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Sample records for mice infected orally

  1. Toxoplasma gondii oral infection induces intestinal inflammation and retinochoroiditis in mice genetically selected for immune oral tolerance resistance.

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    Raul Ramos Furtado Dias

    Full Text Available Toxoplasmosis is a worldwide disease with most of the infections originating through the oral route and generates various pathological manifestations, ranging from meningoencephalitis to retinochoroiditis and inflammatory bowel disease. Animal models for these pathologies are scarce and have limitations. We evaluated the outcome of Toxoplasma gondii oral infection with 50 or 100 cysts of the ME-49 strain in two lines of mice with extreme phenotypes of susceptibility (TS or resistance (TR to immune oral tolerance. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the behaviour of TS and TR mice, orally infected by T. gondii, and determine its value as a model for inflammatory diseases study. Mortality during the acute stage of the infection for TR was 50% for both dosages, while 10 and 40% of the TS died after infection with these respective dosages. In the chronic stage, the remaining TS succumbed while TR survived for 90 days. The TS displayed higher parasite load with lower intestinal inflammation and cellular proliferation, notwithstanding myocarditis, pneumonitis and meningoencephalitis. TR presented massive necrosis of villi and crypt, comparable to inflammatory bowel disease, with infiltration of lymphoid cells in the lamina propria of the intestines. Also, TR mice infected with 100 cysts presented intense cellular infiltrate within the photoreceptor layer of the eyes, changes in disposition and morphology of the retina cell layers and retinochoroiditis. During the infection, high levels of IL-6 were detected in the serum of TS mice and TR mice presented high amounts of IFN-γ and TNF-α. Both mice lineages developed different disease outcomes, but it is emphasized that TR and TS mice presented acute and chronic stages of the infection, demonstrating that the two lineages offer an attractive model for studying toxoplasmosis.

  2. Toxoplasma gondii Oral Infection Induces Intestinal Inflammation and Retinochoroiditis in Mice Genetically Selected for Immune Oral Tolerance Resistance

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    Dias, Raul Ramos Furtado; de Carvalho, Eulógio Carlos Queiroz; Leite, Carla Cristina da Silva; Tedesco, Roberto Carlos; Calabrese, Katia da Silva; Silva, Antonio Carlos; DaMatta, Renato Augusto; de Fatima Sarro-Silva, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a worldwide disease with most of the infections originating through the oral route and generates various pathological manifestations, ranging from meningoencephalitis to retinochoroiditis and inflammatory bowel disease. Animal models for these pathologies are scarce and have limitations. We evaluated the outcome of Toxoplasma gondii oral infection with 50 or 100 cysts of the ME-49 strain in two lines of mice with extreme phenotypes of susceptibility (TS) or resistance (TR) to immune oral tolerance. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the behaviour of TS and TR mice, orally infected by T. gondii, and determine its value as a model for inflammatory diseases study. Mortality during the acute stage of the infection for TR was 50% for both dosages, while 10 and 40% of the TS died after infection with these respective dosages. In the chronic stage, the remaining TS succumbed while TR survived for 90 days. The TS displayed higher parasite load with lower intestinal inflammation and cellular proliferation, notwithstanding myocarditis, pneumonitis and meningoencephalitis. TR presented massive necrosis of villi and crypt, comparable to inflammatory bowel disease, with infiltration of lymphoid cells in the lamina propria of the intestines. Also, TR mice infected with 100 cysts presented intense cellular infiltrate within the photoreceptor layer of the eyes, changes in disposition and morphology of the retina cell layers and retinochoroiditis. During the infection, high levels of IL-6 were detected in the serum of TS mice and TR mice presented high amounts of IFN-γ and TNF-α. Both mice lineages developed different disease outcomes, but it is emphasized that TR and TS mice presented acute and chronic stages of the infection, demonstrating that the two lineages offer an attractive model for studying toxoplasmosis. PMID:25437299

  3. Oral Antibiotic Treatment of Mice Exacerbates the Disease Severity of Multiple Flavivirus Infections

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    Larissa B. Thackray

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Although the outcome of flavivirus infection can vary from asymptomatic to lethal, environmental factors modulating disease severity are poorly defined. Here, we observed increased susceptibility of mice to severe West Nile (WNV, Dengue, and Zika virus infections after treatment with oral antibiotics (Abx that depleted the gut microbiota. Abx treatment impaired the development of optimal T cell responses, with decreased levels of WNV-specific CD8+ T cells associated with increased infection and immunopathology. Abx treatments that resulted in enhanced WNV susceptibility generated changes in the overall structure of the gut bacterial community and in the abundance of specific bacterial taxa. As little as 3 days of treatment with ampicillin was sufficient to alter host immunity and WNV outcome. Our results identify oral Abx therapy as a potential environmental determinant of systemic viral disease, and they raise the possibility that perturbation of the gut microbiota may have deleterious consequences for subsequent flavivirus infections. : Thackray et al. observed increased susceptibility to West Nile, Zika, and Dengue virus infections following oral antibiotic treatment in mice. Antibiotics altered the bacterial abundance and community structure and the development of optimal T cell immunity. These data suggest that antibiotics may have deleterious consequences for subsequent flavivirus infections. Keywords: West Nile virus, Dengue virus, Zika virus, flavivirus, oral antibiotics, gut microbiota, risk factors, pathogenesis determinants, immunity

  4. Immunohematopoietic modulation by oral β-1,3-glucan in mice infected with Listeria monocytogenes.

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    Torello, Cristiane O; de Souza Queiroz, Julia; Oliveira, Sueli C; Queiroz, Mary L S

    2010-12-01

    In this study we demonstrated that the oral administration of β-1,3-glucan (Imunoglucan®) protects mice from a lethal dose of Listeria monocytogenes (LM) when administered prophylactically for 10 days at the doses of 150 and 300 mg/kg, with survival rates up to 40%. These doses also prevented the myelosuppression and the splenomegaly caused by a sublethal infection with LM, due to increased numbers of granulocyte-macrophage progenitors (CFU-GM) in the bone marrow. Investigation of the production of colony-stimulating factors revealed an increased colony-stimulating activity (CSA) in the serum of infected mice pre-treated with Imunoglucan®. The treatment also restored the reduced ability of stromal cells to display myeloid progenitors in long-term bone marrow cultures (LTBMC) and up-regulated IL-6 and IL-1α production by these cells in the infected mice, which was consistent with higher number of non-adherent cells. Additional studies to investigate the levels of interferon-gamma (INF-γ) in the supernatant of splenocyte cultures demonstrated a further increase in the level of this cytokine in infected-treated mice, compared to infected controls. In all cases, no differences were observed between the responses of the two optimal biologically effective doses. In contrast, no significant changes were produced by the treatment with the 50mg/kg dose. In addition, no changes were observed in normal mice treated with the three doses used. All together our results suggest that orally given Imunoglucan® indirectly modulates immune activity and probably disengages Listeria induced suppression of these responses by inducing a higher reserve of myeloid progenitors in the bone marrow in consequence of biologically active cytokine release (CSFs, IL-1α, IL-6, and INF-γ). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of Vehicles Used for Oral Dosing of Test Molecules on the Progression of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Mice

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    Singh, Shubhra; Dwivedi, Richa; Chaturvedi, Vinita

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical evaluation of drug-like molecules requires their oral administration to experimental animals using suitable vehicles. We studied the effect of oral dosing with corn oil, carboxymethyl cellulose, dimethyl sulfoxide, and polysorbate-80 on the progression of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in mice. Infection was monitored by physical (survival time and body weight) and bacteriological (viable counts in lungs) parameters. Compared with water, corn oil significantly improved both ...

  6. Polymicrobial Oral Infection with Four Periodontal Bacteria Orchestrates a Distinct Inflammatory Response and Atherosclerosis in ApoE null Mice.

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    Chukkapalli, Sasanka S; Velsko, Irina M; Rivera-Kweh, Mercedes F; Zheng, Donghang; Lucas, Alexandra R; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) develops from a synergy of complex subgingival oral microbiome, and is linked to systemic inflammatory atherosclerotic vascular disease (ASVD). To investigate how a polybacterial microbiome infection influences atherosclerotic plaque progression, we infected the oral cavity of ApoE null mice with a polybacterial consortium of 4 well-characterized periodontal pathogens, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerealla forsythia and Fusobacterium nucleatum, that have been identified in human atherosclerotic plaque by DNA screening. We assessed periodontal disease characteristics, hematogenous dissemination of bacteria, peripheral T cell response, serum inflammatory cytokines, atherosclerosis risk factors, atherosclerotic plaque development, and alteration of aortic gene expression. Polybacterial infections have established gingival colonization in ApoE null hyperlipidemic mice and displayed invasive characteristics with hematogenous dissemination into cardiovascular tissues such as the heart and aorta. Polybacterial infection induced significantly higher levels of serum risk factors oxidized LDL (p Periodontal microbiome infection is associated with significant decreases in Apoa1, Apob, Birc3, Fga, FgB genes that are associated with atherosclerosis. Periodontal infection for 12 weeks had modified levels of inflammatory molecules, with decreased Fas ligand, IL-13, SDF-1 and increased chemokine RANTES. In contrast, 24 weeks of infection induced new changes in other inflammatory molecules with reduced KC, MCSF, enhancing GM-CSF, IFNγ, IL-1β, IL-13, IL-4, IL-13, lymphotactin, RANTES, and also an increase in select inflammatory molecules. This study demonstrates unique differences in the host immune response to a polybacterial periodontal infection with atherosclerotic lesion progression in a mouse model.

  7. Oral intake of Lactobacillus rhamnosus M21 enhances the survival rate of mice lethally infected with influenza virus.

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    Song, Jeong Ah; Kim, Hee Joo; Hong, Seong Keun; Lee, Dong Hoon; Lee, Sang Won; Song, Chang Seon; Kim, Ki Taek; Choi, In Soo; Lee, Joong Bok; Park, Seung Yong

    2016-02-01

    Influenza viruses cause acute respiratory disease. Because of the high genetic variability of viruses, effective vaccines and antiviral agents are limited. Considering the fact that the site of influenza virus entry is the mucosa of the upper respiratory tract, probiotics that can enhance mucosal immunity as well as systemic immunity could be an important source of treatment against influenza infection. Mice were fed with Lactobacillus rhamnosus M21 or skim milk and were challenged with influenza virus. The resulting survival rate, lung inflammation, and changes in the cytokine and secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) levels were examined. Because of infection (influenza virus), all the mice in the control group and 60% of the mice in the L. rhamnosus M21 group died; however, the remaining 40% of the mice fed with L. rhamnosus M21 survived the infection. Pneumonia was severe in the control group but moderate in the group treated with L. rhamnosus M21. Although there were no significant changes in the proinflammatory cytokines in the lung lysates of mice collected from both groups, levels of interferon-γ and interleukin-2, which are representative cytokines of type I helper T cells, were significantly increased in the L. rhamnosus M21-treated group. An increase in sIgA as well as the diminution of inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was also observed in the L. rhamnosus M21-treated group. These results demonstrate that orally administered L. rhamnosus M21 activates humoral as well as cellular immune responses, conferring increased resistance to the host against influenza virus infection. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Cystic echinococcosis therapy: Albendazole-loaded lipid nanocapsules enhance the oral bioavailability and efficacy in experimentally infected mice.

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    Pensel, Patricia E; Ullio Gamboa, Gabriela; Fabbri, Julia; Ceballos, Laura; Sanchez Bruni, Sergio; Alvarez, Luis I; Allemandi, Daniel; Benoit, Jean Pierre; Palma, Santiago D; Elissondo, María C

    2015-12-01

    Therapeutic failures attributed to medical management of cystic echinococcosis (CE) with albendazole (ABZ) have been primarily linked to the poor drug absorption rate resulting in low drug level in plasma and hydatid cysts. Lipid nanocapsules (LNCs) represent nanocarriers designed to encapsulate lipophilic drugs, such as ABZ. The goals of the current work were: (i) to characterize the plasma and cyst drug exposure after the administration of ABZ as ABZ-LNCs or ABZ suspension (ABZ-SUSP) in mice infected with Echinococcus granulosus, and ii) to compare the clinical efficacies of both ABZ formulations. Enhanced ABZ sulphoxide (ABZ-SO) concentration profiles were obtained in plasma and cysts from ABZ-LNC treated animals. ABZSO exposure (AUC0-LOQ) was significantly higher in plasma and cyst after the ABZ-LNC treatments, both orally and subcutaneously, compared to that observed after oral administration of ABZ-SUSP. Additionally, ABZSO concentrations measured in cysts from ABZ-LNC treated mice were 1.7-fold higher than those detected in plasma. This enhanced drug availability correlated with an increased efficacy against secondary CE in mice observed for the ABZ-LNCs, while ABZ-SUSP did not reach differences with the untreated control group. This new pharmacotechnically-based strategy could be a potential alternative to improve the treatment of human CE. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Infecção via oral por Trypanosoma evansi em animais de laboratório Oral infection by Trypanosoma evansi in rats and mice

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    Aleksandro Schafer da Silva

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Testou-se a infecção de Trypanosoma evansi pela via oral em ratos e camundongos, através de sangue contaminado de ambas as espécies. Dez ratos e dez camundongos foram alocados em quatro grupos iguais A e B (ratos, C e D (camundongos. Os grupos A e C receberam sangue contaminado de um rato e o grupo B e D de um camundongo, através de uma sonda. O volume de sangue administrado foi de 0,2ml, o qual apresentava uma concentração de 10(7 tripanossomas ml-1. Os animais foram mantidos em temperatura e umidade constantes (25°C e 80% UR, sendo realizados esfregaços sanguíneos diários para identificar o período pré-patente e a evolução do parasita na circulação. Nos grupos A e B, o período pré-patente variou de 19 a 25 dias, e o período entre a detecção dos parasitas e a morte dos animais foi em média de 12,7 dias. Os camundongos do grupo C e D não apresentaram infecção pelo parasita, sendo estes avaliados por 60 dias. Os ratos foram susceptíveis a infecção por T. evansi pela via oral; entretanto, os camundongos não se contaminaram com o protozoário por via digestiva.In this research, Trypanosoma evansi infection was tested in rats and mice by oral ingestion of contaminated blood. Groups of ten rats and ten mice were disposed in four experimental groups: A and B (rats, C and D (mice. The groups A and C were contaminated by rat-contaminated blood; B and C groups by mouse-contaminated blood. The blood was given using a probe filled with 0.2ml of contaminated blood with 10(7 trypanosomes ml-1. These animals were maintained at constant temperature and humidity (25°C and 80% UR. Dairy blood smear were done to identify the prepatent period and evolution of parasite in the circulation. In the A and B groups, the pre latency period varied from 19 to 25 days and the period of parasite detection and animals death was an average of 12.7 days. The C and D groups did not present infection by the parasite even when evaluated for 60 days

  10. Cytokine profile and natural killer cell activity in Listeria monocytogenes infected mice treated orally with Petiveria alliacea extract.

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    Queiroz, M L; Quadros, M R; Santos, L M

    2000-08-01

    In this work, we investigated the effects of Petiveria alliacea extract on the production of Th1-type and Th2-type cytokines and on NK cells activity in normal and Listeria monocytogenes infected mice. Our results demonstrated that in normal/non-infected mice P. alliacea administration led to increased levels of Interleukin-2 (IL-2). The infection alone enhanced INF-gamma levels and NK cell activity at 48 and 72 hours of infection. The treatment with five consecutive doses of 1000 mg/kg/day of P. alliacea extract, given previously to infection, led to further increases in IL-2 levels, in relation to normal/non-infected/P. alliacea treated controls, and in INF-gamma levels at 72 h of infection, compared to infected mice. On the other hand, the production of IL-4 and IL-10 were not altered either by the infection or by the treatment with P. alliacea extract. NK cells activity increased at 48 h and 72 h following the inoculation of the bacteria. When mice were treated with P. alliacea previously to infection, NK activity was higher than that observed at 48 h, 72 h and 120 h of infection in the infected animal. Based on these findings we suggest that P. alliacea up-regulates anti-bacterial immune response by enhancing both Th1 function and the activity of NK cells.

  11. Different metabolic profiles of K1 serotype and non-serotype K1 and K2 Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates in oral infection mice model.

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    Chen, Nan; Wang, Lin-Lin; Xue, Juan; Ma, Xiang-Bo; Zhao, Sheng; Rong, Rui-Xue; Li, Hong-Quan; Ding, Liang; Zheng, Ming-Zhi; Chen, Ying-Ying; Duan, Fei; Shen, Yue-Liang

    2014-10-01

    K1 or K2 serotype Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate caused clinical pyogenic liver abscess (KLA) infection is prevalent in many areas. It has been identified that K1 or K2 serotype K. pneumoniae isolates caused KLA infection in mice by oral inoculation. In our study, K1 serotype K. pneumoniae isolate Kp1002 with hypermucoviscosity (HV)-positive phenotype caused KLA infection in C57BL/6 mice by oral inoculation. Simultaneously, non-serotype K1 and K2 isolate Kp1014 with HV-negative phenotype failed to cause KLA infection in the same manner. It seems that gastrointestinal tract translocation is the pathway by which K1 or K2 serotype K. pneumoniae caused KLA infection. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to further analyze metabolic profile changes in mice with KLA infection. Data showed that after Kp1002 or Kp1014 oral inoculation, serum Phosphatidylcholine (PC) and Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) levels significantly changed in mice. Some PC and LPC molecules showed changes both in the Kp1002 KLA group and the Kp1014 no-KLA group compared with the control group. The level of 18:1/18:2-PC significantly changed in the Kp1002 KLA group compared with the control group, but showed no change between the Kp1014 no-KLA group and the control group. The level of 18:1/18:2-PC might have been particularly affected by KLA infection caused by K1 serotype K. pneumoniae Kp1002. It may be a potential biomarker for KLA infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Oral lactoferrin protects against experimental candidiasis in mice.

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    Velliyagounder, K; Alsaedi, W; Alabdulmohsen, W; Markowitz, K; Fine, D H

    2015-01-01

    To determine the role of human lactoferrin (hLF) in protecting the oral cavities of mice against Candida albicans infection in lactoferrin knockout (LFKO(-/-)) mice was compared to wild-type (WT) mice. We also aim to determine the protective role of hLF in LFKO(-/-) mice. Antibiotic-treated immunosuppressed mice were inoculated with C. albicans (or sham infection) by oral swab and evaluated for the severity of infection after 7 days of infection. To determine the protective role of hLF, we added 0·3% solution of hLF to the drinking water given to some of the mice. CFU count, scoring of lesions and microscopic observations were carried out to determine the severity of infection. LFKO(-/-) I mice showed a 2 log (P = 0·001) higher CFUs of C. albicans in the oral cavity compared to the WT mice infected with C. albicans (WTI). LFKO(-/-) I mice given hLF had a 3 log (P = 0·001) reduction in CFUs in the oral cavity compared to untreated LFKO(-/-) I mice. The severity of infection, observed by light microscopy, revealed that the tongue of the LFKO(-/-) I mice showed more white patches compared to WTI and LFKO(-/-) I + hLF mice. Scanning electron microscopic observations revealed that more filiform papillae were destroyed in LFKO(-/-) I mice when compared to WTI or LFKO(-/-) I + hLF mice. Human LF is important in protecting mice from oral C. albicans infection. Administered hLF may be used to prevent C. albicans infection. Human LF, a multifunctional iron-binding glycoprotein can be used as a therapeutic active ingredient in oral healthcare products against C. albicans. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Oral sex, oral health and orogenital infections

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    Rajiv Saini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral sex is commonly practiced by sexually active male-female and same-gender couples of various ages, including adolescents. The various type of oral sex practices are fellatio, cunnilingus and analingus. Oral sex is infrequently examined in research on adolescents; oral sex can transmit oral, respiratory, and genital pathogens. Oral health has a direct impact on the transmission of infection; a cut in your mouth, bleeding gums, lip sores or broken skin increases chances of infection. Although oral sex is considered a low risk activity, it is important to use protection and safer sex precautions. There are various methods of preventing infection during oral sex such as physical barriers, health and medical issues, ethical issues and oral hygiene and dental issues. The lesions or unhealthy periodontal status of oral cavity accelerates the phenomenon of transmission of infections into the circulation. Thus consequences of unhealthy or painful oral cavity are significant and oral health should be given paramount importance for the practice of oral sex.

  14. Oral administration of Lactobacillus plantarum strain AYA enhances IgA secretion and provides survival protection against influenza virus infection in mice.

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    Yosuke Kikuchi

    Full Text Available The mucosal immune system provides the first line of defense against inhaled and ingested pathogenic microbacteria and viruses. This defense system, to a large extent, is mediated by the actions of secretory IgA. In this study, we screened 140 strains of lactic acid bacteria for induction of IgA production by murine Peyer's patch cells. We selected one strain and named it Lactobacillus plantarum AYA. We found that L. plantarum AYA-induced production of IL-6 in Peyer's patch dendritic cells, with this production promoting IgA(+ B cells to differentiate into IgA-secreting plasma cells. We also observed that oral administration of L. plantarum AYA in mice caused an increase in IgA production in the small intestine and lung. This production of IgA correlated strongly with protective ability, with the treated mice surviving longer than the control mice after lethal influenza virus infection. Our data therefore reveals a novel immunoregulatory role of the L. plantarum AYA strain which enhances mucosal IgA production and provides protection against respiratory influenza virus infection.

  15. Pathogenesis of oral FIV infection.

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    Craig Miller

    Full Text Available Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV is the feline analogue of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and features many hallmarks of HIV infection and pathogenesis, including the development of concurrent oral lesions. While HIV is typically transmitted via parenteral transmucosal contact, recent studies prove that oral transmission can occur, and that saliva from infected individuals contains significant amounts of HIV RNA and DNA. While it is accepted that FIV is primarily transmitted by biting, few studies have evaluated FIV oral infection kinetics and transmission mechanisms over the last 20 years. Modern quantitative analyses applied to natural FIV oral infection could significantly further our understanding of lentiviral oral disease and transmission. We therefore characterized FIV salivary viral kinetics and antibody secretions to more fully document oral viral pathogenesis. Our results demonstrate that: (i saliva of FIV-infected cats contains infectious virus particles, FIV viral RNA at levels equivalent to circulation, and lower but significant amounts of FIV proviral DNA; (ii the ratio of FIV RNA to DNA is significantly higher in saliva than in circulation; (iii FIV viral load in oral lymphoid tissues (tonsil, lymph nodes is significantly higher than mucosal tissues (buccal mucosa, salivary gland, tongue; (iv salivary IgG antibodies increase significantly over time in FIV-infected cats, while salivary IgA levels remain static; and, (v saliva from naïve Specific Pathogen Free cats inhibits FIV growth in vitro. Collectively, these results suggest that oral lymphoid tissues serve as a site for enhanced FIV replication, resulting in accumulation of FIV particles and FIV-infected cells in saliva. Failure to induce a virus-specific oral mucosal antibody response, and/or viral capability to overcome inhibitory components in saliva may perpetuate chronic oral cavity infection. Based upon these findings, we propose a model of oral FIV pathogenesis

  16. Oral delivery of the Sj23LHD-GST antigen by Salmonella typhimurium type III secretion system protects against Schistosoma japonicum infection in mice.

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    Guo Chen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schistosomiasis japonica is a zoonotic parasitic disease and oral vaccine delivery system would be benefit for prevention of this disease. Although attenuated salmonella has been used as an antigen expression vector for oral vaccine development, the membrane-bound vacuoles in which bacteria reside hinders the presentation of expressed heterologous antigens to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules. The present work used an attenuated Salmonella typhimurium strain VNP20009 to secretory expression of Sj23LHDGST bivalent antigen from Schistosoma japonicum and tested the protective efficacy against S. japonicum infection in orally immunized mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Promoters (nirB or pagC were used to express the antigen (Sj23LHDGST and the Salmonella type III or α-hemolysin secretion system was employed to secrete it. The immunoblotting analysis and fluorescent microscopy revealed that the antigen was effectively expressed and delivered to the cytosol of macrophages in vitro. Among recombinant vaccine strains, an engineered VNP20009 which expressed the antigen by nirB promoter and secreted it through type III secretion system (nirB-sopE(1-104-Sj23LHD-GST efficiently protected against S. japonicum infection in a mouse model. This strain elicited a predominantly IgG(2a antibody response and a markedly increase in the production of IL-12 and IFN-γ. The flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that this strain caused T cell activation as evidenced by significantly increased expression of CD44 and CD69. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Oral delivery of antigen by nirB-driven Salmonella typhimurium type III secretion system is a novel, safe, inexpensive, efficient and convenient approach for schistosome vaccine development.

  17. Examining the association between oral health and oral HPV infection.

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    Bui, Thanh Cong; Markham, Christine M; Ross, Michael Wallis; Mullen, Patricia Dolan

    2013-09-01

    Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the cause of 40% to 80% of oropharyngeal cancers; yet, no published study has examined the role of oral health in oral HPV infection, either independently or in conjunction with other risk factors. This study examined the relation between oral health and oral HPV infection and the interactive effects of oral health, smoking, and oral sex on oral HPV infection. Our analyses comprised 3,439 participants ages 30 to 69 years for whom data on oral HPV and oral health were available from the nationally representative 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Results showed that higher unadjusted prevalence of oral HPV infection was associated with four measures of oral health, including self-rated oral health as poor-to-fair [prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.56; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25-1.95], indicated the possibility of gum disease (PR = 1.51; 95% CI, 1.13-2.01), reported use of mouthwash to treat dental problems in the past week (PR = 1.28; 95% CI, 1.07-1.52), and higher number of teeth lost (Ptrend = 0.035). In multivariable logistic regression models, oral HPV infection had a statistically significant association with self-rated overall oral health (OR = 1.55; 95% CI, 1.15-2.09), independent of smoking and oral sex. In conclusion, poor oral health was an independent risk factor of oral HPV infection, irrespective of smoking and oral sex practices. Public health interventions may aim to promote oral hygiene and oral health as an additional measure to prevent HPV-related oral cancers.

  18. Oral infections and systemic diseases

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    Holmstrup, Palle; Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Andersen, Lone

    2003-01-01

    An association between periodontal infection and CVD has been revealed in some epidemiologic studies, whereas other studies were unable to demonstrate such an association. A link between the two diseases may be explained by shared established or nonestablished risk factors. Future studies...... with extended control of confounding factors and intervention studies may add to the understanding of a possible relationship between the diseases. In some cases, IE is caused by dental plaque bacteria. Several studies are suggestive of oral bacteria causing respiratory infection. The pathogenesis and course...... of a number of other diseases including DM and rheumatoid arthritis have been associated wish periodontitis, but more research is necessary to elucidate possible pathogenic interactions....

  19. Epidemiology of Oral and Maxillofacial Infections.

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    Rajendra Santosh, Arvind Babu; Ogle, Orrett E; Williams, Dwight; Woodbine, Edward F

    2017-04-01

    Dental caries and periodontal disease are the most common dental infections and are constantly increasing worldwide. Distribution, occurrence of dental caries, gingivitis, periodontitis, odontogenic infections, antibiotic resistance, oral mucosal infections, and microbe-related oral cancer are important to understand the public impact and methods of controlling such disease. Distribution of human papilloma virus and human immunodeficiency virus -related oral cancers in the US population is presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Prevention of pathogenic Escherichia coli infection in mice and stimulation of macrophage activation in rats by an oral administration of probiotic Lactobacillus casei I-5.

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    Ishida-Fujii, Keiko; Sato, Rieko; Goto, Shingo; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Kuboki, Hiroshi; Hirano, Shin-Ichi; Sato, Michikatsu

    2007-04-01

    Lactobacillus casei I-5 isolated from an alcohol fermentation broth enhanced immunity and prevented pathogenic infection as a probiotic. Mice fed with I-5 cells for 11 days prior to an intraperitoneal challenge with pathogenic Escherichia coli Juhl exhibited a high survival rate compared with the control group. Rats fed with I-5 cells for 10 days significantly increased the phagocytosis of peritoneal macrophages. In a cell culture system employing peritoneal macrophages from rats, the I-5 administration activated NF-kappaB stimulated by LPS. It also enhanced LPS-stimulated IL-12 and TNF-alpha production, but not IL-6 production. These results show that L. casei I-5 effectively prevented infection by pathogenic E. coli possibly through the activation of peritoneal macrophages. The strain would be useful to prevent pathogenic microbial infections in humans and farm animals.

  1. Lactobacillus paracasei feeding improves the control of secondary experimental meningococcal infection in flu-infected mice.

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    Belkacem, Nouria; Bourdet-Sicard, Raphaëlle; Taha, Muhamed-Kkeir

    2018-04-10

    The use of probiotics to improve anti-microbial defence, such as for influenza infections, is increasingly recommended. However, no data are available on the effect of probiotics on flu-associated secondary bacterial infections. There is strong evidence of a spatiotemporal association between influenza virus infection and invasive Neisseria meningitidis. We thus investigated the effect of feeding mice Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-1518 in a mouse model of sequential influenza-meningococcal infection. We intranasally infected BALB/c mice with a strain of influenza A virus (IAV) H3N2 that was first adapted to mice. Seven days later, a secondary bacterial infection was induced by intranasal administration of bioluminescent N. meningitidis. During the experiment, mice orally received either L. paracasei CNCM I-1518 or PBS as a control. The effect of L. paracasei administration on secondary bacterial infection by N. meningitidis was evaluated. Oral consumption of L. paracasei CNCM I-1518 reduced the weight loss of infected mice and lowered the bioluminescent signal of infecting meningococci. This improvement was associated with higher recruitment of inflammatory myeloid cells, such as interstitial monocytes and dendritic cells, to the lungs. Our data highlight the role of the gut-lung axis. L. paracasei CNCM I-1518 may boost the defence against IAV infection and secondary bacterial infection, which should be further studied and validated in clinical trials.

  2. HTO oral administration in mice: Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, O.; Yokoro, K.; Seyama, T.; Kinomura, A.; Nomura, T.

    1990-01-01

    Tritiated water in various concentrations was orally administered continuously to (C57BL/6N and C3H/He)F 1 female mice in a closed animal chamber. Tritium radioactivity in various organ tissues was measured periodically after initiating tritiated water intake using an automatic sample combustion system and a liquid scintillation counter. After 7 days the specific radioactivity reached a plateau. Within a range of 1.48 x 10 11 to 5.92 x 10 11 Bq/dm 3 as the concentration of tritiated water in drinking water, the time of death after initiating the administration was about 2 weeks, a typical time for haematopoietic death. A linear relationship of times of death with tritiated water concentrations in drinking water was observed, on a log-log scale, between 1.85 x 10 10 Bq/dm 3 and 1.48 x 10 11 Bq/dm 3 . At concentrations lower than 9.25 x 10 9 Bq/dm 3 , mice no longer died from haematopoietic failure. The authors conclude, therefore, that there should be a threshold dose rate for haematopoietic death. (author)

  3. Microbiological Profile of Oral Infections in Diabetic Patients and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Oral microbial flora is increasingly being incriminated in oral infections. There is paucity of information on the importance of aerobic oral flora in diabetes. The purpose of this study was to compare aerobic oral microbial flora in diabetics and non-diabetics and to relate these microbes with oral infections.

  4. Postirradiation flap infection about the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabbabe, E.B.; Herbold, D.R.; Sunwoo, Y.C.; Baroudi, I.F.

    1983-01-01

    Postirradiation alteration of oral flora is well documented in the literature. Infection as a complication leading to partial or complete loss of a flap used to reconstruct a defect in the oral cavity is a worrisome outcome. We describe how a flap that was judged clinically to be viable became overwhelmingly infected with the Klebsiella oxytoca, an oral cavity pathogen encountered in this patient following irradiation. Local and systemic changes led to detachment of the flap. This complication may be explained, in view of the absence of venous congestion or arterial ischemia both clinically and pathologically, by the proven contamination of the flap by the Klebsiella pathogen. Local factors resulted in lower resistance and subsequent overwhelming infection. Discussion of the case, review of pertinent literature, and proposed solutions are presented

  5. Efficacy of some essential oils in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of orally administered Cymbopogon citratus, Zingiber officinale and Syzygium aromaticum essential oils (EOs) in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. Methods: Three experiments were conducted with 48 Swiss mice each. The animals were inoculated with 2 x 106 metacyclic ...

  6. Oral manifestations of hepatitis C virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrozzo, Marco; Scally, Kara

    2014-01-01

    Extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can affect a variety of organ systems with significant morbidity and mortality. Some of the most frequently reported EHM of HCV infection, involve the oral region predominantly or exclusively. Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory condition that is potentially malignant and represents cell-mediated reaction to a variety of extrinsic antigens, altered self-antigens, or super antigens. Robust epidemiological evidence support the link between OLP and HCV. As the virus may replicate in the oral mucosa and attract HCV-specific T lymphocytes, HCV may be implicated in OLP pathogenesis. Sjögren syndrome (SjS) is an autoimmune exocrinopathy, characterized by dryness of the mouth and eyes and a multitude of other systemic signs and symptoms. SjS patients have also an increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Patients with chronic hepatitis C do frequently have histological signs of Sjögren-like sialadenitis with mild or even absent clinical symptoms. However, it is still unclear if HCV may cause a disease mimicking SjS or it is directly responsible for the development of SjS in a specific subset of patients. Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the most common oral malignant tumour and at least in some part of the world could be linked to HCV. PMID:24976694

  7. Reduction of Influenza Virus Titer and Protection against Influenza Virus Infection in Infant Mice Fed Lactobacillus casei Shirota

    OpenAIRE

    Yasui, Hisako; Kiyoshima, Junko; Hori, Tetsuji

    2004-01-01

    We investigated whether oral administration of Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota to neonatal and infant mice ameliorates influenza virus (IFV) infection in the upper respiratory tract and protects against influenza infection. In a model of upper respiratory IFV infection, the titer of virus in the nasal washings of infant mice administered L. casei Shirota (L. casei Shirota group) was significantly (P < 0.05) lower than that in infant mice administered saline (control group) (102.48 ± 100.31...

  8. Pathogenesis of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Strain 86-24 Following Oral Infection of BALB/c Mice with an Intact Commensal Flora

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    inocula of these organisms are also needed to achieve colonization and disease in monkeys [29] and rabbits [30]. Our data suggested that the predominate...SB. Escherichia coli 0157:H7 srrains associared wirh haemorrhagic colitis in rhe Unired Srares produce a Shigella dysenreriae 1 (SHIGA) like...611-20. (29) Kang G, Pulimood AB, Koshi R. Hull A, Acheson D. Rajan P. er al. A monkey model for enrerohemorrhagic Escherichia coli infection. j

  9. Reduction of influenza virus titer and protection against influenza virus infection in infant mice fed Lactobacillus casei Shirota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Hisako; Kiyoshima, Junko; Hori, Tetsuji

    2004-07-01

    We investigated whether oral administration of Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota to neonatal and infant mice ameliorates influenza virus (IFV) infection in the upper respiratory tract and protects against influenza infection. In a model of upper respiratory IFV infection, the titer of virus in the nasal washings of infant mice administered L. casei Shirota (L. casei Shirota group) was significantly (P survival rate of the L. casei Shirota group was significantly (P L. casei Shirota group were significantly greater than those of mice in the control group. These findings suggest that oral administration of L. casei Shirota activates the immature immune system of neonatal and infant mice and protects against IFV infection. Therefore, oral administration of L. casei Shirota may accelerate the innate immune response of the respiratory tract and protect against various respiratory infections in neonates, infants, and children, a high risk group for viral and bacterial infections.

  10. What Makes Oral Candidiasis Recurrent Infection? A Clinical View

    OpenAIRE

    Azmi M. G. Darwazeh; Tamer A. Darwazeh

    2014-01-01

    Clinical oral Candida infection (candidiasis) is one of the common oral mucosal infections, and its management is usually frustrating due to either treatment failure or recurrence. Historically, oral candidiasis has been branded as disease of diseased. The unsuccessful management of oral candidiasis can due to either incorrect diagnosis, failure to identify (or correct) the underlying predisposing factor(s), or inaccurate prescription of antifungal agents. Failure to properly treat oral ca...

  11. Tracking vaginal, anal and oral infection in a mouse papillomavirus infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiafen; Budgeon, Lynn R; Cladel, Nancy M; Balogh, Karla; Myers, Roland; Cooper, Timothy K; Christensen, Neil D

    2015-12-01

    Noninvasive and practical techniques to longitudinally track viral infection are sought after in clinical practice. We report a proof-of-principle study to monitor the viral DNA copy number using a newly established mouse papillomavirus (MmuPV1) mucosal infection model. We hypothesized that viral presence could be identified and quantified by collecting lavage samples from cervicovaginal, anal and oral sites. Nude mice infected at these sites with infectious MmuPV1 were tracked for up to 23 weeks starting at 6 weeks post-infection. Viral DNA copy number was determined by SYBR Green Q-PCR analysis. In addition, we tracked viral DNA load through three complete oestrous cycles to pinpoint whether there was a correlation between the DNA load and the four stages of the oestrous cycle. Our results showed that high viral DNA copy number was reproducibly detected from both anal and cervicovaginal lavage samples. The infection and disease progression were further confirmed by histology, cytology, in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy. Interestingly, the viral copy number fluctuated over the oestrous cycle, with the highest level at the oestrus stage, implying that multiple sampling might be necessary to provide a reliable diagnosis. Virus DNA was detected in oral lavage samples at a later time after infection. Lower viral DNA load was found in oral samples when compared with those in anal and vaginal tracts. To our knowledge, our study is the first in vivo study to sequentially monitor papillomavirus infection from mucosal anal, oral and vaginal tracts in a preclinical model.

  12. Global oral inequalities in HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challacombe, S J

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of the prevalence and incidence of HIV infection globally reveal striking variances with regard to continent, country, region and gender. Of the global total of 33 million people infected with HIV, approximately 65% are in sub-Saharan African countries and 15% in South and South-East Asia with the remaining 20% spread over the rest of the world. As a percentage of the population, the Caribbean at 1.1% is second only to sub-Saharan Africa (5.5%). The majority of the world's HIV is in women. Deaths from HIV are twenty-fold greater in Africa than in Europe or the USA. Individual countries in sub-Saharan Africa show huge variances in the HIV+ prevalence with most West African countries having a rate of less than 2% whilst southern African countries including Swaziland and Botswana have rates of around 25%. Environment, education and social habits all contribute to the HIV infection rates. Similar variations between countries are seen in SE Asia with Cambodia and Papua New Guinea having rates three times greater than Pakistan. One of the most striking examples of inequality is in life years added to HIV populations as a result of antiretroviral therapy. UN AIDS figures over 1996-2008 suggest an average of 2.88 added years in the USA and Europe, but only 0.1 in sub-Saharan Africa, a thirty-fold difference largely due to accessibility to ART. ART leads to a reduction in oral lesions but it is estimated that some 10 million HIV+ subjects do not have access to oral care. Thus, inequalities exist both for HIV infection and for the associated oral lesions, mainly related to ART access. HIV infection and oral mucosal lesions both appear to be related to general social determinants of health. Oral HCW must be part of mainstream healthcare teams to address these inequalities. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Oral cadmium chloride intoxication in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, O; Nielsen, J B; Svendsen, P

    1988-01-01

    Diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) is known to alleviate acute toxicity due to injection of cadmium salts. However, when cadmium chloride was administered by the oral route, DDC enhanced rather than alleviated the acute toxicity; both oral and intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of DDC had this effect...

  14. Protection of mice against Giardia muris infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts-Thomson, I C; Mitchell, G F

    1979-01-01

    Strains of mice showing relatively rapid (BALB/c) and defective (C3H/He) spontaneous elimination of Giardia muris displayed marked differences in the degree of resistance to infection induced by prior injection of trophozoites in Freund complete adjuvant. PMID:468385

  15. Active invasion of oral and aortic tissues by Porphyromonas gingivalis in mice causally links periodontitis and atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina M Velsko

    Full Text Available Atherosclerotic vascular disease is a leading cause of myocardial infarction and cerebrovascular accident, and independent associations with periodontal disease (PD are reported. PD is caused by polymicrobial infections and aggressive immune responses. Genomic DNA of Porphyromonas gingivalis, the best-studied bacterial pathogen associated with severe PD, is detected within atherosclerotic plaque. We examined causal relationships between chronic P. gingivalis oral infection, PD, and atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic ApoEnull mice. ApoEnull mice (n = 24 were orally infected with P. gingivalis for 12 and 24 weeks. PD was assessed by standard clinical measurements while the aorta was examined for atherosclerotic lesions and inflammatory markers by array. Systemic inflammatory markers serum amyloid A, nitric oxide, and oxidized low-density lipoprotein were analyzed. P. gingivalis infection elicited specific antibodies and alveolar bone loss. Fluorescent in situ hybridization detected viable P. gingivalis within oral epithelium and aorta, and genomic DNA was detected within systemic organs. Aortic plaque area was significantly increased in P. gingivalis-infected mice at 24 weeks (P<0.01. Aortic RNA and protein arrays indicated a strong Th2 response. Chronic oral infection with P. gingivalis results in a specific immune response, significant increases in oral bone resorption, aortic inflammation, viable bacteria in oral epithelium and aorta, and plaque development.

  16. Sarcocystis neurona infection in gamma interferon gene knockout (KO) mice: comparative infectivity of sporocysts in two strains of KO mice, effect of trypsin digestion on merozoite viability, and infectivity of bradyzoites to KO mice and cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, J P; Sundar, N; Kwok, O C H; Saville, W J A

    2013-09-01

    The protozoan Sarcocystis neurona is the primary cause of Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis (EPM). EPM or EPM-like illness has been reported in horses, sea otters, and several other mammals. The gamma interferon gene knockout (KO) mouse is often used as a model to study biology and discovery of new therapies against S. neurona because it is difficult to induce clinical EPM in other hosts, including horses. In the present study, infectivity of three life cycle stages (merozoites, bradyzoites, sporozoites) to KO mice and cell culture was studied. Two strains of KO mice (C57-black, and BALB/c-derived, referred here as black or white) were inoculated orally graded doses of S. neurona sporocysts; 12 sporocysts were infective to both strains of mice and all infected mice died or became ill within 70 days post-inoculation. Although there was no difference in infectivity of sporocysts to the two strains of KO mice, the disease was more severe in black mice. S. neurona bradyzoites were not infectious to KO mice and cell culture. S. neurona merozoites survived 120 min incubation in 0.25% trypsin, indicating that trypsin digestion can be used to recover S. neurona from tissues of acutely infected animals. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. [Recurrent pulmonary infection and oral mucosal ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Fei-Mei; Tang, Lan-Lan; Zhang, Hui; Xie, Min; Yang, Ming-Hua; Yang, Liang-Chun; Yu, Yan; Cao, Li-Zhi

    2017-04-01

    An 8-year-old girl who had experienced intermittent cough and fever over a 3 year period, was admitted after experiencing a recurrence for one month. One year ago the patient experienced a recurrent oral mucosal ulcer. Physical examination showed vitiligo in the skin of the upper right back. Routine blood tests and immune function tests performed in other hospitals had shown normal results. Multiple lung CT scans showed pulmonary infection. The patient had recurrent fever and cough and persistent presence of some lesions after anti-infective therapy. The antitubercular therapy was ineffective. Routine blood tests after admission showed agranulocytosis. Gene detection was performed and she was diagnosed with dyskeratosis congenita caused by homozygous mutation in RTEL1. Patients with dyskeratosis congenita with RTEL1 gene mutation tend to develop pulmonary complications. Since RTEL1 gene sequence is highly variable with many mutation sites and patterns and can be inherited via autosomal dominant or recessive inheritance, this disease often has various clinical manifestations, which may lead to missed diagnosis or misdiagnosis. For children with unexplained recurrent pulmonary infection, examinations of the oral cavity, skin, and nails and toes should be taken and routine blood tests should be performed to exclude dyskeratosis congenita. There are no specific therapies for dyskeratosis congenita at present, and when bone marrow failure and pulmonary failure occur, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and lung transplantation are the only therapies. Androgen and its derivatives are effective in some patients. Drugs targeting the telomere may be promising for patients with dyskeratosis congenita.

  18. Development of infection with Streptococcus bovis and Aspergillus sp. in irradiated mice after glycopeptide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brook, I.; Tom, S.P.; Ledney, G.D.

    1993-01-01

    The use of ofloxacin and glycopeptides was evaluated for the treatment of infections arising in C3H/HeN female mice irradiated with 8.3 Gy from a 60 Co source. The 21 day regimen began 72 h after irradiation when each of five sets of experimental animals received three antimicrobial therapy regimens and a saline-treated control group. With 40 mice in each group, 20 were used to monitor survival, 20 for the recovery of bacteria from the liver culture. Treatment groups were oral ofloxacin; oral or intramuscular vancomycin oral teicoplanin, ofloxacin and vancomycin; ofloxacin and teicoplanin; or saline. Bacteria recovered from saline treated mice were Enterobacteriaceae and Streptococcus spp. By comparison, fewer Enterobacteriaceae were isolated from ofloxacin treated mice and fewer Streptococcus spp. in both vancomycin and teicoplanin treated mice. However, glycopeptide-treated mice developed infection with Aspergillis fumigatus and glycopeptide resistant Streptococcus bovis. Mortality rates within 60 days of irradiation were 100% in all treatment and control groups with the exception of ofloxacin which was 25%-35%. These data suggest that glycopeptide therapy increases rates of systemic infection with fungi and antibiotic resistant bacteria in irradiated mice. (Author)

  19. Development of infection with Streptococcus bovis and Aspergillus sp. in irradiated mice after glycopeptide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brook, I.; Tom, S.P.; Ledney, G.D. (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1993-11-01

    The use of ofloxacin and glycopeptides was evaluated for the treatment of infections arising in C3H/HeN female mice irradiated with 8.3 Gy from a [sup 60]Co source. The 21 day regimen began 72 h after irradiation when each of five sets of experimental animals received three antimicrobial therapy regimens and a saline-treated control group. With 40 mice in each group, 20 were used to monitor survival, 20 for the recovery of bacteria from the liver culture. Treatment groups were oral ofloxacin; oral or intramuscular vancomycin oral teicoplanin, ofloxacin and vancomycin; ofloxacin and teicoplanin; or saline. Bacteria recovered from saline treated mice were Enterobacteriaceae and Streptococcus spp. By comparison, fewer Enterobacteriaceae were isolated from ofloxacin treated mice and fewer Streptococcus spp. in both vancomycin and teicoplanin treated mice. However, glycopeptide-treated mice developed infection with Aspergillis fumigatus and glycopeptide resistant Streptococcus bovis. Mortality rates within 60 days of irradiation were 100% in all treatment and control groups with the exception of ofloxacin which was 25%-35%. These data suggest that glycopeptide therapy increases rates of systemic infection with fungi and antibiotic resistant bacteria in irradiated mice. (Author).

  20. Toxoplasma gondii Actively Inhibits Neuronal Function in Chronically Infected Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroon, Fahad; Händel, Ulrike; Angenstein, Frank; Goldschmidt, Jürgen; Kreutzmann, Peter; Lison, Holger; Fischer, Klaus-Dieter; Scheich, Henning; Wetzel, Wolfram; Schlüter, Dirk; Budinger, Eike

    2012-01-01

    Upon infection with the obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii, fast replicating tachyzoites infect a broad spectrum of host cells including neurons. Under the pressure of the immune response, tachyzoites convert into slow-replicating bradyzoites, which persist as cysts in neurons. Currently, it is unclear whether T. gondii alters the functional activity of neurons, which may contribute to altered behaviour of T. gondii–infected mice and men. In the present study we demonstrate that upon oral infection with T. gondii cysts, chronically infected BALB/c mice lost over time their natural fear against cat urine which was paralleled by the persistence of the parasite in brain regions affecting behaviour and odor perception. Detailed immunohistochemistry showed that in infected neurons not only parasitic cysts but also the host cell cytoplasm and some axons stained positive for Toxoplasma antigen suggesting that parasitic proteins might directly interfere with neuronal function. In fact, in vitro live cell calcium (Ca2+) imaging studies revealed that tachyzoites actively manipulated Ca2+ signalling upon glutamate stimulation leading either to hyper- or hypo-responsive neurons. Experiments with the endoplasmatic reticulum Ca2+ uptake inhibitor thapsigargin indicate that tachyzoites deplete Ca2+ stores in the endoplasmatic reticulum. Furthermore in vivo studies revealed that the activity-dependent uptake of the potassium analogue thallium was reduced in cyst harbouring neurons indicating their functional impairment. The percentage of non-functional neurons increased over time In conclusion, both bradyzoites and tachyzoites functionally silence infected neurons, which may significantly contribute to the altered behaviour of the host. PMID:22530040

  1. Toxoplasma gondii actively inhibits neuronal function in chronically infected mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Haroon

    Full Text Available Upon infection with the obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii, fast replicating tachyzoites infect a broad spectrum of host cells including neurons. Under the pressure of the immune response, tachyzoites convert into slow-replicating bradyzoites, which persist as cysts in neurons. Currently, it is unclear whether T. gondii alters the functional activity of neurons, which may contribute to altered behaviour of T. gondii-infected mice and men. In the present study we demonstrate that upon oral infection with T. gondii cysts, chronically infected BALB/c mice lost over time their natural fear against cat urine which was paralleled by the persistence of the parasite in brain regions affecting behaviour and odor perception. Detailed immunohistochemistry showed that in infected neurons not only parasitic cysts but also the host cell cytoplasm and some axons stained positive for Toxoplasma antigen suggesting that parasitic proteins might directly interfere with neuronal function. In fact, in vitro live cell calcium (Ca(2+ imaging studies revealed that tachyzoites actively manipulated Ca(2+ signalling upon glutamate stimulation leading either to hyper- or hypo-responsive neurons. Experiments with the endoplasmatic reticulum Ca(2+ uptake inhibitor thapsigargin indicate that tachyzoites deplete Ca(2+ stores in the endoplasmatic reticulum. Furthermore in vivo studies revealed that the activity-dependent uptake of the potassium analogue thallium was reduced in cyst harbouring neurons indicating their functional impairment. The percentage of non-functional neurons increased over time In conclusion, both bradyzoites and tachyzoites functionally silence infected neurons, which may significantly contribute to the altered behaviour of the host.

  2. Chronic oral infection with major periodontal bacteria Tannerella forsythia modulates systemic atherosclerosis risk factors and inflammatory markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukkapalli, Sasanka S; Rivera-Kweh, Mercedes F; Velsko, Irina M; Chen, Hao; Zheng, Donghang; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel; Gangula, Pandu R; Lucas, Alexandra R; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya

    2015-04-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a Gram-negative anaerobic organism that inhabits the subgingival cavity and initiates connective tissue destruction and alveolar bone resorption in periodontal disease (PD). PD is a chronic immunoinflammatory disease and has been linked to several systemic diseases including atherosclerosis. This study evaluated the effects of a chronic oral infection with T. forsythia ATCC 43037 on the induction of PD, inflammatory markers and atherosclerosis risk factors in hyperlipidemic ApoE(null) mice. Mice were orally infected for 12 and 24 weeks prior to euthanasia. Bacterial colonization of the oral cavity and bacteremia was confirmed via isolation of genomic DNA from oral plaque and tissues. Oral infection elicited significantly elevated levels of serum IgG and IgM antibodies and alveolar bone resorption compared to control mice. Tannerella forsythia-infected mice had increased serum amyloid A, and significantly reduced serum nitric oxide when compared to controls. Tannerella forsythia chronic infection also significantly increased serum lipoproteins suggesting altered cholesterol metabolism and potential for aortic inflammation. Despite enhanced acute phase reactants and altered lipid profiles, T. forsythia infection was associated with decreased aortic plaque. This study investigates the potential of a known periodontal bacterial pathogen found in atherosclerotic plaque in humans to accelerate atherosclerosis in hyperlipdemic mice. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Methyl gallate limits infection in mice challenged with Brucella abortus while enhancing the inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, A W B; Kim, D G; Simborio, H L T; Hop, H T; Arayan, L T; Min, W; Lee, J J; Chang, H H; Kim, S

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the effects of methyl gallate (MG) on murine macrophages, cytokine production and treatment of Brucella abortus infection using a mouse model. MG-treated cells displayed increased F-actin polymerization and modest increase in ERK, JNK and p38α phosphorylation levels. The mice were intraperitoneally infected with Br. abortus and were orally treated with PBS or MG for 14 days. The weight and bacterial number from each spleen were monitored, and the serum was evaluated for cytokine production. The spleen proliferation and bacterial burden were lower in the MG-treated group than in the MG-untreated control. The noninfected MG-treated mice displayed increased production of TNF, IFN-γ, and the chemokine MCP-1, whereas the Br. abortus-infected MG-treated mice revealed enhanced induction of IL-12p70, TNF and IL-10 compared to the MG-untreated control. MG induced F-actin polymerization and modest upregulation of MAPKs. Furthermore, oral treatment with MG induced an immune response and decreased bacterial proliferation in Br. abortus-infected mice, suggesting that MG may be an alternative treatment for brucellosis. The present study demonstrates the therapeutic effects of MG against Brucella infection through induction of cytokine production and protection from bacterial proliferation in the spleens of mice. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. [Experimental oral candidiasis in healthy and immunocompromised BALB/c mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Meral; Kiray, Müge; Bayrakal, Vahide; Bağrıyanık, H Alper; Yılmaz, Osman; Bahar, I Hakkı

    2011-04-01

    Oral candidiasis which is the most common type of Candida infections affecting humans, is most frequently caused by C.albicans. Immune response of the host, as well as a variety of virulence factors of the causative agent, play important roles in the development of Candida infections. The colonization rate of Candida in the oral cavity of healthy individuals, is between 25-30%, however, this rate is reported to be increased in immunosuppressive subjects. In our study, we established an oral candidiasis model with C.albicans in healthy and experimentally immunocompromised mice and aimed to compare Candida colonization rates and histopathological changes occurred in the tongue and esophagus tissues of the animal groups. A total of 21 BALB/c mice were grouped as control (Group 1; n= 7), healthy (Group 2; n= 7) and immunocompromised (Group 3; n= 7) groups. Immunosuppression in mice was performed by subcutaneous injection of prednisolone. For experimental oral candidiasis, cotton swab impregnated with C.albicans strains which did not have acid proteinase and phospholipase enzyme activity, no biofilm production, and sensitive to fluconazole and amphotericin B, were used. In the control group, physiological saline solution was used instead of C.albicans strain. In the forth day of experimental oral candidiasis model swab samples taken from the dorsal tongue surface of mice were evaluated by quantitative cultivation method. No yeast colonies were detected in Group 1 while more significant number of yeast colonies were observed in Group 3 compared to Group 2 (p= 0.002). Tongue and esophagus tissues of mice were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and periodic acid schiff staining and evaluated in terms of inflammatory response, abscess formation, vascular congestion, vasodilation and for the presence of yeast and hyphae. When the inflammation in esophagus was considered, statistically significant difference was determined between group 1 and group 3 (p= 0.023), however, no

  5. Orally administered nicotine induces urothelial hyperplasia in rats and mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodmane, Puttappa R.; Arnold, Lora L.; Pennington, Karen L.; Cohen, Samuel M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Rats and mice orally administered with nicotine tartrate for total of 4 weeks. • No treatment-related death or whole body toxicity observed in any of the groups. • Urothelium showed simple hyperplasia in treated rats and mice. • No significant change in BrdU labeling index or SEM classification of urothelium. - Abstract: Tobacco smoking is a major risk factor for multiple human cancers including urinary bladder carcinoma. Tobacco smoke is a complex mixture containing chemicals that are known carcinogens in humans and/or animals. Aromatic amines a major class of DNA-reactive carcinogens in cigarette smoke, are not present at sufficiently high levels to fully explain the incidence of bladder cancer in cigarette smokers. Other agents in tobacco smoke could be excreted in urine and enhance the carcinogenic process by increasing urothelial cell proliferation. Nicotine is one such major component, as it has been shown to induce cell proliferation in multiple cell types in vitro. However, in vivo evidence specifically for the urothelium is lacking. We previously showed that cigarette smoke induces increased urothelial cell proliferation in mice. In the present study, urothelial proliferative and cytotoxic effects were examined after nicotine treatment in mice and rats. Nicotine hydrogen tartrate was administered in drinking water to rats (52 ppm nicotine) and mice (514 ppm nicotine) for 4 weeks and urothelial changes were evaluated. Histopathologically, 7/10 rats and 4/10 mice showed simple hyperplasia following nicotine treatment compared to none in the controls. Rats had an increased mean BrdU labeling index compared to controls, although it was not statistically significantly elevated in either species. Scanning electron microscopic visualization of the urothelium did not reveal significant cytotoxicity. These findings suggest that oral nicotine administration induced urothelial hyperplasia (increased cell proliferation), possibly due to a

  6. Oral Mycobiome Analysis of HIV-Infected Patients: Identification of Pichia as an Antagonist of Opportunistic Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Pranab K.; Chandra, Jyotsna; Retuerto, Mauricio; Sikaroodi, Masoumeh; Brown, Robert E.; Jurevic, Richard; Salata, Robert A.; Lederman, Michael M.; Gillevet, Patrick M.; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A.

    2014-01-01

    Oral microbiota contribute to health and disease, and their disruption may influence the course of oral diseases. Here, we used pyrosequencing to characterize the oral bacteriome and mycobiome of 12 HIV-infected patients and matched 12 uninfected controls. The number of bacterial and fungal genera in individuals ranged between 8–14 and 1–9, among uninfected and HIV-infected participants, respectively. The core oral bacteriome (COB) comprised 14 genera, of which 13 were common between the two groups. In contrast, the core oral mycobiome (COM) differed between HIV-infected and uninfected individuals, with Candida being the predominant fungus in both groups. Among Candida species, C. albicans was the most common (58% in uninfected and 83% in HIV-infected participants). Furthermore, 15 and 12 bacteria-fungi pairs were correlated significantly within uninfected and HIV-infected groups, respectively. Increase in Candida colonization was associated with a concomitant decrease in the abundance of Pichia, suggesting antagonism. We found that Pichia spent medium (PSM) inhibited growth of Candida, Aspergillus and Fusarium. Moreover, Pichia cells and PSM inhibited Candida biofilms (P = .002 and .02, respectively, compared to untreated controls). The mechanism by which Pichia inhibited Candida involved nutrient limitation, and modulation of growth and virulence factors. Finally, in an experimental murine model of oral candidiasis, we demonstrated that mice treated with PSM exhibited significantly lower infection score (P = .011) and fungal burden (P = .04) compared to untreated mice. Moreover, tongues of PSM-treated mice had few hyphae and intact epithelium, while vehicle- and nystatin-treated mice exhibited extensive fungal invasion of tissue with epithelial disruption. These results showed that PSM was efficacious against oral candidiasis in vitro and in vivo. The inhibitory activity of PSM was associated with secretory protein/s. Our findings provide the

  7. Periodontitis and oral human papillomavirus infection among Hispanic adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Patricia Ortiz

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Research on the association between periodontitis and oral human papilloma virus (HPV infection is inconsistent. The cross-sectional association of severe periodontitis with oral HPV infection was investigated in a sample of Hispanic adults. Methods: Data from the 2014–2016 San Juan Overweight Adults Longitudinal Study (n = 740 was analyzed. Periodontitis assessment and self-collection of oral HPV samples followed the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey methodology. Periodontitis was defined using the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention/American Academy of Periodontology definition. HPV typing was performed using polymerase chain reaction. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Results: 5.7% of participants had oral HPV infection and 20.3% had severe periodontitis. Adults with severe periodontitis had higher odds of oral HPV infection than those with none/mild disease (OR=2.9, 95% CI: 1.0–8.4, p < 0.05 in multivariable analysis. Adults with clinical attachment loss≥ 7 mm and pocket depth PD≥ 6 mm had 2- to 3-fold higher odds of HPV infection. Conclusions: Severe periodontitis was positively associated to oral HPV infection. Longitudinal evaluation of periodontal inflammation's role in acquisition and persistence of oral HPV infection is needed, as periodontitis screening could identify individuals at increased risk of HPV-related oral malignancies. Keywords: Periodontitis, Oral HPV, Hispanics, Adults, Oral health, Puerto Rico

  8. Long-term effect of oral immunization against influenza with a gamma-inactivated vaccine in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noack, K.; Tischner, H.; Pohl, W.D.; Braeuniger, S.; Nordheim, W.

    1986-01-01

    NMRI mice were immunized orally twice within 10 days with an influenza vaccine inactivated by gamma radiation. The immunization with a relatively low dosis led to the occurence of low specific antibody titer in the lung lavage fluid up to 6th month. Despite of the low titer, immunized mice were protected against aerogenic infection for about 6 months. Protection was demonstrated in comparison to non-immunized mice by a limited increase of cells in bronchoalveolar lavage, low virus titer in the lung and survival of most animals after a lethal aerosol challenge with the live virus. (author)

  9. Scrapie infectivity is quickly cleared in tissues of orally-infected farmed fish

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    Faoro Franco

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE belongs to the group of animal transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE. BSE epidemic in the UK and elsewhere in Europe has been linked to the use of bovine meat and bone meals (MBM in the feeding of cattle. There is concern that pigs, poultry and fish bred for human consumption and fed with infected MBM would eventually develop BSE or carry residual infectivity without disease. Although there has been no evidence of infection in these species, experimental data on the susceptibility to the BSE agent of farm animals other than sheep and cow are limited only to pigs and domestic chicken. In the framework of a EU-granted project we have challenged two species of fish largely used in human food consumption, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss and turbot (Scophthalmus maximus, with a mouse-adapted TSE strain (scrapie 139A, to assess the risk related to oral consumption of TSE contaminated food. In trout, we also checked the "in vitro" ability of the pathological isoform of the mouse prion protein (PrPSc to cross the intestinal epithelium when added to the mucosal side of everted intestine. Results Fish challenged with a large amount of scrapie mouse brain homogenate by either oral or parenteral routes, showed the ability to clear the majority of infectivity load. None of the fish tissues taken at different time points after oral or parenteral inoculation was able to provoke scrapie disease after intracerebral inoculation in recipient mice. However, a few recipient mice were positive for PrPSc and spongiform lesions in the brain. We also showed a specific binding of PrPSc to the mucosal side of fish intestine in the absence of an active uptake of the prion protein through the intestinal wall. Conclusion These results indicate that scrapie 139A, and possibly BSE, is quickly removed from fish tissues despite evidence of a prion like protein in fish and of a specific binding of Pr

  10. Metabolic and adaptive immune responses induced in mice infected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated metabolic and immuno-inflammatory responses of mice infected with tissue-dwelling larvae of Trichinella zimbabwensis and explored the relationship between infection, metabolic parameters and Th1/Th17 immune responses. Sixty (60) female BALB/c mice aged between 6 to 8 weeks old were ...

  11. Mutagenicity of nicotine in Schistosoma mansoni - infected mice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis of meiotic chromosomes showed significant elevation in the Schistosoma-infected mice. Administration of nicotine to infected mice substantially increased the percentages of micronucleated cells and total CAs. The percentage of chromosomal abnormalities in spermatocyte metaphase-I cells increased significantly ...

  12. Poor Oral Hygiene and Middle Ear Infections: Any Relationship?

    OpenAIRE

    Esra, Eryaman; Banu, Oter Ilhan; Erdinc, Aydin

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between poor oral hygiene and middle ear infections. 59 children between 3–12 age intervals were included in this study. The ears were examined by microscope. The findings were marked according to Kempthorne clinical scale and tympanograms were performed. For data analysis of dental caries, dft and DMFT indexes were used in accordance with WHO (World Health Organization) criteria for oral health surveys. The oral hygiene status was det...

  13. Oral Manifestations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients

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    Atessa Pakfetrat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral lesions are among the earliest clinical manifestations of human immunodeficiency (HIV infection and are important in early diagnosis and for monitoring the progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of oral lesions and their relationship with a number of factors in HIV/AIDS patients attending an HIV center.     Methods: A total of 110 HIV-positive patients were examined to investigate the prevalence of oral lesions according to the criteria established by the European Community Clearing House on Oral Problems Related to HIV Infection. An independent T-test was used for correlation of oral lesions with CD4+ count and a χ2 test was used for analysis of the relationship of co-infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV, sexual contact, route of transmission, history of drug abuse, and history of incarceration.   Results: Most of the cases were male patients (82.7%. The mean age across all participants was 36.2±8.1 years. Rampant carries, severe periodontitis and oral candidiasis were the most notable oral lesions. Oral lesions were more prevalent in patients between 26–35 years of age. There was a significant difference between patients with and without pseudomembranous candidiasis and angular cheilitis according to mean level of CD4+.   Conclusion: The most common oral presentations were severe periodontitis, pseudomembranous candidiasis and xerostomia.

  14. Oral Manifestations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients

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    Atessa Pakfetrat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral lesions are among the earliest clinical manifestations of human immunodeficiency (HIV infection and are important in early diagnosis and for monitoring the progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of oral lesions and their relationship with a number of factors in HIV/AIDS patients attending an HIV center.     Methods: A total of 110 HIV-positive patients were examined to investigate the prevalence of oral lesions according to the criteria established by the European Community Clearing House on Oral Problems Related to HIV Infection. An independent T-test was used for correlation of oral lesions with CD4+ count and a χ2 test was used for analysis of the relationship of co-infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV, sexual contact, route of transmission, history of drug abuse, and history of incarceration.   Results: Most of the cases were male patients (82.7%. The mean age across all participants was 36.2±8.1 years. Rampant carries, severe periodontitis and oral candidiasis were the most notable oral lesions. Oral lesions were more prevalent in patients between 26–35 years of age. There was a significant difference between patients with and without pseudomembranous candidiasis and angular cheilitis according to mean level of CD4+.   Conclusion: The most common oral presentations were severe periodontitis, pseudomembranous candidiasis and xerostomia. 

  15. Candida infection in oral leukoplakia: an unperceived public health problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilhari, Ayomi; Weerasekera, Manjula M; Siriwardhana, Anusha; Maheshika, Oshanthi; Gunasekara, Chinthika; Karunathilaka, Sunil; Nagahawatte, Ajith; Fernando, Neluka

    2016-10-01

    The study aimed to determine the proportion, known risk factors and etiology for Candida infection in leukoplakia lesions among patients with oral leukoplakia attending the Oral and Maxillofacial Clinic at a Tertiary Care Hospital in Sri Lanka. Eighty clinically suspected oral leukoplakia patients were included. Two oral swabs each, from leukoplakia patients: one swab from the lesion and the other one from the contralateral unaffected corresponding area (as a control) were collected. Direct microscopy and culture followed by colony count and phenotypic identification were performed to identify pathogenic Candida species. Candida infection was seen in 47% of patients with oral leukoplakia. Candida albicans (94.7%) was the most common Candida species followed by Candida tropicalis (5.3%). Majority of Candida-infected lesions were seen in the buccal mucosa region. Alteration of taste (p = 0.021), having other oral lesions (p = 0.008), angular cheilitis (p = 0.024) and periodontitis (p = 0.041) showed a significant association with Candida-associated leukoplakia. Increasing age showed a significant tendency for Candida infection (p = 0.020). Smoking (p = 0.026) and betel-quid chewing (p = 0.006) were also found to be significantly associated, although alcohol consumption alone did not show a significant association. Oral leukoplakia patients who had all three habits: alcohol consumption, smoking and betel-quid chewing had a significant association with Candida infection (p = 0.004). Patients who had a combination of risk factors: smoking, betel-quid chewing and alcohol consumption were seen to have a significant association with Candida infection. Further betel-quid chewing alone and smoking singly was also significantly associated with Candida infection in oral leukoplakia.

  16. Efficacy of Brazilian Propolis against Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection in Mice and Their Modes of Antiherpetic Efficacies

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    Tomomi Shimizu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol extracts (AF-06, 07, and 08, 10 mg/kg of Brazilian propolis were administered orally to cutaneously herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1-infected mice three times daily on days 0 to 6 after infection to evaluate their efficacies against HSV-1 infection and significantly limited development of herpetic skin lesions. AF-07 and 08 significantly reduced virus titers in brain and/or skin on day 4 without toxicity, but AF-08 had no anti-HSV-1 activity in vitro. AF-06 and 08 significantly enhanced delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH to inactivated HSV-1 antigen in infected mice. Oral AF-08-administration significantly augmented interferon (IFN-γ production by HSV-1 antigen from splenocytes of HSV-1-infected mice, while direct exposure of splenocytes of infected mice to AF-06 significantly elevated IFN-γ production in vitro. Thus, AF-08 might have components that are active in vivo even after oral administration and those of AF-06 might be active only in vitro. Because DTH is a major host defense for intradermal HSV-1 infection, augmentation of DTH response by AF-06 or 08, directly or indirectly, respectively, may contribute to their efficacies against HSV-1 infection. In addition, AF-06 and 07 possibly contain anti-HSV-1 components contributing to their efficacies. Such biological activities of Brazilian propolis may be useful to analyze its pharmacological actions.

  17. Defective IL-17- and IL-22-dependent mucosal host response to Candida albicans determines susceptibility to oral candidiasis in mice expressing the HIV-1 transgene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goupil, Mathieu; Cousineau-Côté, Vincent; Aumont, Francine; Sénéchal, Serge; Gaboury, Louis; Hanna, Zaher; Jolicoeur, Paul; de Repentigny, Louis

    2014-10-26

    The tissue-signaling cytokines IL-17 and IL-22 are critical to host defense against oral Candida albicans infection, by their induction of oral antimicrobial peptide expression and recruitment of neutrophils. Mucosal Th17 cells which produce these cytokines are preferentially depleted in HIV-infected patients. Here, we tested the hypothesis that defective IL-17- and IL-22-dependent host responses to C. albicans determine the phenotype of susceptibility to oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) in transgenic (Tg) mice expressing HIV-1. Naïve CD4+ T-cells and the differentiated Th1, Th2, Th17, Th1Th17 and Treg lineages were all profoundly depleted in cervical lymph nodes (CLNs) of these Tg mice. However, naive CD4+ cells from Tg mice maintained the capacity to differentiate into these lineages in response to polarizing cytokines in vitro. Expression of Il17, Il22, S100a8 and Ccl20 was enhanced in oral mucosal tissue of non-Tg, but not of Tg mice, after oral infection with C. albicans. Treatment of infected Tg mice with the combination of IL-17 and IL-22, but not IL-17 or Il-22 alone, significantly reduced oral burdens of C. albicans and abundance of Candida hyphae in the epithelium of tongues of infected Tg mice, and restored the ability of the Tg mice to up-regulate expression of S100a8 and Ccl20 in response to C. albicans infection. These findings demonstrate that defective IL-17- and IL-22-dependent induction of innate mucosal immunity to C. albicans is central to the phenotype of susceptibility to OPC in these HIV transgenic mice.

  18. A D-octapeptide drug efflux pump inhibitor acts synergistically with azoles in a murine oral candidiasis infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayama, Kazumi; Ishibashi, Hiroko; Ishijima, Sanae A; Niimi, Kyoko; Tansho, Shigeru; Ono, Yasuo; Monk, Brian C; Holmes, Ann R; Harding, David R K; Cannon, Richard D; Abe, Shigeru

    2012-03-01

    Clinical management of patients undergoing treatment of oropharyngeal candidiasis with azole antifungals can be impaired by azole resistance. High-level azole resistance is often caused by the overexpression of Candida albicans efflux pump Cdr1p. Inhibition of this pump therefore represents a target for combination therapies that reverse azole resistance. We assessed the therapeutic potential of the D-octapeptide derivative RC21v3, a Cdr1p inhibitor, in the treatment of murine oral candidiasis caused by either the azole-resistant C. albicans clinical isolate MML611 or its azole-susceptible parental strain MML610. RC21v3, fluconazole (FLC), or a combination of both drugs were administered orally to immunosuppressed ICR mice at 3, 24, and 27 h after oral inoculation with C. albicans. FLC protected the mice inoculated with MML610 from oral candidiasis, but was only partially effective in MML611-infected mice. The co-application of RC21v3 (0.02 μmol per dose) potentiated the therapeutic performance of FLC for mice infected with either strain. It caused a statistically significant decrease in C. albicans cfu isolated from the oral cavity of the infected mice and reduced oral lesions. RC21v3 also enhanced the therapeutic activity of itraconazole against MML611 infection. These results indicate that RC21v3 in combination with azoles has potential as a therapy against azole-resistant oral candidiasis. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Hepatitis C virus infection in patients with oral lichen planus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Lichen planus (LP) is a chronic mucocutaneous disease of uncertain etiology. Recent reports suggest that LP is an extrahepatic manifestation of Hepatitis C infection. Objective: To determine the association of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with oral LP and to study the tests of liver function in patients with ...

  20. Coping with parvovirus infections in mice: health surveillance and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janus, Lydia M; Bleich, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Parvoviruses of mice, minute virus of mice (MVM) and mouse parvovirus (MPV), are challenging pathogens to eradicate from laboratory animal facilities. Due to the impediment on rodent-based research, recent studies have focused on the assessment of re-derivation techniques and parvoviral potential to induce persistent infections. Summarizing recent data, this review gives an overview on studies associated with parvoviral impact on research, diagnostic methods, parvoviral persistence and re-derivation techniques, demonstrating the complex nature of parvovirus infection in mice and unfolding the challenge of controlling parvovirus infections in laboratory animal facilities.

  1. Association Between Helycobacter Pylori Infection and Pathological Oral Manifestations

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    Carini Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Data from the literature are controversial regarding the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori in dental plaque and its association with gastric infection. One of the possible mechanisms suggested for re-infection is the recolonization with H. pylori from dental plaque. The purpose of this review was to determine whether dental plaque, poor oral hygiene, and periodontal disease were risk factors for H. pylori infection.

  2. Transient Oral Human Cytomegalovirus Infections Indicate Inefficient Viral Spread from Very Few Initially Infected Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Bryan T; Krantz, Elizabeth M; Swan, David; Ferrenberg, James; Simmons, Karen; Selke, Stacy; Huang, Meei-Li; Casper, Corey; Corey, Lawrence; Wald, Anna; Schiffer, Joshua T; Gantt, Soren

    2017-06-15

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is acquired by the oral route in children, and primary infection is associated with abundant mucosal replication, as well as the establishment of latency in myeloid cells that results in lifelong infection. The efficiency of primary CMV infection in humans following oral exposure, however, is unknown. We consistently detected self-limited, low-level oral CMV shedding events, which we termed transient CMV infections, in a prospective birth cohort of 30 highly exposed CMV-uninfected infants. We estimated the likelihood of transient oral CMV infections by comparing their observed frequency to that of established primary infections, characterized by persistent high-level shedding, viremia, and seroconversion. We developed mathematical models of viral dynamics upon initial oral CMV infection and validated them using clinical shedding data. Transient infections comprised 76 to 88% of oral CMV shedding events. For this high percentage of transient infections to occur, we identified two mathematical prerequisites: a very small number of initially infected oral cells (1 to 4) and low viral infectivity (<1.5 new cells infected/cell). These observations indicate that oral CMV infection in infants typically begins with a single virus that spreads inefficiently to neighboring cells. Thus, although the incidence of CMV infection is high during infancy, our data provide a mechanistic framework to explain why multiple CMV exposures are typically required before infection is successfully established. These findings imply that a sufficiently primed immune response could prevent CMV from establishing latent infection in humans and support the achievability of a prophylactic CMV vaccine. IMPORTANCE CMV infects the majority of the world's population and is a major cause of birth defects. Developing a vaccine to prevent CMV infection would be extremely valuable but would be facilitated by a better understanding of how natural human CMV infection is acquired. We

  3. Microbial transformation from normal oral microbiota to acute endodontic infections

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    Hsiao William WL

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endodontic infections are a leading cause of oro-facial pain and tooth loss in western countries, and may lead to severe life-threatening infections. These infections are polymicrobial with high bacterial diversity. Understanding the spatial transition of microbiota from normal oral cavities through the infected root canal to the acute periapical abscess can improve our knowledge of the pathogenesis of endodontic infections and lead to more effective treatment. We obtained samples from the oral cavity, infected root canal and periapical abscess of 8 patients (5 with localized and 3 with systemic infections. Microbial populations in these samples were analyzed using next-generation sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons. Bioinformatics tools and statistical tests with rigorous criteria were used to elucidate the spatial transition of the microbiota from normal to diseased sites. Results On average, 10,000 partial 16S rRNA gene sequences were obtained from each sample. All sequences fell into 11 different bacterial phyla. The microbial diversity in root canal and abscess samples was significantly lower than in the oral samples. Streptococcus was the most abundant genus in oral cavities while Prevotella and Fusobacterium were most abundant in diseased samples. The microbiota community structures of root canal and abscess samples were, however, more similar to each other than to the oral cavity microbiota. Using rigorous criteria and novel bioinformatics tools, we found that Granulicatella adiacens, Eubacterium yurii, Prevotella melaninogenica, Prevotella salivae, Streptococcus mitis, and Atopobium rimae were over-represented in diseased samples. Conclusions We used a novel approach and high-throughput methodologies to characterize the microbiota associated normal and diseased oral sites in the same individuals.

  4. Polymicrobial infection with major periodontal pathogens induced periodontal disease and aortic atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic ApoE(null mice.

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    Mercedes F Rivera

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease (PD and atherosclerosis are both polymicrobial and multifactorial and although observational studies supported the association, the causative relationship between these two diseases is not yet established. Polymicrobial infection-induced periodontal disease is postulated to accelerate atherosclerotic plaque growth by enhancing atherosclerotic risk factors of orally infected Apolipoprotein E deficient (ApoE(null mice. At 16 weeks of infection, samples of blood, mandible, maxilla, aorta, heart, spleen, and liver were collected, analyzed for bacterial genomic DNA, immune response, inflammation, alveolar bone loss, serum inflammatory marker, atherosclerosis risk factors, and aortic atherosclerosis. PCR analysis of polymicrobial-infected (Porphyromonas gingivalis [P. gingivalis], Treponema denticola [T. denticola], and Tannerella forsythia [T. forsythia] mice resulted in detection of bacterial genomic DNA in oral plaque samples indicating colonization of the oral cavity by all three species. Fluorescent in situ hybridization detected P. gingivalis and T. denticola within gingival tissues of infected mice and morphometric analysis showed an increase in palatal alveolar bone loss (p<0.0001 and intrabony defects suggesting development of periodontal disease in this model. Polymicrobial-infected mice also showed an increase in aortic plaque area (p<0.05 with macrophage accumulation, enhanced serum amyloid A, and increased serum cholesterol and triglycerides. A systemic infection was indicated by the detection of bacterial genomic DNA in the aorta and liver of infected mice and elevated levels of bacterial specific IgG antibodies (p<0.0001. This study was a unique effort to understand the effects of a polymicrobial infection with P. gingivalis, T. denticola and T. forsythia on periodontal disease and associated atherosclerosis in ApoE(null mice.

  5. Increased TLR4 expression in murine placentas after oral infection with periodontal pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce, R.M.; Barros, S.P.; Wacker, B.; Peters, B.; Moss, K.; Offenbacher, S.

    2009-01-01

    Maternal periodontitis has emerged as a putative risk factor for preterm births in humans. The periodontitis-associated dental biofilm is thought to serve as an important source of oral bacteria and related virulence factors that hematogenously disseminate and affect the fetoplacental unit; however the underlying biological mechanisms are yet to be fully elucidated. This study hypothesized that an oral infection with the human periodontal pathogens Campylobacter rectus and Porphyromonas gingivalis is able to induce fetal growth restriction, placental inflammation and enhance Toll-like receptors type 4 (TLR4) expression in a murine pregnancy model. Female Balb/C mice (n=40) were orally infected with C. rectus and/or P. gingivalis over a 16-week period and mated once per week. Pregnant mice were sacrificed at embryonic day (E) 16.5 and placentas were collected and analyzed for TLR4 mRNA levels and qualitative protein expression by real time PCR and immunofluorescence. TLR4 mRNA expression was found to be increased in C. rectus-infected group (1.98±0.886 fold difference, Pperiodontal pathogens. The TLR4 pathway has been implicated in the pathogenesis of preterm births; therefore the abnormal regulation of placental TLR4 may give new insights into how maternal periodontitis and periodontal pathogens might be linked to placental inflammation and preterm birth pathogenesis. PMID:19101032

  6. Gene Expression Profile in the Liver of BALB/c Mice Infected with Fasciola hepatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Caraballo, Jose; López-Abán, Julio; Fernández-Soto, Pedro; Vicente, Belén; Collía, Francisco; Muro, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica infection still remains one of the helminthic neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). It has a huge worldwide distribution, affecting mainly cattle and, sometimes, human beings. In addition to data reported about the immunological response induced by helminthic infections and that induced by Fasciola hepatica, little is known about the gene expression profile in its organ target, the liver, which is where adult worms are established and live for long periods of time, causing its characteristic pathology. In the present work, we study both the early and late gene expression profiles in the livers of mice infected with F. hepatica metacercariae using a microarray-based methodology. A total of 9 female-6-week-old BALB/c mice (Charles River Laboratories, Barcelona, Spain) weighing 20 to 35 g were used for the experiments. Two groups of BALB/c mice were orally infected with seven F. hepatica metacercariae, and the other group remained untreated and served as a control. Mice were humanely euthanized and necropsied for liver recovery, histological assessment of hepatic damage, RNA isolation, microarray design and gene expression analysis on the day of infection (t0), seven days post-infection (t7) and twenty-one days post-infection (t21). We found that F. hepatica infection induces the differential expression of 128 genes in the liver in the early stage of infection and 308 genes in the late stage, and most of them are up-regulated. The Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed significant changes in the pathways related to metabolism, biosynthesis and signaling as well as genes implicated in inducing liver-toxicity, injury and death. The present study provides us insights at the molecular level about the underlying mechanisms used by F. hepatica, leading to liver damage and its subsequent pathophysiology. The expression pattern obtained here could also be used to explain the lack of association between infection with F. hepatica and cholangiocarcinoma. However

  7. the prevalence of oral lesions in hiv-infected nigerians

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR J T AROTIBA

    I N T R O D U C T I O N. The Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection is a ... have an adequate knowledge of the common oral .... 4 (1.9). 13. Oral Papilloma. 2 (0.9). 14. Molluscum contagiosum. 2 (0.9). 15. Palatal petechiae. 2 (0.9). *Note: Multiple lesions. D i s c u s s i o n. As far as we can establish, this is the first study that.

  8. Detection of Toxoplasma gondii DNA in sera samples of mice experimentally infected

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Langoni

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Detection of Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii DNA in blood can help to diagnose the disease in its acute phase; however, it must be considered that hemoglobin, present in blood, can inhibit polymerase activity, making impracticable the detection of DNA in samples. Mice were experimentally infected via oral route with ME49 and BTU2 strains cysts and RH strain tachyzoites; polymerase chain reaction was used to detect T. gondii DNA in mice sera 18, 24, 48, 96, and 192 hours post infection (PI. Toxoplama gondii DNA was detected in only one animal infected with BTU2 strain, genotype III (isolated from a dog with neurological signs 18 hours PI. The agent's DNA was not detected in any sample of the other experimental groups. New studies must be carried out to verify the technique sensitivity in researches on this agent's genetic material using sera samples of acute-phase toxoplasmosis patients, especially in cases of immunosuppression.

  9. Bioluminescence imaging of Chlamydia muridarum ascending infection in mice.

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    Jessica Campbell

    Full Text Available Chlamydial pathogenicity in the upper genital tract relies on chlamydial ascending from the lower genital tract. To monitor chlamydial ascension, we engineered a luciferase-expressing C. muridarum. In cells infected with the luciferase-expressing C. muridarum, luciferase gene expression and enzymatic activity (measured as bioluminescence intensity correlated well along the infection course, suggesting that bioluminescence can be used for monitoring chlamydial replication. Following an intravaginal inoculation with the luciferase-expressing C. muridarum, 8 of 10 mice displayed bioluminescence signal in the lower with 4 also in the upper genital tracts on day 3 after infection. By day 7, all 10 mice developed bioluminescence signal in the upper genital tracts. The bioluminescence signal was maintained in the upper genital tract in 6 and 2 mice by days 14 and 21, respectively. The bioluminescence signal was no longer detectable in any of the mice by day 28. The whole body imaging approach also revealed an unexpected airway infection following the intravaginal inoculation. Although the concomitant airway infection was transient and did not significantly alter the genital tract infection time courses, caution should be taken during data interpretation. The above observations have demonstrated that C. muridarum can not only achieve rapid ascending infection in the genital tract but also cause airway infection following a genital tract inoculation. These findings have laid a foundation for further optimizing the C. muridarum intravaginal infection murine model for understanding chlamydial pathogenic mechanisms.

  10. Experimental infection of Balb/c nude mice with Hepatitis E virus

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    Zhu Jianguo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several animal species can reportedly act as reservoirs for Hepatitis E virus (HEV, a zoonotic pathogen. HEV and antibody to the virus have been detected in a variety of animals including rodents. Pig and rat models for HEV have been established for HEV, but a nude mouse has not yet been developed. Methods Balb/c nude mice were inoculated with swine HEV, both orally and via intravenous injection to insure infection. Negative control and experimental contact-exposed groups of mice were also included in the study. The liver, spleen, kidney, jejunum, ileum, cecum and colon of each mouse from all three groups were collected for reverse transcription nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nPCR detection, indirect immunofluorescence observation and histopathologic examination. The sera from nude mice were tested for anti-HEV IgG by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Activities of liver enzymes, including alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST and alkaline phosphatase (ALP, as well as total bilirubin (TBIL were also measured in the sera of the nude mice. Results HEV antigens and HEV RNA were detected in liver, spleen, kidney, jejunum, ileum and colon both by indirect immunofluorescence and by RT-nPCR in all of the inoculated and in one of the contact-exposed nude mice. Histopathological changes were observed in the liver and spleen of these mice. Infected mice showed increased levels of AST, ALP, and anti-HEV IgG in sera. The livers of contact-exposed mice showed obvious histopathological damage. Conclusion Nude mice could be readily infected by HEV isolated from pigs. The nude mouse may therefore be a useful animal model for studying the pathogenesis of HEV.

  11. Self-reported oral health, oral hygiene, and oral HPV infection in at-risk women in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Thanh Cong; Tran, Ly Thi-Hai; Markham, Christine M; Huynh, Thuy Thi-Thu; Tran, Loi Thi; Pham, Vy Thi-Tuong; Tran, Quan Minh; Hoang, Ngoc Hieu; Hwang, Lu-Yu; Sturgis, Erich Madison

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to examine the relationships among self-reported oral health, oral hygiene practices, and oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in women at risk for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Convenience and referral sampling methods were used in a clinic-based setting to recruit 126 women aged 18-45 years between August and October 2013. Behavioral factors were self-reported. Oral-rinse samples were tested for HPV DNA of 2 low-risk and 13 high-risk genotypes. A higher unadjusted prevalence of oral HPV infection was associated with poorer self-rated overall oral health (P = .001), reported oral lesions or problems in the past year (P = .001), and reported a tooth loss not because of injury (P = .001). Higher unadjusted prevalence of oral HPV infection was also associated with two measures of oral hygiene: lower frequencies of toothbrushing per day (P = .047) and gargling without toothbrushing (P = .037). After adjusting for other factors in multivariable logistic regression models, poorer self-rated overall oral health remained statistically associated with oral HPV infection (P = .042); yet the frequency of tooth-brushing per day did not (P = .704). Results corroborate the association between self-reported poor oral health and oral HPV infection. The effect of oral hygiene on oral HPV infection remains inconclusive. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Perfluorocarbon emulsion therapy attenuates pneumococcal infection in sickle cell mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmi, Nawal; Andrew, Peter W; Pandya, Hitesh C

    2015-05-15

    Impaired immunity and tissue hypoxia-ischemia are strongly linked with Streptococcus pneumoniae pathogenesis in patients with sickle cell anemia. Perfluorocarbon emulsions (PFCEs) have high O2-dissolving capacity and can alleviate tissue hypoxia. Here, we evaluate the effects of intravenous PFCE therapy in transgenic sickle cell (HbSS) mice infected with S. pneumoniae. HbSS and C57BL/6 (control) mice intravenously infected with S. pneumoniae were treated intravenously with PFCE or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and then managed in either air/O2 (FiO2 proportion, 50%; hereafter referred to as the PFCE-O2 and PBS-O2 groups) or air only (hereafter, the PFCE-air and PBS-air groups) gas mixtures. Lungs were processed for leukocyte and bacterial counts and cytokine measurements. HbSS mice developed severe pneumococcal infection significantly faster than C57BL/6 mice (Kaplan-Maier analysis, P < .05). PFCE-O2-treated HbSS mice had significantly better survival at 72 hours than HBSS mice treated with PFCE-air, PBS-O2, or PBS-air (P < .05). PFCE-O2-treated HbSS mice also had significantly lower pulmonary leukocyte counts, lower interleukin 1β and interferon γ levels, and higher interleukin 10 levels than PFCE-air-treated HbSS mice. Clearance of S. pneumoniae from lungs of HbSS mice or C57BL/6 mice was not altered by PFCE treatment. Improved survival of PFCE-O₂-treated HbSS mice infected with S. pneumoniae is associated with altered pulmonary inflammation but not enhanced bacterial clearance. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Administration of kefir-fermented milk protects mice against Giardia intestinalis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Mariana Correa; Golowczyc, Marina A; De Antoni, Graciela L; Pérez, Pablo F; Humen, Martín; Serradell, María de los Angeles

    2013-12-01

    Giardiasis, caused by the protozoan Giardia intestinalis, is one of the most common intestinal diseases worldwide and constitutes an important problem for the public health systems of various countries. Kefir is a probiotic drink obtained by fermenting milk with 'kefir grains', which consist mainly of bacteria and yeasts that coexist in a complex symbiotic association. In this work, we studied the ability of kefir to protect mice from G. intestinalis infection, and characterized the host immune response to this probiotic in the context of the intestinal infection. Six- to 8-week-old C75BL/6 mice were separated into four groups: controls, kefir mice (receiving 1 : 100 dilution of kefir in drinking water for 14 days), Giardia mice (infected orally with 4×10(7) trophozoites of G. intestinalis at day 7) and Giardia-kefir mice (kefir-treated G. intestinalis-infected mice), and killed at 2 or 7 days post-infection. Kefir administration was able to significantly reduce the intensity of Giardia infection at 7 days post-infection. An increase in the percentage of CD4(+) T cells at 2 days post-infection was observed in the Peyer's patches (PP) of mice belonging to the Giardia group compared with the control and kefir groups, while the percentage of CD4(+) T cells in PP in the Giardia-kefir group was similar to that of controls. At 2 days post-infection, a reduction in the percentage of B220-positive major histocompatibility complex class II medium cells in PP was observed in infected mice compared with the other groups. At 7 days post-infection, Giardia-infected mice showed a reduction in RcFcε-positive cells compared with the control group, suggesting a downregulation of the inflammatory response. However, the percentages of RcFcε-positive cells did not differ from controls in the kefir and Giardia-kefir groups. An increase in IgA-positive cells was observed in the lamina propria of the kefir group compared with controls at 2 days post-infection. Interestingly, the

  14. Combination of Estrogen and Immunosuppressive Agents to Establish a Mouse Model of Candidiasis with Concurrent Oral and Vaginal Mucosal Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Le; Wang, Chong; Mei, Huan; Shen, Yongnian; Lv, Guixia; Zeng, Rong; Zhan, Ping; Li, Dongmei; Liu, Weida

    2016-02-01

    Mouse model is an appropriate tool for pathogenic determination and study of host defenses during the fungal infection. Here, we established a mouse model of candidiasis with concurrent oral and vaginal mucosal infection. Two C. albicans strains sourced from clinical candidemia (SC5314) and mucosal infection (ATCC62342) were tested in ICR mice. The different combinational panels covering estrogen and immunosuppressive agents, cortisone, prednisolone and cyclophosphamide were used for concurrent oral and vaginal candidiasis establishment. Prednisolone in combination with estrogen proved an optimal mode for concurrent mucosal infection establishment. The model maintained for 1 week with fungal burden reached at least 10(5) cfu/g of tissue. This mouse model was evaluated by in vivo pharmacodynamics of fluconazole and host mucosal immunity of IL-17 and IL-23. Mice infected by SC5314 were cured by fluconazole. An increase in IL-23 in both oral and vaginal homogenates was observed after infection, while IL-17 only had a prominent elevation in oral tissue. This model could properly mimic complicated clinical conditions and provides a valuable means for antifungal assay in vivo and may also provide a useful method for the evaluation of host-fungal interactions.

  15. Antihemolytic Activities of Green Tea, Safflower, and Mulberry Extracts during Plasmodium berghei Infection in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suthin Audomkasok

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria-associated hemolysis is associated with mortality in adult patients. It has been speculated that oxidative stress and inflammation induced by malaria parasite are involved in its pathophysiology. Hence, we aimed to investigate the antihemolytic effect of green tea, safflower, and mulberry extracts against Plasmodium berghei infection. Aqueous crude extracts of these plants were prepared using hot water method and used for oral treatment in mice. Groups of ICR mice were infected with 6 × 106 infected red blood cells of P. berghei ANKA by intraperitoneal injection and given the extracts (500, 1500, and 3000 mg/kg twice a day for 4 consecutive days. To assess hemolysis, hematocrit levels were then evaluated. Malaria infection resulted in hemolysis. However, antihemolytic effects were observed in infected mice treated with these extracts at dose-dependent manners. In conclusion, aqueous crude extracts of green tea, safflower, and mulberry exerted antihemolysis induced by malaria infection. These plants may work as potential source in the development of variety of herbal formulations for malarial treatment.

  16. EXPERIMENTAL-INFECTION IN MICE WITH BACILLUS-LICHENIFORMIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerholm, J.S.; Jensen, H.E.; Jensen, N.E.

    1995-01-01

    The pathogenicity of Bacillus licheniformis was assessed in normal and immunodepressed BALB/c mice. The animals were challenged intravenously with 4 x 10(7) colony forming units of B, licheniformis (ATCC 14580) and both normal and immunodepressed mice were susceptible. However, the infection...... was more severe in the immunosuppressed animals. In normal mice, lesions were restricted to the liver and kidneys, while lesions also occurred in other organs of immunodepressed mice. By crossed immunoelectrophoresis it was shown that antigens of B. licheniformis are potent immunogens, and the bacteria...

  17. [Infections of the oral mucosa II. Bacterial, mycotic and viral infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichart, P A

    1999-11-01

    Non-specific infections of the oral mucosa are rare; however, they may present during HIV infection in the form of gingivo-periodontal lesions. In some of these Candida albicans may play a role in the pathogenesis. Sexually transmitted bacterial infections such as gonorrhoea and syphilis are frequently associated with HIV infection. Since penicillin resistance is frequent in gonorrhoea, the cephalosporines are mainly used for treatment. Syphilis increases the risk for transmission of HIV. Lues maligna with oral manifestations has been described. For this, penicillin G is the therapy of choice. Tuberculosis, characterized by multitherapy resistance, is associated with HIV infections world-wide; oral manifestations are rare. Oral candidiasis during HIV infection is often characterized by therapy resistance against fluconazole and a shift in species, with Candida glabrata and Candida krusei as the emerging species. The azoles are still the mainstay of therapy, particularly fluconazole. Herpes simplex (HSV) infections run an atypical course during HIV disease; resistance against acyclovir is a clinical problem. The association of HSV infection with erythema exudativum multiforme has been clearly shown. Oral hairy leukoplakia caused by Epstein Barr virus is a characteristic infection during immunosuppression. Cytomegalovirus infection is also observed in immunodeficient patients. Cases of ganciclovir resistance have been described. Human herpes virus 8 (HHV 8) is associated with Kaposi's sarcoma. Therapeutic trials have focussed on the inhibition of HHV 8 replication. Over 100 different genotypes of human papillomaviruses are known; some can cause infections of the oral mucosa. Characteristic lesions caused by different HPV genotypes are verruca vulgaris, condyloma acuminatum and focal epithelial hyperplasia.

  18. Antiplasmodial Effect of Anthocleista vogelii on Albino Mice Experimentally Infected with Plasmodium berghei berghei (NK 65

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lebari Barine Gboeloh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the antiplasmodial effect of the ethanolic stem bark extract of Anthocleista vogelii at different doses in albino mice infected with Plasmodium berghei berghei (NK 65. Thirty-six mice were divided into six groups of six mice each. Five groups (B1–B3, D, and G were infected with Plasmodium berghei berghei parasitized red blood cells. Groups D, H, and G served as the controls. Six days after infection, mice in groups B1, B2, and B3 were treated orally with 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg body weight of Anthocleista vogelii, respectively, for six executive days. Group D was treated with 5 mg/kg body weight of chloroquine while Group G was given distilled water. Group H was not infected and was not treated. It served as the normal control. The extracts exhibited significant (P<0.05 dose-dependent chemosuppression of P. berghei. The extract exhibited average chemosuppressive effects of 48.5%, 78.5%, and 86.6% at dose levels of 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg body weight, respectively. Phytochemical screening of the plant extract revealed the presence of saponins, cardiac glycosides, flavonoids, terpenes, alkaloids, and steroid. The acute toxicity (LD50 of the plant was estimated to be 3162 mg/kg body weight. It showed that the stem bark of A. vogelii possesses antiplasmodial property.

  19. Oral candida infection among HIV patients at Kilimanjaro Christian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    candida infection in HIV positive patients and investigate the relationship between oral manifestations ... and prescription at Child Centred Family Care Clinic at KCMC for a period of 12 months. .... et al., 2013) compared candida colonization in asymptomatic HIV patients and control. .... Journal of Dental Research, Dental.

  20. [Intestinal disorder of anaerobic bacteria aggravates pulmonary immune pathological injury of mice infected with influenza virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sha; Yan, Yuqi; Zhang, Mengyuan; Shi, Shanshan; Jiang, Zhenyou

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the relationship between the intestinal disorder of anaerobic bacteria and influenza virus infection, and the effect on pulmonary inflammatory cytokines in mice. Totally 36 mice were randomly divided into normal control group, virus-infected group and metronidazole treatment group (12 mice in each group). Mice in the metronidazole group were administrated orally with metronidazole sulfate for 8 days causing anaerobic bacteria flora imbalance; then all groups except the normal control group were treated transnasally with influenza virus (50 μL/d FM1) for 4 days to establish the influenza virus-infected models. Their mental state and lung index were observed, and the pathological morphological changes of lung tissues, caecum and intestinal mucosa were examined by HE staining. The levels of interleukin 4 (IL-4), interferon γ (IFN-γ), IL-10 and IL-17 in the lung homogenates were determined by ELISA. Compared with the virus control group, the metronidazole group showed obviously increased lung index and more serious pathological changes of the lung tissue and appendix inflammation performance. After infected by the FM1 influenza virus, IFN-γ and IL-17 of the metronidazole group decreased significantly and IL-4 and IL-10 levels were raised, but there was no statistically difference between the metronidazole and virus control groups. Intestinal anaerobic bacteria may inhibit the adaptive immune response in the lungs of mice infected with FM1 influenza virus through adjusting the lung inflammatory factors, affect the replication and clean-up time of the FM1 influenza virus, thus further aggravating pulmonary immune pathological injury caused by the influenza virus infection.

  1. [Application of anaerobic bacteria detection in oral and maxillofacial infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Zhen-ying; Lin, Qin; Meng, Yan-hong; He, Chun; Su, Jia-zeng; Peng, Xin

    2016-02-18

    To investigate the distribution and drug resistance of anaerobic bacteria in the patients with oral and maxillofacial infection. Aerobic and anaerobic bacteria cultures from 61 specimens of pus from the patients with oral and maxillofacial infection in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Peking University School of Stomatology were identified. The culture type was evaluated by API 20A kit and drug resistance test was performed by Etest method. The clinical data and antibacterial agents for the treatment of the 61 cases were collected, and the final outcomes were recorded. The bacteria cultures were isolated from all the specimens, with aerobic bacteria only in 6 cases (9.8%), anaerobic bacteria only in 7 cases (11.5%), and both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria in 48 cases (78.7%). There were 55 infected cases (90.2%) with anaerobic bacteria, and 81 anaerobic bacteria stains were isolated. The highest bacteria isolation rate of Gram positive anaerobic bacteria could be found in Peptostreptococcus, Bifidobacterium and Pemphigus propionibacterium. No cefoxitin, amoxicillin/carat acid resistant strain was detected in the above three Gram positive anaerobic bacteria. The highest bacteria isolation rate of Gram negative anaerobic bacteria could be detected in Porphyromonas and Prevotella. No metronidazole, cefoxitin, amoxicillin/carat acid resistant strain was found in the two Gram negative anaerobic bacteria. In the study, 48 patients with oral and maxillofacial infection were treated according to the results of drug resistance testing, and the clinical cure rate was 81.3%. Mixed aerobic and anaerobic bacteria cultures are very common in most oral and maxillofacial infection patients. Anaerobic bacteria culture and drug resistance testing play an important role in clinical treatment.

  2. Poliomyelitis in transgenic mice expressing CD155 under the control of the Tage4 promoter after oral and parenteral poliovirus inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shaukat; Toyoda, Hidemi; Linehan, Melissa; Iwasaki, Akiko; Nomoto, Akio; Bernhardt, Günter; Cello, Jeronimo; Wimmer, Eckard

    2014-08-01

    An important step in poliovirus (PV) infection by the oral route in humans is replication of the virus in lymphatic tissues of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, thought to be mainly in the Peyer's patches of the small intestine. No immunocompetent transgenic (tg) mice that express human PV receptor (CD155) under the control of different promoters can be infected orally. The mouse orthologue of human CD155 is Tage4, a protein expressed at the surface of enterocytes and in the Peyer's patches. We describe here the generation of a tg mouse model in which the Tage4 promoter was used to drive expression of the human PV receptor-coding region (Tage4-CD155tg mice). In this model, CD155 expression was observed by immunostaining in different regions in the Peyer's patches but not in their germinal centres. Although a similar pattern of staining was observed between 3- and 6-week-old Tage4-CD155tg mice, poliomyelitis was only seen in the younger mice after PV infection by the oral route. When compared with TgPVR21 mice that expressed CD155 driven by its human promoter, 3-week-old Tage4-CD155tg mice were more susceptible to gut infection and paralysis following feeding with PV. Also, Tage4-CD155tg mice exhibited higher susceptibility to poliomyelitis after parenteral inoculation of PV. Remarkably, the LD50 after intracerebral inoculation of PV was similar in both CD155 tg mouse strains. The CD155 tg mouse model reported here, although moderately susceptible to oral infection, may be suitable to study mechanisms of PV replication in the gastrointestinal tract and to dissect important aspects of PV neuroinvasiveness. © 2014 The Authors.

  3. Oral Vaccination Based on DNA-Chitosan Nanoparticles against Schistosoma mansoni Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina R. Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of a vaccine would be essential for the control of schistosomiasis, which is recognized as the most important human helminth infection in terms of morbidity and mortality. A new approach of oral vaccination with DNA-chitosan nanoparticles appears interesting because of their great stability and the ease of target accessibility, besides chitosan immunostimulatory properties. Here we described that chitosan nanoparticles loaded with plasmid DNA encoding Rho1-GTPase protein of Schistosoma mansoni, prepared at different molar ratios of primary amines to DNA phosphate anion (N/P, were able to complex electrostatically with DNA and condense it into positively charged nanostructures. Nanoparticles were able to maintain zeta potential and size characteristics in media that simulate gastric (SGF and intestinal fluids (SIF. Further in vivo studies showed that oral immunization was not able to induce high levels of specific antibodies but induced high levels of the modulatory cytokine IL-10. This resulted in a significative reduce of liver pathology, although it could not protect mice of infection challenge with S. mansoni worms. Mice immunized only with chitosan nanoparticles presented 47% of protection against parasite infection, suggesting an important role of chitosan in inducing a protective immune response against schistosomiasis, which will be more explored in further studies.

  4. Virus Infections on Prion Diseased Mice Exacerbate Inflammatory Microglial Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lins, Nara; Mourão, Luiz; Trévia, Nonata; Passos, Aline; Farias, José Augusto; Assunção, Jarila; Bento-Torres, João; Consentino Kronka Sosthenes, Marcia; Diniz, José Antonio Picanço; Vasconcelos, Pedro Fernando da Costa

    2016-01-01

    We investigated possible interaction between an arbovirus infection and the ME7 induced mice prion disease. C57BL/6, females, 6-week-old, were submitted to a bilateral intrahippocampal injection of ME7 prion strain (ME7) or normal brain homogenate (NBH). After injections, animals were organized into two groups: NBH (n = 26) and ME7 (n = 29). At 15th week after injections (wpi), animals were challenged intranasally with a suspension of Piry arbovirus 0.001% or with NBH. Behavioral changes in ME7 animals appeared in burrowing activity at 14 wpi. Hyperactivity on open field test, errors on rod bridge, and time reduction in inverted screen were detected at 15th, 19th, and 20th wpi respectively. Burrowing was more sensitive to earlier hippocampus dysfunction. However, Piry-infection did not significantly affect the already ongoing burrowing decline in the ME7-treated mice. After behavioral tests, brains were processed for IBA1, protease-resistant form of PrP, and Piry virus antigens. Although virus infection in isolation did not change the number of microglia in CA1, virus infection in prion diseased mice (at 17th wpi) induced changes in number and morphology of microglia in a laminar-dependent way. We suggest that virus infection exacerbates microglial inflammatory response to a greater degree in prion-infected mice, and this is not necessarily correlated with hippocampal-dependent behavioral deficits. PMID:28003864

  5. Some putative prebiotics increase the severity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lahtinen Sampo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prebiotics are non-digestible food ingredients believed to beneficially affect host health by selectively stimulating the growth of the beneficial bacteria residing in the gut. Such beneficial bacteria have been reported to protect against pathogenic infections. However, contradicting results on prevention of Salmonella infections with prebiotics have been published. The aim of the present study was to examine whether S. Typhimurium SL1344 infection in mice could be prevented by administration of dietary carbohydrates with different structures and digestibility profiles. BALB/c mice were fed a diet containing 10% of either of the following carbohydrates: inulin, fructo-oligosaccharide, xylo-oligosaccharide, galacto-oligosaccharide, apple pectin, polydextrose or beta-glucan for three weeks prior to oral Salmonella challenge (107 CFU and compared to mice fed a cornstarch-based control diet. Results The mice fed with diets containing fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS or xylo-oligosaccharide (XOS had significantly higher (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05 numbers of S. Typhimurium SL1344 in liver, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes when compared to the mice fed with the cornstarch-based control diet. Significantly increased amounts (P < 0.01 of Salmonella were detected in ileal and fecal contents of mice fed with diets supplemented with apple pectin, however these mice did not show significantly higher numbers of S. Typhimyrium in liver, spleen and lymph nodes than animals from the control group (P < 0.20. The acute-phase protein haptoglobin was a good marker for translocation of S. Typhimurium in mice. In accordance with the increased counts of Salmonella in the organs, serum concentrations of haptoglobin were significantly increased in the mice fed with FOS or XOS (P < 0.001. Caecum weight was increased in the mice fed with FOS (P < 0.01, XOS (P < 0.01, or polydextrose (P < 0.001, and caecal pH was reduced in the mice fed with polydextrose (P < 0

  6. Helicobacter pylori and oral pathology: relationship with the gastric infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Isabel; Muiño, Andrea; Aguas, Silvia; Harada, Laura; Diaz, Mariana; Lence, Adriana; Labbrozzi, Mario; Muiño, Juan Manuel; Elsner, Boris; Avagnina, Alejandra; Denninghoff, Valeria

    2014-08-07

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been found in the oral cavity and stomach, and its infection is one of the most frequent worldwide. We reviewed the literature and conducted a Topic Highlight, which identified studies reporting an association between H. pylori-infection in the oral cavity and H. pylori-positive stomach bacterium. This work was designed to determine whether H. pylori is the etiologic agent in periodontal disease, recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS), squamous cell carcinoma, burning and halitosis. Record selection focused on the highest quality studies and meta-analyses. We selected 48 articles reporting on the association between saliva and plaque and H. pylori-infection. In order to assess periodontal disease data, we included 12 clinical trials and 1 meta-analysis. We evaluated 13 published articles that addressed the potential association with RAS, and 6 with squamous cell carcinoma. Fourteen publications focused on our questions on burning and halitosis. There is a close relation between H. pylori infection in the oral cavity and the stomach. The mouth is the first extra-gastric reservoir. Regarding the role of H. pylori in the etiology of squamous cell carcinoma, no evidence is still available.

  7. Antiplasmodial activity of methanolic extract of asparagus officinalis l. stem on plasmodium berghei infected mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minari, J.B.; Adutuga, A.A.

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at investigating the antiplasmodial activity of methanolic extract of Asparagus officinalis L. stem on Plasmodium berghei infected mice. To investigate this, the mice were infected with P.berghei to cause malaria. The mice were simultaneously given oral doses (20, 40 and 60 mg/kg body weight) of methanolic extract of A. officinalis L. stem. The phytochemical constituents of the extract revealed the presence of alkaloids, phenolics, cardiac glycosides, flavonoids, terpenoid and steroid. The extract administered to the infected mice significantly suppressed the parasite. The extract also significantly (P<0.05) reduced the activities of serum aspatate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphate (ALP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT). White blood corpuscles (WBC), red blood corpuscles (RBC), hemoglobin (HGB), packed cell volume (PCV), platelets (PLT) and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) showed significant (P<0.05) increase after the administration of the extract while mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) showed significant (P<0.05) reduction. Present findings suggests that the plant extract contains phytochemicals that have antiplasmodial and hepatoprotective properties. (author)

  8. Oral cavity infection: an adverse effect after the treatment of oral cancer in aged individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jie; Zhao, Jun; Jiang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    The immune compromised patients after treatment of oral cancer may have a chance of infection by drug-resistant opportunistic microbes. We investigated the occurrence of opportunistic microorganisms in aged individuals receiving follow-up examinations after treatment of oral cancer in China. These patients were used as test group and the respective age grouped healthy individuals as control group. In this study, the oral cavity microorganisms such as bacteria and yeast were taken for the analysis. After the screening of representative microorganisms, their aptitude of pervasiveness against drugs was studied. Here, we used antimicrobial agents which are common in clinical practice. We also performed studies to investigate the presence of toxin genes in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The results indicate that the prevalence of drug-resistant microbes was more pronounced in oral cancer patients after initial treatment above 70 years old. The oxacillin resistance of S. aureus isolate confirms that the prevalence of MRSA is increasing in accordance to age-factor and immune compromise in elderly patients. This study reveals the occurrence of drug-resistant opportunistic microorganisms in oral cavity after treatment for oral cancer in aged individuals. Special attention should be directed to MRSA during the treatment of oral cancer, and to realize the fact of immune compromise in elderly patients.

  9. Respiratory and intraperitoneal infection of mice with encephalomyocarditis cirus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaerts, W.J.C.; Durville-van der Oord, B.J.

    1975-01-01

    The relationships governing host resistance to viraliinfection were evaluated in mice following respiratory or peritoneal infection with three strains of encephalomyocarditis virus, which were antigenically similar but differed in virulence. The contribution of non-specific resistance to the overall defense of the host was assessed in mice that had received 450 R of X-radiation prior to viral infection. Survival time correlated with the degree of attenuation of the virus strains and was not influenced by sublethal X-irradiation and route of inoculation, provided that the viral dose was expressed in LD 50 units

  10. Potential role of meflquine (antimalarial drug and methanol extract of Chenopodium ambrosioides and Sesbania sesban in mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abdel-Wahab El-Emam

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To elucidate the efficacy of mefloquine and methanol extract of the plants Chenopodium ambrosioides (C. ambrosioides and Sesbania sesban (S. sesban as a combined therapy for the treatment of Schistosoma mansoni (S. mansoni infected mice, and study the parasitological, biochemical and histological parameters of treated mice. Methods: Two groups of male Swiss Albino mice were infected with S. mansoni cercariae. The first group untreated served as control. The second group was orally treated with a single dose (200 mg/kg of mefloquine 3 weeks post infection, then subsequently divided into 2 subgroups; the first orally retreated with the plant extracts 1 000 mg/kg of S. sesban followed by 1 250 mg/kg of C. ambrosioides with an 1 h interval, for 2 successive days. The second sub-group was re-treated with the same (dose and method plant extracts after 7 weeks post infection. Results: The results showed that S. mansoni infected mice treated with mefloquine and the plants’ extracts 3 weeks post infection significantly (P < 0.01 reduced the worm burden/ mouse by 95.5% and the few worms recovered from sacrificed mice in this treatment failed to lay ova. Moreover, no worms were recovered from infected mice treated with mefloquine (3 weeks post infection and re-treated by the plant’s extracts at 7 weeks post infection. Also, treatment of infected mice with mefloquine followed by the plants’ extracts either at 3 or 7 weeks post infection ameliorated the activities of the serum enzymes alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkline phosphatase and acid phosphatase as well as the hepatic granulomatous lesions compared to infected untreated group. Conclusions: It is concluded that successive treatment of S. mansoni infected mice with mefloquine and methanol extract of the plants C. ambrosioides and S. sesban could be a promising device in the strategy of schistosomiasis control.

  11. Local immune response to primary infection and re-infection by Clonorchis sinensis in FVB mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Min; Yu, Hak Sun; Jin, Yan; Choi, Min-Ho; Bae, Young Mee; Hong, Sung-Tae

    2017-08-01

    Although Clonorchis sinensis lives in the bile duct, few studies have investigated the local immune response in the liver and bile duct. To investigate the local immune response to C. sinensis, we investigated the activation and recruitment of various immune cells and cytokine levels in the liver and bile duct lymph nodes (BLN) in FVB mice after primary infection and re-infection. Male 4-week-old FVB mice were divided into 6 experimental groups: uninfected controls, primary infection lasting 1week (PI 1w), primary infection lasting 4weeks (PI 4w), praziquantel treatment after PI 4w (Tx), re-infection lasting 1week after Tx (RI 1w), and re-infection lasting 4weeks after Tx (RI 4w). Recovery rates were 80.0% and 73.0% in PI 1w and PI 4w mice, respectively, but significantly decreased during re-infection to 26.6% in RI 1w and 13.3% in RI 4w. This result suggested that the mice were resistant to re-infection. In the liver, Kupffer cells were augmented 70-fold in PI 1w mice (Psinensis-specific IgG1 and IgG2a strongly increased in RI 1w mice. Secretion of C. sinensis-specific IgE reached a plateau at 4weeks after primary infection, and remained elevated in all infected groups. In conclusion, during infection with C. sinensis, Kupffer cells likely act as antigen-presenting cells, stimulating the Th2 cytokine production system. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Oral lesions in HIV+/AIDS adolescents perinatally infected undergoing HAART.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitán-Cepeda, Luis-Alberto; Domínguez-Sánchez, Anitza; Pavía-Ruz, Noris; Muñoz-Hernández, Rocío; Verdugo-Díaz, Roberto; Valles-Medina, Ana-María; Meráz-Acosta, Héctor

    2010-07-01

    To assess the prevalence of the oral lesions related to HIV-infection (HIV-OL) in HIV+/AIDS adolescents (=13 years old), and the differences with HIV+/AIDS children (=3 - 0.05). Oral candidiasis was the most prevalent oral lesion in both groups. Association (p<0.05) of a high prevalence of HIV-OL and oral candidiasis with a high viral load was observed in both study groups. Adolescents perinatally HIV-infected have a high prevalence of HIV-OL. Oral Candidiasis still is the most frequent oral opportunistic infection. Oral lesions could have association to viral failure in HIV+/AIDS adolescents undergoing HAART.

  13. Oral treatment with enrofloxacin early in life promotes Th2-mediated immune response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzępa, Anna; Majewska-Szczepanik, Monika; Kowalczyk, Paulina; Woźniak, Dorota; Motyl, Sylwia; Szczepanik, Marian

    2016-02-01

    Th2 lymphocytes play a crucial role in the development of allergy. These pathologies are caused by coordinated production of the cytokines IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 that regulate the activity of eosinophils, basophils and B cells. According to the 'hygiene hypothesis', the reduced exposure to microorganisms favors allergy occurrence. The advances in medicine in the field of infection therapy promoted an increasing application of antibiotics which, apart from eliminating pathogens, also partially eliminate the microbiota. Epicutaneous (EC) immunization with ovalbumin (OVA) followed by OVA challenge was used to study the influence of partial gut flora depletion by oral treatment with enrofloxacin on type-2 immune response. Current work describes the influence of enrofloxacin application on anti-OVA antibody production and cytokine synthesis in young and adult mice. Immune response in adult mice is less sensitive to modification of natural gut flora. We observed that enrofloxacin treatment of adult mice leads to significant decrease of anti-OVA IgG2a production while synthesis of anti-OVA IgE was not changed. The production of type-1 (IFN-γ), type-2 (IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-13) and Th17-associated (IL-17A) cytokines was inhibited. On the other hand, treatment of young mice with enrofloxacin significantly upregulates the production of anti-OVA IgE and inhibits the secretion of anti-OVA IgG2a antibodies. Additionally, treatment with enrofloxacin early in life prior to OVA immunization results in increased production of type-2 (IL-4, IL-10 and IL-13) cytokines. Our results clearly indicate that the immune system is more vulnerable to decreased bacterial exposure early in life that may promote development of allergy. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  14. Gender and Oral Manifestations of HIV Infection Among Adult ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 47.5% patients had oral manifestations. There were 67.6% females and 32.4% males (p <0.001). The patients ranged in age from 19-70 years. Heterosexual contact with multiple sex partners was the most common mode of transmission of infection (42.9% in females and 74.5% in males, p < 0.05). Candidiasis was ...

  15. Role of human papilloma virus infection and oral-genital contact in oral cancer ethiopathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanko, P; Kruzliak, P; Labas, P

    2013-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and especially oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma is a very significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The majors risk factors of these tumors are tobacco smoking, chewing and alcohol consumption. But there is a group, non-drinking and non-smoking, patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. In these patients may be oral-genital contact and human papillomavirus infection the major risk factor for oral carcinogenesis. Aim of this review is to point out this fact in correlation with clinical studies and clinical conclusion for medical practice (Fig. 1, Ref. 32).

  16. Using oral 18F-FDG for infection imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolwell, Jacob J.

    2009-01-01

    Full text:A 22-year-old female with a complex medical history presented to our department with a complaint of pain around the site her Portocath (PaC). Multiple imaging techniques failed to identify any sign of infection around the pac. A 99 m Tc-Phytate Colloid labelled white cell (LWC) scan was arranged to identify any infective processes in or around the pac. Severe difficulty was encountered attempting to gain IV access aside from the pac and the LWC scan had to aborted. In order to identify infection of the pac a Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scan using oral administration 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) was arranged. The oral 18F-FDG PET scan showed active glucose metabolism around the site of the pac port and along the cathe tubing near the medial right clavicle. As a result of this the pac was removed and replaced and the patient is now receiving continued antibiotics and medication through her new POC. In conclusion we found oral administration of 18F-FDG to be a suitable alternative to IV administered 18F-FDG in on to obtain functional imaging in a case where there was severe difficulty in obtaining venous access.

  17. Lentinan treatment of Plasmodium yoelii-infected mice induces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-31

    Jan 31, 2012 ... infected mice results in down-regulation of the Th1-type immune response, leading to death (Wu et al., 2007;. Amante et al., 2007). Thus, these cells help to promote the pathogenesis of malaria. Several treatments are commonly used to combat malaria; most often is quinine administration (Sahu et al.,.

  18. Infection with Porphyromonas gingivalis exacerbates endothelial injury in obese mice.

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    Min Ao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A number of studies have revealed a link between chronic periodontitis and cardiovascular disease in obese patients. However, there is little information about the influence of periodontitis-associated bacteria, Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg, on pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in obesity. METHODS: In vivo experiment: C57BL/6J mice were fed with a high-fat diet (HFD or normal chow diet (CD, as a control. Pg was infected from the pulp chamber. At 6 weeks post-infection, histological and immunohistochemical analysis of aortal tissues was performed. In vitro experiment: hTERT-immortalized human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HuhT1 were used to assess the effect of Pg/Pg-LPS on free fatty acid (FFA induced endothelial cells apoptosis and regulation of cytokine gene expression. RESULTS: Weaker staining of CD31 and increased numbers of TUNEL positive cells in aortal tissue of HFD mice indicated endothelial injury. Pg infection exacerbated the endothelial injury. Immunohistochemically, Pg was detected deep in the smooth muscle of the aorta, and the number of Pg cells in the aortal wall was higher in HFD mice than in CD mice. Moreover, in vitro, FFA treatment induced apoptosis in HuhT1 cells and exposure to Pg-LPS increased this effect. In addition, Pg and Pg-LPS both attenuated cytokine production in HuhT1 cells stimulated by palmitate. CONCLUSIONS: Dental infection of Pg may contribute to pathogenesis of atherosclerosis by accelerating FFA-induced endothelial injury.

  19. Turnover of T cells in murine gammaherpesvirus 68-infected mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamilton-Easton, A M; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Doherty, P C

    1999-01-01

    Respiratory challenge of C57BL/6 mice with murine gammaherpesvirus 68 induces proliferation of T lymphocytes early after infection, as evidenced by incorporation of the DNA precursor bromodeoxyuridine. Using pulse-chase analysis, splenic and peripheral blood activated T lymphocytes were found...

  20. Effect of Morinda Morindiodes Extracts on Organs of Mice Infected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Morinda Morindiodes Extracts on Organs of Mice Infected with ... The histological evaluation of the effect of Morinda(M.) morindiodes plant part(s) extracts in the treatment ... Control animals were given water for the same period of time.

  1. Interleukin-18 protects mice from Enterovirus 71 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Wang, Hongbin; Chen, Yihui; Niu, Junling; Guo, Qiuhong; Leng, Qibin; Huang, Zhong; Deng, Zhirui; Meng, Guangxun

    2017-08-01

    Previous study has demonstrated that the NLRP3 inflammasome is essential for protecting murine host against Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection. However, the underlying mechanism remained unknown. Here we discovered that the pleiotropic cytokine interleukin-18 (IL-18), an NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent effector protein, exhibits a protective capability against EV71 challenge. Deficiency of IL-18 in mice exacerbated EV71 infection, which was reflected by increased viral replication, elevated production of interferons (IFN-β, IFN-γ), proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6) and chemokine CCL2,as well as decreased survival of experimental animals. Conversely, administration of recombinant IL-18 considerably restrained EV71 infection in IL-18 deficient mice. Thus, our results revealed a protective role for IL-18 against EV71 challenge, and indicated a novel therapeutic application for IL-18 in EV71 associated hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Experimental toxoplasmosis in Balb/c mice. Prevention of vertical disease transmission by treatment and reproductive failure in chronic infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Fux

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In a study of congenital transmission during acute infection of Toxoplasma gondii, 23 pregnant Balb/c mice were inoculated orally with two cysts each of the P strain. Eight mice were inoculated 6-11 days after becoming pregnant (Group 1. Eight mice inoculated on the 10th-15th day of pregnancy (Group 2 were treated with 100 mg/kg/day of minocycline 48 h after inoculation. Seven mice inoculated on the 10th-15th day of pregnancy were not treated and served as a control (Group 3. Congenital transmission was evaluated through direct examination of the brains of the pups or by bioassay and serologic tests. Congenital transmission was observed in 20 (60.6% of the 33 pups of Group 1, in one (3.6% of the 28 pups of Group 2, and in 13 (54.2% of the 24 pups of Group 3. Forty-nine Balb/c mice were examined in the study of congenital transmission of T. gondii during chronic infection. The females showed reproductive problems during this phase of infection. It was observed accentuated hypertrophy of the endometrium and myometrium. Only two of the females gave birth. Our results demonstrate that Balb/c mice with acute toxoplasmosis can be used as a model for studies of congenital T. gondii infection. Our observations indicate the potential of this model for testing new chemotherapeutic agents against congenital toxoplasmosis.

  3. Detection of prion infectivity in fat tissues of scrapie-infected mice.

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    Brent Race

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of prion infectivity in organs and tissues is important in understanding prion disease pathogenesis and designing strategies to prevent prion infection in animals and humans. Transmission of prion disease from cattle to humans resulted in banning human consumption of ruminant nervous system and certain other tissues. In the present study, we surveyed tissue distribution of prion infectivity in mice with prion disease. We show for the first time detection of infectivity in white and brown fat. Since high amounts of ruminant fat are consumed by humans and also incorporated into animal feed, fat-containing tissues may pose a previously unappreciated hazard for spread of prion infection.

  4. Gene Expression Profile in the Liver of BALB/c Mice Infected with Fasciola hepatica.

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    Jose Rojas-Caraballo

    Full Text Available Fasciola hepatica infection still remains one of the helminthic neglected tropical diseases (NTDs. It has a huge worldwide distribution, affecting mainly cattle and, sometimes, human beings. In addition to data reported about the immunological response induced by helminthic infections and that induced by Fasciola hepatica, little is known about the gene expression profile in its organ target, the liver, which is where adult worms are established and live for long periods of time, causing its characteristic pathology. In the present work, we study both the early and late gene expression profiles in the livers of mice infected with F. hepatica metacercariae using a microarray-based methodology.A total of 9 female-6-week-old BALB/c mice (Charles River Laboratories, Barcelona, Spain weighing 20 to 35 g were used for the experiments. Two groups of BALB/c mice were orally infected with seven F. hepatica metacercariae, and the other group remained untreated and served as a control. Mice were humanely euthanized and necropsied for liver recovery, histological assessment of hepatic damage, RNA isolation, microarray design and gene expression analysis on the day of infection (t0, seven days post-infection (t7 and twenty-one days post-infection (t21.We found that F. hepatica infection induces the differential expression of 128 genes in the liver in the early stage of infection and 308 genes in the late stage, and most of them are up-regulated. The Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed significant changes in the pathways related to metabolism, biosynthesis and signaling as well as genes implicated in inducing liver-toxicity, injury and death.The present study provides us insights at the molecular level about the underlying mechanisms used by F. hepatica, leading to liver damage and its subsequent pathophysiology. The expression pattern obtained here could also be used to explain the lack of association between infection with F. hepatica and cholangiocarcinoma

  5. Porphyromonas gingivalis infection induced reproductive abnormalities in mice

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    Ke-min WEI

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To establish a pregnant mouse model infected with Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g, and investigate the relationship of P.g infection to prematurity and associated birth abnormalities. Methods  Fifty two female mice were randomly divided into P.g infection group (n=26 and control group (n=26. Mice in P.g infection group were anesthetized, the pulp cavity of the first molar was opened and directly injected with W83 strain P.g, and the tooth was then filled. Six weeks after infection, the mice were mated with males and the formation of vagina plug was recorded as 0d. The P.g extracted from the granulation tissue in tooth root was cultivated. The pregnant days and the connatal body weight of infant mouse were recorded, the serum and placental tissue were collected to assess the systemic and local conditions during pregnancy. Results  After periodontal P.g infection, the TNF-α, IL-17, IL -6 and IL -1βlevels in peripheral blood sera increased significantly. The average gestation was shorter in P.g infection group (18.25d than in control group (20.45d, P<0.01, and the connatal body weight of infant mouse was also less in the former than in the latter (P<0.01. Immunohistochemistry and PCR revealed the existence of P.g in placenta tissue. P.g infection caused premature rupture of membranes, placental abruption, degeneration and necrosis of trophoblastic and endothelial cells; significantly increased the number of neutrophils and macrophages in placenta tissues, and increased the expression of local TNF-αand COX-2 inflammatory factors at the same time. In P.g infection group, the expressions of CD-31 in endothelial cells of placenta tissues and the apoptotic factor caspase-3 decreased, and the DNA oxidative damage index 8-OHdG increased. Conclusions  P.g infection in female mice may cause premature birth and lower connatal body weight of infant mouse, and increase the expression of serous and local inflammatory factors in the placenta

  6. Characterization of Lethal Zika Virus Infection in AG129 Mice.

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    Matthew T Aliota

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV typically causes a mild and self-limiting illness known as Zika fever, which often is accompanied by maculopapular rash, headache, and myalgia. During the current outbreak in South America, ZIKV infection during pregnancy has been hypothesized to cause microcephaly and other diseases. The detection of ZIKV in fetal brain tissue supports this hypothesis. Because human infections with ZIKV historically have remained sporadic and, until recently, have been limited to small-scale epidemics, neither the disease caused by ZIKV nor the molecular determinants of virulence and/or pathogenicity have been well characterized. Here, we describe a small animal model for wild-type ZIKV of the Asian lineage.Using mice deficient in interferon α/β and Ɣ receptors (AG129 mice, we report that these animals were highly susceptible to ZIKV infection and disease, succumbing within seven to eight days. Rapid viremic dissemination was observed in visceral organs and brain; but only was associated with severe pathologies in the brain and muscle. Finally, these results were consistent across challenge routes, age of mice, and inoculum doses. These data represent a mouse model for ZIKV that is not dependent on adapting ZIKV to intracerebral passage in mice.Foot pad injection of AG129 mice with ZIKV represents a biologically relevant model for studying ZIKV infection and disease development following wild-type virus inoculation without the requirement for adaptation of the virus or intracerebral delivery of the virus. This newly developed Zika disease model can be exploited to identify determinants of ZIKV virulence and reveal molecular mechanisms that control the virus-host interaction, providing a framework for rational design of acute phase therapeutics and for vaccine efficacy testing.

  7. Effects of oral administration of titanium dioxide fine-sized particles on plasma glucose in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ning; Hu, Hailong; Guo, Qian; Jin, Sanli; Wang, Changlin; Oh, Yuri; Feng, Yujie; Wu, Qiong

    2015-12-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is an authorized additive used as a food colorant, is composed of nano-sized particles (NP) and fine-sized particles (FP). Previous study reported that oral administration of TiO2 NPs triggers an increase in plasma glucose of mice. However, no previous studies have focused on toxic effects of TiO2 FPs on plasma glucose homeostasis following oral administration. In the current study, mice were orally administered TiO2 FPs greater than 100 nm in size (64 mg/kg body weight per day), and effects on plasma glucose levels examined. Our results showed that titanium levels was not changed in mouse blood, livers and pancreases after mice were orally administered TiO2 FPs. Biochemical analyzes showed that plasma glucose and ROS levels were not affected by TiO2 FPs. Histopathological results showed that TiO2 FPs did not induce pathology changes in organs, especially plasma glucose homeostasis regulation organs, such as pancreas and liver. Western blotting showed that oral administration of TiO2 FPs did not induce insulin resistance (IR) in mouse liver. These results showed that, TiO2 FPs cannot be absorbed via oral administration and affect plasma glucose levels in mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Dental Infection of Porphyromonas gingivalis Induces Preterm Birth in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Ao

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have revealed a link between dental infection and preterm birth or low birth weight (PTB/LBW, however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Progress in understanding the associated mechanisms has been limited in part by lack of an animal model for chronic infection-induced PTB/LBW, mimicking pregnancy under conditions of periodontitis. We aimed to establish a mouse model of chronic periodontitis in order to investigate the link between periodontitis and PTB/LBW.To establish chronic inflammation beginning with dental infection, we surgically opened mouse (female, 8 weeks old 1st molar pulp chambers and directly infected with w83 strain Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g., a keystone periodontal pathogen. Mating was initiated at 6 wks post-infection, by which time dental granuloma tissue had developed and live P.g. was cultured from extracted tooth root, which serves as a persistent source of P.g. The gestational day (gd and birth weight were recorded during for P.g.-infected and control mice, and serum and placental tissues were collected at gd 15 to evaluate the systemic and local conditions during pregnancy.Dental infection with P.g. significantly increased circulating TNF-α (2.5-fold, IL-17 (2-fold, IL-6 (2-fold and IL-1β (2-fold. The P.g.-infected group delivered at gd 18.25 vs. gd 20.45 in the non-infected control (NC group (p < 0.01, and pups exhibited LBW compared to controls (p < 0.01. P.g. was localized to placental tissues by immunohistochemistry and PCR, and defects in placental tissues of P.g. infected mice included premature rupture of membrane, placental detachment, degenerative changes in trophoblasts and endothelial cells, including necrotic areas. P.g. infection caused significantly increased numbers of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs and macrophages in placental tissues, associated with increased local expression of pro-inflammatory mediators including TNF-α and COX-2. Further placental tissue

  9. Intravascular detection of Giardia trophozoites in naturally infected mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Shewy K.A.

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available During routine transmission electron microscopic (TEM examination of mice naturally infected with Giardia muris, an intense infection with Giardia trophozoites was demonstrated within intestinal and renal tissues. Examination of randomly taken sections from these heavily infected tissues revealed marked deep affection with mixed pathology. Duodenal sections were found loaded with Giardia trophozoites in intimate contact with necrotic gut cells. Some of these trophozoites were detected within central lacteal of damaged villi and nearby blood vessels. Interestingly, and for the first time to be demonstrated, morphologically identical G. muris trophozoite was detected in a renal blood vessel. An intense cellular immune reaction was obviously demonstrated with remarkable interaction between giant macrophages and the trophozoites particulates. Involvement of deep tissues by Giardia trophozoites and their presence within vascular channels could open up questions about the possible invasive and disseminative behavior of G. muris, particularly in heavily and naturally infected hosts.

  10. Comparison of efficacy of alternative medicine with allopathy in treatment of oral fungal infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahil Maghu

    2016-01-01

    The study concluded that TTO, being a natural product, is a better nontoxic modality compared to clotrimazole, in the treatment of oral fungal infection and has a promising future for its potential application in oral health products.

  11. Oral immunization of mice with engineered Lactobacillus gasseri NM713 strain expressing Streptococcus pyogenes M6 antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Nahla M; Abdelaziz, Sahar A

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this in vivo study was to evaluate the effects of a recombinant probiotic strain, Lactobacillus gasseri NM713, which expresses the conserved region of streptococcal M6 protein (CRR6), as an oral vaccine against Streptococcus pyogenes. A dose of 10(9) cells of the recombinant strain in 150 μL PBS buffer was administered orally to a group of mice. One control group received an equivalent dose of Lb. gasseri NM613 (containing the empty plasmid without insert) or and another control group received PBS buffer. Each group contained 30 mice. The immunization protocol was followed on three consecutive days, after which two booster doses were administered at two week intervals. Fecal and serum samples were collected from the mice on Days 18, 32, 46, 58 after the first immunization and Day 0 prior to immunization. Anti-CRR6 IgA and IgG concentrations were measured by ELISA in fecal and sera samples, respectively, to assess immune responses. Vaccination with the recombinant Lb. gasseri NM713 strain induced significant protection after nasal challenge with S. pyogenes, only a small percentage of this group developing streptococcal infection (10%) or dying of it (3.3%) compared with the NM613 and PBS control groups, high percentages of which developed streptococcal infection (43.3% and 46.7%, respectively) and died of it (46.7% and 53%, respectively). These results indicate that recombinant Lb. gasseri NM713 has potential as an oral delivery vaccine against streptococcus group A. © 2016 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Candida albicans infection in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma

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    Čanković Miloš

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground/Aim. Systemic candidiasis in intensive care units remains an improtant problem due to antifungal resistance. Patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer are at increased risk of developing oral candidiasis and they more frequent have prior fungi colonization. Due to identification of specific risk factors predisposing to fungal infection in order to threat such patients the aim of this study was to determine the presence of Candida species in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma and compare it to the control subjects (patients with benign oral mucosal lesions. Methods. A total number of 30 consecutive oral cancer examined patients were included in this prospective study (24 men and 6 women with a mean age of 61.47 years, range 41-81 years. The control group consisted of 30 consecutive patients with histologically proven benign oral mucosal lesions (16 men and 14 women with a mean age of 54.53 years, range 16- 83 years. The samples for mycological examination were obtained by using sterile cotton swabs from the cancer lesion surface and in the patients of the control group from the benign mucosal lesion surface. Samples were inoculated in Sabouraud' dextrose agar. For identification purposes, Mackenzie germ tube test was performend on all isolates. Results. The prevalence of Candida was significantly higher in oral cancer patients than in control subjects (χ2 = 5.455, p = 0.020. Candida was found on nine of the 30 cancer surfaces; 5 (16.7% were identified as non-albicans Candida and 4 (13.3% as Candida albicans. In the control group, only Candida albicans was isolated from 2 (6.7% patients. In this study, no statistically significant differences in the presence of Candida species was found with respect to gender, age, smoking, alcohol consumption, wearing of dental protheses and the site of cancer lesion. Conclusion. The increased prevalence of yeasts on the surfaces of oral carcinoma indicates a need for their

  13. Evaluation of Colicin Effect on the Induction of Treated Mice in Prevention of Infection Caused by Escherichia coli K99

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    Yahya Tahamtan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. Colicin produce by colicinogenic E. coli (CEC arenarrow limited spectrum antimicrobial agents that are able to kill or prevent close related strains. Objective. The objective of this study was to evaluation effect of Colicin to induce immunized mice to prevent infection caused by E. coliK99. Patient and Methods. The experiment was conducted into two mice groups (30 in each group with two weeks old. All mice were administered by streptomycin sulfate prior to treatment to eliminate resident E. coli. Group one was orally inoculated with PBS as control and the second was immunized by Colicin solution as immunize group. Both control and immunized group were challenged by 3 LD 50 of E. coli K99 and follow a week. Results. Immunized mice group were not showed severe clinical signs. While diarrhea with different sings of colibaccillosis was established in control group and infected mice was died. Conclusion. Overuse antibiotics developed serious new types of multi drug resistance in human medicine and therefore has limited their use in farm animals. The study indicates the use of Colicin and biotherapy instead of antibiotic is more safe and efficient for control of E. coliK99 infection. Immunized mice by Colicin solution protected E. coli K99 colonization and reduce fecal shedding. Investigation in livestock for applying Colicin in farm animal is recommended.

  14. Pathological analysis of the Candida albicans-infected tongue tissues of a murine oral candidiasis model in the early infection stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Masashi; Hisajima, Tatsuya; Ishibashi, Hiroko; Miyasaka, Takahiro; Abe, Shigeru; Satoh, Tazuko

    2013-04-01

    The early pathological process of Candida infection and immunological responses in tongues of the mice with experimental oral candidiasis was analysed. CD-1 mice, pretreated by prednisolone were orally inoculated with Candida albicans. Symptoms were monitored by measuring the area of white tongue coating and number of viable Candida cells in oral cavity. The histopathological analysis was carried by PAS-stain and immunofluorescent staining. IL-4, IL-12p70, IFN-γ, TNF-α in recovered from the homogenates of the tongues were measured by ELISA. The fungus invaded the tongue surface of the mice and white patches developed within 24h after inoculation. Histopathological examination indicated the presence of local acute inflammation in superficial tissues of tongues covered by mycelium of C. albicans. Pathological exacerbation was observed from 24 to 48 h after the inoculation and from then the symptoms of oral candidiasis appeared to move into the recovery phase. Inflammatory cells mainly consisting of neutrophils was accumulated and located under the lesions covered by Candida-hyphae. An increase in IL-12p70 and IFN-γ in tongue homogenates was observed at 48 h after inoculation. The worst condition in the pathological process in experimental oral candidiasis was found 48 h after C. albicans inoculation. When the surface of the Candida-inoculated tongues was covered with Candida-hyphae, a dense accumulation of neutrophils was observed under the lesions and homogenates of the tongues contained increased levels of IL-12p70 and IFN-γ. These suggested that local pathological condition of Candida-infected tongues may be affected by neutrophils accumulation and increased levels of some cytokines. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Oral Immunization with Recombinant Norwalk Virus-Like Particles Induces a Systemic and Mucosal Immune Response in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Judith M.; Hardy, Michele E.; Atmar, Robert L.; Conner, Margaret E.; Estes, Mary K.

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant Norwalk virus-like particles (rNV VLPs) produced in insect cells were evaluated as an oral immunogen in CD1 and BALB/c mice by monitoring rNV-specific serum total and subclass immunoglobulin G (IgG) and intestinal IgA responses. Dose and kinetics of response were evaluated in the presence and absence of the mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin (CT). rNV-specific serum IgG and intestinal IgA were detected in the absence of CT, and the number of responders was not significantly different from that of mice administered VLPs with CT at most doses. The use of CT was associated with induction of higher levels of IgG in serum; this effect was greater at higher doses of VLPs. IgG in serum was detected in the majority of animals by 9 days postimmunization (dpi), and intestinal IgA responses were detected by 24 dpi. In the absence of CT, IgG2b was the dominant IgG subclass response in both mouse strains. Thus, nonreplicating rNV VLPs are immunogenic when administered orally in the absence of any delivery system or mucosal adjuvant. These studies demonstrate that rNV VLPs are an excellent model to study the oral delivery of antigen, and they are a potential mucosal vaccine for NV infections. PMID:9445035

  16. Oral infection of Aedes aegypti with yellow fever virus: geographic variation and genetic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabachnick, W J; Wallis, G P; Aitken, T H; Miller, B R; Amato, G D; Lorenz, L; Powell, J R; Beaty, B J

    1985-11-01

    Twenty-eight populations representing a worldwide distribution of Aedes aegypti were tested for their ability to become orally infected with yellow fever virus (YFV). Populations had been analyzed for genetic variations at 11 isozyme loci and assigned to one of 8 genetic geographic groups of Ae. aegypti. Infection rates suggest that populations showing isozyme genetic relatedness also demonstrate similarity to oral infection rates with YFV. The findings support the hypothesis that genetic variation exists for oral susceptibility to YFV in Ae. aegypti.

  17. Protein 3-nitrotyrosine formation during Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Naviliat

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (·NO is a diffusible messenger implicated in Trypanosoma cruzi resistance. Excess production of ·NO and oxidants leads to the generation of nitrogen dioxide (·NO2, a strong nitrating agent. Tyrosine nitration is a post-translational modification resulting from the addition of a nitro (-NO2 group to the ortho-position of tyrosine residues. Detection of protein 3-nitrotyrosine is regarded as a marker of nitro-oxidative stress and is observed in inflammatory processes. The formation and role of nitrating species in the control and myocardiopathy of T. cruzi infection remain to be studied. We investigated the levels of ·NO and protein 3-nitrotyrosine in the plasma of C3H and BALB/c mice and pharmacologically modulated their production during the acute phase of T. cruzi infection. We also looked for protein 3-nitrotyrosine in the hearts of infected animals. Our results demonstrated that C3H animals produced higher amounts of ·NO than BALB/c mice, but their generation of peroxynitrite was not proportionally enhanced and they had higher parasitemias. While N G-nitro-arginine methyl ester treatment abolished ·NO production and drastically augmented the parasitism, mercaptoethylguanidine and guanido-ethyl disulfide, at doses that moderately reduced the ·NO and 3-nitrotyrosine levels, paradoxically diminished the parasitemia in both strains. Nitrated proteins were also demonstrated in myocardial cells of infected mice. These data suggest that the control of T. cruzi infection depends not only on the capacity to produce ·NO, but also on its metabolic fate, including the generation of nitrating species that may constitute an important element in parasite resistance and collateral myocardial damage.

  18. Oral L-Arginine Stimulates GLP-1 Secretion to Improve Glucose Tolerance in Male Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Christoffer; Smajilovic, Sanela; Smith, Eric P

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacological and surgical interventions that increase glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) action are effective to improve glucose homeostasis in type 2 diabetes mellitus. In light of this, nutritional strategies to enhance postprandial GLP-1 secretion, particularly in the context of diet......-induced obesity, may provide an alternative therapeutic approach. Importantly, recent evidence suggests the amino acid l-arginine, a well-known insulin secretagogue, can also stimulate release of GLP-1 from isolated rat intestine. Here we tested the hypothesis that oral l-arginine acts as a GLP-1 secretagogue...... in vivo, to augment postprandial insulin secretion and improve glucose tolerance. To test this, we administered l-arginine or vehicle by oral gavage, immediately prior to an oral glucose tolerance test in lean and diet-induced obese mice. In both lean and obese mice oral l-arginine increased plasma GLP-1...

  19. Indomethacin Treatment of Mice with Premalignant Oral Lesions Sustains Cytokine Production and Slows Progression to Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sara D; Young, M Rita I

    2016-01-01

    Current treatment options for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients are often ineffective due to tumor-localized and systemic immunosuppression. Using the 4-NQO mouse model of oral carcinogenesis, this study showed that premalignant oral lesion cells produce higher levels of the immune modulator, PGE 2 , compared to HNSCC cells. Inhibiting prostaglandin production of premalignant lesion cells with the pan-cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin stimulated their induction of spleen cell cytokine production. In contrast, inhibiting HNSCC prostaglandin production did not stimulate their induction of spleen cell cytokine production. Treatment of mice bearing premalignant oral lesions with indomethacin slowed progression of premalignant oral lesions to HNSCC. Flow cytometric analysis of T cells in the regional lymph nodes of lesion-bearing mice receiving indomethacin treatment showed an increase in lymph node cellularity and in the absolute number of CD8 + T cells expressing IFN-γ compared to levels in lesion-bearing mice receiving diluent control treatment. The cytokine-stimulatory effect of indomethacin treatment was not localized to regional lymph nodes but was also seen in the spleen of mice with premalignant oral lesions. Together, these data suggest that inhibiting prostaglandin production at the premalignant lesion stage boosts immune capability and improves clinical outcomes.

  20. [Enhancing effect of Ulex europaeus agglutinin I modified liposomes on oral insulin absorption in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Na; Ping, Qi-neng; Xu, Wen-fang

    2004-12-01

    To investigate the enhancing effect on insulin absorption through GI. tract in mice by using the Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA1) modified liposomes as the carrier. UEA1 modified phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) was prepared by conjugating method of 1-ethyl-3-(3'-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC), then the modified compound (PE-UEA1) was incorporated into the conventional liposomes of insulin to obtain UEA1 modified liposomes. The agglutination test was performed to examine the UEA1 biological activities after synthesis and modification. When liposomes were applied to healthy mice or diabetic mice at insulin dose of 350 u x kg(-1) orally, the hypoglycemic effect was investigated according to the blood glucose level determination. The blood glucose levels of the healthy mice reduced by UEA1 modified liposomes were (84 +/- 15)% at 4 h, (78 +/- 11)% at 8 h and (90 +/- 12)% at 12 h after oral administration. The conventional liposomes and saline showed no effect. The blood glucose levels of the diabetic mice reduced by UEA1 modified liposomes were (73 +/- 7)% at 4 h, (74 +/- 9)% at 8 h, (86 +/- 9)% at 12 h after oral administration. The UEA1 modified liposomes promote the oral absorption of insulin due to the specific-site combination on M cell membrane.

  1. Parasitic infection improves survival from septic peritonitis by enhancing mast cell responses to bacteria in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E Sutherland

    Full Text Available Mammals are serially infected with a variety of microorganisms, including bacteria and parasites. Each infection reprograms the immune system's responses to re-exposure and potentially alters responses to first-time infection by different microorganisms. To examine whether infection with a metazoan parasite modulates host responses to subsequent bacterial infection, mice were infected with the hookworm-like intestinal nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, followed in 2-4 weeks by peritoneal injection of the pathogenic bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae. Survival from Klebsiella peritonitis two weeks after parasite infection was better in Nippostrongylus-infected animals than in unparasitized mice, with Nippostrongylus-infected mice having fewer peritoneal bacteria, more neutrophils, and higher levels of protective interleukin 6. The improved survival of Nippostrongylus-infected mice depends on IL-4 because the survival benefit is lost in mice lacking IL-4. Because mast cells protect mice from Klebsiella peritonitis, we examined responses in mast cell-deficient Kit(W-sh/Kit(W-sh mice, in which parasitosis failed to improve survival from Klebsiella peritonitis. However, adoptive transfer of cultured mast cells to Kit(W-sh/Kit(W-sh mice restored survival benefits of parasitosis. These results show that recent infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis protects mice from Klebsiella peritonitis by modulating mast cell contributions to host defense, and suggest more generally that parasitosis can yield survival advantages to a bacterially infected host.

  2. Immune regulation in Chandipura virus infection: characterization of CD4+ T regulatory cells from infected mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahir Prajakta

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Back ground Chandipura virus produces acute infection in mice. During infection drastic reduction of CD4+, CD8+ and CD19 + cell was noticed. Depletion of lymphocytes also noticed in spleen. The reduction may be due to the regulatory mechanism of immune system to prevent the bystander host tissue injury. There are several mechanisms like generation of regulatory cells, activation induced cell death (ACID etc were indicated to control the activation and maintain cellular homeostasis. Role of regulatory cells in homeostasis has been described in several viral diseases. This study was undertaken to characterize CD4+T regulatory cells from the infected mice. Method In this study we purified the CD4+ T cells from Chandipura virus infected susceptible Balb/c mice. CD4+ T regulatory cells were identified by expression of cell surface markers CD25, CD127 and CTLA-4 and intracellular markers Foxp3, IL-10 and TGF-beta. Antigen specificity and ability to suppress the proliferation of other lymphocytes were studied in vitro by purified CD4+CD25+T regulatory cells from infected mice. The proliferation was calculated by proliferation module of Flow Jo software. Expression of death receptors on regulatory cells were studied by flowcytometer. Results The CD4+ T cells isolated from infected mice expressed characteristic markers of regulatory phenotype at all post infective hours tested. The CD4+ T regulatory cells were proliferated when stimulated with Chandipura virus antigen. The regulatory cells did not suppress the proliferation of splenocytes stimulated with anti CD3 antibody when co cultured with them. Interesting observation was, while purification of CD4+ T cells by negative selection, the population of cells negative for CD4 also co purified along with CD4+ T cell. Flow cytometry analysis and light microscopy revealed that CD4 negative cells were of different size and shape (atypical compared to the normal lymphocytes. Greater percentage of

  3. Clearance of Giardia muris infection in mice deficient in natural killer cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Heyworth, M F; Kung, J E; Eriksson, E C

    1986-01-01

    Immunocompetent C57BL/6J mice and beige mice (which are deficient in natural killer cells) were infected with Giardia muris. Both types of mice cleared G. muris infection at similar rates. This observation suggests that clearance of G. muris parasites from the mouse intestine is not mediated by natural killer cells.

  4. Effect of sucralfate on antibiotic therapy for Helicobacter pylori infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Koichiro; Murakami, Kazunari; Sato, Ryugo; Kashimura, Koji; Miura, Masahiro; Ootsu, Satoshi; Miyajima, Hajime; Nasu, Masaru; Okimoto, Tadayoshi; Kodama, Masaaki; Fujioka, Toshio

    2004-12-01

    It has been documented that sucralfate, a basic aluminum salt, enhances the efficacies of antibiotics against Helicobacter pylori, resulting in eradication rates comparable to those associated with the use of proton pump inhibitors. However, its mechanism of action remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate sucralfate's ability to complement antibiotic treatment of H. pylori infection in vivo. Four weeks following induced H. pylori infection, clarithromycin (CAM) and amoxicillin (AMPC) were administered orally to C57BL/6 mice for 5 days, both with and without sucralfate or lansoprazole. When sucralfate was concurrently given with CAM and AMPC at the maximum noninhibitory doses for the treatment of H. pylori infection, the bacterial clearance rates were comparable to those achieved by treatment with lansoprazole plus those antibiotics. The results of pharmacokinetic studies showed that lansoprazole delayed gastric clearance and accelerated the absorption of CAM, whereas sucralfate suppressed both gastric clearance and absorption. AMPC was undetectable in all samples. Scanning electron microscopy with a microscope to which a energy dispersive spectrometer was attached revealed that aluminum-containing aggregated substances coated the mucosa surrounding H. pylori in mice receiving sucralfate plus antibiotics, whereas the gastric surface and pits where H. pylori had attached were clearly visible in mice receiving lansoprazole plus antibiotics. The addition of sucralfate to the antibiotic suspension resulted in a more viscous mixture that bound to the H. pylori-infected mucosa and that inhibited the loss of CAM bioavailability in the acidic environment. Sucralfate delays gastric clearance of CAM and physically captures H. pylori through the creation of an adherent mucus, which leads to bacterial clearance.

  5. Directed evolution and targeted mutagenesis to murinize Listeria monocytogenes Internalin A for enhanced infectivity in the murine oral infection model

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Monk, Ian R

    2010-12-13

    Abstract Background Internalin A (InlA) is a critical virulence factor which mediates the initiation of Listeria monocytogenes infection by the oral route in permissive hosts. The interaction of InlA with the host cell ligand E-cadherin efficiently stimulates L. monocytogenes entry into human enterocytes, but has only a limited interaction with murine cells. Results We have created a surface display library of randomly mutated InlA in a non-invasive heterologous host Lactococcus lactis in order to create and screen novel variants of this invasion factor. After sequential passage through a murine cell line (CT-26), multiple clones with enhanced invasion characteristics were identified. Competitive index experiments were conducted in mice using selected mutations introduced into L. monocytogenes EGD-e background. A novel single amino acid change was identified which enhanced virulence by the oral route in the murine model and will form the basis of further engineering approaches. As a control a previously described EGD-InlAm murinized strain was also re-created as part of this study with minor modifications and designated EGD-e InlA m*. The strain was created using a procedure that minimizes the likelihood of secondary mutations and incorporates Listeria-optimized codons encoding the altered amino acids. L. monocytogenes EGD-e InlA m* yielded consistently higher level murine infections by the oral route when compared to EGD-e, but did not display the two-fold increased invasion into a human cell line that was previously described for the EGD-InlAm strain. Conclusions We have used both site-directed mutagenesis and directed evolution to create variants of InlA which may inform future structure-function analyses of this protein. During the course of the study we engineered a murinized strain of L. monocytogenes EGD-e which shows reproducibly higher infectivity in the intragastric murine infection model than the wild type, but does not display enhanced entry into human

  6. Directed evolution and targeted mutagenesis to murinize listeria monocytogenes internalin A for enhanced infectivity in the murine oral infection model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Colin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Internalin A (InlA is a critical virulence factor which mediates the initiation of Listeria monocytogenes infection by the oral route in permissive hosts. The interaction of InlA with the host cell ligand E-cadherin efficiently stimulates L. monocytogenes entry into human enterocytes, but has only a limited interaction with murine cells. Results We have created a surface display library of randomly mutated InlA in a non-invasive heterologous host Lactococcus lactis in order to create and screen novel variants of this invasion factor. After sequential passage through a murine cell line (CT-26, multiple clones with enhanced invasion characteristics were identified. Competitive index experiments were conducted in mice using selected mutations introduced into L. monocytogenes EGD-e background. A novel single amino acid change was identified which enhanced virulence by the oral route in the murine model and will form the basis of further engineering approaches. As a control a previously described EGD-InlAm murinized strain was also re-created as part of this study with minor modifications and designated EGD-e InlAm*. The strain was created using a procedure that minimizes the likelihood of secondary mutations and incorporates Listeria-optimized codons encoding the altered amino acids. L. monocytogenes EGD-e InlAm* yielded consistently higher level murine infections by the oral route when compared to EGD-e, but did not display the two-fold increased invasion into a human cell line that was previously described for the EGD-InlAm strain. Conclusions We have used both site-directed mutagenesis and directed evolution to create variants of InlA which may inform future structure-function analyses of this protein. During the course of the study we engineered a murinized strain of L. monocytogenes EGD-e which shows reproducibly higher infectivity in the intragastric murine infection model than the wild type, but does not display enhanced

  7. Association of marijuana use with oral HPV infection and periodontitis among Hispanic adults: Implications for oral cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Ana P; González, Daisy; Ramos, Jeslie; Muñoz, Cristina; Reyes, Juan Carlos; Pérez, Cynthia M

    2018-02-22

    Despite limited data, research suggests that marijuana use is associated with oral HPV infection and periodontitis, two potential oropharyngeal cancer risk factors. We assessed these associations in a Hispanic adult population in Puerto Rico. A cross-sectional study of 735 adults assessed marijuana use, determined through an audio computer-assisted self-interview, and periodontitis and self-collection of oral HPV samples following the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey methodology. The Centers of Disease Control and Prevention/American Academy of Periodontology definition was used for periodontitis. HPV typing was performed using polymerase chain reaction with modified L1 consensus primers (MY09/MY11). 26.5% of adults reported lifetime use of marijuana, 2.7% were frequent users (lifetime use ≥ 26 times, past year use ≥ 6 times, and past 30-day use ≥2 times), 5.7% had oral HPV infection, and 20.1% had severe periodontitis. The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that frequent marijuana users were more likely to have severe periodontitis (OR = 2.91, 95%CI = 1.06 - 7.96) than never/once lifetime users after adjusting for age, sex, healthcare coverage, smoking, binge drinking, number of oral sex partners, and oral HPV infection. However, frequent marijuana use was not associated with oral HPV infection. Marijuana use was associated with periodontitis, but not with oral HPV infection. Further evaluation of the role of marijuana use in oral HPV infection and periodontitis may inform novel preventive public health strategies, as marijuana users could be at increased risk of oral cancer. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Immune response in mice to ingested soya protein: antibody production, oral tolerance and maternal transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hanne Risager; Pedersen, Susanne Brix; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2004-01-01

    antibody response in the offspring, bat in this case in the absence of oral tolerance. This indicates that, under certain conditions, factors involved in spontaneous antibody production can be transmitted from mother to offspring. Understanding the immune response to soya protein ingested under healthy...... by ELISA, and to the presence of oral tolerance detected as a suppressed antibody and cell-proliferation response upon immunisation with soya protein. F0 mice generated soya-specific antibodies, while oral tolerance to the same soya proteins was also clearly induced. When F0 dams were transferred to soya...

  9. Protection of mice from oral Candidiasis by heat-killed enterococcus faecalis, possibly through its direct binding to Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishijima, Sanae A; Hayama, Kazumi; Ninomiya, Kentaro; Iwasa, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Masatoshi; Abe, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    To develop a new therapy against oral candidiasis, a commensal microorganism, Enterococcus faecalis was tested for its ability to modulate Candida growth in vitro and its therapeutic activities against a murine model in vivo. Addition of heat-killed E. faecalis strain EF2001 (EF2001) isolated from healthy human feces to the culture of C. albicans strain TIMM1768 inhibited adherence of the latter to a microtiter plate in a dose dependent manner and Candida cells surrounded by EF2001 were increased. To examine the protective activities of EF2001 in vivo, heat-killed EF2001 was applied orally before and after inoculation of Candida to the tongue of mice previously immunosuppressed. Two days after inoculation this inoculation, both the symptom score and CFU from swabbed-tongue were significantly reduced in the EF2001-treated animals. Histological analysis indicated that EF2001 may potentiate the accumulation of polymorphnuclear cells near a Candida-infected region. These results suggest that oral administration of EF2001 has protective activity against oral candidiasis and that the in vivo activity may be reflected by direct interaction between EF2001 and Candida cells in vitro and the potentiation of an immunostimulatory effect of EF2001.

  10. Enhancement of curcumin oral absorption and pharmacokinetics of curcuminoids and curcumin metabolites in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhongfa, Liu; Chiu, Ming; Wang, Jiang; Chen, Wei; Yen, Winston; Fan-Havard, Patty; Yee, Lisa D.; Chan, Kenneth K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Curcumin has shown a variety of biological activity for various human diseases including cancer in preclinical setting. Its poor oral bioavailability poses significant pharmacological barriers to its clinical application. Here, we established a practical nano-emulsion curcumin (NEC) containing up to 20% curcumin (w/w) and conducted the pharmacokinetics of curcuminoids and curcumin metabolites in mice. Methods This high loading NEC was formulated based on the high solubility of curcumin in polyethylene glycols (PEGs) and the synergistic enhancement of curcumin absorption by PEGs and Cremophor EL. The pharmacokinetics of curcuminoids and curcumin metabolites was characterized in mice using a LC–MS/MS method, and the pharmacokinetic parameters were determined using WinNonlin computer software. Results A tenfold increase in the AUC0→24h and more than 40-fold increase in the Cmax in mice were observed after an oral dose of NEC compared with suspension curcumin in 1% methylcellulose. The plasma pharmacokinetics of its two natural congeners, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin, and three metabolites, tetrahydrocurcumin (THC), curcumin-O-glucuronide, and curcumin-O-sulfate, was characterized for the first time in mice after an oral dose of NEC. Conclusion This oral absorption enhanced NEC may provide a practical formulation to conduct the correlative study of the PK of curcuminoids and their pharmacodynamics, e.g., hypomethylation activity in vivo. PMID:21968952

  11. COMPARATIVE METABOLISM OF ARSENIC IN MICE AFTER A SINGLE OR REPEATED ORAL ADMINISTRATION OF ARSENATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    COMPARATIVE METABOLISM OF ARSENIC IN MICE AFTER A SINGLE OR REPEATED ORAL ADMINISTRATION OF ARSENATEMichael F. Hughes*1, Elaina M. Kenyon1, Brenda C. Edwards1, Carol T. Mitchell1, Luz Maria Del Razo2 and David J. Thomas11US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, ETD, PKB, Research Triangle Pa...

  12. Vacuolating encephalitis in mice infected by human coronavirus OC43

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacomy, Helene; Talbot, Pierre J.

    2003-01-01

    Involvement of viruses in human neurodegenerative diseases and the underlying pathologic mechanisms remain generally unclear. Human respiratory coronaviruses (HCoV) can infect neural cells, persist in human brain, and activate myelin-reactive T cells. As a means of understanding the human infection, we characterized in vivo the neurotropic and neuroinvasive properties of HCoV-OC43 through the development of an experimental animal model. Virus inoculation of 21-day postnatal C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice led to a generalized infection of the whole CNS, demonstrating HCoV-OC43 neuroinvasiveness and neurovirulence. This acute infection targeted neurons, which underwent vacuolation and degeneration while infected regions presented strong microglial reactivity and inflammatory reactions. Damage to the CNS was not immunologically mediated and microglial reactivity was instead a consequence of direct virus-mediated neuronal injury. Although this acute encephalitis appears generally similar to that induced by murine coronaviruses, an important difference rests in the prominent spongiform-like degeneration that could trigger neuropathology in surviving animals

  13. Prevention of urogenital infections by oral administration of probiotic lactobacilli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedran Slačanac

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In general, lactobacilli are nonpathogenic part of the normal urogenital microflora and have been recognized as a barrier against colonization of unwanted (pathogen microflora. The results of many in vitro studies suggest following mechanisms of probiotic lactobacilli action in urogenital tract: adhesion to urogenital cells, competition with pathogens for adhesive sites, production of biosurfactants, co-aggregation with pathogens, production of antimicrobial substances (organic acids, hydrogen peroxide and bacteriocins and stimulation of immune system. From 80 different lactobacilli species isolated from human or animal intestinal and urogenital tract, only few lactobacilli strains possess optimal properties to be effective as probiotic therapeutics against infections in the urogenital tract. Combination of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus fermentum RC-14 was proposed as the best one for epithelial vaginal cells colonization and inhibition of uropathogens adhesion. The results of a number of clinical studies confirmed beneficial role of oral lactobacilli. However, the most of commercially available Lactobacillus strains, which are ordinary used in fermented dairy products,are seriously limited in protection of urogenital tract when they are ingested orally.

  14. IFNγ and perforin cooperate to control infection and prevent fatal pathology during persistent gammaherpesvirus infection in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, Christina; Høgh-Petersen, Mette; Storm, Pernille

    2014-01-01

    herpes virus infection, we infected IFNγ/perforin double deficient C57BL/6 mice and followed the outcome of infection. While absence of perforin prevented the splenic atrophy in IFNγ deficient mice, fibrosis did not disappear. Moreover, double deficient mice developed extreme splenomegaly, were unable...... in double deficient mice, other aspects are exaggerated, and the normal architecture of the spleen is completely destroyed. Thus, IFNγ and perforin work in concert to minimize pathology and control the viral load. In the absence of both effector molecules, the balancing race between the virus and the host...

  15. Mucositis and oral infections secondary to gram negative rods in patients with prolonged neutropenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindy M. Sampson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with prolonged neutropenia are at risk for a variety of complications and infections including the development of mucositis and oral ulcers. The changes in oral flora during chemotherapy and its effects on the development of infections of the oral cavity have been studied with inconsistent results. However, there is evidence that supports the colonization of gram negative rods in patients undergoing chemotherapy. In this report, we present two leukemic patients who developed oral ulcers secondary to multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It is important to suspect multi-drug resistant gram negative rods in patients with prolonged neutropenia who develop gum infections despite appropriate antibiotic coverage.

  16. A systematic review of oral fungal infections in patients receiving cancer therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lalla, Rajesh V.; Latortue, Marie C.; Hong, Catherine H.; Ariyawardana, Anura; D'Amato-Palumbo, Sandra; Fischer, Dena J.; Martof, Andrew; Nicolatou-Galitis, Ourania; Patton, Lauren L.; Elting, Linda S.; Spijkervet, Fred K. L.; Brennan, Michael T.

    The aims of this systematic review were to determine, in patients receiving cancer therapy, the prevalence of clinical oral fungal infection and fungal colonization, to determine the impact on quality of life and cost of care, and to review current management strategies for oral fungal infections.

  17. The microbiology of oral lichen planus: Is microbial infection the cause of oral lichen planus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, K; Choi, Y

    2018-02-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a variant of lichen planus (LP), a common chronic mucocutaneous inflammatory disease. Cutaneous lesions of LP are self-limiting, but OLP lesions are non-remissive, alternating periods of exacerbation and quiescence, and only symptomatic treatments exist for OLP. The precise etiology and pathogenesis of OLP are hardly understood, which is a major obstacle to the development of new therapeutics for this disease. OLP is considered a T-cell-mediated inflammatory disease. Although various antigens have been considered, what actually triggers the inflammatory response of T cells is unknown. Suggested predisposing factors include genetic factors, stress, trauma, and infection. The aim of this review was to determine whether microbial infection can cause OLP. We first reviewed the association between OLP and microbial factors, including viral, fungal, and bacterial infections. In addition, each microbial factor associated with OLP was assessed by modified guidelines of Fredricks and Relman to determine whether it establishes a causal relationship. In conclusion, no microbial factor yet fulfills the guidelines to establish the causality of OLP. By focusing on the unclarified issues, however, the potential roles of microbial factors in the pathogenesis of OLP will be soon elucidated. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Aqueous stability and oral pharmacokinetics of meloxicam and carprofen in male C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingrao, Joelle C; Johnson, Ron; Tor, Elizabeth; Gu, Yu; Litman, Marcus; Turner, Patricia V

    2013-09-01

    We found that carprofen and meloxicam under 3 environmental conditions (ambient dark, ambient light, and 4 °C) remained stable for at least 7 d. We then evaluated the oral pharmacokinetics of meloxicam (20 mg/kg) and carprofen (10 mg/kg) in male C57BL/6 mice after oral gavage or administration in the drinking water. Mice did not drink meloxicam-medicated water but readily consumed carprofen-medicated water, consuming an average of 14.19 mL carprofen-medicated water per 100 g body weight daily; mice drank more during the dark phase than during the light phase. Plasma analyzed by HPLC (meloxicam) and tandem mass spectrometry (carprofen) revealed that the peak meloxicam and carprofen concentrations were 16.7 and 20.3 μg/mL and occurred at 4 and 2 h after oral gavage, respectively. Similar blood levels were achieved after 12 h access to the carprofen-medicated water bottle. At 24 h after oral gavage, the drugs were not detectable in plasma. Meloxicam plasma AUC, elimination half-life, apparent volume of distribution, and apparent oral clearance were 160.4 mg/L × h, 7.4 h, 0.36 L/kg, and 0.125 mL/h × kg, respectively. Carprofen plasma AUC, elimination half-life, apparent volume of distribution, and apparent oral clearance were 160.8 mg/L × h, 7.4 h, 0.42 L/kg, and 0.062 mL/h × kg, respectively. No gross or microscopic evidence of toxicity was seen in any mouse. Our findings indicate that carprofen can be administered in drinking water to mice and that medicated water bottles should be placed 12 to 24 h prior to painful procedures.

  19. A less stressful alternative to oral gavage for pharmacological and toxicological studies in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, Mary K.; Boberg, Jason R.; Walsh, Mary T.; Wolf, Valerie; Trujillo, Alisha; Duke, Melissa Skelton; Palme, Rupert; Felton, Linda A.

    2012-01-01

    Oral gavage dosing can induce stress and potentially confound experimental measurements, particularly when blood pressure and heart rate are endpoints of interest. Thus, we developed a pill formulation that mice would voluntarily consume and tested the hypothesis that pill dosing would be significantly less stressful than oral gavage. C57Bl/6 male mice were singly housed and on four consecutive days were exposed to an individual walking into the room (week 1, control), a pill being placed into the cage (week 2), and a dose of water via oral gavage (week 3). Blood pressure and heart rate were recorded by radiotelemetry continuously for 5 h after treatment, and feces collected 6–10 h after treatment for analysis of corticosterone metabolites. Both pill and gavage dosing significantly increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) during the first hour, compared to control. However, the increase in MAP was significantly greater after gavage and remained elevated up to 5 h, while MAP returned to normal within 2 h after a pill. Neither pill nor gavage dosing significantly increased heart rate during the first hour, compared to control; however, pill dosing significantly reduced heart rate while gavage significantly increased heart rate 2–5 h post dosing. MAP and heart rate did not differ 24 h after dosing. Lastly, only gavage dosing significantly increased fecal corticosterone metabolites, indicating a systemic stress response via activation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis. These data demonstrated that this pill dosing method of mice is significantly less stressful than oral gavage. -- Highlights: ► Developed a novel oral dosing method using a pill that mice will readily consume. ► Assessed stress by blood pressure, heart rate, and fecal corticosterone metabolites. ► Demonstrated that pill dosing is significantly less stressful than oral gavage.

  20. A less stressful alternative to oral gavage for pharmacological and toxicological studies in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Mary K., E-mail: mwalker@salud.unm.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Boberg, Jason R.; Walsh, Mary T.; Wolf, Valerie; Trujillo, Alisha; Duke, Melissa Skelton [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Palme, Rupert [Department of Biomedical Sciences/Biochemistry, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Felton, Linda A. [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Oral gavage dosing can induce stress and potentially confound experimental measurements, particularly when blood pressure and heart rate are endpoints of interest. Thus, we developed a pill formulation that mice would voluntarily consume and tested the hypothesis that pill dosing would be significantly less stressful than oral gavage. C57Bl/6 male mice were singly housed and on four consecutive days were exposed to an individual walking into the room (week 1, control), a pill being placed into the cage (week 2), and a dose of water via oral gavage (week 3). Blood pressure and heart rate were recorded by radiotelemetry continuously for 5 h after treatment, and feces collected 6–10 h after treatment for analysis of corticosterone metabolites. Both pill and gavage dosing significantly increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) during the first hour, compared to control. However, the increase in MAP was significantly greater after gavage and remained elevated up to 5 h, while MAP returned to normal within 2 h after a pill. Neither pill nor gavage dosing significantly increased heart rate during the first hour, compared to control; however, pill dosing significantly reduced heart rate while gavage significantly increased heart rate 2–5 h post dosing. MAP and heart rate did not differ 24 h after dosing. Lastly, only gavage dosing significantly increased fecal corticosterone metabolites, indicating a systemic stress response via activation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis. These data demonstrated that this pill dosing method of mice is significantly less stressful than oral gavage. -- Highlights: ► Developed a novel oral dosing method using a pill that mice will readily consume. ► Assessed stress by blood pressure, heart rate, and fecal corticosterone metabolites. ► Demonstrated that pill dosing is significantly less stressful than oral gavage.

  1. Effect of Yifukang oral liquid on gastric emptying and intestinal peristalsis in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianhua; Li, Jun; Li, Xianyu; Hao, Shaojun; Guo, Junyi; Ma, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Zhengchen

    2018-04-01

    To observe the effect of Yifukang oral liquid on gastric emptying and intestinal peristalsis in mice. Methods: 60 mice were randomly divided into 5 groups. The suspension of Baohe Pill and the same volume of normal saline group were given once a day for 7 days. After the last administration for 30 minutes, 0.25 ml of 0.04% phenolic red solution was administered by stomach. After 20 minutes, the animals were killed, the stomach was removed, the gastric contents were cleaned, and the lotion 5ml was centrifuged. The absorbance of the supernatant was measured by TU-1901 ultraviolet spectrophotometer at the wavelength of 560nm. The residual rate of gastric phenolic red was calculated. Rate was used to evaluate gastric emptying velocity.60 mice were randomly divided into five groups: group 5, large, medium, small Yifukang oral liquid dosage group, pill suspension and the same volume normal saline. After 20 min after the last dose of carbon powder suspension, the mice were sacrificed, the abdominal cavity was cut open, the intestine of the ileocecum was cut off, the intestinal mesentery was separated, the total length of the small intestine (cm) was measured, and the distance (cm) in the small intestine was measured, and the end-of-carbon propulsion rate was calculated. Compared with the blank group, small dose of Yi Fu Kang group and Baohe Pill group could significantly promote the ability of gastric emptying in mice. Compared with the blank group, small dose group and rehabilitation benefits Baohewan group can significantly promote the gastric emptying ability of mice (Pmice. Yi Fu Kang oral liquid group could significantly increase the percentage of small intestine carbon powder(Pmice (P<0.05). Yi Fukang oral liquid has the effect of promoting gastric emptying and small intestinal peristalsis.

  2. The novel species Streptococcus tigurinus and its association with oral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbinden, Andrea; Bostanci, Nagihan; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus tigurinus is a novel species of viridans streptococci, shown to cause severe invasive infections such as infective endocarditis, spondylodiscitis and meningitis. S. tigurinus belongs to the Streptococcus mitis group and is most closely related to Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae and Streptococcus infantis. The presence of S. tigurinus in the human oral cavity has been documented, including in patients with periodontal disease. This review addresses the available scientific knowledge on S. tigurinus and its association with closely related streptococci, and discusses its putative involvement in common oral infections. While there is as yet no strong evidence on the involvement of S. tigurinus with oral infections, its presence in the oral cavity and its association with endocarditis warrants special attention for a link between oral and systemic infection.

  3. Syphacia obvelata and Radfordia affinis infection in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harslund, Jakob le Fèvre; Mandrupsen, Karina; Bollen, Peter

    Fèvre Harslund, Karina Mandrupsen & Peter Bollen, Biomedical Laboratory, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5000 Odense C, Denmark. Introduction: In 2014 we experienced an infection with pinworms. Subsequent health monitoring revealed positive findings of Radfordia and Tritrichomonas. Activities were...... of IVC have been negative.Treatment strategies for eliminating Tritrichomonas muris have not yet been established, and the protozoa is diagnosed on irregular basis by PCR and microscopy on intestinal smears. Discussion and conclusion: Previously new animals were accepted after evaluation of a recent...... with pinworms and fur mites were successfully treated, and successive health monitoring has demonstrated continuous absence of these pathogens. Tritrichomonas muris is to a wide extent regarded as a commensal in the intestinal lumen with minimal side effects on mice (3), and so far, the infection has not been...

  4. Delivery of Human EV71 Receptors by Adeno-Associated Virus Increases EV71 Infection-Induced Local Inflammation in Adult Mice

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    Hung-Bo Hsiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Enterovirus71 (EV71 is now recognized as an emerging neurotropic virus in Asia and one major causative agent of hand-foot-mouth diseases (HFMD. However potential animal models for vaccine development are limited to young mice. In this study, we used an adeno-associated virus (AAV vector to introduce the human EV71 receptors P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (hPSGL1 or a scavenger receptor class-B member-2 (hSCARB2 into adult ICR mice to change their susceptibility to EV71 infection. Mice were administered AAV-hSCARB2 or AAV-hPSGL1 through intravenous and oral routes. After three weeks, expression of human SCARB2 and PSGL1 was detected in various organs. After infection with EV71, we found that the EV71 viral load in AAV-hSCARB2- or AAV-hPSGL1-transduced mice was higher than that of the control mice in both the brain and intestines. The presence of EV71 viral particles in tissues was confirmed using immunohistochemistry analysis. Moreover, inflammatory cytokines were induced in the brain and intestines of AAV-hSCARB2- or AAV-hPSGL1-transduced mice after EV71 infection but not in wild-type mice. However, neurological disease was not observed in these animals. Taken together, we successfully infected adult mice with live EV71 and induced local inflammation using an AAV delivery system.

  5. Alteration in the endogenous intestinal flora of swiss webster mice by experimental Angiostrongylus costaricensis infection

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    Vandack Nobre

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The association between worm infections and bacterial diseases has only recently been emphasized. This study examined the effect of experimental Angiostrongylus costaricensis infection on endogenous intestinal flora of Swiss Webster mice. Eight mice aging six weeks were selected for this experiment. Four were infected with A. costaricensis and the other four were used as controls. Twenty eight days after the worm infection, all mice in both groups were sacrificed and samples of the contents of the ileum and colon were obtained and cultured for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. In the mice infected with A. costaricensis there was a significant increase in the number of bacteria of the endogenous intestinal flora, accompanied by a decrease in the number of Peptostreptococcus spp. This alteration in the intestinal flora of mice infected by the nematode may help to understand some bacterial infections described in humans.

  6. Anticoccidial activities of Chitosan on Eimeria papillata-infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Latif, Mahmoud; Abdel-Haleem, Heba M; Abdel-Baki, Abdel-Azeem S

    2016-07-01

    Eimeria spp. multiply within the intestinal tract causing severe inflammatory responses. Chitosan (CS), meanwhile, has been shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory activities in different experimental models. Here, we investigated the effect of CS on the outcome of inflammation caused by Eimeria papillata in the mouse intestine. Investigations were undertaken into the oocyst output in feces and developmental stages and goblet cells in intestinal tissue. Assays for lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide (NO), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were also performed. T cells in intestinal tissue were counted using immunohistochemistry while total IgA in serum or intestinal wash was assayed using ELISA. In addition, mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), interleukin (IL)-10, and IL-4 were detected using real-time PCR. The data indicated a reduction in both oocyst output and in the number of parasite developmental stages following CS treatment, while the goblet cell hypoplasia in infected mice was also inhibited. CS decreased lipid peroxidation, NO, and MPO but did not alter the T cell count or IgA levels in comparison to the infected group. The expression of TNF-α and TGF-β decreased but IL-10 and IL-4 increased after CS treatment in comparison to the non-treated infected group. In conclusion, CS showed anti-inflammatory and protective effects against E. papillata infection.

  7. Intranasal administration of live Lactobacillus species facilitates protection against influenza virus infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Ha-Na; Lee, Dong-Hun; Lee, Yu-Na; Park, Jae-Keun; Yuk, Seong-Su; Yang, Si-Yong; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Woo, Seo-Hyung; Kim, Hyoung-Moon; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Choi, In-Soo; Song, Chang-Seon

    2012-01-01

    Influenza virus infections continue to be a significant public health problem. For improved therapies and preventive measures against influenza, there has been an increased tendency in modern medicine involving the use of probiotics. In this study, we compared the protective efficacy of various live and dead Lactobacillus species against challenge with influenza virus in mice according to the administration route and dose. In addition, to understand the underlying mechanism behind this clinical protective effect, we performed immunologic assays including examination of IgA levels and cytokine profiles in the lung. The survival rate of mice receiving intranasal administration of Lactobacillus was higher than after oral administration, and administration of live bacteria was more protective than of dead bacteria. The lung levels of interleukin (IL)-12 and IgA were significantly increased (PLactobacillus strains on influenza virus infection. Therefore, for clinical applications, selection of effective strains could be critical and individually optimized application regimens of the selected strains are required. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Absorption and distribution of orally administered jojoba wax in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaron, A; Samoiloff, V; Benzioni, A

    1982-03-01

    The liquid wax obtained from the seeds of the arid-land shrub jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) is finding increasing use in skin treatment preparations. The fate of this wax upon reaching the digestive tract was studied. 14C-Labeled wax was administered intragastrically to mice, and the distribution of the label in the body was determined as a function of time. Most of the wax was excreted, but a small amount was absorbed, as was indicated by the distribution of label in the internal organs and the epididymal fat. The label was incorporated into the body lipids and was found to diminish with time.

  9. Experimental Oral Herpes Simplex Virus-1 (HSV-1 Co-infection in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV-Infected Rhesus Macaques

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    Meropi Aravantinou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 (HSV-1/2 similarly initiate infection in mucosal epithelia and establish lifelong neuronal latency. Anogenital HSV-2 infection augments the risk for sexual human immunodeficiency virus (HIV transmission and is associated with higher HIV viral loads. However, whether oral HSV-1 infection contributes to oral HIV susceptibility, viremia, or oral complications of HIV infection is unknown. Appropriate non-human primate (NHP models would facilitate this investigation, yet there are no published studies of HSV-1/SIV co-infection in NHPs. Thus, we performed a pilot study for an oral HSV-1 infection model in SIV-infected rhesus macaques to describe the feasibility of the modeling and resultant immunological changes. Three SIV-infected, clinically healthy macaques became HSV-1-infected by inoculation with 4 × 108 pfu HSV-1 McKrae on buccal, tongue, gingiva, and tonsils after gentle abrasion. HSV-1 DNA was shed in oral swabs for up to 21 days, and shedding recurred in association with intra-oral lesions after periods of no shedding during 56 days of follow up. HSV-1 DNA was detected in explant cultures of trigeminal ganglia collected at euthanasia on day 56. In the macaque with lowest baseline SIV viremia, SIV plasma RNA increased following HSV-1 infection. One macaque exhibited an acute pro-inflammatory response, and all three animals experienced T cell activation and mobilization in blood. However, T cell and antibody responses to HSV-1 were low and atypical. Through rigorous assessesments, this study finds that the virulent HSV-1 strain McKrae resulted in a low level HSV-1 infection that elicited modest immune responses and transiently modulated SIV infection.

  10. Oral-resident natural Th17 cells and γδ T cells control opportunistic Candida albicans infections.

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    Conti, Heather R; Peterson, Alanna C; Brane, Lucas; Huppler, Anna R; Hernández-Santos, Nydiaris; Whibley, Natasha; Garg, Abhishek V; Simpson-Abelson, Michelle R; Gibson, Gregory A; Mamo, Anna J; Osborne, Lisa C; Bishu, Shrinivas; Ghilardi, Nico; Siebenlist, Ulrich; Watkins, Simon C; Artis, David; McGeachy, Mandy J; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2014-09-22

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) is an opportunistic fungal infection caused by Candida albicans. OPC is frequent in HIV/AIDS, implicating adaptive immunity. Mice are naive to Candida, yet IL-17 is induced within 24 h of infection, and susceptibility is strongly dependent on IL-17R signaling. We sought to identify the source of IL-17 during the early innate response to candidiasis. We show that innate responses to Candida require an intact TCR, as SCID, IL-7Rα(-/-), and Rag1(-/-) mice were susceptible to OPC, and blockade of TCR signaling by cyclosporine induced susceptibility. Using fate-tracking IL-17 reporter mice, we found that IL-17 is produced within 1-2 d by tongue-resident populations of γδ T cells and CD3(+)CD4(+)CD44(hi)TCRβ(+)CCR6(+) natural Th17 (nTh17) cells, but not by TCR-deficient innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) or NK cells. These cells function redundantly, as TCR-β(-/-) and TCR-δ(-/-) mice were both resistant to OPC. Whereas γδ T cells were previously shown to produce IL-17 during dermal candidiasis and are known to mediate host defense at mucosal surfaces, nTh17 cells are poorly understood. The oral nTh17 population expanded rapidly after OPC, exhibited high TCR-β clonal diversity, and was absent in Rag1(-/-), IL-7Rα(-/-), and germ-free mice. These findings indicate that nTh17 and γδ T cells, but not ILCs, are key mucosal sentinels that control oral pathogens. © 2014 Conti et al.

  11. Dietary medium-chain triglycerides promote oral allergic sensitization and orally induced anaphylaxis to peanut protein in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianing; Wang, Yu; Tang, Lihua; de Villiers, Willem JS; Cohen, Donald; Woodward, Jerold; Finkelman, Fred D; Eckhardt, Erik RM

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The prevalence of peanut allergies is rising. Peanuts and many other allergen sources contain significant amounts of triglycerides, which affect absorption of antigens but have unknown effects on sensitization and anaphylaxis. We recently reported that dietary medium-chain triglycerides (MCT), which bypass mesenteric lymph and directly enter portal blood, reduce intestinal antigen absorption into blood compared to long-chain triglycerides (LCT), which stimulate mesenteric lymph flow and are absorbed in chylomicrons via mesenteric lymph. OBJECTIVE Test how dietary MCT affect food allergy. METHODS C3H/HeJ mice were fed peanut butter protein in MCT, LCT (peanut oil), or LCT plus an inhibitor of chylomicron formation (Pluronic L81; “PL81”). Peanut-specific antibodies in plasma, responses of the mice to antigen challenges, and intestinal epithelial cytokine expression were subsequently measured. RESULTS MCT suppressed antigen absorption into blood, but stimulated absorption into Peyer's patches. A single gavage of peanut protein with MCT as well as prolonged feeding in MCT-based diets caused spontaneous allergic sensitization. MCT-sensitized mice experienced IgG-dependent anaphylaxis upon systemic challenge and IgE-dependent anaphylaxis upon oral challenge. MCT feeding stimulated jejunal-epithelial TSLP, IL-25 and IL-33 expression compared to LCT, and promoted Th2 cytokine responses in splenocytes. Moreover, oral challenges of sensitized mice with antigen in MCT significantly aggravated anaphylaxis compared to challenges with LCT. Importantly, effects of MCT could be mimicked by adding PL81 to LCT, and in vitro assays indicated that chylomicrons prevent basophil activation. CONCLUSION Dietary MCT promote allergic sensitization and anaphylaxis by affecting antigen absorption and availability and by stimulating Th2 responses. PMID:23182172

  12. Single oral dose toxicity test of platycodin d, a saponin from platycodin radix in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won-Ho; Gam, Cheol-Ou; Ku, Sae-Kwang; Choi, Seong-Hun

    2011-12-01

    The object of this study was to evaluate the single oral dose toxicity of platycodin D, a saponin from the root of Platycodon grandiflorum in male and female mice. Platycodin D was administered to female and male mice as an oral dose of 2000, 1000, 500, 250 and 125 mg/kg (body wt.). Animals were monitored for the mortality and changes in body weight, clinical signs and gross observation during 14 days after treatment, upon necropsy, organ weight and histopathology of 14 principle organs were examined. As the results, no platycodin D treatment related mortalities, clinical signs, changes on the body and organ weights, gross and histopathological observations against 14 principle organs were detected up to 2000 mg/kg in both female and male mice. Therefore, LD50 (50% lethal dose) and approximate LD of playtcodin D after single oral treatment in female and male mice were considered over 2000 mg/kg - the limited dosages recommended by KFDA Guidelines [2009-116, 2009], respectively.

  13. Detection of oral early cancerous lesion by using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography: mice model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong-Yi; Chen, Ping-Hsien; Lee, Tzu-Han; Chang, Kuo-Wei; Kuo, Wen-Chuan

    2018-02-01

    Oral cancer is the 11th most common cancer worldwide, especially in a male adult. The median age of death in oral cancer was 55 years, 10-20 years earlier than other cancers. Presently, oral cancer is often found in late stage, because the lesion is often flat in early stage and is difficult to diagnose under traditional white light imaging. The only definitive method for determining cancer is an invasive biopsy and then using histology examination. How to detect precancerous lesions or early malignant lesions is an important issue for improving prognosis of oral cancer. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a new optical tool for diagnosing early malignant lesions in the skin or gastrointestinal tract recently. Here we report a new method for detecting precancerous or early malignant oral lesions by using swept source polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) with center-wavelength 1310 nm, bandwidth 110 nm and 100 kHz swept rate. We used all single-mode fiber design to detect the change of birefringence information in the epithelium structure. This system has an advantage that enables measurement of backscattered intensity and birefringence simultaneously with only one A-scan per transverse location. In preliminary result, we computed the slope of the every A-scan signal in tissue part using a linear-curve fitting in backscattered intensity and birefringence on the enface. In this research, we used an oral cancer mice model for observing the change of structure and birefringence properties in different stages of oral cancer mice. We presented the parametric enface imaging that can detect the early oral malignant lesions.

  14. Immunohistochemical detection of Tritrichomonas foetus in experimentally infected mice

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    Monteavaro Cristina Esther

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The need to intensify knowledge of the pathogenesis of bovine genital trichomoniasis (BGT led to the use of alternative animal models such as the mouse. Nevertheless, it is necessary to elucidate the dynamics of the infection in this animal species, evaluating different stages of the colonization and evolution of the pathological alterations. The immunohistochemistry (IHC offers advantages over the routine histopathological staining techniques for the detection of the protozoan in tissues, cellular detritus and inside the macrophages. The goal of the present study was to demonstrate the presence of Tritrichomonas foetus in the reproductive tract of infected mice using an IHC technique. Female BALB/c mice were infected with a suspension of T. foetus by intravaginal route, in the estrum phase, detected by exfoliative vaginal cytology. After 10 weeks, the animals were sacrificed; uterus and vagina were fixed and histologically processed. Some slides were stained with HE. The rest of the slides were processed for IHC. An immunoadsorbed polyclonal serum against T. foetus was used. The avidine-biotine technique (HistoMouse, Zymed[tm] was employed. The histopathological studies showed a dilation of the uterine glands, presence of macrophages in the lumen of the organ and inner part of the endometrial glands. No T. foetus was identified using this method. The IHQ allowed additionally the identification of the protozoan in the endometrium, endometrial glands, uterine lumen and inside neutrophils and macrophages. The cytological studies stained with IHC showed either isolated T. foetus adhered to epithelial cells or inside macrophages. This technique proves to be a useful tool for the study of the pathogenesis of bovine genital trichomoniasis (BGT in an experimental model.

  15. Human glial chimeric mice reveal astrocytic dependence of JC virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondo, Yoichi; Windrem, Martha S; Zou, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    with humanized white matter by engrafting human glial progenitor cells (GPCs) into neonatal immunodeficient and myelin-deficient mice. Intracerebral delivery of JCV resulted in infection and subsequent demyelination of these chimeric mice. Human GPCs and astrocytes were infected more readily than...... that was chimeric for human astrocytes and GPCs. JCV effectively propagated in these mice, which indicates that astroglial infection is sufficient for JCV spread. Sequencing revealed progressive mutation of the JCV capsid protein VP1 after infection, suggesting that PML may evolve with active infection...

  16. TLR3 deficiency renders astrocytes permissive to herpes simplex virus infection and facilitates establishment of CNS infection in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinert, Line; Harder, Louis Andreas; Holm, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) are highly prevalent neurotropic viruses. While they can replicate lytically in cells of the epithelial lineage, causing lesions on mucocutaneous surfaces, HSVs also establish latent infections in neurons, which act as reservoirs of virus for subsequent reactivation......, it is not known what cell type mediates the role of TLR3 in the immunological control of HSV, and it is not known whether TLR3 sensing occurs prior to or after CNS entry. Here, we show that in mice TLR3 provides early control of HSV-2 infection immediately after entry into the CNS by mediating type I IFN...... responses in astrocytes. Tlr3-/- mice were hypersusceptible to HSV-2 infection in the CNS after vaginal inoculation. HSV-2 exhibited broader neurotropism in Tlr3-/- mice than it did in WT mice, with astrocytes being most abundantly infected. Tlr3-/- mice did not exhibit a global defect in innate immune...

  17. Oral Modeling of an Adenovirus-Based Quadrivalent Influenza Vaccine in Ferrets and Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scallan, Ciaran D; Lindbloom, Jonathan D; Tucker, Sean N

    2016-06-01

    Oral vaccines delivered as tablets offer a number of advantages over traditional parenteral-based vaccines including the ease of delivery, lack of needles, no need for trained medical personnel, and the ability to formulate into temperature-stable tablets. We have been evaluating an oral vaccine platform based on recombinant adenoviral vectors for the purpose of creating a prophylactic vaccine to prevent influenza, and have demonstrated vaccine efficacy in animal models and substantial immunogenicity in humans. These studies have evaluated monovalent vaccines to date. To protect against the major circulating A and B influenza strains, a multivalent influenza vaccine will be required. In this study, the immunogenicity of orally delivered monovalent, bivalent, trivalent, and quadrivalent vaccines was tested in ferrets and mice. The various vaccine combinations were tested by blending monovalent recombinant adenovirus vaccines, each expressing hemagglutinin from a single strain. Human tablet delivery was modeled in animals by oral gavage in mice and by endoscopic delivery in ferrets. We demonstrated minimal interference between the various vaccine vectors when used in combination and that the oral quadrivalent vaccine compared favorably to an approved trivalent inactivated vaccine. The quadrivalent vaccine presented here produced immune responses that we predict should be capable of providing protection against multiple influenza strains, and the platform should have applications to other multivalent vaccines. Vaxart, Inc.

  18. Orally administered indomethacin acutely reduces cellular prion protein in the small intestine and modestly increases survival of mice exposed to infectious prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gary R; Sharkey, Keith A; Jirik, Frank R

    2015-05-01

    The oral uptake of infectious prions represents a common way to acquire a prion disease; thus, host factors, such as gut inflammation and intestinal "leakiness", have the potential to influence infectivity. For example, the ingestion of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is known to induce intestinal inflammation and increase intestinal permeability. Previously, we reported that normal cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) expression was increased in experimental colitis, and since the level of PrP(C) expressed is a determinant of prion disease propagation, we hypothesized that NSAID administration prior to the oral inoculation of mice with infectious prions would increase intestinal PrP(C) expression and accelerate the onset of neurological disease. In the long-term experiments, one group of mice was gavaged with indomethacin, followed by a second gavage with brain homogenate containing mouse-adapted scrapie (ME7). Control mice received ME7 brain homogenate alone. Brain and splenic tissues were harvested at several time points for immunoblotting, including at the onset of clinical signs of disease. In a second series of experiments, mice were gavaged with indomethacin to assess the acute effects of this treatment on intestinal PrP(C) expression. Acutely, NSAID treatment reduced intestinal PrP(C) expression, and chronically, there was a modest delay in the onset of neurological disease. In contrast to our hypothesis, brief exposure to an NSAID decreased intestinal PrP(C) expression and led to a modest survival advantage following oral ingestion of infectious prions.

  19. A Pilot Study into the Association between Oral Health Status and Human Papillomavirus—16 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Xiaohang Sun

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the next 20 years, oropharyngeal cancers (OPC will represent the majority of head and neck cancers (HNCs in the United States. It is estimated that human papillomavirus (HPV may account for as much as 70% to 80% of OPCs in North America and in certain parts of Europe. It is hence crucial to understand the disease risk factors and natural history of oral HPV infections. We hypothesized that poor oral health (by measures such as poor oral hygiene and periodontal disease leads to a higher degree of oral HPV-16 infections within a patient cohort from a dental school clinic. This study aims to test this hypothesis and gauge possible disease associations before larger scale studies. Subjects and Methods: 223 participants were recruited in this study from the University of Queensland Dental School clinic. Clinical oral health parameters (such as oral hygiene measures and periodontal disease measurements have been examined and determined by dental professionals. We have collected oral rinse samples from these volunteers. Results: 10 (4.5% out of 223 participants were found to have HPV-16 DNA in their oral rinse samples using NB2 endpoint PCR and Sanger sequencing. Within the HPV-16 DNA positive subjects, 7 (70% and 3 (30% were associated with poor oral hygiene and periodontal disease, respectively. Conclusion: Our results show a trend towards a positive correlation between oral HPV-16 infection and poor clinical oral health status.

  20. Interleukin-13 is involved in the formation of liver fibrosis in Clonorchis sinensis-infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanquan; Liang, Pei; Bian, Meng; Chen, Wenjun; Wang, Xiaoyun; Lin, Jinsi; Shang, Mei; Qu, Hongling; Wu, Zhongdao; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2016-07-01

    Clonorchiasis is a chronic infection disease often accompanied by formation of liver fibrosis. Previous study has identified that Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis, Cs) infection and CsRNASET2 (a member of CsESPs) immunization can drive Th2 immune response. IL-13, a multifunctional Th2 cytokine, has been widely confirmed to be profibrotic mediator. We want to determine whether IL-13 is involved in the generation of liver fibrosis during C. sinensis infection. A part of mice were infected with C. sinensis or immunized with CsRNASET2, respectively. Another part of mice were intravenously injected with rIL-13. Liver tissues of C. sinensis-infected mice were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and Masson's trichrome, respectively. The transcriptional levels of collagen-I, collagen-III, α-SMA, and TIMP-1 in the livers of infected mice and rIL-13-treated mice were measured by quantitative RT-PCR. Besides, splenocytes of C. sinensis-infected and CsRNASET2-immunized mice were isolated, respectively. The levels of IL-13 in splenocytes were detected by ELISA. Our results displayed that the livers of C. sinensis-infected mice had serious chronic inflammation and collagen deposition. The transcriptional levels of collagen-I, collagen-III, α-SMA, and TIMP-1 in the livers of C. sinensis-infected mice were obviously increased. Splenocytes from both C. sinensis-infected and CsRNASET2-immunized mice expressed high levels of IL-13. Moreover, rIL-13 treatment markedly promoted the transcriptional levels of collagen-I, collagen-III, α-SMA, and TIMP-1. These data implied that hepatic fibrosis was formed in the livers of C. sinensis-infected mice, and IL-13 induced by C. sinensis infection and CsRNASET2 immunization might favor this progression.

  1. Antinociceptive effects of Cremophor EL orally administered to mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Tabarelli

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfactants are frequently used to improve solubilization of lipophilic drugs. Cremophor EL (CrEL is a polyoxyethylated castor oil surfactant used to solubilize water-insoluble drugs such as anesthetic, antineoplastic, immunosuppressive and analgesic drugs, vitamins and new synthetic compounds, including potential analgesics. The antinociceptive effect of CrEL (3.2, 6.4 and 10.6 g/kg, in 10 ml/kg body weight, by gavage on the abdominal writhing response induced by intraperitoneal administration of acetic acid (0.8%, 10 ml/kg body weight and on the tail immersion test was investigated in mice. Control animals received castor oil (10 ml/kg body weight or saline (0.9% NaCl, 10 ml/kg body weight. CrEL reduced nociception in a dose-dependent manner in both tests. At 10.6 g/kg, CrEL caused antinociception similar to that induced by dipyrone (300 mg/kg, by gavage in the abdominal writhing test, and antinociception similar to that induced by morphine (20 mg/kg, by gavage in the tail immersion test. The effect of castor oil was similar to that of saline in both assays. These data indicate that the appropriate controls should be used when evaluating the effects of potential antinociceptive agents dissolved in CrEL.

  2. T-cell-dependent control of acute Giardia lamblia infections in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, S M; Nash, T E

    2000-01-01

    We have studied immune mechanisms responsible for control of acute Giardia lamblia and Giardia muris infections in adult mice. Association of chronic G. lamblia infection with hypogammaglobulinemia and experimental infections of mice with G. muris have led to the hypothesis that antibodies are required to control these infections. We directly tested this hypothesis by infecting B-cell-deficient mice with either G. lamblia or G. muris. Both wild-type mice and B-cell-deficient mice eliminated the vast majority of parasites between 1 and 2 weeks postinfection with G. lamblia. G. muris was also eliminated in both wild-type and B-cell-deficient mice. In contrast, T-cell-deficient and scid mice failed to control G. lamblia infections, as has been shown previously for G. muris. Treatment of wild-type or B-cell-deficient mice with antibodies to CD4 also prevented elimination of G. lamblia, confirming a role for T cells in controlling infections. By infecting mice deficient in either alphabeta- or gammadelta-T-cell receptor (TCR)-expressing T cells, we show that the alphabeta-TCR-expressing T cells are required to control parasites but that the gammadelta-TCR-expressing T cells are not. Finally, infections in mice deficient in production of gamma interferon or interleukin 4 (IL-4) and mice deficient in responding to IL-4 and IL-13 revealed that neither the Th1 nor the Th2 subset is absolutely required for protection from G. lamblia. We conclude that a T-cell-dependent mechanism is essential for controlling acute Giardia infections and that this mechanism is independent of antibody and B cells.

  3. Preoperative oral antibiotics reduce surgical site infection following elective colorectal resections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Jamie A; Altom, Laura K; Deierhoi, Rhiannon J; Morris, Melanie; Richman, Joshua S; Vick, Catherine C; Itani, Kamal M F; Hawn, Mary T

    2012-11-01

    Surgical site infection is a major cause of morbidity after colorectal resections. Despite evidence that preoperative oral antibiotics with mechanical bowel preparation reduce surgical site infection rates, the use of oral antibiotics is decreasing. Currently, the administration of oral antibiotics is controversial and considered ineffective without mechanical bowel preparation. The aim of this study is to examine the use of mechanical bowel preparation and oral antibiotics and their relationship to surgical site infection rates in a colorectal Surgical Care Improvement Project cohort. This retrospective study used Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program preoperative risk and surgical site infection outcome data linked to Veterans Affairs Surgical Care Improvement Project and Pharmacy Benefits Management data. Univariate and multivariable models were performed to identify factors associated with surgical site infection within 30 days of surgery. This study was conducted in 112 Veterans Affairs hospitals. Included were 9940 patients who underwent elective colorectal resections from 2005 to 2009. The primary outcome measured was the incidence of surgical site infection. Patients receiving oral antibiotics had significantly lower surgical site infection rates. Those receiving no bowel preparation had similar surgical site infection rates to those who had mechanical bowel preparation only (18.1% vs 20%). Those receiving oral antibiotics alone had an surgical site infection rate of 8.3%, and those receiving oral antibiotics plus mechanical bowel preparation had a rate of 9.2%. In adjusted analysis, the use of oral antibiotics alone was associated with a 67% decrease in surgical site infection occurrence (OR=0.33, 95% CI 0.21-0.50). Oral antibiotics plus mechanical bowel preparation was associated with a 57% decrease in surgical site infection occurrence (OR=0.43, 95% CI 0.34-0.55). Timely administration of parenteral antibiotics (Surgical Care Improvement

  4. Effects of testosterone on blood leukocytes in plasmodium berghei-infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamis, A B; Ibrahim, J B

    1989-01-01

    Gonadectomized male mice aged 5 weeks were given 5 mg testosterone propionate daily for 14 days. The treatment significantly decreased the number of blood leukocytes. The number of all individual types of leukocytes except basophils in vehicle-treated gonadectomized mice was increased. Testosterone-treated mice consistently had a lower number of leukocytes after being infected with Plasmodium berghei than did vehicle-treated mice. The results suggest that testosterone suppresses the production of leukocytes and that testosterone-treated mice become more susceptible to parasite infection.

  5. Recurrences after oral and genital herpes simplex virus infection. Influence of site of infection and viral type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, W E; Coombs, R W; Benedetti, J; Critchlow, C; Corey, L

    1987-06-04

    We prospectively followed 39 adults with concurrent primary herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection (12 with HSV type 1 and 27 with HSV type 2) of the oropharynx and genitalia, caused by the same virus in each person, to evaluate the influence of viral type (HSV-1 vs. HSV-2) and site of infection (oropharyngeal vs. genital) on the frequency of recurrence. The subsequent recurrence patterns of HSV infection differed markedly according to viral type and anatomical site. Oral-labial recurrences developed in 5 of 12 patients with HSV-1 and 1 of 27 patients with HSV-2 (P less than 0.001). Conversely, genital recurrences developed in 24 of 27 patients with HSV-2 and 3 of 12 patients with HSV-1 (P less than 0.01). The mean rate of subsequent genital recurrences (due to HSV-1 and HSV-2) was 0.23 per month, whereas the mean rate of oral-labial recurrences was only 0.04 per month (P less than 0.001). The mean monthly frequencies of recurrence were, in order, genital HSV-2 infections, 0.33 per month; oral-labial HSV-1 infections, 0.12 per month; genital HSV-1 infections, 0.020 per month; and oral HSV-2 infections, 0.001 per month (P less than 0.01 for each comparison). We conclude that the likelihood of reactivation of HSV infection differs between HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections and between the sacral and trigeminal anatomical sites. The sixfold more frequent clinical recurrence rate of genital HSV infections as compared with oral-labial HSV infections may account for the relatively rapid increase in the prevalence of clinically recognized genital herpes in recent years.

  6. Oxycodone physical dependence and its oral self-administration in C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enga, Rachel M; Jackson, Asti; Damaj, M Imad; Beardsley, Patrick M

    2016-10-15

    Abuse of prescription opioids, such as oxycodone, has markedly increased in recent decades. While oxycodone's antinociceptive effects have been detailed in several preclinical reports, surprisingly few preclinical reports have elaborated its abuse-related effects. This is particularly surprising given that oxycodone has been in clinical use since 1917. In a novel oral operant self-administration procedure, C57BL/6J mice were trained to self-administer water before introducing increasing concentrations of oxycodone (0.056-1.0mg/ml) under post-prandial conditions during daily, 3-h test sessions. As the concentration of oxycodone increased, the numbers of deliveries first increased, then decreased in an inverted U-shape fashion characteristic of the patterns of other drugs self-administered during limited access conditions. After post-prandial conditions were removed, self-administration at the highest concentration was maintained suggesting oral oxycodone served as a positive reinforcer. In other mice, using a novel regimen of physical dependence, mice were administered increasing doses of oxycodone (9.0-33.0mg/kg, s.c.) over 9 days, challenged with naloxone (0.1-10.0mg/kg, s.c.), and then observed for 30min. Naloxone dose-dependently increased the observed number of somatic signs of withdrawal, suggesting physical dependence of oxycodone was induced under this regimen. This is the first report demonstrating induction of oral operant self-administration of oxycodone and dose-dependent precipitations of oxycodone withdrawal in C57BL/6J mice. The use of oral operant self-administration as well as the novel physical dependence regimen provides useful approaches to further examine the abuse- and dependence-related effects of this highly abused prescription opioid. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Intermittent fasting favored the resolution of Salmonella typhimurium infection in middle-aged BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael; Godínez-Victoria, Marycarmen; Reyna-Garfias, Humberto; Arciniega-Martínez, Ivonne Maciel; Reséndiz-Albor, Aldo Arturo; Abarca-Rojano, Edgar; Cruz-Hernández, Teresita Rocío; Drago-Serrano, Maria Elisa

    2016-02-01

    Intermittent fasting (IF) reportedly increases resistance and intestinal IgA response to Salmonella typhimurium infection in mature mice. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of aging on the aforementioned improved immune response found with IF. Middle-aged male BALB/c mice were submitted to IF or ad libitum (AL) feeding for 40 weeks and then orally infected with S. typhimurium. Thereafter, infected animals were all fed AL (to maximize their viability) until sacrifice on day 7 or 14 post-infection. We evaluated body weight, bacterial load (in feces, Peyer's patches, spleen and liver), total and specific intestinal IgA, lamina propria IgA+ plasma cells, plasma corticosterone, and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of α-chain, J-chain, and the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) in liver and intestinal mucosa. In comparison with the infected AL counterpart, the infected IF group (long-term IF followed by post-infection AL feeding) generally had lower intestinal and systemic bacterial loads as well as higher total IgA on both post-infection days. Both infected groups showed no differences in corticosterone levels, body weight, or food and caloric intake. The increase in intestinal IgA was associated with enhanced pIgR mRNA expression in the intestine (day 7) and liver. Thus, to maintain body weight and caloric intake, IF elicited metabolic signals that possibly induced the increased hepatic and intestinal pIgR mRNA expression found. The increase in IgA probably resulted from intestinal IgA transcytosis via pIgR. This IgA response along with phagocyte-induced killing of bacteria in systemic organs (not measured) may explain the resolution of the S. typhimurium infection.

  8. Oral Syphilis: A Reemerging Infection Prompting Clinicians’ Alertness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Dybeck Udd

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Syphilis is a rare but increasing disease. Due to changing sexual habits, presentation of oral manifestations may rise. Since syphilis may mimic other oral manifestations, diagnoses can be difficult. Clinicians need to be aware that ambiguous oral manifestations may in fact be caused by oral syphilis. Here, we present a case of extended diagnostic delay highlighting the importance of consulting an expert in infectious diseases in case of obscure oral lesions not responding to standard treatment. Despite seven visits to six different medical doctors, a patient who presented with oral syphilis was continuously misdiagnosed. After 6 months of increasing complaints and deteriorating severity of disease, the patient was referred to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon where the correct diagnosis was determined and proper treatment initiated.

  9. Associations between Oral Infections and Salivary Gland Hypofunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Siri Beier; Pedersen, Anne Marie Lynge

    2016-01-01

    Saliva plays an important role in the maintenance of oral health and regulation of the oral microbiota. Saliva lubricates the oral hard and soft tissues, dilutes food detritus and bacteria and enhances the clearance of microorganisms and dietary carbohydrates from the oral cavity. Saliva also...... provides antimicrobial activity via numerous proteins and peptides including lactoferrin, lactoperoxidase, lysozyme, statherin and histatins. This chapter focuses on the oral microbiota in patients suffering from salivary gland hypofunction due to Sjögren’s syndrome, radiotherapy of tumours in the head...... and neck region, cancer chemotherapy and intake of medications. Despite the different causes of salivary gland hypofunction, these patient groups show some similarities regarding the composition of the oral microbiota with increased colonisation of oral pathogens associated with dental caries...

  10. Pharmacological manipulation of the chronic granulomatous reactions in the livers of mice infected with schistosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainsford, K D

    1985-01-01

    The severe granulomatous reactions in the liver which occur following infestation by adult Schistosoma mansonii are largely initiated by invading eosinophils and monocytes. The present studies were designed to investigate the possibility that (a) anti-inflammatory drugs could be employed beneficially to attenuate the liver granulomatous reactions in schistosomiasis, and (b) that part of the therapeutic effects of anti-schistosomal (AS) drugs might be due to possible influences on arachidonate metabolism. Therefore the effects were determined of (a) AS as compared with NSAI drugs on eicosanoid metabolism in isolated human peripheral leucocyte populations, and (b) electron-microscopic changes in the livers of mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni in response to AS and/or NSAI drugs. Of the AS drugs only praziquantel (10-100 microM) inhibited 5-HETE production by the 5-lipoxygenase pathway. No effects were observed of this or the other AS drugs on prostaglandin production. In S. mansoni infected mice, praziquantel (250 mg/kg/d), given orally with indomethacin (5 mg/kg/d) for 5 days did not improve the inflammatory reactions around worms or eggs of schistosomes. Furthermore, both indomethacin (5 mg/kg/d) alone and benoxaprofen (20 mg/kg/d for 5 days) elicited liver changes suggestive of specific liver damage by these drugs. These results suggest that liver pathology may be enhanced by NSAI drugs perhaps as a consequence of the liver metabolism of these drugs being compromised. Their use to modify inflammatory reactions at the peak of liver schistosome infections may thus be contraindicated.

  11. Relative oral efficacy and acute toxicity of hydroxypyridin-4-one iron chelators in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, J.B.; Morgan, J.; Hoyes, K.P.; Burke, L.C.; Huehns, E.R.; Hider, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between the oral efficacy and the acute toxicity of hydroxypyridin-4-one iron chelators has been investigated to clarify structure-function relationships of these compounds in vivo and to identify compounds with the maximum therapeutic safety margin. By comparing 59Fe excretion following oral or intraperitoneal administration of increasing doses of each chelator to iron-overloaded mice, the most effective compounds have been identified. These have partition coefficients (Kpart) above 0.3 in the iron-free form with a trend of increasing oral efficacy with increasing Kpart values (r = .6). However, this is achieved at a cost of increasing acute toxicity, as shown by a linear correlation between 59Fe excretion increase per unit dose and 1/LD50 (r = .83). A sharp increase in the LD50 values is observed for compounds with Kpart values above 1.0, suggesting that such compounds are unlikely to possess a sufficient therapeutic safety margin. Below a Kpart of 1.0, acute toxicity is relatively independent of lipid solubility. All the compounds are less toxic by the oral route than by the intraperitoneal route, although iron excretion is not significantly different by these two routes. At least five compounds (CP51, CP94, CP93, CP96, and CP21) are more effective orally than the same dose of intraperitoneal desferrioxamine (DFO) (P less than or equal to .02) or orally administered L1(CP20) (P less than or equal to .02)

  12. Helicobacter sp. MIT 01-6451 infection during fetal and neonatal life in laboratory mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Hitoki; Nakanishi, Tai; Takagi, Toshikazu; Ohsawa, Makiko; Kubo, Noriaki; Yamamoto, Naoto; Takemoto, Takahira; Ohsawa, Kazutaka

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter sp. MIT 01-6451 has been detected in SPF mice kept in Japan. To characterize strain MIT 01-6451, its infection route during fetal and neonatal life and effects on pregnancy were investigated using immunocompetent and immunodeficient mouse strains (BALB/c, C57BL/6, and SCID). MIT 01-6451 was detected in the uterus, vagina, and mammary glands of 50% of infected SCID mice, whereas these tissues were all negative in immunocompetent mice. No fetal infections with MIT 01-6451 were detected at 16-18 days after pregnancy in any mouse strain. In newborn mice, MIT 01-6451 was detected in intestinal tissue of C57BL/6 and SCID mice at 9-11 days after birth, but not in BALB/c mice. The IgA and IgG titers to MIT 01-6451 in sera of C57BL/6 female mice were significantly lower than those of BALB/c mice. Although no significant differences in the number of newborns per litter were observed between MIT 01-6451-infected and MIT 01-6451-free dams, the birth rate was lower in infected SCID mice than in control SCID mice. The present results indicated that MIT 01-6451 infects newborn mice after birth rather than by vertical transmission to the fetus via the placenta and that MIT 01-6451 infection shows opportunistically negative effects on the birth rate. In addition, the maternal immune response may affect infection of newborn mice with MIT 01-6451 through breast milk.

  13. Enhanced bioavailability and cysticidal effect of three mebendazole-oil preparations in mice infected with secondary cysts of Echinococcus granulosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cong-shan; Zhang, Hao-bing; Jiang, Bin; Yao, Jun-min; Tao, Yi; Xue, Jian; Wen, Ai-dan

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to explore the possibility to increase the efficacy of mebendazole (MBZ) against secondary cysts of Echinococcus granulosus harbored in mice by augmenting the solubility and bioavailability of the drug. Firstly, the saturated solubility of MBZ in nine kinds of oil was determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and MBZ was found exhibiting the highest, secondary, and lowest solubility in oleic acid (OA), glycerol trioleate (GT), and soybean oil (SB), respectively. Secondly, MBZ-OA suspension, MBZ-GT suspension, MBZ-SB suspension, and MBZ suspended in 1 % tragacanth (MBZ-1 % tragacanth) were selected for further studies on pharmacokinetics and experimental therapy in mice. Four groups of mice were treated orally with one of aforementioned four MBZ preparations at a single dose of 25 mg/kg, and concentrations of MBZ in plasma obtained from each mouse at various intervals within 24 h postadministration were determined by HPLC. The major pharmacokinetic parameters calculated by MBZ plasma concentration-time curve demonstrated that the peak concentration of the drug (C (max) ) values obtained from three MBZ-oil preparation groups was 1.6-2.8 times higher than that of MBZ-1 % tragacanth group. The same was true that the area under the drug concentration-time curve (AUC(0-∞)) values of 19.8 (2.5)-28.2 (2.5) μg/ml × h revealed in the three MBZ-oil preparation groups was significantly higher than that of 11.6 (2.0) μg/ml × h in MBZ-1 % tragacanth group, and the bioavailability of the three MBZ-oil preparation groups was 71-143 % higher than that of MBZ-1 % tragacanth group. In mice infected with secondary cysts of E. granulosus for 8 months treated orally with MBZ-1 % tragacanth at a daily dose of 25 mg/kg for 14 consecutive days, the mean cyst weight was lower than that of untreated control, but the difference was not statistically significant with cyst weight reduction of 48 %. When the infected mice received three

  14. The Protective Effects of Oral Low-dose Quercetin on Diabetic Nephropathy in Hypercholesterolemic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabele Beserra Santos Gomes

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Diabetic nephropathy (DN is one of the major causes of end-stage renal disease, and the incidence of DN is increasing worldwide. Considering our previous report indicating that chronic treatment with oral low-dose quercetin (10 mg/Kg demonstrated renoprotective, anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic effects in the C57BL/6J model of diabetic nephropathy, we investigated whether this flavonoid could also have beneficial effects in concurrent DN and spontaneous atherosclerosis using the apolipoprotein E-deficient mouse (apoE-/-. Methods: DN was induced by streptozotocin (100 mg/kg/day, for 3 days in adult apoE-/-mice. Six weeks later, the mice were divided into the following groups: diabetic apoE-/- mice treated with quercetin (DQ, 10 mg/kg/day, 4 weeks, diabetic ApoE-/- mice treated with vehicle (DV and non-treated non-diabetic (ND mice.Results: Quercetin treatment caused a reduction in polyuria (~30%, glycemia (~25%, abolished the hypertriglyceridemia and had significant effects on renal function, including decreased proteinuria (~15% and creatininemia (~30%, which were accompanied by beneficial effects on the renal structural changes, including normalization of the index of glomerulosclerosis and kidney weight.Conclusions: Our data revealed that quercetin treatment significantly reduced DN in hypercholesterolemic mice by inducing biochemical and morphological modifications. Thus, this translational study highlights the importance of quercetin as a potential nutraceutical for the management of DN, including in diabetes associated with dyslipidemia.

  15. Controversies surrounding human papilloma virus infection, head & neck vs oral cancer, implications for prophylaxis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisi, Giuseppina; Giovannelli, Lucia

    2009-03-30

    Head & Neck Cancer (HNC) represents the sixth most common malignancy worldwide and it is historically linked to well-known behavioural risk factors, i.e., tobacco smoking and/or the alcohol consumption. Recently, substantial evidence has been mounting that Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection is playing an increasing important role in oral cancer. Because of the attention and clamor surrounding oral HPV infection and related cancers, as well as the use of HPV prophylactic vaccines, in this invited perspective the authors raise some questions and review some controversial issues on HPV infection and its role in HNC, with a particular focus on oral squamous cell carcinoma. The problematic definition and classification of HNC will be discussed, together with the characteristics of oral infection with oncogenic HPV types, the frequency of HPV DNA detection in HNC, the location of HPV-related tumours, the severity and prognosis of HPV-positive HNC, the diagnosis of oral HPV infection, common routes of oral infection and the likelihood of oro-genital HPV transmission, the prevention of HPV infection and novel therapeutic approaches.

  16. Oral and dental infections with anaerobic bacteria: clinical features, predominant pathogens, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, A; Stillman, N

    1993-06-01

    Microbial populations colonizing the teeth are a major source of pathogens responsible for oral and dental infections, including periodontal diseases, gingivitis, pericoronitis, endodontitis, peri-implantitis, and postextraction infections. Each entity has distinct clinical and microbial features. Bacterial species associated with oral infections include Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Bacteroides forsythus, Campylobacter rectus, Eubacterium species, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Eikenella corrodens, and Peptostreptococcus micros. Treponema pallidum-related spirochetes have been associated with acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis. Porphyromonas endodontalis appears to be specifically related to endodontic infections. Oral infections in medically compromised patients, including those with AIDS, are associated with similar species and are usually complicated by superinfection with enteric and Candida species. Isolation of species causing oral infections requires the collection of appropriate samples and the use of strictly anaerobic techniques. Rapid selective culture, immunofluorescence, and DNA probe methods have been developed for the identification of these oral species. The varied measures required in the management of oral and dental infections may include antimicrobial therapy. Accurate microbiological diagnosis, including antibiotic susceptibility testing, is indicated for cases that do not respond to therapy.

  17. Serum concentrations of buprenorphine after oral and parenteral administration in male mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Otto; Jacobsen, Kirsten R; Hau, Jann

    2011-01-01

    Buprenorphine is the most commonly used drug for peri-operative pain relief in laboratory rodents. The systemic concentrations of buprenorphine were measured in mice following administration intravenously (IV), subcutaneously (SC), orally by gavage and by voluntary ingestion, to determine the post-administration...... serum concentration of buprenorphine. Voluntarily ingested buprenorphine resulted in long-lasting high serum concentrations, as did oral gavage administration (24h serum concentration: 110ngh/mL for both routes of administration). In contrast, buprenorphine administered parenterally remained...... in the circulation for a substantially shorter time (24h serum concentration for IV and SC were 40ngh/mL and 30ngh/mL, respectively). This marked difference was probably due to the higher dose used for oral administration, which is regarded necessary for sufficient analgesic effect, and to the slower absorption...

  18. Evaluation of edaravone against radiation-induced oral mucositis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Noriko; Watanabe, Shinichi; Kiyoi, Takeshi; Tanaka, Akihiro; Suemaru, Katsuya; Araki, Hiroaki

    2015-03-01

    Oral mucositis induced by radiotherapy for cancers of the head and neck reduce the quality of life of patients. However, effective therapeutic agents are lacking. Symptomatic treatment involves local anesthesia and analgesia. We focused on the antioxidant effects of edaravone (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one; Radicut(®)). Oral mucositis was induced on the tongue tips of mice using a single dose of X-rays (20 Gy). To evaluate the protective effect of edaravone (30 and 300 mg/kg), administration was carried out 30 min before irradiation. Survival, oral mucositis score, myeloperoxidase activity, and levels of 2-Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances were measured, and all were improved compared with those of control mice. A significant difference was not found in terms of survival due to edaravone. Histopathologic findings also highlighted the beneficial features of edaravone. Edaravone reduced the production of reactive oxygen species. These findings suggest that the protective effect of edaravone against radiation-induced oral mucositis is through an antioxidant effect. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Pharmacological Society. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of edaravone against radiation-induced oral mucositis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Nakajima

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Oral mucositis induced by radiotherapy for cancers of the head and neck reduce the quality of life of patients. However, effective therapeutic agents are lacking. Symptomatic treatment involves local anesthesia and analgesia. We focused on the antioxidant effects of edaravone (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one; Radicut®. Oral mucositis was induced on the tongue tips of mice using a single dose of X-rays (20 Gy. To evaluate the protective effect of edaravone (30 and 300 mg/kg, administration was carried out 30 min before irradiation. Survival, oral mucositis score, myeloperoxidase activity, and levels of 2-Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances were measured, and all were improved compared with those of control mice. A significant difference was not found in terms of survival due to edaravone. Histopathologic findings also highlighted the beneficial features of edaravone. Edaravone reduced the production of reactive oxygen species. These findings suggest that the protective effect of edaravone against radiation-induced oral mucositis is through an antioxidant effect.

  20. Effect of the oral intake of probiotic Pediococcus acidilactici BA28 on Helicobacter pylori causing peptic ulcer in C57BL/6 mice models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Baljinder; Garg, Neena; Sachdev, Atul; Kumar, Balvir

    2014-01-01

    Probiotic lactic acid bacteria are being proposed to cure peptic ulcers by reducing colonization of Helicobacter pylori within the stomach mucosa and by eradicating already established infection. In lieu of that, in vitro inhibitory activity of pediocin-producing probiotic Pediococcus acidilactici BA28 was evaluated against H. pylori by growth inhibition assays. Further, chronic gastritis was first induced in two groups of C57BL/6 mice by orogastric inoculation with H. pylori with polyethylene catheter, and probiotic P. acidilactici BA28 was orally administered to study the eradication and cure of peptic ulcer disease. H. pylori and P. acidilactici BA28 were detected in gastric biopsy and fecal samples of mice, respectively. A probiotic treatment with P. acidilactici BA28, which is able to eliminate H. pylori infection and could reverse peptic ulcer disease, is being suggested as a co-adjustment with conventional antibiotic treatment. The study provided an evidence of controlling peptic ulcer disease, by diet mod

  1. Antibody hyporesponsiveness in resistant BALB/cJ mice intracorneally infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, R S; Preston, M; Montgomery, I N; Hazlett, L D; Tse, H Y

    Six- to eight-week-old BALB/cJ (and BALB/cPi) mice were found able to restore corneal clarity within 3 to 4 weeks after intracorneal infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain 19660. However, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for serum immunoglobulins directed specifically against P. aeruginosa indicated that the mice were initially non- or hypo-responsive for IgG and IgA over the 4-week holding period. Low IgM titers could be detected 1 week after infection, but tended to decrease with time. When the mice were re-infected by using the contralateral control eye, then the serum IgG levels began to gradually increase as the time interval following the secondary infection increased from 1 to 3 weeks. Re-infected mice did not show a significantly increased rate of corneal clarity restoration with time, when compared to the corneas of mice receiving only a primary infection despite the presence of serum antibodies specific to P. aeruginosa. When congenic mice of the BALB/c background carrying the DBA/2N Idh/Pep-3 locus found on chromosome 1 were intracorneally infected, they tended to restore corneal clarity at approximately the same rate as the BALB/cJ mice. However, the congenic mice mounted a faster and substantially greater magnitude of serum IgM and IgG response during the primary infection than BALB/cJ mice receiving either a primary and/or secondary infection. IgG subclass studies with the congenic mice indicated that serum IgG1, and IgG2a to a lesser extent, were the primary immunoglobulins produced and no major shift in subclass was noted with time during the primary infection.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Linezolid Decreases Susceptibility to Secondary Bacterial Pneumonia Post-Influenza Infection in Mice Through its Effects on Interferon-γ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslow-Deckman, Jessica M.; Mattingly, Cynthia M.; Birket, Susan E.; Hoskins, Samantha N.; Ho, Tam N.; Garvy, Beth A.; Feola, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Influenza infection predisposes patients to secondary bacterial pneumonia that contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality. While this association is well documented, the mechanisms that govern this synergism are poorly understood. A window of hyporesponsiveness following influenza infection has been associated with a substantial increase in local and systemic IFNγ concentrations. Recent data suggests that the oxazolidinone antibiotic linezolid decreases IFNγ and TNFα production in vitro from stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We therefore sought to determine whether linezolid would reverse immune hyporesponsiveness after influenza infection in mice through its effects on IFNγ. In vivo dose response studies demonstrated that oral linezolid administration sufficiently decreased bronchoalveolar lavage fluid levels of IFNγ at day 7 post-influenza infection in a dose-dependent manner. The drug also decreased morbidity as measured by weight loss compared to vehicle-treated controls. When mice were challenged intranasally with S. pneumoniae 7 days after infection with influenza, linezolid pre-treatment led to decreased IFNγ and TNFα production, decreased weight loss, and lower bacterial burdens at 24 hours post bacterial infection in comparison to vehicle-treated controls. To determine whether these effects were due to suppression of IFNγ, linezolid-treated animals were given intranasal instillations of recombinant IFNγ before challenge with S. pneumoniae. This partially reversed the protective effects observed in the linezolid-treated mice, suggesting that the modulatory effects of linezolid are mediated partially by its ability to blunt IFNγ production. These results suggest that IFNγ, and potentially TNFα, may be useful drug targets for prophylaxis against secondary bacterial pneumonia following influenza infection. PMID:23833238

  3. Postlactational changes in cadmium retention in mice orally exposed to cadmium during pregnancy and lactation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Sellers, D.A.; Peterson, D.P.

    1986-01-01

    Mice were continuously exposed to 109Cd in drinking water (0.03 microCi/ml; 0.11 ppb total cadmium) during pregnancy and lactation. After cessation of exposure, 109 Cd retention and distribution were examined during a 4-week postlactational period. At the start of the postlactational period (0 time), the fraction of oral 109 Cd retained by the dams was 2.4 times greater than that retained by similarly exposed nonpregnant mice. 109 Cd concentrations at 0 time were greater in the dams than in the nonpregnant mice in kidney (5-fold), liver (2.6-fold), mammary tissue (greater than 28-fold), and duodenum (13-fold). No changes in 109 Cd content of the whole body (minus gastrointestinal tract) occurred during the 4 weeks after cessation of exposure in either the dams or the nonpregnant mice; i.e., pregnancy-dependent increases in 109 Cd contents of individual organs were maintained during the 4 weeks of observation. An indication of translocation of 109 Cd from liver to kidney was observed in the dams but not in the nonpregnant mice. 109 Cd concentrations in the mammary tissue of the dams increased 2-fold during the postlactational period concomitant with a 3-fold decrease in mammary tissue mass. 109 Cd in the duodenum of the pregnant/lactating mice decreased, with a half-life of 14 days. Results indicate that multiparous women exposed to environmental levels of cadmium may takeup and retain in their kidneys, livers, and mammary tissue a greater fraction of their dietary cadmium than women with few or no children. Such results may bear on the etiology of Itai-Itai disease, a disease of the skeleton potentially related to oral cadmium exposure, with an incidence predominantly among postmenopausal women with a history of multiple childbirths

  4. Fructose- and glucose-conditioned preferences in FVB mice: strain differences in post-oral sugar appetition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukerman, Steven; Ackroff, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that, unlike glucose, fructose has little or no post-oral preference conditioning actions in C57BL/6J (B6) mice. The present study determined whether this is also the case for FVB mice, which overconsume fructose relative to B6 mice. In experiment 1, FVB mice strongly preferred a noncaloric 0.1% sucralose + 0.1% saccharin (S+S) solution to 8% fructose in a 2-day choice test but switched their preference to fructose after separate experience with the two sweeteners. Other FVB mice displayed a stronger preference for 8% glucose over S+S. In a second experiment, ad libitum-fed FVB mice trained 24 h/day acquired a significant preference for a flavor (CS+) paired with intragastric (IG) self-infusions of 16% fructose over a different flavor (CS−) paired with IG water infusions. IG fructose infusions also conditioned flavor preferences in food-restricted FVB mice trained 1 h/day. IG infusions of 16% glucose conditioned stronger preferences in FVB mice trained 24- or 1 h/day. Thus, fructose has post-oral flavor conditioning effects in FVB mice, but these effects are less pronounced than those produced by glucose. Further studies of the differential post-oral conditioning effects of fructose and glucose in B6 and FVB mice should enhance our understanding of the physiological processes involved in sugar reward. PMID:25320345

  5. Virological and clinico-pathological features of orf virus infection in experimentally infected rabbits and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargnelutti, J F; Masuda, E K; Martins, M; Diel, D G; Rock, D L; Weiblen, R; Flores, E F

    2011-01-01

    Many aspects of the biology of orf virus (ORFV) infection remain poorly understood and attempts to establish animal models have yielded conflicting and non-reproducible results. We herein describe the characterization of ORFV infection and disease in rabbits and mice. A protocol of intradermal inoculation was employed to inoculate 10(8.5)TCID₅₀/mL of ORFV strain IA-82 in the skin of ears, of the back and labial commissures. All inoculated rabbits presented a clinical course characterized by erythema, macules, papules/vesicles or pustules that eventually dried originating scabs. Local signs started around days 3 and 4 post-inoculation (pi) and lasted 3-10 days. Virus was recovered from lesions between days 2 and 14pi. Histological examination of lesions revealed focal proliferative dermatitis with ballooning degeneration and eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies in keratinocytes, histological hallmarks of contagious ecthyma in sheep. A similar, albeit milder clinical course occurred in 5/10 inoculated mice; virus was recovered from lesions from three animals. Inoculated lambs - used as controls - developed severe lesions of contagious ecthyma. VN tests performed at day 28pi failed to detect neutralizing antibodies in all inoculated animals. In contrast, convalescent rabbit sera were positive by ELISA at dilutions from 100 to 400. These results show that rabbits are susceptible to ORFV infection and thus may be used to study selected aspects of ORFV biology. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of HPV infection on oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Carolin; Drecoll, Enken; Straub, Melanie; Bissinger, Oliver; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Kolk, Andreas

    2016-11-22

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) are often divided by their aetiology. Noxae associated collectives are compared with the human papilloma virus (HPV)-associated group, whereas different localisations of oral (OSCC) and oropharyngeal (OPSCC) squamous cell carcinomas are mostly discussed as one single group. Our aim was to show that classification by aetiology is not appropriate for OSCC. HPV DNA was detected by PCR in 7 (3.47%) patients, and we identified 12 (5.94%) positive (+) cases by p16INK4a immunostaining. Only 4 (1.98%) of the p16INK4a+ cases were + for HPV using PCR. Our homogenous collective of OSCC allowed us to compare HPV+ and HPV negative (-) patients without creating bias for tumour localisation, age, gender or tumour stage. After testing OSCC samples for HPV positivity, we compared the results of two commonly used HPV detection methods, p16INK4a immunostaining and HPV DNA-related PCR, on 202 OSCC patients. HPV subtypes were determined with an HPV LCD Array Kit. Clinicopathological features of the patients were analysed, and the disease specific survival rates (DSS) for HPV+ and HPV- patients were obtained. p16INK4a immunostaining is a not a reliable HPV detection method for OSCC. Positive p16INK4a immunostaining did not agree with + results from PCR of HPV DNA. Furthermore, the influence of HPV-related oncogenic transformation in OSCC is overestimated. The significance of HPV infection remains clinically unclear, and its influence on survival rates is not relevant to OSCC cases.

  7. TAM Receptors Are Not Required for Zika Virus Infection in Mice

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    Andrew K. Hastings

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Tyro3, Axl, and Mertk (TAM receptors are candidate entry receptors for infection with the Zika virus (ZIKV, an emerging flavivirus of global public health concern. To investigate the requirement of TAM receptors for ZIKV infection, we used several routes of viral inoculation and compared viral replication in wild-type versus Axl−/−, Mertk−/−, Axl−/−Mertk−/−, and Axl−/−Tyro3−/− mice in various organs. Pregnant and non-pregnant mice treated with interferon-α-receptor (IFNAR-blocking (MAR1-5A3 antibody and infected subcutaneously with ZIKV showed no reliance on TAMs for infection. In the absence of IFNAR-blocking antibody, adult female mice challenged intravaginally with ZIKV showed no difference in mucosal viral titers. Similarly, in young mice that were infected with ZIKV intracranially or intraperitoneally, ZIKV replication occurred in the absence of TAM receptors, and no differences in cell tropism were observed. These findings indicate that, in mice, TAM receptors are not required for ZIKV entry and infection. : TAM receptors have been implicated as entry receptors for the Zika virus. In this study, Hastings et al. used genetic knockout mouse models to demonstrate that they are not necessary for the infection of mice via multiple routes of viral challenge. These results suggest the existence of redundant entry receptors for ZIKV in mice. Keywords: viral entry, flavivirus, neurotropic virus, CNS, pregnancy, congenital infection

  8. A Functional Food Mixture “Protector” Reinforces the Protective Immune Parameters against Viral Flu Infection in Mice

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    Kenza A. Mansoor

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Viral influenza infection causes serious health issues especially when an outbreak occurs. Although influenza virus vaccines are available and each year manufactures modify the vaccine depending on the expected mutated strain, it is still far from satisfactory, mainly in young children and older adults. Therefore, a product that can support and shape the immune system to protect against viral flu infections is highly essential. Methods: A functional food water-soluble mixture of pomegranate, red grape, dates, olive fruit, figs, and ginger extracts, termed herein “Protector”, was prepared and tested in stimulating/modulating the production of specific cytokines, and hemagglutinin inhibition (HAI antibodies following viral flu vaccination in mice. Results: A single intraperitoneal or multiple oral administration for 1–7 days of “Protector” significantly increased the production of interferon (IFN-γ and interleukin (IL-12 in blood, spleen, and lungs of mice. When “Protector” was orally administered for one week following a single vaccine injection (primary immunization or for two weeks (one week apart following double vaccine injections (secondary immunization, mice significantly produced higher titers of HAI antibodies. This increase in HAI antibodies was associated with Pillow-inducing significant and different changes in vaccine-induced IFN-γ, IL-12, IL-6 and IL-22 following primary and secondary immunizations. Conclusions: “Protector” administration reinforces the protective immune parameters against viral flu infection. Therefore, after performing preclinical toxicology studies and ensuring its safety, “Protector” should be considered a potential product to be tested in clinical trials to conclude its efficacy in reducing the devastating effects of flu infection in humans and its outbreaks.

  9. Controversies surrounding Human Papilloma Virus infection, head & neck vs oral cancer, implications for prophylaxis and treatment

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    Campisi, G.; Giovannelli, L.

    2009-01-01

    Head & Neck Cancer (HNC) represents the sixth most common malignancy worldwide and it is historically linked to well-known behavioural risk factors, i.e., tobacco smoking and/or the alcohol consumption. Recently, substantial evidence has been mounting that Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection is playing an increasing important role in oral cancer. Because of the attention and clamor surrounding oral HPV infection and related cancers, as well as the use of HPV prophylactic vaccines, in this in...

  10. Oral mucosal lesions and immune status in HIV-infected Indian children.

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    Subramaniam, Priya; Kumar, Krishna

    2015-04-01

    Pediatric HIV is growing at an alarming rate in developing countries. Due to their compromised immune status, children infected with HIV are prone to a number of opportunistic infections. Oral manifestations are the first signs of the disease in many of them. To assess the oral mucosal status of Indian children with HIV, based on their CD4 cell counts. Two hundred and twenty one HIV infected children aged 6-18 years from various HIV centers, were divided into three groups, based on their CD4 cell counts; Group 1: ≥500, Group 2: 201-499 and Group 3: ≤200 cells. The children in each group were further considered as 'prior to antiretroviral treatment (ART)' and 'on ART'. Oral mucosal examination was done based on presumptive criteria given by Ramos-Gomez for diagnosis of oro-facial lesions commonly associated with HIV infection in children. Data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis. Angular cheilitis and pseudomembranous candidiasis were the frequently seen oral lesions. Children with CD4 cell count ≥500 had significantly fewer oral lesions each. A high percentage of HIV-infected children were affected with oral mucosal lesions. There was a significant association between immune status and frequency of oral lesions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Oropharyngeal Candidiasis in HIV Infection: Analysis of Impaired Mucosal Immune Response to Candida albicans in Mice Expressing the HIV-1 Transgene

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    Louis de Repentigny

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available IL-17-producing Th17 cells are of critical importance in host defense against oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC. Speculation about defective Th17 responses to oral C. albicans infection in the context of HIV infection prompted an investigation of innate and adaptive immune responses to Candida albicans in transgenic mice expressing the genome of HIV-1 in immune cells and displaying an AIDS-like disease. Defective IL-17 and IL-22-dependent mucosal responses to C. albicans were found to determine susceptibility to OPC in these transgenic mice. Innate phagocytes were quantitatively and functionally intact, and individually dispensable for control of OPC and to prevent systemic dissemination of Candida to deep organs. CD8+ T-cells recruited to the oral mucosa of the transgenic mice limited the proliferation of C. albicans in these conditions of CD4+ T-cell deficiency. Therefore, the immunopathogenesis of OPC in the context of HIV infection involves defective T-cell-mediated immunity, failure of crosstalk with innate mucosal immune effector mechanisms, and compensatory cell responses, which limit Candida infection to the oral mucosa and prevent systemic dissemination.

  12. Comparison of the prevalence of human papilloma virus infection in histopathologically confirmed premalignant oral lesions and healthy oral mucosa by brush smear detection.

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    Dalla Torre, Daniel; Burtscher, Doris; Edlinger, Michael; Sölder, Elisabeth; Widschwendter, Andreas; Rasse, Michael; Puelacher, Wolfgang

    2015-03-01

    The role of human papilloma virus (HPV) infections in oral carcinogenesis is an important topic of research in maxillofacial oncology. Nevertheless, the association between such infections in the oral cavity and the development of oral precancerous lesions remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between oral HPV infections and oral leukoplakia or erythroplakia. The case control study included 118 patients with manifest oral leukoplakia or erythroplakia, who underwent surgical biopsy, including a histopathologic grading of the lesion, and 100 control patients without any oral lesions. HPV detection was achieved with a noninvasive brush smear method (Digene Cervical Sampler, Hybrid Capture II-Test). Logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the associations. A significant association was found between high-risk oral HPV infection and the presence of oral premalignant lesions (P = .001). Among all other evaluated parameters, only smoking showed a significant association with the presence of oral lesions. Oral HPV infections may play a role in the pathogenesis of premalignant oral lesions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The oral cavity is not a primary source for implantable pacemaker or cardioverter defibrillator infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background To test the hypothesis that the oral cavity is a potential source for implantable pacemaker and cardioverter defibrillators infections, the bacterial diversity on explanted rhythm heart management devices was investigated and compared to the oral microbiome. Methods A metagenomic approach was used to analyze the bacterial diversity on the surfaces of non-infected and infected pacemakers. The DNA from surfaces swaps of 24 non-infected and 23 infected pacemaker were isolated and subjected to bacterial-specific DNA amplification, single strand conformation polymorphism- (SSCP) and sequencing analysis. Species-specific primer sets were used to analyze for any correlation between bacterial diversity on pacemakers and in the oral cavity. Results DNA of bacterial origin was detected in 21 cases on infected pacemakers and assigned to the bacterial phylotypes Staphylococcus epidermidis, Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus schleiferi and Stapyhlococcus. In 17 cases bacterial DNA was found on pacemakers with no clinical signs of infections. On the basis of the obtained sequence data, the phylotypes Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus and an uncultured bacterium were identified. Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis were the only bacteria detected in pacemeaker (n = 25) and oral samples (n = 11). Conclusions The frequency of the coincidental detection of bacteria on infected devices and in the oral cavity is low and the detected bacteria are highly abundant colonizers of non-oral human niches. The transmission of oral bacteria to the lead or device of implantable pacemaker or cardioverter defibrillators is unlikely relevant for the pathogenesis of pacemaker or cardioverter defibrillators infections. PMID:23575037

  14. Critical Role of Airway Macrophages in Modulating Disease Severity during Influenza Virus Infection of Mice

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    Tate, Michelle D.; Pickett, Danielle L.; van Rooijen, Nico; Brooks, Andrew G.; Reading, Patrick C.

    2010-01-01

    Airway macrophages provide a first line of host defense against a range of airborne pathogens, including influenza virus. In this study, we show that influenza viruses differ markedly in their abilities to infect murine macrophages in vitro and that infection of macrophages is nonproductive and no infectious virus is released. Virus strain BJx109 (H3N2) infected macrophages with high efficiency and was associated with mild disease following intranasal infection of mice. In contrast, virus strain PR8 (H1N1) was poor in its ability to infect macrophages and highly virulent for mice. Depletion of airway macrophages by clodronate-loaded liposomes led to the development of severe viral pneumonia in BJx109-infected mice but did not modulate disease severity in PR8-infected mice. The severe disease observed in macrophage-depleted mice infected with BJx109 was associated with exacerbated virus replication in the airways, leading to severe airway inflammation, pulmonary edema, and vascular leakage, indicative of lung injury. Thymic atrophy, lymphopenia, and dysregulated cytokine and chemokine production were additional systemic manifestations associated with severe disease. Thus, airway macrophages play a critical role in limiting lung injury and associated disease caused by BJx109. Furthermore, the inability of PR8 to infect airway macrophages may be a critical factor contributing to its virulence for mice. PMID:20504924

  15. Neurobehavioral and Cardiovascular Effects of Potassium Cyanide Administered Orally to Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Michael A; Ritchie, Glenn D; Henderson, Kim A; Knostman, Katherine A B; Roche, Brian M; Ma, Zhenxu J; Matthews, Claire M; Sabourin, Carol L; Wakayama, Edward J; Sabourin, Patrick J

    2016-09-01

    The Food and Drug Administration Animal Rule requires evaluation of cardiovascular and central nervous system (CNS) effects of new therapeutics. To characterize an adult and juvenile mouse model, neurobehavioral and cardiovascular effects and pathology of a single sublethal but toxic, 8 mg/kg, oral dose of potassium cyanide (KCN) for up to 41 days postdosing were investigated. This study describes the short- and long-term sensory, motor, cognitive, and behavioral changes associated with oral dosing of a sublethal but toxic dose of KCN utilizing functional observation battery and Tier II CNS testing in adult and juvenile mice of both sexes. Selected tissues (histopathology) were evaluated for changes associated with KCN exposure with special attention to brain regions. Telemetry (adult mice only) was used to evaluate cardiovascular and temperature changes. Neurobehavioral capacity, sensorimotor responsivity or spontaneous locomotor activity, and rectal temperature were significantly reduced in adult and juvenile mice at 30 minutes post-8 mg/kg KCN dose. Immediate effects of cyanide included bradycardia, adverse electrocardiogram arrhythmic events, hypotension, and hypothermia with recovery by approximately 1 hour for blood pressure and heart rate effects and by 2 hours for body temperature. Lesions consistent with hypoxia, such as mild acute tubular necrosis in the kidneys corticomedullary junction, were the only histopathological findings and occurred at a very low incidence. The mouse KCN intoxication model indicates rapid and completely reversible effects in adult and juvenile mice following a single oral 8 mg/kg dose. Neurobehavioral and cardiovascular measurements can be used in this animal model as a trigger for treatment. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. A DNA Vaccine Protects Human Immune Cells against Zika Virus Infection in Humanized Mice

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    Guohua Yi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A DNA vaccine encoding prM and E protein has been shown to induce protection against Zika virus (ZIKV infection in mice and monkeys. However, its effectiveness in humans remains undefined. Moreover, identification of which immune cell types are specifically infected in humans is unclear. We show that human myeloid cells and B cells are primary targets of ZIKV in humanized mice. We also show that a DNA vaccine encoding full length prM and E protein protects humanized mice from ZIKV infection. Following administration of the DNA vaccine, humanized DRAG mice developed antibodies targeting ZIKV as measured by ELISA and neutralization assays. Moreover, following ZIKV challenge, vaccinated animals presented virtually no detectable virus in human cells and in serum, whereas unvaccinated animals displayed robust infection, as measured by qRT-PCR. Our results utilizing humanized mice show potential efficacy for a targeted DNA vaccine against ZIKV in humans.

  17. Oral manifestation of HIV/AIDS infections in paediatric Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    43.8%) variant was most frequent. The mean CD4 counts were 1138 cells/mm3, 913 cells/mm3 and 629 cells/mm3 for those without oral lesion, with single lesion and multiple oral lesions respectively. These differences were not statistically ...

  18. Oral Human Papillomavirus Detection in Older Adults Who Have Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatahzadeh, Mahnaz; Schlecht, Nicolas F.; Chen, Zigui; Bottalico, Danielle; McKinney, Sharod; Ostoloza, Janae; Dunne, Anne; Burk, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate reproducibility of oral rinse self-collection for HPV detection and investigate associations between oral HPV, oral lesions, immune and sociodemographic factors, we performed a cross-sectional study of older adults with HIV infection. Study Design We collected oral rinse samples from 52 subjects at two different times of day followed by an oral examination and interview. We identified HPV using PCR platforms optimized for detection of mucosal and cutaneous types. Results Eighty seven percent of individuals had oral HPV, of which 23% had oncogenic alpha, 40% had non-oncogenic alpha, and 46% had beta or gamma HPV. Paired oral specimens were concordant in all parameters tested. Significant associations observed for oral HPV with increased HIV viral load, hepatitis-C seropositivity, history of sexually transmitted diseases and lifetime number of sexual partners. Conclusions Oral cavity may be a reservoir of subclinical HPV in older adults who have HIV infection. Understanding natural history, transmission and potential implications of oral HPV warrants further investigations. PMID:23375488

  19. Prevalence and correlates of oral human papillomavirus infection among healthy males and females in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Brian J; Walter, Leora; Gilman, Robert H; Cabrerra, Lilia; Gravitt, Patti E; Marks, Morgan A

    2016-03-01

    The incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV) associated head and neck cancers (HNCs) have been increasing in Peru. However, the burden of oral HPV infection in Peru has not been assessed. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to estimate the prevalence and correlates of oral HPV infection in a population-based sample from males and females from Lima, Peru. Between January 2010 and June 2011, a population-based sample of 1099 individuals between the ages of 10 and 85 from a low-income neighbourhood in Lima, Peru was identified through random household sampling. Information on demographic, sexual behaviours, reproductive factors and oral hygiene were collected using interviewer-administered questionnaires. Oral rinse specimens were collected from each participant, and these specimens were genotyped using the Roche Linear Array assay. ORs were used to assess differences in the prevalence of any oral HPV and any high-risk oral HPV infection by demographic factors, sexual practices and oral hygiene among individuals 15+ years of age. The prevalence of any HPV and any high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) was 6.8% and 2.0%, respectively. The three most common types were HPV 55 (3.4%), HPV 6 (1.5%) and HPV 16 (1.1%). Male sex (aOR, 2.21; 95% CI 1.22 to 4.03) was associated with any HPV infection after adjustment. The prevalence of oral HPV in this study was similar to estimates observed in the USA. Higher prevalence of oral infections in males was consistent with a male predominance of HPV-associated HNCs and may signal a sex-specific aetiology in the natural history of infection. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. Effect of orally administered dipterinyl calcium pentahydrate on oral glucose tolerance in diet-induced obese mice

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    Fuchs D

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Svetlana E Nikoulina1, Dietmar Fuchs2, Phillip Moheno11SanRx Pharmaceuticals, Inc, La Jolla, CA, USA; 2Division of Biological Chemistry, Biocenter, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck, AustriaAbstract: Calcium pterins have been shown to be significant immunotherapeutic agents in models of breast cancer, hepatitis B, and tuberculosis (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin mycobacteria. These compunds modulate the immuno-enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO and the blood levels of several identified inflammatory cytokines. Recent research into the pathology of diabetes implicates inflammatory factors in the progression of the disease, leading the authors to study its possible control by one of the calcium pterins, dipterinyl calcium pentahydrate (DCP.The investigators tested DCP as a novel therapeutic for type 2 diabetes. Female C57BL/6 J mice with diet-induced obesity were fed a high-fat diet and were administered DCP in 0.4% carboxymethylcellulose for 21 days. Blood glucose was followed during the dosing period, and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT was carried out on day 21. Measurements of plasma indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase metabolites (tryptophan and kynurenine and certain cytokines and chemokines were also taken. DCP 7 mg/kg/day reduced OGTT area under the curve (OGTT/AUC by 50% (P < 0.05. A significant multivariate regression (P = 0.013; R2 = 0.571 of OGTT/AUC was derived from DCP dosage and plasma Trp. Elevated plasma Trp concentration, likely from heterogeneity in diet and/or indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity, was found to correlate with higher OGTT/AUC diabetic measures, possibly via inhibition of histamine degradation. In conclusion, an optimum dose of DCP 7 mg/kg/day significantly improved the OGTT diabetic state in these female diet-induced obese mice.Keywords: diabetes, immunotherapy, oral glucose tolerance test, tryptophan, kynurenine

  1. Oral HPV Infection and Sexuality: A Cross-Sectional Study in Women

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    Jessica Bloome

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Human Papillomavirus (HPV is the main risk factor for cervical cancers and is associated with close to 36% of oropharyngeal cancers. There is increasing evidence that oral HPV transmission is related to sexual behavior but to our knowledge studies that involve women who have sex with women have not been performed. We examined the prevalence of oral HPV according to sexual behavior among a population-based sample of 118 women and have made some inferences of possible predictors of oral HPV infection. Women were categorized as heterosexual (history of vaginal sex and/or oral sex with males only, n = 75, bisexual (history of vaginal sex and oral sex with females, n = 32 and other (no history of vaginal sex but oral sex with females [homosexuals], virgins and women with incomplete sexual exposure data, n = 11 The prevalence of oral HPV infection was 12/118 (10.2% for the overall study population and was not significantly different between heterosexual and bisexual women (10.7% (8/75 vs. 12.5% (4/32, p = 0.784. There was no oral HPV detected among homosexual women, virgins or among women where sexual exposure was unknown. Never smokers were more likely to be oral HPV+ compared to former smokers (Adjusted Odds Ratio (Adj OR = 0.1, 95% CI, 0.0–1.1 and there was no difference in risk between never smokers and current smokers (Adj OR = 0.7, 95% CI, 0.1–4.6. Twenty-five percent (3/12 of oral HPV+ women had a history of HPV and/or genital warts compared to 9% (10/106 of oral HPV-women (p = 0.104. For the women with a history of vaginal sex (n = 110, oral HPV status was statistically significantly different according to oral sex exposure (p = 0.039. A higher proportion of oral HPV-positive women reported that they had no history of oral sex exposure compared to oral HPV-negative women (4/12, 33% vs. 7/98, 8%. The prevalence of cervical HPV infection did not vary between heterosexuals and bisexuals (35.7% (25/70 vs. 35.5% (11/31, p-value 0.411 and for

  2. Naïve B cells reduce fungal dissemination in Cryptococcus neoformans infected Rag1-/- mice.

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    Dufaud, Chad; Rivera, Johanna; Rohatgi, Soma; Pirofski, Liise-Anne

    2018-01-01

    IgM and B-1 cell deficient mice exhibit early C. neoformans dissemination from lungs to brain, but a definitive role for B cells in conferring resistance to C. neoformans dissemination has not been established. To address this question, we developed an intranasal (i.n.) C. neoformans infection model in B and T cell deficient Rag1 -/- mice and found they also exhibit earlier fungal dissemination and higher brain CFU than wild-type C57Bl/6 (wild-type) mice. To probe the effect of B cells on fungal dissemination, Rag1 -/- mice were given splenic (intravenously) or peritoneal (intraperitoneally) B cells from wild-type mice and infected i.n. with C. neoformans 7 d later. Mice that received B cells had lung histopathology resembling wild type mice 14 d post-infection, and B-1, not B-2 or T cells in their lungs, and serum and lung IgM and IgG 21 d post-infection. Lung CFU were comparable in wild-type, Rag1 -/-, and Rag1 -/- mice that received B cells 21 d post-infection, but brain CFU were significantly lower in mice that received B cells than Rag1 -/- mice that did not. To determine if natural antibody can promote immunity in our model, we measured alveolar macrophage phagocytosis of C. neoformans in Rag1 -/- mice treated with naive wild-type IgM-sufficient or sIgM -/- IgM-deficient sera before infection. Compared to IgM-deficient sera, IgM-sufficient sera significantly increased phagocytosis. Our data establish B cells are able to reduce early C. neoformans dissemination in mice and suggest natural IgM may be a key mediator of early antifungal immunity in the lungs.

  3. Prevalence of local immune response against oral infection in a Drosophila/Pseudomonas infection model.

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    Peter Liehl

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Pathogens have developed multiple strategies that allow them to exploit host resources and resist the immune response. To study how Drosophila flies deal with infectious diseases in a natural context, we investigated the interactions between Drosophila and a newly identified entomopathogen, Pseudomonas entomophila. Flies orally infected with P. entomophila rapidly succumb despite the induction of both local and systemic immune responses, indicating that this bacterium has developed specific strategies to escape the fly immune response. Using a combined genetic approach on both host and pathogen, we showed that P. entomophila virulence is multi-factorial with a clear differentiation between factors that trigger the immune response and those that promote pathogenicity. We demonstrate that AprA, an abundant secreted metalloprotease produced by P. entomophila, is an important virulence factor. Inactivation of aprA attenuated both the capacity to persist in the host and pathogenicity. Interestingly, aprA mutants were able to survive to wild-type levels in immune-deficient Relish flies, indicating that the protease plays an important role in protection against the Drosophila immune response. Our study also reveals that the major contribution to the fly defense against P. entomophila is provided by the local, rather than the systemic immune response. More precisely, our data points to an important role for the antimicrobial peptide Diptericin against orally infectious Gram-negative bacteria, emphasizing the critical role of local antimicrobial peptide expression against food-borne pathogens.

  4. Differential pulmonic NK and NKT cell responses in Schistosoma japonicum-infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hefei; Qin, Wenjuan; Yang, Quan; Xie, Hongyan; Qu, Jiale; Wang, Mei; Chen, Daixiong; Wang, Fang; Dong, Nuo; Chen, Longhua; Huang, Jun

    2017-02-01

    Natural killer cells (NK cells) and natural killer T cells (NKT cells) play a role in anti-infection, anti-tumor, transplantation immunity, and autoimmune regulation. However, the role of NK and NKT cells during Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) infection has not been widely reported, especially regarding lung infections. The aim of this study was to research the NK and NKT cell response to S. japonicum infection in the lungs of mice. Using immunofluorescent histological analysis, NK and NKT cells were found near pulmonary granulomas. Moreover, flow cytometry revealed that the percentage and number of pulmonic NK cells in S. japonicum-infected mice were significantly increased (P cell number of NKT cells were decreased compared to those of normal mice (P NKT cells was increased after infection (P NKT cells (P cells (P NKT cells significantly increased (P NKT cells (P NKT cell activation during S. japonicum infection.

  5. Cervical Lymph Nodes as a Selective Niche for Brucella during Oral Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bargen, Kristine; Gagnaire, Aurélie; Arce-Gorvel, Vilma; de Bovis, Béatrice; Baudimont, Fannie; Chasson, Lionel; Bosilkovski, Mile; Papadopoulos, Alexia; Martirosyan, Anna; Henri, Sandrine; Mège, Jean-Louis; Malissen, Bernard; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Cervical lymph nodes (CLN) are the first lymph nodes encountered by material taking the oral route. To study their role in orally acquired infections, we analyzed 307 patients of up to 14 years treated in the university clinic of Skopje, Macedonia, for brucellosis, a zoonotic bacterial disease frequently acquired by ingestion of contaminated dairy products. From these children, 36% had lymphadenopathy. Among orally infected children, lymphadenopathy with CLN being the only lymph nodes affected was significantly more frequent as compared to those infected by contact with animals (83% vs. 63%), suggesting a possible involvement of CLN during orally acquired human brucellosis. Using a murine model where bacteria are delivered into the oral cavity, we show that Brucella quickly and selectively colonize the CLN where they proliferate and persist over long periods of time for up to 50 days post-infection. A similar efficient though less specific drainage to CLN was found for Brucella, Salmonella typhimurium and fluorescent microspheres delivered by gavage, a pathway likely representing a mixed infection mode of intragastric and oral infection, suggesting a central pathway of drained material. Microspheres as well as bacteria drained to CLN predominately reside in cells expressing CD68 and no or low levels of CD11c. Even though no systemic response could be detected, Brucella induced a locally restricted inflammatory reaction with increased expression levels of interferon γ, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-12, granzyme B and a delayed induction of Nos2. Inflammation led to pronounced lymphadenopathy, infiltration of macrophages/monocytes expressing high levels of major histocompatibility complex II and to formation of epitheloid granulomas. Together, these results highlight the role of CLN in oral infections as both, an initial and efficient trap for bacterial invaders and as possible reservoir for chronic pathogens. They likewise cast a new light on the significance of oral

  6. Cyclobenzaprine Raises ROS Levels in Leishmania infantum and Reduces Parasite Burden in Infected Mice.

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    Edézio Ferreira Cunha-Júnior

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The leishmanicidal action of tricyclic antidepressants has been studied and evidences have pointed that their action is linked to inhibition of trypanothione reductase, a key enzyme in the redox metabolism of pathogenic trypanosomes. Cyclobenzaprine (CBP is a tricyclic structurally related to the antidepressant amitriptyline, differing only by the presence of a double bond in the central ring. This paper describes the effect of CBP in experimental visceral leishmaniasis, its inhibitory effect in trypanothione reductase and the potential immunomodulatory activity.In vitro antileishmanial activity was determined in promastigotes and in L. infantum-infected macrophages. For in vivo studies, L. infantum-infected BALB/c mice were treated with CBP by oral gavage for five days and the parasite load was estimated. Trypanothione reductase activity was assessed in the soluble fraction of promastigotes of L. infantum. For evaluation of cytokines, L. infantum-infected macrophages were co-cultured with BALB/c splenocytes and treated with CBP for 48 h. The supernatant was analyzed for IL-6, IL-10, MCP-1, IFN-γ and TNF-α. CBP demonstrated an IC50 of 14.5±1.1μM and an IC90 of 74.5±1.2 μM in promastigotes and an IC50 of 12.6±1.05 μM and an IC90 of 28.7±1.3 μM in intracellular amastigotes. CBP also reduced the parasite load in L. infantum-infected mice by 40.4±10.3% and 66.7±10.5% in spleen at 24.64 and 49.28 mg/kg, respectively and by 85.6±5.0 and 89.3±4.8% in liver at 24.64 and 49.28mg/kg, after a short-term treatment. CBP inhibited the trypanothione reductase activity with a Ki of 86 ± 7.7 μM and increased the ROS production in promastigotes. CBP inhibited in 53% the production of IL-6 in infected macrophages co-culture.To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first report of the in vivo antileishmanial activity of the FDA-approved drug CBP. Modulation of immune response and induction of oxidative stress in parasite seem to contribute to

  7. Taxonomy, virulence and epidemiology of black-pigmented Bacteroides species in relation to oral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Steenbergen, T J; van Winkelhoff, A J; van der Velden, U; de Graaff, J

    1989-01-01

    Black-pigmented Bacteroides species are recognized as suspected pathogens of oral infections. Developments in the taxonomy of this group include description of a new asaccharolytic species, Bacteroides salivosus, and proposal for the reclassification of the asaccharolytic species into a separate genus, Porphyromonas. Studies on the pathogenicity and virulence of black-pigmented Bacteroides species have identified Bacteroides gingivalis as the most virulent species. B. gingivalis and Bacteroides intermedius have been associated with periodontal diseases; Bacteroides endodontalis is isolated specifically from infections in the oral cavity, and other black-pigmented Bacteroides species are recovered from oral mucous sites. DNA restriction endonuclease analysis was adapted for typing of B. gingivalis and B. intermedius.

  8. Detection of toxoplasma gondii antigens in sera from experimentally infected mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shojaee, S.; Keshavarz, H.; Rezaian, M.; Mohebali, M.

    2007-01-01

    Detection of Toxoplasma antigen in serum of mice by Immunoblotting. strain. IgG isolated from rabbits that were immunized with T. gondii Immunoblotting was performed to detect T. gondii antigens in sera of mice. Serum samples from mice experimentally infected with T. gondii RH strain. The value of Immunoblotting in diagnosis of toxoplasmosis in acute stage of infection. The antigen bands detected in serum sample of mice were experimentally infected with T. gondii tachyzoite in immunoblotting. Six bands demonstrated on seventh post infection day six bands were identified. Similarly on sixth day four bands, on day five three bands and on fourth post infection day two bands were identified. No band was detected in control group sera. Immunoblotting is a sensitive method for diagnosis of acute stage of toxoplasmosis. (author)

  9. Maternal chronic oral infection with periodontitis and pericoronitis as a possible risk factor for preeclampsia in Egyptian pregnant women (microbiological and serological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lobna A. Aly

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: There was a relationship between chronic oral infection and preeclampsia, so treatment of oral infection during pregnancy may represent a novel approach and preventive strategy that reduce oral bacterial load which would decrease the incidence of preeclampsia.

  10. Lymphocyte proliferation in Peyer's patches of Giardia muris-infected mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, D R

    1990-01-01

    Gastrointestinal immune events in giardiasis are important in controlling infection. In this study, Peyer's patch lymphocytes from mice infected with Giardia muris developed specific, proliferative responses to G. muris antigen. This proliferation correlated with clearance of infection. Further understanding of the gut immune response will be helpful in developing immunoprophylactic strategies in the control of giardiasis.

  11. Evidence supporting pre-radiation elimination of oral foci of infection in head and neck cancer patients to prevent oral sequelae. A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuurhuis, Jennifer M; Stokman, Monique A; Witjes, Max J H; Dijkstra, Pieter U; Vissink, Arjan; Spijkervet, Frederik K L

    2015-03-01

    Pre-radiation dental screening of head-neck cancer patients aims to identify and eliminate oral foci of infection to prevent post-radiation oral problems. The evidence for the efficacy of dental screening is unclear. In this systematic review, we analyzed available evidence on the efficacy of pre-radiation elimination of oral foci of infection in preventing oral sequelae. A search was conducted (MEDLINE/EMBASE) for papers published up to May 2014. Papers on head-neck cancer patients subjected to pre-radiation dental screening, (chemo)radiation and oral follow-up were included. Of the 1770 identified papers, 20 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria of which 17 were retrospective. A great heterogeneity in patient groups, dental screening techniques, definitions of oral foci of infection and techniques for eliminating foci was found. Most papers lacked essential details on how dental screening was performed and a clear definition of an oral focus of infection. The evidence for efficacy of elimination of oral foci of infection to prevent post-radiotherapy oral sequelae was inconclusive. Consequently, the efficacy of pre-radiation elimination of oral foci of infection remains unclear. No conclusions can be drawn about a definition of an oral focus of infection and whether pre-radiation elimination of these foci should be mandatory. We therefore suggest prospective studies with well-defined criteria for oral foci of infection, a clear description of which foci were eliminated and how, a detailed description of pre-radiation dental screening, clearly described patient and tumor characteristics, and a detailed dental history and dental status. Subsequently, oral problems that occur post-radiation should be systematically recorded. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Reduced spatial learning in mice infected with the nematode, Heligmosomoides polygyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavaliers, M; Colwell, D D

    1995-06-01

    Parasite modification of host behaviour influences a number of critical responses, but little is known about the effects on host spatial abilities. This study examined the effects of infection with the intestinal trichostrongylid nematode, Heligmosomoides polygyrus, on spatial water maze learning by male laboratory mice, Mus musculus. In this task individual mice had to learn the spatial location of a submerged hidden platform using extramaze visual cues. Determinations of spatial performance were made on day 19 post-infection with mice that had been administered either 50 or 200 infective larvae of H. polygyrus. The infected mice displayed over 1 day of testing (6 blocks of 4 trials) significantly poorer acquisition and retention of the water maze task than either sham-infected or control mice, with mice that had received 200 infective larvae displaying significantly poorer spatial performance than individuals receiving 50 larvae. The decrease in spatial learning occurred in the absence of either any symptoms of illness and malaise, or any evident motor, visual and motivational impairments. It is suggested that in this single host system the parasitic infection-induced decrease in spatial learning arises as a side-effect of the host's immunological and neuromodulatory responses and represents a fitness cost of response to infection.

  13. Methanogenic Archaea and oral infections – ways to unravel the black box

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Peter Horz

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Archaea, organisms that make up the third domain of cellular life are members of the human oral microflora. They are strikingly less diverse than oral bacteria and appear to be relatively rare with respect to their numerical abundance. Since they have been exclusively found in association with oral infections such as periodontitis and apical periodontitis and given their unique physiology and energy metabolism, it is highly plausible that they are more than just secondary colonizers of infected areas, but instead are actively involved in the overall poly-microbial infection process. Conversely, it is a highly challenging task to clearly demonstrate their possible active participation – mostly due to the difficulty to grow them in routine microbiology laboratories. This current review points out the importance for understanding the medical impact of methanogens and aims at devising strategies for elucidating the true function of archaea in the oral ecosystem.

  14. ORAL MANIFESTATIONS OF AIDS AND HIV INFECTION (HIVI)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and deciding to take a chance while waiting for a vaccine." Comments. With a situation as .... States of America (USA) with other rare infections in homosexu- als. The question arose .... papillomovirus (HPV) infection. The strongest evidence ...

  15. Oral histoplasmosis associated with candidiasis in HIV-infected patients: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittayananta, W; Kumplanont, P; Srisintorn, S; Akkayanont, P; Chungpanich, S; Teanpaisan, R; Chareonwatanan, M; Nuntanaranont, T

    1997-04-26

    Oral histoplasmosis, a rare condition, is reported in two HIV-infected patients. The lesions showed different characteristics. One was an ulcerative lesion presenting as the only manifestation of the disease. The other was nodular, with disseminated histoplasmosis. In both cases infection with Candida was also noted within the lesions.

  16. Oral ulcer as primary manifestation of HIV infection in an 80-year-old man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludvigsen, Lene Ugilt Pagter; Søgaard, Ole Schmeltz

    2014-01-01

    Oral lesions such as candidiasis, Kaposi's sarcoma, hairy leukoplakia, herpes simplex infection, and ulcerative periodontitis are associated with HIV infection and may be the primary presentation in persons with undiagnosed HIV. We report a clinical case in which an 80-year-old man presented...

  17. Curcumin-arteether combination therapy of Plasmodium berghei-infected mice prevents recrudescence through immunomodulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palakkod G Vathsala

    Full Text Available Earlier studies in this laboratory have shown the potential of artemisinin-curcumin combination therapy in experimental malaria. In a parasite recrudescence model in mice infected with Plasmodium berghei (ANKA, a single dose of alpha,beta-arteether (ART with three oral doses of curcumin prevented recrudescence, providing almost 95% protection. The parasites were completely cleared in blood with ART-alone (AE or ART+curcumin (AC treatments in the short-term, although the clearance was faster in the latter case involving increased ROS generation. But, parasites in liver and spleen were not cleared in AE or AC treatments, perhaps, serving as a reservoir for recrudescence. Parasitemia in blood reached up to 60% in AE-treated mice during the recrudescence phase, leading to death of animals. A transient increase of up to 2-3% parasitemia was observed in AC-treatment, leading to protection and reversal of splenomegaly. A striking increase in spleen mRNA levels for TLR2, IL-10 and IgG-subclass antibodies but a decrease in those for INFγ and IL-12 was observed in AC-treatment. There was a striking increase in IL-10 and IgG subclass antibody levels but a decrease in INFγ levels in sera leading to protection against recrudescence. AC-treatment failed to protect against recrudescence in TLR2(-/- and IL-10(-/- animals. IL-10 injection to AE-treated wild type mice and AC-treated TLR2(-/- mice was able to prolong survival. Blood from the recrudescence phase in AE-treatment, but not from AC-treatment, was able to reinfect and kill naïve animals. Sera from the recrudescence phase of AC-treated animals reacted with several parasite proteins compared to that from AE-treated animals. It is proposed that activation of TLR2-mediated innate immune response leading to enhanced IL-10 production and generation of anti-parasite antibodies contribute to protective immunity in AC-treated mice. These results indicate a potential for curcumin-based combination therapy to

  18. microbiological profile of oral infections in diabetic patients and non

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    aerobic bacteria were significantly isolated from cases of dental caries. Conclusion: The oral .... study, it was reported that periodontal pathogens were different in diabetic patients and non-diabetic controls as well as in aggressive and chronic.

  19. Regulation of iron metabolism during Neisseria meningitidis infection in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Letendre, E.D.

    1984-01-01

    Bacterial invasion of vertebrates triggers a marked reduction in the levels of iron associated with the plasma transferrin (Tf) pool. This hypoferremic response has been regarded as a host attempt to withhold essential iron from the invading pathogen. The exact nature of the mechanisms involved remains obscure. The kinetics of iron processing by the RE system were studied by labeling the RE compartments with /sup 59/Fe-labeled denatured red blood cells. Uptake and redistribution of the label indicated the RE-processed iron was not returned to the plasma Tf pool during the hypoferremia. Fractionation of hepatic cellular compartments showed that this impaired release of iron resulted from a preferential incorporation of home-derived iron into the intracellular ferritin pool and this produces the hypoferremia. The role of ceruloplasmin (ferroxidase I,EC.1.16.3.1) (Cp) in iron metabolism during meningococcal infection was investigated. Plasma Cp ferroxidase activity was found to increase greatly in mice during the convalescence phase.

  20. Adaptation and possible attenuation of Theileria parva-infected cells grown in irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irvin, A.D.; Brown, C.G.D.; Stagg, D.A.; Kanhai, G.K.; Kimber, C.D.; Radley, D.E.

    1976-01-01

    Theileria parva-infected bovine lymphoid cells were taken from 8 cattle immediately after death from East Coast fever (ECF). Cells were inoculated into groups of irradiated Swiss and athymic nude mice. The irradiated mice were exposed to 800 rad doses from a 60 Co source. Cells became established in one group of Swiss mice and 2 groups of athymic mice. Development of cells in mice only occurred if cells concurrently established in culture; when establishment in culture was delayed, cells failed to develop in mice. Cells from one of the isolates in athymic mice were passaged 6 times through further mice. On inoculation of these mouse-passaged cells into cattle, the animals underwent mild reactions and subsequently resisted a lethal ECF challenge. The possibility of vaccinating cattle aginst ECF by means of mouse passaged cells merits further study. (author)

  1. Chandipura Virus infection in mice: the role of toll like receptor 4 in pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anukumar Balakrishnan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The susceptibility of mice and humans to Chandipura virus infection is age-dependent. Upon experimental infection, mice secrete significant amounts of proinflammatory cytokines. Similarly, children who recover from natural infection with the virus show significant amounts of TNF-α production, suggesting that innate immunity plays a major role in the response to Chandipura virus. Toll-like receptors (TLR are key host molecules involved in innate immune responses in infections. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the role of TLR in the response to Chandipura virus infection. Methods The mouse monocyte-macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7, and C3H/HeJ mice were used as models. Micro array techniques were used to identify the type of TLR involved in the response to infection. The results were validated by examining TLR expression using flow cytometry and by measuring the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide (NO in the culture supernatants using bead assays and the Griess method, respectively. The pathogenic role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 was studied in a TLR4 mutant strain of mice -C3H/HeJ and the results compared with those from wild-type mice- C3H/CaJ. The pathogenic effects of NO were studied by treating experimentally infected mice with the NO inhibitor, aminoguanidine (AG. Results The micro array results showed that TLR4 was regulated after Chandipura virus infection. At high multiplicities of infection (10 MOI, RAW cells up- regulated cell surface expression of TLR4 and secreted significant amounts of TNF-α, MCP-1, IL-10 and IL-12 and NO. The survival rate of C3H/HeJ mice was higher than those of wild-type C3H/CaJ mice. The survived C3H/HeJ mice secreted significant quantity of MCP-1 and IFN-γ cytokines and cleared virus from brain. Similarly, the survival rate of AG-treated mice was higher than those of the untreated controls. Conclusions Chandipura virus regulates TLR4, which leads to the

  2. Revisiting the association between candidal infection and carcinoma, particularly oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Mohd Bakri

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tobacco and alcohol are risk factors associated with cancer of the upper aerodigestive tract, but increasingly the role of infection and chronic inflammation is recognized as being significant in cancer development. Bacteria, particularly Helicobacter pylori, and viruses such as members of the human papilloma virus family and hepatitis B and C are strongly implicated as etiological factors in certain cancers. There is less evidence for an association between fungi and cancer, although it has been recognized for many years that white patches on the oral mucosa, which are infected with Candida, have a greater likelihood of undergoing malignant transformation than those that are not infected. Objective: This article reviews the association between the development of oral squamous cell carcinoma in potentially malignant oral lesions with chronic candidal infection and describes mechanisms that may be involved in Candida-associated malignant transformation.

  3. Revisiting the association between candidal infection and carcinoma, particularly oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Bakri, Marina; Mohd Hussaini, Haizal; Rachel Holmes, Ann; David Cannon, Richard; Mary Rich, Alison

    2010-12-21

    Tobacco and alcohol are risk factors associated with cancer of the upper aerodigestive tract, but increasingly the role of infection and chronic inflammation is recognized as being significant in cancer development. Bacteria, particularly Helicobacter pylori, and viruses such as members of the human papilloma virus family and hepatitis B and C are strongly implicated as etiological factors in certain cancers. There is less evidence for an association between fungi and cancer, although it has been recognized for many years that white patches on the oral mucosa, which are infected with Candida, have a greater likelihood of undergoing malignant transformation than those that are not infected. This article reviews the association between the development of oral squamous cell carcinoma in potentially malignant oral lesions with chronic candidal infection and describes mechanisms that may be involved in Candida-associated malignant transformation.

  4. Developmental toxicity of orally administered sildenafil citrate (Viagra) in SWR/J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Tarboush, Faisal Mohamed; Abdel-Samad, Mohamed Fathy; Al-Meteri, Mokhlid Hamed

    2011-04-01

    Normal adult inbred SWR/J mice were used to investigate the teratogenic and other possible toxic effects of various dose levels of sildenafil citrate (Viagra) on fetuses. Multiple dose levels of 6.5, 13.0, 19.5, 26.0, 32.5 or 40.0 mg of sildenafil citrate/kg body weight (which correspond to the multiples of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6 of human 50 mg Viagra, respectively) were orally administered into pregnant mice on days 7-9, 10-12 or 13-15 of gestation. On day 17 of pregnancy, all fetuses were removed and examined for toxic phenomena (embryo-fetal toxicity) and for external, internal and skeletal malformations. A total of 285 pregnant mice were used in the present study. None of the dams treated with sildenafil citrate at any of the oral dose levels used in the present study died during the experimental period and all dams treated with the drug failed to reveal overt signs of maternal toxicity. Moreover, the results of the present study clearly demonstrate that none of the multiple oral dose levels of the drug at any time interval used has induced any external, internal or skeletal malformations in the fetuses obtained from treated females. However, the dose level of 40 mg/kg body weight of sildenafil citrate has a growth suppressing effect on alive fetuses when it was administered at all the time intervals used in the present study. Furthermore, the dose levels 26.0, 32.5 and 40 mg/kg of the drug have embryo-fetal toxicity when the drug is applied on days 13-15 of gestation. The possible mechanisms involved in the embryo-fetal toxicity and fetal growth suppressing effects of sildenafil citrate were discussed. The results of this study have important implications for the widespread use of this drug.

  5. HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis for women and infants prevents vaginal and oral HIV transmission in a preclinical model of HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovarova, Martina; Shanmugasundaram, Uma; Baker, Caroline E; Spagnuolo, Rae Ann; De, Chandrav; Nixon, Christopher C; Wahl, Angela; Garcia, J Victor

    2016-11-01

    Approximately 1.5 million HIV-positive women become pregnant annually. Without treatment, up to 45% will transmit HIV to their infants, primarily through breastfeeding. These numbers highlight that HIV acquisition is a major health concern for women and children globally. They also emphasize the urgent need for novel approaches to prevent HIV acquisition that are safe, effective and convenient to use by women and children in places where they are most needed. 4'-Ethynyl-2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine, a potent NRTI with low cytotoxicity, was administered orally to NOD/SCID/γc -/- mice and to bone marrow/liver/thymus (BLT) humanized mice, a preclinical model of HIV infection. HIV inhibitory activity in serum, cervicovaginal secretions and saliva was evaluated 4 h after administration. 4'-Ethynyl-2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine's ability to prevent vaginal and oral HIV transmission was evaluated using highly relevant transmitted/founder viruses in BLT mice. Strong HIV inhibitory activity in serum, cervicovaginal secretions and saliva obtained from animals after a single oral dose of 4'-ethynyl-2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine (10 mg/kg) demonstrated efficient drug penetration into relevant mucosal sites. A single daily oral dose of 4'-ethynyl-2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine resulted in efficient prevention of vaginal and oral HIV transmission after multiple high-dose exposures to transmitted/founder viruses in BLT humanized mice. Our data demonstrated that 4'-ethynyl-2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine efficiently prevents both vaginal and oral HIV transmission. Together with 4'-ethynyl-2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine's relatively low toxicity and high potency against drug-resistant HIV strains, these data support further clinical development of 4'-ethynyl-2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine as a potential pre-exposure prophylaxis agent to prevent HIV transmission in women and their infants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial

  6. Pretreatment of Mice with Oligonucleotide prop5 Protects Them from Influenza Virus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Li

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus is a successful parasite and requires host factors to complete its life cycle. Prop5 is an antisense oligonucleotide, targeting programmed cell death protein 5 (PDCD5. In this study, we tested the antiviral activity of prop5 against mouse-adapted A/FM/1/47 strain of influenza A virus in a mouse model. Prop5 intranasally administered the mice at dosages of 10 and 20 mg/kg/d at 24 h and 30 min before infection, provided 80% and 100% survival rates and prolonged mean survival days in comparison with influenza virus-infected mice (both p < 0.01. Moreover, viral titres in mice pretreated with prop5, at dose of 10 and 20 mg/kg/d, had declined significantly on day two, four, and six post-infection compared with the yields in infected mice (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01; lung index in mice pretreated with prop5 (20 mg/kg/d had been inhibited on day six post-infection (p < 0.05. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry showed that prop5 could down-regulate the PDCD5 protein expression levels in lung tissues of infected mice. These data indicate that antisense oligonucleotide prop5 is a promising drug for prophylaxis and control influenza virus infections and provides an insight into the host-pathogen interaction.

  7. Atypical oral presentation of herpes simplex virus infection in a patient after orthotopic liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, E M; Karp, D L; Wu, T C; Corio, R L

    1994-01-01

    An atypical oral presentation of herpes simplex virus infection in a 49-year-old woman after orthotopic liver transplantation is reported. Clinically, the differential diagnosis included chronic hyperplastic candidiasis, nodular leukoplakia of undetermined etiology, and malignant neoplasm. An excisional biopsy revealed herpesvirus infection, and immunoperoxidase staining confirmed herpes simplex virus infection. This report describes the clinical and histologic appearance of these lesions and the course and treatment of the patient.

  8. ATP-ase positive cells in human oral mucosa transplanted to nude mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, E; Kirkeby, S

    1981-01-01

    A model to study the differentiation of human oral epithelium in vivo utilizing transplantation of human tissue to nude mice has been described. Previous studies have described the epithelial cells in this model. In this study we demonstrate that 8 d after transplantation, Langerhans cells, ident......, identified as ATP-ase positive dendritic cells, have almost disappeared from the transplanted epithelium whereas at day 21 after transplantation such cells were abundant. It is suggested that the ATP-ase positive cells which reappear in the transplanted epithelium are of mouse origin....

  9. Zika virus infection in immunocompetent pregnant mice causes fetal damage and placental pathology in the absence of fetal infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummer, Lawrence W.; Lanthier, Paula; Kim, In-Jeong; Kuki, Atsuo; Thomas, Stephen J.

    2018-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection during human pregnancy may cause diverse and serious congenital defects in the developing fetus. Previous efforts to generate animal models of human ZIKV infection and clinical symptoms often involved manipulating mice to impair their Type I interferon (IFN) signaling, thereby allowing enhanced infection and vertical transmission of virus to the embryo. Here, we show that even pregnant mice competent to generate Type I IFN responses that can limit ZIKV infection nonetheless develop profound placental pathology and high frequency of fetal demise. We consistently found that maternal ZIKV exposure led to placental pathology and that ZIKV RNA levels measured in maternal, placental or embryonic tissues were not predictive of the pathological effects seen in the embryos. Placental pathology included trophoblast hyperplasia in the labyrinth, trophoblast giant cell necrosis in the junctional zone, and loss of embryonic vessels. Our findings suggest that, in this context of limited infection, placental pathology rather than embryonic/fetal viral infection may be a stronger contributor to adverse pregnancy outcomes in mice. Our finding demonstrates that in immunocompetent mice, direct viral infection of the embryo is not essential for fetal demise. Our immunologically unmanipulated pregnancy mouse model provides a consistent and easily measurable congenital abnormality readout to assess fetal outcome, and may serve as an additional model to test prophylactic and therapeutic interventions to protect the fetus during pregnancy, and for studying the mechanisms of ZIKV congenital immunopathogenesis. PMID:29634758

  10. Oral Administration of Fermented Soymilk Products Protects the Skin of Hairless Mice against Ultraviolet Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuyoshi Kano

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The protective effect of isoflavones on skin damage from ultraviolet (UV radiation and their bioavailability were investigated in ovariectomized hairless mice fed diets composed of fermented soymilk containing aglycone forms of isoflavones or control soymilk containing glucose-conjugated forms of isoflavones. The erythema intensity of dorsal skin was significantly higher in ovariectomized mice than in sham-operated mice (p < 0.05. The erythema intensity and epidermal thickness of dorsal skin were significantly lower in the fermented soymilk diet group than in the control diet group (each p < 0.05. Levels of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in dorsal skin were significantly lower in the fermented soymilk diet group than in the control group (p < 0.05. Serum and dorsal skin isoflavone concentrations were significantly higher in the fermented soymilk diet group than in the soymilk diet group (p < 0.05. These results indicate that oral administration of a fermented soymilk diet increases isoflavone concentrations in the blood and skin, effectively scavenging the reactive oxygen species generated by UV irradiation and exerting an estrogen-like activity, with a consequent protective effect on skin photodamage in hairless mice.

  11. Stable engraftment of human microbiota into mice with a single oral gavage following antibiotic conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, Christopher; Kaiser, Thomas; Beura, Lalit K; Hamilton, Matthew J; Weingarden, Alexa R; Bobr, Aleh; Kang, Johnthomas; Masopust, David; Sadowsky, Michael J; Khoruts, Alexander

    2017-08-01

    Human microbiota-associated (HMA) animal models relying on germ-free recipient mice are being used to study the relationship between intestinal microbiota and human disease. However, transfer of microbiota into germ-free animals also triggers global developmental changes in the recipient intestine, which can mask disease-specific attributes of the donor material. Therefore, a simple model of replacing microbiota into a developmentally mature intestinal environment remains highly desirable. Here we report on the development of a sequential, three-course antibiotic conditioning regimen that allows sustained engraftment of intestinal microorganisms following a single oral gavage with human donor microbiota. SourceTracker, a Bayesian, OTU-based algorithm, indicated that 59.3 ± 3.0% of the fecal bacterial communities in treated mice were attributable to the donor source. This overall degree of microbiota engraftment was similar in mice conditioned with antibiotics and germ-free mice. Limited surveys of systemic and mucosal immune sites did not show evidence of immune activation following introduction of human microbiota. The antibiotic treatment protocol described here followed by a single gavage of human microbiota may provide a useful, complimentary HMA model to that established in germ-free facilities. The model has the potential for further in-depth translational investigations of microbiota in a variety of human disease states.

  12. Oral Exposure to Atrazine Induces Oxidative Stress and Calcium Homeostasis Disruption in Spleen of Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuying Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The widely used herbicide atrazine (ATR can cause many adverse effects including immunotoxicity, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. The current study investigated the role of oxidative stress and calcium homeostasis in ATR-induced immunotoxicity in mice. ATR at doses of 0, 100, 200, or 400 mg/kg body weight was administered to Balb/c mice daily for 21 days by oral gavage. The studies performed 24 hr after the final exposure showed that ATR could induce the generation of reactive oxygen species in the spleen of the mice, increase the level of advanced oxidation protein product (AOPP in the host serum, and cause the depletion of reduced glutathione in the serum, each in a dose-related manner. In addition, DNA damage was observed in isolated splenocytes as evidenced by increase in DNA comet tail formation. ATR exposure also caused increases in intracellular Ca2+ within splenocytes. Moreover, ATR treatment led to increased expression of genes for some antioxidant enzymes, such as HO-1 and Gpx1, as well as increased expression of NF-κB and Ref-1 proteins in the spleen. In conclusion, it appears that oxidative stress and disruptions in calcium homeostasis might play an important role in the induction of immunotoxicity in mice by ATR.

  13. Viral infection and oral habits as risk factors for oral squamous cell carcinoma in Yemen: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasher, Akram T; Al-Hebshi, Nezar N; Al-Moayad, Ebtisam E; Suleiman, Ahmed M

    2014-11-01

    The role of qat chewing, tobacco (shammah) dipping, smoking, alcohol drinking, and oral viral infection as risk factors for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in Yemen was assessed. A total of 60 cases of OSCC and 120 age- and gender-matched controls were analyzed with respect to demographic data, history of oral habits, and the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-16, HPV-18, or Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) as determined by Taqman quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent predictors of the disease. Shammah use was the only risk factor for OSCC, with an odds ratio of 12.6 (CI, 3.3-48.2) and 39 (CI, 14-105) for the ex-users and current users, respectively. The association of shammah use alone with OSCC exceeded that of shammah use in combination with qat chewing, smoking, or both. EBV infection, smoking, and qat chewing showed no association with OSCC, while neither HPV-16 nor HPV-18 were detected in any sample. Shammah use is a major risk factor for oral cancer in Yemen. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Radiocomplexation and evaluation of the 99mTc-Gemifloxacin in artificially Escherichia coli infected mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erfani, M.; Shafiei, M.; Rekabgardan, M.; Mortazavi, P.

    2016-01-01

    Gemifloxacin as a broad spectrum quinolone antibacterial agent was radiocomplexed with high activity of 99m Tc and was evaluated as an infection imaging agent in artificially Escherichia coli (E. Coli) infected mice. 99m Tc-Gemifloxacin with high specific activity (0.148 GBq/μmol) and labeling yield (98.60 ± 0.70 %) was obtained. Our main achievement was high accumulation in the E. Coli infected right thigh muscle in mice (T/NT = 1.89 at 4 h post injection) which may diagnostically be beneficial to distinguish sites of E. Coli infection. (author)

  15. Effect of the histaminergic antagonist over the pulmonary oedema growth in P. berghei - infected mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    The involvement of histaminergic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of pulmonary oedema observed in p. berghei - infected mice was investigated. Histamine concentrations in plasma and whole blood of infected and normal mice were determined by radioenzymatic assay during the seven days of the infection. Elevated plasma and whole blood histamine levels were found at the last stages of infection (sixth day and seventh day) after intraperitoneal injection of parasitized erythrocytes, showing a close temporal correlation between the development of the oedema and the elevation of the circulating histamine concentrations. The participation of H 1 and H 2 receptors in the increase in vascular permeability (IVP) induced by histamine was also verified. (author)

  16. The curative activity of thioridazine on mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, Marta; Viveiros, Miguel; Kristiansen, Jette E

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of thioridazine (TZ) at different dose levels on mice that had been infected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with a high dose of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis ATCC H37Rv strain. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Groups of five female BALB/C mice were...

  17. Increased susceptibility to Yersinia enterocolitica Infection of Tff2 deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Aftab A; Mihalj, Martina; Ratkay, Ivana; Lubka-Pathak, Maria; Balogh, Peter; Klingel, Karin; Bohn, Erwin; Blin, Nikolaus; Baus-Loncar, Mirela

    2012-01-01

    TFF2 is one of the members of the trefoil factor family, known for its role in protection of gastrointestinal epithelia upon injury; however, recent studies suggest that TFF2 could also play an important role in the immune system. In the present study Tff2 deficient and wild type mice were infected by Y. enterocolitica which resulted in a lethal outcome in all Tff2 deficient mice, but not in WT animals. Yersinia invaded Peyer's patches more efficiently as shown by high bacterial titers in the KO mice while wild type mice displayed lower titers and a visible bacterial accumulation in the intestine. Bacterial accumulation in Peyer's patches of Tff2 deficient mice was accompanied by increased recruitment of macrophages. While an increased level of MAC-1 positive cells was observed in the spleens of both Tff2 deficient and WT mice at third day post infection, bacterial dissemination to liver, lung and kidneys was observed only in Tff2 knock-out mice. Analysis of the cellular composition of spleen did not reveal any substantial alteration to WT animals, suggesting possible disregulation of hemopoietic cells involved in immune response to Y. enterocolitica. These new data indicate that Tff2 plays an important role in immune response by protecting the organism from consequences of infection and that Tff2 knock-out mice react adversely to bacterial infections, in this case specifically to Y. enterocolitica. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Exendin-4 improves resistance to Listeria monocytogenes infection in diabetic db/db mice

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Hsien Yueh; Chung, Chih-Yao; Yang, Wen-Chin; Liang, Chih-Lung; Wang, Chi-Young; Chang, Chih-Yu; Chang, Cicero Lee-Tian

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of diabetes mellitus is increasing among companion animals. This disease has similar characteristics in both humans and animals. Diabetes is frequently identified as an independent risk factor for infections associated with increased mortality. In the present study, homozygous diabetic (db/db) mice were infected with Listeria (L.) monocytogenes and then treated with the anti-diabetic drug exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide 1 analogue. In aged db/db mice, decreased CD11b+ macroph...

  19. Extensive immune-mediated hippocampal damage in mice surviving infection with neuroadapted Sindbis virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Takashi; Griffin, Diane E.

    2003-01-01

    Viral infections of the central nervous system and immune responses to these infections cause a variety of neurological diseases. Infection of weanling mice with Sindbis virus causes acute nonfatal encephalomyelitis followed by clearance of infectious virus, but persistence of viral RNA. Infection with a neuroadapted strain of Sindbis virus (NSV) causes fatal encephalomyelitis, but passive transfer of immune serum after infection protects from fatal disease and infectious virus is cleared. To determine whether persistent NSV RNA is associated with neurological damage, we examined the brains of recovered mice and found progressive loss of the hippocampal gyrus, adjacent white matter, and deep cerebral cortex associated with mononuclear cell infiltration. Mice deficient in CD4 + T cells showed less tissue loss, while mice lacking CD8 + T cells showed lesions comparable to those in immunocompetent mice. Mice deficient in both CD4 + and CD8 + T cells developed severe tissue loss similar to immunocompetent mice and this was associated with extensive infiltration of macrophages. The number of CD4 + cells and macrophage/microglial cells, but not CD8 + cells, infiltrating the hippocampal gyrus was correlated with the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling positive pyramidal neurons. These results suggest that CD4 + T cells can promote progressive neuronal death and tissue injury, despite clearance of infectious virus

  20. Oral epithelial cells are susceptible to cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1 infection in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Jennifer S.; Rahemtulla, Firoz; Kent, Leigh W.; Hall, Stacy D.; Ikizler, Mine R.; Wright, Peter F.; Nguyen, Huan H.; Jackson, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Epithelial cells lining the oral cavity are exposed to HIV-1 through breast-feeding and oral-genital contact. Genital secretions and breast milk of HIV-1-infected subjects contain both cell-free and cell-associated virus. To determine if oral epithelial cells can be infected with HIV-1 we exposed gingival keratinocytes and adenoid epithelial cells to cell-free virus and HIV-1-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocytes. Using primary isolates we determined that gingival keratinocytes are susceptible to HIV-1 infection via cell-free CD4-independent infection only. R5 but not X4 viral strains were capable of infecting the keratinocytes. Further, infected cells were able to release infectious virus. In addition, primary epithelial cells isolated from adenoids were also susceptible to infection; both cell-free and cell-associated virus infected these cells. These data have potential implications in the transmission of HIV-1 in the oral cavity

  1. Directed evolution and targeted mutagenesis to murinize Listeria monocytogenes internalin A for enhanced infectivity in the murine oral infection model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Monk, Ian R

    2010-01-01

    Internalin A (InlA) is a critical virulence factor which mediates the initiation of Listeria monocytogenes infection by the oral route in permissive hosts. The interaction of InlA with the host cell ligand E-cadherin efficiently stimulates L. monocytogenes entry into human enterocytes, but has only a limited interaction with murine cells.

  2. Persistent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium Infection Increases the Susceptibility of Mice to Develop Intestinal Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara M. Schultz

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic intestinal inflammations are triggered by genetic and environmental components. However, it remains unclear how specific changes in the microbiota, host immunity, or pathogen exposure could promote the onset and exacerbation of these diseases. Here, we evaluated whether Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium infection increases the susceptibility to develop intestinal inflammation in mice. Two mouse models were used to evaluate the impact of S. Typhimurium infection: the chemical induction of colitis by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS and interleukin (IL-10−/− mice, which develop spontaneous intestinal inflammation. We observed that S. Typhimurium infection makes DSS-treated and IL-10−/− mice more susceptible to develop intestinal inflammation. Importantly, this increased susceptibility is associated to the ability of S. Typhimurium to persist in liver and spleen of infected mice, which depends on the virulence proteins secreted by Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2-encoded type three secretion system (TTSS-2. Although immunization with a live attenuated vaccine resulted in a moderate reduction of the IL-10−/− mice susceptibility to develop intestinal inflammation due to previous S. Typhimurium infection, it did not prevent bacterial persistence. Our results suggest that persistent S. Typhimurium infection may increase the susceptibility of mice to develop inflammation in the intestine, which could be associated with virulence proteins secreted by TTSS-2.

  3. Effects of subchronic oral toxic metal exposure on the intestinal microbiota of mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qixiao Zhai; Tianqi Li; Leilei Yu; Yue Xiao; Saisai Feng; Jiangping Wu; Jianxin Zhao; Hao Zhang; Wei Chen

    2017-01-01

    Oral exposure to toxic metals such as cadmium (Cd),lead (Pb),copper (Cu) and aluminum (Al) can induce various adverse health effects in humans and animals.However,the effects of these metals on the gut microbiota have received limited attention.The present study demonstrated that long-term toxic metal exposure altered the intestinal microbiota of mice in a metal-specific and time-dependent manner.Subchronic oral Cu exposure for eight weeks caused a profound decline in gut microbial diversity in mice,whereas no significant changes were observed in groups treated with other metals.Cd exposure significantly increased the relative abundances of organisms from the genera Alistipes and Odoribacter and caused marked decreases in Mollicutes and unclassified Ruminococcaceae.Pb exposure significantly decreased the abundances of eight genera:unclassified and uncultured Ruminococcaceae,unclassified Lachnospiraceae,Ruminiclostridium_9,Rikenellaceae_RC9_gut_group,Oscillibacter,Anaerotruncus and Lachnoclostridium.Cu exposure affected abundances of the genera Alistipes,Bacteroides,Ruminococcaceae_UCG-014,Allobaculum,Mollicutes_RFg_norank,Rikenellaceae_RC9_gut_group,Ruminococcaceae_unclassified and Turicibacter.Al exposure increased the abundance of Odoribacter and decreased that of Anaerotruncus.Exposure to any metal for eight weeks significantly decreased the abundance of Akkermansia.These results provide a new understanding regarding the role of toxic metals in the pathogenesis of intestinal and systemic disorders in the host within the gut microbiota framework.

  4. Alteration of intestinal microbiota in mice orally administered with salmon cartilage proteoglycan, a prophylactic agent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisana Asano

    Full Text Available Proteoglycan (PG extracted from salmon nasal cartilage has potential to be a prophylactic agent. Daily oral administration of the PG attenuates systemic inflammatory response in the experimental mouse models. In this study, we applied the culture-independent approach to investigate an alteration of intestinal microbiota composition in PG-administered mice. The results indicated that the population level of bacilli increased in the small and large intestine upon PG administration. On the other hand, the population level of clostridia decreased in the large intestine. The proportion of bacteria that are able to ferment saccharides and produce short-chain fatty acids increased in the small intestine and decreased in the large intestine. Importantly, population level of probiotic lactobacilli and bacteria exhibiting the immunomodulatory effect increased in the PG-administered mice. In addition, several disease-associated bacteria decreased upon PG administration. These results provided an understanding of the specific role of PG involved in host immune modulation and supported our hypothesis that daily oral administration of PG improves the overall balance in composition of the intestinal microbial community.

  5. Oral intake of beet extract provides protection against skin barrier impairment in hairless mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Ken-Ichi; Umemura, Kazuo

    2013-05-01

    The epidermis acts as a functional barrier against the external environment. Disturbances in the function of this barrier cause water loss and increase the chances of penetration by various irritable stimuli, leading to skin diseases such as dry skin, atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis. Ceramides are a critical natural element of the protective epidermal barrier. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the oral intake of beet (Beta vulgaris) extract, a natural product rich in glucosylceramide (GlcCer), may prevent disturbance in skin barrier function. When HR-1 hairless mice were fed a special diet (HR-AD), transepidermal water loss (TEWL) from the dorsal skin increased, with a compensatory increase in water intake after 5 weeks. Mice fed with HR-AD had dry skin with erythema and showed increased scratching behaviour. Histological examinations revealed a remarkable increase in the thickness of the skin at 8 weeks. Supplemental addition of beet extract, which contained GlcCer at a final concentration of 0.1%, significantly prevented an increase TEWL, water intake, cumulative scratching time, and epidermal thickness at 8 weeks. These results indicate that oral intake of beet extract shows potential for preventing skin diseases associated with impaired skin barrier function. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Development of an in vivo model of Chlamydia abortus chronic infection in mice overexpressing IL-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Río, Laura; Murcia, Antonio; Buendía, Antonio J; Álvarez, Daniel; Ortega, Nieves; Navarro, José A; Salinas, Jesús; Caro, María Rosa

    2018-01-01

    Chlamydia abortus, like other members of the family Chlamydiaceae, have a unique intracellular developmental cycle that is characterized by its chronic nature. Infection of a flock can remain undetected for months, until abortion occurs the following reproductive season but, to date, neither the location nor the mechanisms that maintain this latent phase are fully understood. Studies have shown that IL-10 produced as a response to certain micro-organisms sustains the intracellular survival of pathogens and increases host susceptibility to chlamydial infections. In order to induce a sustained infection C. abortus, transgenic mice that constitutively express IL-10 were infected and the immunological mechanisms that maintain infection in these mice were compared with the mechanisms of a resistant wild-type mouse strain. Viable bacteria could be detected in different tissues of transgenic mice up to 28 days after infection, as analysed by bacterial isolation and immunohistochemistry. Chronic infection in these mice was associated with an impaired recruitment of macrophages, decreased iNOS activity at the site of infection and a more diffuse distribution of inflammatory cells in the liver. This murine model can be of great help for understanding the immunological and bacterial mechanisms that lead to chronic chlamydial infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Differential lymphocyte and antibody responses in deer mice infected with Sin Nombre hantavirus or Andes hantavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schountz, Tony; Quackenbush, Sandra; Rovnak, Joel; Haddock, Elaine; Black, William C; Feldmann, Heinz; Prescott, Joseph

    2014-08-01

    Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) is a rodent-borne disease with a high case-fatality rate that is caused by several New World hantaviruses. Each pathogenic hantavirus is naturally hosted by a principal rodent species without conspicuous disease and infection is persistent, perhaps for life. Deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) are the natural reservoirs of Sin Nombre virus (SNV), the etiologic agent of most HCPS cases in North America. Deer mice remain infected despite a helper T cell response that leads to high-titer neutralizing antibodies. Deer mice are also susceptible to Andes hantavirus (ANDV), which causes most HCPS cases in South America; however, deer mice clear ANDV. We infected deer mice with SNV or ANDV to identify differences in host responses that might account for this differential outcome. SNV RNA levels were higher in the lungs but not different in the heart, spleen, or kidneys. Most ANDV-infected deer mice had seroconverted 14 days after inoculation, but none of the SNV-infected deer mice had. Examination of lymph node cell antigen recall responses identified elevated immune gene expression in deer mice infected with ANDV and suggested maturation toward a Th2 or T follicular helper phenotype in some ANDV-infected deer mice, including activation of the interleukin 4 (IL-4) pathway in T cells and B cells. These data suggest that the rate of maturation of the immune response is substantially higher and of greater magnitude during ANDV infection, and these differences may account for clearance of ANDV and persistence of SNV. Hantaviruses persistently infect their reservoir rodent hosts without pathology. It is unknown how these viruses evade sterilizing immune responses in the reservoirs. We have determined that infection of the deer mouse with its homologous hantavirus, Sin Nombre virus, results in low levels of immune gene expression in antigen-stimulated lymph node cells and a poor antibody response. However, infection of deer mice with a

  8. Respiratory syncytial virus infection facilitates acute colonization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Vrankrijker, Angélica M M; Wolfs, Tom F W; Ciofu, Oana

    2009-01-01

    virus infections in facilitating colonization and infection with P. aeruginosa. A study was undertaken to determine whether respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection could facilitate the initiation of an acute infection with P. aeruginosa in vivo. Balb/c mice were infected intranasally with P......Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes opportunistic infections in immunocompromised individuals and patients ventilated mechanically and is the major pathogen in patients with cystic fibrosis, in which it causes chronic infections. Epidemiological, in vitro and animal data suggest a role for respiratory....... These results suggest that RSV can facilitate the initiation of acute P. aeruginosa infection without the RSV infection being clinically apparent. This could have implications for treatment strategies to prevent opportunistic P. aeruginosa lung infection....

  9. Glucocorticoid treatment of MCMV infected newborn mice attenuates CNS inflammation and limits deficits in cerebellar development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Kosmac

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Infection of the developing fetus with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is a major cause of central nervous system disease in infants and children; however, mechanism(s of disease associated with this intrauterine infection remain poorly understood. Utilizing a mouse model of HCMV infection of the developing CNS, we have shown that peripheral inoculation of newborn mice with murine CMV (MCMV results in CNS infection and developmental abnormalities that recapitulate key features of the human infection. In this model, animals exhibit decreased granule neuron precursor cell (GNPC proliferation and altered morphogenesis of the cerebellar cortex. Deficits in cerebellar cortical development are symmetric and global even though infection of the CNS results in a non-necrotizing encephalitis characterized by widely scattered foci of virus-infected cells with mononuclear cell infiltrates. These findings suggested that inflammation induced by MCMV infection could underlie deficits in CNS development. We investigated the contribution of host inflammatory responses to abnormal cerebellar development by modulating inflammatory responses in infected mice with glucocorticoids. Treatment of infected animals with glucocorticoids decreased activation of CNS mononuclear cells and expression of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-β and IFNγ in the CNS while minimally impacting CNS virus replication. Glucocorticoid treatment also limited morphogenic abnormalities and normalized the expression of developmentally regulated genes within the cerebellum. Importantly, GNPC proliferation deficits were normalized in MCMV infected mice following glucocorticoid treatment. Our findings argue that host inflammatory responses to MCMV infection contribute to deficits in CNS development in MCMV infected mice and suggest that similar mechanisms of disease could be responsible for the abnormal CNS development in human infants infected in-utero with HCMV.

  10. Comparative in vivo antioxidant levels in Schistosoma mansoni infected mice treated with praziquantel or the essential oil of Melaleuca armillaris leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, M; Ibrahim, N; El-Rigal, N

    2012-10-15

    Plant extracts are continuously investigated for their extensive inclusion of biologically active constituents that exert therapeutic activities against many diseases. The aim of this study was to assess the antioxidant/anti-schistosomal activities of the essential oil of the fresh leaves of Melaleuca armillaris (M. armillaris) compared to Praziquantel (PZQ) on normal and Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice. The oil was isolated by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The oil was rich in 1,8-cineole (33.93%), terpinen-4-ol (18.79%), limonene (10.37%) and B-pinene (6.59%). M. armillaris oil (150 mg kg(-1), orally) was administered from the second week post infection twice per week for six weeks. PZQ (500 mg kg(-1), orally) was administered for two successive days 8 weeks post infection and mice sacrificed one week later. Total protein, Malondialdehyde (MDA), Glutathione (GSH), vitamins C and E, the antioxidant enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase, as well as liver weights and liver/body weight were determined in the liver tissues. Results showed that, both treatments significantly ameliorated the disturbed levels ofGSH and MDA in infected mice. Both vitamins were significantly elevated after treatment with the oil while a significant increase in catalase accompanied by a pronounced decrease in SOD were obtained after treatment with PZQ. Both treatments markedly improved liver and body weights in infected mice compared to the infected-untreated ones. In conclusion, natural plant sources may be used as promising alternative agents to chemical drugs for schistosomiasis treatment, since the latter may result in drug-induced resistance arising from repeated use.

  11. Phytochemistry, Brine shrimp lethality and mice acute oral toxicity studies on seed extracts of Vernonia anthelmintica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Subia; Khan, Rafeeq Alam; Afroz, Syeda; Ahmed, Shadab

    2016-11-01

    Despite the widespread use of Vernonia anthelmintica seeds in traditional medicine, the need to establish the safety of the Vernonia anthelmintica is required to ascertain the safe use of this herbal medicine. The aim of the present study is to establish the acute toxicity profile of different extracts of Vernonia anthelmintica. Hexane and ethanol extract of Vernonia Anthelmintica has been studied for its brine shrimp lethality potential. Water decoction (WDVA), Hexane (HEVA) and Ethanol (EEVA) extracts of Vernonia anthelmintica has also been evaluated for their in-vivo acute oral toxicity in mice by Lorke's method. Phytochemistry of all three extracts was also evaluated for the presence of their secondary metabolites. All three extracts showed the presence of flavonoids and terpenoids, while alkaloids, tannins and fixed oils were present in HEVA and EEVA. Furthermore EEVA also showed presence of carbohydrates and HEVA also showed the presence of cardiac glycosides. Ethanol and hexane extracts of Vernonia anthelmintica showed a positive cytotoxicity in brine shrimp lethality test at 24 hours with LC50 104.16 (224.0-48.05)μg/ml and 216.11μg/ml (378.2-128.7) respectively as compared to standard drug etoposide LC50 7.46μg/ml. The oral LD50 for EEVA, HEVA and WDVA in mice by Lorke's method was greater than 5000mg/kg. The result of brine shrimp lethality test clearly exhibited the presence of bioactive compounds with cytotoxic potential; however seems to be safe for oral use since LD50 was higher than 5000mg/kg and thus safety of acute dosing in vivo practices is justified.

  12. Effect of crude extracts of Moringa stenopetala and Artemisia absinthium on parasitaemia of mice infected with Trypanosoma congolense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kifleyohannes, Tsegabirhan; Terefe, Getachew; Tolossa, Yacob H; Giday, Mirutse; Kebede, Nigatu

    2014-06-24

    Treatment of trypanosomosis is currently facing a number of problems including toxicity of trypanocidal drugs and development of resistance by the parasites. These limitations have prompted the search for alternative active substances (such as of natural origin). The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of extracts of Moringa stenopetala and Artemisia absinthium on Trypanosoma congolense in mice. Swiss white male mice aged 8-12 weeks were divided into six experimental groups of six animals. Water and methanol extracts of the two plants were prepared. T. congolense was isolated from cattle at Ghibe valley (Ethiopia). All experimental mice received approximately 1 x 10(5) trypanosomes in 0.2 ml of blood. Plant extracts were given orally to four groups (2 plant species and two extraction methods) at 400 mg/kg body weight for seven consecutive days. One group remained as distilled water treated control and the other as diminzene aceturate treated control. The effect of the extracts on levels of parasitaemia, body weight, packed cell volume (PCV) and mice survival was monitored for 25 days. All treatments have significantly reduced parasitaemia and helped improve body weight, PCV and survival of mice compared to the water-treated control (P < 0.01 in all cases). These effects were comparable to that with diminazene aceturate. No significant difference was observed in the reduction of parasitaemia between plant extract treatment groups. However, mice with extracts of A. absinthium had significantly higher body weight than those with extracts of M. stenopetala (P < 0.05). The two plants have antitrypanosomal potential against T. congolense by reducing the levels of parasitaemia, maintaining good PCV and body weight, and prolonging the lives of infected animals.

  13. Novel small-molecule AMPK activator orally exerts beneficial effects on diabetic db/db mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Yu, Li-Fang; Zhang, Li-Na; Qiu, Bei-Ying; Su, Ming-Bo; Wu, Fang; Chen, Da-Kai; Pang, Tao; Gu, Min; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Wei-Ping; Jiang, Hao-Wen; Li, Jing-Ya, E-mail: jyli@mail.shcnc.ac.cn; Nan, Fa-Jun, E-mail: fjnan@mail.shcnc.ac.cn; Li, Jia, E-mail: jli@mail.shcnc.ac.cn

    2013-12-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is a pivotal guardian of whole-body energy metabolism, has become an attractive therapeutic target for metabolic syndrome. Previously, using a homogeneous scintillation proximity assay, we identified the small-molecule AMPK activator C24 from an optimization based on the original allosteric activator PT1. In this paper, the AMPK activation mechanism of C24 and its potential beneficial effects on glucose and lipid metabolism on db/db mice were investigated. C24 allosterically stimulated inactive AMPK α subunit truncations and activated AMPK heterotrimers by antagonizing autoinhibition. In primary hepatocytes, C24 increased the phosphorylation of AMPK downstream target acetyl-CoA carboxylase dose-dependently without changing intracellular AMP/ATP ratio, indicating its allosteric activation in cells. Through activating AMPK, C24 decreased glucose output by down-regulating mRNA levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) in primary hepatocytes. C24 also decreased the triglyceride and cholesterol contents in HepG2 cells. Due to its improved bioavailability, chronic oral treatment with multiple doses of C24 significantly reduced blood glucose and lipid levels in plasma, and improved the glucose tolerance of diabetic db/db mice. The hepatic transcriptional levels of PEPCK and G6Pase were reduced. These results demonstrate that this orally effective activator of AMPK represents a novel approach to the treatment of metabolic syndrome. - Highlights: • C24 activates AMPK through antagonizing autoinhibition within α subunit. • C24 activates AMPK in hepatocytes and decreases glucose output via AMPK. • C24 exerts beneficial effects on diabetic db/db mice. • C24 represents a novel therapeutic for treatment of metabolic syndrome.

  14. Human T-cell responses to oral streptococci in human PBMC-NOD/SCID mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, M A; Nakao, R; Yonezawa, H; Watanabe, H; Senpuku, H

    2006-06-01

    We investigated cellular and humoral immune responses to oral biofilm bacteria, including Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus anginosus, Streptococcus sobrinus, and Streptococcus sanguinis, in NOD/SCID mice immunized with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hu-PBMC-NOD/SCID mice) to explore the pathogenicity of each of those organisms in dental and oral inflammatory diseases. hu-PBMC-NOD/SCID mice were immunized by intraperitoneal injections with the whole cells of the streptococci once a week for 3 weeks. FACS analyses were used to determine the percentages of various hu-T cell types, as well as intracellular cytokine production of interleukin-4 and interferon-gamma. Serum IgG and IgM antibody levels in response to the streptococci were also determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. S. anginosus induced a significant amount of the proinflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in comparison with the other streptococci. However, there was no significant differences between the streptococci in interleukin-4 production by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells after inoculation. Further, S. mutans significantly induced human anti-S. mutans IgG, IgG(1), IgG(2), and IgM antibodies in comparison with the other organisms. In conclusion, S. anginosus up-regulated Th1 and Tc1 cells, and S. mutans led to increasing levels of their antibodies, which was associated with the induction of Th2 cells. These results may contribute to a better understanding of human lymphocyte interactions to biofilm bacteria, along with their impact on dental and mucosal inflammatory diseases, as well as endocarditis.

  15. Novel small-molecule AMPK activator orally exerts beneficial effects on diabetic db/db mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Yu, Li-Fang; Zhang, Li-Na; Qiu, Bei-Ying; Su, Ming-Bo; Wu, Fang; Chen, Da-Kai; Pang, Tao; Gu, Min; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Wei-Ping; Jiang, Hao-Wen; Li, Jing-Ya; Nan, Fa-Jun; Li, Jia

    2013-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is a pivotal guardian of whole-body energy metabolism, has become an attractive therapeutic target for metabolic syndrome. Previously, using a homogeneous scintillation proximity assay, we identified the small-molecule AMPK activator C24 from an optimization based on the original allosteric activator PT1. In this paper, the AMPK activation mechanism of C24 and its potential beneficial effects on glucose and lipid metabolism on db/db mice were investigated. C24 allosterically stimulated inactive AMPK α subunit truncations and activated AMPK heterotrimers by antagonizing autoinhibition. In primary hepatocytes, C24 increased the phosphorylation of AMPK downstream target acetyl-CoA carboxylase dose-dependently without changing intracellular AMP/ATP ratio, indicating its allosteric activation in cells. Through activating AMPK, C24 decreased glucose output by down-regulating mRNA levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) in primary hepatocytes. C24 also decreased the triglyceride and cholesterol contents in HepG2 cells. Due to its improved bioavailability, chronic oral treatment with multiple doses of C24 significantly reduced blood glucose and lipid levels in plasma, and improved the glucose tolerance of diabetic db/db mice. The hepatic transcriptional levels of PEPCK and G6Pase were reduced. These results demonstrate that this orally effective activator of AMPK represents a novel approach to the treatment of metabolic syndrome. - Highlights: • C24 activates AMPK through antagonizing autoinhibition within α subunit. • C24 activates AMPK in hepatocytes and decreases glucose output via AMPK. • C24 exerts beneficial effects on diabetic db/db mice. • C24 represents a novel therapeutic for treatment of metabolic syndrome

  16. Use of anesthesia dramatically alters the oral glucose tolerance and insulin secretion in C57Bl/6 mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windeløv, Johanne A; Pedersen, Jens; Holst, Jens J

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of the impact of anesthesia on oral glucose tolerance in mice. Anesthesia is often used when performing OGTT in mice to avoid the stress of gavage and blood sampling, although anesthesia may influence gastrointestinal motility, blood glucose, and plasma insulin dynamics. C57Bl/6 mice...... in the time frame -15 to +150 min. Plasma insulin concentration was measured at time 0 and 20 min. All four anesthetic regimens resulted in impaired glucose tolerance compared to saline/no anesthesia. (1) hypnorm/midazolam increased insulin concentrations and caused an altered glucose tolerance; (2) ketamine...... regimens altered the oral glucose tolerance, and we conclude that anesthesia should not be used when performing metabolic studies in mice....

  17. Oral administration of kefiran exerts a bifidogenic effect on BALB/c mice intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamet, M F; Medrano, M; Pérez, P F; Abraham, A G

    2016-01-01

    The activity of kefiran, the exopolysaccharide present in kefir grains, was evaluated on intestinal bacterial populations in BALB/c mice. Animals were orally administered with kefiran and Eubacteria, lactobacilli and bifidobacteria populations were monitored in faeces of mice at days 0, 2, 7, 14 and 21. Profiles obtained by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) with primers for Eubacteria were compared by principal component analysis and clearly defined clusters, correlating with the time of kefiran consumption, were obtained. Furthermore, profile analysis of PCR products amplified with specific oligonucleotides for bifidobacteria showed an increment in the number of DGGE bands in the groups administered with kefiran. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridisation (FISH) with specific probes for bifidobacteria showed an increment of this population in faeces, in accordance to DGGE results. The bifidobacteria population was also studied on distal colon content after 0, 2 and 7 days of kefiran administration. Analysis of PCR products by DGGE with Eubacteria primers showed an increment in the number and intensity of bands with high GC content of mice administered with kefiran. Sequencing of DGGE bands confirmed that bifidobacteria were one of the bacterial populations modified by kefiran administration. DGGE profiles of PCR amplicons obtained by using Bifidobacterium or Lactobacillus specific primers confirmed that kefiran administration enhances bifidobacteria, however no changes were observed in Lactobacillus populations. The results of the analysis of bifidobacteria populations assessed on different sampling sites in a murine model support the use of this exopolysaccharide as a bifidogenic functional ingredient.

  18. Extensive Degradation and Low Bioavailability of Orally Consumed Corn miRNAs in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiqiu Huang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The current study seeks to resolve the discrepancy in the literature regarding the cross-kingdom transfer of plant microRNAs (miRNAs into mammals using an improved miRNA processing and detection method. Two studies utilizing C57BL/6 mice were performed. In the first study, mice were fed an AIN-93M diet and gavaged with water, random deoxynucleotide triphosphates (dNTP or isolated corn miRNAs for two weeks (n = 10 per group. In the second study, mice were fed an AIN-93M diet, or the diet supplemented with 3% fresh or autoclaved corn powder for two weeks (n = 10 per group. Corn miRNA levels were analyzed in blood and tissue samples by real-time PCR (RT-PCR following periodate oxidation and β elimination treatments to eliminate artifacts. After removing false positive detections, there were no differences in corn miRNA levels between control and treated groups in cecal, fecal, liver and blood samples. Using an in vitro digestion system, corn miRNAs in AIN-93M diet or in the extracts were found to be extensively degraded. Less than 1% was recovered in the gastrointestinal tract after oral and gastric phases. In conclusion, no evidence of increased levels of corn miRNAs in whole blood or tissues after supplementation of corn miRNAs in the diet was observed in a mouse model.

  19. Halloysite nanotubes-induced Al accumulation and oxidative damage in liver of mice after 30-day repeated oral administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue; Gong, Jiachun; Gui, Zongxiang; Hu, Tingting; Xu, Xiaolong

    2018-06-01

    Halloysite (Al 2 Si 2 O 5 (OH) 4 ·nH 2 O) nanotubes (HNTs) are natural clay materials and widely applied in many fields due to their natural hollow tubular structures. Many in vitro studies indicate that HNTs exhibit a high level of biocompatibility, however the in vivo toxicity of HNTs remains unclear. The objective of this study was to assess the hepatic toxicity of the purified HNTs in mice via oral route. The purified HNTs were orally administered to mice at 5, 50, and 300 mg/kg body weight (BW) every day for 30 days. Oral administration of HNTs stimulated the growth of the mice at the low dose (5 mg/kg BW) with no liver toxicity, but inhibited the growth of the mice at the middle (50 mg/kg BW) and high (300 mg/kg BW) doses. In addition, oral administration of HNTs at the high dose caused Al accumulation in the liver but had no marked effect on the Si content in the organ. The Al accumulation caused significant oxidative stress in the liver, which induced hepatic dysfunction and histopathologic changes. These findings demonstrated that Al accumulation-induced oxidative stress played an important role in the oral HNTs-caused liver injury. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The Acute Phase of Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Is Attenuated in 5-Lipoxygenase-Deficient Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana M. C. Canavaci

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work we examine the contribution of 5-lipoxygenase- (5-LO- derived lipid mediators to immune responses during the acute phase of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in 5-LO gene knockout (5-LO−/− mice and wild-type (WT mice. Compared with WT mice, the 5-LO−/− mice developed less parasitemia/tissue parasitism, less inflammatory cell infiltrates, and a lower mortality. This resistance of 5-LO−/− mice correlated with several differences in the immune response to infection, including reduced PGE2 synthesis; sustained capacity of splenocytes to produce high levels of interleukin (IL-12 early in the infection; enhanced splenocyte production of IL-1β, IL-6, and IFN-γ; rapid T-cell polarization to secrete high quantities of IFN-γ and low quantities of IL-10; and greater numbers of CD8+CD44highCD62Llow memory effector T cells at the end of the acute phase of infection. The high mortality in WT mice was associated with increased production of LTB4/LTC4, T cell bias to produce IFN-γ, high levels of serum nitrite, and marked protein extravasation into the peritoneal cavity, although survival was improved by treatment with a cys-LT receptor 1 antagonist. These data also provide evidence that 5-LO-derived mediators negatively affect host survival during the acute phase of T. cruzi infection.

  1. Vaccination against lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection in MHC class II-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2011-01-01

    response could be elicited in MHC class II-deficient mice by vaccination with adenovirus encoding lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) glycoprotein tethered to MHC class II-associated invariant chain. Moreover, the response induced conferred significant cytolytic CD8(+) T cell-mediated protection...... against challenge with a high dose of the invasive clone 13 strain of LCMV. In contrast, vaccination with adenovirus encoding unlinked LCMV glycoprotein induced weak virus control in the absence of CD4(+) T cells, and mice may die of increased immunopathology associated with incomplete protection. Acute...... mortality was not observed in any vaccinated mice following infection with the less-invasive Traub strain. However, LCMV Traub infection caused accelerated late mortality in unvaccinated MHC class II-deficient mice; in this case, we observed a strong trend toward delayed mortality in vaccinated mice...

  2. Effectiveness of wet-cupping in treatment of BALB/c mice infected by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alireza Ahmadi, MD, PhD

    Then all mice were killed and their spleen and lymph node cells were cultured and the level of IFN- γ and IL-4 of cultured cells supernatant were measured ... The protozoan L. major is an obligate intracellular parasite, which can infect various mammalian hosts such as rodents, dogs, and humans. Infection in humans with ...

  3. Human hepatocyte depletion in the presence of HIV-1 infection in dual reconstituted humanized mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weimin; Cheng, Yan; Makarov, Edward; Ganesan, Murali; Gebhart, Catherine L.; Gorantla, Santhi; Osna, Natalia

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection impairs liver function, and liver diseases have become a leading cause of morbidity in infected patients. The immunopathology of liver damage caused by HIV-1 remains unclear. We used chimeric mice dually reconstituted with a human immune system and hepatocytes to address the relevance of the model to pathobiology questions related to human hepatocyte survival in the presence of systemic infection. TK-NOG males were transplanted with mismatched human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and hepatocytes, human albumin concentration and the presence of human immune cells in blood were monitored for hepatocytes and immune reconstitution, and mice were infected with HIV-1. HIV-1-infected animals showed a decline in human albumin concentration with a significant reduction in percentage of human hepatocytes compared to uninfected mice. The decrease in human albumin levels correlated with a decline in CD4+ cells in the liver and with an increase in HIV-1 viral load. HIV-1 infection elicited proinflammatory response in the immunological milieu of the liver in HIV-infected mice compared to uninfected animals, as determined by upregulation of IL23, CXCL10 and multiple toll-like receptor expression. The inflammatory reaction associated with HIV-1 infection in vivo could contribute to the depletion and dysfunction of hepatocytes. The dual reconstituted TK-NOG mouse model is a feasible platform to investigate hepatocyte-related HIV-1 immunopathogenesis. This article has an associated First Person interview with the first author of the paper. PMID:29361613

  4. Zika virus infection confers protection against West Nile virus challenge in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Calvo, Ángela; Blázquez, Ana-Belén; Escribano-Romero, Estela; Merino-Ramos, Teresa; Saiz, Juan-Carlos; Martín-Acebes, Miguel A; Jiménez de Oya, Nereida

    2017-09-20

    Flaviviruses are RNA viruses that constitute a worrisome threat to global human and animal health. Zika virus (ZIKV), which was initially reported to cause a mild disease, recently spread in the Americas, infecting millions of people. During this recent epidemic, ZIKV infection has been linked to serious neurological diseases and birth defects, specifically Guillain-Barrè syndrome (GBS) and microcephaly. Because information about ZIKV immunity remains scarce, we assessed the humoral response of immunocompetent mice to infection with three viral strains of diverse geographical origin (Africa, Asia and America). No infected animals showed any sign of disease or died after infection. However, specific neutralizing antibodies were elicited in all infected mice. Considering the rapid expansion of ZIKV throughout the American continent and its co-circulation with other medically relevant flaviviruses, such as West Nile virus (WNV), the induction of protective immunity between ZIKV and WNV was analyzed. Remarkably, protection after challenge with WNV was observed in mice previously infected with ZIKV, as survival rates were significantly higher than in control mice. Moreover, previous ZIKV infection enhanced the humoral immune response against WNV. These findings may be relevant in geographical areas where both ZIKV and WNV co-circulate, as well as for the future development of broad-spectrum flavivirus vaccines.

  5. Human hepatocyte depletion in the presence of HIV-1 infection in dual reconstituted humanized mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghubendra Singh Dagur

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection impairs liver function, and liver diseases have become a leading cause of morbidity in infected patients. The immunopathology of liver damage caused by HIV-1 remains unclear. We used chimeric mice dually reconstituted with a human immune system and hepatocytes to address the relevance of the model to pathobiology questions related to human hepatocyte survival in the presence of systemic infection. TK-NOG males were transplanted with mismatched human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and hepatocytes, human albumin concentration and the presence of human immune cells in blood were monitored for hepatocytes and immune reconstitution, and mice were infected with HIV-1. HIV-1-infected animals showed a decline in human albumin concentration with a significant reduction in percentage of human hepatocytes compared to uninfected mice. The decrease in human albumin levels correlated with a decline in CD4+ cells in the liver and with an increase in HIV-1 viral load. HIV-1 infection elicited proinflammatory response in the immunological milieu of the liver in HIV-infected mice compared to uninfected animals, as determined by upregulation of IL23, CXCL10 and multiple toll-like receptor expression. The inflammatory reaction associated with HIV-1 infection in vivo could contribute to the depletion and dysfunction of hepatocytes. The dual reconstituted TK-NOG mouse model is a feasible platform to investigate hepatocyte-related HIV-1 immunopathogenesis. This article has an associated First Person interview with the first author of the paper.

  6. Interferon production and immune response induction in pathogenic rabies virus-infected mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcovistz, R; Leal, E C; De Souza Matos, D C [Departamento de Immunologia, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Caixa Postal 926, 21045 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Tsiang, H [Service Rage, Istitut Pasteur, Paris (France)

    1994-08-01

    Pathogenic parental rabies virus strain CVS (challenge virus standard) and its apathogenic variant RV194-2 were shown to differ in their ability to induce interferon (IFN) and immune response of the host. After intracerebral inoculation. IFN and antibody production was higher in the RV194-2 virus-infected mice than in the CVS infection. The enhancement of 2-5A synthetase activity, an IFN-mediated enzyme marker, showed biochemical evidence that IFN is active in both apathogenic and pathogenic infections. On the other hand, spontaneous proliferation in vitro of thymocytes and splenocytes from CVS virus-infected mice was strongly inhibited in contrast to the RV194-2 infection. In the CVS infection, the thymocyte proliferation However, in the RV194-2 infection, the thymocyte proliferation was higher than of the splenocytes. These results suggest a better performance of T-cell response to the RV194-2 infection. This fact can be critical for an enhancement of antibody production in the apathogenic infection and subsequent virus clearance from the brain of RV194-2 virus-infected mice. (author) 1 fig., 3 tabs., 32 refs.

  7. Immunomodulatory and protective effect of probiotic Lactobacillus casei against Candida albicans infection in malnourished mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villena, Julio; Salva, Susana; Agüero, Graciela; Alvarez, Susana

    2011-06-01

    The effect of Lactobacillus casei CRL 431 (Lc), when administered as a supplement to a repletion diet, on the resistance of malnourished mice to Candida albicans infection was studied. Weaned mice were malnourished by being given a protein-free diet (PFD) for 21 days. The malnourished mice were then fed a balanced conventional diet (BCD) for 7 days or BCD for 7 days with supplemental Lc on days 6 and 7 (BCD+Lc). Malnourished (MNC) and well-nourished (WNC) mice were used as controls. At the end of the treatments the mice were infected intraperitoneally with C. albicans. Animals that had received probiotics had improved survival and resistance against this infection compared to those in the BCD and MNC groups. The number and fungicidal activity of phagocytes, and the concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ and interleukin-6 (IL-6), increased in blood and infected tissues in all experimental groups, but MNC mice showed lower concentrations than those in the WNC group. BCD and BCD+Lc mice showed higher concentrations of these variables than those in the MNC group, but only the BCD+Lc group presented values similar to the WNC mice. Malnutrition also impaired the production of IL-17 and IL-10 in response to infection. Both repletion treatments normalized IL-17 concentrations, but IL-10 in the BCD+Lc group was significantly higher than in WNC mice. The addition of L. casei to the repletion diet normalized the immune response against C. albicans, allowing efficient recruitment and activation of phagocytes, as well as effective release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, probiotic treatment induced an increase in IL-10 concentrations, which would have helped to prevent damage caused by the inflammatory response. © 2011 The Societies and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. TAM Receptors Are Not Required for Zika Virus Infection in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Andrew K; Yockey, Laura J; Jagger, Brett W; Hwang, Jesse; Uraki, Ryuta; Gaitsch, Hallie F; Parnell, Lindsay A; Cao, Bin; Mysorekar, Indira U; Rothlin, Carla V; Fikrig, Erol; Diamond, Michael S; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2017-04-18

    Tyro3, Axl, and Mertk (TAM) receptors are candidate entry receptors for infection with the Zika virus (ZIKV), an emerging flavivirus of global public health concern. To investigate the requirement of TAM receptors for ZIKV infection, we used several routes of viral inoculation and compared viral replication in wild-type versus Axl -/- , Mertk -/- , Axl -/- Mertk -/- , and Axl -/- Tyro3 -/- mice in various organs. Pregnant and non-pregnant mice treated with interferon-α-receptor (IFNAR)-blocking (MAR1-5A3) antibody and infected subcutaneously with ZIKV showed no reliance on TAMs for infection. In the absence of IFNAR-blocking antibody, adult female mice challenged intravaginally with ZIKV showed no difference in mucosal viral titers. Similarly, in young mice that were infected with ZIKV intracranially or intraperitoneally, ZIKV replication occurred in the absence of TAM receptors, and no differences in cell tropism were observed. These findings indicate that, in mice, TAM receptors are not required for ZIKV entry and infection. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Evolution of sarcoma 180 (ascitic tumor in mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Edmundo Lima Pereira

    1986-03-01

    Full Text Available Mice infected with 60 cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni were more resistant to the sarcoma 180 ascites tumor. Tumor inoculation was performed 50 days after schistosoma infection and the animals were observed and weighed at 48 hours intervals for development and progression of malignancy. In infected mice the weight gain (ascites formation started later and was shorter than in uninfected Controls. Also, the number of tumor cells into the peritoneal cavity 72h after tumor implantation was shorter in infected group than incontrols. This in creased resistance against a transplantable tumor probably is related to the effect of endotoxin on tumoricidal activity of macrophages activated by the infection. The immunodepression induced by Schistosoma mansoni infection enhances the proliferation of endogenous bacteria increasing the amount of endotoxin absorbed from the gut.

  10. Protein-energy malnutrition alters IgA responses to rotavirus vaccination and infection but does not impair vaccine efficacy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Elizabeth A; Weage, Kristina J; Guedes, Marjorie M; Denson, Lee A; McNeal, Monica M; Bernstein, David I; Moore, Sean R

    2013-12-17

    Conflicting evidence links malnutrition to the reduced efficacy of rotavirus vaccines in developing countries, where diarrhea and undernutrition remain leading causes of child deaths. Here, we adapted mouse models of rotavirus vaccination (rhesus rotavirus, RRV), rotavirus infection (EDIM), and protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) to test the hypothesis that undernutrition reduces rotavirus vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy. We randomized wild type Balb/C dams with 3-day-old pups to a control diet (CD) or an isocaloric, multideficient regional basic diet (RBD) that produces PEM. At 3 weeks of age, we weaned CD and RBD pups to their dams' diet and subrandomized weanlings to receive a single dose of either live oral rotavirus vaccine (RRV) or PBS. At 6 weeks of age, we orally challenged all groups with murine rotavirus (EDIM). Serum and stool specimens were collected before and after RRV and EDIM administration to measure viral shedding and antibody responses by ELISA. RBD pups and weanlings exhibited significant failure to thrive compared to age-matched CD mice (Pvaccination induced higher levels of serum anti-RV IgA responses in RBD vs. CD mice (PVaccination protected CD and RBD mice equally against EDIM infection, as measured by viral shedding. In unvaccinated RBD mice, EDIM shedding peaked 1 day earlier (Pvaccination (Pvaccination mitigated stool IgA responses to EDIM more in CD vs. RBD mice (Pvaccination and infection, undernutrition does not impair rotavirus vaccine efficacy nor exacerbate infection in this mouse model of protein-energy malnutrition. Alternative models are needed to elucidate host-pathogen factors undermining rotavirus vaccine effectiveness in high-risk global settings. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Some putative prebiotics increase the severity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anne; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Pedersen, Anna Lovmand

    2009-01-01

    containing 10% of either of the following carbohydrates: inulin, fructo-oligosaccharide, xylo-oligosaccharide, galacto-oligosaccharide, apple pectin, polydextrose or beta-glucan for three weeks prior to oral Salmonella challenge (107 CFU) and compared to mice fed a cornstarch-based control diet. RESULTS...

  12. Oral Administration of Vanillin Improves Imiquimod-Induced Psoriatic Skin Inflammation in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hui-Man; Chen, Feng-Yuan; Li, Chia-Cheng; Lo, Hsin-Yi; Liao, Yi-Fang; Ho, Tin-Yun; Hsiang, Chien-Yun

    2017-11-29

    Vanillin is one of the most widely used flavoring products worldwide. Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder. The interleukin-23 (IL-23)/interleukin-17 (IL-17) axis plays a critical role in psoriasis. Here, we analyzed the effect of vanillin on imiquimod (IMQ)-induced psoriatic skin inflammation in mice. Mice were treated topically with IMQ on the back skin and orally with various amounts of vanillin for 7 consecutive days. Vanillin significantly improved IMQ-induced histopathological changes of skin in a dose-dependent manner. The thickness and number of cell layers of epidermis were reduced by 29 ± 14.4 and 27.8 ± 11%, respectively, in mice given 100 mg/kg of vanillin. A microarray showed that a total of 9042 IMQ-upregulated genes were downregulated by vanillin, and the biological pathways involved in the immune system and metabolism were significantly altered by vanillin. The upregulated expressions of IL-23, IL-17A, and IL-17F genes were suppressed by vanillin, with fold changes of -3.07 ± 0.08, -2.06 ± 0.21, and -1.62 ± 0.21, respectively. Moreover, vanillin significantly decreased both the amounts of IL-17A and IL-23 and the infiltration of immune cells in the skin tissues of IMQ-treated mice. In conclusion, our findings suggested that vanillin was an effective bioactive compound against psoriatic skin inflammation. Moreover, the downregulation of IL-23 and IL-17 expression suggested that vanillin was a novel regulator of the IL-23/IL-17 axis.

  13. Sex differences in shotgun proteome analyses for chronic oral intake of cadmium in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiharu Yamanobe

    Full Text Available Environmental diseases related to cadmium exposure primarily develop owing to industrial wastewater pollution and/or contaminated food. In regions with high cadmium exposure in Japan, cadmium accumulation occurs primarily in the kidneys of individuals who are exposed to the metal. In contrast, in the itai-itai disease outbreak that occurred in the Jinzu River basin in Toyama Prefecture in Japan, cadmium primarily accumulated in the liver. On the other hand, high concentration of cadmium caused renal tubular disorder and osteomalacia (multiple bone fracture, probably resulting from the renal tubular dysfunction and additional pathology. In this study, we aimed to establish a mouse model of chronic cadmium intake. We administered cadmium-containing drinking water (32 mg/l to female and male mice ad libitum for 11 weeks. Metal analysis using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry revealed that cadmium accumulated in the kidneys (927 x 10 + 185 ng/g in females and 661 x 10 + 101 ng/g in males, liver (397 x 10 + 199 ng/g in females and 238 x 10 + 652 ng/g in males, and thyroid gland (293 + 93.7 ng/g in females and 129 + 72.7 ng/g in males of mice. Female mice showed higher cadmium accumulation in the kidney, liver, and thyroid gland than males did (p = 0.00345, p = 0.00213, and p = 0.0331, respectively. Shotgun proteome analyses after chronic oral administration of cadmium revealed that protein levels of glutathione S-transferase Mu2, Mu4, and Mu7 decreased in the liver, and those of A1 and A2 decreased in the kidneys in both female and male mice.

  14. Lycorine reduces mortality of human enterovirus 71-infected mice by inhibiting virus replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Chuan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human enterovirus 71 (EV71 infection causes hand, foot and mouth disease in children under 6 years old and this infection occasionally induces severe neurological complications. No vaccines or drugs are clinical available to control EV71 epidemics. In present study, we show that treatment with lycorine reduced the viral cytopathic effect (CPE on rhabdomyosarcoma (RD cells by inhibiting virus replication. Analysis of this inhibitory effect of lycorine on viral proteins synthesis suggests that lycorine blocks the elongation of the viral polyprotein during translation. Lycorine treatment of mice challenged with a lethal dose of EV71 resulted in reduction of mortality, clinical scores and pathological changes in the muscles of mice, which were achieved through inhibition of viral replication. When mice were infected with a moderate dose of EV71, lycorine treatment was able to protect them from paralysis. Lycorine may be a potential drug candidate for the clinical treatment of EV71-infected patients.

  15. Synthetic analogues of bovine bactenecin dodecapeptide reduce herpes simplex virus type 2 infectivity in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, Håvard; Shestakov, Andrey; Hancock, Robert E. W

    2013-01-01

    We have evaluated the potential of four synthetic peptides (denoted HH-2, 1002, 1006, 1018) with a distant relationship to the host defense peptide bovine bactenecin dodecapeptide for their ability to prevent genital infections with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) in mice. All four peptides...... infectious doses of HSV-2. These data show that peptides HH-2 and 1018 have antiviral properties and can be used to prevent genital herpes infection in mice. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....... was introduced in human semen. Two of the peptides proved especially effective in reducing HSV-2 infection also in vivo. When admixed with virus prior to inoculation, both HH-2 and 1018 reduced viral replication and disease development in a genital model of HSV-2 infection in mice, and also when using very high...

  16. Reduced infectivity of waterborne viable but nonculturable Helicobacter pylori strain SS1 in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehnke, Kevin F; Eaton, Kathryn A; Fontaine, Clinton; Brewster, Rebecca; Wu, Jianfeng; Eisenberg, Joseph N S; Valdivieso, Manuel; Baker, Laurence H; Xi, Chuanwu

    2017-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection has been consistently associated with lack of access to clean water and proper sanitation, but no studies have demonstrated that the transmission of viable but nonculturable (VBNC) H. pylori can occur from drinking contaminated water. In this study, we used a laboratory mouse model to test whether waterborne VBNCH. pylori could cause gastric infection. We performed five mouse experiments to assess the infectivity of VBNCH. pylori in various exposure scenarios. VBNC viability was examined using Live/Dead staining and Biolog phenotype metabolism arrays. High doses of VBNCH. pylori in water were chosen to test the "worst-case" scenario for different periods of time. One experiment also investigated the infectious capabilities of VBNC SS1 using gavage. Further, immunocompromised mice were exposed to examine infectivity among potentially vulnerable groups. After exposure, mice were euthanized and their stomachs were examined for H. pylori infection using culture and PCR methodology. VBNC cells were membrane intact and retained metabolic activity. Mice exposed to VBNCH. pylori via drinking water and gavage were not infected, despite the various exposure scenarios (immunocompromised, high doses) that might have permitted infection with VBNCH. pylori. The positive controls exposed to viable, culturable H. pylori did become infected. While other studies that have used viable, culturable SS1 via gavage or drinking water exposures to successfully infect mice, in our study, waterborne VBNC SS1 failed to colonize mice under all test conditions. Future studies could examine different H. pylori strains in similar exposure scenarios to compare the relative infectivity of the VBNC vs the viable, culturable state, which would help inform future risk assessments of H. pylori in water. © 2017 The Authors. Helicobacter Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Vitamin B5 Reduces Bacterial Growth via Regulating Innate Immunity and Adaptive Immunity in Mice Infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenting He

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which vitamins regulate immunity and their effect as an adjuvant treatment for tuberculosis have gradually become very important research topics. Studies have found that vitamin B5 (VB5 can promote epithelial cells to express inflammatory cytokines. We aimed to examine the proinflammatory and antibacterial effect of VB5 in macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB strain H37Rv and the therapeutic potential of VB5 in vivo with tuberculosis. We investigated the activation of inflammatory signal molecules (NF-κB, AKT, JNK, ERK, and p38, the expression of two primary inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-6 and the bacterial burdens in H37Rv-infected macrophages stimulated with VB5 to explore the effect of VB5 on the inflammatory and antibacterial responses of macrophages. We further treated the H37Rv-infected mice with VB5 to explore VB5’s promotion of the clearance of H37Rv in the lungs and the effect of VB5 on regulating the percentage of inflammatory cells. Our data showed that VB5 enhanced the phagocytosis and inflammatory response in macrophages infected with H37Rv. Oral administration of VB5 decreased the number of colony-forming units of H37Rv in lungs of mice at 1, 2, and 4 weeks after infection. In addition, VB5 regulated the percentage of macrophages and promoted CD4+ T cells to express interferon-γ and interleukin-17; however, it had no effect on the percentage of polymorphonuclear neutrophils, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. In conclusion, VB5 significantly inhibits the growth of MTB by regulating innate immunity and adaptive immunity.

  18. Effect of infection by irradiated Trichinella Spirals larvae on mice and assessment the role of Al bendazole in treating them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moawad, M.A.F.; Amin, M.M.

    2005-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of infection with irradiated Trichinella Spiralis larvae on mice and to asses the role of albendazole in treating them. This study included parasitological and histopathological studies on mice infected with irradiated Trichinella Spiralis larvae in comparison with mice infected with non-irradiated Trichinella Spiralis only or with mice treated after infection by albendazole. The obtained data revealed that, in mice infected with irradiated Trichinella Spiralis larvae (50 Krad or 80 Krad), the number and length of worms in the small intestine, as well as, the number of encysted larvae in muscles of mice, especially diaphragm and tongue, were significantly decreased. Also, using al bendazole 24 hours after infection with irradiated larvae lead to high significant decrease in all the previously mentioned parameters

  19. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is more severe in Th2 responding BALB/c mice compared to Th1 responding C3H/HeN mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moser, C; Johansen, H K; Song, Z

    1997-01-01

    model of this infection was established in two strains of mice: C3H/HeN and BALB/c, generally known as Th1 and Th2 responders, respectively, which were challenged with alginate-embedded P. aeruginosa. Mortality was significantly lower in C3H/HeN compared to BALB/c mice (p ... was cleared more efficiently in C3H/HeN mice and significantly more C3H/HeN mice showed normal lung histopathology (p BALB/c mice (p ... from the two strains of mice, the interferon-(IFN-) gamma levels were higher, whereas IL-4 levels were lower in C3H/HeN mice than in BALB/c mice. The implications of these findings for CF patients with chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection are discussed....

  20. [Calbindin and parvalbumin distribution in spinal cord of normal and rabies-infected mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroy-Gómez, Jeison; Torres-Fernández, Orlando

    2013-01-01

    Rabies is a fatal infectious disease of the nervous system; however, the knowledge about the pathogenic neural mechanisms in rabies is scarce. In addition, there are few studies of rabies pathology of the spinal cord. To study the distribution of calcium binding proteins calbindin and parvalbumin and assessing the effect of rabies virus infection on their expression in the spinal cord of mice. MATERIALES Y METHODS: Mice were inoculated with rabies virus, by intracerebral or intramuscular route. The spinal cord was extracted to perform some crosscuts which were treated by immunohistochemistry with monoclonal antibodies to reveal the presence of the two proteins in normal and rabies infected mice. We did qualitative and quantitative analyses of the immunoreactivity of the two proteins. Calbindin and parvalbumin showed differential distribution in Rexed laminae. Rabies infection produced a decrease in the expression of calbindin. On the contrary, the infection caused an increased expression of parvalbumin. The effect of rabies infection on the two proteins expression was similar when comparing both routes of inoculation. The differential effect of rabies virus infection on the expression of calbindin and parvalbumin in the spinal cord of mice was similar to that previously reported for brain areas. This result suggests uniformity in the response to rabies infection throughout the central nervous system. This is an important contribution to the understanding of the pathogenesis of rabies.

  1. Oral keratinocytes support non-replicative infection and transfer of harbored HIV-1 to permissive cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacharaksa, Anjalee; Asrani, Anil C; Gebhard, Kristin H; Fasching, Claudine E; Giacaman, Rodrigo A; Janoff, Edward N; Ross, Karen F; Herzberg, Mark C

    2008-07-17

    Oral keratinocytes on the mucosal surface are frequently exposed to HIV-1 through contact with infected sexual partners or nursing mothers. To determine the plausibility that oral keratinocytes are primary targets of HIV-1, we tested the hypothesis that HIV-1 infects oral keratinocytes in a restricted manner. To study the fate of HIV-1, immortalized oral keratinocytes (OKF6/TERT-2; TERT-2 cells) were characterized for the fate of HIV-specific RNA and DNA. At 6 h post inoculation with X4 or R5-tropic HIV-1, HIV-1gag RNA was detected maximally within TERT-2 cells. Reverse transcriptase activity in TERT-2 cells was confirmed by VSV-G-mediated infection with HIV-NL4-3Deltaenv-EGFP. AZT inhibited EGFP expression in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that viral replication can be supported if receptors are bypassed. Within 3 h post inoculation, integrated HIV-1 DNA was detected in TERT-2 cell nuclei and persisted after subculture. Multiply spliced and unspliced HIV-1 mRNAs were not detectable up to 72 h post inoculation, suggesting that HIV replication may abort and that infection is non-productive. Within 48 h post inoculation, however, virus harbored by CD4 negative TERT-2 cells trans infected co-cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) or MOLT4 cells (CD4+ CCR5+) by direct cell-to-cell transfer or by releasing low levels of infectious virions. Primary tonsil epithelial cells also trans infected HIV-1 to permissive cells in a donor-specific manner. Oral keratinocytes appear, therefore, to support stable non-replicative integration, while harboring and transmitting infectious X4- or R5-tropic HIV-1 to permissive cells for up to 48 h.

  2. Oral keratinocytes support non-replicative infection and transfer of harbored HIV-1 to permissive cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacaman Rodrigo A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral keratinocytes on the mucosal surface are frequently exposed to HIV-1 through contact with infected sexual partners or nursing mothers. To determine the plausibility that oral keratinocytes are primary targets of HIV-1, we tested the hypothesis that HIV-1 infects oral keratinocytes in a restricted manner. Results To study the fate of HIV-1, immortalized oral keratinocytes (OKF6/TERT-2; TERT-2 cells were characterized for the fate of HIV-specific RNA and DNA. At 6 h post inoculation with X4 or R5-tropic HIV-1, HIV-1gag RNA was detected maximally within TERT-2 cells. Reverse transcriptase activity in TERT-2 cells was confirmed by VSV-G-mediated infection with HIV-NL4-3Δenv-EGFP. AZT inhibited EGFP expression in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that viral replication can be supported if receptors are bypassed. Within 3 h post inoculation, integrated HIV-1 DNA was detected in TERT-2 cell nuclei and persisted after subculture. Multiply spliced and unspliced HIV-1 mRNAs were not detectable up to 72 h post inoculation, suggesting that HIV replication may abort and that infection is non-productive. Within 48 h post inoculation, however, virus harbored by CD4 negative TERT-2 cells trans infected co-cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs or MOLT4 cells (CD4+ CCR5+ by direct cell-to-cell transfer or by releasing low levels of infectious virions. Primary tonsil epithelial cells also trans infected HIV-1 to permissive cells in a donor-specific manner. Conclusion Oral keratinocytes appear, therefore, to support stable non-replicative integration, while harboring and transmitting infectious X4- or R5-tropic HIV-1 to permissive cells for up to 48 h.

  3. Plant-based vaccines for oral delivery of type 1 diabetes-related autoantigens: Evaluating oral tolerance mechanisms and disease prevention in NOD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posgai, Amanda L; Wasserfall, Clive H; Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Daniell, Henry; Schatz, Desmond A; Atkinson, Mark A

    2017-02-13

    Autoantigen-specific immunological tolerance represents a central objective for prevention of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Previous studies demonstrated mucosal antigen administration results in expansion of Foxp3 + and LAP + regulatory T cells (Tregs), suggesting oral delivery of self-antigens might represent an effective means for modulating autoimmune disease. Early preclinical experiments using the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model reported mucosal administration of T1D-related autoantigens [proinsulin or glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD)] delayed T1D onset, but published data are conflicting regarding dose, treatment duration, requirement for combinatorial agents, and extent of efficacy. Recently, dogma was challenged in a report demonstrating oral insulin does not prevent T1D in NOD mice, possibly due to antigen digestion prior to mucosal immune exposure. We used transplastomic plants expressing proinsulin and GAD to protect the autoantigens from degradation in an oral vaccine and tested the optimal combination, dose, and treatment duration for the prevention of T1D in NOD mice. Our data suggest oral autoantigen therapy alone does not effectively influence disease incidence or result in antigen-specific tolerance assessed by IL-10 measurement and Treg frequency. A more aggressive approach involving tolerogenic cytokine administration and/or lymphocyte depletion prior to oral antigen-specific immunotherapy will likely be required to impart durable therapeutic efficacy.

  4. Targeted photodynamic therapy of established soft-tissue infections in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, Faten; Zahra, Touqir; Hasan, Tayyaba; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2004-06-01

    The worldwide rise in antibiotic resistance necessitates the development of novel antimicrobial strategies. Although many workers have used photodynamic therapy (PDT) to kill bacteria in vitro, the use of this approach has seldom been reported in vivo in animal models of infection. We have previously described the first use of PDT to treat excisional wound infections by Gram-negative bacteria in living mice. However these infected wound models used a short time after infection (30 min) before PDT. We now report on the use of PDT to treat an established soft-tissue infection in mice. We used Staphylococcus aureus stably transformed with a Photorhabdus luminescens lux operon (luxABCDE) that was genetically modified to be functional in Gram-positive bacteria. These engineered bacteria emitted bioluminescence allowing the progress of the infection to be monitored in both space and time with a lowlight imaging charged couple device (CCD) camera. One million cells were injected into one or both thigh muscles of mice that had previously been rendered neutropenic by cyclophosphamide administration. Twenty-four hours later the bacteria had multiplied more than one hundred-fold, and poly-L-lysine chlorin(e6) conjugate or free chlorin(e6) was injected into one area of infected muscle and imaged with the CCD camera. Thirty-minutes later red light from a diode laser was delivered as a surface spot or by interstitial fiber into the infection. There was a lightdose dependent loss of bioluminescence (to resistant soft-tissue infections.

  5. Petiveria alliacea L. extract protects mice against Listeria monocytogenes infection--effects on bone marrow progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadros, M R; Souza Brito, A R; Queiroz, M L

    1999-02-01

    In this study we have investigated the effects of Petiveria alliacea on the hematopoietic response of mice infected with Listeria monocytogenes. Our results demonstrate a protective effect of the crude extract of P. alliacea since the survival of the treated/infected was higher than that in the infected group. Moreover, the number of granulocyte/macrophage colonies (CFU-GM) and the serum colony stimulating activity levels were increased in the treated/infected mice in relation to the infected group. These results suggest an immunomodulation of Petiveria alliacea extract on hematopoiesis, which may be responsible, at least in part, for the increased resistance of mice to Listeria monocytogenes infection.

  6. Oral Yeast Colonization and Fungal Infections in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Simões-Silva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Peritonitis and exit-site infections are important complications in peritoneal dialysis (PD patients that are occasionally caused by opportunistic fungi inhabiting distant body sites. In this study, the oral yeast colonization of PD patients and the antifungal susceptibility profile of the isolated yeasts were accessed and correlated with fungal infection episodes in the following 4 years. Saliva yeast colonization was accessed in 21 PD patients and 27 healthy controls by growth in CHROMagar-Candida® and 18S rRNA/ITS sequencing. PD patients presented a lower oral yeast prevalence when compared to controls, namely, Candida albicans. Other species were also isolated, Candida glabrata and Candida carpophila. The antifungal susceptibility profiles of these isolates revealed resistance to itraconazole, variable susceptibility to caspofungin, and higher MIC values of posaconazole compared to previous reports. The 4-year longitudinal evaluation of these patients revealed Candida parapsilosis and Candida zeylanoides as PD-related exit-site infectious agents, but no correlation was found with oral yeast colonization. This pilot study suggests that oral yeast colonization may represent a limited risk for fungal infection development in PD patients. Oral yeast isolates presented a variable antifungal susceptibility profile, which may suggest resistance to some second-line drugs, highlighting the importance of antifungal susceptibility assessment in the clinical practice.

  7. Hepatitis C virus infections in oral lichen planus: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaizari, N A; Al-Maweri, S A; Al-Shamiri, H M; Tarakji, B; Shugaa-Addin, B

    2016-09-01

    A role for hepatitis C virus in oral lichen planus has been postulated. This systematic review and meta-analysis of the existing epidemiological studies was conducted to determine if there is a correlation between oral lichen planus and hepatitis C virus infection. We examined the association between hepatitis C virus and oral lichen planus by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis of case-control studies that examined the prevalence of anti-HCV antibodies in the serum of cases and controls. We searched PubMed, Embase and The Cochrane Library databases from 2005 to January 2015. Associations were measured using random-effect odds ratios (ORs) combined with 95% confidence intervals. Nineteen eligible studies, encompassing 1807 cases of OLP and 2519 controls, were retrieved and included in this review. The summary estimate OR for all studies was 6.07 (95% CI: 2.73-13.48), showing a statistically significant difference in the proportion of HCV seropositivity among oral lichen planus patients, compared with controls and substantial heterogeneity between studies (I(2) = 65%) as a result of a variety of geographical distributions. The association of hepatitis C virus infection with oral lichen planus emphasizes the importance of hepatitis C virus screening in oral lichen planus patients. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  8. Coenzyme Q10 prevented full blown splenomegaly and decreased melarsoprol-induced reactive encephalopathy in mice infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Nyabuga Nyariki

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To establish the modulatory effects of coenzyme Q10 on experimental trypanosome infections in mice and evaluate the risk of occurrence and severity of melarsoprol-induced post treatment reactive encephalopathy (PTRE. Methods: Female Swiss white mice were orally administered with 200 mg/kg of coenzyme Q10 after which they were intraperitoneally inoculated with Trypanasoma brucei rhodesiense (T. b. rhodesiense. The resultant infection was allowed to develop and simulate all phases of human African trypanosomiasis and PTRE. Parasitaemia development, packed cell volume, haematological and pathological changes were determined. Results: A histological study in the brain tissue of T. b. rhodesiense infected mice demonstrated neuroinflammatory pathology which was highly amplified in the PTRE-induced groups. A prominent reduction in the severity of the neuroinflammatory response was detected when coenzyme-Q10 was administered. Furthermore, the mean tissue weight of spleen to body ratio in coenzyme Q10 supplemented group was significantly (P<0.05 different compared to un-supplemented groups, and clearly indicated that coenzyme Q10 prevented full blown splenomegaly pathogenesis by T. b. rhodesiense. A significant (P<0.05 increase in hemoglobin levels and red blood cells was observed in coenzyme Q10 mice compared to those infected and un-supplemented with coenzyme Q10. Conclusions: The capacity of coenzyme Q10 to alter the pathogenesis of T. b. rhodesiense infection in mice and following treatment with melarsoprol, may find application by rendering humans and animals less susceptible to deleterious effects of trypanosome infection such as splenomegaly and melarsoprol-induced PTRE and neurotoxicity.

  9. Oral Candida spp carriage and periodontal diseases in HIV-infected patients in Ribeirão Preto, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Alan Grupioni; Ribeiro, Ana Elisa Rodrigues Alves; Nakao, Cristiano; Motta, Ana Carolina Fragoso; Antonio, Luana Grupioni Lourenço; Machado, Alcyone Artioli; Komesu, Marilena Chinali

    2017-06-01

    The majority of HIV-infected patients develop Candida spp-associated clinical oral lesions. Studies have shown that asymptomatic oral colonization of Candida spp may lead to oral lesions or become a source of disseminated infections. The aim of this study was to verify the effects of periodontal conditions on Candida spp prevalence and Candida spp carriage in the oral cavity of HIV-infected patients compared to non-infected patients. Twenty-five patients not infected with HIV and 48 HIV-infected patients were classified according to periodontal conditions as being periodontal healthy or with periodontal disease. Candida spp carriage and classification were performed in oral rinse samples. Viral load and CD4+ T lymphocyte (CD4+L) counts were performed in blood samples from HIV-infected patients. No differences in Candida spp prevalence related to HIV status or periodontal condition were detected. However, Candida spp carriage was increased in periodontally affected HIV-infected patients when compared to periodontally healthy HIV-infected patients (p= 0.04). Periodontally healthy HIV-infected patients presented Candida spp carriage in similar levels as healthy or periodontally affected non-HIV-infected patients. Candida spp carriage was correlated with CD4+L counting in HIV-infected patients. We concluded that periodontal disease is associated with increased Candida spp carriage in HIV-infected patients and may be a predisposing factor to clinical manifestations of candidiasis.

  10. Policies and protocols for preventing transmission of HIV infection in oral health care in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunbodede, E O; Rudolph, M J

    2002-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection constitutes an unparalleled public health challenge. The unique nature of most oral health procedures, instrumentation and patient-care settings requires specific strategies and protocols aimed at preventing the transmission of HIV/AIDS between oral health care providers and patients, as well as between patients themselves. The present study investigated the level of information and training about protocols and policies for preventing the transmission of HIV/AIDS in oral health care settings in South Africa. The data collection techniques utilised available information, in-depth interviews and an open-ended questionnaire. The respondents were 20 purposively selected key informants who were senior officers for HIV/AIDS programmes and/or oral health organisations. Sixteen (80%) of the respondents reported that there were no existing oral health policies on HIV/AIDS in their health care institutions or organisations. None of the interviewees knew of any specific protocols on HIV/AIDS in the oral health care setting that emanated from South Africa. In addition, none of the dental professional associations had established an infection control committee or a support system for members who might become infected with HIV and develop AIDS. Territorial boundaries existed between sectors within the medical disciplines, as well as between the medical and oral health disciplines. Numerous general impediments were identified, such as prejudice, denial and fear, inadequate training and/or information about the infection, lack of representation and resources for policy planning, a lack of interest from the business sector, and approaching HIV/AIDS in the workplace as a 'one-time issue' Other obstacles identified included unemployment, poverty, illiteracy, disempowerment of women and inadequate communication of policies to service providers. Additional issues raised included the migrant labour systeM, complexities of language and culture

  11. Increased Susceptibility of Humanized NSG Mice to Panton-Valentine Leukocidin and Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection.

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    Ching Wen Tseng

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of skin and soft-tissue infections worldwide. Mice are the most commonly used animals for modeling human staphylococcal infections. However a supra-physiologic S. aureus inoculum is required to establish gross murine skin pathology. Moreover, many staphylococcal factors, including Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL elaborated by community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA, exhibit selective human tropism and cannot be adequately studied in mice. To overcome these deficiencies, we investigated S. aureus infection in non-obese diabetic (NOD/severe combined immune deficiency (SCID/IL2rγnull (NSG mice engrafted with human CD34+ umbilical cord blood cells. These "humanized" NSG mice require one to two log lower inoculum to induce consistent skin lesions compared with control mice, and exhibit larger cutaneous lesions upon infection with PVL+ versus isogenic PVL- S. aureus. Neutrophils appear important for PVL pathology as adoptive transfer of human neutrophils alone to NSG mice was sufficient to induce dermonecrosis following challenge with PVL+ S. aureus but not PVL- S. aureus. PMX53, a human C5aR inhibitor, blocked PVL-induced cellular cytotoxicity in vitro and reduced the size difference of lesions induced by the PVL+ and PVL- S. aureus, but PMX53 also reduced recruitment of neutrophils and exacerbated the infection. Overall, our findings establish humanized mice as an important translational tool for the study of S. aureus infection and provide strong evidence that PVL is a human virulence factor.

  12. Utility of humanized BLT mice for analysis of dengue virus infection and antiviral drug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frias-Staheli, Natalia; Dorner, Marcus; Marukian, Svetlana; Billerbeck, Eva; Labitt, Rachael N; Rice, Charles M; Ploss, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the cause of a potentially life-threatening disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The lack of a small animal model that mimics the symptoms of DENV infection in humans has slowed the understanding of viral pathogenesis and the development of therapies and vaccines. Here, we investigated the use of humanized "bone marrow liver thymus" (BLT) mice as a model for immunological studies and assayed their applicability for preclinical testing of antiviral compounds. Human immune system (HIS) BLT-NOD/SCID mice were inoculated intravenously with a low-passage, clinical isolate of DENV-2, and this resulted in sustained viremia and infection of leukocytes in lymphoid and nonlymphoid organs. In addition, DENV infection increased serum cytokine levels and elicited DENV-2-neutralizing human IgM antibodies. Following restimulation with DENV-infected dendritic cells, in vivo-primed T cells became activated and acquired effector function. An adenosine nucleoside inhibitor of DENV decreased the circulating viral RNA when administered simultaneously or 2 days postinfection, simulating a potential treatment protocol for DENV infection in humans. In summary, we demonstrate that BLT mice are susceptible to infection with clinical DENV isolates, mount virus-specific adaptive immune responses, and respond to antiviral drug treatment. Although additional refinements to the model are required, BLT mice are a suitable platform to study aspects of DENV infection and pathogenesis and for preclinical testing of drug and vaccine candidates. IMPORTANCE Infection with dengue virus remains a major medical problem. Progress in our understanding of the disease and development of therapeutics has been hampered by the scarcity of small animal models. Here, we show that humanized mice, i.e., animals engrafted with components of a human immune system, that were infected with a patient-derived dengue virus strain developed clinical symptoms of the disease and mounted

  13. The role of black-pigmented Bacteroides in human oral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Winkelhoff, A J; van Steenbergen, T J; de Graaff, J

    1988-03-01

    Today, 10 black-pigmented Bacteroides (BPB) species are recognized. The majority of these species can be isolated from the oral cavity. BPB species are involved in anaerobic infections of oral and non-oral sites. In the oral cavity, BPB species are associated with gingivitis, periodontitis, endodontal infections and odontogenic abscesses. Cultural studies suggest a specific role of the various BPB species in the different types of infection. Bacteroides gingivalis is closely correlated with destructive periodontitis in adults as well as in juveniles. Bacteroides intermedius seems to be less specific since it is found in gingivitis, periodontitis, endodontal infections and odontogenic abscesses. The recently described Bacteroides endodontalis is closely associated with endodontal infections and odontogenic abscesses of endodontal origin. There are indications that these periodontopathic BPB species are only present in the oral cavity of subjects suffering from periodontal breakdown, being absent on the mucosal surfaces of subjects without periodontal breakdown. BPB species associated with healthy oral conditions are Bacteroides melaninogenicus, Bacteroides denticola and Bacteroides loescheii. There are indications that these BPB species are part of the normal indigenous oral microflora. Many studies in the past have documented the pathogenic potential and virulence of BPB species. This virulence can be explained by the large numbers of virulence factors demonstrated in this group of micro-organisms. Among others, the proteolytic activity seems to be one of the most important features. Several artificial substrates as well as numerous biological proteins are degraded. These include anti-inflammatory proteins such as alpha-2-macroglobulin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, C3 and C5 complement factors and immunoglobulins. B. gingivalis is by far the most proteolytic species, followed by B. endodontalis. Like other bacteria, the lipopolysaccharide of B. gingivalis has shown to be

  14. Modulation of ovomucoid-specific oral tolerance in mice fed plant extracts containing lectins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Tanja; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the effect of feeding extracts of four different legumes (red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), peanut (Arachis hypogaea), soyabean (Glycine max) and pea (Pisum sativum) on the specific immune response against a food protein. Mice were fed ovomucoid and the specific immune response...... influenced the immune response against ovomucoid; however, this was not as pronounced as for kidney bean and was only significant (Ppea extract was fed and peanut extract had a non-significant effect on induction of oral tolerance...... and on the general immune response. Plasma antibodies against kidney-bean lectin, but not against the three other legume lectins, were detected. Our current findings show that other dietary components can influence the specific immune response against food proteins. Various dietary components may thus contribute...

  15. ORAL REHYDRATION THERAPY INTESTINAL INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN, WHICH SOLUTION TO CHOOSE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Novokshonov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the data of the literature about the history of the development and introduction into clinical practice the method of oral rehydration, the clinical efficacy of standard hyperosmolar glucose-saline solutions, recommended by WHO and new solutions hyperosmolar ESPGHAN for relief exsicosis (dehydration syndrome in intestinal infections of various etiologies and types of diarrhea in children. 

  16. The risk of HIV infection being transmitted by the oral route | Matee ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Apparently, the risk of HIV infection being transmitted by the oral route is small. This information should serve to alleviate fears and concerns of the rapidly growing number of household members and other close. contacts of patients with AIDS, professionals attending these patients, as well as the population at large.

  17. Influence of environmental enrichment on the behavior and physiology of mice infected by Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Déborah Maria Moreira da Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract INTRODUCTION: Enriched environments normally increase behavioral repertoires and diminish the expression of abnormal behaviors and stress-related physiological problems in animals. Although it has been shown that experimental animals infected with microorganisms can modify their behaviors and physiology, few studies have evaluated how environmental enrichment affects these parameters. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of environmental enrichment on the behavior and physiology of confined mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. METHODS: The behaviors of 20 T. cruzi-infected mice and 20 non-infected mice were recorded during three treatments: baseline, enrichment, and post-enrichment. Behavioral data were collected using scan sampling with instantaneous recording of behavior every 30s, totaling 360h. Plasma TNF, CCL2, and IL-10 levels and parasitemia were also evaluated in infected enriched/non-enriched mice. Behavioral data were evaluated by Friedman’s test and physiological data by one-way ANOVA and area under the curve (AUC analysis. RESULTS: Results showed that environmental enrichment significantly increased exploratory behaviors and diminished inactivity. The use of environmental enrichment did not diminish circulating levels of TNF and IL-10 but diminished circulating levels of CCL2 and parasitemia. CONCLUSIONS: Positive behavioral and physiological effects of environmental enrichment were observed in mice living in enriched cages. Thus, environmental enrichment improved the welfare of these animals.

  18. Evidence supporting pre-radiation elimination of oral foci of infection in head and neck cancer patients to prevent oral sequelae. A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurhuis, Jennifer M.; Stokman, Monique A.; Witjes, Max J. H.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Vissink, Arjan; Spijkervet, Frederik K. L.

    Pre-radiation dental screening of head-neck cancer patients aims to identify and eliminate oral foci of infection to prevent post-radiation oral problems. The evidence for the efficacy of dental screening is unclear. In this systematic review, we analyzed available evidence on the efficacy of

  19. The oral and conjunctival microbiotas in cats with and without feline immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weese, Scott J; Nichols, Jamieson; Jalali, Mohammad; Litster, Annette

    2015-03-03

    The oral and conjunctival microbiotas likely play important roles in protection from opportunistic infections, while also being the source of potential pathogens. Yet, there has been limited investigation in cats, and the impact of comorbidities such as feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection has not been reported. Oral and conjunctival swabs were collected from cats with FIV infection and FIV-uninfected controls, and subjected to 16S rRNA gene (V4) PCR and next generation sequencing. 9,249 OTUs were identified from conjunctival swabs, yet the most common 20 (0.22%) OTUs accounted for 76% of sequences. The two most abundant OTUs both belonged to Staphylococcus, and accounted for 37% of sequences. Cats with FIV infection had significantly lower relative abundances of Verrucomicrobia, Fibrobacteres, Spirochaetes, Bacteroidetes and Tenericutes, and a higher relative abundance of Deinococcus-Thermus. There were significant differences in both community membership (P = 0.006) and community structure (P = 0.02) between FIV-infected and FIV-uninfected cats. FIV-infected cats had significantly higher relative abundances of Fusobacteria and Actinobacteria in the oral cavity, and significantly higher relative abundances of several bacterial classes including Fusobacteria (0.022 vs 0.007, P = 0.006), Actinobacteria (0.017 vs 0.003, P = 0.003), Sphingobacteria (0.00015 vs 0.00003, P = 0.0013) and Flavobacteria (0.0073 vs 0.0034, P = 0.030). The feline conjunctival and oral microbiotas are complex polymicrobial communities but dominated by a limited number of genera. There is an apparent impact of FIV infection on various components of the microbiota, and assessment of the clinical relevance of these alterations in required.

  20. Relation of type-C RNA virus infectivity and leukemogenesis in rats and mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, Kenji; Ito, Takaaki; Yokoro, Kenjiro

    1976-01-01

    Observation was made as to movement of type-C RNA virus infectivity in the process of leukemogensis induced by Gross virus, N-nitrosoethylurea (NEU), or, x-ray. Total dose of 680 R in 4 times was given to the whole body or parts of the body at intervals of 5 days. Thymic leukemia occurred in 100% or rats which were inoculated with type-C RNA virus at the period of newborn 64 days after, on the average. Infectious titer of virus rose only in thymus toward leukemogenesis. Thymic leukemia was induced 100% in mice by NEU 122 days after, but its incidence was 9% of mice of which thymus was extracted. Leukemia virus was not detected in non-extracted thymus of mice, and pattern of virus infectivity in other organs did not show any difference with that of mice of which thymus was extracted. Virus showed high infectious titer in uterus of mice of both groups. Leukemia occurred 87% in the whole body irradiated mice, 15% in partially irradiated mice, and 39% in mice of which thymus was extracted and the whole body was irradiated. Virus did not show any homeostatic infectious titer in three kinds of leukemia, but it showed high infectious titer in uterus. (Kanao, N.)

  1. A shorter and more specific oral sensitization-based experimental model of food allergy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailón, Elvira; Cueto-Sola, Margarita; Utrilla, Pilar; Rodríguez-Ruiz, Judith; Garrido-Mesa, Natividad; Zarzuelo, Antonio; Xaus, Jordi; Gálvez, Julio; Comalada, Mònica

    2012-07-31

    Cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) is one of the most prevalent human food-borne allergies, particularly in children. Experimental animal models have become critical tools with which to perform research on new therapeutic approaches and on the molecular mechanisms involved. However, oral food allergen sensitization in mice requires several weeks and is usually associated with unspecific immune responses. To overcome these inconveniences, we have developed a new food allergy model that takes only two weeks while retaining the main characters of allergic response to food antigens. The new model is characterized by oral sensitization of weaned Balb/c mice with 5 doses of purified cow's milk protein (CMP) plus cholera toxin (CT) for only two weeks and posterior challenge with an intraperitoneal administration of the allergen at the end of the sensitization period. In parallel, we studied a conventional protocol that lasts for seven weeks, and also the non-specific effects exerted by CT in both protocols. The shorter protocol achieves a similar clinical score as the original food allergy model without macroscopically affecting gut morphology or physiology. Moreover, the shorter protocol caused an increased IL-4 production and a more selective antigen-specific IgG1 response. Finally, the extended CT administration during the sensitization period of the conventional protocol is responsible for the exacerbated immune response observed in that model. Therefore, the new model presented here allows a reduction not only in experimental time but also in the number of animals required per experiment while maintaining the features of conventional allergy models. We propose that the new protocol reported will contribute to advancing allergy research. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. TISSUE DISTRIBUTION OF INORGANIC ARSENIC (AS) AND ITS METHYLATED METABOLITES IN MICE FOLLOWING ORAL ADMINISTRATION OF ARSENATE (ASV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    TISSUE DISTRIBUTION OF INORGANIC ARSENIC (iAs) AND ITS METHYLATED METABOLITES IN MICE FOLLOWING ORAL ADMINISTRATION OF ARSENATE (AsV). E M Kenyon1, L M Del Razo2, and M F Hughes1. 1NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, USA; 2CINVESTAV-IPN, Mexico City, Mexico.The relationship o...

  3. Antitrypanosomal effect of methanolic extract of Zingiber officinale (ginger on Trypanosoma brucei brucei-infected Wistar mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. I. Kobo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study was carried out to determine the in vivo antitrypanosomal effect of methanolic extract of Zingiber officinale (ginger in Trypanosoma brucei brucei-infected mice. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five mice were randomly allocated into five groups of five animals each. Group I and II were given Tween 80 (1 ml/kg and diminazene aceturate (3.5 mg/kg to serve as untreated and treated controls, respectively. Groups III-V received the extract at 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg body weight, respectively. All treatments were given for 6 consecutive days and through the oral route. The mean body weight, mean survival period and daily level of parasitaemia were evaluated. Results: Acute toxicity showed the extract to be relatively safe. There was an insignificant increase in body weight and survival rate of mice treated with the extract. The level of parasitaemia in the extract treated groups was decreased. Conclusion: This study shows the in vivo potential of methanolic extract of Z. officinale in the treatment of trypanosomiasis.

  4. Oral immunization of mice with gamma-irradiated Brucella neotomae induces protection against intraperitoneal and intranasal challenge with virulent B. abortus 2308.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabral, Neha; Martha-Moreno-Lafont; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Vemulapalli, Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Brucella spp. are Gram-negative, facultative intracellular coccobacilli that cause one of the most frequently encountered zoonosis worldwide. Humans naturally acquire infection through consumption of contaminated dairy and meat products and through direct exposure to aborted animal tissues and fluids. No vaccine against brucellosis is available for use in humans. In this study, we tested the ability of orally inoculated gamma-irradiated B. neotomae and B. abortus RB51 in a prime-boost immunization approach to induce antigen-specific humoral and cell mediated immunity and protection against challenge with virulent B. abortus 2308. Heterologous prime-boost vaccination with B. abortus RB51 and B. neotomae and homologous prime-boost vaccination of mice with B. neotomae led to the production of serum and mucosal antibodies specific to the smooth LPS. The elicited serum antibodies included the isotypes of IgM, IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b and IgG3. All oral vaccination regimens induced antigen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells capable of secreting IFN-γ and TNF-α. Upon intra-peritoneal challenge, mice vaccinated with B. neotomae showed the highest level of resistance against virulent B. abortus 2308 colonization in spleen and liver. Experiments with different doses of B. neotomae showed that all tested doses of 10(9), 10(10) and 10(11) CFU-equivalent conferred significant protection against the intra-peritoneal challenge. However, a dose of 10(11) CFU-equivalent of B. neotomae was required for affording protection against intranasal challenge as shown by the reduced bacterial colonization in spleens and lungs. Taken together, these results demonstrate the feasibility of using gamma-irradiated B. neotomae as an effective and safe oral vaccine to induce protection against respiratory and systemic infections with virulent Brucella.

  5. Comparison of oral manifestations with CD4 count in HIV-infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subodh Arun Sontakke

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim and Objective: This study was carried out with the primary aim of correlating oral changes and general changes of HIV-infected patients with their CD4 count. Materials and Methods: 124 patients were selected, and after taking their informed consent, they were subjected to detailed history taking and thorough clinical examination. Specific oral lesions and general physical changes were recorded. Every patient was subjected to laboratory investigation for CD4 count. All these findings were tabulated. The clinical observation and laboratory findings were subjected to critical analysis and correlated. Statistical test, i.e. Student′s " t" test, was applied and objective conclusions were drawn. Result: Out of 124 patients, 40 had oral candidiasis, 6 had oral hairy leukoplakia, 12 had periodontal disease, 20 had xerostomia, 30 had melanin pigmentation, while 4 had HSV2, and atypical ulceration. Out of 40 patients with oral candidiasis, 28 patients had CD4 count 500 cell/mm 3 . Oral hairy leukoplakia occurred in equal proportions in group A and B. These periodontal diseases were more commonly in group B; xerostomia and melanin pigmentation was equally seen in group A and B. Conclusion: Oral candidiasis, oral hairy leukoplakia, linear gingival erythema, necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, and necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis are specific oral indicators which will definitely suggest to the dental surgeon that the disease is running a rapid downhill course and due to this the oral physician is in a position to raise a suspicion and alert the general physician regarding the declining immune status of patient.

  6. Subcutaneous infection model facilitates treatment assessment of secondary Alveolar echinococcosis in mice.

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    Tatiana Küster

    Full Text Available Alveolar echinococcosis (AE in humans is a parasitic disease characterized by severe damage to the liver and occasionally other organs. AE is caused by infection with the metacestode (larval stage of the fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis, usually infecting small rodents as natural intermediate hosts. Conventionally, human AE is chemotherapeutically treated with mebendazole or albendazole. There is, however still the need for improved chemotherapeutical options. Primary in vivo studies on drugs of interest are commonly performed in small laboratory animals such as mice and Mongolian jirds, and in most cases, a secondary infection model is used, whereby E. multilocularis metacestodes are directly injected into the peritoneal cavity or into the liver. Disadvantages of this methodological approach include risk of injury to organs during the inoculation and, most notably, a limitation in the macroscopic (visible assessment of treatment efficacy. Thus, in order to monitor the efficacy of chemotherapeutical treatment, animals have to be euthanized and the parasite tissue dissected. In the present study, mice were infected with E. multilocularis metacestodes through the subcutaneous route and were then subjected to chemotherapy employing albendazole. Serological responses to infection were comparatively assessed in mice infected by the conventional intraperitoneal route. We demonstrate that the subcutaneous infection model for secondary AE facilitates the assessment of the progress of infection and drug treatment in the live animal.

  7. Improvement of skin condition by oral administration of collagen hydrolysates in chronologically aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenbin; Wang, Qing; Wang, Lin; Xu, Weidong; He, Yuanqing; Li, Yunliang; He, Song; Ma, Haile

    2017-07-01

    Collagen hydrolysates (CHs) have been demonstrated to have positive effects on skin photoaging by topical application or oral ingestion. However, there has been little research on their influence on skin chronological aging. In this study, 9-month-old female ICR mice were given normal AIN-93M diets containing CHs (2.5, 5 and 10% w/w) from Nile tilapia scale. After 6 months, the collagen content and antioxidant enzyme (superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase) activities increased significantly (P skin did not change (P > 0.05). The color, luster and quantity of hair were obviously ameliorated. Moreover, the structure of epidermis and dermis, the density and distribution of collagen fibers and the ratio of type I to type III collagen were improved in a dose-dependent manner as shown by histochemical staining. Oral ingestion of CHs increased the collagen content and antioxidant enzyme activities and improved the appearance and structure of skin. These results suggest the potential of CHs as an anti-skin-aging ingredient in nutraceuticals or functional foods. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Orally administered conjugated linoleic acid ameliorates allergic dermatitis induced by repeated applications of oxazolone in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Tomonori; Tokunaga, Yuzo; Yamasaki, Masao; Erickson, Laurie; Kawahara, Satoshi

    2016-12-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is one of the constituents of animal products with possible health benefits such as anti-carcinogenic and anti-obesity effects. In this study, we investigated the immunomodulatory effects of CLA using a mouse model of allergic dermatitis. Mice were orally administered either a CLA mixture containing equal amounts of 9c, 11 t-CLA and 10 t, 12c-CLA, or high linoleic acid safflower oil, and allergic dermatitis was induced on the ear by repeated topical applications of oxazolone. Oral administration of the CLA mixture but not the high linoleic safflower oil attenuated the symptoms of allergic dermatitis in both ear weights and clinical scores. This effect was associated with decreased levels of ear interleukin-4 (IL-4) and plasma immunoglobulin E. The immunomodulatory effects of the CLA isomers were compared by an in vitro cytokine production assay. The results showed that 9c, 11 t-CLA, the most predominant isomer in animal products, significantly inhibited IL-4 and interferon-γ production from mouse splenocytes with similar potency to 10 t, 12c-CLA. These findings suggest that CLA, a constituent of animal products, has a potentially beneficial effect for amelioration of allergic dermatitis. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  9. Single Oral Dose Toxicity Test of Blue Honeysuckle Concentrate in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-In; Choi, Seung-Hoon; Song, Chang-Hyun; Park, Soo-Jin; Shin, Yong-Kook; Han, Chang-Hyun; Lee, Young Joon; Ku, Sae-Kwang

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain single oral dose toxicity information for concentrated and lyophilized powder of blue honeysuckle (Lonicera caerulea L., Caprifoliaceae; BHcL) in female and male ICR mice to aid in the process of developing natural origin medicinal ingredients or foods following proximate analysis and phytochemical profile measurement. The proximate analysis revealed that BHcL had an energy value of 3.80 kcal/g and contained 0.93 g/g of carbohydrate, 0.41 g/g of sugar, 0.02 g/g of protein, and 0.20 mg/g of sodium. BHcL did not contain lipids, including saturated lipids, trans fats, or cholesterols. Further, BHcL contained 4.54% of betaine, 210.63 mg/g of total phenols, 159.30 mg/g of total flavonoids, and 133.57 mg/g of total anthocyanins. Following administration of a single oral BHcL treatment, there were no treatment-related mortalities, changes in body weight (bw) or organ weight, clinical signs, necropsy or histopathological findings up to 2,000 mg/kg bw, the limited dosage for rodents of both sexes. We concluded that BHcL is a practically non-toxic material in toxicity potency. PMID:25874034

  10. Visual and Motor Deficits in Grown-up Mice with Congenital Zika Virus Infection

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    Liyuan Cui

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Human infants with congenital Zika virus (ZIKV infection exhibit a range of symptoms including microcephaly, intracranial calcifications, macular atrophy and arthrogryposis. More importantly, prognosis data have lagged far behind the recent outbreak of ZIKV in 2015. In this work, we allow congenitally ZIKV-infected mice to grow into puberty. These mice exhibited motor incoordination and visual dysfunctions, which can be accounted by anatomical defects in the retina and cerebellar cortex. In contrary, anxiety level of the ZIKV-infected mice is normal. The spectrum of anatomical and behavioral deficits is consistent across different mice. Our data provided evidence that may help predict the public health burden in terms of prognosis of ZIKV-related congenital brain malformations in an animal model. Our study provided behavioral evaluation for the prognosis of congenital ZIKV infection and provides a platform for screening and evaluation of drugs candidates and treatment aiming at improving regeneration of infected neurons to prevent sequelae caused by ZIKV infection of fetus.

  11. CISH controls bacterial burden early after infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carow, Berit; Gao, Yu; Terán, Graciela; Yang, Xuexian O; Dong, Chen; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Rottenberg, Martin E

    2017-12-01

    CISH gene has been associated with increased susceptibility to human tuberculosis. We found that cish -/- mice had higher M. tuberculosis load in spleens and lungs up to 2.5 weeks after infection but not later compared to controls. Cish mRNA levels were increased in lungs at early and late time points after M. tuberculosis infection. In relation, the titers of inos and tnf mRNA in lungs were reduced early after infection of cish -/- mice. The transfer of cish -/- and control T cells conferred rag1 -/- mice similar protection to infection with M. tuberculosis. Macrophages showed increased cish mRNA levels after M. tuberculosis infection in vitro. However, mycobacterial uptake and growth in cish -/- and control macrophages was similar. Thus, we here show that CISH mediates control of M. tuberculosis in mice early after infection via regulation of innate immune mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Visual and Motor Deficits in Grown-up Mice with Congenital Zika Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Liyuan; Zou, Peng; Chen, Er; Yao, Hao; Zheng, Hao; Wang, Qian; Zhu, Jing-Ning; Jiang, Shibo; Lu, Lu; Zhang, Jiayi

    2017-06-01

    Human infants with congenital Zika virus (ZIKV) infection exhibit a range of symptoms including microcephaly, intracranial calcifications, macular atrophy and arthrogryposis. More importantly, prognosis data have lagged far behind the recent outbreak of ZIKV in 2015. In this work, we allow congenitally ZIKV-infected mice to grow into puberty. These mice exhibited motor incoordination and visual dysfunctions, which can be accounted by anatomical defects in the retina and cerebellar cortex. In contrary, anxiety level of the ZIKV-infected mice is normal. The spectrum of anatomical and behavioral deficits is consistent across different mice. Our data provided evidence that may help predict the public health burden in terms of prognosis of ZIKV-related congenital brain malformations in an animal model. Our study provided behavioral evaluation for the prognosis of congenital ZIKV infection and provides a platform for screening and evaluation of drugs candidates and treatment aiming at improving regeneration of infected neurons to prevent sequelae caused by ZIKV infection of fetus. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Antileishmanial activity of licochalcone A in mice infected with Leishmania major and in hamsters infected with Leishmania donovani

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, M; Christensen, S B; Theander, T G

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the antileishmanial activity of the oxygenated chalcone licochalcone A in mice and hamsters infected with Leishmania parasites. Intraperitoneal administration of licochalcone A at doses of 2.5 and 5 mg/kg of body weight per day completely prevented lesion...... development in BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania major. Treatment of hamsters infected with L. donovani with intraperitoneal administration of licochalcone A at a dose of 20 mg/kg of body weight per day for 6 consecutive days resulted in a > 96% reduction of parasite load in the liver and the spleen...... consecutive days resulted in > 65 and 85% reductions of L. donovani parasite loads in the liver and the spleen, respectively, compared with those of untreated control hamsters. These data clearly demonstrate that licochalcone A is a promising lead for the development of a new drug against leishmaniases....

  14. Immune response in the adipose tissue of lean mice infected with the protozoan parasite Neospora caninum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Luzia; Moreira, João; Melo, Joana; Bezerra, Filipa; Marques, Raquel M; Ferreirinha, Pedro; Correia, Alexandra; Monteiro, Mariana P; Ferreira, Paula G; Vilanova, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The adipose tissue can make important contributions to immune function. Nevertheless, only a limited number of reports have investigated in lean hosts the immune response elicited in this tissue upon infection. Previous studies suggested that the intracellular protozoan Neospora caninum might affect adipose tissue physiology. Therefore, we investigated in mice challenged with this protozoan if immune cell populations within adipose tissue of different anatomical locations could be differently affected. Early in infection, parasites were detected in the adipose tissue and by 7 days of infection increased numbers of macrophages, regulatory T (Treg) cells and T-bet+ cells were observed in gonadal, mesenteric, omental and subcutaneous adipose tissue. Increased expression of interferon-γ was also detected in gonadal adipose tissue of infected mice. Two months after infection, parasite DNA was no longer detected in these tissues, but T helper type 1 (Th1) cell numbers remained above control levels in the infected mice. Moreover, the Th1/Treg cell ratio was higher than that of controls in the mesenteric and subcutaneous adipose tissue. Interestingly, chronically infected mice presented a marked increase of serum leptin, a molecule that plays a role in energy balance regulation as well as in promoting Th1-type immune responses. Altogether, we show that an apicomplexa parasitic infection influences immune cellular composition of adipose tissue throughout the body as well as adipokine production, still noticed at a chronic phase of infection when parasites were already cleared from that particular tissue. This strengthens the emerging view that infections can have long-term consequences for the physiology of adipose tissue. PMID:25581844

  15. No association of oral lichen planus and hepatitis C virus infection in central Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmerbach, Torsten W; Liese, Jan; Krause, Sarah; Schiefke, Ingolf; Schiefke, Franziska; Maier, Melanie; Liebert, Uwe G

    2016-01-01

    Co-occurrence of oral lichen planus (OLP) and chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection suggests a strong association, but the relation between mucocutaneus, autoimmune lichen planus and HCV infection remains unclear. In areas with higher prevalence of HCV infection in general population, like Japan and southern Europe, 20 to 40 % of patients with OLP test positive for anti-HCV antibodies, whereas in German populations, a co-occurrence of 4.2 to 16 % was reported. We screened 143 patients with histopathologically proven OLP for prevalence of anti-HCV antibodies. Additionally, we examined 51 anti-HCV-positive subjects with current or past HCV infection for clinical symptoms of OLP. In all patients, confirmatory diagnosis was made by the detection of HCV RNA via reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A randomized control group comprised 109 blood sera samples of patients without any characteristics of OLP. The results of all patients showed no co-occurrence in either cohort. In conclusion, no association between oral lichen planus and chronic HCV infection in our study population was found. Anti-HCV antibody screening in patients with confirmed oral lichen planus is not indicated routinely in central Germany.

  16. Pharmacologic inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2 in influenza A viral infection in mice.

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    Michelle A Carey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We previously demonstrated that cyclooxygenase (COX-1 deficiency results in greater morbidity and inflammation, whereas COX-2 deficiency leads to reduced morbidity, inflammation and mortality in influenza infected mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the effects of COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitors in influenza A viral infection. Mice were given a COX-1 inhibitor (SC-560, a COX-2 inhibitor (celecoxib or no inhibitor beginning 2 weeks prior to influenza A viral infection (200 PFU and throughout the course of the experiment. Body weight and temperature were measured daily as indicators of morbidity. Animals were sacrificed on days 1 and 4 post-infection and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid was collected or daily mortality was recorded up to 2 weeks post-infection. Treatment with SC-560 significantly increased mortality and was associated with profound hypothermia and greater weight loss compared to celecoxib or control groups. On day 4 of infection, BAL fluid cells were modestly elevated in celecoxib treated mice compared to SC-560 or control groups. Viral titres were similar between treatment groups. Levels of TNF-alpha and G-CSF were significantly attenuated in the SC-560 and celecoxib groups versus control and IL-6 levels were significantly lower in BAL fluid of celecoxib treated mice versus control and versus the SC-560 group. The chemokine KC was significantly lower in SC-560 group versus control. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Treatment with a COX-1 inhibitor during influenza A viral infection is detrimental to the host whereas inhibition of COX-2 does not significantly modulate disease severity. COX-1 plays a critical role in controlling the thermoregulatory response to influenza A viral infection in mice.

  17. Experimental Andes virus infection in deer mice: characteristics of infection and clearance in a heterologous rodent host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica R Spengler

    Full Text Available New World hantaviruses can cause hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome with high mortality in humans. Distinct virus species are hosted by specific rodent reservoirs, which also serve as the vectors. Although regional spillover has been documented, it is unknown whether rodent reservoirs are competent for infection by hantaviruses that are geographically separated, and known to have related, but distinct rodent reservoir hosts. We show that Andes virus (ANDV of South America, carried by the long tailed pygmy rice rat (Oligoryzomys longicaudatus, infects and replicates in vitro and in vivo in the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus, the reservoir host of Sin Nombre virus (SNV, found in North America. In experimentally infected deer mice, viral RNA was detected in the blood, lung, heart and spleen, but virus was cleared by 56 days post inoculation (dpi. All of the inoculated deer mice mounted a humoral immune response by 14 dpi, and produced measurable amounts of neutralizing antibodies by 21 dpi. An up-regulation of Ccl3, Ccl4, Ccl5, and Tgfb, a strong CD4⁺ T-cell response, and down-regulation of Il17, Il21 and Il23 occurred during infection. Infection was transient with an absence of clinical signs or histopathological changes. This is the first evidence that ANDV asymptomatically infects, and is immunogenic in deer mice, a non-natural host species of ANDV. Comparing the immune response in this model to that of the immune response in the natural hosts upon infection with their co-adapted hantaviruses may help clarify the mechanisms governing persistent infection in the natural hosts of hantaviruses.

  18. Role of CXC chemokine ligand 13 in oral squamous cell carcinoma associated osteolysis in athymic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandruvada, Subramanya N M; Yuvaraj, Sambandam; Liu, Xiang; Sundaram, Kumaran; Shanmugarajan, Srinivasan; Ries, William L; Norris, James S; London, Steven D; Reddy, Sakamuri V

    2010-05-15

    Oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) are malignant tumors with a potent activity of local bone invasion; however, the molecular mechanisms of tumor osteolysis are unclear. In this study, we identified high level expression of chemokine ligand, CXCL13 and RANK ligand (RANKL) in OSCC cells (SCC1, SCC12 and SCC14a). OSCC cell-conditioned media (20%) induced osteoclast differentiation which was inhibited by OPG in peripheral blood monocyte cultures indicating that OSCC cells produce soluble RANKL. Recombinant hCXCL13 (10 ng/ml) significantly enhanced RANKL-stimulated osteoclast differentiation in these cultures. Trans-well migration assay identified that CXCL13 induces chemotaxis of peripheral blood monocytes in vitro which was inhibited by addition of anti-CXCR5 receptor antibody. Zymogram analysis of conditioned media from OSCC cells revealed matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity. Interestingly, CXCL13 treatment to OSCC cells induced CXCR5 and MMP-9 expression suggesting an autocrine regulatory function in OSCC cells. To examine the OSCC tumor cell bone invasion/osteolysis, we established an in vivo model for OSCC by subcutaneous injection of OSCC cells onto the surface of calvaria in NCr-nu/nu athymic mice, which developed tumors in 4-5 weeks. muCT analysis revealed numerous osteolytic lesions in calvaria from OSCC tumor-bearing mice. Histochemical staining of calvarial sections from these mice revealed a significant increase in the numbers of TRAP-positive osteoclasts at the tumor-bone interface. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed CXCL13 and MMP-9 expression in tumor cells. Thus, our data implicate a functional role for CXCL13 in bone invasion and may be a potential therapeutic target to prevent osteolysis associated with OSCC tumors in vivo.

  19. Oral repeated-dose systemic and reproductive toxicity of 6:2 fluorotelomer alcohol in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushkor Mukerji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available 6:2 fluorotelomer alcohol (6:2 FTOH was evaluated for potential systemic repeated-dose and reproductive toxicity in mice. 6:2 FTOH was administered by oral gavage to CD-1 mice as a suspension in 0.5% aqueous methylcellulose with 0.1% Tween-80 at dosages of 1, 5, 25, or 100 mg/kg/day. The no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL for systemic toxicity was 25 mg/kg/day (males and 5 mg/kg/day (females, based on effects at higher doses on mortality, clinical observations, body weight, nutritional parameters, hematology (red and white blood cell, clinical chemistry (liver-related, liver weights, and histopathology (liver, teeth, reproductive tract, and mammary gland. However, 6:2 FTOH was not a selective reproductive toxicant. The NOAEL for reproductive toxicity was >100 mg/kg/day; no effects on reproductive outcome were observed at any dosage. The NOAEL for viability and growth of the offspring was 25 mg/kg/day, based on clinical signs of delayed maturation in pups, and reductions in pup survival and pup body weight during lactation at 100 mg/kg/day. While the severity of the effects was generally greater in mice than previously reported in CD rats, the overall NOAELs were identical in both species, 5 mg/kg/day for systemic toxicity and 25 mg/kg/day for offspring viability/growth. 6:2 FTOH was not a selective reproductive toxicant in either species; no effects on reproductive outcome occurred at any dose level, and any effects observed in offspring occurred at dose levels that induced mortality and severe toxicity in maternal animals.

  20. The red flour beetle as a model for bacterial oral infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Milutinović

    Full Text Available Experimental infection systems are important for studying antagonistic interactions and coevolution between hosts and their pathogens. The red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum and the spore-forming bacterial insect pathogen Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt are widely used and tractable model organisms. However, they have not been employed yet as an efficient experimental system to study host-pathogen interactions. We used a high throughput oral infection protocol to infect T. castaneum insects with coleopteran specific B. thuringiensis bv. tenebrionis (Btt bacteria. We found that larval mortality depends on the dietary spore concentration and on the duration of exposure to the spores. Furthermore, differential susceptibility of larvae from different T. castaneum populations indicates that the host genetic background influences infection success. The recovery of high numbers of infectious spores from the cadavers indicates successful replication of bacteria in the host and suggests that Btt could establish infectious cycles in T. castaneum in nature. We were able to transfer plasmids from Btt to a non-pathogenic but genetically well-characterised Bt strain, which was thereafter able to successfully infect T. castaneum, suggesting that factors residing on the plasmids are important for the virulence of Btt. The availability of a genetically accessible strain will provide an ideal model for more in-depth analyses of pathogenicity factors during oral infections. Combined with the availability of the full genome sequence of T. castaneum, this system will enable analyses of host responses during infection, as well as addressing basic questions concerning host-parasite coevolution.

  1. Differential outcome of infection with attenuated Salmonella in MyD88-deficient mice is dependent on the route of administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issac, Jincy M; Sarawathiamma, Dhanya; Al-Ketbi, Mai I; Azimullah, Sheikh; Al-Ojali, Samia M; Mohamed, Yassir A; Flavell, Richard A; Fernandez-Cabezudo, Maria J; al-Ramadi, Basel K

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the innate immune system is a prerequisite for the induction of adaptive immunity to both infectious and non-infectious agents. TLRs are key components of the innate immune recognition system and detect pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Most TLRs utilize the MyD88 adaptor for their signaling pathways. In the current study, we investigated innate and adaptive immune responses to primary as well as secondary Salmonella infections in MyD88-deficient (MyD88(-/-)) mice. Using i.p. or oral route of inoculation, we demonstrate that MyD88(-/-) mice are hypersusceptible to infection by an attenuated, double auxotrophic, mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium). This is manifested by 2-3 logs higher bacterial loads in target organs, delayed recruitment of phagocytic cells, and defective production of proinflammatory cytokines in MyD88(-/-) mice. Despite these deficiencies, MyD88(-/-) mice developed Salmonella-specific memory Th1 responses and produced elevated serum levels of anti-Salmonella Abs, not only of Th1-driven (IgG2c, IgG3) but also IgG1 and IgG2b isotypes. Curiously, these adaptive responses were insufficient to afford full protection against a secondary challenge with a virulent strain of S. typhimurium. In comparison with the high degree of mortality seen in MyD88(-/-) mice following i.p. inoculation, oral infections led to the establishment of a state of long-term persistence, characterized by continuous bacterial shedding in animal feces that lasted for more than 6 months, but absence from systemic organs. These findings suggest that the absent expression of MyD88 affects primarily the innate effector arm of the immune system and highlights its critical role in anti-bacterial defense. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Dysfunction of mitochondrial dynamics in the brains of scrapie-infected mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hong-Seok; Choi, Yeong-Gon; Shin, Hae-Young; Oh, Jae-Min; Park, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Jae-Il; Carp, Richard I.; Choi, Eun-Kyoung; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Mfn1 and Fis1 are significantly increased in the hippocampal region of the ME7 prion-infected brain, whereas Dlp1 is significantly decreased in the infected brain. • Dlp1 is significantly decreased in the cytosolic fraction of the hippocampus in the infected brain. • Neuronal mitochondria in the prion-infected brains are enlarged and swollen compared to those of control brains. • There are significantly fewer mitochondria in the ME7-infected brain compared to the number in control brain. - Abstract: Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common and prominent feature of many neurodegenerative diseases, including prion diseases; it is induced by oxidative stress in scrapie-infected animal models. In previous studies, we found swelling and dysfunction of mitochondria in the brains of scrapie-infected mice compared to brains of controls, but the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial dysfunction remain unclear. To examine whether the dysregulation of mitochondrial proteins is related to the mitochondrial dysfunction associated with prion disease, we investigated the expression patterns of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins in the brains of ME7 prion-infected mice. Immunoblot analysis revealed that Mfn1 was up-regulated in both whole brain and specific brain regions, including the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, of ME7-infected mice compared to controls. Additionally, expression levels of Fis1 and Mfn2 were elevated in the hippocampus and the striatum, respectively, of the ME7-infected brain. In contrast, Dlp1 expression was significantly reduced in the hippocampus in the ME7-infected brain, particularly in the cytosolic fraction. Finally, we observed abnormal mitochondrial enlargement and histopathological change in the hippocampus of the ME7-infected brain. These observations suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction, which is presumably caused by the dysregulation of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins, may contribute to the

  3. Dysfunction of mitochondrial dynamics in the brains of scrapie-infected mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hong-Seok [Department of Microbiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, 1 Okcheon-dong, Chuncheon, Gangwon-do 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Ilsong Institute of Life Science, Hallym University, 1605-4 Gwanyang-dong, Dongan-gu, Anyang, Gyeonggi-do 431-060 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yeong-Gon; Shin, Hae-Young; Oh, Jae-Min [Ilsong Institute of Life Science, Hallym University, 1605-4 Gwanyang-dong, Dongan-gu, Anyang, Gyeonggi-do 431-060 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong-Ho [Department of Microbiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, 1 Okcheon-dong, Chuncheon, Gangwon-do 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Ilsong Institute of Life Science, Hallym University, 1605-4 Gwanyang-dong, Dongan-gu, Anyang, Gyeonggi-do 431-060 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-Il [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Pukyong National University, 599-1 Daeyeon-3-dong, Nam-gu, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of); Carp, Richard I. [New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, 1050 Forest Hill Road, Staten Island, NY 10314 (United States); Choi, Eun-Kyoung, E-mail: ekchoi@hallym.ac.kr [Ilsong Institute of Life Science, Hallym University, 1605-4 Gwanyang-dong, Dongan-gu, Anyang, Gyeonggi-do 431-060 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong-Sun, E-mail: yskim@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Microbiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, 1 Okcheon-dong, Chuncheon, Gangwon-do 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Ilsong Institute of Life Science, Hallym University, 1605-4 Gwanyang-dong, Dongan-gu, Anyang, Gyeonggi-do 431-060 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-30

    Highlights: • Mfn1 and Fis1 are significantly increased in the hippocampal region of the ME7 prion-infected brain, whereas Dlp1 is significantly decreased in the infected brain. • Dlp1 is significantly decreased in the cytosolic fraction of the hippocampus in the infected brain. • Neuronal mitochondria in the prion-infected brains are enlarged and swollen compared to those of control brains. • There are significantly fewer mitochondria in the ME7-infected brain compared to the number in control brain. - Abstract: Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common and prominent feature of many neurodegenerative diseases, including prion diseases; it is induced by oxidative stress in scrapie-infected animal models. In previous studies, we found swelling and dysfunction of mitochondria in the brains of scrapie-infected mice compared to brains of controls, but the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial dysfunction remain unclear. To examine whether the dysregulation of mitochondrial proteins is related to the mitochondrial dysfunction associated with prion disease, we investigated the expression patterns of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins in the brains of ME7 prion-infected mice. Immunoblot analysis revealed that Mfn1 was up-regulated in both whole brain and specific brain regions, including the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, of ME7-infected mice compared to controls. Additionally, expression levels of Fis1 and Mfn2 were elevated in the hippocampus and the striatum, respectively, of the ME7-infected brain. In contrast, Dlp1 expression was significantly reduced in the hippocampus in the ME7-infected brain, particularly in the cytosolic fraction. Finally, we observed abnormal mitochondrial enlargement and histopathological change in the hippocampus of the ME7-infected brain. These observations suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction, which is presumably caused by the dysregulation of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins, may contribute to the

  4. Parasitic loads in tissues of mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and treated with AmBisome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Cencig

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chagas disease is one of the most important public health problems and a leading cause of cardiac failure in Latin America. The currently available drugs to treat T. cruzi infection (benznidazole and nifurtimox are effective in humans when administered during months. AmBisome (liposomal amphotericin B, already shown efficient after administration for some days in human and experimental infection with Leishmania, has been scarcely studied in T. cruzi infection. AIMS: This work investigates the effect of AmBisome treatment, administered in 6 intraperitoneal injections at various times during acute and/or chronic phases of mouse T. cruzi infection, comparing survival rates and parasitic loads in several tissues. METHODOLOGY: Quantitative PCR was used to determine parasitic DNA amounts in tissues. Immunosuppressive treatment with cyclophosphamide was used to investigate residual infection in tissues. FINDINGS: Administration of AmBisome during the acute phase of infection prevented mice from fatal issue. Parasitaemias (microscopic examination were reduced in acute phase and undetectable in chronic infection. Quantitative PCR analyses showed significant parasite load reductions in heart, liver, spleen, skeletal muscle and adipose tissues in acute as well as in chronic infection. An earlier administration of AmBisome (one day after parasite inoculation had a better effect in reducing parasite loads in spleen and liver, whereas repetition of treatment in chronic phase enhanced the parasite load reduction in heart and liver. However, whatever the treatment schedule, cyclophosphamide injections boosted infection to parasite amounts comparable to those observed in acutely infected and untreated mice. CONCLUSIONS: Though AmBisome treatment fails to completely cure mice from T. cruzi infection, it impedes mortality and reduces significantly the parasitic loads in most tissues. Such a beneficial effect, obtained by administrating it over a short

  5. Long-term persistence of oral human papillomavirus type 16: the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce Campbell, Christine M; Kreimer, Aimée R; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William; O'Keefe, Michael T; Ingles, Donna J; Abrahamsen, Martha; Villa, Luisa L; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R

    2015-03-01

    Persistent infection with oral HPV16 is believed to drive the development of most oropharyngeal cancers. However, patterns of oral HPV16 persistence remain understudied, particularly among HIV-negative individuals. Oral HPV16 persistence was evaluated among 1,626 participants of the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study. Twenty-three oral HPV16-positive men who provided an oral gargle sample on ≥2 study visits were included in the analysis. Archived oral samples from all follow-up visits were tested for HPV16 using Linear Array and INNO-LiPA detection methods. Persistence was evaluated using consecutive HPV16-positive visits held approximately 6 months apart and using the Kaplan-Meier method. Oral HPV16-positive men were aged 18 to 64 years [median, 36 years; interquartile range (IQR), 25-42] and were followed for a median of 44.4 months (IQR, 29.9-49.5). Of 13 incident infections, 4 (30.8%) persisted ≥12 months, 1 (10.0%) persisted ≥24 months, and none persisted ≥36 months [median infection duration, 7.3 months; 95% confidence interval (CI), 6.4-NA)]. Of 10 prevalent infections, 9 (90.0%) persisted ≥12 months, 8 (80.0%) persisted ≥24 months, 4 (57.1%) persisted ≥36 months, and 2 (40.0%) persisted ≥48 months (median infection duration, NA). Twelve-month persistence of incident infections increased significantly with age (Ptrend = 0.028). Prevalent oral HPV16 infections in men persisted longer than newly acquired infections, and persistence appeared to increase with age. These findings may explain the high prevalence of oral HPV observed at older ages. Understanding oral HPV16 persistence will aid in the identification of men at high-risk of developing HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. MicroRNA-155 knockout mice are susceptible to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Hiroki; Funatogawa, Keiji; Matsumura, Kazunori; Kato-Miyazawa, Masako; Kirikae, Fumiko; Kiga, Kotaro; Sasakawa, Chihiro; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Kirikae, Teruo

    2015-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short, conserved, non-coding RNA molecules that repress translation, followed by the decay of miRNA-targeted mRNAs that encode molecules involved in cell differentiation, development, immunity and apoptosis. At least six miRNAs, including microRNA-155 (miR-155), were up-regulated when born marrow-derived macrophages from C57BL/6 mice were infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis Erdman. C57BL/6 mice intravenously infected with Erdman showed up-regulation of miR-155 in livers and lungs. Following infection, miR-155-deficient C57BL/6 mice died significantly earlier and had significantly higher numbers of CFU in lungs than wild-type mice. Moreover, fewer CD4(+) T cells, but higher numbers of monocytes and neutrophils, were present in the lungs of Erdman-infected miR-155 knockout (miR-155(-/-)) than of wild-type mice. These findings indicated that miR-155 plays a critical role in immune responses to M. tuberculosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cytokine gene expression and pathology in mice experimentally infected with different isolates of Trypanosoma evansi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, P; Sengupta, P P; Das, Sangita; Ligi, M; Shome, B R; Rahman, H

    2016-11-01

    Aim of the present study was to assess the cytokine gene expression in liver, kidney and spleen and histopathological changes in mice infected with buffalo and dog isolates of Trypanosoma evansi. Forty-four Swiss albino mice was divided into eleven groups of four mice each and injected subcutaneously with 1 × 10 5 trypanosomes of buffalo and dog isolate to twenty mice each, four mice served as control. Mice were examined for clinical signs, blood smear for trypanosome counts. Blood for PCR, liver, kidney, spleen, heart, lung, testis and abdominal muscle for histopathology and liver, kidney, spleen for cytokine gene expression studies, were collected. Mice showed dullness, lethargy, hunched back, sluggish movements on D4 and D5 in buffalo and dog isolate, respectively. Parasite count in blood varied between the two isolates of T. evansi. By PCR, trypanosome DNA was detected on D1 and D2 for buffalo and dog isolate, respectively. Splenomegaly was observed in mice infected with buffalo isolate but not with dog isolate. Histopathological changes were observed in liver, kidney, spleen and heart of mice but no changes in testis and abdominal muscles. Blood vessels of liver, heart, lung showed presence of trypanosomes in mice infected with buffalo isolate but not for dog isolate. Cytokine gene expression of IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-12, TNF-α and IFN-γ increased in liver, kidney and spleen in both these isolates. However, the buffalo isolate exhibited pronounced increase in cytokine gene expression when compare to dog isolate of T. evansi. Anti-inflammatory cytokine gene IL-10 showed 50-60 and 10-20 folds increment in buffalo and dog isolates, respectively. This is the first report of IL-4, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-12 cytokine changes in mice infected with T. evansi. A variation in pathogenicity between buffalo and dog isolates was recorded indicating buffalo isolate of T. evansi remained more pathogenic in mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Oral candidiasis as clinical manifestation of HIV/AIDS infection in Airlangga University hospital patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putranti, A.; Asmarawati, T. P.; Rachman, B. E.; Hadi, U.; Nasronudin

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the characteristics of HIV/AIDS patients with oral candidiasis as its clinical manifestation at Airlangga University Hospital Surabaya. This is a descriptive analytic research with cross-sectional design using Chi-Square statistic test. Samples of this study consist of 34 patients using total sampling methods. Those patients were all HIV/AIDS infected patients with oral candidiasis clinical manifestations, who were admitted to Airlangga University Hospital Surabaya from January 2016 to September 2017. Results showed that mostly HIV/AIDS patients with oral candidiasis are male (79.4%), old age (40-75years) total amounted to 58.8%, heterosexual as main risk factor (70%), clinical stadium mostly in stage IV (61.8%), 26% of patients with chronic diarrhea and 56% with pulmonary TB, clinical stages of patients have a significant relation to the incidence of oral candidiasis infection (p=0.024). The most common oral lesions found in people with HIV are Candidiasis. The best management is through routine dental examination and dental precautions to maintain health and achieve a better quality of life.

  9. The antiviral effectiveness of butylated hydroxytoluene on herpes cutaneous infections in hairless mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keith, A.D.; Arruda, D.; Snipes, W.; Frost, P.

    1982-01-01

    Hairless mice, cutaneously infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), were treated topically with butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). The effectiveness of BHT in shortening the duration of infections was assayed under three conditions. In the first experiments, mice undergoing primary infections with no prior immunity to HSV-1 were utilized. These animals tended to develop deep lesions that were not typical of recurrent HSV-1 infections in humans. A second set of experiments utilized mice that had recovered from a primary infection and that were immunosuppressed by γ irradiation. Immunosuppression was essential for the full development of lesions upon reinfection. The lesions in these animals remained more localized with less tendency to spread into deep tissues. A third set of experiments utilized animals that were subcutaneously inoculated with human serum γ-globulin 24 hr prior to infection. Lesions on these animals also remained localized and did not penetrate into deep tissues. Under all three conditions, BHT was found to be effective in reducing the clearance time of HSV-1 cutaneous lesions when applied topically to the infected area

  10. Competitive inhibitor of cellular alpha-glucosidases protects mice from lethal dengue virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Jinhong; Schul, Wouter; Yip, Andy; Xu, Xiaodong; Guo, Ju-Tao; Block, Timothy M.

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus infection causes diseases in people, ranging from the acute febrile illness Dengue fever, to life-threatening Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever/Dengue Shock Syndrome. We previously reported that a host cellular α-glucosidases I and II inhibitor, imino sugar CM-10-18, potently inhibited dengue virus replication in cultured cells, and significantly reduced viremia in dengue virus infected AG129 mice. In this report we show that CM-10-18 also significantly protects mice from death and/or dis...

  11. Zika Virus Fatally Infects Wild Type Neonatal Mice and Replicates in Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuxuan Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV has been defined as a teratogenic pathogen behind the increased number of cases of microcephaly in French Polynesia, Brazil, Puerto Rico, and other South American countries. Experimental studies using animal models have achieved tremendous insight into understanding the viral pathogenesis, transmission, teratogenic mechanisms, and virus–host interactions. However, the animals used in published investigations are mostly interferon (IFN-compromised, either genetically or via antibody treatment. Herein, we studied ZIKV infection in IFN-competent mice using African (MR766 and Asian strains (PRVABC59 and SZ-WIV01. After testing four different species of mice, we found that BALB/c neonatal mice were resistant to ZIKV infection, that Kunming, ICR and C57BL/6 neonatal mice were fatally susceptible to ZIKV infection, and that the fatality of C57BL/6 neonates from 1 to 3 days old were in a viral dose-dependent manner. The size and weight of the brain were significantly reduced, and the ZIKV-infected mice showed neuronal symptoms such as hind-limb paralysis, tremor, and poor balance during walking. Pathologic and immunofluorescent experiments revealed that ZIKV infected different areas of the central nervous system (CNS including gray matter, hippocampus, cerebral cortex, and spinal cord, but not olfactory bulb. Interestingly, ZIKV replicated in multiple organs and resulted in pathogenesis in liver and testis, implying that ZIKV infection may engender a high health risk in neonates by postnatal infection. In summary, we investigated ZIKV pathogenesis using an animal model that is not IFN-compromised.

  12. Protein energy malnutrition decreases immunity and increases susceptibility to influenza infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Andrew K; Cao, Weiping; Vora, Keyur P; De La Cruz, Juan; Shieh, Wun-Ju; Zaki, Sherif R; Katz, Jacqueline M; Sambhara, Suryaprakash; Gangappa, Shivaprakash

    2013-02-01

    Protein energy malnutrition (PEM), a common cause of secondary immune deficiency in children, is associated with an increased risk of infections. Very few studies have addressed the relevance of PEM as a risk factor for influenza. We investigated the influence of PEM on susceptibility to, and immune responses following, influenza virus infection using isocaloric diets providing either adequate protein (AP; 18%) or very low protein (VLP; 2%) in a mouse model. We found that mice maintained on the VLP diet, when compared to mice fed with the AP diet, exhibited more severe disease following influenza infection based on virus persistence, trafficking of inflammatory cell types to the lung tissue, and virus-induced mortality. Furthermore, groups of mice maintained on the VLP diet showed significantly lower virus-specific antibody response and a reduction in influenza nuclear protein-specific CD8(+) T cells compared with mice fed on the AP diet. Importantly, switching diets for the group maintained on the VLP diet to the AP diet improved virus clearance, as well as protective immunity to viral challenge. Our results highlight the impact of protein energy on immunity to influenza infection and suggest that balanced protein energy replenishment may be one strategy to boost immunity against influenza viral infections.

  13. Alpha-tocopherol transfer protein disruption confers resistance to malarial infection in mice

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    Takeya Motohiro

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various factors impact the severity of malaria, including the nutritional status of the host. Vitamin E, an intra and extracellular anti-oxidant, is one such nutrient whose absence was shown previously to negatively affect Plasmodium development. However, mechanisms of this Plasmodium inhibition, in addition to means by which to exploit this finding as a therapeutic strategy, remain unclear. Methods α-TTP knockout mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 or Plasmodium yoelii XL-17, parasitaemia, survival rate were monitored. In one part of the experiments mice were fed with a supplemented diet of vitamin E and then infected. In addition, parasite DNA damage was monitored by means of comet assay and 8-OHdG test. Moreover, infected mice were treated with chloroquine and parasitaemia and survival rate were monitored. Results Inhibition of α-tocopherol transfer protein (α-TTP, a determinant of vitamin E concentration in circulation, confers resistance to malarial infection as a result of oxidative damage to the parasites. Furthermore, in combination with the anti-malarial drug chloroquine results were even more dramatic. Conclusion Considering that these knockout mice lack observable negative impacts typical of vitamin E deficiency, these results suggest that inhibition of α-TTP activity in the liver may be a useful strategy in the prevention and treatment of malaria infection. Moreover, a combined strategy of α-TTP inhibition and chloroquine treatment might be effective against drug resistant parasites.

  14. The hepatoprotective activity of blue green algae in Schistosoma mansoni infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Azza H; Osman, Gamalat Y; Salem, Tarek A; Elmalawany, Alshimaa M

    2014-10-01

    This study aims to evaluate the immunomodulatory effects of a natural product, blue green algae (BGA) (100 mg/kg BW), alone or combined with praziquantel PZQ (250 mg/kg BW) on granulomatous inflammation, liver histopathology, some biochemical and immunological parameters in mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni. Results showed that the diameter and number of egg granuloma were significantly reduced after treatment of S. mansoni-infected mice with BGA, PZQ and their combination. The histopathological alterations observed in the liver of S. mansoni-infected mice were remarkably inhibited after BGA treatments. BGA decreased the activities of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) as well as the level of total protein (TP) while the level of albumin was increased. Treatment of infected mice with BGA, PZQ as well as their combination led to significant elevation in the activities of hepatic antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) as compared with control group. Combination of BGA and PZQ resulted in significant reduction in the level of intercellular adhesion molecules-1 (ICAM-1), vascular adhesion molecules-1 (VCAM-1) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) when compared to those of the S. mansoni-infected group. Overall, BGA significantly inhibited the liver damage accompanied with schistosomiasis, exhibited a potent antioxidant and immunoprotective activities. This study suggests that BGA can be considered as promising for development a complementary and/or alternative medicine against schistosomiasis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effectiveness of oral antibiotics for definitive therapy of Gram-negative bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutob, Leila F; Justo, Julie Ann; Bookstaver, P Brandon; Kohn, Joseph; Albrecht, Helmut; Al-Hasan, Majdi N

    2016-11-01

    There is paucity of data evaluating intravenous-to-oral antibiotic switch options for Gram-negative bloodstream infections (BSIs). This retrospective cohort study examined the effectiveness of oral antibiotics for definitive treatment of Gram-negative BSI. Patients with Gram-negative BSI hospitalised for antibiotics were included in this study. The cohort was stratified into three groups based on bioavailability of oral antibiotics prescribed (high, ≥95%; moderate, 75-94%; and low, antibiotics were prescribed to 106, 179 and 77 patients, respectively, for definitive therapy of Gram-negative BSI. Mean patient age was 63 years, 217 (59.9%) were women and 254 (70.2%) had a urinary source of infection. Treatment failure rates were 2%, 12% and 14% in patients receiving oral antibiotics with high, moderate and low bioavailability, respectively (P = 0.02). Risk of treatment failure in the multivariate Cox model was higher in patients receiving antibiotics with moderate [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 5.9, 95% CI 1.6-38.5; P = 0.005] and low bioavailability (aHR = 7.7, 95% CI 1.9-51.5; P = 0.003) compared with those receiving oral antimicrobial agents with high bioavailability. These data demonstrate the effectiveness of oral antibiotics with high bioavailability for definitive therapy of Gram-negative BSI. Risk of treatment failure increases as bioavailability of the oral regimen declines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  16. Pharmacological properties of oral antibiotics for the treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novelli, Andrea; Rosi, Elia

    2017-12-01

    The therapeutic management of uncomplicated bacterial urinary tract infections (UTIs) is based on short-term courses of oral antibiotics. The preferred drugs are nitrofurantoin trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, fosfomycin trometamol, fluoroquinolones and β-lactam agents. The choice of agent for treating uncomplicated UTIs should be based on the pharmacokinetic characteristics of the molecule so that clinical benefit is optimized and the risk of antibacterial resistance is minimized. This article discusses the general pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) aspects of antimicrobial chemotherapy, the PK/PD characteristics of oral antimicrobial agents for the treatment of uncomplicated UTIs and the pharmacological and therapeutic strategies for limiting or preventing bacterial resistance.

  17. Lovastatin delays infection and increases survival rates in AG129 mice infected with dengue virus serotype 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlen Martinez-Gutierrez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been reported that treatment of DENV-infected cultures with Lovastatin (LOV, can affect viral assembly. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of LOV on the survival rate and viremia levels of DENV-2-infected AG129 mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mice were inoculated with 1 × 10(6 plaque-forming units (PFU/ml of DENV-2 and treated with LOV (200 mg/kg/day. Pre-treatment with one or three doses of LOV increased the survival rate compared to untreated mice (7.3 and 7.1 days, respectively, compared to 4.8 days. Viremia levels also decreased by 21.8% compared to untreated mice, but only in the group administered three doses prior to inoculation. When LOV was administered after viral inoculation, the survival rate increased (7.3 days in the group treated at 24 hpi, 6.8 days in the group treated at 48 hpi and 6.5 days in the group treated with two doses compared to the untreated group (4.8 days. Interestingly, the serum viral titer increased by 24.6% in mice treated at 48 hpi with a single dose of LOV and by 21.7% in mice treated with two doses (at 24 and 48 hpi of LOV compared to untreated mice. Finally histopathological changes in the liver and spleen in infected and untreated mice included massive extramedullary erythropoiesis foci and inflammatory filtration, and these characteristics were decreased or absent in LOV-treated mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that the effect of LOV on viremia depends on the timing of treatment and on the number of doses administered. We observed a significant increase in the survival rate in both schemes due to a delay in the progression of the disease. However, the results obtained in the post-treatment scheme must be handled carefully because this treatment scheme increases viremia and we do not know how this increase could affect disease progression in humans.

  18. The immuno-regulatory impact of orally-administered Hypericum perforatum extract on Balb/C mice inoculated with H1n1 influenza A virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Huang

    Full Text Available Hypericumperforatum (H. perforatum ethanol extract has been found to inhibit lipopolysaccharide-induced production of inflammatory mediators and cytokines in cultured macrophages. Therefore, it may be able to protect the host from excessive inflammation during viral infection. In the current study, the immune-regulatory effect of H. perforatum extract was evaluated in A549 lung epithelial cells and BALB/c mice exposed to Influenza A/PR/8/34 H1N1 virus. In A549 cells, the extract (30 µg/mL significantly inhibited influenza virus induced monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP-1 and interferon-γ induced protein 10 kD (IP-10, but dramatically increased interleukin-6 (IL-6. In mice inoculated intranasally with 10(7.9 EID50 of Influenza A/PR/8/34 H1N1 (high dose, daily oral treatment of H. perforatum extract at a rate of 110 mg/kg of body weight increased lung viral titer, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels, and the infiltration of pro-inflammatory cells in the lung 5 days post-inoculation, as compared to ethanol vehicle treated mice. Transcription of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3 was increased by H. perforatum extract both in A549 cells and BALB/c mice, which could have interrupted anti-viral immune response and thus led to the inefficient viral clearance and increased lung inflammation. H. perforatum treatment resulted in minor reduction in viral titer without affecting body weight when mice were inoculated with a lower dose (~10(5.0 EID50 and H. perforatum was applied in the later phase of infection. Mice challenged intranasally with high dose of influenza virus (10(7.9 EID50 suffered from a higher mortality rate when dosed with H. perforatum extract. In conclusion, the current study showed that SOCS3 elevation by H. perforatum may cause impaired immune defense against influenza virus infection and lead to higher mortality.

  19. Occurrence of two newly named oral treponemes - Treponema parvum and Treponema putidum - in primary endodontic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rôças, I N; Siqueira, J F

    2005-12-01

    Recent evidence from molecular genetic studies has revealed that oral Treponema species are involved in infections of endodontic origin. This study assessed the occurrence of two newly named oral treponemes - Treponema parvum and Treponema putidum - in primary endodontic infections using a culture-independent identification technique. Genomic DNA was isolated directly from clinical samples, and a 16S rRNA gene-based nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to determine the presence of T. parvum and T. putidum. Species-specific primer pairs were developed by aligning closely related 16S rRNA gene sequences. The specificity for each primer pair was validated by running PCR against a panel of oral bacteria and by sequence analysis of PCR products from positive clinical samples. T. parvum was detected in 52% of the root canals associated with chronic apical periodontitis, in 20% of the cases diagnosed as acute apical periodontitis, and in no abscessed case. In general, T. parvum was detected in 26% of the samples from primary endodontic infections. T. putidum was found in only one case of acute apical periodontitis (2% of the total number of cases investigated). The devised nested PCR protocol was able to identify both T. parvum and T. putidum directly in clinical samples and demonstrated that these two treponemes can take part in endodontic infections.

  20. Comparison of the course of infection with Giardia muris in male and female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, C W; Belosevic, M

    1995-01-01

    The infection with Giardia muris in male and female C57BL/6 mice was characterized by enumerating cyst release in the feces and trophozoite burden in the small intestine. Cyst release differed between males and females during the course of the primary and challenge infections. Males and females released similar numbers of cysts in the feces during the acute phase of the infection. However, the trophozoite burden was significantly higher in males during the same period. Males released cysts in their feces longer than females and trophozoites present in their intestines for a longer period than females. From day 18 of infection the females did not release cysts in their feces, while males continued to do so for at least 60 days. Thus, distinct differences exist between male and female mice in their ability to harbor and eliminate this intestinal parasite.

  1. Effect of Acycloguanosine Treatment on Acute and Latent Herpes Simplex Infections in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Hugh J.; Bell, Susanne E.; Elion, Gertrude B.; Nash, Anthony A.; Wildy, Peter

    1979-01-01

    Systemic treatment of mice with the nucleoside analog 9-(2-hydroxyethoxymethyl)guanine (acycloguanosine [aciclovir]) was found to be highly effective against acute type 1 herpes simplex virus infection of the pinna. The drug ablated clinical signs and reduced virus replication both in tissue local to the inoculation site and within the nervous system. Provided that moderate-sized virus inocula were used, acycloguanosine treatment reduced or prevented the establishment of a latent infection in the dorsal root ganglia relating to the sensory nerve supply of the ear. However, although it aborted artificially produced infections in dorsal root ganglia, acycloguanosine was found not to be effective against the latent infection once established. This finding strongly indicated that latent herpes simplex virus in mice can exist in a nonreplicating form. PMID:464587

  2. Effect of acycloguanosine treatment of acute and latent herpes simplex infections in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, H J; Bell, S E; Elion, G B; Nash, A A; Wildy, P

    1979-04-01

    Systemic treatment of mice with the nucleoside analog 9-(2-hydroxyethoxymethyl)guanine (acycloguanosine [aciclovir]) was found to be highly effective against acute type 1 herpes simplex virus infection of the pinna. The drug ablated clinical signs and reduced virus replication both in tissue local to the inoculation site and within the nervous system. Provided that moderate-sized virus inocula were used, acycloguanosine treatment reduced or prevented the establishment of a latent infection in the dorsal root ganglia relating to the sensory nerve supply of the ear. However, although it aborted artificially produced infections in dorsal root ganglia, acycloguanosine was found not to be effective against the latent infection once established. This finding strongly indicated that latent herpes simplex virus in mice can exist in a nonreplicating form.

  3. In Vivo Imaging of Influenza Virus Infection in Immunized Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Czakó

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Immunization is the cornerstone of seasonal influenza control and represents an important component of pandemic preparedness strategies. Using a bioluminescent reporter virus, we demonstrate the application of noninvasive in vivo imaging system (IVIS technology to evaluate the preclinical efficacy of candidate vaccines and immunotherapy in a mouse model of influenza. Sequential imaging revealed distinct spatiotemporal kinetics of bioluminescence in groups of mice passively or actively immunized by various strategies that accelerated the clearance of the challenge virus at different rates and by distinct mechanisms. Imaging findings were consistent with conclusions derived from virus titers in the lungs and, notably, were more informative than conventional efficacy endpoints in some cases. Our findings demonstrate the reliability of IVIS as a qualitative approach to support preclinical evaluation of candidate medical countermeasures for influenza in mice.

  4. The role of oral antibiotics prophylaxis in prevention of surgical site infection in colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koullouros, Michalis; Khan, Nadir; Aly, Emad H

    2017-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) continues to be a challenge in colorectal surgery. Over the years, various modalities have been used in an attempt to reduce SSI risk in elective colorectal surgery, which include mechanical bowel preparation before surgery, oral antibiotics and intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis at induction of surgery. Even though IV antibiotics have become standard practice, there has been a debate on the exact role of oral antibiotics. The primary aim was to identify the role of oral antibiotics in reduction of SSI in elective colorectal surgery. The secondary aim was to explore any potential benefit in the use of mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) in relation to SSI in elective colorectal surgery. Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched. Any randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or cohort studies after 1980, which investigated the effectiveness of oral antibiotic prophylaxis and/or MBP in preventing SSIs in elective colorectal surgery were included. Twenty-three RCTs and eight cohorts were included. The results indicate a statistically significant advantage in preventing SSIs with the combined usage of oral and systemic antibiotic prophylaxis. Furthermore, our analysis of the cohort studies shows no benefits in the use of MBP in prevention of SSIs. The addition of oral antibiotics to systemic antibiotics could potentially reduce the risk of SSIs in elective colorectal surgery. Additionally, MBP does not seem to provide a clear benefit with regard to SSI prevention.

  5. Subchronic Oral Bromocriptine Methanesulfonate Enhances Open Field Novelty-Induced Behavior and Spatial Memory in Male Swiss Albino Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olakunle James Onaolapo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study set out to assess the neurobehavioral effects of subchronic, oral bromocriptine methanesulfonate using the open field and the Y-maze in healthy male mice. Sixty adult Swiss albino mice were assigned into three groups. Controls received normal saline, while test groups received bromocriptine methanesulfonate at 2.5 and 5 mg/kg/day, respectively, for a period of 21 days. Neurobehavioral tests were carried out on days 1 and 21 after administration. Open field assessment on day 1 after administration revealed significant increase in grooming at 2.5 and 5 mg/kg, while horizontal and vertical locomotion showed no significant changes. Day 1 also showed no significant changes in Y-maze alternation. On day 21, horizontal locomotion, rearing, and grooming were increased significantly at 2.5 and 5 mg/kg doses after administration; also, spatial memory was significantly enhanced at 2.5 mg/kg. In conclusion, the study demonstrates the ability of oral bromocriptine to affect neurobehavior in normal mice. It also suggests that there is a cumulative effect of oral bromocriptine on the behaviors studied with more changes being seen after subchronic administration rather than after a single oral dose.

  6. Subchronic Oral Bromocriptine Methanesulfonate Enhances Open Field Novelty-Induced Behavior and Spatial Memory in Male Swiss Albino Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onaolapo, Olakunle James; Onaolapo, Adejoke Yetunde

    2013-01-01

    This study set out to assess the neurobehavioral effects of subchronic, oral bromocriptine methanesulfonate using the open field and the Y-maze in healthy male mice. Sixty adult Swiss albino mice were assigned into three groups. Controls received normal saline, while test groups received bromocriptine methanesulfonate at 2.5 and 5 mg/kg/day, respectively, for a period of 21 days. Neurobehavioral tests were carried out on days 1 and 21 after administration. Open field assessment on day 1 after administration revealed significant increase in grooming at 2.5 and 5 mg/kg, while horizontal and vertical locomotion showed no significant changes. Day 1 also showed no significant changes in Y-maze alternation. On day 21, horizontal locomotion, rearing, and grooming were increased significantly at 2.5 and 5 mg/kg doses after administration; also, spatial memory was significantly enhanced at 2.5 mg/kg. In conclusion, the study demonstrates the ability of oral bromocriptine to affect neurobehavior in normal mice. It also suggests that there is a cumulative effect of oral bromocriptine on the behaviors studied with more changes being seen after subchronic administration rather than after a single oral dose.

  7. Borrelia burgdorferi infection and immunity in mice deficient in the fifth component of complement.

    OpenAIRE

    Bockenstedt, L K; Barthold, S; Deponte, K; Marcantonio, N; Kantor, F S

    1993-01-01

    When immunocompetent mice are inoculated with Borrelia burgdorferi, they develop acute arthritis and carditis that undergo spontaneous regression despite the persistence of infection. Specific T- and/or B-cell immunity appears to be necessary for resolution of disease manifestations. Humoral immune responses to B. burgdorferi are also important in prevention of B. burgdorferi infection, in that passive transfer of immune sera or protective monoclonal antibodies prevents the spirochete from es...

  8. Congenital and nursing effects on the evolution of Schistosoma mansoni infection in mice

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    J. A. Lenzi

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Modification of the immune response to schistosomal infection in children or offspring born to mother R infected with Schistosoma mansoni has been demonstrated in human and in experimental schistosomiasis. One of the hypothesis to explain this fact could be the transfer of circulating antigens and antibodies from mother to foetus through the placenta or from mother to child by milk. The results of this spontaneous transference are controversial in the literature. In an attempt to investigate these questions, we studied one hundred and twenty offspring (Swiss mice, sixty born to infected-mothers (group A and sixty born to non-infected mothers (group B. These were percutaneously infected with 50 cercariae/mouse, and divided in six sub-groups (20 mice/sub-group, according to the following schedule: after birth (sub-groups A.I and B.I, 10 days old (sub-groups A.II and B.II and 21 days old (sub-groups A.III and B.III. After the exposure period, the young mice returned to their own mothers for nursing. Six weeks later, the mice were killed. We obtained the following results: 1 There is transference of antibody to cercariae (CAP, adult worms (SWAP and egg antigens (SEA from the infected mothers to the offspring, probably through placenta and milk; 2 Offspring born to infected mothers exhibit much less coagulative hepatic necrosis and show a lower number of eggs in the small intestine and a less intense and predominant exsudative stage of the hepatic granulomas when compared with the exsudative-productive stage of the control groups. The findings suggest that congenital and nursing factors can interfere on the development of the schistosomiasis infection, causing an hyporesponse to the eggs.

  9. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP): Early detection of Toxoplasma gondii infection in mice

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    Kong, Qing-Ming; Lu, Shao-Hong; Tong, Qun-Bo; Lou, Di; Chen, Rui; Zheng, Bin; Kumagai, Takashi; Wen, Li-Yong; Ohta, Nobuo; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Toxoplasmosis is a widespread zoonotic parasitic disease that occurs in both animals and humans. Traditional molecular assays are often difficult to perform, especially for the early diagnosis of Toxoplasma gondii infections. Here, we established a novel loop-mediated isothermal amplification targeting the 529 bp repeat element (529 bp-LAMP) to detect T. gondii DNA in blood samples of experimental mice infected with tachyzoites of the RH strain. Findings The assay was perf...

  10. Deferoxamine Compensates for Decreases in B Cell Counts and Reduces Mortality in Enterovirus 71-Infected Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yajun; Ma, Jing; Xiu, Jinghui; Bai, Lin; Guan, Feifei; Zhang, Li; Liu, Jiangning; Zhang, Lianfeng

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 is one of the major causative agents of hand, foot and mouth disease in children under six years of age. No vaccine or antiviral therapy is currently available. In this work, we found that the number of B cells was reduced in enterovirus 71-infected mice. Deferoxamine, a marine microbial natural product, compensated for the decreased levels of B cells caused by enterovirus 71 infection. The neutralizing antibody titer was also improved after deferoxamine treatment. Furthermore...

  11. Extensive metabolism and route-dependent pharmacokinetics of bisphenol A (BPA) in neonatal mice following oral or subcutaneous administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draganov, Dragomir I.; Markham, Dan A.; Beyer, Dieter; Waechter, John M.; Dimond, Stephen S.; Budinsky, Robert A.; Shiotsuka, Ronald N.; Snyder, Stephanie A.; Ehman, Kimberly D.; Hentges, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Orally administered bisphenol A (BPA) undergoes efficient first-pass metabolism to produce the inactive conjugates BPA-glucuronide (BPA-G) and BPA-sulfate (BPA-S). This study was conducted to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of BPA, BPA-G and BPA-S in neonatal mice following the administration of a single oral or subcutaneous (SC) dose. This study consisted of 3 phases: (1) mass-balance phase in which effective dose delivery procedures for oral or SC administration of 3 H-BPA to postnatal day three (PND3) mice were developed; (2) pharmacokinetic phase during which systemic exposure to total 3 H-BPA-derived radioactivity in female PND3 mice was established; and (3) metabolite profiling phase in which 50 female PND3 pups received either a single oral or SC dose of 3 H-BPA. Blood was collected from 5 pups/route/time-point at various times post-dosing, the blood plasma samples were pooled by group, and time-point and samples were profiled by HPLC with fraction collection. Fractions were analyzed for total radioactivity and data used to reconstruct radiochromatograms and to integrate individual peaks. The identity of the BPA, BPA-G, and BPA-S peaks was confirmed using authentic standards and LC–MS/MS analysis. The result of this study revealed that female PND3 mice have the capacity to metabolize BPA to BPA-G, BPA-S and other metabolites after both routes of administration. Systemic exposure to free BPA is route-dependent as the plasma concentrations were lower following oral administration compared to SC injection

  12. Targeted delivery of antigen to intestinal dendritic cells induces oral tolerance and prevents autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice.

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    Chen, Yulin; Wu, Jie; Wang, Jiajia; Zhang, Wenjing; Xu, Bohui; Xu, Xiaojun; Zong, Li

    2018-03-15

    The intestinal immune system is an ideal target to induce immune tolerance physiologically. However, the efficiency of oral protein antigen delivery is limited by degradation of the antigen in the gastrointestinal tract and poor uptake by antigen-presenting cells. Gut dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells that are prone to inducing antigen-specific immune tolerance. In this study, we delivered the antigen heat shock protein 65-6×P277 (H6P) directly to the gut DCs of NOD mice through oral vaccination with H6P-loaded targeting nanoparticles (NPs), and investigated the ability of this antigen to induce immune tolerance to prevent autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice. A targeting NP delivery system was developed to encapsulate H6P, and the ability of this system to protect and facilitate H6P delivery to gut DCs was assessed. NOD mice were immunised with H6P-loaded targeting NPs orally once a week for 7 weeks and the onset of diabetes was assessed by monitoring blood glucose levels. H6P-loaded targeting NPs protected the encapsulated H6P from degradation in the gastrointestinal tract environment and significantly increased the uptake of H6P by DCs in the gut Peyer's patches (4.1 times higher uptake compared with the control H6P solution group). Oral vaccination with H6P-loaded targeting NPs induced antigen-specific T cell tolerance and prevented diabetes in 100% of NOD mice. Immune deviation (T helper [Th]1 to Th2) and CD4 + CD25 + FOXP3 + regulatory T cells were found to participate in the induction of immune tolerance. In this study, we successfully induced antigen-specific T cell tolerance and prevented the onset of diabetes in NOD mice. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt at delivering antigen to gut DCs using targeting NPs to induce T cell tolerance.

  13. Gene expression-based classifiers identify Staphylococcus aureus infection in mice and humans.

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    Sun Hee Ahn

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus causes a spectrum of human infection. Diagnostic delays and uncertainty lead to treatment delays and inappropriate antibiotic use. A growing literature suggests the host's inflammatory response to the pathogen represents a potential tool to improve upon current diagnostics. The hypothesis of this study is that the host responds differently to S. aureus than to E. coli infection in a quantifiable way, providing a new diagnostic avenue. This study uses Bayesian sparse factor modeling and penalized binary regression to define peripheral blood gene-expression classifiers of murine and human S. aureus infection. The murine-derived classifier distinguished S. aureus infection from healthy controls and Escherichia coli-infected mice across a range of conditions (mouse and bacterial strain, time post infection and was validated in outbred mice (AUC>0.97. A S. aureus classifier derived from a cohort of 94 human subjects distinguished S. aureus blood stream infection (BSI from healthy subjects (AUC 0.99 and E. coli BSI (AUC 0.84. Murine and human responses to S. aureus infection share common biological pathways, allowing the murine model to classify S. aureus BSI in humans (AUC 0.84. Both murine and human S. aureus classifiers were validated in an independent human cohort (AUC 0.95 and 0.92, respectively. The approach described here lends insight into the conserved and disparate pathways utilized by mice and humans in response to these infections. Furthermore, this study advances our understanding of S. aureus infection; the host response to it; and identifies new diagnostic and therapeutic avenues.

  14. Host resistance of CD18 knockout mice against systemic infection with Listeria monocytogenes

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    Wu, Huaizhu; Prince, Joseph E.; Brayton, Cory F.; Shah, Chirayu; Zeve, Daniel; Gregory, Stephen H.; Smith, C. Wayne; Ballantyne, Christie M.

    2003-01-01

    Mice with targeted mutations of CD18, the common beta2 subunit of CD11/CD18 integrins, have leukocytosis, impaired transendothelial neutrophil emigration, and reduced host defense to Streptococcus pneumoniae, a gram-positive extracellular bacterium. Previous studies using blocking monoclonal antibodies suggested roles for CD18 and CD11b in hepatic neutrophil recruitment and host innate response to Listeria monocytogenes, a gram-positive intracellular bacterium. We induced systemic listeriosis in CD18 knockout (CD18-ko) and wild-type (WT) mice by tail vein injection with Listeria. By 14 days postinjection (dpi), 8 of 10 WT mice died, compared with 2 of 10 CD18-ko mice (P Listeria organisms in livers and spleens were similar in both groups at 20 min postinfection. By 3, 5, and 7 dpi, however, numbers of Listeria organisms were significantly lower in livers and spleens of CD18-ko mice than in WT mice. Histopathology showed that following Listeria infection, CD18-ko mice had milder inflammatory and necrotizing lesions in both spleens and livers than did WT mice. Cytokine assays indicated that baseline interleukin-1beta and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) levels were higher in CD18-ko mice than in WT mice and that CD18-ko splenocytes produced higher levels of interleukin-1beta and G-CSF than WT splenocytes under the same amount of Listeria stimulation. These findings show that CD18 is not an absolute requirement for antilisterial innate immunity or hepatic neutrophil recruitment. We propose that the absence of CD18 in the mice results in the priming of innate immunity, as evidenced by elevated cytokine expression, and neutrophilic leukocytosis, which augments antilisterial defense.

  15. Mild Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection Improves the Course of Subsequent Endogenous S. aureus Bacteremia in Mice.

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    Sanne van den Berg

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus carriers with S. aureus bacteremia may have a reduced mortality risk compared to non-carriers. A role for the immune system is suggested. Here, we study in mice the effect of mild S. aureus skin infection prior to endogenous or exogenous S. aureus bacteremia, and evaluate protection in relation to anti-staphylococcal antibody levels. Skin infections once or twice by a clinical S. aureus isolate (isolate P or S. aureus strain 8325-4 were induced in mice free of S. aureus and anti-staphylococcal antibodies. Five weeks later, immunoglobulin G (IgG levels in blood against 25 S. aureus antigens were determined, and LD50 or LD100 bacteremia caused by S. aureus isolate P was induced. S. aureus skin infections led to elevated levels of anti-staphylococcal IgG in blood. One skin infection improved the course of subsequent severe endogenous bacteremia only. A second skin infection further improved animal survival rate, which was associated with increased pre-bacteremia IgG levels against Efb, IsaA, LukD, LukE, Nuc, PrsA and WTA. In conclusion, S. aureus isolate P skin infection in mice reduces the severity of subsequent endogenous S. aureus bacteremia only. Although cellular immune effects cannot be rules out, anti-staphylococcal IgG against specified antigens may contribute to this effect.

  16. Elevated carbon monoxide in the exhaled breath of mice during a systemic bacterial infection.

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    Alan G Barbour

    Full Text Available Blood is the specimen of choice for most laboratory tests for diagnosis and disease monitoring. Sampling exhaled breath is a noninvasive alternative to phlebotomy and has the potential for real-time monitoring at the bedside. Improved instrumentation has advanced breath analysis for several gaseous compounds from humans. However, application to small animal models of diseases and physiology has been limited. To extend breath analysis to mice, we crafted a means for collecting nose-only breath samples from groups and individual animals who were awake. Samples were subjected to gas chromatography and mass spectrometry procedures developed for highly sensitive analysis of trace volatile organic compounds (VOCs in the atmosphere. We evaluated the system with experimental systemic infections of severe combined immunodeficiency Mus musculus with the bacterium Borrelia hermsii. Infected mice developed bacterial densities of ∼10(7 per ml of blood by day 4 or 5 and in comparison to uninfected controls had hepatosplenomegaly and elevations of both inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. While 12 samples from individual infected mice on days 4 and 5 and 6 samples from uninfected mice did not significantly differ for 72 different VOCs, carbon monoxide (CO was elevated in samples from infected mice, with a mean (95% confidence limits effect size of 4.2 (2.8-5.6, when differences in CO2 in the breath were taken into account. Normalized CO values declined to the uninfected range after one day of treatment with the antibiotic ceftriaxone. Strongly correlated with CO in the breath were levels of heme oxygenase-1 protein in serum and HMOX1 transcripts in whole blood. These results (i provide further evidence of the informativeness of CO concentration in the exhaled breath during systemic infection and inflammation, and (ii encourage evaluation of this noninvasive analytic approach in other various other rodent models of infection and for utility in

  17. Respiratory syncytial virus infections enhance cigarette smoke induced COPD in mice.

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    Robert F Foronjy

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial viral (RSV infections are a frequent cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD exacerbations, which are a major factor in disease progression and mortality. RSV is able to evade antiviral defenses to persist in the lungs of COPD patients. Though RSV infection has been identified in COPD, its contribution to cigarette smoke-induced airway inflammation and lung tissue destruction has not been established. Here we examine the long-term effects of cigarette smoke exposure, in combination with monthly RSV infections, on pulmonary inflammation, protease production and remodeling in mice. RSV exposures enhanced the influx of macrophages, neutrophils and lymphocytes to the airways of cigarette smoke exposed C57BL/6J mice. This infiltration of cells was most pronounced around the vasculature and bronchial airways. By itself, RSV caused significant airspace enlargement and fibrosis in mice and these effects were accentuated with concomitant smoke exposure. Combined stimulation with both smoke and RSV synergistically induced cytokine (IL-1α, IL-17, IFN-γ, KC, IL-13, CXCL9, RANTES, MIF and GM-CSF and protease (MMP-2, -8, -12, -13, -16 and cathepsins E, S, W and Z expression. In addition, RSV exposure caused marked apoptosis within the airways of infected mice, which was augmented by cigarette smoke exposure. RSV and smoke exposure also reduced protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A and protein tyrosine phosphates (PTP1B expression and activity. This is significant as these phosphatases counter smoke-induced inflammation and protease expression. Together, these findings show for the first time that recurrent RSV infection markedly enhances inflammation, apoptosis and tissue destruction in smoke-exposed mice. Indeed, these results indicate that preventing RSV transmission and infection has the potential to significantly impact on COPD severity and progression.

  18. Ultra-low dose of Mycobacterium tuberculosis aerosol creates partial infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Divey; Hopkins, Gregory W; Seay, Sarah A; Chen, Ching-Ju; Perley, Casey C; Click, Eva M; Frothingham, Richard

    2012-03-01

    A murine low dose (LD) aerosol model is commonly used to test tuberculosis vaccines. Doses of 50-400 CFU (24h lung CFU) infect 100% of exposed mice. The LD model measures progression from infection to disease based on organ CFU at defined time points. To mimic natural exposure, we exposed mice to an ultra-low dose (ULD) aerosol. We estimated the presented dose by sampling the aerosol. Female C57BL/6 mice were exposed to Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv aerosol at 1.0, 1.1, 1.6, 5.4, and 11 CFU presented dose, infecting 27%, 36%, 36%, 100%, and 95% of mice, respectively. These data are compatible with a stochastic infection event (Poisson distribution, weighted R(2)=0.97) or with a dose-response relationship (sigmoid distribution, weighted R(2)=0.97). Based on the later assumption, the ID50 was 1.6CFU presented dose (95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.1). We compared organ CFU after ULD and LD aerosols (5.4 vs. 395CFU presented dose). Lung burden was 30-fold lower in the ULD model at 4 weeks (3.4 vs. 4.8 logs, pLD aerosols had greater within-group CFU variability. Exposure to ULD aerosols leads to infection in a subset of mice, and to persistently low organ CFU. The ULD aerosol model may resemble human pulmonary tuberculosis more closely than the standard LD model, and may be used to identify host or bacterial factors that modulate the initial infection event. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Oral and transdermal DL-methylphenidate-ethanol interactions in C57BL/6J mice: potentiation of locomotor activity with oral delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Guinevere H; Griffin, William C; Patrick, Kennerly S

    2011-12-01

    Many abusers of dl-methylphenidate co-abuse ethanol. The present animal study examined behavioral effects of oral or transdermal DL-methylphenidate in combination with a high, depressive dose of ethanol to model co-abuse. Locomotor activity of C57BL/6J mice was recorded for 3 h following dosing with either oral DL-methylphenidate (7.5 mg/kg) or transdermal DL-methylphenidate (Daytrana®;1/4 of a 12.5 cm(2) patch; mean dose 7.5 mg/kg), with or without oral ethanol (3 g/kg). Brains were enantiospecifically analyzed for the isomers of methylphenidate and the transesterification metabolite ethylphenidate. An otherwise depressive dose of ethanol significantly potentiated oral DL-methylphenidate induced increases in total distance traveled for the first 100 min (pbrain D-methylphenidate concentrations were significantly elevated by ethanol in both the oral (65% increase) and transdermal (88% increase) groups. The corresponding L-ethylphenidate concentrations were 10 ng/g and 130 ng/g. Stimulant induced motor activity in rodents may correlate with abuse liability. Potentiation of DL-methylphenidate motor effects by concomitant ethanol carries implications regarding increased abuse potential of DL-methylphenidate when combined with ethanol. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Chronic Trichuris muris infection causes neoplastic change in the intestine and exacerbates tumour formation in APC min/+ mice.

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    Kelly S Hayes

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Incidences of infection-related cancers are on the rise in developing countries where the prevalence of intestinal nematode worm infections are also high. Trichuris muris (T. muris is a murine gut-dwelling nematode that is the direct model for human T. trichiura, one of the major soil-transmitted helminth infections of humans. In order to assess whether chronic infection with T. muris does indeed influence the development of cancer hallmarks, both wild type mice and colon cancer model (APC min/+ mice were infected with this parasite. Parasite infection in wild type mice led to the development of neoplastic change similar to that seen in mice that had been treated with the carcinogen azoxymethane. Additionally, both chronic and acute infection in the APCmin/+ mice led to an enhanced tumour development that was distinct to the site of infection suggesting systemic control. By blocking the parasite induced T regulatory response in these mice, the increase in the number of tumours following infection was abrogated. Thus T. muris infection alone causes an increase in gut pathologies that are known to be markers of cancer but also increases the incidence of tumour formation in a colon cancer model. The influence of parasitic worm infection on the development of cancer may therefore be significant.

  1. Synergistic effects of resveratrol (free and inclusion complex) and sulfamethoxazole-trimetropim treatment on pathology, oxidant/antioxidant status and behavior of mice infected with Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottari, Nathieli B; Baldissera, Matheus D; Tonin, Alexandre A; Rech, Virginia C; Alves, Catiane B; D'Avila, Fernanda; Thomé, Gustavo R; Guarda, Naiara S; Moresco, Rafael N; Camillo, Giovana; Vogel, Fernanda F; Luchese, Cristiane; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Morsch, Vera M; Tochetto, Camila; Fighera, Rafael; Nishihira, Vivian S K; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the synergistic effects of resveratrol and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (ST) on the treatment of mice experimentally infected by Toxoplasma gondii during the chronic phase of the disease considering infection, behavior, and oxidative/antioxidants profile aspects. For the study, 60 mice were initially divided into two groups: uninfected (n = 24) and infected by T. gondii (n = 36). These two groups were later subdivided into other groups and treated with resveratrol (free and inclusion complex containing resveratrol) alone and co-administered with ST: groups A to D were composed by healthy mice and groups E to J were consisted of animals infected by T. gondii (VEG strain). Treatments began 20 days post-infection for 10 consecutive days with oral doses of 0.5 mg kg(-1) of ST (groups B and F), 100 mg kg(-1) of free resveratrol (groups C and G) and inclusion complex of resveratrol (nanoparticles containing resveratrol) (groups D and H), and lastly an co-administration of both drugs (groups I and J). Behavioral tests (memory, anxiety and locomotion) were performed after treatment. Liver and brain fragments were collected to evaluate pathological changes, brain cysts counts, as well as oxidant and antioxidant levels. A reduction on the number of cysts in the brain of animals treated with both drugs combined was observed; there was also reduced number of lesions on both organs. This drug combined effect was also able to reduce oxidative and increase antioxidant levels in infected mice, which might be interpreted as a resveratrol protective effect. In addition, the combination of ST and resveratrol was able to prevent behavioral changes in infected mice. Therefore, the use of co-administration drugs enhances the therapeutic effect acting on a synergic way, reducing the oxidizing effects of the chemical treatment for toxoplasmosis. In addition, resveratrol in inclusion complex when co-administered with ST showed an improved

  2. Orally administered sodium 4-phenylbutyrate suppresses the development of dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Kazuhiko; Nimura, Satoshi; Hideshima, Yuko; Nabeshima, Kazuki; Nakashima, Manabu

    2017-12-01

    Sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA) exerts therapeutic effects in a wide range of pathologies. A previous study by the present authors revealed that intraperitoneal administration of PBA suppresses the onset of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in mice. In the present study, the effects of orally administered PBA are investigated, as this route of administration is more clinically relevant. The therapeutic efficacy of PBA (10 mg/12 h) in mice with experimental colitis was assessed based on the disease activity index, production of inflammatory cytokines, colon length and histopathological investigations. The results of the present study demonstrated a significantly higher survival rate in the PBA-treated group compared with the PBA-untreated (DSS control) group (P=0.0156). PBA treatment improved pathological indices of experimental colitis (P<0.05). Furthermore, the oral administration of PBA significantly inhibited the DSS-induced shortening of the colon (P<0.05) and overproduction of interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 (both P<0.05) as measured in colonic lavage fluids. A marked attenuation of the DSS-induced overproduction of tumor necrosis factor was also observed. For histopathological analysis, a marked decrease in mature goblet cells and increase in enlarged nuclei of the absorptive cells was observed in colon lesions of DSS control mice as compared with normal untreated mice. However, in the PBA-treated mice, no such lesions were observed and the mucosa resembled that of DSS-untreated mice. The results of the present study, combined with those results of a previous study, suggest that oral and intraperitoneal administration of PBA have similar preventative effects on DSS-induced colitis, achieved by suppressing its pathogenesis.

  3. Dietary Chitosan Supplementation Increases Microbial Diversity and Attenuates the Severity of Citrobacter rodentium Infection in Mice

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    Guiping Guan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available C57BL/6 mice were tested in order to investigate the effects of dietary chitosan (COS supplements on intestinal microflora and resistance to Citrobacter rodentium infection. The findings reveal that, after consuming a 300 mg/kg COS diet for 14 days, microflora became more diverse as a result of the supplement. Mice receiving COS exhibited an increase in the percentage of Bacteroidetes phylum and a decrease in the percentage of Firmicutes phylum. After Citrobacter rodentium infection, the histopathology scores indicated that COS feeding resulted in less severe colitis. IL-6 and TNF-α were significantly lower in colon from COS-feeding mice than those in the control group. Furthermore, mice in COS group were also found to experience inhibited activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB in the colonic tissue. Overall, the findings revealed that adding 300 mg/kg COS to the diet changed the composition of the intestinal microflora of mice, resulting in suppressed NF-κB activation and less production of TNF-α and IL-6; and these changes led to better control of inflammation and resolution of infection with C. rodentium.

  4. Exacerbation of autoimmune neuro-inflammation in mice cured from blood-stage Plasmodium berghei infection.

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    Rodolfo Thomé

    Full Text Available The thymus plays an important role shaping the T cell repertoire in the periphery, partly, through the elimination of inflammatory auto-reactive cells. It has been shown that, during Plasmodium berghei infection, the thymus is rendered atrophic by the premature egress of CD4+CD8+ double-positive (DP T cells to the periphery. To investigate whether autoimmune diseases are affected after Plasmodium berghei NK65 infection, we immunized C57BL/6 mice, which was previously infected with P. berghei NK65 and treated with chloroquine (CQ, with MOG35-55 peptide and the clinical course of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE was evaluated. Our results showed that NK65+CQ+EAE mice developed a more severe disease than control EAE mice. The same pattern of disease severity was observed in MOG35-55-immunized mice after adoptive transfer of P. berghei-elicited splenic DP-T cells. The higher frequency of IL-17+- and IFN-γ+-producing DP lymphocytes in the Central Nervous System of these mice suggests that immature lymphocytes contribute to disease worsening. To our knowledge, this is the first study to integrate the possible relationship between malaria and multiple sclerosis through the contribution of the thymus. Notwithstanding, further studies must be conducted to assert the relevance of malaria-induced thymic atrophy in the susceptibility and clinical course of other inflammatory autoimmune diseases.

  5. Course of induced infection by Eimeria krijgsmannni in immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Yuina; Matsubayashi, Makoto; Kawaguchi, Hiroaki; Tsujio, Masashi; Mizuno, Masanobu; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Masatani, Tatsunori; Matsui, Toshihiro; Matsuo, Tomohide

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated the utility of Eimeria krijgsmanni as a novel mouse eimerian parasite for elucidating the biological diversity. The parasite showed notable infectivity to mice with various levels of immune status and susceptibility to antimicrobial agents including coccidiostat. However, the detailed lifecycle of E. krijgsmanni had not yet been determined and this information was lacking in discussion of previous findings. In the present study, we clarified the morphological characteristics of E. krijgsmanni and its lifecycle in normal mice, and examined the effects in immunodeficient mice and lifecycle stage for challenge infections after the primary inoculation. In immunocompetent mice, the lifecycle consisted of four asexual stages and the sexual sages followed by formation of oocysts during the prepatent periods. Interestingly, the second-generation meronts were detected in all observation periods after the disappearance of the other stages. For the challenge infection of immunodeficient mice, all developmental stages except for the second generation meronts were temporarily vanished. This finding suggests a "rest" or marked delay in development and a "restart" of the promotion toward the next generations. The second generation meronts may play an important role in the lifecycle of E. krijgsmanni.

  6. Excess Fibrin Deposits Decrease Fetal Weight of Pregnant Mice Infected by Plasmodium berghei

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    Desy Andari

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Low birth weight is commonly attributed to malaria in pregnancy, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie this poor birth outcome are incompletely understood. A universally described histopathological feature of placental malaria is excessive deposition of fibrin, the end-product of the coagulation cascade. This study was conducted to compare fibrin deposit in pregnant mice that infected by Plasmodium berghei (treatment group to the normal pregnant mice (control group and its association with fetal weight. This research is in vivo experimental laboratory study that used 18 pregnant Balb/c mice which divided to the control the group (8 mice and treatment group (9 mice infected by P.berghei. Placentas were staining with Haematoxylin-Eosin (HE for fibrin deposits examination whereas fetal weight was performed with Mettler analytical balance AE 50. Fetal weight of the treatment group was lower than those of the control group (t test, p=0,002. Fibrin deposits were increased in the treatment group (t test, p=0,005 and influenced weight of fetuses (Spearman r= -0,586, p= 0,014. Weights of fetuses are interfered by fibrin deposits during malaria infection.

  7. Frequency of fungal infection in biopsies of oral mucosal lesions: A prospective hospital-based study

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    Thimmarasa Venkappa Bhovi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: To determine the frequency and common site of fungal infection in biopsies of oral mucosal lesions and also to detect the lesions most likely to be infected with fungal infection. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 patients with oral mucosal lesions were advised routine hematological examination followed by incisional biopsy under local anesthesia. The specimen were fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin and processed. One section from the specimen was stained with hematoxylin and eosin staining for histopathological diagnosis of the lesion and a second section was stained with Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS stain for detection of fungal infection. Results: Out of the 100 patients, the most common mucosal lesion encountered was carcinoma (56% followed by lesions with dysplastic changes (28%, benign lesions (9%, squamous papilloma (2% and oral submucous fibrosis (5%. The most common anatomic location affected by the mucosal lesions were buccal mucosa, followed by the tongue, gingiva, maxillary tuberosity and floor of the mouth with values of 73%, 16%, 6%, 4% and 1%, respectively. Squamous papilloma had the highest positive association with fungal infection (100% followed by lesions with dysplastic changes (17.9% and carcinoma (8.9%. The maximum fungal positive association was encountered in the mucosal lesions over the tongue (18.7% followed by the buccal mucosa (12.3%. Conclusion: There is statistically significant association of fungal infection with dysplastic lesions and papilloma with the tongue and buccal mucosa as the most common sites. Hence a PAS stain should be performed whenever epithelial dysplasia on the tongue and buccal mucosa is diagnosed.

  8. Therapeutic effect of cefozopran (SCE-2787), a new parenteral cephalosporin, against experimental infections in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizawa, Y; Okonogi, K; Hayashi, R; Iwahi, T; Yamazaki, T; Imada, A

    1993-01-01

    The therapeutic effect of cefozopran (SCE-2787), a new semisynthetic parenteral cephalosporin, against experimental infections in mice was examined. Cefozopran was more effective than cefpiramide and was as effective as ceftazidime and cefpirome against acute respiratory tract infections caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae DT-S. In the model of chronic respiratory tract infection caused by K. pneumoniae 27, cefozopran was as effective as ceftazidime. The therapeutic effect of cefozopran against urinary tract infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa P9 was superior to that of cefpirome and was equal to those of ceftazidime and cefclidin. In addition, cefozopran was more effective than ceftazidime and was as effective as flomoxef in a thigh muscle infection caused by methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus 308A-1. Against thigh muscle infections caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus N133, cefozopran was the most effective agent. The potent therapeutic effect of cefozopran in those experimental infections in mice suggests that it would be effective against respiratory tract, urinary tract, and soft tissue infections caused by a variety of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria in humans. PMID:8431004

  9. Heterologous Infection of Pregnant Mice Induces Low Birth Weight and Modifies Offspring Susceptibility to Malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Sharma

    Full Text Available Pregnancy malaria (PM is associated with poor pregnancy outcomes, and can arise due to relapse, recrudescence or a re-infection with heterologous parasites. We have used the Plasmodium chabaudi model of pregnancy malaria in C57BL/6 mice to examine recrudescence and heterologous infection using CB and AS parasite strains. After an initial course of patent parasitemia and first recrudescence, CB but not AS parasites were observed to recrudesce again in most animals that became pregnant. Pregnancy exacerbated heterologous CB infection of AS-experienced mice, leading to mortality and impaired post-natal growth of pups. Parasites were detected in placental blood without evidence of sequestration, unlike P. falciparum but similar to other malaria species that infect pregnant women. Inflammatory cytokine levels were elevated in pregnant females during malaria, and associated with intensity of infection and with poor outcomes. Pups born to dams during heterologous infection were more resistant to malaria infections at 6-7 weeks of age, compared to pups born to malaria-experienced but uninfected dams or to malaria-naïve dams. In summary, our mouse model reproduces several features of human PM, including recrudescences, heterologous infections, poor pregnancy outcomes associated with inflammatory cytokines, and modulation of offspring susceptibility to malaria. This model should be further studied to explore mechanisms underlying PM pathogenesis.

  10. Oral Candida spp. colonization in human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Moris

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Several yeast species of Candida genus can colonize the skin as well as the mucous membrane of the vagina and the digestive tract for short or long periods. Depending on the host's immunological state and the yeast's virulence, colonization can become an infection, invading the colonized tissues and also disseminating. AIDS is characterized by the host's intensive and progressive immunodepression which manifests as diverse symptoms, mainly lesions in the mouth. Oral candidiasis is the most prevalent opportunistic infection in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and is an important indicator of the disease progress and the immunosuppression increase. The factors involved in the equilibrium between Candida spp. and HIV-infected subjects are sometimes contradictory and were evaluated in the present study specially for colonization.

  11. Effect of some parasitic infection on neurotransmitters in the brain of experimentally infected mice before and after treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Ghafar, A E; Elkowrany, S E; Salem, S A; Menaisy, A A; Fadel, W A; Awara, W M

    1996-08-01

    The effects of some parasitic infection (bilharziasis, toxocariasis and trichinosis) on the brain of experimentally infected mice were investigated. Eighty animals were classified into four groups, group I contained five non infected animals as a control group. The other groups each contained twenty-five mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni (group II), Toxocara canis (group III) and Trichinella spiralis (group IV). Each infected group was divided into two subgroups (a,b). Subgroup (a) left untreated and subgroups (b) treated by praziquantel (in group II) and mebendazole (in group III and IV). Histopathological and immunological examination using peroxidase antiperoxidase (PAP) technique and neurotransmitters estimation (nor-epinephrine, dopamine and serotonine) were carried. In the untreated animals, there were mild histopathological changes and mild antigenic deposition in subgroups (IIa and IIIa) and marked changes in subgroup (IVa). There were significant decrease in dopamine in subgroup (IIIa), not improved after treatment (subgroup IIIb) and significant decrease in nor-epinephrine and serotonine in subgroup (IVa) improved after treatment in subgroup (IVb). The neurotransmitters changes may explain the motor, behavioural and emotional changes that occurred with these parasites.

  12. Current status of herpesvirus identification in the oral cavity of HIV-infected children

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    Raquel dos Santos Pinheiro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Some viruses of the Herpesviridae family are frequently the etiologic agents of oral lesions associated with HIV. The aim of this study was to identify the presence of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1, HSV-2, Varicella Zoster virus (VZV, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV, human herpesvirus type 6, type 7 and type 8 (HHV-6, HHV-7 and HHV-8 in the oral cavity of HIV-infected children/adolescents and verify the association between viral subtypes and clinical factors. METHODS: The cells of oral mucosa were collected from 50 HIV infected children/adolescents, 3-13 years old (mean age 8.66. The majority (66% of selected were girls, and they were all outpatients at the pediatric AIDS clinic of a public hospital in Rio de Janeiro. Nested-PCR was used to identify the viral types. RESULTS: Absence of immunosuppression was observed in 66% of the children. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART was used by 72.1% of selected and moderate viral load was observed in 56% of the children/adolescents. Viral types were found in 86% of the children and the subtypes were: HSV-1 (4%, HSV-2 (2%, VZV (4%, EBV (0%, HCMV (24%, HHV6 (18%, HHV-7 (68%, HHV8 (0%. CONCLUSIONS: The use of HAART has helped to reduce oral lesions, especially with herpes virus infections. The health professionals who work with these patients should be aware of such lesions because of their predictive value and the herpes virus can be found circulating in the oral cavity without causing lesions.

  13. Subchronic Oral Bromocriptine Methanesulfonate Enhances Open Field Novelty-Induced Behavior and Spatial Memory in Male Swiss Albino Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Onaolapo, Olakunle James; Onaolapo, Adejoke Yetunde

    2012-01-01

    This study set out to assess the neurobehavioral effects of subchronic, oral bromocriptine methanesulfonate using the open field and the Y-maze in healthy male mice. Sixty adult Swiss albino mice were assigned into three groups. Controls received normal saline, while test groups received bromocriptine methanesulfonate at 2.5 and 5 mg/kg/day, respectively, for a period of 21 days. Neurobehavioral tests were carried out on days 1 and 21 after administration. Open field assessment on day 1 after...

  14. Extraneural manifestations of prion infection in GPI-anchorless transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Andrew M.; Paulsson, Johan F.; Cruite, Justin; Andaya, Abegail A.; Trifilo, Matthew J.; Oldstone, Michael B.A.

    2011-01-01

    Earlier studies indicated that transgenic (tg) mice engineered to express prion protein (PrP) lacking the glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI -/- ) membrane anchor formed abnormal proteinase-resistant prion (PrPsc) amyloid deposits in their brains and hearts when infected with the RML strain of murine scrapie. In contrast, RML scrapie infection of normal mice with a GPI-anchored PrP did not deposit amyloid with PrPsc in the brain or the heart. Here we report that scrapie-infected GPI -/- PrP tg mice also deposit PrP and transmissible infectious material in the gut, kidneys, and islets of Langerhans. Similar to previously reported amyloid deposits in the brain and heart, amyloid deposits were found in the gut; however, no amyloid deposited in the islets. By high-resolution electron microscopy, we show PrP is located primarily in α cells and also β cells. Islets contain abundant insulin and there is no abnormality in glucose metabolism in infected GPI -/- PrP tg mice.

  15. Effect of wide spectrum anti-helminthic drugs upon Schistosoma mansoni experimentally infected mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PANCERA Christiane Finardi

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Mebendazole, albendazole, levamisole and thiabendazole are well known as active drugs against several nematode species, and against cestodes as well, when the first two drugs are considered. None of the drugs have proven activity, however, against trematodes. We tested the effect of these drugs on the fecal shedding of schistosome eggs and the recovering of adult schistosomes, after portal perfusion in Schistosoma mansoni experimentally infected mice. Balb/c mice infected with 80 S. mansoni cercariae were divided into three groups, each in turn subdivided into four other groups, for each tested drug. The first group was treated with each one of the studied drugs 25 days after S. mansoni infection; the second group was submitted to treatment with each one of the drugs 60 days after infection. Finally, the third group, considered as control, received no treatment. No effect upon fecal shedding of S. mansoni eggs and recovering of schistosomes after portal perfusion was observed when mice were treated with either mebendazole or albendazole. Mice treated with either levamisole or thiabendazole, on the other hand, showed a significant reduction in the recovering of adult schistosomes after portal perfusion, mainly when both drugs were given during the schistosomula evolution period, i.e., 25 days after cercariae penetration, probably due to unspecific immunomodulation

  16. Axl is not an indispensable factor for Zika virus infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhao-Yang; Wang, Zai; Zhen, Zi-Da; Feng, Kai-Hao; Guo, Jing; Gao, Na; Fan, Dong-Ying; Han, Dai-Shu; Wang, Pei-Gang; An, Jing

    2017-08-01

    Recently, Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak has been associated with a sharp increase in cases of Guillain-Barré syndrome and severe fetal abnormalities. However, the mechanism underlying the interaction of ZIKV with host cells is not yet clear. Axl, a receptor tyrosine kinase, is postulated as a receptor for ZIKV entry; however, its in vivo role during ZIKV infection and its impact on the outcome of the disease have not been fully characterized and evaluated. Moreover, there are contradictory results on its involvement in ZIKV infection. Here we utilized Axl-deficient mice (Axl-/-) and their littermates (Axl+/-) to study the in vivo role of Axl in ZIKV infection. Our results showed that both Axl+/- and Axl-/- suckling mice supported the replication of ZIKV and presented clinical manifestations. No significant difference has been found between Axl-deficient mice and their littermates in terms of the survival rate, clinical manifestations, viral load, ZIKV distribution and histopathological changes in major organs. These results therefore indicate that Axl is not an indispensable factor for ZIKV infection in mice.

  17. Anatomopathological study in BALB/c mice brains experimentally infected with Toxoplasma gondii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Gontijo da Silva

    Full Text Available Toxoplasmosis is one of the most important diseases of the nervous central system, leading to severe symptoms and, many times, irreversible sequelae. This work demonstrated the main anatomopathological lesions caused by Toxoplasma gondii in brains from experimentally infected BALB/c mice. We analyzed 51 cases of mice that developed toxoplasmosis after experimental infection by intraperitoneal inoculation of blood, amniotic liquid and cerebrospinal fluid from fetuses, newly born children and pregnant women with clinical and laboratory signals of toxoplasmosis. In all experiments where we detected the parasite in mice we also detected pathological lesions in the animal brains with great polymorphism between experiments. Edema was the most found lesion in all cases. Besides, it was possible to demonstrate the inflammatory process in 82.4% of cases and necrosis in 64.7% of cases, in agreement with the literature that describes severe neurological damage in its hosts.

  18. Experimental pneumococcal meningitis in mice: a model of intranasal infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijnenburg, P. J.; van der Poll, T.; Florquin, S.; van Deventer, S. J.; Roord, J. J.; van Furth, A. M.

    2001-01-01

    Effective laboratory animal models of bacterial meningitis are needed to unravel the pathophysiology of this disease. Previous models have failed to simulate human meningitis by using a directly intracerebral route of infection. Hyaluronidase is a virulence factor of Streptococcus pneumoniae. In

  19. Suppression of humoral response during the course of Candida albicans infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, J C; Meson, O E; de Valdez, G A; Sirena, A

    1984-10-30

    This paper aims at demonstrating the non-specific immunosuppression as regards thyme-dependent antigens sheep erythrocytes (SRBC) during the course of Candida albicans systemic infection. Three lots of syngeneic/BALB/c mice, 8-12 weeks of age, were used. The first normal lot was inoculated via the intraperitoneal route with a (SRBC) suspension (4 X 10(8) cells ml) in a Hank's balanced saline solution. The primary response of antibodies formed by splenic cells was measured from 4 to 8 days after inoculation using the direct plaque forming cells technique. The second lot was infected by the same route with a suspension of Candida albicans (1 X 10(7) cells). Positive retrocultures from the blood and kidneys of these infected mice were obtained. These yeasts cultivated in a Sabouraud medium were harvested after 20 h at 37 degrees C. Following the same methodology the immune response to SRBC was determined. The serum obtained from infected mice was transferred to a third lot of mice at different intervals during the course of the infection. The immune response to SRBC was done by the direct plaque-forming cells technique. Controls were carried out using normal donors and recipients. A suppression of the immune response was obtained as from the 2nd day of inoculation up to the 28th day. It was not possible to transfer such suppression passively by means of the serum. These results suggest that the systemic infection by Candida albicans induce a non-specific immunosuppression in the organism, already demonstrated in viral infections, bacteria, protozoaria and metazoaria in mammals. In some way, this will contribute to explain the mechanisms of immune response to Candida albicans.

  20. Lactoferricin but not lactoferrin inhibit herpes simplex virus type 2 infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shestakov, Andrey; Jenssen, Håvard; Nordström, Inger; Eriksson, Kristina

    2012-03-01

    We have evaluated the potential of bovine lactoferrin and lactoferricin for their ability to prevent and/or treat genital HSV-2 infection in mice. We confirm previous data showing that both lactoferrin and lactoferricin have antiviral properties in vitro and can inhibit HSV-2 infection of GMK cells in a dose-dependent manner. When tested in vivo, lactoferricin but not lactoferrin was also a potent inhibitor of HSV-2 infection. When admixed with virus prior to inoculation, lactoferricin inhibited disease development and significantly reduced the viral load in a genital model of HSV-2 infection in mice. Lactoferrin and lactoferricin were also tested for their ability to stimulate the production of chemokines. Neither of the compounds induced the production of CCL3, CCL5, CXCL1 or CXCL2 by mouse splenocytes in vitro. However, when tested in vivo, both lactoferrin and lactoferricin were able to induce local vaginal production of CCL5. Lactoferrin also induced CXCL2 production. The prophylactic and/or therapeutic effects of lactoferrin or lactoferricin were also tested. But none of the compounds were efficient in blocking HSV-2 infection when given 24h prior to HSV-2 infection. Lactoferricin however showed promising results as a therapeutic agent and delayed both disease onset by 3days as well as reducing the viral load almost 15-fold when given as a single dose 24h post-infection. These data show that lactoferricin can block genital herpes infection in mice, and perhaps also be used for post-infection treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Immunomodulatory effect of diethylcarbamazine in mice infected with Nocardia brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Hernández, M; Castro-Corona, M A; Segoviano-Ramírez, J C; Brattig, N W; Medina-De la Garza, C E

    2014-11-01

    We tested whether diethylcarbamazine (DEC) or ivermectin (IVM), both antiparasitic drugs with reported immunomodulatory properties, were able to affect the immune system to potentiate host defense mechanisms and protect against actinomycetoma in a mouse model. Male BALB/c mice of 10-12 weeks of age were injected with either Nocardia brasiliensis or saline solution. Recorded were the effects of a treatment by DEC (6 mg/kg per os daily for one week) or IVM (200 μg/kg subcutaneously on days 1 and 3) on (i) the development of mycetoma lesion, (ii) the expression of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) by phagocytes, (iii) the proliferation index of lymphocytes and (iv) antibody production of IgG and IgM. After an initial lesion in all mice, DEC inhibited a full development and progression of actinomycetoma resulting in a reduced lesion size (p brasiliensis antigens and concanavalin A in DEC-treated group was higher than in non-treated group at day 21 and 28 postinfection (p brasiliensis leading to retrogression of the mycetoma and increasing cellular immune responses. Our findings may indicate a potential use of DEC as a putative adjuvant in infectious disease or vaccination. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The effectiveness of systematic perioperative oral hygiene in reduction of postoperative respiratory tract infections after elective thoracic surgery in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Ulrich; Larsen, Palle; Håkonsen, Sasja Jul

    2016-01-01

    to increase patients' risk for nosocomial respiratory tract infection. OBJECTIVES: To identify, appraise and synthesize the best available evidence on the effectiveness of systematic perioperative oral hygiene in the reduction of postoperative respiratory airway infections in adult patients undergoing...... elective thoracic surgery. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Patients over the age of 18 years who had been admitted for elective thoracic surgery, regardless of gender, ethnicity, diagnosis severity, co-morbidity or previous treatment.Perioperative systematic oral hygiene (such as mechanical removal of dental biofilm......% confidence interval [CI] 0.55-0.78) for respiratory tract infections RR 0.48 (95%CI: 0.36-0.65) and for deep surgical site infections RR 0.48 (95%CI 0.27-0.84). CONCLUSIONS: Systematic perioperative oral hygiene reduces postoperative nosocomial, lower respiratory tract infections and surgical site infections...

  3. Effects of gamma radiation and azathioprine on Brucella abortus infection in BALB/c mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elzer, P.H.; Rowe, G.E.; Enright, F.M.; Winter, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    Sublethal irradiation of BALB/c mice 4 hours prior to inoculation with 5 x 10(4) virulent Brucella abortus, caused significant (P less than 0.01) reductions in bacterial numbers in comparison with numbers in unirradiated controls. Numbers of brucellae in the spleen were significantly lower by 5 days after inoculation and decreased thereafter, so that at 2 and 3 weeks after inoculation, there were up to 1,000-fold fewer organisms in the spleen of irradiated mice. The number of brucellae in the spleen increased in irradiated mice thereafter. The course of events in the liver was similar, but developed more slowly, and peak differences in bacterial numbers were about 1 log less. These phenomena were not attributable to differences in implantation of brucellae in the liver or spleen, nor to an abnormal distribution of organisms in other organs of irradiated mice. Irradiation of mice during the plateau phase of infection also resulted in significant (P less than 0.05) reductions in bacterial counts in the spleen during the succeeding 4 weeks. Macrophage activation in the spleen, measured by a Listeria monocytogenes-killing assay, was significantly (P less than 0.01) increased by irradiation alone at 1 week after inoculation and at that time was significantly (P less than 0.01) greater in B abortus-infected, irradiated mice than in B abortus-infected controls. Histologic, cytologic, and immunologic studies revealed that the decrease in numbers of organisms between 1 and 2 weeks after inoculation in irradiated mice occurred at a time when their immune response to B abortus was suppressed and when numbers of neutrophils and monocytes infiltrating the spleen were significantly (P less than 0.01) diminished

  4. Effects of gamma radiation and azathioprine on Brucella abortus infection in BALB/c mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elzer, P.H.; Rowe, G.E.; Enright, F.M.; Winter, A.J. (Department of Veterinary Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States))

    1991-06-01

    Sublethal irradiation of BALB/c mice 4 hours prior to inoculation with 5 {times} 10(4) virulent Brucella abortus, caused significant (P less than 0.01) reductions in bacterial numbers in comparison with numbers in unirradiated controls. Numbers of brucellae in the spleen were significantly lower by 5 days after inoculation and decreased thereafter, so that at 2 and 3 weeks after inoculation, there were up to 1,000-fold fewer organisms in the spleen of irradiated mice. The number of brucellae in the spleen increased in irradiated mice thereafter. The course of events in the liver was similar, but developed more slowly, and peak differences in bacterial numbers were about 1 log less. These phenomena were not attributable to differences in implantation of brucellae in the liver or spleen, nor to an abnormal distribution of organisms in other organs of irradiated mice. Irradiation of mice during the plateau phase of infection also resulted in significant (P less than 0.05) reductions in bacterial counts in the spleen during the succeeding 4 weeks. Macrophage activation in the spleen, measured by a Listeria monocytogenes-killing assay, was significantly (P less than 0.01) increased by irradiation alone at 1 week after inoculation and at that time was significantly (P less than 0.01) greater in B abortus-infected, irradiated mice than in B abortus-infected controls. Histologic, cytologic, and immunologic studies revealed that the decrease in numbers of organisms between 1 and 2 weeks after inoculation in irradiated mice occurred at a time when their immune response to B abortus was suppressed and when numbers of neutrophils and monocytes infiltrating the spleen were significantly (P less than 0.01) diminished.

  5. Effect of orally-administered Lactobacillus plantarum LPLM-O1 strain in an immunosuppressed mouse model of urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Arellano, A Ramírez; Sánchez, M; Vera, R; Jara, S; González, M; Castro, E

    2012-03-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) affect both healthy and immunocompromised people, and they are treated with antibiotics. However, the high recurrence of UTIs obliges the use of natural mechanisms to regulate the normal microbiota through the use of e.g. lactic acid bacteria. In order to induce a UTI, 20 µl of the Escherichia coli (Ec-01) strain, in doses of 2.7×10(7) cfu/ml, was inoculated by way of the urethra in female Balb/c mice, all of them immunosuppressed with dexamethasone (10 mg/kg). Lactobacillus plantarum LPLM-O1 was used as a treatment, in daily doses of 1×10(7) cfu/ml, which were orally administered for seven days before the infection (preventive) or alongside the infection for seven days (curative). The oral administration of LPLM-O1 did not cause any adverse effects when used in an immunosuppressed animal model. It was observed that, when used as a preventive measure, LPLM-O1 induces a decrease in the infection, in the concentration of urinary leukocytes, and in the bacterial load. This study proposes the use of this lactic bacterium as a probiotic.

  6. Deferoxamine compensates for decreases in B cell counts and reduces mortality in enterovirus 71-infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yajun; Ma, Jing; Xiu, Jinghui; Bai, Lin; Guan, Feifei; Zhang, Li; Liu, Jiangning; Zhang, Lianfeng

    2014-07-07

    Enterovirus 71 is one of the major causative agents of hand, foot and mouth disease in children under six years of age. No vaccine or antiviral therapy is currently available. In this work, we found that the number of B cells was reduced in enterovirus 71-infected mice. Deferoxamine, a marine microbial natural product, compensated for the decreased levels of B cells caused by enterovirus 71 infection. The neutralizing antibody titer was also improved after deferoxamine treatment. Furthermore, deferoxamine relieved symptoms and reduced mortality and muscle damage caused by enterovirus 71 infection. This work suggested that deferoxamine has the potential for further development as a B cell-immunomodulator against enterovirus 71.

  7. Helicobacter bilis Infection Alters Mucosal Bacteria and Modulates Colitis Development in Defined Microbiota Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherly, Todd; Mosher, Curtis; Wang, Chong; Hostetter, Jesse; Proctor, Alexandra; Brand, Meghan W; Phillips, Gregory J; Wannemuehler, Michael; Jergens, Albert E

    2016-11-01

    Helicobacter bilis infection of C3H/HeN mice harboring the altered Schaedler flora (ASF) triggers progressive immune responsiveness and the development of colitis. We sought to investigate temporal alterations in community structure of a defined (ASF-colonized) microbiota in normal and inflamed murine intestines and to correlate microbiota changes to histopathologic lesions. The colonic mucosal microbiota of healthy mice and ASF mice colonized with H. bilis for 3, 6, or 12 weeks were investigated by fluorescence in situ hybridization targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA genes of total bacteria, group-specific organisms, and individual ASF bacterial species. Microbial profiling of ASF and H. bilis abundance was performed on cecal contents. Helicobacter bilis-colonized mice developed colitis associated with temporal changes in composition and spatial distribution of the mucosal microbiota. The number of total bacteria, ASF519, and helicobacter-positive bacteria were increased (P attachment, or by invasion, and this interaction is differentially expressed over time.

  8. Endogenous interleukin-12 is not required for resolution of Chlamydophila abortus (Chlamydia psittaci serotype 1) infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Río, L; Buendía, A J; Sánchez, J; Gallego, M C; Caro, M R; Ortega, N; Seva, J; Pallarés, F J; Cuello, F; Salinas, J

    2001-08-01

    A Th1 immune response involving gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) production is required to eliminate Chlamydophila abortus infections. In this study, the role of interleukin-12 (IL-12) in protecting against C. abortus infection was investigated using IL-12(-/-) and wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice to determine the role of this Th1-promoting cytokine. IL-12(-/-) mice were able to eliminate the C. abortus infection in a primary infection. However, there was a delay in the clearance of bacteria when IL-12(-/-) mice were infected with a sublethal dose of C. abortus, the delay being associated with a lower production of IFN-gamma. The low level of IFN-gamma was essential for survival of IL-12(-/-) infected mice. Both WT and IL-12(-/-) mice developed a Th1 immune response against C. abortus infection, since they both produced IFN-gamma and immunoglobulin G2a antibody isotype. In addition, when mice were given a secondary infectious challenge with C. abortus, a protective host response which resolved the secondary infection was developed by both WT and IL-12(-/-) mice. The lack of IL-12 resulted in few infiltrating CD4(+) T cells in the liver relative to the number in WT mice, although the number of CD8(+) T cells was slightly higher. The more intense Th1 response presented by WT mice may have a pathogenic effect, as the animals showed higher morbidity after the infection. In conclusion, these results suggest that although IL-12 expedites the clearance of C. abortus infection, this cytokine is not essential for the establishment of a protective host response against the infection.

  9. Effects of iridoid-anthocyanin extract of Cornus mas L. on hematological parameters, population and proliferation of lymphocytes during experimental infection of mice with Trichinella spiralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piekarska, Jolanta; Szczypka, Marianna; Kucharska, Alicja Z; Gorczykowski, Michał

    2018-05-01

    The influence of iridoid-anthocyanin aqueous extract of cornelian cherry fruits (CM) on hematological parameters, lymphocyte subsets and proliferation during Trichinella spiralis infection in mice was investigated. CM (100 mg/kg) was administered orally to T. spiralis-infected mice six times within a period encompassing three days prior to the infection and three days after the infection (dai). CM increased the percentage of CD3 + , CD4 + cells and CD4 + /CD8 + ratio and decreased total count of CD8 + and CD19 + splenocytes (5 th dai). An increase in total count of CD4 + , CD3 + , CD19 + splenocytes was observed (21 st dai). CM elevated the percentage of CD4 + cells (7 th dai) and CD4 + /CD8 + ratio (21 st dai) in MLN. CM increased (14 th dai) and then reduced (21 st dai) the percentage of CD8 + MLN lymphocytes and decreased total count of MLN CD8 + cells (21 st dai) and B cells (14 th dai). An activation of lymphocyte proliferation in spleen and simultaneous decrease in MLN on 5 th dai was observed. An increase in red blood cells parameters (5 th dai) and in leukocyte count (7 th dai) was found. A rise in platelet count was noticed both on 5 th and 7 th dai. Moreover, the number of adult T. spiralis on 5 th dai in mice receiving CM extract was lower than in the control mice. These results suggested that iridoid-anthocyanin aqueous extract of CM stimulated murine immune response during T. spiralis infection. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A poliomyelitis model through mucosal infection in transgenic mice bearing human poliovirus receptor, TgPVR21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Noriyo; Iwasaki, Takuya; Ami, Yasushi; Sato, Yuko; Hatano, Ikuyoshi; Harashima, Ayako; Suzaki, Yuriko; Yoshii, Takao; Hashikawa, Tsutomu; Sata, Tetsutaro; Horiuchi, Yoshinobu; Koike, Satoshi; Kurata, Takeshi; Nomoto, Akio

    2004-01-01

    Transgenic mice bearing the human poliovirus receptor (TgPVR) are less susceptible to oral inoculation, although they are susceptible to parenteral inoculation. We investigated the susceptibility of TgPVR 21 line [Arch. Virol. 130 (1994) 351] to poliovirus through various mucosal routes. Intranasal inoculation of a neurovirulent Mahoney strain (OM1) caused flaccid paralysis with viral replication in the central nervous system at a dose of 10 6 cell culture infectious dose (CCID 50 ), in contrast, no paralysis following oral or intragastric inoculation of the same dose. Intranasal inoculation of a vaccine strain, Sabin 1, at 10 6 CCID 50 , resulted in no paralysis. Initial replication of poliovirus in the nasal cavity was confirmed by virus isolation and detection of negative-stranded replicative intermediates by RT-PCR and viral antigens using a high-sensitive immunohistochemistry and genome/transcripts by in situ hybridization. Poliovirus-specific IgG antibodies were elevated in the sera of surviving TgPVR21. This model can be used as a mucosal infection model and for differentiation of neurovirulent and attenuated poliovirus strains

  11. Oral administration of hot water extracts of Chlorella vulgaris increases physical stamina in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hyo-Jin; Choi, Hyun-Myung; Park, Hyeung-Suk; Han, Jae-Gab; Lee, Eun-Hee; Park, Young-Sig; Um, Jae-Young; Hong, Seung-Heon; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2006-01-01

    A unicellular algae, Chlorella vulgaris, was used as a biological response modifier. Although hot water extracts of C. vulgaris (CVE) are thought to augment immune responses, the effect of CVE on fatigue and physical stamina has not been studied. In the present study, we investigated the effect of CVE on forced swimming test and blood biochemical parameters related to fatigue, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatine kinase (CK), lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), glucose (Glc), and total protein (TP). CVE (0.05-0.15 g/kg/day) was orally administered to mice. After 7 days, the immobility time was decreased in the 0.1- and 0.15-g/kg CVE-treated groups (179 +/- 8.3 and 175 +/- 2.1 s) in comparison with the control group (223 +/- 5.4 s). In addition, the contents of BUN, CK, and LDH in the blood serum were decreased in the CVE-fed group. However, they had no effect on the elevation of Glc and TP level. The results predict a potential benefit of CVE for enhancing immune function and improving physical stamina. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Tissue distribution and elimination of BDE 47 in mice following a single oral dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staskal, D. [Curriculum in Toxicology, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Diliberto, J.; DeVito, M.; Birnbaum, L. [US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, ETD, RTP (United States)

    2004-09-15

    2,2',4,4'-Tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 47) is a polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congener which is part of a class of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) commonly used in a variety of highly flammable consumer goods. Concern for the effects of PBDEs has increased significantly in recent years as their presence has been detected in environmental samples and in human tissues at steadily increasing concentrations. Despite its small contribution to the PBDE global production and usage, BDE 47 is the major congener found in environmental samples and human tissue. Limited toxicology studies suggest that BDE 47 is a developmental neurotoxicant and an endocrine disruptor however, several data gaps exist and must be investigated in order to evaluate the human health risk of BDE 47. This study investigated basic toxicokinetic properties of BDE 47 in female C57BL/6J mice. Here we report the effect of time on the absorption, distribution, and excretion following a single, oral dose of 14C-labeled BDE 47. Animals were administered 1.0mg BDE 47/kg bw, a dose chosen based on previous studies. Distribution and elimination were monitored at several time points ranging from 1 hour to 21 days following exposure. Data from these basic toxicokinetic studies will be applied to studies investigating the toxicokinetics of BDE 47 in a developmental model as well as in the development of a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model.

  13. Serum antibody responses by male and female C57Bl/6 mice infected with Giardia muris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, C W; Belosevic, M

    1994-09-01

    We compared the levels of serum antibodies in male and female C57Bl/6 mice during the primary and after challenge infection with Giardia muris. Male mice began passing cysts in their faeces earlier than females, and were shedding cysts for over 60 days, while females stopped shedding cysts by day 20 after infection. In both males and females there were significant increases in parasite-specific IgM 10 and 20 days after infection. No differences in parasite-specific serum IgA were observed until 40 days after infection. Parasite-specific IgG (whole) levels were elevated on days 20 and 40 in females, while males showed no significant increases. In addition, females had a much stronger IgG2b and IgG3 response than males. After challenge with either cysts or soluble parasite protein only the females had significant increases in specific anti-parasite IgG2b. Our data show differential ability of males and females to control the infection with G. muris is paralleled by a difference in the anti-parasite serum IgG response of the mice.

  14. Dexamethasone treatment induces susceptibility of outbred Webster mice to experimental infection with Besnoitia darlingi isolated from opossums (Didelphis virginiana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsheikha, Hany M; Rosenthal, Benjamin M; Mansfield, Linda S

    2005-04-01

    The Sarcocystidae comprise a diverse, monophyletic apicomplexan parasite family, most of whose members form intracellular cysts in their intermediate hosts. The extent of pathology associated with such cyst formation can range widely. We currently lack experimental animal models for many of these infections. Here we explored dexamethasone treatment as a means to render outbred mice susceptible to Besnoitia darlingi infection and demonstrated that this approach allows viable parasites to be subsequently isolated from these mice and maintained in tissue culture. Besnoitia bradyzoites recovered from crushed cysts derived from naturally infected opossums (Didelphis virginiana) replicated and reproduced the development of besnoitiosis in mice treated with dexamethasone (0.5 mg/ml drinking water) daily for 12 days post infection (DPI). Isolates recovered from the peritoneal exudates of these mice were viable and were maintained in long-term tissue cultures. In contrast, control mice given saline without dexamethasone and challenged with similar bradyzoites remained clinically normal for up to 70 DPI. An additional group of mice challenged with the same inoculum of bradyzoites and given dexamethasone at the same concentration and treated with sulfadiazine (1 mg/ml drinking water) daily for 12 DPI also remained normal for up to 70 DPI. Severe disease developed more rapidly in dexamethasone-treated mice inoculated with culture-derived B. darlingi tachyzoites than in those inoculated with cyst-derived bradyzoites. B. darlingi tachyzoite-infected, untreated control mice developed signs of illness at 18 DPI. In contrast, mice treated with sulfadiazine showed no clinical signs up to 50 DPI. Although dexamethasone treatment was required to establish B. darlingi infection in outbred mice inoculated with opossum-derived B. darlingi bradyzoites, no such treatment was required for mice inoculated with culture-derived B. darlingi tachyzoites. Finally, sulfadiazine was highly

  15. Nitric oxide and HSV vaginal infection in BALB/c mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benencia, Fabian; Gamba, Gisela; Cavalieri, Hernan; Courreges, Maria Cecilia; Benedetti, Ruben; Villamil, Soledad Maria; Massouh, Ernesto Jorge

    2003-01-01

    Here we study the role of nitric oxide in the vaginal infection of Balb/c mice with herpes simplex virus type 2. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA was detected by RT-PCR in vaginal tissue and inguinal lymph nodes early postinfection. iNOS was also found to be activated in cells recovered from vaginal washings of infected animals. Animals treated with aminoguanidine (AG), an iNOS inhibitor, showed a dose-dependent increase in vaginal pathology after viral infection compared to controls. Viral titers in vaginal washings and vaginas were higher in AG-treated mice. Treated animals presented higher PMN counts in vaginal washings compared to controls. Histopathology studies revealed a profound inflammatory exudate in vaginal tissue of treated animals. Finally, RT-PCR analysis showed increased expression of the chemokines MIP-2 and RANTES in vaginal tissue and inguinal lymph nodes of these animals

  16. The effect of centaurein on interferon-γ expression and Listeria infection in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, S.-L.; Yeh, H.-H.; Lin, Y.-S.; Chiang, Y.-M.; Wu, T.-K.; Yang, W.-C.

    2007-01-01

    We previously found that centaurein enhanced IFN-γ transcription in T cells. Here, we demonstrate that centaurein increased the IFN-γ expression in T and NK cells and the serum IFN-γ level in mice. Centaurein elevated the transcription of T-bet but not GATA-3, which is consistent with its effect on that of IFN-γ but not IL-4. Additionally, centaurein effectively protected mice against Listeria infection. Moreover, centaurein per se or in combination with antibiotics could treat Listeria infection. Our mechanistic studies suggest that centaurein augments IFN-γ expression via a transcriptional up-regulation of T-bet and that centaurein protects against or treats Listeria infection via a modulation of IFN-γ expression

  17. Increased infectivity of anchorless mouse scrapie prions in transgenic mice overexpressing human prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Race, Brent; Phillips, Katie; Meade-White, Kimberly; Striebel, James; Chesebro, Bruce

    2015-06-01

    Prion protein (PrP) is found in all mammals, mostly as a glycoprotein anchored to the plasma membrane by a C-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) linkage. Following prion infection, host protease-sensitive prion protein (PrPsen or PrPC) is converted into an abnormal, disease-associated, protease-resistant form (PrPres). Biochemical characteristics, such as the PrP amino acid sequence, and posttranslational modifications, such as glycosylation and GPI anchoring, can affect the transmissibility of prions as well as the biochemical properties of the PrPres generated. Previous in vivo studies on the effects of GPI anchoring on prion infectivity have not examined cross-species transmission. In this study, we tested the effect of lack of GPI anchoring on a species barrier model using mice expressing human PrP. In this model, anchorless 22L prions derived from tg44 mice were more infectious than 22L prions derived from C57BL/10 mice when tested in tg66 transgenic mice, which expressed wild-type anchored human PrP at 8- to 16-fold above normal. Thus, the lack of the GPI anchor on the PrPres from tg44 mice appeared to reduce the effect of the mouse-human PrP species barrier. In contrast, neither source of prions induced disease in tgRM transgenic mice, which expressed human PrP at 2- to 4-fold above normal. Prion protein (PrP) is found in all mammals, usually attached to cells by an anchor molecule called GPI. Following prion infection, PrP is converted into a disease-associated form (PrPres). While most prion diseases are species specific, this finding is not consistent, and species barriers differ in strength. The amino acid sequence of PrP varies among species, and this variability affects prion species barriers. However, other PrP modifications, including glycosylation and GPI anchoring, may also influence cross-species infectivity. We studied the effect of PrP GPI anchoring using a mouse-to-human species barrier model. Experiments showed that prions produced by

  18. Scrapie infectivity is quickly cleared in tissues of orally-infected farmed fish

    OpenAIRE

    Ingrosso, Loredana; Novoa, Beatriz; Valle, Andrea Z Dalla; Cardone, Franco; Aranguren, Raquel; Sbriccoli, Marco; Bevivino, Simona; Iriti, Marcello; Liu, Quanguo; Vetrugno, Vito; Lu, Mei; Faoro, Franco; Ciappellano, Salvatore; Figueras, Antonio; Pocchiari, Maurizio

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) belongs to the group of animal transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). BSE epidemic in the UK and elsewhere in Europe has been linked to the use of bovine meat and bone meals (MBM) in the feeding of cattle. There is concern that pigs, poultry and fish bred for human consumption and fed with infected MBM would eventually develop BSE or carry residual infectivity without disease. Although there has been no evidence of...

  19. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of minute virus of mice and mouse parvovirus infections in laboratory mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K W; Chueh, L L; Wang, M H; Huang, Y T; Fang, B H; Chang, C Y; Fang, M C; Chou, J Y; Hsieh, S C; Wan, C H

    2013-04-01

    Mouse parvoviruses are among the most prevalent infectious pathogens in contemporary mouse colonies. To improve the efficiency of routine screening for mouse parvovirus infections, a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay targeting the VP gene was developed. The assay detected minute virus of mice (MVM), mouse parvovirus (MPV) and a mouse housekeeping gene (α-actin) and was able to specifically detect MVM and MPV at levels as low as 50 copies. Co-infection with the two viruses with up to 200-fold differences in viral concentrations can easily be detected. The multiplex PCR assay developed here could be a useful tool for monitoring mouse health and the viral contamination of biological materials.

  20. Influence of infection by Toxoplasma gondii on purine levels and E-ADA activity in the brain of mice experimentally infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonin, Alexandre A; Da Silva, Aleksandro S; Casali, Emerson A; Silveira, Stephanie S; Moritz, Cesar E J; Camillo, Giovana; Flores, Mariana M; Fighera, Rafael; Thomé, Gustavo R; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Rue, Mario De La; Vogel, Fernanda S F; Lopes, Sonia T A

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the purine levels and E-ADA activity in the brain of mice (BALB/c) experimentally infected with Toxoplasma gondii. In experiment I (n=24) the mice were infected with RH strain of T. gondii, while in experiment II (n=36) they were infected with strain ME-49 of T. gondii. Our results showed that, for RH strain (acute phase), an increase in both periods in the levels of ATP, ADP, AMP, adenosine, hypoxanthine, xanthine (only on day 6 PI) and uric acid (only on day 6 PI). By the other hand, the RH strain led, on days 4 and 6 PI, to a reduction in the concentration of inosine. ME-49, a cystogenic strain, showed some differences in acute and chronic phase, since on day 6 PI the levels of ATP and ADP were increased, while on day 30 these same nucleotides were reduced. On day 60 PI, ME-49 induced a reduction in the levels of ATP, ADP, AMP, adenosine, inosine and xanthine, while uric acid was increased. A decrease of E-ADA activity was observed in brain on days 4 and 6 PI (RH), and 30 PI (ME-49); however on day 60 PI E-ADA activity was increased for infection by ME-49 strain. Therefore, it was possible to conclude that infection with T. gondii changes the purine levels and the activity of E-ADA in brain, which may be associated with neurological signs commonly observed in this disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Progression of chronic pulmonary tuberculosis in mice intravenously infected with ethambutol resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivastava S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Ethambutol (EMB is an important first line drug, however little information on its molecular mechanism of resistance and pathogenicity of resistant isolates is available. Present work was designed to study virulence of the EMB resistant M. tuberculosis strains and the host responses in-vivo on infection of EMB resistant M. tuberculosis using Balb/c mouse model of infection. Methods: Three groups of Balb/c mice (female, age 4-6 wk; 21 mice in each group were infected intravenously with 106 CFU of M. tuberculosis H37Rv and two EMB resistant clinical isolates. Age and sex matched control animals were mock inoculated with Middlebrook 7H9 broth alone. At 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 days post-infection three animals from each group were sacrificed by cervical dislocation and lung tissue was collected for further analysis. Results: Infection with EMB resistant M. tuberculosis led to progressive and chronic disease with significantly high bacillary load (p=0.02. Massive infiltration and exacerbated lung pathology with increased expression of IFN-γ and TNF-α was observed in lungs of mice infected with EMB resistant strains. The present study suggests that infection with EMB resistant M. tuberculosis leads to chronic infection with subsequent loss of lung function, bacterial persistence with elevated expression of TNF-α resulting in increased lung pathology. Conclusion: These findings highlight that EMB resistant M. tuberculosis regulates host immune response differentially and its pathogenicity is different from drug sensitive strains of M. tuberculosis.

  2. EVALUATION OF THE THERAPEUTIC EFFICACY OF LEVAMISOLE HYDROCHLORIDE ON THIRD-STAGE LARVAE OF Lagochilascaris minor IN EXPERIMENTALLY INFECTED MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulcinéa Maria Barbosa CAMPOS

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lagochilascariosis, a disease caused by Lagochilascaris minor, affects the neck, sinuses, tonsils, lungs, the sacral region, dental alveoli, eyeballs and the central nervous system of humans. A cycle of autoinfection may occur in human host tissues characterized by the presence of eggs, larvae and adult worms. This peculiarity of the cycle hinders therapy, since there are no drugs that exhibit ovicidal, larvicidal and vermicidal activity. Given these facts, we studied the action of levamisole hydrochloride on third-stage larvae in the migration phase (G1 and on encysted larvae (G3 of L. minor. To this end, 87 inbred mice of the C57BL/6 strain were divided into test groups comprising 67 animals (G1-37; G3-30 and a control group (G2-10; G4-10 with 20 animals. Each animal was inoculated orally with 2,000 infective eggs of the parasite. The animals of the test groups were treated individually with a single oral dose of levamisole hydrochloride at a concentration of 0.075 mg. The drug was administered either 30 minutes prior to the parasite inoculation (G1 animals or 120 days after the inoculation (G3 animals. The mice in the control groups were not treated with the drug. After the time required for the migration and the encysting of L. minor larvae, all the animals were euthanized and their tissues examined. The data were analyzed using the Student's unpaired t-test and the Levene test. The groups showed no statistically significant difference. Levamisole hydrochloride was ineffective on third-stage larvae of L. minor. These findings explain the massive expulsion of live adult worms, as well as the use of long treatment schemes, owing to the persistence of larvae and eggs in human parasitic lesions.

  3. Prion protein protects mice from lethal infection with influenza A viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Chida

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The cellular prion protein, designated PrPC, is a membrane glycoprotein expressed abundantly in brains and to a lesser extent in other tissues. Conformational conversion of PrPC into the amyloidogenic isoform is a key pathogenic event in prion diseases. However, the physiological functions of PrPC remain largely unknown, particularly in non-neuronal tissues. Here, we show that PrPC is expressed in lung epithelial cells, including alveolar type 1 and 2 cells and bronchiolar Clara cells. Compared with wild-type (WT mice, PrPC-null mice (Prnp0/0 were highly susceptible to influenza A viruses (IAVs, with higher mortality. Infected Prnp0/0 lungs were severely injured, with higher inflammation and higher apoptosis of epithelial cells, and contained higher reactive oxygen species (ROS than control WT lungs. Treatment with a ROS scavenger or an inhibitor of xanthine oxidase (XO, a major ROS-generating enzyme in IAV-infected lungs, rescued Prnp0/0 mice from the lethal infection with IAV. Moreover, Prnp0/0 mice transgenic for PrP with a deletion of the Cu-binding octapeptide repeat (OR region, Tg(PrPΔOR/Prnp0/0 mice, were also highly susceptible to IAV infection. These results indicate that PrPC has a protective role against lethal infection with IAVs through the Cu-binding OR region by reducing ROS in infected lungs. Cu content and the activity of anti-oxidant enzyme Cu/Zn-dependent superoxide dismutase, SOD1, were lower in Prnp0/0 and Tg(PrPΔOR/Prnp0/0 lungs than in WT lungs. It is thus conceivable that PrPC functions to maintain Cu content and regulate SOD1 through the OR region in lungs, thereby reducing ROS in IAV-infected lungs and eventually protecting them from lethal infection with IAVs. Our current results highlight the role of PrPC in protection against IAV infection, and suggest that PrPC might be a novel target molecule for anti-influenza therapeutics.

  4. The Efect of Probiotic Lactobacilli and Alginite on the Cellular Immune Response in Salmonella Infected Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hlubeňová K.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Alginite is organic matter rich in humic substances and commonly found in nature, but despite that, the knowledge of its biological effects is limited. In our study we focused on monitoring the effects of alginite alone, as well as its effect as a carrier of probiotic lactobacilli on the cellular immune response in SPF mice after infection with Salmonella Typhimurium. Sixty six conventional SPF female mice of the Balb/c line were divided into 4 groups: 1. infection free negative control (NK supplied neither alginite nor probiotic lactobacilli in the feed; 2. infection free alginite control (Alg supplied feed with 10 % alginite; infected control supplied alginite in the feed but no lactobacilli; 3. infectious control (Alg + Sal - animals infected with salmonella and supplied 10 % alginite in the feed but no lactobacilli;and 4. probiotic group (Lab + Alg + Sal - animals infected with salmonella and administered 10 % alginite and Lactobacillus reuteri 2/6 in the feed. On day 21 of the experiments, the mice were bled and their mesenteric lymph nodes were taken after their death. The peripheral blood of the mice was analysed for the activity of phagocytes and the percentage of selected lymphocyte subpopulations was determined in the mesenteric lymph nodes and blood. The significantly highest phagocytic activity (FA was noted in the infected group with alginite (Alg + Sal. The FA was significantly increased in groups Alg and Lab + Alg + Sal in comparison with the NK group. The highest engulfing ability of phagocytes (phagocytic index was observed in the Lab + Alg + Sal group in comparison with other groups, but also in Alg group in comparison with NK. In the Lab + Alg + Sal group, we observed a significantly higher percentage of B-lymphocytes, CD4+CD8+ and natural killer T cells (NKT, but more significant impact on the numbers of subpopulations of lymphocytes was observed in the mesenteric lymph nodes, with the significantly highest proportions of CD4

  5. Low dose chronic Schistosoma mansoni infection increases susceptibility to Mycobacterium bovis BCG infection in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elias, D; Akuffo, H; Thors, C

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of mycobacterial diseases is high and the efficacy of Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) is low in most areas of the world where chronic worm infections are common. However, if and how concurrent worm infections could affect immunity to mycobacterial infections has not been elucidated. ...

  6. Humoral immunity through immunoglobulin M protects mice from an experimental actinomycetoma infection by Nocardia brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Carmona, Mario C; Pérez-Rivera, Isabel

    2004-10-01

    An experimental model of infection with Nocardia brasiliensis, used as an example of a facultative intracellular pathogen, was tested. N. brasiliensis was injected into the rear foot pads of BALB/c mice to establish an infection. Within 30 days, infected animals developed a chronic actinomycetoma infection. Batch cultures of N. brasiliensis were used to purify P61, P38, and P24 antigens; P61 is a catalase, and P38 is a protease with strong caseinolytic activity. Active and passive immunizations of BALB/c mice with these three purified soluble antigens were studied. Protection was demonstrated for actively immunized mice. However, immunity lasted only 30 days. Other groups of immunized mice were bled at different times, and their sera were passively transferred to naive recipients that were then infected with N. brasiliensis. Sera collected 5, 6, and 7 days after donor immunization conferred complete, long-lasting protection. The protective effect of passive immunity decreased when sera were collected 2 weeks after donor immunization. However, neither the early sera (1-, 2-, and 3-day sera) nor the later sera (30- or 45-day sera) prevented the infection. Hyperimmune sera with the highest levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG) to N. brasiliensis antigens did not protect at all. The antigens tested induced two IgM peaks. The first peak was present 3 days after immunization but was not antigen specific and did not transfer protection. The second peak was evident 7 days after immunization, was an IgM response, was antigen specific, and conferred protection. This results clearly demonstrate that IgM antibodies protect the host against a facultative intracellular bacterium.

  7. An in vitro investigation of indigenous South African medicinal plants used to treat oral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhalwaya, S; van Vuuren, S; Patel, M

    2018-01-10

    Over a 120 South African medicinal plants are used for the treatment of oral diseases. Despite the vast collection of antimicrobial studies being done on South African plants, there is still limited research on pathogens associated with oral infections. In consultation with the available ethnobotanical literature, this study investigates the antimicrobial efficacy of some South African medicinal plants against oral pathogens. To provide a detailed account of the antimicrobial properties of selected South African medicinal plants used traditionally to treat oral infections. The effect on Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation and the toxicity profiles of these plants are also investigated. A total of 136 aqueous and organic extracts and six essential oils were prepared from 31 different plant species. These plant samples were screened for antimicrobial efficacy against nine oral pathogens using the micro-titre plate dilution assay. Plant extracts that were found to have noteworthy antimicrobial activity against S. mutans were further evaluated on the effect on S. mutans biofilm formation using the glass slide technique. The toxicity profiles of plant samples that were found to have noteworthy antimicrobial activity were evaluated using the brine shrimp lethality assay. The organic extract of Cissampelos torulosa stems displayed the lowest MIC value of 0.05mg/mL against both Lactobacillus spp. This high antimicrobial activity was also observed with the organic extract of Spirostachys africana leaves against Candida albicans. In some instances, a direct relationship was found between the traditional use of the plant and the antimicrobial activity observed. For example, noteworthy activity (MIC plant traditionally used to treat oral thrush. Englerophytum magalismonatanum stems displayed notable activity against both Streptococcus spp. (MIC 0.83mg/mL against S. mutans and MIC 0.67mg/mL against S. sanguis). Spirostachys africana leaves displayed the greatest anti

  8. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor protects mice during respiratory virus infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Hermesh

    Full Text Available A burst in the production of pro-inflammatory molecules characterizes the beginning of the host response to infection. Cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors work in concert to control pathogen replication and activate innate and adaptive immune responses. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF mobilizes and activates hematopoietic cells from the bone marrow, and it has been shown to mediate the generation of effective immunity against bacterial and fungal infections. G-CSF is produced at high levels in the lungs during infection with influenza and parainfluenza viruses, but its role during these infections is unknown. Here we show that during infection of mice with a non-lethal dose of influenza or Sendai virus, G-CSF promotes the accumulation of activated Ly6G+ granulocytes that control the extent of the lung pro-inflammatory response. Remarkably, these G-CSF-mediated effects facilitate viral clearance and sustain mouse survival.

  9. HIV-associated disruption of tight and adherens junctions of oral epithelial cells facilitates HSV-1 infection and spread.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irna Sufiawati

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus (HSV types 1 and 2 are the most common opportunistic infections in HIV/AIDS. In these immunocompromised individuals, HSV-1 reactivates and replicates in oral epithelium, leading to oral disorders such as ulcers, gingivitis, and necrotic lesions. Although the increased risk of HSV infection may be mediated in part by HIV-induced immune dysfunction, direct or indirect interactions of HIV and HSV at the molecular level may also play a role. In this report we show that prolonged interaction of the HIV proteins tat and gp120 and cell-free HIV virions with polarized oral epithelial cells leads to disruption of tight and adherens junctions of epithelial cells through the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. HIV-induced disruption of oral epithelial junctions facilitates HSV-1 paracellular spread between the epithelial cells. Furthermore, HIV-associated disruption of adherens junctions exposes sequestered nectin-1, an adhesion protein and critical receptor for HSV envelope glycoprotein D (gD. Exposure of nectin-1 facilitates binding of HSV-1 gD, which substantially increases HSV-1 infection of epithelial cells with disrupted junctions over that of cells with intact junctions. Exposed nectin-1 from disrupted adherens junctions also increases the cell-to-cell spread of HSV-1 from infected to uninfected oral epithelial cells. Antibodies to nectin-1 and HSV-1 gD substantially reduce HSV-1 infection and cell-to-cell spread, indicating that HIV-promoted HSV infection and spread are mediated by the interaction of HSV gD with HIV-exposed nectin-1. Our data suggest that HIV-associated disruption of oral epithelial junctions may potentiate HSV-1 infection and its paracellular and cell-to-cell spread within the oral mucosal epithelium. This could be one of the possible mechanisms of rapid development of HSV-associated oral lesions in HIV-infected individuals.

  10. Combined administration of oseltamivir and hochu-ekki-to (TJ-41) dramatically decreases the viral load in lungs of senescence-accelerated mice during influenza virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohgitani, Eriko; Kita, Masakazu; Mazda, Osam; Imanishi, Jiro

    2014-02-01

    To enhance the effect of anti-influenza-virus agent treatment, the effect of combined administration of oseltamivir phosphate and hochu-ekki-to (Japanese traditional herbal medicine, HET) on early viral clearance was examined. Senescence-accelerated mice were given HET in drinking water for 2 weeks, followed by intranasal infection with influenza A virus strain PR8. After 4 hours of infection, oseltamivir was administered orally for 5 days. The viral loads in the lungs of the group receiving combined treatment were dramatically lower when compared with the viral loads in the lungs of the group receiving oseltamivir alone. HET significantly increased the induction of IL-1β and TNF-α in the lungs of PR8-infected mice and stimulated alveolar macrophage phagocytosis. From these results, we conclude that these functions may be responsible the increased effect on viral load reduction. Here, we show that the combined administration of oseltamivir and HET is very useful for influenza treatment in senescence-accelerated mice.

  11. Emergence of antiviral resistance during oral valganciclovir treatment of an infant with congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, K Yeon; Sharon, B; Balfour, H H; Belani, K; Pozos, T C; Schleiss, M R

    2013-08-01

    Congenital infection with human cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a major cause of morbidity, including sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), in newborns. Antiviral therapy with ganciclovir (GCV) and its oral prodrug, valganciclovir (VAL-GCV) are increasingly being administered to infected infants, toward the goal of improving neurodevelopmental and auditory outcomes. In this case report, we describe a symptomatic congenitally infected infant treated with VAL-GCV in whom GCV resistance was suspected, based on a 50-fold increase in viral load after 6 weeks of oral therapy. Analyses of CMV sequences from both blood and urine demonstrated populations of viruses with M460V and L595F mutations in the UL97 phosphotransferase gene. In contrast, analysis of viral DNA retrieved from the newborn dried blood spot demonstrated wild-type UL97 sequences. DNAemia resolved after the discontinuation of VAL-GCV. Long-term VAL-GCV therapy in congenitally infected infants can select for resistant viral variants, and anticipatory virological monitoring may be warranted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Recovery Effects of Oral Administration of Glucosylceramide and Beet Extract on Skin Barrier Destruction by UVB in Hairless Mice

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    Yoshihiro Tokudome

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purified glucosylceramide from beet extract (beet GlcCer and beet extract containing an equal amount of GlcCer were administered orally to ultra violet B (UVB-irradiated mice, and differences in the protective effects against skin barrier dysfunction caused by UVB irradiation were compared. In the beet GlcCer group, epidermal thickening and the decrease in stratum corneum (SC ceramide content caused by UVB irradiation were reduced. In the group that was orally administered beet extract containing glucosylceramide, effects similar to those in the beet GlcCer group were observed. Oral administration of beet GlcCer had no obvious effects against an increase in TEWL or decrease in SC water content after UVB irradiation, but there was improvement in the beet extract group. Oral administration of beet GlcCer is effective in improving skin barrier function in UVB-irradiated mice. Beet extract contains constituents other than GlcCer that are also effective in improving skin barrier function.

  13. Virulence factors and antibiotic susceptibility in enterococci isolated from oral mucosal and deep infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Dahlén

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the presence of virulence factors and antibiotic susceptibility among enterococcal isolates from oral mucosal and deep infections. Forty-three enterococcal strains from oral mucosal lesions and 18 from deep infections were isolated from 830 samples that were sent during 2 years to Oral Microbiology, University of Gothenburg, for analysis. The 61 strains were identified by 16S rDNA, and characterized by the presence of the virulence genes efa A (endocarditis gene, gel E (gelatinase gene, ace (collagen binding antigen gene, asa (aggregation substance gene, cyl A (cytolysin activator gene and esp (surface adhesin gene, tested for the production of bacteriocins and presence of plasmids. MIC determination was performed using the E-test method against the most commonly used antibiotics in dentistry, for example, penicillin V, amoxicillin and clindamycin. Vancomycin was included in order to detect vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE strains. Sixty strains were identified as Enterococcus faecalis and one as Enterococcus faecium. All the virulence genes were detected in more than 93.3% (efa A and esp of the E. faecalis strains, while the presence of phenotypic characteristics was much lower (gelatinase 10% and hemolysin 16.7%. Forty-six strains produced bacteriocins and one to six plasmids were detected in half of the isolates. Enterococcal strains from oral infections had a high virulence capacity, showed bacteriocin production and had numerous plasmids. They were generally susceptible to ampicillins but were resistant to clindamycin, commonly used in dentistry, and no VRE-strain was found.

  14. [Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx and larynx].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villagómez-Ortíz, Vicente José; Paz-Delgadillo, Diana Estela; Marino-Martínez, Iván; Ceseñas-Falcón, Luis Ángel; Sandoval-de la Fuente, Anabel; Reyes-Escobedo, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Cancer of the head and neck comprises a group of neoplasms that share a similar anatomical origin. Most originate from the epithelium of the aerodigestive tract and 90% correspond to squamous cell carcinoma. In the last 15 years, an increase in the incidence of squamous cell carcinoma induced by human papillomavirus (HPV) has been seen, mainly types 16 and 18, which are the most frequent found in cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx, and types 6 and 11 in laryngeal cancer. There are reports in the literature that show HPV as the leading cause of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Determine the prevalence of infection with high-risk HPV in patients diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx and larynx. An observational, cross-sectional, descriptive, unblinded study was performed. Prevalence of HPV infection was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in DNA samples from tumour tissue of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx and larynx. Typing was subsequently performed in HPV positive samples in order to detect types 18, 16, 11 and 6, using custom primers. A total of 45 patients were included. The association between laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and HPV was established in two patients, which represented an overall prevalence of 4.4% in our population, and 10% for laringeal tumours. There is a low prevalence of HPV infection in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx and larynx, in our population. Prospective studies on younger patients could provide more information. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  15. Mechanism of infectivity of a murine leukemia virus in adult mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, R.L.; Barrington, M.H.; Lerner, R.A.; Dixon, F.J.

    1976-01-01

    Infection of adult BALB/c mice with murine leukemia virus (MuLV) induces typical thymic lymphomas. Expression of virus was measured by using a radioimmunoassay for murine P-30, a virion core protein. Nineteen days after injection of MuLV-S into adult mice, there were 0.3μg P-30/ml of serum. X-irradiation permitted the early expression of high levels of viremia, when given before or after MuLV-S administration, and it also hastened the development of lymphomas. Seventeen to 21 days after injection of MuLV-S into x-irradiated (600 rads) adult mice, there were 2.7 μg of P-30/ml of serum. The virus produced by infected adult mice was infectious and oncogenic when given to newborn mice. Several lines of evidence are presented that suggest the mechanism by which x-irradiation permits early expession of virion proteins and lymphomas is not immunosuppression

  16. Using of essential oils in the treatment of mice infected with Trypanosoma evansi

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    Matheus D. Baldissera

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study aimed to test the effectiveness of copaiba, andiroba and aroeira essential oils for controlling trypanosomosis by Trypanosoma evansi with mice as experimental model. Materials and methods. Sixty-six mice were divided into eleven groups (A to L with six animals each. Group A was the unique composed by healthy and uninfected animals (negative control. Animals in groups B to L were inoculated with 0.1 mL of blood containing 2.7 x 106 trypanosomes. Group B was used as a positive control without treatment. In experiment were tested copaiba (C, D and E, andiroba (F, G and H and aroeira (I, J and L oils at doses of 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 mL kg-1 to infected mice (T. evansi. Results. These protocols did not provide curative efficacy; however, the mice treated with highest dose of copaiba showed a significant increase in the longevity when compared others groups. Conclusions. Previously in our studies, these essential oils have shown trypanocidal activity in vitro, but when they were tested in vivo in mice infected with T. evansi, this trypanocidal activity, or the curative effect was not found, being only able to prolong the lifespan of the animals treated with copaiba oil.

  17. Vaccine-mediated immune responses to experimental pulmonary Cryptococcus gattii infection in mice.

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    Ashok K Chaturvedi

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus gattii is a fungal pathogen that can cause life-threatening respiratory and disseminated infections in immune-competent and immune-suppressed individuals. Currently, there are no standardized vaccines against cryptococcosis in humans, underlying an urgent need for effective therapies and/or vaccines. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of intranasal immunization with C. gattii cell wall associated (CW and/or cytoplasmic (CP protein preparations to induce protection against experimental pulmonary C. gattii infection in mice. BALB/c mice immunized with C. gattii CW and/or CP protein preparations exhibited a significant reduction in pulmonary fungal burden and prolonged survival following pulmonary challenge with C. gattii. Protection was associated with significantly increased pro-inflammatory and Th1-type cytokine recall responses, in vitro and increased C. gattii-specific antibody production in immunized mice challenged with C. gattii. A number of immunodominant proteins were identified following immunoblot analysis of C. gattii CW and CP protein preparations using sera from immunized mice. Immunization with a combined CW and CP protein preparation resulted in an early increase in pulmonary T cell infiltrates following challenge with C. gattii. Overall, our studies show that C. gattii CW and CP protein preparations contain antigens that may be included in a subunit vaccine to induce prolonged protection against pulmonary C. gattii infection.

  18. Features of pathology in mice experimentally infected with highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabchikova, E. I.; Taranov, O. S.; Malkova, E. M.; Gritsyk, O. B.; Demina, O. K.

    2009-01-01

    Avian influenza became a new threat and has set people thinking about possibility of new influenza pandemic which may be caused by highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus. The virus could acquire ability of fast spreading between the humans and new pandemics could kill millions. Influenza virus H5N1 exhibited its deadly essence by taking out many millions of birds in nature and aviculture; other millions of chicks and ducks were killed to prevent spread of the epizootic. The strains isolated in Russia belong to Qinghai group of H5N1 influenza virus, and were imported to Russia by migratory birds. We examined time-course changes in mice blood and lungs after intranasal infection with strains A /Chicken/ Kurgan/ 05/2005, A/ Duck/ Kurgan/08/ 2005 and A/ Chicken/ Suzdalka/ Nov-11/2005 differing in virulence for this animal species. Development of leucopenia and severe damage of hemopoiesis were found in mice infected with all H5N1 influenza virus strains. Pathological changes in mice lungs during the infection with above mentioned strains, and strain-specific features have been examined. Main characteristics of lung pathology in all mice were focal nature of the alterations, severe damage of bronchial epithelium and pronounced alteration of lung vasculature. Strain A/Chicken/Suzdalka/Nov-11/2005 induced massive apoptosis of infected bronchial cells which may be a part of mechanism responsible for avirulent properties of this strain. The most interesting finding was absence of serious direct virus damage of the lung evidencing for principal role of the host humoral mechanisms in pathogenesis of H5N1 influenza in mice.(author)

  19. Early-life viral infection and allergen exposure interact to induce an asthmatic phenotype in mice

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    Asquith Kelly L

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early-life respiratory viral infections, notably with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, increase the risk of subsequent development of childhood asthma. The purpose of this study was to assess whether early-life infection with a species-specific model of RSV and subsequent allergen exposure predisposed to the development of features of asthma. Methods We employed a unique combination of animal models in which BALB/c mice were neonatally infected with pneumonia virus of mice (PVM, which replicates severe RSV disease in human infants and following recovery, were intranasally sensitised with ovalbumin. Animals received low-level challenge with aerosolised antigen for 4 weeks to elicit changes of chronic asthma, followed by a single moderate-level challenge to induce an exacerbation of inflammation. We then assessed airway inflammation, epithelial changes characteristic of remodelling, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR and host immunological responses. Results Allergic airway inflammation, including recruitment of eosinophils, was prominent only in animals that had recovered from neonatal infection with PVM and then been sensitised and chronically challenged with antigen. Furthermore, only these mice exhibited an augmented Th2-biased immune response, including elevated serum levels of anti-ovalbumin IgE and IgG1 as well as increased relative expression of Th2-associated cytokines IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13. By comparison, development of AHR and mucous cell change were associated with recovery from PVM infection, regardless of subsequent allergen challenge. Increased expression of IL-25, which could contribute to induction of a Th2 response, was demonstrable in the lung following PVM infection. Signalling via the IL-4 receptor α chain was crucial to the development of allergic inflammation, mucous cell change and AHR, because all of these were absent in receptor-deficient mice. In contrast, changes of remodelling were evident in mice

  20. Significant Depletion of CD4+ T Cells Occurs in the Oral Mucosa during Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection with the Infected CD4+ T Cell Reservoir Continuing to Persist in the Oral Mucosa during Antiretroviral Therapy

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    Jeffy George

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human and simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV and SIV infections are characterized by manifestation of numerous opportunistic infections and inflammatory conditions in the oral mucosa. The loss of CD4+ T cells that play a critical role in maintaining mucosal immunity likely contributes to this process. Here we show that CD4+ T cells constitute a minor population of T cells in the oral mucosa and display a predominantly central memory phenotype mirroring other mucosal sites such as the rectal mucosa. Chronic SIV infection was associated with a near total depletion of CD4+ T cells in the oral mucosa that appear to repopulate during antiretroviral therapy (ART. Repopulating CD4+ T cells harbored a large fraction of Th17 cells suggesting that ART potentially reconstitutes oral mucosal immunity. However, a minor fraction of repopulating CD4+ T cells harbored SIV DNA suggesting that the viral reservoir continues to persist in the oral mucosa during ART. Therapeutic approaches aimed at obtaining sustainable CD4+ T cell repopulation in combination with strategies that can eradicate the latent viral reservoir in the oral mucosa are essential for better oral health and long-term outcome in HIV infected patients.

  1. Moderate physical exercise protects myenteric metabolically more active neurons in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Neide Martins; de Moraes, Solange Marta Franzói; Dalálio, M M O; Gomes, Mônica Lúcia; Sant'ana, D M G; de Araújo, Silvana Marques

    2014-02-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi causes neuronal myenteric depopulation compromising intestinal function. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of moderate physical exercise on NADH diaphorase (NADH-d)-positive neurons in the myenteric plexus and intestinal wall of the colon in mice infected with T. cruzi. Forty 30-day-old male Swiss mice were divided into the following groups: trained infected (TI), sedentary infected (SI), trained control (TC), and sedentary control. The TC and TI groups were subjected to a moderate physical exercise program on a treadmill for 8 weeks. Three days after finishing physical exercise, the TI and SI groups were intraperitoneally inoculated with 1,300 blood trypomastigotes of the Y strain of Trypanosoma cruzi. Parasitemia was evaluated from days 4 to 61 after inoculation. On day 75 of infection, myenteric neurons in the colon were quantified (NADH-d), and inflammatory foci were counted. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) levels were evaluated in plasma. The results were compared using analysis of variance and the Kruskal-Wallis test at a 5 % significance level. Moderate physical exercise reduced the parasite peak on day 8 of infection (p = 0.0132) and total parasitemia (p = 0.0307). It also prevented neuronal depopulation (p  0.05). These results reinforce the therapeutic benefits of moderate physical exercise for T. cruzi infection.

  2. No Evidence that Infection Alters Global Recombination Rate in House Mice.

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    Beth L Dumont

    Full Text Available Recombination rate is a complex trait, with genetic and environmental factors shaping observed patterns of variation. Although recent studies have begun to unravel the genetic basis of recombination rate differences between organisms, less attention has focused on the environmental determinants of crossover rates. Here, we test the effect of one ubiquitous environmental pressure-bacterial infection-on global recombination frequency in mammals. We applied MLH1 mapping to assay global crossover rates in male mice infected with the pathogenic bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme Disease, and uninfected control animals. Despite ample statistical power to identify biologically relevant differences between infected and uninfected animals, we find no evidence for a global recombination rate response to bacterial infection. Moreover, broad-scale patterns of crossover distribution, including the number of achiasmate bivalents, are not affected by infection status. Although pathogen exposure can plastically increase recombination in some species, our findings suggest that recombination rates in house mice may be resilient to at least some forms of infection stress. This negative result motivates future experiments with alternative house mouse pathogens to evaluate the generality of this conclusion.

  3. Proteomic analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid proteins from mice infected with Francisella tularensis ssp novicida

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    Varnum, Susan M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Pounds, Joel G.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.; Frevert, Charles; Skerret, Shawn J.; Wunschel, David S.

    2012-07-06

    Francisella tularensis causes the zoonosis tularemia in humans and is one of the most virulent bacterial pathogens. We utilized a global proteomic approach to characterize protein changes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from mice exposed to one of three organisms, F. tularensis ssp. novicida, an avirulent mutant of F. tularensis ssp. novicida (F.t. novicida-ΔmglA); and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The composition of BALF proteins was altered following infection, including proteins involved in neutrophil activation, oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. Components of the innate immune response were induced including the acute phase response and the complement system, however the timing of their induction varied. Francisella tularensis ssp. novicida infected mice do not appear to have an effective innate immune response in the first hours of infection, however within 24 hours they show an upregulation of innate immune response proteins. This delayed response is in contrast to P. aeruginosa infected animals which show an early innate immune response. Likewise, F.t. novicida-ΔmglA infection initiates an early innate immune response, however this response is dimished by 24 hours. Finally, this study identifies several candidate biomarkers, including Chitinase 3-like-1 (CHI3L1 or YKL-40) and peroxiredoxin 1, that are associated with F. tularensis ssp. novicida but not P. aeruginosa infection.

  4. Oral soft tissue infections: causes, therapeutic approaches and microbiological spectrum with focus on antibiotic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Carolin; Reinhart, Edeltraud; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Kolk, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Intraoral soft tissue infections (OSTI) are a common problem in dentistry and oral surgery. These abscesses are mostly exacerbated dental infections (OIDC), and some emerge as postoperative infections (POI) after tooth extraction (OITR) or apicoectomy (OIRR). The main aim of this study was to compare OIDC with POI, especially looking at the bacteria involved. An additional question was, therefore, if different antibiotic treatments should be used with OSTI of differing aetiologies. The impact of third molars on OSTI was evaluated and also the rates of POI after removal of third molars were specified. Patient data was collected from the patients' medical records and the results were statistically evaluated with SPSS (SPSS version 21.0; SPSS, IBM; Chicago, IL, USA). The inclusion criterion was the outpatient treatment of a patient with an exacerbated oral infection; the exclusion criteria were an early stage of infiltration without abscess formation; and a need for inpatient treatment. Periapical exacerbated infections, especially in the molar region were the commonest cause of OIDC. In the OITR group, mandibular tooth removal was the commonest factor (p=0.016). Remarkably, retained lower wisdom teeth led to significant number of cases in the OITR group (p=0.022). In our study we could not define differences between the causal bacteria found in patients with OIDC and POI. Due to resistance rates we conclude that amoxicillin combined with clavulanic acid seems to be the antibiotic standard for exacerbated intraoral infections independent of their aetiology. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Role of oral candidiasis in TB and HIV co-infection: AIDS Clinical Trial Group Protocol A5253.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiboski, C H; Chen, H; Ghannoum, M A; Komarow, L; Evans, S; Mukherjee, P K; Isham, N; Katzenstein, D; Asmelash, A; Omozoarhe, A E; Gengiah, S; Allen, R; Tripathy, S; Swindells, S

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the association between oral candidiasis and tuberculosis (TB) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individuals in sub-Saharan Africa, and to investigate oral candidiasis as a potential tool for TB case finding. Protocol A5253 was a cross-sectional study designed to improve the diagnosis of pulmonary TB in HIV-infected adults in high TB prevalence countries. Participants received an oral examination to detect oral candidiasis. We estimated the association between TB disease and oral candidiasis using logistic regression, and sensitivity, specificity and predictive values. Of 454 participants with TB culture results enrolled in African sites, the median age was 33 years, 71% were female and the median CD4 count was 257 cells/mm(3). Fifty-four (12%) had TB disease; the prevalence of oral candidiasis was significantly higher among TB cases (35%) than among non-TB cases (16%, P oral candidiasis when controlling for CD4 count and antifungals (95%CI 1.2-4.7, P = 0.01). The sensitivity of oral candidiasis as a predictor of TB was 35% (95%CI 22-48) and the specificity 85% (95%CI 81-88). We found a strong association between oral candidiasis and TB disease, independent of CD4 count, suggesting that in resource-limited settings, oral candidiasis may provide clinical evidence for increased risk of TB and contribute to TB case finding.

  6. Classification, diagnostic criteria, and treatment recommendations for orofacial manifestations in HIV-infected pediatric patients. Collaborative Workgroup on Oral Manifestations of Pediatric HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Gomez, F J; Flaitz, C; Catapano, P; Murray, P; Milnes, A R; Dorenbaum, A

    1999-01-01

    The criteria for diagnosis of HIV-related oral lesions in adults are well established, but corresponding criteria in the pediatric population are not as well defined. The Collaborative Workgroup on the Oral Manifestations of Pediatric HIV infection reached a consensus, based upon available data, as to the presumptive and definitive criteria to diagnose the oral manifestations of HIV infection in children. Presumptive criteria refer to the clinical features of the lesions, including signs and symptoms, whereas definitive criteria require specific laboratory tests. In general, it is recommended that definitive criteria be established whenever possible. Orofacial manifestations have been divided into three groups: 1) those commonly associated with pediatric HIV infection; 2) those less commonly associated with pediatric HIV infection; and 3) those strongly associated with HIV infection but rare in children. Orofacial lesions commonly associated with pediatric HIV infection include candidiasis, herpes simplex infection, linear gingival erythema, parotid enlargement, and recurrent aphthous stomatitis. In contrast, orofacial lesions strongly associated with HIV infection but rare in children include Kaposi's sarcoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and oral hairy leukoplakia. Treatment recommendations, specific for this age group, have been included for some of the more common HIV-related orofacial manifestations.

  7. Interleukin-1 receptor type I gene-deficient mice are less susceptible to Staphylococcus epidermidis biomaterial-associated infection than are wild-type mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelens, J. J.; van der Poll, T.; Zaat, S. A.; Murk, J. L.; Weening, J. J.; Dankert, J.

    2000-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of interleukin-1 (IL-1) were found in tissue surrounding biomaterials infected with Staphylococcus epidermidis. To determine the role of IL-1 in biomaterial-associated infection (BAI), IL-1 receptor type I-deficient (IL-1R(-/-)) and wild-type mice received subcutaneous

  8. Oral HPV infection and MHC class II deficiency (A study of two cases with atypical outcome

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    Guirat-Dhouib Naouel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major histocompatibility complex class II deficiency, also referred to as bare lymphocyte syndrome is a rare primary Immunodeficiency disorder characterized by a profondly deficient human leukocyte antigen class II expression and a lack of cellular and humoral immune responses to foreign antigens. Clinical manifestations include extreme susceptibility to viral, bacterial, and fungal infections. The infections begin in the first year of life and involve usually the respiratory system and the gastrointestinal tract. Severe malabsorption with failure to thrive ensues, often leading to death in early childhood. Bone marrow transplantation is the curative treatment. Case reports Here we report two cases with a late outcome MHC class II deficiency. They had a long term history of recurrent bronchopulmonary and gastrointestinal infections. Bone marrow transplantation could not be performed because no compatible donor had been identified. At the age of 12 years, they developed oral papillomatous lesions related to HPV (human papillomavirus. The diagnosis of HPV infection was done by histological examination. HPV typing performed on the tissue obtained at biopsy showed HPV type 6. The lesions were partially removed after two months of laser treatment. Conclusions Viral infections are common in patients with MHC class II and remain the main cause of death. Besides warts caused by HPV infection do not exhibit a propensity for malignant transformation; they can cause great psychosocial morbidity.

  9. TRPV1 Antagonism by Capsazepine Modulates Innate Immune Response in Mice Infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA

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    Elizabeth S. Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thousands of people suffer from severe malaria every year. The innate immune response plays a determinant role in host’s defence to malaria. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1 modulates macrophage-mediated responses in sepsis, but its role in other pathogenic diseases has never been addressed. We investigated the effects of capsazepine, a TRPV1 antagonist, in malaria. C57BL/6 mice received 105 red blood cells infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA intraperitoneally. Noninfected mice were used as controls. Capsazepine or vehicle was given intraperitoneally for 6 days. Mice were culled on day 7 after infection and blood and spleen cell phenotype and activation were evaluated. Capsazepine decreased circulating but not spleen F4/80+Ly6G+ cell numbers as well as activation of both F4/80+and F4/80+Ly6G+ cells in infected animals. In addition, capsazepine increased circulating but not spleen GR1+ and natural killer (NK population, without interfering with natural killer T (NKT cell numbers and blood NK and NKT activation. However, capsazepine diminished CD69 expression in spleen NKT but not NK cells. Infection increased lipid peroxidation and the release of TNFα and IFNγ, although capsazepine-treated group exhibited lower levels of lipid peroxidation and TNFα. Capsazepine treatment did not affect parasitaemia. Overall, TRPV1 antagonism modulates the innate immune response to malaria.

  10. Effects of Mirazid Treatment and Vaccination with Irradiated Cercariae in Experimentally Schistosoma mansoni Infected Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayad, M.E.; Moawad, M.A.; Abd El-Fattah, N.Se.

    2006-01-01

    Schistosomiasis Tops all the endemic parasitic diseases particularly in Egypt. This study was performed on 4 groups of mice, each group formed of 25 mice. Group 1 (control group) infected with Schistosoma mansoni cercariae, group 2 (vaccinated group) vaccinated with irradiated cercariae, group 3 (treated group) infected with living cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni, then treated with Mirazid in the day post infection and group 4 (vaccinated and treated group) vaccinated with irradiated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni then challenged and treated with Mirazid in the day post infection. By comparing the results of group 4 (vaccinated and treated group) with respective control there was a highly significant difference in all parameters. The worm burden reduction was 100 % and the percentage reduction of the eggs in the liver was 96.6 % and in the intestine was 89.76 %. Also, there were marked reduction in the size and number of granulomas with preservation of the liver architecture and absence of areas of degeneration and necrosis. So, this study shown that resistance to schistosomiasis can be consistently induced in mice by combining drug therapy with vaccination

  11. MicroRNA expression signatures in lungs of mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malardo, Thiago; Gardinassi, Luiz Gustavo; Moreira, Bernardo Pereira; Padilha, Éverton; Lorenzi, Júlio César Cetrulo; Soares, Luana Silva; Gembre, Ana Flávia; Fontoura, Isabela Cardoso; de Almeida, Luciana Previato; de Miranda Santos, Isabel Kinney Ferreira; Silva, Célio Lopes; Coelho-Castelo, Arlete Aparecida Martins

    2016-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health concern worldwide; however the factors that account for resistance or susceptibility to disease are not completely understood. Although some studies suggest that the differential expression of miRNAs in peripheral blood of TB patients could be useful as biomarkers of active disease, their involvement during the inflammatory process in lungs of infected individuals is unknown. Here, we evaluated the global expression of miRNAs in the lungs of mice experimentally infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis on 30 and 60 days post-infection. We observed that several miRNAs were differentially expressed compared to uninfected mice. Furthermore, we verified that the expression of miR-135b, miR-21, miR-155, miR-146a, and miR-146b was significantly altered in distinct leukocyte subsets isolated from lungs of infected mice, while genes potentially targeted by those miRNAs were associated with a diversity of immune related molecular pathways. Importantly, we validated the inhibition of Pellino 1 expression by miR-135b in vitro. Overall, this study contributes to the understanding of the dynamics of miRNA expression in lungs during experimental TB and adds further perspectives into the role of miRNAs on the regulation of immune processes such as leukocyte activation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Tahyna virus genetics, infectivity, and immunogenicity in mice and monkeys

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    Whitehead Stephen S

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tahyna virus (TAHV is a human pathogen of the California encephalitis virus (CEV serogroup (Bunyaviridae endemic to Europe, Asia, and Africa. TAHV maintains an enzootic life cycle with several species of mosquito vectors and hares, rabbits, hedgehogs, and rodents serving as small mammal amplifying hosts. Human TAHV infection occurs in summer and early fall with symptoms of fever, headache, malaise, conjunctivitis, pharyngitis, and nausea. TAHV disease can progress to CNS involvement, although unlike related La Crosse virus (LACV, fatalities have not been reported. Human infections are frequent with neutralizing antibodies present in 60-80% of the elderly population in endemic areas. Results In order to determine the genomic sequence of wild-type TAHV, we chose three TAHV isolates collected over a 26-year period from mosquitoes. Here we present the first complete sequence of the TAHV S, M, and L segments. The three TAHV isolates maintained a highly conserved genome with both nucleotide and amino acid sequence identity greater than 99%. In order to determine the extent of genetic relatedness to other members of the CEV serogroup, we compared protein sequences of TAHV with LACV, Snowshoe Hare virus (SSHV, Jamestown Canyon virus (JCV, and Inkoo virus (INKV. By amino acid comparison, TAHV was most similar to SSHV followed by LACV, JCV, and INKV. The sequence of the GN protein is most conserved followed by L, N, GC, NSS, and NSM. In a weanling Swiss Webster mouse model, all three TAHV isolates were uniformly neurovirulent, but only one virus was neuroinvasive. In rhesus monkeys, the virus was highly immunogenic even in the absence of viremia. Cross neutralization studies utilizing monkey immune serum demonstrated that TAHV is antigenically distinct from North American viruses LACV and JCV. Conclusions Here we report the first complete sequence of TAHV and present genetic analysis of new-world viruses, LACV, SSHV, and JCV with old

  13. Oral yeast carriage in HIV-infected and non-infected populations in Rosario, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, A G; Biasoli, M S; Tosello, M E; Binolfi, A; Lupo, S; Magaró, H M

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were: (i) to assess the frequency of oral colonisation by Candida species in HIV-positive patients and to compare it with a population of HIV-negative individuals, (ii) to determine the prevalence of C. dubliniensis in both populations and (iii) to determine the susceptibility of C. dubliniensis and other Candida species isolated from HIV-positive patients to the most commonly used antifungal agents. Oral samples were obtained from 101 HIV-positive and 108 HIV-negative subjects. For yeast identification, we used morphology in cornmeal agar, the API 20C Aux, growth at 45 degrees C, d-xylose assimilation, morphology in sunflower seed agar and PCR. The frequency of isolation of Candida in HIV-positive patients was: C. albicans, 60.7%; C. dubliniensis, 20.2%; C. glabrata, 5.6%; C. krusei, 5.6%; C. tropicalis, 4.5%; others, <5%. The frequency of isolation of Candida in HIV-negative patients was: C. albicans, 73.9%; C. tropicalis, 15.5%; C. dubliniensis, 2.1%; C. glabrata, 2.1%; C. parapsilosis, 2.1%; others, <5%. The oral colonisation by yeast in the HIV-positive patients was higher than that in the HIV-negative subjects. The susceptibilities of 42 Candida isolates to three antifungal agents were determined. All isolates of C. dubliniensis were susceptible to fluconazole, although several individuals had been previously treated with this drug. Out of the 42 Candida isolates, 10 presented resistance to fluconazole and 10 to itraconazole. The presence of Candida species, resistant to commonly used antifungal agents, represents a potential risk in immunocompromised patients.

  14. Evaluating the potential of cubosomal nanoparticles for oral delivery of amphotericin B in treating fungal infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Z

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Zhiwen Yang,1,3 Meiwan Chen,2 Muhua Yang,1 Jian Chen,1 Weijun Fang,1 Ping Xu11Department of Pharmacy, Songjiang Hospital Affiliated The First People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 2State Key Laboratory of Quality Research in Chinese Medicine, Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences, University of Macau, Macau, 3Shanghai Songjiang Hospital Affiliated Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: The oral administration of amphotericin B (AmB has a major drawback of poor bioavailability. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of glyceryl monoolein (GMO cubosomes as lipid nanocarriers to improve the oral efficacy of AmB. Antifungal efficacy was determined in vivo in rats after oral administration, to investigate its therapeutic use. The human colon adenocarcinoma cell line (Caco-2 was used in vitro to evaluate transport across a model of the intestinal barrier. In vivo antifungal results showed that AmB, loaded in GMO cubosomes, could significantly enhance oral efficacy, compared against Fungizone®, and that during a 2 day course of dosage 10 mg/kg the drug reached effective therapeutic concentrations in renal tissue for treating fungal infections. In the Caco-2 transport studies, GMO cubosomes resulted in a significantly larger amount of AmB being transported into Caco-2 cells, via both clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis, but not macropinocytosis. These results suggest that GMO cubosomes, as lipid nanovectors, could facilitate the oral delivery of AmB.Keywords: glyceryl monoolein cubosomes, oral delivery, amphotericin B, antifungal activity, absorption mechanism

  15. Oral feeding with polyunsaturated fatty acids fosters hematopoiesis and thrombopoiesis in healthy and bone marrow-transplanted mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbkar, Kedar; Dhenge, Ankita; Jadhav, Dipesh D; Thulasiram, Hirekodathakallu V; Kale, Vaijayanti; Limaye, Lalita

    2017-09-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells play the vital role of maintaining appropriate levels of cells in blood. Therefore, regulation of their fate is essential for their effective therapeutic use. Here we report the role of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in regulating hematopoiesis which has not been explored well so far. Mice were fed daily for 10 days with n-6/n-3 PUFAs, viz. linoleic acid (LA), arachidonic acid (AA), alpha-linolenic acid and docosahexanoic acid (DHA) in four separate test groups with phosphate-buffered saline fed mice as control set. The bone marrow cells of PUFA-fed mice showed a significantly higher hematopoiesis as assessed using side population, Lin-Sca-1 + ckit+, colony-forming unit (CFU), long-term culture, CFU-spleen assay and engraftment potential as compared to the control set. Thrombopoiesis was also stimulated in PUFA-fed mice. A combination of DHA and AA was found to be more effective than when either was fed individually. Higher incorporation of PUFAs as well as products of their metabolism was observed in the bone marrow cells of PUFA-fed mice. A stimulation of the Wnt, CXCR4 and Notch1 pathways was observed in PUFA-fed mice. The clinical relevance of this study was evident when bone marrow-transplanted recipient mice, which were fed with PUFAs, showed higher engraftment of donor cells, suggesting that the bone marrow microenvironment may also be stimulated by feeding with PUFAs. These data indicate that oral administration of PUFAs in mice stimulates hematopoiesis and thrombopoiesis and could serve as a valuable supplemental therapy in situations of hematopoietic failure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparative genomics of Streptococcus pyogenes M1 isolates differing in virulence and propensity to cause systemic infection in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiebig, A.; Loof, T.G.; Babbar, A.; Itzeg, A.; Koehorst, J.J.; Schaap, P.J.; Nitsche-Schmitz, D.P.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes serotype M1 is a frequent cause of severe infections in humans. Some M1 isolates are pathogenic in mice and used in studies on infection pathogenesis. We observed marked differences in murine infections caused by M1 strain SF370, 5448, 5448AP or AP1 which prompted us to

  17. Epicutaneous immunotherapy (EPIT blocks the allergic esophago-gastro-enteropathy induced by sustained oral exposure to peanuts in sensitized mice.

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    Lucie Mondoulet

    Full Text Available Food allergy may affect the gastrointestinal tract and eosinophilia is often associated with allergic gastrointestinal disorders. Allergy to peanuts is a life-threatening condition and effective and safe treatments still need to be developed. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of sustained oral exposure to peanuts on the esophageal and jejunal mucosa in sensitized mice. We also evaluated the effects of desensitization with epicutaneous immunotherapy (EPIT on these processes.Mice were sensitized by gavages with whole peanut protein extract (PPE given with cholera toxin. Sensitized mice were subsequently exposed to peanuts via a specific regimen and were then analysed for eosinophilia in the esophagus and gut. We also assessed mRNA expression in the esophagus, antibody levels, and peripheral T-cell response. The effects of EPIT were tested when intercalated with sensitization and sustained oral peanut exposure.Sustained oral exposure to peanuts in sensitized mice led to severe esophageal eosinophilia and intestinal villus sub-atrophia, i.e. significantly increased influx of eosinophils into the esophageal mucosa (136 eosinophils/mm(2 and reduced villus/crypt ratios (1.6±0.15. In the sera, specific IgE levels significantly increased as did secretion of Th2 cytokines by peanut-reactivated splenocytes. EPIT of sensitized mice significantly reduced Th2 immunological response (IgE response and splenocyte secretion of Th2 cytokines as well as esophageal eosinophilia (50 eosinophils/mm(2, p<0.05, mRNA expression of Th2 cytokines in tissue--eotaxin (p<0.05, IL-5 (p<0.05, and IL-13 (p<0.05--GATA-3 (p<0.05, and intestinal villus sub-atrophia (2.3±0.15. EPIT also increased specific IgG2a (p<0.05 and mRNA expression of Foxp3 (p<0.05 in the esophageal mucosa.Gastro-intestinal lesions induced by sustained oral exposure in sensitized mice are efficaciously treated by allergen specific EPIT.

  18. Shedding of Japanese Encephalitis Virus in Oral Fluid of Infected Swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Amy C; Huang, Yan-Jang S; Park, So Lee; Ayers, Victoria B; Hettenbach, Susan M; Higgs, Stephen; McVey, D Scott; Noronha, Leela; Hsu, Wei-Wen; Vanlandingham, Dana L

    2018-05-09

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a zoonotic mosquito-borne flavivirus endemic in the Asia-Pacific region. Maintenance of JEV in nature involves enzootic transmission by competent Culex mosquitoes among susceptible avian and swine species. Historically, JEV has been regarded as one of the most important arthropod-borne viruses in Southeast Asia. Oronasal shedding of JEV from infected amplification hosts was not recognized until the recent discovery of vector-free transmission of JEV among domestic pigs. In this study, oral shedding of JEV was characterized in domestic pigs and miniature swine representing the feral phenotype. A rope-based sampling method followed by the detection of viral RNA using RT-qPCR allowed the collection and detection of JEV in oral fluid samples collected from intradermally challenged animals. The results suggest that the shedding of JEV in oral fluid can be readily detected by molecular diagnostic assays at the acute phase of infection. It also demonstrates the feasibility of this technique for the diagnosis and surveillance of JEV in swine species.

  19. Rabies Virus Antibodies from Oral Vaccination as a Correlate of Protection against Lethal Infection in Wildlife

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    Susan M. Moore

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Both cell-mediated and humoral immune effectors are important in combating rabies infection, although the humoral response receives greater attention regarding rabies prevention. The principle of preventive vaccination has been adopted for strategies of oral rabies vaccination (ORV of wildlife reservoir populations for decades to control circulation of rabies virus in free-ranging hosts. There remains much debate about the levels of rabies antibodies (and the assays to measure them that confer resistance to rabies virus. In this paper, data from published literature and our own unpublished animal studies on the induction of rabies binding and neutralizing antibodies following oral immunization of animals with live attenuated or recombinant rabies vaccines, are examined as correlates of protection against lethal rabies infection in captive challenge settings. Analysis of our studies suggests that, though serum neutralization test results are expected to reflect in vivo protection, the blocking enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA result at Day 28 was a better predictor of survival. ELISA kits may have an advantage of greater precision and ability to compare results among different studies and laboratories based on the inherent standardization of the kit format. This paper examines current knowledge and study findings to guide meaningful interpretation of serology results in oral baiting monitoring.

  20. Identification of an astrovirus commonly infecting laboratory mice in the US and Japan.

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    Terry Fei Fan Ng

    Full Text Available Mice (Mus musculus are the most commonly used laboratory animals. Viral metagenomics on tissues of immunodeficient mice revealed sequences of a novel mammalian astrovirus. Using PCR, we screened mice from 4 breeders, 4 pharmaceutical companies, 14 research institutes and 30 universities in the US and Japan. Mice from one US breeder tested positive while none from Japanese breeders were positive for MuAstV. Mice in over half of the universities (19/30, institutes (7/14 and pharmaceutical animal facilities (2/4 investigated revealed the presence of MuAstV. Nine mice strains tested positive including both immunodeficient strains (NSG, NOD-SCID, NSG-3GS, C57BL6-Timp-3 (-/-, and uPA-NOG and immunocompetent strains (B6J, ICR, Bash2, BALB/c. Our data indicates that MuAstV has a wide geographical, institutional and host strain distribution. Comparison of the MuAstV RdRp sequences showed numerous mutations indicating ongoing viral divergence in different facilities. This study demonstrates the need for metagenomic screening of laboratory animals to identify adventitious infections that may affect experimental outcomes.

  1. Pathological And Immunological Study On Infection With Escherichia Coli In ale BALB/c mice

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    Ali, Intisar H.; Jabir, Majid S.; Al-Shmgani, Hanady S. A.; Sulaiman, Ghassan M.; Sadoon, Ali H.

    2018-05-01

    Escherichia coli bacteria is considered as one of the common responsible for the frequency and severity of infections that it hospitalized patients. E. coli simultaneously carries a harmful side in which only a slight genetic recombination can bring about a highly pathogenic strain that most frequently causes the scourge of bacterial infections worldwide including sepsis, neonatal meningitis, pneumonia, bacteremia and traveler’s diarrhea. This study was carried out to assess Escherichia coli infection induced pathologically and immunologically. Following Escherichia coli isolation, identification and counting, the lethal dose (LD-50) was determined before infection. Twenty-two mice were used in this study for 21 days infection, the animals were