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Sample records for michael lynch lawrence

  1. Mike Lynch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horst, Maja; Irwin, Alan

    associated with this position and especially its relationship to STS traditions of policy relevance and engagement. What does it mean for STS to do its job? Or rather, what does it mean for us to do our jobs? Taking inspiration both from Lynch’s published work and the different ways he has performed his STS...... jobs, this presentation will discuss the relationship between vacation, work, professional ethos and personal contribution in the context of STS.......In ’Science as a vacation’, Michael Lynch argues that ’STS might aim for something other than the serious job of doing business’. In so doing, he makes a strong case for an STS that does not aim to be useful but instead does ‘its own job’. In our presentation, we will explore some of the challenges...

  2. Lynching Luther

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backe, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-01

    , cerebral detective – two character-types traditionally rather juxtaposed as irreconcilable opposites. In this fashion, the overall story arc meshes together elements from Thomas Harris-style serial killer fiction and intuitive detection in the tradition of George Simenon’s Maigret. Similarly......, the individual episodes oscillate between carefully plotted psychology and lurid plot-holes. In other words: taken at face value, Luther is as interesting as it is messy. This paper proposes a reading of Luther that reconciles its many inconsistencies by treating it as if it was a David Lynch movie. If one...

  3. Michael Thonet

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Saksa päritolu austria mööblidisaineri ja mööblitöösturi Michael Thonet' (1796-1871) disainiloomingust. 1859. a. Michael Thonet' loodud tool nr. 14 on endiselt tootmises ja on tuntud ka Viini toolina. 2 ill

  4. Extracolonic Manifestations of Lynch Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Bansidhar, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    Lynch syndrome has classically been defined by several predominant malignancies. Initial clinical criteria for diagnosis of Lynch syndrome would miss 40% of affected individuals. As time has passed, our understanding of Lynch syndrome has evolved and will continue to do so. The number of cancer types that are included in the Lynch phenotype is growing. This has allowed clinicians to redefine Lynch syndrome, at risk populations, screening needs, and diagnostic criteria. Inclusion of extracolon...

  5. Michael Scott

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin Hussein

    2015-04-01

    While Michael has contributed significantly to the field of classics and ancient history by publishing extensively, he has also enjoyed great success in engaging wider audiences with the ancient world. He regularly talks in schools around the country, writes books intended for the popular market as well as articles for national and international newspapers and magazines. Michael's experience in writing and presenting a range of programmes intended for TV and radio audiences has made him a household name. He has written and presented programmes for the National Geographic, History Channel, Nova, and the BBC including Delphi: bellybutton of the ancient world (BBC4; Guilty Pleasures: luxury in the ancient and medieval words (BBC4; Jesus: rise to power (Natural Geographic; Ancient Discoveries (History Channel; Who were the Greeks? (BBC2; The Mystery of the X Tombs (BBC2/Nova; The Greatest Show on Earth (BBC4, in conjunction with the Open University. He has also presented a radio series for BBC Radio 4, Spin the Globe. Michael's most recent programme, Roman Britain from the Air, was aired on ITV in December 2014. In this interview, I talk to him about his engagement with other disciplines within the humanities, his forthcoming book project, and his experiences writing and presenting TV and radio documentaries.

  6. Lynch syndrome: the patients' perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seppen, Jurgen; Bruzzone, Linda

    2013-01-01

    People with Lynch syndrome have a high lifetime risk for the development of colorectal, endometrial and several other types of cancer. Lynch syndrome is caused by germline mutations in genes encoding DNA mismatch repair proteins. In this review, issues that concern Lynch patients are highlighted

  7. Diagnosing Lynch Syndrome

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gleeson, J

    2016-11-01

    Lynch Syndrome, also known as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC), is a hereditary condition that increases an individual’s risk of developing a constellation of cancers. These most commonly arise in the colon, but also involve other solid organs such as the endometrium and ovaries in women, the stomach, brain and the skin. Ireland’s small population offers an opportunity to identify all those with Lynch Syndrome (LS) in the country, which would represent a powerful preventive opportunity to meaningfully impact on the incidence of cancer in Ireland.

  8. Michael Griffin | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin Photo of Michael Griffin Michael Griffin Researcher III-Chemical Engineering production of high-value products Physical and chemical material characterization under reaction conditions Physical and chemical characterization of catalytic materials Surface science Design and operation of ultra

  9. Michael E. Himmel | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Himmel Photo of Michael E. Himmel Michael Himmel Senior Research Fellow I-Molecular Biology biochemistry, recombinant technology, enzyme engineering, new micro-organism discovery, and physicochemistry of

  10. Lynch Syndrome: An Updated Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishabh Sehgal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome is one of the most common cancer susceptibility syndromes. Individuals with Lynch syndrome have a 50%–70% lifetime risk of colorectal cancer, 40%–60% risk of endometrial cancer, and increased risks of several other malignancies. It is caused by germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. In a subset of patients, Lynch syndrome is caused by 3' end deletions of the EPCAM gene, which can lead to epigenetic silencing of the closely linked MSH2. Relying solely on age and family history based criteria inaccurately identifies eligibility for Lynch syndrome screening or testing in 25%–70% of cases. There has been a steady increase in Lynch syndrome tumor screening programs since 2000 and institutions are rapidly adopting a universal screening approach to identify the patients that would benefit from genetic counseling and germline testing. These include microsatellite instability testing and/or immunohistochemical testing to identify tumor mismatch repair deficiencies. However, universal screening is not standard across institutions. Furthermore, variation exists regarding the optimum method for tracking and disclosing results. In this review, we summarize traditional screening criteria for Lynch syndrome, and discuss universal screening methods. International guidelines are necessary to standardize Lynch syndrome high-risk clinics.

  11. Jack Michael's Motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel, Caio F.

    2013-01-01

    Among many of Jack Michael's contributions to the field of behavior analysis is his behavioral account of motivation. This paper focuses on the concept of motivating operation (MO) by outlining its development from Skinner's (1938) notion of drive. Conceptually, Michael's term helped us change our focus on how to study motivation by shifting its origins from the organism to the environment. Michael's account also served to stimulate applied research and to better understand behavioral functio...

  12. Lynch syndrome-associated neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shia, Jinru; Holck, Susanne; Depetris, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    It was a century ago that Warthin, a pathologist, first described the clinical condition now known as Lynch syndrome. One hundred years later, our understanding of this syndrome has advanced significantly. Much of the progress took place over the last 25 years and was marked by a series...... of interacting developments from the disciplines of clinical oncology, pathology, and molecular genetics, with each development serving to guide or enhance the next. The advancement of our understanding about the pathology of Lynch syndrome associated tumors exemplifies such intimate interplay among disciplines....... Today, accumulative knowledge has enabled surgical pathologists to detect tumors that are likely to be associated with Lynch syndrome, and the pathologist is playing an increasingly more important role in the care of these patients. The pathologist's ability is afforded primarily by information gained...

  13. Lawrence and his laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellbron, J.L.; Seidel, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    The birthplace of nuclear chemistry and nuclear medicine is the subject of this study of the Radiation Laboratory in Berkeley, California, where Ernest Lawrence used local and national technological, economic, and manpower resources to build the cyclotron

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Lynch syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetic Changes Variations in the MLH1 , MSH2 , MSH6 , PMS2 , or EPCAM gene increase the risk of developing Lynch syndrome . The MLH1 , MSH2 , MSH6 , and PMS2 genes are involved in the repair of errors ...

  15. Milestones of Lynch syndrome: 1895-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Henry T; Snyder, Carrie L; Shaw, Trudy G; Heinen, Christopher D; Hitchins, Megan P

    2015-03-01

    Lynch syndrome, which is now recognized as the most common hereditary colorectal cancer condition, is characterized by the predisposition to a spectrum of cancers, primarily colorectal cancer and endometrial cancer. We chronicle over a century of discoveries that revolutionized the diagnosis and clinical management of Lynch syndrome, beginning in 1895 with Warthin's observations of familial cancer clusters, through the clinical era led by Lynch and the genetic era heralded by the discovery of causative mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes, to ongoing challenges.

  16. Michael Faraday's Bicentenary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, L. Pearce; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Six articles discuss the work of Michael Faraday, a chemist whose work revolutionized physics and led directly to both classical field and relativity theory. The scientist as a young man, the electromagnetic experiments of Faraday, his search for the gravelectric effect, his work on optical glass, his laboratory notebooks, and his creative use of…

  17. Following Michael Faraday's Footprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Last fall I had the good fortune of receiving financial support to shoot a documentary about Michael Faraday. I took the opportunity to learn more about this great experimentalist and to visit the highlights of places in his life. In this paper, I would like to share a list and description of some of the most remarkable places in London suitable…

  18. Lynch syndrome-related small intestinal adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Sun-Young; Lee, Eui-Jin; Kim, Mi-Ju; Chun, Sung Min; Bae, Young Kyung; Hong, Soon Uk; Choi, Jene; Kim, Joon Mee; Jang, Kee-Taek; Kim, Jung Yeon; Kim, Gwang Il; Jung, Soo Jin; Yoon, Ghilsuk; Hong, Seung-Mo

    2017-03-28

    Lynch syndrome is an autosomal-dominant disorder caused by defective DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes and is associated with increased risk of malignancies in multiple organs. Small-intestinal adenocarcinomas are common initial manifestations of Lynch syndrome. To define the incidence and characteristics of Lynch syndrome-related small-intestinal adenocarcinomas, meticulous familial and clinical histories were obtained from 195 patients with small-intestinal adenocarcinoma, and MMR protein immunohistochemistry, microsatellite instability, MLH1 methylation, and germline mutational analyses were performed. Lynch syndrome was confirmed in eight patients (4%), all of whom had synchronous/metachronous malignancies without noticeable familial histories. Small-intestinal adenocarcinomas were the first clinical manifestation in 37% (3/8) of Lynch syndrome patients, and second malignancies developed within 5 years in 63% (5/8). The patients with accompanying Lynch syndrome were younger (≤50 years; P=0.04) and more likely to have mucinous adenocarcinomas (P=0.003), and tended to survive longer (P=0.11) than those with sporadic cases. A meticulous patient history taking, MMR protein immunolabeling, and germline MMR gene mutational analysis are important for the diagnosis of Lynch syndrome-related small-intestinal adenocarcinomas. Identifying Lynch syndrome in patients with small-intestinal adenocarcinoma can be beneficial for the early detection and treatment of additional Lynch syndrome-related cancers, especially in patients who are young or have mucinous adenocarcinomas.

  19. Lawrence, Prof. Ernest Orlando

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1954 Honorary. Lawrence, Prof. Ernest Orlando Nobel Laureate (Physics) - 1939. Date of birth: 8 August 1901. Date of death: 27 August 1958. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. 29th Mid-year meeting. Posted on 19 January 2018. The 29th Mid-year ...

  20. E.O. Lawrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    period in his life when he thought that his discoveries in the field of high explosives would make war so pleasure of a visit to Sweden. I hope that we can in some measure compensate for that loss. I hope too disintegration. The picture has been sketchy; yet I hope it has indicated the versatility of his ideas. lawrence

  1. Michael Faraday, media man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fara, Patricia

    2006-03-01

    Michael Faraday was an enthusiastic portrait collector, and he welcomed the invention of photography not only as a possible means of recording observations accurately, but also as a method for advertising science and its practitioners. This article (which is part of the Science in the Industrial Revolution series) shows that like many eminent scientists, Faraday took advantage of the burgeoning Victorian media industry by posing in various roles.

  2. Modernization and Lynching in the New South

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattias Smångs

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article evaluates an emerging body of historical scholarship that challenges prevailing views of the primacy of rural conditions in southern lynching by positing that it was symbiotically associated with the processes of modernization underway in the region in the decades around 1900. Statistical analyses of lynching data that differentiate among events according to communal participation, support, and ceremony in Georgia and Louisiana from 1882 to 1930 and local-level indices of modernization (urbanization, rural depopulation, industrialization, agricultural commercialization, and dissolution of traditional family roles yield results that both support and contradict such a modernization thesis of lynching. The findings imply that the consequences of the social transformation in the South coinciding with the lynching era were not uniform throughout the region with regard to racial conflict and violence and that broad arguments proposing an intrinsic connection between modernization and lynchings therefore are overstated.

  3. Michael Jackson's Sound Stages

    OpenAIRE

    Morten Michelsen

    2012-01-01

    In order to discuss analytically spatial aspects of recorded sound William Moylan’s concept of ‘sound stage’ is developed within a musicological framework as part of a sound paradigm which includes timbre, texture and sound stage. Two Michael Jackson songs (‘The Lady in My Life’ from 1982 and ‘Scream’ from 1995) are used to: a) demonstrate the value of such a conceptualisation, and b) demonstrate that the model has its limits, as record producers in the 1990s began ignoring the conventions of...

  4. Michael Frayn visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Award-winning playwright and novelist Michael Frayn gave a guest lecture in the main auditorium at CERN on Friday 15 March about his new book The Human Touch: Our Part in the Creation of the Universe. The lecture focused on cosmology and philosophy and the limitations that language places on our ability to understand the creation of a universe in which we seem to play such a small part. In addition to his novels and plays, which include Copenhagen, a play about the 1941 meeting between German physicist Werner Heisenberg and Danish physicist Niels Bohr, Frayn has translated several works from Russian, including plays by Chekhov and Tolstoy.

  5. Diagnosis of Lynch Syndrome: Genetic Testing Identifies a Potentially Deadly Hereditary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Lynch Syndrome Follow us A Diagnosis of Lynch Syndrome Genetic testing identifies a potentially deadly hereditary disease ... helped Jack learn what was wrong. Jack had Lynch Syndrome—an inherited disorder. Lynch Syndrome increases the risk ...

  6. Thyroid cancer in a patient with Lynch syndrome – case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazekas-Lavu M

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Monika Fazekas-Lavu,1 Andrew Parker,2 Allan D Spigelman,3,4 Rodney J Scott,5 Richard J Epstein,6 Michael Jensen,7 Katherine Samaras1,8 1Department of Endocrinology, 2Department of Pathology, St Vincent’s Hospital, Darlinghurst, NSW, Australia; 3Hereditary Cancer Clinic, St Vincent’s Cancer Genetics Service, Darlinghurst, NSW, Australia; 4University of NSW, St Vincent’s Clinical School, Darlinghurst, NSW, Australia; 5Division of Molecular Medicine, Pathology North, John Hunter Hospital and The Hunter Medical Research Institute, Newcastle, NSW, Australia; 6Department of Oncology, 7Department of Oncological Surgery/General Surgery, St Vincent’s Hospital, Darlinghurst, NSW, Australia; 8Diabetes and Metabolism Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, NSW, Australia Abstract: Lynch syndrome describes a familial cancer syndrome comprising germline mutations in one of four DNA mismatch repair genes, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2 and is characterized by colorectal, endometrial, and other epithelial malignancies. Thyroid cancer is not usually considered to be part of the constellation of Lynch syndrome cancers nor have Lynch syndrome tumor gene mutations been reported in thyroid malignancies. This study reports a woman with Lynch syndrome (colonic cancer and a DNA mismatch repair mutation in the MSH2 gene with a synchronous papillary thyroid cancer. Six years later, she developed metachronous breast cancer. Metastatic bone disease developed after 3 years, and the disease burden was due to both breast and thyroid diseases. Despite multiple interventions for both metastatic breast and thyroid diseases, the patient’s metastatic burden progressed and she died of leptomeningeal metastatic disease. Two prior case reports suggested thyroid cancer may be an extraintestinal malignancy of the Lynch syndrome cancer group. Hence, this study examined the genetic relationship between the patient’s known Lynch syndrome and her

  7. Lawrence v. Texas

    OpenAIRE

    Kristan, Andrej

    2014-01-01

    Članek predstavlja nedavno rešeni ameriški primer Lawrence proti Texasu, ki bo v ustavnopravno kroniko zapisan s tremi poudarki. 1. je bilo na Vrhovnem sodišču ZDA v tem primeru izpostavljeno, da standard vrednot »zahodne civilizacije« postavlja Evropsko sodišče za človekove pravice. Ta standard se v ZDA prenaša s odločitvijo vrhovnega sodišča, da imajo homoseksualne osebe pravico do zasebnosti. 2. se s tem primerom postavljajo temelji inkorporacije mednarodnega prava človekovih pravic v amer...

  8. Professor Michael Levitt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma-Louise Davies

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Professor Michael Levitt (Stanford University, USA won the 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems—computational tools which can calculate the course of chemical reactions. Professor Levitt was born in Pretoria, South Africa; he came to the UK on a summer vacation aged 16, where he decided to stay and study for his A‑levels. His interest in the physics of living systems drove him to study biophysics at King’s College London, before securing a PhD position at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge. In the interim year between his degree and beginning his PhD, Professor Levitt worked at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel, where he met his future wife. They married later that year and moved to Cambridge, where their three children were born. After completing his PhD, he spent time working in Israel, Cambridge, the Salk Institute and Stanford (both California. Since 1986, he has split his time between Israel and California. Outside of science, he is a keen hiker and he is well-known to have attended the eclectic ‘Burning Man’ Festival in California.[1] Professor Levitt visited the University of Warwick to speak at the Computational Molecular Science Annual Conference in March 2015. In this interview, Dr Gemma-Louise Davies, an Institute of Advanced Study Global Research Fellow, spoke to Professor Levitt about the importance of Interdisciplinarity in his field, role models in Academia, and his plans for the future. Image: Professor Michael Levitt (left with Dr Scott Habershon (right, organiser of the 2015 Computational Molecular Science Annual Conference during his visit to the University of Warwick in March 2015. [1] ‘Burning Man’ is a unique annual festival dedicated to community, art, music, self-expression and self-reliance. Tens of thousands of people flock to this temporary metropolis built in the Californian desert.

  9. Clinicopathological comparison of colorectal and endometrial carcinomas in patients with Lynch-like syndrome versus patients with Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas-Moya, Jenny; Dudley, Beth; Brand, Randall E; Thull, Darcy; Bahary, Nathan; Nikiforova, Marina N; Pai, Reetesh K

    2015-11-01

    Screening for DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency in colorectal and endometrial carcinomas identifies patients at risk for Lynch syndrome. Some patients with MMR-deficient tumors have no evidence of a germline mutation and have been described as having Lynch-like syndrome. We compared the clinicopathological features of colorectal and endometrial carcinomas in patients with Lynch-like syndrome and Lynch syndrome. Universal screening identified 356 (10.6%) of 3352 patients with colorectal carcinoma and 72 (33%) of 215 patients with endometrial carcinoma with deficient DNA MMR. Sixty-six patients underwent germline mutation analysis with 45 patients (68%) having evidence of a germline MMR gene mutation confirming Lynch syndrome and 21 patients (32%) having Lynch-like syndrome with no evidence of a germline mutation. Most patients with Lynch-like syndrome had carcinoma involving the right colon compared to patients with Lynch syndrome (93% versus 45%; P Lynch syndrome confirmed by germline mutation analysis. Synchronous or metachronous Lynch syndrome-associated carcinoma was more frequently identified in patients with Lynch syndrome compared to Lynch-like syndrome (38% versus 7%; P = .04). There were no significant differences in clinicopathological variables between patients with Lynch-like syndrome and Lynch syndrome with endometrial carcinoma. In summary, 32% of patients with MMR deficiency concerning Lynch syndrome will have Lynch-like syndrome. Our results demonstrate that patients with Lynch-like syndrome are more likely to have right-sided colorectal carcinoma, less likely to have synchronous or metachronous Lynch syndrome-associated carcinoma, and less likely to demonstrate isolated loss of MSH6 expression within their tumor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Michael Levitt and Computational Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    dropdown arrow Site Map A-Z Index Menu Synopsis Michael Levitt and Computational Biology Resources with Michael Levitt, PhD, professor of structural biology at the Stanford University School of Medicine, has function. ... Levitt's early work pioneered computational structural biology, which helped to predict

  11. Fermi, Heisenberg y Lawrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ynduráin, Francisco J.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Not available

    Los azares de las onomásticas hacen coincidir en este año el centenario del nacimiento de tres de los más grandes físicos del siglo XX. Dos de ellos, Fermi y Heisenberg, dejaron una marca fundamental en la ciencia (ambos, pero sobre todo el segundo y, el primero, también en la tecnología. Lawrence, indudablemente de un nivel inferior al de los otros dos, estuvo sin embargo en el origen de uno de los desarrollos tecnológicos que han sido básicos para la exploración del universo subnuclear en la segunda mitad del siglo que ha terminado hace poco, el de los aceleradores de partículas.

  12. Lynch Syndrome: Genomics Update and Imaging Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Veronica L; Saeed Bamashmos, Anas A; Foo, Wai Chin; Gupta, Shiva; Yedururi, Sireesha; Garg, Naveen; Kang, Hyunseon Christine

    2018-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is the most common hereditary cancer syndrome, the most common cause of heritable colorectal cancer, and the only known heritable cause of endometrial cancer. Other cancers associated with Lynch syndrome include cancers of the ovary, stomach, urothelial tract, and small bowel, and less frequently, cancers of the brain, biliary tract, pancreas, and prostate. The oncogenic tendency of Lynch syndrome stems from a set of genomic alterations of mismatch repair proteins. Defunct mismatch repair proteins cause unusually high instability of regions of the genome called microsatellites. Over time, the accumulation of mutations in microsatellites and elsewhere in the genome can affect the production of important cellular proteins, spurring tumorigenesis. Universal testing of colorectal tumors for microsatellite instability (MSI) is now recommended to (a) prevent cases of Lynch syndrome being missed owing to the use of clinical criteria alone, (b) reduce morbidity and mortality among the relatives of affected individuals, and (c) guide management decisions. Organ-specific cancer risks and associated screening paradigms vary according to the sex of the affected individual and the type of germline DNA alteration causing the MSI. Furthermore, Lynch syndrome-associated cancers have different pathologic, radiologic, and clinical features compared with their sporadic counterparts. Most notably, Lynch syndrome-associated tumors tend to be more indolent than non-Lynch syndrome-associated neoplasms and thus may respond differently to traditional chemotherapy regimens. The high MSI in cases of colorectal cancer reflects a difference in the biologic features of the tumor, possibly with a unique susceptibility to immunotherapy. © RSNA, 2018.

  13. Role for Genetic Anticipation in Lynch Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilbert, Mef; Timshel, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Anticipation (ie, an earlier age at onset in successive generations) is linked to repeat expansion in neurodegenerative syndromes, whereas its role in hereditary cancer is unclear. We assessed anticipation in Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer [HNPCC]), in which DNA...... mismatch repair (MMR) defects cause early and accelerated tumor development with a broad tumor spectrum. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In the population-based Danish HNPCC registry, 407 MMR gene mutation carriers who had developed cancer associated with Lynch syndrome, were identified. These individuals formed 290....... The effect remained when cancers diagnosed at surveillance were excluded, applied to maternal as well as paternal inheritance, and was independent of the MMR gene mutated. CONCLUSION: The effect from anticipation demonstrated in this large, population-based Lynch syndrome cohort underscores the need...

  14. Lynch syndrome: still not a familiar picture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hes Frederik J

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germ line mutations in mismatch repair genes underlie Lynch syndrome and predispose carriers for colorectal carcinoma and malignancies in many other organ systems. Case presentation A large Lynch syndrome family with 15 affected family members and involvement in 7 organs is reported. It illustrates a lack of awareness and knowledge about this hereditary tumor syndrome among doctors as well as patients. None of the described family members underwent presymptomatic screening on the basis of the family history. Conclusion Hereditary features, like young age at diagnosis, multiple tumors in multiple organs and a positive family history, should lead to timely referral of suspected cases for genetic counseling and diagnostics. For Lynch syndrome, these features can be found in the Amsterdam and Bethesda criteria. Subsequently, early identification of mutation carriers might have diminished, at least in part, the high and early morbidity and mortality observed in this family.

  15. The Lynch syndrome: a management dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Piergaspare; Amatucci, Chiara; Perotti, Bruno; Dezzi, Claudia; Girolami, Marco; Illuminati, Giulio; Angelici, Alberto M

    2013-05-01

    The case of a familial Lynch syndrome is reported. The criteria for early diagnosis, management and surveillance are briefly reviewed. A germline mutation of genes responsible for mismatch repair is at the basis of the Lynch syndrome. Carriers are predisposed to colorectal cancer and other tumors. Two members of the presently reported family developed colorectal cancer, whereas two others developed other neoplasms. The syndrome was confirmed in members of the same family with appropriate genetic workup. Clinical examination and endoscopy were consequently scheduled once-a-year. Given the high risk of neoplastic disease, such yearly controls can be proposed as the standard follow-up of this condition.

  16. Twenty hanging Dolls and a Lynching:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risør, Helene

    2010-01-01

    The article sets lynching of presumed criminals in the city of El Alto, Bolivia, in relation to both everyday experiences of insecurity about crime and violence and the enactment of neighborliness as a grounded notion of citizenship. Focusing on the experience and management of insecurity and its...

  17. Value-based healthcare in Lynch syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennink, Simone D; Hofland, N.; Gopie, J.P.; van der Kaa, C.; de Koning, K.; Nielsen, M.; Tops, C.; Morreau, H.; de Vos Tot Nederveen Cappel, W.H.; Langers, A.M.; Hardwick, J.C.; Gaarenstroom, K.N.; Tollenaar, R.A.; Veenendaal, R.A.; Tibben, A.; Wijnen, J.; van Heck, M.; van Asperen, C.; Roukema, J.A.; Hommes, D.W.; Hes, F.J.; Vasen, H.F.A.

    2013-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS), one of the most frequent forms of hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC), is caused by a defect in one of the mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Carriers of MMR defects have a strongly increased risk of developing CRC and endometrial cancer. Over the last few years, value-based healthcare

  18. 100 years lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bleiker, Eveline M A; Esplen, Mary Jane; Meiser, Bettina

    2013-01-01

    In the care of patients with Lynch Syndrome (LS), a range of psychosocial issues are encountered, which significantly affect patient outcomes. A brief historical background of 'psycho-onco-genetics' (the domain where psychology, oncology and genetics meet) in relation to LS is presented, followed...

  19. Genetic counseling and cascade genetic testing in Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, Heather

    2016-07-01

    Lynch syndrome is the most common cause of inherited colorectal and endometrial cancers. Individuals with Lynch syndrome have a 10-80 % lifetime risk for colorectal cancer and a 15-60 % lifetime risk for endometrial cancer. Both cancers are preventable through chemoprevention, intensive cancer surveillance, and risk-reducing surgery options. Efforts to identify as many individuals with Lynch syndrome as possible will prevent cancers and save lives. This includes the traditional cancer genetic counseling model whereby individuals with and without cancer are evaluated for a possible Lynch syndrome diagnosis based on their personal and family history of colon polyps and cancers. It also includes universal tumor screening for Lynch syndrome whereby all individuals with colorectal or endometrial cancer are screened for tumor features of Lynch syndrome at the time of diagnosis. Those with tumors suspicious for Lynch syndrome are referred for cancer genetic counseling regardless of their family history of cancer. This two approaches must be maximized to attain high patient reach. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, cascade testing among the at-risk relatives of those diagnosed with Lynch syndrome is critically important to maximize the diagnosis of individuals with Lynch syndrome. In fact, the cost-effectiveness of universal tumor screening for Lynch syndrome relies entirely on counseling and testing as many at-risk individuals as possible since young unaffected individuals stand to benefit the most from an early diagnosis of Lynch syndrome. This approach must be optimized to achieve high family reach. It will take a concerted effort from patients, clinicians and public health officials to improve current approaches to the diagnosis of Lynch syndrome and the prevention and treatment of Lynch syndrome-associated cancer but these lessons can be applied to other conditions as the ultimate example of personalized medicine.

  20. En bog om Michael Strunge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mai, Anne-Marie

    Antologi med bidrag om Michael Strunges forfatterskab. Bidrag af Anne-Marie Mai, Jørgen Aabenhus, Marianne Stidsen, Moritz Schramm, Tue Andersen Nexø, Lars Bukdahl, Jon Helt Haarder, Rune Kühl er optaget efter fagfællesbedømmelse. Antologien er redigeret af Anne-Marie Mai og Jørgen Aabenhus....

  1. Michael Beitz: Objects of Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefferle, Mary

    2014-01-01

    For this Instructional Resource, the author interviewed contemporary sculptor Michael Beitz, who uses art to explore the role of designed objects in human communication and emotional experience. This column was written in response to calls for using Enduring Understandings/Big Ideas (National Coalition for Core Arts Standards, 2013; Stewart &…

  2. Radiation curable Michael addition compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, G.W.; Friedlander, C.B.; McDonald, W.H.; Dowbenko, R.

    1979-01-01

    Radiation polymerizable acrylyloxy-containing reaction products are provided from Michael addition reaction of an amide containing at least two acrylate groups with a primary or secondary amine. The resulting amine adducts of the amide, which contain at least one acrylate group per molecule, possesses high cure rates in air and are useful in compositions for forming coatings. (author)

  3. Childhood cancers in families with and without Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, John A; Reece, Jeanette C; Buchanan, Daniel D; Casey, Graham; Durno, Carol A; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W; Newcomb, Polly A; Potter, John D; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Le Marchand, Loïc; Lindor, Noralane M; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A; Win, Aung Ko

    2015-12-01

    Inheritance of a germline mutation in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes or the EPCAM gene is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, and other adult malignancies (Lynch syndrome). The risk of childhood cancers in Lynch syndrome families, however, is not well studied. Using data from the Colon Cancer Family Registry, we compared the proportion of childhood cancers (diagnosed before 18 years of age) in the first-, second-, and third-degree relatives of 781 probands with a pathogenic mutation in one of the MMR genes; MLH1 (n = 275), MSH2 (n = 342), MSH6 (n = 99), or PMS2 (n = 55) or in EPCAM (n = 10) (Lynch syndrome families), with that of 5073 probands with MMR-deficient colorectal cancer (non-Lynch syndrome families). There was no evidence of a difference in the proportion of relatives with a childhood cancer between Lynch syndrome families (41/17,230; 0.24%) and non-Lynch syndrome families (179/94,302; 0.19%; p = 0.19). Incidence rate of all childhood cancers was estimated to be 147 (95% CI 107-206) per million population per year in Lynch syndrome families and 115 (95% CI 99.1-134) per million population per year in non-Lynch syndrome families. There was no evidence for a significant increase in the risk of all childhood cancers, hematologic cancers, brain and central nervous system cancers, Lynch syndrome-associated cancers, or other cancers in Lynch syndrome families compared with non-Lynch syndrome families. Larger studies, however, are required to more accurately define the risk of specific individual childhood cancers in Lynch syndrome families.

  4. Lynch syndrome and Lynch syndrome mimics: The growing complex landscape of hereditary colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carethers, John M; Stoffel, Elena M

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) was previously synonymous with Lynch syndrome; however, identification of the role of germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes has made it possible to differentiate Lynch syndrome from other conditions associated with familial colorectal cancer (CRC). Broadly, HNPCC may be dichotomized into conditions that demonstrate defective DNA MMR and microsatellite instability (MSI) vs those conditions that demonstrate intact DNA MMR. Conditions characterized by MMR deficient CRCs include Lynch syndrome (germline MMR mutation), Lynch-like syndrome (biallelic somatic MMR mutations), constitutional MMR deficiency syndrome (biallelic germline MMR mutations), and sporadic MSI CRC (somatic biallelic methylation of MLH1). HNPCC conditions with intact DNA MMR associated with familial CRC include polymerase proofreading associated polyposis and familial colorectal cancer type X. Although next generation sequencing technologies have elucidated the genetic cause for some HNPCC conditions, others remain genetically undefined. Differentiating between Lynch syndrome and the other HNPCC disorders has profound implications for cancer risk assessment and surveillance of affected patients and their at-risk relatives. Clinical suspicion coupled with molecular tumor analysis and testing for germline mutations can help differentiate the clinical mimicry within HNPCC and facilitate diagnosis and management. PMID:26309352

  5. Lynch syndrome and Lynch syndrome mimics: The growing complex landscape of hereditary colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carethers, John M; Stoffel, Elena M

    2015-08-21

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) was previously synonymous with Lynch syndrome; however, identification of the role of germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes has made it possible to differentiate Lynch syndrome from other conditions associated with familial colorectal cancer (CRC). Broadly, HNPCC may be dichotomized into conditions that demonstrate defective DNA MMR and microsatellite instability (MSI) vs those conditions that demonstrate intact DNA MMR. Conditions characterized by MMR deficient CRCs include Lynch syndrome (germline MMR mutation), Lynch-like syndrome (biallelic somatic MMR mutations), constitutional MMR deficiency syndrome (biallelic germline MMR mutations), and sporadic MSI CRC (somatic biallelic methylation of MLH1). HNPCC conditions with intact DNA MMR associated with familial CRC include polymerase proofreading associated polyposis and familial colorectal cancer type X. Although next generation sequencing technologies have elucidated the genetic cause for some HNPCC conditions, others remain genetically undefined. Differentiating between Lynch syndrome and the other HNPCC disorders has profound implications for cancer risk assessment and surveillance of affected patients and their at-risk relatives. Clinical suspicion coupled with molecular tumor analysis and testing for germline mutations can help differentiate the clinical mimicry within HNPCC and facilitate diagnosis and management.

  6. Michael J. Fox: Spurring Research on Parkinson's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Parkinson's Disease Michael J. Fox: Spurring Research on Parkinson's Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of Contents Michael J. Fox and his wife, actress Tracy Pollan, founded the ...

  7. Lynch Syndrome: Female Genital Tract Cancer Diagnosis and Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Anne M; Longacre, Teri A

    2016-06-01

    Lynch syndrome is responsible for approximately 5% of endometrial cancers and 1% of ovarian cancers. The molecular basis for Lynch syndrome is a heritable functional deficiency in the DNA mismatch repair system, typically due to a germline mutation. This review discusses the rationales and relative merits of current Lynch syndrome screening tests for endometrial and ovarian cancers and provides pathologists with an informed algorithmic approach to Lynch syndrome testing in gynecologic cancers. Pitfalls in test interpretation and strategies to resolve discordant test results are presented. The potential role for next-generation sequencing panels in future screening efforts is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Merrill Lynch kavandab äridelegatsiooni visiiti Eestisse

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    Investeerimispanga Merrill Lynch eestvedamisel kavandatakse mais ärimeeste visiiti Eestisse, ütles Jüri Mõis, kes viibis New Yorgis toimunud Maailmapanga seminaril "Omavalitsused rahvusvahelistel kapitaliturgudel"

  9. Immunohistochemical Pitfalls: Common Mistakes in the Evaluation of Lynch Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markow, Michael; Chen, Wei; Frankel, Wendy L

    2017-12-01

    At least 15% of colorectal cancers diagnosed in the United States are deficient in mismatch repair mechanisms. Most of these are sporadic, but approximately 3% of colorectal cancers result from germline alterations in mismatch repair genes and represent Lynch syndrome. It is critical to identify patients with Lynch syndrome to institute appropriate screening and surveillance for patients and their families. Exclusion of Lynch syndrome in sporadic cases is equally important because it reduces anxiety for patients and prevents excessive spending on unnecessary surveillance. Immunohistochemistry is one of the most widely used screening tools for identifying patients with Lynch syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Michael Faraday vs. the Spiritualists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshfeld, Alan

    2006-12-01

    In the 1850s, renowned physicist Michael Faraday launched a public campaign against pseudoscience and spiritualism, which were rampant in England at the time. Faraday objected especially to claims that electrical or magnetic forces were responsible for paranormal phenomena, such as table-spinning and communication with the dead. Using scientific methods, Faraday unmasked the deceptions of spiritualists, clairvoyants and mediums and also laid bare the credulity of a public ill-educated in science. Despite his efforts, Victorian society's fascination with the paranormal swelled. Faraday's debacle anticipates current controversies about public science education and the interface between science and religion. This episode is one of many described in the new biography, The Electric Life of Michael Faraday (Walker & Co.), which chronicles Faraday's discoveries and his unlikely rise from poverty to the pinnacle of the English science establishment.

  11. Genetic anticipation in Swedish Lynch syndrome families

    OpenAIRE

    von Salomé, Jenny; Boonstra, Philip S.; Karimi, Masoud; Silander, Gustav; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Gebre-Medhin, Samuel; Aravidis, Christos; Nilbert, Mef; Lindblom, Annika; Lagerstedt-Robinson, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    Among hereditary colorectal cancer predisposing syndromes, Lynch syndrome (LS) caused by mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 is the most common. Patients with LS have an increased risk of early onset colon and endometrial cancer, but also other tumors that generally have an earlier onset compared to the general population. However, age at first primary cancer varies within families and genetic anticipation, i.e. decreasing age at onset in successive generations, ha...

  12. Michael Niegl (1985-2009)

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Our friend and colleague Michael Niegl died in a tragic accident in the first hours of the new year. Michael was a Master’s student in Microsystems Engineering at the University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt. He was responsible for the development of the ATLAS Beam Conditions Monitor (BCM) ROD FPGA firmware, which acquires the data from the BCM detector modules and provides online monitoring of the LHC beams within the ATLAS experiment. He spent several months at CERN to carry out beam tests on the BCM detectors and received his Bachelor of Science with first class honours for his thesis: Concept and Implementation of an FPGA-based Data Recorder and Processor for the ATLAS Beam Conditions Monitor. Michael spent six months at CERN last year to finish the development and commissioning of the ROD firmware for the first beam. He worked the entire night of 10 September to fine tune the system for the first beam. It was a joy to ...

  13. Michael De Sousa (1989 - 2012)

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    We are deeply saddened to announce the death of Mr Michael De Sousa on 13 May 2012. Mr De Sousa, who was born on 02.09.1989, was working as an apprentice in the TE Department and had been at CERN since 24.08.2009. The Director-General has sent a message of condolence to his family on behalf of the CERN personnel. Social Affairs Human Resources Department     It is with great emotion and deep sadness that we learn of the tragic loss of our colleague and friend Michael De Sousa. Michael was a hard working colleague, cordial and considerate. Within a few months, he marked his presence by the implementation of the instrumentation benches for gas permeation measurement in polymers, and the calibration of high technology gas analyzers, necessary for vacuum technology. His last contribution will enable us to measure pressures in the extreme high vacuum range for the ELENA project.  With the continuation of this activity, his memory will remain. His accomplishments will remain...

  14. Lynch Syndrome: A Primer for Urologists and Panel Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mork, Maureen; Hubosky, Scott G; Rouprêt, Morgan; Margulis, Vitaly; Raman, Jay; Lotan, Yair; O'Brien, Timothy; You, Nancy; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Matin, Surena F

    2015-07-01

    Lynch syndrome, also known as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, is a common genetic disease. The predisposition of patients with Lynch syndrome to urological cancer, particularly upper tract urothelial carcinoma, is underappreciated. Urologists may be involved in several aspects of care involving Lynch syndrome, including identifying undiagnosed patients, surveillance of those with established Lynch syndrome or screening family members, in addition to treating patients with Lynch syndrome in whom upper tract urothelial carcinoma develops. We sought to increase awareness in the urological community about Lynch syndrome and provide some guidance where little currently exists. Using the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) statement we reviewed the available published literature and guidelines from 1998 to 2014 on Lynch syndrome and its association with upper tract urothelial carcinoma. Recommendations based on the literature and the consensus of expert opinion are provided. No randomized or prospective study has been done to evaluate Lynch syndrome in the setting of urological cancer. All data were based on retrospective studies. Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant genetic disease caused by germline mutations in 4 mismatch repair genes, leading to the accumulation of DNA errors in microsatellite regions. Upper tract urothelial carcinoma develops in up to 28% of patients with known Lynch syndrome. The diagnosis of Lynch syndrome is established by clinical criteria, tumor tissue testing and genetic evaluation. Urologists should suspect Lynch syndrome when a patient with upper tract urothelial carcinoma presents before age 60 years or meets the 3-2-1 rule. Screening patients with Lynch syndrome for upper tract urothelial carcinoma presents a particular challenge. While no ideal screening test exists, at a minimum routine urinalysis is recommended using the American Urological Association guideline of 3 or more red

  15. Three molecular pathways model colorectal carcinogenesis in Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahadova, Aysel; Gallon, Richard; Gebert, Johannes; Ballhausen, Alexej; Endris, Volker; Kirchner, Martina; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Burn, John; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Bläker, Hendrik; Kloor, Matthias

    2018-07-01

    Lynch syndrome is caused by germline mutations of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. MMR deficiency has long been regarded as a secondary event in the pathogenesis of Lynch syndrome colorectal cancers. Recently, this concept has been challenged by the discovery of MMR-deficient crypt foci in the normal mucosa. We aimed to reconstruct colorectal carcinogenesis in Lynch syndrome by collecting molecular and histology evidence from Lynch syndrome adenomas and carcinomas. We determined the frequency of MMR deficiency in adenomas from Lynch syndrome mutation carriers by immunohistochemistry and by systematic literature analysis. To trace back the pathways of pathogenesis, histological growth patterns and mutational signatures were analyzed in Lynch syndrome colorectal cancers. Literature and immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated MMR deficiency in 491 (76.7%) out of 640 adenomas (95% CI: 73.3% to 79.8%) from Lynch syndrome mutation carriers. Histologically normal MMR-deficient crypts were found directly adjacent to dysplastic adenoma tissue, proving their role as tumor precursors in Lynch syndrome. Accordingly, mutation signature analysis in Lynch colorectal cancers revealed that KRAS and APC mutations commonly occur after the onset of MMR deficiency. Tumors lacking evidence of polypous growth frequently presented with CTNNB1 and TP53 mutations. Our findings demonstrate that Lynch syndrome colorectal cancers can develop through three pathways, with MMR deficiency commonly representing an early and possibly initiating event. This underlines that targeting MMR-deficient cells by chemoprevention or vaccines against MMR deficiency-induced frameshift peptide neoantigens holds promise for tumor prevention in Lynch syndrome. © 2018 UICC.

  16. Organocatalytic aza-Michael/retro-aza-Michael reaction: pronounced chirality amplification in aza-Michael reaction and racemization via retro-aza-Michael reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yong-Feng; Li, Li; Luo, Meng-Xian; Yang, Ke-Fang; Lai, Guo-Qiao; Jiang, Jian-Xiong; Xu, Li-Wen

    2011-05-01

    A detailed experimental investigation of an aza-Michael reaction of aniline and chalcone is presented. A series of Cinchona alkaloid-derived organocatalysts with different functional groups were prepared and used in the aza-Michael and retro-aza-Michael reaction. There was an interesting finding that a complete reversal of stereoselectivity when a benzoyl group was introduced to the cinchonine and cinchonidine. The chirality amplification vs. time proceeds in the quinine-derived organocatalyst containing silicon-based bulky group, QN-TBS, -catalyzed aza-Michael reaction under solvent-free conditions. In addition, we have demonstrated for the first time that racemization was occurred in suitable solvents under mild conditions due to retro-aza-Michael reaction of the Michael adduct of aniline with chalcone. These indicate the equilibrium of retro-aza-Michael reaction and aza-Michael reaction produce the happening of chirality amplification in aza-Michael reaction and racemization via retro-aza-Michael reaction under different conditions, which would be beneficial to the development of novel chiral catalysts for the aza-Michael reactions. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. St. Lawrence action plan meter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    The purpose of this bulletin is to report on the progress achieved under the St. Lawrence Action Plan. Under each of the Action Plan`s five objectives, it outlines environmental management indicators which identify actions taken and shows the results. This report presents the data collected in late August 1992 on the activities carried out by all partners of both governments involved in SLAP. The objectives examined in the bulletin are: to reduce by 90% the liquid toxic waste discharged by the 50 plants targeted for priority action; to prepare remediation plans for contaminated federal sites and restore wetlands; to conserve 5000 additional hectares of habitat and create a marine park; to develop and implement recovery plans for mammals, fish, birds, amphibians, reptiles, and plants; and to determine the state of the St. Lawrence River.

  18. PMS2 Involvement in Patients Suspected of Lynch Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, Renee C.; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Westers, Helga; Jager, Paul O. J.; Rozeveld, Dennie; Bos, Krista K.; Boersma-van Ek, Wytske; Hollema, Harry; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.

    It is well-established that germline mutations in the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 cause Lynch syndrome. However, mutations in these three genes do not account for all Lynch syndrome (suspected) families. Recently, it was shown that germline mutations in another mismatch repair gene,

  19. Recurrence and Variability of Germline EPCAM Deletions in Lynch Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, Roland P.; Vissers, Lisenka E. L. M.; Venkatachalam, Ramprasath; Bodmer, Danielle; Hoenselaar, Eveline; Goossens, Monique; Haufe, Aline; Kamping, Eveline; Niessen, Renee C.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Gille, Johan J. P.; Redeker, Bert; Tops, Carli M. J.; van Gijn, Marielle E.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Rahner, Nils; Steinke, Verena; Kahl, Philip; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Morak, Monika; Kloor, Matthias; Stemmler, Susanne; Betz, Beate; Hutter, Pierre; Bunyan, David J.; Syngal, Sapna; Culver, Julie O.; Graham, Tracy; Chan, Tsun L.; Nagtegaal, Iris D.; van Krieken, J. Han J. M.; Schackert, Hans K.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Kessel, Ad Geurts; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.

    Recently, we identified 3' end deletions in the EPCAM gene as a novel cause of Lynch syndrome. These truncating EPCAM deletions cause allele-specific epigenetic silencing of the neighboring DNA mismatch repair gene MSH2 in tissues expressing EPCAM. Here we screened a cohort of unexplained Lynch-like

  20. Management of extracolonic tumours in patients with Lynch syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornstra, Jan J; Mourits, Marian Je; Sijmons, Rolf H; Leliveld-Kors, Anna; Hollema, Harry; Kleibeuker, Jan H

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, or Lynch syndrome, is responsible for 2-3% of all colorectal cancers. Lynch syndrome is also associated with a high risk of extracolonic cancers, including endometrial, stomach, small bowel, pancreas, biliary tract, ovary, urinary tract, brain, and skin

  1. Advances in the study of Lynch syndrome in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jun-Yu; Sheng, Jian-Qiu

    2015-06-14

    Lynch syndrome, also known as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, is an autosomal dominant genetic condition that has a high risk of colon cancer as well as other cancers due to inherited mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes. During the last decades, there have been great advances in research on Chinese Lynch syndrome. This review mainly focuses on the genetic basis, clinicopathologic features, diagnosis, intervention, chemoprevention, and surveillance of Lynch syndrome in China. In addition to frequently altered MMR genes, such as MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and MLH3, other MMR-associated genes, such as those encoding human exonuclease 1, transforming growth factor β receptor 2, and alanine aminopeptidase, metastasis-associated protein 2, adenomatosis polyposis coli down-regulated 1, and hepatic and glial cell adhesion molecule have also been implicated in Chinese Lynch syndrome. Most Chinese researchers focused on the clinicopathologic features of Lynch syndrome, and it is noticeable that the most frequent extracolonic tumor in northeast China is lung cancer, which is different from other areas in China. The Chinese diagnostic criteria for Lynch syndrome have been established to identify gene mutation or methylation. With regard to chemoprevention, celecoxib may be effective to prevent polyps relapse in Lynch syndrome carriers. Additionally, a colonoscopy-based surveillance strategy for the prevention and early detection of neoplasms in Lynch-syndrome carriers has been proposed.

  2. Features of ovarian cancer in Lynch syndrome (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kanako; Banno, Kouji; Yanokura, Megumi; Iida, Miho; Adachi, Masataka; Masuda, Kenta; Ueki, Arisa; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Nomura, Hiroyuki; Hirasawa, Akira; Tominaga, Eiichiro; Aoki, Daisuke

    2014-11-01

    Lynch syndrome is a hereditary ovarian cancer with a prevalence of 0.9-2.7%. Lynch syndrome accounts for 10-15% of hereditary ovarian cancers, while hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome accounts for 65-75% of these cancers. The lifetime risk for ovarian cancer in families with Lynch syndrome is ~8%, which is lower than colorectal and endometrial cancers, and ovarian cancer is not listed in the Amsterdam Criteria II. More than half of sporadic ovarian cancers are diagnosed in stage III or IV, but ≥80% of ovarian cancers in Lynch syndrome are diagnosed in stage I or II. Ovarian cancers in Lynch syndrome mostly have non-serous histology and different properties from those of sporadic ovarian cancers. A screening method for ovarian cancers in Lynch syndrome has yet to be established and clinical studies of prophylactic administration of oral contraceptives are not available. However, molecular profiles at the genetic level indicate that ovarian cancer in Lynch syndrome has a more favorable prognosis than sporadic ovarian cancer. Inhibitors of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mammalian target of the rapamycin pathway and anti-epidermal growth factor antibodies may have efficacy for the disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first review focusing on ovarian cancer in Lynch syndrome.

  3. Mutation spectrum in South American Lynch syndrome families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dominguez-Valentin, Mev; Nilbert, Mef; Wernhoff, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    Genetic counselling and testing for Lynch syndrome have recently been introduced in several South American countries, though yet not available in the public health care system.......Genetic counselling and testing for Lynch syndrome have recently been introduced in several South American countries, though yet not available in the public health care system....

  4. LAWRENCE RADIATION LABORATORY COUNTING HANDBOOK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Group, Nuclear Instrumentation

    1966-10-01

    The Counting Handbook is a compilation of operational techniques and performance specifications on counting equipment in use at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, Berkeley. Counting notes have been written from the viewpoint of the user rather than that of the designer or maintenance man. The only maintenance instructions that have been included are those that can easily be performed by the experimenter to assure that the equipment is operating properly.

  5. Molecular subtype classification of urothelial carcinoma in Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, Christina; Eriksson, Pontus; Höglund, Mattias

    2018-01-01

    Lynch syndrome confers an increased risk for urothelial carcinoma (UC). Molecular subtypes may be relevant to prognosis and therapeutic possibilities, but have to date not been defined in Lynch syndrome-associated urothelial cancer. We aimed to provide a molecular description of Lynch syndrome......-associated UC. Thus, Lynch syndrome-associated UC of the upper urinary tract and the urinary bladder were identified in the Danish hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) register and were transcriptionally and immunohistochemically profiled and further related to data from 307 sporadic urothelial...... carcinomas. Whole genome mRNA expression profiles of 41 tumors and immunohistochemical stainings against FGFR3, KRT5, CCNB1, RB1, and CDKN2A (p16) of 37 tumors from Lynch syndrome patients were generated. Pathological data, microsatellite instability, anatomic location, and overall survival data was analyzed...

  6. Recent discoveries in the molecular genetics of Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, C Richard

    2016-07-01

    Lynch syndrome is the inherited predisposition to cancer caused by a germline mutation in a DNA mismatch repair gene. The consequent tumors have a characteristic microsatellite instability (MSI) phenotype. Genomic sequencing of Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal cancers (CRCs) has demonstrated that these tumors have a substantially greater number of mutations than non-MSI CRCs, and that the target mutations driving tumor behavior are also different from what occurs in sporadic tumors. There are multiple non-Lynch syndrome entities that can create clinical confusion with that disease, including the acquired methylation of MLH1, Lynch-like syndrome, and Familial CRC-Type X. Patients with Lynch syndrome-associated CRCs have a substantially better prognosis, and there is growing evidence that this is due to the generation of immunogenic frameshift peptides as a consequence of defective DNA mismatch repair, and an effective immune response to the tumor.

  7. Michael Jackson antes del caos

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Luciano Nieves

    2015-01-01

    Michael Jackson es un buen ejemplo de cómo utilizar las relaciones públicas para realizar o manipular la imagen de un producto a través de los medios de comunicación. Este ensayo pretende analizar los eventos que tuvieron lugar antes de que el cantante fuera acusado de abuso sexual contra un menor. Dichos eventos formaron parte de un plan muy bien delineado para disminuir los efectos de la inminente crisis que se acercaba. Este trabajo combina la crítica retórica de temas de fantasía con teor...

  8. Video interview with Michael Dell

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Michael Dell, founder and presently Chairman of the Board of Directors and Chief Executive Office of the DELL computer company visited CERN on Tuesday 26th January 2010. The Bulletin and the Video productions team had the opportunity to meet him. The video interview is transcribed for your convenience.   Michael S. Dell with CERN Director-General Rolf Heuer. What motivated you to come and visit CERN? I obviously heard about the great science and research has going on here, and DELL is very pleased to be a partner and providing a lot of the computers to analyse the data and I really wanted to see for myself in person, some of the great science that is going on here. What is your view on fundamental research in IT, and in general? I think if you look at the field of science in the last hundred years, we have been able to solve a lot of problems, but there are still lots of unsolved problems and unsolved mysteries. And it is only through basic fundamental research that we will address these probl...

  9. Molecular subtype classification of urothelial carcinoma in Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therkildsen, Christina; Eriksson, Pontus; Höglund, Mattias; Jönsson, Mats; Sjödahl, Gottfrid; Nilbert, Mef; Liedberg, Fredrik

    2018-05-23

    Lynch syndrome confers an increased risk for urothelial carcinoma (UC). Molecular subtypes may be relevant to prognosis and therapeutic possibilities, but have to date not been defined in Lynch syndrome-associated urothelial cancer. We aimed to provide a molecular description of Lynch syndrome-associated UC. Thus, Lynch syndrome-associated UC of the upper urinary tract and the urinary bladder were identified in the Danish hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) register and were transcriptionally and immunohistochemically profiled and further related to data from 307 sporadic urothelial carcinomas. Whole genome mRNA expression profiles of 41 tumors and immunohistochemical stainings against FGFR3, KRT5, CCNB1, RB1, and CDKN2A (p16) of 37 tumors from Lynch syndrome patients were generated. Pathological data, microsatellite instability, anatomic location, and overall survival data was analyzed and compared with sporadic bladder cancer. The 41 Lynch syndrome-associated UC developed at a mean age of 61 years with 59% women. mRNA expression profiling and immunostaining classified the majority of the Lynch syndrome-associated UC as Urothelial-like tumors with only 20% being Genomically Unstable, Basal/SCC-like or other subtypes. The subtypes were associated with stage, grade, and microsatellite instability. Comparison to larger data sets revealed that Lynch syndrome-associated UC share molecular similarities with sporadic UC. In conclusion, transcriptomic and immunohistochemical profiling identifies a predominance of the Urothelial-like molecular subtype in Lynch syndrome and reveals that the molecular subtypes of sporadic bladder cancer are relevant also within this hereditary, mismatch-repair defective subset. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. Molecular Oncology (2018) © 2018 The Authors. Published by FEBS Press and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Michael Jackson antes del caos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Luciano Nieves

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Michael Jackson es un buen ejemplo de cómo utilizar las relaciones públicas para realizar o manipular la imagen de un producto a través de los medios de comunicación. Este ensayo pretende analizar los eventos que tuvieron lugar antes de que el cantante fuera acusado de abuso sexual contra un menor. Dichos eventos formaron parte de un plan muy bien delineado para disminuir los efectos de la inminente crisis que se acercaba. Este trabajo combina la crítica retórica de temas de fantasía con teoría de comunicación.

  11. T. E. Lawrence: Theorist and Campaign Planner

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-12

    honors in history, Lawrence’s curiosity lead him to the works of Carl von Clausewitz, Henri Jomini. Karl von Willisen, Rudolf von Caemmerer, Helmut von...113. M. J. Steiner . Inside Pan-Arabia. (Chicago: Herxiricks House, 1947), Chap 7. 114. T. E. Lawrence, "The Evolution of a Revolt," p65. 115. T. E...Unity. New York: Devin-Adair, 1958. Steiner . M. J. Inside Pan-Arabia. Chicago: Hendricks House. 1947. Thomas, Lowell. With Lawrence in Arabia. New York

  12. Jack Michael's Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel, Caio F.

    2013-01-01

    Among many of Jack Michael's contributions to the field of behavior analysis is his behavioral account of motivation. This paper focuses on the concept of "motivating operation" (MO) by outlining its development from Skinner's (1938) notion of "drive." Conceptually, Michael's term helped us change our focus on…

  13. Indsigter og udfordringer i danske Lynch-syndrom-familier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, Christina; Timshel, Susanne; Nilbert, Mef

    2008-01-01

    identified 88 unique mutations in 164 Danish families delineated as Lynch syndrome families. Predictive genetic diagnostics enables the identification of high risk individuals, who are offered participation in surveillance programmes that effectively reduce morbidity and mortality in colorectal cancer....

  14. Quality colonoscopy and risk of interval cancer in Lynch syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanstra, J. F.; Vasen, H. F. A.; Sanduleanu, S.; van der Wouden, E. J.; Koornstra, J. J.; Kleibeuker, J. H.; Cappel, W. H. de Vos Tot Nederveen

    2013-01-01

    Despite colonoscopic surveillance, Lynch syndrome patients develop colorectal cancer (CRC). Identification of modifiable factors has the potential to improve outcome of surveillance. The aims of this study were to determine (1) characteristics of patients with CRC, (2) endoscopic and histological

  15. [A Case of Ascending Colon Cancer with Lynch Syndrome Who Underwent XELOX Adjuvant Chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takase, Koki; Murata, Kohei; Kagawa, Yoshinori; Nose, Yohei; Kawai, Kenji; Sakamoto, Takuya; Naito, Atsushi; Murakami, Kohei; Katsura, Yoshiteru; Omura, Yoshiaki; Takeno, Atsushi; Nakatsuka, Shinichi; Takeda, Yutaka; Kato, Takeshi; Tamura, Shigeyuki

    2018-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is an inherited syndrome with the development of the colorectal and various other cancers. Lynch syndrome is caused by mutations in the mismatch repair genes. A 33 year-old male underwent XELOX adjuvant chemotherapy for ascending colon cancer with Lynch syndrome. Although efficacy of 5-FU is not demonstrated in Lynch syndrome, MOSAIC trial had suggested a benefit from FOLFOX compared with 5-FU in patients who have colorectal cancer with Lynch syndrome. Oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy can be a therapeutic option for colorectal cancer in lynch syndrome patients.

  16. Upper urinary tract carcinoma in Lynch syndrome cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, David G; Wagner, David G; Holmäng, Sten; Johansson, Sonny L; Lynch, Henry T

    2011-05-01

    Patients with Lynch syndrome are much more likely to have generally rare upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma but not bladder urothelial carcinoma. While the risk has been quantified, to our knowledge there is no description of how this population of patients with Lynch syndrome and upper urinary tract cancer differs from the general population with upper urinary tract cancer. We obtained retrospective data on a cohort of patients with Lynch syndrome from the Hereditary Cancer Center in Omaha, Nebraska and compared the data to those on a control general population from western Sweden. These data were supplemented by a new survey about exposure to known risk factors. Of the patients with Lynch syndrome 91% had mutations in MSH2 rather than in MSH1 and 79% showed upper tract urothelial carcinoma a mean of 15.85 years after prior Lynch syndrome-type cancer. Median age at diagnosis was 62 years vs 70 in the general population (p Lynch syndrome 51% had urothelial carcinoma in the ureter while it occurred in the renal pelvis in 65% of the general population (p = 0.0013). Similar numbers of high grade tumors were found in the Lynch syndrome and general populations (88% and 74%, respectively, p = 0.1108). Upper urinary tract tumors develop at a younger age and are more likely to be in the ureter with an almost equal gender ratio in patients with Lynch syndrome. It has high grade potential similar to that in the general population. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. PMS2 involvement in patients suspected of Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, Renée C; Kleibeuker, Jan H; Westers, Helga; Jager, Paul O J; Rozeveld, Dennie; Bos, Krista K; Boersma-van Ek, Wytske; Hollema, Harry; Sijmons, Rolf H; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2009-04-01

    It is well-established that germline mutations in the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 cause Lynch syndrome. However, mutations in these three genes do not account for all Lynch syndrome (suspected) families. Recently, it was shown that germline mutations in another mismatch repair gene, PMS2, play a far more important role in Lynch syndrome than initially thought. To explore this further, we determined the prevalence of pathogenic germline PMS2 mutations in a series of Lynch syndrome-suspected patients. Ninety-seven patients who had early-onset microsatellite instable colorectal or endometrial cancer, or multiple Lynch syndrome-associated tumors and/or were from an Amsterdam Criteria II-positive family were selected for this study. These patients carried no pathogenic germline mutation in MLH1, MSH2, or MSH6. When available, tumors were investigated for immunohistochemical staining (IHC) for PMS2. PMS2 was screened in all patients by exon-by-exon sequencing. We identified four patients with a pathogenic PMS2 mutation (4%) among the 97 patients we selected. IHC of PMS2 was informative in one of the mutation carriers, and in this case, the tumor showed loss of PMS2 expression. In conclusion, our study confirms the finding of previous studies that PMS2 is more frequently involved in Lynch syndrome than originally expected.

  18. Genetic anticipation in Swedish Lynch syndrome families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Salomé, Jenny; Boonstra, Philip S; Karimi, Masoud

    2017-01-01

    Among hereditary colorectal cancer predisposing syndromes, Lynch syndrome (LS) caused by mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 is the most common. Patients with LS have an increased risk of early onset colon and endometrial cancer, but also other tumors that generally have......-2013. We analyzed a homogenous group of mutation carriers, utilizing information from both affected and non-affected family members. In total, 239 families with a mismatch repair gene mutation (96 MLH1 families, 90 MSH2 families including one family with an EPCAM-MSH2 deletion, 39 MSH6 families, 12 PMS2...... families, and 2 MLH1+PMS2 families) comprising 1028 at-risk carriers were identified among the Swedish LS families, of which 1003 mutation carriers had available follow-up information and could be included in the study. Using a normal random effects model (NREM) we estimate a 2.1 year decrease in age...

  19. Role for Genetic Anticipation in Lynch Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilbert, Mef; Timshel, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Anticipation (ie, an earlier age at onset in successive generations) is linked to repeat expansion in neurodegenerative syndromes, whereas its role in hereditary cancer is unclear. We assessed anticipation in Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer [HNPCC]), in which DNA...... parent-child pairs in which age at the first cancer diagnosis was assessed. A paired t-test and a specifically developed bivariate model were used to assess a possible role of anticipation. RESULTS: Both methods revealed anticipation with children developing cancer mean 9.8 years (P ... parents using the paired t-test and 5.5 years (P anticipation with 7.2 years earlier age at onset was identified also in the oldest cohort, in which the children were observed until they were older than 80 years...

  20. Haematuria in association with Lynch syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwan Ma'ayeh

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A 40-year-old Caucasian male presented to the Emergency Department complaining of intermittent painless frank haematuria. Past medical history was significant for Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colon Cancer (HNPCC and a prophylactic total colectomy. Computed tomography urogram showed thickening in the posterior wall of the bladder. Cystoscopy showed a small bladder mass. Histology showed a papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential. HNPCC, also known as Lynch Syndrome, is an autosomal dominant disorder responsible for 3-5% of colorectal cancers. There are certain cancers known to be associated with HNPCC; colorectal cancer, endometrial, ovarian, stomach, pancreas, biliary tract, small bowel, brain, renal pelvic and ureteric tumours, sebaceous gland adenomas and keratocanthomas. An association with bladder tumours is not well established.

  1. Mismatch repair genes in Lynch syndrome: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Cavalcanti Carneiro da Silva

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome represents 1-7% of all cases of colorectal cancer and is an autosomal-dominant inherited cancer predisposition syndrome caused by germline mutations in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA mismatch repair genes. Since the discovery of the major human genes with DNA mismatch repair function, mutations in five of them have been correlated with susceptibility to Lynch syndrome: mutS homolog 2 (MSH2; mutL homolog 1 (MLH1; mutS homolog 6 (MSH6; postmeiotic segregation increased 2 (PMS2; and postmeiotic segregation increased 1 (PMS1. It has been proposed that one additional mismatch repair gene, mutL homolog 3 (MLH3, also plays a role in Lynch syndrome predisposition, but the clinical significance of mutations in this gene is less clear. According to the InSiGHT database (International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumors, approximately 500 different LS-associated mismatch repair gene mutations are known, primarily involving MLH1 (50% and MSH2 (40%, while others account for 10%. Much progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of Lynch Syndrome. Molecular characterization will be the most accurate way of defining Lynch syndrome and will provide predictive information of greater accuracy regarding the risks of colon and extracolonic cancer and enable optimal cancer surveillance regimens.

  2. Early days in the Lawrence Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMillan, E.M.

    1976-10-01

    Events at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory at Berkeley to the end of 1940 are recalled. Radiation detection, discovery of new isotopes and elements, and accelerators are among the subjects included. 29 photographs

  3. Women with double primary cancers of the colorectum and endometrium: do they have Lynch syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Taejong; Kim, Min Kyu; Lee, Yoo-Young; Choi, Chel Hun; Kim, Tae-Joong; Lee, Jeong-Won; Bae, Duk-Soo; Kim, Byoung-Gie

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics of women with double primary cancers of the colorectum and endometrium and assess the probability of Lynch syndrome. We identified 15 women with paraffin-embedded blocks available who were diagnosed, treated and followed for double primary colorectal and endometrial cancers at in a single institution between 1994 and 2014. If there was a family history that met the revised Amsterdam criteria for Lynch syndrome, the woman was considered to have 'clinically defined Lynch syndrome'. If immunohistochemical (IHC) loss of expression of mismatch repair genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, or PMS2) or high microsatellite instability (MSI) was demonstrated in molecular testing, the case was considered 'suspected Lynch syndrome'. The incidence of clinically defined Lynch syndrome according to the revised Amsterdam criteria was 66% (8 of 15). All 8 of the women clinically diagnosed with Lynch syndrome had either abnormal IHC loss or MSI-high, indicating a suspected Lynch syndrome. Furthermore, 27% (4 of 15) experienced second primary colorectal cancer or other Lynch syndrome-related cancers. Overall, 66% (10 of 15) met the criteria for clinically defined Lynch syndrome or suspected Lynch syndrome. Based on our findings, a large percentage (66%) of women with double primary cancers of the colorectum and endometrium are likely to be diagnosed with Lynch syndrome. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  4. Diagnosing lynch syndrome in absence of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Henry T; Knezetic, Joseph; Lanspa, Stephen

    2012-11-01

    There are many ways in which a diagnosis of Lynch syndrome can be made, most prominent of which is family history, presence of cancer, high microsatellite instability, immunohistochemistry, and a mismatch repair germline mutation. There are at least four molecular pathways for colorectal cancer carcinogenesis: 1) adenoma-carcinoma sequence; 2) hereditary microsatellite instability; 3) serrated pathway; 4) epidermal growth factor receptor. The answer to diagnosing Lynch syndrome in the absence of colorectal cancer may be partially based upon the phenotypic characteristics of the colonic polyps should they be identified at colonoscopy, specifically their phenotypic characteristics of location, size, histology, number, and age of polyp onset.

  5. Michael Wood’s Yangzhou Dream

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan; Dan

    2014-01-01

    <正>Mr.Michael Wood is a wellknown British historian and documentary maker who has produced more than a hundred documentaries on various national histories and cultures exemplified by The Story of India.They enjoy wide popularity in more than 150 countries.I met him in February when he took his fi lm crew to Yangzhou to shoot The Story of China documentary for the British Broadcasting Corporation(BBC).It was a snowy day,cold and wet,but Michael said happily that the

  6. Michael Tomasello: Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The APA Awards for Distinguished Scientific Contributions are presented to persons who, in the opinion of the Committee on Scientific Awards, have made distinguished theoretical or empirical contributions to basic research in psychology. One of the 2015 award winners is Michael Tomasello, who received this award for "outstanding empirical and theoretical contributions to understanding what makes the human mind unique. Michael Tomasello's pioneering research on the origins of social cognition has led to revolutionary insights in both developmental psychology and primate cognition." Tomasello's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Revised guidelines for the clinical management of Lynch syndrome (HNPCC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasen, Hans F A; Blanco, Ignacio; Aktan-Collan, Katja

    2013-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is characterised by the development of colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer and various other cancers, and is caused by a mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes: MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. In 2007, a group of European experts (the Mallorca group) published guidelines...

  8. Colorectal choriocarcinoma in a patient with probable Lynch syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Hendrik Koelzer

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Personalized therapy of colorectal cancer (CRC is influenced by morphological, molecular and host-related factors. Here we report the comprehensive clinicopathological and molecular analysis of a pure extra-gestational colorectal choriocarcinoma in a patient with probable Lynch syndrome.Case presentation: A 61 year old female with history of gastric cancer at age 36 presented with a transmurally invasive tumor of the right hemicolon and liver metastasis. A right hemicolectomy was performed. Histopathological analysis showed a mixed trophoblastic and syncytiotrophoblastic differentiation, consistent with choriocarcinoma. Disease progression was rapid under oxaliplatin, capecitabine, irinotecan (XELOXIRI and bevacizumab. Molecular phenotyping identified loss of the mismatch-repair (MMR protein PMS2, microsatellite instability, a lack of MLH1 promoter methylation and lack of of BRAF mutation suggestive of Lynch-Syndrome. Targeted next generation sequencing revealed an Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM p.P604S missense mutation. A bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin (BEP treatment protocol targeting germ-cell neoplasia lead to disease remission and prolonged survival of 34 months.Conclusions: Comprehensive immunohistochemical and genetic testing is essential to identify uncommon cancers possibly related to Lynch syndrome. For rare tumors, personalized therapeutic approaches should take both molecular and morphological information into account.Key words: Colorectal cancer, choriocarcinoma, histopathology, prognostic factors, Lynch syndrome, microsatellite instability, ataxia telangiectasia mutated, molecular pathology, next generation sequencing, personalized medicine

  9. Pain evaluation during gynaecological surveillance in women with Lynch syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helder-Woolderink, Jorien; de Bock, Geertruida; Hollema, Harry; van Oven, Magda; Mourits, Marian

    To evaluate perceived pain during repetitive annual endometrial sampling at gynaecologic surveillance in asymptomatic women with Lynch syndrome (LS) over time and in addition to symptomatic women without LS, undergoing single endometrial sampling. In this prospective study, 52 women with LS or first

  10. Pathological assessment of mismatch repair gene variants in Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Heinen, Christopher D; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte

    2012-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes and is the most prevalent hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome. A significant proportion of variants identified in MMR and other common cancer susceptibility genes are missense or noncoding changes whose...

  11. Sense of coherence and self-concept in Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helle Vendel; Ladelund, Steen; Carlsson, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Most individuals who learn about hereditary cancer manage well, but identification of subgroups who find this knowledge burdening would allow psychosocial intervention. The objective of the study was to assess sense of coherence (SOC) in individuals with Lynch syndrome with comparison to a general...

  12. Small bowel endoscopy in familial adenomatous polyposis and Lynch syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornstra, Jan Jacob

    Patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and patients with Lynch syndrome have an increased risk of developing small intestinal neoplasia. In both conditions, the lifetime risk to develop small bowel cancer is estimated to be around 5%. In FAP, this risk is associated with the degree of

  13. Surveillance for urinary tract cancer in Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernstein, Inge Thomsen; Myrhøj, Torben

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is an inherited multiorgan cancer syndrome, which when caused by a germline mutation in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes is known as Lynch syndrome (LS). Mutation carriers are at risk for developing cancers primarily in the colon, rectum...

  14. Fas Ligand Expression in Lynch Syndrome-Associated Colorectal Tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornstra, Jan J.; de Jong, Steven; Boersma-van Eck, Wietske; Zwart, Nynke; Hollema, Harry; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Kleibeuker, Jan H.

    Fas Ligand (FasL) expression by cancer cells may contribute to tumour immune escape via the Fas counterattack against tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). Whether this plays a role in colorectal carcinogenesis in Lynch syndrome was examined studying FasL expression, tumour cell apoptosis and

  15. Role of new endoscopic techniques in Lynch syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanstra, Jasmijn F.; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Koornstra, Jan J.

    Lynch syndrome, or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), is the most common hereditary condition predisposing for colorectal cancer. International guidelines recommend surveillance of the colorectum by colonoscopy every 1-2 years starting at the age of 20-25 years. This has been shown

  16. The identification of Lynch syndrome in Congolese colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poaty, Henriette; Aba Gandzion, Chandra; Soubeyran, Isabelle; Gassaye, Déby; Peko, Jean Félix; Nkoua Bon, Jean Bernard; Gombé Mbalawa, Charles

    2017-10-01

    We aimed to investigate the prevalence of Lynch syndrome as one of hereditary causes of colorectal cancer (CRC) among young Congolese individuals affected by the CRC, and to define methods for diagnosis in Congo Brazzaville. We conducted a transversal cohort study of 34 patients having a CRC with a family history for a period of eight years. They were selected among 89 CRCs of any type from the Bethesda guidelines criteria combined with pedigrees. Mismatch repair (MMR) genes alterations were researched by immunohistochemistry (IHC). We identified with the Bethesda criteria a total of 38.2% (34/89) patients having familial CRC with a confidence interval (CI) of 95%=[0.34-0.41]. Only 14.7% (5/34) 95% CI=[0.34-2.32] patients showed MMR immunodeficiency involving firstly MLH1 protein then MSH2 protein. These data account for 5.6% (5/89) 95% CI=[0.15-0.33] of patients affected by Lynch syndrome with an earlier median age of 35 years (range 20 to 47 years). The prevalence of Lynch syndrome found in Brazzaville is comparable to that is found in northern countries. The combined Bethesda guidelines, pedigree and IHC is an accessible and good alternative method for the positive diagnosis of Lynch syndrome in current practice in Congo. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Michael Heyrovsky, in memoriam (1932-2017)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Barek, J.; Černý, Slavoj; Herman, Zdeněk; Jindra, Jiří; Paleček, Emil

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 8 (2017), s. 2001-2002 ISSN 1040-0397 Institutional support: RVO:68378114 ; RVO:61388955 ; RVO:68081707 Keywords : Michael Heyrovský Subject RIV: AB - History OBOR OECD: History (history of science and technology to be 6.3, history of specific sciences to be under the respective headings) Impact factor: 2.851, year: 2016

  18. Reframing Michael Scott: Exploring Inappropriate Workplace Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Zachary A.

    2010-01-01

    Individuals who work in professional settings interact with others who may exhibit a variety of cultural beliefs and decision-making approaches. Page (2007) argues that cognitive diversity (i.e., how people approach and attempt to solve problems) is a vital asset in effective organizations. Michael Scott, who portrays the inept main character on…

  19. Michael Hauskeller: Sex and the Posthuman Condition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miller, Lantz Eugene

    2016-01-01

    This new book from Michael Hauskeller explores the currently marketed or projected sex/love products that exhibit some trait of so-called “posthumanistic” theory or design. These products are so designated because of their intention to fuse high technologies, including robotics and computing, with

  20. Aza-Michael reaction: achievements and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rulev, Alexander Yu

    2011-01-01

    Data published in the last 10 years on the use of the aza-Michael reaction in organic synthesis are described systematically. The attention is focused on environmentally friendly processes following green chemistry principles and on methods for the synthesis of compounds that are difficult to access by other routes.

  1. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosene, C. A.; Jones, H. E.

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2015 are to record Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) compliance with environmental standards and requirements, describe LLNL's environmental protection and remediation programs, and present the results of environmental monitoring at the two LLNL sites-the Livermore Site and Site 300. The report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by LLNL's Environmental Functional Area. Submittal of the report satisfies requirements under DOE Order 231.1B, ''Environment, Safety and Health Reporting,'' and DOE Order 458.1, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment.''

  2. Colorectal Cancer Risk in Patients With Lynch Syndrome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derikx, Lauranne A A P; Smits, Lisa J T; van Vliet, Shannon; Dekker, Evelien; Aalfs, Cora M; van Kouwen, Mariëtte C A; Nagengast, Fokko M; Nagtegaal, Iris D; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Hoentjen, Frank

    2017-03-01

    Lynch syndrome and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, it is not clear whether the risk of CRC is even higher for patients with a combination of Lynch syndrome and IBD. We investigated the risk for CRC in this subgroup by establishing a Lynch syndrome cohort from the Radboud University Medical Center (Nijmegen, The Netherlands) and the Academic Medical Center (Amsterdam, The Netherlands). Patients with heterozygous germline mutations in MLH1, MSH2 (and EPCAM deletion-mediated MSH2 methylation), MSH6, or PMS2 who were tested and/or treated from 1998 through 2014 were included. Patients who developed IBD were identified by linkage of this cohort to the Dutch nationwide Pathology Registry (PALGA). Subsequently, we compared the risk of CRC between Lynch syndrome patients with IBD and without IBD. Of 1046 patients with Lynch syndrome, 15 developed IBD (1.4%). Patients with Lynch syndrome and IBD were significantly younger (median age, 38.0 y) than patients with Lynch syndrome without IBD (median age, 52.0 y; P = .001). Nevertheless, a similar proportion of patients in each group developed CRC: 4 of the 15 patients (26.7%) with Lynch syndrome and IBD compared with 311 of the 1031 patients (30.2%) with Lynch syndrome without IBD. Patients with Lynch syndrome and IBD developed CRC at a younger age (median age, 36.0 y) than patients with Lynch syndrome without IBD (median age, 46.0 y; P = .045). However, the cumulative incidence of CRC was similar between groups (P = .121). All patients with Lynch syndrome and IBD who developed CRC had ulcerative colitis, producing a higher cumulative incidence of CRC for this IBD subgroup (P Lynch syndrome and IBD develop CRC risk at a younger age than patients without IBD; patients with ulcerative colitis are at especially high risk. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic anticipation in Swedish Lynch syndrome families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny von Salomé

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Among hereditary colorectal cancer predisposing syndromes, Lynch syndrome (LS caused by mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 is the most common. Patients with LS have an increased risk of early onset colon and endometrial cancer, but also other tumors that generally have an earlier onset compared to the general population. However, age at first primary cancer varies within families and genetic anticipation, i.e. decreasing age at onset in successive generations, has been suggested in LS. Anticipation is a well-known phenomenon in e.g neurodegenerative diseases and several reports have studied anticipation in heritable cancer. The purpose of this study is to determine whether anticipation can be shown in a nationwide cohort of Swedish LS families referred to the regional departments of clinical genetics in Lund, Stockholm, Linköping, Uppsala and Umeå between the years 1990-2013. We analyzed a homogenous group of mutation carriers, utilizing information from both affected and non-affected family members. In total, 239 families with a mismatch repair gene mutation (96 MLH1 families, 90 MSH2 families including one family with an EPCAM-MSH2 deletion, 39 MSH6 families, 12 PMS2 families, and 2 MLH1+PMS2 families comprising 1028 at-risk carriers were identified among the Swedish LS families, of which 1003 mutation carriers had available follow-up information and could be included in the study. Using a normal random effects model (NREM we estimate a 2.1 year decrease in age of diagnosis per generation. An alternative analysis using a mixed-effects Cox proportional hazards model (COX-R estimates a hazard ratio of exp(0.171, or about 1.19, for age of diagnosis between consecutive generations. LS-associated gene-specific anticipation effects are evident for MSH2 (2.6 years/generation for NREM and hazard ratio of 1.33 for COX-R and PMS2 (7.3 years/generation and hazard ratio of 1.86. The estimated anticipation effects for MLH1

  4. Genetic anticipation in Swedish Lynch syndrome families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Salomé, Jenny; Boonstra, Philip S; Karimi, Masoud; Silander, Gustav; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Gebre-Medhin, Samuel; Aravidis, Christos; Nilbert, Mef; Lindblom, Annika; Lagerstedt-Robinson, Kristina

    2017-10-01

    Among hereditary colorectal cancer predisposing syndromes, Lynch syndrome (LS) caused by mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 is the most common. Patients with LS have an increased risk of early onset colon and endometrial cancer, but also other tumors that generally have an earlier onset compared to the general population. However, age at first primary cancer varies within families and genetic anticipation, i.e. decreasing age at onset in successive generations, has been suggested in LS. Anticipation is a well-known phenomenon in e.g neurodegenerative diseases and several reports have studied anticipation in heritable cancer. The purpose of this study is to determine whether anticipation can be shown in a nationwide cohort of Swedish LS families referred to the regional departments of clinical genetics in Lund, Stockholm, Linköping, Uppsala and Umeå between the years 1990-2013. We analyzed a homogenous group of mutation carriers, utilizing information from both affected and non-affected family members. In total, 239 families with a mismatch repair gene mutation (96 MLH1 families, 90 MSH2 families including one family with an EPCAM-MSH2 deletion, 39 MSH6 families, 12 PMS2 families, and 2 MLH1+PMS2 families) comprising 1028 at-risk carriers were identified among the Swedish LS families, of which 1003 mutation carriers had available follow-up information and could be included in the study. Using a normal random effects model (NREM) we estimate a 2.1 year decrease in age of diagnosis per generation. An alternative analysis using a mixed-effects Cox proportional hazards model (COX-R) estimates a hazard ratio of exp(0.171), or about 1.19, for age of diagnosis between consecutive generations. LS-associated gene-specific anticipation effects are evident for MSH2 (2.6 years/generation for NREM and hazard ratio of 1.33 for COX-R) and PMS2 (7.3 years/generation and hazard ratio of 1.86). The estimated anticipation effects for MLH1 and MSH6 are

  5. DNA mismatch repair protein deficient non-neoplastic colonic crypts: a novel indicator of Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Rish K; Dudley, Beth; Karloski, Eve; Brand, Randall E; O'Callaghan, Neil; Rosty, Christophe; Buchanan, Daniel D; Jenkins, Mark A; Thibodeau, Stephen N; French, Amy J; Lindor, Noralane M; Pai, Reetesh K

    2018-06-08

    Lynch syndrome is the most common form of hereditary colorectal carcinoma. However, establishing the diagnosis of Lynch syndrome is challenging, and ancillary studies that distinguish between sporadic DNA mismatch repair (MMR) protein deficiency and Lynch syndrome are needed, particularly when germline mutation studies are inconclusive. The aim of this study was to determine if MMR protein-deficient non-neoplastic intestinal crypts can help distinguish between patients with and without Lynch syndrome. We evaluated the expression of MMR proteins in non-neoplastic intestinal mucosa obtained from colorectal surgical resection specimens from patients with Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal carcinoma (n = 52) and patients with colorectal carcinoma without evidence of Lynch syndrome (n = 70), including sporadic MMR protein-deficient colorectal carcinoma (n = 30), MMR protein proficient colorectal carcinoma (n = 30), and "Lynch-like" syndrome (n = 10). MMR protein-deficient non-neoplastic colonic crypts were identified in 19 of 122 (16%) patients. MMR protein-deficient colonic crypts were identified in 18 of 52 (35%) patients with Lynch syndrome compared to only 1 of 70 (1%) patients without Lynch syndrome (p Lynch-like" syndrome and harbored two MSH2-deficient non-neoplastic colonic crypts. MMR protein-deficient non-neoplastic colonic crypts were not identified in patients with sporadic MMR protein-deficient or MMR protein proficient colorectal carcinoma. Our findings suggest that MMR protein-deficient colonic crypts are a novel indicator of Lynch syndrome, and evaluation for MMR protein-deficient crypts may be a helpful addition to Lynch syndrome diagnostics.

  6. Michael Haneke film Euroopa parim / M. T.

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    M. T.

    2005-01-01

    IX PÖFFil linastuv Michael Haneke film "Varjatud" ("Cache") võitis laupäeval mitu Euroopa Filmiakadeemia auhinda, selhulgas parima filmi, parima lavastaja, parima meesnäitleja (Daniel Auteuil) ja FIPRESCI auhinna. Parim naisnäitleja - Julia Jentsch ("Sophie Scholli viimased päevad"), operaator - Franz Lustig ("Don't Come Knocking"), stsenaarium - Hany Abu-Assad, Bero Beyer ("Kohe paradiisi")

  7. The genetic basis of Lynch syndrome and its implications for clinical practice and risk management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Stephanie A; Leininger, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is the most common cause of hereditary colon cancer, and accounts for as much as 3% of all colon and endometrial cancers. The identification and management of individuals with Lynch syndrome have evolved over the past 20 years, yet the syndrome remains vastly underdiagnosed. It is important for clinicians to recognize individuals and families who are at risk in order to be able to manage them appropriately and reduce their morbidity and mortality from this condition. This review will touch on the history of Lynch syndrome, the current knowledge of genotype–phenotype correlations, the cancers associated with Lynch syndrome, and management of individuals who are gene carriers. PMID:25161364

  8. Metachronous Uterine Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma and Peritoneal Mesothelioma in Lynch Syndrome: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuxin; Milchgrub, Sara; Khatri, Gaurav; Gopal, Purva

    2017-05-01

    Lynch syndrome is a hereditary disease with germline mutation in a DNA mismatch repair gene, most often presenting with colorectal and/or endometrial carcinomas; however, the spectrum of Lynch syndrome-associated tumors is expanding. In this article, we report a case of a primary peritoneal epithelioid mesothelioma that developed in a Lynch syndrome patient 10 months after diagnosis of uterine endometrioid adenocarcinoma. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a Lynch syndrome patient with metachronous uterine endometrioid adenocarcinoma and primary peritoneal mesothelioma.

  9. Current Hypotheses on How Microsatellite Instability Leads to Enhanced Survival of Lynch Syndrome Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen M. Drescher

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available High levels of microsatellite instability (MSI-high are a cardinal feature of colorectal tumors from patients with Lynch Syndrome. Other key characteristics of Lynch Syndrome are that these patients experience fewer metastases and have enhanced survival when compared to patients diagnosed with microsatellite stable (MSS colorectal cancer. Many of the characteristics associated with Lynch Syndrome including enhanced survival are also observed in patients with sporadic MSI-high colorectal cancer. In this review we will present the current state of knowledge regarding the mechanisms that are utilized by the host to control colorectal cancer in Lynch Syndrome and why these same mechanisms fail in MSS colorectal cancers.

  10. Current hypotheses on how microsatellite instability leads to enhanced survival of Lynch Syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drescher, Kristen M; Sharma, Poonam; Lynch, Henry T

    2010-01-01

    High levels of microsatellite instability (MSI-high) are a cardinal feature of colorectal tumors from patients with Lynch Syndrome. Other key characteristics of Lynch Syndrome are that these patients experience fewer metastases and have enhanced survival when compared to patients diagnosed with microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer. Many of the characteristics associated with Lynch Syndrome including enhanced survival are also observed in patients with sporadic MSI-high colorectal cancer. In this review we will present the current state of knowledge regarding the mechanisms that are utilized by the host to control colorectal cancer in Lynch Syndrome and why these same mechanisms fail in MSS colorectal cancers.

  11. 78 FR 56609 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    ... Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice canceling temporary... Beach Bridge, mile 0.4, across Reynolds Channel, at Lawrence, New York. The owner of the bridge, Nassau... published a temporary deviation entitled ``Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY...

  12. Obituary: Michael James Ledlow, 1964-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puxley, Philip John; Grashuis, Randon M.

    2004-12-01

    Michael James Ledlow died on 5 June 2004 from a large, unsuspected brain tumor. Since 2000 he had been on the scientific staff of the Gemini Observatory in La Serena, Chile, initially as a Science Fellow and then as a tenure-track astronomer. Michael was born in Bartlesville, Oklahoma on 1 October 1964 to Jerry and Sharon Ledlow. He obtained his Bachelor Degree in astrophysics at the University of Oklahoma in 1987 and attended the University of New Mexico for his graduate work, obtaining his PhD while studying Galaxy Clusters under Frazer Owen in 1994. From 1995-1997 Michael held a postdoctoral position with Jack Burns at New Mexico State University where he used various astronomical facilities including the VLA and Apache Point Observatory to study distant galaxies. From 1998-2000 Michael rejoined the Physics and Astronomy Department at the University of New Mexico where he was a visiting professor until he moved on to Gemini. At the Gemini Observatory, Mike shared in the excitement, hard work and many long days and nights associated with bringing on-line a major new astronomical facility and its instrumentation. Following its commissioning he assisted visiting observers, supported and took data for many more remote users via the queue system, and for each he showed the same care and attention to detail evident in his own research to ensure that all got the best possible data. His research concentrated on the radio and optical properties of galaxy clusters, especially rich Abell clusters such as A2125, on luminous radio galaxies, including the detection of a powerful double radio source in the "wrong sort of galaxy," the spiral system 0313-192, and on EROs (extremely red objects), dusty galaxies barely detectable at optical wavelengths. Michael thoroughly enjoyed living in Chile and enthusiastically immersed himself in the culture of his surroundings. He and his family were actively involved with the International English Spanish Association in La Serena. He had a

  13. Lynch Syndrome Caused by Germline PMS2 Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ten Broeke, Sanne W; Brohet, Richard M; Tops, Carli M

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The clinical consequences of PMS2 germline mutations are poorly understood compared with other Lynch-associated mismatch repair gene (MMR) mutations. The aim of this European cohort study was to define the cancer risk faced by PMS2 mutation carriers. METHODS: Data were collected from 98...... PMS2 families ascertained from family cancer clinics that included a total of 2,548 family members and 377 proven mutation carriers. To adjust for potential ascertainment bias, a modified segregation analysis model was used to calculate colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC) risks....... Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated to estimate risks for other Lynch syndrome-associated cancers. RESULTS: The cumulative risk (CR) of CRC for male mutation carriers by age 70 years was 19%. The CR among female carriers was 11% for CRC and 12% for EC. The mean age of CRC development was 52...

  14. Ssk or Esw? -- the Bloor-Lynch Debate Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kai-Yuan

    2014-03-01

    Philosophical discussions of rule-following in the later Wittgenstein (1953, 1967) are an important source of inspiration for the development of views on the social nature of scientific knowledge. Two major opposing views in this inquiry -- Bloor's sociology of scientific knowledge (SSK) (1983, 1991, 1992, 1997) and Lynch's (1992, 1993) ethnomethodological studies of work (ESW) -- represent two positions derived from two different readings of Wittgenstein's later writings on rule-following. The aim of this paper is two-fold. One is to re-examine the noted Bloor-Lynch debate by considering Kusch's (2004) recent discussion of this debate. Another is to show that a new semantic framework of rule-following ascriptions based on a cognitive approach to the study of generics can be provided such that SSK and ESW are compatible in it (Leslie, 2009; Cheng, 2011).

  15. Indsigter og udfordringer i danske Lynch-syndrom-familier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, Christina; Timshel, Susanne; Nilbert, Mef

    2008-01-01

    The Danish Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) Register is a national resource that registers families with hereditary colorectal cancer. HNPCC is the most common type of hereditary colorectal cancer and carries an increased risk of other tumor types. Genetic diagnostics has...... identified 88 unique mutations in 164 Danish families delineated as Lynch syndrome families. Predictive genetic diagnostics enables the identification of high risk individuals, who are offered participation in surveillance programmes that effectively reduce morbidity and mortality in colorectal cancer....

  16. Fertility and apparent genetic anticipation in Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupart, Douglas; Win, Aung Ko; Jenkins, Mark; Winship, Ingrid M; Goldberg, Paul; Ramesar, Rajkumar

    2014-09-01

    Genetic anticipation is the phenomenon in which age of onset of an inherited disorder decreases in successive generations. Inconsistent evidence suggests that this occurs in Lynch syndrome. A possible cause for apparent anticipation is fecundity bias, which occurs if the disease adversely affects fertility. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of age of diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) on lifetime fertility in Lynch syndrome, and whether this can falsely create the appearance of genetic anticipation. A computer model simulated age of diagnosis of CRC in hypothetical Lynch syndrome carriers and their offspring. The model assumed similar age distribution of CRC across generations (i.e. that there was no true anticipation). Age distribution of CRC diagnosis, and lifetime fertility rates (grouped by age of diagnosis of CRC) were determined from the Australasian Colorectal Cancer Family Registry (ACCFR). Apparent anticipation was calculated by comparing ages of diagnosis of CRC in affected parent-child pairs. A total of 1,088 patients with CRC were identified from the ACCFR. Total lifetime (cohort) fertility was related to age of diagnosis of CRC (correlation coefficient 0.13, P = 0.0001). In the simulation, apparent anticipation was 1.8 ± 0.54 years (P = 0.0044). Observed apparent anticipation in the ACCFR cohort was 4.8 ± 1.73 years (P = 0.0064). There was no difference in apparent anticipation between the simulate d and observed parent-child pairs (P = 0.89). The appearance of genetic anticipation in Lynch syndrome can be falsely created due to changes in fertility.

  17. Efficacy of b-lynch brace suture in postpartum haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarique, S.; Wazir, S.; Moeen, G.

    2011-01-01

    Massive uncontrolled haemorrhage after childbirth is the leading cause of maternal death in developing countries. Postpartum haemorrhage is traditionally defined as blood loss of more than 500 ml after vaginal delivery and more than 1000 ml after caesarean section, but intraoperative estimation of blood loss is inaccurate. Uterine atony alone accounts for 75 - 90% of PPH. To estimate the effectiveness and safety of B-Lynch brace Suture in the management of primary postpartum haemorrhage (PPH). (author)

  18. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, H. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bertoldo, N. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Blake, R. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Buscheck, W. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Byrne, J. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cerruti, S. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bish, C. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fratanduono, M. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Grayson, A. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacQueen, D. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Montemayor, W. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ottaway, H. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Paterson, L. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Revelli, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rosene, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Swanson, K. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Terrill, A. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wegrecki, A. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wilson, K. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Woollett, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-09-29

    The purposes of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2014 are to record Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s (LLNL’s) compliance with environmental standards and requirements, describe LLNL’s environmental protection and remediation programs, and present the results of environmental monitoring at the two LLNL sites—the Livermore Site and Site 300. The report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by LLNL’s Environmental Functional Area. Submittal of the report satisfies requirements under DOE Order 231.1B, “Environment, Safety and Health Reporting,” and DOE Order 458.1, “Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment.”

  19. Marine geology of the St. Lawrence Estuary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St-Onge, Guillaume [Canada Research Chair in Marine Geology, Institut des sciences de la mer de Rimouski (ISMER) and GEOTOP Research Center, 310 allee des Ursulines, Rimouski, Quebec, G5L 3A1 (Canada); Duchesne, Mathieu J [Geological Survey of Canada, Quebec Division, 490 de la Couronne, Quebec City, Quebec, G1K 9A9 (Canada); Lajeunesse, Patrick, E-mail: guillaume_st-onge@uqar.qc.ca [Departement de geographie and Centre d' etudes nordiques, Universite Laval, Quebec City, Quebec, G1V 0A6 (Canada)

    2011-05-15

    The St. Lawrence Estuary, Eastern Canada, contains a very thick (>450 m) Quaternary sedimentary sequence. The results from recently conducted geophysical surveys in conjunction with piston coring indicate that these sediments were deposited under very high sedimentation rates, sometimes as high as {approx}30 m/ka during the last deglaciation. Results also reveal evidence of large submarine landslides during the Holocene, changes in sedimentation rates and the significant role of submarine canyons and channels to transfer sediments from the coast to the deeper marine environment. Finally, this paper highlights the presence of more than 1900 pockmarks on the seafloor of the St. Lawrence Estuary and discusses their possible origins: active hydrocarbon seeps in the Laurentian Channel and biogenic gas seepage on the northwestern shoulder of the Laurentian Channel.

  20. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosene, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jones, H. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-22

    The purposes of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2015 are to record Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s (LLNL’s) compliance with environmental standards and requirements, describe LLNL’s environmental protection and remediation programs, and present the results of environmental monitoring at the two LLNL sites—the Livermore Site and Site 300. The report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by LLNL’s Environmental Functional Area. Submittal of the report satisfies requirements under DOE Order 231.1B, “Environment, Safety and Health Reporting,” and DOE Order 458.1, “Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment.”

  1. Marine geology of the St. Lawrence Estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    St-Onge, Guillaume; Duchesne, Mathieu J; Lajeunesse, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    The St. Lawrence Estuary, Eastern Canada, contains a very thick (>450 m) Quaternary sedimentary sequence. The results from recently conducted geophysical surveys in conjunction with piston coring indicate that these sediments were deposited under very high sedimentation rates, sometimes as high as ∼30 m/ka during the last deglaciation. Results also reveal evidence of large submarine landslides during the Holocene, changes in sedimentation rates and the significant role of submarine canyons and channels to transfer sediments from the coast to the deeper marine environment. Finally, this paper highlights the presence of more than 1900 pockmarks on the seafloor of the St. Lawrence Estuary and discusses their possible origins: active hydrocarbon seeps in the Laurentian Channel and biogenic gas seepage on the northwestern shoulder of the Laurentian Channel.

  2. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1993 Site Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    This annual Site Environmental Report summarizes Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s (LBL`s) environmental activities in calendar year (CY) 1993. The purpose of this report is to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts. Its format and content are consistent with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  3. Environmental report 1997, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentzner, H.L.; Morris, J.C.; Harrach, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the environmental program activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for 1997. This report accurately summarizes the results of environmental monitoring, compliance, impacts assessment, and the restoration program at LLNL. It features individual chapters on monitoring of air, sewage, surface water, ground water, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuff, and environmental radiation. It also contains chapters on site overview, environmental program information, radiological dose assessment, and quality assurance

  4. Superconductor development program at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornish, D.N.

    1978-01-01

    Winding of a Nb--Ti test coil at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory is nearly complete. The conductor in this coil operates in a maximum field of 7.5 T and provides the 2-T field required by the Mirror Fusion Test Facility. Nb 3 Sn multifilamentary conductors, made using the ''bronze'' technique, appear capable of providing the higher fields needed by commercial reactors

  5. Radiographic testing at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossi, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    Radiographic testing is a nondestructive inspection technique which uses penetrating radiation. The Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Section at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has a broad spectrum of equipment and techniques for radiographic testing. These resources include low-energy vacuum systems, low- and mid-energy cabinet and cell radiographic systems, high-energy linear accelerators, portable x-ray machines and radioisotopes for radiographic inspections. For diagnostic testing the NDE Section also has real-time and flash radiographic equipment

  6. Environmental report 1996, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentzner, H.L.; Napolitano, M.M.; Harrach, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the environmental program activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for 1996. This report accurately summarizes the results of environmental monitoring, compliance, impacts assessment, and the restoration program at LLNL. It features individual chapters on monitoring of air, sewage, surface water, ground water, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuff, and environmental radiation. It also contains chapters on site overview, environmental program information, radiological dose assessment, and quality assurance

  7. The mutational spectrum of Lynch syndrome in cyprus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A Loizidou

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome is the most common form of hereditary colorectal cancer and is caused by germline mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. Mutation carriers have an increased lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer as well as other extracolonic tumours. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the frequency and distribution of mutations in the MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 genes within a cohort of Cypriot families that fulfilled the revised Bethesda guidelines. The study cohort included 77 patients who fulfilled at least one of the revised Bethesda guidelines. Mutational analysis revealed the presence of 4 pathogenic mutations, 3 in the MLH1 gene and 1 in the MSH2 gene, in 5 unrelated individuals. It is noted that out of the 4 pathogenic mutations detected, one is novel (c.1610delG in exon 14 of the MLH1 and has been detected for the first time in the Cypriot population. Overall, the pathogenic mutation detection rate in our patient cohort was 7%. This percentage is relatively low but could be explained by the fact that the sole criterion for genetic screening was compliance to the revised Bethesda guidelines. Larger numbers of Lynch syndrome families and screening of the two additional predisposition genes, PMS2 and EPCAM, are needed in order to decipher the full spectrum of mutations associated with Lynch syndrome predisposition in Cyprus.

  8. Life sciences: Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-07-01

    Life Sciences Research at LBL has both a long history and a new visibility. The physics technologies pioneered in the days of Ernest O. Lawrence found almost immediate application in the medical research conducted by Ernest's brother, John Lawrence. And the tradition of nuclear medicine continues today, largely uninterrupted for more than 50 years. Until recently, though, life sciences research has been a secondary force at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). Today, a true multi-program laboratory has emerged, in which the life sciences participate as a full partner. The LBL Human Genome Center is a contribution to the growing international effort to map the human genome. Its achievements represent LBL divisions, including Engineering, Materials and Chemical Sciences, and Information and Computing Sciences, along with Cell and Molecular Biology and Chemical Biodynamics. The Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center will comprise not only beamlines and experimental end stations, but also supporting laboratories and office space for scientists from across the US. This effort reflects a confluence of scientific disciplines --- this time represented by individuals from the life sciences divisions and by engineers and physicists associated with the Advanced Light Source project. And finally, this report itself, the first summarizing the efforts of all four life sciences divisions, suggests a new spirit of cooperation. 30 figs.

  9. Life sciences: Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    Life Sciences Research at LBL has both a long history and a new visibility. The physics technologies pioneered in the days of Ernest O. Lawrence found almost immediate application in the medical research conducted by Ernest's brother, John Lawrence. And the tradition of nuclear medicine continues today, largely uninterrupted for more than 50 years. Until recently, though, life sciences research has been a secondary force at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). Today, a true multi-program laboratory has emerged, in which the life sciences participate as a full partner. The LBL Human Genome Center is a contribution to the growing international effort to map the human genome. Its achievements represent LBL divisions, including Engineering, Materials and Chemical Sciences, and Information and Computing Sciences, along with Cell and Molecular Biology and Chemical Biodynamics. The Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center will comprise not only beamlines and experimental end stations, but also supporting laboratories and office space for scientists from across the US. This effort reflects a confluence of scientific disciplines --- this time represented by individuals from the life sciences divisions and by engineers and physicists associated with the Advanced Light Source project. And finally, this report itself, the first summarizing the efforts of all four life sciences divisions, suggests a new spirit of cooperation. 30 figs

  10. Systematic immunohistochemical screening for Lynch syndrome in colorectal cancer: a single centre experience of 486 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumstein, Valentin; Vinzens, Fabrizio; Zettl, Andreas; Heinimann, Karl; Koeberle, Dieter; von Flüe, Markus; Bolli, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 cause autosomal dominantly inherited Lynch syndrome. Lynch syndrome patients and their families benefit from life-saving intensive cancer surveillance. Approximately one in 30 colorectal cancers arises in the setting of Lynch syndrome. The aim of this study was to assess the detection rate of Lynch syndrome at our institution after introduction of systematic immunohistochemical screening for MMR deficiency in colorectal cancers from 2011 to 2015. Following the recommendations by the Evaluation of Genomic Applications in Practice and Prevention working group all colorectal cancers were immunohistochemically stained for the presence of MMR proteins MLH1, PMS2, MSH2 and MSH6, independent of clinical criteria. In the case of loss of MLH1, the somatic BRAF mutation V600E was assessed with molecular testing and/or immunohistochemistry. Clinical follow-up of potential Lynch syndrome carriers (patients with tumours showing loss of MLH1 expression with absence of BRAFV600E, loss of PMS2, MSH2 or MSH6) was evaluated. Of all patients (n = 486), loss of MMR protein expression was found in 73 (15.0%) tumours. Twenty-eight (6.0%) were classified as potential Lynch syndrome carriers. Of the genetically tested potential Lynch syndrome carriers (10 out of 28 patients), 40% were first diagnosed with Lynch syndrome. Implementation of systematic immunohistochemistry screening for Lynch syndrome showed that 6% of colorectal cancers were potentially Lynch-syndrome related. Tumour board protocols should systematically contain information on MMR status of all colorectal cancers and, in MMR deficient cases, include clear recommendations for genetic counselling for all potential Lynch syndrome patients.

  11. Obituary: Lawrence Hugh Aller, 1913-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaler, James B.

    2003-12-01

    The announcement still lies in my inbox: ``Lawrence Aller died last Sunday." On 16 March 2003, one of the world's fine astronomers passed away at the age of 89, leaving behind a legacy that will ripple as long as there are students of the celestial science, one that incorporated observation, theory, education, care, decency, and kindness. Lawrence was born in the humblest of conditions in Tacoma, Washington, on 24 September 1913. His mother, Lella (Belle) Allen, was a homemaker and his father Leslie Aller, was an occassional printer and gold prospector who thought that the use of the mind was a waste of time. With fierce persistence and dedication, Lawrence pulled off a feat that would probably not be possible now: getting into college without having finished high school, the result of being dragged to work in his father's primitive gold mining camp. His interest, sparked by leaflets from the Astronomical Society of the Pacific and by Russell, Dugan, and Stewart's venerable textbook, led him to a correspondence, and finally a meeting, with Donald Menzel of Harvard, who persuaded the admissions director of the University of California at Berkeley to admit him in 1932. From there, Lawrence went on to graduate school at Harvard and the Harvard Society of Fellows, where he studied with Menzel and developed his interest in stellar and nebular astronomy. After working in the War effort, he made his professorial debut at Indiana University, where he stayed until 1948 before leaving for the University of Michigan. Residing there for the next 14 years, he established his research reputation and helped develop the Michigan graduate program. In 1962, the opportunity arose to return to California, to UCLA, where he again was instrumental in founding a PhD program. There he stayed, through his retirement in 1984, doing research right up to the end. Eight other schools received him as visiting professor. Lawrence knew that to make inroads into astronomy, he needed to apply

  12. [Colorectal Carcinoma with Suspected Lynch Syndrome: A Multidisciplinary Algorithm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, R; Schneider, C; Büttner, R; Reinacher-Schick, A; Tannapfel, A; Fürst, A; Rüschoff, J; Jakobeit, C; Royer-Pokora, B; Möslein, G

    2015-12-01

    Lynch syndrome is the most frequent hereditary cancer syndrome, accounting for approximately 3-5 % of all colorectal cancers. In addition, it is the most frequent predisposing hereditary cause of endometrial cancer and is also associated with gastric cancer, ovarian cancer, cancer of the urinary tract as well as several other cancers. In clinical practise Lynch syndrome is frequently not detected and many clinicians admit uncertainties regarding diagnostic procedures. Also, counselling of patients is considered difficult regarding therapeutic - especially prophylactic surgical and chemopreventive options and recommendations. Based on a review of available literature we discuss optimized strategies for improved detection of suspected Lynch syndrome patients. The aim of this review is to establish a clinical algorithm of how to proceed on a diagnostic level and to discuss surgical options at the time of a colorectal cancer. In order to identify patients with Lynch syndrome, family history should be ascertained and evaluated in regards to fulfilment of the Amsterdam-II- and/or the revised Bethesda criteria. Subsequently immunohistochemical staining for the mismatch-repair-genes, BRAF testing for MLH1 loss of expression, as well as testing for microsatellite instability in some, followed by genetic counselling and mutation analysis when indicated, is recommended. Pathological identification of suspected Lynch syndrome is readily feasible and straightforward. However, the need of performing these analyses in the tumor biopsy at the time of (gastroenterological) diagnosis of CRC neoplasia is essential, in order to offer patients the option of a prophylactically extended surgery and - as recommended in the German S3 guidelines - to discuss the option of a merely prophylactical hysterectomy and oophorectomy (if postmenopausal) in women. Close cooperation between gastroenterologists, pathologists and surgeons is warranted, so that patients may benefit from options of

  13. Risk of colorectal and endometrial cancers in EPCAM deletion-positive Lynch syndrome : a cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempers, Marlies J. E.; Kuiper, Roland P.; Ockeloen, Charlotte W.; Chappuis, Pierre O.; Hutter, Pierre; Rahner, Nils; Schackert, Hans K.; Steinke, Verena; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Morak, Monika; Kloor, Matthias; Buettner, Reinhard; Verwiel, Eugene T. P.; van Krieken, J. Han; Nagtegaal, Iris D.; Goossens, Monique; van der Post, Rachel S.; Niessen, Renee C.; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Kluijt, Irma; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Leter, Edward M.; Gille, Johan J. P.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Redeker, Egbert J. W.; Hes, Frederik J.; Tops, Carli M. J.; van Nesselrooij, Bernadette P. M.; van Gijn, Marielle E.; Garcia, Encarna B. Gomez; Eccles, Diana M.; Bunyan, David J.; Syngal, Sapna; Stoffel, Elena M.; Culver, Julie O.; Palomares, Melanie R.; Graham, Tracy; Velsher, Lea; Papp, Janos; Olah, Edith; Chan, Tsun L.; Leung, Suet Y.; van Kessel, Ad Geurts; Kiemeney, Lambertus A. L. M.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.

    Background Lynch syndrome is caused by germline mutations in MSH2, MLH1, MSH6, and PMS2 mismatch-repair genes and leads to a high risk of colorectal and endometrial cancer. We previously showed that constitutional 3' end deletions of EPCAM can cause Lynch syndrome through epigenetic silencing of

  14. Small-bowel cancer in Lynch syndrome : is it time for surveillance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornstra, Jan J.; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Vasen, Hans F. A.

    Small-bowel cancer is part of the tumour spectrum of Lynch syndrome. Lynch syndrome, or hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, is caused by germline mutations in one of the mismatch repair genes. Mutation carriers have an estimated lifetime risk for the development of small-bowel cancer of

  15. Predicting the impact of Lynch syndrome-causing missense mutations from structural calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofie V,; Stein, Amelie; Dinitzen, Alexander B.

    2017-01-01

    selected the human mismatch repair protein, MSH2, where missense variants are known to cause the hereditary cancer predisposition disease, known as Lynch syndrome. We show that the majority of disease-causing MSH2 mutations give rise to folding defects and proteasome-dependent degradation rather than...... and for diagnosis of Lynch syndrome, and perhaps other hereditary diseases....

  16. Colorectal Cancer Risk in Patients With Lynch Syndrome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derikx, L.A.A.P.; Smits, L.J.T.; Lent-van Vliet, S. van; Dekker, E.; Aalfs, C.M.; Kouwen, M.C.A. van; Nagengast, F.M.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Hoentjen, F.

    2017-01-01

    Lynch syndrome and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, it is not clear whether the risk of CRC is even higher for patients with a combination of Lynch syndrome and IBD. We investigated the risk for CRC in this subgroup by

  17. Michael Roitmann : Kalandus ei ole Eestile ilmselt prioriteetne valdkond / Michael Roitmann ; interv. Marko Saaret

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Roitmann, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Delovõje Vedomosti 3. dets. lk. 9. Euroopa Komisjoni kalandusdirektoraadi koordinaator Euroopa Liidu laienemise küsimuses Michael Roitmann juhib tähelepanu Eesti kalanduse suurematele probleemidele ning prognoosib EL-iga liitumise mõju Eesti kalandussektori arengule

  18. Lynch Syndrome-Related Clear Cell Carcinoma of the Cervix: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kohei; Nakayama, Kentaro; Minamoto, Toshiko; Ishibashi, Tomoka; Ohnishi, Kaori; Yamashita, Hitomi; Ono, Ruriko; Sasamori, Hiroki; Razia, Sultana; Hossain, Mohammad Mahmud; Kamrunnahar, Shanta; Ishikawa, Masako; Ishikawa, Noriyoshi; Kyo, Satoru

    2018-01-01

    Lynch syndrome, a hereditary cancer syndrome, occurs because of germline mutations in at least one of four DNA mismatch repair genes (MutL Homolog 1 (MLH1), MutS Homolog 2 (MSH2), MutS Homolog 6 (MSH6), and PMS1 Homolog 2 (PMS2)). The disorder is associated with colorectal, endometrial, and other epithelial malignancies, but not cervical cancer. We report a woman with Lynch syndrome with synchronous cervical cancer. This is the first report of Lynch syndrome-related clear cell carcinoma of the cervix, which indicates the possibility of an association between cervical cancer and Lynch syndrome. Suitable genetic tests are required to determine whether common genetics can account for synchronous or subsequent malignancies in Lynch syndrome patients and their families. Such knowledge will also enhance our understanding of the genetic mechanisms governing the development of apparently unrelated cancers. PMID:29587389

  19. Lynch Syndrome-Related Clear Cell Carcinoma of the Cervix: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Nakamura

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome, a hereditary cancer syndrome, occurs because of germline mutations in at least one of four DNA mismatch repair genes (MutL Homolog 1 (MLH1, MutS Homolog 2 (MSH2, MutS Homolog 6 (MSH6, and PMS1 Homolog 2 (PMS2. The disorder is associated with colorectal, endometrial, and other epithelial malignancies, but not cervical cancer. We report a woman with Lynch syndrome with synchronous cervical cancer. This is the first report of Lynch syndrome-related clear cell carcinoma of the cervix, which indicates the possibility of an association between cervical cancer and Lynch syndrome. Suitable genetic tests are required to determine whether common genetics can account for synchronous or subsequent malignancies in Lynch syndrome patients and their families. Such knowledge will also enhance our understanding of the genetic mechanisms governing the development of apparently unrelated cancers.

  20. Lynch Syndrome-Related Clear Cell Carcinoma of the Cervix: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kohei; Nakayama, Kentaro; Minamoto, Toshiko; Ishibashi, Tomoka; Ohnishi, Kaori; Yamashita, Hitomi; Ono, Ruriko; Sasamori, Hiroki; Razia, Sultana; Hossain, Mohammad Mahmud; Kamrunnahar, Shanta; Ishikawa, Masako; Ishikawa, Noriyoshi; Kyo, Satoru

    2018-03-25

    Lynch syndrome, a hereditary cancer syndrome, occurs because of germline mutations in at least one of four DNA mismatch repair genes (MutL Homolog 1 ( MLH1 ), MutS Homolog 2 ( MSH2 ), MutS Homolog 6 ( MSH6 ), and PMS1 Homolog 2 ( PMS2 )). The disorder is associated with colorectal, endometrial, and other epithelial malignancies, but not cervical cancer. We report a woman with Lynch syndrome with synchronous cervical cancer. This is the first report of Lynch syndrome-related clear cell carcinoma of the cervix, which indicates the possibility of an association between cervical cancer and Lynch syndrome. Suitable genetic tests are required to determine whether common genetics can account for synchronous or subsequent malignancies in Lynch syndrome patients and their families. Such knowledge will also enhance our understanding of the genetic mechanisms governing the development of apparently unrelated cancers.

  1. Early onset of colorectal cancer in a 13-year-old girl with Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Do Hee; Rho, Jung Hee; Tchah, Hann; Jeon, In-Sang

    2016-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is the most common inherited colon cancer syndrome. Patients with Lynch syndrome develop a range of cancers including colorectal cancer (CRC) and carry a mutation on one of the mismatched repair (MMR) genes. Although CRC usually occurs after the fourth decade in patients with Lynch syndrome harboring a heterozygous MMR gene mutation, it can occur in children with Lynch syndrome who have a compound heterozygous or homozygous MMR gene mutation. We report a case of CRC in a 13-year-old patient with Lynch syndrome and congenital heart disease. This patient had a heterozygous mutation in MLH1 (an MMR gene), but no compound MMR gene defects, and a K-RAS somatic mutation in the cancer cells.

  2. Universal Point of Care Testing for Lynch Syndrome in Patients with Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Michael J; Petros, Firas G; Rao, Priya; Mork, Maureen E; Xiao, Lianchun; Broaddus, Russell R; Matin, Surena F

    2018-01-01

    Patients with Lynch syndrome are at risk for upper tract urothelial carcinoma. We sought to identify the incidence and most reliable means of point of care screening for Lynch syndrome in patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma. A total of 115 consecutive patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma without a history of Lynch syndrome were universally screened during followup from January 2013 through July 2016. We evaluated patient and family history using AMS (Amsterdam criteria) I and II, and tumor immunohistochemistry for mismatch repair proteins and microsatellite instability. Patients who were positive for AMS I/II, microsatellite instability or immunohistochemistry were classified as potentially having Lynch syndrome and referred for clinical genetic analysis and counseling. Patients with known Lynch syndrome served as positive controls. Of the 115 patients 16 (13.9%) screened positive for potential Lynch syndrome. Of these patients 7.0% met AMS II criteria, 11.3% had loss of at least 1 mismatch repair protein and 6.0% had high microsatellite instability. All 16 patients were referred for germline testing, 9 completed genetic analysis and counseling, and 6 were confirmed to have Lynch syndrome. All 7 patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma who had a known history of Lynch syndrome were positive for AMS II criteria and at least a single mismatch repair protein loss while 5 of 6 had high microsatellite instability. We identified 13.9% of upper tract urothelial carcinoma cases as potential Lynch syndrome and 5.2% as confirmed Lynch syndrome at the point of care. These findings have important implications for universal screening of upper tract urothelial carcinoma, representing one of the highest rates of undiagnosed genetic disease in a urological cancer. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cancer incidence and survival in Lynch syndrome patients receiving colonoscopic and gynaecological surveillance: first report from the prospective Lynch syndrome database

    OpenAIRE

    Moller, Pal; Seppala, Toni; Bernstein, Inge; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Sala, Paola; Evans, D. Gareth; Lindblom, Annika; Macrae, Finlay; Blanco, Ignacio; Sijmons, Rolf; Jeffries, Jacqueline; Vasen, Hans; Burn, John; Nakken, Sigve; Hovig, Eivind

    2017-01-01

    Objective Estimates of cancer risk and the effects of surveillance in Lynch syndrome have been subject to bias, partly through reliance on retrospective studies. We sought to establish more robust estimates in patients undergoing prospective cancer surveillance.\\ud \\ud Design We undertook a multicentre study of patients carrying Lynch syndrome-associated mutations affecting MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. Standardised information on surveillance, cancers and outcomes were collated in an Oracle rela...

  4. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1994 site environmental report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    The 1994 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the calendar year (CY) 1994. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the Laboratory's environmental management programs when measured against regulatory standards and DOE requirements. The report also discusses significant highlight and planning efforts of these programs. The format and content of the report are consistent with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program

  5. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1994 site environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The 1994 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the calendar year (CY) 1994. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the Laboratory`s environmental management programs when measured against regulatory standards and DOE requirements. The report also discusses significant highlight and planning efforts of these programs. The format and content of the report are consistent with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  6. Risk management at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, G.E.; Strait, R.S.

    1993-10-01

    Managing risks at a large national laboratory presents a unique set of challenges. These challenges include the management of a broad diversity of activities, the need to balance research flexibility against management control, and a plethora of requirements flowing from regulatory and oversight bodies. This paper will present the experiences of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in risk management and in dealing with these challenges. While general risk management has been practiced successfully by all levels of Laboratory management, this paper will focus on the Laboratory's use of probabilistic safety assessment and prioritization techniques and the integration of these techniques into Laboratory operations

  7. Michael Maier--nine newly discovered letters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenke, Nils; Roudet, Nicolas; Tilton, Hereward

    2014-02-01

    The authors provide a transcription, translation, and evaluation of nine newly discovered letters from the alchemist Michael Maier (1568-1622) to Gebhardt Johann von Alvensleben (1576-1631), a noble landholder in the vicinity of Magdeburg. Stemming from the final year of his life, this correspondence casts new light on Maier's biography, detailing his efforts to secure patronage amid the financial crisis of the early Thirty Years' War. While his ill-fated quest to perfect potable gold continued to form the central focus of his patronage suits, Maier also offered his services in several arts that he had condemned in his printed works, namely astrology and "supernatural" magic. Remarks concerning his previously unknown acquaintance with Heinrich Khunrath call for a re-evaluation of Maier's negotiation of the discursive boundaries between Lutheran orthodoxy and Paracelsianism. The letters also reveal Maier's substantial contribution to a work previously ascribed solely to the English alchemist Francis Anthony.

  8. Autogrammid, oma aja märk / Mike Lawrence

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lawrence, Mike

    2004-01-01

    Autogrammide kogumisest, nende ehtsusest, sportlastele kuulunud esemete kollektsioneerimisest. Lisatud: Kollektsionääride maiuspalu. Autor Mike Lawrence on oksjonifirma Bonhams/Brooks konsultant, ajakirjanik

  9. Is there a role for prophylactic colectomy in Lynch syndrome patients with inflammatory bowel disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Kate L; Aronson, Melyssa D; Cohen, Zane

    2016-01-01

    Lynch syndrome and chronic inflammatory bowel disease are two important risk factors for colorectal cancer. It is unclear whether Lynch syndrome patients with inflammatory bowel disease are at sufficiently increased risk for colorectal cancer to warrant prophylactic colectomy. This study aims to identify all cases of Lynch syndrome and concurrent inflammatory bowel disease in a large familial gastrointestinal cancer registry, define incidence of colorectal cancer, and characterize mismatch repair protein gene mutation status and inflammatory bowel disease-associated colorectal cancer risk factors. We retrospectively identified and collected clinical data for all cases with confirmed diagnoses of Lynch syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease in the Familial Gastrointestinal Cancer Registry at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto, Canada. Twelve cases of confirmed Lynch syndrome, and concurrent inflammatory bowel disease were identified. Four cases developed colorectal cancer. An additional five cases had colectomy; one was performed for severe colitis, and four were performed for low-grade dysplasia. None of these surgical specimens contained malignancy or high-grade dysplasia. The presentation of Lynch syndrome with inflammatory bowel disease is uncommon and not well described in the literature. This small but important series of twelve cases is the largest reported to date. In this series, patients with Lynch syndrome and concurrent inflammatory bowel disease do not appear to have sufficiently increased risk for colorectal cancer to recommend prophylactic surgery. Therefore, the decision to surgery should continue to be guided by surgical indications for each disease. Further evaluation of this important area will require multi-institutional input.

  10. Universal Versus Targeted Screening for Lynch Syndrome: Comparing Ascertainment and Costs Based on Clinical Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erten, Mujde Z; Fernandez, Luca P; Ng, Hank K; McKinnon, Wendy C; Heald, Brandie; Koliba, Christopher J; Greenblatt, Marc S

    2016-10-01

    Strategies to screen colorectal cancers (CRCs) for Lynch syndrome are evolving rapidly; the optimal strategy remains uncertain. We compared targeted versus universal screening of CRCs for Lynch syndrome. In 2010-2011, we employed targeted screening (age Lynch syndrome and estimated the 5-year costs of preventing CRC by colonoscopy screening, using a system dynamics model. Using targeted screening, 51/175 (29 %) cancers fit criteria and were tested by immunohistochemistry; 15/51 (29 %, or 8.6 % of all CRCs) showed suspicious loss of ≥1 mismatch repair protein. Germline mismatch repair gene mutations were found in 4/4 cases sequenced (11 suspected cases did not have germline testing). Using universal screening, 17/292 (5.8 %) screened cancers had abnormal immunohistochemistry suspicious for Lynch syndrome. Germline mismatch repair mutations were found in only 3/10 cases sequenced (7 suspected cases did not have germline testing). The mean cost to identify Lynch syndrome probands was ~$23,333/case for targeted screening and ~$175,916/case for universal screening at our institution. Estimated costs to identify and screen probands and relatives were: targeted, $9798/case and universal, $38,452/case. In real-world Lynch syndrome management, incomplete clinical follow-up was the major barrier to do genetic testing. Targeted screening costs 2- to 7.5-fold less than universal and rarely misses Lynch syndrome cases. Future changes in testing costs will likely change the optimal algorithm.

  11. Mismatch repair deficiency commonly precedes adenoma formation in Lynch Syndrome-Associated colorectal tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Shigeki; Mori, Taisuke; Ogawa, Reiko; Tanaka, Masahiro; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Nakajima, Takeshi; Sugano, Kokichi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Kato, Mamoru; Furukawa, Eisaku; Ochiai, Atsushi; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi

    2017-08-01

    Lynch syndrome is a cancer predisposition syndrome caused by germline mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes. MMR deficiency is a ubiquitous feature of Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal adenocarcinomas; however, it remains unclear when the MMR-deficient phenotype is acquired during tumorigenesis. To probe this issue, the present study examined genetic alterations and MMR statuses in Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas, in comparison with sporadic adenomas. Among the Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal tumors, 68 of 86 adenomas (79%) and all adenocarcinomas were MMR-deficient, whereas all the sporadic adenomas were MMR-proficient, as determined by microsatellite instability testing and immunohistochemistry for MMR proteins. Sequencing analyses identified APC or CTNNB1 mutations in the majority of sporadic adenomas (58/84, 69%) and MMR-proficient Lynch syndrome-associated adenomas (13/18, 72%). However, MMR-deficient Lynch syndrome-associated adenomas had less APC or CTNNB1 mutations (25/68, 37%) and frequent frameshift RNF43 mutations involving mononucleotide repeats (45/68, 66%). Furthermore, frameshift mutations affecting repeat sequences constituted 14 of 26 APC mutations (54%) in MMR-deficient adenomas whereas these frameshift mutations were rare in MMR-proficient adenomas in patients with Lynch syndrome (1/12, 8%) and in sporadic adenomas (3/52, 6%). Lynch syndrome-associated adenocarcinomas exhibited mutation profiles similar to those of MMR-deficient adenomas. Considering that WNT pathway activation sufficiently drives colorectal adenoma formation, the distinct mutation profiles of WNT pathway genes in Lynch syndrome-associated adenomas suggest that MMR deficiency commonly precedes adenoma formation.

  12. Interview with Michael Apple: The Biography of a Public Intellectual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Michael W. Apple is the John Bascom Professor of Curriculum and Instruction and Educational Policy Studies in the Departments of Curriculum and Instruction (CI) and Educational Policy Studies (EPS) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Education where he has taught since 1970. Michael Apple is one of the foremost educational theorists…

  13. Book Review: Invitation to Topological Robotics by Michael Farber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Book Review: Invitaton to Topological Robotics by Michael Farber. Zurich Lectures in Advanced Mathematics, European Mathematical Society (2008), ISBN 978-3-03719-054-8......Book Review: Invitaton to Topological Robotics by Michael Farber. Zurich Lectures in Advanced Mathematics, European Mathematical Society (2008), ISBN 978-3-03719-054-8...

  14. Prevalence of Lynch syndrome and Lynch-like syndrome among patients with colorectal cancer in a Japanese hospital-based population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chika, Noriyasu; Eguchi, Hidetaka; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Suzuki, Okihide; Ishibashi, Keiichiro; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Akagi, Kiwamu; Tamaru, Jun-Ichi; Okazaki, Yasushi; Ishida, Hideyuki

    2017-02-09

    We investigated the prevalence of Lynch syndrome and Lynch-like syndrome among Japanese colorectal cancer patients, as there have been no credible data from Japan. Immunohistochemical analyses for mismatch repair proteins (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2) were carried out in surgically resected, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens obtained from 1,234 newly diagnosed colorectal cancer patients between March 2005 and April 2014. The presence/absence of the BRAF V600E mutation and hypermethylation of the MLH1 promoter was analyzed where necessary. Genetic testing was finally undertaken in patients suspected as having Lynch syndrome. By the universal screening approach with immunohistochemical analysis for mismatch repair proteins followed by analyses for the BRAF V600E mutation and MLH1 promoter methylation status, 11 (0.9%) of the 1,234 patients were identified as candidates for genetic testing. Out of the 11 patients, 9 (0.7%) were finally diagnosed as having Lynch syndrome; the responsible genes included MLH1 (n = 1), MSH2 (n = 4), EPCAM (n = 1) and MSH6 (n = 3). The remaining two patients (0.2%) were regarded as having Lynch-like syndrome, since biallelic somatic deletion of the relevant mismatch repair genes was detected in the absence of germline mismatch repair alterations. None of the cases was identified as having germline MLH1 epimutation. The prevalence of Lynch syndrome among all newly diagnosed cases of colorectal cancer in Japan is in the same range as that recently reported by studies in Western population. The prevalence of Lynch-like syndrome seems to be extremely low. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  15. A review of statistical methods for testing genetic anticipation: looking for an answer in Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boonstra, Philip S; Gruber, Stephen B; Raymond, Victoria M

    2010-01-01

    the issue of multiplex ascertainment and its effect on the different methods. We then focus on exploring genetic anticipation in Lynch syndrome and analyze new data on the age of onset in affected parent-child pairs from families seen at the University of Michigan Cancer Genetics clinic with a mutation...... in one of the three main mismatch repair (MMR) genes. In contrast to the clinic-based population, we re-analyze data on a population-based Lynch syndrome cohort, derived from the Danish HNPCC-register. Both datasets indicate evidence of genetic anticipation in Lynch syndrome. We then expand our review...

  16. SNP association study in PMS2-associated Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Broeke, Sanne W; Elsayed, Fadwa A; Pagan, Lisa; Olderode-Berends, Maran J W; Garcia, Encarna Gomez; Gille, Hans J P; van Hest, Liselot P; Letteboer, Tom G W; van der Kolk, Lizet E; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; van Os, Theo A; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Redeker, Bert J W; Suerink, Manon; Vos, Yvonne J; Wagner, Anja; Wijnen, Juul T; Steyerberg, E W; Tops, Carli M J; van Wezel, Tom; Nielsen, Maartje

    2017-11-17

    Lynch syndrome (LS) patients are at high risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC). Phenotypic variability might in part be explained by common susceptibility loci identified in Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). Previous studies focused mostly on MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 carriers, with conflicting results. We aimed to determine the role of GWAS SNPs in PMS2 mutation carriers. A cohort study was performed in 507 PMS2 carriers (124 CRC cases), genotyped for 24 GWAS SNPs, including SNPs at 11q23.1 and 8q23.3. Hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using a weighted Cox regression analysis to correct for ascertainment bias. Discrimination was assessed with a concordance statistic in a bootstrap cross-validation procedure. Individual SNPs only had non-significant associations with CRC occurrence with HRs lower than 2, although male carriers of allele A at rs1321311 (6p21.31) may have increased risk of CRC (HR = 2.1, 95% CI 1.2-3.0). A polygenic risk score (PRS) based on 24 HRs had an HR of 2.6 (95% CI 1.5-4.6) for the highest compared to the lowest quartile, but had no discriminative ability (c statistic 0.52). Previously suggested SNPs do not modify CRC risk in PMS2 carriers. Future large studies are needed for improved risk stratification among Lynch syndrome patients.

  17. History, genetics, and strategies for cancer prevention in Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastrinos, Fay; Stoffel, Elena M

    2014-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most common gastrointestinal malignancy and the third cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. The majority of CRC cases diagnosed annually are due to sporadic events, but up to 6% are attributed to known monogenic disorders that confer a markedly increased risk for the development of CRC and multiple extracolonic malignancies. Lynch syndrome is the most common inherited CRC syndrome and is associated with mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes, mainly MLH1 and MSH2 but also MSH6, PMS2, and EPCAM. Although the risk of CRC and endometrial cancer may approach near 75% and 50%, respectively, in gene mutation carriers, the identification of these individuals and at-risk family members through predictive genetic testing provides opportunities for cancer prevention including specialized cancer screening, intensified surveillance, and/or prophylactic surgeries. This article will provide a review of the major advances in risk assessment, molecular genetics, DNA mutational analyses, and cancer prevention and management made since Lynch syndrome was first described 100 years ago. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. “Silencio”: hearing loss in David Lynch's Mulholland Drive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allister Mactaggart

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In a filmmaking career replete with extraordinary images and sounds, David Lynch's Mulholland Drive (2001 stands out for attention as a striking and seemingly inexhaustible resource for analysis. In this article, this film is used to examine the specific ways in which Lynch uses pre-existing pop songs to wrap the spectator within the filmic soundscape. Nowhere is the complexity and uncanniness of pop music made more explicit than in Rebekah Del Rio's stunning performance of “Llorando (Crying” in the Club Silencio scene. The split between the singer's powerful performance and her subsequent collapse with the sound of the voice left hanging in the air marks a pivotal point in the film. This scene, coupled with other examples of feminine jouissance, is contrasted with the deadening roar of the master's voice, which solely demands obedience but is deaf to any reply. At the core of this article is an analysis of the status of the voice (and the gaze as examples of the Lacanian object a and its relationship to Marx's concept of surplus value. Mulholland Drive provides a powerful demonstration of how these concepts can be seen, heard, and felt in relation to film, and how sound can reverberate into the spaces and silences beyond the screen.

  19. LYNCHING IN RUSSIAN COUNTRYSIDE (late XIX-early XX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Borisovich Bezgin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Research actuality is due to the frequent attempts of extrajudicial killings of criminals in the country as a result of the citizens' law enforcement distrust, their doubt of deserved retribution.Such phenomenon of legal life of the Russian countryside as a lynch mob is studied in the article on the basis of a wide range of archival and ethnographic sources. The author analyzes the crimes for which the perpetrators are arbitrarily subjected to massacre in the village. The role of the peasant community in the punishment implementation of criminals was found out. The causes of the stability of this tradition in rural society were set.Lynching played an effective means of suppression of unlawful acts of the peasants. The collective nature of the spontaneously created killings of criminals was the result of mutual responsibility of community members and rural solidarity preservation condition. According to farmers gathering verdict gave legal force to massacre and left no doubt about the justice of the decision.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-8-1

  20. Novel Implications in Molecular Diagnosis of Lynch Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Liccardo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available About 10% of total colorectal cancers are associated with known Mendelian inheritance, as Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP and Lynch syndrome (LS. In these cancer types the clinical manifestations of disease are due to mutations in high-risk alleles, with a penetrance at least of 70%. The LS is associated with germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes. However, the mutation detection analysis of these genes does not always provide informative results for genetic counseling of LS patients. Very often, the molecular analysis reveals the presence of variants of unknown significance (VUSs whose interpretation is not easy and requires the combination of different analytical strategies to get a proper assessment of their pathogenicity. In some cases, these VUSs may make a more substantial overall contribution to cancer risk than the well-assessed severe Mendelian variants. Moreover, it could also be possible that the simultaneous presence of these genetic variants in several MMR genes that behave as low risk alleles might contribute in a cooperative manner to increase the risk of hereditary cancer. In this paper, through a review of the recent literature, we have speculated a novel inheritance model in the Lynch syndrome; this could pave the way toward new diagnostic perspectives.

  1. Lynch syndrome in South America: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, Carlos A; Sarroca, Carlos; Rossi, Benedito; Lopez-Kostner, Francisco; Dominguez, Mev; Calo, Natalia Causada; Cutait, Raul; Valle, Adriana Della; Nuñez, Lina; Neffa, Florencia; Alvarez, Karin; Gonzalez, Maria Laura; Kalfayan, Pablo; Lynch, Henry T; Church, James

    2016-07-01

    After decades of unawareness about Lynch syndrome, the medical community in South America is increasingly interested and informed. The visits and support of mentors like H. T. Lynch had been crucial to this awakening. Several countries have at least one registry with skilled personnel in genetic counseling and research. However, this only represents a very restricted resource for the region. According to the GETH, there are 27 hereditary cancer care centers in South America (21 in Brazil, 3 in Argentina, 1 in Uruguay, 1 in Chile and 1 in Peru). These registries differ in fundamental aspects of function, capabilities and funding, but are able to conduct high quality clinical, research and educational activities due to the dedication and personal effort of their members, and organizational support. More support from the governments as well as the participation of the community would boost the initiatives of people leading these groups. Meantime, the collaboration among the South American registries and the involvement of registries and leaders from developed countries will allow to maximize the efficiency in caring for affected patients and their families. The aim of this article is to describe how the knowledge of LS began to be spread in South America, how the first registries were organized and to summarize the current state of progress. In addition, we will provide an update of the clinical and molecular findings in the region.

  2. Geologic map of Saint Lawrence Island, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, William W.; Wilson, Frederic H.; Taylor, Theresa A.

    2011-01-01

    Saint Lawrence Island is located in the northern Bering Sea, 190 km southwest of the tip of the Seward Peninsula, Alaska, and 75 km southeast of the Chukotsk Peninsula, Russia (see index map, map sheet). It lies on a broad, shallow-water continental shelf that extends from western Alaska to northeastern Russia. The island is situated on a northwest-trending structural uplift exposing rocks as old as Paleozoic above sea level. The submerged shelf between the Seward Peninsula and Saint Lawrence Island is covered mainly with Cenozoic deposits (Dundo and Egiazarov, 1982). Northeast of the island, the shelf is underlain by a large structural depression, the Norton Basin, which contains as much as 6.5 km of Cenozoic strata (Grim and McManus, 1970; Fisher and others, 1982). Sparse test-well data indicate that the Cenozoic strata are underlain by Paleozoic and Proterozoic rocks, similar to those exposed on the Seward Peninsula (Turner and others, 1983). Saint Lawrence Island is 160 km long in an east-west direction and from 15 km to 55 km wide in a north-south direction. The east end of the island consists largely of a wave-cut platform, which has been elevated as much as 30 m above sea level. Isolated upland areas composed largely of granitic plutons rise as much as 550 m above the wave-cut platform. The central part of the island is dominated by the Kookooligit Mountains, a large Quaternary shield volcano that extends over an area of 850 km2 and rises to an elevation of 630 m. The west end of the island is composed of the Poovoot Range, a group of barren, rubble-covered hills as high as 450 m that extend from Boxer Bay on the southwest coast to Taphook Mountain on the north coast. The Poovoot Range is flanked on the southeast by the Putgut Plateau, a nearly flat, lake-dotted plain that stands 30?60 m above sea level. The west end of the island is marked by uplands underlain by the Sevuokuk pluton (unit Kg), a long narrow granite body that extends from Gambell on the

  3. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Affirmative Action Program. Revised

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s Affirmative Action Program (AAP) serves as a working document that describes current policies, practices, and results in the area of affirmative action. It represents the Laboratory`s framework for an affirmative approach to increasing the representation of people of color and women in segments of our work force where they have been underrepresented and taking action to increase the employment of persons with disabilities and special disabled and Vietnam era veterans. The AAP describes the hierarchy of responsibility for Laboratory affirmative action, the mechanisms that exist for full Laboratory participation in the AAP, the policies and procedures governing recruitment at all levels, the Laboratory`s plan for monitoring, reporting, and evaluating affirmative action progress, and a description of special affirmative action programs and plans the Laboratory has used and will use in its efforts to increase the representation and retention of groups historically underrepresented in our work force.

  4. Suspense, culpa y cintas de vídeo. Caché/Escondido de Michael Haneke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Martínez-Cabeza

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Caché/Escondido (2005 representa dentro de la filmografía de Michael Haneke el ejemplo más destacado de síntesis de los planteamientos formales e ideológicos del cineasta austriaco. Este artículo analiza el filme como manifiesto cinematográfico y como explotación de las convenciones genéricas para construir un modelo de espectador reflexivo. La investigación del modo en que el director plantea y abandona las técnicas del suspense aporta claves para explicar el éxito casi unánime de crítica y la respuesta mucho menos homogénea de las audiencias. El desencadenante de la trama, unas cintas de vídeo que reciben los Laurent, es alusión directa a Carretera Perdida (1997 de David Lynch; no obstante, el misterio acerca del autor de la videovigilancia pierde interés en relación al sentimiento de culpa que desencadena en el protagonista. El episodio infantil de celos y venganza hacia un niño argelino y la actitud del Georges adulto representan una alegoría de la relación de Francia con su pasado colonial que tampoco cierra la narración de Haneke. Es precisamente la apertura formal con que el filme (desestructura cuestiones actuales como el límite entre la responsabilidad individual y colectiva lo que conforma un espectador tan distanciado de la diégesis como consciente de su propio papel de observador.

  5. 78 FR 66265 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary deviation... from the regulations governing the operation of the Atlantic Beach Bridge, mile 0.4, across Reynolds.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Atlantic Beach Bridge, across Reynolds Channel, mile 0.4, at Lawrence, New York...

  6. 78 FR 34893 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-11

    ... Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary deviation... from the regulations governing the operation of the Atlantic Beach Bridge, mile 0.4, across Reynolds... Reynolds Channel, mile 0.4, at Lawrence, New York, has a vertical clearance in the closed position of 25...

  7. 78 FR 56610 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    ... Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary deviation... from the regulations governing the operation of the Atlantic Beach Bridge, mile 0.4, across Reynolds.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Atlantic Beach Bridge, across Reynolds Channel, mile 0.4, at Lawrence, New York...

  8. Obituary: Michael John Klein, 1940-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulkis, Samuel

    2006-12-01

    Michael John Klein died on 14 May 2005 at home in South Pasadena, California. The cause of death was tongue cancer that metastasized to the lungs. He was a non-smoker. Mike was a passionate radio astronomer, a trusted astronomical observer, an educator and a family man. Mike was born on 19 January 1940 in Ames, Iowa, the son of Florence Marie (Graf) and Fred Michael Klein. His mother was a homemaker, and his father was a banker. Mike had two older sisters, Lois Jean (Klein) Flauher and Marilyn June (Klein) Griffin. In 1962, Mike married his high school sweetheart Barbara Dahlberg, who survives him along with their three children, Kristin Marie (Klein) Shields, Michael John Klein Jr., Timothy Joel Klein, and six grandchildren. Mike developed a love for astronomy early in his life, and credited an early morning, newspaper-delivery route that he had at age twelve, which took him outside well before sunrise. He told family members that as he walked along his route, he stared into the sky and wondered what everything was. He studied sky charts, located stars, and began to understand how the planets shifted their positions relative to the stars each day. Another big influence in Mike's life was his brother in-law, Jim Griffin. Jim helped Mike understand that his passion for science did not have to remain a hobby, but could and should become a career. Jim's encouragement led Mike to attend Iowa State University in Ames, where he earned a BS in electrical engineering in 1962. Mike then started graduate school in electrical engineering at Michigan State, but after one semester transferred to the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where he earned an MS (1966) and PhD (1968) in astronomy. His doctoral dissertation, under the direction of Professor Fred Haddock, was based on extensive observations of the planets and examined the physical and thermal properties of planetary atmospheres and surfaces. Mike was awarded a Resident Research Associate position at JPL by the National

  9. Race, punishment, and the Michael Vick experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piquero, Alex R; Piquero, Nicole Leeper; Gertz, Marc; Baker, Thomas; Batton, Jason; Barnes, J C

    2011-01-01

    Objective. The relationship between race and crime has been contentious, focusing primarily on offending and incarceration patterns among minorities. There has been some limited work on public perceptions of criminal punishment, and findings show that while minorities believe in the role and rule of law, they simultaneously perceive the justice system as acting in a biased and/or unfair manner. Two limitations have stalled this literature. First, research has focused mainly on criminal punishments to the neglect of noncriminal punishments. Second, most studies have not examined whether race remains salient after considering other demographic variables or discrimination and legitimacy attitudes.Methods. Using data from 400 adults, we examine how race affects perceptions of criminal punishment and subsequent reinstatement into the National Football League in the case of Michael Vick, a star professional quarterback who pled guilty to charges of operating an illegal dog-fighting ring.Results. Findings show that whites are more likely to view Vick's punishment as too soft and that he should not be reinstated, while nonwhites had the opposite views. Race remained significant after controlling for other variables believed to be related to punishment perceptions.Conclusion. Attitudes toward both criminal punishment and NFL reinstatement vary across race such that there exists important divides in how individuals perceive the system meting out punishment and subsequently reintegrating offenders back into society. These results underscore that white and nonwhites perceive the law and its administration differently.

  10. The Failure of Lehman Brothers and Merril Lynch: A Lesson for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR Nneka

    the United State America treasury securities market. Ahimie (2008) ... Thus, the above school of thought considered a bank failure as not when it ceases .... Lynch had further confirmed the historical fact that, no bank or financial institution is.

  11. Surveillance colonoscopy practice in Lynch syndrome in the Netherlands : A nationwide survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornstra, Jan J.; Vasen, Hans Fa

    2007-01-01

    Lynch syndrome, or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), is the most common genetic disorder predisposing to colorectal cancer. As regular colonoscopic surveillance has been shown to reduce the incidence of colorectal cancer, this strategy is recommended worldwide. Recently, several

  12. A frame-shift mutation of PMS2 is a widespread cause of Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clendenning, Mark; Senter, Leigha; Hampel, Heather

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: When compared to the other mismatch repair genes involved in Lynch syndrome, the identification of mutations within PMS2 has been limited (Lynch syndrome cases...... on immunohistochemical analysis. RESULTS: We have identified a frequently occurring frame-shift mutation (c.736_741del6ins11) in 12 ostensibly unrelated Lynch syndrome patients (20% of patients we have identified with a deleterious mutation in PMS2, n=61). These individuals all display the rare allele (population...... and Swedish ancestry. We estimate that there are >10,000 carriers of this mutation in the United States alone. The identification of both the mutation and the common haplotype in one Swedish control sample (n = 225), along with evidence that Lynch syndrome associated cancers are rarer than expected...

  13. Distinct gene expression profiles in ovarian cancer linked to Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jenny-Maria; Bartuma, Katarina; Dominguez-Valentin, Mev

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer linked to Lynch syndrome represents a rare subset that typically presents at young age as early-stage tumors with an overrepresentation of endometrioid and clear cell histologies. We investigated the molecular profiles of Lynch syndrome-associated and sporadic ovarian cancer...... with the aim to identify key discriminators and central tumorigenic mechanisms in hereditary ovarian cancer. Global gene expression profiling using whole-genome c-DNA-mediated Annealing, Selection, extension, and Ligation was applied to 48 histopathologically matched Lynch syndrome-associated and sporadic...... ovarian cancers. Lynch syndrome-associated and sporadic ovarian cancers differed by 349 significantly deregulated genes, including PTPRH, BIRC3, SHH and TNFRSF6B. The genes involved were predominantly linked to cell growth, proliferation, and cell-to-cell signaling and interaction. When stratified...

  14. Upper tract urothelial carcinomas: frequency of association with mismatch repair protein loss and lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Holly L; McKenney, Jesse K; Heald, Brandie; Stephenson, Andrew; Campbell, Steven C; Plesec, Thomas; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Increased risk for upper tract urothelial carcinoma is described in patients with Lynch syndrome, caused by germline mutations in mismatch repair genes. We aimed to identify the frequency of mismatch repair protein loss in upper tract urothelial carcinoma and its potential for identifying an association with Lynch syndrome. We queried our database to identify upper tract urothelial carcinomas. Patients were cross-referenced for history of colorectal carcinoma or other common Lynch syndrome-associated neoplasms to enrich for potential Lynch syndrome cases. Tumor histopathologic characteristics were reviewed and each case was analyzed for loss of mismatch repair proteins, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2, by immunohistochemistry. Of 444 patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma, a subset of 215 (encompassing 30 with upper tract urothelial carcinoma and another common Lynch syndrome-associated neoplasm) was analyzed for loss of mismatch repair protein expression. Of 30 patients with Lynch syndrome-associated neoplasms, six had documented Lynch syndrome, including two with Muir-Torre syndrome. Mismatch repair protein loss was identified in 7% of total upper tract urothelial carcinomas and 30% of patients with Lynch syndrome-associated neoplasms (including all patients with Lynch syndrome/Muir-Torre syndrome). Of patients without history of Lynch syndrome-associated neoplasms, 5 of 184 (2.7%) had loss of mismatch repair protein expression. Twelve cases with mismatch repair protein loss demonstrated loss of MSH2 and MSH6, and 2 had isolated loss of MSH6. MLH1 and PMS2 expression were consistently retained. Although increased intratumoral lymphocytes, inverted growth, pushing tumor-stromal interface, and lack of nuclear pleomorphism were more commonly seen in cases with mismatch repair protein loss, only intratumoral lymphocytes and presence of pushing borders were statistically significant. MLH1 and PMS2 testing appear to have little utility in upper tract urothelial

  15. Common mutations identified in the MLH1 gene in familial Lynch syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Jisha Elias; Coral Karunakaran; Snigdha Majumder; Malini Manoharan; Rakshit Shah; Yogesh Mistry; Rajesh Ramanuj; Niraj Bhatt; Arati Khanna- Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (Hereditary Non Polyposis Colorectal Cancer, HNPCC) is one of the most common hereditary familial colorectal cancers (CRC) with an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. It accounts for 2-5% of the total CRCs reported worldwide. Although a lower incidence for CRCs have been observed in India, the last decade has shown a remarkable increase of CRC incidences (2-4 %). Features of Lynch syndrome associated colorectal cancer include early age of cancer onset, accelerated car...

  16. Distinct Gene Expression Signatures in Lynch Syndrome and Familial Colorectal Cancer Type X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin, Mev; Therkildsen, Christina; Veerla, Srinivas

    2013-01-01

    Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects.......Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects....

  17. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, H E; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Cerruti, S J; Coty, J D; Dibley, V R; Doman, J L; Grayson, A R; MacQueen, D H; Wegrecki, A M; Armstrong, D H; Brigdon, S L; Heidecker, K R; Hollister, R K; Khan, H N; Lee, G S; Nelson, J C; Paterson, L E; Salvo, V J; Schwartz, W W; Terusaki, S H; Wilson, K R; Woods, J M; Yimbo, P O; Gallegos, G M; Terrill, A A; Revelli, M A; Rosene, C A; Blake, R G; Woollett, J S; Kumamoto, G

    2011-09-14

    The purposes of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2010 are to record Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) compliance with environmental standards and requirements, describe LLNL's environmental protection and remediation programs, and present the results of environmental monitoring at the two LLNL sites - the Livermore site and Site 300. The report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by LLNL's Environmental Protection Department. Submittal of the report satisfies requirements under DOE Order 231.1A, Environmental Safety and Health Reporting, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The report is distributed electronically and is available at https://saer.llnl.gov/, the website for the LLNL annual environmental report. Previous LLNL annual environmental reports beginning in 1994 are also on the website. Some references in the electronic report text are underlined, which indicates that they are clickable links. Clicking on one of these links will open the related document, data workbook, or website that it refers to. The report begins with an executive summary, which provides the purpose of the report and an overview of LLNL's compliance and monitoring results. The first three chapters provide background information: Chapter 1 is an overview of the location, meteorology, and hydrogeology of the two LLNL sites; Chapter 2 is a summary of LLNL's compliance with environmental regulations; and Chapter 3 is a description of LLNL's environmental programs with an emphasis on the Environmental Management System including pollution prevention. The majority of the report covers LLNL's environmental monitoring programs and monitoring data for 2010: effluent and ambient air (Chapter 4); waters, including wastewater, storm water runoff, surface water, rain, and groundwater (Chapter 5); and terrestrial, including soil, sediment, vegetation, foodstuff

  18. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, H. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bertoldo, N. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Blake, R. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cerruti, S. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dibley, V. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Doman, J. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fish, C. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Grayson, A. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Heidecker, K. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kumamoto, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacQueen, D. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Montemayor, W. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ottaway, H. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Paterson, L. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Revelli, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rosene, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Terrill, A. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wegrecki, A. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wilson, K. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Woollett, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Veseliza, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a premier research laboratory that is part of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). As a national security laboratory, LLNL is responsible for ensuring that the nation’s nuclear weapons remain safe, secure, and reliable. The Laboratory also meets other pressing national security needs, including countering the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and strengthening homeland security, and conducting major research in atmospheric, earth, and energy sciences; bioscience and biotechnology; and engineering, basic science, and advanced technology. The Laboratory is managed and operated by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS), and serves as a scientific resource to the U.S. government and a partner to industry and academia. LLNL operations have the potential to release a variety of constituents into the environment via atmospheric, surface water, and groundwater pathways. Some of the constituents, such as particles from diesel engines, are common at many types of facilities while others, such as radionuclides, are unique to research facilities like LLNL. All releases are highly regulated and carefully monitored. LLNL strives to maintain a safe, secure and efficient operational environment for its employees and neighboring communities. Experts in environment, safety and health (ES&H) support all Laboratory activities. LLNL’s radiological control program ensures that radiological exposures and releases are reduced to as low as reasonably achievable to protect the health and safety of its employees, contractors, the public, and the environment. LLNL is committed to enhancing its environmental stewardship and managing the impacts its operations may have on the environment through a formal Environmental Management System. The Laboratory encourages the public to participate in matters related to the Laboratory’s environmental impact on the

  19. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Henry E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Armstrong, Dave [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Blake, Rick G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bertoldo, Nicholas A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cerruti, Steven J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fish, Craig [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dibley, Valerie R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Doman, Jennifer L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Grayson, Allen R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Heidecker, Kelly R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hollister, Rod K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kumamoto, Gene [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacQueen, Donald H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nelson, Jennifer C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ottaway, Heather L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Paterson, Lisa E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Revelli, Michael A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rosene, Crystal A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Terrill, Alison A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wegrecki, Anthony M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wilson, Kent R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Woollett, Jim S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-09-19

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a premier research laboratory that is part of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). As a national security laboratory, LLNL is responsible for ensuring that the nation’s nuclear weapons remain safe, secure, and reliable. The Laboratory also meets other pressing national security needs, including countering the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and strengthening homeland security, and conducting major research in atmospheric, earth, and energy sciences; bioscience and biotechnology; and engineering, basic science, and advanced technology. The Laboratory is managed and operated by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS), and serves as a scientific resource to the U.S. government and a partner to industry and academia. LLNL operations have the potential to release a variety of constituents into the environment via atmospheric, surface water, and groundwater pathways. Some of the constituents, such as particles from diesel engines, are common at many types of facilities while others, such as radionuclides, are unique to research facilities like LLNL. All releases are highly regulated and carefully monitored. LLNL strives to maintain a safe, secure and efficient operational environment for its employees and neighboring communities. Experts in environment, safety and health (ES&H) support all Laboratory activities. LLNL’s radiological control program ensures that radiological exposures and releases are reduced to as low as reasonably achievable to protect the health and safety of its employees, contractors, the public, and the environment. LLNL is committed to enhancing its environmental stewardship and managing the impacts its operations may have on the environment through a formal Environmental Management System. The Laboratory encourages the public to participate in matters related to the Laboratory’s environmental impact on the

  20. Clinicopathological Features and Management of Cancers in Lynch Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markku Aarnio

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome (LS is characterized by an autosomal dominant inheritance of the early onset of colorectal cancer (CRC and endometrial cancer, as well as increased risk for several other cancers including gastric, urinary tract, ovarian, small bowel, biliary tract, and brain tumors. The syndrome is due to a mutation in one of the four DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, or PMS2. The majority of LS patients and families can now be identified, and the underlying mutation detected using genetic diagnostics. Regular surveillance for CRC and endometrial cancer has proved beneficial for mutation carriers. However, screening for other tumors is also recommended even though experiences in the screening of these tumors is limited. Prophylactic colectomy, prophylactic hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy may be reasonable options for selected patients with LS. This paper describes the features and management of LS.

  1. Michael Polanyi: Patriarch of Chemical Dynamics and Tacit Knowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herschbach, Dudley R

    2017-03-20

    Connecting Science and the Humanities was the title of the symposium on Michael Polanyi that took place at the Technische Universität Berlin (Technical University of Berlin) in October 2016. This essay, which appraises the scientific and philosophical contributions of Michael Polanyi, is based on the presentation given by Dr. Herschbach on this occasion. In the photograph: Polanyi in 1931. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 2007 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrzanowski, P; Walter, K

    2008-04-25

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's many outstanding accomplishments in 2007 are a tribute to a dedicated staff, which is shaping the Laboratory's future as we go through a period of transition and transformation. The achievements highlighted in this annual report illustrate our focus on the important problems that affect our nation's security and global stability, our application of breakthrough science and technology to tackle those problems, and our commitment to safe, secure, and efficient operations. In May 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS), a new public-private partnership, the contract to manage and operate the Laboratory starting in October. Since its inception in 1952, the Laboratory had been managed by the University of California (UC) for the DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and predecessor organizations. UC is one of the parent organizations that make up LLNS, and UC's presence in the new management entity will help us carry forward our strong tradition of multidisciplinary science and technology. 'Team science' applied to big problems was pioneered by the Laboratory's co-founder and namesake, Ernest O. Lawrence, and has been our hallmark ever since. Transition began fully a year before DOE's announcement. More than 1,600 activities had to be carried out to transition the Laboratory from management by a not-for-profit to a private entity. People, property, and procedures as well as contracts, formal agreements, and liabilities had to be transferred to LLNS. The pre-transition and transition teams did a superb job, and I thank them for their hard work. Transformation is an ongoing process at Livermore. We continually reinvent ourselves as we seek breakthroughs that impact emerging national needs. An example is our development in the late 1990s of a portable instrument that could rapidly detect DNA signatures, research that

  3. Principles of Chemistry (by Michael Munowitz)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovac, Reviewed By Jeffrey

    2000-05-01

    At a time when almost all general chemistry textbooks seem to have become commodities designed by marketing departments to offend no one, it is refreshing to find a book with a unique perspective. Michael Munowitz has written what I can only describe as a delightful chemistry book, full of conceptual insight, that uses a novel and interesting pedagogic strategy. This is a book that has much to recommend it. This is the best-written general chemistry book I have ever read. An editor with whom I have worked recently remarked that he felt his job was to help authors make their writing sing. Well, the writing in Principles of Chemistry sings with the full, rich harmonies and creative inventiveness of the King's Singers or Chanticleer. Here is the first sentence of the introduction: "Central to any understanding of the physical world is one discovery of paramount importance, a truth disarmingly simple yet profound in its implications: matter is not continuous." This is prose to be savored and celebrated. Principles of Chemistry has a distinct perspective on chemistry: the perspective of the physical chemist. The focus is on simplicity, what is common about molecules and reactions; begin with the microscopic and build bridges to the macroscopic. The author's perspective is clear from the organization of the book. After three rather broad introductory chapters, there are four chapters that develop the quantum mechanical theory of atoms and molecules, including a strong treatment of molecular orbital theory. Unlike many books, Principles of Chemistry presents the molecular orbital approach first and introduces valence bond theory later only as an approximation for dealing with more complicated molecules. The usual chapters on descriptive inorganic chemistry are absent (though there is an excellent chapter on organic and biological molecules and reactions as well as one on transition metal complexes). Instead, descriptive chemistry is integrated into the development of

  4. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleimer, G.E.

    1981-04-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data on air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring for 1980 are presented, and general trends are discussed

  5. D.H. Lawrence's conception of the unconscious | Eruvbetine | Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , this work compares his work with that of Freud, as cited, utilised and criticised by Lawrence. Similarities are established in their basic delimitations of the unconscious while differences in their approaches are identified as the main source of ...

  6. EPA Selects Lawrence, Mass. Group for Brownfields Job Training Grant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Today, EPA announced that the Merrimack Valley Workforce Investment Board, of Lawrence, Mass., was one of 14 organizations nationwide selected to receive funding to operate environmental job training programs for local unemployed residents.

  7. Manufacturing of neutral beam sources at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baird, E.D.; Duffy, T.J.; Harter, G.A.; Holland, E.D.; Kloos, W.A.; Pastrone, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    Over 50 neutral beam sources (NBS) of the joint Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL)/Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) design have been manufactured, since 1973, in the LLL Neutral Beam Source Facility. These sources have been used to provide start-up and sustaining neutral beams for LLL mirror fusion experiments, including 2XIIB, TMX, and Beta II. Experimental prototype 20-kV and 80-kV NBS have also been designed, built, and tested for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF)

  8. Bir Ahlak Eğitimcisi Olarak Lawrence Kohlberg

    OpenAIRE

    Çinemre, Arş. Gör. Semra

    2013-01-01

    Lawrence Kohlberg: As A Moral Educator Lawrence Kohlberg (1927-1987) is a scholar who has comprehensive knowledge of many fields especially philosophy, psychology, sociology, anthropology and education, and who is known clearly for cognitive moral development theory. Having looked at the works in national and international scale which are done on Kohlberg, it is seen generally that his moral development theory has been emphasized and that his moral educational works have been neglected. In fa...

  9. Thyroid cancer in a patient with Lynch syndrome - case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazekas-Lavu, Monika; Parker, Andrew; Spigelman, Allan D; Scott, Rodney J; Epstein, Richard J; Jensen, Michael; Samaras, Katherine

    2017-01-01

    Lynch syndrome describes a familial cancer syndrome comprising germline mutations in one of four DNA mismatch repair genes, MLH1 , MSH2 , MSH6 , and PMS2 and is characterized by colorectal, endometrial, and other epithelial malignancies. Thyroid cancer is not usually considered to be part of the constellation of Lynch syndrome cancers nor have Lynch syndrome tumor gene mutations been reported in thyroid malignancies. This study reports a woman with Lynch syndrome (colonic cancer and a DNA mismatch repair mutation in the MSH2 gene) with a synchronous papillary thyroid cancer. Six years later, she developed metachronous breast cancer. Metastatic bone disease developed after 3 years, and the disease burden was due to both breast and thyroid diseases. Despite multiple interventions for both metastatic breast and thyroid diseases, the patient's metastatic burden progressed and she died of leptomeningeal metastatic disease. Two prior case reports suggested thyroid cancer may be an extraintestinal malignancy of the Lynch syndrome cancer group. Hence, this study examined the genetic relationship between the patient's known Lynch syndrome and her thyroid cancer. The thyroid cancer tissue showed normal expression of MSH2 , suggesting that the tumor was not due to the oncogenic mutation of Lynch syndrome, and molecular analysis confirmed BRAF V600E mutation. Although in this case the thyroid cancer was sporadic, it raises the importance of considering cancer genetics in familial cancer syndromes when other cancers do not fit the criteria of the syndrome. Careful documentation of other malignancies in patients with thyroid cancer and their families would assist in better understanding of any potential association. Appropriate genetic testing will clarify whether a common pathogenic mechanism links seemingly unrelated cancers.

  10. Cancer incidence and survival in Lynch syndrome patients receiving colonoscopic and gynaecological surveillance : first report from the prospective Lynch syndrome database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moller, Pal; Seppala, Toni; Bernstein, Inge; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Sala, Paola; Evans, D. Gareth; Lindblom, Annika; Macrae, Finlay; Blanco, Ignacio; Sijmons, Rolf; Jeffries, Jacqueline; Vasen, Hans; Burn, John; Nakken, Sigve; Hovig, Eivind; Rodland, Einar Andreas; Tharmaratnam, Kukatharmini; Cappel, Wouter H. de Vos Tot Nederveen; Hill, James; Wijnen, Juul; Green, Kate; Lalloo, Fiona; Sunde, Lone; Mints, Miriam; Bertario, Lucio; Pineda, Marta; Navarro, Matilde; Morak, Monika; Renkonen-Sinisalo, Laura; Frayling, Ian M.; Plazzer, John-Paul; Pylvanainen, Kirsi; Sampson, Julian R.; Capella, Gabriel; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Moslein, Gabriela

    Objective Estimates of cancer risk and the effects of surveillance in Lynch syndrome have been subject to bias, partly through reliance on retrospective studies. We sought to establish more robust estimates in patients undergoing prospective cancer surveillance. Design We undertook a multicentre

  11. Guest Foreword from Michael Thomas CMG QC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Thomas

    2012-04-01

    precedents and thought in a unique legal market in which ideas drawn from Islamic law, civil law and common law can intermingle and blend. It is not surprising therefore to see that this new publication will be dedicated to the subject of international law, both public and private. Its laudable aim is to promote legal discourse around the world, and to promote a wider international understanding of contemporary legal issues for the common benefit. As an open access, bilingual journal, addressing topics concerning any jurisdiction, I hope it will reach a wide audience, and fulfil its aim of promoting understanding between different cultures. I am sure that the journal will not only benefit Qatar’s legal community by advancing academic and practice-based legal discussion. I am also confident that it will stimulate thought in the global legal community at large. May I wish it every success and a long life. Michael Thomas CMG QC

  12. Obituary: Fred Lawrence Whipple, 1906-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeomans, Donald Keith

    2004-12-01

    Fred Whipple, one of the founding fathers of planetary science, died on August 30, 2004 just two months shy of his 98th birthday. The breadth of Fred's published research from 1927 through 2000 is quite extraordinary. Although his collected works were published in two massive volumes in 1972, shortly before his retirement, Fred's research contributions continued for another three decades - and another volume is planned. Fred Lawrence Whipple was born on November 5, 1906 on a farm in Red Oak Iowa. His parents were Harry Lawrence and Celestia (MacFarl) Whipple. At the age of fifteen, the Whipple family moved to California where Fred studied mathematics at Occidental College and the University of California at Los Angeles. As a graduate student at the University of California at Berkeley in 1930, he was one of the first to compute an orbit for the newly discovered planet Pluto. Upon receiving his PhD in 1931, he joined the staff of the Harvard College Observatory. He was Chairman of the Harvard Department of Astronomy (1949 - 1956), Director or the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (1955 - 1973), Phillips Professor of Astronomy (1968 - 1977) and Emeritus Phillips Professor of astronomy (1977 - 2004). In 1928 he married Dorothy Woods and their son, Earle Raymond, survives him. The marriage ended in divorce in 1935. Eleven years later, he married Babette F. Samelson and she too survives him, as do their two daughters Laura and (Dorothy) Sandra. Shortly after arriving at Harvard in the early 1930's, Fred developed a photographic tracking network to determine meteor trajectories from simultaneous observations from two or more stations. The photographic trails, chopped by a rotating shutter, allowed their orbits in space to be determined accurately. With the strong involvement of Richard McCrosky and others, he concluded in the early 1960's that most of these meteors were on comet-like orbits and less than 1% of the naked eye, sporadic meteors could be traced to an

  13. TumorNext-Lynch-MMR: a comprehensive next generation sequencing assay for the detection of germline and somatic mutations in genes associated with mismatch repair deficiency and Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Phillip N; Tsai, Pei; Chen, Daniel; Wu, Sitao; Hoo, Jayne; Mu, Wenbo; Li, Bing; Vuong, Huy; Lu, Hsiao-Mei; Batth, Navanjot; Willett, Sara; Uyeda, Lisa; Shah, Swati; Gau, Chia-Ling; Umali, Monalyn; Espenschied, Carin; Janicek, Mike; Brown, Sandra; Margileth, David; Dobrea, Lavinia; Wagman, Lawrence; Rana, Huma; Hall, Michael J; Ross, Theodora; Terdiman, Jonathan; Cullinane, Carey; Ries, Savita; Totten, Ellen; Elliott, Aaron M

    2018-04-17

    The current algorithm for Lynch syndrome diagnosis is highly complex with multiple steps which can result in an extended time to diagnosis while depleting precious tumor specimens. Here we describe the analytical validation of a custom probe-based NGS tumor panel, TumorNext-Lynch-MMR, which generates a comprehensive genetic profile of both germline and somatic mutations that can accelerate and streamline the time to diagnosis and preserve specimen. TumorNext-Lynch-MMR can detect single nucleotide variants, small insertions and deletions in 39 genes that are frequently mutated in Lynch syndrome and colorectal cancer. Moreover, the panel provides microsatellite instability status and detects loss of heterozygosity in the five Lynch genes; MSH2 , MSH6 , MLH1 , PMS2 and EPCAM . Clinical cases are described that highlight the assays ability to differentiate between somatic and germline mutations, precisely classify variants and resolve discordant cases.

  14. The Course of Law: State Intervention in Southern Lynch Mob Violence 1882–1930

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinga Makovi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Collective violence when framed by its perpetrators as "citizen" justice is inherently a challenge to state legitimacy. To properly account for such violence, it is necessary to consider an opportunity structure incorporating the actions of both vigilantes and agents of the state. The motivation and lethality of lynch mobs in the South cannot be understood without considering how the state reacted to the legitimacy challenges posed by lynching. We trace the shifting orientation of state agents to lynching attempts between the end of Reconstruction and the start of the Great Depression. Analyzing an inventory of more than 1,000 averted and completed lynching events in three Southern states, we model geographic and temporal patterns in the determinants of mob formation, state intervention, and intervention success. Opponents of lynching often pled with mobs to "let the law take its course." This article examines the course followed by the law itself, as state actors moved between encouraging, accommodating, and in many instances averting mob violence.

  15. How does genetic risk information for Lynch syndrome translate to risk management behaviours?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Emma; Robbins, Andrew; Jenkins, Mark; Flander, Louisa; Gaff, Clara; Keogh, Louise

    2017-01-01

    There is limited research on why some individuals who have undergone predictive genetic testing for Lynch syndrome do not adhere to screening recommendations. This study aimed to explore qualitatively how Lynch syndrome non-carriers and carriers translate genetic risk information and advice to decisions about risk managment behaviours in the Australian healthcare system. Participants of the Australasian Colorectal Cancer Family Registry who had undergone predictive genetic testing for Lynch syndrome were interviewed on their risk management behaviours. Transcripts were analysed thematically using a comparative coding analysis. Thirty-three people were interviewed. Of the non-carriers ( n  = 16), 2 reported having apparently unnecessary colonoscopies, and 6 were unsure about what population-based colorectal cancer screening entails. Of the carriers ( n  = 17), 2 reported they had not had regular colonoscopies, and spoke about their discomfort with the screening process and a lack of faith in the procedure's ability to reduce their risk of developing colorectal cancer. Of the female carriers ( n  = 9), 2 could not recall being informed about the associated risk of gynaecological cancers. Non-carriers and female carriers of Lynch syndrome could benefit from further clarity and advice about appropriate risk management options. For those carriers who did not adhere to colonoscopy screening, a lack of faith in both genetic test results and screening were evident. It is essential that consistent advice is offered to both carriers and non-carriers of Lynch syndrome.

  16. Targeted Screening With Combined Age- and Morphology-Based Criteria Enriches Detection of Lynch Syndrome in Endometrial Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Douglas I; Hecht, Jonathan L

    2016-06-01

    Endometrial cancer is associated with Lynch syndrome in 2% to 6% of cases. Adequate screening may prevent of a second cancer and incident cancers in family members via risk-reducing strategies. The goal of the study was to evaluate the detection rate of Lynch syndrome via a targeted screening approach. In 2009, we incorporated targeted Lynch syndrome screening via immunohistochemistry for MLH1, PMS2, MSH2, and MSH6, followed by MLH1 promoter hypermethylation, in select cases of endometrial carcinoma. Criteria for patient selection included (1) all patients Lynch syndrome. Therefore, targeted screening with combined age and morphology based criteria enriches detection of Lynch syndrome in endometrial cancer. However, the detection rate is lower than the rates from published series that offer universal screening. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Gain of chromosomal region 20q and loss of 18 discriminates between Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, Christina; Jönsson, Göran; Dominguez-Valentin, Mev

    2013-01-01

    Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X, FCCTX, represent the two predominant colorectal cancer syndromes. Whereas Lynch syndrome is clinically and genetically well defined, the genetic cause of FCCTX is unknown and genomic differences between Lynch syndrome and FCCTX tumours...... are largely unknown. We applied array-based comparative genomic hybridisation to 23 colorectal cancers from FCCTX with comparison to 23 Lynch syndrome tumours and to 45 sporadic colorectal cancers. FCCTX tumours showed genomic complexity with frequent gains on chromosomes 20q, 19 and 17 and losses of 18, 8p...... and 15. Gain of genetic material in two separate regions encompassing, 20q12-13.12 and 20q13.2-13.32, was identified in 65% of the FCCTX tumours. Gain of material on chromosome 20q and loss on chromosome 18 significantly discriminated colorectal cancers associated with FCCTX from Lynch syndrome, which...

  18. Obituary: Michael John Seaton, 1923-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Anil; Nahar, Sultana

    2007-12-01

    Professor Michael John Seaton, hailed as the "Father of Atomic Astrophysics," passed away on May 29, 2007. He was one of the few Honorary Fellows of both the American Astronomical Society and the American Physical Society, so honored for his monumental contributions to both physics and astronomy. Mike Seaton was born on January 16, 1923 in Bristol, England. He attended Wallington County High School. But his leftist political activities, even at that stage, led to his expulsion, though he was eventually allowed to matriculate. He enlisted in the Royal Air Force as a navigator during the Second World War, and flew many dangerous missions. His legendary concentration and precision are reflected in the following anecdote. Once after a bombing mission his aircraft was lost in fog over the Alps. Seaton calculated the position and coordinates in flight to guide the aircraft. When the fog lifted, the crew found themselves flying perilously close to the mountains, but made it safely back. His associates often said, "A Seaton calculation is carried out as if his life depended on it." After the War he was admitted to University College London (UCL) as an undergraduate. Thereafter, he spent all of his professional career at UCL. Seaton received his Batchelor's degree in 1948, and his Ph.D. in 1951. His tenure at UCL coincided with the golden age of atomic astrophysics, for he was largely responsible for it. Seaton was elected Fellow of the Royal Society in 1967, and as President of the Royal Astronomical Society (RAS) in 1978. He was the recipient of an Honorary Doctorate from the Observatoire de Paris, an Honorary D.Sc. from the Queen's University of Belfast, the Gold Medal for Astronomy by the RAS, the Guthrie Medal by the Institute of Physics, the Royal Society Hughes award for lifetime work by the RAS, and several other prestigious awards. Nevertheless, as Alex Dalgarno recently remarked, Seaton was not part of the establishment because he chose not to be. Though rooted in

  19. Some aspects of molecular diagnostics in Lynch syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurzawski Grzegorz

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This manuscript is composed of five parts which summarize five publications in succession. Essentially, they are concerned with molecular diagnostics of Lynch syndrome and are based on studies in 238 families. The finding that young age at diagnosis is the key feature in patients with MSH2 and MLH1 mutations (Part 1 has helped to define simple criteria for the preliminary diagnosis of this syndrome. A cheaper method for the detection of mutations has been developed (Part 2 and applied to study the types of mutations and their prevalence in Poland (Part 3 and the Baltic States (Part 4. A specific feature of these mutations, i.e. presence of recurrent mutations in the majority of affected families with mutations, has suggested the feasibility of effective diagnostics with a single test disclosing all of them. An attempt to reveal other causes of familial aggregation of colorectal cancer has ruled out any association with C insertion in the NOD2 gene (Part 5.

  20. Lynch syndrome in the 21st century: clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, A K; Roy, H K; Lynch, H T

    2016-03-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is the most common of all inherited cancer syndromes, associated with substantially elevated risks for colonic and extracolonic malignancies, earlier onset and high rates of multiple primary cancers. At the genetic level, it is caused by a defective mismatch repair (MMR) system due to presence of germline defects in at least one of the MMR genes- MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2 or EPCAM. An impaired MMR function during replication introduces infidelity in DNA sequence and leads to ubiquitous mutations at simple repetitive sequences (microsatellites), causing microsatellite instability (MSI). Although previously, clinicopathological criteria such as Amsterdam I/II and Revised Bethesda Guidelines were commonly used to identify suspected LS mutation carriers, there has been a recent push towards universally testing, especially in case of colorectal cancers (CRCs), through immunohistochemistry for expression of MMR proteins or through molecular tests (polymerase chain reaction, PCR) for MSI, in order to identify LS mutation carriers and subject them to genetic testing to ascertain the specific gene implicated. In this review, we have discussed the latest diagnostic strategies and the current screening and treatment guidelines for colonic and extracolonic cancers in clinically affected and at-risk individuals for LS. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Same MSH2 Gene Mutation But Variable Phenotypes in 2 Families With Lynch Syndrome: Two Case Reports and Review of Genotype-Phenotype Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liccardo, Raffaella; De Rosa, Marina; Duraturo, Francesca

    2018-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome that can be subdivided into Lynch syndrome I, or site-specific colonic cancer, and Lynch syndrome II, or extracolonic cancers, particularly carcinomas of the stomach, endometrium, biliary and pancreatic systems, and urinary tract. Lynch syndrome is associated with point mutations and large rearrangements in DNA MisMatch Repair ( MMR ) genes. This syndrome shows a variable phenotypic expression in people who carry pathogenetic mutations. So far, a correlation in genotype-phenotype has not been definitely established. In this study, we describe 2 Lynch syndrome cases presenting with the same genotype but different phenotypes and discuss possible reasons for this.

  2. A frame-shift mutation of PMS2 is a widespread cause of Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clendenning, Mark; Senter, Leigha; Hampel, Heather

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: When compared to the other mismatch repair genes involved in Lynch syndrome, the identification of mutations within PMS2 has been limited (Lynch syndrome cases...... on immunohistochemical analysis. RESULTS: We have identified a frequently occurring frame-shift mutation (c.736_741del6ins11) in 12 ostensibly unrelated Lynch syndrome patients (20% of patients we have identified with a deleterious mutation in PMS2, n=61). These individuals all display the rare allele (population...... are caused by PMS2. This disparity is primarily due to complications in the study of this gene caused by interference from pseudogene sequences. METHODS: Using a recently developed method for detecting PMS2 specific mutations, we have screened 99 patients who are likely candidates for PMS2 mutations based...

  3. Cancer risks and immunohistochemical profiles linked to the Danish MLH1 Lynch syndrome founder mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, Christina; Isinger-Ekstrand, Anna; Ladelund, Steen

    2012-01-01

    Founder mutations with a large impact in distinct populations have been described in Lynch syndrome. In Denmark, the MLH1 c.1667+2_1667_+8TAAATCAdelinsATTT mutation accounts for 25 % of the MLH1 mutant families. We used the national Danish hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer register...... to estimate the cumulative lifetime risks for Lynch syndrome-associated cancer in 16 founder mutation families with comparison to 47 other MLH1 mutant families. The founder mutation conferred comparable risks for colorectal cancer (relative risks, RR, of 0.99 for males and 0.79 for females) and lower risks...... in 68 % with extensive inter-tumor variability despite the same underlying germline mutation. In conclusion, the Danish MLH1 founder mutation that accounts for a significant proportion of Lynch syndrome and is associated with a lower risk for extracolonic cancers....

  4. Neuroendocrine-type prostatic adenocarcinoma with microsatellite instability in a patient with lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, David G; Gatalica, Zoran; Lynch, Henry T; Kohl, Shane; Johansson, Sonny L; Lele, Subodh M

    2010-12-01

    Lynch syndrome is an autosomal-dominant cancer syndrome that can be identified with microsatellite instability molecular tests or immunohistochemical stains on pathologic material from patients who meet the Amsterdam Criteria II. The development of prostatic carcinoma in situ or invasive small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the prostate has not been previously reported in a patient with this syndrome. In this report, an 87-year-old White man with the Lynch syndrome had a prostate biopsy that revealed a mixed high-grade conventional adenocarcinoma and SCC of the prostate with high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia of the small cell neuroendocrine-type (HGPIN-NE), all showing MSH2 microsatellite instability and loss of MSH2 expression, a finding not previously published. These findings suggest that HGPIN-NE is a precursor of invasive SCC and also that prostatic SCC can develop in a patient with the Lynch syndrome.

  5. Genetic screens to identify pathogenic gene variants in the common cancer predisposition Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drost, Mark; Lützen, Anne; van Hees, Sandrine

    2013-01-01

    In many individuals suspected of the common cancer predisposition Lynch syndrome, variants of unclear significance (VUS), rather than an obviously pathogenic mutations, are identified in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. The uncertainty of whether such VUS inactivate MMR, and therefore...... function. When a residue identified as mutated in an individual suspected of Lynch syndrome is listed as critical in such a reverse diagnosis catalog, there is a high probability that the corresponding human VUS is pathogenic. To investigate the applicability of this approach, we have generated....... Nearly half of these critical residues match with VUS previously identified in individuals suspected of Lynch syndrome. This aids in the assignment of pathogenicity to these human VUS and validates the approach described here as a diagnostic tool. In a wider perspective, this work provides a model...

  6. Effect of aspirin or resistant starch on colorectal neoplasia in the Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burn, John; Bishop, D Timothy; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Observational and epidemiologic data indicate that the use of aspirin reduces the risk of colorectal neoplasia; however, the effects of aspirin in the Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer) are not known. Resistant starch has been associated with an antineoplastic effect...... on the colon. METHODS: In a randomized, placebo-controlled trial, we used a two-by-two design to investigate the effects of aspirin, at a dose of 600 mg per day, and resistant starch (Novelose), at a dose of 30 g per day, in reducing the risk of adenoma and carcinoma among persons with the Lynch syndrome...... on the incidence of colorectal adenoma or carcinoma among carriers of the Lynch syndrome. (Current Controlled Trials number, ISRCTN59521990.)...

  7. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer/Lynch syndrome in three dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravochuck, Sara E; Church, James M

    2017-12-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is defined by family history, and Lynch syndrome (LS) is defined genetically. However, universal tumour testing is now increasingly used to screen for patients with defective mismatch repair. This mixing of the results of family history, tumour testing and germline testing produces multiple permutations and combinations that can foster confusion. We wanted to clarify hereditary colorectal cancer using the three dimensions of classification: family history, tumour testing and germline testing. Family history (Amsterdam I or II criteria versus not Amsterdam criteria) was used to define patients and families with HNPCC. Tumour testing and germline testing were then performed to sub-classify patients and families. The permutations of these classifications are applied to our registry. There were 234 HNPCC families: 129 had LS of which 55 were three-dimensional Lynch (family history, tumour testing and germline testing), 66 were two-dimensional Lynch and eight were one-dimensional Lynch. A total of 10 families had tumour Lynch (tumours with microsatellite instability or loss of expression of a mismatch repair protein but an Amsterdam-negative family and negative germline testing), five were Lynch like (Amsterdam-positive family, tumours with microsatellite instability or loss of expression of a mismatch repair protein on immunohistochemistry but negative germline testing), 26 were familial colorectal cancer type X and 95 were HNPCC. Hereditary colorectal cancer can be confusing. Sorting families in three dimensions can clarify the confusion and may direct further testing and, ultimately, surveillance. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  8. Screening for Lynch syndrome using risk assessment criteria in patients with ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Takashi; Tsuji, Kosuke; Banno, Kouji; Yanokura, Megumi; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Tominaga, Eiichiro; Aoki, Daisuke

    2018-05-01

    Lynch syndrome is a cancer predisposition syndrome caused by germline mutation of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Lynch syndrome only causes about 0.4% of cases of ovarian cancer, which suggests that universal screening may not be cost-efficient. However, the frequency of Lynch syndrome in ovarian cancer is unclear in the Asian population. The goal of the study was to investigate a screening strategy using family history. The subjects were 129 patients with ovarian cancer. Clinical and family history were collected using a self-administered questionnaire, and Society of Gynecologic Oncology (SGO) criteria 2007 and PREMM₅ were used for risk assessment. Microsatellite instability, immunohistochemistry, and methylation of MMR genes were analyzed. Of the 129 cases, 25 (19.4%) met the SGO criteria, and 4 of these 25 had MSI-high and MMR deficiency. Two cases had loss of MSH2 and MSH6, indicating MSH2 mutation, and the other two had loss of MLH1 and PMS2, including one without MLH1 methylation indicating MLH1 mutation. These results show that screening using family history can detect Lynch syndrome in 12.0% (3/25) of ovarian cancer cases. The 3 cases were positive for PREMM₅, but negative for Amsterdam II criteria and revised Bethesda guidelines. Genetic testing in one case with MSH2 and MSH6 deficiency confirmed the diagnosis of Lynch syndrome with MSH2 mutation. This is the first study of screening for Lynch syndrome in ovarian cancer using clinical and family history in an Asian population. This approach may be effective for diagnosis in these patients. Copyright © 2018. Asian Society of Gynecologic Oncology, Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology.

  9. General practitioner attitudes towards prescribing aspirin to carriers of Lynch Syndrome: findings from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Samuel G; Foy, Robbie; McGowan, Jennifer; Kobayashi, Lindsay C; Burn, John; Brown, Karen; Side, Lucy; Cuzick, Jack

    2017-10-01

    A dose non-inferiority study comparing 100 mg, 300 mg and 600 mg of aspirin for cancer prevention among Lynch Syndrome carriers is underway (Colorectal Adenoma/Carcinoma Prevention Programme trial 3, CaPP3). To guide implementation of the findings, we investigated general practitioner (GP) attitudes towards aspirin prescribing for Lynch Syndrome carriers. We surveyed 1007 UK GPs (9.6% response rate). Using a within-subjects design, GPs read a statement on harms and benefits of aspirin and indicated their willingness to prescribe aspirin at three doses (100 mg, 300 mg, 600 mg). Approximately two-thirds (70.8%) of GPs had heard of Lynch Syndrome or its associated names, and among those 46.7% were aware of the cancer preventive effects of aspirin among carriers. Two-thirds (68.1%) of GPs reported feeling comfortable discussing harms and benefits of aspirin with a Lynch Syndrome patient. Willingness to prescribe was 91.3% at 100 mg, and declined to 81.8% at 300 mg and 62.3% at 600 mg (p Lynch Syndrome patient in practice (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.01-2.05, p = 0.045). GPs report limited awareness of Lynch Syndrome and the preventive effects of aspirin among carriers. To ensure the optimal dose identified in the CaPP3 trial is readily available to patients, prescribing guidance and strategies to educate GPs should be developed.

  10. Laboratory Assays in Evaluation of Lynch Syndrome in Patients with Endometrial Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Bojana; Broaddus, Russell R

    2016-06-01

    This article reviews the main tissue testing modalities for Lynch Syndrome in the pathology laboratory, such as immunohistochemistry and PCR based analyses, and discusses their routine application, interpretation pitfalls, and troubleshooting of common technical performance issues. Discrepancies between laboratory and genetic testing may arise, and are examined in the context of the complexity of molecular abnormalities associated with Lynch Syndrome. The merits of targeted versus universal screening in a changing healthcare climate are addressed. In the absence of comprehensive screening programs, specific tumor topography and histological features that may prompt pathologist-initiated molecular tumor testing are outlined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of a Variety of Mutations in Cancer Predisposition Genes in Patients With Suspected Lynch Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurgelun, Matthew B; Allen, Brian; Kaldate, Rajesh R; Bowles, Karla R; Judkins, Thaddeus; Kaushik, Praveen; Roa, Benjamin B; Wenstrup, Richard J; Hartman, Anne-Renee; Syngal, Sapna

    2015-09-01

    Multigene panels are commercially available tools for hereditary cancer risk assessment that allow for next-generation sequencing of numerous genes in parallel. However, it is not clear if these panels offer advantages over traditional genetic testing. We investigated the number of cancer predisposition gene mutations identified by parallel sequencing in individuals with suspected Lynch syndrome. We performed germline analysis with a 25-gene, next-generation sequencing panel using DNA from 1260 individuals who underwent clinical genetic testing for Lynch syndrome from 2012 through 2013. All patients had a history of Lynch syndrome-associated cancer and/or polyps. We classified all identified germline alterations for pathogenicity and calculated the frequencies of pathogenic mutations and variants of uncertain clinical significance (VUS). We also analyzed data on patients' personal and family history of cancer, including fulfillment of clinical guidelines for genetic testing. Of the 1260 patients, 1112 met National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) criteria for Lynch syndrome testing (88%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 86%-90%). Multigene panel testing identified 114 probands with Lynch syndrome mutations (9.0%; 95% CI, 7.6%-10.8%) and 71 with mutations in other cancer predisposition genes (5.6%; 95% CI, 4.4%-7.1%). Fifteen individuals had mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2; 93% of these met the NCCN criteria for Lynch syndrome testing and 33% met NCCN criteria for BRCA1 and BRCA2 analysis (P = .0017). An additional 9 individuals carried mutations in other genes linked to high lifetime risks of cancer (5 had mutations in APC, 3 had bi-allelic mutations in MUTYH, and 1 had a mutation in STK11); all of these patients met NCCN criteria for Lynch syndrome testing. A total of 479 individuals had 1 or more VUS (38%; 95% CI, 35%-41%). In individuals with suspected Lynch syndrome, multigene panel testing identified high-penetrance mutations in cancer predisposition genes, many

  12. Ernest Orlando Lawrence (1901-1958), Cyclotron and Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, William T.

    2005-09-01

    On August 8, 2001, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory celebrated the centennial of the birth of its founder (and namesake), Ernest Orlando Lawrence. For the occasion, many speeches were given and old speeches were remembered. We recall the words of the late Luis Alvarez, a Nobel Laureate and one of the Lawrence's closest colleagues: ''Lawrence will always be remembered as the inventor of the cyclotron, but more importantly, he should be remembered as the inventor of the modern way of doing science''. J. L. Heilbron and R. W. Seidel, in the introduction of their book, ''Lawrence and His Laboratory'' stated, ''The motives and mechanisms that shaped the growth of the Laboratory helped to force deep changes in the scientific estate and in the wider society. In the entrepreneurship of its founder, Ernest Orlando Lawrence, these motives, mechanisms, and changes came together in a tight focus. He mobilized great and small philanthropists, state and local governments, corporations, and plutocrats, volunteers and virtuosos. The work they supported, from astrophysics and atomic bombs, from radiochemistry to nuclear medicine, shaped the way we observe, control, and manipulate our environment.'' Indeed, all over the civilized world, the ways we do science changed forever after Lawrence built his famed Radiation Laboratory. In this editorial, we epitomize his legacy of changing the way we do medicine, thereby affecting the health and well being of all humanity. This year marks the 75th anniversary of the invention of the cyclotron by Ernest Orlando Lawrence at the University of California at Berkeley. Lawrence conceived the idea of the cyclotron early in 1929 after reading an article by Rolf Wideroe on high-energy accelerators. In the spring of 1930 one of his students, Nels Edlefsen, constructed two crude models of a cyclotron. Later in the fall of the same year, another student, M. Stanley Livingston

  13. Tweeting Prayers and Communicating Grief over Michael Jackson Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Jimmy; Cheong, Pauline Hope

    2010-01-01

    Death and bereavement are human experiences that new media helps facilitate alongside creating new social grief practices that occur online. This study investigated how people's postings and tweets facilitated the communication of grief after pop music icon Michael Jackson died. Drawing on past grief research, religion, and new media studies, a…

  14. Professor Porter ja tema viis konkurentsitegurit / Michael E Porter

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Porter, Michael E

    2008-01-01

    Maailmas tuntud juhtimisguru Michael Porter viie konkurentsijõu teooriast ja selle rakendatavusest erinevates valdkondades. Lisad: Erinevused valdkondade kasumlikkuses; 5 määravat konkurentsijõudu; Investeeritud kapitali keskmine tasuvus; Mõnede USA tegevusvaldkondade kasumlikkus; Valdkonnaanalüüs praktikas; Valdkonna määratlemine; Valdkonnaanalüüsi sammud

  15. A Good Time: A Conversation with C. Michael Nelson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabel, Robert; Kaff, Marilyn; Teagarden, Jim

    2015-01-01

    C. Michael Nelson began his special education career as a teacher of adolescents with learning and behavior disorders. He has worked as a child psychologist and as a professor with the Department of Special Education and Rehabilitation Counseling at the University of Kentucky. He coordinated the graduate Personnel Preparation Program for Teachers…

  16. Eesti luksushotellide ristiisa / Michael Stenner ; interv. Malle Koido

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Stenner, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Eesti tipphotelle 1997. aastast juhtinud sakslane, praegu hotellide Kolm Õde ja Telegraaf juht räägib Eesti ja Saksamaa erinevustest, Eesti hotelliärist, teeninduskultuurist ja personalist. Lisa: Kes on Michael Stenner ning kuidas ta Eestisse sattus? Ilmunud ka: Linnaleht : Pärnu, 23. veebr. 2007, lk. 5-6

  17. Michael Polanyi on the Education and Knowledge of Scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Struan

    2000-01-01

    Explains why teachers addressing the nature of science should know the work of Michael Polanyi. Outlines Polanyi's intellectual career and examines his ideas on the education of scientists, research, and knowledge. Polanyi presaged Kuhn, Feyerabend, and the constructivists, yet insisted that science produces true knowledge about reality. (Contains…

  18. Michael Moore kaevati kohtusse pettuse eest / Mari Rebane

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Rebane, Mari

    2006-01-01

    Dokumentaalfilm "9/11 Fahrenheiti" ("Fahrenheit 9/11") : režissöör Michael Moore : USA 2004. Iraagi sõja invaliidistunud veteran andis režissööri kohtusse teda kujutavate flmikaadrite loata ja tenentsliku kasutamise pärast

  19. SuchThatCast Episode 6: Michael Boylan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soraker, Johnny

    2012-01-01

    Michael Boylan is the John J. McDonnell jr chair in Ethics, and professor and chair of the philosophy department at Marymount University in Arlington, Virginia. In addition to being a poet and novelist, he has written more than 100 published articles and 25 books primarily in ethics, social and

  20. Berliinis võidutses Michael Haneke / Jüri Laulik

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Laulik, Jüri, 1959-

    2005-01-01

    IX PÖFFil linastuv Michael Haneke film "Varjatud" ("Cache") võitis laupäeval mitu Euroopa Filmiakadeemia auhinda, sealhulgas parima filmi, parima lavastaja ja parima meesnäitleja (Daniel Auteuil) auhinna. Parima naisnäitleja tiitli pälvis Julia Jentsch ("Sophie Scholli viimased päevad"). Elutööpreemia sai sir Sean Connery

  1. Aza-Michael Reaction for an Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Manisha; Rush, Brittney; Patel, Jay; Castillo, Raul; Dhar, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    A green, aza-Michael reaction is described that can be used to teach undergraduate students conjugate addition of nitrogen nucleophile to an a,ß-unsaturated ester. Students analyze spectral data of the product obtained from the assigned reaction to determine product structure and propose the mechanism of its formation. The experiment requires…

  2. Educational Implications of Michael Fishbane's "Sacred Attunement: A Jewish Theology"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marom, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    This article posits Michael Fishbane's Judaic scholarship as a prime resource for Jewish education. The link between the two fields can be made through a translation of the theological underpinnings of Fishbane's insights into Judaism to educational purposes and practices. Initial work with Jewish educators on establishing this link encouraged…

  3. Correspondence of Michael Faraday, v.5 1855-1860

    CERN Document Server

    Faraday, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This volume includes 70% of previously unpublished letters of Michael Farday spanning half of the 1850s and most of 1860. Topics include Faraday's work on regelation, the transmission of light through gold and his appointment by Emperor Napoleon III to be a Commander of the Legion of Honour.

  4. Pain evaluation during gynaecological surveillance in women with Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helder-Woolderink, Jorien; de Bock, Geertruida; Hollema, Harry; van Oven, Magda; Mourits, Marian

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate perceived pain during repetitive annual endometrial sampling at gynaecologic surveillance in asymptomatic women with Lynch syndrome (LS) over time and in addition to symptomatic women without LS, undergoing single endometrial sampling. In this prospective study, 52 women with LS or first degree relatives who underwent repetitive annual gynaecological surveillance including endometrial sampling of which 33 were evaluated twice or more and 50 symptomatic women without LS who had single endometrial sampling, were included. Pain intensity was registered with VAS scores. Differences in pain intensities between subsequent visits (in LS) and between the two groups were evaluated. The use of painkillers before endometrial sampling was registered. If women with LS decided for preventive surgery, the reason was recorded. The LS group reported a median VAS score of 5.0 (range 0-10) at the first surveillance (n = 52) and at the second visit (n = 24). Women who repeatedly underwent endometrial sampling more often used painkillers for this procedure. During the study period 7/52 (13 %) women with LS choose for preventive surgery, another 4/52 (8 %) refused further endometrial sampling. Painful endometrial sampling was mentioned as main reason to quit screening. The median VAS score of the 50 symptomatic women was 5.0 (range 1-9). Endometrial sampling, irrespective of indication, is a painful procedure, with a median VAS score of 5.0. During subsequent procedures in women with LS, the median pain score does not aggravate although one in five women chose an alternative for endometrial sampling.

  5. Elisa Alicia Lynch: a Dama de Aço do Paraguai * Elisa Alicia Lynch: the Steel ‘S Lady of Paraguay

    OpenAIRE

    Frota, Luciara Silveira de Aragão e

    2015-01-01

    Este trabalho mostra uma nova visão da irlandesa Elisa Alicia Lynch, longe da figura de prostituta manipuladora que incitou o Marechal Solano López no começo da Guerra do Paraguai. Dentro de uma corrente revisionista histórica, apoiada em Marc Bloch, propõe uma nova análise de seu papel na vida de Solano López e do Paraguai, comentando a literatura sobre o assunto.

  6. CTNNB1-mutant colorectal carcinomas with immediate invasive growth: a model of interval cancers in Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahadova, Aysel; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Bläker, Hendrik; Kloor, Matthias

    2016-10-01

    The implementation of regular colonoscopy programs has significantly decreased the mortality associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) in Lynch syndrome patients. However, interval CRCs in Lynch syndrome that remain undetected by colonoscopy still represent a substantial problem in the management of the syndrome. One possible reason of interval cancers could be a non-polypous pathway of cancer development. To examine the possibility of a non-polypous pathway of CRC development in Lynch syndrome, we analyzed the histological appearance of 46 Lynch syndrome-associated CRCs and compared them to 34 sporadic microsatellite unstable cancers. We observed that 25 (62.5 %) out of 40 assessable Lynch syndrome-associated carcinomas lacked evidence of polypous growth, compared to 17 (50 %) out of 34 sporadic MSI-H cancers. We detected CTNNB1 mutations in 8 (17.4 %) out of 46 Lynch syndrome-associated cancers compared to 0 out of 34 sporadic MSI-H cancers (p = 0.01). The majority of CTNNB1-mutant cancers presented with a histological appearance suggesting immediate invasive growth. Our results suggest that a distinct subgroup of CRCs in Lynch syndrome may in fact emerge from a non-polypous precursor, thus potentially explaining the phenomenon of interval cancers. Such a non-polypous precursor may be the recently described mismatch repair-deficient crypt focus, which remains invisible for the examiner during colonoscopy. This calls for considering the implementation of active, primary preventive measures in the management of Lynch syndrome. Future studies on pathogenic pathways and precursor lesions in Lynch syndrome are strongly encouraged, and the clinical efficacy of new prevention approaches should be evaluated in prospective clinical trials.

  7. Michael Pärt ئ suure muusika taustajõud / Michael Pärt ; interv. Siim Nestor

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Pärt, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Arvo Pärdi pojast Michael Pärdist. Tema tööst "music editor"-ina - helimonteerijana, tööst muusika produktsiooni, salvestamise ja muusika kirjutamise abijõuna. Koostööst maailmas tuntud muusikutega

  8. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleimer, G.E.

    1987-04-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1986 are presented and general trends are discussed. Topics include radiation monitoring, wastewater discharge monitoring, dose distribution estimates, and ground water monitoring. 9 refs., 8 figs., 20 tabs

  9. Accelerator safety program at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, C.L.

    1976-01-01

    A proposed accelerator safety standard for the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) is given. All accelerators will comply with this standard when it is included in the LLL Health and Safety Manual. The radiation alarm and radiation safety system for a radiography facility are also described

  10. Crystal clear the autobiographies of Sir Lawrence and Lady Bragg

    CERN Document Server

    Thomson, Patience

    2015-01-01

    The main body of this book contains the hitherto unpublished autobiographies of both William Lawrence Bragg, an innovative scientist who won the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1915, and his wife, Alice, a Mayor of Cambridge and National Chairman of Marriage Guidance. Their autobiographies give unusual insights into the lives and times of two distinguished people and the real personalities behind their public appearance.

  11. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. 1979 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, W.J.; Lindeken, C.L.; White, J.H.; Buddemeir, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    Information on monitoring activities is reported in two sections for EDB/ERA/INIS. The first section covers all information reported except Appendix D, which gives details of sampling and analytical procedures for environmental monitoring used at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. A separate abstract was prepared for Appendix D

  12. Waste management study: Process development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of the present Toxic Waste Control Operations at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, evaluates the technologies most applicable to the treatment of toxic and hazardous wastes and presents conceptual designs of processes for the installation of a new decontamination and waste treatment facility (DWTF) for future treatment of these wastes

  13. Astronaut Wendy Lawrence participates in training session in the CCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Seated in the pilot's seat of a JSC Shuttle trainer, astronaut Wendy B. Lawrence, STS-67 flight engineer, participates in a training session. The 1992 astronaut class graduate is in the crew compartment trainer (CCT) of JSC's Shuttle mockup and integration laboratory.

  14. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1995--2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    This report presents the details of the mission and strategic plan for Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during the fiscal years of 1995--2000. It presents summaries of current programs and potential changes; critical success factors such as human resources; management practices; budgetary allowances; and technical and administrative initiatives.

  15. High energy laser facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, N.C.

    1981-06-01

    High energy laser facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are described, with special emphasis on their use for equation of state investigations using laser-generated shockwaves. Shock wave diagnostics now in use are described. Future Laboratory facilities are also discussed

  16. Lynch, Urry and city marketing: Taking advantage of the city as a built and graphic image

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hospers, G-J.

    2009-01-01

    City marketing is usually addressed from the perspective of marketing theory. This article follows an alternative approach by exploring city marketing from the viewpoint of urban planning and the sociology of tourism. In his classic ‘The Image of the City’ (1960), planner Kevin Lynch found that

  17. Dietary patterns and colorectal adenomas in Lynch syndrome: the GEOLynch cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botma, A.; Vasen, H.F.; Duijnhoven, F.J.B. van; Kleibeuker, J.H.; Nagengast, F.M.; Kampman, E.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with Lynch syndrome (LS) have a high risk of developing colorectal cancer due to mutations in mismatch repair genes. Because dietary factors, alone and in combination, influence sporadic colorectal carcinogenesis, the association of dietary patterns with colorectal adenomas in

  18. Dietary Patterns and Colorectal Adenomas in Lynch Syndrome: The GEOLynch Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botma, A.; Vasen, H.F.; Duijnhoven, van F.J.B.; Kleibeuker, J.H.; Nagengast, F.M.; Kampman, E.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with Lynch syndrome (LS) have a high risk of developing colorectal cancer due to mutations in mismatch repair genes. Because dietary factors, alone and in combination, influence sporadic colorectal carcinogenesis, the association of dietary patterns with colorectal adenomas in

  19. Dietary Patterns and Colorectal Adenomas in Lynch Syndrome The GEOLynch Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botma, Akke; Vasen, Hans F. A.; van Duijnhoven, Franzel J. B.; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Nagengast, Fokko M.; Kampman, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with Lynch syndrome (LS) have a high risk of developing colorectal cancer due to mutations in mismatch repair genes. Because dietary factors, alone and in combination, influence sporadic colorectal carcinogenesis, the association of dietary patterns with colorectal adenomas in

  20. Inflammatory potential of the diet and colorectal tumor risk in persons with Lynch syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Jesca G.M.; Makama, Maureen; Woudenbergh, Van Geertruida J.; Vasen, Hans F.A.; Nagengast, Fokko M.; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Kampman, Ellen; Duijnhoven, Van Fränzel J.B.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Persons with Lynch syndrome (LS) have high lifetime risk of developing colorectal tumors (CRTs) because of a germline mutation in one of their mismatch repair (MMR) genes. An important process in the development of CRTs is inflammation, which has been shown to be modulated by diet.

  1. Mismatch repair gene mutation spectrum in the Swedish Lynch syndrome population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagerstedt-Robinson, Kristina; Rohlin, Anna; Aravidis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Lynch syndrome caused by constitutional mismatch‑repair defects is one of the most common hereditary cancer syndromes with a high risk for colorectal, endometrial, ovarian and urothelial cancer. Lynch syndrome is caused by mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes i.e., MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2...... Lynch syndrome families. These mutations affected MLH1 in 40%, MSH2 in 36%, MSH6 in 18% and PMS2 in 6% of the families. A large variety of mutations were identified with splice site mutations being the most common mutation type in MLH1 and frameshift mutations predominating in MSH2 and MSH6. Large...... deletions of one or several exons accounted for 21% of the mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 and 22% in PMS2, but were rare (4%) in MSH6. In 66% of the Lynch syndrome families the variants identified were private and the effect from founder mutations was limited and predominantly related to a Finnish founder...

  2. Lynch syndrome caused by germline PMS2 mutations: delineating the cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeke, S.W. ten; Brohet, R.M.; Tops, C.M.; Klift, H.M. van der; Velthuizen, M.E.; Bernstein, I.; Capella Munar, G.; Garcia, E.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Letteboer, T.G.; Menko, F.H.; Lindblom, A.; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Moller, P.; Os, T.A. van; Rahner, N.; Redeker, B.J.; Sijmons, R.H.; Spruijt, L.; Suerink, M.; Vos, Y.J.; Wagner, A.; Hes, F.J.; Vasen, H.F.A.; Nielsen, M.; Wijnen, J.T.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The clinical consequences of PMS2 germline mutations are poorly understood compared with other Lynch-associated mismatch repair gene (MMR) mutations. The aim of this European cohort study was to define the cancer risk faced by PMS2 mutation carriers. METHODS: Data were collected from 98

  3. Prevalence of small-bowel neoplasia in Lynch syndrome assessed by video capsule endoscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanstra, Jasmijn F.; Al-Toma, Abdul; Dekker, Evelien; Vanhoutvin, Steven A. L. W.; Nagengast, Fokko M.; Mathus-Vliegen, Elisabeth M.; van Leerdam, Monique E.; de Vos tot Nederveen Cappel, Wouter H.; Sanduleanu, Silvia; Veenendaal, Roeland A.; Cats, Annemieke; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Koornstra, Jan J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to determine the prevalence of small-bowel neoplasia in asymptomatic patients with Lynch syndrome (LS) by video capsule endoscopy (VCE). After obtaining informed consent, asymptomatic proven gene mutation carriers aged 35-70 years were included in this prospective multicentre study in

  4. Lynch Syndrome Caused by Germline PMS2 Mutations: Delineating the Cancer Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Broeke, Sanne W.; Brohet, Richard M.; Tops, Carli M.; van der Klift, Heleen M.; Velthuizen, Mary E.; Bernstein, Inge; Capellá Munar, Gabriel; Gomez Garcia, Encarna; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Letteboer, Tom G. W.; Menko, Fred H.; Lindblom, Annika; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Moller, Pal; van Os, Theo A.; Rahner, Nils; Redeker, Bert J. W.; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Suerink, Manon; Vos, Yvonne J.; Wagner, Anja; Hes, Frederik J.; Vasen, Hans F.; Nielsen, Maartje; Wijnen, Juul T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The clinical consequences of PMS2 germline mutations are poorly understood compared with other Lynch-associated mismatch repair gene (MMR) mutations. The aim of this European cohort study was to define the cancer risk faced by PMS2 mutation carriers. Methods Data were collected from 98 PMS2

  5. Prevalence of small-bowel neoplasia in Lynch syndrome assessed by video capsule endoscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanstra, Jasmijn F.; Al-Toma, Abdul; Dekker, Evelien; Vanhoutvin, Steven A. L. W.; Nagengast, Fokko M.; Mathus-Vliegen, Elisabeth M.; van Leerdam, Monique E.; Cappel, Wouter H. de Vos tot Nederveen; Sanduleanu, Silvia; Veenendaal, Roeland A.; Cats, Annemieke; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Koornstra, Jan J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim was to determine the prevalence of small-bowel neoplasia in asymptomatic patients with Lynch syndrome (LS) by video capsule endoscopy (VCE). Design After obtaining informed consent, asymptomatic proven gene mutation carriers aged 3570 years were included in this prospective

  6. Lynch Syndrome Caused by Germline PMS2 Mutations : Delineating the Cancer Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Broeke, Sanne W.; Brohet, Richard M.; Tops, Carli M.; van der Klift, Heleen M.; Velthuizen, Mary E.; Bernstein, Inge; Capella Munar, Gabriel; Garcia, Encarna Gomez; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Letteboer, Tom G. W.; Menko, Fred H.; Lindblom, Annika; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Moller, Pal; Van Os, Theo A.; Rahner, Nils; Redeker, Bert J. W.; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Suerink, Manon; Vos, Yvonne J.; Wagner, Anja; Hes, Frederik J.; Vasen, Hans F.; Nielsen, Maartje; Wijnen, Juul T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The clinical consequences of PMS2 germline mutations are poorly understood compared with other Lynch-associated mismatch repair gene (MMR) mutations. The aim of this European cohort study was to define the cancer risk faced by PMS2 mutation carriers. Methods Data were collected from 98 PMS2

  7. Diagnostic Strategies for Early Lynch Syndrome Detection: From Molecular Testing to Economic Evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H.M. Leenen (Celine)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Lynch syndrome (LS) is an autosomal dominant inherited syndrome that predisposes to multiple malignancies, in particular colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC). The lifetime risk of developing CRC for a LS mutation carrier is 25 to 70%, while women

  8. Germline Hypermethylation of MLH1 and EPCAM Deletions Are a Frequent Cause of Lynch Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, Renee C.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Westers, Helga; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Kooi, Krista; Jager, Paul O. J.; de Groote, Marloes L.; Dijkhuizen, Trijnie; Olderode-Berends, Maran J. W.; Hollema, Harry; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Sijmons, Rolf H.

    It was shown that Lynch syndrome can be caused by germline hypermethylation of the MLH1 and MSH2 promoters. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated very recently that germline deletions of the 3' region of EPCAM cause transcriptional read-through which results in silencing of MSH2 by hypermethylation.

  9. Germline hypermethylation of MLH1 and EPCAM deletions are a frequent cause of Lynch syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, R.C.; Hofstra, R.M.; Westers, H.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Kooi, K.; Jager, P.O.; Groote, M.L. de; Dijkhuizen, T.; Olderode-Berends, M.J.; Hollema, H.; Kleibeuker, J.H.; Sijmons, R.H.

    2009-01-01

    It was shown that Lynch syndrome can be caused by germline hypermethylation of the MLH1 and MSH2 promoters. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated very recently that germline deletions of the 3' region of EPCAM cause transcriptional read-through which results in silencing of MSH2 by hypermethylation.

  10. Lynch syndrome associated with two MLH1 promoter variants and allelic imbalance of MLH1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesson, Luke B; Packham, Deborah; Kwok, Chau-To; Nunez, Andrea C; Ng, Benedict; Schmidt, Christa; Fields, Michael; Wong, Jason W H; Sloane, Mathew A; Ward, Robyn L

    2015-06-01

    Lynch syndrome is a hereditary cancer syndrome caused by a constitutional mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes. The implementation of predictive testing and targeted preventative surveillance is hindered by the frequent finding of sequence variants of uncertain significance in these genes. We aimed to determine the pathogenicity of previously reported variants (c.-28A>G and c.-7C>T) within the MLH1 5'untranslated region (UTR) in two individuals from unrelated suspected Lynch syndrome families. We investigated whether these variants were associated with other pathogenic alterations using targeted high-throughput sequencing of the MLH1 locus. We also determined their relationship to gene expression and epigenetic alterations at the promoter. Sequencing revealed that the c.-28A>G and c.-7C>T variants were the only potentially pathogenic alterations within the MLH1 gene. In both individuals, the levels of transcription from the variant allele were reduced to 50% compared with the wild-type allele. Partial loss of expression occurred in the absence of constitutional epigenetic alterations within the MLH1 promoter. We propose that these variants may be pathogenic due to constitutional partial loss of MLH1 expression, and that this may be associated with intermediate penetrance of a Lynch syndrome phenotype. Our findings provide further evidence of the potential importance of noncoding variants in the MLH1 5'UTR in the pathogenesis of Lynch syndrome. © 2015 The Authors. **Human Mutation published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Expression defect size among unclassified MLH1 variants determines pathogenicity in Lynch syndrome diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinrichsen, Inga; Brieger, Angela; Trojan, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is caused by a germline mutation in a mismatch repair gene, most commonly the MLH1 gene. However, one third of the identified alterations are missense variants with unclear clinical significance. The functionality of these variants can be tested in the laboratory, but the results...

  12. Gene variants of unknown clinical significance in Lynch syndrome. An introduction for clinicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijmons, Rolf H.; Greenblatt, Marc S.; Genuardi, Maurizio

    Clinicians referring patients for genetic testing for Lynch syndrome will sooner or later receive results for DNA Mismatch Repair (MMR) genes reporting DNA changes that are unclear from a clinical point of view. These changes are referred to as variants of unknown, or unclear, clinical significance

  13. Determinants of adherence to recommendations for cancer prevention among Lynch Syndrome mutation carriers : A qualitative exploration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Annemiek; Vrieling, Alina; Murugesu, Laxsini; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Kampman, Ellen; Hoedjes, Meeke

    2017-01-01

    Background: Lynch Syndrome (LS) mutation carriers are at high risk for various cancer types, particularly colorectal cancer. Adherence to lifestyle and body weight recommendations for cancer prevention may lower this risk. To promote adherence to these recommendations, knowledge on determinants of

  14. Increasing awareness and knowledge of lifestyle recommendations for cancer prevention in Lynch syndrome carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.; Visser, A.; Hoedjes, Meeke; Hurks, H.M.H.; Gómez García, E.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Kampman, E.

    2018-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) mutation carriers may reduce their cancer risk by adhering to lifestyle recommendations for cancer prevention. This study tested the effect of providing LS mutation carriers with World Cancer Research Fund-the Netherlands (WCRF-NL) health promotion materials on awareness and

  15. Determinants of adherence to recommendations for cancer prevention among Lynch Syndrome mutation carriers: a qualitative exploration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.; Vrieling, A.; Murugesu, L.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Kampman, E.; Hoedjes, M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Lynch Syndrome (LS) mutation carriers are at high risk for various cancer types, particularly colorectal cancer. Adherence to lifestyle and body weight recommendations for cancer prevention may lower this risk. To promote adherence to these recommendations, knowledge on determinants of

  16. Informing family members of individuals with Lynch syndrome: a guideline for clinical geneticists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menko, Fred H.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Henneman, Lidewij; Stol, Yrrah; Wijdenes, Miranda; Otten, Ellen; Ploegmakers, Marleen M. J.; Legemaate, Johan; Smets, Ellen M. A.; de Wert, Guido M. W. R.; Tibben, Aad

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of Lynch syndrome can lead to the prevention of colorectal cancer through periodic colonoscopies and removal of premalignant lesions in susceptible individuals. Therefore, predisposed individuals identified by mutation analysis are advised to inform their at-risk relatives about the

  17. What the physician needs to know about Lynch syndrome: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Henry T; Lynch, Jane F

    2005-04-01

    The Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer [HNPCC]), is the most common form of hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC), accounting for 2% to 7% of all CRC cases. The next most common hereditary CRC syndrome is familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), which accounts for less than 1% of all CRC. Lynch syndrome is of crucial clinical importance due to the fact that it predicts the lifetime risk for CRC and a litany of extra-CRC cancers (of the endometrium, ovary, stomach, small bowel, hepatobiliary tract, upper uroepithelial tract, and brain) through assessment of a well-orchestrated family history. A Lynch syndrome diagnosis is almost certain when a mutation in a mismatch repair gene--most commonly MSH2, MLHI, or, to a lesser degree, MSH6--is identified. Once diagnosed, the potential for significant reduction in cancer-related morbidity and mortality through highly targeted surveillance may be profound. Particularly important is colonoscopy initiated at an early age (ie, 25 years) and repeated annually due to accelerated carcinogenesis. In women, endometrial aspiration biopsy and transvaginal ultrasound are important given the extraordinarily high risk for endometrial and ovarian carcinoma. These cancer control strategies have a major impact on at-risk family members once they have been counseled and educated thoroughly about Lynch syndrome's natural history and their own hereditary cancer risk.

  18. Bayesian Modeling for Genetic Anticipation in Presence of Mutational Heterogeneity: A Case Study in Lynch Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boonstra, Philip S; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Taylor, Jeremy M G

    2011-01-01

    to cause hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, also called Lynch syndrome (LS). We find evidence for a decrease in AOO between generations in this article. Our model predicts family-level anticipation effects that are potentially useful in genetic counseling clinics for high-risk families....

  19. Assessing Genetic Variants of Uncertain Significance: The Example of Lynch Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Heinen, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    cancer syndrome, Lynch syndrome, is used as an example. This challenge is addressed by illustrating the importance of combining genetic and functional data in future strategies to assess VUS. The proposed strategies combine clinical genetic, analytical, functional and in silico approaches....

  20. The risk of extra-colonic, extra-endometrial cancer in the Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watson, Patrice; Vasen, Hans F A; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka

    2008-01-01

    Persons with the Lynch syndrome (LS) are at high risk for cancer, including cancers of the small bowel, stomach, upper urologic tract (renal pelvis and ureter), ovary, biliary tract and brain tumors, in addition to the more commonly observed colorectal and endometrial cancers. Cancer prevention...

  1. Informing family members of individuals with Lynch syndrome : a guideline for clinical geneticists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menko, Fred H.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Henneman, Lidewij; Stol, Yrrah; Wijdenes, Miranda; Otten, Ellen; Ploegmakers, Marleen M. J.; Legemaate, Johan; Smets, Ellen M. A.; de Wert, Guido M. W. R.; Tibben, Aad

    The diagnosis of Lynch syndrome can lead to the prevention of colorectal cancer through periodic colonoscopies and removal of premalignant lesions in susceptible individuals. Therefore, predisposed individuals identified by mutation analysis are advised to inform their at-risk relatives about the

  2. HEREDITARY NON-POLYPOSIS COLORECTAL CANCER (LYNCH SYNDROME PADA WANITA UMUR 16 TAHUN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asril Zahari

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakKanker kolorektal menduduki peringkat ketiga jenis kanker yang paling sering terjadi di dunia. Sekitar 3% kasus kanker kolorektal merupakan jenis hereditary non polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC/Lynch syndrome, yang sering muncul pada usia muda. Dilaporkan satu kasus di rumah sakit Dr. M. Djamil Padang, wanita berumur 16 tahun dengan keluhan nyeri perut kanan bawah. Didapatkan riwayat penyakit serupa pada kakek, bibi pasien dan enam anggota keluarga yang lain. Pada pemeriksaan fisik abdomen teraba massa dengan konsistensi keras dan terfiksir. Pada kolonoskopi dan biopsi ditemukan tumor jenis adenocarcinoma colon moderatly differentiated di fleksura hepatika dan polip di kolon sigmoid. Berdasarkan kriteria Amsterdam pasien didiagnosa Lynch syndrome. Pada Pasien dilakukan subtotal kolektomi, anastomose ileorectal dan kemoterapi ajuvan. Identifikasi genetik sedang dikerjakan untuk melihat adanya kelainan genetik pada pasien. Pasien melakukan skrining berkala untuk mencegah kanker HNPCC jenis yang lain.Kata kunci : Hereditary non polyposis colorectal cancer, Lynch syndrome, Microsatellite instability, skrining.AbstractCarcinoma colorectal is the third most common type of cancer that occurs in the world. About 2% -3% of cases of colorectal cancer is hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC/Lynch syndrome, which often appear at a young age. Amsterdam and Bethesda criteria have been used to identify patients with Lynch syndrome.one case was reported at the Dr. M. Djamil Padang hospital, a 16-year-old girl with right lower abdominal pain. Obtained a history of similar disease in grandparents, aunts and six other family members. On physical examination found palpable fixed abdominal mass with hard consistency in the lower right abdomen. At colonoscopy and biopsy found a moderatly differentiated adenocarcinoma colon type at the hepatic flexure and the sigmoid colon polyp. Based on the Amsterdam criteria, patients diagnosed with HNPCC/Lynch

  3. O mito da serpente em D. H. Lawrence = The serpent myth in D. H. Lawrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Leal Cardoso

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho propõe um estudo do mito da serpente, na obra A serpenteemplumada, de D. H. Lawrence, baseado na trajetória mítica do herói, estabelecida por Joseph Campbell e na crítica junguiana da cultura. Kate, a protagonista, empreende uma busca de renascimento psicológico e espiritual, ao chegar à terra primitiva do México. Tal busca simboliza um retorno ao mundo primitivo da Grande Mãe, entendido, do ponto de vista psicológico, como o inconsciente. Assim como o processo de individuação, descrito por Jung, essa personagem enfrenta rompimentos e dificuldades no decorrer da expansão da consciência. Neste sentido, a serpente simboliza tanto o que é viperino na natureza humana, quanto à sabedoria do corpo e dos instintos.This paper proposes a study on the myth of the serpent in D. H. Lawrence’s The Plumed Serpent, based on Joseph Campbell’s mythical map of the hero’s journey and Jungian criticism. Kate, the femaleprotagonist, embarks on a quest for spiritual-psychological rebirth in the primitive lands of Mexico. Following the pattern of Jung’s individuation process and exploring many recurrent symbols in the narrative, we intend to show how Kate faces ruptures anduncertainties as her consciousness is getting into a process of expansion. According to our analysis, the serpent illustrates the Self’s paradoxical aspect, representing both the viper sideof the human being as well as its knowledge.

  4. The clinical phenotype of Lynch syndrome due to germline PMS2 mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senter, Leigha; Clendenning, Mark; Sotamaa, Kaisa; Hampel, Heather; Green, Jane; Potter, John D.; Lindblom, Annika; Lagerstedt, Kristina; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Young, Joanne; Winship, Ingrid; Dowty, James G.; White, Darren M.; Hopper, John L.; Baglietto, Laura; Jenkins, Mark A.; de la Chapelle, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Although the clinical phenotype of Lynch syndrome (also known as Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer) has been well described, little is known about disease in PMS2 mutation carriers. Now that mutation detection methods can discern mutations in PMS2 from mutations in its pseudogenes, more mutation carriers have been identified. Information about the clinical significance of PMS2 mutations is crucial for appropriate counseling. Here, we report the clinical characteristics of a large series of PMS2 mutation carriers. Methods We performed PMS2 mutation analysis using long range PCR and MLPA for 99 probands diagnosed with Lynch syndrome-associated tumors showing isolated loss of PMS2 by immunohistochemistry. Penetrance was calculated using a modified segregation analysis adjusting for ascertainment. Results Germline PMS2 mutations were detected in 62% of probands (n = 55 monoallelic; 6 biallelic). Among families with monoallelic PMS2 mutations, 65.5% met revised Bethesda guidelines. Compared with the general population, in mutation carriers, the incidence of colorectal cancer was 5.2 fold higher and the incidence of endometrial cancer was 7.5 fold higher. In North America, this translates to a cumulative cancer risk to age 70 of 15–20% for colorectal cancer, 15% for endometrial cancer, and 25–32% for any Lynch syndrome-associated cancer. No elevated risk for non-Lynch syndrome-associated cancers was observed. Conclusions PMS2 mutations contribute significantly to Lynch syndrome but the penetrance for monoallelic mutation carriers appears to be lower than that for the other mismatch repair genes. Modified counseling and cancer surveillance guidelines for PMS2 mutation carriers are proposed. PMID:18602922

  5. The clinical phenotype of Lynch syndrome due to germ-line PMS2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senter, Leigha; Clendenning, Mark; Sotamaa, Kaisa; Hampel, Heather; Green, Jane; Potter, John D; Lindblom, Annika; Lagerstedt, Kristina; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Lindor, Noralane M; Young, Joanne; Winship, Ingrid; Dowty, James G; White, Darren M; Hopper, John L; Baglietto, Laura; Jenkins, Mark A; de la Chapelle, Albert

    2008-08-01

    Although the clinical phenotype of Lynch syndrome (also known as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer) has been well described, little is known about disease in PMS2 mutation carriers. Now that mutation detection methods can discern mutations in PMS2 from mutations in its pseudogenes, more mutation carriers have been identified. Information about the clinical significance of PMS2 mutations is crucial for appropriate counseling. Here, we report the clinical characteristics of a large series of PMS2 mutation carriers. We performed PMS2 mutation analysis using long-range polymerase chain reaction and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification for 99 probands diagnosed with Lynch syndrome-associated tumors showing isolated loss of PMS2 by immunohistochemistry. Penetrance was calculated using a modified segregation analysis adjusting for ascertainment. Germ-line PMS2 mutations were detected in 62% of probands (n = 55 monoallelic; 6 biallelic). Among families with monoallelic PMS2 mutations, 65.5% met revised Bethesda guidelines. Compared with the general population, in mutation carriers, the incidence of colorectal cancer was 5.2-fold higher, and the incidence of endometrial cancer was 7.5-fold higher. In North America, this translates to a cumulative cancer risk to age 70 years of 15%-20% for colorectal cancer, 15% for endometrial cancer, and 25%-32% for any Lynch syndrome-associated cancer. No elevated risk for non-Lynch syndrome-associated cancers was observed. PMS2 mutations contribute significantly to Lynch syndrome, but the penetrance for monoallelic mutation carriers appears to be lower than that for the other mismatch repair genes. Modified counseling and cancer surveillance guidelines for PMS2 mutation carriers are proposed.

  6. From "Lawrence Kohlberg's Approach to Moral Education" by F. Clark Power, Ann Higgins, and Lawrence Kohlberg, with Judy Codding (1989)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schools: Studies in Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article is an excerpt from "Lawrence Kohlberg's Approach to Moral Education." It refers several times to Kohlberg's "six stages of moral development." Stages 3 and 4 belong to the second level of moral development, which Kohlberg calls "conventional." At stage 3, one becomes aware of conventions as one sees what is right in terms of living up…

  7. Immune Profiling of Premalignant Lesions in Patients With Lynch Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kyle; Taggart, Melissa W; Reyes-Uribe, Laura; Borras, Ester; Riquelme, Erick; Barnett, Reagan M; Leoni, Guido; San Lucas, F Anthony; Catanese, Maria T; Mori, Federica; Diodoro, Maria G; You, Y Nancy; Hawk, Ernest T; Roszik, Jason; Scheet, Paul; Kopetz, Scott; Nicosia, Alfredo; Scarselli, Elisa; Lynch, Patrick M; McAllister, Florencia; Vilar, Eduardo

    2018-04-16

    Colorectal carcinomas in patients with Lynch syndrome (LS) arise in a background of mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency, display a unique immune profile with upregulation of immune checkpoints, and response to immunotherapy. However, there is still a gap in understanding the pathogenesis of MMR-deficient colorectal premalignant lesions, which is essential for the development of novel preventive strategies for LS. To characterize the immune profile of premalignant lesions from a cohort of patients with LS. Whole-genome transcriptomic analysis using next-generation sequencing was performed in colorectal polyps and carcinomas of patients with LS. As comparator and model of MMR-proficient colorectal carcinogenesis, we used samples from patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). In addition, a total of 47 colorectal carcinomas (6 hypermutants and 41 nonhypermutants) were obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) for comparisons. Samples were obtained from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and "Regina Elena" National Cancer Institute, Rome, Italy. All diagnoses were confirmed by genetic testing. Polyps were collected at the time of endoscopic surveillance and tumors were collected at the time of surgical resection. The data were analyzed from October 2016 to November 2017. Assessment of the immune profile, mutational signature, mutational and neoantigen rate, and pathway enrichment analysis of neoantigens in LS premalignant lesions and their comparison with FAP premalignant lesions, LS carcinoma, and sporadic colorectal cancers from TCGA. The analysis was performed in a total of 28 polyps (26 tubular adenomas and 2 hyperplastic polyps) and 3 early-stage LS colorectal tumors from 24 patients (15 [62%] female; mean [SD] age, 48.12 [15.38] years) diagnosed with FAP (n = 10) and LS (n = 14). Overall, LS polyps presented with low mutational and neoantigen rates but displayed a striking immune activation profile characterized by CD4 T cells

  8. Double Michael Addition Reaction of Bischalcone under Ultrasound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI,Ji-Tai; XU,Wen-Zhi; CHEN,Guo-Feng; LI,Tong-Shuang

    2004-01-01

    @@ The Michael addition of 1,5-diaryl-1,4-pentadien-3-ones with active methylene compounds has been the subjects of many investigations. Ultrasound has increasingly been used in organic synthesis in the last three decades. Compared with traditional methods, this method is more convenient and easily controlled. A large number of organic reactions can be carried out in higher yield, shorter reaction time or milder conditions under ultrasonic irradiation. KF/Al2O3 as a useful solid supported catalyst has received considerable attention because of their high level of chemoselectivity and environmental compatibility as well as simplicity of operation and their ready availability at low cost. Herein we report the double Michael addition of dibenzalacetone with active methlene compounds such as dimethyl malonate, diethyl malonate,methyl cyanoacetate and ethyl cyanoacetate catalyzed by KF/Al2O3 under ultrasound irradiation.

  9. Asymmetric Michael Addition Mediated by Chiral Ionic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yumiko

    2018-01-01

    Chiral ionic liquids with a focus on their applications in asymmetric Michael additions and related reactions were reviewed. The examples were classified on the basis of the mode of asymmetric induction (e.g., external induction/non-covalent interaction or internal induction/covalent bond formation), the roles in reactions (as a solvent or catalyst), and their structural features (e.g., imidazolium-based chiral cations, other chiral oniums; proline derivatives). Most of the reactions with high chiral induction are Michael addition of ketones or aldehydes to chalcones or nitrostyrenes where proline-derived chiral ionic liquids catalyze the reaction through enamine/ iminium formation. Many reports demonstrate the recyclability of ionic liquid-tagged pyrrolidines. PMID:29861702

  10. Asymmetric Michael Addition Mediated by Chiral Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yumiko

    2018-06-01

    Chiral ionic liquids with a focus on their applications in asymmetric Michael additions and related reactions were reviewed. The examples were classified on the basis of the mode of asymmetric induction (e.g., external induction/non-covalent interaction or internal induction/covalent bond formation), the roles in reactions (as a solvent or catalyst), and their structural features (e.g., imidazolium-based chiral cations, other chiral oniums; proline derivatives). Most of the reactions with high chiral induction are Michael addition of ketones or aldehydes to chalcones or nitrostyrenes where proline-derived chiral ionic liquids catalyze the reaction through enamine/ iminium formation. Many reports demonstrate the recyclability of ionic liquid-tagged pyrrolidines.

  11. Pengaruh Tipografi pada Era Massimo Vignelli terhadap Tipografi Michael Bierut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irwan Harnoko

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Massimo Vignelli is a senior graphic designer lived in New York, as a vocal modernism against post-modernism. His statement firmly opposing post-modernism in several occasions: interview in Helvetica the movie, typeradio, talkshow, and some articles in Looking Closer or AIGA Journal. Graphic design works of Massimo Vignelli reflected his characteristic, which is firmly choosing typeface. Typefaces of Vignelly are around 5 typefaces: Bodoni, Helvetica, Times Roman, Century, and Futura. The article uses formal analysis method. The writers collected materials about Michael Bierut, Massimo VIgnelli and Tibor Kalman from books and websites. The writers compare the typeface opinion of Massimo Vignelli (modernism designer, Michael Bierut designer (transition era designer from modernism to post-modernism, and Tibor Kalman (a designer in A Century of Graphic Design, as the influencer of Bierut’s betrayal over Vignelli. 

  12. Tribute to Professor Anthony J. McMichael

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Swaminathan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Emeritus Professor A. J. “Tony” McMichael (1942–2014 was an internationally renowned and pioneering Australian academic and advocate in epidemiology, who was passionate about understanding the influences of the environment on human health. In an illustrious career spanning more than four decades, he made significant contributions to the scientific community and policy discourse—including ground-breaking research related to the health of children. McMichael was a prolific academic writer with over 300 peer-reviewed papers; 160 book chapters and two sole-authored books. However, his outstanding talent was for integrating complex and seemingly unrelated strands from the environmental and health sciences into a cohesive narrative—and highlighting its relevance to lay persons, scientists and governments alike. He was instrumental in validating this nascent field of research and inspiring many others to follow his lead.

  13. Political Cinema and Culture industry: the work of Michael Moore

    OpenAIRE

    Cristiane Toledo Maria

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to reflect upon the production of the American filmmaker Michael Moore, proposing as a central question the relationship established between art and politics in a historical moment which, on one side, points to the crisis of capitalism and, on the other side, to the political fragmentation of the working class. Focusing on the analysis of the documentaries Roger & Me (1989) and Capitalism: a love story (2009), this article is an attempt to understand the method developed by ...

  14. Entretien avec Michael Quinn Patton | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    9 févr. 2011 ... Michael Quinn Patton, évaluateur de renommée internationale, était récemment au CRDI .... C'est un mode de pensée analytique qui doit tout imprégner. ... des données solides et crédibles sur ce qui marche et ce qui ne marche pas. ... des emplois, des infrastructures et un accès à la nourriture et aux mar.

  15. Euroopa parimaks filmiks sai Michael Haneke "Valge lint" / Andres Laasik

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Laasik, Andres, 1960-2016

    2009-01-01

    Euroopa Filmiakadeemia auhindadest: parima filmiauhinna sai Saksamaal Bochumis toimunud tseremoonial Michael Haneke "Valge lint", mille eest Haneke sai ka parima režissööri ja stsenaristi auhinna. Parimaks meesnäitlejaks pärjati Tahar Rahim ("Un Prophete"), parimaks naisnäitlejaks Kate Winslet ("The Reader"), publikupreemia sai Danny Boyle'i "Rentslimiljonär. Ka teistest võitjatest

  16. The Art of the Possible: T. E. Lawrence and Coalition Liaison

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Letters of T. E. Lawrence and his Brothers ed. M. R . Lawrence (Oxford: Blackwell; New York: MacMillan, 1954), 284; quoted in Jeremy Wilson, Lawrence of...and dysentery and was bedridden in his tent for ten days. Up to this point in the fighting things had been moving quickly and Lawrence had been, by...determines that information is subject to special dissemination limitation specified by paragraph 4-505, DoD 5200.1- R . STATEMENT X: Distribution

  17. Limited impact on self-concept in individuals with Lynch syndrome; results from a national cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helle Vendel; Esplen, Mary Jane; Ladelund, Steen

    2011-01-01

    An increasing number of individuals seek genetic counseling and hereby learn about hereditary cancer in the family. Lynch syndrome is associated with an inherited high risk for colorectal and gynecological cancer, but knowledge about how family members at risk perceive their situation is limited....... We used the national Danish HNPCC register to collect data on self-concept from 413 individuals with Lynch syndrome. The recently developed Lynch syndrome self-concept scale contains 20 items within two subscales related to stigma-vulnerability and bowel symptom-related anxiety. Significantly higher...... more often reported by women (odds ratio 1.8) and by individuals with less education (OR 1.8). This study provides the first extended use of the Lynch syndrome self-concept scale and suggests that the majority of the Danish mutation carriers adapt well to the situation, though knowledge about...

  18. The B-Lynch uterine brace suture, and a bit of this and a bit of that...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoshi, Mahantesh

    2010-03-01

    The widespread application of the B-Lynch brace suture to control postpartum hemorrhage has sparked interest in a variety of adjunctive methods, used alone or in combination, to control uterine bleeding. Although the B-Lynch brace suture has been used with good results throughout the world, failures can and do occur in rare instances, especially when the suture is incorrectly placed for use for an inappropriate indication. Four reports of additional methods to control postpartum hemorrhage are published in this issue of IJGO. Three use the B-Lynch brace suture combined with other techniques. The need for additional techniques reminds the reader of the importance of proper suture application for proper indication. Potential reasons for failure of the B-Lynch suture are provided.

  19. 77 FR 42642 - Safety Zone; City of Ogdensburg Fireworks, St. Lawrence River, Ogdensburg, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; City of Ogdensburg Fireworks, St. Lawrence River, Ogdensburg, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard... portion of the St. Lawrence River during the City of Ogdensburg Fireworks display. This temporary safety... as follows: Sec. 165.T09-0608 Safety Zone; City of Ogdensburg Fireworks, St. Lawrence River...

  20. the contribution made by te lawrence to the theory of revolutionary

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lawrence was basically an academic thrown into the hurly-burly of leading an Arab revolt against. Turkish domination. It could be said that the war in the Middle East was a sideshow of the First. World War and Lawrence's part was a ' ... sideshow to the sideshow'l) Why then has Lawrence been remembered when greater ...

  1. 77 FR 38488 - Safety Zone; Alexandria Bay Chamber of Commerce, St. Lawrence River, Alexandria Bay, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-28

    ... 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Alexandria Bay Chamber of Commerce, St. Lawrence River, Alexandria Bay, NY... restrict vessels from a portion of the St. Lawrence River during the Alexandria Bay Chamber of Commerce... of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) entitled Safety Zone; Alexandria Bay Chamber of Commerce, St. Lawrence...

  2. Identification of MSH2 inversion of exons 1-7 in clinical evaluation of families with suspected Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mork, Maureen E; Rodriguez, Andrea; Taggart, Melissa W; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; Lynch, Patrick M; Bannon, Sarah A; You, Y Nancy; Vilar, Eduardo

    2017-07-01

    Traditional germline sequencing and deletion/duplication analysis does not detect Lynch syndrome-causing mutations in all individuals whose colorectal or endometrial tumors demonstrate mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency. Unique inversions and other rearrangements of the MMR genes have been reported in families with Lynch syndrome. In 2014, a recurrent inversion of MSH2 exons 1-7 was identified in five families suspected to have Lynch syndrome. We aimed to describe our clinical experience in identifying families with this specific inversion. Four probands whose Lynch syndrome-associated tumors demonstrated absence of MSH2/MSH6 staining and who had negative MMR germline testing were evaluated for the MSH2 inversion of exons 1-7, offered during initial genetic workup or upon routine clinical follow-up. All four probands tested positive for the MSH2 inversion. Proband cancer diagnoses included colon and endometrial adenocarcinoma and sebaceous adenoma. A variety of Lynch syndrome-associated cancers were reported in the family histories, although only one family met Amsterdam II criteria. Thirteen at-risk relatives underwent predictive testing. MSH2 inversion of exons 1-7 was found in four probands previously suspected to have Lynch syndrome based on family history and tumor testing. This testing should be offered routinely to patients with tumors demonstrating loss of MSH2/MSH6 staining.

  3. Safety analysis report for packaging Lawrence Livermore Laboratories shipping containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.H.

    1975-12-01

    The Lawrence Livermore Laboratories shipping containers were designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for use in transporting weapons and nuclear components. The design for the containers was evaluated to show compliance with applicable regulations governing packages in which radioactive and fissile materials are transported. Computational procedures were used to determine the structural integrity and thermal behavior of the containers relative to the standards for the normal conditions of transport. A full-scale container test model was destructively tested to verify compliance with the standards for the accident conditions. The results of the analytical evaluations and the tests demonstrate that the design for the Lawrence Livermore Laboratories shipping containers is in compliance with the applicable regulations

  4. Seismic evaluation of critical facilities at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.C.; Tokarz, F.J.

    1976-01-01

    The performance of critical facilities at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) are being evaluated for severe earthquake loading. Facilities at Livermore, Site-300 and the Nevada Test Site are included in this study. These facilities are identified, the seismic criteria used for the analysis are indicated, the various methods used for structural analysis are discussed and a summary of the results of facilities analyzed to date are presented

  5. Annual site environmental report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleimer, G.E.; Pauer, R.O.

    1991-05-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1990 are presented, and general trends are discussed. The report is organized under the following topics: Environmental Program Overview; Environmental Permits; Environmental Assessments; Environmental Activities; Penetrating Radiation; Airborne Radionuclides; Waterborne Radionuclides; Public Doses Resulting from LBL Operations; Trends -- LBL Environmental Impact; Waterborne Pollutants; Airborne Pollutants; Groundwater Protection; and Quality Assurance. 20 refs., 26 figs., 23 tabs

  6. Catalog of research projects at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This Catalog has been created to aid in the transfer of technology from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to potential users in industry, government, universities, and the public. The projects are listed for the following LBL groups: Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Applied Science Division, Biology and Medicine Division, Center for Advanced Materials, Chemical Biodynamics Division, Computing Division, Earth Sciences Division, Engineering and Technical Services Division, Materials and Molecular Research Division, Nuclear Science Division, and Physics Division

  7. Aerial radiological survey of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (Livermore, California)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tipton, W.J.

    1977-10-01

    An airborne radiological survey was conducted during August 1975 over several selected sites in the vicinity of Livermore, California. These sites included the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Sandia Livermore Laboratories, LLL Site 300, the Livermore Municipal Golf Course, and the City of Livermore's sewage treatment plant. The radiation results were processed specifically for man-made gamma ray activity. All elevated man-made activity observed during the aerial survey was contained within the site boundaries of the three DOE facilities

  8. Guide to user facilities at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-04-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories' user facilities are described. Specific facilities include: the National Center for Electron Microscopy; the Bevalac; the SuperHILAC; the Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility; the National Tritium Labeling Facility; the 88 inch Cyclotron; the Heavy Charged-Particle Treatment Facility; the 2.5 MeV Van de Graaff; the Sky Simulator; the Center for Computational Seismology; and the Low Background Counting Facility

  9. Catalog of research projects at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    This Catalog has been created to aid in the transfer of technology from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to potential users in industry, government, universities, and the public. The projects are listed for the following LBL groups: Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Applied Science Division, Biology and Medicine Division, Center for Advanced Materials, Chemical Biodynamics Division, Computing Division, Earth Sciences Division, Engineering and Technical Services Division, Materials and Molecular Research Division, Nuclear Science Division, and Physics Division.

  10. Differential expression of CK20, β-catenin, and MUC2/5AC/6 in Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haraldsson, Stefan; Klarskov, Louise; Nilbert, Mef

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer comprises Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX). Differences in genetics, demographics and histopathology have been extensively studied. The purpose of this study is to characterize their immunoprofile of markers other...... than MMR proteins. METHODS: We compared the expression patterns of cytokeratins (CK7 and CK20), mucins (MUC2/5 AC/6), CDX2 and β-catenin in Lynch syndrome and FCCTX. RESULTS: Differences were identified for CK20 and nuclear β-catenin, which were significantly more often expressed in FCCTX than in Lynch...... syndrome (p Lynch syndrome tumors compared with FCCTX tumors (p = 0.001,

  11. Cancer incidence and survival in Lynch syndrome patients receiving colonoscopic and gynaecological surveillance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Pål; Seppälä, Toni; Bernstein, Inge

    2017-01-01

    study of patients carrying Lynch syndrome-associated mutations affecting MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. Standardised information on surveillance, cancers and outcomes were collated in an Oracle relational database and analysed by age, sex and mutated gene. RESULTS: 1942 mutation carriers without previous...... carriers. Among first cancer detected in each patient the colorectal cancer cumulative incidences at 70 years by gene were 46%, 35%, 20% and 10% for MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 mutation carriers, respectively. The equivalent cumulative incidences for endometrial cancer were 34%, 51%, 49% and 24......%; and for ovarian cancer 11%, 15%, 0% and 0%. Ten-year crude survival was 87% after any cancer, 91% if the first cancer was colorectal, 98% if endometrial and 89% if ovarian. CONCLUSIONS: The four Lynch syndrome-associated genes had different penetrance and expression. Colorectal cancer occurred frequently despite...

  12. Michael Kohlhaas or the Germans and Their Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Jung

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Asked to pick a single representative ‘German’ piece for a discourse on ‘Law and Literature’ one almost inevitably ends up with Kleist’s tale Michael Kohlhaas. It seems to be the literary incarnation of the German stance vis-à-vis the law. It is all about horses; it could just as well be about dogs. Kohlhaas fights a devastating battle, using legal means and outright violence, even warfare, for their recovery in good shape. Victorious eventually with his legal actions, he is happy to trade in his own life for this victory, thus giving an extreme example for the nice line between being in the right and pursuing this position with disproportionate rigour. Of course, the interpretations of Michael Kohlhaas (which, in its complete version, dates of 1810 have varied from epoch to epoch as well as from reader to reader. It is not possible to rehearse the bulk of ‘Kohlhaas literature’. In comparing legal cultures, it might be of interest to look into the question why such a somber story on the law forms part and will continue to form part of the German cultural heritage. Si se tiene que elegir un único representante “alemán” para una ponencia sobre “derecho y literatura”, es inevitable optar por la obra de Kleist, Michael Kohlhaas. Parece la encarnación literaria de la posición alemana hacia el derecho. El libro trata de caballos; también podría tratar sobre perros. Kohlhaas libra una batalla devastadora usando medios legales y la violencia pura y dura, incluso la guerra, para que se recuperen en buena forma. Finalmente resulta ganador mediante acciones legales, está contento de dedicar su propia vida para conseguir esta victoria, dando así un ejemplo extremo de la línea que existe entre tener la razón y seguir esta posición con un rigor desproporcionado. Por supuesto, las interpretaciones de Michael Kohlhaas (publicado en 1810 han variado de una época a otra, y de un lector a otro. No es posible revisar el grueso de

  13. The Correspondence of Michael Faraday Pt 6 1860-1867

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, James

    2012-01-01

    Michael Faraday (1791-1867) was one of the most important men of science in nineteenth century Britain. His discoveries of electro-magnetic rotations (1821) and electro-magnetic induction (1831) laid the foundations of the modern electrical industry. His discovery of the magneto-optical effect and diamagnetism (1845) led him to formulate the field theory of electro-magnetism, which forms one of the cornerstones of modern physics.These and a whole host of other fundamental discoveries in physics and chemistry, together with his lecturing at the Royal Institution, his work for the state (includi

  14. Michael Marinov memorial volume multiple facets of quantization and supersymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Vainshtein, A I

    2002-01-01

    This book is dedicated to the memory of Michael Marinov, the theorist who, together with Felix Berezin, introduced the classical description of spin by anticommuting Grassmann variables. It contains original papers and reviews by physicists and mathematicians written specifically for the book. These articles reflect the current status and recent developments in the areas of Marinov's research: quantum tunneling, quantization of constrained systems, supersymmetry, and others. The personal recollections included portray the human face of M Marinov, a person of great knowledge and integrity.

  15. Revised Bethesda Guidelines for Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (Lynch Syndrome) and Microsatellite Instability

    OpenAIRE

    Umar, Asad; Boland, C. Richard; Terdiman, Jonathan P.; Syngal, Sapna; de la Chapelle, Albert; Rüschoff, Josef; Fishel, Richard; Lindor, Noralane M.; Burgart, Lawrence J.; Hamelin, Richard; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Hiatt, Robert A.; Jass, Jeremy; Lindblom, Annika; Lynch, Henry T.

    2004-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), also known as Lynch syndrome, is a common autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by early age at onset, neoplastic lesions, and microsatellite instability (MSI). Because cancers with MSI account for approximately 15% of all colorectal cancers and because of the need for a better understanding of the clinical and histologic manifestations of HNPCC, the National Cancer Institute hosted an international workshop on HNPCC in 1996, which led to...

  16. »Just cut them up like regular children.« : Eraserhead (USA 1977, David Lynch)

    OpenAIRE

    Höltgen, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Zwischen 1970 und 1977 entsteht in fünfjähriger Dreharbeit mit Unterbrechungen und unter extrem schwierigen Produktionsbedingungen David Lynchs erster Spielfilm "Eraserhead". Vorbereitet wurde er in mehrfacher Hinsicht durch das Frühwerk des noch jungen Regisseurs. Seine kinetische Skulptur "Six Men getting sick", sowie seine Kurzfilme "The Alphabet" und "The Grandmother" verhalfen ihm nicht nur zu Stipendien (etwa der AFI für "The Grandmother"), sondern etablierten auch ein Motivinventar, au...

  17. Pancreatic non-functioning neuroendocrine tumor: a new entity genetically related to Lynch syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Serracant Barrera, Anna; Serra Pla, Sheila; Blázquez Maña, Carmen María; Salas, Rubén Carrera; García Monforte, Neus; Bejarano González, Natalia; Romaguera Monzonis, Andreu; Andreu Navarro, Francisco Javier; Bella Cueto, Maria Rosa; Borobia, Francisco G.

    2017-01-01

    Some pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (P-NETs) are associated with hereditary syndromes. An association between Lynch syndrome (LS) and P-NETs has been suggested, however it has not been confirmed to date. We describe the first case associating LS and P-NETs. Here we report a 65-year-old woman who in the past 20 years presented two colorectal carcinomas (CRC) endometrial carcinoma (EC), infiltrating ductal breast carcinoma, small intestine adenocarcinoma, two non-functioning P-NETs and seboma...

  18. Uncertainties in the Management of a Lynch Syndrome Patient: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Campos, Sara; Amaro, Pedro; Cunha, Inês; Fraga, João; Cipriano, Maria Augusta; Tomé, Luís

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Lynch syndrome (LS), the most common hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome, is characterized by mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes leading to an increased cancer risk, namely colorectal cancer. Case: In the context of surveillance colonoscopy, a 40-mm flat lesion (0-IIa+b, Paris classification) was identified and submitted to piecemeal mucosal endoscopic resection in a 64-year-old LS patient with an MLH1 germline mutation (262delATC) and two previous segmental resections d...

  19. Field performance of timber bridges. 8, Lynches Woods Park stress-laminated deck bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. P. Wacker; M. A. Ritter; D. Conger

    The Lynches Woods Park bridge was constructed during the summer of 1990 in Newberry, South Carolina. It is a single-span, single-lane, stress-laminated deck superstructure that measures approximately 30 ft long, 16 ft wide, and 14 in. deep. The bridge is unique in that is one of the first known stress-laminated deck bridges to be constructed of Southern Pine lumber...

  20. Lynch syndrome: barriers to and facilitators of screening and disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Kathy E; Way, Christine Y; Fiander, Jacqueline J; Meadus, Robert J; Esplen, Mary Jane; Green, Jane S; Ludlow, Valerie C; Etchegary, Holly A; Parfrey, Patrick S

    2011-09-07

    Lynch syndrome is a hereditary cancer with confirmed carriers at high risk for colorectal (CRC) and extracolonic cancers. The purpose of the current study was to develop a greater understanding of the factors influencing decisions about disease management post-genetic testing. The study used a grounded theory approach to data collection and analysis as part of a multiphase project examining the psychosocial and behavioral impact of predictive DNA testing for Lynch syndrome. Individual and small group interviews were conducted with individuals from 10 families with the MSH2 intron 5 splice site mutation or exon 8 deletion. The data from confirmed carriers (n = 23) were subjected to re-analysis to identify key barriers to and/or facilitators of screening and disease management. Thematic analysis identified personal, health care provider and health care system factors as dominant barriers to and/or facilitators of managing Lynch syndrome. Person-centered factors reflect risk perceptions and decision-making, and enduring screening/disease management. The perceived knowledge and clinical management skills of health care providers also influenced participation in recommended protocols. The health care system barriers/facilitators are defined in terms of continuity of care and coordination of services among providers. Individuals with Lynch syndrome often encounter multiple barriers to and facilitators of disease management that go beyond the individual to the provider and health care system levels. The current organization and implementation of health care services are inadequate. A coordinated system of local services capable of providing integrated, efficient health care and follow-up, populated by providers with knowledge of hereditary cancer, is necessary to maintain optimal health.

  1. The Germline MLH1 K618A Variant and Susceptibility to Lynch Syndrome-Associated Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Fabiola; Lindor, Noralane M.; Couch, Fergus J.; Highsmith, W. Edward

    2013-01-01

    Missense variants discovered during sequencing of cancer susceptibility genes can be problematic for clinical interpretation. MLH1 K618A, which results from a 2-bp alteration (AAG→GCG) leading to a substitution of lysine to alanine in codon 618, has variously been interpreted as a pathogenic mutation, a variant of unknown significance, and a benign polymorphism. We evaluated the role of MLH1 K618A in predisposition to cancer by genotyping 1512 control subjects to assess its frequency in the general population. We also reviewed the literature concerning MLH1 K618A in families with colorectal cancer. The measured allele frequency of the K618A variant was 0.40%, which is remarkably close to the 0.44% summarized from 2491 control subjects in the literature. K618A was over-represented in families with suspected Lynch syndrome. In 1366 families, the allele frequency was 0.88% (OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.3 to 3.5; P = 0.006). In studies of sporadic cancers of the type associated with Lynch syndrome, K618A was over-represented in 1742 cases (allele frequency of 0.83) (OR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.2 to 3.2; P = 0.008). We conclude that MLH1 K618A is not a fully penetrant Lynch syndrome mutation, although it is not without effect, appearing to increase the risk of Lynch syndrome-associated tumors approximately twofold. Our systematic assessment approach may be useful for variants in other genes. PMID:22426235

  2. Finding the needle in a haystack: identification of cases of Lynch syndrome with MLH1 epimutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchins, Megan P

    2016-07-01

    Constitutional epimutation of the DNA mismatch repair gene, MLH1, represents a minor cause of Lynch syndrome. MLH1 epimutations are characterized by the soma-wide distribution of methylation of a single allele of the MLH1 promoter accompanied by constitutive allelic loss of transcription. 'Primary' MLH1 epimutations, considered pure epigenetic defects, tend to arise de novo in patients without a family history or any apparent genetic mutation. These demonstrate non-Mendelian inheritance. 'Secondary' MLH1 epimutations have a genetic basis and have been linked to non-coding genetic alterations in the vicinity of MLH1. These demonstrate autosomal dominant inheritance. Despite convincing evidence of their role in causing Lynch-type cancers, routine screening for MLH1 epimutations has not been widely adopted. Complicating factors may include: the need to perform additional methylation-based testing beyond the standard genetic screening for a germline mutation; the lack of a consensus algorithm for the selection of patients warranting MLH1 epimutation testing; overlapping molecular pathology features of MLH1 methylation and loss of MLH1 expression with more prevalent sporadic MSI cancers; the rarity of MLH1 epimutation; the variable inter-generational inheritance patterns; and the cost-effectiveness of screening. Nevertheless, a positive molecular diagnosis of MLH1 epimutation is clinically important because carriers have a high personal risk of developing metachronous Lynch-type cancers, and their relatives may also be at risk of carriage. Extending existing universal and clinic-based screening algorithms for Lynch syndrome to include an additional arm of selection criteria for cases warranting MLH1 epimutation testing could provide a cost-effective means of diagnosing these cases.

  3. Lynch syndrome: barriers to and facilitators of screening and disease management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watkins Kathy E

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lynch syndrome is a hereditary cancer with confirmed carriers at high risk for colorectal (CRC and extracolonic cancers. The purpose of the current study was to develop a greater understanding of the factors influencing decisions about disease management post-genetic testing. Methods The study used a grounded theory approach to data collection and analysis as part of a multiphase project examining the psychosocial and behavioral impact of predictive DNA testing for Lynch syndrome. Individual and small group interviews were conducted with individuals from 10 families with the MSH2 intron 5 splice site mutation or exon 8 deletion. The data from confirmed carriers (n = 23 were subjected to re-analysis to identify key barriers to and/or facilitators of screening and disease management. Results Thematic analysis identified personal, health care provider and health care system factors as dominant barriers to and/or facilitators of managing Lynch syndrome. Person-centered factors reflect risk perceptions and decision-making, and enduring screening/disease management. The perceived knowledge and clinical management skills of health care providers also influenced participation in recommended protocols. The health care system barriers/facilitators are defined in terms of continuity of care and coordination of services among providers. Conclusions Individuals with Lynch syndrome often encounter multiple barriers to and facilitators of disease management that go beyond the individual to the provider and health care system levels. The current organization and implementation of health care services are inadequate. A coordinated system of local services capable of providing integrated, efficient health care and follow-up, populated by providers with knowledge of hereditary cancer, is necessary to maintain optimal health.

  4. Phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity of Lynch syndrome: a complex diagnostic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Henry T; Lanspa, Stephen; Shaw, Trudy; Casey, Murray Joseph; Rendell, Marc; Stacey, Mark; Townley, Theresa; Snyder, Carrie; Hitchins, Megan; Bailey-Wilson, Joan

    2018-07-01

    Lynch syndrome is the hereditary disorder that most frequently predisposes to colorectal cancer as well as predisposing to a number of extracolonic cancers, most prominently endometrial cancer. It is caused by germline mutations in the mismatch repair genes. Both its phenotype and genotype show marked heterogeneity. This review gives a historical overview of the syndrome, its heterogeneity, its genomic landscape, and its implications for complex diagnosis, genetic counseling and putative implications for immunotherapy.

  5. A Systematic Review on the Existing Screening Pathways for Lynch Syndrome Identification

    OpenAIRE

    Tognetto, Alessia; Michelazzo, Maria Benedetta; Calabró, Giovanna Elisa; Unim, Brigid; Di Marco, Marco; Ricciardi, Walter; Pastorino, Roberta; Boccia, Stefania

    2017-01-01

    Background Lynch syndrome (LS) is the most common hereditary colon cancer syndrome, accounting for 3–5% of colorectal cancer (CRC) cases, and it is associated with the development of other cancers. Early detection of individuals with LS is relevant, since they can take advantage of life-saving intensive care surveillance. The debate regarding the best screening policy, however, is far from being concluded. This prompted us to conduct a systematic review of the existing screening pathways for ...

  6. Serum antibodies against frameshift peptides in microsatellite unstable colorectal cancer patients with Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuschenbach, Miriam; Kloor, Matthias; Morak, Monika; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Germann, Anja; Garbe, Yvette; Tariverdian, Mirjam; Findeisen, Peter; Neumaier, Michael; Holinski-Feder, Elke; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus

    2010-06-01

    High level microsatellite instability (MSI-H) occurs in about 15% of colorectal cancer (CRCs), either as sporadic cancers or in the context of hereditary non-polyposis cancer or Lynch syndrome. In MSI-H CRC, mismatch repair deficiency leads to insertion/deletion mutations at coding microsatellites and thus to the translation of frameshift peptides (FSPs). FSPs are potent inductors of T cell responses in vitro and in vivo. The present study aims at the identification of FSP-specific humoral immune responses in MSI-H CRC and Lynch syndrome. Sera from patients with history of MSI-H CRC (n = 69), healthy Lynch syndrome mutation carriers (n = 31) and healthy controls (n = 52) were analyzed for antibodies against FSPs using peptide ELISA. Reactivities were measured against FSPs derived from genes frequently mutated in MSI-H CRCs, AIM2, TGFBR2, CASP5, TAF1B, ZNF294, and MARCKS. Antibody reactivity against FSPs was significantly higher in MSI-H CRC patients than in healthy controls (P = 0.036, Mann-Whitney) and highest in patients with shortest interval between tumor resection and serum sampling. Humoral immune responses in patients were most frequently directed against FSPs derived from mutated TAF1B (11.6%, 8/69) and TGFBR2 (10.1%, 7/69). Low level FSP-specific antibodies were also detected in healthy mutation carriers. Our results show that antibody responses against FSPs are detectable in MSI-H CRC patients and healthy Lynch syndrome mutation carriers. Based on the high number of defined FSP antigens, measuring FSP-specific humoral immune responses is a highly promising tool for future diagnostic application in MSI-H cancer patients.

  7. Models for Immune Response and Immune Evasion in MSI Cancer and Lynch Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Özcan, Mine

    2017-01-01

    Microsatellite-unstable (MSI) cancers occurring in the context of the hereditary Lynch syndrome or as sporadic cancers elicit pronounced tumor-specific immune responses. The pronounced immune response was shown to be closely associated with frameshift peptides (FSP) that are generated as a result of deficiency in DNA mismatch repair system leading to insertion/deletion mutations in coding microsatellites (cMS). FSP neoantigens are long antigenic amino acid stretches that bear m...

  8. Serum antibodies against frameshift peptides in microsatellite unstable colorectal cancer patients with Lynch syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuschenbach, Miriam; Kloor, Matthias; Morak, Monika; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Germann, Anja; Garbe, Yvette; Tariverdian, Mirjam; Findeisen, Peter; Neumaier, Michael; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Doeberitz, Magnus von Knebel

    2014-01-01

    High level microsatellite instability (MSI-H) occurs in about 15% of colorectal cancer (CRCs), either as sporadic cancers or in the context of hereditary non-polyposis cancer (HNPCC) or Lynch syndrome. In MSI-H CRC, mismatch repair deficiency leads to insertion/deletion mutations at coding microsatellites (cMS) and thus to the translation of frameshift peptides (FSPs). FSPs are potent inductors of T cell responses in vitro and in vivo. The present study aims at the identification of FSP-specific humoral immune responses in MSI-H CRC and Lynch syndrome. Sera from patients with history of MSI-H CRC (n=69), healthy Lynch syndrome mutation carriers (n=31) and healthy controls (n=52) were analyzed for antibodies against FSPs using peptide ELISA. Reactivities were measured against FSPs derived from genes frequently mutated in MSI-H CRCs, AIM2, TGFBR2, CASP5, TAF1B, ZNF294, and MARCKS. Antibody reactivity against FSPs was significantly higher in MSI-H CRC patients than in healthy controls (p=0.036, Mann-Whitney) and highest in patients with shortest interval between tumor resection and serum sampling. Humoral immune responses in patients were most frequently directed against FSPs derived from mutated TAF1B (11.6%, 8/69) and TGFBR2 (10.1%, 7/69). Low level FSP-specific antibodies were also detected in healthy mutation carriers. Our results show that antibody responses against FSPs are detectable in MSI-H CRC patients and healthy Lynch syndrome mutation carriers. Based on the high number of defined FSP antigens, measuring FSP-specific humoral immune responses is a highly promising tool for future diagnostic application in MSI-H cancer patients. PMID:19957108

  9. Using Social Media Data to Understand the Impact of Promotional Information on Laypeople's Discussions: A Case Study of Lynch Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Jiang; Zhao, Yunpeng; Salloum, Ramzi G; Guo, Yi; Wang, Mo; Prosperi, Mattia; Zhang, Hansi; Du, Xinsong; Ramirez-Diaz, Laura J; He, Zhe; Sun, Yuan

    2017-12-13

    Social media is being used by various stakeholders among pharmaceutical companies, government agencies, health care organizations, professionals, and news media as a way of engaging audiences to raise disease awareness and ultimately to improve public health. Nevertheless, it is unclear what effects this health information has on laypeople. This study aimed to provide a detailed examination of how promotional health information related to Lynch syndrome impacts laypeople's discussions on a social media platform (Twitter) in terms of topic awareness and attitudes. We used topic modeling and sentiment analysis techniques on Lynch syndrome-related tweets to answer the following research questions (RQs): (1) what are the most discussed topics in Lynch syndrome-related tweets?; (2) how promotional Lynch syndrome-related information on Twitter affects laypeople's discussions?; and (3) what impact do the Lynch syndrome awareness activities in the Colon Cancer Awareness Month and Lynch Syndrome Awareness Day have on laypeople's discussions and their attitudes? In particular, we used a set of keywords to collect Lynch syndrome-related tweets from October 26, 2016 to August 11, 2017 (289 days) through the Twitter public search application programming interface (API). We experimented with two different classification methods to categorize tweets into the following three classes: (1) irrelevant, (2) promotional health information, and (3) laypeople's discussions. We applied a topic modeling method to discover the themes in these Lynch syndrome-related tweets and conducted sentiment analysis on each layperson's tweet to gauge the writer's attitude (ie, positive, negative, and neutral) toward Lynch syndrome. The topic modeling and sentiment analysis results were elaborated to answer the three RQs. Of all tweets (N=16,667), 87.38% (14,564/16,667) were related to Lynch syndrome. Of the Lynch syndrome-related tweets, 81.43% (11,860/14,564) were classified as promotional and 18

  10. A frame-shift mutation of PMS2 is a widespread cause of Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clendenning, M; Senter, L; Hampel, H; Robinson, K Lagerstedt; Sun, S; Buchanan, D; Walsh, M D; Nilbert, M; Green, J; Potter, J; Lindblom, A; de la Chapelle, A

    2008-06-01

    When compared to the other mismatch repair genes involved in Lynch syndrome, the identification of mutations within PMS2 has been limited (PMS2. This disparity is primarily due to complications in the study of this gene caused by interference from pseudogene sequences. Using a recently developed method for detecting PMS2 specific mutations, we have screened 99 patients who are likely candidates for PMS2 mutations based on immunohistochemical analysis. We have identified a frequently occurring frame-shift mutation (c.736_741del6ins11) in 12 ostensibly unrelated Lynch syndrome patients (20% of patients we have identified with a deleterious mutation in PMS2, n = 61). These individuals all display the rare allele (population frequency 10 000 carriers of this mutation in the USA alone. The identification of both the mutation and the common haplotype in one Swedish control sample (n = 225), along with evidence that Lynch syndrome associated cancers are rarer than expected in the probands' families, would suggest that this is a prevalent mutation with reduced penetrance.

  11. Lynch syndrome patients' views of and preferences for return of results following whole exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitch, Kelly; Joseph, Galen; Guiltinan, Jenna; Kianmahd, Jessica; Youngblom, Janey; Blanco, Amie

    2014-08-01

    Whole exome sequencing (WES) uses next generation sequencing technology to provide information on nearly all functional, protein-coding regions in an individual's genome. Due to the vast amount of information and incidental findings that can be generated from this technology, patient preferences must be investigated to help clinicians consent and return results to patients. Patients (n = 19) who were previously clinically diagnosed with Lynch syndrome, but received uninformative negative Lynch syndrome genetic results through traditional molecular testing methods participated in semi-structured interviews after WES testing but before return of results to explore their views of WES and preferences for return of results. Analyses of interview results found that nearly all participants believed that the benefits of receiving all possible results generated from WES outweighed the undesirable effects. The majority of participants conveyed that relative to coping with a cancer diagnosis, information generated from WES would be manageable. Importantly, participants' experience with Lynch syndrome influenced their notions of genetic determinism, tolerance for uncertain results, and family communication plans. Participants would prefer to receive WES results in person from a genetic counselor or medical geneticist so that an expert could help explain the meaning and implications of the potentially large quantity and range of complicated results. These results underscore the need to study various populations with regard to the clinical use of WES in order to effectively and empathetically communicate the possible implications of this new technology and return results.

  12. Physical activity and the risk of colorectal cancer in Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashti, S Ghazaleh; Win, Aung Ko; Hardikar, Sheetal S; Glombicki, Stephen E; Mallenahalli, Sheila; Thirumurthi, Selvi; Peterson, Susan K; You, Y Nancy; Buchanan, Daniel D; Figueiredo, Jane C; Campbell, Peter T; Gallinger, Steven; Newcomb, Polly A; Potter, John D; Lindor, Noralane M; Le Marchand, Loic; Haile, Robert W; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A; Basen-Engquist, Karen M; Lynch, Patrick M; Pande, Mala

    2018-06-14

    Greater physical activity is associated with a decrease in risk of colorectal cancer for the general population; however, little is known about its relationship with colorectal cancer risk for people with Lynch syndrome, carriers of inherited pathogenic mutations in genes affecting DNA mismatch repair (MMR). We studied a cohort of 2,042 MMR gene mutations carriers (n=807, diagnosed with colorectal cancer), from the Colon Cancer Family Registry. Self-reported physical activity in three age-periods (20-29, 30-49, and ≥50 years) was summarized as average metabolic equivalent of task hours per week (MET-h/week) during the age-period of cancer diagnosis or censoring (near-term exposure), and across all age-periods preceding cancer diagnosis or censoring (long-term exposure). Weighted Cox regression was used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between physical activity and colorectal cancer risk. Near-term physical activity was associated with a small reduction in the risk of colorectal cancer (HR ≥35 vs. Lynch syndrome, however, further confirmation is warranted. The potential modifying effect of physical activity on colorectal cancer risk for people with Lynch syndrome could be useful for risk prediction and support counseling advice for lifestyle modification to reduce cancer risk. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 UICC.

  13. Adrenocortical carcinoma, an unusual extracolonic tumor associated with Lynch II syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Arana, V; Delgado, L; González, L; Bravo, A; Díaz, H; Salido, E; Riverol, D; González-Aguilera, J J; Fernández-Peralta, A M

    2011-06-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is an autosomal dominant condition that predisposes to colorectal cancer and specific other tumors. Extracolonic tumors occur mainly in the endometrium, stomach, ovary, small intestine and urinary tract. The presence of rare tumors in patients belonging to families who have Lynch syndrome is always interesting, because the question arises whether these tumors should be considered as a coincidence or are related with the syndrome. In this last case, they are also the result of the defect in the mismatch repair system, opening the possibility of extending the tumor spectrum associated with the syndrome. Here we describe a patient from a Lynch syndrome family with a germline mutation c.2063T>G (p.M688R) in the MSH2 gene, who developed an adrenal cortical carcinoma, a tumor not usually associated with LS. We analyzed the adrenocortical tumour for microsatellite instability (MSI), LOH and the presence of the germline c.2063T>G (M688R) mutation. The adrenal cortical carcinoma showed the MSH2 mutation, loss of heterozygosity of the normal allele in the MSH2 gene and loss of immunohistochemical expression for MSH2 protein, but no microsatellite instability. Additionally, the adrenal cortical carcinoma did not harbour a TP53 mutation. The molecular study indicates that this adrenal cortical cancer is probably due to the mismatch repair defect.

  14. Utility of MLH1 methylation analysis in the clinical evaluation of Lynch Syndrome in women with endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruegl, Amanda S; Djordjevic, Bojana; Urbauer, Diana L; Westin, Shannon N; Soliman, Pamela T; Lu, Karen H; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Broaddus, Russell R

    2014-01-01

    Clinical screening criteria, such as young age of endometrial cancer diagnosis and family history of signature cancers, have traditionally been used to identify women with Lynch Syndrome, which is caused by mutation of a DNA mismatch repair gene. Immunohistochemistry and microsatellite instability analysis have evolved as important screening tools to evaluate endometrial cancer patients for Lynch Syndrome. A complicating factor is that 15-20% of sporadic endometrial cancers have immunohistochemical loss of the DNA mismatch repair protein MLH1 and high levels of microsatellite instability due to methylation of MLH1. The PCR-based MLH1 methylation assay potentially resolves this issue, yet many clinical laboratories do not perform this assay. The objective of this study was to determine if clinical and pathologic features help to distinguish sporadic endometrial carcinomas with MLH1 loss secondary to MLH1 methylation from Lynch Syndrome-associated endometrial carcinomas with MLH1 loss and absence of MLH1 methylation. Of 337 endometrial carcinomas examined, 54 had immunohistochemical loss of MLH1. 40/54 had MLH1 methylation and were designated as sporadic, while 14/54 lacked MLH1 methylation and were designated as Lynch Syndrome. Diabetes and deep myometrial invasion were associated with Lynch Syndrome; no other clinical or pathological variable distinguished the 2 groups. Combining Society of Gynecologic Oncology screening criteria with these 2 features accurately captured all Lynch Syndrome cases, but with low specificity. In summary, no single clinical/pathologic feature or screening criteria tool accurately identified all Lynch Syndrome-associated endometrial carcinomas, highlighting the importance of the MLH1 methylation assay in the clinical evaluation of these patients.

  15. Universal tumor screening for Lynch syndrome: Assessment of the perspectives of patients with colorectal cancer regarding benefits and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Jessica Ezzell; Zepp, Jamilyn M; Gilmore, Mari J; Davis, James V; Esterberg, Elizabeth J; Muessig, Kristin R; Peterson, Susan K; Syngal, Sapna; Acheson, Louise S; Wiesner, Georgia L; Reiss, Jacob A; Goddard, Katrina A B

    2015-09-15

    Universal tumor screening for Lynch syndrome, the most common form of hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC), has been recommended among all patients newly diagnosed with CRC. However, there is limited literature regarding patient perspectives of tumor screening for Lynch syndrome among patients with CRC who are not selected for screening based on family history criteria. A total of 145 patients aged 39 to 87 years were administered surveys assessing perceived risk, patient perspectives, and potential benefits of and barriers to tumor screening for Lynch syndrome. Associations between patient-specific and cancer-specific factors and survey responses were analyzed. The majority of participants perceived their risk of developing Lynch syndrome as being low, with 9 participants (6.2%) anticipating an abnormal screening result. However, most participants endorsed the potential benefits of screening for themselves and their families, with 84.8% endorsing ≥6 benefits and 50.3% endorsing all 8 benefits. Participants also endorsed few potential barriers to screening, with 89.4% endorsing ≤4 of 9 potential barriers. A common barrier was worry about the cost of additional testing and surveillance, which was endorsed by 54.5% of participants. The level of distress associated with tumor screening for Lynch syndrome, which was very low, was not associated with age or CRC stage. The results of the current study indicate that patients with CRC overall have a positive attitude toward tumor screening for Lynch syndrome, endorse the benefits of screening, and experience low levels of distress. These findings provide insight into patient attitudes toward tumor screening for Lynch syndrome among unselected patients with CRC to inform educational approaches that assist in patient decision-making and guide the successful implementation of screening programs. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society.

  16. Worldwide Practice Patterns in Lynch Syndrome Diagnosis and Management, Based on Data From the International Mismatch Repair Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jennifer Y; Haile, Robert W; Templeton, Allyson; Macrae, Finlay; Qin, FeiFei; Sundaram, Vandana; Ladabaum, Uri

    2018-04-24

    Families with a history of Lynch syndrome often do not adhere to guidelines for genetic testing and screening. We investigated practice patterns related to Lynch syndrome worldwide, to ascertain potential targets for research and public policy efforts. We collected data from the International Mismatch Repair Consortium (IMRC), which comprises major research and clinical groups engaged in the care of families with Lynch syndrome worldwide. IMRC institutions were invited to complete a questionnaire to characterize diagnoses of Lynch syndrome and management practice patterns. Fifty-five providers, representing 63 of 128 member institutions (49%) in 21 countries, completed the questionnaire. For case finding, 55% of respondents reported participating in routine widespread population tumor testing among persons with newly diagnosed Lynch syndrome-associated cancers, whereas 27% reported relying on clinical criteria with selective tumor and/or germline analyses. Most respondents (64%) reported using multigene panels for germline analysis, and only 28% reported testing tumors for biallelic mutations for cases in which suspected pathogenic mutations were not confirmed by germline analysis. Respondents reported relying on passive dissemination of information to at-risk family members, and there was variation in follow through of genetic testing recommendations. Reported risk management practices varied-nearly all programs (98%) recommended colonoscopy every 1 to 2 years, but only 35% recommended chemoprevention with aspirin. There is widespread heterogeneity in management practices for Lynch syndrome worldwide among IMRC member institutions. This may reflect the rapid pace of emerging technology, regional differences in resources, and the lack of definitive data for many clinical questions. Future efforts should focus on the large numbers of high-risk patients without access to state-of-the-art Lynch syndrome management. Copyright © 2018 AGA Institute. Published by

  17. RNF43 is mutated less frequently in Lynch Syndrome compared with sporadic microsatellite unstable colorectal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, Lochlan J; Clendenning, Mark; McKeone, Diane M; Jamieson, Saara H; Balachandran, Samanthy; Borowsky, Jennifer; Liu, John; Kawamata, Futoshi; Bond, Catherine E; Rosty, Christophe; Burge, Matthew E; Buchanan, Daniel D; Leggett, Barbara A; Whitehall, Vicki L J

    2018-01-01

    The WNT signaling pathway is commonly altered during colorectal cancer development. The E3 ubiquitin ligase, RNF43, negatively regulates the WNT signal through increased ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of the Frizzled receptor. RNF43 has recently been reported to harbor frequent truncating frameshift mutations in sporadic microsatellite unstable (MSI) colorectal cancers. This study assesses the relative frequency of RNF43 mutations in hereditary colorectal cancers arising in the setting of Lynch syndrome. The entire coding region of RNF43 was Sanger sequenced in 24 colorectal cancers from 23 patients who either (i) carried a germline mutation in one of the DNA mismatch repair genes (MLH1, MSH6, MSH2, PMS2), or (ii) showed immunohistochemical loss of expression of one or more of the DNA mismatch repair proteins, was BRAF wild type at V600E, were under 60 years of age at diagnosis, and demonstrated no promoter region methylation for MLH1 in tumor DNA. A validation cohort of 44 colorectal cancers from mismatch repair germline mutation carriers from the Australasian Colorectal Cancer Family Registry (ACCFR) were sequenced for the most common truncating mutation hotspots (X117 and X659). RNF43 mutations were found in 9 of 24 (37.5%) Lynch syndrome colorectal cancers. The majority of mutations were frameshift deletions in the G659 G7 repeat tract (29%); 2 cancers (2/24, 8%) from the one patient harbored frameshift mutations at codon R117 (C6 repeat tract) within exon 3. In the ACCFR validation cohort, RNF43 hotspot mutations were identified in 19/44 (43.2%) of samples, which was not significantly different to the initial series. The proportion of mutant RNF43 in Lynch syndrome related colorectal cancers is significantly lower than the previously reported mutation rate found in sporadic MSI colorectal cancers. These findings identify further genetic differences between sporadic and hereditary colorectal cancers. This may be because Lynch Syndrome cancers

  18. Seismic strengthening of building 111 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eli, M.; Coats, D.; Freeland, G.; Kamath, M.

    1991-01-01

    Since being designed and constructed in the late 1960s, the Director's Building (Building 111) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been evaluated for 1988 seismic criteria and has been upgraded to withstand a major earthquake in the Livermore area. During and immediately after a large earthquake in the Livermore area, Building 111 occupants would be able to exit safely without loss of life. Building 111 itself would be severely damaged, but would not collapse. Highlights of the seismic upgrade design criteria and of the design, analyses, and construction that resulted are presented in this paper

  19. Electromagnetic wiggler technology development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deis, G.A.; Burns, M.J.; Christensen, T.C.; Coffield, F.E.; Kulke, B.; Prosnitz, D.; Scharlemann, E.T.; Halbach, K.

    1987-01-01

    As a part of the program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in induction-linac free-electron laser (IFEL) research, we are conducting a variety of activities addressing the unique requirements imposed on IFEL wiggler systems. We are actively developing improved dc iron-core electromagnetic wiggler designs to attain higher peak fields, greater tunability, and lower random error levels. We are pursuing specialized control systems, such as magnetic-field and beam-position controllers, which can relax requirements on the wiggler itself. We are also pursuing basic studies to establish the effect of radiation on permanent magnets

  20. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1995 site environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balgobin, D.; Javandel, I.; Lackner, G.; Smith, C.; Thorson, P.; Tran, H.

    1996-07-01

    The 1995 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for the 1995 calendar year. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the environmental management programs. The report also discusses significant highlights and plans of these programs. Topics discussed include: environmental monitoring, environmental compliance programs, air quality, water quality, ground water protection, sanitary sewer monitoring, soil and sediment quality, vegetation and foodstuffs monitoring, and special studies which include preoperational monitoring of building 85 and 1995 sampling results, radiological dose assessment, and quality assessment.

  1. Stabilization of plutonium bearing residues at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronson, M.C.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Ebbinghaus, B.B.

    1995-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's (US DOE) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has plutonium holdings including metal, oxide and residue materials, all of which need stabilization of some type. Residue materials include calcined ash, calcined precipitates, pyrochemical salts, glove box sweepings, metallurgical samples, graphite, and pyrochemical ceramic crucibles. These residues are typical of residues stored throughout the US DOE plutonium sites. The stabilization process selected for each of these residues requires data on chemical impurities, physical attributes, and chemical forms of the plutonium. This paper outlines the characterization and stabilization of LLNL ash residues, pyrochemical salts, and graphite

  2. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleimer, G.E.

    1989-06-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is described. Data for 1988 are presented and general trends are discussed. In order to establish whether LBL research activities produced any impact on the population surrounding the laboratory, a program of environmental air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring was carried on throughout the year. For 1988, as in the previous several years, dose equivalents attributable to LBL radiological operations were a small fraction of both the relevant radiation protection guidelines (RPG) and of the natural radiation background. 16 refs., 7 figs., 21 tabs

  3. Pyrochemical processing automation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennison, D.K.; Domning, E.E.; Seivers, R.

    1991-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is developing a fully automated system for pyrochemical processing of special nuclear materials (SNM). The system utilizes a glove box, an automated tilt-pour furnace (TPF), an IBM developed gantry robot, and specialized automation tooling. All material handling within the glove box (i.e., furnace loading, furnace unloading, product and slag separation, and product packaging) is performed automatically. The objectives of the effort are to increase process productivity, decrease operator radiation, reduce process wastes, and demonstrate system reliability and availability. This paper provides an overview of the automated system hardware, outlines the overall operations sequence, and discusses the current status

  4. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1995 site environmental report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balgobin, D.; Javandel, I.; Lackner, G.; Smith, C.; Thorson, P.; Tran, H.

    1996-07-01

    The 1995 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for the 1995 calendar year. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the environmental management programs. The report also discusses significant highlights and plans of these programs. Topics discussed include: environmental monitoring, environmental compliance programs, air quality, water quality, ground water protection, sanitary sewer monitoring, soil and sediment quality, vegetation and foodstuffs monitoring, and special studies which include preoperational monitoring of building 85 and 1995 sampling results, radiological dose assessment, and quality assessment

  5. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleimer, G.E. (ed.)

    1989-06-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is described. Data for 1988 are presented and general trends are discussed. In order to establish whether LBL research activities produced any impact on the population surrounding the laboratory, a program of environmental air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring was carried on throughout the year. For 1988, as in the previous several years, dose equivalents attributable to LBL radiological operations were a small fraction of both the relevant radiation protection guidelines (RPG) and of the natural radiation background. 16 refs., 7 figs., 21 tabs.

  6. Technical Safety Appraisal of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-01

    This report documents the results of the Technical Safety Appraisal (TSA) of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) (including the Site 300 area), Livermore, California, conducted from February 26 to April 5, 1990. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of Environment, Safety and Health (ES H) Programs at LLNL. LLNL is operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE), and is a multi-program, mission-oriented institution engaged in fundamental and applied research programs that require a multidisciplinary approach. 1 fig.

  7. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory upgrading approaches to existing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engle, H.M. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Plant Engineering Department instituted a seismic risk investigation and seismic upgrade program in 1970. This paper covers the upgrade of two buildings with dissimilar framing systems; Building No. 10, a World War II vintage heavy timber frame building, and Building No. 80, a steel frame structure constructed in 1954. The seismic upgrade task for both structures required that the buildings be kept in service during rehabilitation with a minimum of disruption to occupants. Rehabilitations were phased over two and three year periods with construction management and supervision performed by LBL Plant Engineering staff

  8. Natura e morte al tempo della guerra secondo Lawrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Grazia Dongu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available While the propaganda language strived to promote the Great War as a fight against evil forces, the event loomed soon above English people as an anticipation of the death of Western civilization. Images of death recur in the short story “England, my England” by D. H. Lawrence. Egbert’s death stands for the death of Old England and its value system, but also for the intellectuals’ failure to speak out and mould a new language, which could defy the propaganda. In the end, the rural world is abandoned by the characters. Egbert embraces dissolution as a relief from the agony of his own world.

  9. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory seismic yield determination for the NPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrer, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory recorded seismic signals from the Non-Proliferation experiment at the Nevada Test Site on September 22, 1993, at seismic stations near Mina, Nevada; Kanab Utah; Landers, California; and Elko, Nevada. Yields were calculated from these recorded seismic amplitudes at the stations using statistical amplitude- yield regression curves from earlier nuclear experiments performed near the Non-Proliferation experiment. The weighted seismic yield average using these amplitudes is 1.9 kt with a standard deviation of 19%. The calibrating experiments were nuclear, so this yield is equivalent to a 1.9-kt nuclear experiment.

  10. Strategies to Identify the Lynch Syndrome Among Patients With Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladabaum, Uri; Wang, Grace; Terdiman, Jonathan; Blanco, Amie; Kuppermann, Miriam; Boland, C. Richard; Ford, James; Elkin, Elena; Phillips, Kathryn A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Testing has been advocated for all persons with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer to identify families with the Lynch syndrome, an autosomal dominant cancer-predisposition syndrome that is a paradigm for personalized medicine. Objective To estimate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of strategies to identify the Lynch syndrome, with attention to sex, age at screening, and differential effects for probands and relatives. Design Markov model that incorporated risk for colorectal, endometrial, and ovarian cancers. Data Sources Published literature. Target Population All persons with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer and their relatives. Time Horizon Lifetime. Perspective Third-party payer. Intervention Strategies based on clinical criteria, prediction algorithms, tumor testing, or up-front germline mutation testing, followed by tailored screening and risk-reducing surgery. Outcome Measures Life-years, cancer cases and deaths, costs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. Results of Base-Case Analysis The benefit of all strategies accrued primarily to relatives with a mutation associated with the Lynch syndrome, particularly women, whose life expectancy could increase by approximately 4 years with hysterectomy and salpingo-oophorectomy and adherence to colorectal cancer screening recommendations. At current rates of germline testing, screening, and prophylactic surgery, the strategies reduced deaths from colorectal cancer by 7% to 42% and deaths from endometrial and ovarian cancer by 1% to 6%. Among tumor-testing strategies, immunohistochemistry followed by BRAF mutation testing was preferred, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $36 200 per life-year gained. Results of Sensitivity Analysis The number of relatives tested per proband was a critical determinant of both effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, with testing of 3 to 4 relatives required for most strategies to meet a threshold of $50 000 per life-year gained. Immunohistochemistry

  11. Comparison of clinical features between suspected familial colorectal cancer type X and Lynch syndrome in Japanese patients with colorectal cancer: a cross-sectional study conducted by the Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Tatsuro; Furukawa, Yoichi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Matsubara, Nagahide; Ishikawa, Hideki; Arai, Masami; Tomita, Naohiro; Tamura, Kazuo; Sugano, Kokichi; Ishioka, Chikashi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Moriya, Yoshihiro; Ishida, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Sugihara, Kenichi

    2015-02-01

    The characteristics of familial colorectal cancer type X are poorly defined. Here we aimed to clarify the differences in clinical features between suspected familial colorectal cancer type X and Lynch syndrome in Japanese patients. We performed germline mutation analyses of mismatch repair genes in 125 patients. Patients who met the Amsterdam Criteria I but lacked mismatch repair gene mutations were diagnosed with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X. We identified 69 patients with Lynch syndrome and 25 with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X. The frequencies of gastric and extracolonic Lynch syndrome-associated cancers were lower with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X than with Lynch syndrome. The number of organs with Lynch syndrome-associated cancer was significantly lower with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X than with Lynch syndrome. The cumulative incidence of extracolonic Lynch syndrome-associated cancer was significantly lower with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X than with Lynch syndrome. We estimated that the median cancer risk in 60-year-old patients with Lynch syndrome was 89, 36 and 24% for colorectal, endometrial and gastric cancers, respectively. Analyses of family members, including probands, revealed that the median age at diagnosis of extracolonic Lynch syndrome-associated cancer was significantly older with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X than with Lynch syndrome. The frequency of extracolonic Lynch syndrome-associated cancer was significantly lower with suspected familial colorectal cancer type X than with Lynch syndrome. A significant difference in extracolonic Lynch syndrome-associated cancer was evident between suspected familial colorectal cancer type X and Lynch syndrome. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Differential expression of CK20, β-catenin, and MUC2/5AC/6 in Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraldsson, Stefan; Klarskov, Louise; Nilbert, Mef; Bernstein, Inge; Bonde, Jesper; Holck, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer comprises Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX). Differences in genetics, demographics and histopathology have been extensively studied. The purpose of this study is to characterize their immunoprofile of markers other than MMR proteins. We compared the expression patterns of cytokeratins (CK7 and CK20), mucins (MUC2/5 AC/6), CDX2 and β-catenin in Lynch syndrome and FCCTX. Differences were identified for CK20 and nuclear β-catenin, which were significantly more often expressed in FCCTX than in Lynch syndrome ( p  Lynch syndrome tumors compared with FCCTX tumors ( p  = 0.001, Lynch syndrome with a more sporadic-like profile in the former group and a more distinct profile with frequent MUC6 positivity in the latter group.

  13. A Study of Postmodern Narrative in Michael Cunningham's The Hours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajar Abbasi Narinabad

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This project aims at providing a detailed analysis of the major features of the theory of postmodern narrative and at going through the novel The Hours by the American writer Michael Cunningham concentrating on some postmodern narrative techniques. To do so, the researcher goes through the theories set forth by some postmodern theoreticians like Roland Barthes, Jacque Derrida, Jean-François Lyotard and Julia Kristeva to investigate the postmodern narrative techniques and elements used in the novel. The researcher first examines the theories and then critically applies them on the novel. The article goes through the most eminent elements of postmodern narrative including intertextuality, stream of consciousness style, fragmentation and representation respectively which are delicately utilized in The Hours. The article concludes by recommending a few directions for the further research.

  14. Michael Longley’s Father: Memory, Mourning and History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Sloan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Michael Longley’s father has been a recurring presence in the poet’s work from his earliest to his most recent collection. This paper examines the exceptional strength of that bond reflected in the varied and changing ways in which the poet has responded to it – memorizing and mourning his loss; discovering through his father’s First World War stories a means of memorialising loss of life in contemporary conflicts and a way of facing the history of the twentieth century; confronting his own ageing and sense of mortality; and marking the specific, but also representative, generational history of his family. Close readings of key poems are offered to highlight Longley’s skills in meeting his own exacting standards of aesthetic propriety and moral and social responsibility for writers of elegy in order to avoid either exploitation of tragedy and loss, or facile gestures of consolation.

  15. Freshwater and Saline Loads of Dissolved Inorganic Nitrogen to Hood Canal and Lynch Cove, Western Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Anthony J.; Konrad, Christopher P.; Frans, Lonna M.; Noble, Marlene; Kendall, Carol; Josberger, Edward G.; Huffman, Raegan L.; Olsen, Theresa D.

    2006-01-01

    Hood Canal is a long (110 kilometers), deep (175 meters) and narrow (2 to 4 kilometers wide) fjord of Puget Sound in western Washington. The stratification of a less dense, fresh upper layer of the water column causes the cold, saltier lower layer of the water column to be isolated from the atmosphere in the late summer and autumn, which limits reaeration of the lower layer. In the upper layer of Hood Canal, the production of organic matter that settles and consumes dissolved oxygen in the lower layer appears to be limited by the load of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN): nitrate, nitrite, and ammonia. Freshwater and saline loads of DIN to Hood Canal were estimated from available historical data. The freshwater load of DIN to the upper layer of Hood Canal, which could be taken up by phytoplankton, came mostly from surface and ground water from subbasins, which accounts for 92 percent of total load of DIN to the upper layer of Hood Canal. Although DIN in rain falling on land surfaces amounts to about one-half of the DIN entering Hood Canal from subbasins, rain falling directly on the surface of marine waters contributed only 4 percent of the load to the upper layer. Point-source discharges and subsurface flow from shallow shoreline septic systems contributed less than 4 percent of the DIN load to the upper layer. DIN in saline water flowing over the sill into Hood Canal from Admiralty Inlet was at least 17 times the total load to the upper layer of Hood Canal. In September and October 2004, field data were collected to estimate DIN loads to Lynch Cove - the most inland marine waters of Hood Canal that routinely contain low dissolved-oxygen waters. Based on measured streamflow and DIN concentrations, surface discharge was estimated to have contributed about one-fourth of DIN loads to the upper layer of Lynch Cove. Ground-water flow from subbasins was estimated to have contributed about one-half of total DIN loads to the upper layer. In autumn 2004, the relative

  16. Estratégia competitiva: Michael Porter 30 anos depois

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Portugal Ferreira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Os estudos de estratégia têm sido muito influenciados pelos trabalhos de Michael Porter, em todas as suas fases, como as cinco forças, as estratégias genéricas, a cadeia de valor e as vantagens competitivas das nações. Neste artigo, analisou-se a influência de Porter nos trabalhos brasileiros em estratégia, a partir dos trabalhos selecionados e apresentados no EnANPAD. No levantamento para a análise dos artigos, considerando 10 anos de EnANPAD (1997-2006, foram selecionados 46 artigos. A identificação e seleção dos artigos envolveram os seguintes critérios: busca complementar por palavra-chave Porter na base de dados do EnANPAD; avaliação dos títulos e resumos dos artigos apresentados na área de estratégia entre 1997 e 2006, bem como na íntegra quando necessário. Procedeu-se também à análise das referências utilizadas nos artigos e o posicionamento dos autores em relação às tipologias de Porter. Como resultado, verificou-se que Michael Porter é um autor com grande influência nas pesquisas acadêmicas de estratégia. Seus estudos mais utilizados são os da análise da indústria e das estratégias genéricas, e também se verificou que a maioria dos estudos analisados é favorável aos seus conceitos, mesmo existindo pesquisas contrárias.

  17. Sessile serrated polyps of the colorectum are rare in patients with Lynch syndrome and in familial colorectal cancer families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S H; Lykke, E; Folker, M B

    2008-01-01

    Whereas the generally accepted carcinogenesis pathway of the microsatellite instabile high (MSI-H) colorectal carcinoma (CRC) involves the traditional adenoma in patients with Lynch syndrome, a serrate pathway involving serrate adenomas (SA) and sessile serrate polyps (SSP) characterize...... the sporadic MSI-H counterpart. Recent studies have, however, challenged such simple one-pathway models, inviting the consideration of alternative, unexpected pathways. Here, the issue as to the possible role of SSP, primarily in the context of Lynch syndrome, but also in subjects from familial CRC families...... (FCF) is addressed. Polyps coded as hyperplastic polyps (HP) from subjects with Lynch syndrome and FCF enrolled in the HNPCC-register at the Hvidovre University Hospital as well as adenomas from this population were retrieved and reviewed for features of SSP. Ninety-eight polyps coded as HP and 41...

  18. Limited impact on self-concept in individuals with Lynch syndrome; results from a national cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helle Vendel; Esplen, Mary Jane; Ladelund, Steen

    2011-01-01

    . We used the national Danish HNPCC register to collect data on self-concept from 413 individuals with Lynch syndrome. The recently developed Lynch syndrome self-concept scale contains 20 items within two subscales related to stigma-vulnerability and bowel symptom-related anxiety. Significantly higher...... total scores, indicating a greater impact on self-concept, were reported by females and by individuals with experience from cancer in close relatives, whereas individuals with less formal education scored significantly higher on the stigma and vulnerability subscale. Scores in the upper quartile were...... more often reported by women (odds ratio 1.8) and by individuals with less education (OR 1.8). This study provides the first extended use of the Lynch syndrome self-concept scale and suggests that the majority of the Danish mutation carriers adapt well to the situation, though knowledge about...

  19. Cancer spectrum in DNA mismatch repair gene mutation carriers: results from a hospital based Lynch syndrome registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Mala; Wei, Chongjuan; Chen, Jinyun; Amos, Christopher I; Lynch, Patrick M; Lu, Karen H; Lucio, Laura A; Boyd-Rogers, Stephanie G; Bannon, Sarah A; Mork, Maureen E; Frazier, Marsha L

    2012-09-01

    The spectrum of cancers seen in a hospital based Lynch syndrome registry of mismatch repair gene mutation carriers was examined to determine the distribution of cancers and examine excess cancer risk. Overall there were 504 cancers recorded in 368 mutation carriers from 176 families. These included 236 (46.8 %) colorectal and 268 (53.2 %) extracolonic cancers. MLH1 mutation carriers had a higher frequency of colorectal cancers whereas MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 mutation carriers had more extracolonic cancers although these differences were not statistically significant. Men had fewer extracolonic cancers than colorectal (45.3 vs. 54.7 %), whereas women had more extracolonic than colorectal cancers (59.0 vs. 41.0 %). The mean age at diagnosis overall for extracolonic cancers was older than for colorectal, 49.1 versus 44.8 years (P ≤ 0.001). As expected, the index cancer was colorectal in 58.1 % of patients and among the extracolonic index cancers, endometrial was the most common (13.8 %). A significant number of non-Lynch syndrome index cancers were recorded including breast (n = 5) prostate (n = 3), thyroid (n = 3), cervix (n = 3), melanoma (n = 3), and 1 case each of thymoma, sinus cavity, and adenocarcinoma of the lung. However, standardized incidence ratios calculated to assess excess cancer risk showed that only those cancers known to be associated with Lynch syndrome were significant in our sample. We found that Lynch syndrome patients can often present with cancers that are not considered part of Lynch syndrome. This has clinical relevance both for diagnosis of Lynch syndrome and surveillance for cancers of different sites during follow-up of these patients.

  20. Molecular changes preceding endometrial and ovarian cancer: a study of consecutive endometrial specimens from Lynch syndrome surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskakoski, Anni; Pasanen, Annukka; Lassus, Heini; Renkonen-Sinisalo, Laura; Kaur, Sippy; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Bützow, Ralf; Peltomäki, Päivi

    2018-03-27

    Molecular alterations preceding endometrial and ovarian cancer and the sequence of events are unknown. Consecutive specimens from lifelong surveillance for Lynch syndrome provides a natural setting to address such questions. To molecularly define the multistep gynecological tumorigenesis, DNA mismatch repair gene mutation carriers with endometrial or ovarian carcinoma or endometrial hyperplasia were identified from a nation-wide registry and endometrial biopsy specimens taken from these individuals during 20 years of screening were collected. A total of 213 endometrial and ovarian specimens from Lynch syndrome individuals and 197 histology-matched (non-serous) samples from sporadic cases were available for this investigation. The specimens were profiled for markers linked to endometrial and ovarian tumorigenesis, including ARID1A protein expression, mismatch repair status, and tumor suppressor gene promoter methylation. In Lynch syndrome-associated endometrial and ovarian carcinomas, ARID1A protein was lost in 61-100% and mismatch repair was deficient in 97-100%, compared to 0-17% and 14-44% in sporadic cases (P = 0.000). ARID1A loss appeared in complex hyperplasia and deficient mismatch repair and tumor suppressor gene promoter methylation in histologically normal endometrium. Despite quantitative differences between Lynch syndrome and sporadic cases, ARID1A expression, mismatch repair, and tumor suppressor gene promoter methylation divided endometrial samples from both patient groups into three categories of increasing abnormality, comprising normal endometrium and simple hyperplasia (I), complex hyperplasia with or without atypia (II), and endometrial cancer (III). Complex hyperplasias without vs. with atypia were molecularly indistinguishable. In conclusion, surveillance specimens from Lynch syndrome identify mismatch repair deficiency, tumor suppressor gene promoter methylation, and ARID1A loss as early changes in tumor development. Our findings are

  1. Clinical problems of colorectal cancer and endometrial cancer cases with unknown cause of tumor mismatch repair deficiency (suspected Lynch syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buchanan DD

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Daniel D Buchanan,1,2 Christophe Rosty,1,3,4 Mark Clendenning,1 Amanda B Spurdle,5 Aung Ko Win2 1Oncogenomics Group, Genetic Epidemiology Laboratory, Department of Pathology, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia; 2Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia; 3Envoi Specialist Pathologists, Herston, QLD, Australia; 4School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Herston, QLD, Australia; 5Molecular Cancer Epidemiology Laboratory, Genetics and Computational Biology Division, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, QLD, AustraliaAbstract: Carriers of a germline mutation in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes have a high risk of developing numerous different cancers, predominantly colorectal cancer and endometrial cancer (known as Lynch syndrome. MMR gene mutation carriers develop tumors with MMR deficiency identified by tumor microsatellite instability or immunohistochemical loss of MMR protein expression. Tumor MMR deficiency is used to identify individuals most likely to carry an MMR gene mutation. However, MMR deficiency can also result from somatic inactivation, most commonly methylation of the MLH1 gene promoter. As tumor MMR testing of all incident colorectal and endometrial cancers (universal screening is becoming increasingly adopted, a growing clinical problem is emerging for individuals who have tumors that show MMR deficiency who are subsequently found not to carry an MMR gene mutation after genetic testing using the current diagnostic approaches (Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and who also show no evidence of MLH1 methylation. The inability to determine the underlying cause of tumor MMR deficiency in these "Lynch-like" or "suspected Lynch syndrome" cases has significant implications on the clinical management of these individuals and their relatives. When the

  2. Achieving behaviour change for detection of Lynch syndrome using the Theoretical Domains Framework Implementation (TDFI) approach: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Natalie; Long, Janet C; Debono, Deborah; Williams, Rachel; Salisbury, Elizabeth; O'Neill, Sharron; Eykman, Elizabeth; Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Chin, Melvin

    2016-03-12

    Lynch syndrome is an inherited disorder associated with a range of cancers, and found in 2-5 % of colorectal cancers. Lynch syndrome is diagnosed through a combination of significant family and clinical history and pathology. The definitive diagnostic germline test requires formal patient consent after genetic counselling. If diagnosed early, carriers of Lynch syndrome can undergo increased surveillance for cancers, which in turn can prevent late stage cancers, optimise treatment and decrease mortality for themselves and their relatives. However, over the past decade, international studies have reported that only a small proportion of individuals with suspected Lynch syndrome were referred for genetic consultation and possible genetic testing. The aim of this project is to use behaviour change theory and implementation science approaches to increase the number and speed of healthcare professional referrals of colorectal cancer patients with a high-likelihood risk of Lynch syndrome to appropriate genetic counselling services. The six-step Theoretical Domains Framework Implementation (TDFI) approach will be used at two large, metropolitan hospitals treating colorectal cancer patients. Steps are: 1) form local multidisciplinary teams to map current referral processes; 2) identify target behaviours that may lead to increased referrals using discussion supported by a retrospective audit; 3) identify barriers to those behaviours using the validated Influences on Patient Safety Behaviours Questionnaire and TDFI guided focus groups; 4) co-design interventions to address barriers using focus groups; 5) co-implement interventions; and 6) evaluate intervention impact. Chi square analysis will be used to test the difference in the proportion of high-likelihood risk Lynch syndrome patients being referred for genetic testing before and after intervention implementation. A paired t-test will be used to assess the mean time from the pathology test results to referral for high

  3. Universal screening for Lynch syndrome in endometrial cancers: frequency of germline mutations and identification of patients with Lynch-like syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Jessica L; Gonzalez, Jorge L; DeMars, Leslie; Bloch, Katarzyna J; Tafe, Laura J

    2017-12-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is an inherited clinical syndrome characterized by a high risk of colorectal, endometrial (lifetime risk of up to 60%), ovarian, and urinary tract cancers. The diagnosis is confirmed by identification of germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, PMS2, MSH2, MSH6, or EPCAM. In 2015, our institution implemented universal screening of endometrial cancer (EC) hysterectomy specimens by mismatch repair immunohistochemistry (IHC) with reflex MLH1 promoter hypermethylation analysis for tumors with loss of MLH1/PMS2 expression. Patients with tumors negative for MLH1 methylation and those with a loss of the heterodimer pair MSH2 and MSH6, or isolated loss of either PMS2 or MSH6 were referred to the Familial Cancer Program for genetic counseling and consideration of germline testing. Between May 2015 to Dec 2016, 233 EC patients were screened by IHC for LS with a median age of 63 years. Sixty tumors (27%) had abnormal IHC staining results. Fifty-one (22%) harbored heterodimeric loss of MLH1 and PMS2, 49 of which showed MLH1 promoter methylation (1 failure, 1 negative). One showed loss of MLH1/PMS2 and MSH6, 2 showed loss of MSH2/MSH6, and 6 had isolated loss of MSH6 only. Ten patients underwent genetic counseling, and germline testing was performed in 8; LS was confirmed in 5 patients (2.1%). In addition, 3 patients with negative germline testing and presumed Lynch-like syndrome were identified and offered additional somatic testing. Universal screening for LS in EC patients has yielded positive results for identification of patients at risk for this inherited syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Studying Teachers and Schools: Michael Pressley's Legacy and Directions for Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Lindsey; Lundeberg, Mary A.; Reffitt, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Much of Michael Pressley's work during the past decade focused on the nature of highly effective, engaging literacy instruction. Michael Pressley believed that studying effective teachers and schools had the potential to influence more engaging and effective teaching, especially in underresourced schools. First, we describe the grounded…

  5. Markets, Marx, Modernity and Mathematics Education: A Response to Michael Apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Peter

    This paper is a response to Michael Apple's paper, "What Postmodernists Forget: Cultural Capital and Official Knowledge." The paper advocates Michael's identification of the current dangers and processes of the growth of new right ideologies in the development of subjectivity, society, and education. The differences in success in the education…

  6. Reflections on Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri’s Book “Assembly”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Fuchs

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This contribution presents reflections on Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri’s book “Assembly” (2017, Oxford: Oxford University Press, ISBN 978-0190677961. Keywords: assembly, Michael Hardt, Antonio Negri, multitude, common, entrepreneurship of the multitude, the new Prince, digital capitalism, digital assemblage, neoliberalism, finance

  7. Family history of cancer predicts endometrial cancer risk independently of Lynch Syndrome: Implications for genetic counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnatty, Sharon E; Tan, Yen Y; Buchanan, Daniel D; Bowman, Michael; Walters, Rhiannon J; Obermair, Andreas; Quinn, Michael A; Blomfield, Penelope B; Brand, Alison; Leung, Yee; Oehler, Martin K; Kirk, Judy A; O'Mara, Tracy A; Webb, Penelope M; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2017-11-01

    To determine endometrial cancer (EC) risk according to family cancer history, including assessment by degree of relatedness, type of and age at cancer diagnosis of relatives. Self-reported family cancer history was available for 1353 EC patients and 628 controls. Logistic regression was used to quantify the association between EC and cancer diagnosis in ≥1 first or second degree relative, and to assess whether level of risk differed by degree of relationship and/or relative's age at diagnosis. Risk was also evaluated for family history of up to three cancers from known familial syndromes (Lynch, Cowden, hereditary breast and ovarian cancer) overall, by histological subtype and, for a subset of 678 patients, by EC tumor mismatch repair (MMR) gene expression. Report of EC in ≥1 first- or second-degree relative was associated with significantly increased risk of EC (P=3.8×10 -7 ), independent of lifestyle risk factors. There was a trend in increasing EC risk with closer relatedness and younger age at EC diagnosis in relatives (P Trend =4.43×10 -6 ), and with increasing numbers of Lynch cancers in relatives (P Trend ≤0.0001). EC risk associated with family history did not differ by proband tumor MMR status, or histological subtype. Reported EC in first- or second-degree relatives remained associated with EC risk after conservative correction for potential misreported family history (OR 2.0; 95% CI, 1.24-3.37, P=0.004). The strongest predictor of EC risk was closer relatedness and younger EC diagnosis age in ≥1 relative. Associations remained significant irrespective of proband MMR status, and after excluding MMR pathogenic variant carriers, indicating that Lynch syndrome genes do not fully explain familial EC risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Subtotal Colectomy for Colon Cancer Reduces the Need for Subsequent Surgery in Lynch Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renkonen-Sinisalo, Laura; Seppälä, Toni T; Järvinen, Heikki J; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka

    2017-08-01

    The risk of metachronous colorectal cancer is high after surgical resection for first colon cancer in Lynch syndrome. This study aimed to examine whether extended surgery decreases the risk of subsequent colorectal cancer and improves long-term survival. This was a retrospective study. Data were collected from a nationwide registry. Two hundred forty-two Lynch syndrome pathogenic variant carriers who underwent surgery for a first colon cancer from 1984 to 2009 were included. Patients underwent standard segmental colectomy (n = 144) or extended colectomy (n = 98) for colon cancer. Patients were followed a median of 14.6 up to 25 years. Risk of subsequent colorectal cancer in either group, overall and disease-specific survival, and operative mortality were the primary outcomes measured. Subtotal colectomy decreased the risk of subsequent colorectal cancer (HR, 0.20; 95% CI, 0.08-0.52; p = 0.001), compared with segmental resection. Subsequent colorectal cancer decreased in MLH1 carriers. The MSH2 carriers showed no statistical difference, possibly because of their small number. Disease-specific and overall survival within 25 years did not differ between the standard and extended surgeries (82.7% vs 87.2%, p = 0.76 and 47.2% vs 41.4%, p = 0.83). The cumulative risk of subsequent colorectal cancer was 20% in 10 years and 47% within 25 years after standard resection and 4% and 9% after extended surgery. The cumulative risk of metachronous colorectal cancer was 7% within 25 years after subtotal colectomy with ileosigmoidal anastomosis. One patient died of postoperative septicemia within 30 days after segmental colectomy. Data on surgical procedures were primarily collected retrospectively. Lynch syndrome pathogenic variant carriers may undergo subtotal colectomy to manage first colon cancer and avoid repetitive abdominal surgery and to reduce the remaining bowel to facilitate easier endoscopic surveillance. It provides no survival benefit, compared with segmental colon

  9. The Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, A.L.; Perera, R.C.C.; Schlachter, A.S.

    1991-10-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), scheduled to be operational in the spring of 1993 as a US Department of Energy national user facility, will be a next- generation source of soft x-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) synchrotron radiation. Undulators will provide the world's brightest synchrotron radiation at photon energies from below 10 eV to above 2 keV; wiggler and bend-magnet radiation will extend the spectral coverage with high fluxes above 10 keV. These capabilities will support an extensive research program in a broad spectrum of scientific and technological areas in which XUV radiation is used to study and manipulate matter in all its varied gaseous, liquid, and solid forms. The ALS will also serve those interested in developing the fabrication technology for micro- and nanostructures, as well as characterizing them

  10. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory laser-fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    The goals of the Laser-Fusion Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are to produce well-diagnosed, high-gain, laser-driven fusion explosions in the laboratory and to exploit this capability for both military applications and for civilian energy production. In the past year we have made significant progress both theoretically and experimentally in our understanding of the laser interaction with both directly coupled and radiation-driven implosion targets and their implosion dynamics. We have made significant developments in fabricating the target structures. Data from the target experiments are producing important near-term physics results. We have also continued to develop attractive reactor concepts which illustrate ICF's potential as an energy producer

  11. Absolute instrumental neutron activation analysis at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heft, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    The Environmental Science Division at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory has in use a system of absolute Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA). Basically, absolute INAA is dependent upon the absolute measurement of the disintegration rates of the nuclides produced by neutron capture. From such disintegration rate data, the amount of the target element present in the irradiated sample is calculated by dividing the observed disintegration rate for each nuclide by the expected value for the disintegration rate per microgram of the target element that produced the nuclide. In absolute INAA, the expected value for disintegration rate per microgram is calculated from nuclear parameters and from measured values of both thermal and epithermal neutron fluxes which were present during irradiation. Absolute INAA does not depend on the concurrent irradiation of elemental standards but does depend on the values for thermal and epithermal neutron capture cross-sections for the target nuclides. A description of the analytical method is presented

  12. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Intelligent Actinide Analysis System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, W.M.; Carlson, J.B.; Koenig, Z.M.

    1993-07-01

    The authors have developed an Intelligent Actinide Analysis System (IAAS) for Materials Management to use in the Plutonium Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The IAAS will measure isotopic ratios for plutonium and other actinides non-destructively by high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. This system will measure samples in a variety of matrices and containers. It will provide automated control of many aspects of the instrument that previously required manual intervention and/or control. The IAAS is a second-generation instrument, based on the authors' experience in fielding gamma isotopic systems, that is intended to advance non-destructive actinide analysis for nuclear safeguards in performance, automation, ease of use, adaptability, systems integration and extensibility to robotics. It uses a client-server distributed monitoring and control architecture. The IAAS uses MGA 3 as the isotopic analysis code. The design of the IAAS reduces the need for operator intervention, operator training, and operator exposure

  13. Ambient environmental radiation monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindeken, C.L.; White, J.H.; Toy, A.J.; Sundbeck, C.W.

    1975-01-01

    Thermoluminescence dosimetry is the principal means of measuring ambient γ radiation at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. These dosimeters are used at 12 perimeter locations and 41 locations in the off-site vicinity of the Laboratory, and are exchanged quarterly. Control dosimeters are stored in a 75-mm-thick lead shield located out-of-doors to duplicate temperature cycling of field dosimeters. Effect of dosimeter response to radiation in the shield is determined each quarter. Calibration irradiations are made midway through the exposure cycle to compensate for signal fading. Terrestrial exposure rates calculated from the activities of naturally occurring uranium, thorium, and potassium in Livermore Valley soils vary from 3 to 7 μR/hr. Local inferred exposure rates from cosmic radiation are approximately 4 μR/hr. TLD measurements are in good agreement with these data. Off-site and site perimeter data are compared, and differences related to Laboratory operations are discussed

  14. Malignant melanoma among employees of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austin, D.F.; Reynolds, P.J.; Snyder, M.A.; Biggs, M.W.; Stubbs, H.A.

    1981-01-01

    19 cases of malignant melanoma (MM) were observed during 1972-77 among approximately 5100 employees of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, where high energy physics research is conducted. This number was significantly higher (p -6 ) than that expected in a comparable age/race/sex/geographical segment of the population of the San Francisco Bay area. That excess seemed to occur only among laboratory employees and not among the surrounding community, which suggests that an occupational factor is responsible. Preliminary case-comparison findings suggest that MM risk is not associated with length of employment at the laboratory nor with type of monitored radiation exposure. Although the data did not support an association between MM incidence and all scientific job classifications combined, an excess relative risk was observed among chemists. The reasons for the MM excess have not been identified. (author)

  15. Environmental restoration at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziagos, J.P.; Bainer, R.W.; Dresen, M.D.; Hoffman, J.D.

    1992-04-01

    Ground water beneath Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) near Livermore California, contains 19 compounds in concentrations exceeding regulatory standards. These include volatile organic compounds (VOCs), dissolved fuel hydrocarbons, free product gasoline, cadmium, chromium, lead, and tritium. VOCs are the most widespread hazardous materials in the ground water, covering an area of about 1.4 square miles. The other compounds occur sporadically around the site. The LLNL site was added to the National Priorities (Superfund) List in 1987. This paper describes the technology developed at LLNL to remediate soil and ground water contamination. Included in this paper are methods in which site characterization has been aided by using a drilling technique developed at LLNL to evaluate the vertical distribution of VOCs in multiple water-bearing zones in single borehole. The paper also describes the development and implementation of a comprehensive three-step program to investigate and evaluate potential sources of hazardous materials in soil and ground water

  16. Environmental surveillance program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.H.

    1976-04-01

    The major radiological environmental impact of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is due to the operation of four particle accelerators. Potential sources of population exposure at the Laboratory are discussed. The major source of population exposure due to accelerator operation arises from the prompt radiation field which consists principally of neutrons and photons. Release of small quantities of radionuclides is also a potential source of population exposure but is usually an order of magnitude less significant. Accelerator produced radiation levels at the Laboratory boundary are comparable with the magnitudes of the fluctuations found in the natural background radiation. Environmental monitoring of accelerator-produced radiation and of radionuclides is carried on throughout the Laboratory, at the Laboratory perimeter, and in the regions surrounding the Laboratory. The techniques used are described. The models used to calculate population exposure are described and discussed

  17. Images of Turks in the Works of Lawrence Durrell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Kayıntu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study seeks to explore the images of Turks as a non-European other in the works of Lawrence Durrell. In his works, Durrell shows how representations of cultural difference are inextricably linked to representations of sexual difference. Thus Durrell‟s Europeans are surrounded with an aura of colonial power, erotic potency, and easy penetration into the spaces of the other while Turks are represented as feminized, emasculated and humiliated. The images of the European White man and non- are dependent on the negative image of Turks, the other. In exactly the same way, Istanbul is presented as a city of decadence and decay, a place where decent human values broken down and where individuals survive by their wits ability to dodge or swindle

  18. Optical Design Capabilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, J.K.

    2002-01-01

    Optical design capabilities continue to play the same strong role at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that they have played in the past. From defense applications to the solid-state laser programs to the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS), members of the optical design group played critical roles in producing effective system designs and are actively continuing this tradition. This talk will explain the role optical design plays at LLNL, outline current capabilities and summarize a few activities in which the optical design team has been recently participating. Among the many optical engineers working at LLNL, a distinct group exists which specializes in optical design issues. The optical design group collectively has a wide range of fields of expertise as well as a diversity of background histories including LLNL, university, industry and aerospace experience. This unique resource has resulted many effective and productive designs for customers at LLNL and outside the lab.

  19. Lawrence Livermore Laboratory concept for uranium recovery from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregg, D.; Wang, F.

    1980-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory concept for uranium recovery from seawater involves the following process steps: (1) produce activated carbon via a coal gasification plant; (2) contact activated carbon sorbent with seawater using a settling process (no pumping of seawater); (3) vacuum activated carbon from sea floor; (4) gasify or burn activated carbon (further concentrating the uranium in the ash); (5) extract the uranium from the rich ash ore by conventional techniques. The process advantages are: (1) eliminates seawater pumping, the need for an illuent, and the need for a fresh water wash; (2) should result in much lower capital investment and regional process energy. Major process issues are: (1) uranium loading on activated carbon; (2) activated carbon modifications required to improve the sorbtion performance; (3) activated carbon particle size needed to meet system requirements; (4) minimization of sorbent losses when contacted with seawater

  20. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Intelligent Actinide Analysis System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, W.M.; Carlson, J.B.; Koenig, Z.M.

    1993-01-01

    The authors have developed an Intelligent Actinide Analysis System (IAAS) for Materials Management to use in the Plutonium Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The IAAS will measure isotopic ratios for plutonium and other actinides non-destructively by high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. This system will measure samples in a variety of matrices and containers. It will provide automated control of many aspects of the instrument that previously required manual intervention and/or control. The IAAS is a second-generation instrument, based on experience in fielding gamma isotopic systems, that is intended to advance non-destructive actinide analysis for nuclear safeguards in performance, automation, ease of use, adaptability, systems integration and extensibility to robotics. It uses a client-server distributed monitoring and control architecture. The IAAS uses MGA as the isotopic analysis code. The design of the IAAS reduces the need for operator intervention, operator training, and operator exposure

  1. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory environmental report for 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, J.M.; Surano, K.A.; Lamson, K.C.; Balke, B.K.; Steenhoven, J.C.; Schwoegler, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1990. To evaluate the effect of LLNL operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent surface water, groundwater, vegetation, and foodstuff were made at both the Livermore site and at Site 300 nearly. LLNL's compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions to the environment was evaluated. Aside from an August 13 observation of silver concentrations slightly above guidelines for discharges to the sanitary sewer, all the monitoring data demonstrated LLNL compliance with environmental laws and regulations governing emission and discharge of materials to the environment. In addition, the monitoring data demonstrated that the environmental impacts of LLNL are minimal and pose no threat to the public to or to the environment. 114 refs., 46 figs., 79 tabs

  2. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Waste Minimization Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckman, R.A.; Tang, W.R.

    1989-01-01

    This Program Plan document describes the background of the Waste Minimization field at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and refers to the significant studies that have impacted on legislative efforts, both at the federal and state levels. A short history of formal LLNL waste minimization efforts is provided. Also included are general findings from analysis of work to date, with emphasis on source reduction findings. A short summary is provided on current regulations and probable future legislation which may impact on waste minimization methodology. The LLN Waste Minimization Program Plan is designed to be dynamic and flexible so as to meet current regulations, and yet is able to respond to an everchanging regulatory environment. 19 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs

  3. Seip-lawrence Syndrome (Three Cases in a Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.S.N. Reddy

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available A, rare episode of Seip-Lawrence syndrome manifesting in all three case siblings of consanpinous parents is reported. Two children we′re male and one female. They exhibited low intelligence,′ gaunt facies, depressed bridge of nose, large low-sct ears, thick lips and protruberant abdomen. Skin was showing hypermelanosis, hypertrichosis, absence of subcutaneous fat and acan nigricaFNx01s with′ very prominent perianal rUgO6itiS In addition, the first child was short statured having hypertrophic Clitoris, hepatomcoy, left ventricular hypertro hy, hyperglycaemia and glycossuria- without ketoacidosis. The second child was, having enlargement of penis, left ventricular hypertrophy,,hepatospienomegaly and abnormal GTT. The third and the youngest child was having only cutaneous changes and no viscoromegaly or biochemical abnormality. Nou Of these patients were having gigantism and advanced bone age.

  4. Functional characterization of MLH1 missense variants identified in Lynch Syndrome patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sofie Dabros; Liberti, Sascha Emilie; Lützen, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Germline mutations in the human DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes MSH2 and MLH1 are associated with the inherited cancer disorder Lynch Syndrome (LS), also known as Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer or HNPCC. A proportion of MSH2 and MLH1 mutations found in suspected LS patients give rise...... localization and protein-protein interaction with the dimer partner PMS2 and the MMR-associated exonuclease 1. We show that a significant proportion of examined variant proteins have functional defects in either subcellular localization or protein-protein interactions, which is suspected to lead to the cancer...

  5. Validation of a Self-Concept Scale for Lynch Syndrome in Different Nationalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helle Vendel; Domanska, Katarina; Bendahl, Pär-Ola

    2011-01-01

    syndrome. We compared the performance of this scale in 591 mutation carriers from Denmark, Sweden and Canada. Principal component analysis identified two sets of linked statements-the first related to feeling different, isolated and labeled, and the second to concern and worry about bowel changes....... The scale performed consistently in the three countries. Minor differences were identified, with guilt about passing on a defective gene and feelings of losing one's privacy being more pronounced among Canadians, whereas Danes more often expressed worries about cancer. Validation of the Lynch syndrome self...

  6. Estonia's defence dollars spent wisely? / Tony Lawrence, Kaarel Kaas ; interv. Joel Alas

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lawrence, Tony

    2007-01-01

    Rahvusvahelise Kaitseuuringute Keskuse teadurid Tony Lawrence ja Kaarel Kaas kommenteerivad Eestis Suurbritannia kaitseatasheena töötanud kolonelleitnant Glen Granti kriitikat kaitsejõudude efektiivsuse osas, Eesti kaitsepoliitikat, küberrünnakut Eestile, kahe Eesti rahukaitseväelase surma missioonil Afganistanis ning üldsuse suhtumist Eesti osalemisele rahvusvahelistel missioonidel. Lisa: Tony Lawrence; Kaarel Kaas

  7. 75 FR 78335 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Thomas Lawrence: Regency...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 7268] Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Thomas Lawrence: Regency Power and Brilliance'' SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of the... determine that the objects to be included in the exhibition ``Thomas Lawrence: Regency Power and Brilliance...

  8. Lawrence Kohlberg, una obra en permanente construcción Lawrence Kohlberg, a Work in Permanent Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Yánez-Canal

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumen Este artículo, resultado de investigación documental del grupo Estudios sobre el Desarrollo Sociomoral, presenta un análisis sobre la historia y la evolución intelectual de Lawrece Kohlberg, pionero de la Psicología del Desarrollo Moral. Específicamente, el análisis de su obra gira alrededor de tres tópicos: la filosofía moral, la psicología del desarrollo y la pedagogía.Abstract This paper, documental research outcome of the ''Estudios sobre el Desarrollo Sociomoral'' research group, presents an analysis of the history and intellectual evolution of Lawrence Kohlberg, pioneer of Moral Development Psychology. Specifically, the analysis of his work revolves around three issues: moral Philosophy, developmental Psychology and Pedagogy.

  9. Michael Field’s “A Dance of Death”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LeeAnne Richardson

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The 1912 poem "A Dance of Death" by Michael Field (pen name of Katherine Bradley and her niece Edith Cooper depicts Salome in an alternate version of the biblical story: this Salome dances on a frozen river, falls through the ice, and is decapitated on a jagged edge. Nonetheless, her beautiful head continues dancing over the frozen river. This poem is highly unusual, especially in the context of the other poems in the postconversion volume Poems of Adoration, because it questions, rather than submits to, authority. In re-writing a familiar Christian tale, as well as a familiar decadent theme, Field uses the poem to assert the supremacy of their artistic vision, which (despite their ardent Catholicism cannot be subject to any law outside themselves. Like the continually dancing head of Salome, which continues to create beauty even after nature (and perhaps God has struck it down, the poet is subjugate only to her own law and creates without boundaries or restrictions on her art. Bradley and Cooper were acutely aware of their authorial persona (actively taking not only a masculine but also a singular poetic identity, and their mode of reconciling the apparent contradictions of this identity are mirrored in their presentation of Salome in a "Dance of Death."

  10. A Musical Italy: Michael W. Balfe’s Italian Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basil Walsh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Dublin-born musician, Michael W. Balfe, was a singer, composerand conductor whose brilliant musical career was heavily influenced byformative experiences in Italy. In 1825, Balfe, interested in broadeninghis musical studies first went to Paris where he was introduced to thegreat composers, Luigi Cherubini and Gioachino Rossini, who took apersonal interest in him and his musical talents. On the advice of Rossinihe spent the next few years in Italy studying singing with the famousRossini singer, Filippo Galli, and taking music composition lessonsfrom Ferdinando Paer, in Rome. Later in Milan he studied harmonyand counterpoint with Vincenzo Federici. By 1831, when he was only23 years old, his first three operas had been produced in Palermo, Pavia,and Milan. He returned to London in August 1835, participatingwith the great Lablache, Tamburini, Rubini and Grisi in a concert inVauxhall Gardens. In 1834 he made his debut at La Scala, Milan, singingopposite the renowned mezzo-soprano, Maria Malibran in Rossini’sOtello. He appeared again with Malibran in Venice early in 1835,singing once more in Rossini and Bellini operas. Balfe worked as a singerand composer throughout the Italian peninsula/states during the years,1825-1835 and this article will chart these experiences and demonstratehow the time he spent in Italy and the people he met, influenced hislife and later career as an important and popular European composer.

  11. A model-based assessment of the cost–utility of strategies to identify Lynch syndrome in early-onset colorectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snowsill, Tristan; Huxley, Nicola; Hoyle, Martin; Jones-Hughes, Tracey; Coelho, Helen; Cooper, Chris; Frayling, Ian; Hyde, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome caused by mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. Individuals with Lynch syndrome have an increased risk of colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, ovarian and other cancers. Lynch syndrome remains underdiagnosed in the UK. Reflex testing for Lynch syndrome in early-onset colorectal cancer patients is proposed as a method to identify more families affected by Lynch syndrome and offer surveillance to reduce cancer risks, although cost-effectiveness is viewed as a barrier to implementation. The objective of this project was to estimate the cost–utility of strategies to identify Lynch syndrome in individuals with early-onset colorectal cancer in the NHS. A decision analytic model was developed which simulated diagnostic and long-term outcomes over a lifetime horizon for colorectal cancer patients with and without Lynch syndrome and for relatives of those patients. Nine diagnostic strategies were modelled which included microsatellite instability (MSI) testing, immunohistochemistry (IHC), BRAF mutation testing (methylation testing in a scenario analysis), diagnostic mutation testing and Amsterdam II criteria. Biennial colonoscopic surveillance was included for individuals diagnosed with Lynch syndrome and accepting surveillance. Prophylactic hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (H-BSO) was similarly included for women diagnosed with Lynch syndrome. Costs from NHS and Personal Social Services perspective and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were estimated and discounted at 3.5% per annum. All strategies included for the identification of Lynch syndrome were cost-effective versus no testing. The strategy with the greatest net health benefit was MSI followed by BRAF followed by diagnostic genetic testing, costing £5,491 per QALY gained over no testing. The effect of prophylactic H-BSO on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is uncertain and could

  12. A model-based assessment of the cost-utility of strategies to identify Lynch syndrome in early-onset colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowsill, Tristan; Huxley, Nicola; Hoyle, Martin; Jones-Hughes, Tracey; Coelho, Helen; Cooper, Chris; Frayling, Ian; Hyde, Chris

    2015-04-25

    Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome caused by mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. Individuals with Lynch syndrome have an increased risk of colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, ovarian and other cancers. Lynch syndrome remains underdiagnosed in the UK. Reflex testing for Lynch syndrome in early-onset colorectal cancer patients is proposed as a method to identify more families affected by Lynch syndrome and offer surveillance to reduce cancer risks, although cost-effectiveness is viewed as a barrier to implementation. The objective of this project was to estimate the cost-utility of strategies to identify Lynch syndrome in individuals with early-onset colorectal cancer in the NHS. A decision analytic model was developed which simulated diagnostic and long-term outcomes over a lifetime horizon for colorectal cancer patients with and without Lynch syndrome and for relatives of those patients. Nine diagnostic strategies were modelled which included microsatellite instability (MSI) testing, immunohistochemistry (IHC), BRAF mutation testing (methylation testing in a scenario analysis), diagnostic mutation testing and Amsterdam II criteria. Biennial colonoscopic surveillance was included for individuals diagnosed with Lynch syndrome and accepting surveillance. Prophylactic hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (H-BSO) was similarly included for women diagnosed with Lynch syndrome. Costs from NHS and Personal Social Services perspective and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were estimated and discounted at 3.5% per annum. All strategies included for the identification of Lynch syndrome were cost-effective versus no testing. The strategy with the greatest net health benefit was MSI followed by BRAF followed by diagnostic genetic testing, costing £5,491 per QALY gained over no testing. The effect of prophylactic H-BSO on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is uncertain and could outweigh

  13. An {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer study of the ordinary chondrite meteorite Lynch 001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elewa, Nancy N., E-mail: nancy.elewa@student.unsw.edu.au; Cadogan, J. M. [The University of New South Wales at the Australian Defence Force Academy, School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences (Australia)

    2017-11-15

    The Lynch 001 meteorite was found in the Nullarbor Plain region of Western Australia in 1977. This meteorite is classified as an ordinary chondrite of the petrologic group L5/6 that has undergone ‘minor to moderate’ terrestrial weathering. Here, we characterize the Fe-bearing phases in this chondrite using {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy carried out over the temperature range 13 K to room temperature (295 K). The paramagnetic doublets of olivine, pyroxene and a superparamagnetic ferric phase dominate the room temperature Mössbauer spectrum. On the basis of the room temperature quadrupole splitting of the olivine component, we estimate its composition to be Fa {sub 30(5)}. Besides the paramagnetic ferric component, accounting for ∼15 % of the spectral area at room temperature, magnetically ordered ferric phases were also detected. The total relative proportion of the Fe {sup 3+} components allows us to estimate the terrestrial age of Lynch 001 to be 6,500 ± 1,500 yr, consistent with the value of 6,700 ± 1,300 yr determined by {sup 14}C dating.

  14. Locating inputs of freshwater to Lynch Cove, Hood Canal, Washington, using aerial infrared photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheibley, Rich W.; Josberger, Edward G.; Chickadel, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The input of freshwater and associated nutrients into Lynch Cove and lower Hood Canal (fig. 1) from sources such as groundwater seeps, small streams, and ephemeral creeks may play a major role in the nutrient loading and hydrodynamics of this low dissolved-oxygen (hypoxic) system. These disbursed sources exhibit a high degree of spatial variability. However, few in-situ measurements of groundwater seepage rates and nutrient concentrations are available and thus may not represent adequately the large spatial variability of groundwater discharge in the area. As a result, our understanding of these processes and their effect on hypoxic conditions in Hood Canal is limited. To determine the spatial variability and relative intensity of these sources, the U.S. Geological Survey Washington Water Science Center collaborated with the University of Washington Applied Physics Laboratory to obtain thermal infrared (TIR) images of the nearshore and intertidal regions of Lynch Cove at or near low tide. In the summer, cool freshwater discharges from seeps and streams, flows across the exposed, sun-warmed beach, and out on the warm surface of the marine water. These temperature differences are readily apparent in aerial thermal infrared imagery that we acquired during the summers of 2008 and 2009. When combined with co-incident video camera images, these temperature differences allow identification of the location, the type, and the relative intensity of the sources.

  15. Common mutations identified in the MLH1 gene in familial Lynch syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jisha Elias

    2017-12-01

    In this study we identified three families with Lynch syndrome from a rural cancer center in western India (KCHRC, Goraj, Gujarat, where 70-75 CRC patients are seen annually. DNA isolated from the blood of consented family members of all three families (8-10 members/family was subjected to NGS sequencing methods on an Illumina HiSeq 4000 platform. We identified unique mutations in the MLH1 gene in all three HNPCC family members. Two of the three unrelated families shared a common mutation (154delA and 156delA. Total 8 members of a family were identified as carriers for 156delA mutation of which 5 members were unaffected while 3 were affected (age of onset: 1 member <30yrs & 2 were>40yr. The family with 154delA mutation showed 2 affected members (>40yr carrying the mutations.LYS618DEL mutation found in 8 members of the third family showed that both affected and unaffected carried the mutation. Thus the common mutations identified in the MLH1 gene in two unrelated families had a high risk for lynch syndrome especially above the age of 40.

  16. Lynch syndrome caused by germline PMS2 mutations: delineating the cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Broeke, Sanne W; Brohet, Richard M; Tops, Carli M; van der Klift, Heleen M; Velthuizen, Mary E; Bernstein, Inge; Capellá Munar, Gabriel; Gomez Garcia, Encarna; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Letteboer, Tom G W; Menko, Fred H; Lindblom, Annika; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Moller, Pal; van Os, Theo A; Rahner, Nils; Redeker, Bert J W; Sijmons, Rolf H; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Suerink, Manon; Vos, Yvonne J; Wagner, Anja; Hes, Frederik J; Vasen, Hans F; Nielsen, Maartje; Wijnen, Juul T

    2015-02-01

    The clinical consequences of PMS2 germline mutations are poorly understood compared with other Lynch-associated mismatch repair gene (MMR) mutations. The aim of this European cohort study was to define the cancer risk faced by PMS2 mutation carriers. Data were collected from 98 PMS2 families ascertained from family cancer clinics that included a total of 2,548 family members and 377 proven mutation carriers. To adjust for potential ascertainment bias, a modified segregation analysis model was used to calculate colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC) risks. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated to estimate risks for other Lynch syndrome-associated cancers. The cumulative risk (CR) of CRC for male mutation carriers by age 70 years was 19%. The CR among female carriers was 11% for CRC and 12% for EC. The mean age of CRC development was 52 years, and there was a significant difference in mean age of CRC between the probands (mean, 47 years; range, 26 to 68 years) and other family members with a PMS2 mutation (mean, 58 years; range, 31 to 86 years; P PMS2 mutation, and it should be noted that we observed a substantial variation in cancer phenotype within and between families, suggesting the influence of genetic modifiers and lifestyle factors on cancer risks. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  17. [Management and Nursing care for a patient with Lynch syndrome: A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Pérez, Luis Arturo; Guevara Valtier, Milton Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of death from cancer worldwide. Main interventions to reduce the impact are aimed to enhance prevention and early detection. Results of several studies show that tests such as the fecal occult blood test and colonoscopy are effective for early diagnosis. There are hereditary syndromes such as Lynch Syndrome that can lead to certain types of cancers, including bowel neoplasms, therefore early detection needs to be included as part of the treatment. In these cases, family genetic testing is recommended if the bowel cancer is diagnosed before 50 years old. A care plan including the NANDA (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association), NOC (Nursing Outcomes Classification) and NIC (Nursing Interventions Classification) was developed for a patient with suspected Lynch Syndrome. Nurses should be qualified to identify potential cases of cancer associated with this syndrome, and thus, reduce the likelihood that family members develop the disease, through genetic counseling and education of environmental risk factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Predicting the impact of Lynch syndrome-causing missense mutations from structural calculations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie V Nielsen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurate methods to assess the pathogenicity of mutations are needed to fully leverage the possibilities of genome sequencing in diagnosis. Current data-driven and bioinformatics approaches are, however, limited by the large number of new variations found in each newly sequenced genome, and often do not provide direct mechanistic insight. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that saturation mutagenesis, biophysical modeling and co-variation analysis, performed in silico, can predict the abundance, metabolic stability, and function of proteins inside living cells. As a model system, we selected the human mismatch repair protein, MSH2, where missense variants are known to cause the hereditary cancer predisposition disease, known as Lynch syndrome. We show that the majority of disease-causing MSH2 mutations give rise to folding defects and proteasome-dependent degradation rather than inherent loss of function, and accordingly our in silico modeling data accurately identifies disease-causing mutations and outperforms the traditionally used genetic disease predictors. Thus, in conclusion, in silico biophysical modeling should be considered for making genotype-phenotype predictions and for diagnosis of Lynch syndrome, and perhaps other hereditary diseases.

  19. Comparison of extended colectomy and limited resection in patients with Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Nagendra; Watson, Patrice; Silva-Lopez, Edibaldo; Lynch, Henry T

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the advantages and disadvantages of prophylactic/extended colectomy (subtotal colectomy) in patients with Lynch syndrome who manifest colorectal cancer. A retrospective cohort using Creighton University's hereditary cancer database was used to identify cases and controls. Cases are patients who underwent subtotal colectomy, either with no colorectal cancer diagnosis (prophylactic) or at diagnosis of first colorectal cancer; controls for these 2 types of cases were, respectively, patients who underwent no colon surgery or those having limited resection at time of diagnosis of first colorectal cancer. The Kaplan-Meier and proportional hazard regression models from the Statistical Analysis Software program was used to calculate the difference in survival, time to subsequent colorectal cancer, and subsequent abdominal surgery between cases and controls. The event-free survival of our study did not reach 50%, so we used the event-free survival at 5 years as our parameter to compare the 2 groups. The event-free survival for subsequent colorectal cancer, subsequent abdominal surgery, and death was 94%, 84%, and 93%, respectively, for cases and 74%, 63%, and 88%, respectively, for controls. Times to subsequent colorectal cancer and subsequent abdominal surgery were significantly shorter in the control group (P Lynch syndrome.

  20. Screening adherence and cancer risk perceptions in colorectal cancer survivors with Lynch-like syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, L H; Burton-Chase, A M; Advani, S; Fellman, B; Polivka, K M; Yuan, Y; Lynch, P M; Peterson, S K

    2016-03-01

    Cancer screening recommendations for patients with Lynch-like syndrome (LLS) are not well defined. We evaluated adherence to Lynch syndrome (LS) screening recommendations, cancer risk perceptions, and communication within the families among colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors with LLS. Thirty-four participants with LLS completed a questionnaire about risk perception, adherence to LS screening recommendations, and communication with relatives. Clinical data were obtained from medical records. Most participants (76%) believed they should undergo colonoscopy every 1-2 years. Only 41% correctly interpreted their genetic tests as uninformative negative or as variant of unknown significance for LS. Less than half had had an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for screening purpose. Among female participants, 86% had been screened for endometrial cancer (EC) and 71% for ovarian cancer. Most participants had informed relatives about the CRC diagnosis and advised them to undergo CRC screening, but only 50% advised female relatives to be screened for EC and only one-third advised relatives to have genetic counseling. Most CRC survivors with LLS follow the same cancer screening recommended for LS patients but do not understand the meaning of LLS. Greater care must be devoted to communicating the implications of nondiagnostic germline mutation testing among patients with LLS. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Comprehensive population-wide analysis of Lynch syndrome in Iceland reveals founder mutations in MSH6 and PMS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraldsdottir, Sigurdis; Rafnar, Thorunn; Frankel, Wendy L.; Einarsdottir, Sylvia; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Hampel, Heather; Snaebjornsson, Petur; Masson, Gisli; Weng, Daniel; Arngrimsson, Reynir; Kehr, Birte; Yilmaz, Ahmet; Haraldsson, Stefan; Sulem, Patrick; Stefansson, Tryggvi; Shields, Peter G.; Sigurdsson, Fridbjorn; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Moller, Pall H.; Steinarsdottir, Margret; Alexiusdottir, Kristin; Hitchins, Megan; Pritchard, Colin C.; de la Chapelle, Albert; Jonasson, Jon G.; Goldberg, Richard M.; Stefansson, Kari

    2017-01-01

    Lynch syndrome, caused by germline mutations in the mismatch repair genes, is associated with increased cancer risk. Here using a large whole-genome sequencing data bank, cancer registry and colorectal tumour bank we determine the prevalence of Lynch syndrome, associated cancer risks and pathogenicity of several variants in the Icelandic population. We use colorectal cancer samples from 1,182 patients diagnosed between 2000–2009. One-hundred and thirty-two (11.2%) tumours are mismatch repair deficient per immunohistochemistry. Twenty-one (1.8%) have Lynch syndrome while 106 (9.0%) have somatic hypermethylation or mutations in the mismatch repair genes. The population prevalence of Lynch syndrome is 0.442%. We discover a translocation disrupting MLH1 and three mutations in MSH6 and PMS2 that increase endometrial, colorectal, brain and ovarian cancer risk. We find thirteen mismatch repair variants of uncertain significance that are not associated with cancer risk. We find that founder mutations in MSH6 and PMS2 prevail in Iceland unlike most other populations. PMID:28466842

  2. Lynch syndrome-associated extracolonic tumors are rare in two extended families with the same EPCAM deletion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lynch, H.T.; Riegert-Johnson, D.L.; Snyder, C.; Lynch, J.F.; Hagenkord, J.; Boland, C.R.; Rhees, J.; Thibodeau, S.N.; Boardman, L.A.; Davies, J.; Kuiper, R.P.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The Lynch syndrome (LS) is an inherited cancer syndrome showing a preponderance of colorectal cancer (CRC) in context with endometrial cancer and several other extracolonic cancers, which is due to pathogenic mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2. Some

  3. Evaluation of current prediction models for Lynch syndrome: updating the PREMM5 model to identify PMS2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Goverde (Anne); M.C.W. Spaander (Manon); D. Nieboer (Daan); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); W.N.M. Dinjens (Winand); H.J. Dubbink (Erik Jan); C. Tops (Cmj); S.W. Ten Broeke (Sanne W.); M.J. Bruno (Marco); R.M.W. Hofstra (Robert); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); A. Wagner (Anja)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractUntil recently, no prediction models for Lynch syndrome (LS) had been validated for PMS2 mutation carriers. We aimed to evaluate MMRpredict and PREMM5 in a clinical cohort and for PMS2 mutation carriers specifically. In a retrospective, clinic-based cohort we calculated predictions for

  4. Comprehensive population-wide analysis of Lynch syndrome in Iceland reveals founder mutations in MSH6 and PMS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraldsdottir, Sigurdis; Rafnar, Thorunn; Frankel, Wendy L; Einarsdottir, Sylvia; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Hampel, Heather; Snaebjornsson, Petur; Masson, Gisli; Weng, Daniel; Arngrimsson, Reynir; Kehr, Birte; Yilmaz, Ahmet; Haraldsson, Stefan; Sulem, Patrick; Stefansson, Tryggvi; Shields, Peter G; Sigurdsson, Fridbjorn; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Moller, Pall H; Steinarsdottir, Margret; Alexiusdottir, Kristin; Hitchins, Megan; Pritchard, Colin C; de la Chapelle, Albert; Jonasson, Jon G; Goldberg, Richard M; Stefansson, Kari

    2017-05-03

    Lynch syndrome, caused by germline mutations in the mismatch repair genes, is associated with increased cancer risk. Here using a large whole-genome sequencing data bank, cancer registry and colorectal tumour bank we determine the prevalence of Lynch syndrome, associated cancer risks and pathogenicity of several variants in the Icelandic population. We use colorectal cancer samples from 1,182 patients diagnosed between 2000-2009. One-hundred and thirty-two (11.2%) tumours are mismatch repair deficient per immunohistochemistry. Twenty-one (1.8%) have Lynch syndrome while 106 (9.0%) have somatic hypermethylation or mutations in the mismatch repair genes. The population prevalence of Lynch syndrome is 0.442%. We discover a translocation disrupting MLH1 and three mutations in MSH6 and PMS2 that increase endometrial, colorectal, brain and ovarian cancer risk. We find thirteen mismatch repair variants of uncertain significance that are not associated with cancer risk. We find that founder mutations in MSH6 and PMS2 prevail in Iceland unlike most other populations.

  5. Ovarian cancer linked to lynch syndrome typically presents as early-onset, non-serous epithelial tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ketabi, Zohreh; Bartuma, Katarina; Bernstein, Inge

    2011-01-01

    . The underlying MMR gene mutations in these families affected MSH2 in 49%, MSH6 in 33% and MLH1 in 17%. Immunohistochemical loss of the corresponding MMR protein was demonstrated in 33/36 (92%) tumors analyzed. CONCLUSION: The combined data from our cohorts demonstrate that ovarian cancer associated with Lynch...

  6. Barriers and Motivators for Referral of Patients with Suspected Lynch Syndrome to Cancer Genetic Services: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yen Y.; Fitzgerald, Lisa J.

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the views of general practitioners and specialists on their referral of patients with suspected Lynch syndrome to cancer genetic services. Using a purposive maximum variation sampling strategy, we conducted semi-structured interviews face-to-face with 28 general practitioners and specialists in public or private hospitals and specialist clinics between March and August 2011. General practitioners and specialists were recruited in a major metropolitan area in Australia. Interview transcripts were reviewed by two independent researchers, and thematic analysis was performed using NVivo10 software. The main barriers and motivators identified were: (1) clinician-related (e.g., familiarity with Lynch syndrome and family history knowledge); (2) patient-related (e.g., patients’ interests and personal experience with cancer); and (3) organizational-related (e.g., access to services, guidelines and referral pathway). Referral of patients with suspected Lynch syndrome to cancer genetic services is motivated and hindered by a range of individual, interpersonal and organizational factors. In order to improve the care and quality of life of patients and family with suspected Lynch syndrome, further research is needed to develop supportive tools for clinicians. PMID:25562140

  7. A rare case of choroid plexus carcinoma that led to the diagnosis of Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Viola W; Hinduja, Sanjay; Knezevich, Stevan R; Silveira, William R; DeLozier, Celia D

    2017-07-01

    Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by a significant risk of colorectal and endometrial cancers. A variety of other epithelial cancers may be associated with this syndrome. Brian tumors are infrequent, but have been reported in series. Here, we report a case of a 34-year-old Caucasian woman with WHO grade III choroid plexus carcinoma (CPC). Comprehensive genomic profiling of the patient's resected brain tumor revealed mutations in six genes: PTEN, VHL, MSH6, NOTCH1, RB1, and TP53. Family history is significant for endometrial cancer in her mother and sister as well as colon cancer in her maternal grandfather suggestive of Lynch syndrome. Site-specific mutational analysis showed the MSH6 mutation (p.R482*) in peripheral lymphocytes. Subsequently we performed immunohistochemical staining of the tumor tissue which demonstrated widespread loss of MSH6 with intact MSH2, MLH1, and PMS2. The diagnosis of Lynch syndrome due to a mutation in MSH6 was therefore established. Our patient elected to have adjuvant radiation to the surgical bed only followed by prophylactic total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and is doing very well. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of CPC in an adult patient with a germline MSH6 mutation. We believe our data have provided molecular evidence to suggest that CPC could potentially be part of the Lynch syndrome spectrum. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Barriers and Motivators for Referral of Patients with Suspected Lynch Syndrome to Cancer Genetic Services: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen Y. Tan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the views of general practitioners and specialists on their referral of patients with suspected Lynch syndrome to cancer genetic services. Using a purposive maximum variation sampling strategy, we conducted semi-structured interviews face-to-face with 28 general practitioners and specialists in public or private hospitals and specialist clinics between March and August 2011. General practitioners and specialists were recruited in a major metropolitan area in Australia. Interview transcripts were reviewed by two independent researchers, and thematic analysis was performed using NVivo10 software. The main barriers and motivators identified were: (1 clinician-related (e.g., familiarity with Lynch syndrome and family history knowledge; (2 patient-related (e.g., patients’ interests and personal experience with cancer; and (3 organizational-related (e.g., access to services, guidelines and referral pathway. Referral of patients with suspected Lynch syndrome to cancer genetic services is motivated and hindered by a range of individual, interpersonal and organizational factors. In order to improve the care and quality of life of patients and family with suspected Lynch syndrome, further research is needed to develop supportive tools for clinicians.

  9. Berkeley Lab's Saul Perlmutter wins E.O. Lawrence Award; scientist's work on supernovae reveals accelerating Universe

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Saul Perlmutter, from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Physics Division and leader of the Supernova Cosmology Project based there, has won the DOE's 2002 E.O. Lawrence Award in the physics category (2 pages).

  10. 75 FR 8428 - The Indiana Rail Road Company-Abandonment Exemption-in Martin and Lawrence Counties, IN; CSX...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ...; Richard Wilson, on behalf of Radius Indiana; Citizens Against Rails-to-Trails; and several landowners..., Lawrence County Tourism Commission Executive Director; Gene McCracken, Lawrence County Economic Growth...

  11. Clinical problems of colorectal cancer and endometrial cancer cases with unknown cause of tumor mismatch repair deficiency (suspected Lynch syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Daniel D; Rosty, Christophe; Clendenning, Mark; Spurdle, Amanda B; Win, Aung Ko

    2014-01-01

    Carriers of a germline mutation in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes have a high risk of developing numerous different cancers, predominantly colorectal cancer and endometrial cancer (known as Lynch syndrome). MMR gene mutation carriers develop tumors with MMR deficiency identified by tumor microsatellite instability or immunohistochemical loss of MMR protein expression. Tumor MMR deficiency is used to identify individuals most likely to carry an MMR gene mutation. However, MMR deficiency can also result from somatic inactivation, most commonly methylation of the MLH1 gene promoter. As tumor MMR testing of all incident colorectal and endometrial cancers (universal screening) is becoming increasingly adopted, a growing clinical problem is emerging for individuals who have tumors that show MMR deficiency who are subsequently found not to carry an MMR gene mutation after genetic testing using the current diagnostic approaches (Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification) and who also show no evidence of MLH1 methylation. The inability to determine the underlying cause of tumor MMR deficiency in these "Lynch-like" or "suspected Lynch syndrome" cases has significant implications on the clinical management of these individuals and their relatives. When the data from published studies are combined, 59% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 55% to 64%) of colorectal cancers and 52% (95% CI: 41% to 62%) of endometrial cancers with MMR deficiency were identified as suspected Lynch syndrome. Recent studies estimated that colorectal cancer risk for relatives of suspected Lynch syndrome cases is lower than for relatives of those with MMR gene mutations, but higher than for relatives of those with tumor MMR deficiency resulting from methylation of the MLH1 gene promoter. The cause of tumor MMR deficiency in suspected Lynch syndrome cases is likely due to either unidentified germline MMR gene mutations, somatic cell mosaicism, or biallelic somatic

  12. 75 FR 62635 - Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program) Activity: Comment Request... determine patients' satisfaction with services provided by or through the Michael E. DeBakey Home Care...: Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program, VA Form 10-0476. OMB Control Number...

  13. The effectiveness of the double B-lynch suture as a modification in the treatment of intractable postpartum haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, Hanifi; Soylu Karapınar, Oya; Şahin, Eda Adeviye; Dolapçıoğlu, Kenan; Baloğlu, Ali

    2018-03-20

    A broader range of more effective compression techniques are needed in the patients who have an intractable postpartum haemorrhage due to uterine atony despite medical treatment and B-Lynch sutures. The aim of this study was to report the outcome of a series of patients with haemorrhage who were managed by double B-Lynch suture. Fourteen patients who were treated in a tertiary hospital between July 2010 and February 2015 were included in the study. The intractable haemorrhage rate was 0.35% over 5 years (14/4000 births). Bleeding was controlled in all the patients with a double B-Lynch suture. The mean age of the patients was 24 ± 3.4 years. The mean estimated blood loss was 1696 ± 272.075 mL, and the mean transfusion rate was 4.2 ± 2.5 units. Pregnancy was observed in five patients at follow up. The double B-Lynch suture seems to be an effective and reliable solution to an intractable postpartum haemorrhage resulting from uterine atony and has no unfavourable impacts on fertility. It should be considered before the use of any aggressive surgical techniques such as a hypogastric artery ligation or a hysterectomy. This the first study to investigate the effectiveness of the double B-Lynch suture, and we showed that the hysterectomy and/or hypogastric artery ligation rate can be decreased by adding a second B-Lynch suture in cases where the medical treatment or a single B-Lynch has failed. Impact statement What is already known on the subject? Uterine atony is the most common cause of a primary postpartum haemorrhage. When a simple massage of the uterus and medication failed to manage this condition, various surgical solutions have been sought, including uterine compression sutures, uterine artery ligation, devascularisation of the uterus, internal iliac artery ligation and, ultimately, a hysterectomy. The B-Lynch suturing technique is particularly useful because of its simplicity of application, life-saving potential, relative safety and capacity

  14. Genetic variants in the cell cycle control pathways contribute to early onset colorectal cancer in Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinyun; Etzel, Carol J; Amos, Christopher I; Zhang, Qing; Viscofsky, Nancy; Lindor, Noralane M; Lynch, Patrick M; Frazier, Marsha L

    2009-11-01

    Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome of familial malignancies resulting from germ line mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Our goal was to take a pathway-based approach to investigate the influence of polymorphisms in cell cycle-related genes on age of onset for Lynch syndrome using a tree model. We evaluated polymorphisms in a panel of cell cycle-related genes (AURKA, CDKN2A, TP53, E2F2, CCND1, TP73, MDM2, IGF1, and CDKN2B) in 220 MMR gene mutation carriers from 129 families. We applied a novel statistical approach, tree modeling (Classification and Regression Tree), to the analysis of data on patients with Lynch syndrome to identify individuals with a higher probability of developing colorectal cancer at an early age and explore the gene-gene interactions between polymorphisms in cell cycle genes. We found that the subgroup with CDKN2A C580T wild-type genotype, IGF1 CA-repeats >or=19, E2F2 variant genotype, AURKA wild-type genotype, and CCND1 variant genotype had the youngest age of onset, with a 45-year median onset age, while the subgroup with CDKN2A C580T wild-type genotype, IGF1 CA-repeats >or=19, E2F2 wild-type genotype, and AURKA variant genotype had the latest median age of onset, which was 70 years. Furthermore, we found evidence of a possible gene-gene interaction between E2F2 and AURKA genes related to CRC age of onset. Polymorphisms in these cell cycle-related genes work together to modify the age at the onset of CRC in patients with Lynch syndrome. These studies provide an important part of the foundation for development of a model for stratifying age of onset risk among those with Lynch syndrome.

  15. Patient-reported disease knowledge and educational needs in Lynch syndrome: findings of an interactive multidisciplinary patient conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannon, Sarah A; Mork, Maureen; Vilar, Eduardo; Peterson, Susan K; Lu, Karen; Lynch, Patrick M; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; You, Yiqian Nancy

    2014-02-05

    Patients with Lynch Syndrome, the most common hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome, benefit from genetic education and family counseling regarding diagnostic testing and cancer surveillance/prevention recommendations. Although genetic counseling is currently the most common venue where such education and counseling takes place, little is known about the level of disease knowledge and education needs as directly reported by patients and families with Lynch Syndrome. Furthermore, experiences with forums for larger-scale knowledge transfer have been limited in the current literature. We conducted a one-day interactive multidisciplinary patient conference, designed to complement individual genetic counseling for updating disease knowledge, supportive networking and needs assessment among Lynch Syndrome patients and their family members. The patient conference was designed utilizing the conceptual framework of action research. Paired pre- and post-conference surveys were administered to 44 conference participants anonymously to assess patient-reported disease knowledge and education needs. A multidisciplinary team of expert providers utilized a variety of educational formats during the one-day conference. Four main focus areas were: genetic testing, surveillance/prevention, living with Lynch Syndrome, and update on research. Thirty-two participants (73%) completed the pre-conference, and 28 (64%) participants completed the post-conference surveys. Nineteen respondents were affected and the remaining were unaffected. The scores of the disease-knowledge items significantly increased from 84% pre- to 92% post-conference (p = 0.012). Patients reported a high level of satisfaction and identified further knowledge needs in nutrition (71%), surveillance/prevention options (71%), support groups (36%), cancer risk assessment (32%), active role in medical care (32%), and research opportunities (5%). Our experience with a dedicated patient education conference focused on

  16. 78 FR 71037 - St. Lawrence & Atlantic Railroad Company-Discontinuance of Service Exemption-in Cumberland County...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board [Docket No. AB 1117X] St. Lawrence..., 2013, St. Lawrence & Atlantic Railroad Company (SLR) filed with the Surface Transportation Board (Board..., FD 35440 (STB served Dec. 29, 2010); Maine--Acquisition Exemption--Certain Assets of St. Lawrence...

  17. Tiger Team assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Washington, DC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-02-01

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) conducted from January 14 through February 15, 1991. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of environment, safety, and health (ES H) programs at LBL. The Tiger Team concluded that curtailment of cessation of any operations at LBL is not warranted. However, the number and breadth of findings and concerns from this assessment reflect a serious condition at this site. In spite of its late start, LBL has recently made progress in increasing ES H awareness at all staff levels and in identifying ES H deficiencies. Corrective action plans are inadequate, however, many compensatory actions are underway. Also, LBL does not have the technical expertise or training programs nor the tracking and followup to effectively direct and control sitewide guidance and oversight by DOE of ES H activities at LBL. As a result of these deficiencies, the Tiger Team has reservations about LBL's ability to implement effective actions in a timely manner and, thereby, achieve excellence in their ES H program. 4 figs., 24 tabs.

  18. Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Nuclear Test Effects and Geologic Data Bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, N.W.

    1976-01-01

    Data on the geology of the USERDA Nevada Test Site have been collected for the purpose of evaluating the possibility of release of radioactivity at proposed underground nuclear test sites. These data, including both the rock physical properties and the geologic structure and stratigraphy of a large number of drill-hole sites, are stored in the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Earth Sciences Division Nuclear Test Effects and Geologic Data Bank. Retrieval programs can quickly provide a geological and geophysical comparison of a particular site with other sites where radioactivity was successfully contained. The data can be automatically sorted, compared, and averaged, and information listed according to site location, drill-hole construction, rock units, depth to key horizons and to the water table, and distance to faults. These programs also make possible ordered listings of geophysical properties (interval bulk density, overburden density, interval velocity, velocity to the surface, grain density, water content, carbonate content, porosity, and saturation of the rocks). The characteristics and capabilities of the data bank are discussed

  19. Tiger Team assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Washington, DC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) conducted from January 14 through February 15, 1991. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of environment, safety, and health (ES ampersand H) programs at LBL. The Tiger Team concluded that curtailment of cessation of any operations at LBL is not warranted. However, the number and breadth of findings and concerns from this assessment reflect a serious condition at this site. In spite of its late start, LBL has recently made progress in increasing ES ampersand H awareness at all staff levels and in identifying ES ampersand H deficiencies. Corrective action plans are inadequate, however, many compensatory actions are underway. Also, LBL does not have the technical expertise or training programs nor the tracking and followup to effectively direct and control sitewide guidance and oversight by DOE of ES ampersand H activities at LBL. As a result of these deficiencies, the Tiger Team has reservations about LBL's ability to implement effective actions in a timely manner and, thereby, achieve excellence in their ES ampersand H program. 4 figs., 24 tabs

  20. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Working Reference Material Production Pla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Amy; Thronas, Denise; Marshall, Robert

    1998-11-04

    This Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Working Reference Material Production Plan was written for LLNL by the Los Alamos National Laboratory to address key elements of producing seven Pu-diatomaceous earth NDA Working Reference Materials (WRMS). These WRMS contain low burnup Pu ranging in mass from 0.1 grams to 68 grams. The composite Pu mass of the seven WRMS was designed to approximate the maximum TRU allowable loading of 200 grams Pu. This document serves two purposes: first, it defines all the operations required to meet the LLNL Statement of Work quality objectives, and second, it provides a record of the production and certification of the WRMS. Guidance provided in ASTM Standard Guide C1128-89 was used to ensure that this Plan addressed all the required elements for producing and certifying Working Reference Materials. The Production Plan was written to provide a general description of the processes, steps, files, quality control, and certification measures that were taken to produce the WRMS. The Plan identifies the files where detailed procedures, data, quality control, and certification documentation and forms are retained. The Production Plan is organized into three parts: a) an initial section describing the preparation and characterization of the Pu02 and diatomaceous earth materials, b) middle sections describing the loading, encapsulation, and measurement on the encapsulated WRMS, and c) final sections describing the calculations of the Pu, Am, and alpha activity for the WRMS and the uncertainties associated with these quantities.

  1. Comparison of St. Lawrence blue whale vocalizations with field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchok, Catherine; Bradley, David; Gabrielson, Thomas; Sears, Richard

    2003-04-01

    During four field seasons from 1998-2001, vocalizations were recorded in the presence of St. Lawrence blue whales using a single omni-directional hydrophone. Both long duration infrasonic calls (~18 Hz, 5-20 s) as well as short duration higher frequency calls (85-25 Hz, ~2 s) were detected and compared with field observations. Two trends were noted. First, the long infrasonic call series were concentrated primarily in the deep (300 m) channel. These call series appear to compare well with blue whale vocalizations recorded by others in the deep open ocean. Second, the shorter audible calls were more evenly distributed over bathymetry and seem to be a form of short distance communication with at least one case occurring during an agonistic interaction. A comparison of these calls with biological parameters such as density of whales in the area, percentages of paired versus single whales, and numbers of males versus females will also be discussed. [Project supported by ARL/PSU, NSF, and the American Museum of Natural History.

  2. STS-114 Crew Interviews: 1. Eileen Collins 2. Wendy Lawrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    1) STS-114 Commander Eileen Collins emphasized her love for teaching, respect for teachers, and her plan to go back to teaching again someday. Her solid background in Math and Science, focus on her interests, with great support from her family, and great training and support during her career with the Air Force gave her confidence in pursuing her dream to become an astronaut. Commander Collins shares her thoughts on the Columbia, details the various flight operations and crew tasks that will take place during the mission and the importance of Shuttle missions to the International Space Station and space exploration. 2) STS-114 Mission Specialist Wendy Lawrence first dreamed of becoming an astronaut when she watched Neil Armstrong walk on the moon from their black and white TV set. She majored in Engineering and became a Navy pilot. She shares her thoughts on the Columbia, details her major role as the crew in charge of all the transfer operations; getting the MPLM unpacked and repacked; and the importance of Shuttle missions to the International Space Station and space exploration.

  3. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-12-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the Department of Energy (DOE) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), conducted December 1 through 19, 1986. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with LLNL. The Survey covers all environmental media all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at LLNL, and interviews with site personnel. A Sampling and Analysis Plan was developed to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during performance of on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the LLNL Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the LLNL Survey. 70 refs., 58 figs., 52 tabs.,

  4. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, L.D.

    1978-03-01

    The data obtained from the Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for the Calendar year 1977 are described and general trends are discussed. The general trend of decreasing radiation levels at our site boundary due to accelerator operation during past years has leveled off during 1977 and in some areas shows a slight but not statistically significant increase as predicted in last year's summary. There were changes in both ion beams as well as current which have resulted in shifts in maxima at the monitoring stations. The gamma levels are once again reported as zero. There is only one period of detectable gamma radiation due to accelerator operation. The annual dose equivalent are reported from the environmental monitoring stations since they have been established. Radiation levels at the Olympus Gate Station have shown a steady decline since 1959 when estimates were first made. The Olympus Gate Station is in direct view of the Bevatron and most directly influenced by that accelerator. Over the past several years the atmospheric sampling program has, with the exception of occasional known releases, yielded data which are within the range of normal background. The surface water program always yields results within the range of normal background. As no substantial changes in the quantities of radionuclides used are anticipated, no changes are expected in these observations

  5. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the preliminary findings made during the Environmental Survey, February 22--29, 1988, at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) in Berkeley, California. The University of California operates the LBL facility for DOE. The LBL Survey is part of the larger DOE-wide Environmental Survey announced by Secretary John S. Herrington on September 18, 1985. The purpose of this effort is to identify, via ''no fault'' baseline Surveys, existing environmental problems and areas of environmental risk at DOE facilities, and to rank them on a DOE wide basis. This ranking will enable DOE to more effectively establish priorities for addressing environmental problems and allocate the resources necessary to correct them. Because the Survey is ''no fault'' and is not an ''audit,'' it is not designed to identify specific isolated incidents of noncompliance or to analyze environmental management practices. Such incidents and/or management practices will, however, be used in the Survey as a means of identifying existing and potential environmental problems. The LBL Survey was conducted by a multidisciplinary team of technical specialists headed and managed by a Team Leader and Assistant Team Leader from DOE's Office of Environmental Audit. A complete list of the LBL Survey participants and their affiliations is provided in Appendix A. 80 refs., 27 figs., 37 tabs

  6. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory environmental report for 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sims, J.M.; Surano, K.A.; Lamson, K.C.; Balke, B.K.; Steenhoven, J.C.; Schwoegler, D.R. (eds.)

    1990-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1990. To evaluate the effect of LLNL operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent surface water, groundwater, vegetation, and foodstuff were made at both the Livermore site and at Site 300 nearly. LLNL's compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions to the environment was evaluated. Aside from an August 13 observation of silver concentrations slightly above guidelines for discharges to the sanitary sewer, all the monitoring data demonstrated LLNL compliance with environmental laws and regulations governing emission and discharge of materials to the environment. In addition, the monitoring data demonstrated that the environmental impacts of LLNL are minimal and pose no threat to the public to or to the environment. 114 refs., 46 figs., 79 tabs.

  7. LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) research on cold fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomassen, K I; Holzrichter, J F [eds.

    1989-09-14

    With the appearance of reports on Cold Fusion,'' scientists at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) began a series of increasingly sophisticated experiments and calculations to explain these phenomena. These experiments can be categorized as follows: (a) simple experiments to replicate the Utah results, (b) more sophisticated experiments to place lower bounds on the generation of heat and production of nuclear products, (c) a collaboration with Texas A M University to analyze electrodes and electrolytes for fusion by-products in a cell producing 10% excess heat (we found no by-products), and (d) attempts to replicate the Frascati experiment that first found neutron bursts when high-pressure deuterium gas in a cylinder with Ti chips was temperature-cycled. We failed in categories (a) and (b) to replicate either the Pons/Fleischmann or the Jones phenomena. We have seen phenomena similar to the Frascati results, (d) but these low-level burst signals may not be coming from neutrons generated in the Ti chips. Summaries of our experiments are described in Section II, as is a theoretical effort based on cosmic ray muons to describe low-level neutron production. Details of the experimental groups' work are contained in the six appendices. At LLNL, independent teams were spontaneously formed in response to the early announcements on cold fusion. This report's format follows this organization.

  8. Protection planning and risk management at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, J.S.; Altman, W.D.; Hockert, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Effective safeguards and security management begins with comprehensive strategic planning that synthesizes protection objectives, threat information, existing protection capabilities, consequences of protection failure, and the costs and impacts of safeguards changes into cost effective protection strategies that adequately address credible threats. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed a structured risk management approach to safeguards and security planning that is designed to lead to protection strategies that are cost effective, meet the intent of Department of Energy (DOE) orders, balance protection needs with programmatic priorities, and acknowledge a level of residual risks that is not cost effective to eliminate. This risk management approach to safeguards decision making was used to develop the first DOE-approved Master Safeguards and Security Agreement (MSSA) that addresses all security interests at a major facility including: special nuclear material, classified information and materials, computer and communication security, and other DOE property. This risk management approach also provides the strategic basis for day-to-day management of the LLNL security program as well as the integration of safeguards program upgrades

  9. Reuse of waste cutting sand at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, S.; Wilson, K.

    1998-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) examined the waste stream from a water jet cutting operation, to evaluate the possible reuse of waste garnet sand. The sand is a cutting agent used to shape a variety of materials, including metals. Nearly 70,000 pounds of waste sand is generated annually by the cutting operation. The Environmental Protection Department evaluated two potential reuses for the spent garnet sand: backfill in utility trenches; and as a concrete constituent. In both applications, garnet waste would replace the sand formerly purchased by LLNL for these purposes. Findings supported the reuse of waste garnet sand in concrete, but disqualified its proposed application as trench backfill. Waste sand stabilized in a concrete matrix appeared to present no metals-leaching hazard; however, unconsolidated sand in trenches could potentially leach metals in concentrations high enough to threaten ground water quality. A technical report submitted to the San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board was reviewed and accepted by that body. Reuse of waste garnet cutting sand as a constituent in concrete poured to form walkways and patios at LLNL was approved

  10. BUDAYA LONGKO' TORAJA DALAM PERSPEKTIF ETIKA LAWRENCE KOHLBERG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diks Sasmanto Pasande

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This research studies one of the local wisdoms in Toraja society which is longko' or culture of shame. This culture contains values of religious ethics and communal spirit to maintain self-esteem and vigilance in order to be not humiliated/ shamed (kalongkoran. The longko' of Toraja is observed from the ethics perspective of Lawrence Kohlberg to analyze ethical values of the culture. The result of this research indicates that, according to the Kohlberg's theory of moral development stages, Toraja society tends to be at the conventional level and the third stages which is characterized by a social morality where the union with familiar groups becomes the highest value. It is in accordance with communal ties which are very strong in the Toraja society and known as tongkonan. The longko', as an internalization result of understanding varieties which is held steadfastly by the Toraja society, contains not only values of honor, self esteem and shame, but also other positive values such as work ethos and spirit. Kamalamburan (honesty and karapasan (harmony and peace are the main values of Toraja society. The Longko' is quite relevant, especially in relation to the national efforts to solve the problem of corruption through the cultural approach.

  11. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the preliminary findings made during the Environmental Survey, February 22--29, 1988, at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) in Berkeley, California. The University of California operates the LBL facility for DOE. The LBL Survey is part of the larger DOE-wide Environmental Survey announced by Secretary John S. Herrington on September 18, 1985. The purpose of this effort is to identify, via no fault'' baseline Surveys, existing environmental problems and areas of environmental risk at DOE facilities, and to rank them on a DOE wide basis. This ranking will enable DOE to more effectively establish priorities for addressing environmental problems and allocate the resources necessary to correct them. Because the Survey is no fault'' and is not an audit,'' it is not designed to identify specific isolated incidents of noncompliance or to analyze environmental management practices. Such incidents and/or management practices will, however, be used in the Survey as a means of identifying existing and potential environmental problems. The LBL Survey was conducted by a multidisciplinary team of technical specialists headed and managed by a Team Leader and Assistant Team Leader from DOE's Office of Environmental Audit. A complete list of the LBL Survey participants and their affiliations is provided in Appendix A. 80 refs., 27 figs., 37 tabs.

  12. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1997 Site Environmental Report Vol. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorson, Patrick

    1998-01-01

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy Order 231.1. The Site Environmental Report for 1997 is intended to summarize Berkeley Lab's compliance with environmental standards and requirements, characterize environmental management efforts through surveillance and monitoring activities, and highlight significant programs and efforts for calendar year 1997. This report is structured into three basic areas that cover a general overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and the results of the surveillance and monitoring activities, including air quality, surface water, groundwater, sanitary sewer, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuffs, radiation dose assessment, and quality assurance. The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains the body of the report, a list of references, a list of acronyms and abbreviations, a glossary, Appendix A (NESHAPS annual report), and Appendix B (distribution list for volume I). Volume II contains Appendix C, the individual data results from monitoring programs. Each chapter in volume I begins with an outline of the sections that follow

  13. Earthquake safety program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeland, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Within three minutes on the morning of January 24, 1980, an earthquake and three aftershocks, with Richter magnitudes of 5.8, 5.1, 4.0, and 4.2, respectively, struck the Livermore Valley. Two days later, a Richter magnitude 5.4 earthquake occurred, which had its epicenter about 4 miles northwest of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Although no one at the Lab was seriously injured, these earthquakes caused considerable damage and disruption. Masonry and concrete structures cracked and broke, trailers shifted and fell off their pedestals, office ceilings and overhead lighting fell, and bookcases overturned. The Laboratory was suddenly immersed in a site-wide program of repairing earthquake-damaged facilities, and protecting our many employees and the surrounding community from future earthquakes. Over the past five years, LLNL has spent approximately $10 million on its earthquake restoration effort for repairs and upgrades. The discussion in this paper centers upon the earthquake damage that occurred, the clean-up and restoration efforts, the seismic review of LLNL facilities, our site-specific seismic design criteria, computer-floor upgrades, ceiling-system upgrades, unique building seismic upgrades, geologic and seismologic studies, and seismic instrumentation. 10 references

  14. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 2015 Annual Financial Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Kim, P

    2017-08-11

    FY2015 financial results reflect a year of significant scientific, operational and financial achievement for Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Complementing many scientific accomplishments, Berkeley Lab completed construction of four new research facilities: the General Purpose Laboratory, Chu Hall, Wang Hall and the Flexlab Building Efficiency Testbed. These state-of-the-art facilities allow for program growth and enhanced collaboration, in part by enabling programs to return to the Lab’s Hill Campus from offsite locations. Detailed planning began for the new Integrative Genomics Building (IGB) that will house another major program currently located offsite. Existing site infrastructure was another key focus area. The Lab prioritized and increased investments in deferred maintenance in alignment with the Berkeley Lab Infrastructure Plan, which was developed under the leadership of the DOE Office of Science. With the expiration of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds, we completed the close-out of all of our 134 ARRA projects, recording total costs of $331M over the FY2009-2015 period. Download the report to read more.

  15. Beyond Lawrence v. Texas: crafting a fundamental right to sexual privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasullo, Kristin

    2009-05-01

    After the watershed 2003 U.S. Supreme Court decision Lawrence v.Texas, courts are faced with the daunting task of navigating the bounds of sexual privacy in light of Lawrence's sweeping language and unconventional structure. This Note focuses on the specific issue of state governments regulating sexual device distribution. Evaluating the substantive due process rights of sexual device retailers and users, this Note ultimately argues that the privacy interest identified in Lawrence is sufficiently broad to protect intimate decisions to engage in adult consensual sexual behavior, including the liberty to sell, purchase, and use a sexual device.

  16. Theory and practice in action: the contributions of Michael Perkins to clinical linguistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damico, Jack S; Lynch, Karen E

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the scholarly contributions of Michael R. Perkins in the discipline of clinical linguistics and provides some indication of the reasons that he has been so successful. Three primary attributes were described through an analysis of his publications.

  17. Tõsine fotoelamus Dubrovnikus / Wade Goddard, Heidi Levine, Michael Robinson Chaver ; interv. Ahto Külvet

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Goddard, Wade

    2007-01-01

    Dubrovniku vanalinnas asub Sõjafotokeskus. Intervjuu keskuse asutaja, kanadalasest fotograafi Wade Goddardi ja kahe seal augustis avatud näitusel osalenud fotograafi Heidi Levine'i ja Michael Robinson Chavez'iga. Sõjafotograafi tööst

  18. Joseph and Michael Haydn in the Bohemian music archives. An anniversary tribute

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Freemanová, Michaela

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 1 (2012), s. 117-126. ISBN 978-3-486-58949-8. ISSN 1865-5696 Institutional support: RVO:68378076 Keywords : Joseph Haydn * Michael Haydn * music archives Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage

  19. Chiral Aminophosphines as Catalysts for Enantioselective Double-Michael Indoline Syntheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohyun Kwon

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The bisphosphine-catalyzed double-Michael addition of dinucleophiles to electron-deficient acetylenes is an efficient process for the synthesis of many nitrogen-containing heterocycles. Because the resulting heterocycles contain at least one stereogenic center, this double-Michael reaction would be even more useful if an asymmetric variant of the reaction were to be developed. Aminophosphines can also facilitate the double-Michael reaction and chiral amines are more readily available in Nature and synthetically; therefore, in this study we prepared several new chiral aminophosphines. When employed in the asymmetric double-Michael reaction between ortho-tosylamidophenyl malonate and 3-butyn-2-one, the chiral aminophosphines produced indolines in excellent yields with moderate asymmetric induction.

  20. Arenethiolatecopper(I) complexes as homogeneous catalysts for Michael addition reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koten, G. van; Klaveren, M. van; Lambert, F.; Eijkelkamp, D.J.F.M.; Grove, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    Arenethiolatocopper(I) complexes are shown to be efficient homogeneous catalysts in Michael addition reactions of several Grignard reagents to acyclic enones; the addition products are formed with excellent chemoselectivity (>99%) and good enantioselectivity (76% e.e.).

  1. Hexafluorobenzene: A powerful solvent for a noncovalent stereoselective organocatalytic Michael addition reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Lattanzi, Alessandra; De Fusco, Claudia; Russo, Alessio; Poater, Albert; Cavallo, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    A dramatic enhancement of the diastereo- and enantioselectivity in the nitro-Michael addition reaction organocatalysed by a commercially available α,α-l-diaryl prolinol was disclosed when performing the reaction in unconventional hexafluorobenzene

  2. Eesti disain on kõva, ent see tuleb moondada ekspordiks / Michael Thomson ; interv. Urmas Oja

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Thomson, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Euroopa Disainiassotsiatsioonide Liidu presidendi ja Tallinnas toimunud festivali Disainiöö Eesti disainiauhinna Bruno žürii juhi Michael Thomsoni arvamus eesti disainist ning disainipoliitika vajalikkusest Eestis. Auhinnasaajate nimekiri

  3. Reports of the working groups / Eino Tamm, Sahlin Michael, Valve Kirsipuu...[jt.

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1999-01-01

    Töögruppide "EU enlargement and relevant institutional reforms" (juhatajad Eino Tamm, Michael Sahlin) ja "Maintaining of competitiveness of Estonia and other candidate countries" (juhatajad Valve Kirsipuu, Terry Calbom) tööst. Autor: Reformierakond

  4. Michael Bloomberg ähvardab USA valimised "ära rikkuda" / Heiki Suurkask

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Suurkask, Heiki, 1972-

    2008-01-01

    New Yorgi praegune linnapea Michael Bloomberg võib kolmanda kandidaadina sekkuda presidendikandidaatide valimiskampaaniasse, probleem on aga tema vähene tuntus. Lisa: Seni on riigipeakoha jaganud kaks suurparteid

  5. Prints Charles ja prints Michael külastasid Tallinna kirikuid / Allan Tammiku

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tammiku, Allan

    2001-01-01

    Prints Charles külastas 6. novembril Eesti-visiidi ajal Tallinna toomkirikut ja Pühavaimu kirikut, prints Michael viibis Tallinnas 11. novembril eravisiidil, ta külastas toomkirikut, Niguliste ja Pühavaimu kirikut

  6. Mutation spectrum and risk of colorectal cancer in African American families with Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guindalini, Rodrigo Santa Cruz; Win, Aung Ko; Gulden, Cassandra; Lindor, Noralane M; Newcomb, Polly A; Haile, Robert W; Raymond, Victoria; Stoffel, Elena; Hall, Michael; Llor, Xavier; Ukaegbu, Chinedu I; Solomon, Ilana; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Kalady, Matthew; Blanco, Amie; Terdiman, Jonathan; Shuttlesworth, Gladis A; Lynch, Patrick M; Hampel, Heather; Lynch, Henry T; Jenkins, Mark A; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Kupfer, Sonia S

    2015-11-01

    African Americans (AAs) have the highest incidence of and mortality resulting from colorectal cancer (CRC) in the United States. Few data are available on genetic and nongenetic risk factors for CRC among AAs. Little is known about cancer risks and mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes in AAs with the most common inherited CRC condition, Lynch syndrome. We aimed to characterize phenotype, mutation spectrum, and risk of CRC in AAs with Lynch syndrome. We performed a retrospective study of AAs with mutations in MMR genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2) using databases from 13 US referral centers. We analyzed data on personal and family histories of cancer. Modified segregation analysis conditioned on ascertainment criteria was used to estimate age- and sex-specific CRC cumulative risk, studying members of the mutation-carrying families. We identified 51 AA families with deleterious mutations that disrupt function of the MMR gene product: 31 in MLH1 (61%), 11 in MSH2 (21%), 3 in MSH6 (6%), and 6 in PMS2 (12%); 8 mutations were detected in more than 1 individual, and 11 have not been previously reported. In the 920 members of the 51 families with deleterious mutations, the cumulative risks of CRC at 80 years of age were estimated to be 36.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 10.5%-83.9%) for men and 29.7% (95% CI, 8.31%-76.1%) for women. CRC risk was significantly higher among individuals with mutations in MLH1 or MSH2 (hazard ratio, 13.9; 95% CI, 3.44-56.5). We estimate the cumulative risk for CRC in AAs with MMR gene mutations to be similar to that of individuals of European descent with Lynch syndrome. Two-thirds of mutations were found in MLH1, some of which were found in multiple individuals and some that have not been previously reported. Differences in mutation spectrum are likely to reflect the genetic diversity of this population. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of aspirin or resistant starch on colorectal neoplasia in the Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn, John; Bishop, D Timothy; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Macrae, Finlay; Möslein, Gabriela; Olschwang, Sylviane; Bisgaard, Marie-Luise; Ramesar, Raj; Eccles, Diana; Maher, Eamonn R; Bertario, Lucio; Jarvinen, Heikki J; Lindblom, Annika; Evans, D Gareth; Lubinski, Jan; Morrison, Patrick J; Ho, Judy W C; Vasen, Hans F A; Side, Lucy; Thomas, Huw J W; Scott, Rodney J; Dunlop, Malcolm; Barker, Gail; Elliott, Faye; Jass, Jeremy R; Fodde, Ricardo; Lynch, Henry T; Mathers, John C

    2008-12-11

    Observational and epidemiologic data indicate that the use of aspirin reduces the risk of colorectal neoplasia; however, the effects of aspirin in the Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer) are not known. Resistant starch has been associated with an antineoplastic effect on the colon. In a randomized, placebo-controlled trial, we used a two-by-two design to investigate the effects of aspirin, at a dose of 600 mg per day, and resistant starch (Novelose), at a dose of 30 g per day, in reducing the risk of adenoma and carcinoma among persons with the Lynch syndrome. Among 1071 persons in 43 centers, 62 were ineligible to participate in the study, 72 did not enter the study, and 191 withdrew from the study. These three categories were equally distributed across the study groups. Over a mean period of 29 months (range, 7 to 74), colonic adenoma or carcinoma developed in 141 participants. Of 693 participants randomly assigned to receive aspirin or placebo, neoplasia developed in 66 participants receiving aspirin (18.9%), as compared with 65 receiving placebo (19.0%) (relative risk, 1.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7 to 1.4). There were no significant differences between the two groups with respect to the development of advanced neoplasia (7.4% and 9.9%, respectively; P=0.33). Among the 727 participants receiving resistant starch or placebo, neoplasia developed in 67 participants receiving starch (18.7%), as compared with 68 receiving placebo (18.4%) (relative risk, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.7 to 1.4). Advanced adenomas and colorectal cancers were evenly distributed in the two groups. The prevalence of serious adverse events was low, and the events were evenly distributed. The use of aspirin, resistant starch, or both for up to 4 years has no effect on the incidence of colorectal adenoma or carcinoma among carriers of the Lynch syndrome. (Current Controlled Trials number, ISRCTN59521990.) 2008 Massachusetts Medical Society

  8. Chinese Middle Classes: Taiwan, Hong Kong, Macao and China. Edited by Hsin-Huang Michael Hsiao

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brødsgaard, Kjeld Erik

    2018-01-01

    Book review of: Chinese Middle Classes:Taiwan, Hong Kong, Macao and China. Edited by Hsin-Huang Michael Hsiao. Abingdon: Routledge, 2014. Pp. 268. ISBN 10: 1138120847; ISBN 13: 978-1138120846......Book review of: Chinese Middle Classes:Taiwan, Hong Kong, Macao and China. Edited by Hsin-Huang Michael Hsiao. Abingdon: Routledge, 2014. Pp. 268. ISBN 10: 1138120847; ISBN 13: 978-1138120846...

  9. Thyroid cancer in a patient with a germline MSH2 mutation. Case report and review of the Lynch syndrome expanding tumour spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stulp Rein P

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lynch syndrome (HNPCC is a dominantly inherited disorder characterized by germline defects in DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes and the development of a variety of cancers, predominantly colorectal and endometrial. We present a 44-year-old woman who was shown to carry the truncating MSH2 gene mutation that had previously been identified in her family. Recently, she had been diagnosed with an undifferentiated carcinoma of the thyroid and an adenoma of her coecum. Although the thyroid carcinoma was not MSI-high (1 out of 5 microsatellites instable, it did show complete loss of immunohistochemical expression for the MSH2 protein, suggesting that this tumour was not coincidental. Although the risks for some tumour types, including breast cancer, soft tissue sarcoma and prostate cancer, are not significantly increased in Lynch syndrome, MMR deficiency in the presence of a corresponding germline defect has been demonstrated in incidental cases of a growing range of tumour types, which is reviewed in this paper. Interestingly, the MSH2-associated tumour spectrum appears to be wider than that of MLH1 and generally the risk for most extra-colonic cancers appears to be higher for MSH2 than for MLH1 mutation carriers. Together with a previously reported case, our findings show that anaplastic thyroid carcinoma can develop in the setting of Lynch syndrome. Uncommon Lynch syndrome-associated tumour types might be useful in the genetic analysis of a Lynch syndrome suspected family if samples from typical Lynch syndrome tumours are unavailable.

  10. Germ-line variants identified by next generation sequencing in a panel of estrogen and cancer associated genes correlate with poor clinical outcome in Lynch syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jóri, Balazs; Kamps, Rick; Xanthoulea, Sofia; Delvoux, Bert; Blok, Marinus J; Van de Vijver, Koen K; de Koning, Bart; Oei, Felicia Trups; Tops, Carli M; Speel, Ernst Jm; Kruitwagen, Roy F; Gomez-Garcia, Encarna B; Romano, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    The risk to develop colorectal and endometrial cancers among subjects testing positive for a pathogenic Lynch syndrome mutation varies, making the risk prediction difficult. Genetic risk modifiers alter the risk conferred by inherited Lynch syndrome mutations, and their identification can improve genetic counseling. We aimed at identifying rare genetic modifiers of the risk of Lynch syndrome endometrial cancer. A family based approach was used to assess the presence of genetic risk modifiers among 35 Lynch syndrome mutation carriers having either a poor clinical phenotype (early age of endometrial cancer diagnosis or multiple cancers) or a neutral clinical phenotype. Putative genetic risk modifiers were identified by Next Generation Sequencing among a panel of 154 genes involved in endometrial physiology and carcinogenesis. A simple pipeline, based on an allele frequency lower than 0.001 and on predicted non-conservative amino-acid substitutions returned 54 variants that were considered putative risk modifiers. The presence of two or more risk modifying variants in women carrying a pathogenic Lynch syndrome mutation was associated with a poor clinical phenotype. A gene-panel is proposed that comprehends genes that can carry variants with putative modifying effects on the risk of Lynch syndrome endometrial cancer. Validation in further studies is warranted before considering the possible use of this tool in genetic counseling.

  11. Community Relations Plan for Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) has applied to the California Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC), for renewal of its Hazardous Waste Handling Facility Permit. A permit is required under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations. The permit will allow LBL to continue using its current hazardous waste handling facility, upgrade the existing facility, and construct a replacement facility. The new facility is scheduled for completion in 1995. The existing facility will be closed under RCRA guidelines by 1996. As part of the permitting process, LBL is required to investigate areas of soil and groundwater contamination at its main site in the Berkeley Hills. The investigations are being conducted by LBL`s Environmental Restoration Program and are overseen by a number of regulatory agencies. The regulatory agencies working with LBL include the California Environmental Protection Agency`s Department of Toxic Substances Control, the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, the Bay Area Air Quality Management District, the East Bay Municipal Utilities District, and the Berkeley Department of Environmental Health. RCRA requires that the public be informed of LBL`s investigations and site cleanup, and that opportunities be available for the public to participate in making decisions about how LBL will address contamination issues. LBL has prepared this Community Relations Plan (CRP) to describe activities that LBL will use to keep the community informed of environmental restoration progress and to provide for an open dialogue with the public on issues of importance. The CRP documents the community`s current concerns about LBL`s Environmental Restoration Program. Interviews conducted between February and April 1993 with elected officials, agency staff, environmental organizations, businesses, site neighbors, and LBL employees form the basis for the information contained in this document.

  12. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Codes Validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savy, J B

    2003-01-01

    Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) is a methodology that estimates the likelihood that various levels of earthquake-caused ground motion will be exceeded at a given location in a given future time-period. LLNL has been developing the methodology and codes in support of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) needs for reviews of site licensing of nuclear power plants, since 1978. A number of existing computer codes have been validated and still can lead to ranges of hazard estimates in some cases. Until now, the seismic hazard community had not agreed on any specific method for evaluation of these codes. The Earthquake Engineering Research Institute (EERI) and the Pacific Engineering Earthquake Research (PEER) center organized an exercise in testing of existing codes with the aim of developing a series of standard tests that future developers could use to evaluate and calibrate their own codes. Seven code developers participated in the exercise, on a voluntary basis. Lawrence Livermore National laboratory participated with some support from the NRC. The final product of the study will include a series of criteria for judging of the validity of the results provided by a computer code. This EERI/PEER project was first planned to be completed by June of 2003. As the group neared completion of the tests, the managing team decided that new tests were necessary. As a result, the present report documents only the work performed to this point. It demonstrates that the computer codes developed by LLNL perform all calculations correctly and as intended. Differences exist between the results of the codes tested, that are attributed to a series of assumptions, on the parameters and models, that the developers had to make. The managing team is planning a new series of tests to help in reaching a consensus on these assumptions

  13. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan, FY 1993--1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-10-01

    The FY 1993--1998 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that can influence the Laboratory, potential research trends, and several management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation's scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff composition and development programs. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory's ongoing research programs. The plan is an institutional management report for integration with the Department of Energy's strategic planning activities that is developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the National Energy Strategy and the Department of Energy's program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office for Planning and Development from information contributed by the Laboratory's scientific and support divisions.

  14. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan, FY 1993--1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chew, Joseph T.; Stroh, Suzanne C.; Maio, Linda R.; Olson, Karl R.; Grether, Donald F.; Clary, Mary M.; Smith, Brian M.; Stevens, David F.; Ross, Loren; Alper, Mark D.; Dairiki, Janis M.; Fong, Pauline L.; Bartholomew, James C.

    1992-10-01

    The FY 1993--1998 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that can influence the Laboratory, potential research trends, and several management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation`s scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff composition and development programs. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The plan is an institutional management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities that is developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the National Energy Strategy and the Department of Energy`s program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office for Planning and Development from information contributed by the Laboratory`s scientific and support divisions.

  15. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Institutional Plan FY 1994--1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. For FY 1994-1999 the Institutional Plan reflects significant revisions based on the Laboratory`s strategic planning process. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that will influence the Laboratory, as well as potential research trends and management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory, and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation`s scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff diversity and development program. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The new section on Information Resources reflects the importance of computing and communication resources to the Laboratory. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The Institutional Plan is a management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities, developed through an annual planning process.

  16. Status of the belugas of the St Lawrence estuary, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael CS Kingsley

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available A population of belugas (Delphinapterus leucas inhabiting the estuary of the St Lawrence river in Quebec, Canada, was depleted by unregulated hunting, not closed until 1979. Surveys in 1977 showed only a few hundred in the population. Surveys since then have produced increasing estimates of population indices. An estimate of the population, fully corrected for diving animals, was 1,238 (SE 119 in September 1997. The population was estimated to have increased from 1988 through 1997 by 31.4 belugas/yr (SE 13.1. Observations of population age structure, as well as data on age at death obtained from beach-cast carcasses, do not indicate serious problems at the population level, although there are indications that mortality of the oldest animals may be elevated. Few animals appear to live much over 30 years. From examination of beach-cast carcasses, it appears that most deaths are due to old age and disease; hunting is illegal, ship strikes and entrapments in fishing gear are rare, ice entrapments and predation are unknown. Among beach-cast carcasses recovered and necropsied, about 23% of the adults have malignant cancers, while most of the juveniles have pneumonia; other pathological conditions are diverse. No factors are known to be limiting numbers of this population. Habitat quality factors, including persistent contaminants, boat traffic and harassment, may affect the population’s rate of increase, but these effects have not been quantitatively evaluated. Comprehensive legislation exists with powers to protect the population and the environment of which it is a component, but application and enforcement of the laws is not without problems.

  17. Laser materials processing applications at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargrove, R.S.; Dragon, E.P.; Hackel, R.P.; Kautz, D.D.; Warner, B.E.

    1993-01-01

    High power and high radiance laser technologies developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) such as copper-vapor lasers, solid-state slab lasers, dye lasers, harmonic wavelength conversion of these lasers, and fiber optic delivery systems show great promise for material processing tasks. Evaluation of models suggests significant potential for tenfold increases in welding, cutting, and drilling performance, as well as capability for applications in emerging technologies such as micromachining, surface treatment, and stereolithography. Copper and dye laser systems are currently being developed at LLNL for uranium enrichment production facilities. The goals of this program are to develop low-cost, reliable and maintainable industrial laser systems. Chains of copper lasers currently operate at more than 1.5 kW output and achieve mean time between failures of more than 1,000 hours. The beam quality of copper vapor lasers is approximately three times the diffraction limit. Dye lasers have near diffraction limited beam quality at greater than 1.0 kW. Diode laser pumped, Nd:YAG slab lasers are also being developed at LLNL. Current designs achieve powers of greater than 1.0 kW and projected beam quality is in the two to five times diffraction limited range. Results from cutting and drilling studies in titanium and stainless steel alloys show that cuts and holes with extremely fine features can be made with dye and copper-vapor lasers. High radiance beams produce low distortion and small heat-affected zones. The authors have accomplished very high aspect ratio holes in drilling tests (> 60: 1) and features with micron scale (5-50 μm) sizes. Other, traditionally more difficult, materials such as copper, aluminum and ceramics will soon be studied in detail

  18. Topectomy versus leukotomy: J. Lawrence Pool's contribution to psychosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Ryan; Kopel, David; Carmel, Peter W; Prestigiacomo, Charles J

    2017-09-01

    Surgery of the mind has a rather checkered past. Though its history begins with the prehistoric trephination of skulls to allow "evil spirits" to escape, the early- to mid-20th century saw a surge in the popularity of psychosurgery. The 2 prevailing operations were topectomy and leukotomy for the treatment of certain mental illnesses. Although they were modified and refined by several of their main practitioners, the effectiveness of and the ethics involved with these operations remained controversial. In 1947, Dr. J. Lawrence Pool and the Columbia-Greystone Associates sought to rigorously investigate the outcomes of specific psychosurgical procedures. Pool along with R. G. Heath and John Weber believed that nonexcessive bifrontal cortical ablation could successfully treat certain mental illnesses without the undesired consequences of irreversible personality changes. They conducted this investigation at the psychiatric hospital at Greystone Park near Morristown, New Jersey. Despite several encouraging findings of the Columbia-Greystone project, psychosurgery practices began to decline significantly in the 1950s. The uncertainty of results and ethical debates related to side effects made these procedures unpopular. Further, groups such as the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and the American Civil Liberties Union condemned the use of psychosurgery, believing it to be an inhumane form of treatment. Today, there are strict guidelines that must be adhered to when evaluating a patient for psychosurgery procedures. It is imperative for the neurosurgery community to remember the history of psychosurgery to provide the best possible current treatment and to search for better future treatments for a particularly vulnerable patient population.

  19. Proposals for ORNL [Oak Ridge National Laboratory] support to Tiber LLNL [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, L.A.; Rosenthal, M.W.; Saltmarsh, M.J.; Shannon, T.E.; Sheffield, J.

    1987-01-01

    This document describes the interests and capabilities of Oak Ridge National Laboratory in their proposals to support the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) project. Five individual proposals are cataloged separately. (FI)

  20. Bayesian Modeling for Genetic Anticipation in Presence of Mutational Heterogeneity: A Case Study in Lynch Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boonstra, Philip S; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Taylor, Jeremy M G

    2011-01-01

    Summary Genetic anticipation, described by earlier age of onset (AOO) and more aggressive symptoms in successive generations, is a phenomenon noted in certain hereditary diseases. Its extent may vary between families and/or between mutation subtypes known to be associated with the disease phenotype....... In this article, we posit a Bayesian approach to infer genetic anticipation under flexible random effects models for censored data that capture the effect of successive generations on AOO. Primary interest lies in the random effects. Misspecifying the distribution of random effects may result in incorrect...... to cause hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, also called Lynch syndrome (LS). We find evidence for a decrease in AOO between generations in this article. Our model predicts family-level anticipation effects that are potentially useful in genetic counseling clinics for high-risk families....

  1. A review of statistical methods for testing genetic anticipation: looking for an answer in Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boonstra, Philip S; Gruber, Stephen B; Raymond, Victoria M

    2010-01-01

    Anticipation, manifested through decreasing age of onset or increased severity in successive generations, has been noted in several genetic diseases. Statistical methods for genetic anticipation range from a simple use of the paired t-test for age of onset restricted to affected parent-child pairs......, and this right truncation effect is more pronounced in children than in parents. In this study, we first review different statistical methods for testing genetic anticipation in affected parent-child pairs that address the issue of bias due to right truncation. Using affected parent-child pair data, we compare...... the issue of multiplex ascertainment and its effect on the different methods. We then focus on exploring genetic anticipation in Lynch syndrome and analyze new data on the age of onset in affected parent-child pairs from families seen at the University of Michigan Cancer Genetics clinic with a mutation...

  2. Major contribution from recurrent alterations and MSH6 mutations in the Danish Lynch syndrome population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilbert, Mef; Wikman, Friedrik P; Hansen, Thomas V O

    2009-01-01

    mutations in 164 families are considered pathogenic and an additional 50 variants from 76 families are considered to represent variants of unknown pathogenicity. The different MMR genes contribute to 40% (MSH2), 29% (MLH1), and 22% (MSH6) of the mutations and the Danish population thus shows a considerably...... higher frequency of MSH6 mutations than previously described. Although 69/88 (78%) pathogenic mutations were present in a single family, previously recognized recurrent/founder mutations were causative in 75/137 (55%) MLH1/MSH2 mutant families. In addition, the Danish MLH1 founder mutation c.1667......+2_1667_+8TAAATCAdelinsATTT was identified in 14/58 (24%) MLH1 mutant families. The Danish Lynch syndrome population thus demonstrates that MSH6 mutations and recurrent/founder mutations have a larger contribution than previously recognized, which implies that the MSH6 gene should be included in routine diagnostics...

  3. Structure of the human MLH1 N-terminus: implications for predisposition to Lynch syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram; Kerr, Iain D.; Min, Jinrong

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structure of the human MLH1 N-terminus is reported at 2.30 Å resolution. The overall structure is described along with an analysis of two clinically important mutations. Mismatch repair prevents the accumulation of erroneous insertions/deletions and non-Watson–Crick base pairs in the genome. Pathogenic mutations in the MLH1 gene are associated with a predisposition to Lynch and Turcot’s syndromes. Although genetic testing for these mutations is available, robust classification of variants requires strong clinical and functional support. Here, the first structure of the N-terminus of human MLH1, determined by X-ray crystallography, is described. The structure shares a high degree of similarity with previously determined prokaryotic MLH1 homologs; however, this structure affords a more accurate platform for the classification of MLH1 variants

  4. Gynecologic cancer screening and communication with health care providers in women with Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton-Chase, A M; Hovick, S R; Sun, C C; Boyd-Rogers, S; Lynch, P M; Lu, K H; Peterson, S K

    2014-08-01

    We evaluated knowledge of gynecologic cancer screening recommendations, screening behaviors, and communication with providers among women with Lynch syndrome (LS). Women aged ≥25 years who were at risk for LS-associated cancers completed a semi-structured interview and a questionnaire. Of 74 participants (mean age 40 years), 61% knew the appropriate age to begin screening, 75-80% correctly identified the recommended screening frequency, and 84% reported no previous screening endometrial biopsy. Women initiated discussions with their providers about their LS cancer risks, but many used nonspecific terms or relied on family history. Most were not offered high-risk screening options. While many women were aware of risk-appropriate LS screening guidelines, adherence was suboptimal. Improving communication between women and their providers regarding LS-related gynecologic cancer risk and screening options may help improve adherence. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Rare mutations in RINT1 predispose carriers to breast and Lynch Syndrome-spectrum cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Daniel J.; Tao, Kayoko; Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence; Nguyen-Dumont, Tu; Robinot, Nivonirina; Hammet, Fleur; Odefrey, Fabrice; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teo, Zhi L.; Thingholm, Louise B.; Young, Erin L.; Voegele, Catherine; Lonie, Andrew; Pope, Bernard J.; Roane, Terrell C.; Bell, Russell; Hu, Hao; Shankaracharya; Huff, Chad D.; Ellis, Jonathan; Li, Jun; Makunin, Igor V.; John, Esther M.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Terry, Mary B.; Daly, Mary; Buys, Saundra S.; Snyder, Carrie; Lynch, Henry T.; Devilee, Peter; Giles, Graham G.; Hopper, John L.; Feng, Bing J.; Lesueur, Fabienne; Tavtigian, Sean V.; Southey, Melissa C.; Goldgar, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately half of the familial aggregation of breast cancer remains unexplained. A multiple-case breast cancer family exome sequencing study identified three likely pathogenic mutations in RINT1 (NM_021930.4) not present in public sequencing databases: RINT1 c.343C>T (p.Q115X), c.1132_1134del (p.M378del) and c.1207G>T (p.D403Y). Based on this finding, a population-based case-control mutation-screening study was conducted and identified 29 carriers of rare (MAF Lynch syndrome-spectrum cancers (SIR 3.35, 95% CI 1.7-6.0; P=0.005), particularly for relatives diagnosed with cancer under age 60 years (SIR 10.9, 95%CI 4.7-21; P=0.0003). PMID:25050558

  6. HNPCC (Lynch Syndrome: Differential Diagnosis, Molecular Genetics and Management - a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynch Henry T

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract HNPCC (Lynch syndrome is the most common form of hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC, wherein it accounts for between 2-7 percent of the total CRC burden. When considering the large number of extracolonic cancers integral to the syndrome, namely carcinoma of the endometrium, ovary, stomach, hepatobiliary system, pancreas, small bowel, brain tumors, and upper uroepithelial tract, these estimates of its frequency are likely to be conservative. The diagnosis is based upon its natural history in concert with a comprehensive cancer family history inclusive of all anatomic sites. In order for surveillance and management to be effective and, indeed, lifesaving, among these high-risk patients, the linchpin to cancer control would be the physician, who must be knowledgeable about hereditary cancer syndromes, their molecular and medical genetics, genetic counseling, and, most importantly, the natural history of the disorders, so that the entirety of this knowledge can be melded to highly-targeted management.

  7. Gynecologic cancer screening and communication with health care providers in women with Lynch syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton-Chase, AM; Hovick, SR; Sun, CC; Boyd-Rogers, S; Lynch, PM; Lu, KH; Peterson, SK

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated knowledge of gynecologic cancer screening recommendations, screening behaviors, and communication with providers among women with Lynch syndrome (LS). Women aged ≥25 years who were at risk for LS-associated cancers completed a semi-structured interview and a questionnaire. Of 74 participants (mean age 40 years), 61% knew the appropriate age to begin screening, 75–80% correctly identified the recommended screening frequency, and 84% reported no previous screening endometrial biopsy. Women initiated discussions with their providers about their LS cancer risks, but many used nonspecific terms or relied on family history. Most were not offered high-risk screening options. While many women were aware of risk-appropriate LS screening guidelines, adherence was suboptimal. Improving communication between women and their providers regarding LS-related gynecologic cancer risk and screening options may help improve adherence. PMID:23906188

  8. Structure of the human MLH1 N-terminus: implications for predisposition to Lynch syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram [University of Toronto, 101 College Street, Toronto, ON M5G 1L7 (Canada); Kerr, Iain D., E-mail: ikerr@myriad.com [Myriad Genetic Laboratories Inc., 320 Wakara Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84108 (United States); Min, Jinrong, E-mail: ikerr@myriad.com [University of Toronto, 101 College Street, Toronto, ON M5G 1L7 (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5G 1L7 (Canada)

    2015-07-28

    The crystal structure of the human MLH1 N-terminus is reported at 2.30 Å resolution. The overall structure is described along with an analysis of two clinically important mutations. Mismatch repair prevents the accumulation of erroneous insertions/deletions and non-Watson–Crick base pairs in the genome. Pathogenic mutations in the MLH1 gene are associated with a predisposition to Lynch and Turcot’s syndromes. Although genetic testing for these mutations is available, robust classification of variants requires strong clinical and functional support. Here, the first structure of the N-terminus of human MLH1, determined by X-ray crystallography, is described. The structure shares a high degree of similarity with previously determined prokaryotic MLH1 homologs; however, this structure affords a more accurate platform for the classification of MLH1 variants.

  9. Revised Bethesda Guidelines for Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (Lynch Syndrome) and Microsatellite Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Asad; Boland, C. Richard; Terdiman, Jonathan P.; Syngal, Sapna; de la Chapelle, Albert; Rüschoff, Josef; Fishel, Richard; Lindor, Noralane M.; Burgart, Lawrence J.; Hamelin, Richard; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Hiatt, Robert A.; Jass, Jeremy; Lindblom, Annika; Lynch, Henry T.; Peltomaki, Païvi; Ramsey, Scott D.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Hawk, Ernest T.; Barrett, J. Carl; Freedman, Andrew N.; Srivastava, Sudhir

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), also known as Lynch syndrome, is a common autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by early age at onset, neoplastic lesions, and microsatellite instability (MSI). Because cancers with MSI account for approximately 15% of all colorectal cancers and because of the need for a better understanding of the clinical and histologic manifestations of HNPCC, the National Cancer Institute hosted an international workshop on HNPCC in 1996, which led to the development of the Bethesda Guidelines for the identification of individuals with HNPCC who should be tested for MSI. To consider revision and improvement of the Bethesda Guidelines, another HNPCC workshop was held at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, MD, in 2002. In this commentary, we summarize the Workshop presentations on HNPCC and MSI testing; present the issues relating to the performance, sensitivity, and specificity of the Bethesda Guidelines; outline the revised Bethesda Guidelines for identifying individuals at risk for HNPCC; and recommend criteria for MSI testing. PMID:14970275

  10. HNPCC (Lynch Syndrome): Differential Diagnosis, Molecular Genetics and Management - a Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    HNPCC (Lynch syndrome) is the most common form of hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC), wherein it accounts for between 2-7 percent of the total CRC burden. When considering the large number of extracolonic cancers integral to the syndrome, namely carcinoma of the endometrium, ovary, stomach, hepatobiliary system, pancreas, small bowel, brain tumors, and upper uroepithelial tract, these estimates of its frequency are likely to be conservative. The diagnosis is based upon its natural history in concert with a comprehensive cancer family history inclusive of all anatomic sites. In order for surveillance and management to be effective and, indeed, lifesaving, among these high-risk patients, the linchpin to cancer control would be the physician, who must be knowledgeable about hereditary cancer syndromes, their molecular and medical genetics, genetic counseling, and, most importantly, the natural history of the disorders, so that the entirety of this knowledge can be melded to highly-targeted management.

  11. Association of Mismatch Repair Mutation With Age at Cancer Onset in Lynch Syndrome: Implications for Stratified Surveillance Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Neil A J; Morris, Julie; Green, Kate; Lalloo, Fiona; Woodward, Emma R; Hill, James; Crosbie, Emma J; Evans, D Gareth

    2017-12-01

    Lynch syndrome is caused by dominantly inherited germline mutations that predispose individuals to colorectal, endometrial, ovarian, and other cancers through inactivation of the cellular mismatch repair system. Lynch syndrome–associated cancers are amenable to surveillance strategies that may improve survival. The age at which surveillance should start is disputed. To determine whether mutated gene and type of mutation influence age at onset of Lynch syndrome–associated cancers. A retrospective cohort study of individuals with Lynch syndrome–associated colorectal, endometrial, and/or ovarian cancers whose medical records were included in the clinical database of a large quaternary referral center for genomic medicine in the Northwest of England. Mutated gene (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and/or PMS2) and type of mutation (truncating, splicing, or large rearrangement). Age at cancer diagnosis. A total of 1063 individuals with proven Lynch syndrome were included, 495 male and 568 female (mean age 52 years; age range, 10-93 years [children were included in the database, but no children developed cancer]). There were 546 men and women with colorectal cancer, 162 women with endometrial cancer, and 49 women with ovarian cancer; mean follow-up was 68.2 months. Among MLH1 mutation carriers, mutations in MLH1 were associated with colorectal cancer in 249 (61%) of 409 men and women; endometrial cancer in 53 of 196 (27%) women; and ovarian cancer in 15 (8%) of 196 women. Among MSH2 mutation carriers, mutations in MSH2 (the most prevalent mutations overall) were most commonly associated with female-specific cancers: endometrial cancer in 83 (30%) of 279 women; ovarian cancer in 28 (10%) of 279 women; and colorectal cancer in 239 (50%) 479 men and women. Mutations in MSH6 were less prevalent, and MSH6 mutation carriers presented with colorectal and endometrial cancer at later ages than carriers of mutations in MSH2 or MLH1. When stratified by mutation type, women with truncating

  12. Dietary patterns and colorectal adenomas in Lynch syndrome: the GEOLynch cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botma, Akke; Vasen, Hans F A; van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J B; Kleibeuker, Jan H; Nagengast, Fokko M; Kampman, Ellen

    2013-02-01

    Patients with Lynch syndrome (LS) have a high risk of developing colorectal cancer due to mutations in mismatch repair genes. Because dietary factors, alone and in combination, influence sporadic colorectal carcinogenesis, the association of dietary patterns with colorectal adenomas in LS patients was assessed. In the GEOLynch cohort of 486 persons with LS, dietary information was collected, using a food frequency questionnaire. Dietary pattern scores were obtained by principal components analysis. Hazard ratios (HR) between dietary patterns and colorectal adenomas were calculated using Cox regression models. Robust sandwich variance estimates were used to control for dependency within families. Final models were adjusted for age, sex, smoking habits, colorectal adenoma history, and extent of colon resection. During a median follow-up of 20 months, colorectal adenomas were detected in 58 persons. Four dietary patterns were identified: a "Prudent," "Meat," "Snack," and "Cosmopolitan" pattern. Individuals within the highest tertile of the "Prudent" pattern had a HR of 0.73 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.32-1.66) for colorectal adenomas, compared with the lowest tertile. Those with high "Meat" pattern scores had a HR of 1.70 (95% CI, 0.83-3.52). A high "Snack" pattern was associated with an increased risk of colorectal adenomas (HR, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.03-4.49). A HR of 1.25 (95% CI, 0.61-2.55) was observed for persons in the highest tertile of the "Cosmopolitan" pattern. These findings suggest that dietary patterns may be associated with development of colorectal adenoma in patients with Lynch syndrome. The directions of these findings are corroborative with those observed in studies investigating sporadic colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2012 American Cancer Society.

  13. Whole Gene Capture Analysis of 15 CRC Susceptibility Genes in Suspected Lynch Syndrome Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Anne M L; Geilenkirchen, Marije A; van Wezel, Tom; Jagmohan-Changur, Shantie C; Ruano, Dina; van der Klift, Heleen M; van den Akker, Brendy E W M; Laros, Jeroen F J; van Galen, Michiel; Wagner, Anja; Letteboer, Tom G W; Gómez-García, Encarna B; Tops, Carli M J; Vasen, Hans F; Devilee, Peter; Hes, Frederik J; Morreau, Hans; Wijnen, Juul T

    2016-01-01

    Lynch Syndrome (LS) is caused by pathogenic germline variants in one of the mismatch repair (MMR) genes. However, up to 60% of MMR-deficient colorectal cancer cases are categorized as suspected Lynch Syndrome (sLS) because no pathogenic MMR germline variant can be identified, which leads to difficulties in clinical management. We therefore analyzed the genomic regions of 15 CRC susceptibility genes in leukocyte DNA of 34 unrelated sLS patients and 11 patients with MLH1 hypermethylated tumors with a clear family history. Using targeted next-generation sequencing, we analyzed the entire non-repetitive genomic sequence, including intronic and regulatory sequences, of 15 CRC susceptibility genes. In addition, tumor DNA from 28 sLS patients was analyzed for somatic MMR variants. Of 1979 germline variants found in the leukocyte DNA of 34 sLS patients, one was a pathogenic variant (MLH1 c.1667+1delG). Leukocyte DNA of 11 patients with MLH1 hypermethylated tumors was negative for pathogenic germline variants in the tested CRC susceptibility genes and for germline MLH1 hypermethylation. Somatic DNA analysis of 28 sLS tumors identified eight (29%) cases with two pathogenic somatic variants, one with a VUS predicted to pathogenic and LOH, and nine cases (32%) with one pathogenic somatic variant (n = 8) or one VUS predicted to be pathogenic (n = 1). This is the first study in sLS patients to include the entire genomic sequence of CRC susceptibility genes. An underlying somatic or germline MMR gene defect was identified in ten of 34 sLS patients (29%). In the remaining sLS patients, the underlying genetic defect explaining the MMRdeficiency in their tumors might be found outside the genomic regions harboring the MMR and other known CRC susceptibility genes.

  14. Role of microsatellite instability-low as a diagnostic biomarker of Lynch syndrome in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Eduardo; Mork, Maureen E; Cuddy, Amanda; Borras, Ester; Bannon, Sarah A; Taggart, Melissa W; Ying, Jun; Broaddus, Russell R; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; Lynch, Patrick M; You, Yi-Qian Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is the most common Mendelian disorder predisposing persons to hereditary colorectal cancer. Carriers of MSH6 mutations constitute less than 10% of the total of cases with Lynch syndrome and present with a weaker clinical phenotype, including low levels of microsatellite instability (MSI-L) in colorectal tumors. The frequency of MSH6 mutation carriers among patients presenting with MSI-L colorectal cancer has yet to be determined, as has the appropriate genetic workup in this context. We have reviewed here the clinicopathologic characteristics, immunohistochemistry, and genetic testing results for 71 patients at a single institution diagnosed with MSI-L colorectal cancers. Of 71 patients with MSI-L tumors, 21 underwent genetic testing for MSH6 mutations, three of whom presented with loss of staining of MSH6 and only one of whom carried a pathogenic germline MSH6 mutation in exon 4 (c.2677_2678delCT; p.Leu893Alafs*6). This latter patient had a significant family history of cancer and had a rectal primary tumor that showed instability only in mononucleotide markers. In this cohort of MSI-L patients, we detected no notable clinicopathologic or molecular characteristic that would help to distinguish a group most likely to harbor germline MSH6 mutations. Therefore, we conclude that the prevalence of MSH6 mutations among patients with MSI-L tumors is very low. Microsatellite instability analysis combined with immunohistochemistry of mismatch repair proteins adequately detects potential MSH6 mutation carriers among MSI-L colorectal cancers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Use of Social Media to Recruit Participants With Rare Conditions: Lynch Syndrome as an Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton-Chase, Allison M; Parker, Wendy M; Hennig, Kelsey; Sisson, Faith; Bruzzone, Linda L

    2017-01-23

    Social media is increasingly being used as a means of recruiting participants, particularly for investigators whose areas of interest involve rare conditions or hard-to-reach populations. However, much of the literature to date has focused on paid advertisement recruitment. We used Lynch syndrome (LS), a rare hereditary cancer syndrome, as a model to demonstrate the successful partnership between researchers and a Web-based patient education and advocacy organization to facilitate participant recruitment. Recruitment was undertaken in partnership with Lynch Syndrome International (LSI), an advocacy organization with a strong social media presence. After LSI published our study information, participants followed up via email or phone call. Following prescreening and consent, interested and eligible participants were then sent a secure survey link. Within 36 hours of a single Facebook post by the site administrators for LSI, over 150 individuals responded via phone or email. Sixty-five individuals were sent the survey link and 57 individuals completed the survey (88% response rate). Of note, these 57 individuals were geographically diverse within the Unites States, representing LS patients from 26 different states. This approach has several advantages, including recruitment through a trusted source outside of a clinical setting, higher response rates, and cost-effectiveness with a small research team in a relatively short amount of time. Overall, social media recruitment with a trusted online partner can be highly effective in hard-to-reach clinical populations, such as patients with LS. However, this approach requires additional effort for eligibility screening. ©Allison M Burton-Chase, Wendy M Parker, Kelsey Hennig, Faith Sisson, Linda L Bruzzone. Originally published in JMIR Research Protocols (http://www.researchprotocols.org), 23.01.2017.

  16. 77 FR 30443 - Safety Zone; Alexandria Bay Chamber of Commerce, St. Lawrence River, Alexandria Bay, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ...The Coast Guard proposes to establish a temporary safety zone on the St. Lawrence River, Alexandria Bay, NY. This proposed rule is intended to restrict vessels from a portion of the St. Lawrence River during the Alexandria Bay Chamber of Commerce fireworks display. The safety zone established by this proposed rule is necessary to protect spectators and vessels from the hazards associated with a fireworks display.

  17. Scientists in Gray Flannel Suits: Ernest Lawrence and the Development of Color Television

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roebke, Joshua

    Physicists and historians typically remember Ernest Lawrence for one of two activities, his development of the cyclotron or his advocacy for atomic weapons. The two labs that he established in support of such endeavors are still named after him in California: Lawrence Berkeley and Lawrence Livermore. But there was a third accomplishment for which Lawrence believed he would always be remembered: the development of color television. In 1950, he sold a half stake of his company, Chromatic Television Laboratories, to Paramount Pictures for 1 million. That decade, Lawrence and his employees, especially Luis Alvarez and Edwin McMillan, designed cathode-ray tubes for color televisions while they championed hydrogen bombs. Although their commitment to the second was attributed to patriotism and their interest in the first was dismissed as a hobby, it is not so easy to disentangle their motives. Color screens were needed for more than variety shows and sitcoms; they displayed incoming missiles in vivid color. No company has ever been led by three future Nobel Laureates, yet Chromatic Television Laboratories was a failure. Even so, Lawrence had a profound influence on the development of color television, and I will tell this story for the first time.

  18. Anguilla rostrata glass eel migration and recruitment in the estuary and Gulf of St Lawrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutil, J-D; Dumont, P; Cairns, D K; Galbraith, P S; Verreault, G; Castonguay, M; Proulx, S

    2009-06-01

    This study describes catches of Anguilla rostrata glass eels and associated oceanographic conditions in the St Lawrence Estuary and Gulf. Ichthyoplankton survey data suggest that they enter the Gulf primarily in May, migrate at the surface at night, and disperse broadly once they have passed Cabot Strait. They arrive in estuaries beginning at about mid-June and through the month of July. Migration extends west up to Québec City, in the freshwater zone of the St Lawrence Estuary, 1000 km west of Cabot Strait. Anguilla rostrata glass eels travel between Cabot Strait and receiving estuaries at a straight-line ground speed of c. 10-15 km day(-1). Catches of fish per unit effort in estuaries in the St Lawrence system are much lower than those reported for the Atlantic coast of Canada. Low abundance of A. rostrata glass eels in the St Lawrence system may be due to cold surface temperatures during the migration period which decrease swimming capacity, long distances from the spawning ground to Cabot Strait and from Cabot Strait to the destination waters (especially the St Lawrence River), complex circulation patterns, and hypoxic conditions in bottom waters of the Laurentian Channel and the St Lawrence Estuary.

  19. Lynch Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be affected by your diagnosis, such as: Your privacy. The results of your genetic test will be listed in your medical record, ... to tell family members that you're having genetic testing and what that the results mean. By Mayo Clinic ... Conditions and Privacy Policy linked below. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy ...

  20. Lynch Syndrome Associated Colon Adenocarcinoma Resembling Lymphoma on Fluoro-Deoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aparici, Carina Mari; Win, Aung Zaw

    2015-01-01

    The patient was a 46-year-old Asian male diagnosed with lynch syndrome associated colon adenocarcinoma in the right ascending colon. A presurgical staging 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) found increased metabolic activity in the cervical, axillary, mediastinal, supraclavicular, para-aortic and mesenteric lymph nodes. This pattern of metastasis was very unusual for lynch syndrome associated colon adenocarcinoma and the involvement of those lymph nodes resembles the pattern of spread of lymphoma. He underwent right hemicolectomy and he was subsequently treated with 12 cycles of folinic acid (leucovorin), fluorouracil (5-FU), irinotecan. A restaging FDG-PET/CT at the end of the chemotherapy showed interval decrease in size and metabolic activity in the affected lymph nodes. FDG-PET/CT is a useful imaging modality in following-up the treatment response in colon adenocarcinoma

  1. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1987-1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    1986-12-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy, provides national scientific leadership and supports technological innovation through its mission to: (1) Perform leading multidisciplinary research in general sciences and energy sciences; (2) Develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for use by qualified investigators; (3) Educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers; and (4) Foster productive relationships between LBL research programs and industry. The following areas of research excellence implement this mission and provide current focus for achieving DOE goals. GENERAL SCIENCES--(1) Accelerator and Fusion Research--accelerator design and operation, advanced accelerator technology development, accelerator and ion source research for heavy-ion fusion and magnetic fusion, and x-ray optics; (2) Nuclear Science--relativistic heavy-ion physics, medium- and low-energy nuclear physics, nuclear theory, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear chemistry, transuranium elements studies, nuclear data evaluation, and detector development; (3) Physics--experimental and theoretical particle physics, detector development, astrophysics, and applied mathematics. ENERGY SCIENCES--(1) Applied Science--building energy efficiency, solar for building systems, fossil energy conversion, energy storage, and atmospheric effects of combustion; (2) Biology and Medicine--molecular and cellular biology, diagnostic imaging, radiation biophysics, therapy and radiosurgery, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis, lipoproteins, cardiovascular disease, and hemopoiesis research; (3) Center for Advanced Materials--catalysts, electronic materials, ceramic and metal interfaces, polymer research, instrumentation, and metallic alloys; (4) Chemical Biodynamics--molecular biology of nucleic acids and proteins, genetics of photosynthesis, and photochemistry; (5) Earth Sciences--continental lithosphere properties, structures and

  2. Contiguous gene deletion of chromosome 2p16.3-p21 as a cause of Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo-Mullen, Erin E; Lynn, Patricio B; Wang, Lu; Walsh, Michael; Gopalan, Anuradha; Shia, Jinru; Tran, Christina; Man, Fung Ying; McBride, Sean; Schattner, Mark; Zhang, Liying; Weiser, Martin R; Stadler, Zsofia K

    2018-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition caused by pathogenic mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Although commonly associated with clinical features such as intellectual disability and congenital anomalies, contiguous gene deletions may also result in cancer predisposition syndromes. We report on a 52-year-old male with Lynch syndrome caused by deletion of chromosome 2p16.3-p21. The patient had intellectual disability and presented with a prostatic adenocarcinoma with an incidentally identified synchronous sigmoid adenocarcinoma that exhibited deficient MMR with an absence of MSH2 and MSH6 protein expression. Family history was unrevealing. Physical exam revealed short stature, brachycephaly with a narrow forehead and short philtrum, brachydactyly of the hands, palmar transverse crease, broad and small feet with hyperpigmentation of the soles. The patient underwent total colectomy with ileorectal anastomosis for a pT3N1 sigmoid adenocarcinoma. Germline genetic testing of the MSH2, MSH6, and EPCAM genes revealed full gene deletions. SNP-array based DNA copy number analysis identified a deletion of 4.8 Mb at 2p16.3-p21. In addition to the three Lynch syndrome associated genes, the deleted chromosomal section encompassed genes including NRXN1, CRIPT, CALM2, FBXO11, LHCGR, MCFD2, TTC7A, EPAS1, PRKCE, and 15 others. Contiguous gene deletions have been described in other inherited cancer predisposition syndromes, such as Familial Adenomatous Polyposis. Our report and review of the literature suggests that contiguous gene deletion within the 2p16-p21 chromosomal region is a rare cause of Lynch syndrome, but presents with distinct phenotypic features, highlighting the need for recognition and awareness of this syndromic entity.

  3. Family perspectives in lynch syndrome becoming a family at risk, patterns of communication and influence on relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartuma Katarina

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A growing number of individuals are diagnosed with hereditary cancer. Though increased levels of anxiety and depression have been demonstrated around the time of genetic counselling, most individuals handle life at increased risk well. Data have, however, been collected on individual basis, which led us to focus on family perspectives of hereditary cancer. Methods Lynch syndrome represents a major type of hereditary colorectal and gynaecological cancer. We preformed open-ended interviews with 27 informants from 9 Lynch syndrome families. Inductive content analysis revealed three major themes: transition to a risk family, patterns of communication and influence on family relations and individual roles. Results Family members described how learning about Lynch syndrome shifted focus from daily issues to concerns about cancer. Changes in communication related to difficulties in talking to children about heredity and informing new family members and distant relatives about an increased risk of cancer. Influence on relations was exemplified by family members taking on different roles, e.g. females often being responsible for coordinating information about heredity and providing support. Families in which members had experienced cancer at young age typically informed children soon after learning about heredity and at young age, whereas families with experience of cancer at higher age postponed information and thereby also genetic counselling. Conclusions Three major family perspectives are described in Lynch syndrome families; becoming a risk family, patterns of communication and influence on family relations. Since these issues are central, our findings suggests that such family perspectives should be considered during genetic counselling in order to contribute to information spread, help family members cope with the increased risk, and motivate family members at risk to undergo surveillance.

  4. Using Social Media Data to Understand the Impact of Promotional Information on Laypeople’s Discussions: A Case Study of Lynch Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salloum, Ramzi G; Guo, Yi; Wang, Mo; Prosperi, Mattia; Zhang, Hansi; Du, Xinsong; Ramirez-Diaz, Laura J; He, Zhe

    2017-01-01

    Background Social media is being used by various stakeholders among pharmaceutical companies, government agencies, health care organizations, professionals, and news media as a way of engaging audiences to raise disease awareness and ultimately to improve public health. Nevertheless, it is unclear what effects this health information has on laypeople. Objective This study aimed to provide a detailed examination of how promotional health information related to Lynch syndrome impacts laypeople’s discussions on a social media platform (Twitter) in terms of topic awareness and attitudes. Methods We used topic modeling and sentiment analysis techniques on Lynch syndrome–related tweets to answer the following research questions (RQs): (1) what are the most discussed topics in Lynch syndrome–related tweets?; (2) how promotional Lynch syndrome–related information on Twitter affects laypeople’s discussions?; and (3) what impact do the Lynch syndrome awareness activities in the Colon Cancer Awareness Month and Lynch Syndrome Awareness Day have on laypeople’s discussions and their attitudes? In particular, we used a set of keywords to collect Lynch syndrome–related tweets from October 26, 2016 to August 11, 2017 (289 days) through the Twitter public search application programming interface (API). We experimented with two different classification methods to categorize tweets into the following three classes: (1) irrelevant, (2) promotional health information, and (3) laypeople’s discussions. We applied a topic modeling method to discover the themes in these Lynch syndrome–related tweets and conducted sentiment analysis on each layperson’s tweet to gauge the writer’s attitude (ie, positive, negative, and neutral) toward Lynch syndrome. The topic modeling and sentiment analysis results were elaborated to answer the three RQs. Results Of all tweets (N=16,667), 87.38% (14,564/16,667) were related to Lynch syndrome. Of the Lynch syndrome–related tweets, 81

  5. Biallelic MLH1 SNP cDNA expression or constitutional promoter methylation can hide genomic rearrangements causing Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morak, Monika; Koehler, Udo; Schackert, Hans Konrad; Steinke, Verena; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte; Schulmann, Karsten; Kloor, Matthias; Höchter, Wilhelm; Weingart, Josef; Keiling, Cortina; Massdorf, Trisari; Holinski-Feder, Elke

    2011-08-01

    A positive family history, germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes, tumours with high microsatellite instability, and loss of mismatch repair protein expression are the hallmarks of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch syndrome). However, in ~10-15% of cases of suspected Lynch syndrome, no disease-causing mechanism can be detected. Oligo array analysis was performed to search for genomic imbalances in patients with suspected mutation-negative Lynch syndrome with MLH1 deficiency in their colorectal tumours. A deletion in the LRRFIP2 (leucine-rich repeat flightless-interacting protein 2) gene flanking the MLH1 gene was detected, which turned out to be a paracentric inversion on chromosome 3p22.2 creating two new stable fusion transcripts between MLH1 and LRRFIP2. A single-nucleotide polymorphism in MLH1 exon 8 was expressed from both alleles, initially pointing to appropriate MLH1 function at least in peripheral cells. In a second case, an inherited duplication of the MLH1 gene region resulted in constitutional MLH1 promoter methylation. Constitutional MLH1 promoter methylation may therefore in rare cases be a heritable disease mechanism and should not be overlooked in seemingly sporadic patients.

  6. Contribution of Large Genomic Rearrangements in Italian Lynch Syndrome Patients: Characterization of a Novel Alu-Mediated Deletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Duraturo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome is associated with germ-line mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes, mainly MLH1 and MSH2. Most of the mutations reported in these genes to date are point mutations, small deletions, and insertions. Large genomic rearrangements in the MMR genes predisposing to Lynch syndrome also occur, but the frequency varies depending on the population studied on average from 5 to 20%. The aim of this study was to examine the contribution of large rearrangements in the MLH1 and MSH2 genes in a well-characterised series of 63 unrelated Southern Italian Lynch syndrome patients who were negative for pathogenic point mutations in the MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 genes. We identified a large novel deletion in the MSH2 gene, including exon 6 in one of the patients analysed (1.6% frequency. This deletion was confirmed and localised by long-range PCR. The breakpoints of this rearrangement were characterised by sequencing. Further analysis of the breakpoints revealed that this rearrangement was a product of Alu-mediated recombination. Our findings identified a novel Alu-mediated rearrangement within MSH2 gene and showed that large deletions or duplications in MLH1 and MSH2 genes are low-frequency mutational events in Southern Italian patients with an inherited predisposition to colon cancer.

  7. Prospective Study of Combined Colon and Endometrial Cancer Screening in Women With Lynch Syndrome: A Patient-Centered Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Marilyn; Sun, Charlotte; Boyd-Rogers, Stephanie; Burzawa, Jennifer; Milbourne, Andrea; Keeler, Elizabeth; Yzquierdo, Rebecca; Lynch, Patrick; Peterson, Susan K.; Lu, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Background: Endometrial and colorectal cancers are the most common cancers in Lynch syndrome. Consensus guidelines recommend annual endometrial biopsy (EMB) and regular colonoscopies. We assessed the feasibility of concurrently performing EMB and colonoscopy and evaluated women's perception of pain, satisfaction, and acceptability. Methods: From July 2002 to December 2009, women who had a gene mutation for Lynch syndrome, met the Amsterdam II criteria, or had a high-risk situation that required screening were prospectively enrolled. After conscious sedation, the procedures were sequentially performed. Patients completed pre- and postprocedure questionnaires assessing pain, level of satisfaction, and acceptability. The Wilcoxon rank test and Mann-Whitney test were used to compare pain scores. Results: Forty-two women completed the study. Median age was 37 years (range, 25 to 73). Nineteen had previously had an EMB in the office setting. Women reported significantly lower median levels of pain in the combined procedure compared with previous office setting biopsies (P Lynch syndrome screening recommendations. PMID:21532810

  8. Interval colon cancer in a Lynch syndrome patient under annual colonoscopic surveillance: a case for advanced imaging techniques?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oxentenko Amy S

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lynch syndrome confers increased risk for various malignancies, including colorectal cancer. Colonoscopic surveillance programs have led to reduced incidence of colorectal cancer and reduced mortality from colorectal cancer. Colonoscopy every 1–2 years beginning at age 20–25, or 10 years earlier than the first diagnosis of colorectal cancer in a family, with annual colonoscopy after age 40, is the recommended management for mutation carriers. Screening programs have reduced colon cancer mortality, but interval cancers may occur. Case presentation We describe a 48-year-old woman with Lynch syndrome who was found to have an adenoma with invasive colorectal cancer within one year after a normal colonoscopy. Conclusion Our patient illustrates two current concepts about Lynch syndrome: 1 adenomas are the cancer precursor and 2 such adenomas may be “aggressive,” in the sense that the adenoma progresses more readily and more rapidly to carcinoma in this setting compared to usual colorectal adenomas. Our patient’s resected tumor invaded only into submucosa and all lymph nodes were negative; in that sense, she represents a success for annual colonoscopic surveillance. Still, this case does raise the question of whether advanced imaging techniques are advisable for surveillance colonoscopy in these high-risk patients.

  9. Lynch syndrome-associated endometrial carcinoma with MLH1 germline mutation and MLH1 promoter hypermethylation: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Takanori; Takehara, Kazuhiro; Sugimoto, Nao; Kaneko, Keika; Fujimoto, Etsuko; Okazawa-Sakai, Mika; Okame, Shinichi; Shiroyama, Yuko; Yokoyama, Takashi; Teramoto, Norihiro; Ohsumi, Shozo; Saito, Shinya; Imai, Kazuho; Sugano, Kokichi

    2018-05-21

    Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disease caused by germline mutations in mismatch repair genes. Analysis for microsatellite instability (MSI) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) of protein expressions of disease-associated genes is used to screen for Lynch syndrome in endometrial cancer patients. When losses of both MLH1 and PMS2 proteins are observed by IHC, MLH1 promoter methylation analysis is conducted to distinguish Lynch syndrome-associated endometrial cancer from sporadic cancer. Here we report a woman who developed endometrial cancer at the age of 49 years. She had a family history of colorectal cancer (first-degree relative aged 52 years) and stomach cancer (second-degree relative with the age of onset unknown). No other family history was present, and she failed to meet the Amsterdam II criteria for the diagnosis of Lynch syndrome. Losses of MLH1 and PMS2, but not MSH2 and MSH6, proteins were observed by IHC in endometrial cancer tissues. Because MLH1 promoter hypermethylation was detected in endometrial cancer tissue samples, the epigenetic silencing of MLH1 was suspected as the cause of the protein loss. However, because of the early onset of endometrial cancer and the positive family history, a diagnosis of Lynch syndrome was also suspected. Therefore, we provided her with genetic counseling. After obtaining her consent, MLH1 promoter methylation testing and genetic testing of peripheral blood were performed. MLH1 promoter methylation was not observed in peripheral blood. However, genetic testing revealed a large deletion of exon 5 in MLH1; thus, we diagnosed the presence of Lynch syndrome. Both MLH1 germline mutation and MLH1 promoter hypermethylation may be observed in endometrial cancer. Therefore, even if MLH1 promoter hypermethylation is detected, a diagnosis of Lynch syndrome cannot be excluded.

  10. Initiation of universal tumor screening for Lynch syndrome in colorectal cancer patients as a model for the implementation of genetic information into clinical oncology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Stacey A; Laurino, Mercy; Bowen, Deborah J; Upton, Melissa P; Pritchard, Colin; Hisama, Fuki; Jarvik, Gail; Fichera, Alessandro; Sjoding, Britta; Bennett, Robin L; Naylor, Lorraine; Jacobson, Angela; Burke, Wylie; Grady, William M

    2016-02-01

    Lynch syndrome confers a hereditary predisposition to colorectal and other cancers. Universal tumor screening (UTS) for Lynch syndrome is recommended by several professional societies, but the implementation can be complex. This article describes the evaluation, process development, and initiation of Lynch syndrome UTS at a tertiary referral cancer center. A multidisciplinary team developed the new process design. Issues in 5 themes were noted: timing, funding, second-opinion patients, result processing, and the role of genetics providers. A committee approach was used to examine each issue for process-improvement development. The issues related to testing were addressed individually for the successful implementation of UTS at the institutional level. In the conventional-care period, 9 of 30 cases (30%) received Lynch syndrome screening, and 4 cases were referred to medical genetics. During the 6 months following the implementation of UTS, 32 of 44 patients (73%) received Lynch syndrome screening. The 13 unscreened patients all had identified reasons for nonscreening (eg, financial limitations). Ten patients were referred to medical genetics, which identified no new cases of Lynch syndrome, but a low-risk adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) variant was detected in 1 individual. The implementation of effective Lynch syndrome UTS can feasibly alter practice at the institutional level. This experience with the assessment and management of issues relevant to the successful implementation of a new clinical care paradigm based on emerging technology has implications for the uptake of advances across molecular oncology into clinical practice, and this is highly relevant in the current era of rapidly evolving genomic technology. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  11. Efficient molecular screening of Lynch syndrome by specific 3' promoter methylation of the MLH1 or BRAF mutation in colorectal cancer with high-frequency microsatellite instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Hitoshi; Nagasaka, Takeshi; Cullings, Harry M; Notohara, Kenji; Hoshijima, Naoko; Young, Joanne; Lynch, Henry T; Tanaka, Noriaki; Matsubara, Nagahide

    2009-06-01

    It is sometimes difficult to diagnose Lynch syndrome by the simple but strict clinical criteria, or even by the definitive genetic testing for causative germline mutation of mismatch repair genes. Thus, some practical and efficient screening strategy to select highly possible Lynch syndrome patients is exceedingly desirable. We performed a comprehensive study to evaluate the methylation status of whole MLH1 promoter region by direct bisulfite sequencing of the entire MLH1 promoter regions on Lynch and non-Lynch colorectal cancers (CRCs). Then, we established a convenient assay to detect methylation in key CpG islands responsible for the silencing of MLH1 expression. We studied the methylation status of MLH1 as well as the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) and immunohistochemical analysis of mismatch repair proteins on 16 cases of Lynch CRC and 19 cases of sporadic CRCs with high-frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H). Sensitivity to detect Lynch syndrome by MLH1 (CCAAT) methylation was 88% and the specificity was 84%. Positive likelihood ratio (PLR) was 5.5 and negative likelihood ratio (NLR) was 0.15. Sensitivity by mutational analysis of BRAF was 100%, specificity was 84%, PLR was 6.3 and NLR was zero. By CIMP analysis; sensitivity was 88%, specificity was 79%, PLR was 4.2, and NLR was 0.16. BRAF mutation or MLH1 methylation analysis combined with MSI testing could be a good alternative to screen Lynch syndrome patients in a cost effective manner. Although the assay for CIMP status also showed acceptable sensitivity and specificity, it may not be practical because of its rather complicated assay.

  12. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Surface Water Protection: A Watershed Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coty, J

    2009-03-16

    This surface water protection plan (plan) provides an overview of the management efforts implemented at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that support a watershed approach to protect surface water. This plan fulfills a requirement in the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A to demonstrate a watershed approach for surface water protection that protects the environment and public health. This plan describes the use of a watershed approach within which the Laboratory's current surface water management and protections efforts have been structured and coordinated. With more than 800 million acres of land in the U.S. under federal management and stewardship, a unified approach across agencies provides enhanced resource protection and cost-effectiveness. The DOE adopted, along with other federal agencies, the Unified Federal Policy for a Watershed Approach to Federal Land and Resource Management (UFP) with a goal to protect water quality and aquatic ecosystems on federal lands. This policy intends to prevent and/or reduce water pollution from federal activities while fostering a cost-effective watershed approach to federal land and resource management. The UFP also intends to enhance the implementation of existing laws (e.g., the Clean Water Act [CWA] and National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA]) and regulations. In addition, this provides an opportunity for the federal government to serve as a model for water quality stewardship using a watershed approach for federal land and resource activities that potentially impact surface water and its uses. As a federal land manager, the Laboratory is responsible for a small but important part of those 800 million acres of land. Diverse land uses are required to support the Laboratory's mission and provide an appropriate work environment for its staff. The Laboratory comprises two sites: its main site in Livermore, California, and the Experimental Test Site (Site 300), near Tracy, California. The main site

  13. Michael Goodsite gæsteprofessor på Thunderbird School of Global Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Christian

    2010-01-01

    Professor Michael Goodsite er blevet udnævnt til "Visiting Professor of Global Processes and Senior Research Fellow in Climate Strategy" ved Thunderbird School of Global Management, som har verdens højst rangerede MBA uddannelse inden for international handel.......Professor Michael Goodsite er blevet udnævnt til "Visiting Professor of Global Processes and Senior Research Fellow in Climate Strategy" ved Thunderbird School of Global Management, som har verdens højst rangerede MBA uddannelse inden for international handel....

  14. A Greener, Efficient Approach to Michael Addition of Barbituric Acid to Nitroalkene in Aqueous Diethylamine Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany J. Al-Najjar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient method for the synthesis of a variety of pyrimidine derivatives 3a–t by reaction of barbituric acids 1a,b as Michael donor with nitroalkenes 2a–k as Michael acceptor using an aqueous medium and diethylamine is described. This 1,4-addition strategy offers several advantages, such as using an economic and environmentally benign reaction media, high yields, versatility, and shorter reaction times. The synthesized compounds were identified by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, CHN, IR, and MS. The structure of compound 3a was further confirmed by single crystal X-ray structure determination.

  15. Aza-Michael Mono-addition Using Acidic Alumina under Solventless Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Bosica

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aza-Michael reactions between primary aliphatic and aromatic amines and various Michael acceptors have been performed under environmentally-friendly solventless conditions using acidic alumina as a heterogeneous catalyst to selectively obtain the corresponding mono-adducts in high yields. Ethyl acrylate was the main acceptor used, although others such as acrylonitrile, methyl acrylate and acrylamide were also utilized successfully. Bi-functional amines also gave the mono-adducts in good to excellent yields. Such compounds can serve as intermediates for the synthesis of anti-cancer and antibiotic drugs.

  16. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 2016 Annual Financial Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Kim, P.; Williams, Kim, P.

    2017-06-27

    FY2016 was a year of significant change and progress at Berkeley Lab. In March, Laboratory Director Michael Witherell assumed his new role when former Lab Director Paul Alivisatos became Vice Chancellor for Research at UC Berkeley. Dr. Witherell has solidified the Lab’s strategy, with a focus on long term science and technology priorities. Large-scale science efforts continued to expand at the Lab, including the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument now heading towards construction, and the LUX-ZEPLIN dark matter detector to be built underground in South Dakota. Another proposed project, the Advanced Light Source-Upgrade, was given preliminary approval and will be the Lab’s largest scientific investment in years. Construction of the Integrative Genomics Building began, and will bring together researchers from the Lab’s Joint Genome Institute, now based in Walnut Creek, and the Systems Biology Knowledgebase (K-Base) under one roof. Investment in the Lab’s infrastructure also continues, informed by the Lab’s Infrastructure Strategic Plan. Another important focus is on developing the next generation of scientists with the talent and diversity needed to sustain Berkeley Lab’s scientific leadership and mission contributions to DOE and the Nation. Berkeley Lab received $897.5M in new FY2016 funding, a 12.5% increase over FY2015, for both programmatic and infrastructure activities. While the Laboratory experienced a substantial increase in funding, it was accompanied by only a modest increase in spending, as areas of growth were partially offset by the completion of several major efforts in FY2015. FY2016 costs were $826.9M, an increase of 1.9% over FY2015. Similar to the prior year, the indirect-funded Operations units worked with generally flat budgets to yield more funding for strategic needs. A key challenge for Berkeley Lab continues to be achieving the best balance to fund essential investments, deliver highly effective operational mission support and

  17. Causes of Cancer Death Among First-Degree Relatives in Japanese Families with Lynch Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanakaya, Kohji; Yamaguchi, Tatsuro; Ishikawa, Hideki; Hinoi, Takao; Furukawa, Yoichi; Hirata, Keiji; Saida, Yoshihisa; Shimokawa, Mototsugu; Arai, Masami; Matsubara, Nagahide; Tomita, Naohiro; Tamura, Kazuo; Sugano, Kokichi; Ishioka, Chikashi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Ishida, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Sugihara, Kenichi

    2016-04-01

    To elucidate the causes of cancer death in Japanese families with Lynch syndrome (LS). The distributions of cancer deaths in 485 individuals from 67 families with LS (35, 30, and two families with MutL homologue 1 (MLH1), MSH2, and MSH6 gene mutations, respectively), obtained from the Registry of the Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum were analyzed. Among 98 cancer deaths of first-degree relatives of unknown mutation status, 53%, 19%, 13% (among females), 7% (among females) and 5% were due to colorectal, gastric, uterine, ovarian, and hepatobiliary cancer, respectively. The proportion of deaths from extra-colonic cancer was significantly higher in families with MSH2 mutation than in those with MLH1 mutation (p=0.003). In addition to colonic and uterine cancer, management and surveillance targeting gastric, ovarian and hepatobiliary cancer are considered important for Japanese families with LS. Extra-colonic cancer in families with MSH2 mutation might require for more intensive surveillance. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  18. Novel Mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 Genes in Mexican Patients with Lynch Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Miguel Moreno-Ortiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lynch Syndrome (LS is characterized by germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2. This syndrome is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern and is characterized by early onset colorectal cancer (CRC and extracolonic tumors. The aim of this study was to identify mutations in MMR genes in three Mexican patients with LS. Methods. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed as a prescreening method to identify absent protein expression. PCR, Denaturing High Performance Liquid Chromatography (dHPLC, and Sanger sequencing complemented the analysis. Results. Two samples showed the absence of nuclear staining for MLH1 and one sample showed loss of nuclear staining for MSH2. The mutations found in MLH1 gene were c.2103+1G>C in intron 18 and compound heterozygous mutants c.1852_1854delAAG (p.K618del and c.1852_1853delinsGC (p.K618A in exon 16. In the MSH2 gene, we identified mutation c.638dupT (p.L213fs in exon 3. Conclusions. This is the first report of mutations in MMR genes in Mexican patients with LS and these appear to be novel.

  19. Uncertainties in the Management of a Lynch Syndrome Patient: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Sara; Amaro, Pedro; Cunha, Inês; Fraga, João; Cipriano, Maria Augusta; Tomé, Luís

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Lynch syndrome (LS), the most common hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome, is characterized by mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes leading to an increased cancer risk, namely colorectal cancer. Case In the context of surveillance colonoscopy, a 40-mm flat lesion (0-IIa+b, Paris classification) was identified and submitted to piecemeal mucosal endoscopic resection in a 64-year-old LS patient with an MLH1 germline mutation (262delATC) and two previous segmental resections due to metachronous colorectal cancer. Pathology raised the suspicion of superficial submucosal invasive carcinoma with poor differentiation. Immunochemistry showed heterogeneous MLH1 expression and PMS2 loss. In a short-term follow-up colonoscopy, another 30-mm advanced carcinoma was identified. The patient was referred to surgery. Conclusion This case raises several issues: (1) the potentially fast tumorigenesis and progression to carcinoma in LS and implications for endoscopic screening and surveillance; (2) pitfalls in the interpretation of MMR proteins immunochemistry; (3) the role of endoscopic resection in LS. PMID:29255760

  20. Molecular profile of the Lynch Syndrome in the Republic of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Hiljadnikova-Bajro

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The most frequent type of hereditary colorectal cancer, the one occurring in the setting of the Lynch syndrome (LS is considered a phenotypic manifestation of a germline defect in the mismatch repair mechanism i.e. in the MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 gene. Aiming towards establishment of a standardized protocol involving molecular analyses for diagnosis of this syndrome and developing a unique national register of families with hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes in the Republic of Macedonia, we began a prospective study to reveal the genetic defects among Macedonian patients with colorectal cancer (CRC and identifying families with hereditary CRC. A total of 53 patients fulfilling the revised Bethesda criteria for MSI-genetic testing were compared to 350 patients with sporadic CRC. The results reveal significant differences in age at diagnosis (p=0.03, involvement of microsatellite instability (pG nonsense mutation with a possible founder effect in the Macedonian population, the MLH1 ex.3-12 deletion, as well as the c.244A>G mutation, IVS14- 19A>G and IVS4+65A>C changes in MLH1 without confirmed pathological significance. The observed high frequency (87.5% of the Ile219Val (c.655A>G variant in MLH1 among the LS suspects prompts further analyses to evaluate its involvement in the development of hereditary CRC by itself or as a risk modifying factor among the patients from the Republic of Macedonia.

  1. Uncertainties in the Management of a Lynch Syndrome Patient: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Campos

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lynch syndrome (LS, the most common hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome, is characterized by mutations in mismatch repair (MMR genes leading to an increased cancer risk, namely colorectal cancer. Case: In the context of surveillance colonoscopy, a 40-mm flat lesion (0-IIa+b, Paris classification was identified and submitted to piecemeal mucosal endoscopic resection in a 64-year-old LS patient with an MLH1 germline mutation (262delATC and two previous segmental resections due to metachronous colorectal cancer. Pathology raised the suspicion of superficial submucosal invasive carcinoma with poor differentiation. Immunochemistry showed heterogeneous MLH1 expression and PMS2 loss. In a short-term follow-up colonoscopy, another 30-mm advanced carcinoma was identified. The patient was referred to surgery. Conclusion: This case raises several issues: (1 the potentially fast tumorigenesis and progression to carcinoma in LS and implications for endoscopic screening and surveillance; (2 pitfalls in the interpretation of MMR proteins immunochemistry; (3 the role of endoscopic resection in LS.

  2. The changing landscape of Lynch syndrome due to PMS2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, J; Prakash, A

    2018-07-01

    DNA repair pathways are essential for cellular survival as our DNA is constantly under assault from both exogenous and endogenous DNA damaging agents. Five major mammalian DNA repair pathways exist within a cell to maintain genomic integrity. Of these, the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) pathway is highly conserved among species and is well documented in bacteria. In humans, the importance of MMR is underscored by the discovery that a single mutation in any 1 of 4 genes within the MMR pathway (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2) results in Lynch syndrome (LS). LS is a autosomal dominant condition that predisposes individuals to a higher incidence of many malignancies including colorectal, endometrial, ovarian, and gastric cancers. In this review, we discuss the role of PMS2 in the MMR pathway, the evolving testing criteria used to identify variants in the PMS2 gene, the LS phenotype as well as the autosomal recessive condition called constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome, and current methods used to elucidate the clinical impact of PMS2 mutations. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. High incidence of large deletions in the PMS2 gene in Spanish Lynch syndrome families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brea-Fernández, A J; Cameselle-Teijeiro, J M; Alenda, C; Fernández-Rozadilla, C; Cubiella, J; Clofent, J; Reñé, J M; Anido, U; Milá, M; Balaguer, F; Castells, A; Castellvi-Bel, S; Jover, R; Carracedo, A; Ruiz-Ponte, C

    2014-06-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is caused by germline mutations in one of the four mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Defects in this pathway lead to microsatellite instability (MSI) in DNA tumors, which constitutes the molecular hallmark of this disease. Selection of patients for genetic testing in LS is usually based on fulfillment of diagnostic clinical criteria (i.e. Amsterdam criteria or the revised Bethesda guidelines). However, following these criteria PMS2 mutations have probably been underestimated as their penetrances appear to be lower than those of the other MMR genes. The use of universal MMR study-based strategies, using MSI testing and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining, is being one proposed alternative. Besides, germline mutation detection in PMS2 is complicated by the presence of highly homologous pseudogenes. Nevertheless, specific amplification of PMS2 by long-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the improvement of the analysis of large deletions/duplications by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) overcome this difficulty. By using both approaches, we analyzed 19 PMS2-suspected carriers who have been selected by clinical or universal strategies and found five large deletions and one frameshift mutation in PMS2 in six patients (31%). Owing to the high incidence of large deletions found in our cohort, we recommend MLPA analysis as the first-line method for searching germline mutations in PMS2. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Constitutional mismatch repair deficiency and Lynch syndrome among consecutive Arab Bedouins with colorectal cancer in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Freha, Naim; Leibovici Weissman, Yaara; Fich, Alexander; Barnes Kedar, Inbal; Halpern, Marisa; Sztarkier, Ignacio; Behar, Doron M; Arbib Sneh, Orly; Vilkin, Alex; Baris, Hagit N; Gingold, Rachel; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Niv, Yaron; Goldberg, Yael; Levi, Zohar

    2018-01-01

    We assessed the molecular characteristics and the frequency of mutations in mismatch-repair genes among Bedouin patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) in Israel. Bedouin patients with a diagnosis of CRC at a major hospital in the southern part of Israel were deemed eligible for this study. The primary screening method was immunohistochemical staining for mismatch-repair proteins (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2). For subjects with abnormal immunohistochemical staining, we performed microsatellite instability (MSI) analyses, and for tumors with a loss of MLH1 expression we also performed BRAF testing. In MSI high cases we searched further for germline mutations. Of the 24 patients enrolled, four subjects (16.7%) had MSI high tumors: one subject was found to harbor a biallelic PMS2 mutation, one subject had Lynch syndrome (LS) with MSH6 mutation and two subjects had a loss of MLH1/PMS2 proteins/BRAF wild type /normal MLH1 sequence. Ten patients (41.7%) were younger than 50 at the time of diagnosis and none had first degree relatives with CRC. In conclusion, in this cohort of 24 consecutive Arab Bedouins with CRC, one patient was found to harbor a constitutional mismatch repair deficiency, one patient had LS with MSH6 mutation, and two patients had unresolved loss of MLH1/PMS2 proteins/BRAF wild type phenotype.

  5. Patients with colorectal cancer associated with Lynch syndrome and MLH1 promoter hypermethylation have similar prognoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraldsdottir, Sigurdis; Hampel, Heather; Wu, Christina; Weng, Daniel Y; Shields, Peter G; Frankel, Wendy L; Pan, Xueliang; de la Chapelle, Albert; Goldberg, Richard M; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios

    2016-09-01

    Mismatch repair-deficient (dMMR) colorectal cancer (CRC) is caused by Lynch syndrome (LS) in 3% and sporadic inactivation of MLH1 by hypermethylation (MLH1-hm) in 12% of cases. It is not clear whether outcomes between LS-associated and MLH1-hm CRC differ. The objective of this study was to explore differences in clinical factors and outcomes in these two groups. Patients with dMMR CRC identified by immunohistochemistry staining and treated at a single institution from 1998 to 2012 were included. MLH1-hm was established with BRAF mutational analysis or hypermethylation testing. Patients' charts were accessed for information on pathology, germ-line MMR mutation testing, and clinical course. A total of 143 patients had CRC associated with LS (37 patients, 26%) or MLH1-hm (106 patients, 74%). Patients with LS were younger, more often male, presented more often with stage III disease, and had more metachronous disease than patients with MLH1-hm tumors. There was no difference in cancer-specific survival (CSS) between the groups; overall survival was longer in patients with LS, but this difference was minimal after adjusting for age and stage at diagnosis. CSS did not differ in LS-associated CRC compared with MLH1-hm CRC, suggesting that they carry a similar prognosis.Genet Med 18 9, 863-868.

  6. Constitutional MLH1 methylation presenting with colonic polyposis syndrome and not Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidambi, Trilokesh D; Blanco, Amie; Van Ziffle, Jessica; Terdiman, Jonathan P

    2016-04-01

    At least one-third of patients meeting clinical criteria for Lynch syndrome will have no germline mutation and constitutional epimutations leading to promoter methylation of MLH1 have been identified in a subset of these patients. We report the first case of constitutional MLH1 promoter methylation associated with a colonic polyposis syndrome in a 39 year-old man with a family history of colorectal cancer (CRC) and a personal history of 21 polyps identified over 8 years as well as the development of two synchronous CRCs over 16 months who was evaluated for a hereditary cancer syndrome. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) of multiple tumors showed absent MLH1 and PMS2 expression, though germline testing with Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification of these mismatch repair genes (MMR) genes was negative. A next generation sequencing panel of 29 genes also failed to identify a pathogenic mutation. Hypermethylation was identified in MLH1 intron 1 in tumor specimens along with buccal cells and peripheral white blood cells, confirming the diagnosis of constitutional MLH1 promoter methylation. This case highlights that constitutional MLH1 methylation should be considered in the differential diagnosis for a polyposis syndrome if IHC staining shows absent MMR gene expression.

  7. Spectrum of mismatch repair gene mutations and clinical presentation of Hispanic individuals with Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunga, Annette Y; Ricker, Charité; Espenschied, Carin R; Castillo, Danielle; Melas, Marilena; Herzog, Josef; Bannon, Sarah; Cruz-Correa, Marcia; Lynch, Patrick; Solomon, Ilana; Gruber, Stephen B; Weitzel, Jeffrey N

    2017-04-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS), the most common hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome, is caused by mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations. However, data about MMR mutations in Hispanics are limited. This study aims to describe the spectrum of MMR mutations in Hispanics with LS and explore ancestral origins. This case series involved an IRB-approved retrospective chart review of self-identified Hispanic patients (n = 397) seen for genetic cancer risk assessment at four collaborating academic institutions in California, Texas, and Puerto Rico who were evaluated by MMR genotyping and/or tumor analysis. A literature review was conducted for all mutations identified. Of those who underwent clinical genetic testing (n = 176), 71 had MMR gene mutations. Nine mutations were observed more than once. One third (3/9) of recurrent mutations and two additional mutations (seen only once) were previously reported in Spain, confirming the influence of Spanish ancestry on MMR mutations in Hispanic populations. The recurrent mutations identified (n = 9) included both previously reported mutations as well as unique mutations not in the literature. This is the largest report of Hispanic MMR mutations in North America; however, a larger sample and haplotype analyses are needed to better understand recurrent MMR mutations in Hispanic populations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Recognition of Lynch Syndrome Amongst Newly Diagnosed Colorectal Cancers at St. Paul’s Hospital

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    Steven Pi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lynch Syndrome (LS is the most common cause of inherited colorectal cancer (CRC. In British Columbia, most centres still use clinical criteria (Amsterdam II, Revised Bethesda, or the BC Cancer Agency’s criteria to determine who should undergo further first-line testing in the form of microsatellite instability or immunohistochemistry staining. Given the limitations with this strategy, LS is thought to be underrecognized. Objective. To investigate whether LS is truly underrecognized when compared to the reported prevalence. Methods. A retrospective chart review of all CRC cases diagnosed at St. Paul’s Hospital from 2010 to 2013 was conducted. Results. 246 patients met inclusion criteria. 76% (83/109 with a family history of malignancy were unable to recall the specific malignancy or age of diagnosis. 18% (43/235 were only asked about a history of gastrointestinal related malignancy and 26% (65/246 met at least one of the three criteria but only 21% (13/63 received further investigation. Only 1.6% (4/246 had LS compared to the reported prevalence of 2–5% of all CRC cases. Conclusion. This data supports our hypothesis that LS is underrecognized. Issues at the patient, physician, and systems level need to be evaluated to determine where the limitations preventing appropriate testing are occurring.

  9. Prevalence of Lynch syndrome among patients with newly diagnosed endometrial cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Egoavil

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome (LS is a hereditary condition that increases the risk for endometrial and other cancers. The identification of endometrial cancer (EC patients with LS has the potential to influence life-saving interventions. We aimed to study the prevalence of LS among EC patients in our population.Universal screening for LS was applied for a consecutive series EC. Tumor testing using microsatellite instability (MSI, immunohistochemistry (IHC for mismatch-repair (MMR protein expression and MLH1-methylation analysis, when required, was used to select LS-suspicious cases. Sequencing of corresponding MMR genes was performed.One hundred and seventy-three EC (average age, 63 years were screened. Sixty-one patients (35% had abnormal IHC or MSI results. After MLH1 methylation analysis, 27 cases were considered suspicious of LS. From these, 22 were contacted and referred for genetic counseling. Nineteen pursued genetic testing and eight were diagnosed of LS. Mutations were more frequent in younger patients (<50 yrs. Three cases had either intact IHC or MSS and reinforce the need of implement the EC screening with both techniques.The prevalence of LS among EC patients was 4.6% (8/173; with a predictive frequency of 6.6% in the Spanish population. Universal screening of EC for LS is recommended.

  10. Novel germline MSH2 mutation in lynch syndrome patient surviving multiple cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janavicius Ramunas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lynch syndrome (LS individuals are predisposed to a variety of cancers, most commonly colorectal, uterine, urinary tract, ovarian, small bowel, stomach and biliary tract cancers. The risk of extracolonic manifestations appears to be highest in MSH2 mutations carriers. We present a carrier case with a novel MSH2 gene mutation that clearly demonstrates the broad extent of LS phenotypic expression and highlights several important clinical aspects. Current evidence suggests that colorectal tumors from LS patients tend to have better prognoses than their sporadic counterparts, however survival benefits for other cancers encountered in LS are unclear. In this article we describe a family with a novel protein truncating mutation of c.2388delT in the MSH2 gene, particularly focusing on one individual carrier affected with multiple primary cancers who is surviving 25 years on. Our report of multiple primary tumors occurring in the 12-25 years interval might suggest these patients do not succumb to other extracolonic cancers, provided they are regularly followed-up.

  11. Review of the Lynch syndrome: history, molecular genetics, screening, differential diagnosis, and medicolegal ramifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, HT; Lynch, PM; Lanspa, SJ; Snyder, CL; Lynch, JF; Boland, CR

    2010-01-01

    More than one million patients will manifest colorectal cancer (CRC) this year of which, conservatively, approximately 3% (~30,700 cases) will have Lynch syndrome (LS), the most common hereditary CRC predisposing syndrome. Each case belongs to a family with clinical needs that require genetic counseling, DNA testing for mismatch repair genes (most frequently MLH1 or MSH2) and screening for CRC. Colonoscopy is mandated, given CRC’s proximal occurrence (70–80% proximal to the splenic flexure). Due to its early age of onset (average 45 years of age), colonoscopy needs to start by age 25, and because of its accelerated carcinogenesis, it should be repeated every 1 to 2 years through age 40 and then annually thereafter. Should CRC occur, subtotal colectomy may be necessary, given the marked frequency of synchronous and metachronous CRC. Because 40–60% of female patients will manifest endometrial cancer, tailored management is essential. Additional extracolonic cancers include ovary, stomach, small bowel, pancreas, hepatobiliary tract, upper uroepithelial tract, brain (Turcot variant) and sebaceous adenomas/carcinomas (Muir-Torre variant). LS explains only 10–25% of familial CRC. PMID:19659756

  12. Suspected Lynch syndrome associated MSH6 variants: A functional assay to determine their pathogenicity.

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    Hellen Houlleberghs

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome (LS is a hereditary cancer predisposition caused by inactivating mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes. Mutations in the MSH6 DNA MMR gene account for approximately 18% of LS cases. Many LS-associated sequence variants are nonsense and frameshift mutations that clearly abrogate MMR activity. However, missense mutations whose functional implications are unclear are also frequently seen in suspected-LS patients. To conclusively diagnose LS and enroll patients in appropriate surveillance programs to reduce morbidity as well as mortality, the functional consequences of these variants of uncertain clinical significance (VUS must be defined. We present an oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis screen for the identification of pathogenic MSH6 VUS. In the screen, the MSH6 variant of interest is introduced into mouse embryonic stem cells by site-directed mutagenesis. Subsequent selection for MMR-deficient cells using the DNA damaging agent 6-thioguanine (6TG allows the identification of MMR abrogating VUS because solely MMR-deficient cells survive 6TG exposure. We demonstrate the efficacy of the genetic screen, investigate the phenotype of 26 MSH6 VUS and compare our screening results to clinical data from suspected-LS patients carrying these variant alleles.

  13. Las cartas privadas de Wanda Morla Lynch: entre género discursivo y fuente documental

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    Carolina Miranda

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This essay is an approach to the private letters of Wanda Morla Lynch, a Chilean woman from the early XX century. This approach considers the epistolary genre as a complex and often contradictory genre, propitious to describe a feminine intimacy, feelings and subjectivity, due to the relationship of complicity between the letters and the historically acquired status of subordination, imposed by the patriarchal society. In this sense, this epistolary corpus will allow us establishing a characterization of these private letters as they have a formal/discursive singularity in relation to other genres that conform the corpus of autobiographic writing, as well as exploring and rescuing the value of those letters as a documentary source as they unveil the voice of a woman, who was a privileged witness of the changes that took place in Paris in the 1920’s, epicenter of the modernist avant-garde of the time. Regarding this last consideration, Wanda Morla Lynch’s letters can be also described as a “journey diary” (historically known as a particularly masculine experience, giving us the possibility of reading these letters as a secretly transgressor gesture towards the social conventions of an era.

  14. Asymmetric organocatalytic Michael addition of Meldrum's acid to nitroalkenes: probing the mechanism of bifunctional thiourea organocatalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Kataja, Antti O.; Koskinen, Ari M.P.

    2010-01-01

    The asymmetric Michael addition of Meldrum’s acid to nitroalkenes was studied using a novel type of Cinchona alkaloid-based bifunctional thiourea organocatalyst. The functionality of the thiourea catalysts was also probed by preparing and testing thiourea-N-methylated analogues of the well-known bis-(3,5-trifluoromethyl)phenyl-substituted catalyst. Peer reviewed

  15. Passings to note: Paul Michael Packman, MD; S. Charles Schulz, MD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Donald W

    2018-02-01

    One of the keys to the success of Annals of Clinical Psychiatry has always been the tireless efforts of our dedicated Editorial Board. We recently lost 2 longtime Editorial Board members, Drs. Paul Michael Packman and S. Charles Schulz. Both will be greatly missed.

  16. Michael Perelman: An ecological future in view of Marxist Economics (Ⅱ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren Xiaomei

    2009-01-01

    @@ Interviewee profile: Michael Perelman, currently professor of Economics Department of California State University, USA, American economist and economic historian with nearly 20 publications in the field of economics criticism, including Railroading Economics, Manufacturing Discontent, The Perverse Economy, and The Invention of Capitalism.

  17. Wolff-Michael Roth's passibility: at the limits of the constructivist metaphor: a book review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendel, Michelle

    2014-12-01

    Wolff-Michael Roth deconstructs the preeminent role conceded to constructivism in Science Education and demonstrates how we learn and know through pain, suffering, love or passion. This review explores his book "Passibility: At the Limits of the Constructivist Metaphor" through the eyes of an outsider to the world of science education.

  18. Assessment of lipid profile of a group of undergraduates in Michael ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The aim of this study was to measure the lipid fractions in serum blood samples of apparently healthy undergraduates of Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike. Methods: A total of one hundred consenting males and females aged between 19-30 years were purposively selected from the ...

  19. Highly Functionalized Cyclopentane Derivatives by Tandem Michael Addition/Radical Cyclization/Oxygenation Reactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holan, Martin; Pohl, Radek; Císařová, I.; Klepetářová, Blanka; Jones, P. G.; Jahn, Ullrich

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 27 (2015), s. 9877-9888 ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-40188S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : cyclization * domino reactions * electron transfer * Michael addition * radical reactions Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.771, year: 2015

  20. Hexafluorobenzene: A powerful solvent for a noncovalent stereoselective organocatalytic Michael addition reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Lattanzi, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    A dramatic enhancement of the diastereo- and enantioselectivity in the nitro-Michael addition reaction organocatalysed by a commercially available α,α-l-diaryl prolinol was disclosed when performing the reaction in unconventional hexafluorobenzene as a medium. DFT calculations were performed to clarify the origin of stereoselectivity and the role of C 6F 6. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012.