken root: they are fully established and thriving. However, some wonder whether the missing interaction with physical, rather than virtual, tools may be undermining the foundation of more abstract spatial and cognitive skills. Sixty third-grade (28 male and 32 female) children with a mean age of 8.95 years (SD = .56 years) were randomly assigned to practice new math skills on a physical wooden Chinese abacus or a virtual Chinese abacus, programmed using Hypercard. Later; the children did equally well on a paper and pencil recognition test, but the children who had practiced with the virtual Chinese abacus were significantly worse at building on their knowledge to figure out how to use the abacus for more advanced computation than those who had practiced with the wooden Chinese abacus. This could have important implications for the early development of the foundation of mathematical, spatial, and cognitive skills.

  7. Coulomb interaction effect in tilted Weyl fermion in two dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Hiroki; Nagaosa, Naoto

    Weyl fermions with tilted linear dispersions characterized by several different velocities appear in some systems including the quasi-two-dimensional organic semiconductor α-(BEDT-TTF)2I3 and three-dimensional WTe2. The Coulomb interaction between electrons modifies the velocities in an essential way in the low energy limit, where the logarithmic corrections dominate. Taking into account the coupling to both the transverse and longitudinal electromagnetic fields, we derive the renormalization group equations for the velocities of the tilted Weyl fermions in two dimensions, and found that they increase as the energy decreases and eventually hit the velocity of light c to result in the Cherenkov radiation. Especially, the system restores the isotropic Weyl cone even when the bare Weyl cone is strongly tilted and the velocity of electrons becomes negative in certain directions.

  8. Managerial Insights into the Effects of Interactions on Replacing Members of a Team

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Solow; George Vairaktarakis; Sandy Kristin Piderit; Ming-chi Tsai

    2002-01-01

    A mathematical model is presented for studying the effects of interactions among team members on the process of replacing members of a team in an organization. The model provides the ability to control the number of members that interact with each individual on the team. Through the use of analysis and computer simulations, it is shown how the amount of interaction affects the tradeoff between the expected performance and the number of replacements and interviews needed to find a good team us...

  9. Van der Waals and resonance interactions between accelerated atoms in vacuum and the Unruh effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattuca, M.; Marino, J.; Noto, A.; Passante, R.; Rizzuto, L.; Spagnolo, S.; Zhou, W.

    2017-08-01

    We discuss different physical effects related to the uniform acceleration of atoms in vacuum, in the framework of quantum electrodynamics. We first investigate the van der Waals/Casimir-Polder dispersion and resonance interactions between two uniformly accelerated atoms in vacuum. We show that the atomic acceleration significantly affects the van der Waals force, yielding a different scaling of the interaction with the interatomic distance and an explicit time dependence of the interaction energy. We argue how these results could allow for an indirect detection of the Unruh effect through dispersion interactions between atoms. We then consider the resonance interaction between two accelerated atoms, prepared in a correlated Bell-type state, and interacting with the electromagnetic field in the vacuum state, separating vacuum fluctuations and radiation reaction contributions, both in the free-space and in the presence of a perfectly reflecting plate. We show that nonthermal effects of acceleration manifest in the resonance interaction, yielding a change of the distance dependence of the resonance interaction energy. This suggests that the equivalence between temperature and acceleration does not apply to all radiative properties of accelerated atoms. To further explore this aspect, we evaluate the resonance interaction between two atoms in non inertial motion in the coaccelerated (Rindler) frame and show that in this case the assumption of an Unruh temperature for the field is not required for a complete equivalence of locally inertial and coaccelerated points of views.

  10. Effects of laser interaction with living human tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molchanova, O. E.; Protasov, E. A.; Protasov, D. E.; Smirnova, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    With the help of a highly sensitive laser device with the wavelength λ = 0.808 pm, which is optimal for deep penetration of the radiation into biological tissues, the effects associated with the appearance of uncontrolled human infrasonic vibrations of different frequencies were investigated. It was established that the observed fluctuations are associated with the vascular system which is characterized by its own respiratory movements, occurring synchronously with the movements of the respiratory muscles, the operation of the heart muscle, and the effect of compression ischemia. The effect of “enlightenment” of a tissue is observed with stopping of blood flow in vessels by applying a tourniquet on the wrist.

  11. Fitting formulae for the effects of binary interactions on lick indices and colors of stellar populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-Mu Li; Zhan-Wen Han

    2009-01-01

    More than about 50% of stars are in binaries, but most stellar population studies take single star stellar population (ssSSP) models, which do not take binary interactions into account. In fact, the integrated peculiarities of ssSSPs are different from those of stellar populations with binary interactions (bsSSPs). Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the effects of binary interactions on the Lick indices and colors of populations in detail.We show some formulae for calculating the difference between the Lick indices and colors of bsSSPs, and those of ssSSPs. Twenty-five Lick indices and 12 colors are studied in this work. The results can be conveniently used for calculating the effects of binary interactions on stellar population studies and for adding the effects of binary interactions into present ssSSP models. The electronic data and fortran procedures in the paper can be obtained on request from the authors.

  12. Effects of platelet-activating factor on the interaction of Trypanosoma cruzi with Rhodnius prolixus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Luciana T; Folly, Evelize; Gomes, Marta T; Alviano, Daniela S; Alviano, Celuta S; Silva-Filho, Fernando C; Atella, Geórgia C; Lopes, Angela H

    2011-06-01

    We investigated the effects of platelet-activating factor (PAF) on the interaction of Trypanosoma cruzi with Rhodnius prolixus. The parasites (epimastigotes) were treated with PAF and/or WEB 2086 (PAF antagonist) for 1 h prior to the interaction experiments. PAF stimulated both in vivo and ex vivo interactions between T. cruzi and R. prolixus while WEB 2086 abrogated these effects. PAF-treated epimastigotes also showed an increase in surface negativity and in the amount of surface sialic acid. Neither of these effects was observed when the epimastigotes were treated with neuraminidase following PAF treatment. In the ex vivo interaction experiments, the number of epimastigotes bound to the midguts of the insects was reduced when the epimastigotes had been treated with neuraminidase. We conclude that PAF modulates the interaction of T. cruzi with R. prolixus by altering the amount of sialyl residues at the surface of the parasite.

  13. Effect of Dzialoshinski-Moriya interaction on thermal entanglement of a mixed-spin chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The effect of Dzialoshinski-Moriya (DM) interaction on thermal entanglement of a mixed-spin chain in an external magnetic field is investigated. It is found that DM interaction may enhance quantum thermal entanglement to a maximal value even though the magnetic field plays a positive role in shrinking thermal entanglement in the mixed-spin chain. Furthermore, the effect of inhomogeneity of the magnetic field on quantum entanglement is analyzed. Our analysis will shed some light on the understanding of the effect of the DM interaction on thermal entanglement of a mixed-spin chain.

  14. INTERACTION EFFECT OF TREE LEAF LITTER, MANURE AND

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INORGANIC FERTILIZER ON THE PERFORMANCE OF MAIZE IN ... experiment was conducted over two seasons to evaluate the effects of 5 that1 of different organic inputs ... growth was overcome by the application of Compound D fertilizer.

  15. Effect of Temperature on Self-Interaction of Human-Like Collagen%Effect of Temperature on Self-Interaction of Human-Like Collagen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan, Daidi; Xing, Jianyu; Xue, Wenjiao; Zhu, Chenhui; Ma, Xiaoxuan; Ma, Rong

    2011-01-01

    Effects of temperature on self-interaction of human-like collagen (HLC) were investigated by hydrophobic in- teraction chromatography, calorimetric measurement, and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electropho- resis (SDS-PAGE) analysis. Results show that three types of interaction roles may exist between ttLC molecules at 3--50 ℃, which were divided into three narrower temperature ranges. In temperature range from 3--22 ℃, hy- drogen bonding plays a key role in the formation of a gelatinous aggregate. In the range of 22--38 ℃, hydrophobic bonds accompanied by hydrogen bonds are involved in the formation compact aggregates. When temperature is above 38 ℃ the hydrophobic effect formed in the HLC monomer results in the loss of its ability to self-interact.

  16. Early Exposures to Ecogenomics: Effects of Priming and Web Site Interactivity Among Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Mark J.W.; Koolstra, Cees M.; Willems, J.T.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    In the context of public introductions to emerging technologies, this study examined effects of priming and Web site interactivity on adolescents’ attitude development and information processing. In a four (priming) by three (interactivity levels) experiment, participants (N = 273) were required to

  17. NOx Removal and Effect of Adsorbate-Adsorbate Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Tuhin Suvra

    to obtain more accurate catalytic rates than with the commonly used non-interacting mean field model. I then applied the proposed adsorbate-adsorbate interaction model to three important catalytic reactions, the direct NO decomposition, CO methanation, and steam reforming of methane, and analyzed the effect...

  18. Effects of Class Size and Attendance Policy on University Classroom Interaction in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yin; Chang, Te-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Classroom interaction experience is one of the main parts of students' learning lives. However, surprisingly little research has investigated students' perceptions of classroom interaction with different attendance policies across different class sizes in the higher education system. To elucidate the effects of class size and attendance policy on…

  19. The Effect of Interactivity with a Music Video Game on Second Language Vocabulary Recall

    Science.gov (United States)

    deHaan, Jonathan; Reed, W. Michael; Kuwada, Katsuko

    2010-01-01

    Video games are potential sources of second language input; however, the medium's fundamental characteristic, interactivity, has not been thoroughly examined in terms of its effect on learning outcomes. This experimental study investigated to what degree, if at all, video game interactivity would help or hinder the noticing and recall of second…

  20. Effect of electrostatic interactions on the formation of proton transfer pathways in human carbonic anhydrase II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arijit Roy; Srabani Taraphder

    2007-09-01

    We report here a theoretical study on the effect of electrostatic interactions on the formation of dynamical, proton-conducting hydrogen-bonded networks in the protein HCA II. The conformational fluctuations of His-64 is found to contribute crucially to the mechanism of such path formation irrespective of the way electrostatic interactions are modelled.

  1. Effect of air jet vortex generators on a shock wave boundary layer interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souverein, L.J.; Debiève, J.-F.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of upstream injection by means of continuous air jet vortex generators (AJVGs) on a shock wave turbulent boundary layer interaction is experimentally investigated. The baseline interaction is of the impinging type, with a flow deflection angle of 9.5degrees and a Mach number Me = 2.3. Con

  2. Effect on a shock wave boundary layer interaction of air jet vortex generators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souverein, L.J.; Debieve, J.F.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of upstream injection by means of continuous Air Jet Vortex Generators (AJVGs) on a shock wave turbulent boundary layer interaction is experimentally investigated. The baseline interaction is of the impinging type, with a flow deflection angle of 9.5◦, a Mach number Me = 2.3, and a moment

  3. Effect of frequency variation on electromagnetic pulse interaction with charges and plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachatryan, A.G.; Goor, van F.A.; Verschuur, J.W.J.; Boller, K.-J.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of frequency variation (chirp) in an electromagnetic (EM) pulse on the pulse interaction with a charged particle and plasma is studied. Various types of chirp and pulse envelopes are considered. In vacuum, a charged particle receives a kick in the polarization direction after interaction

  4. Effect of Shear and Bulk Viscosities on Interacting Modified Chaplygin Gas Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji, J.; Pourhassan, B.; Amani, Ali R.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we study interacting modified Chaplygin gas (MCG) which has shear and bulk viscosities. We consider sign-changeable interaction between MCG and matter, then investigate the effects of shear and bulk viscosities on the cosmological parameters such as energy, density, Hubble expansion parameter, scale factor and deceleration parameter.

  5. Effects of Alcohol on Women's Risky Sexual Decision Making during Social Interactions in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawacki, Tina

    2011-01-01

    This experiment examined the effects of alcohol on women's sexual decision making during a laboratory social interaction with a potential dating partner. Participants completed an assessment of sex-related alcohol expectancies, were randomly assigned to consume alcohol, no alcohol, or a placebo, and then interacted with a male confederate.…

  6. Combined and interactive effects of global climatee change and toxicants on popuylations and communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moe, S.R.; Schamphelaere, de K.A.C.; Clements, W.H.; Sorensen, T.; Brink, van den P.J.; Liess, M.

    2013-01-01

    Increased temperature and other environmental effects of global climate change (GCC) have documented impacts on many species (e.g., polar bears, amphibians, coral reefs) as well as on ecosystem processes and species interactions (e.g., the timing of predator-prey interactions). A challenge for

  7. Effects of Strength of Accent on an L2 Interactive Lecture Listening Comprehension Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockey, Gary J.; Papageorgiou, Spiros; French, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on a study which aimed to determine the effect of strength of accent on listening comprehension of interactive lectures. Test takers (N = 21,726) listened to an interactive lecture given by one of nine speakers and responded to six comprehension items. The test taker responses were analyzed with the Rasch computer program…

  8. Effects of Sudden, Mass School Desegregation on Interracial Interaction and Attitudes in One Southern City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Irwin; Shaw, Marvin E.

    The authors concern themselves primarily with 2 effects of a school desegregation plan during the semester of its inception in Gainesville, Florida. One deals with the amount of interaction between blacks and whites on the school grounds; the other concerns their attitudes toward each other. Interaction was measured, through observation during the…

  9. Coupled effects of local movement and global interaction on contagion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Li-Xin; Xu, Wen-Juan; Chen, Rong-Da; Qiu, Tian; Shi, Yong-Dong; Zhong, Chen-Yang

    2015-10-01

    By incorporating segregated spatial domain and individual-based linkage into the SIS (susceptible-infected-susceptible) model, we propose a generalized epidemic model which can change from the territorial epidemic model to the networked epidemic model. The role of the individual-based linkage between different spatial domains is investigated. As we adjust the timescale parameter τ from 0 to unity, which represents the degree of activation of the individual-based linkage, three regions are found. Within the region of 0 region of 0.02 region of 0.5 eye on the first region, the role of activating the individual-based linkage in the present model is similar to the role of the shortcuts in the two-dimensional small world network. Only activating a small number of the individual-based linkage can prompt the outbreak of the epidemic globally. The role of narrowing segregated spatial domain and reducing mobility in epidemic control is checked. These two measures are found to be conducive to curbing the spread of infectious disease only when the global interaction is suppressed. A log-log relation between the change in the number of infected individuals and the timescale τ is found. By calculating the epidemic threshold and the mean first encounter time, we heuristically analyze the microscopic characteristics of the propagation of the epidemic in the present model.

  10. Cross-frequency interactions in the precedence effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn-Cunningham, B G; Zurek, P M; Durlach, N I; Clifton, R K

    1995-07-01

    This paper concerns the extent to which the precedence effect is observed when leading and lagging sounds occupy different spectral regions. Subjects, listening under headphones, were asked to match the intracranial lateral position of an acoustic pointer to that of a test stimulus composed of two binaural noise bursts with asynchronous onsets, parametrically varied frequency content, and different interaural delays. The precedence effect was measured by the degree to which the interaural delay of the matching pointer was independent of the interaural delay of the lagging noise burst in the test stimulus. The results, like those of Blauert and Divenyi [Acustica 66, 267-274 (1988)], show an asymmetric frequency effect in which the lateralization influence of a lagging high-frequency burst is almost completely suppressed by a leading low-frequency burst, whereas a lagging low-frequency burst is weighted equally with a leading high-frequency burst. This asymmetry is shown to be the result of an inherent low-frequency dominance that is seen even with simultaneous bursts. When this dominance is removed (by attenuating the low-frequency burst) the precedence effect operates with roughly equal strength both upward and downward in frequency. Within the scope of the current study (with lateralization achieved through the use of interaural time differences alone, stimuli from only two frequency bands, and only three subjects performing in all experiments), these results suggest that the precedence effect arises from a fairly central processing stage in which information is combined across frequency.

  11. ARTICLES: Effect of Interaction upon Translocation of Confined Polymer Chain Through Nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao; Xie, Yong-jun; Yang, Hai-yang; Zhang, Xing-yuan

    2010-06-01

    The effect of the interaction between nanopore and chain monomer on the translocation of a single polymer chain confined in a finite size square through an interacting nanopore to a large space has been studied by two-dimensional bond fluctuation model with Monte Carlo simulation. Results indicate that the free energy barrier before the successful translocation of the chain depends linearly on the chain length as well as the nanopore length for different pore-polymer interaction, and the attractive interaction reduces the free energy barrier, leading to the reduction of the average trapping time.

  12. Non-analgesic effects of opioids: interactions between opioids and other drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiskanen, Tarja; Kalso, Eija

    2012-01-01

    Opioids are increasingly used to manage not only acute but also chronic pain and heroine addiction. These patients usually receive many other medications that can interfere with the effects of opioids and vice versa. Patients often need combinations of drugs for their pain management, for treating opioid-related adverse effects or for other indications including depression and anxiety. Several antibiotics can also have interactions with opioids. It is important to understand what potential interactions exist between opioids and other drugs. Drug interactions can occur due to pharmacokinetic interactions including effects of absorption, metabolic pathways, drug transport through membranes and protein binding. Our knowledge of the metabolism of opioids has significantly increased over the last years and it is now possible to appreciate the role CYP enzymes, mainly CYP 2D6 and 3A4/5, in the metabolism of many commonly used opioids like codeine and oxycodone. Our knowledge regarding the role of the transporter proteins in drug interactions related to opioids is unfortunately meagre. Opioids inhibit the gastrointestinal system and can thus change the absorption of other drugs. Opioids can have synergistic or additive interactions with other drugs that have analgesic or sedative effects. Endogenous opioids control many physiological functions and exogenous opioids can have effects on all important transmitter systems (cholinergic, GABAergic, dopaminergic and serotonergic). The literature in this field is mainly based on case reports. Interindividual differences play an important role. Other potential interactions include prolongation of the QT-interval and lowering of the threshold for convulsions.

  13. The Effectiveness of Interactivity in Multimedia Software Tutorials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Many people face the challenge of finding effective computer-based software instruction, including employees who must learn how to use software applications for their job and students of distance education classes. Therefore, it is important to conduct research on how computer-based multimedia software tutorials should be designed so they are as…

  14. Effective potentials for atom-atom interaction at low temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Bo

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the concept and design of effective atom-atom potentials that accurately describe any physical processes involving only states around the threshold. The existence of such potentials gives hope to a quantitative, and systematic, understanding of quantum few-atom and quantum many-atom systems at relatively low temperatures.

  15. Situational and Personality Factors: Interactive Effects on Attitude - Active Consistency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Stan L.; Warner, Lyle G.

    1975-01-01

    An examination of the combined effect of a situational factor, disclosure, and two personality variables, "need for approval" and "inner-other directedness" on attitude - action relationships with respect to marijuana related attitudes and behavior of college students. Subjects with different personality characteristics were found to respond…

  16. Nonlinear effects in the torsional adjustment of interacting DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornyshev, A A; Wynveen, A

    2004-04-01

    DNA molecules in solution, having negatively charged phosphates and countercations readsorbed on its surface, possess a distinct charge separation motif to interact electrostatically. If their double-helical structure were ideal, duplexes in parallel juxtaposition could choose azimuthal alignment providing attraction, or at least a reduction of repulsion, between them. But duplexes are not perfect staircases and the distortions of their helical structure correlate with their base pair texts. If the patterns of distortions on the opposing molecules are uncorrelated, the mismatch will accumulate as a random walk and attraction vanishes. Based on this idea, a model of recognition of homologous sequences has been proposed [A. A. Kornyshev and S. Leikin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 3666 (2001)]. But DNA has torsional elasticity. How will this help to relax a mismatch between the charge distributions on two nonhomologous DNA's? In the same work, the solution of this problem has been mapped onto a frustrated sine Gordon equation in a nonlocal random field (where the latter represents a pattern of twist angle distortions on the opposing molecules), but the results had been obtained in the limit of torsionally rigid molecules. In the present paper, by solving this equation numerically, we find a strongly nonlinear relaxation mechanism which utilizes static kink-soliton modes triggered by the "random field." In the range of parameters where the solitons do not emerge, we find good agreement with the results of a variational study [A. G. Cherstvy, A. A. Kornyshev, and S. Leikin, J. Phys. Chem. B (to be published)]. We reproduce the first-order transitions in the interaxial separation dependence, but detect also second-order or weak first-order transitions for shorter duplexes. The recognition energy between two nonhomologous DNA sequences is calculated as a function of interaxial separation and the length of juxtaposition. The soliton-caused kinky length dependence is discussed in

  17. Nonlinear effects in the torsional adjustment of interacting DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornyshev, A. A.; Wynveen, A.

    2004-04-01

    DNA molecules in solution, having negatively charged phosphates and countercations readsorbed on its surface, possess a distinct charge separation motif to interact electrostatically. If their double-helical structure were ideal, duplexes in parallel juxtaposition could choose azimuthal alignment providing attraction, or at least a reduction of repulsion, between them. But duplexes are not perfect staircases and the distortions of their helical structure correlate with their base pair texts. If the patterns of distortions on the opposing molecules are uncorrelated, the mismatch will accumulate as a random walk and attraction vanishes. Based on this idea, a model of recognition of homologous sequences has been proposed [A. A. Kornyshev and S. Leikin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 3666 (2001)]. But DNA has torsional elasticity. How will this help to relax a mismatch between the charge distributions on two nonhomologous DNA’s? In the same work, the solution of this problem has been mapped onto a frustrated sine Gordon equation in a nonlocal random field (where the latter represents a pattern of twist angle distortions on the opposing molecules), but the results had been obtained in the limit of torsionally rigid molecules. In the present paper, by solving this equation numerically, we find a strongly nonlinear relaxation mechanism which utilizes static kink-soliton modes triggered by the “random field.” In the range of parameters where the solitons do not emerge, we find good agreement with the results of a variational study [A. G. Cherstvy, A. A. Kornyshev, and S. Leikin, J. Phys. Chem. B (to be published)]. We reproduce the first-order transitions in the interaxial separation dependence, but detect also second-order or weak first-order transitions for shorter duplexes. The recognition energy between two nonhomologous DNA sequences is calculated as a function of interaxial separation and the length of juxtaposition. The soliton-caused kinky length dependence is

  18. Benzodiazepine receptor-mediated behavioral effects of nitrous oxide in the rat social interaction test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quock, R M; Wetzel, P J; Maillefer, R H; Hodges, B L; Curtis, B A; Czech, D A

    1993-09-01

    The present study was conducted to ascertain whether an anxiolytic effect of nitrous oxide was demonstrable in rats using the social interaction test and whether this drug effect might be mediated by benzodiazepine receptors. Compared to behavior of vehicle-pretreated, room air-exposed rats, rat pairs exposed to nitrous oxide showed a generally inverted U-shaped dose-response curve with the maximum increase in social interaction encounters occurring at 25% and significant increase in time of active social interaction at 15-35%; higher concentrations produced a sedative effect that reduced social interaction. Treatment with 5.0 mg/kg of the anxiolytic benzodiazepine chlordiazepoxide also increased social interaction. Pretreatment with 10 mg/kg of the benzodiazepine receptor blocker flumazenil, which alone had no effect, significantly antagonized the social interaction-increasing effects of both nitrous oxide and chlordiazepoxide. In summary, these findings suggest that nitrous oxide produces a flumazenil-sensitive effect comparable to that of chlordiazepoxide and implicate central benzodiazepine mechanisms in mediation of the anxiolytic effect of nitrous oxide.

  19. Vector Susceptibility of QCD Vacuum from an Effective Quark-Quark Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONG Hong-Shi; QI Shi; CHEN Wei; WU Xiao-Hua

    2003-01-01

    .A new approach for calculating vacuum susceptibilities from an effective quark-quark interaction model is derived. As a special case, the vector vacuum susceptibility is calculated. A comparison with the results of the previous approaches is given.

  20. Vector Susceptibility of QCD Vacuum from an Effective Quark-Quark Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONGHong-Shi; QIShi; CHENWei; WUXiao-Hua

    2003-01-01

    A new approach for calculating vacuum susceptibilities from an effective quark-quark interaction model is derived. As a special case, the vector vacuum susceptibility is calculated. A comparison with the results of the previous approaches is given.

  1. Effect of Quark Strong Interaction in Phase Transition on Supernova Explosion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAI Xiang-Jun; LUO Zhi-Quan; LIU Jing-Jing; LIU Hong-Lin

    2008-01-01

    The effect of quark interactions perturbatively to order αc on the conversion, from quark matter to strange quark matter, is studied systematically based on a recent set of current quark masses. The process has a significant effect on increasing the core temperature, the neutrino abundance and the neutrino energies even if there is no quark interaction. Furthermore, with the switch of the strong interaction among quarks, these quantities will increase respectively to some further extents with αc increase. Taking αc = 0.47 as an example, the temperature, the neutrino abundance and the total neutrino energies are further raised by about 10%, 7%, and 20% respectively, which is weakly dependent on the initial temperature. Combining the effect of the current quark mass and the effect of the quark strong interaction, the results of the conversions will greatly enhance the probability of success for a supernova explosion and deeply influence the dynamics of the supernova evolution.

  2. Interactive Effect of Air-Water Ratio and Temperature on the Air ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Windows User

    KEYWORDS: Interactive effect, air-water ratio, temperature, volatile organic ... VOCs removal from wastewater by increasing the surface ... surface area (m2). ... where α and n are constants, DL is liquid diffusion coefficient .... Packing volume.

  3. Interactivity effects in social media marketing on brand engagement: an investigation of underlying mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antheunis, M.L.; van Noort, G.; Eisend, M.; Langner, T.

    2011-01-01

    Although, SNS advertising spending increases, research on SNS campaigning is still underexposed. First, this study aims to investigate the effect of SNS campaign interactivity on the receivers brand engagement, taking four underlying mechanisms into account (brand identification, campaign divergence

  4. The effect of interaction between Lipoprotein Lipase and ApoVLDL-II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of interaction between Lipoprotein Lipase and ApoVLDL-II genes on fat and serum biochemical levels. ... Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in apoVLDL-II and lipoprotein lipase genes was screened by ... Article Metrics.

  5. The Effect of Interactivity with a Music Video Game on Second Language Vocabulary Recall

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    deHaan, Jonathan; Reed, W. Michael; Kuwada, Katsuko

    2010-01-01

    Video games are potential sources of second language input; however, the medium’s fundamental characteristic, interactivity, has not been thoroughly examined in terms of its effect on learning outcomes...

  6. Interactions of phenolic compounds with globular proteins and their effects on food-related functional properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prigent, S.V.E.

    2005-01-01

    In order to modulate the functional properties of food proteins, the interactions between globular proteins and the monomeric phenolic, caffeoylquinic acid (CQA, chlorogenic acid), and the oligomeric phenolics, procyanidins, were characterized and investigated for their effect on protein functional

  7. Interactivity effects in social media marketing on brand engagement: an investigation of underlying mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antheunis, M.L.; van Noort, G.; Eisend, M.; Langner, T.

    2011-01-01

    Although, SNS advertising spending increases, research on SNS campaigning is still underexposed. First, this study aims to investigate the effect of SNS campaign interactivity on the receivers brand engagement, taking four underlying mechanisms into account (brand identification, campaign

  8. Unbalanced 2 x 2 factorial designs and the interaction effect: a troublesome combination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes A Landsheer

    Full Text Available In this power study, ANOVAs of unbalanced and balanced 2 x 2 datasets are compared (N = 120. Datasets are created under the assumption that H1 of the effects is true. The effects are constructed in two ways, assuming: 1. contributions to the effects solely in the treatment groups; 2. contrasting contributions in treatment and control groups. The main question is whether the two ANOVA correction methods for imbalance (applying Sums of Squares Type II or III; SS II or SS III offer satisfactory power in the presence of an interaction. Overall, SS II showed higher power, but results varied strongly. When compared to a balanced dataset, for some unbalanced datasets the rejection rate of H0 of main effects was undesirably higher. SS III showed consistently somewhat lower power. When the effects were constructed with equal contributions from control and treatment groups, the interaction could be re-estimated satisfactorily. When an interaction was present, SS III led consistently to somewhat lower rejection rates of H0 of main effects, compared to the rejection rates found in equivalent balanced datasets, while SS II produced strongly varying results. In data constructed with only effects in the treatment groups and no effects in the control groups, the H0 of moderate and strong interaction effects was often not rejected and SS II seemed applicable. Even then, SS III provided slightly better results when a true interaction was present. ANOVA allowed not always for a satisfactory re-estimation of the unique interaction effect. Yet, SS II worked better only when an interaction effect could be excluded, whereas SS III results were just marginally worse in that case. Overall, SS III provided consistently 1 to 5% lower rejection rates of H0 in comparison with analyses of balanced datasets, while results of SS II varied too widely for general application.

  9. Effect of citric acid on noncovalent interactions in biopolymer jellies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuanyzhbek Musabekov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of citric acid on the formation of gels based on gelatine, melon pulp and sugar has been studied. It is found that the structuring of gelatin the presence of melon pulp is due to hydrogen bonds between the amino acids of gelatin and pectin melon by hydrogen bonds. It is shown that the structuring of gelatin and gelatin – melon pulp depends on the concentration of sugar. The addition of acid in the pectin-gelatin composition reduces the pH, the solubility of pectin and accelerates the formation of jelly. This is due to the fact that in the presence of citric acid reduced the degree of dissociation of galacturonic acid. The intensity of the effect of citric acid on the structure in the presence of melon pulp could be explained by the formation of hydrogen bonds between pectin and citric acid.

  10. Interaction of 4-rotational gauge field with orbital moment, gravi-diamagnetic effect and orbit experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Babourova, Olga V

    2010-01-01

    A direct interaction of the 4-rotational (Lorentzian) gauge field with the angular orbital momentum of an external field is considered. This interaction appears in a new Poincar\\'{e} gauge theory of gravitation, in which tetrads are not true gauge fields, but represent to be some functions of the translational and 4-rotational gauge fields. The given interaction leads to a new effect: the existence of an electronic orbits precession under the action of an intensive external gravitational field (gravi-diamagnetic effect), and also substantiates the existence of the direct interaction of the proper angular momentum of a gyroscope with the torsion field, which theoretically can be generated by the rotational angular momentum of the planet the Earth. The latter interaction can be detected by the experiment "Gravity Probe B" (GP-B) on a satellite orbit

  11. Spin-spin interaction effect in 2D Extended Hubbard Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouhair, A.; Harir, S.; Bennai, M.; Boughaleb, Y.

    2014-09-01

    Using an exact diagonlization for finite square lattice and taking into account the periodic boundary conditions in the two directions, we study the spin-spin interaction effect on some local electronic properties for antiferromagnetic correlated electrons system. We have considered an Extended Hubbard Model (EHM) including on-site coulomb interaction energy U and spin-spin interaction term J. The diagonlization of this 2D EHM model allows us to study J effect on some local properties for finite square lattice. The analysis of the obtained results shows that the introduction of spin-spin interaction induces a supplementary conductivity for antiferromagnetic correlated electrons system, even in the strong on-site interaction regime.

  12. Consideration of pavement roughness effects on vehicle-pavement interaction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Steyn, WJvdM

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available and AT VISSER* CSIR Transportek, PO Box 395, Pretoria, 0001 *University of Pretoria, Department of Civil Engineering, Pretoria, 0002 ABSTRACT Current mechanistic pavement design and analysis techniques use several simplifications to enable... the process to be practical and cost-effective. These include equivalent vehicle loads, linear elastic analysis and static vehicle load and pavement response analysis. These simplifications allow the process of pavement design and analysis to be applied...

  13. EFFECT OF BACKPACKING ON STRUCTURE-MEDIUM INTERACTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A soft crushable layer of material used as ’ backpacking ’ was placed between a buried structure and the surrounding granular soil. Its effect on the... backpacking and the size of the buried structure. Small rigid cylindrical structures were used in laboratory and field tests. The results show the measured...pressures, velocities, and accelerations transmitted through the backpacking . The transmitted pressure was found to be a function of yield-point stress

  14. Quasi-particles and effective mean field in strongly interacting matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levai, P. [MTA KFKI RMKI, POB 49., Budapest 114, 1525 (Hungary); Cyclotron Institute and Physics Department, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Ko, C.M. [Cyclotron Institute and Physics Department, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2010-03-01

    We introduce a quasi-particle model of strongly interacting quark-gluon matter and explore the possible connection to an effective field theoretical description consisting of a scalar sigma field by introducing a dynamically generated mass, M(sigma), and a self-consistently determined interaction term, B(sigma). We display a possible connection between the two types of effective description, using the Friedberg-Lee model.

  15. Quasi-particles and effective mean field in strongly interacting matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévai, P.; Ko, C. M.

    2010-03-01

    We introduce a quasi-particle model of strongly interacting quark-gluon matter and explore the possible connection to an effective field theoretical description consisting of a scalar σ field by introducing a dynamically generated mass, M(σ), and a self-consistently determined interaction term, B(σ). We display a possible connection between the two types of effective description, using the Friedberg-Lee model.

  16. Effects of a general set of interactions on neutrino propagation in matter

    CERN Document Server

    Nardi, E

    2000-01-01

    This talk is based on the article hep-ph/9903517 written in collaborationwith Sven Bergmann and Yuval Grossman. An analysis of the effective potentialfor neutrino propagation in matter, assuming a generic set of Lorentz invariantnon-derivative interactions is presented. In addition to vector and axialvector couplings, also tensor interactions can give coherent effects if themedium is polarized, and the components of a tensor potential transverse to thedirection of neutrino propagation can induce a neutrino spin-flip.

  17. Higher order effective interactions and effective bosonized model for 2-N particle states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braghin Fabio L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, an effective fermion model with particular higher order interactions given by: III=∑nNg2n(ψ¯aψa2n${I_{II}} = \\mathop \\sum \\limits_n^N g{2^n}{({\\bar \\psi _a}{\\psi _a}^{{2^n}}}$, for finite N, is investigated by means of the auxiliary field method by taking into account 2n-particle states as proposed in Ref. [1]. The bosonized model was found to exhibit an approximate symmetry when expanded for weak field fluctuations around the mean field solutions. In the present work, the role of the mean field solutions for the corresponding auxiliary fields is investigated. With the integration of fermions, the resulting determinant is expanded in a polynomial boson model in the weak field approximation and the approximate symmetry found for this series does not appear if the boson mean fields are considered to be zero.

  18. Effects of interactions on the radio properties of non-Seyfert galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giuricin, G.; Mardirossian, F.; Mezzetti, M. (Trieste Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Astronomia Centro Interuniversitario Regionale per l' Astrofisica a la Cosmologia (CIRAC), Trieste (Italy)); Bertotti, G. (Center for Advanced Research in Space Optics, Trieste (Italy))

    1990-12-01

    On the basis of radiosurveys published in the literature we have compared the radio properties of samples of relatively isolated spiral galaxies with LINER- and H II-region-like nuclei (hereafter called L and H galaxies) with corresponding samples of non-Seyfert interacting galaxies, in order to explore the effects of interactions on their radio properties. Our statistical study reveals basic structural differences between the radio properties of the L, H and Seyfert galaxies, and between the effects of interactions on the radio properties of the three classes of galaxies. (author).

  19. Nonlocal plasticity effects on interaction of different size voids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2004-01-01

    A nonlocal elastic-plastic material model is used to show that the rate of void growth is significantly reduced when the voids are small enough to be comparable with a characteristic material length. For a very small void in the material between much larger voids the competition between...... an increased growth rate due to the stress concentrations around the larger voids and a reduced growth rate due to the nonlocal effects is studied. The analyses are based on an axisymmetric unit cell model with special boundary conditions, which allow for a relatively simple investigation of a full three...

  20. Unraveling Uses and Effects of an Interactive Health Communication System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jeong Yeob; Hawkins, Robert P.; Shaw, Bret R.; Pingree, Suzanne; McTavish, Fiona; Gustafson, David H.

    2012-01-01

    By developing a number of measures distinguishing amount, type of content, and when and how that content is used, the current study revealed effective patterns of use that are associated with quality of life benefits during an eHealth intervention. Results generally suggest that the benefits depend on how a patient uses the system, far more than on sheer amount of exposure or even what type of content is chosen. The next generation of eHealth system should focus on providing new and varying content over time, but even more on encouraging intensity of use and long-term commitment to the system. PMID:23172985

  1. Vitamin D-Prostaglandin Interactions and Effects in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    Toro F, Schwartz Z. Differential regulation of growth plate chondrocytes by 1a, 25 -( OH ) 2D3 and 24R, 25 -( OH ) 2D3 involves cell- maturation-specific...vitamin D3 (rapid effects) and 24R, 25 ( OH )2-vitamin D3. Mol Cell Endocrinol 2002;197: 1 –13. 48. Hata AN, Breyer RM. Pharmacology and signaling of...Chemoprevention & Cancer Treatment: Is there a role for vitamin D, 1α, 25 ( OH )2-vitamin D3 or new analogs (deltanoids)", in November, 2004 in Bethesda

  2. Interacting effects of syllable and phrase position on consonant articulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Dani; Lee, Sungbok; Riggs, Daylen; Adams, Jason

    2005-12-01

    The complexities of how prosodic structure, both at the phrasal and syllable levels, shapes speech production have begun to be illuminated through studies of articulatory behavior. The present study contributes to an understanding of prosodic signatures on articulation by examining the joint effects of phrasal and syllable position on the production of consonants. Articulatory kinematic data were collected for five subjects using electromagnetic articulography (EMA) to record target consonants (labial, labiodental, and tongue tip), located in (1) either syllable final or initial position and (2) either at a phrase edge or phrase medially. Spatial and temporal characteristics of the consonantal constriction formation and release were determined based on kinematic landmarks in the articulator velocity profiles. The results indicate that syllable and phrasal position consistently affect the movement duration; however, effects on displacement were more variable. For most subjects, the boundary-adjacent portions of the movement (constriction release for a preboundary coda and constriction formation for a postboundary onset) are not differentially affected in terms of phrasal lengthening-both lengthen comparably.

  3. Wake interaction effects on the transition process on turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, R. W.; Lagraff, J. E.

    1987-10-01

    The characterization of the nozzle guide vane inlet and exit conditions in the Oxford University Isentropic Light Piston Tunnel fully 3-D annular rotating stage has been undertaken. Measurements included hot wire anemometry and pressure/Mach number distributions. Preparations for the rotor heat transfer instrumentation/data acquisition hardware and software are also in progress. Further development of a numerical model to predict the effects of wake passing and transition is reported. The convection of the wake through the passage is predicted, allowing for estimations of the expected times for which the boundary layer is disturbed by the wake fluid. The new model for the random generation and subsequent growth and convection of the turbulent spots produces a time-resolved prediction of the intermittent heat transfer signals by use of a time-marching procedure. By superimposing the two numerical models it is possible to simulate the measured instantaneous heat transfer characteristics and to estimate the effective average intermittency along the blade surface and compare the results to the measured intermittency values.

  4. Dimensional Effects on Densities of States and Interactions in Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dick Rainer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We consider electrons in the presence of interfaces with different effective electron mass, and electromagnetic fields in the presence of a high-permittivity interface in bulk material. The equations of motion for these dimensionally hybrid systems yield analytic expressions for Green’s functions and electromagnetic potentials that interpolate between the two-dimensional logarithmic potential at short distance, and the three-dimensional r−1 potential at large distance. This also yields results for electron densities of states which interpolate between the well-known two-dimensional and three-dimensional formulas. The transition length scales for interfaces of thickness L are found to be of order Lm/2m* for an interface in which electrons move with effective mass m*, and for a dielectric thin film with permittivity in a bulk of permittivity . We can easily test the merits of the formalism by comparing the calculated electromagnetic potential with the infinite series solutions from image charges. This confirms that the dimensionally hybrid models are excellent approximations for distances r ≳ L/2.

  5. Dimensional Effects on Densities of States and Interactions in Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Rainer

    2010-10-01

    We consider electrons in the presence of interfaces with different effective electron mass, and electromagnetic fields in the presence of a high-permittivity interface in bulk material. The equations of motion for these dimensionally hybrid systems yield analytic expressions for Green's functions and electromagnetic potentials that interpolate between the two-dimensional logarithmic potential at short distance, and the three-dimensional r(-1) potential at large distance. This also yields results for electron densities of states which interpolate between the well-known two-dimensional and three-dimensional formulas. The transition length scales for interfaces of thickness L are found to be of order Lm/2m(*) for an interface in which electrons move with effective mass m(*), and Lϵ(*)/2ϵ for a dielectric thin film with permittivity ϵ(*) in a bulk of permittivity ϵ. We can easily test the merits of the formalism by comparing the calculated electromagnetic potential with the infinite series solutions from image charges. This confirms that the dimensionally hybrid models are excellent approximations for distances r ≳ L/2.

  6. Assessment of seismic wave effects on soil-structure interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernreuter, D.L.

    1977-03-01

    It is normally assumed in the seismic analysis of structures that the free-field motion which is used as input is the same for all points on a given level beneath the foundation mat. This represents a simplification, as not all particles of soil describe the same motion simultaneously. As the foundation mat of the structure is rigid in the horizontal direction, it will tend to average the ground motion. Abandoning the assumption of the uniformity of the input motion may lead to a reduction of the translational motion which a foundation mat will experience, as the displacement components will cancel each other to a certain extent. This is of considerable interest for the design of nuclear power plants which are very stiff, large structures. To investigate these effects, the extremely complex phenomenon of the passage of a seismic wave has to be simplified considerably. It is the purpose of this paper to determine if wave passage effects can be determined from the simplified analyses currently used.

  7. Quantitative analysis of TALE-DNA interactions suggests polarity effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckler, Joshua F; Bhakta, Mital S; Kim, Moon-Soo; Ovadia, Robert; Habrian, Chris H; Zykovich, Artem; Yu, Abigail; Lockwood, Sarah H; Morbitzer, Robert; Elsäesser, Janett; Lahaye, Thomas; Segal, David J; Baldwin, Enoch P

    2013-04-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) have revolutionized the field of genome engineering. We present here a systematic assessment of TALE DNA recognition, using quantitative electrophoretic mobility shift assays and reporter gene activation assays. Within TALE proteins, tandem 34-amino acid repeats recognize one base pair each and direct sequence-specific DNA binding through repeat variable di-residues (RVDs). We found that RVD choice can affect affinity by four orders of magnitude, with the relative RVD contribution in the order NG > HD ≈ NN > NI > NK. The NN repeat preferred the base G over A, whereas the NK repeat bound G with 10(3)-fold lower affinity. We compared AvrBs3, a naturally occurring TALE that recognizes its target using some atypical RVD-base combinations, with a designed TALE that precisely matches 'standard' RVDs with the target bases. This comparison revealed unexpected differences in sensitivity to substitutions of the invariant 5'-T. Another surprising observation was that base mismatches at the 5' end of the target site had more disruptive effects on affinity than those at the 3' end, particularly in designed TALEs. These results provide evidence that TALE-DNA recognition exhibits a hitherto un-described polarity effect, in which the N-terminal repeats contribute more to affinity than C-terminal ones.

  8. Meta-analysis of the effects of forest fragmentation on interspecific interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrach, Ainhoa; Laurance, William F; Larrinaga, Asier R; Santamaria, Luis

    2014-10-01

    Forest fragmentation dramatically alters species persistence and distribution and affects many ecological interactions among species. Recent studies suggest that mutualisms, such as pollination and seed dispersal, are more sensitive to the negative effects of forest fragmentation than antagonisms, such as predation or herbivory. We applied meta-analytical techniques to evaluate this hypothesis and quantified the relative contributions of different components of the fragmentation process (decreases in fragment size, edge effects, increased isolation, and habitat degradation) to the overall effect. The effects of fragmentation on mutualisms were primarily driven by habitat degradation, edge effects, and fragment isolation, and, as predicted, they were consistently more negative on mutualisms than on antagonisms. For the most studied interaction type, seed dispersal, only certain components of fragmentation had significant (edge effects) or marginally significant (fragment size) effects. Seed size modulated the effect of fragmentation: species with large seeds showed stronger negative impacts of fragmentation via reduced dispersal rates. Our results reveal that different components of the habitat fragmentation process have varying impacts on key mutualisms. We also conclude that antagonistic interactions have been understudied in fragmented landscapes, most of the research has concentrated on particular types of mutualistic interactions such as seed dispersal, and that available studies of interspecific interactions have a strong geographical bias (arising mostly from studies carried out in Brazil, Chile, and the United States). © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  9. Effects of radiation on direct-drive laser target interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombant, D. G.

    1999-11-01

    Radiation may be useful for reducing laser imprint and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) growth in direct-drive target pellets. We will discuss the important role of radiation in a proposed direct-drive X-ray preheated target concept(S.Bodner et al., Phys. Plasmas 5,1901(1998)). In this design, a high-Z coating surrounds a thin plastic coat, over a DT-wicked foam and on top of the DT fuel. Radiation effects will be examined and discussed in the context of this design. The soft X-ray radiation emitted during the foot of the laser pulse - at a few 10^12W/cm^2- preheats the foam ablator which contributes to the reduction of the RT instability. The ablator also stops the radiation, allowing the fuel to stay on a low adiabat. Radiation in the blow-off corona of the target establishes a long scalelength plasma. This separates the ablation region from the laser absorption region where the remaining defects in laser uniformity/pellet surface finish constitute the seed for hydrodynamic instabilities. However, when the pulse intensity rises, the pressure generated by the laser in combination with the changing opacity of the plasma causes the plasma to be pushed back toward the ablator. This is called a Radiative Plasma Structure (RPS)(J.Dahlburg et al., J.Q.S.R.T. 54,113(1995)). These RPS's are a potential problem because they may carry with them the imprint which was present in the low-density corona. We will show and discuss these various effects, as well as some of the experimental work(C.Pawley et al., this conference) under way in connection with this program. These experiments are essential in order to validate both the design concepts and the numerical models, which include on-line state-of-the-art atomic physics modeling(M.Klapisch et al.,Phys. Plasmas 5,1919(1998)).

  10. Effect of monosaccharides and ethyleneglycol on the interaction between Escherichia coli bacteria and Octyl-Sepharose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohman, L; Magnusson, K E; Stendahl, O

    1985-04-01

    Combined effects of monosaccharides and reduced surface tension of the medium were studied in relation to the hydrophobic binding of Escherichia coli bacteria, with and without mannose-specific structures. Hydrophobic binding was analyzed by hydrophobic interaction chromatography on Octyl-Sepharose. The results showed that ethyleneglycol, as well as mannose, reduced the hydrophobic interaction of the bacteria with mannose-specific structures. This effect was potentiated by combining ethyleneglycol and mannose. No other monosaccharides tested (galactose and fucose) had any effect on the hydrophobic interaction of bacteria with mannose-specific structures. These results further strengthen the hypothesis that the mannose-specific interaction of Escherichia coli bacteria is, at least in part, mediated by hydrophobic forces.

  11. Competitive effects of nuclear deformation and density dependence of $\\Lambda\\!N$ interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Isaka, M; Rijken, T h A

    2016-01-01

    Competitive effects of nuclear deformation and density dependence of $\\Lambda\\!N$-interaction in $\\Lambda$ binding energies $B_\\Lambda$ of hypernuclei are studied systematically on the basis of the baryon-baryon interaction model ESC including many-body effects. By using the $\\Lambda\\!N$ G-matrix interaction derived from ESC, we perform microscopic calculations of $B_\\Lambda$ in $\\Lambda$ hypernuclei within the framework of the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics under the averaged-density approximation. The calculated values of $B_\\Lambda$ reproduce experimental data within a few hundred keV in the wide mass regions from 9 to 51. It is found that competitive effects of nuclear deformation and density dependence of $\\Lambda\\!N$-interaction work decisively for fine tuning of $B_\\Lambda$ values.

  12. Evolution in response to social selection: the importance of interactive effects of traits on fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westneat, David F

    2012-03-01

    Social interactions have a powerful effect on the evolutionary process. Recent attempts to synthesize models of social selection with equations for indirect genetic effects (McGlothlin et al. 2010) provide a broad theoretical base from which to study selection and evolutionary response in the context of social interactions. However, this framework concludes that social selection will lead to evolution only if the traits carried by social partners are nonrandomly associated. I suggest this conclusion is incomplete, and that traits that do not covary between social partners can nevertheless lead to evolution via interactive effects on fitness. Such effects occur when there are functional interactions between traits, and as an example I use the interplay in water striders (Gerridae) between grasping appendages carried by males and spines by females. Functional interactive effects between traits can be incorporated into both the equations for social selection and the general model of social evolution proposed by McGlothlin et al. These expanded equations would accommodate adaptive coevolution in social interactions, integrate the quantitative genetic approach to social evolution with game theoretical approaches, and stimulate some new questions about the process of social evolution.

  13. Isospin Effect of Coulomb Interaction on Momentum Dissipation in Intermediate Energy Heavy Ion Collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-Ye; GUO Wen-Jun; XING Yong-Zhong; Li Xi-Guo

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the isospin effect of Coulomb interaction on the momentum dissipation or nuclear stopping in the intermediate energy heavy ion collisions by using the isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model. The calculated results show that the Coulomb interaction induces obviously the reductions of the momentum dissipation. We also find that the variation amplitude of momentum dissipation induced by the Coulomb interaction depends sensitively on the form and strength of symmetry potential. However, the isospin effect of Coulomb interaction on the momentum dissipation is less than that induced by the in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross section.In this case, Coulomb interaction does not change obviously the isospin effect of momentum dissipation induced by the in-medium two-body collision. In particular, the Coulomb interaction is preferable for standing up the isospin effect of in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross section on the momentum dissipation and reducing the isospin effect of symmetry potential on it, which is important for obtaining the feature about the sensitive dependence of momentum dissipation on the in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross section and weakly on the symmetry potential.

  14. Differential orientation effect in the neural response to interacting biological motion of two agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kakigi Ryusuke

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recent behavioral study demonstrated that the meaningful interaction of two agents enhances the detection sensitivity of biological motion (BM, however, it remains unclear when and how the 'interaction' information of two agents is represented in our neural system. To clarify this point, we used magnetoencephalography and introduced a novel experimental technique to extract a neuromagnetic response relating to two-agent BM perception. We then investigated how this response was modulated by the interaction of two agents. In the present experiment, we presented two kinds of visual stimuli (interacting and non-interacting BM with two orientations (upright and inverted. Results We found a neuromagnetic response in the bilateral occipitotemporal region, on average 300 – 400 ms after the onset of a two-agent BM stimulus. This result showed that interhemispheric differences were apparent for the peak amplitudes. For the left hemisphere, the orientation effect was manifest when the two agents were made to interact, and the interaction effect was manifest when the stimulus was inverted. In the right hemisphere, the main effects of both orientation and interaction were significant, suggesting that the peak amplitude was attenuated when the visual stimulus was inverted or made to interact. Conclusion These results demonstrate that the 'interaction' information of two agents can affect the neural activities in the bilateral occipitotemporal region, on average 300 – 400 ms after the onset of a two-agent BM stimulus, however, the modulation was different between hemispheres: the left hemisphere is more concerned with dynamics, whereas the right hemisphere is more concerned with form information.

  15. Directly probing the effect of strain on magnetic exchange interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorr, Kathrin

    2012-02-01

    Thin films of transition metal oxides of the perovskite type ABO3 (B = 3d or 4d metal) have revealed abundant examples for strain-driven changes of magnetic ordering. One most popular is the strain-induced ferromagnetic ferroelectric state of otherwise antiferromagnetic paraelectric EuTiO3. Another promising example is the strain control of orbital occupation and magnetic coupling at oxide interfaces of SrRuO3 with manganites. In spite of strong efforts, the theoretical treatment of magnetic exchange in complex oxides has remained a challenge, and experiments continue to show unpredicted / unexplained large effects of the epitaxial strains in films. In order to provide meaningful experimental data on strain dependences, epitaxial thin films should be grown in various coherent strain states on different substrates without changing anything but the strain. This is inherently difficult: possible problems may arise from a strain-dependent oxidation level or microstructure. As a complementary approach, the in-plane strain of epitaxial oxide films can be controlled reversibly using a piezoelectric substrate, even though the accessible reversible strain of 0.1 -- 0.2% is an order of magnitude smaller. In my talk, I will address reversible-strain studies on La0.7Sr0.3MnO3, La1-xSrxCoO3 (x = 0, 0.2, 0.3) und SrRuO3 films, showing the strain response of the magnetic Curie temperature, the magnetization and the electrical resistance and discussing the current understanding of the strain effects on magnetic ordering. In La0.8Sr0.2CoO3, a strain-driven phase transition between ferromagnetic and spin-glass-like could be established by combining the piezoelectric substrate with a tuned buffer system providing varied as-grown strain states. In SrRuO3, a tetragonal tensile strain state shows a suppression of the ordered magnetic moment. Lattice parameters and symmetries of the films were determined by x-ray diffraction. It is noted that the atomic displacements (bond lengths and

  16. Direct and interactive effects of enemies and mutualists on plant performance: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, William F; Hufbauer, Ruth A; Agrawal, Anurag A; Bever, James D; Borowicz, Victoria A; Gilbert, Gregory S; Maron, John L; Mitchell, Charles E; Parker, Ingrid M; Power, Alison G; Torchin, Mark E; Vázquez, Diego P

    2007-04-01

    Plants engage in multiple, simultaneous interactions with other species; some (enemies) reduce and others (mutualists) enhance plant performance. Moreover, effects of different species may not be independent of one another; for example, enemies may compete, reducing their negative impact on a plant. The magnitudes of positive and negative effects, as well as the frequency of interactive effects and whether they tend to enhance or depress plant performance, have never been comprehensively assessed across the many published studies on plant-enemy and plant-mutualist interactions. We performed a meta-analysis of experiments in which two enemies, two mutualists, or an enemy and a mutualist were manipulated factorially. Specifically, we performed a factorial meta-analysis using the log response ratio. We found that the magnitude of (negative) enemy effects was greater than that of (positive) mutualist effects in isolation, but in the presence of other species, the two effects were of comparable magnitude. Hence studies evaluating single-species effects of mutualists may underestimate the true effects found in natural settings, where multiple interactions are the norm and indirect effects are possible. Enemies did not on average influence the effects on plant performance of other enemies, nor did mutualists influence the effects of mutualists. However, these averages mask significant and large, but positive or negative, interactions in individual studies. In contrast, mutualists ameliorated the negative effects of enemies in a manner that benefited plants; this overall effect was driven by interactions between pathogens and belowground mutualists (bacteria and mycorrhizal fungi). The high frequency of significant interactive effects suggests a widespread potential for diffuse rather than pairwise coevolutionary interactions between plants and their enemies and mutualists. Pollinators and mycorrhizal fungi enhanced plant performance more than did bacterial mutualists. In

  17. Comparison of the effective interaction to various orders in different mass regions

    CERN Document Server

    Hjorth-Jensen, M; Polls, A; Osnes, E

    1995-01-01

    The convergence of the perturbation expansion for the effective interaction to be used in shell-model calculations is investigated as function of the mass number A, from A=4 to A=208. As the mass number increases, there are more intermediate states to sum over in each higher-order diagram which contributes to the effective interaction. Together with the fact that the energy denominators in each diagram are smaller for larger mass numbers, these two effects could largely enhance higher-order contributions to the effective interaction, thereby deteriorating the order-by-order convergence of the effective interaction. This effect is counterbalanced by the short range of the nucleon-nucleon interaction, which implies that its matrix elements are weaker for valence single-particle states in ``large'' nuclei with large mass number as compared to those in light nuclei. These effects are examined by comparing various mean values of the matrix elements. It turns out that the contributions from higher-order terms remai...

  18. Effects of Ocean Ecosystem on Marine Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Meskhidze

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Using satellite data for the surface ocean, aerosol optical depth (AOD, and cloud microphysical parameters, we show that statistically significant positive correlations exist between ocean ecosystem productivity, the abundance of submicron aerosols, and cloud microphysical properties over different parts of the remote oceans. The correlation coefficient for remotely sensed surface chlorophyll a concentration ([Chl-a] and liquid cloud effective radii over productive areas of the oceans varies between −0.2 and −0.6. Special attention is given to identifying (and addressing problems from correlation analysis used in the previous studies that can lead to erroneous conclusions. A new approach (using the difference between retrieved AOD and predicted sea salt aerosol optical depth, AODdiff is developed to explore causal links between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN in the remote marine atmosphere. We have found that over multiple time periods, 550 nm AODdiff (sensitive to accumulation mode aerosol, which is the prime contributor to CCN correlates well with [Chl-a] over the productive waters of the Southern Ocean. Since [Chl-a] can be used as a proxy of ocean biological productivity, our analysis demonstrates the role of ocean ecology in contributing CCN, thus shaping the microphysical properties of low-level marine clouds.

  19. Effect of Protein Supercharging on Interaction with Polyelectrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Bradley; Obermeyer, Allie; Mills, Carolyn; Dong, Xuehui

    Complexation of proteins with polyelectrolytes can lead to a liquid-liquid phase separation to generate a viscous complex coacervate phase rich in protein and polyelectrolyte. However, many proteins do not readily coacervate at conditions near neutral pH and physiological ionic strength. Here, protein supercharging is used to systematically explore the effect of protein charge on the complex coacervation with polycations. Four model proteins were chemically modified to generate a panel of proteins with varying surface charge, with both the average charge and charge distribution quantified by mass spectrometry. Proteins phase separated with the qP4VP and qPDMAEMA polycations when the ratio of negatively charged residues to positively charged residues was greater than 1.1-1.2. Efficient partitioning of the protein into the coacervate phase required larger charge ratio (1.5-2.0). The model proteins were also encapsulated in complex coacervate core micelles. Dynamic light scattering was used to assess the formation of micelles with POEGMA- b-qP4VP and revealed micellar hydrodynamic radii of approximately 25-30 nm. Small angle neutron scattering and transmission electron microscopy were used to confirm the formation of spherical micelles.

  20. COMT-by-Sex Interaction Effect on Psychosis Proneness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta de Castro-Catala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizotypy phenotypes in the general population share etiopathogenic mechanisms and risk factors with schizophrenia, supporting the notion of psychosis as a continuum ranging from nonclinical to clinical deviance. Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT is a candidate susceptibility gene for schizophrenia that is involved in the regulation of dopamine in the prefrontal cortex. Several recent studies have reported a sex difference in the impact of COMT genotype on psychiatric and cognitive phenotypes and personality traits. The present study investigated the association of COMT Val158Met (rs4680 with psychometric positive and negative schizotypy and psychotic experiences in a sample of 808 nonclinical young adults. The main finding was that sex moderates the association of COMT genotype with the negative dimension of both schizotypy and psychotic experiences. Male subjects carrying the Val allele tended to score higher on the negative dimension of both trait and symptom-like measures. The results from the present study are consistent with recent work suggesting an association between negative schizotypy and diminished prefrontal dopamine availability. They support the idea that a biological differentiation underlies the positive and negative schizotypy dimensions. Additionally, these findings contribute to the growing literature on sex-specific effects of COMT on the predisposition to psychiatric disorders and personality traits.

  1. Interaction energies of CO2·amine complexes: effects of amine substituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Kameron R; Cundari, Thomas R; Wilson, Angela K

    2012-10-25

    To focus on the identification of potential alternative amine carbon capture compounds, CO(2) with methyl, silyl, and trifluoromethyl monosubstituted and disubstituted amine compounds were studied. Interaction energies of these CO(2)·amine complexes were determined via two methods: (a) an ab initio composite method, the correlation consistent composite approach (ccCA), to determine interaction energies and (b) density functional theories, B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ and B97D/aug-cc-pVTZ. Substituent effects on the interaction energies were examined by interchanging electron donating and electron withdrawing substituents on the amine compounds. The calculations suggested two different binding modes, hydrogen bonding and acid-base interactions, which arise from the modification of the amine substituents, echoing previous work by our group on modeling protein·CO(2) interactions. Recommendations have been noted for the development of improved amine scrubber complexes.

  2. Interparticle interactions effects on the magnetic order in surface of FeO4 nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, E; Vargas, J M; Rechenberg, H R; Zysler, R D

    2008-11-01

    We report interparticle interactions effects on the magnetic structure of the surface region in Fe3O4 nanoparticles. For that, we have studied a desirable system composed by Fe3O4 nanoparticles with (d) = 9.3 nm and a narrow size distribution. These particles present an interesting morphology constituted by a crystalline core and a broad (approximately 50% vol.) disordered superficial shell. Two samples were prepared with distinct concentrations of the particles: weakly-interacting particles dispersed in a polymer and strongly-dipolar-interacting particles in a powder sample. M(H, T) measurements clearly show that strong dipolar interparticle interaction modifies the magnetic structure of the structurally disordered superficial shell. Consequently, we have observed drastically distinct thermal behaviours of magnetization and susceptibility comparing weakly- and strongly-interacting samples for the temperature range 2 K hysteresis loops of the dispersed sample that is not observed in the hysteresis loops of the powder one.

  3. Sample Sizes Required to Detect Interactions between Two Binary Fixed-Effects in a Mixed-Effects Linear Regression Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Andrew C; Heo, Moonseong

    2009-01-15

    Mixed-effects linear regression models have become more widely used for analysis of repeatedly measured outcomes in clinical trials over the past decade. There are formulae and tables for estimating sample sizes required to detect the main effects of treatment and the treatment by time interactions for those models. A formula is proposed to estimate the sample size required to detect an interaction between two binary variables in a factorial design with repeated measures of a continuous outcome. The formula is based, in part, on the fact that the variance of an interaction is fourfold that of the main effect. A simulation study examines the statistical power associated with the resulting sample sizes in a mixed-effects linear regression model with a random intercept. The simulation varies the magnitude (Δ) of the standardized main effects and interactions, the intraclass correlation coefficient (ρ ), and the number (k) of repeated measures within-subject. The results of the simulation study verify that the sample size required to detect a 2 × 2 interaction in a mixed-effects linear regression model is fourfold that to detect a main effect of the same magnitude.

  4. Heat tolerance predicts the importance of species interaction effects as the climate changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Sarah E; Chick, Lacy; Penick, Clint A; Nichols, Lauren M; Cahan, Sara Helms; Dunn, Robert R; Ellison, Aaron M; Sanders, Nathan J; Gotelli, Nicholas J

    2017-07-01

    Few studies have quantified the relative importance of direct effects of climate change on communities versus indirect effects that are mediated thorough species interactions, and the limited evidence is conflicting. Trait-based approaches have been popular in studies of climate change, but can they be used to estimate direct versus indirect effects? At the species level, thermal tolerance is a trait that is often used to predict winners and losers under scenarios of climate change. But thermal tolerance might also inform when species interactions are likely to be important because only subsets of species will be able to exploit the available warmer climatic niche space, and competition may intensify in the remaining, compressed cooler climatic niche space. Here, we explore the relative roles of the direct effects of temperature change and indirect effects of species interactions on forest ant communities that were heated as part of a large-scale climate manipulation at high- and low-latitude sites in eastern North America. Overall, we found mixed support for the importance of negative species interactions (competition), but found that the magnitude of these interaction effects was predictable based on the heat tolerance of the focal species. Forager abundance and nest site occupancy of heat-intolerant species were more often influenced by negative interactions with other species than by direct effects of temperature. Our findings suggest that measures of species-specific heat tolerance may roughly predict when species interactions will influence responses to global climate change. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. When trying to understand detracts from trying to behave: effects of perspective taking in intergroup interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorauer, Jacquie D; Martens, Verena; Sasaki, Stacey J

    2009-04-01

    Four studies demonstrate that perspective taking can backfire in intergroup interaction, leading lower prejudice individuals to treat an outgroup member less positively than they do when they adopt alternative mind-sets; for higher prejudice individuals, perspective taking instead had a positive, albeit less consistent, effect on behavior. The net result was behavior disruption, whereby individuals' treatment of an outgroup member became incongruent with their inner attitudes. This disruption effect was evident for cognitive and affective forms of perspective taking, in ostensible and real face-to-face intergroup interactions, and for feelings of happiness experienced by individuals' interaction partner as well as outside observers' behavior assessments. Results further suggested that self-regulatory effort mediated the effect of perspective taking on intergroup interaction behavior, with the negative consequences of perspective taking for lower prejudice individuals' behavior appearing to stem from complacency rather than trying too hard. Overall, the findings reveal that perspective taking rather than self-focus accounts for the cognitive resource depletion and behavior disruption effects previously demonstrated to stem from evaluative concern in intergroup interaction and indicate that perspective taking may be more reliably helpful outside of intergroup interaction situations than within them.

  6. The interaction between constituent year and within-1-year effects in elite German youth basketball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steingröver, C; Wattie, N; Baker, J; Helsen, W F; Schorer, J

    2017-06-01

    The current state of research on relative age effects in basketball shows an uneven picture. These mixed results might be caused by the interaction of constituent year and within-year effects. Our aim was to examine constituent and within-1-year effects in elite German youth basketball. The sample (n = 4400) included players competing in the JBBL (Under-16 first division) and the NBBL (Under-19 first division) from 2011/2012 until 2013/2014. A multi-way frequency analysis revealed an interaction of constituent year effects and within-1-year effects for the JBBL, χ(2) (6, 2590) = 12.76, P year effects, χ(2) (2, n = 1810) = 25.32, P year effects for all three age bands but no interaction. The interaction between constituent year and within-1-year effects in the JBBL showed reduced within-1-year effects with increasing age. Once players enter the system in the JBBL, relatively younger players seem less likely to drop out of the system. Results offer new insight regarding how the regulations of this talent development system may influence athletes' opportunities to enter the system and their likelihood of staying at the highest levels of competition. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Collisional interactions between self-interacting non-relativistic boson stars: effective potential analysis and numerical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Cotner, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Scalar particles are a common prediction of many beyond the Standard Model theories. If they are light and cold enough, there is a possibility they may form Bose-Einstein condensates, which will then become gravitationally bound. These boson stars are solitonic solutions to the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations, but may be approximated in the non-relativistic regime with a coupled Schr\\"odinger-Poisson system. General properties of single soliton states are derived, including the possibility of quartic self-interactions. Binary collisions between two solitons are then studied, and the effects of different mass ratios, relative phases, self-couplings, and separation distances are characterized, leading to an easy conceptual understanding of how these parameters affect the collision outcome in terms of conservation of energy. Applications to dark matter are discussed.

  8. Recorded interactive seminars and follow-up discussions as an effective method for distance learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kenneth T; Hannum, Wallace M; Proffit, William R

    2011-03-01

    Previous studies have suggested that, although orthodontic residents prefer to be live and interactive in a seminar, they learn almost as much when watching a previously recorded interactive seminar and following up with live discussion. Our objective was to test the effectiveness and acceptability of using previously recorded interactive seminars and different types of live follow-up discussions. Residents at schools participating from a distance completed preseminar readings and at their convenience watched streaming video of some or all recordings of 4 interactive seminar sequences consisting of 6 seminars each. Afterward, distant residents participated in 1 of 4 types of interaction: local follow-up discussion, videoconference, teleconference, and no discussion. The effectiveness of the seminar sequences was tested by pretest and posttest scores. Acceptability was evaluated from ratings of aspects of the seminar and discussion experience. Open-ended questions allowed residents to express what they liked and to suggest changes in their experiences. In each seminar sequence, test scores of schools participating through recordings and follow-up discussions improved more than those participating live and interactive. After viewing, residents preferred local follow-up discussion, which was not statistically different from participating live and interactive both locally and from a distance. Videoconference and teleconference discussions were both more acceptable to residents than no follow-up discussion, which was found to be significantly below all methods tested. When residents are live and interactive in a seminar, there does not appear to be a significant difference between being local vs at a distance. Recorded interactive seminars with follow-up discussions are also an effective and acceptable method of distance learning. Residents preferred local follow-up discussion, but, at a distance, they preferred videoconference to both teleconference and no discussion

  9. How abusive supervisors influence employees' voice and silence: the effects of interactional justice and organizational attribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Jiang, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    In this research we investigated the influence of abusive supervision on employees' prosocial voice and silence, as well as clarified the roles of interactional justice (as a mediator) and organizational attribution (as a moderator). Moreover, we examined a mediated moderating model stipulating that interactional justice mediated the moderating effect of organizational attribution on the focal relationship. A scenario experiment was employed in Study 1, and after analyzing data from 196 employees, we found that abusive supervision influenced employees' prosocial voice and silence via interactional justice. In Study 2, data were collected from 379 employees in two waves separated by 1 week. The results not only replicated the findings of Study 1 but also indicated that organizational attribution buffered the abusive supervision-voice and silence relationship, and that interactional justice mediated this moderating effect.

  10. Retrospective analysis of main and interaction effects in genetic association studies of human complex traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Qihua; Christiansen, Lene; Brasch-Andersen, Charlotte;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The etiology of multifactorial human diseases involves complex interactions between numerous environmental factors and alleles of many genes. Efficient statistical tools are demanded in identifying the genetic and environmental variants that affect the risk of disease development....... This paper introduces a retrospective polytomous logistic regression model to measure both the main and interaction effects in genetic association studies of human discrete and continuous complex traits. In this model, combinations of genotypes at two interacting loci or of environmental exposure...... regression model can be used as a convenient tool for assessing both main and interaction effects in genetic association studies of human multifactorial diseases involving genetic and non-genetic factors as well as categorical or continuous traits....

  11. The proximate memory mechanism underlying the survival-processing effect: richness of encoding or interactive imagery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroneisen, Meike; Erdfelder, Edgar; Buchner, Axel

    2013-01-01

    Nairne and collaborators showed that assessing the relevance of words in the context of an imagined survival scenario boosts memory for these words. Although this survival-processing advantage has attracted a considerable amount of research, little is known about the proximate memory mechanism mediating this effect. Recently, Kroneisen and Erdfelder (2011) argued that it is not survival processing itself that facilitates recall but rather the richness and distinctiveness of encoding that is triggered by the survival-processing task. Alternatively, however, it is also conceivable that survival processing fosters interactive imagery, a process known to improve associative learning. To test these explanations we compared relevance-rating and interactive imagery tasks for survival and control scenarios. Results show that the survival advantage replicates in the relevance-rating condition but vanishes in the interactive imagery condition. This refutes the interactive imagery explanation and corroborates the richness-of-encoding hypothesis of the survival-processing effect.

  12. The interactive effects of PTSD, emotion regulation, and anger management strategies on female-perpetrated IPV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Rachel Kendra; Bell, Kathryn M; Lilly, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Research supports a relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration, and theory implicates emotion regulation and anger management skills as probable moderators to that relationship (Chemtob, Novaco, Hamada, Gross, & Smith, 1997). However, no study has investigated these interactive relationships with female-perpetrated physical IPV. Therefore, this study examined the interactive effects of PTSD symptoms, emotion regulation, and anger management skills on female-perpetrated physical IPV. Female community members (N = 254) completed measures of PTSD symptoms, emotion regulation strategies, anger management skills during partner conflict, and IPV perpetration. Results indicated two-way interaction effects between emotion regulation and both PTSD symptoms and negative partner attributions. In addition, PTSD symptoms, emotion regulation, and escalating strategies marginally interacted to predict female-perpetrated IPV. Implications of these results for future research and interventions are discussed.

  13. Irregular Aharonov-Bohm effect for interacting electrons in a ZnO quantum ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Tapash; Manaselyan, Aram; Barseghyan, Manuk

    2017-02-22

    The electronic states and optical transitions of a ZnO quantum ring containing few interacting electrons in an applied magnetic field are found to be very different from those in a conventional semiconductor system, such as a GaAs ring. The strong Zeeman interaction and the Coulomb interaction of the ZnO system, two important characteristics of the electron system in ZnO, exert a profound influence on the electron states and on the optical properties of the ring. In particular, our results indicate that the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect in a ZnO quantum ring strongly depends on the electron number. In fact, for two electrons in the ZnO ring, the AB oscillations become aperiodic, while for three electrons (interacting) the AB oscillations completely disappear. Therefore, unlike in conventional quantum ring topology, here the AB effect (and the resulting persistent current) can be controlled by varying the electron number.

  14. Irregular Aharonov-Bohm effect for interacting electrons in a ZnO quantum ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Tapash; Manaselyan, Aram; Barseghyan, Manuk

    2017-02-01

    The electronic states and optical transitions of a ZnO quantum ring containing few interacting electrons in an applied magnetic field are found to be very different from those in a conventional semiconductor system, such as a GaAs ring. The strong Zeeman interaction and the Coulomb interaction of the ZnO system, two important characteristics of the electron system in ZnO, exert a profound influence on the electron states and on the optical properties of the ring. In particular, our results indicate that the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect in a ZnO quantum ring strongly depends on the electron number. In fact, for two electrons in the ZnO ring, the AB oscillations become aperiodic, while for three electrons (interacting) the AB oscillations completely disappear. Therefore, unlike in conventional quantum ring topology, here the AB effect (and the resulting persistent current) can be controlled by varying the electron number.

  15. Sudden Transition between Quantum Correlation and Classical Correlation: the Effect of Interaction between Subsystems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Jun-Yan; WANG Lin-Cheng; YI Xue-Xi

    2011-01-01

    We study the quantum discord dynamics of a bipartite composite system in the presence of a dissipative environment and investigate the effect of the interaction between the two subsystems. The results show that the interaction can influence the sudden transition between the quantum correlation and the classical correlation and for the maximally mixed marginals initial states, the sudden transition regime will always exist. The entanglements are also discussed in comparison to the quantum discord in describing the quantum correlations.%@@ We study the quantum discord dynamics of a bipartite composite system in the presence of a dissipative envi- ronment and investigate the effect of the interaction between the two subsystems.The results show that the interaction can influence the sudden transition between the quantum correlation and the classical correlation and for the maximally mixed marginals initial states, the sudden transition regime will always exist.The entangle- ments are also discussed in comparison to the quantum discord in describing the quantum correlations.

  16. Generalized Poisson-Boltzmann Equation Taking into Account Ionic Interaction and Steric Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘新敏; 李航; 李睿; 田锐; 许晨阳

    2012-01-01

    Generalized Poisson l3oltzmann equation which takes into account both ionic interaction in bulk solution and steric effects of adsorbed ions has been suggested. We found that, for inorganic cations adsorption on negatively charged surface, the steric effect is not significant for surface charge density 〈 0.0032 C/dm2, while the ionic interaction is an important effect for electrolyte concentration 〉 0.15 tool/1 in bulk solution. We conclude that for most actual cases the original PB equation can give reliable result in describing inorganic cation adsorption.

  17. Interaction of graphene oxide with albumins: Effect of size, pH, and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šimšíková, M

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the interaction between graphene oxide (GO) and the biomolecules is fundamentally essential, especially for disease- and drug-related peptides and proteins. In this study, the interaction between GO and albumins (bovine serum albumin, human serum albumin, and bovine alpha-lactalbumin) has been performed by fluorescence and UV-Vis spectroscopic techniques. The fluorescence quenching mechanism between GO and aromatic acids residues with intrinsic fluorescence was determined as mainly static quenching in combination with dynamic quenching. The optimal conditions for the most effective affinity between albumins and GO have been estimated at neutral pH and room temperature. The strong impact of the size of graphene oxide on the interaction between proteins and graphene oxide has been confirmed, as well. The interaction between GO and albumins has been examined as electrostatic and hydrophobic. The electrostatic interaction was confirmed by pH effect, while the hydrophobic interaction was proved by the presence of Poloxamer188. The CD spectra of albumins exhibit decreasing helicity in the secondary structure of albumins upon the addition of GO. However, no significant changes in position and shape of characteristic negative bands have been noted. Mentioned changes indicate the successful interaction between GO and proteins, the predominantly α-helical structure of albumins has been preserved.

  18. Nonlinear thermoelectric transport in single-molecule junctions: the effect of electron-phonon interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we theoretically analyze steady-state thermoelectric transport through a single-molecule junction with a vibrating bridge. The thermally induced charge current in the system is explored using a nonequilibrium Green function formalism. We study the combined effects of Coulomb interactions between charge carriers on the bridge and electron-phonon interactions on the thermocurrent beyond the linear response regime. It is shown that electron-vibron interactions may significantly affect both the magnitude and the direction of the thermocurrent, and vibrational signatures may appear.

  19. Improving Effectiveness Of E-Learning In Maintenance Using Interactive-3D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Lobo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In aerospace and defense, training is being carried out on the web by viewing PowerPoint presentations, manuals and videos that are limited in their ability to convey information to the technician. Interactive training in the form of 3D is a more cost effective approach compared to creation of physical simulations and mockups. This paper demonstrates how training using interactive 3D simulations in e-learning achieves a reduction in the time spent in training and improves the efficiency of a trainee performing the installation or removal..Keywords: Interactive 3D, E-Learning, Training, Simulation

  20. Effects of high-order dispersions on dark-bright vector soliton propagation and interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Li; Dongning Wang

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of dark-bright vector solitons is investigated in a birefringent fiber with the high-order dispersions, and their effects on vector soliton propagation and interaction are analyzed using the numerical method. The combined role of the high-order dispersions, such as the third-order dispersion (TOD) and the fourth-order dispersion (FOD), may cause various deformation of the vector soliton and enhance interaction. These effects depend strictly on the sign of the high-order dispersions. Results indicate that the disadvantageous effects can be reduced effectively via proper mapping of the high-order dispersions.%@@ The dynamics of dark-bright vector solitons is investigated in a birefringent fiber with the high-order dispersions, and their effects on vector soliton propagation and interaction are analyzed using the numerical method.The combined role of the high-order dispersions, such as the third-order dispersion (TOD) and the fourth-order dispersion (FOD), may cause various deformation of the vector soliton and enhance interaction.These effects depend strictly on the sign of the high-order dispersions.Results indicate that the disadvantageous effects can be reduced effectively via proper mapping of the high-order dispersions.

  1. Explicit and Dynamical Chiral Symmetry Bresking in an Effective Quark-Quark Interaction Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宗红石; 吴小华; 侯丰尧; 赵恩广

    2004-01-01

    A method for obtaining the small current quark mass effect on the dressed quark propagator from an effective quark-quark interaction model is developed. Within this approach both the explicit and dynamical chiral symmetry breakings are analysed. A comparison with the previous results is given.

  2. The Effects of Persistence and Small Group Interaction during Computer-Based Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Simon

    2003-01-01

    Compared the effects of grouping sixth grade students with different levels of persistence on their ability to learn in cooperative learning groups while working at the computer. Reports results that indicated that average persisters interacted more than either high or low persisters and discusses implications for forming effective cooperative…

  3. High Element Interactivity Information during Problem Solving May Lead to Failure to Obtain the Testing Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, Wayne; Hanham, José; Sweller, John

    2015-01-01

    The testing effect occurs when learners who are tested rather than relearning material perform better on a final test than those who relearn. Based on cognitive load theory, it was predicted that the testing effect may not be obtained when the material being learned is high in element interactivity. Three experiments investigated conditions of the…

  4. Resilience of palm populations to disturbance is determined by interactive effects of fire, herbivory and harvest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mandle, Lisa; Ticktin, Tamara; Zuidema, Pieter A.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the interactive effects of multiple forms of disturbance - natural or anthropogenic - on plant population dynamics. This limits our ability to understand the drivers of these dynamics and effectively manage plant populations in the face of changing disturbance regimes. Fire,

  5. Effects produced by multi-parton interactions and color reconnection in small systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuautle, Eleazar; Ortiz, Antonio; Paić, Guy

    2016-12-01

    Multi-parton interactions and color reconnection can produce QGP-like effects in small systems, specifically, radial flow-like patterns. For pp collisions simulated with Pythia 8.212, in this work we investigate their effects on different observables like event multiplicity, event shapes and transverse momentum distributions.

  6. Environmental effects of ozone depletion and its interactions with climate change: progress report, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Effects Assessment Panel (EEAP) is one of three Panels that regularly informs the Parties (countries) to the Montreal Protocol on the effects of ozone depletion and the consequences of climate change interactions with respect to human health, animals, plants, bi...

  7. Environmental effects of ozone depletion and its interactions with climate change: progress report, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Effects Assessment Panel (EEAP) is one of three Panels that regularly informs the Parties (countries) to the Montreal Protocol on the effects of ozone depletion and the consequences of climate change interactions with respect to human health, animals, plants, bi...

  8. Interacting effects of landscape context and habitat quality on flower visiting insects in agricultural landscapes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijn, D.; Langevelde, van F.

    2006-01-01

    Landscape context and habitat quality may have pronounced effects on the diversity of flower visiting insects. We investigated whether the effects of landscape context and habitat quality on flower visiting insects interact in agricultural landscapes in the Netherlands. Landscape context was express

  9. The Reverse Modality Effect: Examining Student Learning from Interactive Computer-Based Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, Fethi A.; Crooks, Steven M.; Cheon, Jongpil; Ari, Fatih; Flores, Raymond; Kurucay, Murat; Paniukov, Dmitrii

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of modality on learning from multimedia instruction. This study utilized a factorial between-subject design to examine the effects of modality on student learning outcomes, study patterns and mental effort. An interactive computer-presented diagram was developed to teach the places of…

  10. INTERACTIVE EFFECTS OF ELEVATED CO2 AND 03 ON RICE AND FLACCA TOMATO

    Science.gov (United States)

    All atmospheric concentrations of both carbon dioxide (CO2) and ozone (03) are increasing, with potentially dramatic effects on plants. This study was conducted to determine interactive effects of CO2 and 03 on rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. IR 74) and a 'wilty' mutant of tomato (Lyco...

  11. Effects of Professional Experience and Group Interaction on Information Requested in Analyzing IT Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Constance M.; Heagy, Cynthia D.

    2008-01-01

    The authors investigated the effects of professional experience and group interaction on the information that information technology professionals and graduate accounting information system (AIS) students request when analyzing business cases related to information systems design and implementation. Understanding these effects can contribute to…

  12. Non-integer Quantum Transition, a True Non-perturbation Effect in Laser-Atom Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qi-Ren

    2007-01-01

    We show that in the quantum transition of an atom interacting with an intense laser of circular frequencyω, the energy difference between the initial and the final states of the atom is not necessarily an integer multiple of the quantum energy (h)ω. This kind of non-integer transition is a true non-perturbation effect in laser-atom interaction.

  13. Aharonov-Casher effect in exchange interactions in a Wigner crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Kindermann, Markus

    2009-03-27

    We theoretically study the effects of spin-orbit coupling on spin exchange in a low-density Wigner crystal. In addition to the familiar antiferromagnetic Heisenberg exchange, we find general anisotropic interactions in spin space if the exchange paths allowed by the crystal structure form loops in real space. In particular, it is shown that the two-electron exchange interaction can acquire ferromagnetic character.

  14. Planning Marketing-Mix Strategies in the Presence of Interaction Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Prasad A. Naik; Kalyan Raman; Russell S. Winer

    2005-01-01

    Companies spend millions of dollars on advertising to boost a brand's image and simultaneously spend millions of dollars on promotion that many believe calls attention to price and erodes brand equity. We believe this paradoxical situation exists because both advertising and promotion are necessary to compete effectively in dynamic markets. Consequently, brand managers need to account for interactions between marketing activities and interactions among competing brands. By recognizing interac...

  15. Load-Speed Interaction Effects on the Biomechanics of Backpack Load Carriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    Backpack Load Carriage DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public release, distribution unlimited This paper is part of the following report: TITLE: Soldier...1 Load-Speed Interaction Effects on the Biomechanics of Backpack Load Carriage Everett Harman, Ki-Hoon Han, and Peter Frykman U.S. Army Research...Institute of Environmental Medicine Natick, MA, 01760-5007, U.S.A. Summary We biomechanically examined how backpack load and walking speed interact in

  16. Neutron Skin Thickness of Nuclei and Effective Nucleon-Nucleon Interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Min; WANG Ning; LI Zhu-Xia; WU Xi-Zhen

    2006-01-01

    @@ The Skyrme energy density functional is applied to study the ground state properties of a series of finite nuclei.The charge rms radii, neutron rms radii, and the neutron skin thickness for some nuclei are calculated and compared with the experimental data. The constraint on the effective interactions, especially, the density dependence of the isospin-dependent part of Skyrme interactions is extracted by the data of neutron skin thicknesses of 208 pb and isotopes of Sn.

  17. Interactive effects of fire and large herbivores on web-building spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, C N; Barton, P S; Wood, J T; Lindenmayer, D B

    2015-09-01

    Altered disturbance regimes are a major driver of biodiversity loss worldwide. Maintaining or re-creating natural disturbance regimes is therefore the focus of many conservation programmes. A key challenge, however, is to understand how co-occurring disturbances interact to affect biodiversity. We experimentally tested for the interactive effects of prescribed fire and large macropod herbivores on the web-building spider assemblage of a eucalypt forest understorey and investigated the role of vegetation in mediating these effects using path analysis. Fire had strong negative effects on the density of web-building spiders, which were partly mediated by effects on vegetation structure, while negative effects of large herbivores on web density were not related to changes in vegetation. Fire amplified the effects of large herbivores on spiders, both via vegetation-mediated pathways and by increasing herbivore activity. The importance of vegetation-mediated pathways and fire-herbivore interactions differed for web density and richness and also differed between web types. Our results demonstrate that for some groups of web-building spiders, the effects of co-occurring disturbance drivers may be mostly additive, whereas for other groups, interactions between drivers can amplify disturbance effects. In our study system, the use of prescribed fire in the presence of high densities of herbivores could lead to reduced densities and altered composition of web-building spiders, with potential cascading effects through the arthropod food web. Our study highlights the importance of considering both the independent and interactive effects of disturbances, as well as the mechanisms driving their effects, in the management of disturbance regimes.

  18. Group composition effects on aggressive interpack interactions of gray wolves in Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Kira A.; MacNulty, Daniel R.; Stahler, Daniel R.; Smith, Douglas W.; Mech, L. David

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of characteristics that promote group success during intraspecific encounters is key to understanding the adaptive advantages of sociality for many group-living species. In addition, some individuals in a group may be more likely than others to influence intergroup conflicts, a relatively neglected idea in research on social animals. Here we use observations of aggressive interactions between wolf (Canis lupus) packs over an extended period and use pack characteristics to determine which groups had an advantage over their opponents. During 16 years of observation in Yellowstone National Park from 1995 to 2010, we documented 121 interpack aggressive interactions. We recorded pack sizes, compositions, and spatial orientation related to residency to determine their effects on the outcomes of interactions between packs. Relative pack size (RPS) improved the odds of a pack displacing its opponent. However, pack composition moderated the effect of RPS as packs with relatively more old members (>6.0 years old) or adult males had higher odds of winning despite a numerical disadvantage. The location of the interaction with respect to pack territories had no effect on the outcome of interpack interactions. Although the importance of RPS in successful territorial defense suggests the evolution and maintenance of group living may be at least partly due to larger packs’ success during interpack interactions, group composition is also an important factor, highlighting that some individuals are more valuable than others during interpack conflicts.

  19. Studying the physical basis of global warming: thermal effects of the interaction between radiation and matter and greenhouse effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besson, Ugo; De Ambrosis, Anna; Mascheretti, Paolo [Department of Physics ' A Volta' , University of Pavia, Via A Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy)], E-mail: ugo.besson@unipv.it, E-mail: anna.deambrosisvigna@unipv.it

    2010-03-15

    We present a teaching module dealing with the thermal effects of interaction between radiation and matter, the infrared emission of bodies and the greenhouse effect devoted to university level and teacher education. The module stresses the dependence of the optical properties of materials (transparency, absorptivity and emissivity) on radiation frequency, as a result of interaction between matter and radiation. Multiple experiences are suggested to favour a progressive construction of knowledge on the physical aspects necessary to understand the greenhouse effect and global warming. Some results obtained with university students are briefly reported.

  20. Small Current Quark Mass Effects on Dressed-Quark Propagator in an Effective Quark-Quark Interaction Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONG Hong-Shi; WU Xiao-Hua; SUN Wei-Min; ZHAO En-Guang; WANG Fan

    2003-01-01

    A method for obtaining the smallcurrent quark mass dependence of the dressed quark propagator froman effective quark-quark interaction model is developed. Within this approach the small current quark mass effects ondressed-quark propagator have been studied. A comparison with previous results is given.