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Sample records for microbially induced precipitation

  1. Biogrout, ground improvement by microbial induced carbonate precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Paassen, L.A.

    2009-01-01

    Biogrout is a new ground improvement method based on microbially induced precipitation of calcium carbonate (MICP). When supplied with suitable substrates, micro-organisms can catalyze biochemical conversions in the subsurface resulting in precipitation of inorganic minerals, which change the

  2. Microbially Induced Precipitation of Gold(0) Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Yu; Kang, Serku; Park, Bitna; Kim, Yumi

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to synthesize gold nanoparticles by biomineralization using metal-reducing bacteria and to characterize their mineralogical properties. The metal-reducing bacteria were able to reduce Au(III) to Au(0) with organic fatty acids as electron donors, as indicated by the color change of the culture solution from colorless gold ions to black precipitates at 25 degrees C. XRD, SEM- and TEM-EDS analyses of the precipitates showed that Au(0) was precipitated and formed at either the cell membrane or extracellularly. The Au(0) nanoparticles were about 200 nm in size and ball-shaped. Biomineralization for elemental Au(0) nanoparticle synthesis may be useful for the recovery of natural gold in natural environments.

  3. Rock fracture grouting with microbially induced carbonate precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minto, James M.; MacLachlan, Erica; El Mountassir, Gráinne; Lunn, Rebecca J.

    2016-11-01

    Microbially induced carbonate precipitation has been proposed for soil stabilization, soil strengthening, and permeability reduction as an alternative to traditional cement and chemical grouts. In this paper, we evaluate the grouting of fine aperture rock fractures with calcium carbonate, precipitated through urea hydrolysis, by the bacteria Sporosarcina pasteurii. Calcium carbonate was precipitated within a small-scale and a near field-scale (3.1 m2) artificial fracture consisting of a rough rock lower surfaces and clear polycarbonate upper surfaces. The spatial distribution of the calcium carbonate precipitation was imaged using time-lapse photography and the influence on flow pathways revealed from tracer transport imaging. In the large-scale experiment, hydraulic aperture was reduced from 276 to 22 μm, corresponding to a transmissivity reduction of 1.71 × 10-5 to 8.75 × 10-9 m2/s, over a period of 12 days under constantly flowing conditions. With a modified injection strategy a similar three orders of magnitude reduction in transmissivity was achieved over a period of 3 days. Calcium carbonate precipitated over the entire artificial fracture with strong adhesion to both upper and lower surfaces and precipitation was controlled to prevent clogging of the injection well by manipulating the injection fluid velocity. These experiments demonstrate that microbially induced carbonate precipitation can successfully be used to grout a fracture under constantly flowing conditions and may be a viable alternative to cement based grouts when a high level of hydraulic sealing is required and chemical grouts when a more durable grout is required.

  4. Microbial Community Structure of an Alluvial Aquifer Treated to Encourage Microbial Induced Calcite Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohan, J.; Saneiyan, S.; Lee, J.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Burns, S.; Colwell, F. S.

    2017-12-01

    An oligotrophic aquifer in the Colorado River floodplain (Rifle, CO) was treated with molasses and urea to encourage microbial induced calcite precipitation (MICP). This would stabilize the soil mass by reducing porosity and strengthening the mineral fabric. Over the course of a 15-day treatment period, microbial biomass was collected from monitoring well groundwater for DNA extraction and sequencing. Bromide, a conservative tracer, was co-injected and subsequently detected in downgradient wells, confirming effective nutrient delivery. Conductivity increased during the injection regime and an overall decrease in pH was observed. Groundwater chemistry showed a marked increase in ammonia, suggesting urea hydrolysis - a process catalyzed by the enzyme urease - the primary enzyme implicated in MICP. Additionally, soluble iron was detected, suggesting a general increase in microbial activity; possibly as iron-reducing bacteria changed insoluble ferric oxide to soluble ferrous hydroxide in the anoxic aquifer. DNA sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene confirmed the presence of iron reducing bacteria, including Shewanella and Desulfuromonadales. Generally, a decrease in microbial community diversity was observed when pre-injection community taxa were compared with post-injection community taxa. Phyla indicative of anoxic aquifers were represented in accordance with previous literature at the Rifle site. Linear discriminant analysis showed significant differences in representative phyla over the course of the injection series. Geophysical monitoring of the site further suggested changes that could be due to MICP. Induced polarization increased the phase shift in the primary treated area, in agreement with laboratory experiments. Cross-hole seismic testing confirmed that the shear wave velocities increased in the treated soil mass, implying the soil matrix became more stable. Future investigations will help elucidate the viability and efficacy of MICP treatment in changing

  5. Heavy metal immobilization via microbially induced carbonate precipitation and co-precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauchnor, E. G.; Stoick, E.

    2017-12-01

    Microbially induced CaCO3 precipitation (MICP) has been successfully used in applications such as porous media consolidation and sealing of leakage pathways in the subsurface, and it has the potential to be used for remediation of metal and radionuclide contaminants in surface and groundwater. In this work, MICP is investigated for removal of dissolved heavy metals from contaminated mine discharge water via co-precipitation in CaCO3 or formation of other metal carbonates. The bacterially catalyzed hydrolysis of urea produces inorganic carbon and ammonium and increases pH and the saturation index of carbonate minerals to promote precipitation of CaCO3. Other heavy metal cations can be co-precipitated in CaCO3 as impurities or by replacing Ca2+ in the crystal lattice. We performed laboratory batch experiments of MICP in alkaline mine drainage sampled from an abandoned mine site in Montana and containing a mixture of heavy metals at near neutral pH. Both a model bacterium, Sporosarcina pasteurii, and a ureolytic bacterium isolated from sediments on the mine site were used to promote MICP. Removal of dissolved metals from the aqueous phase was determined via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and resulting precipitates were analyzed via electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Both S. pasteurii and the native ureolytic isolate demonstrated ureolysis, increased the pH and promoted precipitation of CaCO3 in batch tests. MICP by the native bacterium reduced concentrations of the heavy metals zinc, copper, cadmium, nickel and manganese in the water. S. pasteurii was also able to promote MICP, but with less removal of dissolved metals. Analysis of precipitates revealed calcium carbonate and phosphate minerals were likely present. The native isolate is undergoing identification via 16S DNA sequencing. Ongoing work will evaluate biofilm formation and MICP by the isolate in continuous flow, gravel-filled laboratory columns. This research

  6. Biocementation of Concrete Pavements Using Microbially Induced Calcite Precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jin-Hoon; Jo, Yoon-Soo; Park, Chang-Seon; Kang, Chang-Ho; So, Jae-Seong

    2017-07-28

    In this study, the feasibility of introducing calcite-forming bacteria into concrete pavements to improve their mechanical performance was investigated. Lysinibacillus sphaericus WJ-8, which was isolated in a previous study and is capable of exhibiting high urease activity and calcite production, was used. When analyzed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction, WJ-8 showed a significant amount of calcite precipitation. The compressive strength of cement mortar mixed with WJ-8 cells and nutrient medium (urea with calcium lactate) increased by 10% compared with that of the controls. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analyses confirmed that the increase in strength was due to the calcite formed by the WJ-8 cells.

  7. Microbial network of the carbonate precipitation process induced by microbial consortia and the potential application to crack healing in concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaguang; Zhou, Aijuan; Liu, Yuanzhen; Zhao, Bowei; Luan, Yunbo; Wang, Sufang; Yue, Xiuping; Li, Zhu

    2017-11-06

    Current studies have employed various pure-cultures for improving concrete durability based on microbially induced carbonate precipitation (MICP). However, there have been very few reports concerned with microbial consortia, which could perform more complex tasks and be more robust in their resistance to environmental fluctuations. In this study, we constructed three microbial consortia that are capable of MICP under aerobic (AE), anaerobic (AN) and facultative anaerobic (FA) conditions. The results showed that AE consortia showed more positive effects on inorganic carbon conversion than AN and FA consortia. Pyrosequencing analysis showed that clear distinctions appeared in the community structure between different microbial consortia systems. Further investigation on microbial community networks revealed that the species in the three microbial consortia built thorough energetic and metabolic interaction networks regarding MICP, nitrate-reduction, bacterial endospores and fermentation communities. Crack-healing experiments showed that the selected cracks of the three consortia-based concrete specimens were almost completely healed in 28 days, which was consistent with the studies using pure cultures. Although the economic advantage might not be clear yet, this study highlights the potential implementation of microbial consortia on crack healing in concrete.

  8. Long-term sustainability of microbial-induced CaCO3 precipitation in aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gat, Daniella; Ronen, Zeev; Tsesarsky, Michael

    2017-10-01

    Microbially induced CaCO 3 precipitation (MICP) via urea hydrolysis is an emerging technique for soil amelioration, building materials rehabilitation and pollutants sequestration amongst other various environmental applications. The successful application of MICP requires the sustainability of the precipitated CaCO 3 ; to which the fate of ammonia, the main by-product of ureolysis, is potentially significante. Ammonia volatilization and biological ammonia oxidation both induce a pH decrease, which, in turn, might cause CaCO 3 dissolution. To examine the potential effect of accumulated ammonia on precipitated CaCO 3 , we conducted a long-term MICP batch experiment, using environmental enrichment cultures of ureolytic bacteria. Here we show that CaCO 3 precipitation was completed within 15-27 days, along with a rise in ammonium concentration. Following completion of ureolysis and precipitation, ammonium concentrations decreased, leading to a pH decrease. About 30 days after precipitation was completed, as much as 30% CaCO 3 dissolution, was observed. A two-step model, describing urea hydrolysis followed by the removal of ammonia from the precipitation solution, predicted CaCO 3 dissolution due to ammonia volatilization. We suggest that ureolytic MICP might result in ammonia volatilization, leading to significant CaCO 3 dissolution. These results provide basic insights into the sustainability of ureolytic MICP and should further encourage removal of the accumulated ammonia from the treated site. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A review on the kinetics of microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation by urea hydrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Paassen, L. A.

    2017-12-01

    In this study the kinetics of calcium carbonate precipitation induced by the ureolytic bacteria are reviewed based on experiments and mathematical modelling. The study shows how urea hydrolysis rate depends on the amount of bacteria and the conditions during growth, storage, hydrolysis and precipitation. The dynamics of Microbially Induced Carbonate Precipitation has been monitored in non-seeded liquid batch experiments. Results show that particulary for a fast hydrolysis of urea (>1 M-urea day-1) in a highly concentrated equimolar solution with calcium chloride (>0.25 M) the solubility product of CaCO3 is exceeded within a short period (less than 30 minutes), the supersaturation remains high for an exended period, resulting in prolonged periods of nucleation and crystal growth and extended growth of metastable precursor mineral phases. The pH, being a result of the speciation, quickly rises until critical supersaturation is reached and precipitation is initiated. Then pH drops (sometimes showing oscillating behaviour) to about neutral where it stays until all substrates are depleted. Higher hydrolysis rates lead to higher supersaturation and pH and relatively many small crystals, whereas higher concentrations of urea and calcium chloride mainly lead to lower pH values. The conversion can be reasonably monitored by electrical conductivity and reasonably predicted, using a simplified model based on a single reaction as long as the urea hydrolysis rate is known. Complex geochemical models, which include chemical speciciation through acid-base equilibria and kinetic equations to describe mineral precipitation, do not show significant difference from the simplified model regarding the bulk chemistry and the total amount of precipitates. However, experiments show that ureolytic MICP can result in a highly variable crystal morphologies with large variation in the affected hydraulic properties when applied in a porous medium. In order to calculate the number, size and

  10. Effect of Mg/Ca ratios on microbially induced carbonate precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Nurgul; Demirel, Cansu; Seref Sonmez, M.; Kurt, M. Ali

    2016-04-01

    Influence of Mg/Ca ratios on microbially induced carbonate mineralogy were investigated by series of experiments carried out under various environmental conditions (Mg/Ca ratio, temperature and salinity). Halophilic bacterial cultures used for biomineralization experiments were isolated from hypersaline Lake Acıgöl (Denizli, SW Turkey), displaying extreme water chemistry with an average pH around 8.6 (Balci eta l.,2015). Enriched bacterial culture used in the experiments consisted of Halomonas saccharevitans strain AJ275, Halomonas alimentaria strain L7B; Idiomarina sp. TBZ29, 98% Idiomarina seosensis strain CL-SP19. Biomineralization experiments were set up using above enriched culture with Mg/Ca ratios of 0.05, 1, 4 and 15 and salinity of 8% and 15% experiments at 30oC and 10oC. Additionally, long-term biomineralization experiments were set up to last for a year, for Mg/Ca=4 and Mg/Ca=15 experiments at 30oC. For each experimental condition abiotic experiments were also conducted. Solution chemistry throughout incubation was monitored for Na, K, Mg, Ca, bicarbonate, carbonate, ammonium and phosphate for a month. At the end of the experiments, precipitates were collected and morphology and mineralogy of the biominerals were investigated and results were evaluated using the software DIFFRAC.SUITE EVA. Overall the preliminary results showed chemical precipitation of calcite, halite, hydromagnesite and sylvite. Results obtained from biological experiments indicate that, low Mg/Ca ratios (0.05 and 1) favor chlorapatite precipitation, whereas higher Mg/Ca ratios favor struvite precipitation. Biomineralization of dolomite, huntite and magnesite is favorable at high Mg/Ca ratios (4 and 15), in the presence of halophilic bacteria. Moreover, results indicate that supersaturation with respect to Mg (Mg/Ca=15) combined with NaCl (15%) inhibits biomineralization and forms chemical precipitates. 15% salinity is shown to favor chemical precipitation of mineral phases more than

  11. Micro-scale experimental study of Microbial-Induced Carbonate Precipitation (MICP) by using microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Soga, K.; DeJong, J. T.; Kabla, A.

    2017-12-01

    Microbial-induced carbonate precipitation (MICP), one of the bio-mineralization processes, is an innovative subsurface improvement technique for enhancing the strength and stiffness of soils, and controlling their hydraulic conductivity. These macro-scale engineering properties of MICP treated soils controlled by micro-scale factors of the precipitated carbonate, such as its content, amount and distribution in the soil matrix. The precipitation process itself is affected by bacteria amount, reaction kinetics, porous medium geometry and flow distribution in the soils. Accordingly, to better understand the MICP process at the pore scale a new experimental technique that can observe the entire process of MICP at the pore-scale was developed. In this study, a 2-D transparent microfluidic chip made of Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) representing the soil matrix was designed and fabricated. A staged-injection MICP treatment procedure was simulated inside the microfluidic chip while continuously monitored using microscopic techniques. The staged-injection MICP treatment procedure started with the injection of bacteria suspension, followed with the bacteria setting for attachment, and then ended with the multiple injections of cementation liquid. The main MICP processes visualized during this procedure included the bacteria transport and attachment during the bacteria injection, the bacteria attachment and growth during the bacteria settling, the bacteria detachment during the cementation liquid injection, the cementation development during the cementation liquid injection, and the cementation development after the completion of cementation liquid injection. It is suggested that the visualization of the main MICP processes using the microfluidic technique can improve understating of the fundamental mechanisms of MICP and consequently help improve the treatment technique for in situ implementation of MICP.

  12. Toxicity effects on metal sequestration by microbially-induced carbonate precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mugwar, Ahmed J. [Cardiff School of Engineering, Cardiff University, Queen’s Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); College of Engineering, Al-Muthanna University, Samawah (Iraq); Harbottle, Michael J., E-mail: harbottlem@cardiff.ac.uk [Cardiff School of Engineering, Cardiff University, Queen’s Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) are determined for S. pasteurii with a range of metals. • Zinc & cadmium bioprecipitation is strongly linked to microbial carbonate generation. • Lead & copper carbonate bioprecipitation is limited & abiotic processes may be significant. • Bioprecipitation allows survival at & remediation of higher metal concentrations than expected. - Abstract: Biological precipitation of metallic contaminants has been explored as a remedial technology for contaminated groundwater systems. However, metal toxicity and availability limit the activity and remedial potential of bacteria. We report the ability of a bacterium, Sporosarcina pasteurii, to remove metals in aerobic aqueous systems through carbonate formation. Its ability to survive and grow in increasingly concentrated aqueous solutions of zinc, cadmium, lead and copper is explored, with and without a metal precipitation mechanism. In the presence of metal ions alone, bacterial growth was inhibited at a range of concentrations depending on the metal. Microbial activity in a urea-amended medium caused carbonate ion generation and pH elevation, providing conditions suitable for calcium carbonate bioprecipitation, and consequent removal of metal ions. Elevation of pH and calcium precipitation are shown to be strongly linked to removal of zinc and cadmium, but only partially linked to removal of lead and copper. The dependence of these effects on interactions between the respective metal and precipitated calcium carbonate are discussed. Finally, it is shown that the bacterium operates at higher metal concentrations in the presence of the urea-amended medium, suggesting that the metal removal mechanism offers a defence against metal toxicity.

  13. Microbially Induced Calcite Precipitation (MICP) - A Technology for Managing Flow and Transport in Porous and Fractured Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, A. J.; Hiebert, R.; Kirksey, J.; Lauchnor, E. G.; Rothman, A.; Spangler, L.; Esposito, R.; Gerlach, R.; Cunningham, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Certain microorganisms e.g., Sporosarcina pasteurii contribute enzymes that catalyze reactions which in the presence of calcium, can create saturation conditions favorable for calcium carbonate precipitation (microbially-induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICP)). MICP can be used for a number of engineering applications including securing geologic storage of CO2 or other fluids by sealing fractures, improving wellbore integrity, and stabilizing fractured and unstable porous media. MICP treatment has the advantage of the use of small microorganisms, ~2μm, suggesting applicability to treatment of small aperture fractures not accessible to traditional treatments, for example the use of fine cement. The promotion of MICP in the subsurface is a complex reactive transport problem coupling microbial, abiotic (geochemical), geomechanical and hydrodynamic processes. In the laboratory, MICP has been demonstrated to cement together heavily fractured shale and reduce the permeability of fractures in shale and sandstone cores up to five orders of magnitude under both ambient and subsurface relevant pressure conditions (Figure 1). Most recently, a MICP fracture treatment field study was performed at a well at the Southern Company Gorgas Steam Generation Plant (Alabama) (Figure 1). The Fayetteville Sandstone at approximately 1120' below ground surface was hydraulically fractured prior to MICP treatment. After 4 days of injection of 24 calcium pulses and 6 microbial inoculations, injectivity of brine into the formation was significantly reduced. The experiment also resulted in a reduction in pressure decay which is a measure of improved wellbore integrity. These promising results suggest the potential for MICP treatment to seal fractured pathways at the field scale to improve the long-term security of geologically-stored carbon dioxide or prevent leakage of shale gas or hydraulic fracturing fluids into functional overlying aquifers, reducing environmental impacts.

  14. Microbially induced carbonate precipitation (MICP) by denitrification as ground improvement method - Process control in sand column experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Vinh; van Paassen, Leon; Nakano, Akiko; Kanayama, Motohei; Heimovaara, Timo

    2013-04-01

    Calcite precipitation induced by microbes has been proven to be efficient in stabilizing granular soils, especially with urea hydrolysis, as it has been successfully demonstrated in a pilot application 2010. However, as a byproduct highly concentrated ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) solution is produced, which has to be removed and disposed and forms a significant disadvantage of the technique that makes an alternative process like denitrification preferred. The proof of principle of microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP) by denitrification has been demonstrated by Van Paassen et al (2010) who suggested that instead of producing waste as a byproduct, different pre-treated waste streams could be used as substrates for in situ growth of denitrifying bacteria and simultaneous cementation without producing waste to be removed. In this study sand column experiments are performed in which calcium carbonate was successfully precipitated by indigenous denitrifying micro-organisms, which were supplied weekly with a pulse of a substrate solution containing calcium acetate and calcium nitrate. Besides the production of calcite and the growth of bacteria in biofilms, the reduction of nitrate resulted in the production of (nitrogen) gas. It was observed that this gas partly fills up the pore space and consequently contributed to a reduction of the permeability of the treated sand. The presence of gas in the pore space affected the flow of the injected substrates and influenced to the distribution of calcium carbonate. The effect of the mean particle size (D50) on the flow and transport of solutes and gas in the porous media has been evaluated by treating several columns with varying grain size distribution and comparing the change in permeability after each incubation period and analyzing the distribution of the gas throughout the columns using X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning. The present results show that there is a considerable decrease of permeability - a

  15. Microbially induced iron precipitation associated with a neutrophilic spring at Borra Caves, Vishakhapatnam, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskar, Sushmitha; Baskar, Ramanathan; Thorseth, Ingunn H; Ovreås, Lise; Pedersen, Rolf B

    2012-04-01

    The present investigation uncovers various pieces of evidence for the possible biologically induced mineralization in iron mats associated with a pH-neutral spring in the Borra caves, Vishakhapatnam, India. Electron microscopy [scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM)] demonstrated large numbers of (i) hollow tubes (diameter ∼1 μm) resembling sheaths of the iron-oxidizing bacteria Leptothrix, (ii) thin (diameter springs. Understanding biogenic iron oxides in caves has important astrobiological applications as it provides a potential tool for the detection of extraterrestrial life.

  16. Evaluating Monitoring Strategies to Detect Precipitation-Induced Microbial Contamination Events in Karstic Springs Used for Drinking Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Besmer

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of microbial drinking water quality is a key component for ensuring safety and understanding risk, but conventional monitoring strategies are typically based on low sampling frequencies (e.g., quarterly or monthly. This is of concern because many drinking water sources, such as karstic springs are often subject to changes in bacterial concentrations on much shorter time scales (e.g., hours to days, for example after precipitation events. Microbial contamination events are crucial from a risk assessment perspective and should therefore be targeted by monitoring strategies to establish both the frequency of their occurrence and the magnitude of bacterial peak concentrations. In this study we used monitoring data from two specific karstic springs. We assessed the performance of conventional monitoring based on historical records and tested a number of alternative strategies based on a high-resolution data set of bacterial concentrations in spring water collected with online flow cytometry (FCM. We quantified the effect of increasing sampling frequency and found that for the specific case studied, at least bi-weekly sampling would be needed to detect precipitation events with a probability of >90%. We then proposed an optimized monitoring strategy with three targeted samples per event, triggered by precipitation measurements. This approach is more effective and efficient than simply increasing overall sampling frequency. It would enable the water utility to (1 analyze any relevant event and (2 limit median underestimation of peak concentrations to approximately 10%. We conclude with a generalized perspective on sampling optimization and argue that the assessment of short-term dynamics causing microbial peak loads initially requires increased sampling/analysis efforts, but can be optimized subsequently to account for limited resources. This offers water utilities and public health authorities systematic ways to evaluate and optimize their

  17. Microbial composition in a deep saline aquifer in the North German Basin -microbiologically induced corrosion and mineral precipitation affecting geothermal plant operation and the effects of plant downtime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerm, Stephanie; Westphal, Anke; Miethling-Graff, Rona; Alawi, Mashal; Seibt, Andrea; Wolfgramm, Markus; Würdemann, Hilke

    2013-04-01

    The microbial composition in fluids of a deep saline geothermal used aquifer in the North German Basin was characterized over a period of five years. The genetic fingerprinting techniques PCR-SSCP and PCR-DGGE revealed distinct microbial communities in fluids produced from the cold and warm side of the aquifer. Direct cell counting and quantification of 16S rRNA genes and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrA) genes by real-time PCR proved different population sizes in fluids, showing higher abundance of Bacteria and sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) in cold fluids compared to warm fluids. Predominating SRB in the cold well probably accounted for corrosion damage to the submersible well pump, and iron sulfide precipitates in the near wellbore area and topside facility filters. This corresponded to a lower sulfate content in fluids produced from the cold well as well as higher content of hydrogen gas that was probably released from corrosion, and maybe favoured growth of hydrogenotrophic SRB. Plant downtime significantly influenced the microbial biocenosis in fluids. Samples taken after plant restart gave indications about the processes occurring downhole during those phases. High DNA concentrations in fluids at the beginning of the restart process with a decreasing trend over time indicated a higher abundance of microbes during plant downtime compared to regular plant operation. It is likely that a gradual drop in temperature as well as stagnant conditions favoured the growth of microbes and maturation of biofilms at the casing and in pores of the reservoir rock in the near wellbore area. Furthermore, it became obvious that the microorganisms were more associated to particles then free-living. This study reflects the high influence of microbial populations for geothermal plant operation, because microbiologically induced precipitative and corrosive processes adversely affect plant reliability. Those processes may favourably occur during plant downtime due to enhanced

  18. Microbially-Mediated Precipitation of Calcium Carbonate Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ser Ku; Roh, Yul

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the biomineralization of carbonate minerals using microorganisms (Wu Do-1) enriched from rhodoliths. A 16S rRNA sequence analysis showed that Wu Do-1 mainly contained Proteus mirabilis. The pH decreased from 6.5 to 5.3 over the first 4 days of incubation due to microbial oxidation of organic acids, after which it increased to 7.8 over the remaining incubation period. XRD analysis showed that the precipitates were Mg-rich cal- cite (MgxCa(1-x)CO3), whereas no precipitates were formed without the addition of Wu Do-1 in D-1 medium. SEM-EDS analyses showed that the Mg-rich calcite had a rhombohedron shape and consisted of Ca, Si and Mg with an extracelluar polymeric substance (EPS). In addition, TEM-EDS analyses revealed they were hexagon in shape, 500-700 nm in size, and composed of Ca, Mg, C, and O. These results indicated that Wu Do-1 induced precipitation of Mg-rich calcite on the cell walls and EPS via the accumulation of Ca and/or Mg ions. Therefore, microbial precipitation of carbonate nanoparticles may play an important role in metal and carbon biogeochemistry, as well as in carbon sequestration in natural environments.

  19. Effects of Calcium Source on Biochemical Properties of Microbial CaCO3 Precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Du, Yali; Jiang, Zhengwu; She, Anming

    2015-01-01

    The biochemical properties of CaCO3 precipitation induced by Sporosarcina pasteurii, an ureolytic type microorganism, were investigated. Effects of calcium source on the precipitation process were examined, since calcium source plays a key role in microbiologically induced mineralization. Regardless of the calcium source type, three distinct stages in the precipitation process were identified by Ca(2+), NH4 (+), pH and cell density monitoring. Compared with stage 1 and 3, stage 2 was considered as the most critical part since biotic CaCO3 precipitation occurs during this stage. Kinetics studies showed that the microbial CaCO3 precipitation rate for calcium lactate was over twice of that for calcium nitrate, indicating that calcium lactate is more beneficial for the cell activity, which in turn determines urease production and CaCO3 precipitation. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the CaCO3 crystal as calcite, although scanning electron microscopy revealed a difference in crystal size and morphology if calcium source was different. The findings of this paper further suggest a promising application of microbiologically induced CaCO3 precipitation in remediation of surface and cracks of porous media, e.g., cement-based composites, particularly by using organic source of calcium lactate.

  20. Final Technical Report for DOE Award DE-FG02-07ER64403 [Modeling of Microbially Induced Calcite Precipitation for the Immobilization of Strontium-90 Using a Variable Velocity Streamtube Ensemble

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginn, Timothy R. [University of California, Davis; Weathers, Tess [University of California, Davis

    2013-08-26

    Biogeochemical modeling using PHREEQC2 and a streamtube ensemble approach is utilized to understand a well-to-well subsurface treatment system at the Vadose Zone Research Park (VZRP) near Idaho Falls, Idaho. Treatment involves in situ microbially-mediated ureolysis to induce calcite precipitation for the immobilization of strontium-90. PHREEQC2 is utilized to model the kinetically-controlled ureolysis and consequent calcite precipitation. Reaction kinetics, equilibrium phases, and cation exchange are used within PHREEQC2 to track pH and levels of calcium, ammonium, urea, and calcite precipitation over time, within a series of one-dimensional advective-dispersive transport paths creating a streamtube ensemble representation of the well-to-well transport. An understanding of the impact of physical heterogeneities within this radial flowfield is critical for remediation design; we address this via the streamtube approach: instead of depicting spatial extents of solutes in the subsurface we focus on their arrival distribution at the control well(s). Traditionally, each streamtube maintains uniform velocity; however in radial flow in homogeneous media, the velocity within any given streamtube is spatially-variable in a common way, being highest at the input and output wells and approaching a minimum at the midpoint between the wells. This idealized velocity variability is of significance in the case of ureolytically driven calcite precipitation. Streamtube velocity patterns for any particular configuration of injection and withdrawal wells are available as explicit calculations from potential theory, and also from particle tracking programs. To approximate the actual spatial distribution of velocity along streamtubes, we assume idealized radial non-uniform velocity associated with homogeneous media. This is implemented in PHREEQC2 via a non-uniform spatial discretization within each streamtube that honors both the streamtube’s travel time and the idealized

  1. Radiation Induced Precipitation in Iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solly, B

    1964-02-15

    Foils of iron have been neutron-irradiated in the Swedish re- search reactor R2 to integrated doses in the range 10{sup 17} - 10{sup 19} nvt (> 1 MeV) and examined by transmission electron microscopy. Features have been observed having diffraction contrast similar to that of the prismatic dislocation loops formed in f.c.c. metals by the collapse of point-defect clusters. The features have been shown to be due to precipitation of impurities at radiation damage centres in the iron matrix.

  2. Radiation Induced Precipitation in Iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solly, B.

    1964-02-01

    Foils of iron have been neutron-irradiated in the Swedish re- search reactor R2 to integrated doses in the range 10 17 - 10 19 nvt (> 1 MeV) and examined by transmission electron microscopy. Features have been observed having diffraction contrast similar to that of the prismatic dislocation loops formed in f.c.c. metals by the collapse of point-defect clusters. The features have been shown to be due to precipitation of impurities at radiation damage centres in the iron matrix

  3. Radiation induced microbial pesticide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Yup; Lee, Young Keun; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, Sang Jae

    2000-01-01

    To control plant pathogenic fungi, 4 strains of bacteria (K1, K3, K4, YS1) were isolated from mushroom compost and hot spring. K4, K1, K3, YS1 strain showed wide antifungal spectrum and high antifungal activities against 13 kinds of fungi. Mutants of K1 and YS1 strains were induced by gamma-ray radiation and showed promising antifungal activities. These wild type and mutants showed resistant against more than 27 kinds of commercial pesticides among 30 kinds of commercial pesticides test particularly, YS1-1006 mutant strain showed resistant against hydrogen oxide. And mutants had increased antifungal activity against Botryoshaeria dothidea. These results suggested that radiation could be an useful method for the induction of functional mutants. (author)

  4. Inducing mineral precipitation in groundwater by addition of phosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartmann Thomas

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Induced precipitation of phosphate minerals to scavenge trace elements from groundwater is a potential remediation approach for contaminated aquifers. The success of engineered precipitation schemes depends on the particular phases generated, their rates of formation, and their long term stability. The purpose of this study was to examine the precipitation of calcium phosphate minerals under conditions representative of a natural groundwater. Because microorganisms are present in groundwater, and because some proposed schemes for phosphate mineral precipitation rely on stimulation of native microbial populations, we also tested the effect of bacterial cells (initial densities of 105 and 107 mL-1 added to the precipitation medium. In addition, we tested the effect of a trace mixture of propionic, isovaleric, formic and butyric acids (total concentration 0.035 mM. Results The general progression of mineral precipitation was similar under all of the study conditions, with initial formation of amorphous calcium phosphate, and transformation to poorly crystalline hydroxylapatite (HAP within one week. The presence of the bacterial cells appeared to delay precipitation, although by the end of the experiments the overall extent of precipitation was similar for all treatments. The stoichiometry of the final precipitates as well as Rietveld structure refinement using x-ray diffraction data indicated that the presence of organic acids and bacterial cells resulted in an increasing a and decreasing c lattice parameter, with the higher concentration of cells resulting in the greatest distortion. Uptake of Sr into the solids was decreased in the treatments with cells and organic acids, compared to the control. Conclusions Our results suggest that the minerals formed initially during an engineered precipitation application for trace element sequestration may not be the ones that control long-term immobilization of the contaminants. In

  5. Induced and catalysed mineral precipitation in the deep biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    adsorption of silica to freshly precipitated iron oxides along a deep iron oxidation front. In conclusion, two different modes of precipitation can be observed in modern sub-seafloor porewater systems. Dolomite precipitation is thermodynamically controlled through microbially induced supersaturation. Quartz formation is controlled through an auxiliary process that helps it to overcome a kinetic barrier. These observations exemplify the importance to distinguish between kinetic and thermodynamic effects on mineral formation under Earth surface conditions. To evaluate geochemical signatures, these modes of precipitation need to be taken into account. Contreras et al. (2013) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., doi/10.1073/pnas.1305981110 Meister, et al. (2007) Sedimentology 54, 1007-1032. Meister, et al. (2014) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 137, 188-207. Meister, P. (2015) Terra Nova, Focus Article, 00, 1-9.

  6. Complex electrical monitoring of biopolymer and iron mineral precipitation for microbial enhanced hydrocarbon recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Hubbard, C. G.; Dong, W.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2011-12-01

    Microbially enhanced hydrocarbon recovery (MEHR) mechanisms are expected to be impacted by processes and properties that occur over a wide range of scales, ranging from surface interactions and microbial metabolism at the submicron scale to changes in wettability and pore geometry at the pore scale to geological heterogeneities at the petroleum reservoir scale. To eventually ensure successful, production-scale implementation of laboratory-developed MEHR procedures under field conditions, it is necessary to develop approaches that can remotely monitor and accurately predict the complex microbially-facilitated transformations that are expected to occur during MEHR treatments in reservoirs (such as the evolution of redox profiles, oil viscosity or matrix porosity/permeability modifications). Our initial studies are focused on laboratory experiments to assess the geophysical signatures of MEHR-induced biogeochemical transformations, with an ultimate goal of using these approaches to monitor field treatments. Here, we explore the electrical signatures of two MEHR processes that are designed to produce end-products that will plug high permeability zones in reservoirs and thus enhance sweep efficiency. The MEHR experiments to induce biopolymers (in this case dextran) and iron mineral precipitates were conducted using flow-through columns. Leuconostoc mesenteroides, a facultative anaerobe, known to produce dextran from sucrose was used in the biopolymer experiments. Paused injection of sucrose, following inoculation and initial microbial attachment, was carried out on daily basis, allowing enough time for dextran production to occur based on batch experiment observations. Electrical data were collected on daily basis and fluid samples were extracted from the column for characterization. Changes in electrical signal were not observed during initial microbial inoculation. Increase of electrical resistivity and decrease of electrical phase response were observed during the

  7. Seasonal Analysis of Microbial Communities in Precipitation in the Greater Tokyo Area, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Hiraoka

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The presence of microbes in the atmosphere and their transport over long distances across the Earth's surface was recently shown. Precipitation is likely a major path by which aerial microbes fall to the ground surface, affecting its microbial ecosystems and introducing pathogenic microbes. Understanding microbial communities in precipitation is of multidisciplinary interest from the perspectives of microbial ecology and public health; however, community-wide and seasonal analyses have not been conducted. Here, we carried out 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of 30 precipitation samples that were aseptically collected over 1 year in the Greater Tokyo Area, Japan. The precipitation microbial communities were dominated by Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria and were overall consistent with those previously reported in atmospheric aerosols and cloud water. Seasonal variations in composition were observed; specifically, Proteobacteria abundance significantly decreased from summer to winter. Notably, estimated ordinary habitats of precipitation microbes were dominated by animal-associated, soil-related, and marine-related environments, and reasonably consistent with estimated air mass backward trajectories. To our knowledge, this is the first amplicon-sequencing study investigating precipitation microbial communities involving sampling over the duration of a year.

  8. Irradiation induced precipitation: a thermodynamical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocquet, J.-L.; Martin, Georges.

    1979-02-01

    A binary alloy (A, B) under steady state irradiation is considered as a ternary alloy (A, B, defects) in constrained equilibrium (the constraint represented by the irradiation consists in maintaining a given supersaturation of point defects). All possible two-body interactions (attractive, repulsive) have been checked between the solvent A, the solute B, and the defects C. The conditions of an irradiation corresponds to a low point-defect concentration; the only cases of interest are those where such a low concentration makes new phases precipitate, which are richer in solute than the initial solid-solution. Radiation induced precipitation is expected to occur under the following necessary conditions: - when the binary alloy (A, B) shows ordering or is ideal, a necessary condition is that the binary solute-defects must show ordering. - when the binary alloy (A, B) shows clustering, a necessary condition is that the temperature must be close to the critical mixing temperature Tsub(AB)sup(D). The physical significance of these conditions is discussed [fr

  9. Carbonate Precipitation through Microbial Activities in Natural Environment, and Their Potential in Biotechnology: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tingting; Dittrich, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate represents a large portion of carbon reservoir and is used commercially for a variety of applications. Microbial carbonate precipitation, a by-product of microbial activities, plays an important metal coprecipitation and cementation role in natural systems. This natural process occurring in various geological settings can be mimicked and used for a number of biotechnologies, such as metal remediation, carbon sequestration, enhanced oil recovery, and construction restoration. In this study, different metabolic activities leading to calcium carbonate precipitation, their native environment, and potential applications and challenges are reviewed. PMID:26835451

  10. Carbonate precipitation through microbial activities in natural environment, and their potential in biotechnology: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting eZhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium carbonate represents a large portion of carbon reservoir and is used commercially for a variety of applications. Microbial carbonate precipitation (MCP, a by-product of microbial activities, plays an important metal coprecipitation and cementation role in natural systems. This natural process occurring in various geological settings can be mimicked and used for a number of biotechnology such as metal remediation, carbon sequestration, enhanced oil recovery and construction restoration. In this study, different metabolic activities leading to calcium carbonate precipitation, their native environment, and potential applications and challenges are reviewed.

  11. A unique model system of microbial carbonate precipitation: Stromatolites of Lagoa Vermelha, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warthmann, R. J.; Vasoncelos, C.; van Lith, Y.; Visscher, P. T.; McKenzie, J. A.

    2003-04-01

    Modern stromatolites are recognized as analogues to fossil laminated structures, which are remains of microbial activity that are widely found in sedimentary rocks beginning in the Neo-Archean, but are quite rare today. The key difference of modern microbial mats and stromatolites compared to ancient examples is the type of lithification. A few marine and hypersaline microbial mats have been observed to precipitate carbonates, and only in Shark Bay (Western, Australia) and Highborne Cay (Bahamas) has the formation of continuous laminae of carbonates been observed. Lagoa Vermelha, a moderate hypersaline lagoon in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, offers the ideal conditions to promote lithification. Calcified, sometimes dolomitic stromatolites grow on the sediment surface, whereas within the sediments dolomite precipitates. The factors controlling carbonate precipitation in Lagoa Vermelha are the changing water chemistry and the special hydrology, combined with a high primary production by cyanobacteria, a high rate of respiration and the absence of higher organisms. Here, we present a study of the physico-chemical parameters, microbial processes and bio-minerals associated with these stromatolites and microbial mats. This approach provides boundary conditions to better understand dolomite formation. Several discrete lithified calcium carbonate layers are present. The first lithified layer is found beneath a 2-mm-thick biofilm, which contains Gloeocapsa. Below the underlying dense Microcoleus layer, the second micrite deposit is observed at 4-5 mm depth. Successive micritic laminae are preserved in the layer of decaying cyanobacteria that harbors large numbers of purple sulfur bacteria, heterotrophic microbes and sulfate-reducing bacteria. C-isotope studies of the carbonate layers indicate a contribution of organic derived carbon associated with microbial processes, such as sulfate reduction. The O-isotopic values indicate an evaporitic enrichment of the water. Understanding

  12. Microbial Activity and Precipitation at Solution-Solution Mixing Zones in Porous Media -- Subsurface Biogeochemical Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colwell, Frederick [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Wildenschild, Dorthe [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Wood, Brian [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Gerlach, Robin [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Mitchell, Andrew [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Redden, George [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-08-29

    The goal for this research was to understand how best to add compounds to receptive microbial communities in porous media in order to achieve optimal calcite precipitation in a volumetrically significant space and to understand the physiological health of the cells that are responsible for the calcite precipitation. The specific objectives were to: (1) develop better tools for visually examining biofilms in porous media and calcium carbonate precipitation being mediated by microbes in porous media, and (2) demonstrate the effectiveness of using that tool within a flow cell model system.

  13. A generic transport-reactive model for simulating microbially influenced mineral precipitation in porous medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, J.; Van Turnhout, A.G.; Heimovaara, T.J.; Afanasyev, M.

    2015-01-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of precipitated minerals is one of the key factors governing various processes in the sub-surface environment, including microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) (Huang, 2002), bio-cementation (van Paassen et al., 2010) and sediment diagenesis (Paraska et al.,

  14. Biogeochemical Processes Controlling Microbial Reductive Precipitation of Radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredrickson, James K.; Brooks, Scott C.

    2004-01-01

    This project is focused on elucidating the principal biogeochemical reactions that govern the concentrations, chemical speciation, and distribution of the redox sensitive contaminants uranium (U) and technetium (Tc) between the aqueous and solid phases. The research is designed to provide new insights into the under-explored areas of competing geochemical and microbiological oxidation-reduction reactions that govern the fate and transport of redox sensitive contaminants and to generate fundamental scientific understanding of the identity and stoichiometry of competing microbial reduction and geochemical oxidation reactions. These goals and objectives are met through a series of hypothesis-driven tasks that focus on (1) the use of well-characterized microorganisms and synthetic and natural mineral oxidants, (2) advanced spectroscopic and microscopic techniques to monitor redox transformations of U and Tc, and (3) the use of flow-through experiments to more closely approximate groundwater environments. The results are providing an improved understanding and predictive capability of the mechanisms that govern the redox dynamics of radionuclides in subsurface environments. For purposes of this poster, the results are divided into three sections: (1) influence of Ca on U(VI) bioreduction; (2) localization of biogenic UO 2 and TcO 2 ; and (3) reactivity of Mn(III/IV) oxides.

  15. Long Term Monitoring of Microbial Induced Soil Strengthening Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saneiyan, S.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Werkema, D. D., Jr.; Colwell, F. S.; Ohan, J.

    2016-12-01

    Soil strengthening/stabilization processes are used to address some of soil quality issues. Microbial induced calcite precipitation (MICP) is a promising soil stabilization process that could offer long term solution by overcoming problems of commonly used methods (e.g. injecting cement slurry). MICP can be applied in larger spatial scales, allowing the enhanced soils to be maintained in an economic sustainable and environmental friendly way. Methods are sought for the long term monitoring of MICP enhanced soils. The spectral induced polarization (SIP) method is one promising method due to sensitivity on such processes and the ability for long term, even autonomous, operation as well as cost effectiveness. Previous laboratory tests showed the sensitivity of the SIP method on soil strengthening as a result of abiotic calcite precipitation. We extended this work to biotic calcite precipitation through MICP. Early results suggest that the MICP formed calcite is denser and could provide improved strengthening capabilities. Our results are supported by geophysical (SIP and shear-wave velocity), geo-chemical and microbiological monitoring. Destructive analysis and visualization (scanning electron imaging - SEM) is expected to provide conclusive evidence on the MICP long term effectiveness.

  16. Interactions in the Geo-Biosphere: Processes of Carbonate Precipitation in Microbial Mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupraz, C.; Visscher, P. T.

    2009-12-01

    Microbial communities are situated at the interface between the biosphere, the lithosphere and the hydrosphere. These microbes are key players in the global carbon cycle, where they influence the balance between the organic and inorganic carbon reservoirs. Microbial populations can be organized in microbial mats, which can be defined as organosedimentary biofilms that are dominated by cyanobacteria, and exhibit tight coupling of element cycles. Complex interactions between mat microbes and their surrounding environment can result in the precipitation of carbonate minerals. This process refers as ‘organomineralization sensu lato' (Dupraz et al. in press), which differs from ‘biomineralization’ (e.g., in shells and bones) by lacking genetic control on the mineral product. Organomineralization can be: (1) active, when microbial metabolic reactions are responsible for the precipitation (“biologically-induced” mineralization) or (2) passive, when mineralization within a microbial organic matrix is environmentally driven (e.g., through degassing or desiccation) (“biologically-influenced” mineralization). Studying microbe-mineral interactions is essential to many emerging fields of the biogeoscience, such as the study of life in extreme environments (e.g, deep biosphere), the origin of life, the search for traces of extraterrestrial life or the seek of new carbon sink. This research approach combines sedimentology, biogeochemistry and microbiology. Two tightly coupled components that control carbonate organomineralization s.l.: (1) the alkalinity engine and (2) the extracellular organic matter (EOM), which is ultimately the location of mineral nucleation. Carbonate alkalinity can be altered both by microbial metabolism and environmental factors. In microbial mats, the net accumulation of carbonate minerals often reflect the balance between metabolic activities that consume/produce CO2 and/or organic acids. For example, photosynthesis and sulfate reduction

  17. The role microbial sulfate reduction in the direct mediation of sedimentary authigenic carbonate precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchyn, A. V.; Walker, K.; Sun, X.

    2016-12-01

    The majority of modern deep marine sediments are bathed in water that is undersaturated with respect to calcium carbonate. However, within marine sediments changing chemical conditions, driven largely by the microbial oxidation of organic carbon in the absence of oxygen, lead to supersaturated conditions and drive calcium carbonate precipitation. This sedimentary calcium carbonate is often called `authigenic carbonate', and is found in the form of cements and disseminated crystals within the marine sedimentary pile. As this precipitation of this calcium carbonate is microbially mediated, identifying authigenic carbonate within the geological record and understanding what information its geochemical and/or isotopic signature may hold is key for understanding its importance and what information it may contain past life. However, the modern controls on authigenic carbonate precipitation remain enigmatic because the myriad of microbially mediated reactions occurring within sediments both directly and indirectly impact the proton balance. In this submission we present data from 25 ocean sediment cores spanning the globe where we explore the deviation from the stoichiometrically predicted relationships among alkalinity, calcium and sulfate concentrations. In theory for every mol of organic carbon reduced by sulfate, two mol of alkalinity is produced, and to precipitate subsurface calcium carbonate one mol of calcium is used to consume two mol of alkalinity. We use this data with a model to explore changes in carbonate saturation state with depth below the seafloor. Alkalinity changes in the subsurface are poorly correlated with changes in calcium concentrations, however calcium concentrations are directly and tightly coupled to changes in sulfate concentrations in all studied sites. This suggests a direct role for sulfate reducing bacteria in the precipitation of subsurface carbonate cements.

  18. Response of microbial communities to experimental warming and precipitation decrease in Rzecin peatland (Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basińska, Anna M.; Gąbka, Maciej; Reczuga, Monika; Łuców, Dominika; Stróżecki, Marcin; Samson, Mateusz; Józefczyk, Damian; Chojnicki, Bogdan; Urbaniak, Marek; Leśny, Jacek; Olejnik, Janusz; Gilbert, Daniel; Silvennoinen, Hanna; Juszczak, Radosław; Lamentowicz, Mariusz

    2017-04-01

    In the last decade researchers are intensively testing the consequences of different climate change scenarios. Due to high biodiversity, huge amount of stored carbon and their sensitivity to environmental changes, peatlands became important for the temperature increase and drought experiments. Analyses showed that mosses, vascular plants and microbial communities were affected by warming or drought, but still not all effects are clear. Studying the response of microbial groups and indicators (e.g. mixotrophic species of testate amoeba) to warming in combination with decrease of precipitation will allow to better understand the future environmental changes. To recognize the inflow of organic matter and the carbon fixing processes in disturbed environment, we need to analyse the structure and biomass of main groups living in peatlands and the response of those groups to disturbances. The Polish - Norway "WETMAN" project was designed to recognize biotic and abiotic components of ecosystem response to active warming and decrease of precipitation. In this study we present the response of microbial communities and chosen testate amoeba species (TA) to different treatments: warming, warming and decreased precipitation and only decreased precipitation, in relation to control plots. The microbial biomass of upper and lower Sphagnum segments were analysed separately. Particular microbial groups were positively correlated with manipulations e. g. microalgae and rotifers, and other were negatively affected by combination of drought and warming e.g. cyanobacteria and testate amoeba. The structure of community was modified by manipulations, and differed in the case of upper and lower segment of Sphagnum. RDA analyses showed that different factors were crucial for the biomass of microbial groups in upper (conductivity, temperature and phosphorus) and lower (nitrates and sodium) segment. Considering higher taxonomic resolution we found that at the beginning of the experiment TA

  19. Kinetics of radiation-induced precipitation at the alloy surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, N. Q.; Nguyen, T.; Leaf, G. K.; Yip, S.

    1988-05-01

    Radiation-induced precipitation of a new phase at the surface of an alloy during irradiation at elevated temperatures was studied with the aid of a kinetic model of segregation. The preferential coupling of solute atoms with the defect fluxes gives rise to a strong solute enrichment at the surface, which, if surpassing the solute solubility limit, leads to the formation of a precipitate layer. The moving precipitate/matrix interface was accommodated by means of a mathematical scheme that transforms spatial coordinates into a reference frame in which the boundaries are immobile. Sample calculations were performed for precipitation of the γ'-Ni 3Si layer on Ni-Si alloys undergoing electron irradiation. The dependences of the precipitation kinetics on the defect-production rate, irradiation temperature, internal defect sink concentration and alloy composition were investigated systematically.

  20. Historical precipitation predictably alters the shape and magnitude of microbial functional response to soil moisture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averill, Colin; Waring, Bonnie G; Hawkes, Christine V

    2016-05-01

    Soil moisture constrains the activity of decomposer soil microorganisms, and in turn the rate at which soil carbon returns to the atmosphere. While increases in soil moisture are generally associated with increased microbial activity, historical climate may constrain current microbial responses to moisture. However, it is not known if variation in the shape and magnitude of microbial functional responses to soil moisture can be predicted from historical climate at regional scales. To address this problem, we measured soil enzyme activity at 12 sites across a broad climate gradient spanning 442-887 mm mean annual precipitation. Measurements were made eight times over 21 months to maximize sampling during different moisture conditions. We then fit saturating functions of enzyme activity to soil moisture and extracted half saturation and maximum activity parameter values from model fits. We found that 50% of the variation in maximum activity parameters across sites could be predicted by 30-year mean annual precipitation, an indicator of historical climate, and that the effect is independent of variation in temperature, soil texture, or soil carbon concentration. Based on this finding, we suggest that variation in the shape and magnitude of soil microbial response to soil moisture due to historical climate may be remarkably predictable at regional scales, and this approach may extend to other systems. If historical contingencies on microbial activities prove to be persistent in the face of environmental change, this approach also provides a framework for incorporating historical climate effects into biogeochemical models simulating future global change scenarios. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Morphology and formation mechanism in precipitation of calcite induced by Curvibacter lanceolatus strain HJ-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chonghong; Li, Fuchun; Lv, Jiejie

    2017-11-01

    Precipitation of calcium carbobate induced by microbial activities is common occurrence in controlled solution, but the formation mechanism and morphology in precipitation of calcite in solution systems is unclear, and the role of microbes is disputed. Here, culture experiment was performed for 50 days using the Curvibacter lanceolatus strain HJ-1 in a M2 culture medium, and the phase composition and morphology of the precipitates were characterized by the X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. We show that the precipitation processes in our experiment lead to unusual morphologies of crystals corresponding to different growth stages, and the morphologies of the precipitated crystal aggregates ranging from the main rod-, cross-, star-, cauliflower-like morphologies to spherulitic structure. The complex and unusual morphologies of the precipitated calcite by strain HJ-1 may provide a reference point for better understanding the biomineralization mechanism of calcite, moreover, morphological transition of minerals revealed that the multi-ply crystals-aggregation mechanism for calcite growth in crystallisation media.

  2. Microbial community composition and endolith colonization at an Arctic thermal spring are driven by calcite precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starke, Verena; Kirshtein, Julie; Fogel, Marilyn L.; Steele, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Environmental conditions shape community composition. Arctic thermal springs provide an opportunity to study how environmental gradients can impose strong selective pressures on microbial communities and provide a continuum of niche opportunities. We use microscopic and molecular methods to conduct a survey of microbial community composition at Troll Springs on Svalbard, Norway, in the high Arctic. Microorganisms there exist under a wide range of environmental conditions: in warm water as periphyton, in moist granular materials, and in cold, dry rock as endoliths. Troll Springs has two distinct ecosystems, aquatic and terrestrial, together in close proximity, with different underlying environmental factors shaping each microbial community. Periphyton are entrapped during precipitation of calcium carbonate from the spring's waters, providing microbial populations that serve as precursors for the development of endolithic communities. This process differs from most endolith colonization, in which the rock predates the communities that colonize it. Community composition is modulated as environmental conditions change within the springs. At Troll, the aquatic environments show a small number of dominant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that are specific to each sample. The terrestrial environments show a more even distribution of OTUs common to multiple samples.

  3. Radiation induced homogeneous precipitation in undersaturated solid-solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cauvin, R.; Martin, G.

    1979-01-01

    A TEM study of 1 MeV electron irradiated Al 1.9 at% Zn solid solution shows that Zn precipitates form, under irradiation at temperatures well above the Zn solvus temperature outside irradiation. The corresponding upward shift of this temperature is dose rate dependent. This new example of radiation-induced precipitation exhibits unexpected features, which are not accounted for by the available models: (1) no correlation exists between the location of the precipitates and that of the point defects sinks; (2) the precipitation of incoherent β-phase with atomic volume smaller than that of the matrix, and of coherent G.P. zones both occurs; (3) the size of the coherent β precipitates saturates at large dose. A general mechanism for solute concentration fluctuations under irradiation is proposed which qualitatively accounts for the formation of coherent G.P. zones and for the nucleation of solute clusters with more complex structures. A reanalysis of Russell's model (1977) for the growth of incoherent precipitates shows that it may qualitatively account for the observed behavior of the β phase precipitates. (Auth.)

  4. The large-scale process of microbial carbonate precipitation for nickel remediation from an industrial soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xuejiao; Li, Weila; Zhan, Lu; Huang, Minsheng; Zhang, Qiuzhuo; Achal, Varenyam

    2016-12-01

    Microbial carbonate precipitation is known as an efficient process for the remediation of heavy metals from contaminated soils. In the present study, a urease positive bacterial isolate, identified as Bacillus cereus NS4 through 16S rDNA sequencing, was utilized on a large scale to remove nickel from industrial soil contaminated by the battery industry. The soil was highly contaminated with an initial total nickel concentration of approximately 900 mg kg -1 . The soluble-exchangeable fraction was reduced to 38 mg kg -1 after treatment. The primary objective of metal stabilization was achieved by reducing the bioavailability through immobilizing the nickel in the urease-driven carbonate precipitation. The nickel removal in the soils contributed to the transformation of nickel from mobile species into stable biominerals identified as calcite, vaterite, aragonite and nickelous carbonate when analyzed under XRD. It was proven that during precipitation of calcite, Ni 2+ with an ion radius close to Ca 2+ was incorporated into the CaCO 3 crystal. The biominerals were also characterized by using SEM-EDS to observe the crystal shape and Raman-FTIR spectroscopy to predict responsible bonding during bioremediation with respect to Ni immobilization. The electronic structure and chemical-state information of the detected elements during MICP bioremediation process was studied by XPS. This is the first study in which microbial carbonate precipitation was used for the large-scale remediation of metal-contaminated industrial soil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Test particle modeling of wave-induced energetic electron precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, H.C.; Inan, U.S.

    1985-01-01

    A test particle computer model of the precipitation of radiation belt electrons is extended to compute the dynamic energy spectrum of transient electron fluxes induced by short-duration VLF wave packets traveling along the geomagnetic field lines. The model is adapted to estimate the count rate and associated spectrum of precipitated electrons that would be observed by satellite-based particle detectors with given geometric factor and orientation with respect to the magnetic field. A constant-frequency wave pulse and a lightning-induced whistler wave packet are used as examples of the stimulating wave signals. The effects of asymmetry of particle mirror heights in the two hemispheres and the atmospheric backscatter of loss cone particles on the computed precipitated fluxes are discussed

  6. Glycation inhibits trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-induced whey protein precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four different WPI saccharide conjugates were successfully prepared to test whether glycation could inhibit WPI precipitation induced by trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Conjugates molecular weights after glycation were analyzed with SDS-PAGE. No significant secondary structure change due to glycation wa...

  7. Irradiation induced precipitation in tungsten based, W-Re alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. K.; Wiffen, F. W.; Bentley, J.; Stiegler, J. O.

    1983-03-01

    Tungsten-base alloys containing 5, 11, and 25 pct Re were irradiated in the EBR-II reactor. Irradiation temperatures ranged from 600 to 1500 °C. All compositions were irradiated to fluences in the range 4.3 to 6.1 X 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV), and three 25 pct Re samples were also irradiated to 3.7 X 1026 n/m2 at temperatures 700 to 900 °C. Postirradiation examination included measurement of electrical resistivity at room temperature and lower temperatures, X-ray diffraction, optical metallography, microprobe analysis, and transmission electron microscopy. Irradiation induced resistivity decreases observed in most of the samples suggested second-phase precipitation. Complete results confirmed the precipitate formation in all samples, in disagreement with existing phase diagrams for the W-Re system. Electron diffraction showed the precipitates to be consistent with the cubic, Re-rich X-phase and inconsistent with the σ-phase. Large variations in precipitate morphology and distribution were observed between the different compositions and irradiation conditions. For the 5 and 11 pct Re-alloys, spherically symmetric strain fields surrounded the equiaxed precipitate particles, and were observed even where no particles were visible. These strain fields are believed to arise from local Re enrichment. Thermoelectric data show that the precipitation can lead to decalibration of W/Re thermocouples.

  8. Synchrotron X-ray induced solution precipitation of nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, H J; Hwu, Y; Tsai, W L

    2003-01-01

    By irradiating a solution in electroless Ni deposition using synchrotron X-rays, Ni composite was found to nucleate homogeneously and eventually precipitate in the form of nanoparticles. The size of the nanoparticles precipitated is rather uniform (100-300 nm depending on the applied temperature). By the addition of an organic acid, well-dispersed nanoparticles could be effectively deposited on glass substrate. The hydrated electrons (e sub a sub q sup -), products of radiolysis of water molecules by synchrotron X-rays, may be responsible for the effective reduction of the metal ions, resulting in homogeneous nucleation and nanoparticle formation. Our results suggest that synchrotron X-ray can be used to induce solution precipitation of nanoparticles and therefore lead to a new method of producing nanostructured particles and coating.

  9. Biochemical process of ureolysis-based microbial CaCO3 precipitation and its application in self-healing concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Wang, Xianzhi; Wang, Binbin

    2018-04-01

    Urea hydrolysis has already been considered as the most effective pathway for microbially induced CaCO 3 precipitation (MICP). The present work first studied the combination of several key factors including initial pH, temperature, and dosage of urea, which contribute to the biochemical process of MICP. Under an amiable condition of pH and temperature, the dosage of urea has a significant impact on the rate of urea degradation and CaCO 3 precipitation. A bacteria-based self-healing system was developed by loading healing agents on ceramsite carriers. The self-healing efficiency was evaluated by visual inspection on crack closure, compressive strength regain, and capillary water absorption. A preferable healing effectiveness was obtained when the bacteria and organic nutrients were co-immobilized in carriers. Image analysis showed that cracks up to 273 μm could be healed with a crack closure ratio of 86% in 28 days. The compressive strength regain increased 24% and the water absorption coefficient decreased 27% compared to the reference. The findings indicated a promising application of ureolysis-based MICP in restoring the mechanical properties and enhancing the durability of concrete.

  10. Iron Isotope Fractionation in Microbial and Non-Biological Precipitates, and the Human Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Blanckenburg, F.; Boettcher, M. E.; Hofmann, B.; Walczyk, T.

    2001-12-01

    represent fossil remnants of microbial mats, have been found as encrustations in chalcedony. Delta57Fe is 3 permil heavier than the associated calcite (representing the Fe-rich fluids). Therefore, the fractionations found in microbial precipitates are not larger than those produced in the abiotic experiments. In contrast, major Fe isotope fractionations are produced by the human body: The major iron compartments in the human body, blood, liver, muscle tissues, and also hair, are all depleted by as much as 6 permil in the 57Fe isotope relative to 54Fe when compared to the average dietary intake. Since feces are similar to the average intake, we conclude that a significant Fe isotope fractionation occurs at the adsorptive stage in the intestine. In conclusion, with respect to the hypothesis that Fe isotope effects might serve as "biosignatures" it appears that microbial and abiotic reactions cause similar isotope effects which essentially depend on redox reactions and the speciation in the aqueous solution. On the other hand, higher organisms bear distinct Fe isotope signatures.

  11. Precipitation effects on microbial pollution in a river: lag structures and seasonal effect modification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Tornevi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The river Göta Älv is a source of freshwater for 0.7 million swedes. The river is subject to contamination from sewer systems discharge and runoff from agricultural lands. Climate models projects an increase in precipitation and heavy rainfall in this region. This study aimed to determine how daily rainfall causes variation in indicators of pathogen loads, to increase knowledge of variations in river water quality and discuss implications for risk management. METHODS: Data covering 7 years of daily monitoring of river water turbidity and concentrations of E. coli, Clostridium and coliforms were obtained, and their short-term variations in relation with precipitation were analyzed with time series regression and non-linear distributed lag models. We studied how precipitation effects varied with season and compared different weather stations for predictive ability. RESULTS: Generally, the lowest raw water quality occurs 2 days after rainfall, with poor raw water quality continuing for several more days. A rainfall event of >15 mm/24-h (local 95 percentile was associated with a three-fold higher concentration of E. coli and 30% higher turbidity levels (lag 2. Rainfall was associated with exponential increases in concentrations of indicator bacteria while the effect on turbidity attenuated with very heavy rainfall. Clear associations were also observed between consecutive days of wet weather and decreased water quality. The precipitation effect on increased levels of indicator bacteria was significant in all seasons. CONCLUSIONS: Rainfall elevates microbial risks year-round in this river and freshwater source and acts as the main driver of varying water quality. Heavy rainfall appears to be a better predictor of fecal pollution than water turbidity. An increase of wet weather and extreme events with climate change will lower river water quality even more, indicating greater challenges for drinking water producers, and suggesting better

  12. Biocontainment of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) on flat concrete surfaces by microbial carbonate precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okwadha, George D O; Li, Jin

    2011-10-01

    In this study, a biosealant obtained from microbial carbonate precipitation (MCP) was evaluated as an alternative to an epoxy-coating system. A bacterium Sporosarcina pasteurii strain ATCC 11859, which metabolizes urea and precipitates calcite in a calcium-rich environment, was used in this study to generate the biosealant on a PCB-contaminated concrete surface. Concrete cylinders measuring 3 in (76.2 mm) by 6 in (152.4 mm) were made in accordance with ASTM C33 and C192 and used for this purpose. The PCB, urea, Ca(2+), and bacterial cell concentrations were set at 10 ppm, 666 mM, 250 mM, and about 2.1 × 10(8) cells mL(-1), respectively. The results indicate that the biosealed surfaces reduced water permeability by 1-5 orders of magnitude, and had a high resistance to carbonation. Since the MCP biosealant is thermally stable under temperatures of up to 840 °C, the high temperatures that normally exist in the surrounding equipment, which may contain PCB-based fluids, have no effect on the biosealed surfaces. Consequently, there is greater potential to obtain a stronger, coherent, and durable surface by MCP. No measurable amount of PCBs was detected in the permeating water, indicating that the leaching water, if any, will have a minimum impact on the surrounding environment. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Microbially induced separation of quartz from calcite using Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padukone, S Usha; Natarajan, K A

    2011-11-01

    Cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and their metabolites were successfully utilized to achieve selective separation of quartz and calcite through microbially induced flotation and flocculation. S. cerevisiae was adapted to calcite and quartz minerals. Adsorption studies and electrokinetic investigations were carried out to understand the changes in the surface chemistry of yeast cells and the minerals after mutual interaction. Possible mechanisms in microbially induced flotation and flocculation are outlined. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of Temperature on Precipitation Rate of Calcium Carbonate Produced through Microbial Metabolic Process of Bio Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prima Yane Putri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is the most widely used construction material in civil engineering. But plain concrete is a brittle material and has little resistance to cracking. The cracking in concrete promotes deterioration such as the corrosion of reinforcing rebar, therefore, repair in filling the crack is often carried out. Recently, repair methods using bio-based materials associated with microbial metabolic processes leading to precipitation of calcium carbonate have been intensively studied. In this study, influencing factors on the precipitation rate depending on the constituents of bio-based material comprising yeast, glucose and calcium acetate mixed in tris buffer solution was examined for improving the rate of initial reactions. In addition, effect of temperature change on the amount of calcium carbonate precipitation was also investigated. The precipitates were identified by X-ray diffraction. It was shown that the increase of temperature lead to a change on calcium carbonate precipitation and caused the pH decrease under 7.0.

  15. Microbially induced corrosion of carbon steel in deep groundwater environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauliina eRajala

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The metallic low and intermediate level radioactive waste generally consists of carbon steel and stainless steels. The corrosion rate of carbon steel in deep groundwater is typically low, unless the water is very acidic or microbial activity in the environment is high. Therefore, the assessment of microbially induced corrosion of carbon steel in deep bedrock environment has become important for evaluating the safety of disposal of radioactive waste. Here we studied the corrosion inducing ability of indigenous microbial community from a deep bedrock aquifer. Carbon steel coupons were exposed to anoxic groundwater from repository site 100 m depth (Olkiluoto, Finland for periods of three and eight months. The experiments were conducted at both in situ temperature and room temperature to investigate the response of microbial population to elevated temperature. Our results demonstrate that microorganisms from the deep bedrock aquifer benefit from carbon steel introduced to the nutrient poor anoxic deep groundwater environment. In the groundwater incubated with carbon steel the planktonic microbial community was more diverse and 100-fold more abundant compared to the environment without carbon steel. The betaproteobacteria were the most dominant bacterial class in all samples where carbon steel was present, whereas in groundwater incubated without carbon steel the microbial community had clearly less diversity. Microorganisms induced pitting corrosion and were found to cluster inside the corrosion pits. Temperature had an effect on the species composition of microbial community and also affected the corrosion deposits layer formed on the surface of carbon steel.

  16. Photometric evidence of electron precipitation induced by first hop whistlers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doolittle, J.H.; Carpenter, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    Electron precipitation events induced by discrete VLF whistler mode waves have previously been detected by photometers at Siple Station, Antarctica. This paper presents the first observations of ionospheric optical emissions correlated with VLF waves at the conjugate location, near Roberval, Quebec. Since most whistlers recorded at Siple or Roberval originate in the north, Roberval affords a clear perspective on the direct precipitation induced during the first pass of the wave as it propagates southward. For such a wave the direct precipitation and that induced in the ''mirrored mode'' by the returning two-hop wave should differ in arrival time by roughly twice the wave propagation time between hemispheres, while at Siple the effects of the direct and mirrored modes may overlap in time. A well defined series of observations of structured lambda4278 optical emissions was observed on August 30, 1979 in the aftermath of an intense magnetic storm. The optical emissions were found to lead the arrival time of the two-hop waves by about 0.7 s instead of lagging the local waves by about 1--2 s as had been previously observed for whistler driven events at Siple. The observed arrival time relationships are consistent with the predictions of a cyclotron resonance interaction model, and thus support previous observations of x-rays at Roberval. The importance of the first pass of the wave is further emphasized by an approximate proportionality between the amplitude of the VLF waves recorded at Siple and the intensity of the optical emission bursts at Roberval. Although structured optical emissions correlated with wave bursts can clearly be detected at Roberval, relatively large magnetospheric particle fluxes may be required to produce such events

  17. The microbial mats of Pavilion Lake microbialites: examining the relationship between photosynthesis and carbonate precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, D. S. S.; Hawes, I.; Mackey, T. J.; Brady, A. L.; Biddle, J.; Andersen, D. T.; Belan, M.; Slater, G.; Abercromby, A.; Squyres, S. W.; Delaney, M.; Haberle, C. W.; Cardman, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Pavilion Lake in British Columbia, Canada is an ultra-oligotrophic lake that has abundant microbialite growth. Recent research has shown that photoautotrophic microbial communities are important to modern microbialite development in Pavilion Lake. However, questions remain as to the relationship between changing light levels within the lake, variation in microbialite macro-structure, microbial consortia, and the preservation of associated biosignatures within the microbialite fabrics. The 2014 Pavilion Lake Research Project (PLRP) field program was focused on data gathering to understand these complex relationships by determining if a) light is the immediate limit to photosynthetic activity and, if so, if light is distributed around microbialites in ways that are consistent with emergent microbialite structure; and b) if at more local scales, the filamentous pink and green cyanobacterial nodular colonies identified in previous PLRP studies are centers of photosynthetic activity that create pH conditions suitable for carbonate precipitation. A diver-deployed pulse-amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometer was used to collect synoptic in situ measurements of fluorescence yield and irradiance and across microbialites, focusing on comparing flat and vertical structural elements at a range of sites and depths. As well, we collected time series measurements of photosynthetic activity and irradiance at a set depth of 18 m across three different regions in Pavilion Lake. Our initial findings suggest that all microbialite surfaces are primarily light-limited regardless of depth or location within the lake. Shore based PAM fluorometry and microelectrode profiling of diver-collected samples suggest that pink and green nodules have different photosynthetic properties and pH profiles, and that nodular growth is likely to be the primary route of calcification due to the gelatinous covering the nodule creates. On-going tests for molecular signatures and isotopic shifts will allow for

  18. Electrochemical struvite precipitation from digestate with a fluidized bed cathode microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusick, Roland D; Ullery, Mark L; Dempsey, Brian A; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-05-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) can be used to simultaneously convert wastewater organics to hydrogen and precipitate struvite, but scale formation at the cathode surface can block catalytic active sites and limit extended operation. To promote bulk phase struvite precipitation and minimize cathode scaling, a two-chamber MEC was designed with a fluidized bed to produce suspended particles and inhibit scale formation on the cathode surface. MEC operation elevated the cathode pH to between 8.3 and 8.7 under continuous flow conditions. Soluble phosphorus removal using digester effluent ranged from 70 to 85% with current generation, compared to 10-20% for the control (open circuit conditions). At low current densities (≤2 mA/m(2)), scouring of the cathode by fluidized particles prevented scale accumulation over a period of 8 days. There was nearly identical removal of soluble phosphorus and magnesium from solution, and an equimolar composition in the collected solids, supporting phosphorus removal by struvite formation. At an applied voltage of 1.0 V, energy consumption from the power supply and pumping (0.2 Wh/L, 7.5 Wh/g-P) was significantly less than that needed by other struvite formation methods based on pH adjustment such as aeration and NaOH addition. In the anode chamber, current generation led to COD oxidation (1.1-2.1 g-COD/L-d) and ammonium removal (7-12 mM) from digestate amended with 1 g/L of sodium acetate. These results indicate that a fluidized bed cathode MEC is a promising method of sustainable electrochemical nutrient and energy recovery method for nutrient rich wastewaters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Electrochemical struvite precipitation from digestate with a fluidized bed cathode microbial electrolysis cell

    KAUST Repository

    Cusick, Roland D.

    2014-05-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) can be used to simultaneously convert wastewater organics to hydrogen and precipitate struvite, but scale formation at the cathode surface can block catalytic active sites and limit extended operation. To promote bulk phase struvite precipitation and minimize cathode scaling, a two-chamber MEC was designed with a fluidized bed to produce suspended particles and inhibit scale formation on the cathode surface. MEC operation elevated the cathode pH to between 8.3 and 8.7 under continuous flow conditions. Soluble phosphorus removal using digester effluent ranged from 70 to 85% with current generation, compared to 10-20% for the control (open circuit conditions). At low current densities (≤2mA/m2), scouring of the cathode by fluidized particles prevented scale accumulation over a period of 8 days. There was nearly identical removal of soluble phosphorus and magnesium from solution, and an equimolar composition in the collected solids, supporting phosphorus removal by struvite formation. At an applied voltage of 1.0V, energy consumption from the power supply and pumping (0.2Wh/L, 7.5Wh/g-P) was significantly less than that needed by other struvite formation methods based on pH adjustment such as aeration and NaOH addition. In the anode chamber, current generation led to COD oxidation (1.1-2.1g-COD/L-d) and ammonium removal (7-12mM) from digestate amended with 1g/L of sodium acetate. These results indicate that a fluidized bed cathode MEC is a promising method of sustainable electrochemical nutrient and energy recovery method for nutrient rich wastewaters. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Electrochemical struvite precipitation from digestate with a fluidized bed cathode microbial electrolysis cell

    KAUST Repository

    Cusick, Roland D.; Ullery, Mark L.; Dempsey, Brian A.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) can be used to simultaneously convert wastewater organics to hydrogen and precipitate struvite, but scale formation at the cathode surface can block catalytic active sites and limit extended operation. To promote bulk phase struvite precipitation and minimize cathode scaling, a two-chamber MEC was designed with a fluidized bed to produce suspended particles and inhibit scale formation on the cathode surface. MEC operation elevated the cathode pH to between 8.3 and 8.7 under continuous flow conditions. Soluble phosphorus removal using digester effluent ranged from 70 to 85% with current generation, compared to 10-20% for the control (open circuit conditions). At low current densities (≤2mA/m2), scouring of the cathode by fluidized particles prevented scale accumulation over a period of 8 days. There was nearly identical removal of soluble phosphorus and magnesium from solution, and an equimolar composition in the collected solids, supporting phosphorus removal by struvite formation. At an applied voltage of 1.0V, energy consumption from the power supply and pumping (0.2Wh/L, 7.5Wh/g-P) was significantly less than that needed by other struvite formation methods based on pH adjustment such as aeration and NaOH addition. In the anode chamber, current generation led to COD oxidation (1.1-2.1g-COD/L-d) and ammonium removal (7-12mM) from digestate amended with 1g/L of sodium acetate. These results indicate that a fluidized bed cathode MEC is a promising method of sustainable electrochemical nutrient and energy recovery method for nutrient rich wastewaters. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Ion irradiation-induced precipitation of Cr23C6 at dislocation loops in austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Shuoxue; Guo, Liping; Luo, Fengfeng; Yao, Zhongwen; Ma, Shuli; Tang, Rui

    2013-01-01

    The irradiation-induced precipitates in argon ion-irradiated austenitic stainless steel at 550 °C were examined via transmission electron microscopy. The selected-area electron diffraction patterns of precipitates indicated unambiguously that the precipitates were Cr 23 C 6 carbides. It was observed directly for the first time that irradiation-induced Cr 23 C 6 precipitates formed at dislocation loops in austenitic stainless steel, and coarsened with increasing irradiation dose.

  2. Northwestcape-induced Electron Precipitation and Theoretica Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Li, X.; Wang, C.; Chen, L.

    2017-12-01

    Enhancement of the electron fluxes in the inner radiation belt, which is induced by the powerful North West Cape (NWC) very-low-frequency (VLF) transmitter, have been observed and analyzed by several research groups. However, all of the previous publications have focused on NWC-induced > 100-keV electrons only, based on observations from the Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER) and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) satellites. Here, we present flux enhancements with 30-100-keV electrons related to NWC transmitter for the first time, which were observed by the GOES satellite at night. Similar to the 100- 300-keV precipitated-electron behavior, the low energy 30-100-keV electron precipitation is primarily located east of the transmitter. However, the latter does not drift eastward to the same extent as the former, possibly because of the lower electron velocity. The 30-100-keV electrons are distributed in the L = 1.8-2.1 L-shell range, in contrast to the 100-300-keVelectronswhichareatL=1.67-1.9. ThisisconsistentwiththeperspectivethattheenergyoftheVLF-waveinducedelectronfluxenhancementdecreaseswithhigherL-shellvalues. Weexpandupontherationalityofthesimultaneous enhancementofthe30-100-and100-300-keVelectronfluxesthroughcomparisonwiththecyclotronresonancetheoryfor the quasi-linear wave-particle interaction. In addition, we interpret the asymmetry characteristics of NWC electric power distribution in northand south hemisphere by ray tracing model. Finally, we present considerable discussionand showthat good agreement exists between the observation of satellites and theory.

  3. North west cape-induced electron precipitation and theoretical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen-xia; Li, Xin-qiao; Wang, Chen-Yu; Chen, Lun-Jin

    2016-11-01

    Enhancement of the electron fluxes in the inner radiation belt, which is induced by the powerful North West Cape (NWC) very-low-frequency (VLF) transmitter, have been observed and analyzed by several research groups. However, all of the previous publications have focused on NWC-induced > 100-keV electrons only, based on observations from the Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER) and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) satellites. Here, we present flux enhancements with 30-100-keV electrons related to NWC transmitter for the first time, which were observed by the GOES satellite at night. Similar to the 100-300-keV precipitated-electron behavior, the low energy 30-100-keV electron precipitation is primarily located east of the transmitter. However, the latter does not drift eastward to the same extent as the former, possibly because of the lower electron velocity. The 30-100-keV electrons are distributed in the L = 1.8-2.1 L-shell range, in contrast to the 100-300-keV electrons which are at L = 1.67-1.9. This is consistent with the perspective that the energy of the VLF-wave-induced electron flux enhancement decreases with higher L-shell values. We expand upon the rationality of the simultaneous enhancement of the 30-100- and 100-300-keV electron fluxes through comparison with the cyclotron resonance theory for the quasi-linear wave-particle interaction. In addition, we interpret the asymmetry characteristics of NWC electric power distribution in north and south hemisphere by ray tracing model. Finally, we present considerable discussion and show that good agreement exists between the observation of satellites and theory. Supported by the China Seismo-Electromagnetic Satellite Mission Ground-Based Verification Project of the Administration of Science, Technology, and Industry for National Defense and Asia-Pacific Space Cooperation Organization Project (APSCO-SP/PM-EARTHQUAKE).

  4. Formation of radiation induced precipitates in VVER RPV materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platonov, P.A.; Chernobaeva, A.A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of experimental results received in course of research of copper-enriched precipitates (Cu-precipitates) and nickel-manganese-silicon clusters (Ni-Mn-Si clusters), which are formed in steels of VVER-type reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) under neutron irradiation. Based on this analysis, a hypothetical model is suggested for cluster formation in course of evolution of a cascade region. The model presumes cluster formation in two stages. At the first stage, in course of cascade region crystallization, a stable cluster is formed in the center of the cascade region, which consists of vacancies and Cu atoms following the mechanism of the inverse Kirkendall effect. At the second stage, diffusion of Ni, Mn and P atoms with a flow of vacancies from the matrix takes place to form a cluster. The size of a cluster is limited by a balance of vacancies' flows entering and leaving the cluster. The paper also considers a possibility of stabilization of atomic-vacancy cluster due to uneven distribution of Ni, Mn and P atoms, which explains dependence of cluster density on the content of these elements. Kinetics of cluster formation and evolution presumed by suggested model is analyzed. It is demonstrated that a fall in cluster density and an increase in their size under high irradiation doses may be caused by a decrease of matrix supersaturation with vacancies resulting from high density of dislocation loops. - Highlights: • The analysis of the mechanism of formation of radiation-induced clusters in RPV steels has been done. • Radiation-induced clusters are formed after the mechanism based on the inverse Kirkendall effect in two stages. • At post-dynamic stage a flow of vacancies moving to the center of the cascade entrains Cu atoms contained and forms a stable atom-vacancies cluster. • At the 2nd stage Cu, Ni, Mn, Si atoms forming complexes with vacancies diffuse into a cluster driving out Fe and Cr atoms from the cluster. • The cluster

  5. Mechanism of acetaldehyde-induced deactivation of microbial lipases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeger Karl E

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial lipases represent the most important class of biocatalysts used for a wealth of applications in organic synthesis. An often applied reaction is the lipase-catalyzed transesterification of vinyl esters and alcohols resulting in the formation of acetaldehyde which is known to deactivate microbial lipases, presumably by structural changes caused by initial Schiff-base formation at solvent accessible lysine residues. Previous studies showed that several lipases were sensitive toward acetaldehyde deactivation whereas others were insensitive; however, a general explanation of the acetaldehyde-induced inactivation mechanism is missing. Results Based on five microbial lipases from Candida rugosa, Rhizopus oryzae, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Bacillus subtilis we demonstrate that the protonation state of lysine ε-amino groups is decisive for their sensitivity toward acetaldehyde. Analysis of the diverse modification products of Bacillus subtilis lipases in the presence of acetaldehyde revealed several stable products such as α,β-unsaturated polyenals, which result from base and/or amino acid catalyzed aldol condensation of acetaldehyde. Our studies indicate that these products induce the formation of stable Michael-adducts at solvent-accessible amino acids and thus lead to enzyme deactivation. Further, our results indicate Schiff-base formation with acetaldehyde to be involved in crosslinking of lipase molecules. Conclusions Differences in stability observed with various commercially available microbial lipases most probably result from different purification procedures carried out by the respective manufacturers. We observed that the pH of the buffer used prior to lyophilization of the enzyme sample is of utmost importance. The mechanism of acetaldehyde-induced deactivation of microbial lipases involves the generation of α,β-unsaturated polyenals from acetaldehyde which subsequently form stable Michael-adducts with the

  6. Influence of phosphorus precipitation on permeability and soluble microbial product concentration in a membrane bioreactor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gómez, M.; Dvořák, L.; Růžičková, I.; Wanner, J.; Holba, Marek; Sýkorová, E.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 129, Feb 2013 (2013), s. 164-169 ISSN 0960-8524 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : membrane bioreactor * coagulant adition * soluble microbial products Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 5.039, year: 2013

  7. Investigating the legacy effect of drought on microbial responses to drying and rewetting along a Texan precipitation gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Lettice; Leizeaga, Ainara; Hawkes, Christine; Rousk, Johannes

    2017-04-01

    Hydrological regimes will intensify due to climate change, thus increasing the duration and intensity of drought and rainfall events. Rewetting of dry soil is known to stimulate dramatic CO2 releases. A clear understanding of the mechanisms that determine the dynamics of CO2 loss upon rewetting is therefore required to characterise ecosystem C-budgets and predict responses to climate change. Laboratory studies have identified two distinct responses upon rewetting; bacterial growth either increases linearly immediately, with maximal respiration also occurring immediately and decreasing exponentially with time ("Type 1"), or bacterial growth increases exponentially after a period of near-zero growth, with a sustained period of elevated respiration, sometimes followed by a secondary increase in respiration coinciding with the onset of bacterial growth ("Type 2"). A shift from a Type 1 to a Type 2 response has been observed with increasing duration and intensity of drying prior to rewetting. The size of the surviving microbial community after drying, relative to resources available after rewetting, is suggested to dictate whether a Type 1 or 2 response occurs, with more 'harsh' (i.e. longer or more severe) drying reducing microbial biomass such that carbon available upon rewetting is sufficient to support exponential growth (leading to Type 2 response). However, this is yet to be tested in intact ecosystems. We investigated the legacy of drought on microbial responses to drying and rewetting using grassland soils from a natural precipitation gradient in Texas. Mean annual precipitation spanned a 500 mm range (400-900 mm year-1) across the 400 km gradient, while mean annual temperature was constant. Soil properties (pH, SOM) did not vary systematically across the gradient, with differences reflecting land-use history rather than rainfall. Air dried soils from 18 sites were rewetted to 50 % water holding capacity with bacterial growth, fungal growth and respiration

  8. Ammonia induced precipitation of cobalt hydroxide: observation of turbostratic disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, T. N.; Rajamathi, Michael; Kamath, P. Vishnu

    2003-05-01

    Cobalt hydroxide freshly precipitated from aqueous solutions of Co salts using ammonia, is a layered phase having a 9.17 Å interlayer spacing. DIFFaX simulations of the PXRD pattern reveal that it is turbostratically disordered.

  9. Irradiation-induced precipitation in Ni--Si alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbu, A.; Ardell, A.J.

    1975-07-01

    The microstructures of Ni + ion-irradiated Ni--Si solid-solution alloys, containing 2, 4, 6 and 8 at. percent Si were investigated as a function of dose, dose-rate, and temperature. Results of transmission electron microscopy and other data show the precipitation of γ' (Ni 3 Si) in all samples irradiated at 500 0 C. Characteristics of the precipitates are described and a mechanism for their formation is suggested. (U.S.)

  10. Limitations of polyethylene glycol-induced precipitation as predictive tool for protein solubility during formulation development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Melanie; Winzer, Matthias; Weber, Christian; Gieseler, Henning

    2018-05-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-induced protein precipitation is often used to extrapolate apparent protein solubility at specific formulation compositions. The procedure was used for several fields of application such as protein crystal growth but also protein formulation development. Nevertheless, most studies focused on applicability in protein crystal growth. In contrast, this study focuses on applicability of PEG-induced precipitation during high-concentration protein formulation development. In this study, solubility of three different model proteins was investigated over a broad range of pH. Solubility values predicted by PEG-induced precipitation were compared to real solubility behaviour determined by either turbidity or content measurements. Predicted solubility by PEG-induced precipitation was confirmed for an Fc fusion protein and a monoclonal antibody. In contrast, PEG-induced precipitation failed to predict solubility of a single-domain antibody construct. Applicability of PEG-induced precipitation as indicator of protein solubility during formulation development was found to be not valid for one of three model molecules. Under certain conditions, PEG-induced protein precipitation is not valid for prediction of real protein solubility behaviour. The procedure should be used carefully as tool for formulation development, and the results obtained should be validated by additional investigations. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  11. Microbial decomposition of dead grassland roots and its influence on the carbon cycle under changing precipitation patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, C.; Schimel, J.

    2013-12-01

    Soil is the largest reservoir of organic carbon in terrestrial ecosystems and as such, represents a potential sink for carbon dioxide.The decomposition products of dead roots buried in the soil is a contributor to soil organic carbon. However, changing precipitation patterns may affect its fate by influencing the microbial community responsible for decomposing dead roots. To assess the impact of changing precipitation patterns, we constructed microcosms with grassland soil collected from the UCSB Sedgwick Reserve, an active and long-term research site, and dead roots from greenhouse-grown grass, Bromus diandrus. Microcosms were wetted continuously, every seven days, or every twenty days. Sets of microcosms were periodically deconstructed to assess the soil versus the roots-associated microbial community and its function. Differences in respiration rates of microcosms continuously wetted or wetted every 7 days versus microcosms wetted every 20 days existed for the first 70 days. After which, no differences in respiration rates were seen with microcosms containing roots and the no roots control. Relatedly, after a 70% roots mass loss by day 50, there was no difference in the respiration rate of microcosms containing roots and the no roots control. More than half of the roots mass loss had occurred by 30 days. By the end of the incubation period, the roots mass loss in continuously wet and 7-day wetted microcosms were over 80% compared to 67% for the microcosms wetted every 20 days. Microbial biomass in the soil were constant over time and showed no difference in treatment except with the no roots control during the first half of the incubation period. Hydrolytic enzyme activities (β-1,4-glucosidase; α-1,4-glucosidase; β-1,4-xylosidase; β-1,4-cellobiosidase) on the roots versus the soil attached to the roots were over an order greater and decreased faster with the exception of N-acetyl-glucosaminidase and acid phosphatase. Oxidative enzyme activities (phenol

  12. The Effect of Cell Immobilization by Calcium Alginate on Bacterially Induced Calcium Carbonate Precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Seifan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Microbially induced mineral precipitation is recognized as a widespread phenomenon in nature. A diverse range of minerals including carbonate, sulphides, silicates, and phosphates can be produced through biomineralization. Calcium carbonate (CaCO3 is one of the most common substances used in various industries and is mostly extracted by mining. In recent years, production of CaCO3 by bacteria has drawn much attention because it is an environmentally- and health-friendly pathway. Although CaCO3 can be produced by some genera of bacteria through autotrophic and heterotrophic pathways, the possibility of producing CaCO3 in different environmental conditions has remained a challenge to determine. In this study, calcium alginate was proposed as a protective carrier to increase the bacterial tolerance to extreme environmental conditions. The model showed that the highest concentration of CaCO3 is achieved when the bacterial cells are immobilized in the calcium alginate beads fabricated using 1.38% w/v Na-alginate and 0.13 M CaCl2.

  13. Stability of thermally induced copper precipitates under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phythian, W.J.; Dumbill, S.; Brown, P.; Sinclair, R.

    1993-01-01

    Model Fe 1.3%Cu and Fe 1.3%Cu 1.1%Ni alloys have been thermally aged at 550 C for 2 hours (peak) and 10 hours prior to irradiation at 288 C to a dose of 5.10 22 n/m 2 . Results of a microstructural investigation using dedicated field emission gun scanning transmission electron microscopy (FEGSTEM) and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) to assess precipitate stability in the binary alloy, are presented. These data are then used to predict a hardness change as a result of copper precipitation for comparison with the measured values obtained using standard 5 kg Vickers hardness tests on the SANS samples. Implications of these data to the re-embrittlement of the RPV by subsequent copper precipitation is discussed. (authors). 16 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  14. Radiation induced homogeneous precipitation in undersaturated solid-solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cauvin, Richard; Martin, Georges.

    1978-01-01

    The stability of various types of solid solutions under irradiation is studied. In this paper, observations made on AlZn solid solutions under 1 MeV electron irradiation are reported. Al-Zn was chosen as a prototype of solid solutions with a simple miscibility gap. It is shown that under appropriate irradiation conditions undersaturated AnZn solid solutions give rise to a homogeneous precipitation of coherent G.P. zones and of incoherent Zn precipitates the atomic volume of which is smaller than that of the matrix. We propose a more general treatment of solute concentration heterogeneities in solid solutions under irradiation and suggest how it might account for the nucleation of the observed phases. The growth of the observed precipitates is studied

  15. Stability of thermally induced copper precipitates under neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phythian, W J; Dumbill, S; Brown, P; Sinclair, R [AEA Technology, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    Model Fe 1.3%Cu and Fe 1.3%Cu 1.1%Ni alloys have been thermally aged at 550 C for 2 hours (peak) and 10 hours prior to irradiation at 288 C to a dose of 5.10{sup 22} n/m{sup 2}. Results of a microstructural investigation using dedicated field emission gun scanning transmission electron microscopy (FEGSTEM) and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) to assess precipitate stability in the binary alloy, are presented. These data are then used to predict a hardness change as a result of copper precipitation for comparison with the measured values obtained using standard 5 kg Vickers hardness tests on the SANS samples. Implications of these data to the re-embrittlement of the RPV by subsequent copper precipitation is discussed. (authors). 16 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Increased precipitation accelerates soil organic matter turnover associated with microbial community composition in topsoil of alpine grassland on the eastern Tibetan Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Conghai; Wang, Zongli; Si, Guicai; Lei, Tianzhu; Yuan, Yanli; Zhang, Gengxin

    2017-10-01

    Large quantities of carbon are stored in alpine grassland of the Tibetan Plateau, which is extremely sensitive to climate change. However, it remains unclear whether soil organic matter (SOM) in different layers responds to climate change analogously, and whether microbial communities play vital roles in SOM turnover of topsoil. In this study we measured and collected SOM turnover by the 14 C method in alpine grassland to test climatic effects on SOM turnover in soil profiles. Edaphic properties and microbial communities in the northwestern Qinghai Lake were investigated to explore microbial influence on SOM turnover. SOM turnover in surface soil (0-10 cm) was more sensitive to precipitation than that in subsurface layers (10-40 cm). Precipitation also imposed stronger effects on the composition of microbial communities in the surface layer than that in deeper soil. At the 5-10 cm depth, the SOM turnover rate was positively associated with the bacteria/fungi biomass ratio and the relative abundance of Acidobacteria, both of which are related to precipitation. Partial correlation analysis suggested that increased precipitation could accelerate the SOM turnover rate in topsoil by structuring soil microbial communities. Conversely, carbon stored in deep soil would be barely affected by climate change. Our results provide valuable insights into the dynamics and storage of SOM in alpine grasslands under future climate scenarios.

  17. Spectral induced polarization and electrodic potential monitoring of microbially mediated iron sulfide transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbard, Susan; Personna, Y.R.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Slater, L.; Yee, N.; O' Brien, M.; Hubbard, S.

    2008-02-15

    Stimulated sulfate-reduction is a bioremediation technique utilized for the sequestration of heavy metals in the subsurface.We performed laboratory column experiments to investigate the geoelectrical response of iron sulfide transformations by Desulfo vibriovulgaris. Two geoelectrical methods, (1) spectral induced polarization (SIP), and (2) electrodic potential measurements, were investigated. Aqueous geochemistry (sulfate, lactate, sulfide, and acetate), observations of precipitates (identified from electron microscopy as iron sulfide), and electrodic potentials on bisulfide ion (HS) sensitive silver-silver chloride (Ag-AgCl) electrodes (630 mV) were diagnostic of induced transitions between an aerobic iron sulfide forming conditions and aerobic conditions promoting iron sulfide dissolution. The SIP data showed 10m rad anomalies during iron sulfide mineralization accompanying microbial activity under an anaerobic transition. These anomalies disappeared during iron sulfide dissolution under the subsequent aerobic transition. SIP model parameters based on a Cole-Cole relaxation model of the polarization at the mineral-fluid interface were converted to (1) estimated biomineral surface area to pore volume (Sp), and (2) an equivalent polarizable sphere diameter (d) controlling the relaxation time. The temporal variation in these model parameters is consistent with filling and emptying of pores by iron sulfide biofilms, as the system transitions between anaerobic (pore filling) and aerobic (pore emptying) conditions. The results suggest that combined SIP and electrodic potential measurements might be used to monitor spatiotemporal variability in microbial iron sulfide transformations in the field.

  18. Effect of strain-induced precipitation on dynamic recrystallization in Mg–Al–Sn alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabir, Abu Syed Humaun; Sanjari, Mehdi; Su, Jing; Jung, In-Ho; Yue, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Two different amounts of tin (Sn) were added to a Mg–3 wt% Al binary alloy to form different amounts of precipitates during hot deformation. The thermodynamic modeling software, FactSage ™ , was used to calculate the amounts of Sn to generate the desired relative levels of precipitation. The alloys were deformed at four different temperatures and three different strain rates to generate different amounts of precipitates. The objective was to study the effect of these precipitates on dynamic recrystallization. The results indicated that the formation of strain-induced precipitates is a function of deformation temperature, strain, and strain rate. The findings also revealed that higher amounts of precipitates reduced the volume fraction of dynamic recrystallization and refined the dynamically recrystallized grain size

  19. Analytical model of radiation-induced precipitation at the surface of dilute binary alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechenkin, V. A.; Stepanov, I. A.; Konobeev, Yu. V.

    2002-12-01

    Growth of precipitate layer at the foil surface of an undersaturated binary alloy under uniform irradiation is treated analytically. Analytical expressions for the layer growth rate, layer thickness limit and final component concentrations in the matrix are derived for coherent and incoherent precipitate-matrix interfaces. It is shown that the high temperature limit of radiation-induced precipitation is the same for both types of interfaces, whereas layer thickness limits are different. A parabolic law of the layer growth predicted for both types of interfaces is in agreement with experimental data on γ '-phase precipitation at the surface of Ni-Si dilute alloys under ion irradiation. Effect of sputtering on the precipitation rate and on the low temperature limit of precipitation under ion irradiation is discussed.

  20. Aerobic microbial dolomite at the nanometer scale : Implications for the geologic record

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sánchez-Román, Mónica; Vasconcelos, Crisógono; Schmid, Thomas; Dittrich, Maria; McKenzie, Judith A.; Zenobi, Renato; Rivadeneyra, Maria A.

    2008-01-01

    Microbial experiments are the only proven approach to produce experimental dolomite under Earth's surface conditions. Although microbial metabolisms are known to induce dolomite precipitation by favoring dolomite growth kinetics, the involvement of microbes in the dolomite nucleation process is

  1. Deuterium ion irradiation induced precipitation in Fe–Cr alloy: Characterization and effects on irradiation behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, P.P.; Yu, R.; Zhu, Y.M.; Zhao, M.Z.; Bai, J.W.; Wan, F.R.; Zhan, Q.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A new phase precipitated in Fe–Cr alloy after deuterium ion irradiation at 773 K. • B2 structure was proposed for the Cr-rich new phase. • Strain fields around the precipitate have been measured by GPA. • The precipitate decrease growth rate of dislocation loop under electron irradiation. - Abstract: A new phase was found to precipitate in a Fe–Cr model alloy after 58 keV deuterium ion irradiation at 773 K. The nanoscale radiation-induced precipitate was studied systematically using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), image simulation and in-situ ultrahigh voltage transmission electron microscopy (HVEM). B2 structure is proposed for the new Cr-rich phase, which adopts a cube-on-cube orientation relationship with regard to the Fe matrix. Geometric phase analysis (GPA) was employed to measure the strain fields around the precipitate and this was used to explain its characteristic 1-dimensional elongation along the 〈1 0 0〉 Fe direction. The precipitate was stable under subsequent electron irradiation at different temperatures. We suggest that the precipitate with a high interface-to-volume ratio enhances the radiation resistance of the material. The reason for this is the presence of a large number of interfaces between the precipitate and the matrix, which may greatly reduce the concentration of point defects around the dislocation loops. This leads to a significant decrease in the growth rate

  2. Final Report - Montana State University - Microbial Activity and Precipitation at Solution-Solution Mixing Zones in Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerlach, Robin [Montana State University

    2014-10-31

    Background. The use of biological and chemical processes that degrade or immobilize contaminants in subsurface environments is a cornerstone of remediation technology. The enhancement of biological and chemical processes in situ, involves the transport, displacement, distribution and mixing of one or more reactive agents. Biological and chemical reactions all require diffusive transport of solutes to reaction sites at the molecular scale and accordingly, the success of processes at the meter-scale and larger is dictated by the success of phenomena that occur at the micron-scale. However, current understanding of scaling effects on the mixing and delivery of nutrients in biogeochemically dynamic porous media systems is limited, despite the limitations this imposes on the efficiency and effectiveness of the remediation challenges at hand. Objectives. We therefore proposed to experimentally characterize and computationally describe the growth, evolution, and distribution of microbial activity and mineral formation as well as changes in transport processes in porous media that receive two or more reactive amendments. The model system chosen for this project was based on a method for immobilizing 90Sr, which involves stimulating microbial urea hydrolysis with ensuing mineral precipitation (CaCO3), and co-precipitation of Sr. Studies at different laboratory scales were used to visualize and quantitatively describe the spatial relationships between amendment transport and consumption that stimulate the production of biomass and mineral phases that subsequently modify the permeability and heterogeneity of porous media. Biomass growth, activity, and mass deposition in mixing zones was investigated using two-dimensional micro-model flow cells as well as flow cells that could be analyzed using synchrotron-based x-ray tomography. Larger-scale flow-cell experiments were conducted where the spatial distribution of media properties, flow, segregation of biological activity and

  3. Endolithic microbial communities in carbonate precipitates from serpentinite-hosted hyperalkaline springs of the Voltri Massif (Ligurian Alps, Northern Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quéméneur, Marianne; Palvadeau, Alexandra; Postec, Anne; Monnin, Christophe; Chavagnac, Valérie; Ollivier, Bernard; Erauso, Gaël

    2015-09-01

    The Voltri Massif is an ophiolitic complex located in the Ligurian Alps close to the city of Genova (Northern Italy) where several springs discharge high pH (up to 11.7), low salinity waters produced by the active serpentinization of the ultramafic basement. Mixing of these hyperalkaline waters with the river waters along with the uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide forms brownish carbonate precipitates covering the bedrock at the springs. Diverse archaeal and bacterial communities were detected in these carbonate precipitates using 454 pyrosequencing analyses of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. Archaeal communities were dominated by members of potential methane-producing and/or methane-oxidizing Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales (Euryarchaeota) together with ammonia-oxidizing Nitrososphaerales (Thaumarchaeota) similar to those found in other serpentinization-driven submarine and terrestrial ecosystems. Bacterial communities consisted of members of the Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Planctomycetes, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, and Verrucomicrobia phyla, altogether accounting for 92.2% of total retrieved bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences. Amongst Bacteria, potential chemolithotrophy was mainly associated with Alpha- and Betaproteobacteria classes, including nitrogen-fixing, methane-oxidizing or hydrogen-oxidizing representatives of the genera Azospirillum, Methylosinus, and Hydrogenophaga/'Serpentinomonas', respectively. Besides, potential chemoorganotrophy was attributed mainly to representatives of Actinobacteria and Planctomycetales phyla. The reported 16S rRNA gene data strongly suggested that hydrogen, methane, and nitrogen-based chemolithotrophy can sustain growth of the microbial communities inhabiting the carbonate precipitates in the hyperalkaline springs of the Voltri Massif, similarly to what was previously observed in other serpentinite-hosted ecosystems.

  4. Microbial community responses to 17 years of altered precipitation are seasonally dependent and coupled to co-varying effects of water content on vegetation and soil C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Patrick O.; Germino, Matthew J.; Feris, Kevin P.

    2013-01-01

    Precipitation amount and seasonal timing determine the duration and distribution of water available for plant and microbial activity in the cold desert sagebrush steppe. In this study, we sought to determine if a sustained shift in the amount and timing of precipitation would affect soil microbial diversity, community composition, and soil carbon (C) storage. Field plots were irrigated (+200 mm) during the dormant or growing-season for 17 years. Microbial community responses were assessed over the course of a year at two depths (15–20 cm, 95–100 cm) by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), along with co-occurring changes in plant cover and edaphic properties. Bacterial richness, Shannon Weaver diversity, and composition in shallow soils (15–20 cm) as well as evenness in deep soils (95–100 cm) differed across irrigation treatments during July. Irrigation timing affected fungal community diversity and community composition during the dormant season and most strongly in deep soils (95–100 cm). Dormant-season irrigation increased the ratio of shrubs to forbs and reduced soil C in shallow soils by 16% relative to ambient conditions. It is unclear whether or not soil C will continue to decline with continued treatment application or if microbial adaptation could mitigate sustained soil C losses. Future changes in precipitation timing will affect soil microbes in a seasonally dependent manner and be coupled to co-varying effects of water content on vegetation and soil C.

  5. Novel features of radiation-induced segregation and radiation-induced precipitation in austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Z., E-mail: zjiao@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Was, G.S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Three stainless steel alloys, high-purity 304 (HP304), high-purity 304 with high Si (HP304 + Si) and commercial purity 304 (CP304), were irradiated with 2 MeV protons to a dose of 5 dpa at 360 deg. C and subsequently examined using atom probe tomography (APT) and scanning transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (STEM-EDS). Several novel features of radiation-induced segregation and radiation-induced precipitation were observed. There is a significant variation in the composition of enriched and depleted elements in the grain boundary plane and along the dislocation loop core. Boron segregation to the grain boundary prior to irradiation is not affected by the irradiation. Phosphorus segregation is enhanced by irradiation. Carbon depletes at the grain boundary and may be affected by co-segregation with Cr. APT and STEM-EDS measurements are in excellent agreement for almost all the elements studied. The segregation behavior of elements at dislocations mirrors that at the grain boundary, but at a lower magnitude, except for Si. Ni/Si-rich clusters formed in irradiated HP304 + Si and CP304 are probably the precursors of {gamma}' or other Si- and Ni-rich phases. Copper depletion was observed at both the grain boundary and the dislocation loops. Regions adjacent to the depleted zones were sites for Cu cluster formation, which were also spatially correlated with Ni/Si-rich clusters.

  6. Estimation of the impact of climate change-induced extreme precipitation events on floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavčová, Kamila; Lapin, Milan; Valent, Peter; Szolgay, Ján; Kohnová, Silvia; Rončák, Peter

    2015-09-01

    In order to estimate possible changes in the flood regime in the mountainous regions of Slovakia, a simple physically-based concept for climate change-induced changes in extreme 5-day precipitation totals is proposed in the paper. It utilizes regionally downscaled scenarios of the long-term monthly means of the air temperature, specific air humidity and precipitation projected for Central Slovakia by two regional (RCM) and two global circulation models (GCM). A simplified physically-based model for the calculation of short-term precipitation totals over the course of changing air temperatures, which is used to drive a conceptual rainfall-runoff model, was proposed. In the paper a case study of this approach in the upper Hron river basin in Central Slovakia is presented. From the 1981-2010 period, 20 events of the basin's most extreme average of 5-day precipitation totals were selected. Only events with continual precipitation during 5 days were considered. These 5-day precipitation totals were modified according to the RCM and GCM-based scenarios for the future time horizons of 2025, 2050 and 2075. For modelling runoff under changed 5-day precipitation totals, a conceptual rainfall-runoff model developed at the Slovak University of Technology was used. Changes in extreme mean daily discharges due to climate change were compared with the original flood events and discussed.

  7. A quantitative comparison of lightning-induced electron precipitation and VLF signal perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, W. B.; Inan, U. S.

    2007-12-01

    VLF signal perturbations recorded on the Holographic Array for Ionospheric/Lightning Research (HAIL) are quantitatively related to a comprehensive model of lightning-induced electron precipitation (LEP) events. The model consists of three major components: a test-particle model of gyroresonant whistler-induced electron precipitation, a Monte Carlo simulation of energy deposition into the ionosphere, and a model of VLF subionospheric signal propagation. For the two representative LEP events studied, the model calculates peak VLF amplitude perturbations within a factor of three of those observed, well within the expected variability of radiation belt flux levels. The phase response of the observed VLF signal to precipitation varied dramatically over the course of the two nights and this variability in phase response is not properly reproduced by the model. The model calculates a peak in the precipitation that is poleward displaced ~6° from the causative lightning flash, consistent with observations. The modeled precipitated energy flux (E > 45 keV) peaks at ~1 × 10-2 (ergs s-1 cm-2), resulting in a peak loss of ~0.001% from a single flux tube at L ~ 2.2, consistent with previous satellite measurements of LEP events. The precipitation calculated by the model is highly dependent on the near-loss-cone trapped radiation belt flux levels assumed, and hence our main objective is not to compare the model calculations and the VLF signal observations on an absolute basis but is rather to develop metrics with which we can characterize the VLF signal perturbations recorded on HAIL in terms of the associated precipitation flux. Metrics quantifying the ionospheric density enhancement (N ILDE) and the electron precipitation (Γ) along a VLF signal path are strongly correlated with the VLF signal perturbations calculated by the model. A conversion ratio Ψ, relating VLF signal amplitude perturbations (ΔA) to the time-integrated precipitation (100-300 keV) along the VLF path (

  8. An increase in precipitation exacerbates negative effects of nitrogen deposition on soil cations and soil microbial communities in a temperate forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Leilei; Zhang, Hongzhi; Liu, Tao; Mao, Peng; Zhang, Weixin; Shao, Yuanhu; Fu, Shenglei

    2018-04-01

    World soils are subjected to a number of anthropogenic global change factors. Although many previous studies contributed to understand how single global change factors affect soil properties, there have been few studies aimed at understanding how two naturally co-occurring global change drivers, nitrogen (N) deposition and increased precipitation, affect critical soil properties. In addition, most atmospheric N deposition and precipitation increase studies have been simulated by directly adding N solution or water to the forest floor, and thus largely neglect some key canopy processes in natural conditions. These previous studies, therefore, may not realistically simulate natural atmospheric N deposition and precipitation increase in forest ecosystems. In a field experiment, we used novel canopy applications to investigate the effects of N deposition, increased precipitation, and their combination on soil chemical properties and the microbial community in a temperate deciduous forest. We found that both soil chemistry and microorganisms were sensitive to these global change factors, especially when they were simultaneously applied. These effects were evident within 2 years of treatment initiation. Canopy N deposition immediately accelerated soil acidification, base cation depletion, and toxic metal accumulation. Although increased precipitation only promoted base cation leaching, this exacerbated the effects of N deposition. Increased precipitation decreased soil fungal biomass, possible due to wetting/re-drying stress or to the depletion of Na. When N deposition and increased precipitation occurred together, soil gram-negative bacteria decreased significantly, and the community structure of soil bacteria was altered. The reduction of gram-negative bacterial biomass was closely linked to the accumulation of the toxic metals Al and Fe. These results suggested that short-term responses in soil cations following N deposition and increased precipitation could change

  9. Structural, Optical, Morphological and Microbial Studies on SnO₂ Nanoparticles Prepared by Co-Precipitation Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arularasu, M V; Anbarasu, M; Poovaragan, S; Sundaram, R; Kanimozhi, K; Magdalane, C Maria; Kaviyarasu, K; Thema, F T; Letsholathebe, D; Mola, Genene T; Maaza, M

    2018-05-01

    Nanoparticles of tin oxide (SnO2) powders were prepared by co-precipitation method at 500 °C, 700 °C and 900 °C temperature. The sintered SnO2 nanoparticles, structural, optical, magnetic, morphological properties and microbial activity have been studied. XRD studies reveals that sintered powder which exhibits tetragonal crystal structure and both crystallinity as well as crystal size increase with increase in temperature. The morphological studies reveal randomly arranged grains with compact nature grain size increases with sintering temperature. The compositional analyses of SnO2 nanoparticles have been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. The optical band gap values of SnO2 nanoparticles were calculated to be about 4.3 eV in the temperature 500 °C, comparing with that of the bulk SnO2 3.78 eV, by optical absorption measurement. Room temperature M-H curve for pure SnO2 nanoparticles exhibits ferromagnetic behaviour. The tin oxide nanoparticles are acted as potential candidate material for bacterial and fungal activity.

  10. Assessing marine microbial induced corrosion at Santa Catalina Island, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Antonio Ramírez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available High iron and eutrophic conditions are reported as environmental factors leading to accelerated low-water corrosion, an enhanced form of near-shore microbial-induced corrosion. To explore this hypothesis, we deployed flow-through colonization systems in laboratory-based aquarium tanks under a continuous flow of surface seawater from Santa Catalina Island, California, USA, for periods of two and six months. Substrates consisted of mild steel – a major constituent of maritime infrastructure – and the naturally occurring iron sulfide mineral pyrite. Four conditions were tested: free-venting high-flux conditions; a stagnant condition; an active flow-through condition with seawater slowly pumped over the substrates; and an enrichment condition where the slow pumping of seawater was supplemented with nutrient rich medium. Electron microscopy analyses of the two-month high flux incubations document coating of substrates with twisted stalks, resembling iron oxyhydroxide bioprecipitates made by marine neutrophilic Fe-oxidizing bacteria. Six-month incubations exhibit increased biofilm and substrate corrosion in the active flow and nutrient enriched conditions relative to the stagnant condition. A scarcity of twisted stalks was observed for all six month slow-flow conditions compared to the high-flux condition, which may be attributable to oxygen concentrations in the slow-flux conditions being prohibitively low for sustained growth of stalk-producing bacteria. All substrates developed microbial communities reflective of the original seawater input, as based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Deltaproteobacteria sequences increased in relative abundance in the active flow and nutrient enrichment conditions, whereas Gammaproteobacteria sequences were relatively more abundant in the stagnant condition. These results indicate that i high-flux incubations with higher oxygen availability favor the development of biofilms with twisted stalks resembling those of

  11. Pseudomonas, Pantoea and Cupriavidus isolates induce calcium carbonate precipitation for biorestoration of ornamental stone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daskalakis, M I; Magoulas, A; Kotoulas, G; Catsikis, I; Bakolas, A; Karageorgis, A P; Mavridou, A; Doulia, D; Rigas, F

    2013-08-01

    Bacterially induced calcium carbonate precipitation from various isolates was investigated aiming at developing an environmentally friendly technique for ornamental stone protection and restoration. Micro-organisms isolated from stone samples and identified using 16S rDNA and biochemical tests promoted calcium carbonate precipitation in solid and novel liquid growth media. Biomineral morphology was studied on marble samples with scanning electron microscopy. Most isolates demonstrated specimen weight increase, covering partially or even completely the marble surfaces mainly with vaterite. The conditions under which vaterite precipitated and its stability throughout the experimental runs are presented. A growth medium that facilitated bacterial growth of different species and promoted biomineralization was formulated. Most isolates induced biomineralization of CaCO3 . Micro-organisms may actually be a milestone in the investigation of vaterite formation facilitating our understanding of geomicrobiological interactions. Pseudomonas, Pantoea and Cupriavidus strains could be candidates for bioconsolidation of ornamental stone protection. Characterization of biomineralization capacity of different bacterial species improves understanding of the bacterially induced mineralization processes and enriches the list of candidates for biorestoration applications. Knowledge of biomineral morphology assists in differentiating mineral from biologically induced precipitates. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Decadal Variation of Precipitation in Saudi Arabia induced by Agricultural Irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, M. H.; Wey, H. W.; Wada, Y.; IM, E. S.; Chien, R. Y.; Wu, R. J.

    2017-12-01

    Decadal variation of wet-season precipitation has been found in the arid region of central Saudi Arabia. 1980s has been a rather wet decade compared with the decades before. Previous studies have mentioned that the irrigation moisture may contribute to the precipitation anomalies in Saudi Arabia. In the current study, we show from observational data that the contribution of the variation comes mostly from February to May. As the irrigation is a localized forcing, we therefore use the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model to simulate the response of the land-atmosphere interaction to the wet soil moisture resulted from additional irrigation moisture supply. Preliminary result shows in the irrigated simulation that precipitation in central Saudi Arabia is enhanced, indicating the possible link between irrigation expansion in the 1980s and the decadal precipitation variation over central Saudi Arabia. We propose it is the anomalous convergence induced by irrigation as well as additional moisture that contribute to the enhanced precipitation over heavily irrigation region in the central Saudi Arabian. In addition, analysis on the daily precipitation from the WRF outputs indicates that positive rainfall anomalies tend to happen when there is rainfall originally; that is, irrigation enhances rainfall but not creates rainfall.

  13. Plasmodium falciparum-Derived Uric Acid Precipitates Induce Maturation of Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Hoef, Diana L.; Coppens, Isabelle; Holowka, Thomas; Ben Mamoun, Choukri; Branch, OraLee; Rodriguez, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Malaria is characterized by cyclical fevers and high levels of inflammation, and while an early inflammatory response contributes to parasite clearance, excessive and persistent inflammation can lead to severe forms of the disease. Here, we show that Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes contain uric acid precipitates in the cytoplasm of the parasitophorous vacuole, which are released when erythrocytes rupture. Uric acid precipitates are highly inflammatory molecules that are considered a danger signal for innate immunity and are the causative agent in gout. We determined that P. falciparum-derived uric acid precipitates induce maturation of human dendritic cells, increasing the expression of cell surface co-stimulatory molecules such as CD80 and CD86, while decreasing human leukocyte antigen-DR expression. In accordance with this, uric acid accounts for a significant proportion of the total stimulatory activity induced by parasite-infected erythrocytes. Moreover, the identification of uric acid precipitates in P. falciparum- and P. vivax-infected erythrocytes obtained directly from malaria patients underscores the in vivo and clinical relevance of our findings. Altogether, our data implicate uric acid precipitates as a potentially important contributor to the innate immune response to Plasmodium infection and may provide a novel target for adjunct therapies. PMID:23405174

  14. Sealing of rock joints by induced calcite precipitation. A case study from Bergeforsen hydro power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakami, E.; Qvarfort, U.; Ekstav, A.

    1991-01-01

    The possibilities of sealing rock fractures by injecting water saturated with calcite solution, and hereby inducing a calcite precipitation inside the fracture, is investigated. The way of reaction and the amount of calcite precipitation will depend on the saturation of calcium carbonate in the water, the temperature, the pH and the CO 2 -pressure. There is experience of lime-saturated water injection in the rock foundation below the dam at Bergeforsens power plant (1955-1968). It was observed that the consumption of injected lime water decreased with time. A possible reason to the decrease in lime water consumption is that calcite has precipitated such that the permeability of the rock in general is lowered. Another explanation to this could be that calcite precipitation is concentrated to the fractures surrounding the injection holes, thus preventing the lime water from penetrating further into the rock. It is recommended that further studies of the fracture fillings in drill cores from Bergeforsen is performed. The aim of such study should be to determine the extent of induced calcite precipitation and to investigate its chemical and physical properties. (authors)

  15. Modification of the ionosphere by VLF wave-induced electron precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doolittle, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    Very low frequency (VLF) waves propagating in the whistler mode in the magnetosphere are known to cause precipitation of energetic electrons at middle latitudes. The interactions between the waves and electrons trapped in the magnetic field are believed to occur through cyclotron resonance. As a monochromatic wave propagates along a field line, the condition for resonance can be satisfied by electrons of a minimum energy at the equator and higher energies at increasing latitudes. Resonant interactions occurring in a field aligned region extending several thousand kilometers on both sides of the equator can therefore result in a precipitation flux with a wide range of energies. Electrons which are scattered into the loss cone will collide with the constituents of the ionosphere, causing additional ionization optical emissions, x-rays and heating. A computational technique is introduced which allows the temporal shape of pulse of precipitation to be modeled. A realistic energy distribution is used to weigh the contribution to the total precipitation energy flux resulting from resonant interactions in each segment of the duct. Wave growth along the path is found to affect the shape of the pulse. In its simplest application, the model sets limits on the time window in which a precipitation event can occur. The model arrival times are shown to agree with experimental correlations of VLF waves and effects of precipitation occurring on three occasions, thus supporting the assumption, that the precipitation results from cyclotron resonant scattering. Various techniques that have been employed for detecting wave-induced precipitation are compared. A quantitative analysis of the use of an HF radar for this purpose is introduced, based on the changes in the phase and group paths of the radar signals that are reflected from the perturbed ionosphere

  16. Quantitative measurement of lightning-induced electron precipitation using VLF remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, William Bolton

    This dissertation examines the detection of lightning-induced energetic electron precipitation via subionospheric Very Low Frequency (VLF) remote sensing. The primary measurement tool used is a distributed set of VLF observing sites, the Holographic Array for Ionospheric/Lightning Research (HAIL), located along the eastern side of the Rocky Mountains in the Central United States. Measurements of the VLF signal perturbations indicate that 90% of the precipitation occurs over a region ˜8 degrees in latitudinal extent, with the peak of the precipitation poleward displaced ˜7 degrees from the causative discharge. A comparison of the VLF signal perturbations recorded on the HAIL array with a comprehensive model of LEP events allows for the quantitative measurement of electron precipitation and ionospheric density enhancement with unprecedented quantitative detail. The model consists of three major components: a test-particle model of gyroresonant whistler-induced electron precipitation; a Monte Carlo simulation of energy deposition into the ionosphere; and a model of VLF subionospheric signal propagation. For the two representative LEP events studied, the model calculates peak VLF amplitude and phase perturbations within a factor of three of those observed, well within the expected variability of radiation belt flux levels. The modeled precipitated energy flux (E>45 keV) peaks at ˜1 x 10-2 [ergs s-1 cm -2], resulting in a peak loss of ˜0.001% from a single flux tube at L˜2.2, consistent with previous satellite measurements of LEP events. Metrics quantifying the ionospheric density enhancement (N ILDE) and the electron precipitation (Gamma) are strongly correlated with the VLF signal perturbations calculated by the model. A conversion ratio Psi relates VLF signal amplitude perturbations (DeltaA) to the time-integrated precipitation (100-300 keV) along the VLF path (Psi=Gamma / DeltaA). The total precipitation (100-300 keV) induced by one of the representative LEP

  17. Early-life family structure and microbially induced cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaser, Martin J; Nomura, Abraham; Lee, James; Stemmerman, Grant N; Perez-Perez, Guillermo I

    2007-01-01

    Cancer may follow exposure to an environmental agent after many decades. The bacterium Helicobacter pylori, known to be acquired early in life, increases risk for gastric adenocarcinoma, but other factors are also important. In this study, we considered whether early-life family structure affects the risk of later developing gastric cancer among H. pylori+ men. We examined a long-term cohort of Japanese-American men followed for 28 y, and performed a nested case-control study among those carrying H. pylori or the subset carrying the most virulent cagA+ H. pylori strains to address whether family structure predicted cancer development. We found that among the men who were H. pylori+ and/or cagA+ (it is possible to be cagA+ and H. pylori- if the H. pylori test is falsely negative), belonging to a large sibship or higher birth order was associated with a significantly increased risk of developing gastric adenocarcinoma late in life. For those with cagA+ strains, the risk of developing gastric cancer was more than twice as high (odds ratio 2.2; 95% confidence interval 1.2-4.0) among those in a sibship of seven or more individuals than in a sibship of between one and three persons. These results provide evidence that early-life social environment plays a significant role in risk of microbially induced malignancies expressing five to eight decades later, and these findings lead to new models to explain these interactions.

  18. A precipitation-induced landslide susceptibility model for natural gas transmission pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, Jason P. [Fugro William Lettis and Associates, Inc., Valencia, California (United States); Slayter, David L.; Hitchcock, Chris S. [Fugro William Lettis and Associates, Inc., Walnut Creek, California (United States); Lee, Chih-Hung [Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Gas Systems Integrity Management, Walnut Creek, California (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Landslides related to heavy rainfall can cause extensive damage to natural gas transmission pipelines. Fugro William Lettis and Associates Inc. have developed and implemented a geographic information system (GIS) model that evaluates near real-time precipitation-induced landslide susceptibility. The model incorporates state-wide precipitation data and geologically-based landslide classifications to produce rapid landslide risk evaluation for Pacific Gas and Electric Company's (PGandE) gas transmission system during winter rain storms in California. The precipitation data include pre-storm event quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPF) and post-storm event quantitative precipitation estimate (QPE) from the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The geologic classifications are based on slope, susceptible geologic formations, and the locations of historic or known landslide occurrences. Currently the model is calibrated using qualitative measures. This paper describes the development of the model algorithm and input data, model results, calibration efforts, and the on-going research and landslide collection warranted for continued refinement of the model.

  19. Early-life family structure and microbially induced cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin J Blaser

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer may follow exposure to an environmental agent after many decades. The bacterium Helicobacter pylori, known to be acquired early in life, increases risk for gastric adenocarcinoma, but other factors are also important. In this study, we considered whether early-life family structure affects the risk of later developing gastric cancer among H. pylori+ men.We examined a long-term cohort of Japanese-American men followed for 28 y, and performed a nested case-control study among those carrying H. pylori or the subset carrying the most virulent cagA+ H. pylori strains to address whether family structure predicted cancer development. We found that among the men who were H. pylori+ and/or cagA+ (it is possible to be cagA+ and H. pylori- if the H. pylori test is falsely negative, belonging to a large sibship or higher birth order was associated with a significantly increased risk of developing gastric adenocarcinoma late in life. For those with cagA+ strains, the risk of developing gastric cancer was more than twice as high (odds ratio 2.2; 95% confidence interval 1.2-4.0 among those in a sibship of seven or more individuals than in a sibship of between one and three persons.These results provide evidence that early-life social environment plays a significant role in risk of microbially induced malignancies expressing five to eight decades later, and these findings lead to new models to explain these interactions.

  20. Microbial Carbonate Precipitation by Synechococcus PCC8806, LS0519 and Synechocystis PCC6803 on Concrete Surfaces and in Low Saturation Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, T.; Lin, Y.; Dittrich, M.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial carbonate precipitation (MCP) by cyanobacteria has been recognized in a variety of environment such as freshwater, marine, cave, and even desert. Recently, their calcification potential has been tested in an emerging technology-- bioconcrete. This study is to explore the calcification by three cyanobacteria strains under different environmental conditions. Experiment A was carried out in 2mM NaHCO3 and 5mM CaCl2, with a cell concentration of 107 cells L-1. In experiment B, one side of the concrete surface was treated with bacteria and then immersed in the solution containing 0.4 mM NaHCO3 and 300 mM CaCl2. In experiment A, the pH of the abiotic condition remained constant around 8.55, while that of biotic conditions increased by 0.15 units in the presence of LS0519, and by 0.3 units in the presence of PCC8806 or PCC6803 within 8 hours. Over a period of 30 hours, PCC8806, LS0519 and PCC6803 removed 0.1, 0.12 and 0.2 mM calcium from the solution respectively. After 30 hours, the alkalinity of the solution decreased by 30 mg/L, 10 mg/L and 5 mg/L respectively in the presence of PCC6803, LS0519 and PCC8806. Under scanning electron microscopy (SEM), no precipitate was found in the abiotic condition, while calcium carbonate was associated by all the three strains. Among them, PCC6803 precipitated more carbonates. In experiment B, LS0519 and PCC8806 increased the pH with a value of 0.25, while PCC6803 increased the pH by 0.33 units. SEM shows LS0519 was less likely attached to the concrete surface. Neither did the precipitates on concrete surface differ from that in the abiotic condition. In comparison, PCC8806 and PCC6803 were closely associated with 8-μm porous precipitates. Cells were either found enclosed in precipitates or connecting two precipitates. In conclusion, all the three strains triggered the calcium carbonate precipitation. LS0519 has a little impact on the carbonate precipitation in the solution, but negligent influence on the concrete surface

  1. A phase field model for segregation and precipitation induced by irradiation in alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badillo, A.; Bellon, P.; Averback, R. S.

    2015-04-01

    A phase field model is introduced to model the evolution of multicomponent alloys under irradiation, including radiation-induced segregation and precipitation. The thermodynamic and kinetic components of this model are derived using a mean-field model. The mobility coefficient and the contribution of chemical heterogeneity to free energy are rescaled by the cell size used in the phase field model, yielding microstructural evolutions that are independent of the cell size. A new treatment is proposed for point defect clusters, using a mixed discrete-continuous approach to capture the stochastic character of defect cluster production in displacement cascades, while retaining the efficient modeling of the fate of these clusters using diffusion equations. The model is tested on unary and binary alloy systems using two-dimensional simulations. In a unary system, the evolution of point defects under irradiation is studied in the presence of defect clusters, either pre-existing ones or those created by irradiation, and compared with rate theory calculations. Binary alloys with zero and positive heats of mixing are then studied to investigate the effect of point defect clustering on radiation-induced segregation and precipitation in undersaturated solid solutions. Lastly, irradiation conditions and alloy parameters leading to irradiation-induced homogeneous precipitation are investigated. The results are discussed in the context of experimental results reported for Ni-Si and Al-Zn undersaturated solid solutions subjected to irradiation.

  2. A phase field model for segregation and precipitation induced by irradiation in alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badillo, A; Bellon, P; Averback, R S

    2015-01-01

    A phase field model is introduced to model the evolution of multicomponent alloys under irradiation, including radiation-induced segregation and precipitation. The thermodynamic and kinetic components of this model are derived using a mean-field model. The mobility coefficient and the contribution of chemical heterogeneity to free energy are rescaled by the cell size used in the phase field model, yielding microstructural evolutions that are independent of the cell size. A new treatment is proposed for point defect clusters, using a mixed discrete-continuous approach to capture the stochastic character of defect cluster production in displacement cascades, while retaining the efficient modeling of the fate of these clusters using diffusion equations. The model is tested on unary and binary alloy systems using two-dimensional simulations. In a unary system, the evolution of point defects under irradiation is studied in the presence of defect clusters, either pre-existing ones or those created by irradiation, and compared with rate theory calculations. Binary alloys with zero and positive heats of mixing are then studied to investigate the effect of point defect clustering on radiation-induced segregation and precipitation in undersaturated solid solutions. Lastly, irradiation conditions and alloy parameters leading to irradiation-induced homogeneous precipitation are investigated. The results are discussed in the context of experimental results reported for Ni–Si and Al–Zn undersaturated solid solutions subjected to irradiation. (paper)

  3. Irradiation-induced precipitates in a neutron irradiated 304 stainless steel studied by three-dimensional atom probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyama, T., E-mail: ttoyama@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Narita-cho 2145-2, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nozawa, Y. [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Narita-cho 2145-2, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Van Renterghem, W. [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Matsukawa, Y.; Hatakeyama, M.; Nagai, Y. [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Narita-cho 2145-2, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Al Mazouzi, A. [EDF R and D, Avenue des Renardieres Ecuelles, 77818 Moret sur Loing Cedex (France); Van Dyck, S. [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > Irradiation-induced precipitates in a 304 stainless steel were investigated by three-dimensional atom probe. > The precipitates were found to be {gamma}' precipitates (Ni{sub 3}Si). > Post-irradiation annealing was performed to discuss the contribution of the precipitates to irradiation-hardening. - Abstract: Irradiation-induced precipitates in a 304 stainless steel, neutron-irradiated to a dose of 24 dpa at 300 deg. C in the fuel wrapper plates of a commercial pressurized water reactor, were investigated by laser-assisted three-dimensional atom probe. A high number density of 4 x 10{sup 23} m{sup -3} of Ni-Si rich precipitates was observed, which is one order of magnitude higher than that of Frank loops. The average diameter was {approx}10 nm and the average chemical composition was 40% Ni, 14% Si, 11% Cr and 32% Fe in atomic percent. Over a range of Si concentrations, the ratio of Ni to Si was {approx}3, close to that of {gamma}' precipitate (Ni{sub 3}Si). In some precipitates, Mn enrichment inside the precipitate and P segregation at the interface were observed. Post-irradiation annealing was performed to discuss the contribution of the precipitates to irradiation-hardening.

  4. Electron precipitation induced by VLF noise bursts at the plasmapause and detected at conjugate ground stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingle, B.; Carpenter, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    A new type of wave-induced electron precipitation event has been identified. During observations at conjugate stations Siple, Antarctica, and Roberval, Canada (L-4.2), VLF noise bursts were found to be associated on a one-to-one basis with amplitude perturbations of subionispheric radio propagation. The amplitude perturbations are attributed to patches of enhanced ionization that extended below approx.80 km in the nighttime ionosphere and that were produced by precipitating electron bursts. Similar amplitude perturbations seen previously were correlated with whistlers that propagated within the plasmasphere. For the new events the driving waves were structured collections of rising elements that propagated just beyond the plasmapause at roughly 5-min intervals over a several-hour period. These noise bursts were of relatively long duration (approx.10 s) and strong intensity (inferred to be >30 pT at the equator). Triggering of the noise bursts appears to have been mostly by whistlers but changed in character with time. Some later bursts had narrowband precursors at constant frequencies possibly locked to power line harmonic radiation. The burst initiation characteristics suggest the existence of a variable threshold for rapid temporal growth in the magnetosphere controlled by the trapped electron dynamics. The temporal signatures of the amplitude perturbations show that precipitation was maintained over multiple bounces of the trapped magnetospheric electrons. In some cases these signatures include a new undershoot effect during the recovery phase lasting 2--5 min. This effect may have been related to cutoff of background drizzle precipitation. Precipitation effects were observed on both long (approx.10 Mm) and short (approx.1/2 Mm) subionospheric paths and were monitored simultaneously at the conjugate stations. Similarities in the perturbation signatures on long and short paths suggest that the form of the signatures was governed by ionospheric changes

  5. Irradiation-induced precipitation in a SUS316 stainless steel using three-dimensional atom probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatakeyama, M.; Yamagata, I.

    2013-01-01

    Precipitation and segregation were investigated in a compositionally modified 316 austenitic stainless steel, neutron-irradiated at 862 K using a three-dimensional atom probe. In the solution-annealed specimen, Mo, Ti, Nb, C and P enrichment were observed in a silicide, with nominal composition Fe 3 Cr 2 Ni 2 Mo 2 Si 2 . In a Ti-rich carbide, nominaling Fe 5 Cr 8 Ni 10 Mo 2 Ti 11 Si 2 C 6 , enrichment of Mo, Si, O, and Nb was observed. Radiation-induced segregation (RIS) at the precipitate–matrix interface was also investigated at an atomic scale. RIS of Ni and P atoms, which are undersized in Fe, was also analyzed around the interface of the Ti-rich carbide and matrix. Results suggest that the carbide–matrix interface is a sink with an interstitial bias. In the cold-worked specimen, complex-precipitates consisting of silicide and carbide were formed

  6. Microbial mat-induced sedimentary structures in siliciclastic sediments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper addresses macroscopic signatures of microbial mat-related structures within the. 1.6Ga-old Chorhat Sandstone ... Sandstone differentiated in facies superposed one over the other and their respective structural assemblages (b). may be ..... within the classification of primary sedimentary struc- tures; J. Sed. Res.

  7. Image-based Modeling of Biofilm-induced Calcium Carbonate Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, J. M.; Rothman, A.; Jackson, B.; Klapper, I.; Cunningham, A. B.; Gerlach, R.

    2013-12-01

    Pore scale biological processes in the subsurface environment are important to understand in relation to many engineering applications including environmental contaminant remediation, geologic carbon sequestration, and petroleum production. Specifically, biofilm induced calcium carbonate precipitation has been identified as an attractive option to reduce permeability in a lasting way in the subsurface. This technology may be able to replace typical cement-based grouting in some circumstances; however, pore-scale processes must be better understood for it to be applied in a controlled manor. The work presented will focus on efforts to observe biofilm growth and ureolysis-induced mineral precipitation in micro-fabricated flow cells combined with finite element modelling as a tool to predict local chemical gradients of interest (see figure). We have been able to observe this phenomenon over time using a novel model organism that is able to hydrolyse urea and express a fluorescent protein allowing for non-invasive observation over time with confocal microscopy. The results of this study show the likely existence of a wide range of local saturation indices even in a small (1 cm length scale) experimental system. Interestingly, the locations of high predicted index do not correspond to the locations of higher precipitation density, highlighting the need for further understanding. Figure 1 - A micro-fabricated flow cell containing biofilm-induced calcium carbonate precipitation. (A) Experimental results: Active biofilm is in green and dark circles are calcium carbonate crystals. Note the channeling behavior in the top of the image, leaving a large hydraulically inactive area in the biofilm mass. (B) Finite element model: The prediction of relative saturation of calcium carbonate (as calcite). Fluid enters the system at a low saturation state (blue) but areas of high supersaturation (red) are predicted within the hydraulically inactive area in the biofilm. If only effluent

  8. Correlation between hypocenter depth, antecedent precipitation and earthquake-induced landslide spatial distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Eisuke

    2017-04-01

    Since Keefer published the paper on earthquake magnitude and affected area, maximum epicentral/fault distance of induced landslide distribution in 1984, showing the envelope of plots, a lot of studies on this topic have been conducted. It has been generally supposed that landslides have been triggered by shallow quakes and more landslides are likely to occur with heavy rainfalls immediately before the quake. In order to confirm this, we have collected 22 case records of earthquake-induced landslide distribution in Japan and examined the effect of hypocenter depth and antecedent precipitation. Earthquake magnitude by JMA (Japan Meteorological Agency) of the cases are from 4.5 to 9.0. Analysis on hycpocenter depth showed the deeper quake cause wider distribution. Antecedent precipitation was evaluated using the Soil Water Index (SWI), which was developed by JMA for issuing landslide alert. We could not find meaningful correlation between SWI and the earthquake-induced landslide distribution. Additionally, we found that smaller minimum size of collected landslides results in wider distribution especially between 1,000 to 100,000 m2.

  9. Quantifying the strain-induced dissolution of precipitates in Al alloy microstructures using nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, C.R.; Loo, P.T.; Bastow, T.J.; Hill, A.J.; Costa Teixeira, J. da

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been used for the first time to directly monitor the dynamic partitioning of Cu atoms from shearable precipitates into the solid solution as a function of straining at room temperature in two Al-Cu-based alloys. Al-3Cu-0.05Sn (wt.%) and Al-2.5Mg-1.5Cu (wt.%) alloys were heat-treated to provide a fine distribution of ∼5 nm Guinier-Preston (GP) zones and <1 nm Guinier-Preston-Bagaryatsky (GPB) zones, respectively, and were then subjected to rolling strains up to 100%. It is shown that in the Al-Cu-0.05Sn alloy, strains up to ∼40% can pump solute from the ∼5 nm GP zones back into solid solution for the temperature and strain-rate of deformation employed here. In the case of the Al-Cu-Mg alloy, no dissolution of the GPB zones is observed. A simple model for the strain-induced dissolution of the shearable precipitates is given and compared with the experimental results. The dependence of the Cu repartitioning process on the precipitate size is emphasized. These observations and modeling give guidelines for the design of Al-Cu-based alloys to exploit the dynamic interplay of strain-induced Cu partitioning between metastable states, e.g. solid solution and GP (or GPB) zones, for tailoring ultimate mechanical properties. It is proposed that this strain-induced phase transformation is a form of dynamically responding microstructure that can be employed to obtain aluminum alloys with well-designed microstructures.

  10. Gut Microbial Diversity in Rat Model Induced by Rhubarb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ying; Wu, Chunfu; Yang, Jingyu; Li, Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    Rhubarb is often used to establish chronic diarrhea and spleen (Pi)-deficiency syndrome animal models in China. In this study, we utilized the enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR) method to detect changes in bacterial diversity in feces and the bowel mucosa associated with this model. Total microbial genomic DNA from the small bowel (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum), large bowel (proximal colon, distal colon, and rectum), cecum, and feces of normal and rhubarb-exposed rats were used as templates for the ERIC-PCR analysis. We found that the fecal microbial composition did not correspond to the bowel bacteria mix. More bacterial diversity was observed in the ileum of rhubarb-exposed rats (Panalysis with the SPSS software, the Canonical Discriminant Function Formulae for model rats was established. PMID:25048267

  11. Hyperosmolar nonketotic coma precipitated by lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, H.; Newton, R. W.; Morris, A. D.; Thompson, C. J.

    1998-01-01

    A 45-year-old man, with a 10-year history of manic depression treated with lithium, was admitted with hyperosmolar, nonketotic coma. He gave a five-year history of polyuria and polydipsia, during which time urinalysis had been negative for glucose. After recovery from hyperglycaemia, he remained polyuric despite normal blood glucose concentrations; water deprivation testing indicated nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, likely to be lithium-induced. We hypothesize that when this man developed type 2 diabetes, chronic polyuria due to nephrogenic diabetes insipidus was sufficient to precipitate hyperosmolar dehydration. PMID:9538487

  12. Final report for DOE Grant No. DE-SC0006609 - Persistence of Microbially Facilitated Calcite Precipitation as an in situ Treatment for Strontium-90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Robert W. [Univ. of Idaho, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Fujita, Yoshiko [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hubbard, Susan S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Subsurface radionuclide and metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of DOE's greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide 90Sr, is co-precipitation in calcite. We have previously found that nutrient addition can stimulate microbial ureolytic activity, that this activity accelerates calcite precipitation and co-precipitation of Sr, and that higher calcite precipitation rates can result in increased Sr partitioning. We have conducted integrated field, laboratory, and computational research to evaluate the relationships between ureolysis and calcite precipitation rates and trace metal partitioning under environmentally relevant conditions, and investigated the coupling between flow/flux manipulations and precipitate distribution. A field experimental campaign conducted at the Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site located at Rifle, CO was based on a continuous recirculation design; water extracted from a down-gradient well was amended with urea and molasses (a carbon and electron donor) and re-injected into an up-gradient well. The goal of the recirculation design and simultaneous injection of urea and molasses was to uniformly accelerate the hydrolysis of urea and calcite precipitation over the entire inter-wellbore zone. The urea-molasses recirculation phase lasted, with brief interruptions for geophysical surveys, for 12 days and was followed by long-term monitoring which continued for 13 months. A post experiment core located within the inter-wellbore zone was collected on day 321 and characterized with respect to cation exchange capacity, mineral carbonate content, urease activity, ureC gene abundance, extractable ammonium (a urea hydrolysis product) content, and the 13C isotopic composition of solid carbonates. It was also subjected to selective extractions for strontium and uranium. Result

  13. Carbon dioxide sequestration induced mineral precipitation healing of fractured reservoir seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, N.; Crawshaw, J.

    2017-12-01

    Initial experiments and the thermodynaic basis for carbon dioxide sequestration induced mineral precipitation healing of fractures through reservoir seals will be presented. The basis of this work is the potential exists for the dissolution of reservoir host rock formation carbonate minerals in the acidified injection front of CO2 during sequestration or EOR. This enriched brine and the bulk CO2 phase will then flow through the reservoir until contact with the reservoir seal. At this point any fractures present in the reservoir seal will be the preferential flow path for the bulk CO2 phase as well as the acidified brine front. These fractures would currently be filled with non-acidified brine saturated in seal formation brine. When the acidifeid brine from the host formation and the cap rock brine mix there is the potential for minerals to fall out of solution, and for these precipitated minerals to decrease or entirely cut off the fluid flow through the fractures present in a reservoir seal. Initial equilibrium simulations performed using the PHREEQC1 database drived from the PHREEQE2 database are used to show the favorable conditions under which this mineral precipitation can occurs. Bench scale fluid mixing experiments were then performed to determine the kinetics of the mineral precipitation process, and determine the progress of future experiemnts involving fluid flow within fractured anhydrite reservoir seal samples. 1Parkhurst, D.L., and Appelo, C.A.J., 2013, Description of input and examples for PHREEQC version 3—A computer program for speciation, batch-reaction, one-dimensional transport, and inverse geochemical calculations: U.S. Geological Survey Techniques and Methods, book 6, chap. A43, 497 p., available only at https://pubs.usgs.gov/tm/06/a43/. 2Parkhurst, David L., Donald C. Thorstenson, and L. Niel Plummer. PHREEQE: a computer program for geochemical calculations. No. 80-96. US Geological Survey, Water Resources Division,, 1980.

  14. Defect-induced Au precipitation in Fe–Au and Fe–Au–B–N alloys studied by in situ small-angle neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Langelaan, G.; Brück, E.; Zwaag, S. van der; Dijk, N.H. van

    2013-01-01

    Nanoscale Au precipitation in high-purity Fe–Au and Fe–Au–B–N alloys has been studied by in situ small-angle neutron scattering during isothermal aging at 550 °C and complementary ex situ transmission electron microscopy. The high temperature precipitation behavior in samples having received different degrees of cold deformation has been studied to explore the potential self-healing of deformation-induced defects by Au precipitation. It is found that dislocations induced by prior plastic deformation strongly facilitate the formation of Au precipitates, as no significant precipitation is observed for undeformed samples. Defect-induced Au precipitates are formed both at dislocations and along grain boundaries where the defect density is high. The fact that the Au atoms only precipitate on deformation-induced defects demonstrates that solute gold atoms act as efficient self-healing agents in the ferrous matrix. The addition of B and N is found to retard the Au precipitation

  15. Microbial Precipitation of Cr(III)-Hydroxide and Se(0) Nanoparticles During Anoxic Bioreduction of Cr(VI)- and Se(VI)-Contaminated Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yumi; Oh, Jong-Min; Roh, Yul

    2017-04-01

    This study examined the microbial precipitations of Cr(III)-hydroxide and Se(0) nanoparticles during anoxic bioreductions of Cr(VI) and Se(VI) using metal-reducing bacteria enriched from groundwater. Metal-reducing bacteria enriched from groundwater at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) Underground Research Tunnel (KURT), Daejeon, S. Korea were used. Metal reduction and precipitation experiments with the metal-reducing bacteria were conducted using Cr(VI)- and Se(VI)-contaminated water and glucose as a carbon source under an anaerobic environment at room temperature. XRD, SEM-EDX, and TEM-EDX analyses were used to characterize the mineralogy, crystal structure, chemistry, shape, and size distribution of the precipitates. The metal-reducing bacteria reduced Cr(VI) of potassium chromate (K₂CrO₄) to Cr(III) of chromium hydroxide [Cr(OH)3], and Se(VI) of sodium selenate (Na₂SeO₄) to selenium Se(0), with changes of color and turbidity. XRD, SEM-EDX, and TEM-EDX analyses revealed that the chromium hydroxide [Cr(OH)₃] was formed extracellularly with nanoparticles of 20–30 nm in size, and elemental selenium Se(0) nanoparticles had a sphere shape of 50–250 nm in size. These results show that metal-reducing bacteria in groundwater can aid or accelerate precipitation of heavy metals such as Cr(VI) and Se(VI) via bioreduction processes under anoxic environments. These results may also be useful for the recovery of Cr and Se nanoparticles in natural environments.

  16. Irradiation-induced precipitation in a SUS316 stainless steel using three-dimensional atom probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatakeyama, M., E-mail: hatake@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, IMR/Tohoku University, Narita, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Yamagata, I. [Japan Atom Energy Agency, Narita, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Precipitation and segregation were investigated in a compositionally modified 316 austenitic stainless steel, neutron-irradiated at 862 K using a three-dimensional atom probe. In the solution-annealed specimen, Mo, Ti, Nb, C and P enrichment were observed in a silicide, with nominal composition Fe{sub 3}Cr{sub 2}Ni{sub 2}Mo{sub 2}Si{sub 2}. In a Ti-rich carbide, nominaling Fe{sub 5}Cr{sub 8}Ni{sub 10}Mo{sub 2}Ti{sub 11}Si{sub 2}C{sub 6}, enrichment of Mo, Si, O, and Nb was observed. Radiation-induced segregation (RIS) at the precipitate–matrix interface was also investigated at an atomic scale. RIS of Ni and P atoms, which are undersized in Fe, was also analyzed around the interface of the Ti-rich carbide and matrix. Results suggest that the carbide–matrix interface is a sink with an interstitial bias. In the cold-worked specimen, complex-precipitates consisting of silicide and carbide were formed.

  17. Experimental Investigation Of Microbially Induced Corrosion Of Test Samples And Effect Of Self-assembled Hydrophobic Monolayers. Exposure Of Test Samples To Continuous Microbial Cultures, Chemical Analysis, And Biochemical Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Laurinavichius, K S

    1998-01-01

    Experimental Investigation Of Microbially Induced Corrosion Of Test Samples And Effect Of Self-assembled Hydrophobic Monolayers. Exposure Of Test Samples To Continuous Microbial Cultures, Chemical Analysis, And Biochemical Studies

  18. Soil microbial effects of smelter induced heavy metal contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordgren, A

    1986-01-01

    The soil concentrations of Cu and Zn at the secondary smelter were 20 00 mu g/g dry soil. Close to the primary smelter the soil was contaminated with more than ten elements including Pb, Zn, Cu and As at levels ranging between 6000 and 1000 mu g/g dry soil. The correlations between the concentrations of the metals were high at both smelters. Soil respiration rate decreased by about 75% close to both smelters. Total and fluorescein diacetate stained mycelial lengths decrease with increasing heavy metal pollution at the secondary but not at the primary smelter. The fungal community structure was strongly affected by the contamination. General common in coniferous forest soils such as Penicillium and Oidiodendron virtually vanished, while less frequent species like Paecilomyces farinosus and Geomyces pannorum dominated the site close to the smelter. Colony forming units of a number of functional groups of bacteria were found to be very sensitive to metal contamination. The urease activity of the soil was inhibited. Multivariate statistical analyses showed that the metal contamination was the major environmental influence on the microbiotain the soils studied. A study of about 200 decomposition curves resulting from glutamic acid additions to the different soils produced four microbially related parameters: basal respiration rate, initial respiration rate after the addition of the glutamic acid, specific respiration rate during the exponential increase of the respiration rate and the lag time before the exponential phase. With 53 refs.

  19. Herbivore-induced resistance against microbial pathogens in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de M.; Zaanen, van W.; Koornneef, A.; Korzelius, J.P.; Dicke, M.; Loon, van L.C.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Caterpillars of the herbivore Pieris rapae stimulate the production of jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and trigger a defense response that affects insect performance on systemic tissues. To investigate the spectrum of effectiveness of P. rapae-induced

  20. Herbivore-induced resistance against microbial pathogens in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, M. de; Zaanen, W. van; Koornneef, A.; Korzelius, J.P.; Dicke, M.; Loon, L.C. van; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Caterpillars of the herbivore Pieris rapae stimulate the production of jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and trigger a defense response that affects insect performance on systemic tissues. To investigate the sspectrum of effectiveness of P. rapae-induced

  1. Investigation Of The Microbial-Induced Corrosion Potential Of Soils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigation of sulphate-reducing bacteria induced corrosion potential of soils along 18-inch 45km Tebidaba/Brass underground oil pipeline in Southern Ijaw LGA of Bayelsa State, Nigeria, is carried out experimentally. The analysis involves determination of some physico-chemical parameters of soils in the pipeline route, ...

  2. Preferential Au precipitation at deformation-induced defects in Fe–Au and Fe–Au–B–N alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S., E-mail: S.Zhang-1@tudelft.nl [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Langelaan, G. [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Brouwer, J.C.; Sloof, W.G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Brück, E. [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Zwaag, S. van der [Novel Aerospace Materials Group, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands); Dijk, N.H. van [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-01-25

    Highlights: • Fe–Au–B–N forms a good model alloy system for self healing of deformation damage. • Solute Au atoms exclusively precipitate at grain boundaries, cracks and cavities. • XPS indicates a strong tendency for Au segregation on free surfaces at 550 °C. • Interstitial B and N form hexagonal BN on free surfaces at 550 °C. • Selective Au precipitation at open volume defects can cause autonomous repair. -- Abstract: The influence of deformation-induced defects on the isothermal precipitation of Au was studied in high-purity Fe–Au and Fe–Au–B–N alloys. Preferential Au precipitation upon annealing at 550 °C is observed at local plastic indentations. In fractured Fe–Au–B–N, solute Au atoms were found to heterogeneously precipitate at grain boundaries and local micro-cracks. This is supported by in-situ creep tests that showed a strong tendency for Au precipitation at cracks and cavities also formed during creep loading at 550 °C. Complementary X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiments indicate a strong tendency of Au, B and N segregation onto free surface during aging. The observed site-specific precipitation of Au holds interesting opportunities for defect healing in steels subjected to creep deformation.

  3. Alterations in oral microbial flora induced by waterpipe tobacco smoking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakhatreh MAK

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Muhamad Ali K Shakhatreh,1 Omar F Khabour,1 Karem H Alzoubi,2 Majed M Masadeh,3 Emad I Hussein,4 George N Bshara1 1Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Irbid, Jordan; 2Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan; 3Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan; 4Department of Biological Sciences, Yarmouk University, Irbid, Jordan Background: Waterpipe smoking is a global health problem and a serious public concern. Little is known about the effects of waterpipe smoking on oral health. In the current study, we examined the alterations of oral microbial flora by waterpipe smoking. Methods: One hundred adult healthy subjects (59 waterpipe smokers and 41 non-smokers were recruited into the study. Swabs were taken from the oral cavity and subgingival regions. Standard culturing techniques were used to identify types, frequency, and mean number of microorganisms in cultures obtained from the subjects. Results: It was notable that waterpipe smokers were significantly associated with a history of oral infections. In subgingiva, Acinetobacter and Moraxella species were present only in waterpipe smokers. In addition, the frequency of Candida albicans was higher in the subgingiva of waterpipe smokers (p = 0.023 while the frequency of Fusobacterium nucleatum was significantly lower in the subgingiva of waterpipe smokers (p = 0.036. However, no change was observed in other tested bacteria, such as Campylobacter species; Viridans group streptococci, Enterobacteriaceae, and Staphylococcus aureus. In oral cavity and when colony-forming units were considered, the only bacterial species that showed significant difference were the black-pigmented bacteria (p < 0.001. Conclusion: This study provides evidence indicating that some of the oral microflora is significantly altered by

  4. Radiation induced precipitation of the γ' phase in under-saturated nickel-silicon alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbu, A.

    1976-01-01

    The microstructure of Ni-Si solid solutions containing 2, 4, 6, and 8at.%Si was investigated after irradiation with 500keV Ni + ions. In all samples, Ni 3 Si precipitation was found to be independent of the amount of silicon. A correspondance between interstitial loops and precipitates has been found. At low temperature the precipitates become spatially ordered. A mechanism is suggested for the formation of the precipitates [fr

  5. Calculation of the driving force for the radiation induced precipitation of Ni3Si in nickel-silicon alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miodownik, A.P.; Watkin, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    The appearance of precipitates which have been identified as Ni 3 Si in irradiated stainless steels and nickel rich alloys such as Inconel is of considerable interest in relation to the swelling behaviour of such materials. Work on binary nickel-silicon alloys has shown that Ni 3 Si can be induced to precipitate in alloys whose silicon content is well below the accepted solubility limit, and it has also been shown that such precipitates redissolve when heat-treatment is continued at the same temperature in the absence of irradiation. Such effects imply an irradiation induced shift of chemical potential, and cannot be explained by merely involving accelerated diffusion. This paper represents an attempt to calculate the shift in chemical potential required to precipitate Ni 3 Si in alloys containing 1-10% Si (at%) over a range of temperatures (300-1000K), and then proceeds to relate this calculated chemical potential with available information concerning the dose rates required to induce such precipitates at various temperatures. Presentation of the results is modelled on the well established methods for handling the Time-Temperature-Transformation behaviour of ordinary alloy systems, with dose rate being substituted for the time axis. Analogous calculations are presented for nickel-germanium alloys, in order to check whether the numerical values deduced from the nickel silicon system have more general applicability, and also to see whether there are any significant differences in a system where the size factor of the solute is of the opposite sign. (orig.) [de

  6. The role of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in the bacterially induced calcium carbonate precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifan, Mostafa; Ebrahiminezhad, Alireza; Ghasemi, Younes; Samani, Ali Khajeh; Berenjian, Aydin

    2018-04-01

    Recently, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) have been used to control and modify the characteristics of concrete and mortar. Concrete is one of the most used materials in the world; however, it is susceptible to cracking. Over recent years, a sustainable biotechnological approach has emerged as an alternative approach to conventional techniques to heal the concrete cracks by the incorporation of bacterial cells and nutrients into the concrete matrix. Once cracking occurs, CaCO 3 is induced and the crack is healed. Considering the positive effects of IONs on the concrete properties, the effect of these nanoparticles on bacterial growth and CaCO 3 biosynthesis needs to be evaluated for their possible application in bio self-healing concrete. In the present work, IONs were successfully synthesized and characterized using various techniques. The presence of IONs showed a significant effect on both bacterial growth and CaCO 3 precipitation. The highest bacterial growth was observed in the presence of 150 μg/mL IONs. The highest concentration of induced CaCO 3 (34.54 g/L) was achieved when the bacterial cells were immobilized with 300 μg/mL of IONs. This study provides new data and supports the possibility of using IONs as a new tool in designing the next generation of bio self-healing concrete.

  7. Spatial variability in photosynthetic and heterotrophic activity drives localized δ13C org fluctuations and carbonate precipitation in hypersaline microbial mats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, J; Fike, D; Druschel, G; Orphan, V; Hoehler, T M; Des Marais, D J

    2014-11-01

    Modern laminated photosynthetic microbial mats are ideal environments to study how microbial activity creates and modifies carbon and sulfur isotopic signatures prior to lithification. Laminated microbial mats from a hypersaline lagoon (Guerrero Negro, Baja California, Mexico) maintained in a flume in a greenhouse at NASA Ames Research Center were sampled for δ(13) C of organic material and carbonate to assess the impact of carbon fixation (e.g., photosynthesis) and decomposition (e.g., bacterial respiration) on δ(13) C signatures. In the photic zone, the δ(13) C org signature records a complex relationship between the activities of cyanobacteria under variable conditions of CO2 limitation with a significant contribution from green sulfur bacteria using the reductive TCA cycle for carbon fixation. Carbonate is present in some layers of the mat, associated with high concentrations of bacteriochlorophyll e (characteristic of green sulfur bacteria) and exhibits δ(13) C signatures similar to DIC in the overlying water column (-2.0‰), with small but variable decreases consistent with localized heterotrophic activity from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Model results indicate respiration rates in the upper 12 mm of the mat alter in situ pH and HCO3- concentrations to create both phototrophic CO2 limitation and carbonate supersaturation, leading to local precipitation of carbonate minerals. The measured activity of SRB with depth suggests they variably contribute to decomposition in the mat dependent on organic substrate concentrations. Millimeter-scale variability in the δ(13) C org signature beneath the photic zone in the mat is a result of shifting dominance between cyanobacteria and green sulfur bacteria with the aggregate signature overprinted by heterotrophic reworking by SRB and methanogens. These observations highlight the impact of sedimentary microbial processes on δ(13) C org signatures; these processes need to be considered when attempting to relate

  8. NWP-Based Adjustment of IMERG Precipitation for Flood-Inducing Complex Terrain Storms: Evaluation over CONUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxuan Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the use of precipitation forecasts from a numerical weather prediction (NWP model for near-real-time satellite precipitation adjustment based on 81 flood-inducing heavy precipitation events in seven mountainous regions over the conterminous United States. The study is facilitated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR real-time ensemble forecasts (called model, the Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG near-real-time precipitation product (called raw IMERG and the Stage IV multi-radar/multi-sensor precipitation product (called Stage IV used as a reference. We evaluated four precipitation datasets (the model forecasts, raw IMERG, gauge-adjusted IMERG and model-adjusted IMERG through comparisons against Stage IV at six-hourly and event length scales. The raw IMERG product consistently underestimated heavy precipitation in all study regions, while the domain average rainfall magnitudes exhibited by the model were fairly accurate. The model exhibited error in the locations of intense precipitation over inland regions, however, while the IMERG product generally showed correct spatial precipitation patterns. Overall, the model-adjusted IMERG product performed best over inland regions by taking advantage of the more accurate rainfall magnitude from NWP and the spatial distribution from IMERG. In coastal regions, although model-based adjustment effectively improved the performance of the raw IMERG product, the model forecast performed even better. The IMERG product could benefit from gauge-based adjustment, as well, but the improvement from model-based adjustment was consistently more significant.

  9. Light-induced aggregation of microbial exopolymeric substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Luni; Xu, Chen; Zhang, Saijin; Lin, Peng; Schwehr, Kathleen A; Quigg, Antonietta; Chiu, Meng-Hsuen; Chin, Wei-Chun; Santschi, Peter H

    2017-08-01

    Sunlight can inhibit or disrupt the aggregation process of marine colloids via cleavage of high molecular weight compounds into smaller, less stable fragments. In contrast, some biomolecules, such as proteins excreted from bacteria can form aggregates via cross-linking due to photo-oxidation. To examine whether light-induced aggregation can occur in the marine environment, we conducted irradiation experiments on a well-characterized protein-containing exopolymeric substance (EPS) from the marine bacterium Sagitulla stellata. Our results show that after 1 h sunlight irradiation, the turbidity level of soluble EPS was 60% higher than in the dark control. Flow cytometry also confirmed that more particles of larger sized were formed by sunlight. In addition, we determined a higher mass of aggregates collected on filter in the irradiated samples. This suggests light can induce aggregation of this bacterial EPS. Reactive oxygen species hydroxyl radical and peroxide played critical roles in the photo-oxidation process, and salts assisted the aggregation process. The observation that Sagitulla stellata EPS with relatively high protein content promoted aggregation, was in contrast to the case where no significant differences were found in the aggregation of a non-protein containing phytoplankton EPS between the dark and light conditions. This, together with the evidence that protein-to-carbohydrate ratio of aggregates formed under light condition is significantly higher than that formed under dark condition suggest that proteins are likely the important component for aggregate formation. Light-induced aggregation provides new insights into polymer assembly, marine snow formation, and the fate/transport of organic carbon and nitrogen in the ocean. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. MODELING OF STRAIN-INDUCED PRECIPITATION KINETICS IN Nb MICROALLOYED STEELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.G. Zhou; Z.Y. Liu; D. Wu; Z.Li; C.M. Li

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of the thermodynamic calculation of precipitation and considering the effect of strain on the precipitation behavior and chemical composition (Si and Mn), the kinetics of precipitation from austenite has been investigated for different temperatures and strains. Nucleation theory and the solubility product of niobium, carbon, and nitrogen in austenite have been used to derive equations for the start time of precipitation as a function of temperature and composition. The value of n in Avrami equation was determined using the available experimental data from the published reports, which indicated that n is a constant independent of temperature and the end time of precipitation is a function of n and the start time of precipitation. The values of the start time and end time of precipitation predicted by the new model are compared with the experimental values and a good agreement was obtained between both.

  11. Dislocation pinning effects induced by nano-precipitates during warm laser shock peening: Dislocation dynamic simulation and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yiliang; Ye, Chang; Gao, Huang; Kim, Bong-Joong; Suslov, Sergey; Stach, Eric A.; Cheng, Gary J.

    2011-07-01

    Warm laser shock peening (WLSP) is a new high strain rate surface strengthening process that has been demonstrated to significantly improve the fatigue performance of metallic components. This improvement is mainly due to the interaction of dislocations with highly dense nanoscale precipitates, which are generated by dynamic precipitation during the WLSP process. In this paper, the dislocation pinning effects induced by the nanoscale precipitates during WLSP are systematically studied. Aluminum alloy 6061 and AISI 4140 steel are selected as the materials with which to conduct WLSP experiments. Multiscale discrete dislocation dynamics (MDDD) simulation is conducted in order to investigate the interaction of dislocations and precipitates during the shock wave propagation. The evolution of dislocation structures during the shock wave propagation is studied. The dislocation structures after WLSP are characterized via transmission electron microscopy and are compared with the results of the MDDD simulation. The results show that nano-precipitates facilitate the generation of highly dense and uniformly distributed dislocation structures. The dislocation pinning effect is strongly affected by the density, size, and space distribution of nano-precipitates.

  12. A light-induced shortcut in the planktonic microbial loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptacnik, Robert; Gomes, Ana; Royer, Sarah-Jeanne; Berger, Stella A.; Calbet, Albert; Nejstgaard, Jens C.; Gasol, Josep M.; Isari, Stamatina; Moorthi, Stefanie D.; Ptacnikova, Radka; Striebel, Maren; Sazhin, Andrey F.; Tsagaraki, Tatiana M.; Zervoudaki, Soultana; Altoja, Kristi; Dimitriou, Panagiotis D.; Laas, Peeter; Gazihan, Ayse; Martínez, Rodrigo A.; Schabhüttl, Stefanie; Santi, Ioulia; Sousoni, Despoina; Pitta, Paraskevi

    2016-07-01

    Mixotrophs combine photosynthesis with phagotrophy to cover their demands in energy and essential nutrients. This gives them a competitive advantage under oligotropihc conditions, where nutrients and bacteria concentrations are low. As the advantage for the mixotroph depends on light, the competition between mixo- and heterotrophic bacterivores should be regulated by light. To test this hypothesis, we incubated natural plankton from the ultra-oligotrophic Eastern Mediterranean in a set of mesocosms maintained at 4 light levels spanning a 10-fold light gradient. Picoplankton (heterotrophic bacteria (HB), pico-sized cyanobacteria, and small-sized flagellates) showed the fastest and most marked response to light, with pronounced predator-prey cycles, in the high-light treatments. Albeit cell specific activity of heterotrophic bacteria was constant across the light gradient, bacterial abundances exhibited an inverse relationship with light. This pattern was explained by light-induced top-down control of HB by bacterivorous phototrophic eukaryotes (PE), which was evidenced by a significant inverse relationship between HB net growth rate and PE abundances. Our results show that light mediates the impact of mixotrophic bacterivores. As mixo- and heterotrophs differ in the way they remineralize nutrients, these results have far-reaching implications for how nutrient cycling is affected by light.

  13. A light-induced shortcut in the planktonic microbial loop

    KAUST Repository

    Ptacnik, Robert

    2016-07-11

    Mixotrophs combine photosynthesis with phagotrophy to cover their demands in energy and essential nutrients. This gives them a competitive advantage under oligotropihc conditions, where nutrients and bacteria concentrations are low. As the advantage for the mixotroph depends on light, the competition between mixo- and heterotrophic bacterivores should be regulated by light. To test this hypothesis, we incubated natural plankton from the ultra-oligotrophic Eastern Mediterranean in a set of mesocosms maintained at 4 light levels spanning a 10-fold light gradient. Picoplankton (heterotrophic bacteria (HB), pico-sized cyanobacteria, and small-sized flagellates) showed the fastest and most marked response to light, with pronounced predator-prey cycles, in the high-light treatments. Albeit cell specific activity of heterotrophic bacteria was constant across the light gradient, bacterial abundances exhibited an inverse relationship with light. This pattern was explained by light-induced top-down control of HB by bacterivorous phototrophic eukaryotes (PE), which was evidenced by a significant inverse relationship between HB net growth rate and PE abundances. Our results show that light mediates the impact of mixotrophic bacterivores. As mixo- and heterotrophs differ in the way they remineralize nutrients, these results have far-reaching implications for how nutrient cycling is affected by light.

  14. A light-induced shortcut in the planktonic microbial loop

    KAUST Repository

    Ptacnik, Robert; Gomes, Ana; Royer, Sarah-Jeanne; Berger, Stella A.; Calbet, Albert; Nejstgaard, Jens C.; Gasol, Josep M.; Isari, Stamatina; Moorthi, Stefanie D.; Ptacnikova, Radka; Striebel, Maren; Sazhin, Andrey F.; Tsagaraki, Tatiana M.; Zervoudaki, Soultana; Altoja, Kristi; Dimitriou, Panagiotis D.; Laas, Peeter; Gazihan, Ayse; Martí nez, Rodrigo A.; Schabhü ttl, Stefanie; Santi, Ioulia; Sousoni, Despoina; Pitta, Paraskevi

    2016-01-01

    Mixotrophs combine photosynthesis with phagotrophy to cover their demands in energy and essential nutrients. This gives them a competitive advantage under oligotropihc conditions, where nutrients and bacteria concentrations are low. As the advantage for the mixotroph depends on light, the competition between mixo- and heterotrophic bacterivores should be regulated by light. To test this hypothesis, we incubated natural plankton from the ultra-oligotrophic Eastern Mediterranean in a set of mesocosms maintained at 4 light levels spanning a 10-fold light gradient. Picoplankton (heterotrophic bacteria (HB), pico-sized cyanobacteria, and small-sized flagellates) showed the fastest and most marked response to light, with pronounced predator-prey cycles, in the high-light treatments. Albeit cell specific activity of heterotrophic bacteria was constant across the light gradient, bacterial abundances exhibited an inverse relationship with light. This pattern was explained by light-induced top-down control of HB by bacterivorous phototrophic eukaryotes (PE), which was evidenced by a significant inverse relationship between HB net growth rate and PE abundances. Our results show that light mediates the impact of mixotrophic bacterivores. As mixo- and heterotrophs differ in the way they remineralize nutrients, these results have far-reaching implications for how nutrient cycling is affected by light.

  15. Effects of solvent and alkaline earth metals on the heat-induced precipitation process of sodium caseinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Francesco; Cuomo, Francesca; Nostro, Pierandrea Lo; Ceglie, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The precipitation temperatures of sodium caseinate in H(2)O and D(2)O in the presence of Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+) and Ba(2+) were investigated through fluorescence, turbidity and conductivity experiments. As for the ability of the divalent cations (1-17.5mM) to induce the precipitation process in H(2)O, the sequence Ba(2+) ≥ Ca(2+)>Mg(2+)>Sr(2+) was found. Remarkably, while at low salt concentrations (10mM) the differences among the different cations were greatly reduced. By fitting these results with a modified Jones-Dole equation, we confirmed that the less hydrated ions possess a greater capacity to induce precipitation. In D(2)O, the order of ion ability to induce caseinate precipitation was Ba(2+)>Ca(2+)>Sr(2+)>Mg(2+). The different hydrophobicity between D(2)O and H(2)O was shown to affect significantly the T(Ps) of caseinate in the presence of calcium, strontium and barium. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Precipitate-induced R-phase in martensitic transformation of as-spun and annealed Ti51Ni49 ribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Ling-Mei; Chang, Shih-Hang; Wu, Shyi-Kaan

    2010-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results indicate that a two-step B2 → R → B19' martensitic transformation and a one-step B19' → B2 transformation exhibit in as-spun and in 200-600 o C annealed Ti 51 Ni 49 ribbons. Guinier-Preston (GP) zones and Ti 2 Ni precipitates are formed in ribbons annealed at ≤300 o C and ≥400 o C, respectively, and a conspicuous increase of DSC transformation peak temperature occurs in between 300 o C and 400 o C. The sizes of GP zones and Ti 2 Ni precipitates increase with increased annealing temperature. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations show that GP zones can induce the R-phase and both of them are formed along B2 directions. DSC and TEM tests show that Ti 2 Ni precipitates can induce the R-phase more than GP zones and the induced R-phase plates are also found along B2 directions. Experimental results show that the growing direction of R-phase plates is strongly confined by that of GP zones and Ti 2 Ni precipitates. The length of R-phase plates can reach about 2 μm in 300 o C annealed ribbon.

  17. The time series variations of tritium concentration in precipitation and its relationships to the rainfall-inducing air mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Jun

    1978-01-01

    The author measured the tritium concentration in precipitation of Tokyo for every ten-day period from August 1972 to May 1974. Judging from the daily synoptic weather chart, the rainfall-inducing air masses in Japan were classified into five types; polar maritime air mass (Pm), polar continental air mass (Pc), tropical maritime air mass (Tm), tropical continental air mass (Tc), and equatorial maritime air mass (Em). And the precipitation for every ten-day period sampled for tritium measurement were classified into these five types. Based on this classification, it is confirmed that there exist clear difference in the tritium concentration between the rainfall from the continental air mass and ones from the maritime air mass. It is characteristic that the tritium concentration in rainfall induced by equatorial maritime air mass such as typhoon in summer and early fall season is very low whereas the tritium concentration in rainfall and snowfall induced directly by the polar continental air mass in late winter season is very high. The regional difference of the tritium concentration in intermonthly precipitation could considerably be explained by this synoptic meteological classification of rainfall-inducing air mass. In spite of these regional difference of tritium concentration in precipitation, use of the tritium concentration of Tokyo as a representative value of Japan may be allowed because of the similarities of the changing pattern and annual mean tritium concentration. The time series variations of tritium concentration in precipitation of Tokyo from August 1972 to December 1977, Tsukuba from December 1976 to April 1978, and Nagaoka from April 1977 to March 1978 are listed. (author)

  18. Radiation-induced instability of MnS precipitates and its possible consequences on irradiation-induced stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.; Sanecki, J.E.; Garner, F.A.

    1996-12-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a significant materials issue for the light water reactor (LWR) industry and may also pose a problem for fusion power reactors that will use water as coolant. A new metallurgical process is proposed that involves the radiation-induced release into solution of minor impurity elements not usually thought to participate in IASCC. MnS-type precipitates, which contain most of the sulfur in stainless steels, are thought to be unstable under irradiation. First, Mn transmutes strongly to Fe in thermalized neutron spectra. Second, cascade-induced disordering and the inverse Kirkendall effect operating at the incoherent interfaces of MnS precipitates are thought to act as a pump to export Mn from the precipitate into the alloy matrix. Both of these processes will most likely allow sulfur, which is known to exert a deleterious influence on intergranular cracking, to re-enter the matrix. To test this hypothesis, compositions of MnS-type precipitates contained in several unirradiated and irradiated heats of Type 304, 316, and 348 stainless steels (SSs) were analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy. Evidence is presented that shows a progressive compositional modification of MnS precipitates as exposure to neutrons increases in boiling water reactors. As the fluence increases, the Mn level in MnS decreases, whereas the Fe level increases. The S level also decreases relative to the combined level of Mn and Fe. MnS precipitates were also found to be a reservoir of other deleterious impurities such as F and O which could be also released due to radiation-induced instability of the precipitates

  19. Seasonal induced changes in spinach rhizosphere microbial community structure with varying salinity and drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Ibekwe, A; Ors, Selda; Ferreira, Jorge F S; Liu, Xuan; Suarez, Donald L

    2017-02-01

    Salinity is a common problem under irrigated agriculture, especially in low rainfall and high evaporative demand areas of southwestern United States and other semi-arid regions around the world. However, studies on salinity effects on soil microbial communities are relatively few while the effects of irrigation-induced salinity on soil chemical and physical properties and plant growth are well documented. In this study, we examined the effects of salinity, temperature, and temporal variability on soil and rhizosphere microbial communities in sand tanks irrigated with prepared solutions designed to simulate saline wastewater. Three sets of experiments with spinach (Spinacia oleracea L., cv. Racoon) were conducted under saline water during different time periods (early winter, late spring, and early summer). Bacterial 16S V4 rDNA region was amplified utilizing fusion primers designed against the surrounding conserved regions using MiSeq® Illumina sequencing platform. Across the two sample types, bacteria were relatively dominant among three phyla-the Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, and Bacteroidetes-accounted for 77.1% of taxa detected in the rhizosphere, while Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria accounted for 55.1% of taxa detected in soil. The results were analyzed using UniFrac coupled with principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) to compare diversity, abundance, community structure, and specific bacterial groups in soil and rhizosphere samples. Permutational analysis of variance (PERMANOVA) analysis showed that soil temperature (P=0.001), rhizosphere temperature (P=0.001), rhizosphere salinity (P=0.032), and evapotranspiration (P=0.002) significantly affected beta diversity of soil and rhizosphere microbial communities. Furthermore, salinity had marginal effects (P=0.078) on soil beta diversity. However, temporal variability differentially affected rhizosphere microbial communities irrigated with saline wastewater. Therefore, microbial communities in

  20. Oral mucosal lesions, microbial changes, and taste disturbances induced by adjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Siri Beier; Mouridsen, Henning T.; Bergmann, Olav Jonas

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to examine oral mucosal lesions, microbial changes, and taste disturbances induced by adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) in breast cancer patients during and 1 year after treatment. STUDY DESIGN: Forty-five consecutive breast cancer patients, eligible for adjuvant CT...... with cyclophosphamide, epirubicin or methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil were followed before, during, 6 months and 1 year after CT and were compared to a control group of 31 breast cancer patients not receiving adjuvant CT. RESULTS: During CT, oral mucosal lesions developed including erythema (n = 10, 22%) and ulceration...... (n = 7, 16%). Five patients (11%) were diagnosed with oral candidosis. Scores of dental bacterial plaque and gingival inflammation increased during CT and the oral microbial composition changed towards a more acidophilic flora. Taste disturbances were experienced by 84% (n = 38) of the patients...

  1. Radiation-induced instability of MnS precipitates and its possible consequences on IASCC of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.; Garner, F.A.

    1996-01-01

    Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) continues to be a significant materials issue for the light water reactor industry and may also pose a problem for fusion power devices that employ water cooling. Although a number of potential mechanisms have been proposed to participate in this phenomenon, at this time it is not clear that any of these candidate mechanisms are sufficient to rationalize the observed failures. A new mechanism is proposed in this paper that involves the radiation-induced release into solution of elements not usually thought to participate in IASCC. It is shown in this paper that MnS precipitates, which contain most of the sulphur in stainless steels, are probably unstable under irradiation. First, the Mn transmutes very strongly to Fe in highly thermalized neutron spectra. Second, the combination of cascade-induced disordering and the inverse-Kirkendall effect operating at the incoherent interfaces of MnS precipitates will probably act as a pump to export Mn from the precipitate surface into the alloy matrix. Both of these processes will most likely allow some of the sulphur to re-enter the alloy matrix. Sulphur is known to exert a deleterious influence on grain boundary cracking. MnS precipitates are also thought to be a reservoir of other deleterious impurities such as fluorine which could be also released due to radiation-induced instability of the precipitates. This possibility has been confirmed by Auger electron spectroscopy of Types 304, 316, and 348 stainless steel specimens sectioned from several BWR components irradiated up to 3.5x10 21 n/cm 2 (E > 1 MeV)

  2. Radiation-induced instability of MnS precipitates and its possible consequences on IASCC of austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Garner, F.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) continues to be a significant materials issue for the light water reactor industry and may also pose a problem for fusion power devices that employ water cooling. Although a number of potential mechanisms have been proposed to participate in this phenomenon, at this time it is not clear that any of these candidate mechanisms are sufficient to rationalize the observed failures. A new mechanism is proposed in this paper that involves the radiation-induced release into solution of elements not usually thought to participate in IASCC. It is shown in this paper that MnS precipitates, which contain most of the sulphur in stainless steels, are probably unstable under irradiation. First, the Mn transmutes very strongly to Fe in highly thermalized neutron spectra. Second, the combination of cascade-induced disordering and the inverse-Kirkendall effect operating at the incoherent interfaces of MnS precipitates will probably act as a pump to export Mn from the precipitate surface into the alloy matrix. Both of these processes will most likely allow some of the sulphur to re-enter the alloy matrix. Sulphur is known to exert a deleterious influence on grain boundary cracking. MnS precipitates are also thought to be a reservoir of other deleterious impurities such as fluorine which could be also released due to radiation-induced instability of the precipitates. This possibility has been confirmed by Auger electron spectroscopy of Types 304, 316, and 348 stainless steel specimens sectioned from several BWR components irradiated up to 3.5x10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV).

  3. Mechanisms of pollution induced community tolerance in a soil microbial community exposed to Cu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakelin, Steven; Gerard, Emily; Black, Amanda; Hamonts, Kelly; Condron, Leo; Yuan, Tong; Nostrand, Joy van; Zhou, Jizhong; O'Callaghan, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    Pollution induced community tolerance (PICT) to Cu 2+ , and co-tolerance to nanoparticulate Cu, ionic silver (Ag + ), and vancomycin were measured in field soils treated with Cu 2+ 15 years previously. EC 50 values were determined using substrate induced respiration and correlations made against soil physicochemical properties, microbial community structure, physiological status (qCO 2 ; metabolic quotient), and abundances of genes associated with metal and antibiotic resistance. Previous level of exposure to copper was directly (P  2+ , and also of nanoparticle Cu. However, Cu-exposed communities had no co-tolerance to Ag + and had increased susceptibly to vancomycin. Increased tolerance to both Cu correlated (P  + or vancomycin. • Tolerance not due to shifts in community composition or resistance genes. - Pollution induced community tolerance to Cu was linked with increased metabolic quotient but not changes in community composition or abundance of metal resistance genes in a field soil

  4. Precipitation of ferromagnetic phase induced by defect energies during creep deformation in Type 304 austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, Yuhki; Shiraki, Atsuhiro; Murata, Yoshinori; Takaya, Shigeru; Koyama, Toshiyuki; Morinaga, Masahiko

    2010-01-01

    The correlation of defect energies with precipitation of the ferromagnetic phase near M 23 C 6 carbide during creep tests at high temperature in Type 304 austenitic steel was examined by estimating the defect energies near the carbide, based on micromechanics. As one of the defect energies, the precipitation energy was calculated by assuming M 23 C 6 carbide to be a spherical inclusion. The other defect energy, creep dislocation energy, was calculated based on dislocation density data obtained from transmission electron microscopy observations of the creep samples. The dislocation energy density was much higher than the precipitation energy density in the initial stage of the creep process, when the ferromagnetic phase started to increase. Creep dislocation energy could be the main driving force for precipitation of the ferromagnetic phase.

  5. Precipitation of ferromagnetic phase induced by defect energies during creep deformation in Type 304 austenitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, Yuhki, E-mail: tsukada@silky.numse.nagoya-u.ac.j [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Shiraki, Atsuhiro; Murata, Yoshinori [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Takaya, Shigeru [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, O-arai-machi, Higashi-ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Koyama, Toshiyuki [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Morinaga, Masahiko [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2010-06-15

    The correlation of defect energies with precipitation of the ferromagnetic phase near M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide during creep tests at high temperature in Type 304 austenitic steel was examined by estimating the defect energies near the carbide, based on micromechanics. As one of the defect energies, the precipitation energy was calculated by assuming M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide to be a spherical inclusion. The other defect energy, creep dislocation energy, was calculated based on dislocation density data obtained from transmission electron microscopy observations of the creep samples. The dislocation energy density was much higher than the precipitation energy density in the initial stage of the creep process, when the ferromagnetic phase started to increase. Creep dislocation energy could be the main driving force for precipitation of the ferromagnetic phase.

  6. Geraniin attenuates Naloxone-Precipitated Morphine Withdrawal and Morphine-Induced Tolerance in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella Anle Kasanga

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: Geraniin does not produce any tolerant effects like morphine and also reduced the signs associated with naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal in mice. [J Complement Med Res 2017; 6(2.000: 199-205

  7. Attributable Human-Induced Changes in the Likelihood and Magnitude of the Observed Extreme Precipitation during Hurricane Harvey

    OpenAIRE

    Risser, MD; Wehner, MF

    2017-01-01

    ©2017. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. Record rainfall amounts were recorded during Hurricane Harvey in the Houston, Texas, area, leading to widespread flooding. We analyze observed precipitation from the Global Historical Climatology Network with a covariate-based extreme value statistical analysis, accounting for both the external influence of global warming and the internal influence of El Niño–Southern Oscillation. We find that human-induced climate change likely increase...

  8. Advances in concrete materials for sewer systems affected by microbial induced concrete corrosion: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grengg, Cyrill; Mittermayr, Florian; Ukrainczyk, Neven; Koraimann, Günther; Kienesberger, Sabine; Dietzel, Martin

    2018-05-01

    Microbial induced concrete corrosion (MICC) is recognized as one of the main degradation mechanisms of subsurface infrastructure worldwide, raising the demand for sustainable construction materials in corrosive environments. This review aims to summarize the key research progress acquired during the last decade regarding the understanding of MICC reaction mechanisms and the development of durable materials from an interdisciplinary perspective. Special focus was laid on aspects governing concrete - micoorganisms interaction since being the central process steering biogenic acid corrosion. The insufficient knowledge regarding the latter is proposed as a central reason for insufficient progress in tailored material development for aggressive wastewater systems. To date no cement-based material exists, suitable to withstand the aggressive conditions related to MICC over its entire service life. Research is in particular needed on the impact of physiochemical material parameters on microbial community structure, growth characteristics and limitations within individual concrete speciation. Herein an interdisciplinary approach is presented by combining results from material sciences, microbiology, mineralogy and hydrochemistry to stimulate the development of novel and sustainable materials and mitigation strategies for MICC. For instance, the application of antibacteriostatic agents is introduced as an effective instrument to limit microbial growth on concrete surfaces in aggressive sewer environments. Additionally, geopolymer concretes are introduced as highly resistent in acid environments, thus representing a possible green alternative to conventional cement-based construction materials. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Superiority of Graphene over Polymer Coatings for Prevention of Microbially Induced Corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Ajay; Gadhamshetty, Venkataramana; Mukherjee, Rahul; Natarajan, Bharath; Eksik, Osman; Ali Shojaee, S; Lucca, Don A; Ren, Wencai; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2015-09-09

    Prevention of microbially induced corrosion (MIC) is of great significance in many environmental applications. Here, we report the use of an ultra-thin, graphene skin (Gr) as a superior anti-MIC coating over two commercial polymeric coatings, Parylene-C (PA) and Polyurethane (PU). We find that Nickel (Ni) dissolution in a corrosion cell with Gr-coated Ni is an order of magnitude lower than that of PA and PU coated electrodes. Electrochemical analysis reveals that the Gr coating offers ~10 and ~100 fold improvement in MIC resistance over PU and PA coatings respectively. This finding is remarkable considering that the Gr coating (1-2 nm) is ~25 and ~4000 times thinner than the PA (40-50 nm), and PU coatings (20-80 μm), respectively. Conventional polymer coatings are either non-conformal when deposited or degrade under the action of microbial processes, while the electro-chemically inert graphene coating is both resistant to microbial attack and is extremely conformal and defect-free. Finally, we provide a brief discussion regarding the effectiveness of as-grown vs. transferred graphene films for anti-MIC applications. While the as-grown graphene films are devoid of major defects, wet transfer of graphene is shown to introduce large scale defects that make it less suitable for the current application.

  10. Monitoring microbial growth and activity using spectral induced polarization and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Keating, Kristina; Revil, Andre

    2015-04-01

    Microbes and microbial activities in the Earth's subsurface play a significant role in shaping subsurface environments and are involved in environmental applications such as remediation of contaminants in groundwater and oil fields biodegradation. Stimulated microbial growth in such applications could cause wide variety of changes of physical/chemical properties in the subsurface. It is critical to monitor and determine the fate and transportation of microorganisms in the subsurface during such applications. Recent geophysical studies demonstrate the potential of two innovative techniques, spectral induced polarization (SIP) and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), for monitoring microbial growth and activities in porous media. The SIP measures complex dielectric properties of porous media at low frequencies of exciting electric field, and NMR studies the porous structure of geologic media and characterizes fluids subsurface. In this laboratory study, we examined both SIP and NMR responses from bacterial growth suspension as well as suspension mixed with silica sands. We focus on the direct contribution of microbes to the SIP and NMR signals in the absence of biofilm formation or biomineralization. We used Zymomonas mobilis and Shewanella oneidensis (MR-1) for SIP and NMR measurements, respectively. The SIP measurements were collected over the frequency range of 0.1 - 1 kHz on Z. mobilis growth suspension and suspension saturated sands at different cell densities. SIP data show two distinct peaks in imaginary conductivity spectra, and both imaginary and real conductivities increased as microbial density increased. NMR data were collected using both CPMG pulse sequence and D-T2 mapping to determine the T2-distribution and diffusion properties on S. oneidensis suspension, pellets (live and dead), and suspension mixed with silica sands. NMR data show a decrease in the T2-distribution in S. oneidensis suspension saturated sands as microbial density increase. A

  11. Irradiation-induced precipitation and solute segregation in alloys. Fourth annual progress report, February 1, 1981-March 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardell, A.J.

    1982-04-01

    The studies of irradiation-induced solute segregation (IISS) and irradiation-induced precipitation (IIP) in Ni-Si and Pd-Fe alloys have been completed. Progress is reported for several other projects: irradiation damage in binary Pd-Cr, -Mn and -V alloys (15 at. %); IIP in Pd-Mo and Pd-W alloys; IIP in Pd-25 at. % Cr alloy; and irradiation damage effects in proton-bombarded metallic glasses (Ni-65 Zr, 40 Fe 40 Ni 14 P6B). 27 figures

  12. Construction of PAH-degrading mixed microbial consortia by induced selection in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafra, German; Absalón, Ángel E; Anducho-Reyes, Miguel Ángel; Fernandez, Francisco J; Cortés-Espinosa, Diana V

    2017-04-01

    Bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)-contaminated soils through the biostimulation and bioaugmentation processes can be a strategy for the clean-up of oil spills and environmental accidents. In this work, an induced microbial selection method using PAH-polluted soils was successfully used to construct two microbial consortia exhibiting high degradation levels of low and high molecular weight PAHs. Six fungal and seven bacterial native strains were used to construct mixed consortia with the ability to tolerate high amounts of phenanthrene (Phe), pyrene (Pyr) and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and utilize these compounds as a sole carbon source. In addition, we used two engineered PAH-degrading fungal strains producing heterologous ligninolytic enzymes. After a previous selection using microbial antagonism tests, the selection was performed in microcosm systems and monitored using PCR-DGGE, CO 2 evolution and PAH quantitation. The resulting consortia (i.e., C1 and C2) were able to degrade up to 92% of Phe, 64% of Pyr and 65% of BaP out of 1000 mg kg -1 of a mixture of Phe, Pyr and BaP (1:1:1) after a two-week incubation. The results indicate that constructed microbial consortia have high potential for soil bioremediation by bioaugmentation and biostimulation and may be effective for the treatment of sites polluted with PAHs due to their elevated tolerance to aromatic compounds, their capacity to utilize them as energy source. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The inhibiting effect of dislocation helices on the stress-induced orientation of S' precipitates in Al–Cu–Mg alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xiaobin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha (China); Deng, Yunlai, E-mail: luckdeng@csu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha (China); State Key Laboratory of High Performance and Complex Manufacturing, Central South University, Changsha (China); Zhang, Jin [State Key Laboratory of High Performance and Complex Manufacturing, Central South University, Changsha (China); Light Alloy Research Institute, Central South University, Changsha (China); Zhang, Xinming [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha (China); State Key Laboratory of High Performance and Complex Manufacturing, Central South University, Changsha (China)

    2015-09-15

    The phenomenon of restrained stress-induced preferential orientation of S′ precipitates is investigated using a single-crystal of Al–1.23Cu–0.43 Mg alloy. Al–1.23Cu–0.43 Mg single-crystal specimens are subjected to stress aging, and the microstructure is analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It is found that the stress-induced preferential orientation of S′ precipitates is restrained owing to the dislocations produced by a higher stress. The effect of dislocations on the oriented precipitates depends on the total length of the intersection lines for precipitate habit planes and dislocation glide planes. This investigation not only provides important insight into solving the anisotropy problem attributed to precipitation strengthening, but also offers a benchmark for choosing the appropriate stress range in manufacturing of Al–Cu–Mg alloys. - Highlights: • Single crystals of an Al–Cu–Mg alloy were prepared for the investigations. • A phenomenon of restrained stress-induced preferential orientation of S′ precipitates was found. • The influence of dislocation helices on precipitation during stress-aging was studied. • Difference of orientation degree of S′ precipitates and θ′ precipitates was explained. • A basis for choosing the appropriate stress range in manufacturing of Al–Cu–Mg alloys is provided.

  14. Irradiation-induced instability of MnS precipitates and its possible contribution to IASCC in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Greenwood, L.R.; Chung, H.M.

    1997-01-01

    Although a number of candidate mechanisms have been proposed to participate in the IASCC phenomenon, it is not clear at this time that all of the contributing mechanisms have been identified. A new mechanism was proposed by Garner and Greenwood as a potential contribution to IASCC that involves the radiation-induced release into solution of sulphur and other deleterious elements that are normally concentrated into MnS precipitates. The instability arises from the combined action of the transmutation of manganese to iron, cascade-induced mixing and the very strong action of the inverse Kirkendall effect. The latter mechanism acts as a pump to export manganese from the precipitate surface and to replace it primarily with iron, as well as smaller amounts of chromium, nickel and other lesser elements. Evidence previously presented by Chung and coworkers appears to show that MnS precipitates in typical 300 series stainless steels become progressively depleted in manganese and enriched with iron as irradiation proceeds in boiling water reactor neutron spectra. It is shown in this paper that transmutation alone is insufficient to produce the observed behavior

  15. On the modeling of irradiation-induced homogeneous precipitation in proton-bombarded Ni-Si solid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Nghi Q.; Janghorban, K.; Ardell, A. J.

    1981-10-01

    Irradiation-induced solute redistribution leading to precipitation of coherent γ' particles in undersaturated Ni-based solid solutions containing 6 and 8 at.% Si during 400-keV proton bombardment was modeled, based on the concept of solute segregation in concentrated alloys under spatially-dependent defect production conditions. The combined effects of (i) an extremely large difference between the defect production rates in the peak-damage and mid-range regions during irradiation and (ii) a preferential coupling between the interstitial and solute fluxes generate a net transient flux of Si atoms into the mid-range region, which is much larger than the solute flux out of this location. As a result, the Si concentration exceeds the solubility limit and homogeneous precipitation of the γ' phase occurs in this particular region of the irradiated samples. The spatial, compositional and temperature dependences of irradiation-induced homogeneous precipitation derived from the present theoretical calculations are in good qualitative agreement with experimental observations

  16. Sympathetic activity induced by naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal is blocked in genetically engineered mice lacking functional CRF1 receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Carmona, Juan-Antonio; Martínez-Laorden, Elena; Milanés, María-Victoria; Laorden, María-Luisa

    2015-01-01

    There is large body evidence indicating that stress can lead to cardiovascular disease. However, the exact brain areas and the mechanisms involved remain to be revealed. Here, we performed a series of experiments to characterize the role of CRF1 receptor (CRF1R) in the stress response induced by naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal. The experiments were performed in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) ventrolateral medulla (VLM), brain regions involved in the regulation of cardiovascular activity, and in the right ventricle by using genetically engineered mice lacking functional CRF1R levels (KO). Mice were treated with increasing doses of morphine and withdrawal was precipitated by naloxone administration. Noradrenaline (NA) turnover, c-Fos, expression, PKA and TH phosphorylated at serine 40, was evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Morphine withdrawal induced an enhancement of NA turnover in PVN in parallel with an increase in TH neurons expressing c-Fos in VLM in wild-type mice. In addition we have demonstrated an increase in NA turnover, TH phosphorylated at serine 40 and PKA levels in heart. The main finding of the present study was that NA turnover, TH positive neurons that express c-Fos, TH phosphorylated at serine 40 and PKA expression observed during morphine withdrawal were significantly inhibited in CRF1R KO mice. Our results demonstrate that CRF/CRF1R activation may contribute to the adaptive changes induced by naloxone-precipitated withdrawal in the heart and in the brain areas which modulate the cardiac sympathetic function and suggest that CRF/CRF1R pathways could be contributing to cardiovascular disease associated to opioid addiction. - Highlights: • Naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal increases sympathetic activity in the PVN and heart. • Co-localization of TH phosphorylated at serine 40/c-Fos in the VLM after morphine withdrawal • Naloxone-precipitated

  17. Sympathetic activity induced by naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal is blocked in genetically engineered mice lacking functional CRF1 receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Carmona, Juan-Antonio; Martínez-Laorden, Elena; Milanés, María-Victoria; Laorden, María-Luisa

    2015-02-15

    There is large body evidence indicating that stress can lead to cardiovascular disease. However, the exact brain areas and the mechanisms involved remain to be revealed. Here, we performed a series of experiments to characterize the role of CRF1 receptor (CRF1R) in the stress response induced by naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal. The experiments were performed in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) ventrolateral medulla (VLM), brain regions involved in the regulation of cardiovascular activity, and in the right ventricle by using genetically engineered mice lacking functional CRF1R levels (KO). Mice were treated with increasing doses of morphine and withdrawal was precipitated by naloxone administration. Noradrenaline (NA) turnover, c-Fos, expression, PKA and TH phosphorylated at serine 40, was evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Morphine withdrawal induced an enhancement of NA turnover in PVN in parallel with an increase in TH neurons expressing c-Fos in VLM in wild-type mice. In addition we have demonstrated an increase in NA turnover, TH phosphorylated at serine 40 and PKA levels in heart. The main finding of the present study was that NA turnover, TH positive neurons that express c-Fos, TH phosphorylated at serine 40 and PKA expression observed during morphine withdrawal were significantly inhibited in CRF1R KO mice. Our results demonstrate that CRF/CRF1R activation may contribute to the adaptive changes induced by naloxone-precipitated withdrawal in the heart and in the brain areas which modulate the cardiac sympathetic function and suggest that CRF/CRF1R pathways could be contributing to cardiovascular disease associated to opioid addiction. - Highlights: • Naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal increases sympathetic activity in the PVN and heart. • Co-localization of TH phosphorylated at serine 40/c-Fos in the VLM after morphine withdrawal • Naloxone-precipitated

  18. Soil microbial activity in Aleppo pine stands naturally regenerated after fire: silvicultural management and induced drought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Moya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In post-fire restoration, early monitoring is mandatory to check impacts and ecosystem responses to apply proper management according to social standards and ecological conditions. In areas where the natural regeneration was successful, excessive tree density can be found which induces to high intraspecific competence and assisted restoration management could be adequate. In addition, climatic changes will have large impacts on vegetation productivity and resilience since the regional models for south-eastern Spain predicts a rainfall decrease of about 20% and temperature increase of 4.5 ºC. The microbial biomass could be used as indicator of ecosystem recovery, since it is negatively affected by wildfires and depends on fire characteristics, vegetation and soil properties. Our aim is to determine how forest management may affect the ecosystem recovery in different climatic scenarios, included drought scenarios with and without forest management (thinning.We compared soil physicochemical properties and microbial activity in four scenarios: unmanaged and thinned stands in two rainfall scenarios (under induced drought. The study areas were set close to Yeste (Albacete where Aleppo pine forest were burned in summer 1994 (nearly 14000 ha. We set sixteen rectangular plots (150 m2; 15 m ×10 m implementing experimental silvicultural treatments: thinning eight plots in 2004, reducing the naturally recovered tree density from about 12000 to 1600 pine trees ha-1. In addition, in half the plots, we induced drought conditions from about 500 to 400 mm (20% from March 2009. In every plot, we monitored temperature at ground level (Ts, 10 cm depth (T10d and soil relative humidity (RH. Taking into account season of the year and canopy coverage, we collected soil samples in mid-winter (ending January 2011 and mid-spring (ending May 2011 under pine trees and in bare soil. The soil samples were used to evaluate soil physicochemical properties and soil microbial

  19. Snow precipitation on Mars driven by cloud-induced night-time convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiga, Aymeric; Hinson, David P.; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste; Navarro, Thomas; Millour, Ehouarn; Forget, François; Montmessin, Franck

    2017-09-01

    Although it contains less water vapour than Earth's atmosphere, the Martian atmosphere hosts clouds. These clouds, composed of water-ice particles, influence the global transport of water vapour and the seasonal variations of ice deposits. However, the influence of water-ice clouds on local weather is unclear: it is thought that Martian clouds are devoid of moist convective motions, and snow precipitation occurs only by the slow sedimentation of individual particles. Here we present numerical simulations of the meteorology in Martian cloudy regions that demonstrate that localized convective snowstorms can occur on Mars. We show that such snowstorms--or ice microbursts--can explain deep night-time mixing layers detected from orbit and precipitation signatures detected below water-ice clouds by the Phoenix lander. In our simulations, convective snowstorms occur only during the Martian night, and result from atmospheric instability due to radiative cooling of water-ice cloud particles. This triggers strong convective plumes within and below clouds, with fast snow precipitation resulting from the vigorous descending currents. Night-time convection in Martian water-ice clouds and the associated snow precipitation lead to transport of water both above and below the mixing layers, and thus would affect Mars' water cycle past and present, especially under the high-obliquity conditions associated with a more intense water cycle.

  20. Effects of Elevated Carbon Dioxide and Salinity on the Microbial Diversity in Lithifying Microbial Mats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven R. Ahrendt

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide (CO2 are rising at an accelerated rate resulting in changes in the pH and carbonate chemistry of the world’s oceans. However, there is uncertainty regarding the impact these changing environmental conditions have on carbonate-depositing microbial communities. Here, we examine the effects of elevated CO2, three times that of current atmospheric levels, on the microbial diversity associated with lithifying microbial mats. Lithifying microbial mats are complex ecosystems that facilitate the trapping and binding of sediments, and/or the precipitation of calcium carbonate into organosedimentary structures known as microbialites. To examine the impact of rising CO2 and resulting shifts in pH on lithifying microbial mats, we constructed growth chambers that could continually manipulate and monitor the mat environment. The microbial diversity of the various treatments was compared using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. The results indicated that elevated CO2 levels during the six month exposure did not profoundly alter the microbial diversity, community structure, or carbonate precipitation in the microbial mats; however some key taxa, such as the sulfate-reducing bacteria Deltasulfobacterales, were enriched. These results suggest that some carbonate depositing ecosystems, such as the microbialites, may be more resilient to anthropogenic-induced environmental change than previously thought.

  1. Impact of floods induced by extreme precipitation events on public health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroulis, Spyridon; Mavrouli, Maria; Lekkas, Efthymios; Tsakris, Athanassios

    2017-04-01

    Hydrometeorological disasters comprise the most reported type of natural disaster, and floods account for the majority of disasters in this category in both developed and developing countries. Flooding can lead to extensive morbidity and mortality and pose multiple risks to public health throughout the world. This study involved an extensive and systematic literature review of 124 research publications related to public health impact of 98 floods that occurred globally (Oceania 4, Africa 9, America 22, Europe 24, Asia 39) from 1942 to 2014. The inclusion criteria were literature type comprising journal articles and official reports, natural disaster type including floods induced after extreme precipitation events (accumulation of rainwater in poorly-drained environments, riverine and flash floods), population type including humans, and outcome measure characterized by infectious diseases (ID) incidence increase. The potential post-flood ID are classified into 13 groups including rodent-borne (reported in 38 of the total 98 events, 38.78%), water-borne (33, 33.67%), vector-borne (25, 25.51%), respiratory (19, 19.39%), fecal-oral (14, 14.29%), skin (9, 9.18%), blood-borne (4, 4.08%), eye (3, 3.06%), soil-related (3, 3.06%), ear (2, 2.04%), fungal (1, 1.02%) and wound-borne (1, 1.02%) ID. Based on available age and genre data, it is concluded that the most vulnerable population groups are predominantly young children (age ≤ 5 years) and male. The most fatal post-flood ID are leptospirosis and diarrhea followed by respiratory tract infections. The detected risk factors include (1) poor economic status and living in flood prone areas, (2) destruction of infrastructures, disruption of public utilities and interruption of basic public health services such as vector control programs, (3) direct physical exposure to sewage-polluted flood water, (4) lack of adequate potable water and water-supply from contaminated ponds and tube wells along with lack of distribution of

  2. Biostimulation induces syntrophic interactions that impact C, S and N cycling in a sediment microbial community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handley, KM [University of California, Berkeley; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Steefel, Carl I [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Sharon, I [University of California, Berkeley; Williams, Ken [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Miller, CS [University of California, Berkeley; Frischkorn, Kyle C [University of California, Berkeley; Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; Thomas, Brian [University of California, Berkeley; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Long, Phil [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Banfield, Jillian F. [University of California, Berkeley

    2013-01-01

    Stimulation of subsurface microorganisms to induce reductive immobilization of metals is a promising approach for bioremediation, yet the overall microbial community response is typically poorly understood. Here we used community proteogenomics to test the hypothesis that excess input of acetate activates syntrophic interactions among autotrophs and heterotrophs. A flow-through sediment column was incubated in a groundwater well of an acetate-amended aquifer. Genomic sequences from the community recovered during microbial sulfate reduction were used to econstruct, de novo, near-complete genomes for Desulfobacter (Deltaproteobacteria) and relatives of Sulfurovum and Sulfurimonas (Epsilonproteobacteria), and Bacteroidetes. Partial genomes were obtained for Clostridiales (Firmicutes) and Desulfuromonadales-like Deltaproteobacteria. The majority of proteins identified by mass spectrometry corresponded to Desulfobacter-like species, and demonstrate the role of this organism in sulfate reduction (Dsr and APS), nitrogen-fixation (Nif) and acetate oxidation to CO2 during amendment. Results suggest less abundant Desulfuromonadales and Bacteroidetes also actively contributed to CO2 production via the TCA cycle. Proteomic data indicate that sulfide was partially re-oxidized by Epsilonproteobacteria through nitrate-dependent sulfide oxidation (using Nap, Nir, Nos, SQR and Sox), with CO2 fixed using the reverse TCA cycle. Modeling shows that this reaction was thermodynamically possible, and kinetically favorable relative to acetate-dependent denitrification. We conclude that high-levels of carbon amendment aimed to stimulate anaerobic heterotrophy led to carbon fixation in co-dependent chemoautotrophs. These results have implications for understanding complex ecosystem behavior, and show that high levels of organic carbon supplementation can expand the range of microbial functionalities accessible for ecosystem manipulation.

  3. Gut microbial degradation of organophosphate insecticides-induces glucose intolerance via gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velmurugan, Ganesan; Ramprasath, Tharmarajan; Swaminathan, Krishnan; Mithieux, Gilles; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash; Dhivakar, Mani; Parthasarathy, Ayothi; Babu, D D Venkatesh; Thumburaj, Leishman John; Freddy, Allen J; Dinakaran, Vasudevan; Puhari, Shanavas Syed Mohamed; Rekha, Balakrishnan; Christy, Yacob Jenifer; Anusha, Sivakumar; Divya, Ganesan; Suganya, Kannan; Meganathan, Boominathan; Kalyanaraman, Narayanan; Vasudevan, Varadaraj; Kamaraj, Raju; Karthik, Maruthan; Jeyakumar, Balakrishnan; Abhishek, Albert; Paul, Eldho; Pushpanathan, Muthuirulan; Rajmohan, Rajamani Koushick; Velayutham, Kumaravel; Lyon, Alexander R; Ramasamy, Subbiah

    2017-01-24

    Organophosphates are the most frequently and largely applied insecticide in the world due to their biodegradable nature. Gut microbes were shown to degrade organophosphates and cause intestinal dysfunction. The diabetogenic nature of organophosphates was recently reported but the underlying molecular mechanism is unclear. We aimed to understand the role of gut microbiota in organophosphate-induced hyperglycemia and to unravel the molecular mechanism behind this process. Here we demonstrate a high prevalence of diabetes among people directly exposed to organophosphates in rural India (n = 3080). Correlation and linear regression analysis reveal a strong association between plasma organophosphate residues and HbA1c but no association with acetylcholine esterase was noticed. Chronic treatment of mice with organophosphate for 180 days confirms the induction of glucose intolerance with no significant change in acetylcholine esterase. Further fecal transplantation and culture transplantation experiments confirm the involvement of gut microbiota in organophosphate-induced glucose intolerance. Intestinal metatranscriptomic and host metabolomic analyses reveal that gut microbial organophosphate degradation produces short chain fatty acids like acetic acid, which induces gluconeogenesis and thereby accounts for glucose intolerance. Plasma organophosphate residues are positively correlated with fecal esterase activity and acetate level of human diabetes. Collectively, our results implicate gluconeogenesis as the key mechanism behind organophosphate-induced hyperglycemia, mediated by the organophosphate-degrading potential of gut microbiota. This study reveals the gut microbiome-mediated diabetogenic nature of organophosphates and hence that the usage of these insecticides should be reconsidered.

  4. Rain-induced changes in soil CO2 flux and microbial community composition in a tropical forest of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qi; Hui, Dafeng; Chu, Guowei; Han, Xi; Zhang, Quanfa

    2017-07-17

    Rain-induced soil CO 2 pulse, a rapid excitation in soil CO 2 flux after rain, is ubiquitously observed in terrestrial ecosystems, yet the underlying mechanisms in tropical forests are still not clear. We conducted a rain simulation experiment to quantify rain-induced changes in soil CO 2 flux and microbial community composition in a tropical forest. Soil CO 2 flux rapidly increased by ~83% after rains, accompanied by increases in both bacterial (~51%) and fungal (~58%) Phospholipid Fatty Acids (PLFA) biomass. However, soil CO 2 flux and microbial community in the plots without litters showed limited response to rains. Direct releases of CO 2 from litter layer only accounted for ~19% increases in soil CO 2 flux, suggesting that the leaching of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from litter layer to the topsoil is the major cause of rain-induced soil CO 2 pulse. In addition, rain-induced changes in soil CO 2 flux and microbial PLFA biomass decreased with increasing rain sizes, but they were positively correlated with litter-leached DOC concentration rather than total DOC flux. Our findings reveal an important role of litter-leached DOC input in regulating rain-induced soil CO 2 pulses and microbial community composition, and may have significant implications for CO 2 losses from tropical forest soils under future rainfall changes.

  5. Precipitation-induced of partial annealing of Ni-rich NiTi shape memory alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashrudin, Muhammad Naqib; Mahmud, Abdus Samad; Mohamad, Hishamiakim

    2018-05-01

    NiTi shape memory alloy behavior is very sensitive to alloy composition and heat treatment processes. Thermomechanical behavior of near-equiatomic alloy is normally enhanced by partial anneal of a cold-worked specimen. The shape memory behavior of Ni-rich alloy can be enhanced by ageing precipitation. This work studied the effect of simultaneous partial annealing and ageing precipitation of a Ni-rich cold drawn Ti-50.9at%Ni wire towards martensite phase transformation behavior. Ageing treatment of a non-cold worked specimen was also done for comparison. It was found that the increase of heat treatment temperature caused the forward transformation stress to decrease for the cold worked and non-cold worked specimens. Strain recovery on the reverse transformation of the cold worked wire improved compared to the non-cold worked wire as the temperature increased.

  6. Physicochemical Approach to Alkaline Flocculation of Chlorella vulgaris Induced by Calcium Phosphate Precipitates.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brányiková, Irena; Filipenská, Monika; Urbanová, K.; Růžička, Marek; Pivokonský, Martin; Brányik, T.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 166, 1 June (2018), s. 54-60 ISSN 0927-7765 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA18-05007S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 ; RVO:67985874 Keywords : microalgae * calcium phosphate * precipitates * surface interactions Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering; BK - Fluid Dynamics (UH-J) OBOR OECD: Chemical process engineering; Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7) (UH-J) Impact factor: 3.887, year: 2016

  7. Phase and amplitude perturbations on the NWC signal at Dunedin from lightning-induced electron precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowden, R.L.; Adams, C.D.D.

    1989-01-01

    Localized ionospheric depressions near the NWC-Dunedin great circle path diffract echoes which interfere with the direct signal at the Dunedin receiver to produce perturbations in phase and amplitude. The statistics both of these perturbations and of the echo phasors (echo magnitude and echo phase) which can be deduced from them are studied here. From these statistics it is deduced that echo paths must be frequently more than a wavelength (14 km) longer than the direct path so that many of the diffracting centers (electron precipitation beams) must be laterally displaced up to 200 km from the direct path. Since echo signals from these must be diffracted through angles of ∼10 0 , ionization enhancements produced by electron precipitation must frequently have lateral (cross-path) dimensions of less than 50 km, with some as narrow as 25 km. The largest perturbation magnitudes seem to require ionization enhancement of longitudinal (parallel to path) dimensions of ∼300 km. Electron precipitation confined to thin L-shells could produce such enhancements for the NWC-Dunedin path. copyright American Geophysical Union 1989

  8. Attributable Human-Induced Changes in the Likelihood and Magnitude of the Observed Extreme Precipitation during Hurricane Harvey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risser, Mark D.; Wehner, Michael F.

    2017-12-01

    Record rainfall amounts were recorded during Hurricane Harvey in the Houston, Texas, area, leading to widespread flooding. We analyze observed precipitation from the Global Historical Climatology Network with a covariate-based extreme value statistical analysis, accounting for both the external influence of global warming and the internal influence of El Niño-Southern Oscillation. We find that human-induced climate change likely increased the chances of the observed precipitation accumulations during Hurricane Harvey in the most affected areas of Houston by a factor of at least 3.5. Further, precipitation accumulations in these areas were likely increased by at least 18.8% (best estimate of 37.7%), which is larger than the 6-7% associated with an attributable warming of 1°C in the Gulf of Mexico and Clausius-Clapeyron scaling. In a Granger causality sense, these statements provide lower bounds on the impact of climate change and motivate further attribution studies using dynamical climate models.

  9. Spectral Induced Polarization (SIP) monitoring during Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heenan, J. W.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Slater, L. D.

    2010-12-01

    Jeffrey Heenan, Dimitrios Ntarlagiannis, Lee Slater Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Rutgers University, Newark NJ Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) is an established, cost effective, method for enhancing tertiary oil recovery. Although not commonly used for shallow heavy oils, it could be a viable alternative since it can offer sustainable economic recovery and minimal environmental impact. A critical component of successful MEOR treatments is accurate, real time monitoring of the biodegradation processes resulting from the injection of microbial communities into the formation; results of recent biogeophysical research suggest that minimally-invasive geophysical methods could significantly contribute to such monitoring efforts. Here we present results of laboratory experiments, to assess the sensitivity of the spectral induced polarization method (SIP) to MEOR treatments. We used heavy oil, obtained from a shallow oilfield in SW Missouri, to saturate three sand columns. We then followed common industry procedures,and used a commercially available microbial consortia, to treat the oil columns. The active MEOR experiments were performed in duplicate while a control column maintained similar conditions, without promoting microbial activity and oil degradation. We monitored the SIP signatures, between 0.001 Hz and 1000 Hz, for a period of six months. To support the geophysical measurements we also monitored common geochemical parameters, including pH, Eh and fluid conductivity, and collected weekly fluid samples from the outflow and inflow for further analysis; fluid samples were analyzed to confirm that microbes actively degraded the heavy oils in the column while destructive analysis of the solid materials was performed upon termination of the experiment. Preliminary analysis of the results suggests that SIP is sensitive to MEOR processes. In both inoculated columns we recorded an increase in the low frequency polarization with time; measureable

  10. Modeling investigation of the stability and irradiation-induced evolution of nanoscale precipitates in advanced structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirth, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Materials used in extremely hostile environment such as nuclear reactors are subject to a high flux of neutron irradiation, and thus vast concentrations of vacancy and interstitial point defects are produced because of collisions of energetic neutrons with host lattice atoms. The fate of these defects depends on various reaction mechanisms which occur immediately following the displacement cascade evolution and during the longer-time kinetically dominated evolution such as annihilation, recombination, clustering or trapping at sinks of vacancies, interstitials and their clusters. The long-range diffusional transport and evolution of point defects and self-defect clusters drive a microstructural and microchemical evolution that are known to produce degradation of mechanical properties including the creep rate, yield strength, ductility, or fracture toughness, and correspondingly affect material serviceability and lifetimes in nuclear applications. Therefore, a detailed understanding of microstructural evolution in materials at different time and length scales is of significant importance. The primary objective of this work is to utilize a hierarchical computational modeling approach i) to evaluate the potential for nanoscale precipitates to enhance point defect recombination rates and thereby the self-healing ability of advanced structural materials, and ii) to evaluate the stability and irradiation-induced evolution of such nanoscale precipitates resulting from enhanced point defect transport to and annihilation at precipitate interfaces. This project will utilize, and as necessary develop, computational materials modeling techniques within a hierarchical computational modeling approach, principally including molecular dynamics, kinetic Monte Carlo and spatially-dependent cluster dynamics modeling, to identify and understand the most important physical processes relevant to promoting the ''selfhealing'' or radiation resistance in advanced

  11. Modeling investigation of the stability and irradiation-induced evolution of nanoscale precipitates in advanced structural materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirth, Brian [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-04-08

    Materials used in extremely hostile environment such as nuclear reactors are subject to a high flux of neutron irradiation, and thus vast concentrations of vacancy and interstitial point defects are produced because of collisions of energetic neutrons with host lattice atoms. The fate of these defects depends on various reaction mechanisms which occur immediately following the displacement cascade evolution and during the longer-time kinetically dominated evolution such as annihilation, recombination, clustering or trapping at sinks of vacancies, interstitials and their clusters. The long-range diffusional transport and evolution of point defects and self-defect clusters drive a microstructural and microchemical evolution that are known to produce degradation of mechanical properties including the creep rate, yield strength, ductility, or fracture toughness, and correspondingly affect material serviceability and lifetimes in nuclear applications. Therefore, a detailed understanding of microstructural evolution in materials at different time and length scales is of significant importance. The primary objective of this work is to utilize a hierarchical computational modeling approach i) to evaluate the potential for nanoscale precipitates to enhance point defect recombination rates and thereby the self-healing ability of advanced structural materials, and ii) to evaluate the stability and irradiation-induced evolution of such nanoscale precipitates resulting from enhanced point defect transport to and annihilation at precipitate interfaces. This project will utilize, and as necessary develop, computational materials modeling techniques within a hierarchical computational modeling approach, principally including molecular dynamics, kinetic Monte Carlo and spatially-dependent cluster dynamics modeling, to identify and understand the most important physical processes relevant to promoting the “selfhealing” or radiation resistance in advanced materials containing

  12. Suppression of SOS-inducing activity of chemical mutagens by metabolites from microbial transformation of (-)-isolongifolene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Kazuki; Oda, Yoshimitsu; Miyazawa, Mitsuo

    2010-02-24

    In this study, biotransformation of (-)-isolongifolene (1) by Glomerella cingulata and suppressive effect on umuC gene expression by chemical mutagens 2-(2-furyl)-3-(5-nitro-2-furyl)acrylamide (furylfuramide) and aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)) of the SOS response in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002 were investigated. Initially, 1 was carried out the microbial transformation by G. cingulata. The result found that 1 was converted into (-)-isolongifolen-9-one (2), (-)-(2S)-13-hydroxy-isolongifolen-9-one (3), and (-)-(4R)-4-hydroxy-isolongifolen-9-one (4) by G. cingulata, and their conversion rates were 60, 25, and 15%, respectively. The metabolites suppressed the SOS-inducing activity of furylfuramid and AFB(1) in the umu test. Comound 2 showed gene expression by chemical mutagens furylfuramide and AFB(1) was suppressed 54 and 50% at <0.5 mM, respectively. Compound 2 is the most effective compound in this experiment.

  13. Application of the Lyapunov exponent to detect noise-induced chaos in oscillating microbial cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patnaik, P.R.

    2005-01-01

    Oscillating microbial processes can, under certain conditions, gravitate into chaotic behavior induced by external noise. Detection and control of chaos are important for the survival of the microorganisms and to operate a process usefully. In this study the largest Lyapunov exponent is recommended as a convenient and reliable index of chaos in continuous oscillating cultures. For the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, the exponents increase with the oxygen mass transfer coefficient and decrease as the dilution rate increases. By comparing with the corresponding time-domain oscillations determined earlier, it is inferred that weakly oscillating cultures are less likely to be driven to chaotic behavior. The main carbon source, glucose, is quite robust to chaotic destabilization, thus enhancing its suitability as a manipulated variable for bioreactor control

  14. Copper Tube Pitting in Santa Fe Municipal Water Caused by Microbial Induced Corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burleigh, Thomas D; Gierke, Casey G; Fredj, Narjes; Boston, Penelope J

    2014-06-05

    Many copper water lines for municipal drinking water in Santa Fe, New Mexico USA, have developed pinhole leaks. The pitting matches the description of Type I pitting of copper, which has historically been attributed to water chemistry and to contaminants on the copper tubing surface. However, more recent studies attribute copper pitting to microbial induced corrosion (MIC). In order to test for microbes, the copper tubing was fixed in hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS), then the tops of the corrosion mounds were broken open, and the interior of the corrosion pits were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The analysis found that microbes resembling actinobacteria were deep inside the pits and wedged between the crystallographic planes of the corroded copper grains. The presence of actinobacteria confirms the possibility that the cause of this pitting corrosion was MIC. This observation provides better understanding and new methods for preventing the pitting of copper tubing in municipal water.

  15. Copper Tube Pitting in Santa Fe Municipal Water Caused by Microbial Induced Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas D. Burleigh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Many copper water lines for municipal drinking water in Santa Fe, New Mexico USA, have developed pinhole leaks. The pitting matches the description of Type I pitting of copper, which has historically been attributed to water chemistry and to contaminants on the copper tubing surface. However, more recent studies attribute copper pitting to microbial induced corrosion (MIC. In order to test for microbes, the copper tubing was fixed in hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS, then the tops of the corrosion mounds were broken open, and the interior of the corrosion pits were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The analysis found that microbes resembling actinobacteria were deep inside the pits and wedged between the crystallographic planes of the corroded copper grains. The presence of actinobacteria confirms the possibility that the cause of this pitting corrosion was MIC. This observation provides better understanding and new methods for preventing the pitting of copper tubing in municipal water.

  16. Microbial induced corrosion in French concept of nuclear waste underground disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feron, D.; Crusset, D.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to give a short overview of how the bacteria, that may influence the corrosion behaviour of metals and alloys, are taken into account in the French concept of geological repository. It is important to underline that microbial induced corrosion is not a new corrosion phenomena but the presence of bacteria may modify (increase or decrease) anodic or cathodic corrosion reactions. In aerobic conditions, high corrosion rates may be obtained due to the bio-oxidation of pyrites. Under anaerobic conditions (longer period), bacteria may have negative (localised corrosion) or positive (consumption of hydrogen) effects. The mixed conditions (with and without oxygen) may be the most dangerous period for localised corrosion of metals and alloys due to the coupling and galvanic corrosion phenomena enhanced by aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. The first conclusions lead to consider that MIC is a 'short term' issue rather than a long term one. (authors)

  17. Microbially mediated mineral carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, I. M.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral carbonation involves silicate dissolution and carbonate precipitation, which are both natural processes that microorganisms are able to mediate in near surface environments (Ferris et al., 1994; Eq. 1). (Ca,Mg)SiO3 + 2H2CO3 + H2O → (Ca,Mg)CO3 + H2O + H4SiO4 + O2 (1) Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophs with cell surface characteristics and metabolic processes involving inorganic carbon that can induce carbonate precipitation. This occurs partly by concentrating cations within their net-negative cell envelope and through the alkalinization of their microenvironment (Thompson & Ferris, 1990). Regions with mafic and ultramafic bedrock, such as near Atlin, British Columbia, Canada, represent the best potential sources of feedstocks for mineral carbonation. The hydromagnesite playas near Atlin are a natural biogeochemical model for the carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals (Power et al., 2009). Field-based studies at Atlin and corroborating laboratory experiments demonstrate the ability of a microbial consortium dominated by filamentous cyanobacteria to induce the precipitation of carbonate minerals. Phototrophic microbes, such as cyanobacteria, have been proposed as a means for producing biodiesel and other value added products because of their efficiency as solar collectors and low requirement for valuable, cultivable land in comparison to crops (Dismukes et al., 2008). Carbonate precipitation and biomass production could be facilitated using specifically designed ponds to collect waters rich in dissolved cations (e.g., Mg2+ and Ca2+), which would allow for evapoconcentration and provide an appropriate environment for growth of cyanobacteria. Microbially mediated carbonate precipitation does not require large quantities of energy or chemicals needed for industrial systems that have been proposed for rapid carbon capture and storage via mineral carbonation (e.g., Lackner et al., 1995). Therefore, this biogeochemical approach may represent a readily

  18. Atomic-resolution study of homogeneous radiation-induced precipitation in a neutron-irradiated W-10 at. % Re alloy. MSC report No. 5014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herschitz, R.; Seidman, D.N.

    1983-06-01

    The phenomenon of radiation-induced precipitation has been investigated in a W-10 at. % Re alloy using the atom-probe field-ion microscope. Results show a significant alteration of the microstructure of this alloy as a result of the fast-neutron irradiation. Precipitates with the composition approx. WRe (sigma phase) were detected at a density of 10 16 cm -3 . Coherent, semicoherent and possibly incoherent precipitates of the sigma phase have been observed. They were not associated with either linear or planar defects, or with any impurity atoms; i.e. a true homogeneous radiation-induced precipitation occurs in this alloy. A physical argument is presented for the nucleation of the sigma phase precipitates in the vicinity of displacement cascades produced by primary knock-on atoms. It is suggested that the nucleation of the sigma phase is due to the formation of tightly-bound mobil mixed dumbells which react to form an immobile rhenium cluster. The growth of this cluster into a precipitate is most likely driven by the irreversible vacancy: self-interstitial atom (SIA) annihilation reaction, as suggested recently by Cauvin and Martin. A mechanism for the suppression of voids, in this alloy, is presented which is self-consistent with the homogeneous radiation-induced precipitation mechanism

  19. Evolution of permeability in siliceous rocks induced by mineral dissolution and precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuhara, Hideaki; Kinoshita, Naoki; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Nakashima, Shinichiro; Kishida, Kiyoshi

    2007-01-01

    A conceptual model is presented to follow the evolution of permeability in siliceous rocks mediated by pressure solution. Specifically, the main minerals of siliceous rocks that are quartz, cristobalite, and amorphous silica, are focused to examine differences of the permeability evolutions among them at effective pressures of 1, 5, and 10 MPa, and temperatures of 20 and 90degC. The rates and magnitudes of permeability reduction increase with increases of the pressures and temperatures applied. Ultimate permeabilities reduced by the order of 90 % at the completion of dissolution-mediated compaction at 10 MPa and 90degC. Precipitation may augment more degradation of flow transport in time. (author)

  20. Dependence of Whistler-mode Wave Induced Electron Precipitation on k-vector Direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, P.; Inan, U. S.; Bell, T. F.; Bortnik, J.

    2007-12-01

    Whistler-mode waves that are either spontaneously generated in-situ (i.e., chorus), or externally injected (lightning, VLF transmitters) are known to be responsible for the loss of radiation belt electrons. An important determinant in the quantification of this loss is the dependence of the cyclotron resonant pitch angle scattering on the initial wave normal angles of the driving waves. Inan et al. (U.S. Inan et al., Controlled precipitation of radiation belt electrons, Journal of Geophysical Research-Space Physics, 108 (A5), 1186, doi: 10.1029/2002JA009580, 2003.) suggested that the lifetime of > 1 MeV electrons in the inner radiation belts might be moderated by in situ injection of VLF whistler mode waves at frequencies of a few kHz. The formulation of Wang and Bell (T.N.C. Wang and T.F. Bell, Radiation resisitance of a short dipole immersed in a cold magnetoionic medium, Radio Science, 4(2), 167-177, February 1969) for an electric dipole antenna located in the inner magnetosphere established that most of the radiated power is concentrated in waves whose wave normal angles lie near the local resonance cone. Such waves, compared to those injected at less oblique initial wave normal angles, undergo several more magnetospheric reflections, persist in the magnetospheric cavity for longer periods of time, and resonate with electrons of higher energies. Accordingly, such waves may be highly effective in contributing to the loss of electrons from the inner belt and slot regions [Inan et al., 2006]. Nevertheless, it has been noted (Inan et al. [2006], Inan and Bell [1991] and Albert [1999]) that > 1 MeV electrons may not be effectively scattered by waves propagating with very high wave normal angles, due to the generally reduced gyroresonant diffusion coefficients for wave normals near the resonance cone. We use the Stanford 2D VLF raytracing program to determine the energetic electron pitch angle scattering and the precipitated flux signatures that would be detected for

  1. Mechanisms of pollution induced community tolerance in a soil microbial community exposed to Cu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakelin, Steven; Gerard, Emily; Black, Amanda; Hamonts, Kelly; Condron, Leo; Yuan, Tong; van Nostrand, Joy; Zhou, Jizhong; O'Callaghan, Maureen

    2014-07-01

    Pollution induced community tolerance (PICT) to Cu(2+), and co-tolerance to nanoparticulate Cu, ionic silver (Ag(+)), and vancomycin were measured in field soils treated with Cu(2+) 15 years previously. EC50 values were determined using substrate induced respiration and correlations made against soil physicochemical properties, microbial community structure, physiological status (qCO2; metabolic quotient), and abundances of genes associated with metal and antibiotic resistance. Previous level of exposure to copper was directly (P < 0.05) associated with tolerance to addition of new Cu(2+), and also of nanoparticle Cu. However, Cu-exposed communities had no co-tolerance to Ag(+) and had increased susceptibly to vancomycin. Increased tolerance to both Cu correlated (P < 0.05) with increased metabolic quotient, potentially indicating that the community directed more energy towards cellular maintenance rather than biomass production. Neither bacterial or fungal community composition nor changes in the abundance of genes involved with metal resistance were related to PICT or co-tolerance mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Variation in antibiotic-induced microbial recolonization impacts on the host metabolic phenotypes of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, Jonathan R; Tuohy, Kieran M; Lindfors, Peter; Brown, Duncan T; Gibson, Glenn R; Wilson, Ian D; Sidaway, James; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Holmes, Elaine

    2011-08-05

    The interaction between the gut microbiota and their mammalian host is known to have far-reaching consequences with respect to metabolism and health. We investigated the effects of eight days of oral antibiotic exposure (penicillin and streptomycin sulfate) on gut microbial composition and host metabolic phenotype in male Han-Wistar rats (n = 6) compared to matched controls. Early recolonization was assessed in a third group exposed to antibiotics for four days followed by four days recovery (n = 6). Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of the intestinal contents collected at eight days showed a significant reduction in all bacterial groups measured (control, 10(10.7) cells/g feces; antibiotic-treated, 10(8.4)). Bacterial suppression reduced the excretion of mammalian-microbial urinary cometabolites including hippurate, phenylpropionic acid, phenylacetylglycine and indoxyl-sulfate whereas taurine, glycine, citrate, 2-oxoglutarate, and fumarate excretion was elevated. While total bacterial counts remained notably lower in the recolonized animals (10(9.1) cells/g faeces) compared to the controls, two cage-dependent subgroups emerged with Lactobacillus/Enterococcus probe counts dominant in one subgroup. This dichotomous profile manifested in the metabolic phenotypes with subgroup differences in tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolites and indoxyl-sulfate excretion. Fecal short chain fatty acids were diminished in all treated animals. Antibiotic treatment induced a profound effect on the microbiome structure, which was reflected in the metabotype. Moreover, the recolonization process was sensitive to the microenvironment, which may impact on understanding downstream consequences of antibiotic consumption in human populations.

  3. pH-Induced precipitation behavior of weakly basic compounds: determination of extent and duration of supersaturation using potentiometric titration and correlation to solid state properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yi-Ling; Ilevbare, Grace A; Van Eerdenbrugh, Bernard; Box, Karl J; Sanchez-Felix, Manuel Vincente; Taylor, Lynne S

    2012-10-01

    To examine the precipitation and supersaturation behavior of ten weak bases in terms of the relationship between pH-concentration-time profiles and the solid state properties of the precipitated material. Initially the compound was dissolved at low pH, followed by titration with base to induce precipitation. Upon precipitation, small aliquots of acid or base were added to induce slight subsaturation and supersaturation respectively and the resultant pH gradient was determined. The concentration of the unionized species was calculated as a function of time and pH using mass and charge balance equations. Two patterns of behavior were observed in terms of the extent and duration of supersaturation arising following an increase in pH and this behavior could be rationalized based on the crystallization tendency of the compound. For compounds that did not readily crystallize, an amorphous precipitate was formed and a prolonged duration of supersaturation was observed. For compounds that precipitated to crystalline forms, the observed supersaturation was short-lived. This study showed that supersaturation behavior has significant correlation with the solid-state properties of the precipitate and that pH-metric titration methods can be utilized to evaluate the supersaturation behavior.

  4. The Influence of the Induced Ferrite and Precipitates of Ti-bearing Steel on the Ductility of Continuous Casting Slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Guoyu; Cheng, Guoguang; Hou, Zibing

    2015-11-01

    In order to investigate the loss of the ductility of Ti-bearing ship plate steel under 1000 °C, where the ductility begins to reduce rapidly, so the hot ductility of Ti-bearing ship plate steel has been obtained using the Gleeble 1500 thermal-mechanical simulator and also the studies about the effect of grain boundary ferrite films and precipitates containing Ti on the ductility has been carried out. The result showed that the TiN particles precipitating at 950 °C with a larger size and smaller volume fraction cannot effectively suppress the occurrence of recrystallization and the ductility still retains at a high level, although R.A. value presents a certain degree of decline compared with 1000 °C. A large number of smaller Ti(C,N) particles precipitate at 900 °C and can induce the formation of a very small amount of fine grain boundary ferrite, which deteriorates the adhesion strength of the grain boundary, so the R.A. value rapidly reduces to less than 50%. When the temperature falls to close Ae3 (827 °C), the amount of the grain boundary ferrite films increase due to the ferrite phase transformation, but the ferrite film thickness becomes more uneven at the same time, which results in the increase of strain concentration and plays a leading role in causing the decrease of ductility, so the R.A. value has been kept less than 40% as the temperature cooling to 800 °C from 850 °C. When the temperature further decreases, the ductility starts to recover due to the increase of average ferrite film thickness to a greater degree which greatly reduces the strain concentration of the grain boundary.

  5. Soil frost-induced soil moisture precipitation feedback and effects on atmospheric states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, Stefan; Blome, Tanja; Ekici, Altug; Beer, Christian

    2016-04-01

    land atmosphere feedback to precipitation over the high latitudes, which reduces the model's wet biases in precipitation and evapotranspiration during the summer. This is noteworthy as soil moisture - atmosphere feedbacks have previously not been in the research focus over the high latitudes. These results point out the importance of high latitude physical processes at the land surface for the regional climate.

  6. Review Article: Atmospheric conditions inducing extreme precipitation over the eastern and western Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayan, U.; Nissen, K.; Ulbrich, U.

    2015-11-01

    This review discusses published studies of heavy rainfall events over the Mediterranean Basin, combining them in a more general picture of the dynamic and thermodynamic factors and processes that produce heavy rain storms. It distinguishes the western and eastern Mediterranean in order to point out specific regional peculiarities. The crucial moisture for developing intensive convection over these regions can be originated not only from the adjacent Mediterranean Sea but also from distant upwind sources. Transport from remote sources is usually in the mid-tropospheric layers and associated with specific features and patterns of the larger-scale circulations. The synoptic systems (tropical and extratropical) that account for most of the major extreme precipitation events and the coupling of circulation and extreme rainfall patterns are presented. Heavy rainfall over the Mediterranean Basin is caused at times in concert by several atmospheric processes working at different atmospheric scales, such as local convection, upper synoptic-scale-level troughs, and mesoscale convective systems. Under tropical air-mass intrusions, convection generated by static instability seems to play a more important role than synoptic-scale vertical motions. Locally, the occurrence of torrential rains and their intensity is dependent on factors such as temperature profiles and implied instability, atmospheric moisture, and lower-level convergence.

  7. Identification and diagnosis of spatiotemporal hydrometeorological structure of heavy precipitation induced floods in Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, M.; Hao, X.; Devineni, N.

    2017-12-01

    Extreme floods have a long history of being an important cause of death and destruction worldwide. It is estimated by Munich RE and Swiss RE that floods and severe storms dominate all other natural hazards globally in terms of average annual property loss and human fatalities. The top 5 most disastrous floods in the period from 1900 to 2015, ranked by economic damage, are all in the Asian monsoon region. This study presents an interdisciplinary approach integrating hydrometeorology, atmospheric science and state-of-the-art space-time statistics and modeling to investigate the association between the space-time characteristics of floods, precipitation and atmospheric moisture transport in a statistical and physical framework, using tropical moisture export dataset and curve clustering algorithm to study the source-to-destination features; explore the teleconnected climate regulations on the moisture formation process at different timescales (PDO, ENSO and MJO), and study the role of the synoptic-to-large atmospheric steering on the moisture transport and convergence.

  8. Lipoprotein glomerulopathy treated with LDL-apheresis (Heparin-induced Extracorporeal Lipoprotein Precipitation system: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivasi Paolo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Lipoprotein glomerulopathy is a glomerulonephritis which was described for the first time by Saito in 1989 and is currently acknowledged as a separate nosological entity. It is histologically characterized by a marked dilatation of the glomerular capillaries and the presence of lipoprotein thrombi in the glomerular lumens. The dyslipidemic profile is similar to that of type III dyslipoproteinemia with Apolipoprotein E values that are often high; proteinuria and renal dysfunction are present. Proteinuria often does not respond to steroid and cytostatic treatments. The phenotypic expression of lipoprotein glomerulopathy is most probably correlated to a genetic alteration of the lipoprotein metabolism (mutation of the Apolipoprotein E coding gene. In literature, lipoprotein glomerulopathies have mainly been reported in Japanese and Chinese subjects, except for three cases in the Caucasian race, reported in France and the USA. Case presentation We describe the case of a 60-year-old female, Caucasian patient suffering from lipoprotein glomerulopathy, carrier of a new mutation on the Apolipoprotein E gene (Apolipoprotein EMODENA, and treated successfully with low density lipoprotein-apheresis with the Heparin induced extracorporeal lipoprotein precipitation system. After a first phase of therapeutic protocol with statins, the patient was admitted for nephrotic syndrome, renal failure and hypertension. Since conventional treatment alone was not able to control dyslipidemia, aphaeretic treatment with heparin-induced Extracorporeal Lipoprotein Precipitation - apheresis (HELP-apheresis was started to maintain angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor therapy for the treatment of hypertension. Treatment with HELP-apheresis led to a complete remission of the proteinuria in a very short time (four months, as well as control of hypercholesterolemia and renal function recovery. Conclusion According to this case of lipoprotein glomerulopathy

  9. Microbially induced separation of quartz from hematite using sulfate reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakasan, M R Sabari; Natarajan, K A

    2010-07-01

    Cells and metabolic products of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans were successfully used to separate quartz from hematite through environmentally benign microbially induced flotation. Bacterial metabolic products such as extracellular proteins and polysaccharides were isolated from both unadapted and mineral-adapted bacterial metabolite and their basic characteristics were studied in order to get insight into the changes brought about on bioreagents during adaptation. Interaction between bacterial cells and metabolites with minerals like hematite and quartz brought about significant surface-chemical changes on both the minerals. Quartz was rendered more hydrophobic, while hematite became more hydrophilic after biotreatment. The predominance of bacterial polysaccharides on interacted hematite and of proteins on quartz was responsible for the above surface-chemical changes, as attested through adsorption studies. Surface-chemical changes were also observed on bacterial cells after adaptation to the above minerals. Selective separation of quartz from hematite was achieved through interaction with quartz-adapted bacterial cells and metabolite. Mineral-specific proteins secreted by quartz-adapted cells were responsible for conferment of hydrophobicity on quartz resulting in enhanced separation from hematite through flotation. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Fruit-Enhanced Resistance to Microbial Infection Induced by Selective Laser Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia G. Gonzálvez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Table grapes were irradiated with laser pulses at two different wavelengths: one selected at 302.1 nm, that is, resonant with the transresveratrol biphoton absorption band, and another selected at 300 nm, that is a nonresonant wavelength where trans-resveratrol two-photon absorption is negligible. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopic analyses of the irradiated grapes' skin showed an enhancement of polyphenols' content when the resonant wavelength was employed. Furthermore, microbiological analysis performed with nontreated (control, nonresonant, and resonantly irradiated grapes demonstrated how the last samples developed a significantly lower number of colony forming units. Since the only difference between the two (resonant and nonresonant irradiation conditions was just a couple of nanometres in the employed UV-B laser wavelengths, the germicidal effect should be considered very similar. As a result, the observed difference in the table grape resistance to microbial infection was attributed to a wavelength-dependent-induced photochemistry. Finally, the potentiality of this method to enhance the postharvest health status of table grapes is remarked.

  11. Microbial-Induced Heterogeneity in the Acoustic Properties of Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acoustic wave data were acquired over a two-dimensional region of a microbial-stimulated sand column and an unstimulated sand column to assess the spatiotemporal changes in a porous medium caused by microbial growth and biofilm formation. The acoustic signals from the unstimulate...

  12. Changes in Microbial Plankton Assemblages Induced by Mesoscale Oceanographic Features in the Northern Gulf of Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia K Williams

    Full Text Available Mesoscale circulation generated by the Loop Current in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM delivers growth-limiting nutrients to the microbial plankton of the euphotic zone. Consequences of physicochemically driven community shifts on higher order consumers and subsequent impacts on the biological carbon pump remain poorly understood. This study evaluates microbial plankton <10 μm abundance and community structure across both cyclonic and anti-cyclonic circulation features in the NGOM using flow cytometry (SYBR Green I and autofluorescence parameters. Non-parametric multivariate hierarchical cluster analyses indicated that significant spatial variability in community structure exists such that stations that clustered together were defined as having a specific 'microbial signature' (i.e. statistically homogeneous community structure profiles based on relative abundance of microbial groups. Salinity and a combination of sea surface height anomaly and sea surface temperature were determined by distance based linear modeling to be abiotic predictor variables significantly correlated to changes in microbial signatures. Correlations between increased microbial abundance and availability of nitrogen suggest nitrogen-limitation of microbial plankton in this open ocean area. Regions of combined coastal water entrainment and mesoscale convergence corresponded to increased heterotrophic prokaryote abundance relative to autotrophic plankton. The results provide an initial assessment of how mesoscale circulation potentially influences microbial plankton abundance and community structure in the NGOM.

  13. Heat pretreatment-induced activation of gadolinium surfaces towards the initial precipitation of hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benamar, G.; Schweke, D.; Shamir, N.; Zalkind, S.; Livneh, T.; Danon, A.; Kimmel, G.; Mintz, M.H.

    2010-01-01

    A vacuum heat pretreatment is applied, in order to enhance the reactivity of hydride-forming metals towards hydrogen reaction. For gadolinium, as for other rare-earth metals and some actinides, pretreatment temperatures of about 470 K are sufficient to induce such activation. The different factors that may be involved in that activation mechanism are identified and analyzed for gadolinium and their role is evaluated. It is concluded that the most prominent effect is desorption of surface hydroxyl groups, which impede the dissociative chemisorptions of hydrogen.

  14. Evaluation of NWP-based Satellite Precipitation Error Correction with Near-Real-Time Model Products and Flood-inducing Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Anagnostou, E. N.; Schwartz, C. S.

    2017-12-01

    Satellite precipitation products tend to have significant biases over complex terrain. Our research investigates a statistical approach for satellite precipitation adjustment based solely on numerical weather simulations. This approach has been evaluated in two mid-latitude (Zhang et al. 2013*1, Zhang et al. 2016*2) and three topical mountainous regions by using the WRF model to adjust two high-resolution satellite products i) National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climate Prediction Center morphing technique (CMORPH) and ii) Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation (GSMaP). Results show the adjustment effectively reduces the satellite underestimation of high rain rates, which provides a solid proof-of-concept for continuing research of NWP-based satellite correction. In this study we investigate the feasibility of using NCAR Real-time Ensemble Forecasts*3 for adjusting near-real-time satellite precipitation datasets over complex terrain areas in the Continental United States (CONUS) such as Olympic Peninsula, California coastal mountain ranges, Rocky Mountains and South Appalachians. The research will focus on flood-inducing storms occurred from May 2015 to December 2016 and four satellite precipitation products (CMORPH, GSMaP, PERSIANN-CCS and IMERG). The error correction performance evaluation will be based on comparisons against the gauge-adjusted Stage IV precipitation data. *1 Zhang, Xinxuan, et al. "Using NWP simulations in satellite rainfall estimation of heavy precipitation events over mountainous areas." Journal of Hydrometeorology 14.6 (2013): 1844-1858. *2 Zhang, Xinxuan, et al. "Hydrologic Evaluation of NWP-Adjusted CMORPH Estimates of Hurricane-Induced Precipitation in the Southern Appalachians." Journal of Hydrometeorology 17.4 (2016): 1087-1099. *3 Schwartz, Craig S., et al. "NCAR's experimental real-time convection-allowing ensemble prediction system." Weather and Forecasting 30.6 (2015): 1645-1654.

  15. Helium 3 precipitation in AISI 316L stainless steel induced by radioactive decay of tritium: Microstructural study of helium bubble precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brass, A.M.; Chene, J.

    1994-01-01

    The development of the thermonuclear technology has given rise to a renewed interest in the study of the behavior of helium in metals. A great amount of work is still required for the understanding of the role of helium on the mechanical properties of structural materials for fusion technology, especially austenitic stainless steels. This article deals with the study of the influence of thermomechanical heat treatments, aging conditions (temperature and time), and helium concentration of helium bubble precipitation in a 316L austenitic steel. Helium was generated by the radioactive decay of tritium (tritium trick). Helium bubbles impede the grain growth in 316L steel aged at 1,373 K and also the recrystallization reaction at this temperature if cold working is performed prior to aging. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations indicated a weak helium precipitation at 1,073 and 1,223 K, presumably due to the presence of trapping sites for tritium, and no bubble growth after aging up to 100 hours. Precipitation sites are mainly dislocations in the matrix at 1,073 K and grain boundaries and individual dislocations in the matrix at 1,223 K. The large bubble size (50 nm) observed at 1,373 K, even for short aging times (0.083), can partly be attributed to bubble dragging by dislocations toward the grain boundaries. Cold deformation prior to aging leads to a larger bubble size due to growth enhancement during recrystallization. Decreasing the helium content leads to a smaller helium bubble size and density. Tritium trapping at helium bubbles may favor helium 3 accumulation on defects such as grain boundaries, as observed by tritium autoradiography

  16. Selected durability studies of geopolymer concrete with respect to carbonation, elevated temperature, and microbial induced corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badar, Mohammad Sufian

    This thesis reports a comprehensive study related to the experimental evaluation of carbonation in reinforced geopolymer concrete, the evaluation of geopolymer concretes at elevated temperature, and the resistance of geopolymer concrete to microbial induced corrosion (MIC). Carbonation: Reinforced concretes, made of geopolymer, prepared from two class F fly ashes and one class C fly ash, were subjected to accelerated carbonation treatment for a period of 450 days. Electrochemical, microstructure and pore structure examinations were performed to evaluate the effect of corrosion caused due to carbonation. GPC specimens prepared from class F fly ash exhibited lower corrosion rates by a factor of 21, and higher pH values (pH>12) when compared with concrete specimens prepared from class C Fly ash (GPCMN). Microstructure and pore characterization of GPC prepared using class F fly ash revealed lower porosity by a factor of 2.5 as compared with thier counterparts made using GPC-MN. The superior performace of GPC prepared with the class F fly ash could be attributed to the dense pore structure and formation of the protective layer of calcium and sodium alumino silicate hydrates (C/N-A-S-H) geopolymeric gels around the steel reinforcement. Elevated Temperature: Geopolymers are an emerging class of cementitious binders which possess a potential for high temperature resistance that could possibly be utilized in applications such as nozzles, aspirators and refractory linings. This study reports on the results of an investigation into the performance of a fly ash based geopolymer binder in high temperature environments. Geopolymer concrete (GPC) was prepared using eleven types of fly ashes obtained from four countries. High content alumina and silica sand was used in the mix for preparing GPC. GPC was subjected to thermal shock tests following ASTM C 1100-88. The GPC samples prepared with tabular alumina were kept at 1093° C and immediately quenched in water. GPC specimens

  17. Microbial biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Yu; Chen, Wilfred; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2006-01-01

    A microbial biosensor is an analytical device that couples microorganisms with a transducer to enable rapid, accurate and sensitive detection of target analytes in fields as diverse as medicine, environmental monitoring, defense, food processing and safety. The earlier microbial biosensors used the respiratory and metabolic functions of the microorganisms to detect a substance that is either a substrate or an inhibitor of these processes. Recently, genetically engineered microorganisms based on fusing of the lux, gfp or lacZ gene reporters to an inducible gene promoter have been widely applied to assay toxicity and bioavailability. This paper reviews the recent trends in the development and application of microbial biosensors. Current advances and prospective future direction in developing microbial biosensor have also been discussed

  18. Systematic evaluation of bias in microbial community profiles induced by whole genome amplification.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Direito, S.; Zaura, E.; Little, M.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Roling, W.F.M.

    2014-01-01

    Whole genome amplification methods facilitate the detection and characterization of microbial communities in low biomass environments. We examined the extent to which the actual community structure is reliably revealed and factors contributing to bias. One widely used [multiple displacement

  19. Systematic evaluation of bias in microbial community profiles induced by whole genome amplification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Direito, S.O.L.; Zaura, E.; Little, M.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Röling, W.F.M.

    2014-01-01

    Whole genome amplification methods facilitate the detection and characterization of microbial communities in low biomass environments. We examined the extent to which the actual community structure is reliably revealed and factors contributing to bias. One widely used [multiple displacement

  20. The chemistry on a subnanometer scale of radiation-induced precipitation and segregation in fast-neutron irradiated tungsten-rhenium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershitz, R.; Seidman, D.N.

    1984-01-01

    The phenomena of radiation-induced precipitation and segregation have been investigated in W-10 at.% Re and W-25 at.% Re alloys, employing the atom-probe field-ion-microscope technique. The specimens had been irradiated to a fast-neutron fluence of approx.4x10 22 neutrons cm -2 (e>0.1 MeV) at 575, 625 and 675 deg C. This corresponds to 8.6 dpa and an average displacement rate, for the two year irradiation time of 1.4x10 -7 dpa s -1 . In the W-10 at.% Re alloy, coherent, semicoherent and possibly incoherent precipitates with the composition approx.WRe and a disc-shaped morphology -- one or two atomic planes thick -- were detected at a number density of approx.10 16 cm -3 , and a mean diameter of approx.57 A. In the W-25 at.% Re alloy the same precipitates with the composition approx.WRe 3 were detected at a number density of approx.10 17 cm -3 and a mean diameter of 40 A. The semicoherent WRe 3 precipitates were associated with 4 He atoms; that is, they may have been heterogeneously nucleated. None of the other precipitates were associated with either line or planar defects or with any impurity atoms. Therefore, a true homogeneous radiation-induced precipitation occurs in these alloys. In the W-25 at.% Re alloy a two dimensional WRe 3 phase has been observed at a grain boundary. The nucleation of both precipitates in the vicinity of displacement cascades might be produced by primary knock-on atoms. In both cases, the first step in the nucleation is due to the formation of tightly-bound mobile mixed dumbbells which react to form an immobile di-rhenium cluster. Point-defect mechanisms for all the other observations are also discussed

  1. Soil microbial species loss affects plant biomass and survival of an introduced bacterial strain, but not inducible plant defences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurm, Viola; van der Putten, Wim H; Pineda, Ana; Hol, W H Gera

    2018-02-12

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) strains can influence plant-insect interactions. However, little is known about the effect of changes in the soil bacterial community in general and especially the loss of rare soil microbes on these interactions. Here, the influence of rare soil microbe reduction on induced systemic resistance (ISR) in a wild ecotype of Arabidopsis thaliana against the aphid Myzus persicae was investigated. To create a gradient of microbial abundances, soil was inoculated with a serial dilution of a microbial community and responses of Arabidopsis plants that originated from the same site as the soil microbes were tested. Plant biomass, transcription of genes involved in plant defences, and insect performance were measured. In addition, the effects of the PGPR strain Pseudomonas fluorescens SS101 on plant and insect performance were tested under the influence of the various soil dilution treatments. Plant biomass showed a hump-shaped relationship with soil microbial community dilution, independent of aphid or Pseudomonas treatments. Both aphid infestation and inoculation with Pseudomonas reduced plant biomass, and led to downregulation of PR1 (salicylic acid-responsive gene) and CYP79B3 (involved in synthesis of glucosinolates). Aphid performance and gene transcription were unaffected by soil dilution. Neither the loss of rare microbial species, as caused by soil dilution, nor Pseudomonas affect the resistance of A. thaliana against M. persicae. However, both Pseudomonas survival and plant biomass respond to rare species loss. Thus, loss of rare soil microbial species can have a significant impact on both above- and below-ground organisms. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Experimental drought induces short-term changes in soil functionality and microbial community structure after fire in a Mediterranean shrubland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, M. B.; Parra, A.; Laudicina, V. A.; Moreno, J. M.

    2014-10-01

    Fire is a major ecosystem driver, causing significant changes in soil nutrients and microbial community structure and functionality. Post-fire soil dynamics can vary depending on rainfall patterns, although variations in response to drought are poorly known. This is particularly important in areas with poor soils and limited rainfall, like arid and semiarid ones. Furthermore, climate change projections in many such areas anticipate reduced precipitation and longer drought, together with an increase in fire severity. The effects of experimental drought and fire were studied on soils in a Mediterranean Cistus-Erica shrubland in Central Spain. A replicated (n = 4) field experiment was carried out in which four levels of rainfall pattern were implemented by means of a rain-out shelters and irrigation system. The treatments were: environmental control (natural rainfall), historical control (long-term average rainfall, 2 months drought), moderate drought (25% reduction of historical control, 5 months drought) and severe drought (45% reduction, 7 months drought). After one growing season, the plots were burned with high fire intensity, except a set of unburned plots that served as control. Soils were collected seasonally during one year and variables related to soil nutrient availability and microbial community structure and functionality were studied. Burned soils increased nutrient availability (P, N, K) with respect to unburned ones, but drought reduced such an increase in P, while it further increased N and K. Such changes in available soil nutrients were short-lived. Drought caused a further decrease of enzyme activities, carbon mineralization rate and microbial biomass. Fire decreased the relative abundance of fungi and actinomycetes. However, fire and drought caused a further reduction in fungi, with bacteria becoming relatively more abundant. Arguably, increasing drought and fires due to climate change will likely shift soil recovery after fire.

  3. Ion Transport and Precipitation Kinetics as Key Aspects of Stress Generation on Pore Walls Induced by Salt Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naillon, A.; Joseph, P.; Prat, M.

    2018-01-01

    The stress generation on pore walls due to the growth of a sodium chloride crystal in a confined aqueous solution is studied from evaporation experiments in microfluidic channels in conjunction with numerical computations of crystal growth. The study indicates that the stress buildup on the pore walls is a highly transient process taking place over a very short period of time (in less than 1 s in our experiments). The analysis makes clear that what matters for the stress generation is not the maximum supersaturation at the onset of the crystal growth but the supersaturation at the interface between the solution and the crystal when the latter is about to be confined between the pore walls. The stress generation is summarized in a simple stress diagram involving the pore aspect ratio and the Damkhöler number characterizing the competition between the precipitation reaction kinetics and the ion transport towards the growing crystal. This opens up the route for a better understanding of the damage of porous materials induced by salt crystallization, an important issue in Earth sciences, reservoir engineering, and civil engineering.

  4. Multi-satellite sensor study on precipitation-induced emission pulses of NOx from soils in semi-arid ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zörner

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a top-down approach to infer and quantify rain-induced emission pulses of NOx ( ≡  NO + NO2, stemming from biotic emissions of NO from soils, from satellite-borne measurements of NO2. This is achieved by synchronizing time series at single grid pixels according to the first day of rain after a dry spell of prescribed duration. The full track of the temporal evolution several weeks before and after a rain pulse is retained with daily resolution. These are needed for a sophisticated background correction, which accounts for seasonal variations in the time series and allows for improved quantification of rain-induced soil emissions. The method is applied globally and provides constraints on pulsed soil emissions of NOx in regions where the NOx budget is seasonally dominated by soil emissions. We find strong peaks of enhanced NO2 vertical column densities (VCDs induced by the first intense precipitation after prolonged droughts in many semi-arid regions of the world, in particular in the Sahel. Detailed investigations show that the rain-induced NO2 pulse detected by the OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument, GOME-2 and SCIAMACHY satellite instruments could not be explained by other sources, such as biomass burning or lightning, or by retrieval artefacts (e.g. due to clouds. For the Sahel region, absolute enhancements of the NO2 VCDs on the first day of rain based on OMI measurements 2007–2010 are on average 4 × 1014  molec cm−2 and exceed 1 × 1015  molec cm−2 for individual grid cells. Assuming a NOx lifetime of 4 h, this corresponds to soil NOx emissions in the range of 6 up to 65 ng N m−2 s−1, which is in good agreement with literature values. Apart from the clear first-day peak, NO2 VCDs are moderately enhanced (2 × 1014  molec cm−2 compared to the background over the following 2 weeks, suggesting potential further emissions during that period of about 3.3 ng N m−2

  5. Variations in soil microbial community structure induced by the conversion from paddy fields to upland fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, X.

    2015-12-01

    Land-use conversion is an important factor influencing the carbon and nitrogen gas exchange between land and atmosphere, and soil microorganisms is main driver of soil carbon and nitrogen gas production. Understanding the effect of land-use conversion on soil microbial communities and its influencing factor is important for greenhouse gas emission reduction and soil organic carbon and nitrogen sequestration and stability. The influence of land use conversion on soil process was undergoing a dynamic change, but little research has been done to understand the effect on soil microbial communities during the initial years after land conversion. In the study, the influences of land-use conversion from double rice cropping (RR) to maize-maize (MM) and soybean-peanut (SP) double cropping systems on soil physical and chemical properties, and microbial community structure was studied after two years of the conversion in southern China. The results showed that land use conversion significantly changed soil properties, microbial communities and biomass. Soil pH significantly decreased by 0.50 and 0.52 after conversion to MM and SP, respectively. Soil TN and NH4-N also significantly decreased by 9%-15% and 60% after conversion to upland fields, respectively. The total PLFAs, bacterial, gram-positive bacterial (G+), gram-negative bacterial (G-) and actinomycetic PLFAs decreased significantly. The ng g-1 soil concentration of monounsaturated chain PLFAs 16:1ω7c and 18:1ω9t were significantly higher at paddy fields than at upland fields. No significant differences in soil properties, microbial communities and biomass were found between conversed MM and SP. Our results indicated that land use conversion, not crop type conversed had a significant effects on soil properties and microbial communities at the initial of land conversion. And soil pH was the key factor regulating the variations in soil microbial community structure after land use conversion from paddy to upland fields.

  6. Precipitation thresholds and drought-induced tree die-off: insights from patterns of Pinus edulis mortality along an environmental stress gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Michael J; Royer, Patrick D; Cobb, Neil S; Breshears, David D; Ford, Paulette L

    2013-10-01

    Recent regional tree die-off events appear to have been triggered by a combination of drought and heat - referred to as 'global-change-type drought'. To complement experiments focused on resolving mechanisms of drought-induced tree mortality, an evaluation of how patterns of tree die-off relate to highly spatially variable precipitation is needed. Here, we explore precipitation relationships with a die-off event of pinyon pine (Pinus edulis Engelm.) in southwestern North America during the 2002-2003 global-change-type drought. Pinyon die-off and its relationship with precipitation was quantified spatially along a precipitation gradient in north-central New Mexico with standard field plot measurements of die-off combined with canopy cover derived from normalized burn ratio (NBR) from Landsat imagery. Pinyon die-off patterns revealed threshold responses to precipitation (cumulative 2002-2003) and vapor pressure deficit (VPD), with little to no mortality (< 10%) above 600 mm and below warm season VPD of c. 1.7 kPa. [Correction added after online publication 17 June 2013; in the preceding sentence, the word 'below' has been inserted.] Our results refine how precipitation patterns within a region influence pinyon die-off, revealing a precipitation and VPD threshold for tree mortality and its uncertainty band where other factors probably come into play - a response type that influences stand demography and landscape heterogeneity and is of general interest, yet has not been documented. © 2013 No claim to US Government works. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. Gamma-irradiation induced mutagenesis on some microbial strains of interest in food biotechnologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferdes, O.S.; Ferdes, M.; Dumitru, E.; Mencinicopschi, G.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper there were presented the results concerning gamma-ray effects on some microbial strains which are of interest in food biotechnologies. The irradiations are performed to a Co-60 source, under several condition, at dose rates between 0.1-2.0 kGy/h and in a dose range between 0.1-20.0 kGy. The microbial strains are of Bacillus subtilis, Aspergillus niger, Mucor pusillus and Monascus rubens from IFC collection. There were established the survival curves and the optimum irradiation doses for mutagenic effects. There were isolated, analysed and characterised some mutant strains, with better properties in obtaining food enzymes and pigments. (orig.)

  8. Rearing Water Treatment Induces Microbial Selection Influencing the Microbiota and Pathogen Associated Transcripts of Cod (Gadus morhua Larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragnhild I. Vestrum

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that K-selection and microbial stability in the rearing water increases survival and growth of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua larvae, and that recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS are compatible with this. Here, we have assessed how water treatment influenced the larval microbiota and host responses at the gene expression level. Cod larvae were reared with two different rearing water systems: a RAS and a flow-through system (FTS. The water microbiota was examined using a 16S rDNA PCR/DGGE strategy. RNA extracted from larvae at 8, 13, and 17 days post hatching was used for microbiota and microarray gene expression analysis. Bacterial cDNA was synthesized and used for 16S rRNA amplicon 454 pyrosequencing of larval microbiota. Both water and larval microbiota differed significantly between the systems, and the larval microbiota appeared to become more dissimilar between systems with time. In total 4 phyla were identified for all larvae: Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria. The most profound difference in larval microbiota was a high abundance of Arcobacter (Epsilonproteobacteria in FTS larvae (34 ± 9% of total reads. Arcobacter includes several species that are known pathogens for humans and animals. Cod larval transcriptome responses were investigated using an oligonucleotide gene expression microarray covering approximately 24,000 genes. Interestingly, FTS larvae transcriptional profiles revealed an overrepresentation of upregulated transcripts associated with responses to pathogens and infections, such as c1ql3-like, pglyrp-2-like and zg16, compared to RAS larvae. In conclusion, distinct water treatment systems induced differences in the larval microbiota. FTS larvae showed up-regulation of transcripts associated with responses to microbial stress. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that RAS promotes K-selection and microbial stability by maintaining a microbial load close to the

  9. Precipitation trends over the Korean peninsula: typhoon-induced changes and a typology for characterizing climate-related risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong-Suk; Jain, Shaleen

    2011-01-01

    Typhoons originating in the west Pacific are major contributors to climate-related risk over the Korean peninsula. The current perspective regarding improved characterization of climatic risk and the projected increases in the intensity, frequency, duration, and power dissipation of typhoons during the 21st century in the western North Pacific region motivated a reappraisal of historical trends in precipitation. In this study, trends in the magnitude and frequency of seasonal precipitation in the five major river basins in Korea are analyzed on the basis of a separation analysis, with recognition of moisture sources (typhoon and non-typhoon). Over the 1966-2007 period, typhoons accounted for 21-26% of seasonal precipitation, with the largest values in the Nakdong River Basin. Typhoon-related precipitation events have increased significantly over portions of Han, Nakdong, and Geum River Basins. Alongside broad patterns toward increases in the magnitude and frequency of precipitation, distinct patterns of trends in the upper and lower quartiles (corresponding to changes in extreme events) are evident. A trend typology-spatially resolved characterization of the combination of shifts in the upper and lower tails of the precipitation distribution-shows that a number of sub-basins have undergone significant changes in one or both of the tails of the precipitation distribution. This broader characterization of trends illuminates the relative role of causal climatic factors and an identification of 'hot spots' likely to experience high exposure to typhoon-related climatic extremes in the future.

  10. A Survey of Precipitation-Induced Atmospheric Cold Pools over Oceans and Their Interactions with the Larger-Scale Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuidema, Paquita; Torri, Giuseppe; Muller, Caroline; Chandra, Arunchandra

    2017-11-01

    Pools of air cooled by partial rain evaporation span up to several hundreds of kilometers in nature and typically last less than 1 day, ultimately losing their identity to the large-scale flow. These fundamentally differ in character from the radiatively-driven dry pools defining convective aggregation. Advancement in remote sensing and in computer capabilities has promoted exploration of how precipitation-induced cold pool processes modify the convective spectrum and life cycle. This contribution surveys current understanding of such cold pools over the tropical and subtropical oceans. In shallow convection with low rain rates, the cold pools moisten, preserving the near-surface equivalent potential temperature or increasing it if the surface moisture fluxes cannot ventilate beyond the new surface layer; both conditions indicate downdraft origin air from within the boundary layer. When rain rates exceed ˜ 2 mm h^{-1}, convective-scale downdrafts can bring down drier air of lower equivalent potential temperature from above the boundary layer. The resulting density currents facilitate the lifting of locally thermodynamically favorable air and can impose an arc-shaped mesoscale cloud organization. This organization allows clouds capable of reaching 4-5 km within otherwise dry environments. These are more commonly observed in the northern hemisphere trade wind regime, where the flow to the intertropical convergence zone is unimpeded by the equator. Their near-surface air properties share much with those shown from cold pools sampled in the equatorial Indian Ocean. Cold pools are most effective at influencing the mesoscale organization when the atmosphere is moist in the lower free troposphere and dry above, suggesting an optimal range of water vapor paths. Outstanding questions on the relationship between cold pools, their accompanying moisture distribution and cloud cover are detailed further. Near-surface water vapor rings are documented in one model inside but

  11. CATALASE FROM A FUNGAL MICROBIAL PESTICIDE INDUCES A UNIQUE IGE RESPONSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BALB/c mice exposed by involuntary aspiration to Metarhizium anisopliae extract (MACA), a microbial pesticide, have shown responses characteristic of human allergic lung disease/asthma. IgE-binding proteins have been identified in MACA by Western blot analysis, 2-dimensio...

  12. Precipitation-induced runoff and leaching from milled peat mining mires by peat types : a comparative method for estimating the loading of water bodies during peat pruduction

    OpenAIRE

    Svahnbäck, Lasse

    2007-01-01

    Precipitation-induced runoff and leaching from milled peat mining mires by peat types: a comparative method for estimating the loading of water bodies during peat production. This research project in environmental geology has arisen out of an observed need to be able to predict more accurately the loading of watercourses with detrimental organic substances and nutrients from already existing and planned peat production areas, since the authorities capacity for insisting on such predicti...

  13. Arsenic Removal from Groundwater by Solar Driven Inline-Electrolytic Induced Co-Precipitation and Filtration—A Long Term Field Test Conducted in West Bengal

    OpenAIRE

    Otter, Philipp; Malakar, Pradyut; Jana, Bana Bihari; Grischek, Thomas; Benz, Florian; Goldmaier, Alexander; Feistel, Ulrike; Jana, Joydev; Lahiri, Susmita; Alvarez, Juan Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Arsenic contamination in drinking water resources is of major concern in the Ganga delta plains of West Bengal in India and Bangladesh. Here, several laboratory and field studies on arsenic removal from drinking water resources were conducted in the past and the application of strong-oxidant-induced co-precipitation of arsenic on iron hydroxides is still considered as the most promising mechanism. This paper suggests an autonomous, solar driven arsenic removal setting and presents the finding...

  14. High-Resolution Modeling of ENSO-Induced Precipitation in the Tropical Andes: Implications for Proxy Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, J.; Karamperidou, C.

    2017-12-01

    Clastic sediment flux into high-elevation Andean lakes is controlled by glacial processes and soil erosion caused by high precipitation events, making these lakes suitable archives of past climate. To wit, sediment records from Laguna Pallcacocha in Ecuador have been interpreted as proxies of ENSO variability, owing to increased precipitation in the greater region during El Niño events. However, the location of the lake's watershed, the presence of glaciers, and the different impacts of ENSO on precipitation in the eastern vs western Andes have challenged the suitability of the Pallcacocha record as an ENSO proxy. Here, we employ WRF, a high-resolution regional mesoscale weather prediction model, to investigate the circulation dynamics, sources of moisture, and resulting precipitation response in the L. Pallcacocha region during different flavors of El Niño and La Niña events, and in the presence or absence of ice caps. In patricular, we investigate Eastern Pacific (EP), Central Pacific (CP), coastal El Niño, and La Niña events. We validate the model simulations against spatially interpolated station measurements and reanalysis data. We find that during EP events, moisture is primarily advected from the Pacific, whereas during CP events, moisture primarily originates from the Atlantic. More moisture is available during EP events, which implies higher precipitation rates. Furthermore, we find that precipitation during EP events is mostly non-convective in contrast to primarily convective precipitation during CP events. Finally, a synthesis of the sedimentary record and the EP:CP ratio of accumulated precipitation and specific humidity in the L. Pallcacocha region allows us to assess whether past changes in the relative frequency of the two ENSO flavors may have been recorded in paleoclimate archives in this region.

  15. Investigation of microbial-mineral interactions by Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicki, J.A.; Brown, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to investigate the reactions of microbes with iron minerals in aqueous solutions and as components of rocks in banded iron formations and granite. A microbial biofilm that formed on a wall of an excavated granite vault in a deep underground laboratory initiated this research. At the aerobic face of the biofilm, iron was found in a form of ferrihydrite; in the anaerobic face against the rock, iron was found as very small siderite particles. Laboratory incubations of the biofilm microbial consortium showed different mineral species could be formed. When the microbial consortium from the biofilm was incubated with magnetite grains, up to about 10% of the iron was altered in three weeks to hematite. The ability of the consortium to precipitate iron both as Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ in close proximity may have a bearing on the deposition of banded iron formations. These reactions could also be important in microbially induced corrosion

  16. Influence of precipitation behavior on mechanical properties and hydrogen induced cracking during tempering of hot-rolled API steel for tubing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Joonoh, E-mail: mjo99@kims.re.kr [Ferrous Alloy Department, Advanced Metallic Materials Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwondae-ro, Seongsan-gu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jongmin; Han, Seong-Kyung; Huh, Sungyul; Kim, Seong-Ju [Sheet Products Design Team, Technical Research Center, Hyundai Steel Company, 1480 Bukbusaneop-ro, Dangjin, Chungnam 343-823 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Tae-Ho [Ferrous Alloy Department, Advanced Metallic Materials Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwondae-ro, Seongsan-gu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    Precipitation behavior and its effect on hydrogen embrittlement during tempering process of hot-rolled API steel designed with 0.4 wt% Cr and 0.25 wt% Mo were investigated. The base steel was normalized and then tempered at 650 °C for up to 60 min. The precipitation behavior of the examined steel was explored using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, and it was found that the precipitation sequence during tempering at 650 °C were as follows: MX+M{sub 3}C→MX→MX+M{sub 7}C{sub 3}+M{sub 23}C{sub 6}. The change of particle fraction was measured by electrolytic extraction technique. At the early stage of tempering, the particle fraction greatly decreased due to dissolution of M{sub 3}C particle, and increased after 10 min by the precipitation of M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} particles. The particle fraction showed a peak at 30 min tempering and decreased again due to the dissolution of M{sub 7}C{sub 3} particle. Vickers hardness tests of base steel and tempered samples were carried out, and then the hardness was changed by accompanying with the change of particle fraction. The sensitivity of hydrogen embrittlement was evaluated through hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) tests, and the results clearly proved that HIC resistance of tempered samples was better than that of base steel due to the formation of tempered martensite, and then the HIC resistance changed depending on the precipitation behavior during tempering, i.e., the precipitation of coarse M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and M{sub 7}C{sub 3} particles deteriorated the HIC resistance.

  17. Influence of precipitation behavior on mechanical properties and hydrogen induced cracking during tempering of hot-rolled API steel for tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Joonoh; Choi, Jongmin; Han, Seong-Kyung; Huh, Sungyul; Kim, Seong-Ju; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Tae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Precipitation behavior and its effect on hydrogen embrittlement during tempering process of hot-rolled API steel designed with 0.4 wt% Cr and 0.25 wt% Mo were investigated. The base steel was normalized and then tempered at 650 °C for up to 60 min. The precipitation behavior of the examined steel was explored using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, and it was found that the precipitation sequence during tempering at 650 °C were as follows: MX+M_3C→MX→MX+M_7C_3+M_2_3C_6. The change of particle fraction was measured by electrolytic extraction technique. At the early stage of tempering, the particle fraction greatly decreased due to dissolution of M_3C particle, and increased after 10 min by the precipitation of M_7C_3 and M_2_3C_6 particles. The particle fraction showed a peak at 30 min tempering and decreased again due to the dissolution of M_7C_3 particle. Vickers hardness tests of base steel and tempered samples were carried out, and then the hardness was changed by accompanying with the change of particle fraction. The sensitivity of hydrogen embrittlement was evaluated through hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) tests, and the results clearly proved that HIC resistance of tempered samples was better than that of base steel due to the formation of tempered martensite, and then the HIC resistance changed depending on the precipitation behavior during tempering, i.e., the precipitation of coarse M_2_3C_6 and M_7C_3 particles deteriorated the HIC resistance.

  18. Relating soil microbial activity to water content and tillage-induced differences in soil structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjønning, Per; Thomsen, Ingrid Kaag; Petersen, Søren O

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have identified optima in soil water content for aerobic microbial activity, and this has been ascribed to a balance between gas and solute diffusivity as limiting processes. We investigated the role of soil structure, as created by different tillage practices (moldboard ploughing......, MP, or shallow tillage, ST), in regulating net nitrification, applied here as an index of aerobic microbial activity. Intact soil cores were collected at 0–4 and 14–18 cm depth from a fine sandy (SAND) and a loamy (LOAM) soil. The cores were drained to one of seven matric potentials ranging from − 15...... content to a maximum and then decreased. This relationship was modelled with a second order polynomium. Model parameters did not show any tillage effect on the optimum water content, but the optimum coincided with a lower matric potential in ST (SAND: − 140 to –197 hPa; LOAM: − 37 to − 65 hPa) than in MP...

  19. Microbial production of isotopically light iron(II) in a modern chemically precipitated sediment and implications for isotopic variations in ancient rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangalos, G.E.; Beard, B.L.; Johnson, C.M.; Alpers, Charles N.; Shelobolina, E.S.; Xu, H.; Konishi, H.; Roden, E.E.

    2012-01-01

    The inventories and Fe isotope composition of aqueous Fe(II) and solid-phase Fe compounds were quantified in neutral-pH, chemically precipitated sediments downstream of the Iron Mountain acid mine drainage site in northern California, USA. The sediments contain high concentrations of amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxides [Fe(III)am] that allow dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) to predominate over Fe–S interactions in Fe redox transformation, as indicated by the very low abundance of Cr(II)-extractable reduced inorganic sulfur compared with dilute HCl-extractable Fe. δ56Fe values for bulk HCl- and HF-extractable Fe were ≈ 0. These near-zero bulk δ56Fe values, together with the very low abundance of dissolved Fe in the overlying water column, suggest that the pyrite Fe source had near-zero δ56Fe values, and that complete oxidation of Fe(II) took place prior to deposition of the Fe(III) oxide-rich sediment. Sediment core analyses and incubation experiments demonstrated the production of millimolar quantities of isotopically light (δ56Fe ≈ -1.5 to -0.5‰) aqueous Fe(II) coupled to partial reduction of Fe(III)am by DIR. Trends in the Fe isotope composition of solid-associated Fe(II) and residual Fe(III)am are consistent with experiments with synthetic Fe(III) oxides, and collectively suggest an equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation between aqueous Fe(II) and Fe(III)am of approximately -2‰. These Fe(III) oxide-rich sediments provide a model for early diagenetic processes that are likely to have taken place in Archean and Paleoproterozoic marine sediments that served as precursors for banded iron formations. Our results suggest pathways whereby DIR could have led to the formation of large quantities of low-δ56Fe minerals during BIF genesis.

  20. Precipitation and measurements of precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, F.H.; Bruin, H.A.R. de; Attmannspacher, W.; Harrold, T.W.; Kraijenhoff van de Leur, D.A.

    1977-01-01

    In Western Europe, precipitation is normal phenomenon; it is of importance to all aspects of society, particularly to agriculture, in cattle breeding and, of course, it is a subject of hydrological research. Precipitation is an essential part in the hydrological cycle. How disastrous local

  1. Deformation induced dynamic recrystallization and precipitation strengthening in an Mg−Zn−Mn alloy processed by high strain rate rolling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Jimiao; Song, Min [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Yan, Hongge [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Yang, Chao [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Ni, Song, E-mail: song.ni@csu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2016-11-15

    The microstructure of a high strain-rate rolled Mg−Zn−Mn alloy was investigated by transmission electron microscopy to understand the relationship between the microstructure and mechanical properties. The results indicate that: (1) a bimodal microstructure consisting of the fine dynamic recrystallized grains and the largely deformed grains was formed; (2) a large number of dynamic precipitates including plate-like MgZn{sub 2} phase, spherical MgZn{sub 2} phase and spherical Mn particles distribute uniformly in the grains; (3) the major facets of many plate-like MgZn{sub 2} precipitates deviated several to tens of degrees (3°–30°) from the matrix basal plane. It has been shown that the high strength of the alloy is attributed to the formation of the bimodal microstructure, dynamic precipitation, and the interaction between the dislocations and the dynamic precipitates. - Highlights: •A bimodal microstructure was formed in a high strain-rate rolled Mg−Zn−Mn alloy. •Plate-like MgZn{sub 2}, spherical MgZn{sub 2} and spherical Mn phases were observed. •The major facet of the plate-like MgZn{sub 2} deviated from the matrix basal plane.

  2. Influence of temperature and hydrogen content on stress-induced radial hydride precipitation in Zircaloy-4 cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desquines, J., E-mail: jean.desquines@irsn.fr; Drouan, D.; Billone, M.; Puls, M.P.; March, P.; Fourgeaud, S.; Getrey, C.; Elbaz, V.; Philippe, M.

    2014-10-15

    Radial hydride precipitation in stress relieved Zircaloy-4 fuel claddings is studied using a new thermal–mechanical test. Two maximum temperatures for radial hydride precipitation heat treatment are studied, 350 and 450 °C with hydrogen contents ranging between 50 and 600 wppm. The new test provides two main results of interest: the minimum hoop stress required to precipitate radial hydrides and a maximum stress above which, all hydrides precipitate in the radial direction. Based on these two extreme stress conditions, a model is derived to determine the stress level required to obtain a given fraction of radial hydrides after high temperature thermal–mechanical heat treatment. The proposed model is validated using metallographic observation data on pressurized tubes cooled down under constant pressure. Most of the samples with reoriented hydrides are further subjected to a ductility test. Using finite element modeling, the test results are analyzed in terms of crack nucleation within radial hydrides at the outer diameter and crack growth through the thickness of the tubular samples. The combination of test results shows that samples with hydrogen contents of about 100 wppm had the lowest ductility.

  3. Pore-network model of evaporation-induced salt precipitation in porous media: The effect of correlations and heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashtian, Hassan; Shokri, Nima; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2018-02-01

    Salt transport and precipitation in porous media constitute a set of complex and fascinating phenomena that are of considerable interest to several important problems, ranging from storage of CO2 in geological formations, to soil fertility, and protection of pavements and roads, as well as historical monuments. The phenomena occur at the pore scale and are greatly influenced by the heterogeneity of the pore space morphology. We present a pore-network (PN) model to study the phenomena. Vapor diffusion, capillary effect at the brine-vapor interface, flow of brine, and transport of salt and its precipitation in the pores that plug the pores partially or completely are all accounted for. The drying process is modeled by the invasion percolation, while transport of salt in brine is accounted for by the convective-diffusion equation. We demonstrate that the drying patterns, the clustering and connectivity of the pore throats in which salt precipitation occurs, the saturation distribution, and the drying rate are all strongly dependent upon the pore-size distribution, the correlations among the pore sizes, and the anisotropy of the pore space caused by stratification that most natural porous media contain. In particular, if the strata are more or less parallel to the direction of injection of the gas that dries out the pore space (air, for example) and/or causes salt precipitation (CO2, for example), the drying rate increases significantly. Moreover, salt tends to precipitate in clusters of neighboring pores that are parallel to the open surface of the porous medium.

  4. Diurnal variations of summertime precipitation over the Tibetan Plateau in relation to orographically-induced regional circulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaodong; Bai Aijuan; Liu Changhai

    2009-01-01

    The diurnal patterns of variation of summertime precipitation over the Tibetan Plateau were first investigated using the TRMM multi-satellite precipitation analysis product for five summer seasons (i.e. June to August for 2002-2006). Both hourly precipitation amount and precipitation frequency exhibit pronounced daily variability with an overall late-afternoon-evening maximum and a dominant morning minimum. A notable exception is the prevalent nocturnal maximum around the periphery of the Plateau. In terms of the normalized harmonic amplitude, the diurnal signal shows significant regional contrast with the strongest manifestation over the central Plateau and the weakest near the periphery. This remarkable spatial dependence in daily rainfall cycles is clear evidence of orographic and heterogeneous land-surface impacts on convective development. Using six-hourly NCEP FNL data, we then examined the diurnal variability in the atmospheric circulation and thermodynamics in this region. The results show that the Plateau heats (cools) the overlying atmosphere during the day (night) more than the surrounding areas, and as a consequence a relatively stronger confluent circulation in this region occurs during the day than during the night, consistent with the diurnal rainfall cycles. Moreover, the regions with large low-level convergence and upper-level divergence correspond to the strong diurnal rainfall variations. The reversed daily alterations of convergence-divergence patterns in the vicinity of the Plateau edges are in agreement with the observed nighttime rainfall peak therein. This study further demonstrates the importance of the Tibetan Plateau in regulating regional circulation and precipitation.

  5. Systematic evaluation of bias in microbial community profiles induced by whole genome amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direito, Susana O L; Zaura, Egija; Little, Miranda; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Röling, Wilfred F M

    2014-03-01

    Whole genome amplification methods facilitate the detection and characterization of microbial communities in low biomass environments. We examined the extent to which the actual community structure is reliably revealed and factors contributing to bias. One widely used [multiple displacement amplification (MDA)] and one new primer-free method [primase-based whole genome amplification (pWGA)] were compared using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method as control. Pyrosequencing of an environmental sample and principal component analysis revealed that MDA impacted community profiles more strongly than pWGA and indicated that this related to species GC content, although an influence of DNA integrity could not be excluded. Subsequently, biases by species GC content, DNA integrity and fragment size were separately analysed using defined mixtures of DNA from various species. We found significantly less amplification of species with the highest GC content for MDA-based templates and, to a lesser extent, for pWGA. DNA fragmentation also interfered severely: species with more fragmented DNA were less amplified with MDA and pWGA. pWGA was unable to amplify low molecular weight DNA (microbial communities in low-biomass environments and for currently planned astrobiological missions to Mars. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Autoimmunity in Rheumatic Diseases Is Induced by Microbial Infections via Crossreactivity or Molecular Mimicry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Rashid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A general consensus supports fundamental roles for both genetic and environmental, mainly microbial, factors in the development of autoimmune diseases. One form of autoimmune rheumatic diseases is confined to a group of nonpyogenic conditions which are usually preceded by or associated with either explicit or occult infections. A previous history of clinical pharyngitis, gastroenteritis/urethritis, or tick-borne skin manifestation can be obtained from patients with rheumatic fever, reactive arthritis, or Lyme disease, respectively, whilst, other rheumatic diseases like rheumatoid arthritis (RA, ankylosing spondylitis (AS, and Crohn’s disease (CD are usually lacking such an association with a noticeable microbial infection. A great amount of data supports the notion that RA is most likely caused by Proteus asymptomatic urinary tract infections, whilst AS and CD are caused by subclinical bowel infections with Klebsiella microbes. Molecular mimicry is the main pathogenetic mechanism that can explain these forms of microbe-disease associations, where the causative microbes can initiate the disease with consequent productions of antibacterial and crossreactive autoantibodies which have a great impact in the propagation and the development of these diseases.

  7. Precipitates in irradiated Zircaloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.

    1985-10-01

    Precipitates in high-burnup (>20 MWd/kg U) Zircaloy spent-fuel cladding discharged from commercial boiling- and pressurized-water reactors have been characterized by TEM-HVEM. Three classes of primary precipitates were observed in the irradiated Zircaloys: Zr 3 O (2 to 6 nm), cubic-ZrO 2 (greater than or equal to 10 nm), and delta-hydride (35 to 100 nm). The former two precipitations appears to be irradiation induced in nature. Zr(Fe/sub x/Cr/sub 1-x/) 2 and Zr 2 (Fe/sub x/Ni/sub 1-x/) intermetallics, which are the primary precipitates in unirradiated Zircaloys, were largely dissolved after the high burnup. It seems, therefore, that the influence of the size and distribution of the intermetallics on the corrosion behavior may be quite different for the irradiated Zircaloys

  8. Microbial induced corrosion (MIC) on DHP copper by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans and Bacillus megaterium strains in media simulating heater waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zumelzu, E.; Cabezas, C.; Schoebitz, R.; Ugarte, R.; Rodriguez, E.D.; Rios, J.

    2003-01-01

    The complexity and diversity of microbial populations in water heating systems of steam generators make it necessary to study the magnitude of the metabolic activity of bacteria and biofilm development that may lead to degradation of metal components through microbial induced corrosion (MIC). Electrolytes simulating the conditions found in heater water networks were used to induce biofilm formation on DHP copper coupons by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans DSMZ and Bacillus megaterium C10, a commercial strain and an isolate from these waters, respectively. In order to enhance their action, industrial waters enriched with the minimum nutrient content such as sodium lactate and sodium sulphite for the DSMZ strain and glucose, proteose peptone and starch for the C10 strain were employed. Biofilm formation was studied under controlled temperature, time, shaking, pH and concentrations of the media used in this study. Then, the samples were electrochemically tested in an artificial solution of sea water as control medium, based on the hypothesis that the action of an aggressive biofilm/electrolyte medium generates damaged and non-damaged areas on the metal surface, and assuming that the sea water trial can detect the latter. Hence, a higher anodic current was associated with a lower degradation of the metal surface by the action of one of the media under study. All these trials were performed along with bacterial count, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Furthermore, it was possible to identify under which conditions MIC on DHP copper occurred and complex mechanisms from retention of cations to diffusion processes at the biofilm/tested media interface level were proposed. Surface corrosion by MIC took place on DHP copper; therefore, greater control on the treatment of industrial waters is highly desirable. (author)

  9. Performance of Microbial Concrete Developed Using Bacillus Subtilus JC3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M. V. Seshagiri; Reddy, V. Srinivasa; Sasikala, Ch.

    2017-12-01

    Concrete is vulnerable to deterioration, corrosion, and cracks, and the consequent damage and loss of strength requires immensely expensive remediation and repair. So need for special concrete that they would respond to crack formation with an autonomous self-healing action lead to research and development of microbial concrete. The microbial concrete works on the principle of calcite mineral precipitation by a specific group of alkali-resistant spore-forming bacteria related to the genus Bacillus called Bacillus subtilis JC3, this phenomenon is called biomineralization or Microbiologically Induced Calcite Crystal Precipitation. Bacillus subtilis JC3, a common soil bacterium, has inherent ability to precipitate calcite crystals continuously which enhances the strength and durability performance of concrete enormously. This microbial concrete can be called as a "Self healing Bacterial Concrete" because it can remediate its cracks by itself without any human intervention and would make the concrete more durable and sustainable. This paper discuss the incorporation of microorganism Bacillus subtilis JC3 (developed at JNTU, India) into concrete and presents the results of experimental investigations carried out to study the improved durability and sustainability characteristics of microbial concrete.

  10. Precipitous Birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Yee

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This scenario was developed to educate emergency medicine residents on the management of a precipitous birth in the emergency department (ED. The case is also appropriate for teaching of medical students and advanced practice providers, as well as reviewing the principles of crisis resource management, teamwork, and communication. Introduction: Patients with precipitous birth require providers to manage two patients simultaneously with limited time and resources. Crisis resource management skills will be tested once baby is delivered, and the neonate will require assessment for potential neonatal resuscitation. Objectives: At the conclusion of the simulation session, learners will be able to manage women who have precipitous deliveries, as well as perform neonatal assessment and management. Method: This session was conducted using high-fidelity simulation, followed by a debriefing session and lecture on precipitous birth management and neonatal evaluation.

  11. TCA precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) precipitation of proteins is commonly used to concentrate protein samples or remove contaminants, including salts and detergents, prior to downstream applications such as SDS-PAGE or 2D-gels. TCA precipitation denatures the protein, so it should not be used if the protein must remain in its folded state (e.g., if you want to measure a biochemical activity of the protein). © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. STRONTIUM PRECIPITATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, T.R.

    1960-09-13

    A process is given for improving the precipitation of strontium from an aqueous phosphoric-acid-containing solution with nickel or cobalt ferrocyanide by simultaneously precipitating strontium or calcium phosphate. This is accomplished by adding to the ferrocyanide-containing solution calcium or strontium nitrate in a quantity to yield a concentration of from 0.004 to 0.03 and adjusting the pH of the solution to a value of above 8.

  13. The resistance of titanium to pitting, microbially induced corrosion and corrosion in unsaturated conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoesmith, D W; Ikeda, B M

    1997-04-01

    Titanium and its alloys (Grades-2, -12, -16) are candidate materials for Canadian nuclear waste containers on the basis of their apparent immunity to many localized corrosion processes. This simplifies markedly the effort needed to justify the use of these materials and to develop models to predict the lifetimes of containers. Here we review the pitting, microbially influenced corrosion (MIC), and corrosion under unsaturated conditions, of titanium. For all these processes, the properties of the passive oxide film are paramount in determining the metal`s resistance to corrosion. A review of these oxide properties is included and the conditions to which the metal must be exposed if localized corrosion is to occur are defined. Since these conditions cannot be achieved under Canadian waste vault conditions, it can be concluded that pitting and MIC will not occur and that corrosion under unsaturated conditions is extremely unlikely. (author) 114 refs., 1 tab., 18 figs.

  14. The resistance of titanium to pitting, microbially induced corrosion and corrosion in unsaturated conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoesmith, D.W.; Ikeda, B.M.

    1997-04-01

    Titanium and its alloys (Grades-2, -12, -16) are candidate materials for Canadian nuclear waste containers on the basis of their apparent immunity to many localized corrosion processes. This simplifies markedly the effort needed to justify the use of these materials and to develop models to predict the lifetimes of containers. Here we review the pitting, microbially influenced corrosion (MIC), and corrosion under unsaturated conditions, of titanium. For all these processes, the properties of the passive oxide film are paramount in determining the metal's resistance to corrosion. A review of these oxide properties is included and the conditions to which the metal must be exposed if localized corrosion is to occur are defined. Since these conditions cannot be achieved under Canadian waste vault conditions, it can be concluded that pitting and MIC will not occur and that corrosion under unsaturated conditions is extremely unlikely. (author)

  15. Microbial Inactivation in the Liquid Phase Induced by Multigas Plasma Jet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro Takamatsu

    Full Text Available Various gas atmospheric nonthermal plasmas were generated using a multigas plasma jet to treat microbial suspensions. Results indicated that carbon dioxide and nitrogen plasma had high sterilization effects. Carbon dioxide plasma, which generated the greatest amount of singlet oxygen than other gas plasmas, killed general bacteria and some fungi. On the other hand, nitrogen plasma, which generated the largest amount of OH radical, killed ≥ 6 log of 11 species of microorganisms, including general bacteria, fungi, acid-fast bacteria, spores, and viruses in 1-15 min. To identify reactive species responsible for bacterial inactivation, antioxidants were added to bacterial suspensions, which revealed that singlet oxygen and OH radicals had greatest inactivation effects.

  16. UV B-induced vertical migrations of cyanobacteria in a microbial mat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebout, B.M.; Garcia-Pichel, F.

    1995-01-01

    Exposure to moderate doses of UV B (0.35 to 0.79 W m -2 s -1 or 0.98 to 2.2 μmol of photons m -2 s -1 at 310 nm) caused the surface layers of microbial mats from Solar Lake, Sinai, Egypt, to become visibly lighter green. Concurrent with the color change were rapid and dramatic reductions in gross photosynthesis and in the resultant high porewater oxygen concentrations in the surface layers of the mats. The depths at which both maximum gross photosynthesis and maximum oxygen concentrations occurred were displaced downward. In contrast, gross photosynthesis in the deeper layers of the mats increased in response to UV B incident upon the surface. The cessation of exposure to UV B partially reversed all of these changes. Taken together, these responses suggest that photoautotrophic members of the mat community, most likely the dominant cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes, were migrating in response to the added UV B. The migration phenomenon was also observed in response to increases in visible radiation and UV A, but UV B was ca. 100-fold more effective than visible radiation and ca. 20-fold more effective than UV A in provoking the response. Migrating microorganisms within this mat are apparently able to sense UV B directly and respond behaviorally to limit their exposure to UV. Because of strong vertical gradients of light and dissolved substances in microbial mats, the migration and the resultant vertical redistribution of photosynthetic activity have important consequences for both the photobiology of the cyanobacteria and the net primary productivity of the mat ecosystem

  17. Strengthening effect of nano-scaled precipitates in Ta alloying layer induced by high current pulsed electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Guangze; Luo, Dian; Fan, Guohua [School of Material Science & Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Ma, Xinxin, E-mail: maxin@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Liqin [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • Ta alloying layer are fabricated by magnetron sputtering and high current pulsed electron beam. • Nano-scaled TaC precipitates forms within the δ-Fe grain after tempering treatment. • The mean diameter of TaC particles is about 5–8 nm. • The hardness of alloying layer increased by over 50% after formation of nano-scaled TaC particle. - Abstract: In this study, the combination of magnetron sputtering and high current pulsed electron beam are used for surface alloying treatment of Ta film on high speed steel. And the Ta alloying layer is about 6 μm. After tempering treatment, TaC phase forms in Ta alloying layer when the treated temperature is over 823 K. Through the TEM and HRTEM observation, a large amount of nano-scaled precipitates (mean diameter 5–8 nm) form within the δ-Fe grain in Ta alloying layer after tempering treatment and these nano-scaled precipitates are confirmed as TaC particles, which contribute to the strengthening effect of the surface alloying layer. The hardness of tempered alloying layer can reach to 18.1 GPa when the treated temperature is 823 K which increase by 50% comparing with the untreated steel sample before surface alloying treatment.

  18. Management of precipitated opiate withdrawal syndrome induced by nalmefene mistakenly prescribed in opiate-dependent patients: a review for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchitto, Nicolas; Jullian, Benedicte; Salles, Juliette; Pelissier, Fanny; Rolland, Benjamin

    2017-06-01

    Nalmefene, a long-acting µ-opioid antagonist approved to treat alcohol use disorder, is occasionally mistakenly prescribed to opiate-dependent or opioid-treated patients. We review recent literature on drug-drug interactions between nalmefene and opioids that lead to precipitated opioid withdrawal, and focus on its management and planning for care at discharge. Areas covered: This article provides a brief and comprehensive review of management of precipitated opioid withdrawal syndrome when nalmefene is associated with an opioid, whether misused or legally prescribed. Expert opinion: When treating an opiate-dependent patient with co-occurring alcohol use disorder, both conditions need to be a focus of clinical attention. New drugs for alcohol use disorder have been approved, but must be given cautiously and with a full understanding of their potential drug-drug interactions with opioid medications. Opiate-dependent patients should be intensively monitored for risk factors of alcohol use disorder and should be continuously motivated for treatment maintenance. When nalmefene is administered to opiate-dependent patients, acute opioid withdrawal syndrome may occur. Management of precipitated acute opioid withdrawal may include short or long-acting µ-opioid agonists during hospitalization, in addition to supportive treatment. The best management of polydrug abusers is based on a multidisciplinary approach, which should be pursued and improved through continuing medical education.

  19. Interaction between recrystallization and strain-induced precipitation in a high Nb- and N-bearing austenitic stainless steel: Influence of the interpass time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, M.B.R., E-mail: marianabdrs@gmail.com [Department of Materials Engineering, UFSCar, Via Washington Luis, Km 235, 13565-905 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Gallego, J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, UNESP, Avenida Brasil, 56, 15385-000 Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil); Cabrera, J.M. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, Polytechnic University of Catalunya, Avenida Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fundacio CTM Centre Tecnologic, Plaza de la Ciencia 2, 08243 Manresa (Spain); Balancin, O. [Department of Materials Engineering, UFSCar, Via Washington Luis, Km 235, 13565-905 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Jorge, A.M., E-mail: moreira@dema.ufscar.br [Department of Materials Engineering, UFSCar, Via Washington Luis, Km 235, 13565-905 São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2015-06-18

    In this work, we studied the influence of the interpass time (20 and 5 s) on the interaction between recrystallization and strain-induced precipitation occurring during multiple passes' deformations under continuous cooling conditions in a high niobium- and nitrogen-bearing austenitic stainless steel (ISO 5832-9). The correlation between microstructure evolution and hot mechanical properties was performed by physical simulation using hot torsion tests. The microstructure evolution was analyzed by optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD). This technique indicated that dynamic recrystallization occurred at the first passes promoting an excellent grain refinement. On the other hand, shorter interpass time (5 s) allowed higher volume fraction of smallest precipitates than larger interpass time (20 s). After soaking, only TiNbN precipitates were found, whereas, Z-phase (CrNbN) and NbN were formed during thermomechanical processing. Particles with sizes between 20 and 50 nm were effective to pin grain boundaries and dislocations.

  20. Watershed-Induced Limnological and Microbial Status in Two Oligotrophic Andean Lakes Exposed to the Same Climatic Scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverría-Vega, Alex; Chong, Guillermo; Serrano, Antonio E; Guajardo, Mariela; Encalada, Olga; Parro, Victor; Blanco, Yolanda; Rivas, Luis; Rose, Kevin C; Moreno-Paz, Mercedes; Luque, José A; Cabrol, Nathalie A; Demergasso, Cecilia S

    2018-01-01

    Laguna Negra and Lo Encañado are two oligotrophic Andean lakes forming part of the system fed by meltwater from distinct glacial tongues of the Echaurren glacier in central Chile, which is in a recession period. The recent increase in temperature and decline in precipitation have led to an increase of glacial meltwater and sediments entering these lakes. Although the lacustrine systems are also hydrogeologically connected, the limnology of the lakes is strongly controlled by the surface processes related to the respective sub-watersheds and hydrology. Watershed characteristics (area and length, slope, lithology, resistance to erosion, among others) affect the chemical and physical characteristics of both lakes (e.g., nutrient concentration and turbidity). We studied physical and chemical variables and performed 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing to determine the specific microbial signature of the lakes. The transparency, temperature, turbidity and concentrations of chlorophyll-a, dissolved organic matter, nutrients and the total number of cells, revealed the different status of both lakes at the time of sampling. The predominant bacterial groups in both lakes were Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and Bacteroidetes. Interestingly, the contribution of phototrophs was significantly higher in LN compared to LE (13 and 4% respectively) and the major fraction corresponded to Anoxygenic Phototrophs (AP) represented by Chloroflexi, Alpha, and Betaproteobacteria. Multivariate analyses showed that the nutrient levels and the light availability of both lakes, which finally depend on the hydrological characteristics of the respective watersheds, explain the differential community composition/function. The abundance of a diverse photoheterotrophic bacterioplankton community suggests that the ability to utilize solar energy along with organic and inorganic substrates is a key function in these oligotrophic mountain lakes.

  1. Watershed-Induced Limnological and Microbial Status in Two Oligotrophic Andean Lakes Exposed to the Same Climatic Scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Echeverría-Vega

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Laguna Negra and Lo Encañado are two oligotrophic Andean lakes forming part of the system fed by meltwater from distinct glacial tongues of the Echaurren glacier in central Chile, which is in a recession period. The recent increase in temperature and decline in precipitation have led to an increase of glacial meltwater and sediments entering these lakes. Although the lacustrine systems are also hydrogeologically connected, the limnology of the lakes is strongly controlled by the surface processes related to the respective sub-watersheds and hydrology. Watershed characteristics (area and length, slope, lithology, resistance to erosion, among others affect the chemical and physical characteristics of both lakes (e.g., nutrient concentration and turbidity. We studied physical and chemical variables and performed 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing to determine the specific microbial signature of the lakes. The transparency, temperature, turbidity and concentrations of chlorophyll-a, dissolved organic matter, nutrients and the total number of cells, revealed the different status of both lakes at the time of sampling. The predominant bacterial groups in both lakes were Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and Bacteroidetes. Interestingly, the contribution of phototrophs was significantly higher in LN compared to LE (13 and 4% respectively and the major fraction corresponded to Anoxygenic Phototrophs (AP represented by Chloroflexi, Alpha, and Betaproteobacteria. Multivariate analyses showed that the nutrient levels and the light availability of both lakes, which finally depend on the hydrological characteristics of the respective watersheds, explain the differential community composition/function. The abundance of a diverse photoheterotrophic bacterioplankton community suggests that the ability to utilize solar energy along with organic and inorganic substrates is a key function in these oligotrophic mountain lakes.

  2. Watershed-Induced Limnological and Microbial Status in Two Oligotrophic Andean Lakes Exposed to the Same Climatic Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverría-Vega, Alex; Chong, Guillermo; Serrano, Antonio E.; Guajardo, Mariela; Encalada, Olga; Parro, Victor; Blanco, Yolanda; Rivas, Luis; Rose, Kevin C.; Moreno-Paz, Mercedes; Luque, José A.; Cabrol, Nathalie A.; Demergasso, Cecilia S.

    2018-01-01

    Laguna Negra and Lo Encañado are two oligotrophic Andean lakes forming part of the system fed by meltwater from distinct glacial tongues of the Echaurren glacier in central Chile, which is in a recession period. The recent increase in temperature and decline in precipitation have led to an increase of glacial meltwater and sediments entering these lakes. Although the lacustrine systems are also hydrogeologically connected, the limnology of the lakes is strongly controlled by the surface processes related to the respective sub-watersheds and hydrology. Watershed characteristics (area and length, slope, lithology, resistance to erosion, among others) affect the chemical and physical characteristics of both lakes (e.g., nutrient concentration and turbidity). We studied physical and chemical variables and performed 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing to determine the specific microbial signature of the lakes. The transparency, temperature, turbidity and concentrations of chlorophyll-a, dissolved organic matter, nutrients and the total number of cells, revealed the different status of both lakes at the time of sampling. The predominant bacterial groups in both lakes were Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and Bacteroidetes. Interestingly, the contribution of phototrophs was significantly higher in LN compared to LE (13 and 4% respectively) and the major fraction corresponded to Anoxygenic Phototrophs (AP) represented by Chloroflexi, Alpha, and Betaproteobacteria. Multivariate analyses showed that the nutrient levels and the light availability of both lakes, which finally depend on the hydrological characteristics of the respective watersheds, explain the differential community composition/function. The abundance of a diverse photoheterotrophic bacterioplankton community suggests that the ability to utilize solar energy along with organic and inorganic substrates is a key function in these oligotrophic mountain lakes. PMID:29556224

  3. Ripening-induced changes in microbial groups of artisanal Sicilian goats’ milk cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Di Marco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the microbial flora of “Caprino dei Nebrodi”, a raw goat’s milk cheese produced in Sicily, were studied during ripening. From 2 batches of cheese, 4 samples were taken at day 0, 2, 15, and 30 of ripening. Also, samples of curd and milk used in the manufacturing process were analyzed. By the end of the ripening process (day 30, high log10 cfu/g were found for Lactobacilli (7.20, Lattococci (7.10, and Enterococci (7.00, whereas counts of Enterobacteriaceae (3.91, Escherichia coli (3.30, and Staphylococcus (3.89 were found to be lower. The study provides useful information on the microbiological properties of “Caprino dei Nebrodi” cheese, and the results obtained suggest that in order to increase the quality of this artisanal product, it is necessary to improve the sanitary conditions of milking and cheese-making. The study was intended as a preliminary step towards the isolation and identification of bacterial species found in this type of goat’s cheese.

  4. Microbial Risk Assessment of Tidal−Induced Urban Flooding in Can Tho City (Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Quan Nguyen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Public health risks from urban flooding are a global concern. Contaminated floodwater may expose residents living in cities as they are in direct contact with the water. However, the recent literature does not provide much information about this issue, especially for developing countries. In this paper, the health risk due to a flood event occurred in Can Tho City (Mekong Delta, Vietnam on 7 October 2013 was investigated. The Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment method was used in this study. The data showed that the pathogen concentrations were highly variable during the flood event and exceeded water standards for surface water. Per 10,000 people in contact with the floodwater, we found Salmonella caused the highest number of infections to adults and children (137 and 374, respectively, while E. coli caused 4 and 12 cases, per single event, respectively. The results show that further investigations on health risk related to flood issues in Can Tho City are required, especially because of climate change and urbanization. In addition, activities to raise awareness- about floods, e.g., “living with floods”, in the Mekong Delta should also consider health risk issues.

  5. Microbial Risk Assessment of Tidal−Induced Urban Flooding in Can Tho City (Mekong Delta, Vietnam)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Thi Thao Nguyen; Van der Steen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Public health risks from urban flooding are a global concern. Contaminated floodwater may expose residents living in cities as they are in direct contact with the water. However, the recent literature does not provide much information about this issue, especially for developing countries. In this paper, the health risk due to a flood event occurred in Can Tho City (Mekong Delta, Vietnam) on 7 October 2013 was investigated. The Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment method was used in this study. The data showed that the pathogen concentrations were highly variable during the flood event and exceeded water standards for surface water. Per 10,000 people in contact with the floodwater, we found Salmonella caused the highest number of infections to adults and children (137 and 374, respectively), while E. coli caused 4 and 12 cases, per single event, respectively. The results show that further investigations on health risk related to flood issues in Can Tho City are required, especially because of climate change and urbanization. In addition, activities to raise awareness- about floods, e.g., “living with floods”, in the Mekong Delta should also consider health risk issues. PMID:29189715

  6. Microbial Risk Assessment of Tidal-Induced Urban Flooding in Can Tho City (Mekong Delta, Vietnam).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hong Quan; Huynh, Thi Thao Nguyen; Pathirana, Assela; Van der Steen, Peter

    2017-11-30

    Public health risks from urban flooding are a global concern. Contaminated floodwater may expose residents living in cities as they are in direct contact with the water. However, the recent literature does not provide much information about this issue, especially for developing countries. In this paper, the health risk due to a flood event occurred in Can Tho City (Mekong Delta, Vietnam) on 7 October 2013 was investigated. The Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment method was used in this study. The data showed that the pathogen concentrations were highly variable during the flood event and exceeded water standards for surface water. Per 10,000 people in contact with the floodwater, we found Salmonella caused the highest number of infections to adults and children (137 and 374, respectively), while E. coli caused 4 and 12 cases, per single event, respectively. The results show that further investigations on health risk related to flood issues in Can Tho City are required, especially because of climate change and urbanization. In addition, activities to raise awareness- about floods, e.g., "living with floods", in the Mekong Delta should also consider health risk issues.

  7. A novel Nrf2 activator from microbial transformation inhibits radiation-induced dermatitis in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagami, Yasuhiro; Masuda, Kayoko

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcriptional factor that regulates many antioxidants, and we have recently succeeded in obtaining a novel Nrf2 activator, RS9, from microbial transformation. RS9 is categorized as a triterpenoid, and well-known triterpenoids such as RTA 402 (bardoxolone methyl) and RTA 408 have been tested in clinical trials. RTA 408 lotion is currently being tested in patients at risk for radiation dermatitis. This prompted us to study the profiles of RS9 in the skin. All the above triterpenoids increased the level of an Nrf2-targeted gene, NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase-1, in normal human epidermal keratinocytes. Among them, the activity of RS9 was prominent; furthermore, the cellular toxicity was less compared with RTA compounds. BALB/c mice were irradiated with 30 Gy/day on Day 0, and compounds were topically applied on the back once daily from Day 1 to Day 30. Dermatitis scores peaked on Day 18, with a score of 2.6 in vehicle-treated mice, and topical applications of 0.1% RTA 402, RTA 408 and RS9 reduced the scores to 1.8, 2.0 and 1.4, respectively. Moreover, the percentage of animals with scores ≥2 was analyzed, and 0.1% RS9 suppressed the percentage from 100% to 47%. These results imply that RS9 has potential efficacy for treating radiation dermatitis.

  8. Deformation-Induced Dissolution and Precipitation of Nitrides in Austenite and Ferrite of a High-Nitrogen Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabashov, V. A.; Makarov, A. V.; Kozlov, K. A.; Sagaradze, V. V.; Zamatovskii, A. E.; Volkova, E. G.; Luchko, S. N.

    2018-02-01

    Methods of Mössbauer spectroscopy and electron microscopy have been used to study the effect of the severe plastic deformation by high pressure torsion in Bridgman anvils on the dissolution and precipitation of chromium nitrides in the austenitic and ferritic structure of an Fe71.2Cr22.7Mn1.3N4.8 high-nitrogen steel. It has been found that an alternative process of dynamic aging with the formation of secondary nitrides affects the kinetics of the dissolution of chromium nitrides. The dynamic aging of ferrite is activated with an increase in the deformation temperature from 80 to 573 K.

  9. Gd doping induced weak ferromagnetic ordering in ZnS nanoparticles synthesized by low temperature co-precipitation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Palvinder [Department of Physics, Punjabi University, Patiala, Punjab, 147002 (India); Kumar, Sanjeev, E-mail: sanjeev04101977@gmail.com [Applied Science Department, PEC University of Technology, Chandigarh, 160012 (India); Chen, Chi-Liang, E-mail: chen.cl@nsrrc.org.tw [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (NSRRC), Hsinchu, 30076, Taiwan (China); Yang, Kai-Siang [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (NSRRC), Hsinchu, 30076, Taiwan (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wei, Da-Hua [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Dong, Chung-Li [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui, Taiwan (China); Srivastava, C. [Materials Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, 560012 (India); Rao, S.M. [Department of Physics, Punjabi University, Patiala, Punjab, 147002 (India); Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, 11529, Taiwan (China)

    2017-01-15

    Zn{sub 1−x}Gd{sub x}S nanoparticles with Gd concentration x = 0.00, 0.02 and 0.04 were synthesized by the chemical co-precipitation technique using thioglycerol as capping agent. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) were employed to characterize the as synthesized Gd doped ZnS nanoparticles. XRD and TEM studies show the formation of cubic ZnS nanoparticles with an average size in the range 5–10 nm. The doping did not alter the phase of the ZnS. The PL spectra of doped ZnS nanoparticles showed the presence of sulphur vacancies in the lattice. XANES of Gd doped ZnS nanoparticles depicts spectral changes may arise from charge transfer between host Zn and dopant Gd ions. A VSM study shows that the weak ferromagnetic behaviour increases with increase in Gd doping ZnS nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Gd doped ZnS nanoparticles synthesized using co-precipitation technique. • PL studies depict sulphur and zinc vacancies in Gd doped ZnS nanoparticles. • XANES studies depict the charge transfer between host Zn and dopant Gd ions. • Room temperature weak ferromagnetism is observed in Gd doped ZnS nanoparticles.

  10. Gd doping induced weak ferromagnetic ordering in ZnS nanoparticles synthesized by low temperature co-precipitation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Palvinder; Kumar, Sanjeev; Chen, Chi-Liang; Yang, Kai-Siang; Wei, Da-Hua; Dong, Chung-Li; Srivastava, C.; Rao, S.M.

    2017-01-01

    Zn_1_−_xGd_xS nanoparticles with Gd concentration x = 0.00, 0.02 and 0.04 were synthesized by the chemical co-precipitation technique using thioglycerol as capping agent. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) were employed to characterize the as synthesized Gd doped ZnS nanoparticles. XRD and TEM studies show the formation of cubic ZnS nanoparticles with an average size in the range 5–10 nm. The doping did not alter the phase of the ZnS. The PL spectra of doped ZnS nanoparticles showed the presence of sulphur vacancies in the lattice. XANES of Gd doped ZnS nanoparticles depicts spectral changes may arise from charge transfer between host Zn and dopant Gd ions. A VSM study shows that the weak ferromagnetic behaviour increases with increase in Gd doping ZnS nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Gd doped ZnS nanoparticles synthesized using co-precipitation technique. • PL studies depict sulphur and zinc vacancies in Gd doped ZnS nanoparticles. • XANES studies depict the charge transfer between host Zn and dopant Gd ions. • Room temperature weak ferromagnetism is observed in Gd doped ZnS nanoparticles.

  11. Innate sensing of microbial products promotes wound-induced skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoste, Esther; Arwert, Esther N.; Lal, Rohit; South, Andrew P.; Salas-Alanis, Julio C.; Murrell, Dedee F.; Donati, Giacomo; Watt, Fiona M.

    2015-01-01

    The association between tissue damage, chronic inflammation and cancer is well known. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here we characterize a mouse model in which constitutive epidermal extracellular-signal-regulated kinase-MAP-kinase signalling results in epidermal inflammation, and skin wounding induces tumours. We show that tumour incidence correlates with wound size and inflammatory infiltrate. Ablation of tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-1/-2, Myeloid Differentiation primary response gene 88 or Toll-like receptor (TLR)-5, the bacterial flagellin receptor, but not other innate immune sensors, in radiosensitive leukocytes protects against tumour formation. Antibiotic treatment inhibits, whereas injection of flagellin induces, tumours in a TLR-5-dependent manner. TLR-5 is also involved in chemical-induced skin carcinogenesis in wild-type mice. Leukocytic TLR-5 signalling mediates upregulation of the alarmin HMGB1 (High Mobility Group Box 1) in wound-induced papillomas. HMGB1 is elevated in tumours of patients with Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa, a disease characterized by chronic skin damage. We conclude that in our experimental model the combination of bacteria, chronic inflammation and wounding cooperate to trigger skin cancer. PMID:25575023

  12. Precipitation Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDuffie, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Although weather, including its role in the water cycle, is included in most elementary science programs, any further examination of raindrops and snowflakes is rare. Together rain and snow make up most of the precipitation that replenishes Earth's life-sustaining fresh water supply. When viewed individually, raindrops and snowflakes are quite…

  13. Blue light induced free radicals from riboflavin in degradation of crystal violet by microbial viability evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ji-Yuan; Yuann, Jeu-Ming P; Hsie, Zong-Jhe; Huang, Shiuh-Tsuen; Chen, Chiing-Chang

    2017-09-01

    Crystal violet (CV) is applied in daily use mainly as a commercial dye and antimicrobial agent. Waste water containing CV may affect aquatic ecosystems. Riboflavin, also known as vitamin B 2 , is non-toxic and an essential vitamin required for the functions of the human body. Riboflavin is photosensitive to UV and visible light in terms of generating reactive oxygen species. This study investigated the potential application of blue light on riboflavin, so as to come up with an effective way of degrading CV during its treatment. Photosensitivity of CV leading to degradation in the presence of riboflavin was investigated by light intensity, exposure time, and irradiation dosage. The degradation of CV during riboflavin photolysis treatment was studied by a UV/vis spectrometry and chromatography. The effects of CV degradation on microbial viability are relevant when considering the influences on the ecosystem. This study proved that riboflavin photochemical treatment with blue light degrades CV dye by ROS formation. The riboflavin photolysis-treated CV solution appeared to be transparent during conformational transformations of the CV that was rearranged by free radical species generated from riboflavin photolysis. After riboflavin photolysis, colony-forming units (CFUs) were determined for each CV solution. CFU preservation was 85.2% for the CV dissolved riboflavin solution treated with blue light irradiation at 2.0mW/cm 2 for 120min. Degradation of CV by riboflavin photochemical procedures can greatly reduce antimicrobial ability and serve as an environmental friendly waste water treatment method. Our results presented here concerning riboflavin photolysis in degradation of CV provide a novel technique, and a simple and safe practice for environmental decontamination processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Reliable solution processed planar perovskite hybrid solar cells with large-area uniformity by chloroform soaking and spin rinsing induced surface precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann-Cherng Chern

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A solvent soaking and rinsing method, in which the solvent was allowed to soak all over the surface followed by a spinning for solvent draining, was found to produce perovskite layers with high uniformity on a centimeter scale and with much improved reliability. Besides the enhanced crystallinity and surface morphology due to the rinsing induced surface precipitation that constrains the grain growth underneath in the precursor films, large-area uniformity with film thickness determined exclusively by the rotational speed of rinsing spinning for solvent draining was observed. With chloroform as rinsing solvent, highly uniform and mirror-like perovskite layers of area as large as 8 cm × 8 cm were produced and highly uniform planar perovskite solar cells with power conversion efficiency of 10.6 ± 0.2% as well as much prolonged lifetime were obtained. The high uniformity and reliability observed with this solvent soaking and rinsing method were ascribed to the low viscosity of chloroform as well as its feasibility of mixing with the solvent used in the precursor solution. Moreover, since the surface precipitation forms before the solvent draining, this solvent soaking and rinsing method may be adapted to spinless process and be compatible with large-area and continuous production. With the large-area uniformity and reliability for the resultant perovskite layers, this chloroform soaking and rinsing approach may thus be promising for the mass production and commercialization of large-area perovskite solar cells.

  15. Characterizing the effect of carbon steel exposure in sulfide containing solutions to microbially induced corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherar, B.W.A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Power, I.M. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Keech, P.G.; Mitlin, S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Southam, G. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Shoesmith, D.W., E-mail: dwshoesm@uwo.c [Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 5B7 (Canada)

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: Compares inorganic sulfide and sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) on steel corrosion. Mackinawite was the dominant iron sulfide phase. SRBs can form nanowires, presumably grown to acquire energy. - Abstract: This article compares the electrochemical effects induced by inorganic sulfide and sulfate reducing bacteria on the corrosion of carbon steel - a subject of concern for pipelines. Biological microcosms, containing varying concentrations of bioorganic content, were studied to investigate changes to the morphology of biofilms and corrosion product deposits. Raman analysis indicated mackinawite (FeS{sub 1-x}) was the dominant iron sulfide phase grown both abiotically and biotically. A fascinating feature of biological media, void of an organic electron donor, was the formation of putative nanowires that may be grown to acquire energy from carbon steel by promoting the measured cathodic reaction.

  16. Biologically-induced precipitation of sphalerite-wurtzite nanoparticles by sulfate-reducing bacteria: implications for acid mine drainage treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Julio; Pérez-López, Rafael; Caraballo, Manuel A; Nieto, José M; Martins, Mónica; Costa, M Clara; Olías, Manuel; Cerón, Juan C; Tucoulou, Rémi

    2012-04-15

    Several experiments were conducted to evaluate zinc-tolerance of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) obtained from three environmental samples, two inocula from sulfide-mining districts and another inoculum from a wastewater treatment plant. The populations of SRB resisted zinc concentrations of 260 mg/L for 42 days in a sulfate-rich medium. During the experiments, sulfate was reduced to sulfide and concentrations in solution decreased. Zinc concentrations also decreased from 260 mg/L to values below detection limit. Both decreases were consistent with the precipitation of newly-formed sphalerite and wurtzite, two polymorphs of ZnS, forming <2.5-μm-diameter spherical aggregates identified by microscopy and synchrotron-μ-XRD. Sulfate and zinc are present in high concentrations in acid mine drainage (AMD) even after passive treatments based on limestone dissolution. The implementation of a SRB-based zinc removal step in these systems could completely reduce the mobility of all metals, which would improve the quality of stream sediments, water and soils in AMD-affected landscapes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Neutral escape at Mars induced by the precipitation of high-energy protons and hydrogen atoms of the solar wind origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shematovich, Valery I.

    2017-04-01

    One of the first surprises of the NASA MAVEN mission was the observation by the SWIA instrument of a tenuous population of protons with solar wind energies travelling anti-sunward near periapsis, at altitudes of 150-250 km (Halekas et al., 2015). While the penetration of solar wind protons to low altitude is not completely unexpected given previous Mars Express results, this population maintains exactly the same velocity as the solar wind observed. From previous studies it was known that some fraction of the solar wind can interact with the extended corona of Mars. By charge exchange with the neutral particles in this corona, some fraction of the incoming solar wind protons can gain an electron and become an energetic neutral hydrogen atom. Once neutral, these particles penetrate through the Martian induced magnetosphere with ease, with free access to the collisional atmosphere/ionosphere. The origin, kinetics and transport of the suprathermal O atoms in the transition region (from thermosphere to exosphere) of the Martian upper atmosphere due to the precipitation of the high-energy protons and hydrogen atoms are discussed. Kinetic energy distribution functions of suprathermal and superthermal (ENA) oxygen atoms formed in the Martian upper atmosphere were calculated using the kinetic Monte Carlo model (Shematovich et al., 2011, Shematovich, 2013) of the high-energy proton and hydrogen atom precipitation into the atmosphere. These functions allowed us: (a) to estimate the non-thermal escape rates of neutral oxygen from the Martian upper atmosphere, and (b) to compare with available MAVEN measurements of oxygen corona. Induced by precipitation the escape of hot oxygen atoms may become dominant under conditions of extreme solar events - solar flares and coronal mass ejections, - as it was shown by recent observations of the NASA MAVEN spacecraft (Jakosky et al., 2015). This work is supported by the RFBR project and by the Basic Research Program of the Praesidium of

  18. Microbially induced selective flotation of sphalerite from galena using mineral-adapted strains of Bacillus megaterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasanthakumar, B; Ravishankar, H; Subramanian, S

    2013-12-01

    The selective flotation of sphalerite from a sphalerite-galena mineral mixture has been achieved using cells and extracellular secretions of Bacillus megaterium after adaptation to the chosen minerals. The extracellular secretions obtained after thermolysis of bacterial cells adapted to sphalerite yield the highest flotation recovery of sphalerite with a selectivity index value of 24.5, in comparison to the other cellular and extra-cellular bio-reagents studied. The protein profile for the unadapted and mineral-adapted cells has been found to differ distinctly, attesting to variation in the yield and nature of extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS). The changes induced in the bacterial cell wall components after adaptation to sphalerite or galena with respect to the contents of phosphate, uronic acid and acetylated sugars of B. megaterium have been quantified. The role of the dissolved metal ions from the minerals as well as that of the constituents of extracellular secretions in modulating the surface charge of the bacterial cells as well as the minerals under study has been confirmed using various enzymatic treatments of the bacterial cells. It has been demonstrated that the induction of additional molecular weight protein fractions as well as the higher amount of extracellular proteins and phosphate secreted after adaptation to sphalerite vis-à-vis galena are contributory factors for the selective separation of sphalerite from galena. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cadmium (II) removal mechanisms in microbial electrolysis cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colantonio, Natalie; Kim, Younggy, E-mail: younggy@mcmaster.ca

    2016-07-05

    Highlights: • Rapid removal of Cd(II) was achieved in 24 h using microbial electrolysis cells. • Cathodic reduction (electrodeposition) of Cd(II) cannot explain the rapid removal. • H{sub 2} evolution in microbial electrolysis cells increases local pH near the cathode. • High local pH induces Cd(OH){sub 2} and CdCO{sub 3} precipitation only with electric current. • Neutral pH caused by low current and depleted substrate dissolves the precipitated Cd. - Abstract: Cadmium is a toxic heavy metal, causing serious environmental and human health problems. Conventional methods for removing cadmium from wastewater are expensive and inefficient for low concentrations. Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) can simultaneously treat wastewater, produce hydrogen gas, and remove heavy metals with low energy requirements. Lab-scale MECs were operated to remove cadmium under various electric conditions: applied voltages of 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0 V; and a fixed cathode potential of −1.0 V vs. Ag/AgCl. Regardless of the electric condition, rapid removal of cadmium was demonstrated (50–67% in 24 h); however, cadmium concentration in solution increased after the electric current dropped with depleted organic substrate under applied voltage conditions. For the fixed cathode potential, the electric current was maintained even after substrate depletion and thus cadmium concentration did not increase. These results can be explained by three different removal mechanisms: cathodic reduction; Cd(OH){sub 2} precipitation; and CdCO{sub 3} precipitation. When the current decreased with depleted substrates, local pH at the cathode was no longer high due to slowed hydrogen evolution reaction (2H{sup +} + 2e{sup −} → H{sub 2}); thus, the precipitated Cd(OH){sub 2} and CdCO{sub 3} started dissolving. To prevent their dissolution, sufficient organic substrates should be provided when MECs are used for cadmium removal.

  20. Microbial-induced remediation of Zn2+ pollution based on the capture and utilization of carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiwei Zhan

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The TG-DSC results showed that weight loss of the precipitates occurred around 253°C. The FTIR and TG-DSC results were in accord with the XRD and EDS results and proved again that the precipitates were basic zinc carbonate. This work thus demonstrates a new method for processing Zn2+ pollution based on the utilization of carbon dioxide.

  1. Permeability change with dissolution and precipitation reaction induced by highly alkaline plume in packed bed with amorphous silica particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, Kyo; Kadowaki, Junichi; Niibori, Yuichi; Mimura, Hitoshi; Usui, Hideo

    2008-01-01

    A large amount of cement is used to construct of the geological disposal system. Such a material alters the pH of groundwater to highly alkaline region. The highly alkaline plume contains rich Ca ion compared to the surrounding environment, and the Ca ion reacts with soluble silicic acid. Its product would deposit on the surface of flow-paths in the natural barrier and decrease the permeability. In this study, the influence of Ca ions in highly alkaline plume on flow-paths has been examined by using packed bed column. The column was packed with the amorphous silica particles of 75-150 μm in diameter. The Ca(OH) 2 solution (0.78 mM, 2.58 mM, 4.37 mM, and 8.48 mM, pH: 12.2-12.4) was continuously injected into the column at a constant flow rate (5 ml/min, and 2 ml/min), and the change of permeability was monitored. At the same time, the concentrations of [Ca] total and [Si] in the eluted solution were measured by the inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The Ca(OH) 2 solutions were prepared with CO 2 -free pure water, and filtrated through 0.45 μm filter. The permeability was normalized by the initial permeability value. In the experiment results, the permeability dramatically changed with increasing Ca concentration, because Ca ions and H 4 SiO 4 (due to the dissolution of SiO 2 ) produce C-S-H gel between the packed particles in the column. The SEM images and XRD analyses showed that the surface of SiO 2 particles was covered with the C-S-H gel precipitation. On the other hand, when the Ca concentration was relatively low, the permeability did not show remarkable change. For the cross section of SiO 2 particles, EPMA analysis suggested the consumption of Ca in the inner pore of the SiO 2 particles. However, the time-change in the concentrations of Si and Ca was not always simple. Such time-change strongly depended not only on pH or Ca concentration, but also on the flow rates. This suggested that mass transport controls the chemical

  2. New steady-state microbial community compositions and process performances in biogas reactors induced by temperature disturbances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Gang; De Francisci, Davide; Kougias, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    that stochastic factors had a minor role in shaping the profile of the microbial community composition and activity in biogas reactors. On the contrary, temperature disturbance was found to play an important role in the microbial community composition as well as process performance for biogas reactors. Although...... three different temperature disturbances were applied to each biogas reactor, the increased methane yields (around 10% higher) and decreased volatile fatty acids (VFAs) concentrations at steady state were found in all three reactors after the temperature disturbances. After the temperature disturbance...... in shaping the profile of the microbial community composition and activity in biogas reactors. New steady-state microbial community profiles and reactor performances were observed in all the biogas reactors after the temperature disturbance....

  3. Competition between autotrophic and heterotrophic microbial plankton for inorganic nutrients induced by variability in estuarine biophysicochemical conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, A.; Quigg, A.

    2016-02-01

    Competition for inorganic nutrients between autotrophic and heterotrophic fractions of microbial plankton (0.2-20μm) was investigated at two stations in a sub-tropical estuary, Galveston Bay, Texas. Competition potential between these groups is enhanced because individuals are similar in size, reducing variability among their nutrient uptake efficiencies. Further, in estuaries, allochthonous supplements to autochthonous carbon may satisfy heterotrophic requirements, allowing alternative factors to limit abundance. The relative abundance of autotrophs and heterotrophs stained with SYBR Green I and enumerated on a Beckman Coulter Gallios flow cytometer were evaluated monthly during a year-long study. Shifts in the relative in situ abundance were significantly related to temperature, dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), phosphorous (Pi), and total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations revealing opposing gradients of limitation by different abiotic factors. In corresponding in vitro nutrient enrichment bioassays the relative contribution of autotrophic or heterotrophic microbial plankton to significant enrichment responses varied. Only during macro- (>20μm) phytoplankton blooms do autotrophic microbial plankton respond to nutrient enrichment. Contrastingly, the heterotrophic microbial plankton responded to nutrient enrichment primarily when temperature limitation was alleviated. Therefore, the potential for autotrophic and heterotrophic microbial plankton competition for limiting nutrients is highest when autotrophic microbial plankton are also competing with larger phytoplankton during bloom events. Based on this evidence, we hypothesize that the autotrophic microbial fraction has a competitive advantage over the heterotrophs for inorganic nutrients in Galveston Bay. The observed microbial competition during estuarine phytoplankton blooms may have important consequences on biogeochemical processes including carbon and nutrient cycling.

  4. Arsenic Removal from Groundwater by Solar Driven Inline-Electrolytic Induced Co-Precipitation and Filtration—A Long Term Field Test Conducted in West Bengal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakar, Pradyut; Jana, Bana Bihari; Benz, Florian; Goldmaier, Alexander; Feistel, Ulrike; Jana, Joydev; Lahiri, Susmita; Alvarez, Juan Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Arsenic contamination in drinking water resources is of major concern in the Ganga delta plains of West Bengal in India and Bangladesh. Here, several laboratory and field studies on arsenic removal from drinking water resources were conducted in the past and the application of strong-oxidant-induced co-precipitation of arsenic on iron hydroxides is still considered as the most promising mechanism. This paper suggests an autonomous, solar driven arsenic removal setting and presents the findings of a long term field test conducted in West Bengal. The system applies an inline-electrolytic cell for in situ chlorine production using the natural chloride content of the water and by that substituting the external dosing of strong oxidants. Co-precipitation of As(V) occurs on freshly formed iron hydroxide, which is removed by Manganese Greensand Plus® filtration. The test was conducted for ten months under changing source water conditions considering arsenic (187 ± 45 µg/L), iron (5.5 ± 0.8 mg/L), manganese (1.5 ± 0.4 mg/L), phosphate (2.4 ± 1.3 mg/L) and ammonium (1.4 ± 0.5 mg/L) concentrations. Depending on the system setting removal rates of 94% for arsenic (10 ± 4 µg/L), >99% for iron (0.03 ± 0.03 mg/L), 96% for manganese (0.06 ± 0.05 mg/L), 72% for phosphate (0.7 ± 0.3 mg/L) and 84% for ammonium (0.18 ± 0.12 mg/L) were achieved—without the addition of any chemicals/adsorbents. Loading densities of arsenic on iron hydroxides averaged to 31 µgAs/mgFe. As the test was performed under field conditions and the here proposed removal mechanisms work fully autonomously, it poses a technically feasible treatment alternative, especially for rural areas. PMID:28974053

  5. Arsenic Removal from Groundwater by Solar Driven Inline-Electrolytic Induced Co-Precipitation and Filtration-A Long Term Field Test Conducted in West Bengal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otter, Philipp; Malakar, Pradyut; Jana, Bana Bihari; Grischek, Thomas; Benz, Florian; Goldmaier, Alexander; Feistel, Ulrike; Jana, Joydev; Lahiri, Susmita; Alvarez, Juan Antonio

    2017-10-02

    Arsenic contamination in drinking water resources is of major concern in the Ganga delta plains of West Bengal in India and Bangladesh. Here, several laboratory and field studies on arsenic removal from drinking water resources were conducted in the past and the application of strong-oxidant-induced co-precipitation of arsenic on iron hydroxides is still considered as the most promising mechanism. This paper suggests an autonomous, solar driven arsenic removal setting and presents the findings of a long term field test conducted in West Bengal. The system applies an inline-electrolytic cell for in situ chlorine production using the natural chloride content of the water and by that substituting the external dosing of strong oxidants. Co-precipitation of As(V) occurs on freshly formed iron hydroxide, which is removed by Manganese Greensand Plus ® filtration. The test was conducted for ten months under changing source water conditions considering arsenic (187 ± 45 µg/L), iron (5.5 ± 0.8 mg/L), manganese (1.5 ± 0.4 mg/L), phosphate (2.4 ± 1.3 mg/L) and ammonium (1.4 ± 0.5 mg/L) concentrations. Depending on the system setting removal rates of 94% for arsenic (10 ± 4 µg/L), >99% for iron (0.03 ± 0.03 mg/L), 96% for manganese (0.06 ± 0.05 mg/L), 72% for phosphate (0.7 ± 0.3 mg/L) and 84% for ammonium (0.18 ± 0.12 mg/L) were achieved-without the addition of any chemicals/adsorbents. Loading densities of arsenic on iron hydroxides averaged to 31 µgAs/mgFe. As the test was performed under field conditions and the here proposed removal mechanisms work fully autonomously, it poses a technically feasible treatment alternative, especially for rural areas.

  6. Effects of B2 precipitate size on transformation-induced plasticity of Cu–Zr–Al glassy alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, C.N. [Department of Materials and Optoelectronic Science, Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, J.C., E-mail: jacobc@mail.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Materials and Optoelectronic Science, Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan, ROC (China); Li, J.B.; Jang, J.S.C. [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Central University, Chung-Li, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, C.H. [Department of Mechanical and Electromechanical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan, ROC (China); Nieh, T.G. [Department of Materials and Optoelectronic Science, Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2014-03-25

    Highlights: • This paper addresses the effects of the CuZr B2 size and distribution on plasticity. • There is a critical size to induce the martensitic/twinning transformation. • An analytic model based on melt flow dynamics is settled. -- Abstract: To demonstrate the effect of processing on the microstructure and subsequent mechanical property of bulk metallic glasses, we prepared two alloys, Cu{sub 47.5}Zr{sub 47.5}Al{sub 5} and Cu{sub 47.5}Zr{sub 48}Al{sub 4}Co{sub 0.5}, using two different designs of suction mold – one with a sharp inlet and one with a blunt inlet. The two alloys have been demonstrated previously to be ductile via phase transformation of the B2 phase and twin formation during plastic deformation. Microstructures of the as-cast as well plastically deformed samples, in particular, the size and distribution of the B2 phase, were examined using X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Compressive tests were conducted on samples cast by different molds and their properties were found to closely correlate with the B2 morphology. Fluid dynamics during suction casting was also analyzed. Effects of Vena contracta, flow velocity, and Reynolds number were discussed and compared favorably with experimental observations.

  7. Microbial Fingerprints of Community Structure Correlate with Changes in Ecosystem Function Induced by Perturbing the Redox Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, A. L.; Ford, R. M.; Vallino, J. J.; Herman, J. S.; Hornberger, G. M.

    2001-12-01

    Restoration of high-quality groundwater has been an elusive engineering goal. Consequently, natural microbially-mediated reactions are increasingly relied upon to degrade organic contaminants, including hydrocarbons and many synthetic compounds. Of concern is how the introduction of an organic chemical contaminant affects the indigenous microbial communities, the geochemistry of the aquifer, and the function of the ecosystem. The presence of functional redundancy in microbial communities suggests that recovery of the community after a disturbance such as a contamination event could easily result in a community that is similar in function to that which existed prior to the contamination, but which is compositionally quite different. To investigate the relationship between community structure and function we observed the response of a diverse microbial community obtained from raw sewage to a dynamic redox environment using an aerobic/anaerobic/aerobic cycle. To evaluate changes in community function CO2, pH, ammonium and nitrate levels were monitored. A phylogenetically-based DNA technique (tRFLP) was used to assess changes in microbial community structure. Principal component analysis of the tRFLP data revealed significant changes in the composition of the microbial community that correlated well with changes in community function. Results from our experiments will be discussed in the context of a metabolic model based the biogeochemistry of the system. The governing philosophy of this thermodynamically constrained metabolic model is that living systems synthesize and allocate cellular machinery in such a way as to "optimally" utilize available resources in the environment. The robustness of this optimization-based approach provides a powerful tool for studying relationships between microbial diversity and ecosystem function.

  8. Asymmetrical Precipitation of Ag3Sn Intermetallic Compounds Induced by Thermomigration of Ag in Pb-Free Microbumps During Solid-State Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yu-Ping; Wu, Chun-Sen; Ouyang, Fan-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional integrated circuit technology has become a major trend in electronics packaging in the microelectronics industry. To effectively remove heat from stacked integrated circuitry, a temperature gradient must be established across the chips. Furthermore, because of the trend toward higher device current density, Joule heating is more serious and temperature gradients across soldered joints are expected to increase. In this study we used heat-sink and heat-source devices to establish a temperature gradient across SnAg microbumps to investigate the thermomigration behavior of Ag in SnAg solder. Compared with isothermal conditions, small Ag3Sn particles near the hot end were dissolved and redistributed toward the cold end under a temperature gradient. The results indicated that temperature gradient-induced movement of Ag atoms occurred from the hot side toward the cold side, and asymmetrical precipitation of Ag3Sn resulted. The mechanism of growth of the intermetallic compound (IMC) Ag3Sn, caused by thermomigration of Ag, is discussed. The rate of growth Ag3Sn IMC at the cold side was found to increase linearly with solid-aging time under a temperature gradient. To understand the force driving Ag diffusion under the temperature gradient, the molar heat of transport ( Q*) of Ag in Sn was calculated as +13.34 kJ/mole.

  9. Graphene crystal growth by thermal precipitation of focused ion beam induced deposition of carbon precursor via patterned-iron thin layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rius Gemma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, relevant advances on graphene as a building block of integrated circuits (ICs have been demonstrated. Graphene growth and device fabrication related processing has been steadily and intensively powered due to commercial interest; however, there are many challenges associated with the incorporation of graphene into commercial applications which includes challenges associated with the synthesis of this material. Specifically, the controlled deposition of single layer large single crystal graphene on arbitrary supports, is particularly challenging. Previously, we have reported the first demonstration of the transformation of focused ion beam induced deposition of carbon (FIBID-C into patterned graphitic layers by metal-assisted thermal treatment (Ni foils. In this present work, we continue exploiting the FIBID-C approach as a route for graphene deposition. Here, thin patterned Fe layers are used for the catalysis of graphenization and graphitization. We demonstrate the formation of high quality single and few layer graphene, which evidences, the possibility of using Fe as a catalyst for graphene deposition. The mechanism is understood as the minute precipitation of atomic carbon after supersaturation of some iron carbides formed under a high temperature treatment. As a consequence of the complete wetting of FIBID-C and patterned Fe layers, which enable graphene growth, the as-deposited patterns do not preserve their original shape after the thermal treatment

  10. Subtle shifts in microbial communities occur alongside the release of carbon induced by drought and rewetting in contrasting peatland ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Caitlin; Freeman, Chris; Golyshin, Peter N; Ackermann, Gail; Fenner, Nathalie; McDonald, James E; Ehbair, Abdassalam; Jones, Timothy G; Murphy, Loretta M; Creer, Simon

    2017-09-12

    Peat represents a globally significant pool of sequestered carbon. However, peatland carbon stocks are highly threatened by anthropogenic climate change, including drought, which leads to a large release of carbon dioxide. Although the enzymatic mechanisms underlying drought-driven carbon release are well documented, the effect of drought on peatland microbial communities has been little studied. Here, we carried out a replicated and controlled drought manipulation using intact peat 'mesocosm cores' taken from bog and fen habitats, and used a combination of community fingerprinting and sequencing of marker genes to identify community changes associated with drought. Community composition varied with habitat and depth. Moreover, community differences between mesocosm cores were stronger than the effect of the drought treatment, emphasising the importance of replication in microbial marker gene studies. While the effect of drought on the overall composition of prokaryotic and eukaryotic communities was weak, a subset of the microbial community did change in relative abundance, especially in the fen habitat at 5 cm depth. 'Drought-responsive' OTUs were disproportionately drawn from the phyla Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria. Collectively, the data provide insights into the microbial community changes occurring alongside drought-driven carbon release from peatlands, and suggest a number of novel avenues for future research.

  11. The Effect of Re-Planting Trees on Soil Microbial Communities in a Wildfire-Induced Subalpine Grassland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ed-Haun Chang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Wildfire often causes tremendous changes in ecosystems, particularly in subalpine and alpine areas, which are vulnerable due to severe climate conditions such as cold temperature and strong wind. This study aimed to clarify the effect of tree re-planting on ecosystem services such as the soil microbial community after several decades. We compared the re-planted forest and grassland with the mature forest as a reference in terms of soil microbial biomass C and N (Cmic and Nmic, enzyme activities, phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA composition, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE. The Cmic and Nmic did not differ among the grassland, re-planted forest and mature forest soil; however, ratios of Cmic/Corg and Nmic/Ntot decreased from the grassland to re-planted forest and mature forest soil. The total PLFAs and those attributed to bacteria and Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria did not differ between the re-planted forest and grassland soil. Principle component analysis of the PLFA content separated the grassland from re-planted forest and mature forest soil. Similarly, DGGE analysis revealed changes in both bacterial and fungal community structures with changes in vegetation. Our results suggest that the microbial community structure changes with the re-planting of trees after a fire event in this subalpine area. Recovery of the soil microbial community to the original state in a fire-damaged site in a subalpine area may require decades, even under a re-planted forest.

  12. Arsenic Removal from Groundwater by Solar Driven Inline-Electrolytic Induced Co-Precipitation and Filtration—A Long Term Field Test Conducted in West Bengal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Otter

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic contamination in drinking water resources is of major concern in the Ganga delta plains of West Bengal in India and Bangladesh. Here, several laboratory and field studies on arsenic removal from drinking water resources were conducted in the past and the application of strong-oxidant-induced co-precipitation of arsenic on iron hydroxides is still considered as the most promising mechanism. This paper suggests an autonomous, solar driven arsenic removal setting and presents the findings of a long term field test conducted in West Bengal. The system applies an inline-electrolytic cell for in situ chlorine production using the natural chloride content of the water and by that substituting the external dosing of strong oxidants. Co-precipitation of As(V occurs on freshly formed iron hydroxide, which is removed by Manganese Greensand Plus® filtration. The test was conducted for ten months under changing source water conditions considering arsenic (187 ± 45 µg/L, iron (5.5 ± 0.8 mg/L, manganese (1.5 ± 0.4 mg/L, phosphate (2.4 ± 1.3 mg/L and ammonium (1.4 ± 0.5 mg/L concentrations. Depending on the system setting removal rates of 94% for arsenic (10 ± 4 µg/L, >99% for iron (0.03 ± 0.03 mg/L, 96% for manganese (0.06 ± 0.05 mg/L, 72% for phosphate (0.7 ± 0.3 mg/L and 84% for ammonium (0.18 ± 0.12 mg/L were achieved—without the addition of any chemicals/adsorbents. Loading densities of arsenic on iron hydroxides averaged to 31 µgAs/mgFe. As the test was performed under field conditions and the here proposed removal mechanisms work fully autonomously, it poses a technically feasible treatment alternative, especially for rural areas.

  13. Pore-Scale Study of Transverse Mixing Induced CaCO 3 Precipitation and Permeability Reduction in a Model Subsurface Sedimentary System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Changyong; Dehoff, Karl; Hess, Nancy; Oostrom, Mart; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Valocchi, Albert J.; Fouke, Bruce W.; Werth, Charles J.

    2010-10-15

    A microfluidic pore structure etched into a silicon wafer was used as a two-dimensional model subsurface sedimentary system (i.e., a micromodel) to study mineral precipitation and permeability reduction relevant to groundwater remediation and geological carbon sequestration. Solutions containing CaCl2 and Na2CO3 at four different saturation states (Ω = [Ca2+] [CO32-] / KspCaCO3) were introduced through two separate inlets and they mixed by diffusion transverse to the main flow direction along the center of the micromodel resulting in CaCO3 precipitation. Precipitation rates increased and the total amount of precipitates decreased with increasing saturation state, and only vaterite and calcite crystals were formed (no aragonite). The relative amount of vaterite increased from 80% at the lowest saturation (Ωv = 2.8 for vaterite) state to 95% at the highest saturation state (Ωv = 4.5). Fluorescent tracer tests conducted before and after CaCO3 precipitation indicate that pore spaces were completely occluded by CaCO3 precipitates along the transverse mixing zone, thus significantly reducing porosity and permeability, and potentially limiting transformation from vaterite to the more stable calcite. The results suggest that mineral precipitation along plume margins can decrease both reactant mixing during groundwater remediation, and injection and storage efficiency during CO2 sequestration.

  14. Microbially produced phytotoxins and plant disease management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nowadays, these evaluation techniques are becoming an important complement to classical breeding methods. The knowledge of the inactivation of microbial toxins has led to the use of microbial enzymes to inactivate phytotoxins thereby reducing incidence and severity of disease induced by microbial toxins. Considering ...

  15. Altmetric: 165More detailArticle | OPENClimate change-induced increases in precipitation are reducing the potential for solar ultraviolet radiation to inactivate pathogens in surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climate change is accelerating the release of dissolved organic matter (DOM) to inland and coastal waters through increases in precipitation, thawing of permafrost, and changes in vegetation. Our modeling approach suggests that the selective absorption of ultraviolet radiation (U...

  16. Landscape runoff, precipitation variation and reservoir limnology

    OpenAIRE

    Geraldes, Ana Maria

    2010-01-01

    Landscape runoff potential impact on reservoir limnology was indirectly evaluated by assessing the effect of precipitation variation on several water quality parameters, on Anabaena (Cyanophyta) and crustacean zooplankton abundances. The obtained results showed that total phosphorus increased with strong precipitation events whereas water transparency presented an opposite trend. Wet periods followed by long dry periods favored Anabaena dominance, which induced a...

  17. Investigation of Asphaltene Precipitation at Elevated Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Simon Ivar; Lindeloff, Niels; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1998-01-01

    In order to obtain quantitative data on the asphaltene precipitation induced by the addition of n-alkane (heptane) at temperatures above the normal boiling point of the precipitant, a high temperature/high pressure filtration apparatus has been constructed. Oil and alkane are mixed...

  18. Stress-assisted, microbial-induced corrosion of stainless steel primary piping and other aging issues at the Omega West Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, A.

    1995-01-01

    After the discovery of cooling system leak of about 284 liters per twenty-four (24) hour period, an investigation determined that the 76.2-cm diameter, 33.5-m long stainless-steel (304) OWR delay line was losing water at the same nominal rate. An excavation effort revealed that a circumferential crack, approximately 0.0025 cm in width, extended around the bottom half of the delay line. In addition, other evidence of what appeared to be microcracking and pitting that originated at random nucleated sites around the pipe were also found. Results of destructive analysis and nondestructive testing allowed Los Alamos staff to conclude that the direct cause for the main crack and other pitting resulted from stress-assisted, microbial-induced corrosion of the stainless steel primary piping. The results also indicated that microbial action from bacteria that are normally present in earth can be extremely harmful to stainless- steel piping under certain conditions. Other potential problems that could have also eventually led to a permanent shutdown of the OWR were discussed. These problems, although never encountered nor associated with the current shutdown, were identified in aging studies and are associated with: (1) the water-cooled, bismuth gamma-ray shield and, (2) the aluminum thermal column head seal that prevents reactor vessel water from entering into the graphite-filled thermal column

  19. Precipitation-Induced Changes in Microstrain and Its Relation with Hardness and Tempering Parameter in 17-4 PH Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, S.; Manojkumar, R.; Jayakumar, T.; Das, C. R.; Rao, B. P. C.

    2016-06-01

    17-4 PH (precipitation hardening) stainless steel is a soft martensitic stainless steel strengthened by aging at appropriate temperature for sufficient duration. Precipitation of copper particles in the martensitic matrix during aging causes coherency strains which improves the mechanical properties, namely hardness and strength of the matrix. The contributions to X-ray diffraction (XRD) profile broadening due to coherency strains caused by precipitation and crystallite size changes due to aging are separated and quantified using the modified Williamson-Hall approach. The estimated normalized mean square strain and crystallite size are used to explain the observed changes in hardness. Microstructural changes observed in secondary electron images are in qualitative agreement with crystallite size changes estimated from XRD profile analysis. The precipitation kinetics in the age-hardening regime and overaged regime are studied from hardness changes and they follow the Avrami kinetics and Wilson's model, respectively. In overaged condition, the hardness changes are linearly correlated to the tempering parameter (also known as Larson-Miller parameter). Similar linear variation is observed between the normalized mean square strain (determined from XRD line profile analysis) and the tempering parameter, in the incoherent regime which is beyond peak microstrain conditions.

  20. Promoting Ti{sub 4}C{sub 2}S{sub 2} strain induced precipitation during asymmetrical hot rolling to improve r value and advantaged texture in Ti stabilized IF steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Futao, E-mail: dongft@sina.com [College of Metallurgy and Energy, Hebei United University, Tangshan 063000 (China); Xue, Fei [College of Electrical Engineering, Hebei United University, Tangshan 063000 (China); Du, Linxiu; Liu, Xianghua [The State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2015-01-25

    Highlights: • We study Ti{sub 4}C{sub 2}S{sub 2} strain induced precipitation in Ti stabilized IF steel. • The PTT diagram is obtained by plotting 1/A{sub r}–time curves. • Hot rolling at the nose of P{sub s} line effectively promotes Ti{sub 4}C{sub 2}S{sub 2} precipitation. • Annealed sheet with promoted Ti{sub 4}C{sub 2}S{sub 2} exhibits higher r value and stronger γ fiber texture. • Adverse impact of tiny TiC has been significantly mitigated. - Abstract: The kinetic of Ti{sub 4}C{sub 2}S{sub 2} strain induced precipitation in a Ti stabilized IF steel was investigated using two stage interrupted compression test with high true strain (0.5). The PTT (precipitation–time–temperature) diagram was obtained by plotting 1/A{sub r}–time curves. TEM (transmission electron microscopy) observation confirmed that the evolution of Ti{sub 4}C{sub 2}S{sub 2} precipitate in the quenched samples of thermal simulation is in good agreement with the PTT diagram. Hot strips were produced at three different rolling temperatures with high strain and slight shear deformation. It was found that hot rolling at the nose temperature of the P{sub s} line of the PTT diagram can effectively promote the precipitation of Ti{sub 4}C{sub 2}S{sub 2} and retard the precipitation of TiC. Cold rolled and annealed sheets from hot strip containing higher volume fraction of Ti{sub 4}C{sub 2}S{sub 2} exhibited higher r value and stronger γ fiber texture with equal {1 1 1}〈1 1 2〉 and {1 1 1}〈1 1 0〉 components. By contrast, cold rolled and annealed sheets from hot strips containing lower volume fraction of Ti{sub 4}C{sub 2}S{sub 2} represented lower r values and weaker γ fiber texture with significant drops from {1 1 1}〈1 1 2〉 to {1 1 1}〈1 1 0〉 component.

  1. Modelled Precipitation Over Greenland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes the annual total precipitation from 1985 to 1999 and monthly total precipitation from January 1985 to December 1999. The data is derived from...

  2. C isotope fractionation during heterotrophic activity driven carbonate precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Nurgul; Demirel, Cansu

    2016-04-01

    Stable carbon isotopic fractionation during carbonate precipitation induced by environmentally enriched heterotrophic halophilic microorganims was experimentally investigated under various salinity (% 4.5, %8, %15) conditions at 30 °C. Halophilic heterotrophic microorganims were enriched from a hypersaline Lake Acigöl located in SW Turkey (Balci et al.,2015) and later used for the precipitation experiments (solid and liquid medium). The carbonate precipitates had relatively high δ13C values (-4.3 to -16.9 ‰) compared to the δ13C values of the organic compounds that ranged from -27.5 to -25.4 ‰. At salinity of 4.5 % δ13C values of carbonate ranged from -4.9 ‰ to -10.9 ‰ with a 13C-enrichment factor of +20 to +16 ‰ higher than the δ13C values of the associated DOC (-27.5) . At salinity 8 % δ13C values of carbonate ranged from -16.3 ‰ to -11.7 ‰ with a 13C-enrichment factor of+11.3 to+15.9 ‰ higher than the δ13C values of the associated DOC. The respected values for 15 % salinity ranged from -12.3 ‰ to -9.7 ‰ with a 13C-enrichment factor of +15.2 to+16.8 ‰ higher than the δ13C values of the associated DOC. The carbonate precipitates produced in the solid medium are more enriched in 13C relative to liquid culture experiments. These results suggest that the carbon in the solid was derived from both the bacterial oxidation of organic compounds in the medium and from the atmospheric CO2. A solid medium used in the experiments may have suppressed convective and advective mass transport favouring diffusion-controlled system. This determination suggests that the rate and equilibration of CO2 exchange with the atmosphere is the major control on C isotope composition of carbonate minerals precipitated in the experiments. Key words: Lake Acıgöl, halophilic bacteria, carbonate biomineralization, C isotopes References Nurgul Balci, Meryem Menekşe, Nevin Gül Karagüler, M. Şeref Sönmez,Patrick Meister 2015.Reproducing authigenic carbonate

  3. RNA-Seq Study of Microbially Induced Hemocyte Transcripts from Larval Heliothis virescens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent S. Shelby

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Larvae of the tobacco budworm are major polyphagous pests throughout the Americas. Development of effective microbial biopesticides for this and related noctuid pests has been stymied by the natural resistance mediated innate immune response. Hemocytes play an early and central role in activating and coordinating immune responses to entomopathogens. To approach this problem we completed RNA-seq expression profiling of hemocytes collected from larvae following an in vivo challenge with bacterial and fungal cell wall components to elicit an immune response. A de novo exome assembly was constructed by combination of sequence tags from all treatments. Sequence tags from each treatment were aligned separately with the assembly to measure expression. The resulting table of differential expression had > 22,000 assemblies each with a distinct combination of annotation and expression. Within these assemblies > 1,400 were upregulated and > 1,500 downregulated by immune activation with bacteria or fungi. Orthologs to innate immune components of other insects were identified including pattern recognition, signal transduction pathways, antimicrobial peptides and enzymes, melanization and coagulation. Additionally orthologs of components regulating hemocytic functions such as autophagy, apoptosis, phagocytosis and nodulation were identified. Associated cellular oxidative defenses and detoxification responses were identified providing a comprehensive snapshot of the early response to elicitation.

  4. Ultra-sonic observation in niobium hydride precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florencio, O.; Pinatti, Dyonisio G.

    1982-01-01

    The hidrogen embrittlement of exothermic ocluders, had been considered as due to applied stress induced hydride precipitates leading to brittle fracture. The results of simultaneous measurements of macroscopic deformation and elastic change due to hydride precipitation, using the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique are showed. THen it was tested the possibility of kinectis precipitation parameters evoluation. (Author) [pt

  5. Unveiling Microbial Carbon Cycling Processes in Key U.S. Soils using ''Omics''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myrold, David D. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Bottomely, Peter J. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Jumpponen, Ari [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States); Rice, Charles W. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States); Zeglin, Lydia H. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States); David, Maude M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Jansson, Janet K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Prestat, Emmanuel [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hettich, Robert L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-09-17

    Soils process and store large amounts of C; however, considerable uncertainty still exists about the details of that influence microbial partitioning of C into soil C pools, and what are the main influential forces that control the fraction of the C input that is stabilized. The soil microbial community is genotypically and phenotypically diverse. Despite our ability to predict the kinds of regional environmental changes that will accompany global climate change, it is not clear how the microbial community will respond to climate-induced modification of precipitation and inter-precipitation intervals, and if this response will affect the fate of C deposited into soil by the local plant community. Part of this uncertainty lies with our ignorance of how the microbial community adapts genotypically and physiologically to changes in soil moisture brought about by shifts in precipitation. Our overarching goal is to harness the power of multiple meta-omics tools to gain greater understanding of the functioning of whole-soil microbial communities and their role in C cycling. We will do this by meeting the following three objectives: 1. Further develop and optimize a combination of meta-omics approaches to study how environmental factors affect microbially-mediated C cycling processes. 2. Determine the impacts of long-term changes in precipitation timing on microbial C cycling using an existing long-term field manipulation of a tallgrass prairie soil. 3. Conduct laboratory experiments that vary moisture and C inputs to confirm field observations of the linkages between microbial communities and C cycling processes. We took advantage of our state-of-the-art expertise in community “omics” to better understand the functioning soil C cycling within the Great Prairie ecosystem, including our ongoing Konza Prairie soil metagenome flagship project at JGI and the unique rainfall manipulation plots (RaMPs) established at this site more than a decade ago. We employed a systems

  6. GRAIN-BOUNDARY PRECIPITATION UNDER IRRADIATION IN DILUTE BINARY ALLOYS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.H. Song; Z.X. Yuan; J. Liu; R.G.Faulkner

    2003-01-01

    Irradiation-induced grain boundary segregation of solute atoms frequently bring about grain boundary precipitation of a second phase because of its making the solubility limit of the solute surpassed at grain boundaries. Until now the kinetic models for irradiation-induced grain boundary precipitation have been sparse. For this reason, we have theoretically treated grain boundary precipitation under irradiation in dilute binary alloys. Predictions ofγ'-Ni3Si precipitation at grain boundaries ave made for a dilute Ni-Si alloy subjected to irradiation. It is demonstrated that grain boundary silicon segregation under irradiation may lead to grain boundaryγ'-Ni3 Si precipitation over a certain temperature range.

  7. Mechanisms affecting swelling in alloys with precipitates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansur, L.K.; Haynes, M.R.; Lee, E.H.

    1980-01-01

    In alloys under irradiation many mechanisms exist that couple phase instability to cavity swelling. These are compounded with the more familiar mechanisms associated with point defect behavior and the evolution of microstructure. The mechanisms may be classified according to three modes of operation. Some affect cavity swelling directly by cavity-precipitate particle association, others operate indirectly by precipitate-induced changes in sinks other than cavities and finally there are mechanisms that are mediated by precipitate-induced changes in the host matrix. The physics of one mechanism of each type is developed in detail and the results compared where possible to experimental measurements. In particular, we develop the theory necessary to treat the effects on swelling of precipitation-induced changes in overall sink density; precipitation-induced changes in point defect trapping by solute depletion and creation of precipitate particle-matrix interfacial trap sites; and preciwill come from waste wood available locally requiring minimal energy for recovery and transportation to the site. The applicant is strongly considering the use of a solar preheating unit anium southward as well as to deeper dened al half-lives with experimental ones, over a range of 24 orders of magnitude was obtained. This is a strong argument that the alpha decay could be considered a fission process with very high mass asymmetry and charge density asymmetry

  8. Improved microbial growth inhibition activity of bio-surfactant induced Ag–TiO{sub 2} core shell nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nithyadevi, D. [Department of Nanoscience and Technology, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046 (India); Kumar, P. Suresh [Thin Film and Nanomaterials Laboratory, Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046 (India); Mangalaraj, D., E-mail: dmraj800@yahoo.com [Department of Nanoscience and Technology, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046 (India); Ponpandian, N.; Viswanathan, C. [Department of Nanoscience and Technology, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046 (India); Meena, P. [Department of Physics, PSGR Krishnammal college for women, Coimbatore 641 004 (India)

    2015-02-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrolysis process and Ag nanoparticles were prepared by using hydrazine reduction method. • Ag–TiO{sub 2} core shell nanoparticles were synthesized by reverse micelle method. • Coatings of TiO{sub 2} shell leads to decrease the usage of silver particles and also it reduces the release of silver ions from the matrix. • Optimum ratio of TiO{sub 2} particles: Ag atoms are needed for better antibacterial activity. • Sodium alginate (Bio-copolymer) induced core shell nanoparticles results 100% cell growth inhibition toward Staphylococcus aureus. - Abstract: Surfactant induced silver–titanium dioxide core shell nanoparticles within the size range of 10–50 nm were applied in the antibacterial agent to inhibit the growth of bacterial cells. The single crystalline silver was located in the core part of the composite powder and the titanium dioxide components were uniformly distributed in the shell part. HRTEM and XRD results indicated that silver was completely covered by titanium dioxide and its crystal structure was not affected after being coated by titanium dioxide. The effect of silver–titanium dioxide nanoparticles in the inhibition of bacterial cell growth was studied by means of disk diffusion method. The inhibition zone results reveal that sodium alginate induced silver–titanium dioxide nanoparticles exhibit 100% more antibacterial activity than that with cetyltrimethylbromide or without surfactant. UV–vis spectroscopic analysis showed a large concentration of silver was rapidly released into phosphate buffer solution (PBS) within a period of 1 day, with a much smaller concentration being released after this 1-day period. It was concluded that sodium alginate induced silver–titanium dioxide core shell nanoparticles could enhance long term cell growth inhibition in comparison with cetyltrimethylbromide or without surfactant. The surfactant mediated core shell

  9. Screening of microbial radiation-inducible promoter and study of its expression; Development of basic technique of radiogenic therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sangyong; Kim Dongho; Yang, Jaeseung

    2007-02-15

    In the search for new therapeutic modalities for cancer, gene therapy has attracted enormous interest over the last few years. Recently, the use of bacteria as a tumor specific protein transfer system has attracted interest. Attenuated Salmonella has been shown to provide selective colonization in tumors. This strategy to apply gene therapy for cancer has been defined as 'Radiogenic Therapy'. In this research, firstly, we screened a radiation inducible promoter of Salmonella responding to clinically relevant low dose of 10 Gy using microarray analysis. Of all genes showing a expression ratio of at least 2-fold changes relative to wild type, 168 genes were induced. To confirm the findings of the microarray by an alternative method, we investigated the transcriptional changes of radio-inducible genes using real time PCR analysis. To verify the ability of screened genes (fadB, narK, cyoA, STM1011, STM2617, and STM2632) to produce a downstream protein by irradiation, the reporter plasmids were constructed. Finally, we found that the promoter of fadB, cyoA, and STM2617 can be activated by irradiation within cancer cells. These results suggest that these genes may be the most probable candidate used in radiogenic therapy.

  10. Screening of microbial radiation-inducible promoter and study of its expression; Development of basic technique of radiogenic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sangyong; Kim Dongho; Yang, Jaeseung

    2007-02-01

    In the search for new therapeutic modalities for cancer, gene therapy has attracted enormous interest over the last few years. Recently, the use of bacteria as a tumor specific protein transfer system has attracted interest. Attenuated Salmonella has been shown to provide selective colonization in tumors. This strategy to apply gene therapy for cancer has been defined as 'Radiogenic Therapy'. In this research, firstly, we screened a radiation inducible promoter of Salmonella responding to clinically relevant low dose of 10 Gy using microarray analysis. Of all genes showing a expression ratio of at least 2-fold changes relative to wild type, 168 genes were induced. To confirm the findings of the microarray by an alternative method, we investigated the transcriptional changes of radio-inducible genes using real time PCR analysis. To verify the ability of screened genes (fadB, narK, cyoA, STM1011, STM2617, and STM2632) to produce a downstream protein by irradiation, the reporter plasmids were constructed. Finally, we found that the promoter of fadB, cyoA, and STM2617 can be activated by irradiation within cancer cells. These results suggest that these genes may be the most probable candidate used in radiogenic therapy

  11. Microbial healing of cracks in concrete: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Sumit; Goyal, Shweta; Mukherjee, Abhijit; Reddy, M Sudhakara

    2017-11-01

    Concrete is the most widely used construction material of the world and maintaining concrete structures from premature deterioration is proving to be a great challenge. Early age formation of micro-cracking in concrete structure severely affects the serviceability leading to high cost of maintenance. Apart from conventional methods of repairing cracks with sealants or treating the concrete with adhesive chemicals to prevent the cracks from widening, a microbial crack-healing approach has shown promising results. The unique feature of the microbial system is that it enables self-healing of concrete. The effectiveness of microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICCP) in improving durability of cementitious building materials, restoration of stone monuments and soil bioclogging is discussed. Main emphasis has been laid on the potential of bacteria-based crack repair in concrete structure and the applications of different bacterial treatments to self-healing cracks. Furthermore, recommendations to employ the MICCP technology at commercial scale and reduction in the cost of application are provided in this review.

  12. Study of asphaltene precipitation by Calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdier, Sylvain Charles Roland; Plantier, Frédéric; Bessières, David

    2007-01-01

    Can calorimetry bring new input to the Current understanding of asphaltene precipitation? In this work, two types of precipitation were studied by means of calorimetry: addition of n-heptane into asphaltene solutions and temperature/pressure variations on a recombined live oil. The first series...... of experiments showed that weak forces determine precipitation. Indeed, isothermal titration calorimetry could not detect any clear signal although this technique can detect low-energy transitions such as liquid-liquid equilibrium and rnicellization. The second series of tests proved that precipitation caused...... by T and P variations is exothermic for this system. Furthermore, the temperature-induced precipitation is accompanied by an increase in the apparent thermal expansivity. Therefore, it seems that these two phase transitions exhibit different calorimetric behaviours and they may not be as similar...

  13. Influence of altered precipitation pattern on greenhouse gas emissions and soil enzyme activities in Pannonian soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forstner, Stefan Johannes; Michel, Kerstin; Berthold, Helene; Baumgarten, Andreas; Wanek, Wolfgang; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Kitzler, Barbara

    2013-04-01

    Precipitation patterns are likely to be altered due to climate change. Recent models predict a reduction of mean precipitation during summer accompanied by a change in short-term precipitation variability for central Europe. Correspondingly, the risk for summer drought is likely to increase. This may especially be valid for regions which already have the potential for rare, but strong precipitation events like eastern Austria. Given that these projections hold true, soils in this area will receive water irregularly in few, heavy rainfall events and be subjected to long-lasting dry periods in between. This pattern of drying/rewetting can alter soil greenhouse gas fluxes, creating a potential feedback mechanism for climate change. Microorganisms are the key players in most soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) transformation processes including greenhouse gas exchange. A conceptual model proposed by Schimel and colleagues (2007) links microbial stress-response physiology to ecosystem-scale biogeochemical processes: In order to cope with decreasing soil water potential, microbes modify resource allocation patterns from growth to survival. However, it remains unclear how microbial resource acquisition via extracellular enzymes and microbial-controlled greenhouse gas fluxes respond to water stress induced by soil drying/rewetting. We designed a laboratory experiment to test for effects of multiple drying/rewetting cycles on soil greenhouse gas fluxes (CO2, CH4, N2O, NO), microbial biomass and extracellular enzyme activity. Three soils representing the main soil types of eastern Austria were collected in June 2012 at the Lysimeter Research Station of the Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety (AGES) in Vienna. Soils were sieved to 2mm, filled in steel cylinders and equilibrated for one week at 50% water holding capacity (WHC) for each soil. Then soils were separated into two groups: One group received water several times per week (C=control), the other group received

  14. Oral administration of Saccharomyces boulardii ameliorates carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis in rats via reducing intestinal permeability and modulating gut microbial composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Zhu, Lin; Xie, Ao; Yuan, Jieli

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the effects of orally administrated Saccharomyces boulardii (S. boulardii) on the progress of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver fibrosis, 34 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four experimental groups including the control group (n = 8), the cirrhotic group (n = 10), the preventive group (n = 8), and the treatment group (n = 8). Results showed that the liver expression levels of collagen, type I, alpha 1 (Col1A1), alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) and the serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and malondialdehyde (MDA) increased significantly in cirrhotic rats compared with control and decreased by S. boulardii administration. Treatment of S. boulardii also attenuated the increased endotoxin levels and pro-inflammatory cytokines in CCl4-treated rats. And, these were associated with the changes of intestinal permeability and fecal microbial composition. Our study suggested that oral administration of S. boulardii can promote the liver function of CCl4-treated rats, and the preventive treatment of this probiotic yeast may decelerate the progress of liver fibrosis.

  15. Ligand-Induced Cross-Linking of Z-Elastin-like Polypeptide-Functionalized E2 Protein Nanoparticles for Enhanced Affinity Precipitation of Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Andrew R; Sun, Qing; Chen, Wilfred

    2017-05-08

    Affinity precipitation is an ideal alternative to chromatography for antibody purification because it combines the high selectivity of an affinity ligand with the operational benefits of precipitation. However, the widespread use of elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) capture scaffolds for antibody purification has been hindered by the high salt concentrations and temperatures necessary for efficient ELP aggregation. In this paper, we employed a tandem approach to enhance ELP aggregation by enlarging the dimension of the capturing scaffold and by creating IgG-triggered scaffold cross-linking. This was accomplished by covalently conjugating the Z-domain-ELP (Z-ELP) capturing scaffold to a 25 nm diameter E2 protein nanocage using Sortase A ligation. We demonstrated the isothermal recovery of IgG in the virtual absence of salt due to the significantly increased scaffold dimension and cross-linking from multivalent IgG-E2 interactions. Because IgG cross-linking is reversible at low pH, it may be feasible to achieve a high yielding IgG purification by isothermal phase separation using a simple pH trigger.

  16. Cerium oxalate precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, T.P.

    1987-02-01

    Cerium, a nonradioactive, common stand-in for plutonium in development work, has been used to simulate several plutonium precipitation processes at the Savannah River Laboratory. There are similarities between the plutonium trifluoride and the cerium oxalate precipitations in particle size and extent of plating, but not particle morphology. The equilibrium solubility, precipitation kinetics, particle size, extent of plating, and dissolution characteristics of cerium oxalate have been investigated. Interpretations of particle size and plating based on precipitation kinetics (i.e., nucleation and crystal growth) are presented. 16 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs

  17. Microbial glycoproteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halim, Adnan; Anonsen, Jan Haug

    2017-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based "-omics" technologies are important tools for global and detailed mapping of post-translational modifications. Protein glycosylation is an abundant and important post translational modification widespread throughout all domains of life. Characterization of glycoproteins...... and research in this area is rapidly accelerating. Here, we review recent developments in glycoproteomic technologies with a special focus on microbial protein glycosylation....

  18. Relative importance of precipitation frequency and intensity in inter-annual variation of precipitation in Singapore during 1980-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Babovic, Vladan

    2017-04-01

    Observed studies on inter-annual variation of precipitation provide insight into the response of precipitation to anthropogenic climate change and natural climate variability. Inter-annual variation of precipitation results from the concurrent variations of precipitation frequency and intensity, understanding of the relative importance of frequency and intensity in the variability of precipitation can help fathom its changing properties. Investigation of the long-term changes of precipitation schemes has been extensively carried out in many regions across the world, however, detailed studies of the relative importance of precipitation frequency and intensity in inter-annual variation of precipitation are still limited, especially in the tropics. Therefore, this study presents a comprehensive framework to investigate the inter-annual variation of precipitation and the dominance of precipitation frequency and intensity in a tropical urban city-state, Singapore, based on long-term (1980-2013) daily precipitation series from 22 rain gauges. First, an iterative Mann-Kendall trend test method is applied to detect long-term trends in precipitation total, frequency and intensity at both annual and seasonal time scales. Then, the relative importance of precipitation frequency and intensity in inducing the inter-annual variation of wet-day precipitation total is analyzed using a dominance analysis method based on linear regression. The results show statistically significant upward trends in wet-day precipitation total, frequency and intensity at annual time scale, however, these trends are not evident during the monsoon seasons. The inter-annual variation of wet-day precipitation is mainly dominated by precipitation intensity for most of the stations at annual time scale and during the Northeast monsoon season. However, during the Southwest monsoon season, the inter-annual variation of wet-day precipitation is mainly dominated by precipitation frequency. These results have

  19. PRECIPITATION OF PROTACTINIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.L.

    1958-07-15

    An lmprovement in the separation of protactinium from aqueous nitric acid solutions is described. 1t covers the use of lead dioxide and tin dioxide as carrier precipitates for the protactinium. In carrying out the process, divalent lead or divalent tin is addcd to the solution and oxidized, causing formation of a carrier precipitate of lead dioxide or stannic oxide, respectively.

  20. Global Precipitation Measurement Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarbarzin, Art

    2010-01-01

    This poster presents an overview of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) constellation of satellites which are designed to measure the Earth's precipitation. It includes the schedule of launches for the various satellites in the constellation, and the coverage of the constellation, It also reviews the mission capabilities, and the mission science objectives.

  1. Microbial alterations of the soil influenced by induced compaction Alterações microbianas do solo influenciadas por compactação induzida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breno Pupin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Compaction is one of the most destructive factors of soil quality, however the effects on the microbial community and enzyme activity have not been investigated in detail so far. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of soil compaction caused by the traffic of agricultural machines on the soil microbial community and its enzyme activity. Six compaction levels were induced by tractors with different weights driving over a Eutrustox soil and the final density was measured. Soil samples were collected after corn from the layers 0-0.10 and 0.10-0.20 m. The compaction effect on all studied properties was evident. Total bacteria counts were reduced significantly (by 22-30 % and by 38-41 % of nitrifying bacteria in the soil with highest bulk density compared to the control. On the other hand, fungi populations increased 55-86 % and denitrifying bacteria 49-53 %. Dehydrogenase activity decreased 20-34 %, urease 44-46 % and phosphatase 26-28 %. The organic matter content and soil pH decreased more in the 0-0.10 than in the 0.10-0.20 m layer and possibly influenced the reduction of the microbial counts, except denitrifying bacteria, and all enzyme activities, except urease. Results indicated that soil compaction influences the community of aerobic microorganisms and their activity. This effect can alter nutrient cycling and reduce crop yields.A compactação é um dos fatores mais agravantes para a qualidade do solo, porém o seu efeito na comunidade e atividade enzimática microbiana não tem sido suficientemente estudado. Seis níveis de compactação foram obtidos pela passagem de tratores com diferentes pesos em um Latossolo Vermelho, e a densidade final foi medida. Amostras de solo foram coletadas nas profundidades de 0-10 e 10-20 cm, após a colheita do milho. O efeito da compactação foi evidente em todos os parâmetros estudados, mas nem sempre foi significativo. A contagem das bactérias totais reduziu significativamente em 22

  2. Forced normalisation precipitated by lamotrigine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Béla

    2005-10-01

    To report two patients with lamotrigine-induced forced normalization (FN). Evaluation of the patient files, EEG, and video-EEG records, with special reference to the parallel clinical and EEG changes before, during, and after FN. This is the first documented report of lamotrigine-induced FN. The two epileptic patients (one of them was a 10-year-old girl) were successfully treated with lamotrigine. Their seizures ceased and interictal epileptiform events disappeared from the EEG record. Simultaneously, the patients displayed de novo occurrence of psychopathologic manifestations and disturbed behaviour. Reduction of the daily dose of LTG led to disappearance of the psychopathological symptoms and reappearance of the spikes but not the seizures. Lamotrigine may precipitate FN in adults and children. Analysis of the cases showed that lamotrigine-induced FN is a dose-dependent phenomenon and can be treated by reduction of the daily dose of the drug.

  3. Microbial xanthophylls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhosale, Prakash; Bernstein, Paul S

    2005-09-01

    Xanthophylls are oxygenated carotenoids abundant in the human food supply. Lutein, zeaxanthin, and cryptoxanthin are major xanthophyll carotenoids in human plasma. The consumption of these xanthophylls is directly associated with reduction in the risk of cancers, cardiovascular disease, age-related macular degeneration, and cataract formation. Canthaxanthin and astaxanthin also have considerable importance in aquaculture for salmonid and crustacean pigmentation, and are of commercial interest for the pharmaceutical and food industries. Chemical synthesis is a major source for the heavy demand of xanthophylls in the consumer market; however, microbial producers also have potential as commercial sources. In this review, we discuss the biosynthesis, commercial utility, and major microbial sources of xanthophylls. We also present a critical review of current research and technologies involved in promoting microbes as potential commercial sources for mass production.

  4. Fast microbial reduction of ferrihydrite colloids from a soil effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsche, Andreas; Bosch, Julian; Rennert, Thilo; Heister, Katja; Braunschweig, Juliane; Meckenstock, Rainer U.; Totsche, Kai U.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies on the microbial reduction of synthetic iron oxide colloids showed their superior electron accepting property in comparison to bulk iron oxides. However, natural colloidal iron oxides differ in composition from their synthetic counterparts. Besides a potential effect of colloid size, microbial iron reduction may be accelerated by electron-shuttling dissolved organic matter (DOM) as well as slowed down by inhibitors such as arsenic. We examined the microbial reduction of OM- and arsenic-containing ferrihydrite colloids. Four effluent fractions were collected from a soil column experiment run under water-saturated conditions. Ferrihydrite colloids precipitated from the soil effluent and exhibited stable hydrodynamic diameters ranging from 281 (±146) nm in the effluent fraction that was collected first and 100 (±43) nm in a subsequently obtained effluent fraction. Aliquots of these oxic effluent fractions were added to anoxic low salt medium containing diluted suspensions of Geobacter sulfurreducens. Independent of the initial colloid size, the soil effluent ferrihydrite colloids were quickly and completely reduced. The rates of Fe2+ formation ranged between 1.9 and 3.3 fmol h-1 cell-1, and are in the range of or slightly exceeding previously reported rates of synthetic ferrihydrite colloids (1.3 fmol h-1 cell-1), but greatly exceeding previously known rates of macroaggregate-ferrihydrite reduction (0.07 fmol h-1 cell-1). The inhibition of microbial Fe(III) reduction by arsenic is unlikely or overridden by the concurrent enhancement induced by soil effluent DOM. These organic species may have increased the already high intrinsic reducibility of colloidal ferrihydrite owing to quinone-mediated electron shuttling. Additionally, OM, which is structurally associated with the soil effluent ferrihydrite colloids, may also contribute to the higher reactivity due to increasing solubility and specific surface area of ferrihydrite. In conclusion, ferrihydrite

  5. Maternal antibiotic-induced early changes in microbial colonization selectively modulate colonic permeability and inducible heat shock proteins, and digesta concentrations of alkaline phosphatase and TLR-stimulants in swine offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Edith Arnal

    Full Text Available Elevated intake of high energy diets is a risk factor for the development of metabolic diseases and obesity. High fat diets cause alterations in colonic microbiota composition and increase gut permeability to bacterial lipopolysaccharide, and subsequent low-grade chronic inflammation in mice. Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases are increasing worldwide and may involve alterations in microbiota-host dialog. Metabolic disorders appearing in later life are also suspected to reflect changes in early programming. However, how the latter affects the colon remains poorly studied. Here, we hypothesized that various components of colonic physiology, including permeability, ion exchange and protective inducible heat shock proteins (HSP are influenced in the short- and long-terms by early disturbances in microbial colonization. The hypothesis was tested in a swine model. Offspring were born to control mothers (n = 12 or mothers treated with the antibiotic (ATB amoxicillin around parturition (n = 11. Offspring were slaughtered between 14 and 42 days of age to study short-term effects. For long-term effects, young adult offspring from the same litters consumed a normal or a palm oil-enriched diet for 4 weeks between 140 and 169 days of age. ATB treatment transiently modified maternal fecal microbiota although the minor differences observed for offspring colonic microbiota were nonsignificant. In the short-term, consistently higher HSP27 and HSP70 levels and transiently increased horseradish peroxidase permeability in ATB offspring colon were observed. Importantly, long-term consequences included reduced colonic horseradish peroxidase permeability, and increased colonic digesta alkaline phosphatase (AP and TLR2- and TLR4-stimulant concentrations in rectal digesta in adult ATB offspring. Inducible HSP27 and HSP70 did not change. Interactions between early ATB treatment and later diet were noted for paracellular permeability and concentrations of colonic

  6. Study of cross-linking reactions induced by gamma rays in hybrid membranes of Bisphenol-A-Polysulfone and precipitated silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furtado Filho, Acacio Antonio M.; Gomes, Ailton de S.; Lopes, Lea; Benzi, Marcia R.

    2011-01-01

    In this work the bisphenol-A-polysulfone (PSF) was sulfonated using trimethyl silyl chlorosulfonate [(CH 3 ) 3 SiSO 3 Cl] as a mild sulfonating agent in a homogeneous solution of dichloroethane. The sulfonation reaction was confirmed by acid-base titration and FTIR-spectroscopy analysis. The hybrid membranes were obtained by casting the sulfonated bisphenol-A-polysulfone (SPSF) and precipitated silica Tixosil R 333 solutions in N-N-dimethylacetamide. Cross-linking in the hybrid membranes was obtained by irradiation, with doses ranging from 5 to 30 kGy using gamma ray from a 60 Co source. The water uptake and the swelling of the membranes were estimated by measuring the change in weight between dry and wet conditions. The conductivity of the membranes in acid form was measured with the ac impedance technique using a PGSTAT30 frequency response analyzer. The hybrid cross-linked membranes have conductivity close to 10-1 S.cm -1 at 100% RH and 80 deg C. Electrochemical performances, thermo-mechanical stability and low cost make this cross-linked SPSF hybrid membrane an attractive material for fuel cells using a proton exchange membrane. (author)

  7. Laser-induced reversion of δ′ precipitates in an Al-Li alloy: Study on temperature rise in pulsed laser atom probe

    KAUST Repository

    Khushaim, Muna Saeed Amin

    2016-06-14

    The influence of tuning the laser pulse energy during the analyses on the resulting microstructure in a specimen utilizing an ultra-fast laser assisted atom probe was demonstrated by a case study of a binary Al-Li alloy. The decomposition parameters, such as the size, number density, volume fraction, and composition of δ\\' precipitates, were carefully monitored after each analysis. A simple model was employed to estimate the corresponding specimen temperature for each value of the laser energy. The results indicated that the corresponding temperatures for the laser pulse energy in the range of 10 to 80 pJ are located inside the miscibility gap of the binary Al-Li phase diagram and fall into the metastable equilibrium field. In addition, the corresponding temperature for a laser pulse energy of 100 pJ was in fairly good agreement with reported range of δ\\' solvus temperature, suggesting a result of reversion upon heating due to laser pulsing. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Laser-induced reversion of δ′ precipitates in an Al-Li alloy: Study on temperature rise in pulsed laser atom probe

    KAUST Repository

    Khushaim, Muna Saeed Amin; Gemma, Ryota; Al-Kassab, Talaat

    2016-01-01

    The influence of tuning the laser pulse energy during the analyses on the resulting microstructure in a specimen utilizing an ultra-fast laser assisted atom probe was demonstrated by a case study of a binary Al-Li alloy. The decomposition parameters, such as the size, number density, volume fraction, and composition of δ' precipitates, were carefully monitored after each analysis. A simple model was employed to estimate the corresponding specimen temperature for each value of the laser energy. The results indicated that the corresponding temperatures for the laser pulse energy in the range of 10 to 80 pJ are located inside the miscibility gap of the binary Al-Li phase diagram and fall into the metastable equilibrium field. In addition, the corresponding temperature for a laser pulse energy of 100 pJ was in fairly good agreement with reported range of δ' solvus temperature, suggesting a result of reversion upon heating due to laser pulsing. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. WPA Precipitation Tabulations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hourly precipitation data tabulated under the Work Projects Administration (WPA), a New Deal program created to reduce unemployment during the Great Depression....

  10. Errors and Correction of Precipitation Measurements in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Zhihua; LI Mingqin

    2007-01-01

    In order to discover the range of various errors in Chinese precipitation measurements and seek a correction method, 30 precipitation evaluation stations were set up countrywide before 1993. All the stations are reference stations in China. To seek a correction method for wind-induced error, a precipitation correction instrument called the "horizontal precipitation gauge" was devised beforehand. Field intercomparison observations regarding 29,000 precipitation events have been conducted using one pit gauge, two elevated operational gauges and one horizontal gauge at the above 30 stations. The range of precipitation measurement errors in China is obtained by analysis of intercomparison measurement results. The distribution of random errors and systematic errors in precipitation measurements are studied in this paper.A correction method, especially for wind-induced errors, is developed. The results prove that a correlation of power function exists between the precipitation amount caught by the horizontal gauge and the absolute difference of observations implemented by the operational gauge and pit gauge. The correlation coefficient is 0.99. For operational observations, precipitation correction can be carried out only by parallel observation with a horizontal precipitation gauge. The precipitation accuracy after correction approaches that of the pit gauge. The correction method developed is simple and feasible.

  11. Microbial effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharpe, V.J.

    1985-10-01

    The long term safety and integrity of radioactive waste disposal sites proposed for use by Ontario Hydro may be affected by the release of radioactive gases. Microbes mediate the primary pathways of waste degradation and hence an assessment of their potential to produce gaseous end products from the breakdown of low level waste was performed. Due to a number of unknown variables, assumptions were made regarding environmental and waste conditions that controlled microbial activity; however, it was concluded that 14 C and 3 H would be produced, albeit over a long time scale of about 1500 years for 14 C in the worst case situation

  12. Induced calcite precipitation for the restoration of stratified hardwater lakes: The case of Lake Schmaler Luzin (North-East Germany); Induzierte Calcitfaellung zur Restaurierung eutropher Seen am Beispiel des Schmalen Luzins (Nord-Ost-Deutschland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittrich, M.; Heiser, A.; Koschel, R. [Inst. fuer Gewaesseroekologie und Binnenfischerei, Neuglobsow (Germany). Abt. fuer Limnologie Geschichteter Seen

    1997-11-01

    Artificially induced calcite precipitation combined with deep water aeration has been tested as a possible technology for lake restoration. A pilot equipment for whole lake experiments has been developed for the restoration of the Lake Schmaler Luzin on the basis of enclosure experiments. The hypolimnetic calcite precipitation was induced by hypolimnetic addition of Ca(OH){sub 2}. In 1996 the first experiments were aimed at checking the conditions for artificially induced hypolimnetic calcite precipitation and their effectiveness on phosphorus elimination. 140 t Ca(OH){sub 2} and 416 000 m{sup 3} air were added in the hypolimnion during two cycles of these experiments, each lasting one month. This led to an increase of the pH value in the hypolimnion from 7.2 to 9.1, above the sediment (2-3 cm) from 7.2 to 8.2 and in the upper layers of sediments from 7.4 to 8.6. The chemical equilibrium was shifted towards the calcite and we observed hypolimnetic calcite precipitations. In 1996 the hypolimnetic aeration was performed with the aim of homogenisation of the hypolimnion. As expected the amount of added air was not enough to make the whole hypolimnion aerobic during the summer stagnation. The reduction of the total and dissolved phosphorus concentration in the hypolimnion and at the sediment-water interface in comparison to the values of the year before indicated the occurence of phosphorus coprecipitation with calcite. The concentration of the soluble reactive phosphorus above the sediment decreased from 0.31 mgl{sup -1} in 1995 (26.07.) to 0.04 mgl{sup -1} in 1996 (01.08.). (orig.) [Deutsch] Basirend auf den Ergebnissen von Enclosureversuchen wurde 1995/96 eine Pilotanlage zur Restaurierung geschichteter eutrophierter und kalkreicher Seen entwickelt. Die Pilotanlage kombiniert die hypolimnische Ca(OH){sub 2}-Zugabe mit einer Tiefenwasserbelueftung. Die Anlage hat 1996 ihren Betrieb aufgenommen und wird zur Restaurierung des ehemals oligotrophen, jetzt eutrophen

  13. Molecular fossils of prokaryotes in ancient authigenic minerals: archives of microbial activity in reefs and mounds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heindel, Katrin; Birgel, Daniel; Richoz, Sylvain; Westphal, Hildegard; Peckmann, Jörn

    2016-04-01

    Molecular fossils (lipid biomarkers) are commonly used as proxies in organic-rich sediments of various sources, including eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Usually, molecular fossils of organisms transferred from the water column to the sediment are studied to monitor environmental changes (e.g., temperature, pH). Apart from these 'allochthonous' molecular fossils, prokaryotes are active in sediments and mats on the seafloor and leave behind 'autochthonous' molecular fossils in situ. In contrast to many phototrophic organisms, most benthic sedimentary prokaryotes are obtaining their energy from oxidation or reduction of organic or inorganic substrates. A peculiarity of some of the sediment-thriving prokaryotes is their ability to trigger in situ mineral precipitation, often but not only due to metabolic activity, resulting in authigenic rocks (microbialites). During that process, prokaryotes are rapidly entombed in the mineral matrix, where the molecular fossils are protected from early (bio)degradation. In contrast to other organic compounds (DNA, proteins etc.), molecular fossils can be preserved over very long time periods (millions of years). Thus, molecular fossils in authigenic mineral phases are perfectly suitable to trace microbial activity back in time. Among the best examples of molecular fossils, which are preserved in authigenic rocks are various microbialites, forming e.g. in phototrophic microbial mats and at cold seeps. Microbialite formation is reported throughout earth history. We here will focus on reefal microbialites form the Early Triassic and the Holocene. After the End-Permian mass extinction, microbialites covered wide areas on the ocean margins. In microbialites from the Griesbachian in Iran and Turkey (both Neotethys), molecular fossils of cyanobacteria, archaea, anoxygenic phototrophs, and sulphate-reducing bacteria indicate the presence of layered microbial mats on the seafloor, in which carbonate precipitation was induced. In association with

  14. Centrifugal precipitation chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yoichiro; Lin, Qi

    2009-01-01

    Centrifugal precipitation chromatography separates analytes according their solubility in ammonium sulfate (AS) solution and other precipitants. The separation column is made from a pair of long spiral channels partitioned with a semipermeable membrane. In a typical separation, concentrated ammonium sulfate is eluted through one channel while water is eluted through the other channel in the opposite direction. The countercurrent process forms an exponential AS concentration gradient through the water channel. Consequently, protein samples injected into the water channel is subjected to a steadily increasing AS concentration and at the critical AS concentration they are precipitated and deposited in the channel bed by the centrifugal force. Then the chromatographic separation is started by gradually reducing the AS concentration in the AS channel which lowers the AS gradient concentration in the water channel. This results in dissolution of deposited proteins which are again precipitated at an advanced critical point as they move through the channel. Consequently, proteins repeat precipitation and dissolution through a long channel and finally eluted out from the column in the order of their solubility in the AS solution. The present method has been successfully applied to a number of analytes including human serum proteins, recombinant ketosteroid isomerase, carotenoid cleavage enzymes, plasmid DNA, polysaccharide, polymerized pigments, PEG-protein conjugates, etc. The method is capable to single out the target species of proteins by affinity ligand or immunoaffinity separation. PMID:19541553

  15. Medium-term response of microbial community to rhizodeposits of white clover and ryegrass and tracing of active processes induced by 13C and 15N labelled exudates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusliene, Gedrime; Rasmussen, Jim; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-01-01

    and actinomycetes was unaffected by plant species, but pool of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria was greater under white clover at the 10 percent significance level. In the short term, microorganisms more actively utilised fresh exudates (13C-labelled) of ryegrass than of white clover. We expected ryegrass...... microbial groups in soil under white clover (Trifolium repens L.) and ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) following leaf-labelling with 13C-bicarbonate and 15N-urea. In this way microbial N and 15N and the composition of PLFAs reflect the medium-term (two months) response of microorganisms to rhizodeposits......, whereas the 13C-label of the PLFAs reflects the short-term (one week) utilisation of root exudates following labelling of shoots. In the medium term, microbial biomass N and 15N were greater under the ryegrass, whereas total PLFA was higher under white clover. The relative abundance of fungi...

  16. Microbial C:P stoichiometry is shaped by redox conditions along an elevation gradient in humid tropical rainforests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y.; Gross, A.; Silver, W. L.

    2017-12-01

    Elemental stoichiometry of microorganisms is intimately related to ecosystem carbon and nutrient fluxes and is ultimately controlled by the chemical (plant tissue, soil, redox) and physical (temperature, moisture, aeration) environment. Previous meta-analyses have shown that the C:P ratio of soil microbial biomass exhibits significant variations among and within biomes. Little is known about the underlying causes of this variability. We examined soil microbial C:P ratios along an elevation gradient in the Luquillo Experimental Forest in Puerto Rico. We analyzed soils from mixed forest paired with monodominant palm forest every 100 m from 300 m to 1000 m a.s.l.. Mean annual precipitation increased with increasing elevation, resulting in stronger reducing conditions and accumulation of soil Fe(II) at higher elevations. The mean value and variability of soil microbial C:P ratios generally increased with increasing elevation except at 1000 m. At high elevations (600-900 m), the average value of microbial C:P ratio (108±10:1) was significantly higher than the global average ( 55:1). We also found that soil organic P increased with increasing elevation, suggesting that an inhibition of organic P mineralization, not decreased soil P availability, may cause the high microbial C:P ratio. The soil microbial C:P ratio was positively correlated with soil HCl-extractable Fe(II), suggesting that reducing conditions may be responsible for the elevational changes observed. In a follow-up experiment, soils from mixed forests at four elevation levels (300, 500, 700, and 1000 m) were incubated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions for two weeks. We found that anaerobic incubation consistently increased the soil microbial C:P ratio relative to the aerobic incubation. Overall, our results indicate that redox conditions can shift the elemental composition of microbial biomass. The high microbial C:P ratios induced under anoxic conditions may reflect inhibition of microbial P

  17. Modeling of Nonlinear Dynamics and Synchronized Oscillations of Microbial Populations, Carbon and Oxygen Concentrations, Induced by Root Exudation in the Rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molz, F. J.; Faybishenko, B.; Jenkins, E. W.

    2012-12-01

    Mass and energy fluxes within the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum are highly coupled and inherently nonlinear. The main focus of this presentation is to demonstrate the results of numerical modeling of a system of 4 coupled, nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs), which are used to describe the long-term, rhizosphere processes of soil microbial dynamics, including the competition between nitrogen-fixing bacteria and those unable to fix nitrogen, along with substrate concentration (nutrient supply) and oxygen concentration. Modeling results demonstrate the synchronized patterns of temporal oscillations of competing microbial populations, which are affected by carbon and oxygen concentrations. The temporal dynamics and amplitude of the root exudation process serve as a driving force for microbial and geochemical phenomena, and lead to the development of the Gompetzian dynamics, synchronized oscillations, and phase-space attractors of microbial populations and carbon and oxygen concentrations. The nonlinear dynamic analysis of time series concentrations from the solution of the ODEs was used to identify several types of phase-space attractors, which appear to be dependent on the parameters of the exudation function and Monod kinetic parameters. This phase space analysis was conducted by means of assessing the global and local embedding dimensions, correlation time, capacity and correlation dimensions, and Lyapunov exponents of the calculated model variables defining the phase space. Such results can be used for planning experimental and theoretical studies of biogeochemical processes in the fields of plant nutrition, phyto- and bio-remediation, and other ecological areas.

  18. Biomineralization processes of calcite induced by bacteria isolated from marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shiping; Cui, Hongpeng; Jiang, Zhenglong; Liu, Hao; He, Hao; Fang, Nianqiao

    2015-06-01

    Biomineralization is a known natural phenomenon associated with a wide range of bacterial species. Bacterial-induced calcium carbonate precipitation by marine isolates was investigated in this study. Three genera of ureolytic bacteria, Sporosarcina sp., Bacillus sp. and Brevundimonas sp. were observed to precipitate calcium carbonate minerals. Of these species, Sporosarcina sp. dominated the cultured isolates. B. lentus CP28 generated higher urease activity and facilitated more efficient precipitation of calcium carbonate at 3.24 ± 0.25 × 10(-4) mg/cell. X-ray diffraction indicated that the dominant calcium carbonate phase was calcite. Scanning electron microscopy showed that morphologies of the minerals were dominated by cubic, rhombic and polygonal plate-like crystals. The dynamic process of microbial calcium carbonate precipitation revealed that B. lentus CP28 precipitated calcite crystals through the enzymatic hydrolysis of urea, and that when ammonium ion concentrations reached 746 mM and the pH reached 9.6, that favored calcite precipitation at a higher level of 96 mg/L. The results of this research provide evidence that a variety of marine bacteria can induce calcium carbonate precipitation, and may influence the marine carbonate cycle in natural environments.

  19. Precipitation Reconstruction (PREC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The PREC data set is an analysis of monthly precipitation constructed on a 2.5(o)lat/lon grid over the global for the period from 1948 to the present. The land...

  20. Application of microbial biocementation to improve the physico-mechanical properties of cement mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Abo-El-Enein

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Calcite is one of the most common and wide spread mineral on Earth constituting 4 wt% of the Earth’s crust. It is naturally found in extensive sedimentary rock masses, as lime stone marble and calcareous sandstone in marine, fresh water and terrestrial environments. Calcium carbonate is one of the most well known mineral that bacteria deposit by the phenomenon called biocementation or microbiologically induced calcite precipitation (MICP. Such deposits have recently emerged as promising binders for protecting and consolidating various building materials. Microbially enhanced calcite precipitation on concrete or mortar has become an important area of research regarding construction materials. This study describes a method of strength and water absorption improvement of cement–sand mortar by the microbiologically induced calcium carbonate precipitation. A moderately alkalophilic aerobic Sporosarcina pasteurii was incorporated at different cell concentrations with the mixing water. The study showed that a 33% increase in 28 days compressive strength of cement mortar was achieved with the addition of about one optical density (1 OD of bacterial cells with mixing water. The strength and water absorption improvement are due to the growth of calcite crystals within the pores of the cement–sand matrix as indicated from the microstructure obtained from scanning electron microscopy (SEM examination.

  1. Preventing Precipitation in the ISS Urine Processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muirhead, Dean; Carter, Layne; Williamson, Jill; Chambers, Antja

    2017-01-01

    The ISS Urine Processor Assembly (UPA) was initially designed to achieve 85% recovery of water from pretreated urine on ISS. Pretreated urine is comprised of crew urine treated with flush water, an oxidant (chromium trioxide), and an inorganic acid (sulfuric acid) to control microbial growth and inhibit precipitation. Unfortunately, initial operation of the UPA on ISS resulted in the precipitation of calcium sulfate at 85% recovery. This occurred because the calcium concentration in the crew urine was elevated in microgravity due to bone loss. The higher calcium concentration precipitated with sulfate from the pretreatment acid, resulting in a failure of the UPA due to the accumulation of solids in the Distillation Assembly. Since this failure, the UPA has been limited to a reduced recovery of water from urine to prevent calcium sulfate from reaching the solubility limit. NASA personnel have worked to identify a solution that would allow the UPA to return to a nominal recovery rate of 85%. This effort has culminated with the development of a pretreatment based on phosphoric acid instead of sulfuric acid. By eliminating the sulfate associated with the pretreatment, the brine can be concentrated to a much higher concentration before calcium sulfate reach the solubility limit. This paper summarizes the development of this pretreatment and the testing performed to verify its implementation on ISS.

  2. Using biological and physico-chemical test methods to assess the role of concrete mixture design in resistance to microbially induced corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Mitchell Wayne

    Concrete is the most widely used material for construction of wastewater collection, storage, and treatment infrastructure. The chemical and physical characteristics of hydrated portland cement make it susceptible to degradation under highly acidic conditions. As a result, some concrete wastewater infrastructure may be susceptible to a multi-stage degradation process known as microbially induced corrosion, or MIC. MIC begins with the production of aqueous hydrogen sulfide (H2S(aq)) by anaerobic sulfate reducing bacteria present below the waterline. H2S(aq) partitions to the gas phase where it is oxidized to sulfuric acid by the aerobic sulfur oxidizing bacteria Thiobacillus that resides on concrete surfaces above the waterline. Sulfuric acid then attacks the cement paste portion of the concrete matrix through decalcification of calcium hydroxide and calcium silica hydrate coupled with the formation of expansive corrosion products. The attack proceeds inward resulting in reduced service life and potential failure of the concrete structure. There are several challenges associated with assessing a concrete's susceptibility to MIC. First, no standard laboratory tests exist to assess concrete resistance to MIC. Straightforward reproduction of MIC in the laboratory is complicated by the use of microorganisms and hydrogen sulfide gas. Physico-chemical tests simulating MIC by immersing concrete specimens in sulfuric acid offer a convenient alternative, but do not accurately capture the damage mechanisms associated with biological corrosion. Comparison of results between research studies is difficult due to discrepancies that can arise in experimental methods even if current ASTM standards are followed. This thesis presents two experimental methods to evaluate concrete resistance to MIC: one biological and one physico-chemical. Efforts are made to address the critical aspects of each testing method currently absent in the literature. The first method presented is a new test

  3. Geophysical Monitoring of Coupled Microbial and Geochemical Processes During Stimulated Subsurface Bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Kenneth H.; Kemna, Andreas; Wilkins, Michael J.; Druhan, Jennifer L.; Arntzen, Evan V.; N'Guessan, A. Lucie; Long, Philip E.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding how microorganisms alter their physical and chemical environment during bioremediation is hindered by our inability to resolve subsurface microbial activity with high spatial resolution. Here we demonstrate the use of a minimally invasive geophysical technique to monitor stimulated microbial activity during acetate amendment in an aquifer near Rifle, Colorado. During electrical induced polarization (IP) measurements, spatiotemporal variations in the phase response between imposed electric current and the resultant electric field correlated with changes in groundwater geochemistry accompanying stimulated iron and sulfate reduction and sulfide mineral precipitation. The magnitude of the phase response varied with measurement frequency (0.125 and 1 Hz) and was dependent upon the dominant metabolic process. The spectral effect was corroborated using a biostimulated column experiment containing Rifle sediments and groundwater. Fluids and sediments recovered from regions exhibiting an anomalous phase response were enriched in Fe(II), dissolved sulfide, and cell-associated FeS nanoparticles. The accumulation of mineral precipitates and electroactive ions altered the ability of pore fluids to conduct electrical charge, accounting for the anomalous IP response and revealing the usefulness of multifrequency IP measurements for monitoring mineralogical and geochemical changes accompanying stimulated subsurface bioremediation

  4. Acidity of Scandinavian precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, E; Bordin, G

    1955-01-01

    Data on the pH of the total monthly precipitation at stations of a Swedish network for sampling and chemical analysis of precipitation and atmospheric aerosols during the year July 1953 to June 1954 are presented and discussed, together with the pH data from the first two months of operation of a large pan-Scandinavian net. It is found that well-defined regions of acidity and alkalinity relative to the pH of water in equilibrium with atmospheric carbon dioxide exist, and that these regions persist to such an extent that the monthly deviations from the pattern of the annual mean pH at stations unaffected by local pollution show persistently high acidity, while inland northern stations show equally persistent alkalinity. Some possible reasons for the observed distributions are considered.

  5. Microbially induced magnetosusceptibility anomalies below the surface of emerged carbonate banks - observed pathway of their origin (San Salvador Island, The Bahamas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hladil, Jindřich; Bosák, Pavel; Carew, J. L.; Zawidzki, P.; Lacka, B.; Charvátová, K.; Mylroie, J. E.; Langrová, Anna; Galle, Arnošt

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 5, - (2003), s. Abstract Number 06936 ISSN 1029-7006. [EGS-AGU-EUG Joint Assembly. 06.04.2003-11.04.2003, Nice] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3013209 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3013912 Keywords : microbial diagenesis * carbonate platforms * Quaternary Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy http://www.cosis.net/abstracts/EAE03/06936/EAE03-J-06936.pdf

  6. Magnetite precipitation and characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joyce, A.; Garside, J.; Ivens, R.

    1988-06-01

    Magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) precipitation was investigated as a possible alternative treatment process to the conventional ferric hydroxide for removal of actinides from radioactive effluents. This offered the possibility of improved dewatering of filtered residues. Whilst a poor quality magnetite could be produced from deoxygenated ferrous/ferric solutions, all attempts to prepare magnetite from effluent simulates were unsuccessful. The failure was attributed to the presence of high nitrate and other interfering ions. (author)

  7. On the complex conductivity signatures of calcite precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yuxin; Hubbard, Susan; Williams, Kenneth Hurst; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    2009-11-01

    Calcite is a mineral phase that frequently precipitates during subsurface remediation or geotechnical engineering processes. This precipitation can lead to changes in the overall behavior of the system, such as flow alternation and soil strengthening. Because induced calcite precipitation is typically quite variable in space and time, monitoring its distribution in the subsurface is a challenge. In this research, we conducted a laboratory column experiment to investigate the potential of complex conductivity as a mean to remotely monitor calcite precipitation. Calcite precipitation was induced in a glass bead (3 mm) packed column through abiotic mixing of CaCl{sub 2} and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solutions. The experiment continued for 12 days with a constant precipitation rate of {approx}0.6 milimole/d. Visual observations and scanning electron microscopy imaging revealed two distinct phases of precipitation: an earlier phase dominated by well distributed, discrete precipitates and a later phase characterized by localized precipitate aggregation and associated pore clogging. Complex conductivity measurements exhibited polarization signals that were characteristic of both phases of calcite precipitation, with the precipitation volume and crystal size controlling the overall polarization magnitude and relaxation time constant. We attribute the observed responses to polarization at the electrical double layer surrounding calcite crystals. Our experiment illustrates the potential of electrical methods for characterizing the distribution and aggregation state of nonconductive minerals like calcite. Advancing our ability to quantify geochemical transformations using such noninvasive methods is expected to facilitate our understanding of complex processes associated with natural subsurface systems as well as processes induced through engineered treatments (such as environmental remediation and carbon sequestration).

  8. Microbial micropatches within microbial hotspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Renee J.; Tobe, Shanan S.; Paterson, James S.; Seymour, Justin R.; Oliver, Rod L.; Mitchell, James G.

    2018-01-01

    The spatial distributions of organism abundance and diversity are often heterogeneous. This includes the sub-centimetre distributions of microbes, which have ‘hotspots’ of high abundance, and ‘coldspots’ of low abundance. Previously we showed that 300 μl abundance hotspots, coldspots and background regions were distinct at all taxonomic levels. Here we build on these results by showing taxonomic micropatches within these 300 μl microscale hotspots, coldspots and background regions at the 1 μl scale. This heterogeneity among 1 μl subsamples was driven by heightened abundance of specific genera. The micropatches were most pronounced within hotspots. Micropatches were dominated by Pseudomonas, Bacteroides, Parasporobacterium and Lachnospiraceae incertae sedis, with Pseudomonas and Bacteroides being responsible for a shift in the most dominant genera in individual hotspot subsamples, representing up to 80.6% and 47.3% average abundance, respectively. The presence of these micropatches implies the ability these groups have to create, establish themselves in, or exploit heterogeneous microenvironments. These genera are often particle-associated, from which we infer that these micropatches are evidence for sub-millimetre aggregates and the aquatic polymer matrix. These findings support the emerging paradigm that the microscale distributions of planktonic microbes are numerically and taxonomically heterogeneous at scales of millimetres and less. We show that microscale microbial hotspots have internal structure within which specific local nutrient exchanges and cellular interactions might occur. PMID:29787564

  9. Biologically induced mineralization of dypingite by cyanobacteria from an alkaline wetland near Atlin, British Columbia, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipple Gregory M

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study provides experimental evidence for biologically induced precipitation of magnesium carbonates, specifically dypingite (Mg5(CO34(OH2·5H2O, by cyanobacteria from an alkaline wetland near Atlin, British Columbia. This wetland is part of a larger hydromagnesite (Mg5(CO34(OH2·4H2O playa. Abiotic and biotic processes for magnesium carbonate precipitation in this environment are compared. Results Field observations show that evaporation of wetland water produces carbonate films of nesquehonite (MgCO3·3H2O on the water surface and crusts on exposed surfaces. In contrast, benthic microbial mats possessing filamentous cyanobacteria (Lyngbya sp. contain platy dypingite (Mg5(CO34(OH2·5H2O and aragonite. Bulk carbonates in the benthic mats (δ13C avg. = 6.7%, δ18O avg. = 17.2% were isotopically distinguishable from abiotically formed nesquehonite (δ13C avg. = 9.3%, δ18O avg. = 24.9%. Field and laboratory experiments, which emulated natural conditions, were conducted to provide insight into the processes for magnesium carbonate precipitation in this environment. Field microcosm experiments included an abiotic control and two microbial systems, one containing ambient wetland water and one amended with nutrients to simulate eutrophic conditions. The abiotic control developed an extensive crust of nesquehonite on its bottom surface during which [Mg2+] decreased by 16.7% relative to the starting concentration. In the microbial systems, precipitation occurred within the mats and was not simply due to the capturing of mineral grains settling out of the water column. Magnesium concentrations decreased by 22.2% and 38.7% in the microbial systems, respectively. Laboratory experiments using natural waters from the Atlin site produced rosettes and flakey globular aggregates of dypingite precipitated in association with filamentous cyanobacteria dominated biofilms cultured from the site, whereas the abiotic control again precipitated

  10. Precipitation in partially stabilized zirconia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bansal, G.K.

    1975-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy was used to study the substructure of partially stabilized ZrO 2 (PSZ) samples, i.e., 2-phase systems containing both cubic and monoclinic modifications of zirconia, after various heat treatments. Monoclinic ZrO 2 exists as (1) isolated grains within the polycrystalline aggregate (a grain- boundary phase) and (2) small plate-like particles within cubic grains. These intragranular precipitates are believed to contribute to the useful properties of PSZ via a form of precipitation hardening. These precipitates initially form as tetragonal ZrO 2 , with a habit plane parallel to the brace 100 brace matrix planes. The orientation relations between the tetragonal precipitates and the cubic matrix are brace 100 brace/sub matrix/ 2 parallel brace 100 brace /sub precipitate/ or (001)/sub precipitate/ and broken bracket 100 broken bracket/sub matrix/ 2 parallel broken bracket 100 broken bracket/sub precipitate/ or [001]/sub precipitate/. (U.S.)

  11. Hourly Precipitation Data (HPD) Publication

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hourly Precipitation Data (HPD) Publication is archived and available from the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). This publication contains hourly precipitation...

  12. Shifts in pore connectivity from precipitation versus groundwater rewetting increases soil carbon loss after drought

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Ashly P.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Benscoter, Brian W.; Tfaily, Malak M.; Hinkle, Ross; Liu, Chongxuan; Bailey, Vanessa L.

    2017-11-06

    Droughts and other extreme precipitation events are predicted to increase in intensity, duration and extent, with uncertain implications for terrestrial carbon (C) sequestration. Soil wetting from above (precipitation) results in a characteristically different pattern of pore-filling than wetting from below (groundwater), with larger, well-connected pores filling before finer pore spaces, unlike groundwater rise in which capillary forces saturate the finest pores first. Here we demonstrate that pore-scale wetting patterns interact with antecedent soil moisture conditions to alter pore-, core- and field-scale C dynamics. Drought legacy and wetting direction are perhaps more important determinants of short-term C mineralization than current soil moisture content in these soils. Our results highlight that microbial access to C is not solely limited by physical protection, but also by drought or wetting-induced shifts in hydrologic connectivity. We argue that models should treat soil moisture within a three-dimensional framework emphasizing hydrologic conduits for C and resource diffusion.

  13. Precipitation Indices Low Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Engelen, A. F. V.; Ynsen, F.; Buisman, J.; van der Schrier, G.

    2009-09-01

    Since 1995, KNMI published a series of books(1), presenting an annual reconstruction of weather and climate in the Low Countries, covering the period AD 763-present, or roughly, the last millennium. The reconstructions are based on the interpretation of documentary sources predominantly and comparison with other proxies and instrumental observations. The series also comprises a number of classifications. Amongst them annual classifications for winter and summer temperature and for winter and summer dryness-wetness. The classification of temperature have been reworked into peer reviewed (2) series (AD 1000-present) of seasonal temperatures and temperature indices, the so called LCT (Low Countries Temperature) series, now incorporated in the Millennium databases. Recently we started a study to convert the dryness-wetness classifications into a series of precipitation; the so called LCP (Low Countries Precipitation) series. A brief outline is given here of the applied methodology and preliminary results. The WMO definition for meteorological drought has been followed being that a period is called wet respectively dry when the amount of precipitation is considerable more respectively less than usual (normal). To gain a more quantitative insight for four locations, geographically spread over the Low Countries area (De Bilt, Vlissingen, Maastricht and Uccle), we analysed the statistics of daily precipitation series, covering the period 1900-present. This brought us to the following definition, valid for the Low Countries: A period is considered as (very) dry respectively (very) wet if over a continuous period of at least 60 days (~two months) cq 90 days (~three months) on at least two out of the four locations 50% less resp. 50% more than the normal amount for the location (based on the 1961-1990 normal period) has been measured. This results into the following classification into five drought classes hat could be applied to non instrumental observations: Very wet period

  14. 11 Soil Microbial Biomass

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    186–198. Insam H. (1990). Are the soil microbial biomass and basal respiration governed by the climatic regime? Soil. Biol. Biochem. 22: 525–532. Insam H. D. and Domsch K. H. (1989). Influence of microclimate on soil microbial biomass. Soil Biol. Biochem. 21: 211–21. Jenkinson D. S. (1988). Determination of microbial.

  15. Molecular microbial ecology manual

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kowalchuk, G.A.; Bruijn, de F.J.; Head, I.M.; Akkermans, A.D.L.

    2004-01-01

    The field of microbial ecology has been revolutionized in the past two decades by the introduction of molecular methods into the toolbox of the microbial ecologist. This molecular arsenal has helped to unveil the enormity of microbial diversity across the breadth of the earth's ecosystems, and has

  16. Microbial Rechargeable Battery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, Sam D.; Mol, Annemerel R.; Sleutels, Tom H.J.A.; Heijne, Ter Annemiek; Buisman, Cees J.N.

    2016-01-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems hold potential for both conversion of electricity into chemicals through microbial electrosynthesis (MES) and the provision of electrical power by oxidation of organics using microbial fuel cells (MFCs). This study provides a proof of concept for a microbial

  17. Childhood microbial keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah G Al Otaibi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Children with suspected microbial keratitis require comprehensive evaluation and management. Early recognition, identifying the predisposing factors and etiological microbial organisms, and instituting appropriate treatment measures have a crucial role in outcome. Ocular trauma was the leading cause of childhood microbial keratitis in our study.

  18. DISSOLUTION OF LANTHANUM FLUORIDE PRECIPITATES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, B.A.

    1959-11-10

    A plutonium separatory ore concentration procedure involving the use of a fluoride type of carrier is presented. An improvement is given in the derivation step in the process for plutonium recovery by carrier precipitation of plutonium values from solution with a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitate and subsequent derivation from the resulting plutonium bearing carrier precipitate of an aqueous acidic plutonium-containing solution. The carrier precipitate is contacted with a concentrated aqueous solution of potassium carbonate to effect dissolution therein of at least a part of the precipitate, including the plutonium values. Any remaining precipitate is separated from the resulting solution and dissolves in an aqueous solution containing at least 20% by weight of potassium carbonate. The reacting solutions are combined, and an alkali metal hydroxide added to a concentration of at least 2N to precipitate lanthanum hydroxide concomitantly carrying plutonium values.

  19. A novel electrostatic precipitator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Minkang; Wang, Liqian; Lin, Zhigui

    2013-01-01

    ESP (Electrostatic Precipitation) has been widely used in the mining, building materials, metallurgy and power industries. Dust particles or other harmful particles from the airstream can be precipitated by ESP with great collecting efficiency. Because of its' large size, high cost and energy consumption, the scope of application of ESP has been limited to a certain extent. By means of the theory of electrostatics and fluid dynamics, a corona assembly with a self-cleaning function and a threshold voltage automatic tracking technology has been developed and used in ESP. It is indicated that compared with conventional ESP, the electric field length has been reduced to 1/10 of the original, the current density on the collecting electrode increased 3-5 times at the maximum, the approach speed of dust particles in the electric field towards the collecting electrode is 4 times that in conventional ESP and the electric field wind speed may be enhanced by 2-3 times the original. Under the premise of ESP having a high efficiency of dust removal, equipment volume may be actually reduced to 1/5 to 1/10 of the original volume and energy consumption may be reduced by more than 50%.

  20. Low iron availability in continuous in vitro colonic fermentations induces strong dysbiosis of the child gut microbial consortium and a decrease of main metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostal, Alexandra; Fehlbaum, Sophie; Chassard, Christophe; Zimmermann, Michael Bruce; Lacroix, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency affects an estimated 2 billion people worldwide and Fe supplements are a common corrective strategy. The impact of Fe deficiency and Fe supplementation on the complex microbial community of the child gut was studied using in vitro colonic fermentation models inoculated with immobilized fecal microbiota. Chyme media (all Fe chelated by 2,2’-dipyridyl to 26.5 mg Fe L-1) mimicking Fe deficiency and supplementation were continuously fermented. Fermentation effluent samples were analyzed daily on the microbial composition and metabolites by qPCR, 16S rRNA gene 454-pyrosequencing and HPLC. Low Fe conditions (1.56 mg Fe L-1) significantly decreased acetate concentrations and subsequent Fe supplementation (26.5 mg Fe L-1) restored acetate production. High Fe following normal Fe conditions had no impact on the gut microbiota composition and metabolic activity. During very low Fe conditions (0 . 9 m g F e L-1 or Fe chelated b y 2,2’-dipyridyl), a decrease of Roseburia spp./Eubacterium rectale, Clostridium Cluster IV members and Bacteroides spp. was observed while Lactobacillus spp. and Enterobacteriaceae increased consistent with a decrease of butyrate (-84%) and propionate (-55%). The strong dysbiosis of the gut microbiota together with decrease of main gut microbiota metabolites observed with very low iron conditions could weaken the barrier effect of the microbiota and negatively impact gut health. PMID:22845175

  1. Microbial community changes at a terrestrial volcanic CO2 vent induced by soil acidification and anaerobic microhabitats within the soil column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerichs, Janin; Oppermann, Birte I; Gwosdz, Simone; Möller, Ingo; Herrmann, Martina; Krüger, Martin

    2013-04-01

    CO2 capture and storage (CCS) in deep geological formations is one option currently evaluated to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Consequently, the impact of a possible CO2 leakage from a storage site into surface environments has to be evaluated. During such a hypothetical leakage event, the CO2 migrates upwards along fractures entering surface soils, a scenario similar to naturally occurring CO2 vents. Therefore, such a natural analogue site at the Laacher See was chosen for an ecosystem study on the effects of high CO2 concentrations on soil chemistry and microbiology. The microbial activities revealed differences in their spatial distribution and temporal variability for CO2 -rich and reference soils. Furthermore, the abundance of several functional and group-specific gene markers revealed further differences, for example, a decrease in Geobacteraceae and an increase in sulphate-reducing prokaryotes in the vent centre. Molecular-biological fingerprinting of the microbial communities with DGGE indicated a shift in the environmental conditions within the Laacher See soil column leading to anaerobic and potentially acidic microenvironments. Furthermore, the distribution and phylogenetic affiliation of the archaeal 16S rRNA genes, the presence of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and the biomarker analysis revealed a predominance of Thaumarchaeota as possible indicator organisms for elevated CO2 concentrations in soils. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Low iron availability in continuous in vitro colonic fermentations induces strong dysbiosis of the child gut microbial consortium and a decrease in main metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostal, Alexandra; Fehlbaum, Sophie; Chassard, Christophe; Zimmermann, Michael B; Lacroix, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency affects an estimated 2 billion people worldwide, and Fe supplements are a common corrective strategy. The impact of Fe deficiency and Fe supplementation on the complex microbial community of the child gut was studied using in vitro colonic fermentation models inoculated with immobilized fecal microbiota. Chyme media (all Fe chelated by 2,2'-dipyridyl to 26.5 mg Fe L(-1) ) mimicking Fe deficiency and supplementation were continuously fermented. Fermentation effluent samples were analyzed daily on the microbial composition and metabolites by quantitative PCR, 16S rRNA gene 454-pyrosequencing, and HPLC. Low Fe conditions (1.56 mg Fe L(-1) ) significantly decreased acetate concentrations, and subsequent Fe supplementation (26.5 mg Fe L(-1) ) restored acetate production. High Fe following normal Fe conditions had no impact on the gut microbiota composition and metabolic activity. During very low Fe conditions (0.9 mg Fe L(-1) or Fe chelated by 2,2'-dipyridyl), a decrease in Roseburia spp./Eubacterium rectale, Clostridium Cluster IV members and Bacteroides spp. was observed, while Lactobacillus spp. and Enterobacteriaceae increased consistent with a decrease in butyrate (-84%) and propionate (-55%). The strong dysbiosis of the gut microbiota together with decrease in main gut microbiota metabolites observed with very low iron conditions could weaken the barrier effect of the microbiota and negatively impact gut health. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Microbial effects on the release and attenuation of arsenic in the shallow subsurface of a natural geochemical anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drahota, Petr; Falteisek, Lukáš; Redlich, Aleš; Rohovec, Jan; Matoušek, Tomáš; Čepička, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Critical factors leading to arsenic release and attenuation from the shallow subsurface were studied with multidisciplinary approach in the natural gold–arsenic geochemical anomaly at Mokrsko (Czech Republic). The results show that microbial reduction promotes arsenic release from Fe(III) (hydr)oxides and Fe(III) arsenates, thereby enhancing dissolved arsenic in the shallow groundwater at average concentration of 7.76 mg/L. In the organic-rich aggregates and wood particles, however, microbial sulfate reduction triggers the formation of realgar deposits, leading to accumulation of As in the distinct organic-rich patches of the shallow subsurface. We conclude that precipitation of realgar in the shallow subsurface of soil/sediment depends on specific and non-trivial combination of water and rock chemistry, microbial community composition and spatial organisation of the subsurface zone, where speciation in saturated environments varied on a centimeter scale from reduced (decomposed wood, H 2 S and realgar present) to oxidized (goethite and arsenate minerals are present). Highlights: •Very high As(III) concentrations were detected in the shallow groundwater. •Arsenic is bound to Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, Fe(III) arsenates and newly-formed realgar. •Reductive dissolution of Fe(III) and As(V) minerals by bacteria leads to mobilization of arsenic. •Precipitation of realgar is constrained to anaerobic domains around and within organic particles. -- Microbial reduction of Fe(III) and As(V) minerals leads to mobilization of As and induces a mineralogical transition toward realgar formation

  4. Microbial selenium sulfide reduction for selenium recovery from wastewater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, S.P.W.; Weijden, van der R.D.; Stams, A.J.M.; Cappellen, van P.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2017-01-01

    Microbial reduction of selenium sulfide (SeS2) is a key step in a new treatment process to recover selenium from selenate and selenite streams. In this process, selenate is first reduced to selenite, and subsequently selenite is reduced by sulfide and precipitates from the solution as SeS2. The

  5. Characterisation of Microbial Cellulose Modified by Graft Copolymerization Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tita Puspitasari; Cynthia Linaya Radiman

    2008-01-01

    Chemical and phisycal modifications of polymer can be carried out by radiation induced graft copolymerization. This research was carried out to study the morphology and crystallinity of microbial cellulose copolymer grafted by acrylic acid (MC-g-AAC). The SEM microstructural analysis proved that the acrylic acid could diffuse into the microbial celullose and resulted a dense structure. Crystallinity measurement showded that the crystalinity of microbial cellulose increase from 50 % to 53 % after modification. (author)

  6. The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) Combined Precipitation Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, George J.; Adler, Robert F.; Arkin, Philip; Chang, Alfred; Ferraro, Ralph; Gruber, Arnold; Janowiak, John; McNab, Alan; Rudolf, Bruno; Schneider, Udo

    1997-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) has released the GPCP Version 1 Combined Precipitation Data Set, a global, monthly precipitation dataset covering the period July 1987 through December 1995. The primary product in the dataset is a merged analysis incorporating precipitation estimates from low-orbit-satellite microwave data, geosynchronous-orbit -satellite infrared data, and rain gauge observations. The dataset also contains the individual input fields, a combination of the microwave and infrared satellite estimates, and error estimates for each field. The data are provided on 2.5 deg x 2.5 deg latitude-longitude global grids. Preliminary analyses show general agreement with prior studies of global precipitation and extends prior studies of El Nino-Southern Oscillation precipitation patterns. At the regional scale there are systematic differences with standard climatologies.

  7. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, M.R.; Arnold, R.G.; Stephanopoulos, G.

    1989-11-14

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry. 11 figs.

  8. Microbial life in geothermal waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sand, W. [Universitaet Hamburg (Germany). Mikrobiologie

    2003-12-01

    Geothermal waters usually contain many salts, often in varying concentrations. Some of these salts, especially if they are oxidizable or reducible, may be subject to microbial conversion and/or (bio)precipitation. Microorganisms can oxidize, sometimes even under anoxic (absence of oxygen) conditions, reduced sulfur compounds, iron (II) ions, and manganese (II) ions, to mention just a few of the most important. On the other hand, partially or fully oxidized compounds can be reduced by microorganisms, for example sulfur compounds, iron (III) ions, manganese (IV) ions, nitrogen oxides such as nitrite and nitrate, and, finally, bicarbonate and carbonate ions. If organic compounds are present, these may also be oxidized or reduced. A multitude of these microorganisms are able to perform such a metabolism under aerobic or anoxic conditions. All these (bio)processes allow bacteria to grow and proliferate. The consequences include biocorrosion and biodeterioration. The growth requirements and the biodeterioration mechanisms will be discussed in this review. (author)

  9. Optimization of precipitation conditions of thorium oxalate precipitate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazukhin, Eh.M.; Smirnova, E.A.; Krivokhatskij, A.S.; Pazukhina, Yu.L.; Kiselev, P.P.

    1986-01-01

    Thorium precipitation in the form of difficultly soluble oxalate has been investigated. The equation binding the concentration of metal with the nitric acid in the initial solution and quantity of a precipitator necessary for minimization of desired product losses is derived. The graphical solution of this equation for a case, when the oxalic acid with 0.78 mol/l concentration is the precipitator, is presented

  10. Precipitation-productivity Relation in Grassland in Northern China: Investigations at Multiple Spatiotemporal Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Climate change is predicted to cause dramatic variability in precipitation regime, not only in terms of change in annual precipitation amount, but also in precipitation seasonal distribution and precipitation event characteristics (high frenquency extrem precipitation, larger but fewer precipitation events), which combined to influence productivity of grassland in arid and semiarid regions. In this study, combining remote sensing products with in-situ measurements of aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) and gross primary productivity (GPP) data from eddy covariance system in grassland of northern China, we quantified the effects of spatio-temporal vairation in precipitation on productivity from local sites to region scale. We found that, for an individual precipitation event, the duration of GPP-response to the individual precipitation event and the maximum absolute GPP response induced by the individual precipitation event increased linearly with the size of precipitation events. Comparison of the productivity-precipitation relationships between multi-sites determined that the predominant characteristics of precipitation events (PEC) that affected GPP differed remarkably between the water-limited temperate steppe and the temperature-limited alpine meadow. The number of heavy precipitation events (>10 mm d-1) was the most important PEC to impact GPP in the temperate steppe through affecting soil moisture at different soil profiles, while precipitation interval was the factor that affected GPP most in the alpine meadow via its effects on temperature. At the region scale, shape of ANPP-precipitation relationship varies with distinct spatial scales, and besides annual precipitation, precipitation seasonal distribution also has comparable impacts on spatial variation in ANPP. Temporal variability in ANPP was lower at both the dry and wet end, and peaked at a precipitation of 243.1±3.5mm, which is the transition region between typical steppe and desert steppe

  11. Acid precipitation literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seip, H M; Andersen, B; Andersson, G; Hov, Oe; Kucera, V; Moseholm, L

    1986-01-01

    There is an increasing number of publications on acid deposition and related phenomena. Interest in these topics has also been reflected in a considerable number of meetings and conferences in this field. The largest of these in 1985 was the ''International Symposium on Acidic Precipitation'' (Muskoka, Ontario). Most work so far has been carried out in North America and Europe. There is, however, an increasing interest in obtaining a better picture of sensitive areas and possible acidification in other parts of the world. Anthropogenic SO/sub 2/ emissions have been estimated to be (in TgSyr/sup -1/): 2.4 (Africa), 4.1 (South America), 0.7 (Ocenia), and 18.3 (Asia). The largest increase during the last decade has been in Asia. Based on Studies of precipitation in remote areas it has been suggested that the natural background concentration for sulphate in many areas should be about 6 ..mu..eq 1/sup -1/. A new study of sulphate and nitrate in Greenland snow showed that both ions increased by a factor of about 2 from 1895 to 1978. The concentrations of SO/sub 2/ at Norwegian rural sites show a decreasing trend since late 1970s, while concentrations of sulphate in air show no clear trend. More reliable models for transformation, transport and deposition of chemicals are being developed, including three-dimensional grid models to describe episodes of elevated pollution levels lasting for a few days. Model calculations indicate that control of hydrocarbon (HC) emissions is much more efficient in reducing the ozone level in southern Scandinavia in episodes influenced by long-range transported pollutants than NO/sub x/ control of combined NO/sub x/ and HC control. 36 refs. (EG).

  12. Microbial activity at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, J.M.; Meike, A.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is engaged in a suitability study for a potential geological repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the containment and storage of commercially generated spent fuel and defense high-level nuclear waste. There is growing recognition of the role that biotic factors could play in this repository, either directly through microbially induced corrosion (MIC), or indirectly by altering the chemical environment or contributing to the transport of radionuclides. As a first step toward describing and predicting these processes, a workshop was held on April 10-12, 1995, in Lafayette, California. The immediate aims of the workshop were: (1) To identify microbially related processes relevant to the design of a radioactive waste repository under conditions similar to those at Yucca Mountain. (2) To determine parameters that are critical to the evaluation of a disturbed subterranean environment. (3) To define the most effective means of investigating the factors thus identified

  13. Microbial activity at Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, J.M.; Meike, A.

    1995-09-25

    The U.S. Department of Energy is engaged in a suitability study for a potential geological repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the containment and storage of commercially generated spent fuel and defense high-level nuclear waste. There is growing recognition of the role that biotic factors could play in this repository, either directly through microbially induced corrosion (MIC), or indirectly by altering the chemical environment or contributing to the transport of radionuclides. As a first step toward describing and predicting these processes, a workshop was held on April 10-12, 1995, in Lafayette, California. The immediate aims of the workshop were: (1) To identify microbially related processes relevant to the design of a radioactive waste repository under conditions similar to those at Yucca Mountain. (2) To determine parameters that are critical to the evaluation of a disturbed subterranean environment. (3) To define the most effective means of investigating the factors thus identified.

  14. Laser engineering of microbial systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusupov, V. I.; Gorlenko, M. V.; Cheptsov, V. S.; Minaev, N. V.; Churbanova, E. S.; Zhigarkov, V. S.; Chutko, E. A.; Evlashin, S. A.; Chichkov, B. N.; Bagratashvili, V. N.

    2018-06-01

    A technology of laser engineering of microbial systems (LEMS) based on the method of laser-induced transfer of heterogeneous mixtures containing microorganisms (laser bioprinting) is described. This technology involves laser printing of soil microparticles by focusing near-infrared laser pulses on a specially prepared gel/soil mixture spread onto a gold-coated glass plate. The optimal range of laser energies from the point of view of the formation of stable jets and droplets with minimal negative impact on living systems of giant accelerations, laser pulse irradiation, and Au nanoparticles was found. Microsamples of soil were printed on glucose-peptone-yeast agar plates to estimate the LEMS process influence on structural and morphological microbial diversity. The obtained results were compared with traditionally treated soil samples. It was shown that LEMS technology allows significantly increasing the biodiversity of printed organisms and is effective for isolating rare or unculturable microorganisms.

  15. Connecting Urbanization to Precipitation: the case of Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgescu, Matei

    2017-04-01

    Considerable evidence exists illustrating the influence of urban environments on precipitation. We revisit this theme of significant interest to a broad spectrum of disciplines ranging from urban planning to engineering to urban numerical modeling and climate, by detailing the simulated effect of Mexico City's built environment on regional precipitation. Utilizing the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) system to determine spatiotemporal changes in near-surface air temperature, precipitation, and boundary layer conditions induced by the modern-day urban landscape relative to presettlement conditions, I mechanistically link the built environment-induced increase in air temperature to simulated increases in rainfall during the evening hours. This simulated increase in precipitation is in agreement with historical observations documenting observed rainfall increase. These results have important implications for understanding the meteorological conditions leading to the widespread and recurrent urban flooding that continues to plague the Mexico City Metropolitan Area.

  16. Two-stage precipitation of plutonium trifluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luerkens, D.W.

    1984-04-01

    Plutonium trifluoride was precipitated using a two-stage precipitation system. A series of precipitation experiments identified the significant process variables affecting precipitate characteristics. A mathematical precipitation model was developed which was based on the formation of plutonium fluoride complexes. The precipitation model relates all process variables, in a single equation, to a single parameter that can be used to control particle characteristics

  17. Microbial reduction of uranium using cellulosic substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thombre, M.S.; Thomson, B.M.; Barton, L.L.

    1996-01-01

    Previous work at the University of New Mexico and elsewhere has shown that sulfate-reducing bacteria are capable of reducing uranium from the soluble +6 oxidation state to the insoluble +4 oxidation state. This chemistry forms the basis of a proposed ground water remediation strategy in which microbial reduction would be used to immobilize soluble uranium. One such system would consist of a subsurface permeable barrier which would stimulate microbial growth resulting in the reduction of sulfate and nitrate and immobilization of metals while permitting the unhindered flow of ground water through it. This research investigated some of the engineering considerations associated with a microbial reducing barrier such as identifying an appropriate biological substrate, estimating the rate of substrate utilization, and identifying the final fate of the contaminants concentrated in the barrier matrix. The performance of batch reactors and column systems that treated simulated plume water was evaluated using cellulose, wheat straw, alfalfa hay, sawdust, and soluble starch as substrates. The concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, and U(VI) were monitored over time. Precipitates from each system were collected, and the precipitated U(IV) was determined to be crystalline UO 2(s) by x-ray diffraction. The results of this study support the proposed use of cellulosic substrates as candidate barrier materials

  18. Effective Assimilation of Global Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, G.; Kalnay, E.; Miyoshi, T.; Huffman, G. J.

    2012-12-01

    Assimilating precipitation observations by modifying the moisture and sometimes temperature profiles has been shown successful in forcing the model precipitation to be close to the observed precipitation, but only while the assimilation is taking place. After the forecast start, the model tends to "forget" the assimilation changes and lose their extra skill after few forecast hours. This suggests that this approach is not an efficient way to modify the potential vorticity field, since this is the variable that the model would remember. In this study, the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) method is used to effectively change the potential vorticity field by allowing ensemble members with better precipitation to receive higher weights. In addition to using an EnKF, two other changes in the precipitation assimilation process are proposed to solve the problems related to the highly non-Gaussian nature of the precipitation variable: a) transform precipitation into a Gaussian distribution based on its climatological distribution, and b) only assimilate precipitation at the location where some ensemble members have positive precipitation. The idea is first tested by the observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) using SPEEDY, a simplified but realistic general circulation model. When the global precipitation is assimilated in addition to conventional rawinsonde observations, both the analyses and the medium range forecasts are significantly improved as compared to only having rawinsonde observations. The improvement is much reduced when only modifying the moisture field with the same approach, which shows the importance of the error covariance between precipitation and all other model variables. The effect of precipitation assimilation is larger in the Southern Hemisphere than that in the Northern Hemisphere because the Northern Hemisphere analyses are already accurate as a result of denser rawinsonde stations. Assimilation of precipitation using a more comprehensive

  19. Electrical operation of electrostatic precipitators

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Ken

    2003-01-01

    The electrostatic precipitator remains on of the most cost effective means of controlling the emission of particulates from most industrial processes. This book will be of interest to both users and suppliers of electrostatic precipitators as well as advanced students on environmental based courses. The author identifies the physical and engineering basis for the development of electrical equipment for electrostatic precipitators and thoroughly explores the technological factors which optimize the efficiency of the precipitator and hence minimize emissions, as well as future developments in th

  20. Microbial effects on high-level waste disposal. Research review and perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-09-01

    Various microorganisms have been observed in deep geologic formation. The effects of such microorganisms on the performance of HLW disposal are still unknown. This paper reviews the studies of microbial effects on the long-term containment of HLW disposal, and discusses the future work to be carried out. Microbial reduction and oxidation and byproducts derived from microbial activities affect performance of HLW repository and have a potential to enhance actinides migration in geologic formation (degradation of the materials of repository, complex-formation, dissolution of actinides precipitates and occurrence of nm scale colloid formation). Potential microbial perturbation of performance of the barriers may enhance confinement of actinides by biomineralization, bioadsorption, bioaccumulation and precipitation. These studies indicate that further experiments are required to elucidate microbial effects on the performance of HLW disposal. (author)

  1. River flooding due to intense precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, James C.

    2014-01-01

    River stage can rise and cause site flooding due to local intense precipitation (LIP), dam failures, snow melt in conjunction with precipitation or dam failures, etc. As part of the re-evaluation of the design basis as well as the PRA analysis of other external events, the likelihood and consequence of river flooding leading to the site flooding need to be examined more rigorously. To evaluate the effects of intense precipitation on site structures, the site watershed hydrology and pond storage are calculated. To determine if river flooding can cause damage to risk-significant systems, structures, and components (SSC), water surface elevations are analyzed. Typically, the amount and rate of the input water is determined first. For intense precipitation, the fraction of the rainfall in the watershed drainage area not infiltrated into the ground is collected in the river and contributes to the rise of river water elevation. For design basis analysis, the Probable Maximum Flood (PMF) is evaluated using the Probable Maximum Precipitation (PMP) based on the site topography/configuration. The peak runoff flow rate and water surface elevations resulting from the precipitation induced flooding can then be estimated. The runoff flow hydrograph and peak discharge flows can be developed using the synthetic hydrograph method. The standard step method can then be used to determine the water surface elevations along the river channel. Thus, the flood water from the local intense precipitation storm and excess runoff from the nearby river can be evaluated to calculate the water surface elevations, which can be compared with the station grade floor elevation to determine the effects of site flooding on risk-significant SSCs. The analysis needs to consider any possible diversion flow and the effects of changes to the site configurations. Typically, the analysis is performed based on conservative peak rainfall intensity and the assumptions of failure of the site drainage facilities

  2. Improving precipitation measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strangeways, Ian

    2004-09-01

    Although rainfall has been measured for centuries scientifically and in isolated brief episodes over millennia for agriculture, it is still not measured adequately even today for climatology, water resources, and other precise applications. This paper outlines the history of raingauges, their errors, and describes the field testing over 3 years of a first guess design for an aerodynamic rain collector proposed by Folland in 1988. Although shown to have aerodynamic advantage over a standard 5 gauge, the new rain collector was found to suffer from outsplash in heavy rain. To study this problem, and to derive general basic design rules for aerodynamic gauges, its performance was investigated in turbulent, real-world conditions rather than in the controlled and simplified environment of a wind tunnel or mathematical model as in the past. To do this, video records were made using thread tracers to indicate the path of the wind, giving new insight into the complex flow of natural wind around and within raingauges. A new design resulted, and 2 years of field testing have shown that the new gauge has good aerodynamic and evaporative characteristics and minimal outsplash, offering the potential for improved precipitation measurement.

  3. CEOS precipitation constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeck, Steven P.; Oki, Riko

    2007-10-01

    The outcomes of the 19th Committee on Earth Observing Satellites (CEOS) Plenary held in London in November 2005, recognized that the CEOS Implementation Plan for Space-Based Observations for Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) should: - identify the supply of space-based observations required to satisfy the requirements expressed by the 10-year implementation plan for GEOSS; and - propose an innovative process whereby the many disparate types of Earth observing programs funded by CEOS Member agencies might contribute to the supply of the required observations. The CEOS Task Force charged with drafting the CEOS Implementation Plan for Space-Based Observations for GEOSS focused its early efforts on the creation of a 'new planning process' which would satisfy the various criteria demanded by member space agencies, and which would hopefully encourage a new phase of specificity and focus in the multi-lateral co-operation efforts undertaken by space agencies under the CEOS umbrella - resulting in improved engagement of all CEOS Members and real implementation results. The CEOS Constellations is the title given to this new process, and four pilot studies have been initiated in order to pioneer and test the concept. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) were selected as the lead agencies for the study of the development of a CEOS Precipitation Constellation with the support of other CEOS space agency and user community participants. The goals, approach, and anticipated outcomes for the study will be discussed.

  4. Microbial electrosynthetic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Harold D.; Marshall, Christopher W.; Labelle, Edward V.

    2018-01-30

    Methods are provided for microbial electrosynthesis of H.sub.2 and organic compounds such as methane and acetate. Method of producing mature electrosynthetic microbial populations by continuous culture is also provided. Microbial populations produced in accordance with the embodiments as shown to efficiently synthesize H.sub.2, methane and acetate in the presence of CO.sub.2 and a voltage potential. The production of biodegradable and renewable plastics from electricity and carbon dioxide is also disclosed.

  5. Precipitation in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Gordon

    2007-01-01

    As an astronomy instructor, I am always looking for commonly observed Earthly experiences to help my students and me understand and appreciate similar occurrences elsewhere in the solar system. Recently I wrote a short TPT article on frost. This paper is on the related phenomena of precipitation. Precipitation, so common on most of the Earth's…

  6. Responses of switchgrass soil respiration and its components to precipitation gradient in a mescocosm study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of the precipitation changes on soil, microbial and root respirations of switchgrass soils, and the relationships between soil respiration and plant growth, soil moisture and temperature. A mesocosm experiment was conducted with five prec...

  7. Kinetics of cadmium hydroxide precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, J.W.; Marani, D.; Luo, B.; Swenson, P.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents some preliminary results on the kinetics of Cd(OH)/sub 2/ precipitation, both in the absence and the presence of citric acid as an inhibiting agent. Batch and continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) precipitation studies are performed by mixing equal volumes of NaOH and Cd(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ solutions, in order to avoid localized supersaturation conditions. The rate of metal removal from the soluble phase is calculated from the mass balance for the CSTR precipitation tests. In addition, precipitation kinetics are studied in terms of nucleation and crystal growth rates, by means of a particle counter that allows a population balance analysis for the precipitation reactor at steady state conditions

  8. Encoding information into precipitation structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martens, Kirsten; Bena, Ioana; Droz, Michel; Rácz, Zoltan

    2008-01-01

    Material design at submicron scales would be profoundly affected if the formation of precipitation patterns could be easily controlled. It would allow the direct building of bulk structures, in contrast to traditional techniques which consist of removing material in order to create patterns. Here, we discuss an extension of our recent proposal of using electrical currents to control precipitation bands which emerge in the wake of reaction fronts in A + + B – → C reaction–diffusion processes. Our main result, based on simulating the reaction–diffusion–precipitation equations, is that the dynamics of the charged agents can be guided by an appropriately designed time-dependent electric current so that, in addition to the control of the band spacing, the width of the precipitation bands can also be tuned. This makes straightforward the encoding of information into precipitation patterns and, as an amusing example, we demonstrate the feasibility by showing how to encode a musical rhythm

  9. Resistance and Resilience of Soil Microbial Communities Exposed to Petroleum-Derived Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modrzynski, Jakub Jan

    Functioning of soil microbial communities is generally considered resilient to disturbance, including chemical stress. Activities of soil microbial communities are often sustained in polluted environments due to exceptional plasticity of microbial communities and functional redundancy. Pollution......-induced community tolerance (PICT) often develops following chemical stress. Nonetheless, environmental pollution may severely disturb functioning of soil microbial communities, thereby threatening provision of important ecosystem services provided by microorganisms. Pollution with petroleum and petroleum......-derived compounds (PDCs) is a significant environmental problem on a global scale. Research addressing interactions between microorganisms and PDC pollution is dominated by studies of biodegradation, with less emphasis on microbial ecotoxicology. Soil microbial communities are generally considered highly resilient...

  10. Supplementation of Lactobacillus curvatus HY7601 and Lactobacillus plantarum KY1032 in diet-induced obese mice is associated with gut microbial changes and reduction in obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Do-Young Park

    Full Text Available To investigate the functional effects of probiotic treatment on the gut microbiota, as well as liver and adipose gene expression in diet-induced obese mice.Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD for 8 weeks to induce obesity, and then randomized to receive HFD+probiotic (Lactobacillus curvatus HY7601 and Lactobacillus plantarum KY1032, n = 9 or HFD+placebo (n = 9 for another 10 weeks. Normal diet (ND fed mice (n = 9 served as non-obese controls.Diet-induced obese mice treated with probiotics showed reduced body weight gain and fat accumulation as well as lowered plasma insulin, leptin, total-cholesterol and liver toxicity biomarkers. A total of 151,061 pyrosequencing reads for fecal microbiota were analyzed with a mean of 6,564, 5,274 and 4,464 reads for the ND, HFD+placebo and HFD+probiotic groups, respectively. Gut microbiota species were shared among the experimental groups despite the different diets and treatments. The diversity of the gut microbiota and its composition were significantly altered in the diet-induced obese mice and after probiotic treatment. We observed concurrent transcriptional changes in adipose tissue and the liver. In adipose tissue, pro-inflammatory genes (TNFα, IL6, IL1β and MCP1 were down-regulated in mice receiving probiotic treatment. In the liver, fatty acid oxidation-related genes (PGC1α, CPT1, CPT2 and ACOX1 were up-regulated in mice receiving probiotic treatment.The gut microbiota of diet-induced obese mice appears to be modulated in mice receiving probiotic treatment. Probiotic treatment might reduce diet-induced obesity and modulate genes associated with metabolism and inflammation in the liver and adipose tissue.

  11. Application and Study of Precipitation Schemes in Weather Simulation in Summer and Winter over China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Guoqiang; WAN Qilin; HUANG Liping; XUE Jishan; CHEN Dehui

    2006-01-01

    Through simulation of summer and winter precipitation cases in China, the cloud precipitation schemes of model were examined. Results indicate that it is discrepant between convective precipitation simulated by the Kain-Fritsch (KF) scheme and Betts-Miller (BM) scheme in summer, the former scheme is better than the latter in this case. The ambient atmosphere may be varied by different convective schemes. The air is wetter and the updraft is stronger in the KF scheme than in the BM scheme, which can induce the more grid scale precipitation in the KF scheme, i.e., the different cumulus schemes may have the different and important effect on the grid scale precipitation. However, there is almost no convective rain in winter in northern China, so the effect of cumulus precipitation on the grid scale precipitation can be disregarded.Therefore, the gird scale precipitation is primary in the winter of northern China.

  12. Compaction agent clarification of microbial lysates

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWalt, Brad W.; Murphy, Jason C.; Fox, George E.; Willson, Richard C.

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are often purified from microbial lysates containing high concentrations of nucleic acids. Pre-purification steps such as nuclease addition or precipitation with polyethyleneimine or ammonium sulfate are normally required to reduce viscosity and to eliminate competing polyanions before anion exchange chromatography. We report that small polycationic compaction agents such as spermine selectively precipitate nucleic acids during or after Escherichia coli lysis, allowing DNA and RNA to be pelleted with the insoluble cell debris. Analysis by spectrophotometry and protein assay confirmed a significant reduction in the concentration of nucleic acids present, with preservation of protein. Lysate viscosity is greatly reduced, facilitating subsequent processing. We have used 5mM spermine to remove nucleic acids from E. coli lysate in the purification of a hexahistidine-tagged HIV reverse transcriptase.

  13. Effects of microbial redox cycling of iron on cast iron pipe corrosion in drinking water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haibo; Hu, Chun; Zhang, Lili; Li, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min

    2014-11-15

    Bacterial characteristics in corrosion products and their effect on the formation of dense corrosion scales on cast iron coupons were studied in drinking water, with sterile water acting as a reference. The corrosion process and corrosion scales were characterized by electrochemical and physico-chemical measurements. The results indicated that the corrosion was more rapidly inhibited and iron release was lower due to formation of more dense protective corrosion scales in drinking water than in sterile water. The microbial community and denitrifying functional genes were analyzed by pyrosequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCR), respectively. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the bacteria in corrosion products played an important role in the corrosion process in drinking water. Nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) Acidovorax and Hydrogenophaga enhanced iron corrosion before 6 days. After 20 days, the dominant bacteria became NRB Dechloromonas (40.08%) with the protective corrosion layer formation. The Dechloromonas exhibited the stronger corrosion inhibition by inducing the redox cycling of iron, to enhance the precipitation of iron oxides and formation of Fe3O4. Subsequently, other minor bacteria appeared in the corrosion scales, including iron-respiring bacteria and Rhizobium which captured iron by the produced siderophores, having a weaker corrosion-inhibition effect. Therefore, the microbially-driven redox cycling of iron with associated microbial capture of iron caused more compact corrosion scales formation and lower iron release. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Radiation-induced sprout and growth inhibition in vegetables with special reference to the susceptibility to microbial attacks and the effect of calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skou, J.P.

    1979-03-01

    Experiments have shown ionizing irradiation to be an effective method for sprout and growth inhibition but it is necessary to keep the doses at the absolute minimum in order to avoid unwanted by-effects One of the by-effects is an increased susceptibility to storage rot in potatoes, onions and carrots. This effect is connected with the wounding and bruising caused by digging up and handling as the wound healing process is inhibited simultaneously with the sprout inhibition. Patogens increase tissue permeability during pathogenesis and, as irradiation has an analogous effect on tissues it might facilitate the growth of the pathogens. Irradiation softens the tissue and mobilizes the calcium in the tissue; this may thereby make the tissue more accessible to microbial attack. An external supply of calcium increases the firmness of tissue, reduces tissue permeability, and may compensate for the loss of calcium in irradiated tissue mainly as a result of a surplus of calcium in the wounds. Botrytis cinerea and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum were some of the most wide spread and serious pathogens in carrots, which vegetable were the main object of the studies. Culture filtrates of these fungi had a strong macerating activity on carrot tissues. The effect, which results from activity and interaction of pectolytic enzymes and oxalic acid, could be reduced or nullified by calcium. A diversity of the groups of pectolytic enzymes are widely distributed among organisms and not confined to plant pathogens. Because of this, because there exists pectolytic enzymes for every condition and pectic substances, and because calcium is not very inhibiting to all kinds of pectolytic enzymes it is not to be expected that the protective effect of calcium will always be expressed to the same extent on storage of the products. (author)

  15. Microbial accumulation of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wei; Dong Faqin; Dai Qunwei

    2005-01-01

    The mechanism of microbial accumulation of uranium and the effects of some factors (including pH, initial uranium concentration, pretreatment of bacteria, and so on) on microbial accumulation of uranium are discussed briefly. The research direction and application prospect are presented. (authors)

  16. MICROBIAL FUEL CELL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    A novel microbial fuel cell construction for the generation of electrical energy. The microbial fuel cell comprises: (i) an anode electrode, (ii) a cathode chamber, said cathode chamber comprising an in let through which an influent enters the cathode chamber, an outlet through which an effluent...

  17. Microbial control of pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, J C; Gadd, G M; Herbert, R A; Jones, C W; Watson-Craik, I A [eds.

    1992-01-01

    12 papers are presented on the microbial control of pollution. Topics covered include: bioremediation of oil spills; microbial control of heavy metal pollution; pollution control using microorganisms and magnetic separation; degradation of cyanide and nitriles; nitrogen removal from water and waste; and land reclamation and restoration.

  18. Effects of bacterially produced precipitates on the metabolism of sulfate reducing bacteria during the bio-treatment process of copper-containing wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A large volume of bacterially produced precipitates are generated during the bio-treatment of heavy metal wastewater.The composition of the bacterially produced precipitates and its effects on sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) in copper-containing waste stream were evaluated in this study.The elemental composition of the microbial precipitate was studied using electrodispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX),and it was found that the ratio of S:Cu was 1.12.Combining with the results of copper distribution in the SRB metabolism culture,which was analyzed by the sequential extraction procedure,copper in the precipitates was determined as covellite (CuS).The bacterially produced precipitates caused a decrease of the sulfate reduction rate,and the more precipitates were generated,the lower the sulfate reduction rate was.The particle sizes of bacterially generated covellite were ranging from 0.03 to 2 m by particles size distribution (PSD) analysis,which was smaller than that of the SRB cells.Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis showed that the microbial covellite was deposited on the surface of the cell.The effects of the microbial precipitate on SRB metabolism were found to be weakened by increasing the precipitation time and adding microbial polymeric substances in later experiments.These results provided direct evidence that the SRB activity was inhibited by the bacterially produced covellite,which enveloped the bacterium and thus affected the metabolism of SRB on mass transfer.

  19. Microbial strategy for potential lead remediation: a review study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaohong; Chen, Zhi; Li, Lan; Rao, Wenhua; Xu, Zhangyan; Guan, Xiong

    2017-02-01

    The extensive exploitation and usage of lead compounds result in severe lead(II) pollution in water and soil environments, even in agricultural land, threatening the health of animals and humans via food chains. The recovery and remediation of lead(II) from water and soil environments have been intensively concerned in recent years. Compared with the traditional physic-chemistry treatment, microbial remediation strategy is a promising alternative to remediate lead(II)-contaminated environments due to its cost-effective and environmentally-friendly properties. Various microorganisms are capable of removing or immobilizing lead(II) from water and soil environments through bioaccumulation, precipitation or accelerated transformation of lead(II) into a very stable mineral, resulting in significant effects on lead(II) mobility and bioavailability. In the present review, we investigated a wide diversity of lead(II) bioremediation induced by different microbes and its multi-mechanisms. Moreover, we also discussed the progress and limitations, summarized the common rules of lead(II)-microbe interaction, and evaluated the environmental significance of microbes in lead biogeochemistry process. In addition, we further deliberated the feasibility and potential application of microbes in developing cost-effective, eco-friendly bioremediation or long-term management strategy for lead(II) contaminated repositories.

  20. On the Precipitation and Precipitation Change in Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerd Wendler

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Alaska observes very large differences in precipitation throughout the state; southeast Alaska experiences consistently wet conditions, while northern Arctic Alaska observes very dry conditions. The maximum mean annual precipitation of 5727 mm is observed in the southeastern panhandle at Little Port Arthur, while the minimum of 92 mm occurs on the North Slope at Kuparuk. Besides explaining these large differences due to geographic and orographic location, we discuss the changes in precipitation with time. Analyzing the 18 first-order National Weather Service stations, we found that the total average precipitation in the state increased by 17% over the last 67 years. The observed changes in precipitation are furthermore discussed as a function of the observed temperature increase of 2.1 °C, the mean temperature change of the 18 stations over the same period. This observed warming of Alaska is about three times the magnitude of the mean global warming and allows the air to hold more water vapor. Furthermore, we discuss the effect of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO, which has a strong influence on both the temperature and precipitation in Alaska.

  1. Precipitation Mechanism of Sigma Phase in Super Duplex Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakade, Katsuyuki; Kuroda, Toshio

    The influence of alloying elements on the precipitation behavior of sigma (σ) phase was investigated for conventional SAF2205 and SAF2507 super duplex stainless steel. Time-Temperature-Precipitation (T-T-P) diagram of sigma phase of SAF2507 were shifted toward to shorter times compared to SAF2205. The precipitation of sigma phase was accelerated with increasing Cr and Mo concentration. According to the microstructure observation, the sigma phase began to precipitate at ferrite (α) ⁄ austenite (γ) phase boundaries and grew into ferrite for SAF2507 and SAF2205 steel. In the as-received condition, Cr and Mo concentration in ferrite was clearly higher than that in austenite. Especially, it was found that Mo concentration in ferrite of SAF2507 was higher than that in ferrite of SAF2205. The result of EPMA-measurement showed that sigma phase was mainly Fe-Cr-Mo intermetallic compound and Mo was significantly enriched into sigma phase. The difference of Mo concentration in ferrite significantly affected to the sigma phase precipitation. The secondary austenite formation was also induced by sigma phase precipitation. Cr and Mo were ejected to the remained ferrite ⁄ austenite phase boundaries by secondary austenite formation. Consequently, sigma phase precipitation was more accelerated by the reheating.

  2. The inhibition of LPS-induced splenocyte proliferation by ortho-substituted and microbially dechlorinated polychlorinated biphenyls is associated with a decreased expression of cyclin D2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smithwick, L. Ashley; Quensen, John F.; Smith, Andrew; Kurtz, David T.; London, Lucille; Morris, Pamela J.

    2004-01-01

    Immunological effects of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been demonstrated in our laboratories with the preferential inhibition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced splenocyte proliferation by ortho-substituted PCB congeners. An investigation of the mechanism behind this immunotoxicity revealed an interruption in the progression of murine lymphocytes from G 0 /G 1 into S phase by Aroclor 1242 and the di-ortho-substituted congener, 2,2'-chlorobiphenyl (CB), whereas, a non-ortho-substituted congener, 4,4'-CB, did not affect cell cycle progression. This interruption of cell cycle progression by 2,2'-CB and Aroclor 1242 was associated with a decreased expression of the cell cycle regulatory protein, cyclin D2, while expression was not affected by exposure to the non-ortho-substituted 4,4'-CB. These results suggest the preferential inhibition of LPS-induced splenocyte proliferation by ortho-substituted congeners is a result of a decreased expression of cyclin D2, which leads to an interruption in cell cycle progression. In addition, PCB mixtures with an increased percentage of chlorines in the ortho position following an environmentally occurring degradation process inhibited LPS-induced proliferation, interrupted cell cycle progression, and decreased cyclin D2 expression. This study provides evidence for a mechanism of action of the immunological effects of ortho-substituted individual congeners as well as environmentally relevant mixtures enriched in congeners with this substitution pattern

  3. Intensification of extreme European summer precipitation in a warmer climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, O. B.; Christensen, J. H.

    2004-01-01

    Heavy and/or extended precipitation episodes with subsequent surface runoff can inflict catastrophic property damage and loss of human life. Thus, it is important to determine how the character of such events could change in response to greenhouse gas-induced global warming. Impacts of climate...... warming on severe precipitation events in Europe on a diurnal time scale were investigated with a high-resolution regional climate model for two of the greenhouse gas emission scenarios constructed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC; Nakicenovic, N., et al., 2000, IPCC special report...... models both originating from fully transient climate change simulations. Here, we show that although the summer time precipitation decreases over a substantial part of Europe in the scenarios analysed, an increase in the amount of precipitation exceeding the present-day 99th and in most cases even the 95...

  4. Precipitation of lithium in germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masaik, M.; Furgolle, B.

    1969-01-01

    The precipitation of Lithium in Germanium was studied. Taking account of the interactions Ga LI, LiO, we calculated the oxygen content in germanium samples from the resistivity measurements. (authors)

  5. Environmental Radioactivity, Temperature, and Precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riland, Carson A.

    1996-01-01

    Reports that environmental radioactivity levels vary with temperature and precipitation and these effects are due to radon. Discusses the measurement of this environmental radioactivity and the theory behind it. (JRH)

  6. Aluminum precipitation from Hanford DSSF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgen, D.; Frazier, P.; Staton, G.

    1994-01-01

    A series of pilot scale tests using simulated Double Shell Slurry Feed (DSSF) showed that well-settled aluminum precipitate can be produced in Hanford double shell tank (DST) high level waste by slow neutralization with carbon dioxide. This pretreatment could provide an early grout feed and free tank space, as well as facilitate downstream processes such as ion exchange by providing a less caustic feed. A total of eight test runs were completed using a 10-ft tall 3-in i.d. glass column. The 10-ft height corresponds to about one third of the vertical height of a DST, hence providing a reasonable basis for extrapolating the observed precipitate settling and compaction to the actual waste tank environment. Four runs (three with a simplified simulant and one with a chemically complete simulant) produced well settled precipitates averaging 1.5 to 2 feet high. Aluminum gel rather than settled precipitate resulted from one test where neutralization was too rapid

  7. Hourly and Daily Precipitation Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Precipitation reports submitted on many form types, including tabular and autographic charts. Reports are almost exclusively from the US Cooperative Observer Network.

  8. Evaluation of Coupled Precipitator Two

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    The offline testing of the Coupled Precipitator Two (CP-2) has been completed. The tests were conducted and are documented. The tests were conducted at an offline test rack near the Drain Tube Test Stand facility in 672-T

  9. The removal of uranium from mining waste water using algal/microbial biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalin, Margarete; Wheeler, W.N.; Meinrath, G.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a three step process for the removal of uranium (U) from dilute waste waters. Step one involves the sequestration of U on, in, and around aquatic plants such as algae. Cell wall ligands efficiently remove U(VI) from waste water. Growing algae continuously renew the cellular surface area. Step 2 is the removal of U-algal particulates from the water column to the sediments. Step 3 involves reducing U(VI) to U(IV) and transforming the ions into stable precipitates in the sediments. The algal cells provide organic carbon and other nutrients to heterotrophic microbial consortia to maintain the low E H , within which the U is transformed. Among the microorganisms, algae are of predominant interest for the ecological engineer because of their ability to sequester U and because some algae can live under many extreme environments, often in abundance. Algae grow in a wide spectrum of water qualities, from alkaline environments (Chara, Nitella) to acidic mine drainage waste waters (Mougeotia, Ulothrix). If they could be induced to grow in waste waters, they would provide a simple, long-term means to remove U and other radionuclides from U mining effluents. This paper reviews the literature on algal and microbial adsorption, reduction, and transformation of U in waste streams, wetlands, lakes and oceans

  10. Development of precipitator of fluid film type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yupu

    1987-01-01

    The precipitator of fluid film type is developed for the determination of fuel element cladding failure of water-cooled reactor. It integrates the scrubber, precipitator and detector. The jet of element cooling water automatically circulates carrier gas and the flow water film transfers precipitates onto the surface of centre electrode. Three different types are designed. On the special test loop, the uranium sample pellets of simulating cladding failure is measured. The sensitivity of precipitators, saturated precipitation voltage, incremental speed of signal, speed of driving out precipitates and the contents of the precipitates are determined. The test shows that the precipitators are highly sensitive, reliable, cheap and easy to operate

  11. Microbial hotspots and hot moments in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzyakov, Yakov; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia

    2015-04-01

    Soils are the most heterogeneous parts of the biosphere, with an extremely high differentiation of properties and processes within nano- to macroscales. The spatial and temporal heterogeneity of input of labile organics by plants creates microbial hotspots over short periods of time - the hot moments. We define microbial hotspots as small soil volumes with much faster process rates and much more intensive interactions compared to the average soil conditions. Such hotspots are found in the rhizosphere, detritusphere, biopores (including drilosphere) and on aggregate surfaces, but hotspots are frequently of mixed origin. Hot moments are short-term events or sequences of events inducing accelerated process rates as compared to the averaged rates. Thus, hotspots and hot moments are defined by dynamic characteristics, i.e. by process rates. For this hotspot concept we extensively reviewed and examined the localization and size of hotspots, spatial distribution and visualization approaches, transport of labile C to and from hotspots, lifetime and process intensities, with a special focus on process rates and microbial activities. The fraction of active microorganisms in hotspots is 2-20 times higher than in the bulk soil, and their specific activities (i.e. respiration, microbial growth, mineralization potential, enzyme activities, RNA/DNA ratio) may also be much higher. The duration of hot moments in the rhizosphere is limited and is controlled by the length of the input of labile organics. It can last a few hours up to a few days. In the detritusphere, however, the duration of hot moments is regulated by the output - by decomposition rates of litter - and lasts for weeks and months. Hot moments induce succession in microbial communities and intense intra- and interspecific competition affecting C use efficiency, microbial growth and turnover. The faster turnover and lower C use efficiency in hotspots counterbalances the high C inputs, leading to the absence of strong

  12. Statin precipitated lactic acidosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, R; Reynolds, T M; Saweirs, W

    2004-09-01

    An 82 year old woman was admitted with worsening dyspnoea. Arterial blood gases were taken on air and revealed a pH of 7.39, with a partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) of 1.2 kPa, pO2 of 19.3 kPa, HCO3 of 13.8 mmol/litre, and base excess of -16.3 mmol/litre: a compensated metabolic acidosis with hyperventilation induced hypocapnia, which is known to be a feature of lactic acidosis. There was also an increased anion gap ((Na140 + K4.0) - (Cl 106 + HCO3 13.8) = 24.2 mEq/litre (reference range, 7-16)), consistent with unmeasured cation. Lactate was measured and found to be raised at 3.33 mmol/litre (reference range, 0.9-1.7). After exclusion of common causes of lactic acidosis Atorvastatin was stopped and her acid-base balance returned to normal. Subsequently, thiamine was also shown to be deficient. The acidosis was thought to have been the result of a mitochondrial defect caused by a deficiency of two cofactors, namely: ubiquinone (as a result of inhibition by statin) and thiamine (as a result of dietary deficiency).

  13. Satellite-Based Precipitation Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munchak, S. J.; Huffman, G. J.

    2017-12-01

    Of the possible sources of precipitation data, those based on satellites provide the greatest spatial coverage. There is a wide selection of datasets, algorithms, and versions from which to choose, which can be confusing to non-specialists wishing to use the data. The International Precipitation Working Group (IPWG) maintains tables of the major publicly available, long-term, quasi-global precipitation data sets (http://www.isac.cnr.it/ ipwg/data/datasets.html), and this talk briefly reviews the various categories. As examples, NASA provides two sets of quasi-global precipitation data sets: the older Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) and current Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission (IMERG). Both provide near-real-time and post-real-time products that are uniformly gridded in space and time. The TMPA products are 3-hourly 0.25°x0.25° on the latitude band 50°N-S for about 16 years, while the IMERG products are half-hourly 0.1°x0.1° on 60°N-S for over 3 years (with plans to go to 16+ years in Spring 2018). In addition to the precipitation estimates, each data set provides fields of other variables, such as the satellite sensor providing estimates and estimated random error. The discussion concludes with advice about determining suitability for use, the necessity of being clear about product names and versions, and the need for continued support for satellite- and surface-based observation.

  14. Shifts of growing-season precipitation peaks decrease soil respiration in a semiarid grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ru, Jingyi; Zhou, Yaqiong; Hui, Dafeng; Zheng, Mengmei; Wan, Shiqiang

    2018-03-01

    Changing precipitation regimes could have profound influences on carbon (C) cycle in the biosphere. However, how soil C release from terrestrial ecosystems responds to changing seasonal distribution of precipitation remains unclear. A field experiment was conducted for 4 years (2013-2016) to examine the effects of altered precipitation distributions in the growing season on soil respiration in a temperate steppe in the Mongolian Plateau. Over the 4 years, both advanced and delayed precipitation peaks suppressed soil respiration, and the reductions mainly occurred in August. The decreased soil respiration could be primarily attributable to water stress and subsequently limited plant growth (community cover and belowground net primary productivity) and soil microbial activities in the middle growing season, suggesting that precipitation amount in the middle growing season is more important than that in the early, late, or whole growing seasons in regulating soil C release in grasslands. The observations of the additive effects of advanced and delayed precipitation peaks indicate semiarid grasslands will release less C through soil respiratory processes under the projected seasonal redistribution of precipitation in the future. Our findings highlight the potential role of intra-annual redistribution of precipitation in regulating ecosystem C cycling in arid and semiarid regions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Evolution of microbial pathogens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DiRita, Victor J; Seifert, H. Steven

    2006-01-01

    ... A. Hogan vvi ■ CONTENTS 8. Evolution of Pathogens in Soil Rachel Muir and Man-Wah Tan / 131 9. Experimental Models of Symbiotic Host-Microbial Relationships: Understanding the Underpinnings of ...

  16. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Carbon Dioxide Flooding by Managing Asphaltene Precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deo, M.D.

    2001-01-12

    The objective of this project was to identify conditions at which carbon dioxide induced precipitation occurred in crude oils. Establishing compositions of the relevant liquid and solid phases was planned. Other goals of the project were to determine if precipitation occurred in cores and to implement thermodynamic and compositional models to examine the phenomenon. Exploring kinetics of precipitation was also one of the project goals. Crude oil from the Rangely Field (eastern Colorado) was used as a prototype.

  17. Synthetic Electric Microbial Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-10

    domains and DNA-binding domains into a single protein for deregulation of down stream genes of have been favored [10]. Initially experiments with... Germany DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release: distribution unlimited.   Talk title: “Synthetic biology based microbial biosensors for the...toolbox” in Heidelberg, Germany Poster title: “Anaerobic whole cell microbial biosensors” Link: http://phdsymposium.embl.org/#home   September, 2014

  18. Microbial bioinformatics 2020.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallen, Mark J

    2016-09-01

    Microbial bioinformatics in 2020 will remain a vibrant, creative discipline, adding value to the ever-growing flood of new sequence data, while embracing novel technologies and fresh approaches. Databases and search strategies will struggle to cope and manual curation will not be sustainable during the scale-up to the million-microbial-genome era. Microbial taxonomy will have to adapt to a situation in which most microorganisms are discovered and characterised through the analysis of sequences. Genome sequencing will become a routine approach in clinical and research laboratories, with fresh demands for interpretable user-friendly outputs. The "internet of things" will penetrate healthcare systems, so that even a piece of hospital plumbing might have its own IP address that can be integrated with pathogen genome sequences. Microbiome mania will continue, but the tide will turn from molecular barcoding towards metagenomics. Crowd-sourced analyses will collide with cloud computing, but eternal vigilance will be the price of preventing the misinterpretation and overselling of microbial sequence data. Output from hand-held sequencers will be analysed on mobile devices. Open-source training materials will address the need for the development of a skilled labour force. As we boldly go into the third decade of the twenty-first century, microbial sequence space will remain the final frontier! © 2016 The Author. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Finger millet bran supplementation alleviates obesity-induced oxidative stress, inflammation and gut microbial derangements in high-fat diet-fed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtaza, Nida; Baboota, Ritesh K; Jagtap, Sneha; Singh, Dhirendra P; Khare, Pragyanshu; Sarma, Siddhartha M; Podili, Koteswaraiah; Alagesan, Subramanian; Chandra, T S; Bhutani, K K; Boparai, Ravneet K; Bishnoi, Mahendra; Kondepudi, Kanthi Kiran

    2014-11-14

    Several epidemiological studies have shown that the consumption of finger millet (FM) alleviates diabetes-related complications. In the present study, the effect of finger millet whole grain (FM-WG) and bran (FM-BR) supplementation was evaluated in high-fat diet-fed LACA mice for 12 weeks. Mice were divided into four groups: control group fed a normal diet (10 % fat as energy); a group fed a high-fat diet; a group fed the same high-fat diet supplemented with FM-BR; a group fed the same high-fat diet supplemented with FM-WG. The inclusion of FM-BR at 10 % (w/w) in a high-fat diet had more beneficial effects than that of FM-WG. FM-BR supplementation prevented body weight gain, improved lipid profile and anti-inflammatory status, alleviated oxidative stress, regulated the expression levels of several obesity-related genes, increased the abundance of beneficial gut bacteria (Lactobacillus, Bifidobacteria and Roseburia) and suppressed the abundance of Enterobacter in caecal contents (P≤ 0·05). In conclusion, FM-BR supplementation could be an effective strategy for preventing high-fat diet-induced changes and developing FM-BR-enriched functional foods.

  20. Iron oxyhydroxide mineralization on microbial extracellular polysaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Clara S.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Edwards, David C.; Emerson, David; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2010-06-22

    Iron biominerals can form in neutral pH microaerophilic environments where microbes both catalyze iron oxidation and create polymers that localize mineral precipitation. In order to classify the microbial polymers that influence FeOOH mineralogy, we studied the organic and mineral components of biominerals using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), micro X-ray fluorescence ({mu}XRF) microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). We focused on iron microbial mat samples from a creek and abandoned mine; these samples are dominated by iron oxyhydroxide-coated structures with sheath, stalk, and filament morphologies. In addition, we characterized the mineralized products of an iron-oxidizing, stalk-forming bacterial culture isolated from the mine. In both natural and cultured samples, microbial polymers were found to be acidic polysaccharides with carboxyl functional groups, strongly spatially correlated with iron oxyhydroxide distribution patterns. Organic fibrils collect FeOOH and control its recrystallization, in some cases resulting in oriented crystals with high aspect ratios. The impact of polymers is particularly pronounced as the materials age. Synthesis experiments designed to mimic the biomineralization processes show that the polysaccharide carboxyl groups bind dissolved iron strongly but release it as mineralization proceeds. Our results suggest that carboxyl groups of acidic polysaccharides are produced by different microorganisms to create a wide range of iron oxyhydroxide biomineral structures. The intimate and potentially long-term association controls the crystal growth, phase, and reactivity of iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles in natural systems.

  1. Highly active microbial phosphoantigen induces rapid yet sustained MEK/Erk- and PI-3K/Akt-mediated signal transduction in anti-tumor human gammadelta T-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel V Correia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The unique responsiveness of Vgamma9Vdelta2 T-cells, the major gammadelta subset of human peripheral blood, to non-peptidic prenyl pyrophosphate antigens constitutes the basis of current gammadelta T-cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for phosphoantigen-mediated activation of human gammadelta T-cells remain unclear. In particular, previous reports have described a very slow kinetics of activation of T-cell receptor (TCR-associated signal transduction pathways by isopentenyl pyrophosphate and bromohydrin pyrophosphate, seemingly incompatible with direct binding of these antigens to the Vgamma9Vdelta2 TCR. Here we have studied the most potent natural phosphoantigen yet identified, (E-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate (HMB-PP, produced by Eubacteria and Protozoa, and examined its gammadelta T-cell activation and anti-tumor properties. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have performed a comparative study between HMB-PP and the anti-CD3epsilon monoclonal antibody OKT3, used as a reference inducer of bona fide TCR signaling, and followed multiple cellular and molecular gammadelta T-cell activation events. We show that HMB-PP activates MEK/Erk and PI-3K/Akt pathways as rapidly as OKT3, and induces an almost identical transcriptional profile in Vgamma9(+ T-cells. Moreover, MEK/Erk and PI-3K/Akt activities are indispensable for the cellular effects of HMB-PP, including gammadelta T-cell activation, proliferation and anti-tumor cytotoxicity, which are also abolished upon antibody blockade of the Vgamma9(+ TCR Surprisingly, HMB-PP treatment does not induce down-modulation of surface TCR levels, and thereby sustains gammadelta T-cell activation upon re-stimulation. This ultimately translates in potent human gammadelta T-cell anti-tumor function both in vitro and in vivo upon transplantation of human leukemia cells into lymphopenic mice, CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The development of

  2. Influence of austenite grain size on recrystallisation-precipitation interaction in a V-microalloyed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quispe, A.; Medina, S.F.; Gomez, M.; Chaves, J.I.

    2007-01-01

    By means of torsion tests using small specimens, the influence of austenite grain size on strain induced precipitation kinetics has been determined in a vanadium microalloyed steel. Determination of recrystallisation-precipitation-time-temperature (RPTT) diagrams for two austenite grain sizes allows values of the aforementioned magnitudes to be determined. An ample discussion is made of the quantitative influence found and its relation with nucleation and growth mechanisms of precipitates. The results are compared with the quantitative influence exerted by the other variables, reaching the conclusion that the austenite grain size has a notable influence on strain induced precipitation kinetics which should not be underestimated. Finally, the influence of austenite grain size is included in a strain induced precipitation model constructed by the authors of this work and which also takes into account the other aforementioned variables

  3. Measurement of precipitation using lysimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fank, Johann; Klammler, Gernot

    2013-04-01

    Austria's alpine foothill aquifers contain important drinking water resources, but are also used intensively for agricultural production. These groundwater bodies are generally recharged by infiltrating precipitation. A sustainable water resources management of these aquifers requires quantifying real evapotranspiration (ET), groundwater recharge (GR), precipitation (P) and soil water storage change (ΔS). While GR and ΔS can be directly measured by weighable lysimeters and P by separate precipitation gauges, ET is determined by solving the climatic water balance ET = P GR ± ΔS. According to WMO (2008) measurement of rainfall is strongly influenced by precipitation gauge errors. Most significant errors result from wind loss, wetting loss, evaporation loss, and due to in- and out-splashing of water. Measuring errors can be reduced by a larger area of the measuring gaugés surface and positioning the collecting vessel at ground level. Modern weighable lysimeters commonly have a surface of 1 m², are integrated into their typical surroundings of vegetation cover (to avoid oasis effects) and allow scaling the mass change of monolithic soil columns in high measuring accuracy (0.01 mm water equivalent) and high temporal resolution. Thus, also precipitation can be quantified by measuring the positive mass changes of the lysimeter. According to Meissner et al. (2007) also dew, fog and rime can be determined by means of highly precise weighable lysimeters. Furthermore, measuring precipitation using lysimeters avoid common measuring errors (WMO 2008) at point scale. Though, this method implicates external effects (background noise, influence of vegetation and wind) which affect the mass time series. While the background noise of the weighing is rather well known and can be filtered out of the mass time series, the influence of wind, which blows through the vegetation and affects measured lysimeter mass, cannot be corrected easily since there is no clear relation between

  4. Precipitation process for supernate decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, L.M.; Kilpatrick, L.L.

    1982-11-01

    A precipitation and adsorption process has been developed to remove cesium, strontium, and plutonium from water-soluble, high-level radioactive waste. An existing waste tank serves as the reaction vessel and the process begins with the addition of a solution of sodium tetraphenylborate and a slurry of sodium titanate to the contained waste salt solution. Sodium tetraphenylborate precipitates the cesium and sodium titanate adsorbs the strontium and plutonium. The precipitate/adsorbate is then separated from the decontaminated salt solution by crossflow filtration. This new process offers significant capital savings over an earlier ion exchange process for salt decontamination. Chemical and small-scale engineering studies with actual waste are reported. The effect of many variables on the decontamination factors and filter performance are defined

  5. Arsenic precipitation from metallurgical effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, P.; Vargas, C.; Araya, E.; Martin, I.; Alguacil, F. J.

    2004-01-01

    In the mining-metallurgical companies different liquid effluents are produced, which can contain a series of dissolved elements that are considered dangerous from an environmental point of view. One of these elements is the arsenic, especially in the state of oxidation +5 that can be precipitated as calcium or iron arsenate. To fulfil the environmental requests it should have in solution a content of arsenic lower than 0,5 mg/l and the obtained solid product should be very stable under the condition in which it will be stored. this work looks for the best conditions of arsenic precipitation, until achieving contents in solution lower than such mentioned concentration. Also, the stability of the precipitates was studied. (Author) 7 refs

  6. Radar-Derived Quantitative Precipitation Estimation Based on Precipitation Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for improving radar-derived quantitative precipitation estimation is proposed. Tropical vertical profiles of reflectivity (VPRs are first determined from multiple VPRs. Upon identifying a tropical VPR, the event can be further classified as either tropical-stratiform or tropical-convective rainfall by a fuzzy logic (FL algorithm. Based on the precipitation-type fields, the reflectivity values are converted into rainfall rate using a Z-R relationship. In order to evaluate the performance of this rainfall classification scheme, three experiments were conducted using three months of data and two study cases. In Experiment I, the Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D default Z-R relationship was applied. In Experiment II, the precipitation regime was separated into convective and stratiform rainfall using the FL algorithm, and corresponding Z-R relationships were used. In Experiment III, the precipitation regime was separated into convective, stratiform, and tropical rainfall, and the corresponding Z-R relationships were applied. The results show that the rainfall rates obtained from all three experiments match closely with the gauge observations, although Experiment II could solve the underestimation, when compared to Experiment I. Experiment III significantly reduced this underestimation and generated the most accurate radar estimates of rain rate among the three experiments.

  7. Silver precipitation from electrolytic effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, I.; Patino, F.; Cruells, M.; Roca, A.; Vinals, J.

    2004-01-01

    The recovery of silver contained in electrolytic effluents is attractive due to its high economic value. These effluents are considered toxic wastes and it is not possible to dump them directly without any detoxification process. One of the most important way for silver recovery is the precipitation with sodium ditionite, sodium borohidride or hydrazine monohidrate. In this work, the most significant aspects related to the use of these reagents is presented. Results of silver precipitation with sodium ditionite from effluents containing thiosulfate without previous elimination of other species are also presented. silver concentration in the final effluents w <1 ppm. (Author) 15 refs

  8. The characterisation of precipitated magnetites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rush, D.F.; Segal, D.L.

    1982-06-01

    Methods are described for the preparation of magnetite by precipitation from aqueous solutions of iron(II) and iron(III) salts. The magnetites have been characterised by transmission electron microscopy, chemical analysis and X-ray diffraction. Transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy has also been used to characterise precipitated magnetites and a comparison of the spectra has been made with those obtained from nickel ferrite and hydrated ferric oxides. The hydrothermal stability of magnetite at 573 K has also been investigated. This work is relevant to corrosion processes that can occur in the water coolant circuits of nuclear reactors. (author)

  9. An Improved Plutonium Trifluoride Precipitation Flowsheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, H.D.

    2001-06-26

    This report discusses results of the plutonium trifluoride two-stage precipitation study. A series of precipitation experiments was used to identify the significant process variables affecting precipitation performance. A mathematical model of the precipitation process was developed which is based on the formation of plutonium fluoride complexes. The precipitation model relates all process variables, in a single equation, to a single parameter which can be used to control the performance of the plutonium trifluoride precipitation process. Recommendations have been made which will optimize the FB-Line plutonium trifluoride precipitation process.

  10. An Improved Plutonium Trifluoride Precipitation Flowsheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, H.D.

    2001-01-01

    This report discusses results of the plutonium trifluoride two-stage precipitation study. A series of precipitation experiments was used to identify the significant process variables affecting precipitation performance. A mathematical model of the precipitation process was developed which is based on the formation of plutonium fluoride complexes. The precipitation model relates all process variables, in a single equation, to a single parameter which can be used to control the performance of the plutonium trifluoride precipitation process. Recommendations have been made which will optimize the FB-Line plutonium trifluoride precipitation process

  11. On the effects of wildfires on precipitation in Southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sales, Fernando; Okin, Gregory S.; Xue, Yongkang; Dintwe, Kebonye

    2018-03-01

    This study investigates the impact of wildfire on the climate of Southern Africa. Moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer derived burned area fraction data was implemented in a set of simulations to assess primarily the role of wildfire-induced surface changes on monthly precipitation. Two post-fire scenarios are examined namely non-recovering and recovering vegetation scenarios. In the former, burned vegetation fraction remains burned until the end of the simulations, whereas in the latter it is allowed to regrow following a recovery period. Control simulations revealed that the model can dependably capture the monthly precipitation and surface temperature averages in Southern Africa thus providing a reasonable basis against which to assess the impacts of wildfire. In general, both wildfire scenarios have a negative impact on springtime precipitation. September and October were the only months with statistically significant precipitation changes. During these months, precipitation in the region decreases by approximately 13 and 9% in the non-recovering vegetation scenario, and by about 10 and 6% in the recovering vegetation wildfire scenario, respectively. The primary cause of precipitation deficit is the decrease in evapotranspiration resulting from a reduction in surface net radiation. Areas impacted by the precipitation reduction includes the Luanda, Kinshasa, and Brazzaville metropolitan areas, The Angolan Highlands, which are the source of the Okavango Rive, and the Okavango Delta region. This study suggests that a probable intensification in wildfire frequency and extent resulting from projected population increase and global warming in Southern Africa could potentially exacerbate the impacts of wildfires in the region's seasonal precipitation.

  12. Deep subsurface microbial processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, D.R.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1995-01-01

    Information on the microbiology of the deep subsurface is necessary in order to understand the factors controlling the rate and extent of the microbially catalyzed redox reactions that influence the geophysical properties of these environments. Furthermore, there is an increasing threat that deep aquifers, an important drinking water resource, may be contaminated by man's activities, and there is a need to predict the extent to which microbial activity may remediate such contamination. Metabolically active microorganisms can be recovered from a diversity of deep subsurface environments. The available evidence suggests that these microorganisms are responsible for catalyzing the oxidation of organic matter coupled to a variety of electron acceptors just as microorganisms do in surface sediments, but at much slower rates. The technical difficulties in aseptically sampling deep subsurface sediments and the fact that microbial processes in laboratory incubations of deep subsurface material often do not mimic in situ processes frequently necessitate that microbial activity in the deep subsurface be inferred through nonmicrobiological analyses of ground water. These approaches include measurements of dissolved H2, which can predict the predominant microbially catalyzed redox reactions in aquifers, as well as geochemical and groundwater flow modeling, which can be used to estimate the rates of microbial processes. Microorganisms recovered from the deep subsurface have the potential to affect the fate of toxic organics and inorganic contaminants in groundwater. Microbial activity also greatly influences 1 the chemistry of many pristine groundwaters and contributes to such phenomena as porosity development in carbonate aquifers, accumulation of undesirably high concentrations of dissolved iron, and production of methane and hydrogen sulfide. Although the last decade has seen a dramatic increase in interest in deep subsurface microbiology, in comparison with the study of

  13. Modern Microbial Ecosystems are a Key to Understanding Our Biosphere's Early Evolution and its Contributions To The Atmosphere and Rock Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesMarais, David J.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    environments experience conditions such as low O2 and sulfate and high inorganic carbon and sulfide levels that resemble those of ancient marine environments. Later in history, both biologically-induced carbonate precipitation and the trapping and binding of suspended grains of carbonate became a dominant mechanism for carbonate deposition. Modern marine carbonate platforms and alkaline offer good examples of microbiologically-induced calcification. Both marine platforms and solar salterns illustrate microbially-driven trapping and binding. We are also exploring the effects of water composition upon the exchange of biogenic gases with the atmosphere.

  14. Mixing and solid suspension in a stirred precipitator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, T.P.

    1986-04-01

    Full-scale mixing and solid suspension studies have been conducted to determine the optimum agitator design for precipitators used in plutonium processing. Design considerations include the geometry of precipitator vessels, feed locations, flow patterns, and product requirements. Evaluations of various agitator designs are based on their capabilities: (1) to achieve uniform mixing of reactants in minimum time, (2) to suspend slurry uniformly throughout the vessel, and (3) to minimize power consumption without inducing air entrainment. Tests of full-scale agitator designs showed that significant improvements in mixing, solid suspension, and energy consumption were achieved

  15. Precipitation kinetics of a continuous precipitator, with application to the precipitation of ammonium polyuranate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyt, R.C.

    1978-04-01

    A mathematical model describing the kinetics of continuous precipitation was developed which accounts for crystal nucleation, crystal growth, primary coagulation, and secondary coagulation. Population density distributions, average particle sizes, dominant particle sizes, and suspension density fractions of the crystallites, primary agglomerates, and secondary agglomerates leaving the continuous precipitator can be determined. This kinetic model was applied to the continuous precipitation of ammonium polyuranate, which consists of: (1) elementary crystals, (2) clusters or primary coagulated particles, and (3) agglomerates or secondary coagulated particles. The crystallites are thin, submicron, hexagonal platelets. The clusters had an upper size limit of about 7 μ in diameter and contained numerous small voids (less than 0.3 μm) due to the packing of the crystallites. The agglomerates had an upper size limit of about 40 μm in diameter and contained large voids (approximately 1 μm). The particle size distribution and particle structure of the ammonium polyuranate precipitate can be controlled through proper regulation of the precipitation conditions. The ratio of clusters to agglomerates can be best controlled through the uranium concentration, and the cohesiveness or internal bonding strength of the particles can be controlled with the ammonium to uranium reacting feed mole ratio. These two conditions, in conjunction with the residence time, will determine the nucleation rates, growth rates, and size distributions of the particles leaving the continuous precipitator. With proper control of these physical particle characteristics, the use of pore formers, ball-milling, and powder blending can probably be eliminated from the nuclear fuel fabrication process, substantially reducing the cost

  16. Precipitation kinetics of a continuous precipitator, with application to the precipitation of ammonium polyuranate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyt, R.C.

    1978-04-01

    A mathematical model describing the kinetics of continuous precipitation was developed which accounts for crystal nucleation, crystal growth, primary coagulation, and secondary coagulation. Population density distributions, average particle sizes, dominant particle sizes, and suspension density fractions of the crystallites, primary agglomerates, and secondary agglomerates leaving the continuous precipitator can be determined. This kinetic model was applied to the continuous precipitation of ammonium polyuranate, which consists of: (1) elementary crystals, (2) clusters or primary coagulated particles, and (3) agglomerates or secondary coagulated particles. The crystallites are thin, submicron, hexagonal platelets. The clusters had an upper size limit of about 7 ..mu.. in diameter and contained numerous small voids (less than 0.3 ..mu..m) due to the packing of the crystallites. The agglomerates had an upper size limit of about 40 ..mu..m in diameter and contained large voids (approximately 1 ..mu..m). The particle size distribution and particle structure of the ammonium polyuranate precipitate can be controlled through proper regulation of the precipitation conditions. The ratio of clusters to agglomerates can be best controlled through the uranium concentration, and the cohesiveness or internal bonding strength of the particles can be controlled with the ammonium to uranium reacting feed mole ratio. These two conditions, in conjunction with the residence time, will determine the nucleation rates, growth rates, and size distributions of the particles leaving the continuous precipitator. With proper control of these physical particle characteristics, the use of pore formers, ball-milling, and powder blending can probably be eliminated from the nuclear fuel fabrication process, substantially reducing the cost.

  17. Uranium precipitation with hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Although hydrogen peroxide precipitation of uranium continues to be used primarily as means of producing a high purity yellowcake, it has also become an important process due to its superior physical properties. Processing costs such as filtering, drying and/or calcining and drumming, can be reduced. 5 refs

  18. Tritium Level in Romanian Precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varlam, C.; Stefanescu, I.; Faurescu, I.; Bogdan, D.; Soare, A. [Institute for Cryogenic and Isotope Technologies, Rm. Valcea (Romania); Duliu, O. G. [Faculty of Physics, University of Bucharest, Magurele (Romania)

    2013-07-15

    Romania is one of the countries that has no station included in GNIP (Global Network of Isotopes in Precipitation) on its territory. This paper presents results regarding the tritium concentration in precipitation for the period 1999-2009. The precipitation fell at the Institute for cryogenic and Isotope technologies (geographical coordinates: altitude 237 m, latitude 45{sup o}02'07' N, longitude 24{sup o}17'03' E) an was collected both individually and as a composite average of each month. It was individually measured and the average was calculated and compared with the tritium concentration measured in the composite sample. tritium concentration levels ranged from 9.9 {+-} 2.1 TU for 2004 and 13.7 {+-} 2.2 TU for 2009. Comparing the arithmetic mean values with the weighted mean for the period of observation, it was noticed that the higher absolute values of the weighted means were constant. It was found that for the calculated monthly average for the period of observation (1999-2009), the months with the maximum tritium concentration are the same as the months with the maximum amount of precipitation. This behaviour is typical for the monitored location. (author)

  19. Waste and Simulant Precipitation Issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, W.V.

    2000-01-01

    As Savannah River Site (SRS) personnel have studied methods of preparing high-level waste for vitrification in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), questions have arisen with regard to the formation of insoluble waste precipitates at inopportune times. One option for decontamination of the SRS waste streams employs the use of an engineered form of crystalline silicotitanate (CST). Testing of the process during FY 1999 identified problems associated with the formation of precipitates during cesium sorption tests using CST. These precipitates may, under some circumstances, obstruct the pores of the CST particles and, hence, interfere with the sorption process. In addition, earlier results from the DWPF recycle stream compatibility testing have shown that leaching occurs from the CST when it is stored at 80 C in a high-pH environment. Evidence was established that some level of components of the CST, such as silica, was leached from the CST. This report describes the results of equilibrium modeling and precipitation studies associated with the overall stability of the waste streams, CST component leaching, and the presence of minor components in the waste streams

  20. Rheology of tetraphenylborate precipitate slurry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goren, I.D.; Martin, H.D.; McLain, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    The rheological properties of tetraphenylborate precipitate slurry were determined. This nonradioactive slurry simulates the radioactive tetraphenylborate precipitate generated at the Savannah River Plant by the In-Tank Precipitation Process. The data obtained in this study was applied in the design of slurry pumps, transfer pumps, transfer lines, and vessel agitation for the Defense Waste Processing Facility and other High Level Waste treatment projects. The precipitate slurry behaves as a Bingham plastic. The yield stress is directly proportional to the concentration of insoluble solids over the range of concentrations studied. The consistency is also a linear function of insoluble solids over the same concentration range. Neither the yield stress nor the consistency was observed to be affected by the presence of the soluble solids. Temperature effects on flow properties of the slurry were also examined: the yield stress is inversely proportional to temperature, but the consistency of the slurry is independent of temperature. No significant time-dependent effects were found. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Precipitation scavenging of aerosol particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radke, L.F.; Eltgroth, M.W.; Hobbs, P.V.

    1978-01-01

    The paper presents the results of precipitation scavenging measurements of particles in the atmosphere and in plumes which were obtained using an airborne measuring system. Attention is given to the so-called 'Greenfield gap' and collection efficiencies for submicron particles

  2. Microbial ureolysis in the seawater-catalysed urine phosphorus recovery system: Kinetic study and reactor verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wen-Tao; Dai, Ji; Liu, Rulong; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2015-12-15

    Our previous study has confirmed the feasibility of using seawater as an economical precipitant for urine phosphorus (P) precipitation. However, we still understand very little about the ureolysis in the Seawater-based Urine Phosphorus Recovery (SUPR) system despite its being a crucial step for urine P recovery. In this study, batch experiments were conducted to investigate the kinetics of microbial ureolysis in the seawater-urine system. Indigenous bacteria from urine and seawater exhibited relatively low ureolytic activity, but they adapted quickly to the urine-seawater mixture during batch cultivation. During cultivation, both the abundance and specific ureolysis rate of the indigenous bacteria were greatly enhanced as confirmed by a biomass-dependent Michaelis-Menten model. The period for fully ureolysis was decreased from 180 h to 2.5 h after four cycles of cultivation. Based on the successful cultivation, a lab-scale SUPR reactor was set up to verify the fast ureolysis and efficient P recovery in the SUPR system. Nearly complete urine P removal was achieved in the reactor in 6 h without adding any chemicals. Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (TRFLP) analysis revealed that the predominant groups of bacteria in the SUPR reactor likely originated from seawater rather than urine. Moreover, batch tests confirmed the high ureolysis rates and high phosphorus removal efficiency induced by cultivated bacteria in the SUPR reactor under seawater-to-urine mixing ratios ranging from 1:1 to 9:1. This study has proved that the enrichment of indigenous bacteria in the SUPR system can lead to sufficient ureolytic activity for phosphate precipitation, thus providing an efficient and economical method for urine P recovery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. EVAPORITE MICROBIAL FILMS, MATS, MICROBIALITES AND STROMATOLITES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R; Penny Morris, P; Garriet Smith, G

    2008-01-28

    Evaporitic environments are found in a variety of depositional environments as early as the Archean. The depositional settings, microbial community and mineralogical composition vary significantly as no two settings are identical. The common thread linking all of the settings is that evaporation exceeds precipitation resulting in elevated concentrations of cations and anions that are higher than in oceanic systems. The Dead Sea and Storrs Lake are examples of two diverse modern evaporitic settings as the former is below sea level and the latter is a coastal lake on an island in the Caribbean. Each system varies in water chemistry as the Dead Sea dissolved ions originate from surface weathered materials, springs, and aquifers while Storrs Lake dissolved ion concentration is primarily derived from sea water. Consequently some of the ions, i.e., Sr, Ba are found at significantly lower concentrations in Storrs Lake than in the Dead Sea. The origin of the dissolved ions are ultimately responsible for the pH of each system, alkaline versus mildly acidic. Each system exhibits unique biogeochemical properties as the extreme environments select certain microorganisms. Storrs Lake possesses significant biofilms and stromatolitic deposits and the alkalinity varies depending on rainfall and storm activity. The microbial community Storrs Lake is much more diverse and active than those observed in the Dead Sea. The Dead Sea waters are mildly acidic, lack stromatolites, and possess a lower density of microbial populations. The general absence of microbial and biofilm fossilization is due to the depletion of HCO{sub 3} and slightly acidic pH.

  4. Microbial conversion technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, P. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Bioconversion and Sustainable Development

    2006-07-01

    Microbes are a biomass and an valuable resource. This presentation discussed microbial conversion technologies along with background information on microbial cells, their characteristics and microbial diversity. Untapped opportunities for microbial conversion were identified. Metagenomic and genome mining approaches were also discussed, as they can provide access to uncultivated or unculturable microorganisms in communal populations and are an unlimited resource for biocatalysts, novel genes and metabolites. Genome mining was seen as an economical approach. The presentation also emphasized that the development of microbial biorefineries would require significant insights into the relevant microorganisms and that biocatalysts were the ultimate in sustainability. In addition, the presentation discussed the natural fibres initiative for biochemicals and biomaterials. Anticipated outputs were identified and work in progress of a new enzyme-retting cocktail to provide diversity and/or consistency in fibre characteristics for various applications were also presented. It was concluded that it is necessary to leverage understanding of biological processes to produce bioproducts in a clean and sustainable manner. tabs., figs.

  5. Preservation in microbial mats: mineralization by a talc-like phase of a fish embedded in a microbial sarcophagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesto, Miguel; Zeyen, Nina; López-Archilla, Ana; Bernard, Sylvain; Buscalioni, Ángela; Guerrero, M. Carmen; Benzerara, Karim

    2015-09-01

    Microbial mats have been repeatedly suggested to promote early fossilization of macroorganisms. Yet, experimental simulations of this process remain scarce. Here, we report results of 5 year-long experiments performed onfish carcasses to document the influence of microbial mats on mineral precipitation during early fossilization. Carcasses were initially placed on top of microbial mats. After two weeks, fishes became coated by the mats forming a compact sarcophagus, which modified the microenvironment close to the corpses. Our results showed that these conditions favoured the precipitation of a poorly crystalline silicate phase rich in magnesium. This talc-like mineral phase has been detected in three different locations within the carcasses placed in microbial mats for more than 4 years: 1) within inner tissues, colonized by several bacillary cells; 2) at the surface of bones of the upper face of the corpse buried in the mat; and 3) at the surface of several bones such as the dorsal fin which appeared to be gradually replaced by the Mg-silicate phase. This mineral phase has been previously shown to promote bacteria fossilization. Here we provide first experimental evidence that such Mg-rich phase can also be involved in exceptional preservation of animals.

  6. MICROBIAL TRANSFORMATIONS OF TRU AND MIXED WASTES: ACTINIDE SPECIATION AND WASTE VOLUME REDUCTION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FRANCIS, A.J.; DODGE, C.J.

    2006-11-16

    The overall goals of this research project are to determine the mechanism of microbial dissolution and stabilization of actinides in Department of Energy's (DOE) TRU wastes, contaminated sludges, soils, and sediments. This includes (1) investigations on the fundamental aspects of microbially catalyzed radionuclide and metal transformations (oxidation/reduction reactions, dissolution, precipitation, chelation); (2) understanding of the microbiological processes that control speciation and alter the chemical forms of complex inorganic/organic contaminant mixtures; and (3) development of new and improved microbially catalyzed processes resulting in immobilization of metals and radionuclides in the waste with concomitant waste volume reduction.

  7. MICROBIAL TRANSFORMATIONS OF TRU AND MIXED WASTES: ACTINIDE SPECIATION AND WASTE VOLUME REDUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.

    2006-06-01

    The overall goals of this research project are to determine the mechanism of microbial dissolution and stabilization of actinides in Department of Energy’s (DOE) TRU wastes, contaminated sludges, soils, and sediments. This includes (i) investigations on the fundamental aspects of microbially catalyzed radionuclide and metal transformations (oxidation/reduction reactions, dissolution, precipitation, chelation); (ii) understanding of the microbiological processes that control speciation and alter the chemical forms of complex inorganic/organic contaminant mixtures; and (iii) development of new and improved microbially catalyzed processes resulting in immobilization of metals and radionuclides in the waste with concomitant waste volume reduction.

  8. MICROBIAL TRANSFORMATIONS OF TRU AND MIXED WASTES: ACTINIDE SPECIATION AND WASTE VOLUME REDUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.

    2006-06-01

    The overall goals of this research project are to determine the mechanism of microbial dissolution and stabilization of actinides in Department of Energy's (DOE) TRU wastes, contaminated sludges, soils, and sediments. This includes (1) investigations on the fundamental aspects of microbially catalyzed radionuclide and metal transformations (oxidation/reduction reactions, dissolution, precipitation, chelation); (2) understanding of the microbiological processes that control speciation and alter the chemical forms of complex inorganic/organic contaminant mixtures; and (3) development of new and improved microbially catalyzed processes resulting in immobilization of metals and radionuclides in the waste with concomitant waste volume reduction.

  9. Pulse frequency and soil-litter mixing alter the control of cumulative precipitation over litter decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, François-Xavier; Kurupas, Kelsey L; Throop, Heather L

    2017-09-01

    Macroclimate has traditionally been considered the predominant driver of litter decomposition. However, in drylands, cumulative monthly or annual precipitation typically fails to predict decomposition. In these systems, the windows of opportunity for decomposer activity may rather depend on the precipitation frequency and local factors affecting litter desiccation, such as soil-litter mixing. We used a full-factorial microcosm experiment to disentangle the relative importance of cumulative precipitation, pulse frequency, and soil-litter mixing on litter decomposition. Decomposition, measured as litter carbon loss, saturated with increasing cumulative precipitation when pulses were large and infrequent, suggesting that litter moisture no longer increased and/or microbial activity was no longer limited by water availability above a certain pulse size. More frequent precipitation pulses led to increased decomposition at high levels of cumulative precipitation. Soil-litter mixing consistently increased decomposition, with greatest relative increase (+194%) under the driest conditions. Collectively, our results highlight the need to consider precipitation at finer temporal scale and incorporate soil-litter mixing as key driver of decomposition in drylands. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  10. On transformation shear of precipitated zirconia particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J.M.; Lam, K.Y.

    1993-01-01

    A model is proposed to investigate the transformation shear of the precipitated zirconia particles which undergo a stress-induced lattice transformation from tetragonal to monoclinic symmetry. Kinematically admissible twinning planes and the corresponding twinning elements are determined according to the continuum theory of dispacive phase transformation. It is postulated that only one twinning mode prevails in each transformed particle and that the minimization of elastic strain energy change dictates the morphology of the transformed variants. The transformation shear is determined by the twinning mode and the volume fraction of the corresponding variant. Numerical calculations show that each of the six kinematically admissible twinning modes may be kinematically favorable and therefore operate in constrained particle. The actual transformation shear in a transformed particle is shown to be dependent on the transformation stress, on the particle shape as well as on the lattice orientation relative to the principal axes of the ellipsoidal particle

  11. Mesoscale modeling of solute precipitation and radiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schwen, Daniel [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ke, Huibin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Bai, Xianming [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hales, Jason [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report summarizes the low length scale effort during FY 2014 in developing mesoscale capabilities for microstructure evolution in reactor pressure vessels. During operation, reactor pressure vessels are subject to hardening and embrittlement caused by irradiation-induced defect accumulation and irradiation-enhanced solute precipitation. Both defect production and solute precipitation start from the atomic scale, and manifest their eventual effects as degradation in engineering-scale properties. To predict the property degradation, multiscale modeling and simulation are needed to deal with the microstructure evolution, and to link the microstructure feature to material properties. In this report, the development of mesoscale capabilities for defect accumulation and solute precipitation are summarized. Atomic-scale efforts that supply information for the mesoscale capabilities are also included.

  12. Patterns of Precipitation and Streamflow Responses to Moisture Fluxes during Atmospheric Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, B. M.; Wilson, A. M.; Asgari Lamjiri, M.; Ralph, M.

    2017-12-01

    Precipitation from landfalling atmospheric rivers (ARs) have been shown to dominate the hydroclimate of many parts of the world. ARs are associated with saturated, neutrally-stable profiles in the lower atmosphere, in which forced ascent by topography induces precipitation. Understanding the spatial and temporal variability of precipitation over complex terrain during AR-driven precipitation is critical for accurate forcing of distributed hydrologic models and streamflow forecasts. Past studies using radar wind profilers and radiosondes have demonstrated predictability of precipitation rates based on upslope water vapor flux over coastal terrain, with certain levels of moisture flux exhibiting the greatest influence on precipitation. Additionally, these relationships have been extended to show that streamflow in turn responds predictably to upslope vapor flux. However, past studies have focused on individual pairs of profilers and precipitation gauges; the question of how orographic precipitation in ARs is distributed spatially over complex terrain, at different topographic scales, is less well known. Here, we examine profiles of atmospheric moisture transport from radiosondes and wind profilers, against a relatively dense network of precipitation gauges, as well as stream gauges, to assess relationships between upslope moisture flux and the spatial response of precipitation and streamflow. We focus on California's Russian River watershed in the 2016-2017 cool season, when regular radiosonde launches were made at two locations during an active sequence of landfalling ARs. We examine how atmospheric water vapor flux results in precipitation patterns across gauges with different topographic relationships to the prevailing moisture-bearing winds, and conduct a similar comparison of runoff volume response from several unimpaired watersheds in the upper Russian watershed, taking into account antecedent soil moisture conditions that influence runoff generation. Finally

  13. Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation Interactions in WRF Model:Sensitivity to Autoconversion Parameterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解小宁; 刘晓东

    2015-01-01

    Cloud-to-rain autoconversion process is an important player in aerosol loading, cloud morphology, and precipitation variations because it can modulate cloud microphysical characteristics depending on the par-ticipation of aerosols, and aff ects the spatio-temporal distribution and total amount of precipitation. By applying the Kessler, the Khairoutdinov-Kogan (KK), and the Dispersion autoconversion parameterization schemes in a set of sensitivity experiments, the indirect eff ects of aerosols on clouds and precipitation are investigated for a deep convective cloud system in Beijing under various aerosol concentration backgrounds from 50 to 10000 cm−3. Numerical experiments show that aerosol-induced precipitation change is strongly dependent on autoconversion parameterization schemes. For the Kessler scheme, the average cumulative precipitation is enhanced slightly with increasing aerosols, whereas surface precipitation is reduced signifi-cantly with increasing aerosols for the KK scheme. Moreover, precipitation varies non-monotonically for the Dispersion scheme, increasing with aerosols at lower concentrations and decreasing at higher concentrations. These diff erent trends of aerosol-induced precipitation change are mainly ascribed to diff erences in rain wa-ter content under these three autoconversion parameterization schemes. Therefore, this study suggests that accurate parameterization of cloud microphysical processes, particularly the cloud-to-rain autoconversion process, is needed for improving the scientifi c understanding of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions.

  14. Microbial degradation and impact of Bracken toxin ptaquiloside on microbial communities in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engel, Pernille; Brandt, Kristian Koefoed; Rasmussen, Lars Holm

    2007-01-01

    ), but not in the NZ soil (weak acid loamy Entisol). In the DK soil PTA turnover was predominantly due to microbial degradation (biodegradation); chemical hydrolysis was occurring mainly in the uppermost A horizon where pH was very low (3.4). Microbial activity (basal respiration) and growth ([3H]leucine incorporation...... assay) increased after PTA exposure, indicating that the Bracken toxin served as a C substrate for the organotrophic microorganisms. On the other hand, there was no apparent impact of PTA on community size as measured by substrate-induced respiration or composition as indicated by community......-level physiological profiles. Our results demonstrate that PTA stimulates microbial activity and that microorganisms play a predominant role for rapid PTA degradation in Bracken-impacted soils....

  15. In situ Dynamics of O2, pH, Light, and Photosynthesis in Ikaite Tufa Columns (Ikka Fjord, Greenland)?A Unique Microbial Habitat

    OpenAIRE

    Trampe, Erik C. L.; Larsen, Jens E. N.; Glaring, Mikkel A.; Stougaard, Peter; K?hl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Ikka Fjord (SW Greenland) harbors a unique microbial habitat in the form of several hundred submarine tufa columns composed of ikaite, a special hexahydrate form of calcium carbonate that precipitates when alkaline phosphate- and carbonate-enriched spring water seeping out of the sea floor meets cold seawater. While several unique heterotrophic microbes have been isolated from the tufa columns, the microbial activity, and the boundary conditions for microbial growth in ikaite have remaine...

  16. EVA Suit Microbial Leakage Investigation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this project is to collect microbial samples from various EVA suits to determine how much microbial contamination is typically released during...

  17. CONCENTRATION OF Pu USING AN IODATE PRECIPITATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, B.A.

    1960-02-23

    A method is given for separating plutonium from lanthanum in a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitation process for the recovery of plutonium values from an aqueous solution. The carrier precipitation process includes the steps of forming a lanthanum fluoride precipi- . tate, thereby carrying plutonium out of solution, metathesizing the fluoride precipitate to a hydroxide precipitate, and then dissolving the hydroxide precipitate in nitric acid. In accordance with the invention, the nitric acid solution, which contains plutonium and lanthanum, is made 0.05 to 0.15 molar in potassium iodate. thereby precipitating plutonium as plutonous iodate and the plutonous iodate is separated from the lanthanum- containing supernatant solution.

  18. Precipitation model in microalloyed steels both isothermal and continuous cooling conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, S. F.; Quispe, A.; Gomez, M.

    2015-01-01

    Niobium and vanadium precipitates (nitrides and carbides) can inhibit the static recrystallization of austenite but this does not happen for Ti, which form nitrides at high temperatures. RPTT diagrams show the interaction between recrystallization and precipitation allowing study the strain induced precipitation kinetics and precipitate coarsening. Based on Dutta and Sellars expression for the start of strain-induced precipitation in microalloyed steels, a new model has been constructed which takes into account the influence of variables such as microalloying element percentages, strain, temperature, strain rate and grain size. Recrystallization- Precipitation-Time-Temperature (RPTT) diagrams have been plotted thanks to a new experimental study carried out by means of hot torsion tests on approximately twenty microalloyed steels with different Nb, V and Ti contents. Mathematical analysis of the results recommends the modification of some parameters such as the supersaturation ratio (ks) and constant B, which is no longer a constant but a function of ks. The expressions are now more consistent and predict the Precipitation-Time-Temperature (PTT) curves with remarkable accuracy. The model for strain-induced precipitation kinetics is completed by means of Avramis equation. Finally, the model constructed in isothermal testing conditions, it has been converted to continuous cooling conditions in order to apply it in hot rolling. (Author)

  19. A meta-analysis of soil microbial biomass responses to forest disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Robin Holden

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Climate warming is likely to increase the frequency and severity of forest disturbances, with uncertain consequences for soil microbial communities and their contribution to ecosystem C dynamics. To address this uncertainty, we conducted a meta-analysis of 139 published soil microbial responses to forest disturbances. These disturbances included abiotic (fire, harvesting, storm and biotic (insect, pathogen disturbances. We hypothesized that soil microbial biomass would decline following forest disturbances, but that abiotic disturbances would elicit greater reductions in microbial biomass than biotic disturbances. In support of this hypothesis, across all published studies, disturbances reduced soil microbial biomass by an average of 29.4%. However, microbial responses differed between abiotic and biotic disturbances. Microbial responses were significantly negative following fires, harvest, and storms (48.7%, 19.1%, and 41.7% reductions in microbial biomass, respectively. In contrast, changes in soil microbial biomass following insect infestation and pathogen-induced tree mortality were non-significant, although biotic disturbances were poorly represented in the literature. When measured separately, fungal and bacterial responses to disturbances mirrored the response of the microbial community as a whole. Changes in microbial abundance following disturbance were significantly positively correlated with changes in microbial respiration. We propose that the differential effect of abiotic and biotic disturbances on microbial biomass may be attributable to differences in soil disruption and organic C removal from forests among disturbance types. Altogether, these results suggest that abiotic forest disturbances may significantly decrease soil microbial abundance, with corresponding consequences for microbial respiration. Further studies are needed on the effect of biotic disturbances on forest soil microbial communities and soil C dynamics.

  20. Acid precipitation; an annotated bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltshire, Denise A.; Evans, Margaret L.

    1984-01-01

    This collection of 1660 bibliographies references on the causes and environmental effects of acidic atmospheric deposition was compiled from computerized literature searches of earth-science and chemistry data bases. Categories of information are (1) atmospheric chemistry (gases and aerosols), (2) precipitation chemistry, (3) transport and deposition (wet and dry), (4) aquatic environments (biological and hydrological), (5) terrestrial environments, (6) effects on materials and structures, (7) air and precipitation monitoring and data collection, and (8) modeling studies. References date from the late 1800 's through December 1981. The bibliography includes short summaries of most documents. Omitted are unpublished manuscripts, publications in press, master 's theses and doctoral dissertations, newspaper articles, and book reviews. Coauthors and subject indexes are included. (USGS)

  1. Isotopic composition of past precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, T.W.D.

    1998-01-01

    The distribution of stable isotopes in precipitation provides critical quantitative information about the global water cycle. The first PAGES/IAEA ISOMAP workshop was held at the IAEA headquarters in Vienna, 24-26 August 1998, which gathered 32 participants. The presentation and discussions demonstrated that a high level of sophistication already exists in the development of transfer functions between measured parameters and precipitation, as a result of the extensive use of water isotope tracers in paleo-environmental investigations, but a major challenge facing both producers and users of paleo-isotope data is the effective management of data and meta-data, to permit ready retrieval of raw and inferred data for comparison and reinterpretation. This will be in important goal of future ISOMAP activities. The critical need for more paleo-data from low latitudes was clearly recognized

  2. Pareto-optimal estimates that constrain mean California precipitation change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenbrunner, B.; Neelin, J. D.

    2017-12-01

    Global climate model (GCM) projections of greenhouse gas-induced precipitation change can exhibit notable uncertainty at the regional scale, particularly in regions where the mean change is small compared to internal variability. This is especially true for California, which is located in a transition zone between robust precipitation increases to the north and decreases to the south, and where GCMs from the Climate Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) archive show no consensus on mean change (in either magnitude or sign) across the central and southern parts of the state. With the goal of constraining this uncertainty, we apply a multiobjective approach to a large set of subensembles (subsets of models from the full CMIP5 ensemble). These constraints are based on subensemble performance in three fields important to California precipitation: tropical Pacific sea surface temperatures, upper-level zonal winds in the midlatitude Pacific, and precipitation over the state. An evolutionary algorithm is used to sort through and identify the set of Pareto-optimal subensembles across these three measures in the historical climatology, and we use this information to constrain end-of-century California wet season precipitation change. This technique narrows the range of projections throughout the state and increases confidence in estimates of positive mean change. Furthermore, these methods complement and generalize emergent constraint approaches that aim to restrict uncertainty in end-of-century projections, and they have applications to even broader aspects of uncertainty quantification, including parameter sensitivity and model calibration.

  3. Testing and development of transfer functions for weighing precipitation gauges in WMO-SPICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kochendorfer

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Weighing precipitation gauges are used widely for the measurement of all forms of precipitation, and are typically more accurate than tipping-bucket precipitation gauges. This is especially true for the measurement of solid precipitation; however, weighing precipitation gauge measurements must still be adjusted for undercatch in snowy, windy conditions. In WMO-SPICE (World Meteorological Organization Solid Precipitation InterComparison Experiment, different types of weighing precipitation gauges and shields were compared, and adjustments were determined for the undercatch of solid precipitation caused by wind. For the various combinations of gauges and shields, adjustments using both new and previously existing transfer functions were evaluated. For most of the gauge and shield combinations, previously derived transfer functions were found to perform as well as those more recently derived. This indicates that wind shield type (or lack thereof is more important in determining the magnitude of wind-induced undercatch than the type of weighing precipitation gauge. It also demonstrates the potential for widespread use of the previously developed transfer functions. Another overarching result was that, in general, the more effective shields, which were associated with smaller unadjusted errors, also produced more accurate measurements after adjustment. This indicates that although transfer functions can effectively reduce measurement biases, effective wind shielding is still required for the most accurate measurement of solid precipitation.

  4. Testing and development of transfer functions for weighing precipitation gauges in WMO-SPICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochendorfer, John; Nitu, Rodica; Wolff, Mareile; Mekis, Eva; Rasmussen, Roy; Baker, Bruce; Earle, Michael E.; Reverdin, Audrey; Wong, Kai; Smith, Craig D.; Yang, Daqing; Roulet, Yves-Alain; Meyers, Tilden; Buisan, Samuel; Isaksen, Ketil; Brækkan, Ragnar; Landolt, Scott; Jachcik, Al

    2018-02-01

    Weighing precipitation gauges are used widely for the measurement of all forms of precipitation, and are typically more accurate than tipping-bucket precipitation gauges. This is especially true for the measurement of solid precipitation; however, weighing precipitation gauge measurements must still be adjusted for undercatch in snowy, windy conditions. In WMO-SPICE (World Meteorological Organization Solid Precipitation InterComparison Experiment), different types of weighing precipitation gauges and shields were compared, and adjustments were determined for the undercatch of solid precipitation caused by wind. For the various combinations of gauges and shields, adjustments using both new and previously existing transfer functions were evaluated. For most of the gauge and shield combinations, previously derived transfer functions were found to perform as well as those more recently derived. This indicates that wind shield type (or lack thereof) is more important in determining the magnitude of wind-induced undercatch than the type of weighing precipitation gauge. It also demonstrates the potential for widespread use of the previously developed transfer functions. Another overarching result was that, in general, the more effective shields, which were associated with smaller unadjusted errors, also produced more accurate measurements after adjustment. This indicates that although transfer functions can effectively reduce measurement biases, effective wind shielding is still required for the most accurate measurement of solid precipitation.

  5. An underestimated role of precipitation frequency in regulating summer soil moisture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Chaoyang; Chen, Jing M; Pumpanen, Jukka; Cescatti, Alessandro; Marcolla, Barbara; Blanken, Peter D; Ardö, Jonas; Tang, Yanhong; Magliulo, Vincenzo; Georgiadis, Teodoro; Soegaard, Henrik; Cook, David R; Harding, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Soil moisture induced droughts are expected to become more frequent under future global climate change. Precipitation has been previously assumed to be mainly responsible for variability in summer soil moisture. However, little is known about the impacts of precipitation frequency on summer soil moisture, either interannually or spatially. To better understand the temporal and spatial drivers of summer drought, 415 site yr measurements observed at 75 flux sites world wide were used to analyze the temporal and spatial relationships between summer soil water content (SWC) and the precipitation frequencies at various temporal scales, i.e., from half-hourly, 3, 6, 12 and 24 h measurements. Summer precipitation was found to be an indicator of interannual SWC variability with r of 0.49 (p < 0.001) for the overall dataset. However, interannual variability in summer SWC was also significantly correlated with the five precipitation frequencies and the sub-daily precipitation frequencies seemed to explain the interannual SWC variability better than the total of precipitation. Spatially, all these precipitation frequencies were better indicators of summer SWC than precipitation totals, but these better performances were only observed in non-forest ecosystems. Our results demonstrate that precipitation frequency may play an important role in regulating both interannual and spatial variations of summer SWC, which has probably been overlooked or underestimated. However, the spatial interpretation should carefully consider other factors, such as the plant functional types and soil characteristics of diverse ecoregions. (letter)

  6. Precipitation patterns during channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamtveit, B.; Hawkins, C.; Benning, L. G.; Meier, D.; Hammer, O.; Angheluta, L.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral precipitation during channelized fluid flow is widespread in a wide variety of geological systems. It is also a common and costly phenomenon in many industrial processes that involve fluid flow in pipelines. It is often referred to as scale formation and encountered in a large number of industries, including paper production, chemical manufacturing, cement operations, food processing, as well as non-renewable (i.e. oil and gas) and renewable (i.e. geothermal) energy production. We have studied the incipient stages of growth of amorphous silica on steel plates emplaced into the central areas of the ca. 1 meter in diameter sized pipelines used at the hydrothermal power plant at Hellisheidi, Iceland (with a capacity of ca 300 MW electricity and 100 MW hot water). Silica precipitation takes place over a period of ca. 2 months at approximately 120°C and a flow rate around 1 m/s. The growth produces asymmetric ca. 1mm high dendritic structures ';leaning' towards the incoming fluid flow. A novel phase-field model combined with the lattice Boltzmann method is introduced to study how the growth morphologies vary under different hydrodynamic conditions, including non-laminar systems with turbulent mixing. The model accurately predicts the observed morphologies and is directly relevant for understanding the more general problem of precipitation influenced by turbulent mixing during flow in channels with rough walls and even for porous flow. Reference: Hawkins, C., Angheluta, L., Hammer, Ø., and Jamtveit, B., Precipitation dendrites in channel flow. Europhysics Letters, 102, 54001

  7. Precipitation processes in implanted materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borders, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    Ion implantation is a nonequilibrium process. It is possible to implant materials with impurities to concentration levels which exceed the solid solubilities. The return of the system to thermodynamic equilibrium is often accomplished by precipitation of the implanted species or a compound involving atoms of both the host and the implanted species. This may involve long time scales when taking place at room temperature or it may take place during the implantation

  8. Precipitation-Static-Reduction Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1943-03-31

    if» 85 z \\ PRECIPITATION-STATIC-REDUCTION RESEARCH study of the effects of flame length , flame spacing, and burner spacing on B shows that there...unod: Flame length *. The visual length of the flame from the burner tip to the flame tip when examined in a darkened room against a black background...Postlve and Negative Flames The use of the second flame-conduction coefficient, B, facilitates considerably the study of the effect of flame length , spacing

  9. Phase characterization of precipitated zirconia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutzov, S.; Ponahlo, J.; Lengauer, C.L.; Beran, A.

    1994-01-01

    The phase compositions of undoped and europium-doped zirconia samples, obtained by precipitation and thermal treatment from 350 to 1,000 C, have been investigated by powder X-ray diffractometry, infrared spectroscopy, and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. The low-temperature stabilization of tetragonal zirconia is mainly controlled by the presence of anion additives, such as ammonium chloride. The influences of the crystallite size is less important. Cathodoluminescence spectra show a structural similarity between tetragonal and amorphous zirconia

  10. Molecular ecology of microbial mats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, H.; Cretoiu, M.S.; Stal, L.J.

    2014-01-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats are ideal model systems for ecological and evolutionary analysis of highly diverse microbial communities. Microbial mats are small-scale, nearly closed, and self-sustaining benthic ecosystems that comprise the major element cycles, trophic levels, and food webs. The steep

  11. Anaerobic microbial dehalogenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smidt, H.; Vos, de W.M.

    2004-01-01

    The natural production and anthropogenic release of halogenated hydrocarbons into the environment has been the likely driving force for the evolution of an unexpectedly high microbial capacity to dehalogenate different classes of xenobiotic haloorganics. This contribution provides an update on the

  12. Diazotrophic microbial mats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severin, I.; Stal, L.J.; Seckbach, J.; Oren, A.

    2010-01-01

    Microbial mats have been the focus of scientific research for a few decades. These small-scale ecosystems are examples of versatile benthic communities of microorganisms, usually dominated by phototrophic bacteria (e.g., Krumbein et al., 1977; Jørgensen et al., 1983). They develop as vertically

  13. Microbial Energy Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, Merry [American Society for Microbiology (ASM), Washington, DC (United States); Wall, Judy D. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2006-10-01

    The American Academy of Microbiology convened a colloquium March 10-12, 2006, in San Francisco, California, to discuss the production of energy fuels by microbial conversions. The status of research into various microbial energy technologies, the advantages and disadvantages of each of these approaches, research needs in the field, and education and training issues were examined, with the goal of identifying routes for producing biofuels that would both decrease the need for fossil fuels and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Currently, the choices for providing energy are limited. Policy makers and the research community must begin to pursue a broader array of potential energy technologies. A diverse energy portfolio that includes an assortment of microbial energy choices will allow communities and consumers to select the best energy solution for their own particular needs. Funding agencies and governments alike need to prepare for future energy needs by investing both in the microbial energy technologies that work today and in the untested technologies that will serve the world’s needs tomorrow. More mature bioprocesses, such as ethanol production from starchy materials and methane from waste digestors, will find applications in the short term. However, innovative techniques for liquid fuel or biohydrogen production are among the longer term possibilities that should also be vigorously explored, starting now. Microorganisms can help meet human energy needs in any of a number of ways. In their most obvious role in energy conversion, microorganisms can generate fuels, including ethanol, hydrogen, methane, lipids, and butanol, which can be burned to produce energy. Alternatively, bacteria can be put to use in microbial fuel cells, where they carry out the direct conversion of biomass into electricity. Microorganisms may also be used some day to make oil and natural gas technologies more efficient by sequestering carbon or by assisting in the recovery of oil and

  14. Microbial electrosynthesis of biochemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bajracharya, S.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial electrosynthesis (MES) is an electricity-driven production of chemicals from low-value waste using microorganisms as biocatalysts. MES from CO2 comprises conversion of CO2 to multi-carbon compounds employing microbes at the cathode which use electricity as an energy source. This thesis

  15. Case histories of microbial induced corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birketveit, Oe.; Liengen, T.

    2006-03-15

    Recent years bacterial activity has caused process problems and corrosion on several of Hydro s installations in the North Sea. The process problems are related to iron sulphide formed in process equipment and increased oil in discharge water. The corrosion problem is seen in downstream pipelines made of carbon steel, where deposits and formation of biofilm cause the corrosion inhibitor to be ineffective. In most cases the bacteria reproduce in the topside system and especially in the reclaimed oil sump tank. The problems observed, related to bacterial activity, are often a result of how the content from the reclaimed oil sump tank is re-circulated to the process system. Process modifications, changes in biocide treatment strategy, sulphide measurements, cleaning strategy and bio monitoring are presented. (author) (tk)

  16. High salinity facilitates dolomite precipitation mediated by Haloferax volcanii DS52

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xuan; Wang, Hongmei; Yao, Yanchen; Duan, Yong

    2017-08-01

    Although most modern dolomites occur in hypersaline environments, the effects of elevated salinity on the microbial mediation of dolomite precipitation have not been fully evaluated. Here we report results of dolomite precipitation in association with a batch culture of Haloferax volcanii DS52, a halophilic archaeon, under various salinities (from 120‰ to 360‰) and the impact of salinity on microbe-mediated dolomite formation. The mineral phases, morphology and atomic arrangement of the precipitates were analyzed by XRD, SEM and TEM, respectively. The amount of amino acids on the archaeal cell surface was quantified by HPLC/MS. The XRD analysis indicated that disordered dolomite formed successfully with the facilitation of cells harvested from cultures with relatively high salinities (200‰ and 280‰) but was not observed in association with cells harvested from cultures with lower salinity (120‰) or the lysates of cells harvested from extremely high salinity (360‰). The TEM analysis demonstrated that the crystals from cultures with a salinity of 200‰ closely matched that of dolomite. Importantly, we found that more carboxyl groups were presented on the cell surface under high salinity conditions to resist the high osmotic pressure, which may result in the subsequent promotion of dolomite formation. Our finding suggests a link between variations in the hydro-chemical conditions and the formation of dolomite via microbial metabolic activity and enhances our understanding about the mechanism of microbially mediated dolomite formation under high salinity conditions.

  17. Precipitation Sedimentation and Advection in GFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, R.; Tallapragada, V.

    2016-12-01

    Zhao and Carr microphysics scheme as implemented in the NCEP Global Forecasting System (GFS) predicts only the total cloud condensate (cloud water or ice). The precipitation generated in the column fall to the ground instantly. This mean precipitation sedimentation and advection are not considered. As resolution increases the lack of the two physical processes creates problems. The slowly falling precipitation (snow) falls to the wrong surface grid box, which may have led to the observed spotty-precipitation pattern. To solve the problem two prognositic variables, snow and rain, are added. Addition of the two precipitation variable allows their advection. The corresponding sedimentation process are also added. In this study we examine the effect of precipitation advection and sedimentation on the precipitation pattern, associated precipitation skills and clouds.

  18. U.S. 15 Minute Precipitation Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. 15 Minute Precipitation Data is digital data set DSI-3260, archived at the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). This is precipitation data. The primary source...

  19. European climate change experiments on precipitation change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Claus

    Presentation of European activities and networks related to experiments and databases within precipitation change......Presentation of European activities and networks related to experiments and databases within precipitation change...

  20. Amazon River Basin Precipitation, 1972-1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The precipitation data is 0.2 degree gridded monthly precipitation data based upon monthly rain data from Peru and Bolivia and daily rain data from Brazil....

  1. Microbial decomposers not constrained by climate history along a Mediterranean climate gradient in southern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Nameer R; Khalili, Banafshe; Martiny, Jennifer B H; Allison, Steven D

    2018-06-01

    Microbial decomposers mediate the return of CO 2 to the atmosphere by producing extracellular enzymes to degrade complex plant polymers, making plant carbon available for metabolism. Determining if and how these decomposer communities are constrained in their ability to degrade plant litter is necessary for predicting how carbon cycling will be affected by future climate change. We analyzed mass loss, litter chemistry, microbial biomass, extracellular enzyme activities, and enzyme temperature sensitivities in grassland litter transplanted along a Mediterranean climate gradient in southern California. Microbial community composition was manipulated by caging litter within bags made of nylon membrane that prevent microbial immigration. To test whether grassland microbes were constrained by climate history, half of the bags were inoculated with local microbial communities native to each gradient site. We determined that temperature and precipitation likely interact to limit microbial decomposition in the extreme sites along our gradient. Despite their unique climate history, grassland microbial communities were not restricted in their ability to decompose litter under different climate conditions across the gradient, although microbial communities across our gradient may be restricted in their ability to degrade different types of litter. We did find some evidence that local microbial communities were optimized based on climate, but local microbial taxa that proliferated after inoculation into litterbags did not enhance litter decomposition. Our results suggest that microbial community composition does not constrain C-cycling rates under climate change in our system, but optimization to particular resource environments may act as more general constraints on microbial communities. © 2018 by the Ecological Society of America.

  2. Seasonal and episodic moisture controls on plant and microbial contributions to soil respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Mariah S; Still, Christopher J; Ambrose, Anthony R; Dawson, Todd E; Williams, A Park; Boot, Claudia M; Schaeffer, Sean M; Schimel, Joshua P

    2011-09-01

    Moisture inputs drive soil respiration (SR) dynamics in semi-arid and arid ecosystems. However, determining the contributions of root and microbial respiration to SR, and their separate temporal responses to periodic drought and water pulses, remains poorly understood. This study was conducted in a pine forest ecosystem with a Mediterranean-type climate that receives seasonally varying precipitation inputs from both rainfall (in the winter) and fog-drip (primarily in the summer). We used automated SR measurements, radiocarbon SR source partitioning, and a water addition experiment to understand how SR, and its separate root and microbial sources, respond to seasonal and episodic changes in moisture. Seasonal changes in SR were driven by surface soil water content and large changes in root respiration contributions. Superimposed on these seasonal patterns were episodic pulses of precipitation that determined the short-term SR patterns. Warm season precipitation pulses derived from fog-drip, and rainfall following extended dry periods, stimulated the largest SR responses. Microbial respiration dominated these SR responses, increasing within hours, whereas root respiration responded more slowly over days. We conclude that root and microbial respiration sources respond differently in timing and magnitude to both seasonal and episodic moisture inputs. These findings have important implications for the mechanistic representation of SR in models and the response of dry ecosystems to changes in precipitation patterns.

  3. Microbial processes in banded iron formation deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posth, Nicole; Konhauser, Kurt; Kappler, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    , remains unresolved. Evidence of an anoxic Earth with only localized oxic areas until the Great Oxidation Event ca 2·45 to 2·32 Ga makes the investigation of O2-independent mechanisms for banded iron formation deposition relevant. Recent studies have explored the long-standing proposition that Archean......Banded iron formations have been studied for decades, particularly regarding their potential as archives of the Precambrian environment. In spite of this effort, the mechanism of their deposition and, specifically, the role that microbes played in the precipitation of banded iron formation minerals...... banded iron formations may have been formed, and diagenetically modified, by anaerobic microbial metabolisms. These efforts encompass a wide array of approaches including isotope, ecophysiological and phylogeny studies, molecular and mineral marker analysis, and sedimentological reconstructions. Herein...

  4. Cellulolytic potential under environmental changes in microbial communities from grassland litter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renaud eBerlemont

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In many ecosystems, global changes are likely to profoundly affect microorganisms. In Southern California, changes in precipitation and nitrogen deposition may influence the composition and functional potential of microbial communities and their resulting ability to degrade plant material. To test whether environmental changes impact the distribution of functional groups involved in leaf litter degradation, we determined how the genomic diversity of microbial communities in a semi-arid grassland ecosystem changed under reduced precipitation or increased N deposition. We monitored communities seasonally over a period of two years to place environmental change responses into the context of natural variation. Fungal and bacterial communities displayed strong seasonal patterns, Fungi being mostly detected during the dry season whereas Bacteria were common during wet periods. Most putative cellulose degraders were associated with 33 bacterial genera and constituted ~18.2% of the microbial community. Precipitation reduction reduced bacterial abundance and cellulolytic potential whereas nitrogen addition did not affect the cellulolytic potential of the microbial community. Finally, we detected a strong correlation between the frequencies of genera putative cellulose degraders and cellulase genes. Thus, microbial taxonomic composition was predictive of cellulolytic potential. This work provides a framework for how environmental changes affect microorganisms responsible for plant litter deconstruction.

  5. Precipitation variability assessment of northeast China: Songhua ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Variability in precipitation is critical for the management of water resources. ... applied on precipitation data on a monthly, seasonally, annually, decade scale and the number of rainy ... 2015). As a result, such irregularities in precipitation,. i.e., droughts and floods can affect the ... (January–December), years and decades.

  6. Characterisation of microbial biocoenosis in vertical subsurface flow constructed wetlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tietz, Alexandra; Kirschner, Alexander; Langergraber, Guenter; Sleytr, Kirsten; Haberl, Raimund

    2007-01-01

    In this study a quantitative description of the microbial biocoenosis in subsurface vertical flow constructed wetlands fed with municipal wastewater was carried out. Three different methods (substrate induced respiration, ATP measurement and fumigation-extraction) were applied to measure the microbial biomass at different depths of planted and unplanted systems. Additionally, bacterial biomass was determined by epifluorescence microscopy and productivity was measured via 14 C leucine incorporation into bacterial biomass. All methods showed that > 50% of microbial biomass and bacterial activity could be found in the first cm and about 95% in the first 10 cm of the filter layer. Bacterial biomass in the first 10 cm of the filter body accounted only for 16-19% of the total microbial biomass. Whether fungi or methodical uncertainties are mainly responsible for the difference between microbial and bacterial biomass remains to be examined. A comparison between the purification performance of planted and unplanted pilot-scale subsurface vertical flow constructed wetlands (PSCWs) showed no significant difference with the exception of the reduction of enterococci. The microbial biomass in all depths of the filter body was also not different in planted and unplanted systems. Compared with data from soils the microbial biomass in the PSCWs was high, although the specific surface area of the used sandy filter material available for biofilm growth was lower, especially in the beginning of the set-up of the PSCWs, due to missing clay and silt fraction

  7. Investigating Microbial Habitats in Hydrothermal Chimneys using Ti-Thermocouple Arrays: Microbial Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagé, A.; Tivey, M. K.; Stakes, D. S.; Bradley, A. M.; Seewald, J. S.; Wheat, C. G.; Reysenbach, A.

    2004-12-01

    In order to examine the changes that occur in the microbial community composition as a deep-sea hydrothermal vent chimney develops, we deployed Ti-thermocouple arrays over high temperature vents at two active sites of the Guaymas Basin Southern Trough. Chimney material that precipitated around the arrays was recovered after 4 and 72 days. Chimney material that precipitated prior to deployment of the arrays was also recovered at one of the sites (Busted Shroom). Culture-independent analysis based on the small subunit rRNA sequence (cloning and DGGE) was used to determine the microbial diversity associated with subsamples of each chimney. The original Busted Shroom chimney (BSO) was dominated by members of the Crenarchaeota Marine Group I, a group of cosmopolitan marine Archaea, ɛ -Proteobacteria, and γ -Proteobacteria, two divisions of Bacteria that are common to deep-sea vents. The 4 days old Busted Shroom chimney (BSD1) was dominated by members of the Methanocaldococcaceae, hyperthermophilic methanogens, and the 72 days old chimney (BSD2) by members of the Methanosarcinaceae, mesophilic and thermophilic methanogens. At the second site, Toadstool, the 72 days old chimney material that had precipitated around the array (TS) revealed the dominance of sequences from uncultured marine Archaea, the DHVE group I and II, and from the ɛ -Proteobacteria. Additionally, sequences belonging to the Methanocaldococcaceae and Desulfurococcaceae were recovered next to thermocouples that were at temperatures of 109° C (at Busted Shroom) and 116° C (at Toadstool), respectively. These temperatures are higher than the upper limit for growth of cultured representatives from each family.

  8. Effective assimilation of global precipitation: simulation experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Yuan Lien

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Past attempts to assimilate precipitation by nudging or variational methods have succeeded in forcing the model precipitation to be close to the observed values. However, the model forecasts tend to lose their additional skill after a few forecast hours. In this study, a local ensemble transform Kalman filter (LETKF is used to effectively assimilate precipitation by allowing ensemble members with better precipitation to receive higher weights in the analysis. In addition, two other changes in the precipitation assimilation process are found to alleviate the problems related to the non-Gaussianity of the precipitation variable: (a transform the precipitation variable into a Gaussian distribution based on its climatological distribution (an approach that could also be used in the assimilation of other non-Gaussian observations and (b only assimilate precipitation at the location where at least some ensemble members have precipitation. Unlike many current approaches, both positive and zero rain observations are assimilated effectively. Observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs are conducted using the Simplified Parametrisations, primitivE-Equation DYnamics (SPEEDY model, a simplified but realistic general circulation model. When uniformly and globally distributed observations of precipitation are assimilated in addition to rawinsonde observations, both the analyses and the medium-range forecasts of all model variables, including precipitation, are significantly improved as compared to only assimilating rawinsonde observations. The effect of precipitation assimilation on the analyses is retained on the medium-range forecasts and is larger in the Southern Hemisphere (SH than that in the Northern Hemisphere (NH because the NH analyses are already made more accurate by the denser rawinsonde stations. These improvements are much reduced when only the moisture field is modified by the precipitation observations. Both the Gaussian transformation and

  9. Precipitation interpolation in mountainous areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolberg, Sjur

    2015-04-01

    Different precipitation interpolation techniques as well as external drift covariates are tested and compared in a 26000 km2 mountainous area in Norway, using daily data from 60 stations. The main method of assessment is cross-validation. Annual precipitation in the area varies from below 500 mm to more than 2000 mm. The data were corrected for wind-driven undercatch according to operational standards. While temporal evaluation produce seemingly acceptable at-station correlation values (on average around 0.6), the average daily spatial correlation is less than 0.1. Penalising also bias, Nash-Sutcliffe R2 values are negative for spatial correspondence, and around 0.15 for temporal. Despite largely violated assumptions, plain Kriging produces better results than simple inverse distance weighting. More surprisingly, the presumably 'worst-case' benchmark of no interpolation at all, simply averaging all 60 stations for each day, actually outperformed the standard interpolation techniques. For logistic reasons, high altitudes are under-represented in the gauge network. The possible effect of this was investigated by a) fitting a precipitation lapse rate as an external drift, and b) applying a linear model of orographic enhancement (Smith and Barstad, 2004). These techniques improved the results only marginally. The gauge density in the region is one for each 433 km2; higher than the overall density of the Norwegian national network. Admittedly the cross-validation technique reduces the gauge density, still the results suggest that we are far from able to provide hydrological models with adequate data for the main driving force.

  10. Geochemical modeling of the influence of silicate mineral alteration on alkalinity production and carbonate precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herda, Gerhard; Kraemer, Stephan M.; Gier, Susanne; Meister, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    High CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) in deep rock reservoirs causes acidification of the porefluid. Such conditions occur during injection and subsurface storage of CO2 (to prevent the release of greenhouse gas) but also naturally in zones of strong methanogenic microbial activity in organic matter-rich ocean margin sediments. The acidic fluids are corrosive to carbonates and bear the risk of leakage of CO2 gas to the surface. Porefluid acidification may be moderated by processes that increase the alkalinity, i.e. that produce weak acid anions capable of buffering the acidification imposed by the CO2. Often, alkalinity increases as a result of anaerobic microbial activity, such as anaerobic oxidation of methane. However, on a long term the alteration of silicates, in particular, clay minerals, may be a more efficient mechanism of alkalinity production. Under altered temperature, pressure and porefluid composition at depth, clay minerals may change to thermodynamically more stable states, thereby increasing the alkalinity of the porefluid by partial leaching of Mg-(OH)2 and Ca-(OH)2 (e.g. Wallmann et al., 2008; Mavromatis et al., 2014). This alteration may even be enhanced by a high pCO2. Thus, silicate alteration can be essential for a long-term stabilization of volatile CO2 in the form of bicarbonate or may even induce precipitation of carbonate minerals, but these processes are not fully understood yet. The goal of this study is to simulate the alkalinity effect of silicate alteration under diagenetic conditions and high pCO2 by geochemical modeling. We are using the program PHREEQC (Parkhurst and Appelo, 2013) to generate high rock/fluid ratio characteristics for deep subsurface rock reservoirs. Since we are interested in the long-term evolution of diagenetic processes, over millions of years, we do not consider kinetics but calculate the theoretically possible equilibrium conditions. In a first step we are calculating the saturation state of different clay minerals

  11. Recent Developments on Discontinuous Precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zięba P.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The discontinuous precipitation (DP belongs to a group of diffusive solid state phase transformations during which the formation of a new phase is heterogeneous and limited to a migrating reaction front (RF. The use of analytical electron microscopy provided reliable information that there is no differences in the diffusion rate at the stationary grain boundary and moving RF of DP reaction. On the other hand, the use of “in situ” transmission electron microscopy observations indicated the importance of stop-go motion or oscillatory movement of the RF.

  12. Acid precipitation and forest vegetation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamm, C O; Cowling, E B

    1977-04-01

    Effects of acidic precipitation on forest vegetation may be classified as being either direct or indirect. Among the most important direct effects are damage to protective cuticular layers, interference with normal functioning of guard cells, poisoning of plant cells after diffusion of acidic substances through stomata or cuticle and interference with reproductive processes. Indirect effects include accelerated leaching of substances from foliar organs, increased susceptibility to drought and other environmental stress factors, and alteration of symbiotic associations and host-parasite interactions. The potential importance of nutrient uptake through foliage and the need to understand atmosphere-plant-soil interactions are stressed.

  13. Precipitation of uranium concentrates by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa Filho, O.; Teixeira, L.A.C.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental study on the precipitation of uranyl peroxide (UO 4 x H 2 O) has been carried out in a laboratory scale. The objective was to assess the possibility of the peroxide route as an alternative to a conventional ammonium diuranate process. A factorial design was used to evaluate the effects of the initial pH, precipitation pH and H 2 O 2 /UO 2 2+ ratio upon the process. The responses were measured in terms of: efficiency of U precipitation, content of U in the precipitates, and distribution of impurities in the precipitates. (Author) [pt

  14. Effects of turbulence on warm clouds and precipitation with various aerosol concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunho; Baik, Jong-Jin; Han, Ji-Young

    2015-02-01

    This study investigates the effects of turbulence-induced collision enhancement (TICE) on warm clouds and precipitation by changing the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) number concentration using a two-dimensional dynamic model with bin microphysics. TICE is determined according to the Taylor microscale Reynolds number and the turbulent dissipation rate. The thermodynamic sounding used in this study is characterized by a warm and humid atmosphere with a capping inversion layer, which is suitable for simulating warm clouds. For all CCN concentrations, TICE slightly reduces the liquid water path during the early stage of cloud development and accelerates the onset of surface precipitation. However, changes in the rainwater path and in the amount of surface precipitation that are caused by TICE depend on the CCN concentrations. For high CCN concentrations, the mean cloud drop number concentration (CDNC) decreases and the mean effective radius increases due to TICE. These changes cause an increase in the amount of surface precipitation. However, for low CCN concentrations, changes in the mean CDNC and in the mean effective radius induced by TICE are small and the amount of surface precipitation decreases slightly due to TICE. A decrease in condensation due to the accelerated coalescence between droplets explains the surface precipitation decrease. In addition, an increase in the CCN concentration can lead to an increase in the amount of surface precipitation, and the relationship between the CCN concentration and the amount of surface precipitation is affected by TICE. It is shown that these results depend on the atmospheric relative humidity.

  15. Microbial Decomposers Not Constrained by Climate History Along a Mediterranean Climate Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, N. R.; Khalili, B.; Martiny, J. B. H.; Allison, S. D.

    2017-12-01

    The return of organic carbon to the atmosphere through terrestrial decomposition is mediated through the breakdown of complex organic polymers by extracellular enzymes produced by microbial decomposer communities. Determining if and how these decomposer communities are constrained in their ability to degrade plant litter is necessary for predicting how carbon cycling will be affected by future climate change. To address this question, we deployed fine-pore nylon mesh "microbial cage" litterbags containing grassland litter with and without local inoculum across five sites in southern California, spanning a gradient of 10.3-22.8° C in mean annual temperature and 100-400+ mm mean annual precipitation. Litterbags were deployed in October 2014 and collected four times over the course of 14 months. Recovered litter was assayed for mass loss, litter chemistry, microbial biomass, extracellular enzymes (Vmax and Km­), and enzyme temperature sensitivities. We hypothesized that grassland litter would decompose most rapidly in the grassland site, and that access to local microbial communities would enhance litter decomposition rates and microbial activity in the other sites along the gradient. We determined that temperature and precipitation likely interact to limit microbial decomposition in the extreme sites along our gradient. Despite their unique climate history, grassland microbes were not restricted in their ability to decompose litter under different climate conditions. Although we observed a strong correlation between bacterial biomass and mass loss across the gradient, litter that was inoculated with local microbial communities lost less mass despite having greater bacterial biomass and potentially accumulating more microbial residues. Our results suggest that microbial community composition may not constrain C-cycling rates under climate change in our system. However, there may be community constraints on decomposition if climate change alters litter chemistry, a

  16. The Contribution of Extreme Precipitation to the Total Precipitation in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jian-Qi

    2012-01-01

    Using daily precipitation data from weather stations in China, the variations in the contribution of extreme precipitation to the total precipitation are analyzed. It is found that extreme precipitation accounts for approximately one third of the total precipitation based on the overall mean for China. Over the past half century, extreme precipitation has played a dominant role in the year-to-year variability of the total precipitation. On the decadal time scale, the extreme precipitation makes different contributions to the wetting and drying regions of China. The wetting trends of particular regions are mainly attributed to increases in extreme precipitation; in contrast, the drying trends of other regions are mainly due to decreases in non-extreme precipitation.

  17. Rumen microbial genomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, M.; Nelson, K.E.

    2005-01-01

    Improving microbial degradation of plant cell wall polysaccharides remains one of the highest priority goals for all livestock enterprises, including the cattle herds and draught animals of developing countries. The North American Consortium for Genomics of Fibrolytic Ruminal Bacteria was created to promote the sequencing and comparative analysis of rumen microbial genomes, offering the potential to fully assess the genetic potential in a functional and comparative fashion. It has been found that the Fibrobacter succinogenes genome encodes many more endoglucanases and cellodextrinases than previously isolated, and several new processive endoglucanases have been identified by genome and proteomic analysis of Ruminococcus albus, in addition to a variety of strategies for its adhesion to fibre. The ramifications of acquiring genome sequence data for rumen microorganisms are profound, including the potential to elucidate and overcome the biochemical, ecological or physiological processes that are rate limiting for ruminal fibre degradation. (author)

  18. Microbial Genomes Multiply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    2002-01-01

    The publication of the first complete sequence of a bacterial genome in 1995 was a signal event, underscored by the fact that the article has been cited more than 2,100 times during the intervening seven years. It was a marvelous technical achievement, made possible by automatic DNA-sequencing machines. The feat is the more impressive in that complete genome sequencing has now been adopted in many different laboratories around the world. Four years ago in these columns I examined the situation after a dozen microbial genomes had been completed. Now, with upwards of 60 microbial genome sequences determined and twice that many in progress, it seems reasonable to assess just what is being learned. Are new concepts emerging about how cells work? Have there been practical benefits in the fields of medicine and agriculture? Is it feasible to determine the genomic sequence of every bacterial species on Earth? The answers to these questions maybe Yes, Perhaps, and No, respectively.

  19. Degradation of microbial polyesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokiwa, Yutaka; Calabia, Buenaventurada P

    2004-08-01

    Microbial polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), one of the largest groups of thermoplastic polyesters are receiving much attention as biodegradable substitutes for non-degradable plastics. Poly(D-3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) is the most ubiquitous and most intensively studied PHA. Microorganisms degrading these polyesters are widely distributed in various environments. Although various PHB-degrading microorganisms and PHB depolymerases have been studied and characterized, there are still many groups of microorganisms and enzymes with varying properties awaiting various applications. Distributions of PHB-degrading microorganisms, factors affecting the biodegradability of PHB, and microbial and enzymatic degradation of PHB are discussed in this review. We also propose an application of a new isolated, thermophilic PHB-degrading microorganism, Streptomyces strain MG, for producing pure monomers of PHA and useful chemicals, including D-3-hydroxycarboxylic acids such as D-3-hydroxybutyric acid, by enzymatic degradation of PHB.

  20. Global Microbial Identifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wielinga, Peter; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2017-01-01

    ) will likely also enable a much better understanding of the pathogenesis of the infection and the molecular basis of the host response to infection. But the full potential of these advances will only transpire if the data in this area become transferable and thereby comparable, preferably in open-source...... of microorganisms, for the identification of relevant genes and for the comparison of genomes to detect outbreaks and emerging pathogens. To harness the full potential of WGS, a shared global database of genomes linked to relevant metadata and the necessary software tools needs to be generated, hence the global...... microbial identifier (GMI) initiative. This tool will ideally be used in amongst others in the diagnosis of infectious diseases in humans and animals, in the identification of microorganisms in food and environment, and to track and trace microbial agents in all arenas globally. This will require...

  1. Estimating Tropical Cyclone Precipitation from Station Observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Fumin; WANG Yongmei; WANG Xiaoling; LI Weijing

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, an objective technique for estimating the tropical cyclone (TC) precipitation from station observations is proposed. Based on a comparison between the Original Objective Method (OOM) and the Expert Subjective Method (ESM), the Objective Synoptic Analysis Technique (OSAT) for partitioning TC precipitation